Science.gov

Sample records for four-fermion interaction models

  1. Gravitational four-fermion interaction in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, A. S.; Khriplovich, I. B.

    2014-02-01

    If torsion exists, it generates gravitational four-fermion interaction (GFFI), essential on the Planck scale. We analyze the influence of this interaction on the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmology. An explicit analytic solution is derived for the problem where both the energy-momentum tensor generated by GFFI and the common ultrarelativistic energy-momentum tensor are included. We demonstrate that gravitational four-fermion interaction does not result in a Big Bounce.

  2. Gravitational Four-Fermion Interaction in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khriplovich, I.; Rudenko, A.

    If torsion exists, it generates gravitational four-fermion interaction (GFFI), essential on the Planck scale. We analyze the influence of this interaction on the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmology. Explicit analytical solution is derived for the problem where both the energy-momentum tensor generated by GFFI and the common ultrarelativistic energy-momentum tensor are included. We demonstrate that gravitational four-fermion interaction does not result in Big Bounce.

  3. Gravitational four-fermion interaction in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khriplovich, I. B.; Rudenko, A. S.

    2014-07-01

    If torsion exists, it generates gravitational four-fermion interaction (GFFI), essential on the Planck scale. We analyze the influence of this interaction on the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmology. Explicit analytical solution is derived for the problem where both the energy-momentum tensor generated by GFFI and the common ultrarelativistic energy-momentum tensor are included. We demonstrate that gravitational four-fermion interaction does not result in Big Bounce.

  4. Big Bounce and Inflation from Gravitational Four-Fermion Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khriplovich, I. B.

    2013-11-01

    The four-fermion gravitational interaction is induced by torsion. It gets dominating below the Planck scale. The regular, axial-axial part of this interaction by itself does not stop the gravitational compression. However, the anomalous, vector-vector interaction results in a natural way both in big bounce and in inflation.

  5. Four-fermion interaction from torsion as dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popławski, Nikodem J.

    2012-02-01

    The observed small, positive cosmological constant may originate from a four-fermion interaction generated by the spin-torsion coupling in the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble gravity if the fermions are condensing. In particular, such a condensation occurs for quark fields during the quark-gluon/hadron phase transition in the early Universe. We study how the torsion-induced four-fermion interaction is affected by adding two terms to the Dirac Lagrangian density: the parity-violating pseudoscalar density dual to the curvature tensor and a spinor-bilinear scalar density which measures the nonminimal coupling of fermions to torsion.

  6. Gravitational four-fermion interaction and dynamics of the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khriplovich, I. B.; Rudenko, A. S.

    2013-11-01

    If torsion exists, it generates gravitational four-fermion interaction (GFFI), essential on the Planck scale. We analyze the influence of this interaction on the FriedmannLemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmology. Explicit analytical solution is derived for the problem where both the energy-momentum tensor generated by GFFI and the common ultrarelativistic energy-momentum tensor are included. We demonstrate that gravitational four-fermion interaction does not result in Big Bounce.

  7. Renormalization of high-energy Lorentz-violating four-fermion models

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, Damiano; Ciuffoli, Emilio

    2010-04-15

    We study the one-loop renormalization of high-energy Lorentz-violating four-fermion models. We derive general formulas and then consider a number of specific models. We study the conditions for asymptotic freedom and give a practical method to determine the asymptotic-freedom domain. We also point out that in some models the renormalization-group flow contains rational Zimmermann trajectories that might hide new symmetries.

  8. A technique for calculating the γ-matrix structures of the diagrams of a total four-fermion interaction with infinite number of vertices in d=2+ɛ dimensional regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'Ev, A. N.; Derkachev, S. É.; Kivel', N. A.

    1995-05-01

    It is known [1] that in d=2+ɛ dimensional regularization any four-fermion interaction generates an infinite number of counterterms of the form MediaObjects/11232_2005_BF02274026_f1.jpg , where 11232_2005_Article_BF02274026_TeX2GIFE1.gif γ _{α _1 ...α _n }^{(n)} equiv As[γ α _1 ...γ α _n ] is an antisymmetrized product of γ matrices. Therefore, a multiplicatively renormalizable complete model must include all such vertices, and the calcultion of the γ-matrix factors of its diagrams is a rather complicated problem. An effective technique for such calculations is proposed here. Its main elements are the realization of the γ matrices by the operators of a fermionic free field, transition to generating functions and functionals, the use of various functional forms of Wick's theorem, and reduction of the general d-dimensional problem to the case d=1. The general method is illustrated by specific calculations of the γ factors of one- and two-loop diagrams with arbitrary set of vertices γ (n) ⊗γ (n) .

  9. Resonant and nonresonant new phenomena of four-fermion operators for experimental searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, She-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    In the fermion content and gauge symmetry of the standard model (SM), we study the four-fermion operators in the torsion-free Einstein-Cartan theory. The collider signatures of irrelevant operators are suppressed by the high-energy cutoff (torsion-field mass) Λ, and cannot be experimentally accessible at TeV scales. Whereas the dynamics of relevant operators accounts for (i) the SM symmetry-breaking in the domain of infrared-stable fixed point with the energy scale v ≈ 239.5 GeV and (ii) composite Dirac particles restoring the SM symmetry in the domain of ultraviolet-stable fixed point with the energy scale E ≳ 5 TeV. To search for the resonant phenomena of composite Dirac particles with peculiar kinematic distributions in final states, we discuss possible high-energy processes: multi-jets and dilepton Drell-Yan process in LHC pp collisions, the resonant cross-section in e-e+ collisions annihilating to hadrons and deep inelastic lepton-hadron e- p scatterings. To search for the nonresonant phenomena due to the form-factor of Higgs boson, we calculate the variation of Higgs-boson production and decay rate with the CM energy in LHC. We also present the discussions on four-fermion operators in the lepton sector and the mass-squared differences for neutrino oscillations in short baseline experiments.

  10. Study of neutral-current four-fermion and ZZ production in e+e- collisions at sqrt(s)= 183 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L3 Collaboration; Acciarri, M.; Achard, P.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banicz, K.; Barczyk, A.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Böhm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J. G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Button, A.; Cai, X. D.; Campanelli, M.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chereau, X.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A. P.; Colino, N.; Conventi, F.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de La Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Dai, T. S.; van Dalen, J. A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Denes, P.; Denotaristefani, F.; de Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournand, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falagan, M. A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S. S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Gruenewald, M. W.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S. R.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberría, I.; Khan, R. A.; Kamrad, D.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, D.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, J.; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Kopp, A.; Korolko, I.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraemer, R. W.; Krenz, W.; Kunin, A.; Lacentre, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lapoint, C.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurikainen, P.; Lavorato, A.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H. J.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Leonardi, E.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Lin, C. H.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mangeol, D.; Marchesini, P.; Marian, G.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R. R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; von der Mey, M.; Migani, D.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Molnar, P.; Monteleoni, B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G. S.; Muheim, F.; Muijs, A. J. M.; Nahn, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nippe, A.; Nisati, A.; Nowak, H.; Oh, Y. D.; Organtini, G.; Ostonen, R.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Park, H. K.; Park, I. H.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Peach, D.; Pedace, M.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Petrak, S.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Produit, N.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Raja, N.; Rancoita, P. G.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; van Rhee, T.; Riemann, S.; Riles, K.; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Roe, B. P.; Romero, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Ruschmeier, D.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M. P.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Scholz, N.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shukla, J.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.

    1999-03-01

    A study of neutral-current four-fermion processes is performed using a data sample corresponding to 55.3 pb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the L3 detector at LEP at an average centre-of-mass energy of 183 GeV. The neutral-current four-fermion cross sections for final states with a pair of charged leptons plus jets and with four charged leptons are measured to be consistent with the Standard Model predictions. Events with fermion pair masses close to the Z boson mass are selected in all observable final states and the ZZ production cross section is measured to be σZZ=0.30+0.22 +0.07-0.16 -0.03 pb, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. No evidence for the existence of anomalous triple gauge boson ZZZ and ZZγ couplings is found and limits on these couplings are set.

  11. Perturbative matching of the staggered four-fermion operators for {epsilon}'/{epsilon}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Weonjong

    2001-09-01

    Using staggered fermions, we calculate the perturbative corrections to the bilinear and four-fermion operators that are used in the numerical study of weak matrix elements for {epsilon}'/{epsilon}. We present results for one-loop matching coefficients between continuum operators, calculated in the naive dimensional regularization (NDR) scheme, and gauge invariant staggered fermion operators. In particular, we concentrate on Feynman diagrams of the current-current insertion type. We also present results for the tadpole improved operators. These results, combined with existing results for penguin diagrams, provide a complete one-loop renormalization of the staggered four-fermion operators. Therefore, using our results, it is possible to match a lattice calculation of K{sup 0}-{bar K}{sup 0} mixing and K{yields}{pi}{pi} decays to the continuum NDR results with all corrections of O(g{sup 2}) included.

  12. Relativistic interactions and realistic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch, T.; Madland, D.; Manakos, P.; Mannel, T.; Nikolaus, B.A.; Strottman, D. |

    1992-12-31

    A four-fermion-coupling Lagrangian (relativistic Skyrme-type) interaction has been proposed for relativistic nuclear structure calculations. This interaction, which has the merit of simplicity, is from the outset tailored as an effective interaction for relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations. Various extensions of such a model are discussed and compared with Walecka`s meson-nucleon mean field approach. We also present results of the calculation of nuclear ground state properties with an extended (density dependent) version of the four fermion interaction in a relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation.

  13. Matrix elements of four-fermion operators with quenched Wilson fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    1997-04-01

    We present results for the matrix elements of a variety of four-fermion operators calculated using quenched Wilson fermions. Our simulations are done on 170 lattices of size 323×64 at β=6.0. We find BK=0.74+/-0.04+/-0.05, BD=0.78+/-0.01, B3/27=0.58+/-0.02+0.07-0.03, B3/28=0.81+/-0.03+0.03-0.02, with all results being in the NDR scheme at μ=2 GeV. We also calculate the B parameter for the operator Qs, which is needed in the study of the difference of B-meson lifetimes. Our best estimate is BS(NDR,μ=1/a=2.33 GeV) =0.80+/-0.01. This is given at the lattice scale since the required two-loop anomalous dimension matrix is not known. In all these estimates, the first error is statistical, while the second is due to the use of truncated perturbation theory to match continuum and lattice operators. Errors due to quenching and lattice discretization are not included. We also present new results for the perturbative matching coefficients, extending the calculation to all Lorentz scalar four-fermion operators, and using NDR as the continuum scheme.

  14. Phenomenological study of the QCD vacuum. Questions of factorizability of four-fermion operators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhitnitskii, A.R.

    1985-03-01

    The vacuum averages of various four-fermion operators are determined on the basis of the QCD sum-rule method. We find that the value of is 3--3.5 times larger than its factorized value, and that is 3--5 times less. A byproduct of our work is a phenomenological determination of the quantity approx. =0.06 GeV/sup 6/.

  15. Distributions in four-fermion processes for W-physics at LEP 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomando, Elena; Ballestrero, Alessandro; Passarino, Giampiero

    1996-02-01

    The programs WPHACT and WTO, which are designed for computing cross sections and other relevant observables in the e+e- annihilation into four fermions, are used to make detailed and complete predictions for the semi-leptonic and fully hadronic channels e + e - → overlineqqlν, overlineqq overlineqq . Both the total cross sections in the LEP 2 energy range and some of the most relevant distributions are analyzed. Particular algorithms are introduced for the fully hadronic channels in order to analyze the WW physics and to properly define the signal versus the background. With appropriate kinematical cuts it has been shown that the neutral-current background can be made vanishingly small when the problem of determining the W-boson mass is addressed. The remaining background from the complete charge-current and mixed processes is again small but not completely negligible. A detailed discussion is performed on the validity of the most relevant approximations such as the double-resonant one. The inclusion of a final state QCD correction, in its naive form (NQCD), is discussed and various implementations are examined.

  16. WOPPER, version 1.1: A Monte Carlo Event Generator for Four Fermion Production at LEP-2 and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Anlauf, Harald

    2003-07-07

    We report on the status of the Monte Carlo event generator WOPPER. Version 1.1 of WOPPER describes four fermion production at LEP-II and beyond with leading logarithmic radiative corrections in the double W{sup {+-}} pole approximation. These approximations are appropriate for almost all practical purposes, but the inclusion of these finite width effects and radiative corrections is nevertheless indispensable for LEP-II physics.

  17. Non-perturbative renormalization of the complete basis of four-fermion operators and B-parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, L.; Donini, A.; Gimenez, V.; Martinelli, G.; Talevi, M.; Vladikas, A.

    1998-04-01

    We present results on the B-parameters B K, B 7{3}/{2}and B 8{3}/{2}, at β = 6.0, with the tree-level Clover action. The renormalization of the complete basis of dimension-six four-fermion operators has been performed non-perturbatively. Our results for BK and B 7{3}/{2} are in reasonable agreement with those obtained with the (unimproved) Wilson action. This is not the case for B 8{3}/{2}. We also discuss some subtleties arising from a recently proposed modified definition of the B-parameters.

  18. Four-fermion production at γ γ colliders: 1. Lowest-order predictions and anomalous couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredenstein, A.; Dittmaier, S.; Roth, M.

    2004-08-01

    We have constructed a Monte Carlo generator (the corresponding FORTRAN code can be obtained from the authors upon request) for lowest-order predictions for the processes γγto 4f and γγto 4fγ in the standard model and extensions thereof by an effective γγ H coupling as well as anomalous triple and quartic gauge-boson couplings. Polarization is fully supported, and a realistic photon beam spectrum can be taken into account. For the processes γγto 4f all helicity amplitudes are explicitly given in a compact form. The presented numerical results contain, in particular, a survey of cross sections for representative final states and their comparison to results obtained with the program package Whizard/Madgraph. The impact of a realistic beam spectrum on cross sections and distributions is illustrated. Moreover, the size of various contributions to cross sections, such as from weak charged- or neutral-current, or from strong interactions, is analyzed. Particular attention is paid to W-pair production channels γγto W Wto 4f(γ) where we investigate the impact of background diagrams, possible definitions of the W-pair signal, and the issue of gauge-invariance violation caused by finite gauge-boson widths. Finally, the effects of triple and quartic anomalous gauge-boson couplings on cross sections as well as the possibility to constrain these anomalous couplings at future γγ colliders are discussed.

  19. Latent Variable Interaction Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacker, Randall E.

    2002-01-01

    Used simulation to study two different approaches to latent variable interaction modeling with continuous observed variables: (1) a LISREL 8.30 program and (2) data analysis through PRELIS2 and SIMPLIS programs. Results show that parameter estimation was similar but standard errors were different. Discusses differences in ease of implementation.…

  20. JSPAM: Interacting galaxies modeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, John F.; Holincheck, Anthony; Harvey, Allen

    2015-11-01

    JSPAM models galaxy collisions using a restricted n-body approach to speed up computation. Instead of using a softened point-mass potential, the software supports a modified version of the three component potential created by Hernquist (1994, ApJS 86, 389). Although spherically symmetric gravitationally potentials and a Gaussian model for the bulge are used to increase computational efficiency, the potential mimics that of a fully consistent n-body model of a galaxy. Dynamical friction has been implemented in the code to improve the accuracy of close approaches between galaxies. Simulations using this code using thousands of particles over the typical interaction times of a galaxy interaction take a few seconds on modern desktop workstations, making it ideal for rapidly prototyping the dynamics of colliding galaxies. Extensive testing of the code has shown that it produces nearly identical tidal features to those from hierarchical tree codes such as Gadget but using a fraction of the computational resources. This code was used in the Galaxy Zoo: Mergers project and is very well suited for automated fitting of galaxy mergers with automated pattern fitting approaches such as genetic algorithms. Java and Fortran versions of the code are available.

  1. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are favorable to…

  2. Interaction Terms in Nonlinear Models

    PubMed Central

    Karaca-Mandic, Pinar; Norton, Edward C; Dowd, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explain the use of interaction terms in nonlinear models. Study Design We discuss the motivation for including interaction terms in multivariate analyses. We then explain how the straightforward interpretation of interaction terms in linear models changes in nonlinear models, using graphs and equations. We extend the basic results from logit and probit to difference-in-differences models, models with higher powers of explanatory variables, other nonlinear models (including log transformation and ordered models), and panel data models. Empirical Application We show how to calculate and interpret interaction effects using a publicly available Stata data set with a binary outcome. Stata 11 has added several features which make those calculations easier. LIMDEP code also is provided. Conclusions It is important to understand why interaction terms are included in nonlinear models in order to be clear about their substantive interpretation. PMID:22091735

  3. Digital quantum simulation of fermionic models with a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; García-Álvarez, L; Fowler, A G; Megrant, A; Jeffrey, E; White, T C; Sank, D; Mutus, J Y; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Hoi, I-C; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; Solano, E; Martinis, John M

    2015-01-01

    One of the key applications of quantum information is simulating nature. Fermions are ubiquitous in nature, appearing in condensed matter systems, chemistry and high energy physics. However, universally simulating their interactions is arguably one of the largest challenges, because of the difficulties arising from anticommutativity. Here we use digital methods to construct the required arbitrary interactions, and perform quantum simulation of up to four fermionic modes with a superconducting quantum circuit. We employ in excess of 300 quantum logic gates, and reach fidelities that are consistent with a simple model of uncorrelated errors. The presented approach is in principle scalable to a larger number of modes, and arbitrary spatial dimensions. PMID:26153660

  4. Digital quantum simulation of fermionic models with a superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Barends, R.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; García-Álvarez, L.; Fowler, A. G.; Megrant, A; Jeffrey, E; White, T. C.; Sank, D.; Mutus, J. Y.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Hoi, I.-C.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Solano, E.; Martinis, John M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the key applications of quantum information is simulating nature. Fermions are ubiquitous in nature, appearing in condensed matter systems, chemistry and high energy physics. However, universally simulating their interactions is arguably one of the largest challenges, because of the difficulties arising from anticommutativity. Here we use digital methods to construct the required arbitrary interactions, and perform quantum simulation of up to four fermionic modes with a superconducting quantum circuit. We employ in excess of 300 quantum logic gates, and reach fidelities that are consistent with a simple model of uncorrelated errors. The presented approach is in principle scalable to a larger number of modes, and arbitrary spatial dimensions. PMID:26153660

  5. Digital quantum simulation of fermionic models with a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barends, R.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; García-Álvarez, L.; Fowler, A. G.; Megrant, A.; Jeffrey, E.; White, T. C.; Sank, D.; Mutus, J. Y.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Hoi, I.-C.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Solano, E.; Martinis, John M.

    2015-07-01

    One of the key applications of quantum information is simulating nature. Fermions are ubiquitous in nature, appearing in condensed matter systems, chemistry and high energy physics. However, universally simulating their interactions is arguably one of the largest challenges, because of the difficulties arising from anticommutativity. Here we use digital methods to construct the required arbitrary interactions, and perform quantum simulation of up to four fermionic modes with a superconducting quantum circuit. We employ in excess of 300 quantum logic gates, and reach fidelities that are consistent with a simple model of uncorrelated errors. The presented approach is in principle scalable to a larger number of modes, and arbitrary spatial dimensions.

  6. Interactive geologic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, J.D.; Krajewski, S.A.

    1984-04-01

    Improved success in finding hydrocarbons and minerals depends on developing geologic models from seismic, gravity, and magnetic data that most closely approximate real-world settings. Although data processing remains the chore of mainframe and minicomputers, interpretations and modeling of geologic and geophysical information now are best accomplished on personal computers because these computers afford the explorationist maximum freedom to shape and fine tune geophysical evaluations. Three case histories use the GEOSIM geophysical modeling systems to delineate exploration targets. The first example is Silurian Niagaran reef trends in the Michigan basin. Here, differences in seismic reef anomalies result from variations in carbonate-evaporite stratigraphy encasing the reefs, reef geometry, and reef reservoir parameters. These variations which influence real seismic-response differences can be successfully matched using appropriate geologic models in generating synthetic seismic reef anomalies. The second example applies gravity and magnetic data to seismic modeling of a Wyoming coal field. Detailed seismic stratigraphy helps locate those portions of the field having multiple seams, although it does not resolve individual economic zones. Gravity data do identify pinchout margins of multiseam zones and pinchouts between principal coals. Magnetic data are then used to delineate the burn (clinker) margin. Seismic modeling of subtle stratigraphic traps is the broader area of exploration interest contained in the first 2 examples. In the third, successfully modeled and tested examples of lateral changes in deltaic facies and of faulted, unconformity-bounded continent-margin sequences are shown to be successful guides to reinterpretation of seismic data.

  7. E-Mentoring Interaction Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenear, Phoebe E.

    2007-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on electronic mentoring. Several traditional mentoring models exist; however, due to the novelty of the research area, no theoretical e-mentoring models appear in the literature. Using Moore's Theory of Transactional Distance as the theoretical framework, this research compared mentor-protege interaction,…

  8. The joy of interactive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchyts, Gennadii; Baart, Fedor; van Dam, Arthur; Jagers, Bert

    2013-04-01

    The conventional way of working with hydrodynamical models usually consists of the following steps: 1) define a schematization (e.g., in a graphical user interface, or by editing input files) 2) run model from start to end 3) visualize results 4) repeat any of the previous steps. This cycle commonly takes up from hours to several days. What if we can make this happen instantly? As most of the research done using numerical models is in fact qualitative and exploratory (Oreskes et al., 1994), why not use these models as such? How can we adapt models so that we can edit model input, run and visualize results at the same time? More and more, interactive models become available as online apps, mainly for demonstration and educational purposes. These models often simplify the physics behind flows and run on simplified model geometries, particularly when compared with state-of-the-art scientific simulation packages. Here we show how the aforementioned conventional standalone models ("static, run once") can be transformed into interactive models. The basic concepts behind turning existing (conventional) model engines into interactive engines are the following. The engine does not run the model from start to end, but is always available in memory, and can be fed by new boundary conditions, or state changes at any time. The model can be run continuously, per step, or up to a specified time. The Hollywood principle dictates how the model engine is instructed from 'outside', instead of the model engine taking all necessary actions on its own initiative. The underlying techniques that facilitate these concepts are introspection of the computation engine, which exposes its state variables, and control functions, e.g. for time stepping, via a standardized interface, such as BMI (Peckam et. al., 2012). In this work we have used a shallow water flow model engine D-Flow Flexible Mesh. The model was converted from executable to a library, and coupled to the graphical modelling

  9. Interactive graphics for geometry modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wozny, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive vector capability to create geometry and a raster color shaded rendering capability to sample and verify interim geometric design steps through color snapshots is described. The development is outlined of the underlying methodology which facilitates computer aided engineering and design. At present, raster systems cannot match the interactivity and line-drawing capability of refresh vector systems. Consequently, an intermediate step in mechanical design is used to create objects interactively on the vector display and then scan convert the wireframe model to render it as a color shaded object on a raster display. Several algorithms are presented for rendering such objects. Superquadric solid primitive extend the class of primitives normally used in solid modelers.

  10. Modeling Interactions in Small Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heise, David R.

    2013-01-01

    A new theory of interaction within small groups posits that group members initiate actions when tension mounts between the affective meanings of their situational identities and impressions produced by recent events. Actors choose partners and behaviors so as to reduce the tensions. A computer model based on this theory, incorporating reciprocal…

  11. Modeling intercellular interactions during carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Rainer K; Chan, Michael; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2005-09-01

    By modulating the microenvironment of malignant or premalignant cells, inhibitory or stimulatory signals from nearby cells can play a key role in carcinogenesis. However, current commonly used quantitative models for induction of cancers by ionizing radiation focus on single cells and their progeny. Intercellular interactions are neglected or assumed to be confined to unidirectional radiation bystander effect signals from cells of the same tissue type. We here formulate a parsimoniously parameterized two-stage logistic (TSL) carcinogenesis model that incorporates some effects of intercellular interactions during the growth of premalignant cells. We show that for baseline tumor rates, involving no radiation apart from background radiation, this TSL model gives acceptable fits to a number of data sets. Specifically, it gives the same baseline hazard function, using the same number of adjustable parameters, as does the commonly used two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model, so it is automatically applicable to the many data sets on baseline cancer that have been analyzed using the TSCE model. For perturbations of baseline rates due to radiation, the models differ. We argue from epidemiological and laboratory evidence, especially results for the atomic bomb survivors, that for radiation carcinogenesis the TSL model gives results at least as realistic as the TSCE or similar models, despite involving fewer adjustable parameters in many cases. PMID:16137206

  12. Fermions and Goldstone bosons in an asymptotically safe model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzocchi, F.; Fabbrichesi, M.; Percacci, R.; Tonero, A.; Vecchi, L.

    2011-11-01

    We consider a model in which Goldstone bosons, described by a SU (N) chiral nonlinear σ model, are coupled to an N-plet of colored fermions by means of a Yukawa interaction. We study the one-loop renormalization group flow and show that the non-Gaussian UV fixed point, which is present in the purely bosonic model, is lost because of fermion loop effects unless N is sufficiently large. We then add four-fermion contact interactions to the Lagrangian and show that in this case there exist several non-Gaussian fixed points. The strength of the contact interactions, predicted by the requirement that the theory flows towards a fixed point in the UV, is compared to the current experimental bounds. This toy model could provide an important building block of an asymptotically safe model of the weak interactions.

  13. Models of dyadic social interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Dale; Gonzalez, Richard

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the logic of research designs for dyadic interaction and present statistical models with parameters that are tied to psychologically relevant constructs. Building on Karl Pearson's classic nineteenth-century statistical analysis of within-organism similarity, we describe several approaches to indexing dyadic interdependence and provide graphical methods for visualizing dyadic data. We also describe several statistical and conceptual solutions to the 'levels of analytic' problem in analysing dyadic data. These analytic strategies allow the researcher to examine and measure psychological questions of interdependence and social influence. We provide illustrative data from casually interacting and romantic dyads. PMID:12689382

  14. Wave/current interaction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, A. K.

    1988-01-01

    The wave-current interaction for the application to remote sensing data via numerical simulations and data comparison is modelled. Using the field data of surface current shear, wind condition and ambient wave spectrum, the numerical simulations of directional wave spectrum evolution were used to interpret and to compare with the aircraft data from Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) and Surface Contour Radar (SCR) across the front during Frontal Air Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX). The wave-ice interaction was inspired by the observation of large amplitude waves hundreds of kms inside the ice pack in the Weddell Sea, resulting in breakup of the ice pack. The developed analysis of processes includes the refraction of waves at the pack edge, the effects of pack compression on wave propagation, wave train stability and buckling stability in the ice pack. Sources of pack compression and interaction between wave momentum and pack compression are investigated. Viscous camping of propagating waves in the marginal ice zone are also studied. The analysis suggests an explanation for the change in wave dispersion observed from the ship and the sequence of processes that cause ice pack breakup, pressure ridge formation and the formation of open bands of water.

  15. Standard model bosons as composite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, D.E. . Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility); Kahana, S.H. )

    1990-01-01

    The Standard model of electro-weak interactions is derived from a Nambu, Jona-Lasinio type four-fermion interaction, which is assumed to result from a more basic theory valid above a very high scale {Lambda}. The masses of the gauge bosons and the Higgs are then produced by dynamical symmetry breaking of the Nambu model at an intermediate scale {mu}, and are evolved back to experimental energies via the renormalisation group equations of the Standard model. The weak angle sin{sup 2} ({theta}{sub W}) is predicted to be 3/8 at the scale {mu}, as in grand unified theories, and is evolved back to the experimental value at scale M{sub W}, thus determining {mu} {approximately}10{sup 13}GeV. Predictions for the ratios of the masses of the gauge and the Higgs bosons to the top quark mass, at experimental energies, are also obtained.

  16. Modelling Positron Interactions with Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, G.; Petrovic, Z.; White, R.; Buckman, S.

    2011-05-01

    In this work we link fundamental measurements of positron interactions with biomolecules, with the development of computer codes for positron transport and track structure calculations. We model positron transport in a medium from a knowledge of the fundamental scattering cross section for the atoms and molecules comprising the medium, combined with a transport analysis based on statistical mechanics and Monte-Carlo techniques. The accurate knowledge of the scattering is most important at low energies, a few tens of electron volts or less. The ultimate goal of this work is to do this in soft condensed matter, with a view to ultimately developing a dosimetry model for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The high-energy positrons first emitted by a radionuclide in PET may well be described by standard formulas for energy loss of charged particles in matter, but it is incorrect to extrapolate these formulas to low energies. Likewise, using electron cross-sections to model positron transport at these low energies has been shown to be in serious error due to the effects of positronium formation. Work was supported by the Australian Research Council, the Serbian Government, and the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Spain.

  17. Light sterile neutrinos, lepton number violating interactions and short baseline neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. S.; McKay, D. W.; Mocioiu, Irina; Pakvasa, Sandip

    2016-06-01

    We develop the consequences of introducing a purely leptonic, non-standard interaction (NSI) ΔL = 2, four-fermion effective Lagrangian and standard model neutrino mixing with a fourth, sterile neutrino in the analysis of short-baseline, neutrino experiments. We focus on the muon decay at rest (DAR) results from the Liquid Scintillation Neutrino Experiment (LSND) and the Karlsruhe and Rutherford medium Energy Neutrino Experiment (KARMEN), seeking a reconciliation between the two. Both v¯e appearance from v¯μ oscillation and v¯e survival after production from NSI decay of the µ+ contribute to the expected signal. This is a unique feature of our scheme. We comment on further implications of the lepton number violating interaction and sterile neutrino-standard neutrino mixing.

  18. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  19. Modelling Iron-Bentonite Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C.; Savage, D.; Benbow, S.; Wilson, J.

    2009-04-01

    The presence of both iron canisters and bentonitic clay in some engineered barrier system (EBS) designs for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes creates the potential for chemical interactions which may impact upon the long-term performance of the clay as a barrier to radionuclide migration. Flooding of potential radionuclide sorption sites on the clay by ferrous ions and conversion of clay to non-swelling sheet silicates (e.g. berthierine) are two possible outcomes deleterious to long-term performance. Laboratory experimental studies of the corrosion of iron in clay show that corrosion product layers are generally thin (< 1 µm) with magnetite, siderite, or ‘green rust' occurring depending upon temperature and ambient partial pressure of carbon dioxide. In theory, incorporation of iron into clay alteration products could act as a ‘pump' to accelerate corrosion. However, the results of laboratory experiments to characterise the products of iron-bentonite interaction are less than unequivocal. The type and amounts of solid products appear to be strong functions of time, temperature, water/clay ratio, and clay and pore fluid compositions. For example, the products of high temperature experiments (> 250 °C) are dominated by chlorite, whereas lower temperatures produce berthierine, odinite, cronstedtite, or Fe-rich smectite. Unfortunately, the inevitable short-term nature of laboratory experimental studies introduces issues of metastability and kinetics. The sequential formation in time of minerals in natural systems often produces the formation of phases not predicted by equilibrium thermodynamics. Evidence from analogous natural systems suggests that the sequence of alteration of clay by Fe-rich fluids will proceed via an Ostwald step sequence. The computer code, QPAC, has been modified to incorporate processes of nucleation, growth, precursor cannibalisation, and Ostwald ripening to address the issues of the slow growth of bentonite

  20. Method and apparatus for modeling interactions

    DOEpatents

    Xavier, Patrick G.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for modeling interactions that overcomes drawbacks. The method of the present invention comprises representing two bodies undergoing translations by two swept volume representations. Interactions such as nearest approach and collision can be modeled based on the swept body representations. The present invention is more robust and allows faster modeling than previous methods.

  1. Interactive Group Modeling: Part 2. An Interactive Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vian, Kathleen Spangler; And Others

    This is the second of four reports of the Interactive Group Modeling project--an undertaking designed to extend group communication through computers to support the more task-focused communication required by those building computer models. The report focuses on the HUB system--a system that facilitates communication in four modes: computer…

  2. Interacting Boson Model: selected recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Balantekin, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    The Interacting Boson Model is briefly reviewed. Recent applications of this model to the low-lying collective magnetic-dipole excitations and to the spectra of /sup 195/Ir are described. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  3. TOUGH Pitzer Ion-Interaction Model

    2008-10-23

    The TOUGHREACT Pitzer ion-interaction model version was developed based on the previous versions of TOUGHREACT. The main extensions include the Pitzer ion-interaction model for ionic activity calculation of solutions over a broad range of concentrations and the coupling of the vapor-pressure-lowering effect of salinity to phase partitioning.

  4. Computational modeling of laser-tissue interaction

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Amendt, P.; Bailey, D.S.; Eder, D.C.; Maitland, D.J.; Glinsky, M.E.; Strauss, M.; Zimmerman, G.B.

    1996-05-01

    Computational modeling can play an important role both in designing laser-tissue interaction experiments and in understanding the underlying mechanisms. This can lead to more rapid and less expensive development if new procedures and instruments, and a better understanding of their operation. We have recently directed computer programs and associated expertise developed over many years to model high intensity laser-matter interactions for fusion research towards laser-tissue interaction problem. A program called LATIS is being developed to specifically treat laser-tissue interaction phenomena, such as highly scattering light transport, thermal coagulation, and hydrodynamic motion.

  5. Toward creation of interaction models: simple objects-interaction approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Díaz, Teresa; García-Huerta, Juan-M.; Vázquez-Cervantes, Alberto; Jiménez-Hernández, Hugo; Herrera-Navarro, Ana-M.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a proposal to manage simple-objects interaction in video surveillance system. The proposal consists on locating a set of features in each video frame. Maxima regions from the second Eigen- value of the tensor matrix are used as features. Afterwards, statics features are discarded (labeling as background) and dynamic features are used to represent objects in motion (foreground). Dynamics features are dynamically clustered with k-neighborhood and EM algorithm. The centroid of each cluster locally represents motion objects, and its displacement through time is denoted by displacement of cumulus over several frames. The behavior of cumulus in time help us to model simple object interactions. These primitives can be used in addition to a causal dependencies across time; i.e. cluster division, cluster fusion and cluster motion with respect to the others, offer information of local dynamics which is referred to local interactions. And based on causal dependencies theory, a graph dependence of local centroids behavior can be built. This graph can represent the local interaction model. In experimental section, the approach is tested in several scenarios, extracting simple interaction objects in controlled/not-controlled scenarios.

  6. The Monash University Interactive Simple Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommenget, Dietmar

    2013-04-01

    The Monash university interactive simple climate model is a web-based interface that allows students and the general public to explore the physical simulation of the climate system with a real global climate model. It is based on the Globally Resolved Energy Balance (GREB) model, which is a climate model published by Dommenget and Floeter [2011] in the international peer review science journal Climate Dynamics. The model simulates most of the main physical processes in the climate system in a very simplistic way and therefore allows very fast and simple climate model simulations on a normal PC computer. Despite its simplicity the model simulates the climate response to external forcings, such as doubling of the CO2 concentrations very realistically (similar to state of the art climate models). The Monash simple climate model web-interface allows you to study the results of more than a 1000 different model experiments in an interactive way and it allows you to study a number of tutorials on the interactions of physical processes in the climate system. By switching OFF/ON physical processes you can deconstruct the climate and learn how all the different processes interact to generate the observed climate and how the processes interact to generate the IPCC predicted climate change for anthropogenic CO2 increase. The presentation will illustrate how this web-base tool works and what are the possibilities in teaching students with this tool are.

  7. The Monash University Interactive Simple Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommenget, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Monash university interactive simple climate model is a web-based interface that allows students and the general public to explore the physical simulation of the climate system with a real global climate model. It is based on the Globally Resolved Energy Balance (GREB) model, which is a climate model published by Dommenget and Floeter [2011] in the international peer review science journal Climate Dynamics. The model simulates most of the main physical processes in the climate system in a very simplistic way and therefore allows very fast and simple climate model simulations on a normal PC computer. Despite its simplicity the model simulates the climate response to external forcings, such as doubling of the CO2 concentrations very realistically (similar to state of the art climate models). The Monash simple climate model web-interface allows you to study the results of more than a 2000 different model experiments in an interactive way and it allows you to study a number of tutorials on the interactions of physical processes in the climate system and solve some puzzles. By switching OFF/ON physical processes you can deconstruct the climate and learn how all the different processes interact to generate the observed climate and how the processes interact to generate the IPCC predicted climate change for anthropogenic CO2 increase. The presentation will illustrate how this web-base tool works and what are the possibilities in teaching students with this tool are.

  8. Modeling of laser interactions with composite materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Boley, Charles D.

    2013-05-07

    In this study, we develop models of laser interactions with composite materials consisting of fibers embedded within a matrix. A ray-trace model is shown to determine the absorptivity, absorption depth, and optical power enhancement within the material, as well as the angular distribution of the reflected light. We also develop a macroscopic model, which provides physical insight and overall results. We show that the parameters in this model can be determined from the ray trace model.

  9. Key Results of Interaction Models with Centering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afshartous, David; Preston, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the effect on estimation of simultaneous variable centering and interaction effects in linear regression. We technically define, review, and amplify many of the statistical issues for interaction models with centering in order to create a useful and compact reference for teachers, students, and applied researchers. In addition, we…

  10. The Spiral-Interactive Program Evaluation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaleel, Ibrahim Adamu

    1988-01-01

    Describes the spiral interactive program evaluation model, which is designed to evaluate vocational-technical education programs in secondary schools in Nigeria. Program evaluation is defined; utility oriented and process oriented models for evaluation are described; and internal and external evaluative factors and variables that define each…

  11. Method and apparatus for modeling interactions

    DOEpatents

    Xavier, Patrick G.

    2000-08-08

    A method and apparatus for modeling interactions between bodies. The method comprises representing two bodies undergoing translations and rotations by two hierarchical swept volume representations. Interactions such as nearest approach and collision can be modeled based on the swept body representations. The present invention can serve as a practical tool in motion planning, CAD systems, simulation systems, safety analysis, and applications that require modeling time-based interactions. A body can be represented in the present invention by a union of convex polygons and convex polyhedra. As used generally herein, polyhedron includes polygon, and polyhedra includes polygons. The body undergoing translation can be represented by a swept body representation, where the swept body representation comprises a hierarchical bounding volume representation whose leaves each contain a representation of the region swept by a section of the body during the translation, and where the union of the regions is a superset of the region swept by the surface of the body during translation. Interactions between two bodies thus represented can be modeled by modeling interactions between the convex hulls of the finite sets of discrete points in the swept body representations.

  12. Multisite Interactions in Lattice-Gas Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, T. L.; Sathiyanarayanan, R.

    For detailed applications of lattice-gas models to surface systems, multisite interactions often play at least as significant a role as interactions between pairs of adatoms that are separated by a few lattice spacings. We recall that trio (3-adatom, non-pairwise) interactions do not inevitably create phase boundary asymmetries about half coverage. We discuss a sophisticated application to an experimental system and describe refinements in extracting lattice-gas energies from calculations of total energies of several different ordered overlayers. We describe how lateral relaxations complicate matters when there is direct interaction between the adatoms, an issue that is important when examining the angular dependence of step line tensions. We discuss the connector model as an alternative viewpoint and close with a brief account of recent work on organic molecule overlayers.

  13. An experiment with interactive planning models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beville, J.; Wagner, J. H.; Zannetos, Z. S.

    1970-01-01

    Experiments on decision making in planning problems are described. Executives were tested in dealing with capital investments and competitive pricing decisions under conditions of uncertainty. A software package, the interactive risk analysis model system, was developed, and two controlled experiments were conducted. It is concluded that planning models can aid management, and predicted uses of the models are as a central tool, as an educational tool, to improve consistency in decision making, to improve communications, and as a tool for consensus decision making.

  14. A Unified Approach to Modeling Multidisciplinary Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Bhatia, Kumar G.

    2000-01-01

    There are a number of existing methods to transfer information among various disciplines. For a multidisciplinary application with n disciplines, the traditional methods may be required to model (n(exp 2) - n) interactions. This paper presents a unified three-dimensional approach that reduces the number of interactions from (n(exp 2) - n) to 2n by using a computer-aided design model. The proposed modeling approach unifies the interactions among various disciplines. The approach is independent of specific discipline implementation, and a number of existing methods can be reformulated in the context of the proposed unified approach. This paper provides an overview of the proposed unified approach and reformulations for two existing methods. The unified approach is specially tailored for application environments where the geometry is created and managed through a computer-aided design system. Results are presented for a blended-wing body and a high-speed civil transport.

  15. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  16. Phase transition and critical behavior of d=3 chiral fermion models with left-right asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gies, Holger; Janssen, Lukas; Rechenberger, Stefan; Scherer, Michael M.

    2010-01-15

    We investigate the critical behavior of three-dimensional relativistic fermion models with a U(N{sub L}){sub L} x U(1){sub R} chiral symmetry reminiscent of the Higgs-Yukawa sector of the standard model of particle physics. We classify all possible four-fermion interaction terms and the corresponding discrete symmetries. For sufficiently strong correlations in a scalar parity-conserving channel, the system can undergo a second-order phase transition to a chiral-symmetry broken phase, which is a 3d analog of the electroweak phase transition. We determine the critical behavior of this phase transition in terms of the critical exponent {nu} and the fermion and scalar anomalous dimensions for N{sub L{>=}}1. Our models define new universality classes that can serve as prototypes for studies of strongly correlated chiral fermions.

  17. Modeling Systems Involving Interactions Between Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A. B.

    2005-05-01

    When we think of numerical models, `simulation modeling' often comes to mind: The modeler strives to include as many of the processes operating in the system of interest, and in as much detail, as is practical. The goal is typically to make accurate quantitative predictions. However, numerical models can also play an explanatory role. The goal of explaining a poorly understood phenomenon is often best pursued with an `exploratory' model (Murray 2002, 2003), in which a modeler minimizes the processes included and the level of detail, to try to determine what mechanisms-and what aspects of those mechanisms-are essential. These strategies are closely associated with different approaches to modeling processes across temporal and spatial scales. Simulation models often involve `explicit numerical reductionism'-the direct representation of interactions at scales as small as possible. Parameterizing sub-grid-scale processes is often seen as an unfortunate necessity, to be avoided if possible. On the other hand, when devising an exploratory model, a top-down strategy is often employed; an effort is made to represent only the effects that much smaller-scale processes have on the scale of interest. This approach allows investigation of the interactions between the emergent variables and structures that most directly explain many complex behaviors. As a caricature, we don't investigate water-wave phenomena by simulating molecular collisions. In addition, basing a model on processes at much smaller scales than those of the phenomena of interest leads to the concern that model imperfections may propagate up through the scales; that if the small-scale processes are not treated very accurately, the key interactions that emerge at larger scales may not occur as they do in the natural system. However, this risk can be bypassed by basing a model directly on larger-scale interactions, and examining which of these interactions might cause a phenomenon. For this reason, it has been

  18. Ciliary motion modeling, and dynamic multicilia interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, Shay; Liron, Nadav

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a rigorous and accurate modeling tool for ciliary motion. The hydrodynamics analysis, originally suggested by Lighthill (1975), has been modified to remove computational problems. This approach is incorporated into a moment-balance model of ciliary motion in place of the previously used hydrodynamic analyses, known as Resistive Force Theory. The method is also developed to include the effect of a plane surface at the base of the cilium, and the effect of the flow fields produced by neighboring cilia. These extensions were not possible with previous work using the Resistive Force Theory hydrodynamics. Performing reliable simulations of a single cilium as well as modeling multicilia interactions is now possible. The result is a general method which could now be used for detailed modeling of the mechanisms for generating ciliary beat patterns and patterns of metachronal interactions in arrays of cilia. A computer animation technique was designed and applied to display the results. PMID:19431847

  19. AN INTERACTION MODEL APPLIED TO SUPERVISION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOYD, ROBERT D.

    THIS STUDY OUTLINES A SMALL GROUP INTERACTION MODEL WHICH CAN BE APPLIED TO SUPERVISION. IT CONSISTS OF THREE CHANNELS -- (1) THE MOTIVATIONAL CHANNEL IN WHICH THE MOTIVATIONAL ASPECT OF AN UTTERANCE (I.E. QUESTIONS, EXCLAMATIONS, ASSERTIONS) IS IDENTIFIED ACCORDING TO THE PARTICULAR EGO CRISIS (TRUST VS. MISTRUST, AUTONOMY VS. SHAME DOUBT,…

  20. A vector model for electroweak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifler, Frank

    1985-03-01

    In this paper we present a vector model for the electroweak interactions. The Cartan map gives an isomorphism between Dirac bispinors and an isotropic class of Yang-Mills vector fields. The isotropic Yang-Mills vector fields Fk =Ek +iHk with k=1,2,3, satisfy the condition that the matrix of scalar invariants (Fj ṡFk) equals a scalar multiple of the identity matrix. We show that all the bispinor observables commute with the Cartan isomorphism, including all gauge transformations, as well as Lorentz transformations. We derive the Yang-Mills equivalent Dirac equation. As a consequence of the vector model, we obtain a new Lagrangian for electroweak interactions, which is an alternative to the Weinberg-Salam Lagrangian. Moreover, we show that the vector model predicts that the Weinberg angle θw satisfies sin2 θw =0.25, which is close to the measured value of sin2 θw =0.23. The vector model accommodates all the lepton and quark flavors. Furthermore, it predicts the conservation of baryon number and lepton number, as well as electric charge in electroweak interactions. The vector model also gives a new interpretation to antiparticles. In the vector model, an antiparticle is characterized by its opposite baryon number, lepton number, and electric charge; yet both particles and antiparticles propagate forward in time with positive energies.

  1. Algebraic Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    The results of a series of Perfectly Stirred Reactor (PSR) and Partially Stirred Reactor (PaSR) simulations are compared to each other over a wide range of operating conditions. It is found that the PaSR results can be simulated by a PSR solution with just an adjusted chemical reaction rate. A simple expression has been developed that gives the required change in reaction rate for a PSR solution to simulate the PaSR results. This expression is the basis of a simple turbulence-chemistry interaction model. The interaction model that has been developed is intended for use with simple one-step global reaction mechanisms and for steady-state flow simulations. Due to the simplicity of the model there is very little additional computational cost in adding it to existing CFD codes.

  2. Secret neutrino interactions: a pseudoscalar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archidiacono, Maria; Hannestad, Steen; Sloth Hansen, Rasmus; Tram, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments point towards the existence of additional mostly sterile neutrino mass eigenstates in the eV mass range. At the same time, such sterile neutrinos are disfavoured by cosmology (Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure), unless they can be prevented from being thermalised in the early Universe. To this aim, we introduce a model of sterile neutrino secret interactions mediated by a new light pseudoscalar: The new interactions can accomodate sterile neutrinos in the early Universe, providing a good fit to all the up to date cosmological data.

  3. Peppytides: Interactive Models of Polypeptide Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckermann, Ron; Chakraborty, Promita; Derisi, Joe

    2014-01-21

    Peppytides are scaled, 3D-printed models of polypeptide chains that can be folded into accurate protein structures. Designed and created by Berkeley Lab Researcher, Promita Chakraborty, and Berkeley Lab Senior Scientist, Dr. Ron Zuckermann, Peppytides are accurate physical models of polypeptide chains that anyone can interact with and fold intro various protein structures - proving to be a great educational tool, resulting in a deeper understanding of these fascinating structures and how they function. Build your own Peppytide model and learn about how nature's machines fold into their intricate architectures!

  4. Peppytides: Interactive Models of Polypeptide Chains

    ScienceCinema

    Zuckermann, Ron; Chakraborty, Promita; Derisi, Joe

    2016-07-12

    Peppytides are scaled, 3D-printed models of polypeptide chains that can be folded into accurate protein structures. Designed and created by Berkeley Lab Researcher, Promita Chakraborty, and Berkeley Lab Senior Scientist, Dr. Ron Zuckermann, Peppytides are accurate physical models of polypeptide chains that anyone can interact with and fold intro various protein structures - proving to be a great educational tool, resulting in a deeper understanding of these fascinating structures and how they function. Build your own Peppytide model and learn about how nature's machines fold into their intricate architectures!

  5. Atomistic modeling of dislocation-interface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Valone, Steven M; Beyerlein, Irene J; Misra, Amit; Germann, T. C.

    2011-01-31

    Using atomic scale models and interface defect theory, we first classify interface structures into a few types with respect to geometrical factors, then study the interfacial shear response and further simulate the dislocation-interface interactions using molecular dynamics. The results show that the atomic scale structural characteristics of both heterophases and homophases interfaces play a crucial role in (i) their mechanical responses and (ii) the ability of incoming lattice dislocations to transmit across them.

  6. Method of and apparatus for modeling interactions

    DOEpatents

    Budge, Kent G.

    2004-01-13

    A method and apparatus for modeling interactions can accurately model tribological and other properties and accommodate topological disruptions. Two portions of a problem space are represented, a first with a Lagrangian mesh and a second with an ALE mesh. The ALE and Lagrangian meshes are constructed so that each node on the surface of the Lagrangian mesh is in a known correspondence with adjacent nodes in the ALE mesh. The interaction can be predicted for a time interval. Material flow within the ALE mesh can accurately model complex interactions such as bifurcation. After prediction, nodes in the ALE mesh in correspondence with nodes on the surface of the Lagrangian mesh can be mapped so that they are once again adjacent to their corresponding Lagrangian mesh nodes. The ALE mesh can then be smoothed to reduce mesh distortion that might reduce the accuracy or efficiency of subsequent prediction steps. The process, from prediction through mapping and smoothing, can be repeated until a terminal condition is reached.

  7. Nagaoka's atomic model and hyperfine interactions.

    PubMed

    Inamura, Takashi T

    2016-01-01

    The prevailing view of Nagaoka's "Saturnian" atom is so misleading that today many people have an erroneous picture of Nagaoka's vision. They believe it to be a system involving a 'giant core' with electrons circulating just outside. Actually, though, in view of the Coulomb potential related to the atomic nucleus, Nagaoka's model is exactly the same as Rutherford's. This is true of the Bohr atom, too. To give proper credit, Nagaoka should be remembered together with Rutherford and Bohr in the history of the atomic model. It is also pointed out that Nagaoka was a pioneer of understanding hyperfine interactions in order to study nuclear structure.

  8. Visible Geology - Interactive online geologic block modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockett, R.

    2012-12-01

    Geology is a highly visual science, and many disciplines require spatial awareness and manipulation. For example, interpreting cross-sections, geologic maps, or plotting data on a stereonet all require various levels of spatial abilities. These skills are often not focused on in undergraduate geoscience curricula and many students struggle with spatial relations, manipulations, and penetrative abilities (e.g. Titus & Horsman, 2009). A newly developed program, Visible Geology, allows for students to be introduced to many geologic concepts and spatial skills in a virtual environment. Visible Geology is a web-based, three-dimensional environment where students can create and interrogate their own geologic block models. The program begins with a blank model, users then add geologic beds (with custom thickness and color) and can add geologic deformation events like tilting, folding, and faulting. Additionally, simple intrusive dikes can be modelled, as well as unconformities. Students can also explore the interaction of geology with topography by drawing elevation contours to produce their own topographic models. Students can not only spatially manipulate their model, but can create cross-sections and boreholes to practice their visual penetrative abilities. Visible Geology is easy to access and use, with no downloads required, so it can be incorporated into current, paper-based, lab activities. Sample learning activities are being developed that target introductory and structural geology curricula with learning objectives such as relative geologic history, fault characterization, apparent dip and thickness, interference folding, and stereonet interpretation. Visible Geology provides a richly interactive, and immersive environment for students to explore geologic concepts and practice their spatial skills.; Screenshot of Visible Geology showing folding and faulting interactions on a ridge topography.

  9. Discrete network models of interacting nephrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Rob; Kazmierczak, Ed; Kirley, Michael; Harris, Peter

    2009-11-01

    The kidney is one of the major organs involved in whole-body homeostasis, and exhibits many of the properties of a complex system. The functional unit of the kidney is the nephron, a complex, segmented tube into which blood plasma is filtered and its composition adjusted. Although the behaviour of individual nephrons can fluctuate widely and even chaotically, the behaviour of the kidney remains stable. In this paper, we investigate how the filtration rate of a multi-nephron system is affected by interactions between nephrons. We introduce a discrete-time multi-nephron network model. The tubular mechanisms that have the greatest effect on filtration rate are the transport of sodium and water, consequently our model attempts to capture these mechanisms. Multi-nephron systems also incorporate two competing coupling mechanisms-vascular and hemodynamic-that enforce in-phase and anti-phase synchronisations respectively. Using a two-nephron model, we demonstrate how changing the strength of the hemodynamic coupling mechanism and changing the arterial blood pressure have equivalent effects on the system. The same two-nephron system is then used to demonstrate the interactions that arise between the two coupling mechanisms. We conclude by arguing that our approach is scalable to large numbers of nephrons, based on the performance characteristics of the model.

  10. Comments on interactions in the SUSY models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker; Reshetnyak, Alexander; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad

    2016-07-01

    We consider special supersymmetry (SUSY) transformations with m generators overleftarrow{s}_α , for some class of models and study the physical consequences when making the Grassmann-odd transformations to form an Abelian supergroup with finite parameters and a set of group-like elements with finite parameters being functionals of the field variables. The SUSY-invariant path integral measure within conventional quantization scheme leads to the appearance of the Jacobian under a change of variables generated by such SUSY transformations, which is explicitly calculated. The Jacobian implies, first of all, the appearance of trivial interactions in the transformed action, and, second, the presence of a modified Ward identity which reduces to the standard Ward identities in the case of constant parameters. We examine the case of the {N}=1 and N=2 supersymmetric harmonic oscillators to illustrate the general concept by a simple free model with (1, 1) physical degrees of freedom. It is shown that the interaction terms U_{tr} have a corresponding SUSY-exact form: U_{tr}= big (V_{(1)}overleftarrow{s}; V_{(2)}overleftarrow{bar{s}} overleftarrow{s}big ) generated naturally under such generalized formulation. We argue that the case of a non-trivial interaction cannot be obtained in such a way.

  11. Developing a model of plant hormone interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu Hua

    2011-01-01

    Plant growth and development is influenced by mutual interactions among plant hormones. The five classical plant hormones are auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid and ethylene. They are small diffusible molecules that easily penetrate between cells. In addition, newer classes of plant hormones have been identified such as brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid and various small proteins or peptides. These hormones also play important roles in the regulation of plant growth and development. This review begins with a brief summary of the current findings on plant hormones. Based on this knowledge, a conceptual model about interactions among plant hormones is built so as to link and develop an understanding of the diverse functions of different plant hormones as a whole in plants. PMID:21406974

  12. On dark degeneracy and interacting models

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, S.; Borges, H.A. E-mail: humberto@ufba.br

    2014-06-01

    Cosmological background observations cannot fix the dark energy equation of state, which is related to a degeneracy in the definition of the dark sector components. Here we show that this degeneracy can be broken at perturbation level by imposing two observational properties on dark matter. First, dark matter is defined as the clustering component we observe in large scale structures. This definition is meaningful only if dark energy is unperturbed, which is achieved if we additionally assume, as a second condition, that dark matter is cold, i.e. non-relativistic. As a consequence, dark energy models with equation-of-state parameter −1 ≤ ω < 0 are reduced to two observationally distinguishable classes with ω = −1, equally competitive when tested against observations. The first comprises the ΛCDM model with constant dark energy density. The second consists of interacting models with an energy flux from dark energy to dark matter.

  13. Interacting damage models mapped onto ising and percolation models

    SciTech Connect

    Toussaint, Renaud; Pride, Steven R.

    2004-03-23

    The authors introduce a class of damage models on regular lattices with isotropic interactions between the broken cells of the lattice. Quasistatic fiber bundles are an example. The interactions are assumed to be weak, in the sense that the stress perturbation from a broken cell is much smaller than the mean stress in the system. The system starts intact with a surface-energy threshold required to break any cell sampled from an uncorrelated quenched-disorder distribution. The evolution of this heterogeneous system is ruled by Griffith's principle which states that a cell breaks when the release in potential (elastic) energy in the system exceeds the surface-energy barrier necessary to break the cell. By direct integration over all possible realizations of the quenched disorder, they obtain the probability distribution of each damage configuration at any level of the imposed external deformation. They demonstrate an isomorphism between the distributions so obtained and standard generalized Ising models, in which the coupling constants and effective temperature in the Ising model are functions of the nature of the quenched-disorder distribution and the extent of accumulated damage. In particular, they show that damage models with global load sharing are isomorphic to standard percolation theory, that damage models with local load sharing rule are isomorphic to the standard ising model, and draw consequences thereof for the universality class and behavior of the autocorrelation length of the breakdown transitions corresponding to these models. they also treat damage models having more general power-law interactions, and classify the breakdown process as a function of the power-law interaction exponent. Last, they also show that the probability distribution over configurations is a maximum of Shannon's entropy under some specific constraints related to the energetic balance of the fracture process, which firmly relates this type of quenched-disorder based damage model

  14. Modeling selective local interactions with memory

    PubMed Central

    Galante, Amanda; Levy, Doron

    2012-01-01

    Recently we developed a stochastic particle system describing local interactions between cyanobacteria. We focused on the common freshwater cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp., which are coccoidal bacteria that utilize group dynamics to move toward a light source, a motion referred to as phototaxis. We were particularly interested in the local interactions between cells that were located in low to medium density areas away from the front. The simulations of our stochastic particle system in 2D replicated many experimentally observed phenomena, such as the formation of aggregations and the quasi-random motion of cells. In this paper, we seek to develop a better understanding of group dynamics produced by this model. To facilitate this study, we replace the stochastic model with a system of ordinary differential equations describing the evolution of particles in 1D. Unlike many other models, our emphasis is on particles that selectively choose one of their neighbors as the preferred direction of motion. Furthermore, we incorporate memory by allowing persistence in the motion. We conduct numerical simulations which allow us to efficiently explore the space of parameters, in order to study the stability, size, and merging of aggregations. PMID:24244060

  15. Numerical modeling of laser-matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marczak, Jan; Jach, Karol; Sarzynski, Antoni

    2003-10-01

    Laser radiation is often used in cleaning and conservation of artworks. Interaction of laser radiation with matter is so sophisticated process that analytical solutions rarely bring the valuable formulas. Even numerical methods seldom give quantitative insight into the physics of processes. Chemical and physical properties of surface impurity layers may change from point to point within the same sample. Absorption coefficient of the layers depends on such factors as weather or air humidity. In spite of this, theoretical description of laser cleaning is necessary, as it allows to explain some characteristic features of processes under investigation. In this work we present a model for laser pulse interaction with graphite layer placed on aluminium substrate. The model is limited to one dimensional hydrodynamic equations. The following phenomena are included into the model: absorption and reflection of laser radiation, heat conductivity, radiation transport in grey body approximation, shock waves, ionisation and the elastic properties of the media. Numerical calculations and experimental results give a qualitative agreement.

  16. Optimal Scaling of Interaction Effects in Generalized Linear Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rosmalen, Joost; Koning, Alex J.; Groenen, Patrick J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Multiplicative interaction models, such as Goodman's (1981) RC(M) association models, can be a useful tool for analyzing the content of interaction effects. However, most models for interaction effects are suitable only for data sets with two or three predictor variables. Here, we discuss an optimal scaling model for analyzing the content of…

  17. Interaction of Defensins with Model Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Lori K.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Yang, Lihua; Mishra, Abhijit; Gordon, Vernita D.; Selsted, Michael E.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2009-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) comprise a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. For many AMPs, activity comes from their ability to selectively disrupt and lyse bacterial cell membranes. There are a number of proposed models for this action, but the detailed molecular mechanism of selective membrane permeation remains unclear. Theta defensins are circularized peptides with a high degree of selectivity. We investigate the interaction of model bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes with theta defensins RTD-1, BTD-7, and compare them to protegrin PG-1, a prototypical AMP, using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The relationship between membrane composition and peptide induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. By comparing the membrane phase behavior induced by these different peptides we will discuss the importance of amino acid composition and placement on membrane rearrangement.

  18. Interaction of Mastoparan with Model Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haloot, Justin

    2010-10-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents began during the 20th century to reduce the effects of infectious diseases. Since the 1990s, antimicrobial resistance has become an ever-increasing global problem. Our laboratory recently found that small antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have potent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms including antibiotic resistant organisms. These AMPs are potential therapeutic agents against the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance. AMPs are small peptides produced by plants, insects and animals. Several hypotheses concede that these peptides cause some type of structural perturbations and increased membrane permeability in bacteria however, how AMPs kill bacteria remains unclear. The goal of this study was to design an assay that would allow us to evaluate and monitor the pore forming ability of an AMP, Mastoparan, on model membrane structures called liposomes. Development of this model will facilitate the study of how mastoparan and related AMPs interact with the bacterial membrane.

  19. Interactions of Model Cell Membranes with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, S. M.; Camesano, T. A.; Nagarajan, R.

    2011-12-01

    The same properties that give nanoparticles their enhanced function, such as high surface area, small size, and better conductivity, can also alter the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials. Ultimately, many of these nanomaterials will be released into the environment, and can cause cytotoxic effects to environmental bacteria, aquatic organisms, and humans. Previous results from our laboratory suggest that nanoparticles can have a detrimental effect on cells, depending on nanoparticle size. It is our goal to characterize the properties of nanomaterials that can result in membrane destabilization. We tested the effects of nanoparticle size and chemical functionalization on nanoparticle-membrane interactions. Gold nanoparticles at 2, 5,10, and 80 nm were investigated, with a concentration of 1.1x1010 particles/mL. Model cell membranes were constructed of of L-α-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), which has negatively charged lipid headgroups. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to measure frequency changes at different overtones, which were related to mass changes corresponding to nanoparticle interaction with the model membrane. In QCM-D, a lipid bilayer is constructed on a silicon dioxide crystal. The crystals, oscillate at different harmonic frequencies depending upon changes in mass or energy dissipation. When mass is added to the crystal surface, such as through addition of a lipid vesicle solution, the frequency change decreases. By monitoring the frequency and dissipation, we could verify that a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formed on the silica surface. After formation of the SLB, the nanoparticles can be added to the system, and the changes in frequency and dissipation are monitored in order to build a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell membrane interactions. For all of the smaller nanoparticles (2, 5, and 10 nm), nanoparticle addition caused a loss of mass from the lipid bilayer, which appears to be due to the formation of holes

  20. Cloud-chemistry interactions modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristjansson, J.; Storelvmo, T.; Iversen, T.

    2006-12-01

    Clouds play a crucial role in several processes related to atmospheric chemistry, many of which include aerosols: On the one hand, aerosols are needed for the formation of clouds, and any change in the amount or composition of aerosols will influence cloud properties. For instance, the addition of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) by human activity changes the cloud microphysical properties such that cloud albedo is enhanced and precipitation is suppressed (aerosol indirect effect). Furthermore, adding anthropogenic ice nuclei enhances the ability of supercooled water droplets to freeze. On the other hand, clouds serve as sites for wet-phase oxidation processes, by which gases (e.g., SO2) are transformed to aerosols (e.g., sulfate). Through cloud processing, both the aerosol size distribution and the chemical composition of the air are modified. In addition, clouds influence the atmospheric chemical composition through wet deposition, which is the removal of material from the atmosphere by cloud particles or precipitation. In this talk we will focus on the modeling of aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models (GCMs). We will start by reviewing some recent literature on this topic. We will then describe in detail a modeling approach developed at the University of Oslo and implemented in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model. A life-cycle model dealing with the chemistry transformations of 5 aerosol species (sulfate, black carbon, organic matter, sea salt and mineral dust) and their precursors is involved. The aerosol size distributions are then determined, assuming log-normal modes. Cloud droplet nucleation is computed, assuming different hygroscopicities based on chemical composition, and taking into account the competition effect, i.e., the lowering of the supersaturation by the competition between the CCN for the available vapor. Some of the aerosol particles (e.g., soot and dust particles) are assumed to have ice nucleating capabilities, enabling an

  1. Integrating interactive computational modeling in biology curricula.

    PubMed

    Helikar, Tomáš; Cutucache, Christine E; Dahlquist, Lauren M; Herek, Tyler A; Larson, Joshua J; Rogers, Jim A

    2015-03-01

    While the use of computer tools to simulate complex processes such as computer circuits is normal practice in fields like engineering, the majority of life sciences/biological sciences courses continue to rely on the traditional textbook and memorization approach. To address this issue, we explored the use of the Cell Collective platform as a novel, interactive, and evolving pedagogical tool to foster student engagement, creativity, and higher-level thinking. Cell Collective is a Web-based platform used to create and simulate dynamical models of various biological processes. Students can create models of cells, diseases, or pathways themselves or explore existing models. This technology was implemented in both undergraduate and graduate courses as a pilot study to determine the feasibility of such software at the university level. First, a new (In Silico Biology) class was developed to enable students to learn biology by "building and breaking it" via computer models and their simulations. This class and technology also provide a non-intimidating way to incorporate mathematical and computational concepts into a class with students who have a limited mathematical background. Second, we used the technology to mediate the use of simulations and modeling modules as a learning tool for traditional biological concepts, such as T cell differentiation or cell cycle regulation, in existing biology courses. Results of this pilot application suggest that there is promise in the use of computational modeling and software tools such as Cell Collective to provide new teaching methods in biology and contribute to the implementation of the "Vision and Change" call to action in undergraduate biology education by providing a hands-on approach to biology.

  2. Integrating interactive computational modeling in biology curricula.

    PubMed

    Helikar, Tomáš; Cutucache, Christine E; Dahlquist, Lauren M; Herek, Tyler A; Larson, Joshua J; Rogers, Jim A

    2015-03-01

    While the use of computer tools to simulate complex processes such as computer circuits is normal practice in fields like engineering, the majority of life sciences/biological sciences courses continue to rely on the traditional textbook and memorization approach. To address this issue, we explored the use of the Cell Collective platform as a novel, interactive, and evolving pedagogical tool to foster student engagement, creativity, and higher-level thinking. Cell Collective is a Web-based platform used to create and simulate dynamical models of various biological processes. Students can create models of cells, diseases, or pathways themselves or explore existing models. This technology was implemented in both undergraduate and graduate courses as a pilot study to determine the feasibility of such software at the university level. First, a new (In Silico Biology) class was developed to enable students to learn biology by "building and breaking it" via computer models and their simulations. This class and technology also provide a non-intimidating way to incorporate mathematical and computational concepts into a class with students who have a limited mathematical background. Second, we used the technology to mediate the use of simulations and modeling modules as a learning tool for traditional biological concepts, such as T cell differentiation or cell cycle regulation, in existing biology courses. Results of this pilot application suggest that there is promise in the use of computational modeling and software tools such as Cell Collective to provide new teaching methods in biology and contribute to the implementation of the "Vision and Change" call to action in undergraduate biology education by providing a hands-on approach to biology. PMID:25790483

  3. Modeling of molten-fuel-moderator interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diab, Aya K.

    CANDU reactors are pressurized heavy-water moderated and cooled reactor designs. During commissioning of nuclear power plants a range of possible accidents must be considered to assure the plants' robust design. Consider a complete channel blockage in the CANDU reactor. Such an extreme flow blockage event would result in fuel overheating, pressure tube failure, partial melting of fuel rods and possible molten fuel-moderator interactions (MFMI). The MFMI phenomenon would occur immediately after tube rupture, and would involve a mixture of steam, hydrogen and molten fuel being ejected into the surrounding moderator water in the form of a high-pressure vapor bubble mixture. This bubble mixture would accelerate the surrounding denser water, causing interfacial mixing due to hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface. As a result of these interfacial instabilities, water is entrained into the growing two-phase bubble mixture with the attendant mass and heat transfer; e.g., water vaporization, fuel oxidation. A comprehensive model is developed to investigate these complex phenomena resulting from a postulated complete flow blockage and complete pressure tube failure. This dynamic model serves as a baseline to characterize the pressure response due to a pressure tube rupture and the associated MFMI phenomena. Theoretical modeling of these interrelated complex phenomena is not known a priori and therefore a semi-empirical approach is adopted. Consequently, experimental work is being proposed as part of the thesis work to verify key hypotheses regarding these interfacial fluid instabilities, such as the entrainment fraction into the rapidly expanding bubble.

  4. Detecting abandoned objects using interacting multiple models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Stefan; Münch, David; Kieritz, Hilke; Hübner, Wolfgang; Arens, Michael

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, the wide use of video surveillance systems has caused an enormous increase in the amount of data that has to be stored, monitored, and processed. As a consequence, it is crucial to support human operators with automated surveillance applications. Towards this end an intelligent video analysis module for real-time alerting in case of abandoned objects in public spaces is proposed. The overall processing pipeline consists of two major parts. First, person motion is modeled using an Interacting Multiple Model (IMM) filter. The IMM filter estimates the state of a person according to a finite-state, discrete-time Markov chain. Second, the location of persons that stay at a fixed position defines a region of interest, in which a nonparametric background model with dynamic per-pixel state variables identifies abandoned objects. In case of a detected abandoned object, an alarm event is triggered. The effectiveness of the proposed system is evaluated on the PETS 2006 dataset and the i-Lids dataset, both reflecting prototypical surveillance scenarios.

  5. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  6. Calculating the annihilation rate of weakly interacting massive particles.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Matthew; Rothstein, Ira Z; Vaidya, Varun

    2015-05-29

    We develop a formalism that allows one to systematically calculate the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) annihilation rate into gamma rays whose energy far exceeds the weak scale. A factorization theorem is presented which separates the radiative corrections stemming from initial-state potential interactions from loops involving the final state. This separation allows us to go beyond the fixed order calculation, which is polluted by large infrared logarithms. For the case of Majorana WIMPs transforming in the adjoint representation of SU(2), we present the result for the resummed rate at leading double-log accuracy in terms of two initial-state partial-wave matrix elements and one hard matching coefficient. For a given model, one may calculate the cross section by finding the tree level matching coefficient and determining the value of a local four-fermion operator. The effects of resummation can be as large as 100% for a 20 TeV WIMP. However, for lighter WIMP masses relevant for the thermal relic scenario, leading-log resummation modifies the Sudakov factors only at the 10% level. Furthermore, given comparably sized Sommerfeld factors, the total effect of radiative corrections on the semi-inclusive photon annihilation rate is found to be percent level. The generalization of the formalism to other types of WIMPs is discussed.

  7. Modeling Molten-Fuel-Moderator Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diab, Aya

    2005-11-01

    CANDU reactors are pressurized heavy-water moderated and cooled nuclear reactor designs. During commissioning of nuclear power plants a range of possible accidents must be considered to assure the plants' robust design. One must consider a complete channel blockage in the CANDU reactor. Such an extreme flow blockage event would result in fuel overheating, pressure tube failure, partial melting of fuel rods and possible molten fuel-moderator interactions (MFMI). The MFMI phenomenon would occur immediately following tube rupture, and involves a mixture of steam, hydrogen and molten fuel being ejected into the surrounding moderator water in the form of a high-pressure vapor bubble mixture. This bubble mixture would accelerate the surrounding denser water, causing interfacial mixing due to hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface. As a result of these interfacial instabilities, water is entrained into the growing two-phase bubble mixture with the attendant mass and heat transfer; e.g., water vaporization, fuel oxidation. A comprehensive model has been developed to investigate the complex phenomena resulting from a postulated complete flow blockage and pressure tube failure. This dynamic model will serve as a baseline to characterize the pressure response due to a pressure tube rupture and the associated MFMI phenomena.

  8. Institute for Multiscale Modeling of Biological Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paulaitis, Michael E; Garcia-Moreno, Bertrand; Lenhoff, Abraham

    2009-12-26

    The Institute for Multiscale Modeling of Biological Interactions (IMMBI) has two primary goals: Foster interdisciplinary collaborations among faculty and their research laboratories that will lead to novel applications of multiscale simulation and modeling methods in the biological sciences and engineering; and Building on the unique biophysical/biology-based engineering foundations of the participating faculty, train scientists and engineers to apply computational methods that collectively span multiple time and length scales of biological organization. The success of IMMBI will be defined by the following: Size and quality of the applicant pool for pre-doctoral and post-doctoral fellows; Academic performance; Quality of the pre-doctoral and post-doctoral research; Impact of the research broadly and to the DOE (ASCR program) mission; Distinction of the next career step for pre-doctoral and post-doctoral fellows; and Faculty collaborations that result from IMMBI activities. Specific details about accomplishments during the three years of DOE support for IMMBI have been documented in Annual Progress Reports (April 2005, June 2006, and March 2007) and a Report for a National Academy of Sciences Review (October 2005) that were submitted to DOE on the dates indicated. An overview of these accomplishments is provided.

  9. Interactive Model Visualization for NET-VISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, H. A.; Arora, N. S.

    2013-12-01

    NET-VISA is a probabilistic system developed for seismic network processing of data measured on the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). NET-VISA is composed of a Generative Model (GM) and an Inference Algorithm (IA). The GM is an explicit mathematical description of the relationships between various factors in seismic network analysis. Some of the relationships inside the GM are deterministic and some are statistical. Statistical relationships are described by probability distributions, the exact parameters of which (such as mean and standard deviation) are found by training NET-VISA using recent data. The IA uses the GM to evaluate the probability of various events and associations, searching for the seismic bulletin which has the highest overall probability and is consistent with a given set of measured arrivals. An Interactive Model Visualization tool (IMV) has been developed which makes 'peeking into' the GM simple and intuitive through a web-based interfaced. For example, it is now possible to access the probability distributions for attributes of events and arrivals such as the detection rate for each station for each of 14 phases. It also clarifies the assumptions and prior knowledge that are incorporated into NET-VISA's event determination. When NET-VISA is retrained, the IMV will be a visual tool for quality control both as a means of testing that the training has been accomplished correctly and that the IMS network has not changed unexpectedly. A preview of the IMV will be shown at this poster presentation. Homepage for the IMV IMV shows current model file and reference image.

  10. Experimental modelling of outburst flood - bed interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrivick, J. L.; Xie, Z.; Sleigh, A.; Hubbard, M.

    2009-04-01

    Outburst floods are a sudden release and advancing wave of water and sediment, with a peak discharge that is often several orders of magnitude greater than perennial flows. Common outburst floods from natural sources include those from glacial and moraine-impounded lakes, freshwater dyke and levee bursts, volcanic debris dams, landslides, avalanches, coastal bay-bars, and those from tree or vegetation dams. Outburst flood hazards are regularly incorporated into risk assessments for urban, coastal and mountainous areas, for example. Outburst flood hazards are primarily due to direct impacts, caused by a frontal surge wave, from debris within a flow body, and from the mass and consistency of the flows. A number of secondary impacts also pose hazards, including widespread deposition of sediment and blocked tributary streams. It is rapid landscape change, which is achieved the mobilization and redistribution of sediment that causes one of the greatest hazards due to outburst floods. The aim of this project is therefore to parameterise hydrodynamic - sedimentary interactions in experimental outburst floods. Specifically, this project applies laboratory flume modelling, which offers a hitherto untapped opportunity for examining complex interactions between water and sediment within outburst floods. The experimental set-up is of a tradition lock-gate design with a straight 4 m long tank. Hydraulics are scaled at 1:20 froude scale and the following controls on frontal wave flow-bed interactions and hence on rapid landscape change are being investigated: 1. Pre-existing mobile sediment effects, fixed bed roughness effects, sediment concentration effects, mobile bed effects. An emphasis is being maintained on examining the downstream temporal and spatial change in physical character of the water / sediment frontal wave. Facilities are state-of-the-art with a fully-automated laser bed-profiler to measure bed elevation after a run, Seatek arrays to measure transient flow

  11. Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Frances L.; Matt, John; McCaw, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships (SIMOR) integrates two models addressed in the leadership literature and then highlights the importance of relationships. The Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships combines the modified Hersey and Blanchard model of situational leadership, the…

  12. Relationship between X(5) models and the interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect

    Barea, Jose; Arias, Jose M.; Garcia-Ramos, Jose Enrique

    2010-08-15

    The connections between the X(5) models [the original X(5) using an infinite square well, X(5)-{beta}{sup 8}, X(5)-{beta}{sup 6}, X(5)-{beta}{sup 4}, and X(5)-{beta}{sup 2}], based on particular solutions of the geometrical Bohr Hamiltonian with harmonic potential in the {gamma} degree of freedom, and the interacting boson model (IBM) are explored. This work is the natural extension of the work presented in Garcia-Ramos and Arias, Phys. Rev. C 77, 054307 (2008) for the E(5) models. For that purpose, a quite general one- and two-body IBM Hamiltonian is used and a numerical fit to the different X(5) model energies is performed; then the obtained wave functions are used to calculate B(E2) transition rates. It is shown that within the IBM one can reproduce well the results for energies and B(E2) transition rates obtained with all these X(5) models, although the agreement is not so impressive as for the E(5) models. From the fitted IBM parameters the corresponding energy surface can be extracted and, surprisingly, only the X(5) case corresponds in the moderately large N limit to an energy surface very close to the one expected for a critical point, whereas the rest of models are situated a little further away.

  13. The Interaction of Courseware Development and Implementation: Functions and Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, William A.

    1976-01-01

    A discussion of how the interaction of design and content of curricular materials determine their possible applications. A review of functions and models is presented for interactive curriculum development for computer based instructional systems. (HB)

  14. Molecular modeling of protein-glycosaminoglycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Cardin, A D; Weintraub, H J

    1989-01-01

    Forty-nine regions in 21 proteins were identified as potential heparin-binding sites based on the sequence organizations of their basic and nonbasic residues. Twelve known heparin-binding sequences in vitronectin, apolipoproteins E and B-100, and platelet factor 4 were used to formulate two search strings for identifying potential heparin-binding regions in other proteins. Consensus sequences for glycosaminoglycan recognition were determined as [-X-B-B-X-B-X-] and [-X-B-B-B-X-X-B-X-] where B is the probability of a basic residue and X is a hydropathic residue. Predictions were then made as to the heparin-binding domains in endothelial cell growth factor, purpurin, and antithrombin-III. Many of the natural sequences conforming to these consensus motifs show prominent amphipathic periodicities having both alpha-helical and beta-strand conformations as determined by predictive algorithms and circular dichroism studies. The heparin-binding domain of vitronectin was modeled and formed a hydrophilic pocket that wrapped around and folded over a heparin octasaccharide, yielding a complementary structure. We suggest that these consensus sequence elements form potential nucleation sites for the recognition of polyanions in proteins and may provide a useful guide in identifying heparin-binding regions in other proteins. The possible relevance of protein-glycosaminoglycans interactions in atherosclerosis is discussed. PMID:2463827

  15. 3D Models of Stellar Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Booth, R.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Vlemmings, W.; Harries, T.; Mackey, J.; Langer, N.; Corradi, R.

    2014-04-01

    Symbiotic binaries consist of a cool, evolved mass-losing giant and an accreting compact companion. As symbiotic nebulae show similar morphologies to those in planetary nebulae (so much so that it is often difficult to distinguish between the two), they are ideal laboratories for understanding the role a binary companion plays in shaping the circumstellar envelopes in these evolved systems. We will present 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) models of interacting binaries, e.g. R Aquarii and Mira, and discuss the formation of spiral outflows, arcs, shells and equatorial density enhancements.We will also discuss the implications of the former for planetary nebulae, e.g. the Egg Nebula and Cat's Eye, and the latter for the formation of bipolar geometries, e.g. M2-9. We also investigate accretion and angular momentum evolution in symbiotic binaries which may be important to understand the formation of jets and more episodic mass-loss features we see in circumstellar envelopes and the orbital characteristics of binary central stars of planetary nebulae.

  16. Model ecosystems with random nonlinear interspecies interactions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Danielle O C; Fontanari, José F

    2004-12-01

    The principle of competitive exclusion in ecology establishes that two species living together cannot occupy the same ecological niche. Here we present a model ecosystem in which the species are described by a series of phenotypic characters and the strength of the competition between two species is given by a nondecreasing (modulating) function of the number of common characters. Using analytical tools of statistical mechanics we find that the ecosystem diversity, defined as the fraction of species that coexist at equilibrium, decreases as the complexity (i.e., number of characters) of the species increases, regardless of the modulating function. By considering both selective and random elimination of the links in the community web, we show that ecosystems composed of simple species are more robust than those composed of complex species. In addition, we show that the puzzling result that there exists either rich or poor ecosystems for a linear modulating function is not typical of communities in which the interspecies interactions are determined by a complementarity rule.

  17. Interaction of antiarrhythmic drugs with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Sánchez, I; Bagnara, M; Sotomayor, C P

    1994-11-01

    Several hypotheses link the molecular mechanism of action of the antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) that belong to class I to nonspecific interactions with phospholipids sited in the neighborhood of the sodium channels in the membrane of the myocard. The interactions of asocainol (ASOC), procainamide (PROC) and quinidine (QUIN) with: (a) multibilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), in both a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic medium, and (b) DMPC vesicles, were studied, respectively, by X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that the three AAD interacted with the lipid bilayers. However, the extension of these interactions depended on the nature and concentration of the lipids and AAD as well as on the medium where the interactions were performed. The different capacity of ASOC and PROC to perturb the bilayer structures, mainly that of DMPC, indicated that the interactions were strongly dependent on the lipophilicity of these drugs. The fact that QUIN did not completely interact in accordance to its lipophilicity suggested that other factors also play a role in these interactions. It is concluded that it may be valid the suggested molecular mechanisms of action of class I AAD involving their interaction with the membrane phospholipids. PMID:7947909

  18. Functionalized anatomical models for EM-neuron Interaction modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, Esra; Cassará, Antonino Mario; Montanaro, Hazael; Kuster, Niels; Kainz, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of interactions between electromagnetic (EM) fields and nerves are crucial in contexts ranging from therapeutic neurostimulation to low frequency EM exposure safety. To properly consider the impact of in vivo induced field inhomogeneity on non-linear neuronal dynamics, coupled EM-neuronal dynamics modeling is required. For that purpose, novel functionalized computable human phantoms have been developed. Their implementation and the systematic verification of the integrated anisotropic quasi-static EM solver and neuronal dynamics modeling functionality, based on the method of manufactured solutions and numerical reference data, is described. Electric and magnetic stimulation of the ulnar and sciatic nerve were modeled to help understanding a range of controversial issues related to the magnitude and optimal determination of strength-duration (SD) time constants. The results indicate the importance of considering the stimulation-specific inhomogeneous field distributions (especially at tissue interfaces), realistic models of non-linear neuronal dynamics, very short pulses, and suitable SD extrapolation models. These results and the functionalized computable phantom will influence and support the development of safe and effective neuroprosthetic devices and novel electroceuticals. Furthermore they will assist the evaluation of existing low frequency exposure standards for the entire population under all exposure conditions.

  19. Model membrane/substrate interactions: ethanol and procaine interactions.

    PubMed

    Cadenhead, D A.

    2001-09-01

    The ability of ethanol to lower the surface tension of water plays a major role in its ability to affect membrane lipids. Typical lipids will show little expansion on exposure to ethanol substrates and may even show condensations. At the same time, the overall stability of the lipid phase is significantly reduced. Previously, we reported experimental and theoretical studies of the stearic acid (SA)/procaine (PR) system. PR substrate concentrations were examined in the 10(-4)-10(-2) M range as Gibbs monolayers, in order to establish the surface activity of both charged and uncharged species, and to estimate the orientation of the PR species at the air/water interface. SA interactions with PR substrates were studied by compressing films of the former and recording the surface pressure/area per molecule isotherms at both pH 2 and 8, so that the SA was in an uncharged and charged state, respectively. More recently, we have carried out similar studies with L-alpha-dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), maintaining the substrate pH at between 5 and 6, at PR concentrations of 10(-6)-10(-2)M. We also carried out studies of the DPPC/PR system using fluorescence microscopy in order to examine the effects of PR on the biphasic liquid expanded/liquid condensed (LE/LC) transition region. In the absence of any lipid film, PR species appear to be horizontally oriented at the air/water interface, while the surface activity of PR species increases in the order PRH(2+)

  20. Modeling the interactions between noise exposure and other variables.

    PubMed

    Humes, L E; Jesteadt, W

    1991-07-01

    The interaction of noise exposure with other variables is reviewed. For the case of the interaction of noise with other variables that produce behavioral threshold shifts, the application of a newly developed model is described and demonstrated. This model, referred to as the modified power-law model, provides an accurate prediction of the combined effects of two threshold-elevating factors. The model accounts for the interaction of post-exposure a pre-existing pre-existing permanent loss or a pre-existing temporary loss. The model's application is demonstrated for multiple exposures to steady-state noise in which each exposure lasts as short as 12 min or as long as 6 h. Finally, implications of the model's application to the interaction long as 6 h. Finally, implications of the model's application to the interaction of noise with other ototraumatic agents are reviewed.

  1. Cosmic Ray Interaction Models: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchenko, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    I review the state-of-the-art concerning the treatment of high energy cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, discussing in some detail the underlying physical concepts and the possibilities to constrain the latter by current and future measurements at the Large Hadron Collider. The relation of basic characteristics of hadronic interactions tothe properties of nuclear-electromagnetic cascades induced by primary cosmic rays in the atmosphere is addressed.

  2. Interactive Multimedia and Model-based Learning in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Barbara C.

    2000-01-01

    Documents a case of model-building in biology through microanalysis of one student's interaction with "Science for Living: The Circulatory System (SFL)", an interactive multimedia resource prototype for research. Describes the student's learning goals, gains, and activities with particular attention to interactions with representations, then…

  3. Hyperon-hyperon interaction based on quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukukawa, Kenji

    2014-04-01

    Energy-independent nonlocal Gaussian potential based on the quark-model baryon-baryon interaction is derived by using the Gauss-Legendre quadrature and the Bargmann algebra. The reliability of this potential is examined with respect to the NN, YN and YY phase shifts. This potential reproduces the phase shifts predicted by quark-model baryon-baryon interaction fss2.

  4. Search for Contact Interactions in the Dimuon Channel in $pp$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV at CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gollapinni, Sowjanya

    2012-01-01

    The standard model fails to explain the variety of observed quark and lepton avors and their masses suggesting that there might exist a more fundamental basis. If quarks and leptons are composite particles made up of more basic constituents, a new physics interaction in the form of a four-fermion contact interaction arises between them. Experimentally the signal is manifest as a deviation from the standard model prediction in the high-mass tail for the invariant mass distribution of the opposite-sign dimuon pairs. The Large Hadron Collider accelerator at the Center for European Nuclear Research is built to explore new physics possibilities from proton-proton collisions occurring at the world's highest center-of-mass energy. This thesis discusses in detail a search strategy for a new physics possibility based on a left-handed current model of contact interactions. Based on 5.3 fb-1 of 2011 data as collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid detector, exclusion lower limits at 95% con dence level are set on the compositeness energy scale , for both destructive and constructive interferences of the new physics with the standard model Drell-Yan process. These limits form the most stringent limits to date and exceed the current published limits signi cantly.

  5. Dynamical symmetry breaking in models with the Yukawa interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ksenzov, V. G.; Romanov, A. I.

    2013-04-15

    The models with a massless fermion and a self-interacting massive scalar field with the Yukawa interaction are discussed. The chiral condensate and the fermion mass are calculated analytically through a one-loop approximation in (1 + 1)-dimensions. It is shown that the models have a phase transition as a function of the squared mass of the scalar field.

  6. Lepton flavor violation in a nonuniversal gauge interaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Young

    2010-11-01

    The flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNC) are derived at tree level if the electroweak gauge group depends on the fermion family, which are absent in the standard model. We study the lepton flavor violation through the FCNC interactions in a nonuniversal gauge interaction model where the third generation fermions are subjected to the separate SU(2){sub L} gauge group.

  7. CHOREO: An Interactive Computer Model for Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, G. J.; Officer, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Establishes the need for literacy in dance; and describes two dance notation systems: the Massine notation method, and the Labanotation method. The use of interactive computer graphics as a tool for both learning and interpreting dance notation is introduced. (Author/VT)

  8. Turbulent Chemical Interaction Models in NCC: Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Andrew T.; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2006-01-01

    The performance of a scalar PDF hydrogen-air combustion model in predicting a complex reacting flow is evaluated. In addition the results are compared to those obtained by running the same case with the so-called laminar chemistry model and also a new model based on the concept of mapping partially stirred reactor data onto perfectly stirred reactor data. The results show that the scalar PDF model produces significantly different results from the other two models, and at a significantly higher computational cost.

  9. A new interaction potential for swarming models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, J. A.; Martin, S.; Panferov, V.

    2013-10-01

    We consider a self-propelled particle system which has been used to describe certain types of collective motion of animals, such as fish schools and bird flocks. Interactions between particles are specified by means of a pairwise potential, repulsive at short ranges and attractive at longer ranges. The exponentially decaying Morse potential is a typical choice, and is known to reproduce certain types of collective motion observed in nature, particularly aligned flocks and rotating mills. We introduce a class of interaction potentials, that we call Quasi-Morse, for which flock and rotating mills states are also observed numerically, however in that case the corresponding macroscopic equations allow for explicit solutions in terms of special functions, with coefficients that can be obtained numerically without solving the particle evolution. We compare the obtained solutions with long-time dynamics of the particle systems and find a close agreement for several types of flock and mill solutions.

  10. Modeling Microbiological Interactions with Hydrothermal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori

    2006-01-01

    All organisms require energy. Characterizing and quantifying the biological demand for energy places constraints on the possible interactions of organisms with each other and with the environment. This talk will consider energetic and mass transfer constraints on the ecology of hydrothermal vent microbes. Following a general introduction to the biological energy requirements and their link to environmental conditions, energy constraints will be applied to several vent-relevant case studies.

  11. Five challenges in modelling interacting strain dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wikramaratna, Paul S; Kucharski, Adam; Gupta, Sunetra; Andreasen, Viggo; McLean, Angela R; Gog, Julia R

    2015-03-01

    Population epidemiological models where hosts can be infected sequentially by different strains have the potential to help us understand many important diseases. Researchers have in recent years started to develop and use such models, but the extra layer of complexity from multiple strains brings with it many technical challenges. It is therefore hard to build models which have realistic assumptions yet are tractable. Here we outline some of the main challenges in this area. First we begin with the fundamental question of how to translate from complex small-scale dynamics within a host to useful population models. Next we consider the nature of so-called "strain space". We describe two key types of host heterogeneities, and explain how models could help generate a better understanding of their effects. Finally, for diseases with many strains, we consider the challenge of modelling how immunity accumulates over multiple exposures.

  12. Modeling land use interaction using linguistic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Mohammad; Sharifi, Mohammad Ali; Mesgari, Mohammad Saadi

    2012-06-01

    One of the main factors of land use change (LUC) modeling is the land use intersection (LUI) or neighborhood effect, which is normally modeled using cellular automata (CA) concept. The effects of LUI over distance are represented in terms of CA transition rules. In this paper, a new model for LUI process is developed that makes use of expert knowledge to define the transition rules. In this model, the region of influence is defined using a new radial structure; the transition rules are described by expert knowledge and spatial metrics in the form of linguistic variables; and finally, the neighborhood effect is classified into three groups of compactness, dependency and incompatibility. The model is implemented and evaluated using the data of Borkhar and Meymeh township, in Esfahan, Iran, for the two periods of 1986-1998 and 1998-2005. The results show that the model and its related concept are performing rather well.

  13. The GOURD model of human-computer interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Goldbogen, G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a model, the GOURD model, that can be used to measure the goodness of {open_quotes}interactivity{close_quotes} of an interface design and qualifies how to improve the design. The GOURD model describes what happens to the computer and to the human during a human-computer interaction. Since the interaction is generally repeated, the traversal of the model repeatedly is similar to a loop programming structure. Because the model measures interaction over part or all of the application, it can also be used as a classifier of the part or the whole application. But primarily, the model is used as a design guide and a predictor of effectiveness.

  14. Comet-solar wind interaction - Dynamical length scales and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, D. A.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Jones, D. E.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1986-03-01

    ICE magnetometer measurements at Comet Giacobini-Zinner and model simulations of comet-solar wind interactions are analyzed. The magnetometer data reveal the existence of intense hydromagnetic turbulence, a draping of the magnetic field lines to form a magnetotail, a weak shock, and a magnetic barrier region in the magnetosphere. The global models of the comet-solar wind interaction are described. The observed data and models are compared and good correlation is displayed.

  15. Comparison of models of odor interaction.

    PubMed

    Cain, W S; Schiet, F T; Olsson, M J; de Wijk, R A

    1995-12-01

    Subjects rated the overall perceived intensity of concentrations of the odorants cineole, geraniol, hexyl salicylate, and linalyl acetate smelled alone and in binary mixtures. The subjects also rated intensity of specified constituents (e.g. amount of cineole in cineole, and in mixtures of cineole and linalyl acetate). The intensity of the stronger component alone offered a close description of perceived intensity. In addition to the Stronger Component model, two other psychological models (Vector and U model) and two psychophysical models (UPL2 and Equiratio Mixture model) offered descriptions ranging from fair to very good. Psychological models gave better fits, but lack explanatory power. Some results indicated that weaker odors add more potently than stronger odors, an outcome incompatible with these models. The psychophysical models, based on the additivity of single components, generally overestimated perceived intensity. Judgments of individual qualities gave only slight encouragement to any expectation of differences in masking or maskability among odorants. The results highlight the need to test particular critical hypotheses regarding how people perceive mixtures.

  16. MODELING DISPERSANT INTERACTIONS WITH OIL SPILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is developing a model called the EPA Research Object-Oriented Oil Spill Model (ERO3S) and associated databases to simulate the impacts of dispersants on oil slicks. Because there are features of oil slicks that align naturally with major concepts of object-oriented programmi...

  17. Proton-neutron interacting boson model under random two-body interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, N.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2009-12-15

    The low-lying states of sd-boson systems in the presence of random two-body interactions are studied in the proton-neutron interacting boson model (IBM-2). The predominance of spin-zero ground states is confirmed, and a very prominent maximum F-spin dominance in ground states is found. It turns out that the requirement of random interactions with F-spin conservation intensifies the above predominance. Collective motion in the low-lying states is discussed.

  18. Effective Interactions from No Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dikmen, E.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Barrett, B. R.; Navratil, P.; Vary, J. P.

    2008-11-11

    We construct the many-body effective Hamiltonian for pf-shell by carrying out 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}. NCSM calculations at the 2-body cluster level. We demonstrate how the effective Hamiltonian derived from realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials for the 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} NCSM space should be modified to properly account for the many-body correlations produced by truncating to the major pf-shell. We obtain two-body effective interactions for the pf-shell by using direct projection and use them to reproduce the results of large scale NCSM for other light Ca isotopes.

  19. Role of interactions and damage in a cohesive fracture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, Josesph; Rundle, John; Turcotte, Donald; Klein, William

    2012-02-01

    We study the influences of local and long range interactions in a numerical model of tensile fracture. Our model simulates fracture events on a 2D square lattice plane with a Metropolis algorithm. We chose a Hamiltonian that is written as a function of the crack separation (offset field) and includes contributions from an external field, interactions, as well as a cohesive energy across the crack surfaces. Included in our study is both a ferromagnetic-type (attractive) and antiferromagnetic-type (repulsive) interactions. We test both of these interactions individually as well as a hybrid interaction in which over a short range the interaction is antiferromagnetic and in the long range the interaction becomes ferromagnetic. This dual interaction approximates a Lennard-Jones potential. We also propose a characterization of damage and investigate the increase of damage in time for fractures occurring by a static-load as well as a time-dependent load. Damaged sites do not interact with neighboring sites and cannot hold any load. We compare our damage model to previous studies of fiber-bundle models.

  20. INFUSION: Modeling Robot and Crew Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    Brahms is a multi-agent modeling and simulation language and distributed runtime system developed at NASA. It can be used to model and run a simualtion of the distributed work activities of multiple agents, such as humans,robots, and software agents, to coordinate a mission on one or more locations.Brahms is being used to model activities at the Flashline Man Arctic Research Station for possible use in planning Mars missions. The station is located at Haughton Crater, Devon Island, Nutiavut, Arctic Canada.

  1. Pedagogical Interaction in High School, the Structural and Functional Model of Pedagogical Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semenova, Larissa A.; Kazantseva, Anastassiya I.; Sergeyeva, Valeriya V.; Raklova, Yekaterina M.; Baiseitova, Zhanar B.

    2016-01-01

    The study covers the problems of pedagogical technologies and their experimental implementation in the learning process. The theoretical aspects of the "student-teacher" interaction are investigated. A structural and functional model of pedagogical interaction is offered, which determines the conditions for improving pedagogical…

  2. Modelling refractive index changes due to molecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Manoj

    2016-03-01

    There are a large number of sensing techniques which use optical changes to monitor interactions between molecules. In the absence of fluorophores or other labels, the basic signal transduction mechanism relies on refractive index changes arising from the interactions of the molecules involved. A quantitative model incorporating molecular transport, reaction kinetics and optical mixing is presented which reveals important insights concerning the optimal detection of molecular interactions optically. Although conceptually simple, a comprehensive model such as this has not been reported anywhere. Specifically, we investigate the pros and cons of detecting molecular interactions in free solution relative to detecting molecular interactions on surfaces using surface bound receptor molecules such as antibodies. The model reveals that the refractive index change produced in surface based sensors is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that from interactions in free solution. On the other hand, the model also reveals that it is indeed possible to distinguish specific molecular interactions from non-specific ones based on free-solution bulk refractometry without any washing step necessary in surface based sensors. However, the refractive index change for free solution interactions predicted by the model is smaller than 10-7 RIU, even for large proteins such as IgG in sufficiently high concentrations. This value is smaller than the typical 10-6 RIU detection limit of most state of the art optical sensing techniques therefore requiring techniques with substantially higher index sensitivity such as Back Scattering Interferometry.

  3. Utilitarian supersymmetric gauge model of particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ernest

    2010-05-01

    A remarkabale U(1) gauge extension of the supersymmetric standard model was proposed 8 years ago. It is anomaly free, has no μ term, and conserves baryon and lepton numbers automatically. The phenomenology of a specific version of this model is discussed. In particular, leptoquarks are predicted, with couplings to the heavy singlet neutrinos, the scalar partners of which may be components of dark matter. The Majorana neutrino mass matrix itself may have two zero subdeterminants.

  4. Ferromagnetic interaction model of activity level in workplace communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akitomi, Tomoaki; Ara, Koji; Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Yano, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    The nature of human-human interaction, specifically, how people synchronize with each other in multiple-participant conversations, is described by a ferromagnetic interaction model of people’s activity levels. We found two microscopic human interaction characteristics from a real-environment face-to-face conversation. The first characteristic is that people quite regularly synchronize their activity level with that of the other participants in a conversation. The second characteristic is that the degree of synchronization increases as the number of participants increases. Based on these microscopic ferromagnetic characteristics, a “conversation activity level” was modeled according to the Ising model. The results of a simulation of activity level based on this model well reproduce macroscopic experimental measurements of activity level. This model will give a new insight into how people interact with each other in a conversation.

  5. Supersonic jet and crossflow interaction: Computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ez; Boles, John; Aono, Hikaru; Davis, Douglas; Shyy, Wei

    2013-02-01

    The supersonic jet-in-crossflow problem which involves shocks, turbulent mixing, and large-scale vortical structures, requires special treatment for turbulence to obtain accurate solutions. Different turbulence modeling techniques are reviewed and compared in terms of their performance in predicting results consistent with the experimental data. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models are limited in prediction of fuel structure due to their inability to accurately capture unsteadiness in the flow. Large eddy simulation (LES) is not yet practical due to prohibitively large grid requirement near the wall. Hybrid RANS/LES can offer reasonable compromise between accuracy and efficiency. The hybrid models are based on various approaches such as explicit blending of RANS and LES, detached eddy simulation (DES), and filter-based multi-scale models. In particular, they can be used to evaluate the turbulent Schmidt number modeling techniques used in jet-in-crossflow simulations. Specifically, an adaptive approach can be devised by utilizing the information obtained from the resolved field to help assign the value of turbulent Schmidt number in the sub-filter field. The adaptive approach combined with the multi-scale model improves the results especially when highly refined grids are needed to resolve small structures involved in the mixing process.

  6. Approaches to modelling hydrology and ecosystem interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberstein, Richard P.

    2014-05-01

    As the pressures of industry, agriculture and mining on groundwater resources increase there is a burgeoning un-met need to be able to capture these multiple, direct and indirect stresses in a formal framework that will enable better assessment of impact scenarios. While there are many catchment hydrological models and there are some models that represent ecological states and change (e.g. FLAMES, Liedloff and Cook, 2007), these have not been linked in any deterministic or substantive way. Without such coupled eco-hydrological models quantitative assessments of impacts from water use intensification on water dependent ecosystems under changing climate are difficult, if not impossible. The concept would include facility for direct and indirect water related stresses that may develop around mining and well operations, climate stresses, such as rainfall and temperature, biological stresses, such as diseases and invasive species, and competition such as encroachment from other competing land uses. Indirect water impacts could be, for example, a change in groundwater conditions has an impact on stream flow regime, and hence aquatic ecosystems. This paper reviews previous work examining models combining ecology and hydrology with a view to developing a conceptual framework linking a biophysically defensable model that combines ecosystem function with hydrology. The objective is to develop a model capable of representing the cumulative impact of multiple stresses on water resources and associated ecosystem function.

  7. Reduced Order Models for Fluid-Structure Interaction Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Daniele

    With the advent of active flow control devices for regulating the structural responses of systems involving fluid-structure interaction phenomena, there is a growing need of efficient models that can be used to control the system. The first step is then to be able to model the system in an efficient way based on reduced-order models. This is needed so that accurate predictions of the system evolution could be performed in a fast manner, ideally in real time. However, existing reduced-order models of fluid-structure interaction phenomena that provide closed-form solutions are applicable to only a limited set of scenarios while for real applications high-fidelity experiments or numerical simulations are required, which are unsuitable as efficient or reduced-order models. This thesis proposes a novel reduced-order and efficient model for fluid-structure interaction phenomena. The model structure employed is such that it is generic for different fluid-structure interaction problems. Based on this structure, the model is first built for a given fluid-structure interaction problem based on a database generated through high-fidelity numerical simulations while it can subsequently be used to predict the structural response over a wide set of flow conditions for the fluid-structure interaction problem at hand. The model is tested on two cases: a cylinder suspended in a low Reynolds number flow that includes the lock-in region and an airfoil subjected to plunge oscillations in a high Reynolds number regime. For each case, in addition to training profile we also present validation profiles that are used to determine the performance of the reduced-order model. The reduced-order model devised in this study proved to be an effective and efficient modeling method for fluid-structure interaction phenomena and it shown its applicability in very different kind of scenarios.

  8. Internal kinematics of modelled interacting disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberger, T.; Kapferer, W.; Schindler, S.; Böhm, A.; Kutdemir, E.; Ziegler, B. L.

    2006-10-01

    We present an investigation of galaxy-galaxy interactions and their effects on the velocity fields of disc galaxies in combined N-body/hydrodynamic simulations, which include cooling, star formation with feedback, and galactic winds. Rotation curves (RCs) of the gas are extracted from these simulations in a way that follows the procedure applied to observations of distant, small, and faint galaxies as closely as possible. We show that galaxy-galaxy mergers and fly-bys disturb the velocity fields significantly and hence the RCs of the interacting galaxies, leading to asymmetries and distortions in the RCs. Typical features of disturbed kinematics are significantly rising or falling profiles in the direction of the companion galaxy and pronounced bumps in the RCs. In addition, tidal tails can leave strong imprints on the rotation curve. All these features are observable for intermediate redshift galaxies, on which we focus our investigations. We use a quantitative measure for the asymmetry of rotation curves to show that the appearance of these distortions strongly depends on the viewing angle. We also find in this way that the velocity fields settle back into relatively undisturbed equilibrium states after unequal mass mergers and fly-bys. About 1 Gyr after the first encounter, the RCs show no severe distortions anymore. These results are consistent with previous theoretical and observational studies. As an illustration of our results, we compare our simulated velocity fields and direct images with rotation curves from VLT/FORS spectroscopy and ACS images of a cluster at z=0.53 and find remarkable similarities.

  9. RF models for plasma-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Smithe, David; Lin, Ming-Chieh; Kruger, Scott; Stoltz, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Computational models for DC and oscillatory (RF-driven) sheath potentials, arising at metal or dielectric-coated surfaces in contact with plasma, are developed within the VSim code and applied in parameter regimes characteristic of fusion plasma experiments and plasma processing scenarios. Results from initial studies quantifying the effects of various dielectric wall coating materials and thicknesses on these sheath potentials, as well as on the ensuing flux of plasma particles to the wall, are presented. As well, the developed models are used to model plasma-facing ICRF antenna structures in the ITER device; we present initial assessments of the efficacy of dielectric-coated antenna surfaces in reducing sputtering-induced high-Z impurity contamination of the fusion reaction. Funded by U.S. DoE via a Phase I SBIR grant, award DE-SC0009501.

  10. Self-consistent Models of Strong Interaction with Chiral Symmetry

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nambu, Y.; Pascual, P.

    1963-04-01

    Some simple models of (renormalizable) meson-nucleon interaction are examined in which the nucleon mass is entirely due to interaction and the chiral ( gamma {sub 5}) symmetry is "broken'' to become a hidden symmetry. It is found that such a scheme is possible provided that a vector meson is introduced as an elementary field. (auth)

  11. Modeling the interacting detonation fronts observed by low energy radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Aufderheide, M; Egan, P O; Morgan, D L; Vantine, H C

    1998-09-18

    We have completed a series of experiments in which we made radiographs of interacting detonation fronts in a high explosive. Although the fronts and interactions were observed, the experimental data were insufficient to distinguish between two computer models which we employed to simulate the experiments.

  12. Speech Perception as a Cognitive Process: The Interactive Activation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elman, Jeffrey L.; McClelland, James L.

    Research efforts to model speech perception in terms of a processing system in which knowledge and processing are distributed over large numbers of highly interactive--but computationally primative--elements are described in this report. After discussing the properties of speech that demand a parallel interactive processing system, the report…

  13. Evaluating Intercept-Slope Interactions in Latent Growth Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Ronghua; Willson, Victor L.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of misspecifying intercept-covariate interactions in a 4 time-point latent growth model were the focus of this investigation. The investigation was motivated by school growth studies in which students' entry-level skills may affect their rate of growth. We studied the latent interaction of intercept and a covariate in predicting growth…

  14. Bilingual Lexical Interactions in an Unsupervised Neural Network Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Li, Ping

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present an unsupervised neural network model of bilingual lexical development and interaction. We focus on how the representational structures of the bilingual lexicons can emerge, develop, and interact with each other as a function of the learning history. The results show that: (1) distinct representations for the two lexicons…

  15. One-Dimensional Ising Model with "k"-Spin Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Yale

    2011-01-01

    We examine a generalization of the one-dimensional Ising model involving interactions among neighbourhoods of "k" adjacent spins. The model is solved by exploiting a connection to an interesting computational problem that we call ""k"-SAT on a ring", and is shown to be equivalent to the nearest-neighbour Ising model in the absence of an external…

  16. Electromagnetic interactions in the sigma-. omega. model

    SciTech Connect

    de Forest,Jr., T.

    1984-08-27

    The predictions of the sigma-..omega.. model for electromagnetic current are explored and found to be quite different from those given by the impulse approximation. In particular large variations in the quasielastic electron scattering cross section are found depending upon the choice of the operator used for the current.

  17. Modeling User Interactions with Instructional Design Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, J. Michael; And Others

    As one of a series of studies being conducted to develop a useful (predictive) model of the instructional design process that is appropriate to military technical training settings, this study performed initial evaluations on two pieces of instructional design software developed by M. David Merrill and colleagues at Utah State University i.e.,…

  18. Solvent effects on thiamin-enzyme model interactions. I. Interactions with tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Farzami, B; Mariam, Y H; Jordan, F

    1977-03-22

    The solvent polarity dependence of the interaction between thiamin and tryptophan was studied by spectrophotometric methods. The ultraviolet (UV) data clearly indicate that the interaction is weakened when the complex is transferred from water to aqueous ethanol or aqueous dioxane. The interaction of thiamin and tryptophan could also be detected by fluorescence-quenching studies (excitation of tryptophan at 287 nm, maximum emission at 348 nm). Appropriate treatment of the quenching data allowed dissection into static and dynamic contributions. A pyrimidine derivative related to thiamin, both in its neutral and protonated states, was shown to interact with tryptophan by fluorescence techniques, but not by UV. A thiazolium model was shown to interact with tryptophan by UV but was an inefficient quencher of the tryptophan fluorescence. Theoretical models are presented to explain the solvent dielectric constant dependence of the association constant between tryptophan and thiamin. Both electrostatic and dispersion forces are found to contribute to the stability of the complex.

  19. Integrability and Quantum Phase Transitions in Interacting Boson Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukelsky, J.; Arias, J. M.; Garcia-Ramos, J. E.; Pittel, S.

    2004-04-01

    The exact solution of the boson pairing hamiltonian given by Richardson in the sixties is used to study the phenomena of level crossings and quantum phase transitions in the integrable regions of the sd and sdg interacting boson models.

  20. An Integrative-Interactive Conceptual Model for Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Ibrahim, Abdul Rahman H.

    1982-01-01

    The Integrative-Interactive Conceptual Model for Curriculum Development calls for curriculum reform and innovation to be cybernetic so that all aspects of curriculum planning get adequate attention. (CJ)

  1. Chiral susceptibility in an effective interaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Min He; Yu Jiang; Sun Weimin; Zong Hongshi

    2008-04-01

    A closed integral expression for the chiral susceptibility at finite temperature is derived. The corresponding disconnected part, which proves to be of major physical relevance and free from the additive quadratic ultraviolet divergence, is identified. Then a calculation based on an effective model gluon propagator is conducted within the framework of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for two flavors in the chiral limit. A narrow, divergent peak is observed as temperature varies, and its implications are discussed.

  2. Membrane–drug interactions studied using model membrane systems

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, Jacqueline; Suhendro, Daniel K.; Zieleniecki, Julius L.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Köper, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The direct interaction of drugs with the cell membrane is often neglected when drug effects are studied. Systematic investigations are hindered by the complexity of the natural membrane and model membrane systems can offer a useful alternative. Here some examples are reviewed of how model membrane architectures including vesicles, Langmuir monolayers and solid supported membranes can be used to investigate the effects of drug molecules on the membrane structure, and how these interactions can translate into effects on embedded membrane proteins. PMID:26586998

  3. Application of large eddy interaction model to a mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. N. B.

    1989-01-01

    The large eddy interaction model (LEIM) is a statistical model of turbulence based on the interaction of selected eddies with the mean flow and all of the eddies in a turbulent shear flow. It can be utilized as the starting point for obtaining physical structures in the flow. The possible application of the LEIM to a mixing layer formed between two parallel, incompressible flows with a small temperature difference is developed by invoking a detailed similarity between the spectra of velocity and temperature.

  4. Improved simulation of groundwater - surface water interaction in catchment models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    teklesadik, aklilu; van Griensven, Ann; Anibas, Christian; Huysmans, Marijke

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater storage can have a significant contribution to stream flow, therefore a thorough understanding of the groundwater surface water interaction is of prime important when doing catchment modeling. The aim of this study is to improve the simulation of groundwater - surface water interaction in a catchment model of the upper Zenne River basin located in Belgium. To achieve this objective we used the "Groundwater-Surface water Flow" (GSFLOW) modeling software, which is an integration of the surface water modeling tool "Precipitation and Runoff Modeling system" (PRMS) and the groundwater modeling tool MODFLOW. For this case study, the PRMS model and MODFLOW model were built and calibrated independently. The PRMS upper Zenne River basin model is divided into 84 hydrological response units (HRUs) and is calibrated with flow data at the Tubize gauging station. The spatial discretization of the MODFLOW upper Zenne groundwater flow model consists of 100m grids. Natural groundwater divides and the Brussels-Charleroi canal are used as boundary conditions for the MODFLOW model. The model is calibrated using piezometric data. The GSFLOW results were evaluated against a SWAT model application and field observations of groundwater-surface water interactions along a cross section of the Zenne River and riparian zone. The field observations confirm that there is no exchange of groundwater beyond the Brussel-Charleroi canal and that the interaction at the river bed is relatively low. The results show that there is a significant difference in the groundwater simulations when using GSFLOW versus SWAT. This indicates that the groundwater component representation in the SWAT model could be improved and that a more realistic implementation of the interactions between groundwater and surface water is advisable. This could be achieved by integrating SWAT and MODFLOW.

  5. Modeling the interaction of ultrasound with pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Parthasarathi, Sanjai

    1991-01-01

    Factors that affect ultrasonic velocity sensing of density during consolidation of metal powders are examined. A comparison is made between experimental results obtained during the final stage of densification and the predictions of models that assume either a spherical or a spheroidal pore shape. It is found that for measurements made at low frequencies during the final stage of densification, relative density (pore fraction) and pore shape are the two most important factors determining the ultrasonic velocity, the effect of pore size is negligible.

  6. Interaction field modeling of mini-UAV swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, William W.; Ro, Kapseong; Szu, Harold

    2006-05-01

    A behavior-based, simple interaction model inspired by molecular interaction field depicted by the Lennard-Jones function is examined for the averaged interaction in swarming. The modeled kinematic equation of motion contains only one variable, instead of a multiple state variable dependence a more complete dynamics entails. The model assumes a spatial distribution of the potential associate with the swarm. The model has been applied to examine the formation of swarm and the results are reported. The modeling can be reflected in an equilibrium theory for the operation of a swarm of mini-UAVs pioneered by Szu, where every member serves the mission while exploiting other's loss, resulting in a zero-sum game among the team members.

  7. Modelling the interaction between bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts.

    PubMed

    Beke, Gabor; Stano, Matej; Klucar, Lubos

    2016-09-01

    A mathematical model simulating the interaction between bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts has been developed. It is based on other known models describing this type of interaction, enhanced with an ability to model the system influenced by other environmental factor such as pH and temperature. This could be used for numerous estimations of growth rate, when the pH and/or the temperature of the environment are not constant. The change of pH or the temperature greatly affects the specific growth rate which has an effect on the final results of the simulation. Since the model aims on practical application and easy accessibility, an interactive website has been developed where users can run simulations with their own parameters and easily calculate and visualise the result of simulation. The web simulation is accessible at the URL http://www.phisite.org/model. PMID:27393678

  8. Limited interactions in flocks: relating model simulations to empirical data

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Nikolai W. F.; Franks, Daniel W.; Wood, A. Jamie

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of self-organization resulting in coordinated collective motion has received wide attention from a range of scientists interested in both its technical and biological relevance. Models have been highly influential in highlighting how collective motion can be produced from purely local interactions between individuals. Typical models in this field are termed ‘metric’ because each individual only reacts to conspecifics within a fixed distance. A recent large-scale study has, however, provided evidence that interactions ruling collective behaviour occur between a fixed number of nearest neighbours (‘topological’ framework). Despite their importance in clarifying the nature of the mechanism underlying animal interactions, these findings have yet to be produced by either metric or topological models. Here, we present an original individual-based model of collective animal motion that reproduces the previous findings. Our approach bridges the current gap between previous model analysis and recent evidence, and presents a framework for further study. PMID:20826476

  9. Modelling the interaction between bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts.

    PubMed

    Beke, Gabor; Stano, Matej; Klucar, Lubos

    2016-09-01

    A mathematical model simulating the interaction between bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts has been developed. It is based on other known models describing this type of interaction, enhanced with an ability to model the system influenced by other environmental factor such as pH and temperature. This could be used for numerous estimations of growth rate, when the pH and/or the temperature of the environment are not constant. The change of pH or the temperature greatly affects the specific growth rate which has an effect on the final results of the simulation. Since the model aims on practical application and easy accessibility, an interactive website has been developed where users can run simulations with their own parameters and easily calculate and visualise the result of simulation. The web simulation is accessible at the URL http://www.phisite.org/model.

  10. New generation of exploration tools: interactive modeling software and microcomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Krajewski, S.A.

    1986-08-01

    Software packages offering interactive modeling techniques are now available for use on microcomputer hardware systems. These packages are reasonably priced for both company and independent explorationists; they do not require users to have high levels of computer literacy; they are capable of rapidly completing complex ranges of sophisticated geologic and geophysical modeling tasks; and they can produce presentation-quality output for comparison with real-world data. For example, interactive packages are available for mapping, log analysis, seismic modeling, reservoir studies, and financial projects as well as for applying a variety of statistical and geostatistical techniques to analysis of exploration data. More importantly, these packages enable explorationists to directly apply their geologic expertise when developing and fine-tuning models for identifying new prospects and for extending producing fields. As a result of these features, microcomputers and interactive modeling software are becoming common tools in many exploration offices. Gravity and magnetics software programs illustrate some of the capabilities of such exploration tools.

  11. Towards a Revised Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Surface Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler

    2005-06-09

    The components of the neutral- and plasma-surface interaction model used in the Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS 2 are reviewed. The idealized surfaces and processes handled by that model are inadequate for accurately simulating neutral transport behavior in present day and future fusion devices. We identify some of the physical processes missing from the model, such as mixed materials and implanted hydrogen, and make some suggestions for improving the model.

  12. Modeling Human Dynamics of Face-to-Face Interaction Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starnini, Michele; Baronchelli, Andrea; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2013-04-01

    Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of interconversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents that perform a random walk in a two-dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks.

  13. Exactly solvable interacting spin-ice vertex model.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Anderson A; Alcaraz, Francisco C

    2006-07-01

    A special family of solvable five-vertex model is introduced on a square lattice. In addition to the usual nearest-neighbor interactions, the vertices defining the model also interact along one of the diagonals of the lattice. This family of models includes in a special limit the standard six-vertex model. The exact solution of these models is an application of the matrix product ansatz introduced recently and applied successfully in the solution of quantum chains. The phase diagram and the free energy of the models are calculated in the thermodynamic limit. The models exhibit massless phases, and our analytical and numerical analyses indicate that such phases are governed by a conformal field theory with central charge c=1 and continuously varying critical exponents.

  14. Galaxy Zoo: Mergers - Dynamical models of interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holincheck, Anthony J.; Wallin, John F.; Borne, Kirk; Fortson, Lucy; Lintott, Chris; Smith, Arfon M.; Bamford, Steven; Keel, William C.; Parrish, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The dynamical history of most merging galaxies is not well understood. Correlations between galaxy interaction and star formation have been found in previous studies, but require the context of the physical history of merging systems for full insight into the processes that lead to enhanced star formation. We present the results of simulations that reconstruct the orbit trajectories and disturbed morphologies of pairs of interacting galaxies. With the use of a restricted three-body simulation code and the help of citizen scientists, we sample 105 points in parameter space for each system. We demonstrate a successful recreation of the morphologies of 62 pairs of interacting galaxies through the review of more than 3 million simulations. We examine the level of convergence and uniqueness of the dynamical properties of each system. These simulations represent the largest collection of models of interacting galaxies to date, providing a valuable resource for the investigation of mergers. This paper presents the simulation parameters generated by the project. They are now publicly available in electronic format at http://data.galaxyzoo.org/mergers.html. Though our best-fitting model parameters are not an exact match to previously published models, our method for determining uncertainty measurements will aid future comparisons between models. The dynamical clocks from our models agree with previous results of the time since the onset of star formation from starburst models in interacting systems and suggest that tidally induced star formation is triggered very soon after closest approach.

  15. A random interacting network model for complex networks.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Bedartha; Shekatkar, Snehal M; Rheinwalt, Aljoscha; Ambika, G; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a RAndom Interacting Network (RAIN) model to study the interactions between a pair of complex networks. The model involves two major steps: (i) the selection of a pair of nodes, one from each network, based on intra-network node-based characteristics, and (ii) the placement of a link between selected nodes based on the similarity of their relative importance in their respective networks. Node selection is based on a selection fitness function and node linkage is based on a linkage probability defined on the linkage scores of nodes. The model allows us to relate within-network characteristics to between-network structure. We apply the model to the interaction between the USA and Schengen airline transportation networks (ATNs). Our results indicate that two mechanisms: degree-based preferential node selection and degree-assortative link placement are necessary to replicate the observed inter-network degree distributions as well as the observed inter-network assortativity. The RAIN model offers the possibility to test multiple hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying network interactions. It can also incorporate complex interaction topologies. Furthermore, the framework of the RAIN model is general and can be potentially adapted to various real-world complex systems. PMID:26657032

  16. A random interacting network model for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Bedartha; Shekatkar, Snehal M.; Rheinwalt, Aljoscha; Ambika, G.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We propose a RAndom Interacting Network (RAIN) model to study the interactions between a pair of complex networks. The model involves two major steps: (i) the selection of a pair of nodes, one from each network, based on intra-network node-based characteristics, and (ii) the placement of a link between selected nodes based on the similarity of their relative importance in their respective networks. Node selection is based on a selection fitness function and node linkage is based on a linkage probability defined on the linkage scores of nodes. The model allows us to relate within-network characteristics to between-network structure. We apply the model to the interaction between the USA and Schengen airline transportation networks (ATNs). Our results indicate that two mechanisms: degree-based preferential node selection and degree-assortative link placement are necessary to replicate the observed inter-network degree distributions as well as the observed inter-network assortativity. The RAIN model offers the possibility to test multiple hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying network interactions. It can also incorporate complex interaction topologies. Furthermore, the framework of the RAIN model is general and can be potentially adapted to various real-world complex systems.

  17. Validation of a transparent decision model to rate drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Multiple databases provide ratings of drug-drug interactions. The ratings are often based on different criteria and lack background information on the decision making process. User acceptance of rating systems could be improved by providing a transparent decision path for each category. Methods We rated 200 randomly selected potential drug-drug interactions by a transparent decision model developed by our team. The cases were generated from ward round observations and physicians’ queries from an outpatient setting. We compared our ratings to those assigned by a senior clinical pharmacologist and by a standard interaction database, and thus validated the model. Results The decision model rated consistently with the standard database and the pharmacologist in 94 and 156 cases, respectively. In two cases the model decision required correction. Following removal of systematic model construction differences, the DM was fully consistent with other rating systems. Conclusion The decision model reproducibly rates interactions and elucidates systematic differences. We propose to supply validated decision paths alongside the interaction rating to improve comprehensibility and to enable physicians to interpret the ratings in a clinical context. PMID:22950884

  18. Coexistence of interacting opinions in a generalized Sznajd model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpanaro, André M.; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2011-08-01

    The Sznajd model is a sociophysics model that mimics the propagation of opinions in a closed society, where the interactions favor groups of agreeing people. It is based in the Ising and Potts ferromagnetic models and, although the original model used only linear chains, it has since been adapted to general networks. This model has a very rich transient, which has been used to model several aspects of elections, but its stationary states are always consensus states. In order to model more complex behaviors, we have, in a recent work, introduced the idea of biases and prejudices to the Sznajd model by generalizing the bounded confidence rule, which is common to many continuous opinion models, to what we called confidence rules. In that work we have found that the mean field version of this model (corresponding to a complete network) allows for stationary states where noninteracting opinions survive, but never for the coexistence of interacting opinions. In the present work, we provide networks that allow for the coexistence of interacting opinions for certain confidence rules. Moreover, we show that the model does not become inactive; that is, the opinions keep changing, even in the stationary regime. This is an important result in the context of understanding how a rule that breeds local conformity is still able to sustain global diversity while avoiding a frozen stationary state. We also provide results that give some insights on how this behavior approaches the mean field behavior as the networks are changed.

  19. SU(3) gauge model of weak and electromagnetic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, R.E.

    1980-02-01

    An SU(3) gauge model of weak and electromagnetic interactions is based on the fundamental triplet (e/sup +/,e/sup -/,..nu../sub e/)/sub L/. The Weinberg angle is predicted to be 30/sup 0/. The extension of the model to hadrons requires the use of Han-Nambu quarks.

  20. The Engagement Model of Person-Environment Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Jason E.; Rasmussen, Heather N.; Lopez, Shane J.; Ryder, Jamie A.; Magyar-Moe, Jeana L.; Ford, Alicia Ito; Edwards, Lisa M.; Bouwkamp, Jennifer C.

    2006-01-01

    This article focuses on growth-promoting aspects in the environment, and the authors propose a strength-based, dynamic model of person-environment interaction. The authors begin by briefly discussing the typical recognition of contextual variables in models that rely on the concept of person-environment fit. This is followed by a review of recent…

  1. Evaluating Differential Effects Using Regression Interactions and Regression Mixture Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This article focuses on understanding regression mixture models, which are relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their…

  2. Reduced-order models for vertical human-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nimmen, Katrien; Lombaert, Geert; De Roeck, Guido; Van den Broeck, Peter

    2016-09-01

    For slender and lightweight structures, the vibration serviceability under crowd- induced loading is often critical in design. Currently, designers rely on equivalent load models, upscaled from single-person force measurements. Furthermore, it is important to consider the mechanical interaction with the human body as this can significantly reduce the structural response. To account for these interaction effects, the contact force between the pedestrian and the structure can be modelled as the superposition of the force induced by the pedestrian on a rigid floor and the force resulting from the mechanical interaction between the structure and the human body. For the case of large crowds, however, this approach leads to models with a very high system order. In the present contribution, two equivalent reduced-order models are proposed to approximate the dynamic behaviour of the full-order coupled crowd-structure system. A numerical study is performed to evaluate the impact of the modelling assumptions on the structural response to pedestrian excitation. The results show that the full-order moving crowd model can be well approximated by a reduced-order model whereby the interaction with the pedestrians in the crowd is modelled using a single (equivalent) SDOF system.

  3. Monitoring and modeling human interactions with ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milesi, Cristina

    With rapidly increasing consumption rates and global population, there is a growing interest in understanding how to balance human activities with the other components of the Earth system. Humans alter ecosystem functioning with land cover changes, greenhouse gas emissions and overexploitation of natural resources. On the other side, climate and its inherent interannual variability drive global Net Primary Productivity (NPP), the base of energy for all trophic levels, shaping humans' distribution on the land surface and their sensitivity to natural and accelerated patterns of variation in ecosystem processes. In this thesis, I analyzed anthropogenic influences on ecosystems and ecosystems impacts on humans through a multi-scale approach. Anthropogenic influences were analyzed with a special focus on urban ecosystems, the living environment of nearly half of the global population and almost 90% of the population in the industrialized countries. A poorly quantified aspect of urban ecosystems is the biogeochemistry of urban vegetation, intensively managed through fertilization and irrigation. In chapter 1, adapting the ecosystem model Biome-BGC, I simulated the growth of turf grasses across the United States, and estimated their potential impact on the continental water and carbon budget. Using a remote sensing-based approach, I also developed a methodology to estimate the impact of land cover changes due to urbanization on the regional photosynthetic capacity (chapter 2), finding that low-density urbanization can retain high levels of net primary productivity, although at the expense of inefficient sprawl. One of the feedbacks of urbanization is the urban heat island effect, which I analyzed in conjunction with a remote sensing based estimate of fractional impervious surface area, showing how this is related to increases in land surface temperatures, independently from geographic location and population density (chapter 3). Finally, in chapter 4, I described the

  4. Modeling Local Interactions during the Motion of Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Galante, Amanda; Wisen, Susanne; Bhaya, Devaki; Levy, Doron

    2012-01-01

    Synechocystis sp., a common unicellular freshwater cyanobacterium, has been used as a model organism to study phototaxis, an ability to move in the direction of a light source. This microorganism displays a number of additional characteristics such as delayed motion, surface dependence, and a quasi-random motion, where cells move in a seemingly disordered fashion instead of in the direction of the light source, a global force on the system. These unexplained motions are thought to be modulated by local interactions between cells such as intercellular communication. In this paper, we consider only local interactions of these phototactic cells in order to mathematically model this quasi-random motion. We analyze an experimental data set to illustrate the presence of quasi-random motion and then derive a stochastic dynamic particle system modeling interacting phototactic cells. The simulations of our model are consistent with experimentally observed phototactic motion. PMID:22713858

  5. Modeling symbiosis by interactions through species carrying capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Yukalova, E. P.; Sornette, D.

    2012-08-01

    We introduce a mathematical model of symbiosis between different species by taking into account the influence of each species on the carrying capacities of the others. The modeled entities can pertain to biological and ecological societies or to social, economic and financial societies. Our model includes three basic types: symbiosis with direct mutual interactions, symbiosis with asymmetric interactions, and symbiosis without direct interactions. In all cases, we provide a complete classification of all admissible dynamical regimes. The proposed model of symbiosis turned out to be very rich, as it exhibits four qualitatively different regimes: convergence to stationary states, unbounded exponential growth, finite-time singularity, and finite-time death or extinction of species.

  6. Systematic Uncertainties in High-Energy Hadronic Interaction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, M.; Knapp, J.; Ostapchenko, S.

    2003-07-01

    Hadronic interaction models for cosmic ray energies are uncertain since our knowledge of hadronic interactions is extrap olated from accelerator experiments at much lower energies. At present most high-energy models are based on Grib ov-Regge theory of multi-Pomeron exchange, which provides a theoretical framework to evaluate cross-sections and particle production. While experimental data constrain some of the model parameters, others are not well determined and are therefore a source of systematic uncertainties. In this paper we evaluate the variation of results obtained with the QGSJET model, when modifying parameters relating to three ma jor sources of uncertainty: the form of the parton structure function, the role of diffractive interactions, and the string hadronisation. Results on inelastic cross sections, on secondary particle production and on the air shower development are discussed.

  7. Primary care access improvement: an empowerment-interaction model.

    PubMed

    Ledlow, G R; Bradshaw, D M; Shockley, C

    2000-05-01

    Improving community primary care access is a difficult and dynamic undertaking. Realizing a need to improve appointment availability, a systematic approach based on measurement, empowerment, and interaction was developed. The model fostered exchange of information and problem solving between interdependent staff sections within a managed care system. Measuring appointments demanded but not available proved to be a credible customer-focused approach to benchmark against set goals. Changing the organizational culture to become more sensitive to changing beneficiary needs was a paramount consideration. Dependent-group t tests were performed to compare the pretreatment and posttreatment effect. The empowerment-interaction model significantly improved the availability of routine and wellness-type appointments. The availability of urgent appointments improved but not significantly; a better prospective model needs to be developed. In aggregate, appointments demanded but not available (empowerment-interaction model) were more than 10% before the treatment and less than 3% with the treatment. PMID:10826388

  8. Interactive Documentary: A Production Model for Nonfiction Multimedia Narratives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Insook

    This paper presents an interactive production model for nonfiction multimedia, referred to as interactive documentary. We discuss the design of ontologies for authoring interactive documentary. A working prototype supports the use of reasoning for retrieving, composing, and displaying media resources in real-time. A GUI is designed to facilitate concept-based navigation which enables queries across media resources of diverse types. A dual-root-node data design links ontological reasoning with metadata, which provides a method for defining hybrid semantic-quantitative relationships. Our application focuses on archiving and retrieving non-text based media resources. The system architecture supports sensory-rich display feedback with real time interactivity for navigating documents’ space. We argue an experience of narratives evolves through the performitivity in the interactive narrative structure when the constituents are mediated by common ontology. The consequential experience identifies a renewed practice of oral tradition where the accumulative sensorial propositions inform narratives, such as in performance practice.

  9. Neutron-proton interaction and bandcrossing in the cranking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvasil, J.; Jain, A. K.; Sheline, R. K.

    1990-03-01

    A cranked Hartree-Fock-Bogolubov formalism for a description of collective rotational states, which includes the n-p residual interaction along with pairing and is applicable to a neutron-proton system, is presented. A delta force form is used for the n-p residual interaction. A simple model is then developed where the valence neutrons and the valence protons occupy i13/2 and h11/2 orbitals, respectively. Results of these calculations are presented to show the effect of n-p interaction on the phenomenon of bandcrossing. Within the limits of such a restrictive model (which is particularly applicable to the (h11/2) p(i13/2) n bands in odd-odd nuclei) we find evidence for a shifting of the first bandcrossing frequency to a larger value. We find that n-p interaction may also affect many other phenomena in the high spin region.

  10. Meson exchange current (MEC) models in neutrino interaction generators

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2015-05-15

    Understanding of the so-called 2 particle-2 hole (2p-2h) effect is an urgent program in neutrino interaction physics for current and future oscillation experiments. Such processes are believed to be responsible for the event excesses observed by recent neutrino experiments. The 2p-2h effect is dominated by the meson exchange current (MEC), and is accompanied by a 2-nucleon emission from the primary vertex, instead of a single nucleon emission from the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interaction. Current and future high resolution experiments can potentially nail down this effect. For this reason, there are world wide efforts to model and implement this process in neutrino interaction simulations. In these proceedings, I would like to describe how this channel is modeled in neutrino interaction generators.

  11. Effects of Latent Variable Nonnormality and Model Misspecification on Testing Structural Equation Modeling Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Shaojing; Konold, Timothy R.; Fan, Xitao

    2011-01-01

    Interest in testing interaction terms within the latent variable modeling framework has been on the rise in recent years. However, little is known about the influence of nonnormality and model misspecification on such models that involve latent variable interactions. The authors used Mattson's data generation method to control for latent variable…

  12. Mathematical modeling and physical reality in noncovalent interactions.

    PubMed

    Politzer, Peter; Murray, Jane S; Clark, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    The Hellmann-Feynman theorem provides a straightforward interpretation of noncovalent bonding in terms of Coulombic interactions, which encompass polarization (and accordingly include dispersion). Exchange, Pauli repulsion, orbitals, etc., are part of the mathematics of obtaining the system's wave function and subsequently its electronic density. They do not correspond to physical forces. Charge transfer, in the context of noncovalent interactions, is equivalent to polarization. The key point is that mathematical models must not be confused with physical reality. PMID:25697332

  13. NON-LINEAR MODELING OF THE RHIC INTERACTION REGIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    TOMAS,R.FISCHER,W.JAIN,A.LUO,Y.PILAT,F.

    2004-07-05

    For RHIC's collision lattices the dominant sources of transverse non-linearities are located in the interaction regions. The field quality is available for most of the magnets in the interaction regions from the magnetic measurements, or from extrapolations of these measurements. We discuss the implementation of these measurements in the MADX models of the Blue and the Yellow rings and their impact on beam stability.

  14. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  15. Lifshitz tail in a model of interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgacs, G.; Kotov, V.

    1995-05-01

    The density of states of noninteracting disordered particle systems shows a characteristic behavior deep in the band, known as the Lifshitz tail. In the present work the Lifshitz problem is reconsidered in a model one-dimensional disordered system with ``minimal'' interactions. The interaction has a form which allows the calculations to be performed asymptotically exactly in the tail, using nonperturbative techniques. Correlation between the particles leads to a considerable decrease of the density of states. These findings indicate that interactions may favor delocalization, a result obtained earlier, using phenomenological approaches, perturbative analysis, and the renormalization-group method.

  16. A model of nonautonomous dynamics driven by repeated harmonic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebnov, V. A.; Tamura, H.

    2016-06-01

    We consider an exactly solvable model of nonautonomous W*-dynamics driven by repeated harmonic interaction. The dynamics is Hamiltonian and quasifree. Because of inelastic interaction in the large-time limit, it leads to relaxation of initial states to steady states. We derive the explicit entropy production rate accompanying this relaxation. We also study the evolution of different subsystems to elucidate their eventual correlations and convergence to equilibriums. In conclusion, we prove that the W*-dynamics manifests a universal stationary behavior in a short-time interaction limit.

  17. Frustration in spin models with cavity-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Sarang

    2013-05-01

    Ultracold atoms confined in transversely pumped optical cavities experience cavity-mediated interactions, which can give rise to phenomena such as crystallization that are otherwise difficult to realize using ultracold atoms. We show that for atoms with three or more internal levels, the spin-dependent cavity-mediated interactions are long-ranged and sign-changing, like the RKKY interaction; therefore, ensembles of such atoms subject to frozen-in positional randomness can realize spin systems having disordered and frustrated interactions. We map the problem of spins with cavity-mediated interactions onto a variant of the Hopfield associative-memory model. Using this mapping we argue that if the spins are coupled to sufficiently many cavity modes, the cavity-mediated interactions give rise to a spin glass. We then discuss how spins in cavities can emulate models of interacting bosons subject to purely ``off-diagonal'' disorder, which exhibit Mott glass and random-singlet glass phases (hitherto unrealized using ultracold atoms). We discuss how the realizable glassy phases can be detected through their slow dynamics, as well as their imprint on the correlations of the light emitted from the cavity. Finally, we discuss the robustness of the predicted glassy physics in the presence of driving and dissipation.

  18. The growth of structure in interacting dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Schaefer, Bjoern Malte E-mail: roy.maartens@port.ac.uk

    2009-07-01

    If dark energy interacts with dark matter, there is a change in the background evolution of the universe, since the dark matter density no longer evolves as a{sup −3}. In addition, the non-gravitational interaction affects the growth of structure. In principle, these changes allow us to detect and constrain an interaction in the dark sector. Here we investigate the growth factor and the weak lensing signal for a new class of interacting dark energy models. In these models, the interaction generalises the simple cases where one dark fluid decays into the other. In order to calculate the effect on structure formation, we perform a careful analysis of the perturbed interaction and its effect on peculiar velocities. Assuming a normalization to today's values of dark matter density and overdensity, the signal of the interaction is an enhancement (suppression) of both the growth factor and the lensing power, when the energy transfer in the background is from dark matter to dark energy (dark energy to dark matter)

  19. Estimation of exposure to toxic releases using spatial interaction modeling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The United States Environmental Protection Agency's Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) data are frequently used to estimate a community's exposure to pollution. However, this estimation process often uses underdeveloped geographic theory. Spatial interaction modeling provides a more realistic approach to this estimation process. This paper uses four sets of data: lung cancer age-adjusted mortality rates from the years 1990 through 2006 inclusive from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database, TRI releases of carcinogens from 1987 to 1996, covariates associated with lung cancer, and the EPA's Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI) model. Results The impact of the volume of carcinogenic TRI releases on each county's lung cancer mortality rates was calculated using six spatial interaction functions (containment, buffer, power decay, exponential decay, quadratic decay, and RSEI estimates) and evaluated with four multivariate regression methods (linear, generalized linear, spatial lag, and spatial error). Akaike Information Criterion values and P values of spatial interaction terms were computed. The impacts calculated from the interaction models were also mapped. Buffer and quadratic interaction functions had the lowest AIC values (22298 and 22525 respectively), although the gains from including the spatial interaction terms were diminished with spatial error and spatial lag regression. Conclusions The use of different methods for estimating the spatial risk posed by pollution from TRI sites can give different results about the impact of those sites on health outcomes. The most reliable estimates did not always come from the most complex methods. PMID:21418644

  20. Strong zero modes and eigenstate phase transitions in the XYZ/interacting Majorana chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendley, Paul

    2016-07-01

    I explicitly construct a strong zero mode in the XYZ chain or, equivalently, Majorana wires coupled via a four-fermion interaction. The strong zero mode is an operator that pairs states in different symmetry sectors, resulting in identical spectra up to exponentially small finite-size corrections. Such pairing occurs in the Ising/Majorana fermion chain and possibly in strongly disordered many-body localized phases. The proof here shows that the strong zero mode occurs in a clean interacting system, and that it possesses some remarkable structure—despite being a rather elaborate operator, it squares to the identity. Eigenstate phase transitions separate regions with different strong zero modes.

  1. Combining microsimulation and spatial interaction models for retail location analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaya, Tomoki; Fotheringham, A. Stewart; Hanaoka, Kazumasa; Clarke, Graham; Ballas, Dimitris; Yano, Keiji

    2007-12-01

    Although the disaggregation of consumers is crucial in understanding the fragmented markets that are dominant in many developed countries, it is not always straightforward to carry out such disaggregation within conventional retail modelling frameworks due to the limitations of data. In particular, consumer grouping based on sampled data is not assured to link with the other statistics that are vital in estimating sampling biases and missing variables in the sampling survey. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a useful combination of spatial interaction modelling and microsimulation approaches for the reliable estimation of retail interactions based on a sample survey of consumer behaviour being linked with other areal statistics. We demonstrate this approach by building an operational retail interaction model to estimate expenditure flows from households to retail stores in a local city in Japan, Kusatsu City.

  2. Developing an Empirical Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2014-01-01

    The process of developing an empirical model for jet-surface interaction noise is described and the resulting model evaluated. Jet-surface interaction noise is generated when the high-speed engine exhaust from modern tightly integrated or conventional high-bypass ratio engine aircraft strikes or flows over the airframe surfaces. An empirical model based on an existing experimental database is developed for use in preliminary design system level studies where computation speed and range of configurations is valued over absolute accuracy to select the most promising (or eliminate the worst) possible designs. The model developed assumes that the jet-surface interaction noise spectra can be separated from the jet mixing noise and described as a parabolic function with three coefficients: peak amplitude, spectral width, and peak frequency. These coefficients are fit to functions of surface length and distance from the jet lipline to form a characteristic spectra which is then adjusted for changes in jet velocity and/or observer angle using scaling laws from published theoretical and experimental work. The resulting model is then evaluated for its ability to reproduce the characteristic spectra and then for reproducing spectra measured at other jet velocities and observer angles; successes and limitations are discussed considering the complexity of the jet-surface interaction noise versus the desire for a model that is simple to implement and quick to execute.

  3. An Opinion Interactive Model Based on Individual Persuasiveness.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Chen, Bin; Liu, Liang; Ma, Liang; Qiu, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the formation process of group opinion in real life, we put forward a new opinion interactive model based on Deffuant model and its improved models in this paper because current models of opinion dynamics lack considering individual persuasiveness. Our model has following advantages: firstly persuasiveness is added to individual's attributes reflecting the importance of persuasiveness, which means that all the individuals are different from others; secondly probability is introduced in the course of interaction which simulates the uncertainty of interaction. In Monte Carlo simulation experiments, sensitivity analysis including the influence of randomness, initial persuasiveness distribution, and number of individuals is studied at first; what comes next is that the range of common opinion based on the initial persuasiveness distribution can be predicted. Simulation experiment results show that when the initial values of agents are fixed, no matter how many times independently replicated experiments, the common opinion will converge at a certain point; however the number of iterations will not always be the same; the range of common opinion can be predicted when initial distribution of opinion and persuasiveness are given. As a result, this model can reflect and interpret some phenomena of opinion interaction in realistic society.

  4. Developing an Empirical Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clif

    2014-01-01

    The process of developing an empirical model for jet-surface interaction noise is described and the resulting model evaluated. Jet-surface interaction noise is generated when the high-speed engine exhaust from modern tightly integrated or conventional high-bypass ratio engine aircraft strikes or flows over the airframe surfaces. An empirical model based on an existing experimental database is developed for use in preliminary design system level studies where computation speed and range of configurations is valued over absolute accuracy to select the most promising (or eliminate the worst) possible designs. The model developed assumes that the jet-surface interaction noise spectra can be separated from the jet mixing noise and described as a parabolic function with three coefficients: peak amplitude, spectral width, and peak frequency. These coefficients are t to functions of surface length and distance from the jet lipline to form a characteristic spectra which is then adjusted for changes in jet velocity and/or observer angle using scaling laws from published theoretical and experimental work. The resulting model is then evaluated for its ability to reproduce the characteristic spectra and then for reproducing spectra measured at other jet velocities and observer angles; successes and limitations are discussed considering the complexity of the jet-surface interaction noise versus the desire for a model that is simple to implement and quick to execute.

  5. Rich-and-Poor Model for Human and Nature Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motesharrei, S.; Kalnay, E.; Rivas, J.; Rich-n-Poor

    2011-12-01

    Historical evidence shows collapse of several civilizations in different regions of the world. Jared Diamond presents an account of such societal failures in his 2005 book "Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed." As a precursor to building a complex model for interaction of human and environment, we developed a "thought-experiment" model based on Lotka-Volterra equations for the interaction of two species, known as the Predator-Prey model. We constructed a fairly simple rich-and-poor model that includes only four state variables (or stocks): Rich Population, Poor Population, Nature, and Rich Savings. We observed several scenarios for growth of societies by varying the model's parameter values, including scenarios that resemble the catastrophic fall of ancient civilizations such as the Maya and Anasazi.

  6. Interacting boson models for N{approx}Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Van Isacker, P.

    2011-05-06

    This contribution discusses the use of boson models in the description of N{approx}Z nuclei. A brief review is given of earlier attempts, initiated by Elliott and co-workers, to extend the interacting boson model of Arima and Iachello by the inclusion of neutron-proton s and d bosons with T = 1 (IBM-3) as well as T = 0 (IBM-4). It is argued that for the N{approx}Z nuclei that are currently studied experimentally, a different approach is needed which invokes aligned neutron-proton pairs with angular momentum J = 2j and isospin T = 0. This claim is supported by an analysis of shell-model wave functions in terms of pair states. Results of this alternative version of the interacting boson model are compared with shell-model calculations in the 1g{sub 9/2} shell.

  7. Modelling of molten fuel/concrete interactions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, J. F.; Benjamin, A. S.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program modelling the interaction between molten core materials and structural concrete (CORCON) is being developed to provide quantitative estimates of fuel-melt accident consequences suitable for risk assessment of light water reactors. The principal features of CORCON are reviewed. Models developed for the principal interaction phenomena, inter-component heat transfer, concrete erosion, and melt/gas chemical reactions, are described. Alternative models for the controlling phenomenon, heat transfer from the molten pool to the surrounding concrete, are presented. These models, formulated in conjunction with the development of CORCON, are characterized by the presence or absence of either a gas film or viscous layer of molten concrete at the melt/concrete interface. Predictions of heat transfer based on these models compare favorably with available experimental data.

  8. Interacting boson models for N˜Z nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Isacker, P.

    2011-05-01

    This contribution discusses the use of boson models in the description of N˜Z nuclei. A brief review is given of earlier attempts, initiated by Elliott and co-workers, to extend the interacting boson model of Arima and Iachello by the inclusion of neutron-proton s and d bosons with T = 1 (IBM-3) as well as T = 0 (IBM-4). It is argued that for the N˜Z nuclei that are currently studied experimentally, a different approach is needed which invokes aligned neutron-proton pairs with angular momentum J = 2j and isospin T = 0. This claim is supported by an analysis of shell-model wave functions in terms of pair states. Results of this alternative version of the interacting boson model are compared with shell-model calculations in the 1g9/2 shell.

  9. Nucleon-Nucleon Interactions from the Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Downum, C.; Stone, J. R.; Barnes, T.; Swanson, E. S.; Vidana, I.

    2010-08-05

    We report on investigations of the applicability of non-relativistic constituent quark models to the low-energy nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. The major innovations of a resulting NN potential are the use of the {sup 3}P{sub 0} decay model and quark model wave functions to derive nucleon-nucleon-meson form-factors, and the use of a colored spin-spin contact hyperfine interaction to model the repulsive core rather than the phenomenological treatment common in other NN potentials. We present the results of the model for experimental free NN scattering phase shifts, S-wave scattering lengths and effective ranges and deuteron properties. Plans for future study are discussed.

  10. Modelling the interaction between flooding events and economic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grames, J.; Prskawetz, A.; Grass, D.; Blöschl, G.

    2015-06-01

    Socio-hydrology describes the interaction between the socio-economy and water. Recent models analyze the interplay of community risk-coping culture, flooding damage and economic growth (Di Baldassarre et al., 2013; Viglione et al., 2014). These models descriptively explain the feedbacks between socio-economic development and natural disasters like floods. Contrary to these descriptive models, our approach develops an optimization model, where the intertemporal decision of an economic agent interacts with the hydrological system. In order to build this first economic growth model describing the interaction between the consumption and investment decisions of an economic agent and the occurrence of flooding events, we transform an existing descriptive stochastic model into an optimal deterministic model. The intermediate step is to formulate and simulate a descriptive deterministic model. We develop a periodic water function to approximate the former discrete stochastic time series of rainfall events. Due to the non-autonomous exogenous periodic rainfall function the long-term path of consumption and investment will be periodic.

  11. A Mathematical Learning Model Including Interactions among Different Learnings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nariyuki, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Norikazu

    2015-03-01

    The mathematical learning model reported by Nitta [Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 6, 020105 (2010)], which describes the transition from pre test score (fraction of the correct answer) to the post score, is extended to include interactions among different learnings. Numerical solutions of the model suggest that the effects of loss due to the different learnings possibly conceal interactive learnings from observational data.

  12. Constraining interacting dark energy models with latest cosmological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong-Mei; Wang, Sai

    2016-11-01

    The local measurement of H0 is in tension with the prediction of Λ cold dark matter model based on the Planck data. This tension may imply that dark energy is strengthened in the late-time Universe. We employ the latest cosmological observations on cosmic microwave background, the baryon acoustic oscillation, large-scale structure, supernovae, H(z) and H0 to constrain several interacting dark energy models. Our results show no significant indications for the interaction between dark energy and dark matter. The H0 tension can be moderately alleviated, but not totally released.

  13. Constraining interacting dark energy models with latest cosmological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong-Mei; Wang, Sai

    2016-08-01

    The local measurement of H0 is in tension with the prediction of ΛCDM model based on the Planck data. This tension may imply that dark energy is strengthened in the late-time Universe. We employ the latest cosmological observations on CMB, BAO, LSS, SNe, H(z) and H0 to constrain several interacting dark energy models. Our results show no significant indications for the interaction between dark energy and dark matter. The H0 tension can be moderately alleviated, but not totally released.

  14. Vector and axial vector mesons in a nonlocal chiral quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo Villafañe, M. F.; Gómez Dumm, D.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2016-09-01

    Basic features of nonstrange vector and axial vector mesons are analyzed in the framework of a chiral quark model that includes nonlocal four-fermion couplings. Unknown model parameters are determined from some input values of masses and decay constants, while nonlocal form factors are taken from a fit to lattice QCD results for effective quark propagators. Numerical results show a good agreement with the observed meson phenomenology.

  15. Stochastic hyperfine interactions modeling library-Version 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacate, Matthew O.; Evenson, William E.

    2016-02-01

    The stochastic hyperfine interactions modeling library (SHIML) provides a set of routines to assist in the development and application of stochastic models of hyperfine interactions. The library provides routines written in the C programming language that (1) read a text description of a model for fluctuating hyperfine fields, (2) set up the Blume matrix, upon which the evolution operator of the system depends, and (3) find the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Blume matrix so that theoretical spectra of experimental techniques that measure hyperfine interactions can be calculated. The optimized vector and matrix operations of the BLAS and LAPACK libraries are utilized. The original version of SHIML constructed and solved Blume matrices for methods that measure hyperfine interactions of nuclear probes in a single spin state. Version 2 provides additional support for methods that measure interactions on two different spin states such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation. Example codes are provided to illustrate the use of SHIML to (1) generate perturbed angular correlation spectra for the special case of polycrystalline samples when anisotropy terms of higher order than A22 can be neglected and (2) generate Mössbauer spectra for polycrystalline samples for pure dipole or pure quadrupole transitions.

  16. Spoken language interaction with model uncertainty: an adaptive human-robot interaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doshi, Finale; Roy, Nicholas

    2008-12-01

    Spoken language is one of the most intuitive forms of interaction between humans and agents. Unfortunately, agents that interact with people using natural language often experience communication errors and do not correctly understand the user's intentions. Recent systems have successfully used probabilistic models of speech, language and user behaviour to generate robust dialogue performance in the presence of noisy speech recognition and ambiguous language choices, but decisions made using these probabilistic models are still prone to errors owing to the complexity of acquiring and maintaining a complete model of human language and behaviour. In this paper, a decision-theoretic model for human-robot interaction using natural language is described. The algorithm is based on the Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP), which allows agents to choose actions that are robust not only to uncertainty from noisy or ambiguous speech recognition but also unknown user models. Like most dialogue systems, a POMDP is defined by a large number of parameters that may be difficult to specify a priori from domain knowledge, and learning these parameters from the user may require an unacceptably long training period. An extension to the POMDP model is described that allows the agent to acquire a linguistic model of the user online, including new vocabulary and word choice preferences. The approach not only avoids a training period of constant questioning as the agent learns, but also allows the agent actively to query for additional information when its uncertainty suggests a high risk of mistakes. The approach is demonstrated both in simulation and on a natural language interaction system for a robotic wheelchair application.

  17. Current noise of the interacting resonant level model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T. J.; Kennes, D. M.; Meden, V.

    2016-02-01

    We study the zero-frequency current noise of the interacting resonant level model for arbitrary bias voltages using a functional renormalization group approach. For this we extend the existing nonequilibrium scheme by deriving and solving flow equations for the current-vertex functions. On-resonance artificial divergences of the latter found in lowest-order perturbation theory in the two-particle interaction are consistently removed. Away from resonance they are shifted to higher orders. This allows us to gain a comprehensive picture of the current noise in the scaling limit. At high bias voltages, the current noise exhibits a universal power-law decay, whose exponent is, to leading order in the interaction, identical to that of the current. The effective charge on resonance is analyzed in detail, employing properties of the vertex correction. We find that it is only modified to second or higher order in the two-particle interaction.

  18. Coarse-Grained Models for Protein-Cell Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Ryan; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    The physiological properties of biological soft matter are the product of collective interactions, which span many time and length scales. Recent computational modeling efforts have helped illuminate experiments that characterize the ways in which proteins modulate membrane physics. Linking these models across time and length scales in a multiscale model explains how atomistic information propagates to larger scales. This paper reviews continuum modeling and coarse-grained molecular dynamics methods, which connect atomistic simulations and single-molecule experiments with the observed microscopic or mesoscale properties of soft-matter systems essential to our understanding of cells, particularly those involved in sculpting and remodeling cell membranes. PMID:26613047

  19. Learning Petri net models of non-linear gene interactions.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Michael

    2005-10-01

    Understanding how an individual's genetic make-up influences their risk of disease is a problem of paramount importance. Although machine-learning techniques are able to uncover the relationships between genotype and disease, the problem of automatically building the best biochemical model or "explanation" of the relationship has received less attention. In this paper, I describe a method based on random hill climbing that automatically builds Petri net models of non-linear (or multi-factorial) disease-causing gene-gene interactions. Petri nets are a suitable formalism for this problem, because they are used to model concurrent, dynamic processes analogous to biochemical reaction networks. I show that this method is routinely able to identify perfect Petri net models for three disease-causing gene-gene interactions recently reported in the literature.

  20. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Poeton, R.W.; Moeller, M.P.; Laughlin, G.J.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the continuing emphasis on emergency preparedness the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored the development of a rapid dose assessment system by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This system, the Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program for rapidly assessing the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. This User's Guide provides instruction in the setup and operation of the equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Instructions are also given on how to load the magnetic disks and access the interactive part of the program. Two other companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. Reactor Accident Assessment Methods (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 2) describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations. Scenarios for Comparing Dose Assessment Models (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 3) provides the results of calculations made by IRDAM and other models for specific accident scenarios.

  1. Enhanced compressibility due to repulsive interaction in the Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Yaacov E.; Zilberberg, Oded; Berkovits, Richard

    2014-04-01

    We study the interplay between a repulsive interaction and an almost staggered on-site potential in one dimension. Specifically, we address the Harper model for spinless fermions with nearest-neighbor repulsion, close to half filling. Using the density matrix renormalization group, we find that, in contrast to standard behavior, the system becomes more compressible as the repulsive interaction is increased. By deriving a low-energy effective model, we unveil the effect of interactions using mean-field analysis: The density of a narrow band around half filling is anticorrelated with the on-site potential, whereas the density of lower occupied bands follows the potential and strengthens it. As a result, the states around half filling are squeezed by the background density, their band becomes flatter, and the compressibility increases.

  2. One-dimensional Ising model with multispin interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turban, Loïc

    2016-09-01

    We study the spin-1/2 Ising chain with multispin interactions K involving the product of m successive spins, for general values of m. Using a change of spin variables the zero-field partition function of a finite chain is obtained for free and periodic boundary conditions and we calculate the two-spin correlation function. When placed in an external field H the system is shown to be self-dual. Using another change of spin variables the one-dimensional Ising model with multispin interactions in a field is mapped onto a zero-field rectangular Ising model with first-neighbour interactions K and H. The 2D system, with size m × N/m, has the topology of a cylinder with helical BC. In the thermodynamic limit N/m\\to ∞ , m\\to ∞ , a 2D critical singularity develops on the self-duality line, \\sinh 2K\\sinh 2H=1.

  3. Tools and Equipment Modeling for Automobile Interactive Assembling Operating Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Dianliang; Zhu Hongmin

    2010-05-21

    Tools and equipment play an important role in the simulation of virtual assembly, especially in the assembly process simulation and plan. Because of variety in function and complexity in structure and manipulation, the simulation of tools and equipments remains to be a challenge for interactive assembly operation. Based on analysis of details and characteristics of interactive operations for automobile assembly, the functional requirement for tools and equipments of automobile assembly is given. Then, a unified modeling method for information expression and function realization of general tools and equipments is represented, and the handling methods of manual, semi-automatic, automatic tools and equipments are discussed. Finally, the application in assembly simulation of rear suspension and front suspension of Roewe 750 automobile is given. The result shows that the modeling and handling methods are applicable in the interactive simulation of various tools and equipments, and can also be used for supporting assembly process planning in virtual environment.

  4. Making Transporter Models for Drug-Drug Interaction Prediction Mobile.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Clark, Alex M; Wright, Stephen H

    2015-10-01

    The past decade has seen increased numbers of studies publishing ligand-based computational models for drug transporters. Although they generally use small experimental data sets, these models can provide insights into structure-activity relationships for the transporter. In addition, such models have helped to identify new compounds as substrates or inhibitors of transporters of interest. We recently proposed that many transporters are promiscuous and may require profiling of new chemical entities against multiple substrates for a specific transporter. Furthermore, it should be noted that virtually all of the published ligand-based transporter models are only accessible to those involved in creating them and, consequently, are rarely shared effectively. One way to surmount this is to make models shareable or more accessible. The development of mobile apps that can access such models is highlighted here. These apps can be used to predict ligand interactions with transporters using Bayesian algorithms. We used recently published transporter data sets (MATE1, MATE2K, OCT2, OCTN2, ASBT, and NTCP) to build preliminary models in a commercial tool and in open software that can deliver the model in a mobile app. In addition, several transporter data sets extracted from the ChEMBL database were used to illustrate how such public data and models can be shared. Predicting drug-drug interactions for various transporters using computational models is potentially within reach of anyone with an iPhone or iPad. Such tools could help prioritize which substrates should be used for in vivo drug-drug interaction testing and enable open sharing of models. PMID:26199424

  5. Geometry of coexistence in the interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect

    Van Isacker, P.; Frank, A.; Vargas, C.E.

    2004-09-13

    The Interacting Boson Model (IBM) with configuration mixing is applied to describe the phenomenon of coexistence in nuclei. The analysis suggests that the IBM with configuration mixing, used in conjunction with a (matrix) coherent-state method, may be a reliable tool for the study of geometric aspects of shape coexistence in nuclei.

  6. An Information Search Model of Evaluative Concerns in Intergroup Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorauer, Jacquie D.

    2006-01-01

    In an information search model, evaluative concerns during intergroup interaction are conceptualized as a joint function of uncertainty regarding and importance attached to out-group members' views of oneself. High uncertainty generally fosters evaluative concerns during intergroup exchanges. Importance depends on whether out-group members'…

  7. Interactive Training Model: Enhancing Beginning Counseling Student Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paladino, Derrick A.; Minton, Casey A. Barrio; Kern, Carolyn W.

    2011-01-01

    The authors propose the Interactive Training Model (ITM), a full classroom role play experience, as a method for helping student counselors develop essential interviewing and counseling skills and self-awareness as required by the 2009 Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs "Standards." This pre-post,…

  8. Interactions of Latent Variables in Structural Equation Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollen, Kenneth A.; Paxton, Pamela

    1998-01-01

    Provides a discussion of an alternative two-stage least squares (2SLS) technique to include interactions of latent variables in structural equation models. The method requires selection of instrumental variables, and rules for selection are presented. An empirical example and Statistical Analysis System programs are presented. (SLD)

  9. Online Education as Interactive Experience: Some Guiding Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLellan, Hilary

    1999-01-01

    Presents conceptual models and proven practices that are emerging at the convergence of economics, entertainment, and virtual community-building and applies them to the design of online courses. Discusses the experience economy; digital storytelling; social presence; personal space and computer interaction; and online technologies and types of…

  10. Symmetries of preon interactions modeled as a finite group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinger, James N.

    1997-07-01

    I model preon interactions as a finite group. Treating the elements of the group as the bases of a vector space, I examine those linear mappings under which the transformed bases may be treated as members of a group isomorphic to the original. In some cases these mappings are continuous Lie groups.

  11. Describing interactions in dystocia scores with a threshold model.

    PubMed

    Quaas, R L; Zhao, Y; Pollak, E J

    1988-02-01

    Field data on calving difficulty scores provided by the American Simmental Association were subjected to two methods of analysis: ordinary least-squares analysis and maximum likelihood with an assumed threshold model. In each analysis, the model included the interaction of sex of calf X age of dam. This interaction was readily apparent in the data (observed scale): within the youngest dams 58% of the heifer calves and 37% of the bull calves were born unassisted vs 96% and 92%, respectively, in the oldest dams. The objective was to determine if this interaction would be greatly reduced or would disappear on the underlying scale of a threshold model. The least-squares estimate of the sex difference was greatest within the youngest age-of-dam group (18 to 24 mo) and steadily declined with increasing age of dam, approaching zero for dams 6 yr and older. In contrast, the estimates of the sex difference from the threshold analysis were remarkably similar across ages of dam. It was concluded that observed interactions in calving ease data could be adequately described by a threshold model in which the effects of age of dam and sex of calf act additively on the underlying variable.

  12. Modeling attacker-defender interactions in information networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michael Joseph

    2010-09-01

    The simplest conceptual model of cybersecurity implicitly views attackers and defenders as acting in isolation from one another: an attacker seeks to penetrate or disrupt a system that has been protected to a given level, while a defender attempts to thwart particular attacks. Such a model also views all non-malicious parties as having the same goal of preventing all attacks. But in fact, attackers and defenders are interacting parts of the same system, and different defenders have their own individual interests: defenders may be willing to accept some risk of successful attack if the cost of defense is too high. We have used game theory to develop models of how non-cooperative but non-malicious players in a network interact when there is a substantial cost associated with effective defensive measures. Although game theory has been applied in this area before, we have introduced some novel aspects of player behavior in our work, including: (1) A model of how players attempt to avoid the costs of defense and force others to assume these costs; (2) A model of how players interact when the cost of defending one node can be shared by other nodes; and (3) A model of the incentives for a defender to choose less expensive, but less effective, defensive actions.

  13. A coarse grain model for protein-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces is important in numerous applications in many fields—such as biotechnology, proteomics, sensors, and medicine—but fundamental understanding of how protein stability and structure are affected by surfaces remains incomplete. Over the last several years, molecular simulation using coarse grain models has yielded significant insights, but the formalisms used to represent the surface interactions have been rudimentary. We present a new model for protein surface interactions that incorporates the chemical specificity of both the surface and the residues comprising the protein in the context of a one-bead-per-residue, coarse grain approach that maintains computational efficiency. The model is parameterized against experimental adsorption energies for multiple model peptides on different types of surfaces. The validity of the model is established by its ability to quantitatively and qualitatively predict the free energy of adsorption and structural changes for multiple biologically-relevant proteins on different surfaces. The validation, done with proteins not used in parameterization, shows that the model produces remarkable agreement between simulation and experiment.

  14. Interactive graphical model building using telepresence and virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, C.; Stansfield, S.

    1993-10-01

    This paper presents a prototype system developed at Sandia National Laboratories to create and verify computer-generated graphical models of remote physical environments. The goal of the system is to create an interface between an operator and a computer vision system so that graphical models can be created interactively. Virtual reality and telepresence are used to allow interaction between the operator, computer, and remote environment. A stereo view of the remote environment is produced by two CCD cameras. The cameras are mounted on a three degree-of-freedom platform which is slaved to a mechanically-tracked, stereoscopic viewing device. This gives the operator a sense of immersion in the physical environment. The stereo video is enhanced by overlaying the graphical model onto it. Overlay of the graphical model onto the stereo video allows visual verification of graphical models. Creation of a graphical model is accomplished by allowing the operator to assist the computer in modeling. The operator controls a 3-D cursor to mark objects to be modeled. The computer then automatically extracts positional and geometric information about the object and creates the graphical model.

  15. The effect of model uncertainty on cooperation in sensorimotor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grau-Moya, J.; Hez, E.; Pezzulo, G.; Braun, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Decision-makers have been shown to rely on probabilistic models for perception and action. However, these models can be incorrect or partially wrong in which case the decision-maker has to cope with model uncertainty. Model uncertainty has recently also been shown to be an important determinant of sensorimotor behaviour in humans that can lead to risk-sensitive deviations from Bayes optimal behaviour towards worst-case or best-case outcomes. Here, we investigate the effect of model uncertainty on cooperation in sensorimotor interactions similar to the stag-hunt game, where players develop models about the other player and decide between a pay-off-dominant cooperative solution and a risk-dominant, non-cooperative solution. In simulations, we show that players who allow for optimistic deviations from their opponent model are much more likely to converge to cooperative outcomes. We also implemented this agent model in a virtual reality environment, and let human subjects play against a virtual player. In this game, subjects' pay-offs were experienced as forces opposing their movements. During the experiment, we manipulated the risk sensitivity of the computer player and observed human responses. We found not only that humans adaptively changed their level of cooperation depending on the risk sensitivity of the computer player but also that their initial play exhibited characteristic risk-sensitive biases. Our results suggest that model uncertainty is an important determinant of cooperation in two-player sensorimotor interactions. PMID:23945266

  16. Factor selection and structural identification in the interaction ANOVA model.

    PubMed

    Post, Justin B; Bondell, Howard D

    2013-03-01

    When faced with categorical predictors and a continuous response, the objective of an analysis often consists of two tasks: finding which factors are important and determining which levels of the factors differ significantly from one another. Often times, these tasks are done separately using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by a post hoc hypothesis testing procedure such as Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test. When interactions between factors are included in the model the collapsing of levels of a factor becomes a more difficult problem. When testing for differences between two levels of a factor, claiming no difference would refer not only to equality of main effects, but also to equality of each interaction involving those levels. This structure between the main effects and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This article introduces a new method for accomplishing both of the common analysis tasks simultaneously in an interaction model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. An appropriate penalization is constructed that encourages levels of factors to collapse and entire factors to be set to zero. It is shown that the procedure has the oracle property implying that asymptotically it performs as well as if the exact structure were known beforehand. We also discuss the application to estimating interactions in the unreplicated case. Simulation studies show the procedure outperforms post hoc hypothesis testing procedures as well as similar methods that do not include a structural constraint. The method is also illustrated using a real data example.

  17. Compressibility enhancement in an almost staggered interacting Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Bat-el; Berkovits, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the compressibility in the almost staggered fermionic Harper model with repulsive interactions in the vicinity of half-filling. It has been shown by Kraus et al. [Phys. Rev. B 89, 161106(R) (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.161106 that for spinless electrons and nearest neighbors electron-electron interactions the compressibility in the central band is enhanced by repulsive interactions. Here we would like to investigate the sensitivity of this conclusion to the spin degree of freedom and longer range interactions. We use the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation, as well as the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculation to evaluate the compressibility. In the almost staggered Harper model, the central energy band is essentially flat and separated from the other bands by a large gap and therefore, the HF approximation is rather accurate. In both cases the compressibility of the system is enhanced compared to the noninteracting case, although the enhancement is weaker due to the inclusion of Hubbard and longer ranged interactions. We also show that the entanglement entropy is suppressed when the compressibility of the system is enhanced.

  18. Evaluating differential effects using regression interactions and regression mixture models

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This paper focuses on understanding regression mixture models, a relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their formulation, and their assumptions are compared using Monte Carlo simulations and real data analysis. The capabilities of regression mixture models are described and specific issues to be addressed when conducting regression mixtures are proposed. The paper aims to clarify the role that regression mixtures can take in the estimation of differential effects and increase awareness of the benefits and potential pitfalls of this approach. Regression mixture models are shown to be a potentially effective exploratory method for finding differential effects when these effects can be defined by a small number of classes of respondents who share a typical relationship between a predictor and an outcome. It is also shown that the comparison between regression mixture models and interactions becomes substantially more complex as the number of classes increases. It is argued that regression interactions are well suited for direct tests of specific hypotheses about differential effects and regression mixtures provide a useful approach for exploring effect heterogeneity given adequate samples and study design. PMID:26556903

  19. Head Motion Modeling for Human Behavior Analysis in Dyadic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Georgiou, Panayiotis; Baucom, Brian; Narayanan, Shrikanth S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of head motion in human interaction, notably of its role in conveying interlocutors’ behavioral characteristics. Head motion is physically complex and carries rich information; current modeling approaches based on visual signals, however, are still limited in their ability to adequately capture these important properties. Guided by the methodology of kinesics, we propose a data driven approach to identify typical head motion patterns. The approach follows the steps of first segmenting motion events, then parametrically representing the motion by linear predictive features, and finally generalizing the motion types using Gaussian mixture models. The proposed approach is experimentally validated using video recordings of communication sessions from real couples involved in a couples therapy study. In particular we use the head motion model to classify binarized expert judgments of the interactants’ specific behavioral characteristics where entrainment in head motion is hypothesized to play a role: Acceptance, Blame, Positive, and Negative behavior. We achieve accuracies in the range of 60% to 70% for the various experimental settings and conditions. In addition, we describe a measure of motion similarity between the interaction partners based on the proposed model. We show that the relative change of head motion similarity during the interaction significantly correlates with the expert judgments of the interactants’ behavioral characteristics. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed head motion model, and underscore the promise of analyzing human behavioral characteristics through signal processing methods. PMID:26557047

  20. Model Checking for Verification of Interactive Health IT Systems

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Keith A.; Mercer, Eric; Bahrami, Ali; Tao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Rigorous methods for design and verification of health IT systems have lagged far behind their proliferation. The inherent technical complexity of healthcare, combined with the added complexity of health information technology makes their resulting behavior unpredictable and introduces serious risk. We propose to mitigate this risk by formalizing the relationship between HIT and the conceptual work that increasingly typifies modern care. We introduce new techniques for modeling clinical workflows and the conceptual products within them that allow established, powerful modeling checking technology to be applied to interactive health IT systems. The new capability can evaluate the workflows of a new HIT system performed by clinicians and computers to improve safety and reliability. We demonstrate the method on a patient contact system to demonstrate model checking is effective for interactive systems and that much of it can be automated. PMID:26958166

  1. Using Agent Based Modeling (ABM) to Develop Cultural Interaction Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drucker, Nick; Jones, Phillip N.

    2012-01-01

    Today, most cultural training is based on or built around "cultural engagements" or discrete interactions between the individual learner and one or more cultural "others". Often, success in the engagement is the end or the objective. In reality, these interactions usually involve secondary and tertiary effects with potentially wide ranging consequences. The concern is that learning culture within a strict engagement context might lead to "checklist" cultural thinking that will not empower learners to understand the full consequence of their actions. We propose the use of agent based modeling (ABM) to collect, store, and, simulating the effects of social networks, promulgate engagement effects over time, distance, and consequence. The ABM development allows for rapid modification to re-create any number of population types, extending the applicability of the model to any requirement for social modeling.

  2. ANNIE - INTERACTIVE PROCESSING OF DATA BASES FOR HYDROLOGIC MODELS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lumb, Alan M.; Kittle, John L.

    1985-01-01

    ANNIE is a data storage and retrieval system that was developed to reduce the time and effort required to calibrate, verify, and apply watershed models that continuously simulate water quantity and quality. Watershed models have three categories of input: parameters to describe segments of a drainage area, linkage of the segments, and time-series data. Additional goals for ANNIE include the development of software that is easily implemented on minicomputers and some microcomputers and software that has no special requirements for interactive display terminals. Another goal is for the user interaction to be based on the experience of the user so that ANNIE is helpful to the inexperienced user and yet efficient and brief for the experienced user. Finally, the code should be designed so that additional hydrologic models can easily be added to ANNIE.

  3. MESOI: an interactive Lagrangian trajectory puff diffusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.

    1981-12-01

    MESOI is an interactive Lagrangian trajectory puff diffusion model based on an earlier model by Start and Wendell at the Air Resources Laboratory Field Office at Idaho Falls, Idaho. Puff trajectories are determined using spatially and temporally varying wind fields. Diffusion in the puffs is computed as a function of distance traveled and atmospheric stability. Exposures are computed at nodes of a 31 by 31 grid. There is also provision for interpolation of short term exposures at off-grid locations. This report discusses: the theoretical bases of the model, the numerical approach used in the model, and the sensitivity and accuracy of the model. It contains a description of the computer program and a listing of the code. MESOI is written in FORTRAN. A companion report (Athey, Allwine and Ramsdell, 1981) contains a user's guide to MESOI and documents utility programs that maintain the data files needed by the model.

  4. (Modeling the upper ocean and its interaction with the atmosphere)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Tsung-Hung.

    1990-03-28

    The traveler attended the International Meeting on Modeling the Physics, Biology and Chemistry of the Upper Ocean and Its Interaction with the Atmosphere in London, England, and presented a lecture entitled Modeling the Seasonality of CO{sub 2} in the North Atlantic.'' This international meeting was jointly sponsored by the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme and the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study. Most lectures focused on the modeling of the upper ocean, with a particular emphasis in the area of marine biology and marine ecosystems. Models ranged from simple box ocean models to general circulation models. A total of 16 papers were presented in this two-day conference. At the end of the conference, it became clear that a better understanding of global change in climate atmospheric CO{sub 2} variations requires a closer link between the studies of marine biology and ocean physics and chemistry.

  5. A nonlinear Bloch model for Coulomb interaction in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Bidegaray-Fesquet, Brigitte Keita, Kole

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, we first derive a Coulomb Hamiltonian for electron–electron interaction in quantum dots in the Heisenberg picture. Then we use this Hamiltonian to enhance a Bloch model, which happens to be nonlinear in the density matrix. The coupling with Maxwell equations in case of interaction with an electromagnetic field is also considered from the Cauchy problem point of view. The study is completed by numerical results and a discussion about the advisability of neglecting intra-band coherences, as is done in part of the literature.

  6. Modeling variation in interaction strength between barnacles and fucoids.

    PubMed

    Kordas, Rebecca L; Dudgeon, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The strength by which species interact can vary throughout their ontogeny, as environments vary in space and time, and with the density of their populations. Characterizing strengths of interaction in situ for even a small number of species is logistically difficult and may apply only to those conditions under which the estimates were derived. We sought to combine data from field experiments estimating interaction strength of life stages of the barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides, on germlings of Ascophyllum nodosum, with a model that explored the consequences of variability at per capita and per population levels to the abundance of year-old algal recruits. We further simulated how this interaction affected fucoid germling abundance as the timing of their respective settlements varied relative to one another, as occurs regionally across the Gulf of Maine, USA. Juvenile S. balanoides have a weak estimated per capita effect on germlings. Germling populations are sensitive to variation in per capita effects of juvenile barnacles because of the typically large population sizes of the latter. However, high mortality of juvenile barnacles weakens the population interaction strength over time. Adult barnacles probably weakly facilitate fucoid germlings, but greater survival of adults sustains the strength of that interaction at the population level. Germling abundance is positively associated with densities of adult barnacles and negatively associated with that of juvenile barnacles. Metamorphosing cyprid larvae have the strongest per capita effect on germling abundance, but the interaction between the two stages is so short-lived that germling abundance is altered little. Variation in the timing of barnacle and A. nodosum settlement relative to one another had very little influence on the abundance of yearling germlings. Interactions between barnacles and germlings may influence the demographic structure of A. nodosum populations and the persistence of fucoid

  7. Modeling variation in interaction strength between barnacles and fucoids

    PubMed Central

    Dudgeon, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The strength by which species interact can vary throughout their ontogeny, as environments vary in space and time, and with the density of their populations. Characterizing strengths of interaction in situ for even a small number of species is logistically difficult and may apply only to those conditions under which the estimates were derived. We sought to combine data from field experiments estimating interaction strength of life stages of the barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides, on germlings of Ascophyllum nodosum, with a model that explored the consequences of variability at per capita and per population levels to the abundance of year-old algal recruits. We further simulated how this interaction affected fucoid germling abundance as the timing of their respective settlements varied relative to one another, as occurs regionally across the Gulf of Maine, USA. Juvenile S. balanoides have a weak estimated per capita effect on germlings. Germling populations are sensitive to variation in per capita effects of juvenile barnacles because of the typically large population sizes of the latter. However, high mortality of juvenile barnacles weakens the population interaction strength over time. Adult barnacles probably weakly facilitate fucoid germlings, but greater survival of adults sustains the strength of that interaction at the population level. Germling abundance is positively associated with densities of adult barnacles and negatively associated with that of juvenile barnacles. Metamorphosing cyprid larvae have the strongest per capita effect on germling abundance, but the interaction between the two stages is so short-lived that germling abundance is altered little. Variation in the timing of barnacle and A. nodosum settlement relative to one another had very little influence on the abundance of yearling germlings. Interactions between barnacles and germlings may influence the demographic structure of A. nodosum populations and the persistence of fucoid

  8. A model of interaction between anticorruption authority and corruption groups

    SciTech Connect

    Neverova, Elena G.; Malafeyef, Oleg A.

    2015-03-10

    The paper provides a model of interaction between anticorruption unit and corruption groups. The main policy functions of the anticorruption unit involve reducing corrupt practices in some entities through an optimal approach to resource allocation and effective anticorruption policy. We develop a model based on Markov decision-making process and use Howard’s policy-improvement algorithm for solving an optimal decision strategy. We examine the assumption that corruption groups retaliate against the anticorruption authority to protect themselves. This model was implemented through stochastic game.

  9. Stochastic waves in a Brusselator model with nonlocal interaction.

    PubMed

    Biancalani, Tommaso; Galla, Tobias; McKane, Alan J

    2011-08-01

    We show that intrinsic noise can induce spatiotemporal phenomena such as Turing patterns and traveling waves in a Brusselator model with nonlocal interaction terms. In order to predict and to characterize these stochastic waves we analyze the nonlocal model using a system-size expansion. The resulting theory is used to calculate the power spectra of the stochastic waves analytically and the outcome is tested successfully against simulations. We discuss the possibility that nonlocal models in other areas, such as epidemic spread or social dynamics, may contain similar stochastically induced patterns. PMID:21929075

  10. Stochastic waves in a Brusselator model with nonlocal interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancalani, Tommaso; Galla, Tobias; McKane, Alan J.

    2011-08-01

    We show that intrinsic noise can induce spatiotemporal phenomena such as Turing patterns and traveling waves in a Brusselator model with nonlocal interaction terms. In order to predict and to characterize these stochastic waves we analyze the nonlocal model using a system-size expansion. The resulting theory is used to calculate the power spectra of the stochastic waves analytically and the outcome is tested successfully against simulations. We discuss the possibility that nonlocal models in other areas, such as epidemic spread or social dynamics, may contain similar stochastically induced patterns.

  11. Exactly solvable relativistic model with the anomalous interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Elena; Messina, Antonino; Nikitin, A. G.

    2010-04-01

    A special class of Dirac-Pauli equations with time-like vector potentials of an external field is investigated. An exactly solvable relativistic model describing the anomalous interaction of a neutral Dirac fermion with a cylindrically symmetric external electromagnetic field is presented. The related external field is a superposition of the electric field generated by a charged infinite filament and the magnetic field generated by a straight line current. In the nonrelativistic approximation the considered model is reduced to the integrable Pron’ko-Stroganov model.

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Tumor Cell Growth and Immune System Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Fathalla A.; Safan, Muntaser; Abdeen, Mohamed A.; Abdel-Rahman, Duaa H.

    In this paper, we provide a family of ordinary and delay differential equations to describe the dynamics of tumor-growth and immunotherapy interactions. We explore the effects of adoptive cellular immunotherapy on the model and describe under what circumstances the tumor can be eliminated. The possibility of clearing the tumor, with a strategy, is based on two parameters in the model: the rate of influx of the effector cells, and the rate of influx of IL2. The critical tumor-growth rate, below which endemic tumor does not exist, has been found. One can use the model to make predictions about tumor-dormancy.

  13. Web-based Interactive Landform Simulation Model - Grand Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Pelletier, J. D.; Duffin, K.; Ormand, C. J.; Hung, W.; Iverson, E. A.; Shernoff, D.; Zhai, X.; Chowdary, A.

    2013-12-01

    Earth science educators need interactive tools to engage and enable students to better understand how Earth systems work over geologic time scales. The evolution of landforms is ripe for interactive, inquiry-based learning exercises because landforms exist all around us. The Web-based Interactive Landform Simulation Model - Grand Canyon (WILSIM-GC, http://serc.carleton.edu/landform/) is a continuation and upgrade of the simple cellular automata (CA) rule-based model (WILSIM-CA, http://www.niu.edu/landform/) that can be accessed from anywhere with an Internet connection. Major improvements in WILSIM-GC include adopting a physically based model and the latest Java technology. The physically based model is incorporated to illustrate the fluvial processes involved in land-sculpting pertaining to the development and evolution of one of the most famous landforms on Earth: the Grand Canyon. It is hoped that this focus on a famous and specific landscape will attract greater student interest and provide opportunities for students to learn not only how different processes interact to form the landform we observe today, but also how models and data are used together to enhance our understanding of the processes involved. The latest development in Java technology (such as Java OpenGL for access to ubiquitous fast graphics hardware, Trusted Applet for file input and output, and multithreaded ability to take advantage of modern multi-core CPUs) are incorporated into building WILSIM-GC and active, standards-aligned curricula materials guided by educational psychology theory on science learning will be developed to accompany the model. This project is funded NSF-TUES program.

  14. Enhancing species distribution modeling by characterizing predator-prey interactions.

    PubMed

    Trainor, Anne M; Schmitz, Oswald J; Ivan, Jacob S; Shenk, Tanya M

    2014-01-01

    Niche theory is a well-established concept integrating a diverse array of environmental variables and multispecies interactions used to describe species geographic distribution. It is now customary to employ species distribution models (SDMs) that use environmental variables in conjunction with species location information to characterize species' niches and map their geographic ranges. The challenge remains, however, to account for the biotic interactions of species with other community members on which they depend. We show here how to connect species spatial distribution and their dependence with other species by modeling spatially explicit predator-prey interactions, which we call a trophic interaction distribution model (TIDM). To develop the principles, we capitalized on data from Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) reintroduced into Colorado. Spatial location information for lynx obtained from telemetry was used in conjunction with environmental data to construct an SDM. The spatial locations of lynx-snowshoe hare encounters obtained from snow-tracking in conjunction with environmental data were used to construct a TIDM. The environmental conditions associated with lynx locations and lynx-hare encounters identified through both SDM and TIDM revealed an initial transient phase in habitat use that settled into a steady state. Nevertheless, despite the potential for the SDM to broadly encompass all lynx hunting and nonhunting spatial locations, the spatial extents of the SDM and TIDM differed; about 40% of important lynx-snowshoe hare locations identified in the TIDM were not identified in the lynx-only SDM. Our results encourage greater effort to quantify spatial locations of trophic interactions among species in a community and the associated environmental conditions when attempting to construct models aimed at projecting current and future species geographic distributions.

  15. Dark Matter in the Heavens and at Colliders: Models and Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Primulando, Reinard

    2012-08-01

    In this dissertation, we investigate various aspects of dark matter detection and model building. Motivated by the cosmic ray positron excess observed by PAMELA, we construct models of decaying dark matter to explain the excess. Specifically we present an explicit, TeV-scale model of decaying dark matter in which the approximate stability of the dark matter candidate is a consequence of a global symmetry that is broken only by instanton-induced operators generated by a non-Abelian dark gauge group. Alternatively, the decaying operator can arise as a Planck suppressed correction in a model with an Abelian discrete symmetry and vector-like states at an intermediate scale that are responsible for generating lepton Yukawa couplings. A flavor-nonconserving dark matter decay is also considered in the case of fermionic dark matter. Assuming a general Dirac structure for the four-fermion contact interactions of interest, the cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra were studied. We show that good fits to the current data can be obtained for both charged-leptonflavor- conserving and flavor-violating decay channels. Motivated by a possible excess of gamma rays in the galactic center, we constructed a supersymmetric leptophilic higgs model to explain the excess. Finally, we consider an improvement on dark matter collider searches using the Razor analysis, which was originally utilized for supersymmetry searches by the CMS collaboration.

  16. A Qualitative Model of Human Interaction with Complex Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    1987-01-01

    A qualitative model describing human interaction with complex dynamic systems is developed. The model is hierarchical in nature and consists of three parts: a behavior generator, an internal model, and a sensory information processor. The behavior generator is responsible for action decomposition, turning higher level goals or missions into physical action at the human-machine interface. The internal model is an internal representation of the environment which the human is assumed to possess and is divided into four submodel categories. The sensory information processor is responsible for sensory composition. All three parts of the model act in consort to allow anticipatory behavior on the part of the human in goal-directed interaction with dynamic systems. Human workload and error are interpreted in this framework, and the familiar example of an automobile commute is used to illustrate the nature of the activity in the three model elements. Finally, with the qualitative model as a guide, verbal protocols from a manned simulation study of a helicopter instrument landing task are analyzed with particular emphasis on the effect of automation on human-machine performance.

  17. A qualitative model of human interaction with complex dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    1987-01-01

    A qualitative model describing human interaction with complex dynamic systems is developed. The model is hierarchical in nature and consists of three parts: a behavior generator, an internal model, and a sensory information processor. The behavior generator is responsible for action decomposition, turning higher level goals or missions into physical action at the human-machine interface. The internal model is an internal representation of the environment which the human is assumed to possess and is divided into four submodel categories. The sensory information processor is responsible for sensory composition. All three parts of the model act in consort to allow anticipatory behavior on the part of the human in goal-directed interaction with dynamic systems. Human workload and error are interpreted in this framework, and the familiar example of an automobile commute is used to illustrate the nature of the activity in the three model elements. Finally, with the qualitative model as a guide, verbal protocols from a manned simulation study of a helicopter instrument landing task are analyzed with particular emphasis on the effect of automation on human-machine performance.

  18. Interactive agent based modeling of public health decision-making.

    PubMed

    Parks, Amanda L; Walker, Brett; Pettey, Warren; Benuzillo, Jose; Gesteland, Per; Grant, Juliana; Koopman, James; Drews, Frank; Samore, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Agent-based models have yielded important insights regarding the transmission dynamics of communicable diseases. To better understand how these models can be used to study decision making of public health officials, we developed a computer program that linked an agent-based model of pertussis with an agent-based model of public health management. The program, which we call the Public Health Interactive Model & simulation (PHIMs) encompassed the reporting of cases to public health, case investigation, and public health response. The user directly interacted with the model in the role of the public health decision-maker. In this paper we describe the design of our model, and present the results of a pilot study to assess its usability and potential for future development. Affinity for specific tools was demonstrated. Participants ranked the program high in usability and considered it useful for training. Our ultimate goal is to achieve better public health decisions and outcomes through use of public health decision support tools. PMID:20351907

  19. Modeling the interaction between flow and highly flexible aquatic vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, J. T.; Uittenbogaard, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Aquatic vegetation has an important role in estuaries and rivers by acting as bed stabilizer, filter, food source, and nursing area. However, macrophyte populations worldwide are under high anthropogenic pressure. Protection and restoration efforts will benefit from more insight into the interaction between vegetation, currents, waves, and sediment transport. Most aquatic plants are very flexible, implying that their shape and hence their drag and turbulence production depend on the flow conditions. We have developed a numerical simulation model that describes this dynamic interaction between very flexible vegetation and a time-varying flow, using the sea grass Zostera marina as an example. The model consists of two parts: an existing 1DV k-ɛ turbulence model simulating the flow combined with a new model simulating the bending of the plants, based on a force balance that takes account of both vegetation position and buoyancy. We validated this model using observations of positions of flexible plastic strips and of the forces they are subjected to, as well as hydrodynamic measurements. The model predicts important properties like the forces on plants, flow velocity profiles, and turbulence characteristics well. Although the validation data are limited, the results are sufficiently encouraging to consider our model to be of generic value in studying flow processes in fields of flexible vegetation.

  20. Particle-Surface Interaction Model and Method of Determining Particle-Surface Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method and model of predicting particle-surface interactions with a surface, such as the surface of a spacecraft. The method includes the steps of: determining a trajectory path of a plurality of moving particles; predicting whether any of the moving particles will intersect a surface; predicting whether any of the particles will be captured by the surface and/or; predicting a reflected trajectory and velocity of particles reflected from the surface.

  1. Toward construction of a unified neutrino-nucleus interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamano, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A precise knowledge of the neutrino-nucleus interactions is becoming one of the crucial issues for a successful determination of the neutrino parameters from the future neutrino-oscillation experiments. It is therefore urgent to have a reliable neutrino-nucleus interactoin model that enables a quantitative description of neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections in an accuracy of 10 percent or less. However, the kinematic regions relevant to the neutrino parameter searches extend over the quasi-elastic, resonance, and deep-inelastic-scattering regions, where different theoretical treatments based on hadronic or partonic degrees of freedom are usually employed, and this makes the construction of a unified neutrino-nucleus interaction model covering those kinematic regions challenging. To tackle on such a challenging issue, we have recently developed a collaboration of experimentalists and theorists in different fields at J-PARC Branch of KEK Theory Center (http://www.nuint.kek.jp/index_e.html). In this talk, I review our efforts toward construction of the unified neutrino-nucleus interaction model at J-PARC Branch of KEK Theory Center. A precise knowledge of the neutrino-nucleus interactions is becoming one of the crucial issues for a successful determination of the neutrino parameters from the future neutrino-oscillation experiments. It is therefore urgent to have a reliable neutrino-nucleus interactoin model that enables a quantitative description of neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections in an accuracy of 10 percent or less. However, the kinematic regions relevant to the neutrino parameter searches extend over the quasi-elastic, resonance, and deep-inelastic-scattering regions, where different theoretical treatments based on hadronic or partonic degrees of freedom are usually employed, and this makes the construction of a unified neutrino-nucleus interaction model covering those kinematic regions challenging. To tackle on such a challenging issue, we have

  2. Model-independent analyses of dark-matter particle interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2015-03-24

    A model-independent treatment of dark-matter particle elastic scattering has been developed, yielding the most general interaction for WIMP-nucleon low-energy scattering, and the resulting amplitude has been embedded into the nucleus, taking into account the selection rules imposed by parity and time-reversal. One finds that, in contrast to the usual spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation, the resulting cross section contains six independent nuclear response functions, three of which are associated with possible velocity-dependent interactions. We find that current experiments are four orders of magnitude more sensitive to derivative couplings than is apparent in the standard SI/SD treatment, which necessarily associated such interactions withmore » cross sections proportional to v2T ~ 10⁻⁶, where vT is the WIMP velocity relative to the center of mass of the nuclear target.« less

  3. Modeling the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marceau, Vincent; Noël, Pierre-André; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Allard, Antoine; Dubé, Louis J.

    2011-08-01

    Epidemics seldom occur as isolated phenomena. Typically, two or more viral agents spread within the same host population and may interact dynamically with each other. We present a general model where two viral agents interact via an immunity mechanism as they propagate simultaneously on two networks connecting the same set of nodes. By exploiting a correspondence between the propagation dynamics and a dynamical process performing progressive network generation, we develop an analytical approach that accurately captures the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks. The formalism allows for overlay networks with arbitrary joint degree distribution and overlap. To illustrate the versatility of our approach, we consider a hypothetical delayed intervention scenario in which an immunizing agent is disseminated in a host population to hinder the propagation of an undesirable agent (e.g., the spread of preventive information in the context of an emerging infectious disease).

  4. Adapting GOMS to Model Human-Robot Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, Jill; Scholtz, Jean; Kieras, David

    2007-03-09

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) has been maturing in tandem with robots’ commercial success. In the last few years HRI researchers have been adopting—and sometimes adapting—human-computer interaction (HCI) evaluation techniques to assess the efficiency and intuitiveness of HRI designs. For example, Adams (2005) used Goal Directed Task Analysis to determine the interaction needs of officers from the Nashville Metro Police Bomb Squad. Scholtz et al. (2004) used Endsley’s (1988) Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique to determine robotic vehicle supervisors’ awareness of when vehicles were in trouble and thus required closer monitoring or intervention. Yanco and Drury (2004) employed usability testing to determine (among other things) how well a search-andrescue interface supported use by first responders. One set of HCI tools that has so far seen little exploration in the HRI domain, however, is the class of modeling and evaluation techniques known as formal methods.

  5. Model-independent analyses of dark-matter particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2015-03-24

    A model-independent treatment of dark-matter particle elastic scattering has been developed, yielding the most general interaction for WIMP-nucleon low-energy scattering, and the resulting amplitude has been embedded into the nucleus, taking into account the selection rules imposed by parity and time-reversal. One finds that, in contrast to the usual spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation, the resulting cross section contains six independent nuclear response functions, three of which are associated with possible velocity-dependent interactions. We find that current experiments are four orders of magnitude more sensitive to derivative couplings than is apparent in the standard SI/SD treatment, which necessarily associated such interactions with cross sections proportional to v2T ~ 10⁻⁶, where vT is the WIMP velocity relative to the center of mass of the nuclear target.

  6. Models of atmosphere-ecosystem-hydrology interactions: Approaches and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimel, David S.

    1992-01-01

    Interactions among the atmosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, and the hydrological cycle have been the subject of investigation for many years, although most of the research has had a regional focus. The topic is broad, including the effects of climate and hydrology on vegetation, the effects of vegetation on hydrology, the effects of the hydrological cycle on the atmosphere, and interactions of the cycles via material flux such as solutes and trace gases. The intent of this paper is to identify areas of critical uncertainty, discuss modeling approaches to resolving those problems, and then propose techniques for testing. I consider several interactions specifically to illustrate the range of problems. These areas are as follows: (1) cloud parameterizations and the land surface, (2) soil moisture, and (3) the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  7. A Conceptual Model for Extratropical Atmosphere-ocean Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; Reichler, T.

    2015-12-01

    Equipped with the current understanding for atmosphere-ocean interaction, we build a simple physically-based system of coupled equations to portray the relationships among major atmospheric and oceanic modes, including the NAO, AMO, AMOC, ENSO and stratospheric NAM. The simple model reproduces the strongly timescale-dependent character of the relationships, which changes in strength and direction on scales ranging from days to centuries. Another emphasis is placed on explicitly resolving the air-sea heat fluxes as a function of timescale to provide insight into the coupling between ocean and atmosphere. In constructing and testing the simple model we make use of a multi-millennium-long control integration with a fully coupled climate model. Cross-correlation, spectral analysis and inverse methods are employed to characterize important aspects of the interactions in the full and simple models. It is found that, a) Bjerknes' conjecture on ocean-atmosphere coupling, that is the atmosphere drives climate on high frequencies (days to months) while the ocean acts as the main source of climate variability on interannual and longer timescales, is confirmed; b) the AMOC can be readily understood as a harmonic oscillator driven by the NAO; c) the two-way interaction between NAO and AMO, and also the influence of ENSO on both NAO and AMO are essential for reproducing important correlation features; and d) the consideration of heat fluxes provides additional explanatory power to our model. Our approach not only helps to clarify our understanding for the nature of the atmosphere-ocean interaction problem but also raises new and intriguing questions for future research.

  8. Stochastic models for large interacting systems and related correlation inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Liggett, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    A very large and active part of probability theory is concerned with the formulation and analysis of models for the evolution of large systems arising in the sciences, including physics and biology. These models have in their description randomness in the evolution rules, and interactions among various parts of the system. This article describes some of the main models in this area, as well as some of the major results about their behavior that have been obtained during the past 40 years. An important technique in this area, as well as in related parts of physics, is the use of correlation inequalities. These express positive or negative dependence between random quantities related to the model. In some types of models, the underlying dependence is positive, whereas in others it is negative. We give particular attention to these issues, and to applications of these inequalities. Among the applications are central limit theorems that give convergence to a Gaussian distribution. PMID:20826441

  9. Modeling the Interactions Between Multiple Crack Closure Mechanisms at Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    A fatigue crack closure model is developed that includes interactions between the three closure mechanisms most likely to occur at threshold; plasticity, roughness, and oxide. This model, herein referred to as the CROP model (for Closure, Roughness, Oxide, and Plasticity), also includes the effects of out-of plane cracking and multi-axial loading. These features make the CROP closure model uniquely suited for, but not limited to, threshold applications. Rough cracks are idealized here as two-dimensional sawtooths, whose geometry induces mixed-mode crack- tip stresses. Continuum mechanics and crack-tip dislocation concepts are combined to relate crack face displacements to crack-tip loads. Geometric criteria are used to determine closure loads from crack-face displacements. Finite element results, used to verify model predictions, provide critical information about the locations where crack closure occurs.

  10. Modelling social interaction as perceptual crossing: an investigation into the dynamics of the interaction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froese, Tom; Di Paolo, Ezequiel A.

    2010-03-01

    This paper continues efforts to establish a mutually informative dialogue between psychology and evolutionary robotics in order to investigate the dynamics of social interaction. We replicate a recent simulation model of a minimalist experiment in perceptual crossing and confirm the results with significantly simpler artificial agents. A series of psycho-physical tests of their behaviour informs a hypothetical circuit model of their internal operation. However, a detailed study of the actual internal dynamics reveals this circuit model to be unfounded, thereby offering a tale of caution for those hypothesising about sub-personal processes in terms of behavioural observations. In particular, it is shown that the behaviour of the agents largely emerges out of the interaction process itself rather than being an individual achievement alone. We also extend the original simulation model in two novel directions in order to test further the extent to which perceptual crossing between agents can self-organise in a robust manner. These modelling results suggest new hypotheses that can become the basis for further psychological experiments.

  11. Brachypodium as an emerging model for cereal–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Timothy L.; Powell, Jonathan J.; Schneebeli, Katharina; Hsia, M. Mandy; Gardiner, Donald M.; Bragg, Jennifer N.; McIntyre, C. Lynne; Manners, John M.; Ayliffe, Mick; Watt, Michelle; Vogel, John P.; Henry, Robert J.; Kazan, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Background Cereal diseases cause tens of billions of dollars of losses annually and have devastating humanitarian consequences in the developing world. Increased understanding of the molecular basis of cereal host–pathogen interactions should facilitate development of novel resistance strategies. However, achieving this in most cereals can be challenging due to large and complex genomes, long generation times and large plant size, as well as quarantine and intellectual property issues that may constrain the development and use of community resources. Brachypodium distachyon (brachypodium) with its small, diploid and sequenced genome, short generation time, high transformability and rapidly expanding community resources is emerging as a tractable cereal model. Scope Recent research reviewed here has demonstrated that brachypodium is either susceptible or partially susceptible to many of the major cereal pathogens. Thus, the study of brachypodium–pathogen interactions appears to hold great potential to improve understanding of cereal disease resistance, and to guide approaches to enhance this resistance. This paper reviews brachypodium experimental pathosystems for the study of fungal, bacterial and viral cereal pathogens; the current status of the use of brachypodium for functional analysis of cereal disease resistance; and comparative genomic approaches undertaken using brachypodium to assist characterization of cereal resistance genes. Additionally, it explores future prospects for brachypodium as a model to study cereal–pathogen interactions. Conclusions The study of brachypodium–pathogen interactions appears to be a productive strategy for understanding mechanisms of disease resistance in cereal species. Knowledge obtained from this model interaction has strong potential to be exploited for crop improvement. PMID:25808446

  12. Modeling light-sound interaction in nanoscale cavities and waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennec, Yan; Laude, Vincent; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; El Jallal, Said; Beugnot, Jean Charles; Escalante, Jose M.; Martínez, Alejandro

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of light and sound waves at the micro and nanoscale has attracted considerable interest in recent years. The main reason is that this interaction is responsible for a wide variety of intriguing physical phenomena, ranging from the laser-induced cooling of a micromechanical resonator down to its ground state to the management of the speed of guided light pulses by exciting sound waves. A common feature of all these phenomena is the feasibility to tightly confine photons and phonons of similar wavelengths in a very small volume. Amongst the different structures that enable such confinement, optomechanical or phoxonic crystals, which are periodic structures displaying forbidden frequency band gaps for light and sound waves, have revealed themselves as the most appropriate candidates to host nanoscale structures where the light-sound interaction can be boosted. In this review, we describe the theoretical tools that allow the modeling of the interaction between photons and acoustic phonons in nanoscale structures, namely cavities and waveguides, with special emphasis in phoxonic crystal structures. First, we start by summarizing the different optomechanical or phoxonic crystal structures proposed so far and discuss their main advantages and limitations. Then, we describe the different mechanisms that make light interact with sound, and show how to treat them from a theoretical point of view. We then illustrate the different photon-phonon interaction processes with numerical simulations in realistic phoxonic cavities and waveguides. Finally, we introduce some possible applications which can take enormous benefit from the enhanced interaction between light and sound at the nanoscale.

  13. Modeling the intracellular pathogen-immune interaction with cure rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Balram; Dubey, Preeti; Dubey, Uma S.

    2016-09-01

    Many common and emergent infectious diseases like Influenza, SARS, Hepatitis, Ebola etc. are caused by viral pathogens. These infections can be controlled or prevented by understanding the dynamics of pathogen-immune interaction in vivo. In this paper, interaction of pathogens with uninfected and infected cells in presence or absence of immune response are considered in four different cases. In the first case, the model considers the saturated nonlinear infection rate and linear cure rate without absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells and without immune response. The next model considers the effect of absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells while all other terms are same as in the first case. The third model incorporates innate immune response, humoral immune response and Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) mediated immune response with cure rate and without absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells. The last model is an extension of the third model in which the effect of absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells has been considered. Positivity and boundedness of solutions are established to ensure the well-posedness of the problem. It has been found that all the four models have two equilibria, namely, pathogen-free equilibrium point and pathogen-present equilibrium point. In each case, stability analysis of each equilibrium point is investigated. Pathogen-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when basic reproduction number is less or equal to unity. This implies that control or prevention of infection is independent of initial concentration of uninfected cells, infected cells, pathogens and immune responses in the body. The proposed models show that introduction of immune response and cure rate strongly affects the stability behavior of the system. Further, on computing basic reproduction number, it has been found to be minimum for the fourth model vis-a-vis other models. The analytical findings of each model have been exemplified by

  14. Spin-orbit interaction in relativistic nuclear structure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebran, J.-P.; Mutschler, A.; Khan, E.; Vretenar, D.

    2016-08-01

    Relativistic self-consistent mean-field (SCMF) models naturally account for the coupling of the nucleon spin to its orbital motion, whereas nonrelativistic SCMF methods necessitate a phenomenological ansatz for the effective spin-orbit potential. Recent experimental studies aim to explore the isospin properties of the effective spin-orbit interaction in nuclei. SCMF models are very useful in the interpretation of the corresponding data; however, standard relativistic mean-field and nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock models use effective spin-orbit potentials with different isovector properties, mainly because exchange contributions are not treated explicitly in the former. The impact of exchange terms on the effective spin-orbit potential in relativistic mean-field models is analyzed, and it is shown that it leads to an isovector structure similar to the one used in standard nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock models. Data on the isospin dependence of spin-orbit splittings in spherical nuclei could be used to constrain the isovector-scalar channel of relativistic mean-field models. The reproduction of the empirical kink in the isotope shifts of even Pb nuclei by relativistic effective interactions points to the occurrence of pseudospin symmetry in the single-neutron spectra in these nuclei.

  15. Detection of Drug-Drug Interactions by Modeling Interaction Profile Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Uriarte, Eugenio; Santana, Lourdes; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) constitute an important problem in postmarketing pharmacovigilance and in the development of new drugs. The effectiveness or toxicity of a medication could be affected by the co-administration of other drugs that share pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic pathways. For this reason, a great effort is being made to develop new methodologies to detect and assess DDIs. In this article, we present a novel method based on drug interaction profile fingerprints (IPFs) with successful application to DDI detection. IPFs were generated based on the DrugBank database, which provided 9,454 well-established DDIs as a primary source of interaction data. The model uses IPFs to measure the similarity of pairs of drugs and generates new putative DDIs from the non-intersecting interactions of a pair. We described as part of our analysis the pharmacological and biological effects associated with the putative interactions; for example, the interaction between haloperidol and dicyclomine can cause increased risk of psychosis and tardive dyskinesia. First, we evaluated the method through hold-out validation and then by using four independent test sets that did not overlap with DrugBank. Precision for the test sets ranged from 0.4–0.5 with more than two fold enrichment factor enhancement. In conclusion, we demonstrated the usefulness of the method in pharmacovigilance as a DDI predictor, and created a dataset of potential DDIs, highlighting the etiology or pharmacological effect of the DDI, and providing an exploratory tool to facilitate decision support in DDI detection and patient safety. PMID:23520498

  16. Exploring host–microbiota interactions in animal models and humans

    PubMed Central

    Kostic, Aleksandar D.; Howitt, Michael R.; Garrett, Wendy S.

    2013-01-01

    The animal and bacterial kingdoms have coevolved and coadapted in response to environmental selective pressures over hundreds of millions of years. The meta'omics revolution in both sequencing and its analytic pipelines is fostering an explosion of interest in how the gut microbiome impacts physiology and propensity to disease. Gut microbiome studies are inherently interdisciplinary, drawing on approaches and technical skill sets from the biomedical sciences, ecology, and computational biology. Central to unraveling the complex biology of environment, genetics, and microbiome interaction in human health and disease is a deeper understanding of the symbiosis between animals and bacteria. Experimental model systems, including mice, fish, insects, and the Hawaiian bobtail squid, continue to provide critical insight into how host–microbiota homeostasis is constructed and maintained. Here we consider how model systems are influencing current understanding of host–microbiota interactions and explore recent human microbiome studies. PMID:23592793

  17. Trilevel interaction design model for pilot part-task training

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, J.H.; Pistone, R.A.; Stoddard, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Development of effective, scenario-driven training exercises requires both an instructional design and a delivery system that match the subject domain and needs of the students. The Training Research Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory conducts research and development of prototype training systems. One of the Team's efforts is a joint research project, supported with funding and behavioral science guidance from the Army Research Institute, to develop a prototype part-task trainer for student helicopter pilots. The Team designed a ''trilevel interaction'' model and a Level III interactive videodisc delivery system for this project. The model, founded on instructional and psychological theory, should be transferable to other domains where part-task training is appropriate.

  18. Modeling of light-matter interactions with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Selle, Reimer; Vogt, Gerhard; Brixner, Tobias; Gerber, Gustav; Metzler, Richard; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2007-08-15

    We show that a neural network (NN) can be used for automated generation of computer models of light-matter interaction. Nonlinear input-output maps are created for phase-shaped femtosecond laser pulses in the exemplary cases of second-harmonic generation and molecular fluorescence yield. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that the NN has the capability of generalizing and extrapolating beyond initial training data, by predicting the response of the investigated systems for arbitrary laser pulse shapes. Applications are envisioned in the area of quantum control, specifically for the interpolation and extrapolation of control maps and possibly as a tool for investigating control mechanisms. In a wider scope, neural networks might generally provide effective computer models for light-matter interactions for cases where ab initio calculations are intractable.

  19. Interacting agegraphic dark energy models in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Lemets, O.A.; Yerokhin, D.A.; Zazunov, L.G. E-mail: denyerokhin@gmail.com

    2011-01-01

    Agegraphic dark energy, has been recently proposed, based on the so-called Karolyhazy uncertainty relation, which arises from quantum mechanics together with general relativity. In the first part of the article we study the original agegraphic dark energy model by including the interaction between agegraphic dark energy and pressureless (dark) matter. The phase space analysis was made and the critical points were found, one of which is the attractor corresponding to an accelerated expanding Universe. Recent observations of near supernova show that the acceleration of Universe decreases. This phenomenon is called the transient acceleration. In the second part of Article we consider the 3-component Universe composed of a scalar field, interacting with the dark matter on the agegraphic dark energy background. We show that the transient acceleration appears in frame of such a model. The obtained results agree with the observations.

  20. Understanding polycaroboxylate interactions with counterions: A molecular modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzwater, S.; Freeman, M.B.

    1993-12-31

    Low molecular weight polycarboyxlates, such as poly(acrylic acid), have utility as dispersants in a variety of commercial applications including home laundry detergents, mineral processing and water treatment. In general, counterions (Ca, Mg, Fe, etc.) are unavoidable in these applications and often dictate the polymer composition and molecular weight necessary for successful performance. The authors have been investigating the interaction of polycarboxylates with counterions in order to better understand how that interaction impacts on the dispersant properties of a polymer. Using computer modeling, it can be seen how molecular geometry, molecular dynamics, and the shape/polarity of the molecular surface are affected by counterion binding and polymer composition. The authors can then combine information from the modeling with experimental information and literature concepts to provide a direction toward the synthesis of improved low molecular weight polycarboxylate dispersants.

  1. Interactive simulation of embolization coils: modeling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Dequidt, Jérémie; Marchal, Maud; Duriez, Christian; Kerien, Erwan; Cotin, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    Coil embolization offers a new approach to treat aneurysms. This medical procedure is namely less invasive than an open-surgery as it relies on the deployment of very thin platinum-based wires within the aneurysm through the arteries. When performed intracranially, this procedure must be particularly accurate and therefore carefully planned and performed by experienced radiologists. A simulator of the coil deployment represents an interesting and helpful tool for the physician by providing information on the coil behavior. In this paper, an original modeling is proposed to obtain interactive and accurate simulations of coil deployment. The model takes into account geometric nonlinearities and uses a shape memory formulation to describe its complex geometry. An experimental validation is performed in a contact-free environment to identify the mechanical properties of the coil and to quantitatively compare the simulation with real data. Computational performances are also measured to insure an interactive simulation. PMID:18979807

  2. Stochastic Local Interaction (SLI) model: Bridging machine learning and geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.

    2015-12-01

    Machine learning and geostatistics are powerful mathematical frameworks for modeling spatial data. Both approaches, however, suffer from poor scaling of the required computational resources for large data applications. We present the Stochastic Local Interaction (SLI) model, which employs a local representation to improve computational efficiency. SLI combines geostatistics and machine learning with ideas from statistical physics and computational geometry. It is based on a joint probability density function defined by an energy functional which involves local interactions implemented by means of kernel functions with adaptive local kernel bandwidths. SLI is expressed in terms of an explicit, typically sparse, precision (inverse covariance) matrix. This representation leads to a semi-analytical expression for interpolation (prediction), which is valid in any number of dimensions and avoids the computationally costly covariance matrix inversion.

  3. Turbulence radiation interaction modeling in hydrocarbon pool fire simulations

    SciTech Connect

    BURNS,SHAWN P.

    1999-12-01

    The importance of turbulent fluctuations in temperature and species concentration in thermal radiation transport modeling for combustion applications is well accepted by the radiation transport and combustion communities. A number of experimental and theoretical studies over the last twenty years have shown that fluctuations in the temperature and species concentrations may increase the effective emittance of a turbulent flame by as much as 50% to 300% over the value that would be expected from the mean temperatures and concentrations. With the possibility of such a large effect on the principal mode of heat transfer from a fire, it is extremely important for fire modeling efforts that turbulence radiation interaction be well characterized and possible modeling approaches understood. Toward this end, this report seeks to accomplish three goals. First, the principal turbulence radiation interaction closure terms are defined. Second, an order of magnitude analysis is performed to understand the relative importance of the various closure terms. Finally, the state of the art in turbulence radiation interaction closure modeling is reviewed. Hydrocarbon pool fire applications are of particular interest in this report and this is the perspective from which this review proceeds. Experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that, for this type of heavily sooting flame, the turbulent radiation interaction effect is dominated by the nonlinear dependence of the Planck function on the temperature. Additional effects due to the correlation between turbulent fluctuations in the absorptivity and temperature may be small relative to the Planck function effect for heavily sooting flames. This observation is drawn from a number of experimental and theoretical discussions. Nevertheless, additional analysis and data is needed to validate this observation for heavily sooting buoyancy dominated plumes.

  4. A magnetic reconnection model for shock-turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2014-05-01

    It is well recognized that several kinds of shock waves such as the Earth's bow shocks, transient shocks produced by solar flares, etc. play very important roles in solar system plasmas. Shocks are also ubiquitous in reconnection situations. It has been considered that shocks are essential to materialize a fast reconnection. In the previous papers [1-3], we considered the effects of turbulence in the fast magnetic reconnection. There we stressed the importance of the interaction between turbulence and mean-field structures as well as the importance of the balance between the transport enhancement and suppression. Considering the importance of shocks, it is required to treat shock--turbulent interaction properly in a turbulent reconnection model. In the context of turbulence theory and modeling, the shock--turbulence interaction is a very challenging problem. With the interactions with a shock, turbulence properties change considerably: (i) The intensity of fluctuations changes in an anisotropic manner; (ii) The vorticity structure is also strongly affected; (iii) The turbulence length scale changes in a complex manner across the shock; and so on. Towards the theory treating these points, in the present work, we propose a turbulence model with the density fluctuation effects incorporated. The inclusion of the density variance leads to a complicated expressions for the turbulent correlations such as the Reynolds (and Maxwell) stresses and the turbulent electromotive force, which leads to deeper understanding of the turbulent transport in shocks. It is expected that a numerical simulation of magnetic reconnection with the present turbulence model will give substantially different results near the shock regions. [1] Yokoi, N. and Hoshino, M. Phys. Plasmas 18, 111208 (2011). [2] Higashimori, K., Yokoi, N., and Hoshino, M.) Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 255001 (2013). [3] Yokoi, N., Higashimori, K., and Hoshino, M. Phys. Plsamas 20, 122310 (2013).

  5. Beyond-standard-model tensor interaction and hadron phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Courtoy, Aurore; Baessler, Stefan; Gonzalez-Alonso, Martin; Liuti, Simonetta

    2015-10-15

    Here, we evaluate the impact of recent developments in hadron phenomenology on extracting possible fundamental tensor interactions beyond the standard model. We show that a novel class of observables, including the chiral-odd generalized parton distributions, and the transversity parton distribution function can contribute to the constraints on this quantity. Experimental extractions of the tensor hadronic matrix elements, if sufficiently precise, will provide a, so far, absent testing ground for lattice QCD calculations.

  6. Beyond-Standard-Model Tensor Interaction and Hadron Phenomenology.

    PubMed

    Courtoy, Aurore; Baeßler, Stefan; González-Alonso, Martín; Liuti, Simonetta

    2015-10-16

    We evaluate the impact of recent developments in hadron phenomenology on extracting possible fundamental tensor interactions beyond the standard model. We show that a novel class of observables, including the chiral-odd generalized parton distributions, and the transversity parton distribution function can contribute to the constraints on this quantity. Experimental extractions of the tensor hadronic matrix elements, if sufficiently precise, will provide a, so far, absent testing ground for lattice QCD calculations. PMID:26550868

  7. A validation study of a stochastic model of human interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchfield, Mitchel Talmadge

    The purpose of this dissertation is to validate a stochastic model of human interactions which is part of a developmentalism paradigm. Incorporating elements of ancient and contemporary philosophy and science, developmentalism defines human development as a progression of increasing competence and utilizes compatible theories of developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, educational psychology, social psychology, curriculum development, neurology, psychophysics, and physics. To validate a stochastic model of human interactions, the study addressed four research questions: (a) Does attitude vary over time? (b) What are the distributional assumptions underlying attitudes? (c) Does the stochastic model, {-}N{intlimitssbsp{-infty}{infty}}varphi(chi,tau)\\ Psi(tau)dtau, have utility for the study of attitudinal distributions and dynamics? (d) Are the Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein theories applicable to human groups? Approximately 25,000 attitude observations were made using the Semantic Differential Scale. Positions of individuals varied over time and the logistic model predicted observed distributions with correlations between 0.98 and 1.0, with estimated standard errors significantly less than the magnitudes of the parameters. The results bring into question the applicability of Fisherian research designs (Fisher, 1922, 1928, 1938) for behavioral research based on the apparent failure of two fundamental assumptions-the noninteractive nature of the objects being studied and normal distribution of attributes. The findings indicate that individual belief structures are representable in terms of a psychological space which has the same or similar properties as physical space. The psychological space not only has dimension, but individuals interact by force equations similar to those described in theoretical physics models. Nonlinear regression techniques were used to estimate Fermi-Dirac parameters from the data. The model explained a high degree

  8. Modeling of flap endonuclease interactions with DNA substrate.

    PubMed

    Allawi, Hatim T; Kaiser, Michael W; Onufriev, Alexey V; Ma, Wu-Po; Brogaard, Andrew E; Case, David A; Neri, Bruce P; Lyamichev, Victor I

    2003-05-01

    Structure-specific 5' nucleases play an important role in DNA replication and repair uniquely recognizing an overlap flap DNA substrate and processing it into a DNA nick. However, in the absence of a high-resolution structure of the enzyme/DNA complex, the mechanism underlying this recognition and substrate specificity, which is key to the enzyme's function, remains unclear. Here, we propose a three-dimensional model of the structure-specific 5' flap endonuclease from Pyrococcus furiosus in its complex with DNA. The model is based on the known X-ray structure of the enzyme and a variety of biochemical and molecular dynamics (MD) data utilized in the form of distance restraints between the enzyme and the DNA. Contacts between the 5' flap endonuclease and the sugar-phosphate backbone of the overlap flap substrate were identified using enzyme activity assays on substrates with methylphosphonate or 2'-O-methyl substitutions. The enzyme footprint extends two to four base-pairs upstream and eight to nine base-pairs downstream of the cleavage site, thus covering 10-13 base-pairs of duplex DNA. The footprint data are consistent with a model in which the substrate is bound in the DNA-binding groove such that the downstream duplex interacts with the helix-hairpin-helix motif of the enzyme. MD simulations to identify the substrate orientation in this model are consistent with the results of the enzyme activity assays on the methylphosphonate and 2'-O-methyl-modified substrates. To further refine the model, 5' flap endonuclease variants with alanine point substitutions at amino acid residues expected to contact phosphates in the substrate and one deletion mutant were tested in enzyme activity assays on the methylphosphonate-modified substrates. Changes in the enzyme footprint observed for two point mutants, R64A and R94A, and for the deletion mutant in the enzyme's beta(A)/beta(B) region, were interpreted as being the result of specific interactions in the enzyme/DNA complex

  9. Stochastic model of agent interaction with opinion leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellero, Andrea; Fasano, Giovanni; Sorato, Annamaria

    2013-04-01

    We analyze the problem of agents' interactions in a given population. The purpose of this paper is twofold. Starting from a scheme proposed by Galam [Physica A0378-437110.1016/S0378-4371(02)01582-0 320, 571 (2003)], which is based on a majority rule to treat the individuals’ interactions, we first study some of its relevant properties. Then, we introduce special individuals, called opinion leaders, who play a key role in information spreading in several practical applications. Opinion leaders have the special feature of strongly interfering with the process based on the majority rule, speeding up the diffusion. We consider a model describing agents’ interactions, which encompasses Galam's proposal, where opinion leaders are included as special agents. Then we study its specific properties which significantly recast and extend some conclusions drawn for the models given by Galam and Ellero, Fasano, and Sorato [Physica A0378-437110.1016/j.physa.2009.06.002 388, 3901 (2009)]. Finally, we provide theoretical and numerical results concerning the dynamics of our model, showing that a small percentage of opinion leaders may both accelerate and/or even reverse the overall consensus among all the agents.

  10. Space station crew safety: Human factors interaction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M. M.; Junge, M. K.

    1985-01-01

    A model of the various human factors issues and interactions that might affect crew safety is developed. The first step addressed systematically the central question: How is this space station different from all other spacecraft? A wide range of possible issue was identified and researched. Five major topics of human factors issues that interacted with crew safety resulted: Protocols, Critical Habitability, Work Related Issues, Crew Incapacitation and Personal Choice. Second, an interaction model was developed that would show some degree of cause and effect between objective environmental or operational conditions and the creation of potential safety hazards. The intermediary steps between these two extremes of causality were the effects on human performance and the results of degraded performance. The model contains three milestones: stressor, human performance (degraded) and safety hazard threshold. Between these milestones are two countermeasure intervention points. The first opportunity for intervention is the countermeasure against stress. If this countermeasure fails, performance degrades. The second opportunity for intervention is the countermeasure against error. If this second countermeasure fails, the threshold of a potential safety hazard may be crossed.

  11. Model-based description of environment interaction for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Carlo; Pagello, Enrico; Vianello, Marco

    1999-01-01

    We consider a mobile robot that attempts to accomplish a task by reaching a given goal, and interacts with its environment through a finite set of actions and observations. The interaction between robot and environment is modeled by Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDP). The robot takes its decisions in presence of uncertainty about the current state, by maximizing its reward gained during interactions with the environment. It is able to self-locate into the environment by collecting actions and perception histories during the navigation. To make the state estimation more reliable, we introduce an additional information in the model without adding new states and without discretizing the considered measures. Thus, we associate to the state transition probabilities also a continuous metric given through the mean and the variance of some significant sensor measurements suitable to be kept under continuous form, such as odometric measurements, showing that also such unreliable data can supply a great deal of information to the robot. The overall control system of the robot is structured as a two-levels layered architecture, where the low level implements several collision avoidance algorithms, while the upper level takes care of the navigation problem. In this paper, we concentrate on how to use POMDP models at the upper level.

  12. Analyzing Groundwater-Vegetation Interactions using a Dynamic Agroecosystem Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soylu, M. E.; Kucharik, C. J.; Loheide, S. P.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater is a crucial source of water for vegetation, especially in arid and semiarid environments in many regions around the world and its availability controls the distribution and the physiology of plant species. However, the impact of groundwater on vegetation is not completely understood mainly due to the limited ability of current models to simulate groundwater and vegetation interactions. Existing land surface models (LSM) simulate water and energy fluxes among soil-vegetation-atmosphere systems in a process-based way, but lack a detailed simulation of soil water movement in the unsaturated zone, particularly when groundwater is present. Furthermore, there are only a few available LSM and/or process based vegetation models that can simulate agroecosystems, which are as important to understand as natural ecosystems considering they occupy approximately 40% of the global land surface. On the other hand, current physically-based, variably-saturated soil water flux models are able to accurately simulate water movement in the unsaturated zone. However, they often lack a detailed plant physiology component making it difficult to understand plant responses to both variations in energy fluxes and upward capillary fluxes in shallow groundwater environments. To connect these two different model types, the objectives of this study are (1) to incorporate an advanced dynamic agroecosystem model (Agro-IBIS) and a variably saturated soil water flow model (Hydrus-1D) into a single framework that is capable of simulating groundwater and plant/crop system interactions in a fully, physically-based fashion, and (2) to apply this model using observed climate records to better understand the responses of managed and natural ecosystems to varied water table depths under inter-annual climate forcing conditions. The model results show that as the water table becomes shallower, (1) soil temperature decreases due to the moisture content driven effects on the thermal diffusivity of

  13. Interactions between model bacterial membranes and synthetic antimicrobials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lihua; Mishra, Abhijit; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2006-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides comprise a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. It has been shown that natural antimicrobial peptides and their analogs can permeate bacterial membranes selectively. There are a number of proposed models for this action, but the detailed molecular mechanism of the induced membrane permeation remains unclear. We investigate interactions between model bacterial membranes and a prototypical family of phenylene ethynylene-based antimicrobials with controllable hydrophilic and hydrophobic volume fractions, controllable charge placement. Preliminary results from synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) results will be presented.

  14. Modeling the cell division cycle: cdc2 and cyclin interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, J J

    1991-01-01

    The proteins cdc2 and cyclin form a heterodimer (maturation promoting factor) that controls the major events of the cell cycle. A mathematical model for the interactions of cdc2 and cyclin is constructed. Simulation and analysis of the model show that the control system can operate in three modes: as a steady state with high maturation promoting factor activity, as a spontaneous oscillator, or as an excitable switch. We associate the steady state with metaphase arrest in unfertilized eggs, the spontaneous oscillations with rapid division cycles in early embryos, and the excitable switch with growth-controlled division cycles typical of nonembryonic cells. PMID:1831270

  15. Sdg interacting-boson model applied to /sup 168/Er

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshinaga, N.; Akiyama, Y.; Arima, A.

    1986-03-17

    The sdg interacting-boson model is applied to /sup 168/Er. Energy levels and E2 transitions are calculated. This model is shown to solve the problem of anharmonicity regarding the excitation energy of the first K/sup ..pi../ = 4/sup +/ band relative to that of the first K/sup ..pi../ = 2/sup +/ one. The level scheme including the K/sup ..pi../ = 3/sup +/ band is well reproduced and the calculated B(E2)'s are consistent with the experimental data.

  16. An investigation of ab initio shell-model interactions derived by no-core shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, XiaoBao; Dong, GuoXiang; Li, QingFeng; Shen, CaiWan; Yu, ShaoYing

    2016-09-01

    The microscopic shell-model effective interactions are mainly based on the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT), the first work of which can be traced to Brown and Kuo's first attempt in 1966, derived from the Hamada-Johnston nucleon-nucleon potential. However, the convergence of the MBPT is still unclear. On the other hand, ab initio theories, such as Green's function Monte Carlo (GFMC), no-core shell model (NCSM), and coupled-cluster theory with single and double excitations (CCSD), have made many progress in recent years. However, due to the increasing demanding of computing resources, these ab initio applications are usually limited to nuclei with mass up to A = 16. Recently, people have realized the ab initio construction of valence-space effective interactions, which is obtained through a second-time renormalization, or to be more exactly, projecting the full-manybody Hamiltonian into core, one-body, and two-body cluster parts. In this paper, we present the investigation of such ab initio shell-model interactions, by the recent derived sd-shell effective interactions based on effective J-matrix Inverse Scattering Potential (JISP) and chiral effective-field theory (EFT) through NCSM. In this work, we have seen the similarity between the ab initio shellmodel interactions and the interactions obtained by MBPT or by empirical fitting. Without the inclusion of three-body (3-bd) force, the ab initio shell-model interactions still share similar defects with the microscopic interactions by MBPT, i.e., T = 1 channel is more attractive while T = 0 channel is more repulsive than empirical interactions. The progress to include more many-body correlations and 3-bd force is still badly needed, to see whether such efforts of ab initio shell-model interactions can reach similar precision as the interactions fitted to experimental data.

  17. Modeling insurer-homeowner interactions in managing natural disaster risk.

    PubMed

    Kesete, Yohannes; Peng, Jiazhen; Gao, Yang; Shan, Xiaojun; Davidson, Rachel A; Nozick, Linda K; Kruse, Jamie

    2014-06-01

    The current system for managing natural disaster risk in the United States is problematic for both homeowners and insurers. Homeowners are often uninsured or underinsured against natural disaster losses, and typically do not invest in retrofits that can reduce losses. Insurers often do not want to insure against these losses, which are some of their biggest exposures and can cause an undesirably high chance of insolvency. There is a need to design an improved system that acknowledges the different perspectives of the stakeholders. In this article, we introduce a new modeling framework to help understand and manage the insurer's role in catastrophe risk management. The framework includes a new game-theoretic optimization model of insurer decisions that interacts with a utility-based homeowner decision model and is integrated with a regional catastrophe loss estimation model. Reinsurer and government roles are represented as bounds on the insurer-insured interactions. We demonstrate the model for a full-scale case study for hurricane risk to residential buildings in eastern North Carolina; present the results from the perspectives of all stakeholders-primary insurers, homeowners (insured and uninsured), and reinsurers; and examine the effect of key parameters on the results.

  18. Modeling the interactions between compliant microcapsules and pillars in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangdong; Alexeev, Alexander; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Balazs, Anna C.

    2007-07-01

    Using a computational model, we investigate the motion of microcapsules inside a microchannel that encompasses a narrow constriction. The microcapsules are composed of a compliant, elastic shell and an encapsulated fluid; these fluid-filled shells model synthetic polymeric microcapsules or biological cells (e.g., leukocytes). Driven by an imposed flow, the capsules are propelled along the microchannel and through the constricted region, which is formed by two pillars that lie in registry, extending from the top and bottom walls of the channels. The tops of these pillars (facing into the microchannel) are modified to exhibit either a neutral or an attractive interaction with the microcapsules. The pillars (and constriction) model topological features that can be introduced into microfluidic devices or the physical and chemical heterogeneities that are inherently present in biological vessels. To simulate the behavior of this complex system, we employ a hybrid method that integrates the lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) for fluid dynamics and the lattice spring model (LSM) for the micromechanics of elastic solids. Through this LBM/LSM technique, we probe how the capsule's stiffness and interaction with the pillars affect its passage through the chambers. The results yield guidelines for regulating the movement of microcarriers in microfluidic systems and provide insight into the flow properties of biological cells in capillaries.

  19. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  20. A computer model of solar panel-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, D. L.; Freeman, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    High power solar arrays for satellite power systems are presently being planned with dimensions of kilometers, and with tens of kilovolts distributed over their surface. Such systems face many plasma interaction problems, such as power leakage to the plasma, particle focusing, and anomalous arcing. These effects cannot be adequately modeled without detailed knowledge of the plasma sheath structure and space charge effects. Laboratory studies of 1 by 10 meter solar array in a simulated low Earth orbit plasma are discussed. The plasma screening process is discussed, program theory is outlined, and a series of calibration models is presented. These models are designed to demonstrate that PANEL is capable of accurate self consistant space charge calculations. Such models include PANEL predictions for the Child-Langmuir diode problem.

  1. A Computational Model for Rotor-Fuselage Interactional Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Barnwell, Richard W.; Gorton, Susan Althoff

    2000-01-01

    A novel unsteady rotor-fuselage interactional aerodynamics model has been developed. This model loosely couples a Generalized Dynamic Wake Theory (GDWT) to a thin-layer Navier-Stokes solution procedure. This coupling is achieved using an unsteady pressure jump boundary condition in the Navier-Stokes model. The new unsteady pressure jump boundary condition models each rotor blade as a moving pressure jump which travels around the rotor azimuth and is applied between two adjacent planes in a cylindrical, non-rotating grid. Comparisons are made between measured and predicted time-averaged and time-accurate rotor inflow ratios. Additional comparisons are made between measured and predicted unsteady surface pressures on the top centerline and sides of the fuselage.

  2. Estimation and Model Selection for Finite Mixtures of Latent Interaction Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Jui-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Latent interaction models and mixture models have received considerable attention in social science research recently, but little is known about how to handle if unobserved population heterogeneity exists in the endogenous latent variables of the nonlinear structural equation models. The current study estimates a mixture of latent interaction…

  3. How to model the interaction of charged Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieronimus, Reint; Raschke, Simon; Heuer, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the interaction of charged Janus particles including screening effects. The explicit interaction is mapped via a least square method on a variable number n of systematically generated tensors that reflect the angular dependence of the potential. For n = 2 we show that the interaction is equivalent to a model previously described by Erdmann, Kröger, and Hess (EKH). Interestingly, this mapping is for n = 2 not able to capture the subtleties of the interaction for small screening lengths. Rather, a larger number of tensors has to be used. We find that the characteristics of the Janus type interaction plays an important role for the aggregation behavior. We obtained cluster structures up to the size of 13 particles for n = 2 and 36 and screening lengths κ-1 = 0.1 and 1.0 via Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of the screening length is analyzed and the structures are compared to results for an electrostatic-type potential and for the multipole-expanded Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We find that a dipole-like potential (EKH or dipole DLVO approximation) is not able to sufficiently reproduce the anisotropy effects of the potential. Instead, a higher order expansion has to be used to obtain cluster structures that are compatible with experimental observations. The resulting minimum-energy clusters are compared to those of sticky hard sphere systems. Janus particles with a short-range screened interaction resemble sticky hard sphere clusters for all considered particle numbers, whereas for long-range screening even very small clusters are structurally different.

  4. Agent Based Modeling of Human Gut Microbiome Interactions and Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Shashkova, Tatiana; Popenko, Anna; Tyakht, Alexander; Peskov, Kirill; Kosinsky, Yuri; Bogolubsky, Lev; Raigorodskii, Andrei; Ischenko, Dmitry; Alexeev, Dmitry; Govorun, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Background Intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the human health. It is involved in the digestion and protects the host against external pathogens. Examination of the intestinal microbiome interactions is required for understanding of the community influence on host health. Studies of the microbiome can provide insight on methods of improving health, including specific clinical procedures for individual microbial community composition modification and microbiota correction by colonizing with new bacterial species or dietary changes. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work we report an agent-based model of interactions between two bacterial species and between species and the gut. The model is based on reactions describing bacterial fermentation of polysaccharides to acetate and propionate and fermentation of acetate to butyrate. Antibiotic treatment was chosen as disturbance factor and used to investigate stability of the system. System recovery after antibiotic treatment was analyzed as dependence on quantity of feedback interactions inside the community, therapy duration and amount of antibiotics. Bacterial species are known to mutate and acquire resistance to the antibiotics. The ability to mutate was considered to be a stochastic process, under this suggestion ratio of sensitive to resistant bacteria was calculated during antibiotic therapy and recovery. Conclusion/Significance The model confirms a hypothesis of feedbacks mechanisms necessity for providing functionality and stability of the system after disturbance. High fraction of bacterial community was shown to mutate during antibiotic treatment, though sensitive strains could become dominating after recovery. The recovery of sensitive strains is explained by fitness cost of the resistance. The model demonstrates not only quantitative dynamics of bacterial species, but also gives an ability to observe the emergent spatial structure and its alteration, depending on various feedback mechanisms

  5. Making Other Worlds: Modelling Past Interactions of Agriculture and Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, J.

    2012-04-01

    It is argued that the understanding of past agricultural erosion has been greatly simplified because conceptual or numerical models have been used that emphasize the technical aspects of the erosion process, fail to recognize the spatial and temporal scaling of the erosion, and especially ignore the idea that such erosion is the result of multiple, interacting decisions made by people. While there have been significant developments in the first two of these areas over the last decade, there has been little explicit recognition of the third of these limitations. This problem is a consequence of the very different disciplinary approaches that are needed. One method that can be used to address this limitation is that of agent-based modelling. Agent-based models permit an explicit representation of how individuals or groups of individuals interact with each other and their environment. Furthermore, environmental changes can be fed back into agent behaviour, and other potential controls such as climate variations can be assessed. The CYBEROSION modelling framework has been developed to take this approach and evaluate patterns of erosion due to past land-use decision-making. Examples will be drawn from case studies in the Neolithic and Bronze Age, largely from the Mediterranean region. The emphasis is on modelling as a heuristic approach to understanding, rather than necessarily as a predictive tool. In particular, it provides guidance in relation to which parts of existing discipline-bound knowledge are needed to produce an explicit, interdisciplinary understanding of patterns of landscape change as a result of changing agricultural practice. Results from the case studies demonstrate how complex spatio-temporal patterns of past erosion can arise from relatively simple, local interactions between people and their environment. To conclude, will also be an assessment of more modern examples, as well as of related literature in archaeology, and geoarchaeology, and a

  6. Galaxies and Genes: How to Model Interacting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harfst, Stefan; Gerds, Christoph; Theis, Christian

    The observed features of interacting galaxies (e.g. tidal tails) provide a lot of information on the dynamics of such a system. Dark matter halos, for example, play an important rôle for the dynamical evolution of galaxies so that they should obviously have perceptible effects on the interaction. Unfortunately, the problem of modeling interacting galaxies from observational data suffers from an extended parameter space. Recently it has been shown that a Genetic Algorithm (GA) can be applied to this problem (Wahde 1998; Theis 1999). The general idea of a GA is to mimic natural evolution: A population of individuals which correspond to single points in parameter space (i.e. single N-body simulations) is evolved according to the principle of ``survival of the fittest''. The fitness is calculated by a comparison of observed intensities with the numerical model. New populations are created by ``sexual reproduction'' whereas individuals with a higher fitness reproduce themselves more often. This breeding process is repeated until a sufficient fit is achieved. Until now the GA has been applied to a chosen reference model (i.e. a preferred set of parameters) as in the case of NGC 4449 (Theis 1999). An automatic procedure for the selection of a suitable set of parameters on the basis of observational data is highly desirable. A first step in order to achieve this goal is an ``idealized'' observation which can be computed from a self-consistent N-body simulation. By this not only the parameters of the interaction are in control but one can also adjust the quality of the observational data allowing to check the general applicability of the GA to observational data.

  7. PREFACE: Singular interactions in quantum mechanics: solvable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Antonio, Gianfausto; Exner, Pavel; Geyler, Vladimir

    2005-06-01

    This issue comprises two dozen research papers which are all in one sense or another devoted to models in which the interaction is singular and sharply localized; a typical example is a quantum particle interacting with a family of δ-type potentials. Such an idealization usually makes analysis of their properties considerably easier, sometimes allowing us to reduce it to a simple algebraic problem—this is why one speaks about solvable models. The subject can be traced back to the early days of quantum mechanics; however, the progress in this field was slow and uneven until the 1960s, mostly because singular interactions are often difficult to deal with mathematically and intuitive arguments do not work. After overcoming the initial difficulties the `classical' theory of point interactions was developed, and finally summarized in 1988 in a monograph by Albeverio, Gesztesy, Høegh-Krohn, and Holden, which you will find quoted in numerous places within this issue. A reliable way to judge theories is to observe the progress they make within one or two decades. In this case there is no doubt that the field has witnessed a continuous development and covered areas which nobody had thought of when the subject first emerged. The reader may see it in the second edition of the aforementioned book which was published by AMS Chelsea only recently and contained a brief survey of these new achievements. It is no coincidence that this topical issue appears at the same time; it has been conceived as its counterpart and a forum at which fresh results in the field can demonstrated. Let us briefly survey the contents of the issue. While the papers included have in common the basic subject, they represent a broad spectrum philosophically as well as technically, and any attempt to classify them is somewhat futile. Nevertheless, we will divide them into a few groups. The first comprises contributions directly related to the usual point-interaction ideology. M Correggi and one of the

  8. Laboratory modeling and analysis of aircraft-lightning interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, C. D.; Trost, T. F.

    1982-01-01

    Modeling studies of the interaction of a delta wing aircraft with direct lightning strikes were carried out using an approximate scale model of an F-106B. The model, which is three feet in length, is subjected to direct injection of fast current pulses supplied by wires, which simulate the lightning channel and are attached at various locations on the model. Measurements are made of the resulting transient electromagnetic fields using time derivative sensors. The sensor outputs are sampled and digitized by computer. The noise level is reduced by averaging the sensor output from ten input pulses at each sample time. Computer analysis of the measured fields includes Fourier transformation and the computation of transfer functions for the model. Prony analysis is also used to determine the natural frequencies of the model. Comparisons of model natural frequencies extracted by Prony analysis with those for in flight direct strike data usually show lower damping in the in flight case. This is indicative of either a lightning channel with a higher impedance than the wires on the model, only one attachment point, or short streamers instead of a long channel.

  9. Water on hydrophobic surfaces: Mechanistic modeling of hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Hahn, Tobias; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-09-23

    Mechanistic models are successfully used for protein purification process development as shown for ion-exchange column chromatography (IEX). Modeling and simulation of hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) in the column mode has been seldom reported. As a combination of these two techniques is often encountered in biopharmaceutical purification steps, accurate modeling of protein adsorption in HIC is a core issue for applying holistic model-based process development, especially in the light of the Quality by Design (QbD) approach. In this work, a new mechanistic isotherm model for HIC is derived by consideration of an equilibrium between well-ordered water molecules and bulk-like ordered water molecules on the hydrophobic surfaces of protein and ligand. The model's capability of describing column chromatography experiments is demonstrated with glucose oxidase, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lysozyme on Capto™ Phenyl (high sub) as model system. After model calibration from chromatograms of bind-and-elute experiments, results were validated with batch isotherms and prediction of further gradient elution chromatograms. PMID:27575919

  10. The Development in modeling Tibetan Plateau Land/Climate Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yongkang; Liu, Ye; li, qian; Maheswor Shrestha, Maheswor; Ma, Hsi-Yen; Cox, Peter; Sun, shufen; Koike, Toshio

    2015-04-01

    Tibetan Plateau (TP) plays an important role in influencing the continental and planetary scale climate, including East Asian and South Asian monsoon, circulation and precipitation over West Pacific and Indian Oceans. The numerical study has identified TP as the area with strongest land/atmosphere interactions over the midlatitude land. The land degradation there has also affected the monsoon precipitation in TP along the monsoon pathway. The water cycle there affects water sources for major Asian river systems, which include the Tarim, Amu Darya, Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra, Irrawaddy, Salween, Mekong, Yellow, and Yangtze Rivers. Despite the importance of TP land process in the climate system, the TP land surface processes are poorly modeled due to lack of data available for model validation. To better understand, simulate, and project the role of Tibetan Plateau land surface processes, better parameterization of the Tibetan Land surface processes have been developed and evaluated. The recently available field measurement there and satellite observation have greatly helped this development. This paper presents these new developments and preliminary results using the newly developed biophysical/dynamic vegetation model, frozen soil model, and glacier model. In recent CMIP5 simulation, the CMIP5 models with dynamic vegetation model show poor performance in simulating the TP vegetation and climate. To better simulate the TP vegetation condition and its interaction with climate, we have developed biophysical/dynamic vegetation model, the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model version 4/Top-down Representation of Interactive Foliage and Flora Including Dynamics Model (SSiB4/TRIFFID), based on water, carbon, and energy balance. The simulated vegetation variables are updates, driven by carbon assimilation, allocation, and accumulation, as well as competition between plant functional types. The model has been validated with the station data, including those measured over the TP

  11. Exploring the Earth System through online interactive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coogan, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Upper level Earth Science students commonly have a strong background of mathematical training from Math courses, however their ability to use mathematical models to solve Earth Science problems is commonly limited. Their difficulty comes, in part, because of the nature of the subject matter. There is a large body of background ';conceptual' and ';observational' understanding and knowledge required in the Earth Sciences before in-depth quantification becomes useful. For example, it is difficult to answer questions about geological processes until you can identify minerals and rocks and understand the general geodynamic implications of their associations. However, science is fundamentally quantitative. To become scientists students have to translate their conceptual understanding into quantifiable models. Thus, it is desirable for students to become comfortable with using mathematical models to test hypotheses. With the aim of helping to bridging the gap between conceptual understanding and quantification I have started to build an interactive teaching website based around quantitative models of Earth System processes. The site is aimed at upper-level undergraduate students and spans a range of topics that will continue to grow as time allows. The mathematical models are all built for the students, allowing them to spend their time thinking about how the ';model world' changes in response to their manipulation of the input variables. The web site is divided into broad topics or chapters (Background, Solid Earth, Ocean and Atmosphere, Earth history) and within each chapter there are different subtopic (e.g. Solid Earth: Core, Mantle, Crust) and in each of these individual webpages. Each webpage, or topic, starts with an introduction to the topic, followed by an interactive model that the students can use sliders to control the input to and watch how the results change. This interaction between student and model is guided by a series of multiple choice questions that

  12. Resonating valence bond wave functions and classical interacting dimer models.

    PubMed

    Damle, Kedar; Dhar, Deepak; Ramola, Kabir

    2012-06-15

    We relate properties of nearest-neighbor resonating valence-bond (NNRVB) wave functions for SU(g) spin systems on two-dimensional bipartite lattices to those of fully packed interacting classical dimer models on the same lattice. The interaction energy can be expressed as a sum of n-body potentials V(n), which are recursively determined from the NNRVB wave function on finite subgraphs of the original lattice. The magnitude of the n-body interaction V(n) (n>1) is of order O(g(-(n-1))) for small g(-1). The leading term is a two-body nearest-neighbor interaction V2(g) favoring two parallel dimers on elementary plaquettes. For SU(2) spins, using our calculated value of V2(g=2), we find that the long-distance behavior of the bond-energy correlation function is dominated by an oscillatory term that decays as 1/|r|α with α≈1.22. This result is in remarkable quantitative agreement with earlier direct numerical studies of the corresponding wave function, which give α≈1.20. PMID:23004328

  13. Freed by interaction kinetic states in the Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, Klaus M.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2015-12-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in a one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattice of the Harper model. We show that a short or long range interaction between particles leads to emergence of delocalized pairs in the non-interacting localized phase. The properties of these freed by interaction kinetic states (FIKS) are analyzed numerically including the advanced Arnoldi method. We find that the number of sites populated by FIKS pairs grows algebraically with the system size with the maximal exponent b = 1, up to a largest lattice size N = 10 946 reached in our numerical simulations, thus corresponding to a complete delocalization of pairs. For delocalized FIKS pairs the spectral properties of such quasiperiodic operators represent a deep mathematical problem. We argue that FIKS pairs can be detected in the framework of recent cold atom experiments [M. Schreiber et al., Science 349, 842 (2015)] by a simple setup modification. We also discuss possible implications of FIKS pairs for electron transport in the regime of charge-density wave and high T c superconductivity.

  14. Periodic Striped Ground States in Ising Models with Competing Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Seiringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    We consider Ising models in two and three dimensions, with short range ferromagnetic and long range, power-law decaying, antiferromagnetic interactions. We let J be the ratio between the strength of the ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic interactions. The competition between these two kinds of interactions induces the system to form domains of minus spins in a background of plus spins, or vice versa. If the decay exponent p of the long range interaction is larger than d + 1, with d the space dimension, this happens for all values of J smaller than a critical value J c ( p), beyond which the ground state is homogeneous. In this paper, we give a characterization of the infinite volume ground states of the system, for p > 2 d and J in a left neighborhood of J c ( p). In particular, we prove that the quasi-one-dimensional states consisting of infinite stripes ( d = 2) or slabs ( d = 3), all of the same optimal width and orientation, and alternating magnetization, are infinite volume ground states. Our proof is based on localization bounds combined with reflection positivity.

  15. Modelling family 2 cystatins and their interaction with papain.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Suman Kumar; Bhuyan, Rajabrata; Seal, Alpana

    2013-01-01

    Cystatins are extensively studied cysteine protease inhibitors, found in wide range of organisms with highly conserved structural folds. S-type of cystatins is well known for their abundance in saliva, high selectivity and poorer activity towards host cysteine proteases in comparison to their immediate ancestor cystatin C. Despite more than 90% sequence similarity, the members of this group show highly dissimilar binding affinity towards papain. Cystatin M/E is a potent inhibitor of legumain and papain like cysteine proteases and recognized for its involvement in skin barrier formation and potential role as a tumor suppressor gene. However, the structures of these proteins and their complexes with papain or legumain are still unknown. In the present study, we have employed computational methods to get insight into the interactions between papain and cystatins. Three-dimensional structures of the cystatins are generated by homology modelling, refined with molecular dynamics simulation, validated through numerous web servers and finally complexed with papain using ZDOCK algorithm in Discovery Studio. A high degree of shape complementarity is observed within the complexes, stabilized by numerous hydrogen bonds (HB) and hydrophobic interactions. Using interaction energy, HB and solvent accessible surface area analyses, we have identified a series of key residues that may be involved in papain-cystatin interaction. Differential approaches of cystatins towards papain are also noticed which are possibly responsible for diverse inhibitory activity within the group. These findings will improve our understanding of fundamental inhibitory mechanisms of cystatin and provide clues for further research.

  16. Modeling Callisto's Interaction with the Jovian Magnetospheric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, L.; Feyerabend, M.; Simon, S.; Motschmann, U. M.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of the Jovian magnetospheric environment with an atmosphere and induced dipole at Callisto is investigated by applying a hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulation code. Callisto is unique among the Galilean satellites in its interaction with the ambient magnetospheric plasma as the gyroradii of the impinging plasma and pickup ions are large compared to the size of the moon. A kinetic representation of the ions is therefore mandatory to adequately describe the resulting asymmetries in the electromagnetic fields and the deflection of the plasma flow near Callisto. When Callisto is embedded in the magnetodisk lobes of Jupiter, a dipolar magnetic field is generated via induction in a subsurface ocean. This field creates an obstacle to the impinging magnetospheric plasma flow at the moon. However, when Callisto is located near the center of the Jovian current sheet, local magnetic perturbations due to the magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction are more than twice the strength of the background field and may therefore obscure any magnetic signal generated via induction in a subsurface ocean. Our simulations demonstrate that the deflection of the magnetospheric plasma into Callisto's wake cannot alone explain the plasma density enhancement of two orders of magnitude measured in the wake of the interaction region during Galileo flybys of the moon. However, through inclusion of an ionosphere around Callisto, modeled densities in the wake are consistent with in situ measurements.

  17. Periodic Striped Ground States in Ising Models with Competing Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Seiringer, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We consider Ising models in two and three dimensions, with short range ferromagnetic and long range, power-law decaying, antiferromagnetic interactions. We let J be the ratio between the strength of the ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic interactions. The competition between these two kinds of interactions induces the system to form domains of minus spins in a background of plus spins, or vice versa. If the decay exponent p of the long range interaction is larger than d + 1, with d the space dimension, this happens for all values of J smaller than a critical value J c (p), beyond which the ground state is homogeneous. In this paper, we give a characterization of the infinite volume ground states of the system, for p > 2d and J in a left neighborhood of J c (p). In particular, we prove that the quasi-one-dimensional states consisting of infinite stripes (d = 2) or slabs (d = 3), all of the same optimal width and orientation, and alternating magnetization, are infinite volume ground states. Our proof is based on localization bounds combined with reflection positivity.

  18. Turbulence modeling for shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillard, Randolph Pascal

    Accurate aerodynamic computational predictions are essential for the safety of space vehicles, but these computations are of limited accuracy when large pressure gradients are present in the flow. The goal of the current project is to improve the state of compressible turbulence modeling for high speed flows with shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions (SWTBLI). Emphasis is placed on models that can accurately predict the separated region caused by SWTBLI. These flows are classified as nonequilibrium boundary layers because of the very large and variable adverse pressure gradients caused by the shock waves. The Lag model was designed to model these nonequilibrium flows by incorporating history effects. Standard one- and two-equation models (Spalart Allmaras and SST) and the Lag model are run and compared to the new model. The focus of this work is thus to introduce a new model that builds on the success of the Lag model, but uses the Reynolds Stress Tensor (RST) as the lagged variable. This new model, the Reynolds stress tensor lag model (lagRST), is assessed against multiple wind tunnel tests and correlations as well as other models. The basis of the Lag and lagRST models is to preserve the accuracy of the standard turbulence models in equilibrium turbulence, when the Reynolds stresses are linearly related to the mean strain rates, but create a lag between mean strain rate effects and turbulence when nonequilibrium effects become important, such as in large pressure gradients. The effect this lag has on the results for SWTBLI and massively separated flows is determined. These computations are done with a modified version of the OVERFLOW code. This code solves the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations on overset grids. It was used for this study for its ability to input very complex geometries into the flow solver, such as the Space Shuttle in the full stack configuration. The model was successfully implemented within two versions of the

  19. Harnessing your GPU for interactive immersive oceanographic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, A. J.; Moore, C. W.

    2011-12-01

    We report on recent success using GPU for interactive Lagrangian (fish) and Eulerian (tsunami) modeling of marine systems. Lagrangian analyses based on numerical float tracks are a fundamental tool in hydrodynamic and marine biological modeling. In particular, spatially-explicit individual-based models (IBMs) can be used to explore how changes in coastal circulation affect fish recruitment, and 3D viewing of the results leads to new insights regarding the effects of behavior on spatial path. One limit to the usefulness of this modeling approach is the latency between submission of a run and examination of the results, especially when a large (i.e. statistically meaningful) number of individuals are being tracked through finely resolved current and scalar fields. Since float tracking is an inherently parallel problem, the hundreds of cores available in modern graphics cards (GPU) can readily increase the performance of suitably adapted code by two orders of magnitude at low cost. This offers a way forward to achieve interactive submission/examination of IBMs (and float tracks in general), even on a laptop computer. Latency is an even larger issue in tsunami forecasting, where there is a need to run simple deep-ocean shallow water wave models in real time, particularly during an event when tsunamigenic earthquake events occur outside known fault zones. This problem, too, lends itself to dramatic speedup via GPU, given a suitable parallel algorithm for the shallow water solver. Here we demonstrate successful model speedup using GPU-adapted code for: 1) a spatially explicit IBM prototype, based on pre-stored circulation model output for the Bering Sea; 2) real-time runs of tsunami propagation. In both cases, results will be presented using the stereo-immersive capabilities of the graphics card, for 3D animation.

  20. Dynamic modeling of plasma-vapor interactions during plasma disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Ehst, D.A.

    1992-05-01

    Intense deposition of energy in short times on fusion reactor components during a plasma disruption may cause severe surface erosion due to ablation of these components. The exact amount of the eroded material is very important to the reactor design and its lifetime. During the plasma deposition, the vaporized wall material will interact with the incoming plasma particles and may shield the rest of the wall from damage. The vapor shielding may then prolong the lifetime of these components and increase the reactor duty cycle. To correctly evaluate the impact of vapor shielding effect a comprehensive model is developed. In this model the dynamic slowing down of the plasma particles, both ions and electrons, with the eroded wall material is established. Different interaction processes between the plasma particles and the ablated material is included. The generated photons radiation source and the transport of this radiation through the vapor to the wall is modeled. Recent experimental data on disruptions is analyzed and compared with model predictions. Vapor shielding may be effective in reducing the overall erosion rate for certain plasma disruption parameters and conditions.

  1. Modeling of Propagation of Interacting Cracks Under Hydraulic Pressure Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Podgorney, Robert Karl

    2015-04-01

    A robust and reliable numerical model for fracture initiation and propagation, which includes the interactions among propagating fractures and the coupling between deformation, fracturing and fluid flow in fracture apertures and in the permeable rock matrix, would be an important tool for developing a better understanding of fracturing behaviors of crystalline brittle rocks driven by thermal and (or) hydraulic pressure gradients. In this paper, we present a physics-based hydraulic fracturing simulator based on coupling a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) for deformation and fracturing with conjugate lattice network flow model for fluid flow in both fractures and porous matrix. Fracturing is represented explicitly by removing broken bonds from the network to represent microcracks. Initiation of new microfractures and growth and coalescence of the microcracks leads to the formation of macroscopic fractures when external and/or internal loads are applied. The coupled DEM-network flow model reproduces realistic growth pattern of hydraulic fractures. In particular, simulation results of perforated horizontal wellbore clearly demonstrate that elastic interactions among multiple propagating fractures, fluid viscosity, strong coupling between fluid pressure fluctuations within fractures and fracturing, and lower length scale heterogeneities, collectively lead to complicated fracturing patterns.

  2. A multi-interacting-agent model for financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, Sílvio M. Duarte; Curado, E. M. F.; Nobre, F. D.

    2007-02-01

    Microscopic models, which resemble random magnetic systems, have been used recently in the literature for the description of financial markets. In the present work, a model with many interacting agents, similar to an Ising random magnet with infinite-range interactions, is investigated. The introduction of a local-field term, depending on the absolute value of a magnetization-like parameter-which measures the volatility of a financial market-leads to a significant improvement with respect to previously studied models in the literature. By investigating the return time series, we show that several features, characteristic of real financial markets, are better reproduced by the present model. In particular, within this approach one is able to provide a proper behavior for the following properties: (i) the power-law tails and the nonzero skewness of the probability distribution of returns; (ii) the exponential decay of the two-time autocorrelation function of returns, typical of high-frequency financial data; (iii) the so-called “leverage effect”, which corresponds to a negative correlation between past returns and future volatility.

  3. Modeling the interactions between pathogenic bacteria, bacteriophage and immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Chung Yin (Joey); Weitz, Joshua S.

    The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria has led to renewed interest in the use of bacteriophage (phage), or virus that infects bacteria, as a therapeutic agent against bacterial infections. However, little is known about the theoretical mechanism by which phage therapy may work. In particular, interactions between the bacteria, the phage and the host immune response crucially influences the outcome of the therapy. Few models of phage therapy have incorporated all these three components, and existing models suffer from unrealistic assumptions such as unbounded growth of the immune response. We propose a model of phage therapy with an emphasis on nonlinear feedback arising from interactions with bacteria and the immune response. Our model shows a synergistic effect between the phage and the immune response which underlies a possible mechanism for phage to catalyze the elimination of bacteria even when neither the immune response nor phage could do so alone. We study the significance of this effect for different parameters of infection and immune response, and discuss its implications for phage therapy.

  4. RANS Modeling of Benchmark Shockwave / Boundary Layer Interaction Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nick; Vyas, Manan; Yoder, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the computations of a set of shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interaction (SWTBLI) test cases using the Wind-US code, as part of the 2010 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) shock / boundary layer interaction workshop. The experiments involve supersonic flows in wind tunnels with a shock generator that directs an oblique shock wave toward the boundary layer along one of the walls of the wind tunnel. The Wind-US calculations utilized structured grid computations performed in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes mode. Three turbulence models were investigated: the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, the Menter Shear Stress Transport wavenumber-angular frequency two-equation model, and an explicit algebraic stress wavenumber-angular frequency formulation. Effects of grid resolution and upwinding scheme were also considered. The results from the CFD calculations are compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) data from the experiments. As expected, turbulence model effects dominated the accuracy of the solutions with upwinding scheme selection indicating minimal effects.!

  5. A Human View Model for Socio-Technical Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Holly A.; Tolk, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The Human View was developed as an additional architectural viewpoint to focus on the human part of a system. The Human View can be used to collect and organize data in order to understand how human operators interact and impact the other elements of a system. This framework can also be used to develop a model to describe how humans interact with each other in network enabled systems. These socio-technical interactions form the foundation of the emerging area of Human Interoperability. Human Interoperability strives to understand the relationships required between human operators that impact collaboration across networked environments, including the effect of belonging to different organizations. By applying organizational relationship concepts from network theory to the Human View elements, and aligning these relationships with a model developed to identify layers of coalition interoperability, the conditions for different levels for Human Interoperability for network enabled systems can be identified. These requirements can then be captured in the Human View products to improve the overall network enabled system.

  6. Group chase and escape model with chasers' interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takuya; Nakamura, Tomomichi; Ohira, Toru

    2016-04-01

    Group chase and escape is a new direction of studying collective behaviors merged with the traditional mathematical problems of chases and escapes proposed by Kamimura and Ohira in 2010. In their model, the chasers recognize only the escapees and pursue the nearest neighbor escapee, and the escapees recognize only the chasers and flee from the nearest neighbor chaser. We call the basic moving rule the nearest opponent interaction (NOI) strategy. In this paper we introduce a new strategy in the model. It is a local interaction that the chasers do not get too close each other, where we call the chasers' local interaction (CLI) strategy. The result of comparisons of the two strategies shows that when the number of the chasers is relatively small compared to the number of the escapees, the trapping time by the CLI strategy is much shorter than that by the NOI strategy. On the other hand, when the number of the chasers is larger than that of the escapees, this advantage of the CLI strategy does not appear. Also, we find that although chasers form clusters (spatial aggregates of chasers) when we apply the NOI strategy, the clusters appear less when we apply the CLI strategy.

  7. Fermented foods, neuroticism, and social anxiety: An interaction model.

    PubMed

    Hilimire, Matthew R; DeVylder, Jordan E; Forestell, Catherine A

    2015-08-15

    Animal models and clinical trials in humans suggest that probiotics can have an anxiolytic effect. However, no studies have examined the relationship between probiotics and social anxiety. Here we employ a cross-sectional approach to determine whether consumption of fermented foods likely to contain probiotics interacts with neuroticism to predict social anxiety symptoms. A sample of young adults (N=710, 445 female) completed self-report measures of fermented food consumption, neuroticism, and social anxiety. An interaction model, controlling for demographics, general consumption of healthful foods, and exercise frequency, showed that exercise frequency, neuroticism, and fermented food consumption significantly and independently predicted social anxiety. Moreover, fermented food consumption also interacted with neuroticism in predicting social anxiety. Specifically, for those high in neuroticism, higher frequency of fermented food consumption was associated with fewer symptoms of social anxiety. Taken together with previous studies, the results suggest that fermented foods that contain probiotics may have a protective effect against social anxiety symptoms for those at higher genetic risk, as indexed by trait neuroticism. While additional research is necessary to determine the direction of causality, these results suggest that consumption of fermented foods that contain probiotics may serve as a low-risk intervention for reducing social anxiety.

  8. Measuring and Modeling the Interactions Between DNA-Functionalized Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, William; Crocker, John

    2011-03-01

    DNA hybridization is an ideal tool to direct ``bottom-up'' assembly of complex materials and has been used to form crystalline assemblies of quantum dots, polymer microspheres and other materials made exclusively of DNA. In order to fully realize the potential of DNA-directed self-assembly, one must be able to quantitatively predict the binding energies and interaction potentials between the relevant ``building blocks.'' In this work, we use a scanning-line optical tweezers instrument to measure DNA-induced interactions between colloidal microspheres. We then use well-known concepts in statistical mechanics to model the pair-potentials, whose functional form and energetics of binding are intimately related to the equilibrium configurations of grafted polymers and polymer bridges. By measuring and modeling the pair interaction energies as a function of the essential system parameters (solution hybridization free energies, DNA concentrations, temperature, interparticle separation, etc.), we are able to develop simple, numerical tools that can be used to guide both experiment and simulation.

  9. Dynamic modeling of tube-support interaction in heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizian, Reza

    Flow-induced forces in heat exchangers can cause excessive tube vibration and interaction with their supports. Long term interaction may develop fretting-wear and consequently lead to tube failures. An accurate prediction of the tube-support interaction behavior is important to quantify tube fretting-wear. Therefore, a detailed study of the related friction and impact forces is required for formulating a precise wear model. This study aimed to develop a friction model for accurate representations of various states of the friction process, including elastic, plastic and partial slipping states. In addition, the tube-support impact model is verified both numerically and experimentally. A hybrid spring-damper rate dependent friction model was developed to precisely simulate the friction process from zero velocity to the gross slip state. This was achieved by considering various physical phenomena during the friction process including the Stribeck effect, varying break-away force, bristle elastic, plastic and partial-slipping behaviors. The slipping time in the velocity-limited friction model was compared to the LuGre friction model. The inability of the velocity limited friction model to detect the sticking region was explained by the dependency of a limiting velocity criterion on the varying break-away force and the Stribeck effect. This confirmed the importance of having an adaptive limiting velocity for the velocity limited friction model. In addition, the stress distribution within the contact region was studied in detail to demarcate different regions within a contact area during the friction process. This analysis attributed a physical meaning to each component of the new hybrid friction model. The ability of the hybrid model to accurately reproduce stick-slip behavior was examined using the Ozaki and Hashiguchi friction model and the Baumberger et al. experimental tests. The result showed better estimation of the stick-slip behavior, both qualitatively and

  10. Baryon-Baryon Interactions ---Nijmegen Extended-Soft-Core Models---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, T. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    We review the Nijmegen extended-soft-core (ESC) models for the baryon-baryon (BB) interactions of the SU(3) flavor-octet of baryons (N, Lambda, Sigma, and Xi). The interactions are basically studied from the meson-exchange point of view, in the spirit of the Yukawa-approach to the nuclear force problem [H. Yukawa, ``On the interaction of Elementary Particles I'', Proceedings of the Physico-Mathematical Society of Japan 17 (1935), 48], using generalized soft-core Yukawa-functions. These interactions are supplemented with (i) multiple-gluon-exchange, and (ii) structural effects due to the quark-core of the baryons. We present in some detail the most recent extended-soft-core model, henceforth referred to as ESC08, which is the most complete, sophisticated, and successful interaction-model. Furthermore, we discuss briefly its predecessor the ESC04-model [Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044007; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Ph ys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044008; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, nucl-th/0608074]. For the soft-core one-boson-exchange (OBE) models we refer to the literature [Th. A. Rijken, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Few-Body Problems in Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quebec, 1974, ed. R. J. Slobodrian, B. Cuec and R. Ramavataram (Presses Universitè Laval, Quebec, 1975), p. 136; Th. A. Rijken, Ph. D. thesis, University of Nijmegen, 1975; M. M. Nagels, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. D 17 (1978), 768; P. M. M. Maessen, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. C 40 (1989), 2226; Th. A. Rijken, V. G. J. Stoks and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 21; V. G. J. Stoks and Th. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 3009]. All ingredients of these latter models are also part of ESC08, and so a description of ESC08 comprises all models so far in principle. The extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions consist of local- and non-local-potentials due to (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of

  11. Modelling the interaction between flooding events and economic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grames, Johanna; Grass, Dieter; Prskawetz, Alexia; Blöschl, Günther

    2015-04-01

    Socio-hydrology describes the interaction between the socio-economy, water and population dynamics. Recent models analyze the interplay of community risk-coping culture, flooding damage and economic growth (Di Baldassarre, 2013, Viglione, 2014). These models descriptively explain the feedbacks between socio-economic development and natural disasters like floods. Contrary to these descriptive models, our approach develops an optimization model, where the intertemporal decision of an economic agent interacts with the hydrological system. This is the first economic growth model describing the interaction between the consumption and investment decisions of an economic agent and the occurrence of flooding events: Investments in defense capital can avoid floods even when the water level is high, but on the other hand such investment competes with investment in productive capital and hence may reduce the level of consumption. When floods occur, the flood damage therefore depends on the existing defense capital. The aim is to find an optimal tradeoff between investments in productive versus defense capital such as to optimize the stream of consumption in the long-term. We assume a non-autonomous exogenous periodic rainfall function (Yevjevich et.al. 1990, Zakaria 2001) which implies that the long-term equilibrium will be periodic . With our model we aim to derive mechanisms that allow consumption smoothing in the long term, and at the same time allow for optimal investment in flood defense to maximize economic output. We choose an aggregate welfare function that depends on the consumption level of the society as the objective function. I.e. we assume a social planer with perfect foresight that maximizes the aggregate welfare function. Within our model framework we can also study whether the path and level of defense capital (that protects people from floods) is related to the time preference rate of the social planner. Our model also allows to investigate how the frequency

  12. A Network Synthesis Model for Generating Protein Interaction Network Families

    PubMed Central

    Sahraeian, Sayed Mohammad Ebrahim; Yoon, Byung-Jun

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a novel network synthesis model that can generate families of evolutionarily related synthetic protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks. Given an ancestral network, the proposed model generates the network family according to a hypothetical phylogenetic tree, where the descendant networks are obtained through duplication and divergence of their ancestors, followed by network growth using network evolution models. We demonstrate that this network synthesis model can effectively create synthetic networks whose internal and cross-network properties closely resemble those of real PPI networks. The proposed model can serve as an effective framework for generating comprehensive benchmark datasets that can be used for reliable performance assessment of comparative network analysis algorithms. Using this model, we constructed a large-scale network alignment benchmark, called NAPAbench, and evaluated the performance of several representative network alignment algorithms. Our analysis clearly shows the relative performance of the leading network algorithms, with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The algorithm and source code of the network synthesis model and the network alignment benchmark NAPAbench are publicly available at http://www.ece.tamu.edu/bjyoon/NAPAbench/. PMID:22912671

  13. Defect modelling in an interactive 3-D CAD environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, D.; Potts, A.; McNab, A.; Toft, M.; Chapman, R. K.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes enhancement of the NDT Workbench, as presented at QNDE '98, to include theoretical models for the ultrasonic inspection of smooth planar defects, developed by British Energy and BNFL-Magnox Generation. The Workbench is a PC-based software package for the reconstruction, visualization and analysis of 3-D ultrasonic NDT data in an interactive CAD environment. This extension of the Workbeach now provides the user with a well established modelling approach, coupled with a graphical user interface for: a) configuring the model for flaw size, shape, orientation and location; b) flexible specification of probe parameters; c) selection of scanning surface and scan pattern on the CAD component model; d) presentation of the output as a simulated ultrasound image within the component, or as graphical or tabular displays. The defect modelling facilities of the Workbench can be used for inspection procedure assessment and confirmation of data interpretation, by comparison of overlay images generated from real and simulated data. The modelling technique currently implemented is based on the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction, for simulation of strip-like, circular or elliptical crack responses in the time harmonic or time dependent cases. Eventually, the Workbench will also allow modelling using elastodynamic Kirchhoff theory.

  14. Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model for Complex Material Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2008-01-01

    The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from the launch external tanks. The multi-factor has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points the initial and final points. The exponent describes a monotonic path from the initial condition to the final. The exponent values are selected so that the described path makes sense in the absence of experimental data. In the present investigation, the data used was obtained by testing simulated specimens in launching conditions. Results show that the MFIM is an effective method of describing the divot weight ejected under the conditions investigated.

  15. Interaction of antioxidant biobased epicatechin conjugates with biomembrane models.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, Elisabet; Castillo, José A; Rafols, Clara; Rosés, Martí; Clapés, Pere; Torres, Josep Lluís

    2007-04-18

    (-)-Epicatechin conjugates with sulfur-containing moieties are strong free radical scavengers with cell-protecting activities, which may be in part modulated by their capacity to bind to biological membranes. We present here a study of the interaction of these conjugates with membrane models such as multilamellar vesicles and a phospholipid-coated silica column (immobilized artificial membrane), monitored by differential scanning calorimetry and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The nonpolyphenolic moiety significantly influenced the membrane behavior of the whole molecules. Bulky and hydrophobic conjugates clearly interacted with the phospholipids and may have a tendency to penetrate into the hydrophobic core of the vesicles. In contrast, the smaller cationic 4beta-(2-aminoethylthio)epicatechin may be located at the outer interface of the lipid membrane. The outcomes from both experimental set-ups were in good agreement. The differences detected in the biological activities of the conjugates may be explained in part by their tendency to penetrate the cell membrane.

  16. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Baul, Upayan Vemparala, Satyavani; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2014-08-28

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides.

  17. Numerical modelling of wave current interactions at a local scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles, Maria João; Pires-Silva, António A.; Benoit, Michel

    2013-08-01

    The present work is focused on the evaluation of wave-current interactions through numerical simulations of combined wave and current flows with the Code_Saturne (Archambeau et al., 2004), an advanced CFD solver based on the RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) equations. The objectives of this paper are twofold. Firstly, changes in the mean horizontal velocity and the horizontal-velocity amplitude profiles are studied when waves are superposed on currents. The influence of various first and second order turbulence closure models is addressed. The results of the numerical simulations are compared to the experimental data of Klopman (1994) and Umeyama (2005). Secondly, a more detailed study of the shear stresses and the turbulence viscosity vertical profile changes is also pursued when waves and currents interact. This analysis is completed using the data from Umeyama (2005). A relationship between a non-dimensional parameter involving the turbulence viscosity and the Ursell number is subsequently proposed.

  18. Interactions of model biomolecules. Benchmark CC calculations within MOLCAS

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Miroslav; Pitoňák, Michal; Neogrády, Pavel; Dedíková, Pavlína; Hobza, Pavel

    2015-01-22

    We present results using the OVOS approach (Optimized Virtual Orbitals Space) aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of the Coupled Cluster calculations. This approach allows to reduce the total computer time required for large-scale CCSD(T) calculations about ten times when the original full virtual space is reduced to about 50% of its original size without affecting the accuracy. The method is implemented in the MOLCAS computer program. When combined with the Cholesky decomposition of the two-electron integrals and suitable parallelization it allows calculations which were formerly prohibitively too demanding. We focused ourselves to accurate calculations of the hydrogen bonded and the stacking interactions of the model biomolecules. Interaction energies of the formaldehyde, formamide, benzene, and uracil dimers and the three-body contributions in the cytosine – guanine tetramer are presented. Other applications, as the electron affinity of the uracil affected by solvation are also shortly mentioned.

  19. Interaction of Sindbis virus with liposomal model membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, J J; Dalrymple, J M; Alving, C R; Russell, P K

    1975-01-01

    Radiolabeled Sindbis virus was found to bind to protein-free lipid model membranes (liposomes) derived from extracts of sheep erythrocytes. The virus interaction was dependent on initial pH, and the range of pH dependence (pH 6.0 to 6.8) was the same as the observed with virus-dependent hemagglutination. After the initial interaction, pH changes no longer influenced the virus binding to liposomes. Virus bound to liposomes prepared from a mixture of erythrocyte phospholipids, but the binding was greatly diminished when either cholesterol or phosphatidylethanolamine was omitted from the liposomal lipid mixture. It was concluded that phospholipids and cholesterol, in a bilayer configuration, may be sufficient for specific virus binding in the absence of membrane protein. PMID:234538

  20. Interactions of model biomolecules. Benchmark CC calculations within MOLCAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Miroslav; PitoÅák, Michal; Neogrády, Pavel; Dedíková, Pavlína; Hobza, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    We present results using the OVOS approach (Optimized Virtual Orbitals Space) aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of the Coupled Cluster calculations. This approach allows to reduce the total computer time required for large-scale CCSD(T) calculations about ten times when the original full virtual space is reduced to about 50% of its original size without affecting the accuracy. The method is implemented in the MOLCAS computer program. When combined with the Cholesky decomposition of the two-electron integrals and suitable parallelization it allows calculations which were formerly prohibitively too demanding. We focused ourselves to accurate calculations of the hydrogen bonded and the stacking interactions of the model biomolecules. Interaction energies of the formaldehyde, formamide, benzene, and uracil dimers and the three-body contributions in the cytosine - guanine tetramer are presented. Other applications, as the electron affinity of the uracil affected by solvation are also shortly mentioned.

  1. Quantum phase transitions studied within the interacting boson model

    PubMed

    Cejnar; Jolie

    2000-06-01

    We study quasicritical phenomena in transitions between two "quantum phases" of a finite boson system, described by the interacting boson model 1 used in nuclear physics. The model is formulated in the algebraic framework and has a simple geometrical interpretation; the "phases" represented by dynamical symmetries U(5) and SU(3) correspond to spherical and deformed nuclear shapes. The quasicriticality of the U(5)-SU(3) transition is shown to be connected with the following phenomena simultaneously occurring in a narrow parameter region between the symmetries: (a) abrupt structural changes of eigenstates, (b) multiple avoided crossing of levels, (c) peaked density of exceptional points, (d) qualitative changes of the corresponding classical potential. We show that these spectroscopic features influence the dynamics of intersymmetry transitions in the model parameter space if the parameters themselves become dynamical variables. PMID:11088296

  2. On the earthquake predictability of fault interaction models

    PubMed Central

    Marzocchi, W; Melini, D

    2014-01-01

    Space-time clustering is the most striking departure of large earthquakes occurrence process from randomness. These clusters are usually described ex-post by a physics-based model in which earthquakes are triggered by Coulomb stress changes induced by other surrounding earthquakes. Notwithstanding the popularity of this kind of modeling, its ex-ante skill in terms of earthquake predictability gain is still unknown. Here we show that even in synthetic systems that are rooted on the physics of fault interaction using the Coulomb stress changes, such a kind of modeling often does not increase significantly earthquake predictability. Earthquake predictability of a fault may increase only when the Coulomb stress change induced by a nearby earthquake is much larger than the stress changes caused by earthquakes on other faults and by the intrinsic variability of the earthquake occurrence process. PMID:26074643

  3. Modeling of interactions of electromagnetic fields with human bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputa, Krzysztof

    Interactions of electromagnetic fields with the human body have been a subject of scientific interest and public concern. In recent years, issues in power line field effects and those of wireless telephones have been in the forefront of research. Engineering research compliments biological investigations by quantifying the induced fields in biological bodies due to exposure to external fields. The research presented in this thesis aims at providing reliable tools, and addressing some of the unresolved issues related to interactions with the human body of power line fields and fields produced by handheld wireless telephones. The research comprises two areas, namely development of versatile models of the human body and their visualisation, and verification and application of numerical codes to solve selected problems of interest. The models of the human body, which are based on the magnetic resonance scans of the body, are unique and differ considerably from other models currently available. With the aid of computer software developed, the models can be arranged to different postures, and medical devices can be accurately placed inside them. A previously developed code for modeling interactions of power line fields with biological bodies has been verified by rigorous, quantitative inter-laboratory comparison for two human body models. This code has been employed to model electromagnetic interference (EMI) of the magnetic field with implanted cardiac pacemakers. In this case, the correct placement and representation of the pacemaker leads are critical, as simplified computations have been shown to result in significant errors. In modeling interactions of wireless communication devices, the finite difference time domain technique (FDTD) has become a de facto standard. The previously developed code has been verified by comparison with the analytical solution for a conductive sphere. While previously researchers limited their verifications to principal axes of the sphere

  4. Cloud-radiation interactions and their parameterization in climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains papers from the International Workshop on Cloud-Radiation Interactions and Their Parameterization in Climate Models met on 18-20 October 1993 in Camp Springs, Maryland, USA. It was organized by the Joint Working Group on Clouds and Radiation of the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences. Recommendations were grouped into three broad areas: (1) general circulation models (GCMs), (2) satellite studies, and (3) process studies. Each of the panels developed recommendations on the themes of the workshop. Explicitly or implicitly, each panel independently recommended observations of basic cloud microphysical properties (water content, phase, size) on the scales resolved by GCMs. Such observations are necessary to validate cloud parameterizations in GCMs, to use satellite data to infer radiative forcing in the atmosphere and at the earth's surface, and to refine the process models which are used to develop advanced cloud parameterizations.

  5. Cloud-radiation interactions and their parameterization in climate models

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This report contains papers from the International Workshop on Cloud-Radiation Interactions and Their Parameterization in Climate Models met on 18--20 October 1993 in Camp Springs, Maryland, USA. It was organized by the Joint Working Group on Clouds and Radiation of the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences. Recommendations were grouped into three broad areas: (1) general circulation models (GCMs), (2) satellite studies, and (3) process studies. Each of the panels developed recommendations on the. themes of the workshop. Explicitly or implicitly, each panel independently recommended observations of basic cloud microphysical properties (water content, phase, size) on the scales resolved by GCMs. Such observations are necessary to validate cloud parameterizations in GCMs, to use satellite data to infer radiative forcing in the atmosphere and at the earth`s surface, and to refine the process models which are used to develop advanced cloud parameterizations.

  6. Interacting ghost dark energy models with variable G and Λ

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, J.; Farahani, H.; Khurshudyan, M.; Movsisyan, A. E-mail: martiros.khurshudyan@nano.cnr.it E-mail: h.farahani@umz.ac.ir

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we consider several phenomenological models of variable Λ. Model of a flat Universe with variable Λ and G is accepted. It is well known, that varying G and Λ gives rise to modified field equations and modified conservation laws, which gives rise to many different manipulations and assumptions in literature. We will consider two component fluid, which parameters will enter to Λ. Interaction between fluids with energy densities ρ{sub 1} and ρ{sub 2} assumed as Q = 3Hb(ρ{sub 1}+ρ{sub 2}). We have numerical analyze of important cosmological parameters like EoS parameter of the composed fluid and deceleration parameter q of the model.

  7. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Niklas

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  8. Modeling of Fluid-Membrane Interaction in Cellular Microinjection Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karzar-Jeddi, Mehdi; Diaz, Jhon; Olgac, Nejat; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2009-11-01

    Cellular microinjection is a well-accepted method to deliver matters such as sperm, nucleus, or macromolecules into biological cells. To improve the success rate of in vitro fertilization and to establish the ideal operating conditions for a novel computer controlled rotationally oscillating intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) technology, we investigate the fluid-membrane interactions in the ICSI procedure. The procedure consists of anchoring the oocyte (a developing egg) using a holding pipette, penetrating oocyte's zona pellucida (the outer membrane) and the oolemma (the plasma or inner membrane) using an injection micropipette, and finally to deliver sperm into the oocyte for fertilization. To predict the large deformation of the oocyte membranes up to the piercing of the oolemma and the motion of fluids across both membranes, the dynamic fluid-pipette-membrane interactions are formulated by the coupled Stokes' equations and the continuum membrane model based on Helfrich's energy theory. A boundary integral model is developed to simulate the transient membrane deformation and the local membrane stress induced by the longitudinal motion of the injection pipette. The model captures the essential features of the membranes shown on optical images of ICSI experiments, and is capable of suggesting the optimal deformation level of the oolemma to start the rotational oscillations for piercing into the oolemma.

  9. Interactive decision-making support model in MOSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Lan, Ze-ying; Liu, Yao-lin; Qin, Liang-jun

    2009-10-01

    The Multi-objective spatial optimization problem is common in the word, which usually has a set of non-dominated resolutions, also called Pareto resolutions, instead of a single ideal one. So, the Multi-objectives spatial decision support system (MOSDSS) has two vital basements: how to acquire all the Pareto resolutions by Multi-objective optimization arithmetic, and how to analysis and appraise the candidates to determinate the final satisfying solution. At present, there are abundant research fruit for the former problem, however the latter one hasn't attracted abroad attention in the field. Nowadays, the findings about analyzing and evaluating the Pareto resolutions mainly focus on three aspects: the visual expression of candidates, appraising the comparability among the solutions, and designing the prototype system of visual support tools, which are lack of systemic conclusion and summarization. Hence, this paper emphasizes the latter problem of MOSDSS and puts up an interactive decision-making support model to largely improve the efficiency of analyzing and evaluating the Pareto resolutions. This model is composed of 3 pivotal parts: the geographic brush mechanism, the similarity querying operators as well as the interactive searching method. Then, the paper designs a prototype system on the base of the model, which is successfully tested in the exam.

  10. Determining Interactions in PSA models: Application to a Space PSA

    SciTech Connect

    C. Smith; E. Borgonovo

    2010-06-01

    This paper addresses use of an importance measure interaction study of a probabilistic risk analysis (PSA) performed for a hypothetical aerospace lunar mission. The PSA methods used in this study follow the general guidance provided in the NASA Probabilistic Risk Assessment Procedures Guide for NASA Managers and Practitioners. For the PSA portion, we used phased-based event tree and fault tree logic structures are used to model a lunar mission, including multiple phases (from launch to return to the Earth surface) and multiple critical systems. Details of the analysis results are not provided in this paper – instead specific basic events are denoted by number (e.g., the first event is 1, the second is 2, and so on). However, in the model, we used approximately 150 fault trees and over 800 basic events. Following analysis and truncation of cut sets, we were left with about 400 basic events to evaluate. We used this model to explore interactions between different basic events and systems. These sensitivity studies provide high-level insights into features of the PSA for the hypothetical lunar mission.

  11. Turbulence Modeling for Shock Wave/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillard, Randolph P.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate aerodynamic computational predictions are essential for the safety of space vehicles, but these computations are of limited accuracy when large pressure gradients are present in the flow. The goal of the current project is to improve the state of compressible turbulence modeling for high speed flows with shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions (SWTBLI). Emphasis will be placed on models that can accurately predict the separated region caused by the SWTBLI. These flows are classified as nonequilibrium boundary layers because of the very large and variable adverse pressure gradients caused by the shock waves. The lag model was designed to model these nonequilibrium flows by incorporating history effects. Standard one- and two-equation models (Spalart Allmaras and SST) and the lag model will be run and compared to a new lag model. This new model, the Reynolds stress tensor lag model (lagRST), will be assessed against multiple wind tunnel tests and correlations. The basis of the lag and lagRST models are to preserve the accuracy of the standard turbulence models in equilibrium turbulence, when the Reynolds stresses are linearly related to the mean strain rates, but create a lag between mean strain rate effects and turbulence when nonequilibrium effects become important, such as in large pressure gradients. The affect this lag has on the results for SWBLI and massively separated flows will be determined. These computations will be done with a modified version of the OVERFLOW code. This code solves the RANS equations on overset grids. It was used for this study for its ability to input very complex geometries into the flow solver, such as the Space Shuttle in the full stack configuration. The model was successfully implemented within two versions of the OVERFLOW code. Results show a substantial improvement over the baseline models for transonic separated flows. The results are mixed for the SWBLI assessed. Separation predictions are not as good as the

  12. Modelling the interactions between TLR4 and IFNβ pathways.

    PubMed

    Günel, Aylin

    2012-08-21

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) association with their connate receptor TLR4 triggers Type I interferon signaling cascade through its MyD88 independent downstream. Compared to plethora of reported empirical data on both TLR4 and Type I interferon pathways, there is no known model to decipher crosstalk mechanisms between these two crucial innate immune pathogen activated pathways regulating vital transcriptional factors such as nuclear factor-κB (NFκB), IFNβ, the interferon-stimulated gene factor-3 (ISGF3) and an important cancer drug target protein kinase-R (PKR). Innate immune system is based on a sensitive balance of intricate interactions. In elucidating these interactions, in silico integration of pathways has great potential. Attempts confined to single pathway may not be effective in truly addressing source of real systems behavior. This is the first report combining toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and interferon beta (IFNβ) pathways in a single in silico model, analyzing their interactions, pinpointing the source of delay in PKR late phase activity and limiting the transcription of IFN and PKR by using a method including an statistical physics technique in reaction equations. The model quite successfully recapitulates published interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF3) and IFNβ data from mouse macrophages and PKR data from mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines. The simulations end up with an estimate of IRF3, IFNβ, ISGF3 dose dependent profiles mimicking nonlinear dose response characteristic of the system. Involvement of concomitant PKR downstream can unravel elusive mechanisms in specific profiles like NFκB regulation.

  13. Current Advancements and Challenges in Soil-Root Interactions Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, A.; Huber, K.; Abesha, B.; Meunier, F.; Leitner, D.; Roose, T.; Javaux, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Roots change their surrounding soil chemically, physically and biologically. This includes changes in soil moisture and solute concentration, the exudation of organic substances into the rhizosphere, increased growth of soil microorganisms, or changes in soil structure. The fate of water and solutes in the root zone is highly determined by these root-soil interactions. Mathematical models of soil-root systems in combination with non-invasive techniques able to characterize root systems are a promising tool to understand and predict the behaviour of water and solutes in the root zone. With respect to different fields of applications, predictive mathematical models can contribute to the solution of optimal control problems in plant recourse efficiency. This may result in significant gains in productivity, efficiency and environmental sustainability in various land use activities. Major challenges include the coupling of model parameters of the relevant processes with the surrounding environment such as temperature, nutrient concentration or soil water content. A further challenge is the mathematical description of the different spatial and temporal scales involved. This includes in particular the branched structures formed by root systems or the external mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi. Here, reducing complexity as well as bridging between spatial scales is required. Furthermore, the combination of experimental and mathematical techniques may advance the field enormously. Here, the use of root system, soil and rhizosphere models is presented through a number of modelling case studies, including image based modelling of phosphate uptake by a root with hairs, model-based optimization of root architecture for phosphate uptake from soil, upscaling of rhizosphere models, modelling root growth in structured soil, and the effect of root hydraulic architecture on plant water uptake efficiency and drought resistance.

  14. Current advancements and challenges in soil-root interactions modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Huber, Katrin; Abesha, Betiglu; Meunier, Felicien; Leitner, Daniel; Roose, Tiina; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Roots change their surrounding soil chemically, physically and biologically. This includes changes in soil moisture and solute concentration, the exudation of organic substances into the rhizosphere, increased growth of soil microorganisms, or changes in soil structure. The fate of water and solutes in the root zone is highly determined by these root-soil interactions. Mathematical models of soil-root systems in combination with non-invasive techniques able to characterize root systems are a promising tool to understand and predict the behaviour of water and solutes in the root zone. With respect to different fields of applications, predictive mathematical models can contribute to the solution of optimal control problems in plant recourse efficiency. This may result in significant gains in productivity, efficiency and environmental sustainability in various land use activities. Major challenges include the coupling of model parameters of the relevant processes with the surrounding environment such as temperature, nutrient concentration or soil water content. A further challenge is the mathematical description of the different spatial and temporal scales involved. This includes in particular the branched structures formed by root systems or the external mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi. Here, reducing complexity as well as bridging between spatial scales is required. Furthermore, the combination of experimental and mathematical techniques may advance the field enormously. Here, the use of root system, soil and rhizosphere models is presented through a number of modelling case studies, including image based modelling of phosphate uptake by a root with hairs, model-based optimization of root architecture for phosphate uptake from soil, upscaling of rhizosphere models, modelling root growth in structured soil, and the effect of root hydraulic architecture on plant water uptake efficiency and drought resistance.

  15. Probabilistic Usage of the Multi-Factor Interaction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2008-01-01

    A Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to predict the insulating foam mass expulsion during the ascending of a space vehicle. The exponents in the MFIM are evaluated by an available approach which consists of least squares and an optimization algorithm. These results were subsequently used to probabilistically evaluate the effects of the uncertainties in each participating factor in the mass expulsion. The probabilistic results show that the surface temperature dominates at high probabilities and the pressure which causes the mass expulsion at low probabil

  16. Modeling flux noise in SQUIDs due to hyperfine interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiansheng; Yu, Clare C

    2012-06-15

    Recent experiments implicate spins on the surface of metals as the source of flux noise in superconducting quantum interference devices and indicate that these spins are able to relax without conserving total magnetization. We present a model of 1/f flux noise in which electron spins on the surface of metals can relax via hyperfine interactions. Our results indicate that flux noise would be significantly reduced in superconducting materials where the most abundant isotopes do not have nuclear moments, such as zinc and lead.

  17. QSAR Modeling and Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Alexey V; Varlamova, Ekaterina V; Lagunin, Alexey A; Dmitriev, Alexander V; Muratov, Eugene N; Fourches, Denis; Kuz'min, Victor E; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Tropsha, Alexander; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2016-02-01

    Severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are the fourth leading cause of fatality in the U.S. with more than 100,000 deaths per year. As up to 30% of all ADRs are believed to be caused by drug-drug interactions (DDIs), typically mediated by cytochrome P450s, possibilities to predict DDIs from existing knowledge are important. We collected data from public sources on 1485, 2628, 4371, and 27,966 possible DDIs mediated by four cytochrome P450 isoforms 1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4 for 55, 73, 94, and 237 drugs, respectively. For each of these data sets, we developed and validated QSAR models for the prediction of DDIs. As a unique feature of our approach, the interacting drug pairs were represented as binary chemical mixtures in a 1:1 ratio. We used two types of chemical descriptors: quantitative neighborhoods of atoms (QNA) and simplex descriptors. Radial basis functions with self-consistent regression (RBF-SCR) and random forest (RF) were utilized to build QSAR models predicting the likelihood of DDIs for any pair of drug molecules. Our models showed balanced accuracy of 72-79% for the external test sets with a coverage of 81.36-100% when a conservative threshold for the model's applicability domain was applied. We generated virtually all possible binary combinations of marketed drugs and employed our models to identify drug pairs predicted to be instances of DDI. More than 4500 of these predicted DDIs that were not found in our training sets were confirmed by data from the DrugBank database. PMID:26669717

  18. PREFACE: Singular interactions in quantum mechanics: solvable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Antonio, Gianfausto; Exner, Pavel; Geyler, Vladimir

    2005-06-01

    This issue comprises two dozen research papers which are all in one sense or another devoted to models in which the interaction is singular and sharply localized; a typical example is a quantum particle interacting with a family of δ-type potentials. Such an idealization usually makes analysis of their properties considerably easier, sometimes allowing us to reduce it to a simple algebraic problem—this is why one speaks about solvable models. The subject can be traced back to the early days of quantum mechanics; however, the progress in this field was slow and uneven until the 1960s, mostly because singular interactions are often difficult to deal with mathematically and intuitive arguments do not work. After overcoming the initial difficulties the `classical' theory of point interactions was developed, and finally summarized in 1988 in a monograph by Albeverio, Gesztesy, Høegh-Krohn, and Holden, which you will find quoted in numerous places within this issue. A reliable way to judge theories is to observe the progress they make within one or two decades. In this case there is no doubt that the field has witnessed a continuous development and covered areas which nobody had thought of when the subject first emerged. The reader may see it in the second edition of the aforementioned book which was published by AMS Chelsea only recently and contained a brief survey of these new achievements. It is no coincidence that this topical issue appears at the same time; it has been conceived as its counterpart and a forum at which fresh results in the field can demonstrated. Let us briefly survey the contents of the issue. While the papers included have in common the basic subject, they represent a broad spectrum philosophically as well as technically, and any attempt to classify them is somewhat futile. Nevertheless, we will divide them into a few groups. The first comprises contributions directly related to the usual point-interaction ideology. M Correggi and one of the

  19. Investigations and advanced concepts on gyrotron interaction modeling and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramidis, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    In gyrotron theory, the interaction between the electron beam and the high frequency electromagnetic field is commonly modeled using the slow variables approach. The slow variables are quantities that vary slowly in time in comparison to the electron cyclotron frequency. They represent the electron momentum and the high frequency field of the resonant TE modes in the gyrotron cavity. For their definition, some reference frequencies need to be introduced. These include the so-called averaging frequency, used to define the slow variable corresponding to the electron momentum, and the carrier frequencies, used to define the slow variables corresponding to the field envelopes of the modes. From the mathematical point of view, the choice of the reference frequencies is, to some extent, arbitrary. However, from the numerical point of view, there are arguments that point toward specific choices, in the sense that these choices are advantageous in terms of simulation speed and accuracy. In this paper, the typical monochromatic gyrotron operation is considered, and the numerical integration of the interaction equations is performed by the trajectory approach, since it is the fastest, and therefore it is the one that is most commonly used. The influence of the choice of the reference frequencies on the interaction simulations is studied using theoretical arguments, as well as numerical simulations. From these investigations, appropriate choices for the values of the reference frequencies are identified. In addition, novel, advanced concepts for the definitions of these frequencies are addressed, and their benefits are demonstrated numerically.

  20. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja

    2016-05-01

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO2 (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO2 has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=-21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  1. Shell-model phenomenology of low-momentum interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenk, Achim; Zuker, Andres P.

    2006-12-15

    The first detailed comparison of the low-momentum interaction V{sub lowk} with G matrices is presented. We use overlaps to measure quantitatively the similarity of shell-model matrix elements for different cutoffs and oscillator frequencies. Over a wide range, all sets of V{sub lowk} matrix elements can be approximately obtained from a universal set by a simple scaling. In an oscillator mean-field approach, V{sub lowk} reproduces satisfactorily many features of the single-particle and single-hole spectra on closed-shell nuclei, in particular through remarkably good splittings between spin-orbit partners on top of harmonic oscillator closures. The main deficiencies of pure two-nucleon interactions are associated with binding energies and with the failure to ensure magicity for the extruder-intruder closures. Here, calculations including three-nucleon interactions are most needed. V{sub lowk} makes it possible to define directly a meaningful unperturbed monopole Hamiltonian, for which the inclusion of three-nucleon forces is tractable.

  2. Theory and modeling of particles with DNA-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.

    2008-05-01

    In recent years significant attention has been attracted to proposals which utilize DNA for nanotechnological applications. Potential applications of these ideas range from the programmable self-assembly of colloidal crystals, to biosensors and nanoparticle based drug delivery platforms. In Chapter I we introduce the system, which generically consists of colloidal particles functionalized with specially designed DNA markers. The sequence of bases on the DNA markers determines the particle type. Due to the hybridization between complementary single-stranded DNA, specific, type-dependent interactions can be introduced between particles by choosing the appropriate DNA marker sequences. In Chapter II we develop a statistical mechanical description of the aggregation and melting behavior of particles with DNA-mediated interactions. In Chapter III a model is proposed to describe the dynamical departure and diffusion of particles which form reversible key-lock connections. In Chapter IV we propose a method to self-assemble nanoparticle clusters using DNA scaffolds. A natural extension is discussed in Chapter V, the programmable self-assembly of nanoparticle clusters where the desired cluster geometry is encoded using DNA-mediated interactions. In Chapter VI we consider a nanoparticle based drug delivery platform for targeted, cell specific chemotherapy. In Chapter VII we present prospects for future research: the connection between DNA-mediated colloidal crystallization and jamming, and the inverse problem in self-assembly.

  3. Investigations and advanced concepts on gyrotron interaction modeling and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Avramidis, K. A.

    2015-12-15

    In gyrotron theory, the interaction between the electron beam and the high frequency electromagnetic field is commonly modeled using the slow variables approach. The slow variables are quantities that vary slowly in time in comparison to the electron cyclotron frequency. They represent the electron momentum and the high frequency field of the resonant TE modes in the gyrotron cavity. For their definition, some reference frequencies need to be introduced. These include the so-called averaging frequency, used to define the slow variable corresponding to the electron momentum, and the carrier frequencies, used to define the slow variables corresponding to the field envelopes of the modes. From the mathematical point of view, the choice of the reference frequencies is, to some extent, arbitrary. However, from the numerical point of view, there are arguments that point toward specific choices, in the sense that these choices are advantageous in terms of simulation speed and accuracy. In this paper, the typical monochromatic gyrotron operation is considered, and the numerical integration of the interaction equations is performed by the trajectory approach, since it is the fastest, and therefore it is the one that is most commonly used. The influence of the choice of the reference frequencies on the interaction simulations is studied using theoretical arguments, as well as numerical simulations. From these investigations, appropriate choices for the values of the reference frequencies are identified. In addition, novel, advanced concepts for the definitions of these frequencies are addressed, and their benefits are demonstrated numerically.

  4. Modelling cavitation erosion using fluid–material interaction simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Georges L.; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    Material deformation and pitting from cavitation bubble collapse is investigated using fluid and material dynamics and their interaction. In the fluid, a novel hybrid approach, which links a boundary element method and a compressible finite difference method, is used to capture non-spherical bubble dynamics and resulting liquid pressures efficiently and accurately. The bubble dynamics is intimately coupled with a finite-element structure model to enable fluid/structure interaction simulations. Bubble collapse loads the material with high impulsive pressures, which result from shock waves and bubble re-entrant jet direct impact on the material surface. The shock wave loading can be from the re-entrant jet impact on the opposite side of the bubble, the fast primary collapse of the bubble, and/or the collapse of the remaining bubble ring. This produces high stress waves, which propagate inside the material, cause deformation, and eventually failure. A permanent deformation or pit is formed when the local equivalent stresses exceed the material yield stress. The pressure loading depends on bubble dynamics parameters such as the size of the bubble at its maximum volume, the bubble standoff distance from the material wall and the pressure driving the bubble collapse. The effects of standoff and material type on the pressure loading and resulting pit formation are highlighted and the effects of bubble interaction on pressure loading and material deformation are preliminarily discussed. PMID:26442140

  5. Modelling cavitation erosion using fluid-material interaction simulations.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges L; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2015-10-01

    Material deformation and pitting from cavitation bubble collapse is investigated using fluid and material dynamics and their interaction. In the fluid, a novel hybrid approach, which links a boundary element method and a compressible finite difference method, is used to capture non-spherical bubble dynamics and resulting liquid pressures efficiently and accurately. The bubble dynamics is intimately coupled with a finite-element structure model to enable fluid/structure interaction simulations. Bubble collapse loads the material with high impulsive pressures, which result from shock waves and bubble re-entrant jet direct impact on the material surface. The shock wave loading can be from the re-entrant jet impact on the opposite side of the bubble, the fast primary collapse of the bubble, and/or the collapse of the remaining bubble ring. This produces high stress waves, which propagate inside the material, cause deformation, and eventually failure. A permanent deformation or pit is formed when the local equivalent stresses exceed the material yield stress. The pressure loading depends on bubble dynamics parameters such as the size of the bubble at its maximum volume, the bubble standoff distance from the material wall and the pressure driving the bubble collapse. The effects of standoff and material type on the pressure loading and resulting pit formation are highlighted and the effects of bubble interaction on pressure loading and material deformation are preliminarily discussed.

  6. Observations & modeling of solar-wind/magnetospheric interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoilijoki, Sanni; Von Alfthan, Sebastian; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Palmroth, Minna; Ganse, Urs

    2016-07-01

    The majority of the global magnetospheric dynamics is driven by magnetic reconnection, indicating the need to understand and predict reconnection processes and their global consequences. So far, global magnetospheric dynamics has been simulated using mainly magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models, which are approximate but fast enough to be executed in real time or near-real time. Due to their fast computation times, MHD models are currently the only possible frameworks for space weather predictions. However, in MHD models reconnection is not treated kinetically. In this presentation we will compare the results from global kinetic (hybrid-Vlasov) and global MHD simulations. Both simulations are compared with in-situ measurements. We will show that the kinetic processes at the bow shock, in the magnetosheath and at the magnetopause affect global dynamics even during steady solar wind conditions. Foreshock processes cause an asymmetry in the magnetosheath plasma, indicating that the plasma entering the magnetosphere is not symmetrical on different sides of the magnetosphere. Behind the bow shock in the magnetosheath kinetic wave modes appear. Some of these waves propagate to the magnetopause and have an effect on the magnetopause reconnection. Therefore we find that kinetic phenomena have a significant role in the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. While kinetic models cannot be executed in real time currently, they could be used to extract heuristics to be added in the faster MHD models.

  7. Ions interacting with planar aromatic molecules: Modeling electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, B. O.; Alexander, J. D.; Chen, T.; Pettersson, A. T.; Gatchell, M.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H.

    2013-02-07

    We present theoretical absolute charge exchange cross sections for multiply charged cations interacting with the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules pyrene C{sub 14}H{sub 10}, coronene C{sub 24}H{sub 12}, or circumcoronene C{sub 54}H{sub 18}. These planar, nearly circular, PAHs are modelled as conducting, infinitely thin, and perfectly circular discs, which are randomly oriented with respect to straight line ion trajectories. We present the analytical solution for the potential energy surface experienced by an electron in the field of such a charged disc and a point-charge at an arbitrary position. The location and height of the corresponding potential energy barrier from this simple model are in close agreement with those from much more computationally demanding Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations in a number of test cases. The model results compare favourably with available experimental data on single- and multiple electron transfer reactions and we demonstrate that it is important to include the orientation dependent polarizabilities of the molecules (model discs) in particular for the larger PAHs. PAH ionization energy sequences from DFT are tabulated and used as model inputs. Absolute cross sections for the ionization of PAH molecules, and PAH ionization energies such as the ones presented here may be useful when considering the roles of PAHs and their ions in, e.g., interstellar chemistry, stellar atmospheres, and in related photoabsorption and photoemission spectroscopies.

  8. Novel symmetries in Christ-Lee model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Shukla, A.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that the gauge-fixed Lagrangian of the Christ-Lee model respects four fermionic symmetries, namely; (anti-)BRST symmetries, (anti-)co-BRST symmetries within the framework of BRST formalism. The appropriate anticommutators amongst the fermionic symmetries lead to a unique bosonic symmetry. It turns out that the algebra obeyed by the symmetry transformations (and their corresponding conserved charges) is reminiscent of the algebra satisfied by the de Rham cohomological operators of differential geometry. We also provide the physical realizations of the cohomological operators in terms of the symmetry properties. Thus, the present model provides a simple model for the Hodge theory.

  9. A THC Simulator for Modeling Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Sahar; Galvan, Boris; Heinze, Thomas; Miller, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Fluid-rock interactions play an essential role in many earth processes, from a likely influence on earthquake nucleation and aftershocks, to enhanced geothermal system, carbon capture and storage (CCS), and underground nuclear waste repositories. In THC models, two-way interactions between different processes (thermal, hydraulic and chemical) are present. Fluid flow influences the permeability of the rock especially if chemical reactions are taken into account. On one hand solute concentration influences fluid properties while, on the other hand, heat can affect further chemical reactions. Estimating heat production from a naturally fractured geothermal systems remains a complex problem. Previous works are typically based on a local thermal equilibrium assumption and rarely consider the salinity. The dissolved salt in fluid affects the hydro- and thermodynamical behavior of the system by changing the hydraulic properties of the circulating fluid. Coupled thermal-hydraulic-chemical models (THC) are important for investigating these processes, but what is needed is a coupling to mechanics to result in THMC models. Although similar models currently exist (e.g. PFLOTRAN), our objective here is to develop algorithms for implementation using the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computer architecture to be run on GPU clusters. To that aim, we present a two-dimensional numerical simulation of a fully coupled non-isothermal non-reactive solute flow. The thermal part of the simulation models heat transfer processes for either local thermal equilibrium or nonequilibrium cases, and coupled to a non-reactive mass transfer described by a non-linear diffusion/dispersion model. The flow process of the model includes a non-linear Darcian flow for either saturated or unsaturated scenarios. For the unsaturated case, we use the Richards' approximation for a mixture of liquid and gas phases. Relative permeability and capillary pressure are determined by the van Genuchten relations

  10. Modeling RNA polymerase interaction in mitochondria of chordates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In previous work, we introduced a concept, a mathematical model and its computer realization that describe the interaction between bacterial and phage type RNA polymerases, protein factors, DNA and RNA secondary structures during transcription, including transcription initiation and termination. The model accurately reproduces changes of gene transcription level observed in polymerase sigma-subunit knockout and heat shock experiments in plant plastids. The corresponding computer program and a user guide are available at http://lab6.iitp.ru/en/rivals. Here we apply the model to the analysis of transcription and (partially) translation processes in the mitochondria of frog, rat and human. Notably, mitochondria possess only phage-type polymerases. We consider the entire mitochondrial genome so that our model allows RNA polymerases to complete more than one circle on the DNA strand. Results Our model of RNA polymerase interaction during transcription initiation and elongation accurately reproduces experimental data obtained for plastids. Moreover, it also reproduces evidence on bulk RNA concentrations and RNA half-lives in the mitochondria of frog, human with or without the MELAS mutation, and rat with normal (euthyroid) or hyposecretion of thyroid hormone (hypothyroid). The transcription characteristics predicted by the model include: (i) the fraction of polymerases terminating at a protein-dependent terminator in both directions (the terminator polarization), (ii) the binding intensities of the regulatory protein factor (mTERF) with the termination site and, (iii) the transcription initiation intensities (initiation frequencies) of all promoters in all five conditions (frog, healthy human, human with MELAS syndrome, healthy rat, and hypothyroid rat with aberrant mtDNA methylation). Using the model, absolute levels of all gene transcription can be inferred from an arbitrary array of the three transcription characteristics, whereas, for selected genes only

  11. Interactive display of molecular models using a microcomputer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, J. T.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A simple, microcomputer-based, interactive graphics display system has been developed for the presentation of perspective views of wire frame molecular models. The display system is based on a TERAK 8510a graphics computer system with a display unit consisting of microprocessor, television display and keyboard subsystems. The operating system includes a screen editor, file manager, PASCAL and BASIC compilers and command options for linking and executing programs. The graphics program, written in USCD PASCAL, involves the centering of the coordinate system, the transformation of centered model coordinates into homogeneous coordinates, the construction of a viewing transformation matrix to operate on the coordinates, clipping invisible points, perspective transformation and scaling to screen coordinates; commands available include ZOOM, ROTATE, RESET, and CHANGEVIEW. Data file structure was chosen to minimize the amount of disk storage space. Despite the inherent slowness of the system, its low cost and flexibility suggests general applicability.

  12. Phase transitions in the sdg interacting boson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Bouldjedri, A.; Zerguine, S.

    2010-05-01

    A geometric analysis of the sdg interacting boson model is performed. A coherent state is used in terms of three types of deformation: axial quadrupole ( β), axial hexadecapole ( β) and triaxial ( γ). The phase-transitional structure is established for a schematic sdg Hamiltonian which is intermediate between four dynamical symmetries of U(15), namely the spherical U(5)⊗U(9), the (prolate and oblate) deformed SU(3) and the γ-soft SO(15) limits. For realistic choices of the Hamiltonian parameters the resulting phase diagram has properties close to what is obtained in the sd version of the model and, in particular, no transition towards a stable triaxial shape is found.

  13. Accurate first principles model potentials for intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Mark S; Smith, Quentin A; Xu, Peng; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V

    2013-01-01

    The general effective fragment potential (EFP) method provides model potentials for any molecule that is derived from first principles, with no empirically fitted parameters. The EFP method has been interfaced with most currently used ab initio single-reference and multireference quantum mechanics (QM) methods, ranging from Hartree-Fock and coupled cluster theory to multireference perturbation theory. The most recent innovations in the EFP model have been to make the computationally expensive charge transfer term much more efficient and to interface the general EFP dispersion and exchange repulsion interactions with QM methods. Following a summary of the method and its implementation in generally available computer programs, these most recent new developments are discussed.

  14. Double scaling in tensor models with a quartic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartois, Stéphane; Gurau, Razvan; Rivasseau, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we identify and analyze in detail the subleading contributions in the 1 /N expansion of random tensors, in the simple case of a quartically interacting model. The leading order for this 1 /N expansion is made of graphs, called melons, which are dual to particular triangulations of the D-dimensional sphere, closely related to the "stacked" triangulations. For D < 6 the subleading behavior is governed by a larger family of graphs, hereafter called cherry trees, which are also dual to the D-dimensional sphere. They can be resummed explicitly through a double scaling limit. In sharp contrast with random matrix models, this double scaling limit is stable. Apart from its unexpected upper critical dimension 6, it displays a singularity at fixed distance from the origin and is clearly the first step in a richer set of yet to be discovered multi-scaling limits.

  15. Bifurcation analysis of a photoreceptor interaction model for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Erika T.; Radulescu, Anca; Wirkus, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is the term used to describe a diverse set of degenerative eye diseases affecting the photoreceptors (rods and cones) in the retina. This work builds on an existing mathematical model of RP that focused on the interaction of the rods and cones. We non-dimensionalize the model and examine the stability of the equilibria. We then numerically investigate other stable modes that are present in the system for various parameter values and relate these modes to the original problem. Our results show that stable modes exist for a wider range of parameter values than the stability of the equilibrium solutions alone, suggesting that additional approaches to preventing cone death may exist.

  16. Multilayer adsorption model for the protein-ligand interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, L. M.; Garcia, M.; Perez-Rodriguez, M.; Taboada, P.; Ruso, J. M.; Mosquera, V.

    2001-05-01

    In the present work we present a theoretical formalism based on the combination of the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller multilayer adsorption model with an electrolytic adsorbate, and the results are used to predict binding isotherms of several synthetic penicillin drugs onto human serum albumin. The occurrence of adsorption maxima in these binding processes is correctly predicted by this noncooperative binding model and it is demonstrated to be due to the ionic character of the adsorbate. The effect of the hydrophobic interactions between adsorbate monomers on the value of the maximum number of adsorbed particles is also a matter of study, and it is proven that this number increases with increasing hydrophobic character of the adsorbate.

  17. Electric multipole interactions in an extended BEG model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Teresa; Dennison, J. R.

    2013-03-01

    General 2D dielectric phase diagrams and phase transitions for multipolar molecules adsorbed to a square ionic crystal are presented. The adsorbed molecules are modeled using a dilute spin-one Ising model in the Blume-Emery-Griffiths formalism, using a mean-field approximation. Physical constants such as the electric multipole moments and binding energies are used to uniquely determine the interaction parameters over the full range of physically-relevant values. We find that temperature- and coverage-dependent antiferroelectric to ferroelectric, coverage-dependent ferroelectric up to ferroelectric down, reentrant ferroelectric to ferrielectric, and order-disorder dipole phase transitions can occur. The results are presented as a quasi-continuous set of phase diagrams. Extensions into ferro-electric parameter space are discussed and connections to analytical solutions are explored.

  18. Nagaoka’s atomic model and hyperfine interactions

    PubMed Central

    INAMURA, Takashi T.

    2016-01-01

    The prevailing view of Nagaoka’s “Saturnian” atom is so misleading that today many people have an erroneous picture of Nagaoka’s vision. They believe it to be a system involving a ‘giant core’ with electrons circulating just outside. Actually, though, in view of the Coulomb potential related to the atomic nucleus, Nagaoka’s model is exactly the same as Rutherford’s. This is true of the Bohr atom, too. To give proper credit, Nagaoka should be remembered together with Rutherford and Bohr in the history of the atomic model. It is also pointed out that Nagaoka was a pioneer of understanding hyperfine interactions in order to study nuclear structure. PMID:27063182

  19. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: a lattice model.

    PubMed

    Pink, D A; Chapman, D

    1979-04-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure-area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T(0), which locates the gel-fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a "smooth" homogeneous surface ("cholesterol-like") and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T(0) can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken "annulus" of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T(0) does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10(-7) sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed.

  20. Bayesian Safety Risk Modeling of Human-Flightdeck Automation Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancel, Ersin; Shih, Ann T.

    2015-01-01

    Usage of automatic systems in airliners has increased fuel efficiency, added extra capabilities, enhanced safety and reliability, as well as provide improved passenger comfort since its introduction in the late 80's. However, original automation benefits, including reduced flight crew workload, human errors or training requirements, were not achieved as originally expected. Instead, automation introduced new failure modes, redistributed, and sometimes increased workload, brought in new cognitive and attention demands, and increased training requirements. Modern airliners have numerous flight modes, providing more flexibility (and inherently more complexity) to the flight crew. However, the price to pay for the increased flexibility is the need for increased mode awareness, as well as the need to supervise, understand, and predict automated system behavior. Also, over-reliance on automation is linked to manual flight skill degradation and complacency in commercial pilots. As a result, recent accidents involving human errors are often caused by the interactions between humans and the automated systems (e.g., the breakdown in man-machine coordination), deteriorated manual flying skills, and/or loss of situational awareness due to heavy dependence on automated systems. This paper describes the development of the increased complexity and reliance on automation baseline model, named FLAP for FLightdeck Automation Problems. The model development process starts with a comprehensive literature review followed by the construction of a framework comprised of high-level causal factors leading to an automation-related flight anomaly. The framework was then converted into a Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) using the Hugin Software v7.8. The effects of automation on flight crew are incorporated into the model, including flight skill degradation, increased cognitive demand and training requirements along with their interactions. Besides flight crew deficiencies, automation system

  1. Interactive training model of TRIZ for mechanical engineers in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Runhua; Zhang, Huangao

    2014-03-01

    Innovation is a process of taking an original idea and converting it into a business value, in which the engineers face some inventive problems which can be solved hardly by experience. TRIZ, as a new theory for companies in China, provides both conceptual and procedural knowledge for finding and solving inventive problems. Because the government plays a leading role in the diffusion of TRIZ, too many companies from different industries are waiting to be trained, but the quantity of the trainers mastering TRIZ is incompatible with that requirement. In this context, to improve the training effect, an interactive training model of TRIZ for the mechanical engineers in China is developed and the implementation in the form of training classes is carried out. The training process is divided into 6 phases as follows: selecting engineers, training stage-1, finding problems, training stage-2, finding solutions and summing up. The government, TRIZ institutions and companies to join the programs interact during the process. The government initiates and monitors a project in form of a training class of TRIZ and selects companies to join the programs. Each selected companies choose a few engineers to join the class and supervises the training result. The TRIZ institutions design the training courses and carry out training curriculum. With the beginning of the class, an effective communication channel is established by means of interview, discussion face to face, E-mail, QQ and so on. After two years training practices, the results show that innovative abilities of the engineers to join and pass the final examinations increased distinctly, and most of companies joined the training class have taken congnizance of the power of TRIZ for product innovation. This research proposes an interactive training model of TRIZ for mechanical engineers in China to expedite the knowledge diffusion of TRIZ.

  2. Latent variable models with nonparametric interaction effects of latent variables.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinyuan; Lu, Zhaohua; Feng, Xiangnan

    2014-05-10

    Renal disease is one of the common complications of diabetes, especially for Asian populations. Moreover, cardiovascular and renal diseases share common risk factors. This paper proposes a latent variable model with nonparametric interaction effects of latent variables for a study based on the Hong Kong Diabetes Registry, which was established in 1995 as part of a continuous quality improvement program at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Hong Kong. Renal outcome (outcome latent variable) is regressed in terms of cardiac function and diabetes (explanatory latent variables) through an additive structural equation formulated using a series of unspecified univariate and bivariate smooth functions. The Bayesian P-splines approach, along with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm, is proposed to estimate smooth functions, unknown parameters, and latent variables in the model. The performance of the developed methodology is demonstrated via a simulation study. The effect of the nonparametric interaction of cardiac function and diabetes on renal outcome is investigated using the proposed methodology. PMID:24338916

  3. Interactions of PAMAM dendrimers with negatively charged model biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Yanez Arteta, Marianna; Ainalem, Marie-Louise; Porcar, Lionel; Martel, Anne; Coker, Helena; Lundberg, Dan; Chang, Debby P; Soltwedel, Olaf; Barker, Robert; Nylander, Tommy

    2014-11-13

    We have investigated the interactions between cationic poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers of generation 4 (G4), a potential gene transfection vector, with net-anionic model biomembranes composed of different ratios of zwitterionic phosphocholine (PC) and anionic phospho-L-serine (PS) phospholipids. Two types of model membranes were used: solid-supported bilayers, prepared with lipids carrying palmitoyl-oleoyl (PO) and diphytanoyl (DPh) acyl chains, and free-standing bilayers, formed at the interface between two aqueous droplets in oil (droplet interface bilayers, DIBs) using the DPh-based lipids. G4 dendrimers were found to translocate through POPC:POPS bilayers deposited on silica surfaces. The charge density of the bilayer affects translocation, which is reduced when the ionic strength increases. This shows that the dendrimer-bilayer interactions are largely controlled by their electrostatic attraction. The structure of the solid-supported bilayers remains intact upon translocation of the dendrimer. However, the amount of lipids in the bilayer decreases and dendrimer/lipid aggregates are formed in bulk solution, which can be deposited on the interfacial layers upon dilution of the system with dendrimer-free solvent. Electrophysiology measurements on DIBs confirm that G4 dendrimers cross the lipid membranes containing PS, which then become more permeable to ions. The obtained results have implications for PAMAM dendrimers as delivery vehicles to cells. PMID:25310456

  4. Template-Based Modeling of Protein-RNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jinfang; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes formed by specific recognition between RNA and RNA-binding proteins play an important role in biological processes. More than a thousand of such proteins in human are curated and many novel RNA-binding proteins are to be discovered. Due to limitations of experimental approaches, computational techniques are needed for characterization of protein-RNA interactions. Although much progress has been made, adequate methodologies reliably providing atomic resolution structural details are still lacking. Although protein-RNA free docking approaches proved to be useful, in general, the template-based approaches provide higher quality of predictions. Templates are key to building a high quality model. Sequence/structure relationships were studied based on a representative set of binary protein-RNA complexes from PDB. Several approaches were tested for pairwise target/template alignment. The analysis revealed a transition point between random and correct binding modes. The results showed that structural alignment is better than sequence alignment in identifying good templates, suitable for generating protein-RNA complexes close to the native structure, and outperforms free docking, successfully predicting complexes where the free docking fails, including cases of significant conformational change upon binding. A template-based protein-RNA interaction modeling protocol PRIME was developed and benchmarked on a representative set of complexes. PMID:27662342

  5. A minimal model of predator–swarm interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuxin; Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    We propose a minimal model of predator–swarm interactions which captures many of the essential dynamics observed in nature. Different outcomes are observed depending on the predator strength. For a ‘weak’ predator, the swarm is able to escape the predator completely. As the strength is increased, the predator is able to catch up with the swarm as a whole, but the individual prey is able to escape by ‘confusing’ the predator: the prey forms a ring with the predator at the centre. For higher predator strength, complex chasing dynamics are observed which can become chaotic. For even higher strength, the predator is able to successfully capture the prey. Our model is simple enough to be amenable to a full mathematical analysis, which is used to predict the shape of the swarm as well as the resulting predator–prey dynamics as a function of model parameters. We show that, as the predator strength is increased, there is a transition (owing to a Hopf bifurcation) from confusion state to chasing dynamics, and we compute the threshold analytically. Our analysis indicates that the swarming behaviour is not helpful in avoiding the predator, suggesting that there are other reasons why the species may swarm. The complex shape of the swarm in our model during the chasing dynamics is similar to the shape of a flock of sheep avoiding a shepherd. PMID:24598204

  6. Development of an interactive anatomical three-dimensional eye model.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lauren K; Bhattacharyya, Siddhartha; Wilson, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    The discrete anatomy of the eye's intricate oculomotor system is conceptually difficult for novice students to grasp. This is problematic given that this group of muscles represents one of the most common sites of clinical intervention in the treatment of ocular motility disorders and other eye disorders. This project was designed to develop a digital, interactive, three-dimensional (3D) model of the muscles and cranial nerves of the oculomotor system. Development of the 3D model utilized data from the Visible Human Project (VHP) dataset that was refined using multiple forms of 3D software. The model was then paired with a virtual user interface in order to create a novel 3D learning tool for the human oculomotor system. Development of the virtual eye model was done while attempting to adhere to the principles of cognitive load theory (CLT) and the reduction of extraneous load in particular. The detailed approach, digital tools employed, and the CLT guidelines are described herein. PMID:25228501

  7. Linguistic steganography on Twitter: hierarchical language modeling with manual interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Alex; Blunsom, Phil; Ker, Andrew D.

    2014-02-01

    This work proposes a natural language stegosystem for Twitter, modifying tweets as they are written to hide 4 bits of payload per tweet, which is a greater payload than previous systems have achieved. The system, CoverTweet, includes novel components, as well as some already developed in the literature. We believe that the task of transforming covers during embedding is equivalent to unilingual machine translation (paraphrasing), and we use this equivalence to de ne a distortion measure based on statistical machine translation methods. The system incorporates this measure of distortion to rank possible tweet paraphrases, using a hierarchical language model; we use human interaction as a second distortion measure to pick the best. The hierarchical language model is designed to model the speci c language of the covers, which in this setting is the language of the Twitter user who is embedding. This is a change from previous work, where general-purpose language models have been used. We evaluate our system by testing the output against human judges, and show that humans are unable to distinguish stego tweets from cover tweets any better than random guessing.

  8. Wave-current interactions: model development and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayet, Clement; Lyard, Florent; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    The coastal area concentrates many uses that require integrated management based on diagnostic and predictive tools to understand and anticipate the future of pollution from land or sea, and learn more about natural hazards at sea or activity on the coast. The realistic modelling of coastal hydrodynamics needs to take into account various processes which interact, including tides, surges, and sea state (Wolf [2008]). These processes act at different spatial scales. Unstructured-grid models have shown the ability to satisfy these needs, given that a good mesh resolution criterion is used. We worked on adding a sea state forcing in a hydrodynamic circulation model. The sea state model is the unstructured version of WAVEWATCH III c (Tolman [2008]) (which version is developed at IFREMER, Brest (Ardhuin et al. [2010]) ), and the hydrodynamic model is the 2D barotropic module of the unstructured-grid finite element model T-UGOm (Le Bars et al. [2010]). We chose to use the radiation stress approach (Longuet-Higgins and Stewart [1964]) to represent the effect of surface waves (wind waves and swell) in the barotropic model, as previously done by Mastenbroek et al. [1993]and others. We present here some validation of the model against academic cases : a 2D plane beach (Haas and Warner [2009]) and a simple bathymetric step with analytic solution for waves (Ardhuin et al. [2008]). In a second part we present realistic application in the Ushant Sea during extreme event. References Ardhuin, F., N. Rascle, and K. Belibassakis, Explicit wave-averaged primitive equations using a generalized Lagrangian mean, Ocean Modelling, 20 (1), 35-60, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2007.07.001, 2008. Ardhuin, F., et al., Semiempirical Dissipation Source Functions for Ocean Waves. Part I: Definition, Calibration, and Validation, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 40 (9), 1917-1941, doi:10.1175/2010JPO4324.1, 2010. Haas, K. A., and J. C. Warner, Comparing a quasi-3D to a full 3D nearshore circulation model: SHORECIRC and

  9. System for Predicting Pitzer Ion-Interaction Model Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, D. R.; Obias, T.

    2002-12-01

    Pitzer's Ion-Interaction Model has been widely utilized for the prediction of non-ideal solution behavior. The Pitzer model does an excellent job of predicting the solubility of minerals over a wide range of conditions for natural water systems. While Pitzer's equations have been successful in modeling systems when there are parameters available, there are still some systems that can't be modeled because parameters aren't available for all of the salts of interest. For example, there is little to no data for aluminum salts yet in acidified natural waters it may be present at significant concentrations. In addition, aluminum chemistry will also be important in the remediation of acidified High-level waste. Given the quantity of work involved in generating the needed parameters it would be advantageous to be able to predict Pitzer parameters for salt systems when there is no data available. Recently we began work on modeling High-level waste systems where Pitzer parameters are not available for some of the constituents of interest. We will discuss a set of relations we have developed for the prediction of Pitzer's binary ion-interaction parameters. In the binary parameter case, we reformulated the Pitzer's equations by replacing the parameters, β(0), β(1), β(2), and C, with expressions in ionic radii. Equations have been developed for salts of a particular anion with cations of similar charge. For example, there is a single equation for the 1:1 chloride salts. Relations for acids were developed separately. Also we have developed a separate set of equations for all salts of a particular charge type independent of the anion. While the latter set of equations are of lesser predictive value, they can be used in cases where we don't have a relation for a particular anion. Since any system used to predict parameters would result in a loss of accuracy, experimentally determined parameters should be used when available. The ability of parameters derived from our model

  10. Nonclassical interactions portrait in a macroscopic pedestrian flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosini, Massimiliano D.

    In this paper we describe the main characteristics of the macroscopic model for pedestrian flows introduced in [R.M. Colombo, M.D. Rosini, Pedestrian flows and non-classical shocks, Math. Methods Appl. Sci. 28 (13) (2005) 1553-1567] and recently sperimentally verified in [D. Helbing, A. Johansson, H.Z. Al-Abideen, Dynamics of crowd disasters: An empirical study, Phys. Rev. E (Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics) 75 (4) (2007) 046109]. After a detailed study of all the possible wave interactions, we prove the existence of a weighted total variation that does not increase after any interaction. This is the main ingredient used in [R.M. Colombo, M.D. Rosini, Existence of nonclassical Cauchy problem modeling pedestrian flows, technical report, Brescia Department of Mathematics, 2008] to tackle the Cauchy problem through wave front tracking, see [A. Bressan, Hyperbolic Systems of Conservation Laws. The One-Dimensional Cauchy Problem, Oxford Lecture Ser. Math. Appl., vol. 20, Oxford Univ. Press, Oxford, 2000, The one-dimensional Cauchy problem; A. Bressan, The front tracking method for systems of conservation laws, in: C.M. Dafermos, E. Feireisl (Eds.), Handbook of Differential Equations; Evolutionary Equations, vol. 1, Elsevier, 2004, pp. 87-168; R.M. Colombo, Wave front tracking in systems of conservation laws, Appl. Math. 49 (6) (2004) 501-537]. From the mathematical point of view, this model is one of the few examples of conservation laws in which nonclassical solutions have a physical motivation, see [P.G. Lefloch, Hyperbolic Systems of Conservation Laws, Lectures Math. ETH Zürich, Birkhäuser, Basel, 2002, The theory of classical and nonclassical shock waves], and an existence result is available.

  11. Fluid-Rock Interaction Models: Code Release and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, E. W.

    2006-12-01

    Numerical models our group has developed for understanding the role of kinetic processes during fluid-rock interaction will be released free to the public. We will also present results that highlight the importance of kinetic processes. The author is preparing manuals describing the numerical methods used, as well as "how-to" guides for using the models. The release will include input files, full in-line code documentation of the FORTRAN source code, and instructions for use of model output for visualization and analysis. The aqueous phase (weathering) and supercritical (mixed-volatile metamorphic) fluid flow and reaction models for porous media will be released separately. These codes will be useful as teaching and research tools. The codes may be run on current generation personal computers. Although other codes are available for attacking some of the problems we address, unique aspects of our codes include sub-grid-scale grain models to track grain size changes, as well as dynamic porosity and permeability. Also, as the flow field can change significantly over the course of the simulation, efficient solution methods have been developed for the repeated solution of Poisson-type equations that arise from Darcy's law. These include sparse-matrix methods as well as the even more efficient spectral-transform technique. Results will be presented for kinetic control of reaction pathways and for heterogeneous media. Codes and documentation for modeling intra-grain diffusion of trace elements and isotopes, and exchange of these between grains and moving fluids will also be released. The unique aspect of this model is that it includes concurrent diffusion and grain growth or dissolution for multiple mineral types (low-diffusion regridding has been developed to deal with the moving-boundary problem at the fluid/mineral interface). Results for finite diffusion rates will be compared to batch and fractional melting models. Additional code and documentation will be released

  12. Modelling the interaction between flooding events and economic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grames, Johanna; Fürnkranz-Prskawetz, Alexia; Grass, Dieter; Viglione, Alberto; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Recently socio-hydrology models have been proposed to analyze the interplay of community risk-coping culture, flooding damage and economic growth. These models descriptively explain the feedbacks between socio-economic development and natural disasters such as floods. Complementary to these descriptive models, we develop a dynamic optimization model, where the inter-temporal decision of an economic agent interacts with the hydrological system. This interdisciplinary approach matches with the goals of Panta Rhei i.e. to understand feedbacks between hydrology and society. It enables new perspectives but also shows limitations of each discipline. Young scientists need mentors from various scientific backgrounds to learn their different research approaches and how to best combine them such that interdisciplinary scientific work is also accepted by different science communities. In our socio-hydrology model we apply a macro-economic decision framework to a long-term flood-scenario. We assume a standard macro-economic growth model where agents derive utility from consumption and output depends on physical capital that can be accumulated through investment. To this framework we add the occurrence of flooding events which will destroy part of the capital. We identify two specific periodic long term solutions and denote them rich and poor economies. Whereas rich economies can afford to invest in flood defense and therefore avoid flood damage and develop high living standards, poor economies prefer consumption instead of investing in flood defense capital and end up facing flood damages every time the water level rises. Nevertheless, they manage to sustain at least a low level of physical capital. We identify optimal investment strategies and compare simulations with more frequent and more intense high water level events.

  13. Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Peters, Len K.

    2008-07-03

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a new Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC), with a special focus on addressing the long-standing issues associated with solving the dynamic partitioning of semi-volatile inorganic gases (HNO3, HCl, and NH3) to size-distributed atmospheric aerosol particles. The coupled ordinary differential equations (ODE) for dynamic gas-particle mass transfer are extremely stiff, and the available numerical techniques are either too expensive or produce oscillatory and/or inaccurate steady-state solutions. These limitations are overcome in MOSAIC, which couples an accurate and computationally efficient thermodynamic module [Zaveri et al., 2005a,b] with a new dynamic gas-particle partitioning module described here. The algorithm involves time-split integrations of non-volatile and semi-volatile species, and a new concept of “dynamic pH” and an adaptive time-stepping scheme hold the key to smooth, accurate, and efficient solutions over the entire relative humidity range. MOSAIC is found to be in excellent agreement with a benchmark version of the model that uses LSODES (a Gear solver) for rigorously integrating the stiff ODEs. The steady-state MOSAIC results for monodisperse aerosol test cases are also in excellent agreement with those obtained with the benchmark equilibrium model AIM. MOSAIC is also evaluated within a 3-D model, and the average CPU speed is estimated to be over 100 times faster than the dynamic aerosol model MADM [Pilinis et al., 2000]. These results suggest that MOSAIC is highly attractive for use in 3-D aerosol and air quality models in which both accuracy and efficiency are critically important.

  14. Simple model for deriving [ital sdg] interacting boson model Hamiltonians: [sup 150]Nd example

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, Y.D.; Kota, V.K.B. )

    1993-07-01

    A simple and yet useful model for deriving [ital sdg] interacting boson model (IBM) Hamiltonians is to assume that single-boson energies derive from identical particle ([ital pp] and [ital nn]) interactions and proton, neutron single-particle energies, and that the two-body matrix elements for bosons derive from [ital pn] interaction, with an IBM-2 to IBM-1 projection of the resulting [ital p]-[ital n] [ital sdg] IBM Hamiltonian. The applicability of this model in generating [ital sdg] IBM Hamiltonians is demonstrated, using a single-[ital j]-shell Otsuka-Arima-Iachello mapping of the quadrupole and hexadecupole operators in proton and neutron spaces separately and constructing a quadrupole-quadrupole plus hexadecupole-hexadecupole Hamiltonian in the analysis of the spectra, [ital B]([ital E]2)'s, and [ital E]4 strength distribution in the example of [sup 150]Nd.

  15. Theory and modeling of particles with DNA-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.

    In recent years significant attention has been attracted to proposals which utilize DNA for nanotechnological applications. Potential applications of these ideas range from the programmable self-assembly of colloidal crystals, to biosensors and nanoparticle based drug delivery platforms. In Chapter I we introduce the system, which generically consists of colloidal particles functionalized with specially designed DNA markers. The sequence of bases on the DNA markers determines the particle type. Due to the hybridization between complementary single-stranded DNA, specific, type-dependent interactions can be introduced between particles by choosing the appropriate DNA marker sequences. In Chapter II we develop a statistical mechanical description of the aggregation and melting behavior of particles with DNA-mediated interactions. A quantitative comparison between the theory and experiments is made by calculating the experimentally observed melting profile. In Chapter III a model is proposed to describe the dynamical departure and diffusion of particles which form reversible key-lock connections. The model predicts a crossover from localized to diffusive behavior. The random walk statistics for the particles' in plane diffusion is discussed. The lateral motion is analogous to dispersive transport in disordered semiconductors, ranging from standard diffusion with a renormalized diffusion coefficient to anomalous, subdiffusive behavior. In Chapter IV we propose a method to self-assemble nanoparticle clusters using DNA scaffolds. An optimal concentration ratio is determined for the experimental implementation of our self-assembly proposal. A natural extension is discussed in Chapter V, the programmable self-assembly of nanoparticle clusters where the desired cluster geometry is encoded using DNA-mediated interactions. We determine the probability that the system self-assembles the desired cluster geometry, and discuss the connections to jamming in granular and colloidal

  16. Modelling Sea Ice and Surface Wave Interactions in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosekova, L.; Aksenov, Y.; Coward, A.; Williams, T.; Bertino, L.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2015-12-01

    In the Polar Oceans, the surface ocean waves break up sea ice cover and create the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ), an area between the sea-ice free ocean and pack ice characterized by highly fragmented ice. This band of sea ice cover is undergoing dramatic changes due to sea ice retreat, with a widening of up to 39% in the Arctic Ocean reported over the last three decades and projections predicting a continuing increase. The surface waves, sea ice and ocean interact in the MIZ through multiple complex feedbacks and processes which are not accounted for in any of the present-day climate models. To address this issue, we present a model development which implements surface ocean wave effects in the global Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) NEMO, coupled to the CICE sea ice model. Our implementation takes into account a number of physical processes specific to the MIZ dynamics. Incoming surface waves are attenuated due to scattering and energy dissipation induced by the presence of ice cover, which is in turn fragmented in response to flexural stresses. This fragmentation modifies the floe size distribution and impacts the sea ice thermodynamics by increasing lateral melting and thus affecting momentum and heat transfer between sea ice and the upper ocean. In addition, the dynamics of the sea ice is modified by a combined rheology that takes into account floe collisions and allows for a more realistic representation of the MIZ. We present results from the NEMO OGCM at 1 and 0.25 degree resolution with a wave-ice interaction module. The module introduces two new diagnostics previously unavailable in OGCM's: surface wave spectra in sea ice covered areas, and floe size distribution (FSD) due to wave-induced fragmentation. We evaluate the sea ice and wave simulations with available observational estimates, and analyze the impact of these MIZ processes on the ocean and sea ice state. We focus on ocean mixing, stratification, circulation and the role of the MIZ in ocean

  17. The XY model with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Ransell

    2014-04-24

    One can get spin-orbit interaction of the magnetic ions, besides the strong Heisenberg interaction, known as the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. We show the effect of the DM interaction on the excitation spectrum. We also show here the magnetic Susceptibility and ferroelectric polarization of the system in a longitudinal magnetic field.

  18. Modeling interaction of deep groundwaters with bentonite and radionuclide speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Wanner, H.

    1987-12-01

    Based on available experimental data on the interaction of sodium bentonite and groundwater, a model has been developed that represents a means of extrapolation from laboratory data to the conditions in compacted bentonite. The basic reactions between sodium bentonite and groundwater are described by an ion exchange model for sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. The model also assumes equilibrium with calcite and quartz. The calculations are carried out for two types of granitic groundwater: the Swiss reference groundwater (ionic strength I = 0.24 M) and the standard Swedish groundwater (I = 0.0044 M). It is calculated that the pore water of compacted sodium bentonite will have a pH of 9.7 and a carbonate activity of 8 x 10/sup -4/ M if the dry bentonite is saturated with Swiss reference groundwater; it will have a pH near 10.2 and )CO/sub 3//sup 2-/) = 8 x 10/sup -3/ M for standard Swedish groundwater. The long-term situation, which is important for nuclear waste disposal, is modeled by the assumption that the near field of a radioactive waste repository behaves like a mixing tank. It is calculated that sodium bentonite will be slowly converted to calcium bentonite over a long period. The model is used to calculate short- and long-term maximum solubilities of thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and technetium in the near-field pore water of a potential Swiss nuclear waste repository. The redox potential in the near field is assumed to be controlled by the corrosion products of the iron canister.

  19. A coupled hidden Markov model for disease interactions.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Chris; Xifara, Tatiana; Telfer, Sandra; Begon, Mike

    2013-08-01

    To investigate interactions between parasite species in a host, a population of field voles was studied longitudinally, with presence or absence of six different parasites measured repeatedly. Although trapping sessions were regular, a different set of voles was caught at each session, leading to incomplete profiles for all subjects. We use a discrete time hidden Markov model for each disease with transition probabilities dependent on covariates via a set of logistic regressions. For each disease the hidden states for each of the other diseases at a given time point form part of the covariate set for the Markov transition probabilities from that time point. This allows us to gauge the influence of each parasite species on the transition probabilities for each of the other parasite species. Inference is performed via a Gibbs sampler, which cycles through each of the diseases, first using an adaptive Metropolis-Hastings step to sample from the conditional posterior of the covariate parameters for that particular disease given the hidden states for all other diseases and then sampling from the hidden states for that disease given the parameters. We find evidence for interactions between several pairs of parasites and of an acquired immune response for two of the parasites. PMID:24223436

  20. Tool/tissues interaction modeling for transluminal angioplasty simulation.

    PubMed

    Le Fol, T; Haigron, P; Lucas, A

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a simulation environment is described for balloon dilation during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. It means simulating tool/tissues interactions involved in the inflation of a balloon by considering patient specific data. In this context, three main behaviors have been identified: soft tissues, crush completely under the effect of the balloon, calcified plaques, do not admit any deformation but could move in deformable structures and blood vessel wall and organs, try to find their original forms. A deformable soft tissue model is proposed, based on the Enhanced ChainMail method to take into account tissues deformation during dilatation. We improved the original ChainMail method with a "forbidden zone" step to facilitate tool/tissues interactions. The simulation was implemented using five key steps: 1) initialization of balloon parameters; 2) definition of the data structure; 3) dilatation of the balloon and displacement approximation; 4) final position estimation by an elastic relaxation; and 5) interpolation step for visualization. Preliminary results obtained from patient CT data are reported. PMID:18002311

  1. Computational modeling of fluid structural interaction in arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Leila; Boukedjane, Mouloud; Bahi, Lakhdar

    2013-12-01

    Atherosclerosis affects the arterial blood vessels causing stenosis because of which the artery hardens resulting in loss of elasticity in the affected region. In this paper, we present: an approach to model the fluid-structure interaction through such an atherosclerosis affected region of the artery, The blood is assumed as an incompressible Newtonian viscous fluid, and the vessel wall was treated as a thick-walled, incompressible and isotropic material with uniform mechanical properties. The numerical simulation has been studied in the context of The Navier-Stokes equations for an interaction with an elastic solid. The study of fluid flow and wall motion was initially carried out separately, Discretized forms of the transformed wall and flow equations, which are coupled through the boundary conditions at their interface, are obtained by control volume method and simultaneously to study the effects of wall deformability, solutions are obtained for both rigid and elastic walls. The results indicate that deformability of the wall causes an increase in the time average of pressure drop, but a decrease in the maximum wall shear stress. Displacement and stress distributions in the wall are presented.

  2. A coupled hidden Markov model for disease interactions.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Chris; Xifara, Tatiana; Telfer, Sandra; Begon, Mike

    2013-08-01

    To investigate interactions between parasite species in a host, a population of field voles was studied longitudinally, with presence or absence of six different parasites measured repeatedly. Although trapping sessions were regular, a different set of voles was caught at each session, leading to incomplete profiles for all subjects. We use a discrete time hidden Markov model for each disease with transition probabilities dependent on covariates via a set of logistic regressions. For each disease the hidden states for each of the other diseases at a given time point form part of the covariate set for the Markov transition probabilities from that time point. This allows us to gauge the influence of each parasite species on the transition probabilities for each of the other parasite species. Inference is performed via a Gibbs sampler, which cycles through each of the diseases, first using an adaptive Metropolis-Hastings step to sample from the conditional posterior of the covariate parameters for that particular disease given the hidden states for all other diseases and then sampling from the hidden states for that disease given the parameters. We find evidence for interactions between several pairs of parasites and of an acquired immune response for two of the parasites.

  3. Quantum Phenomena Modeled by Interactions between Many Classical Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Michael J. W.; Deckert, Dirk-André; Wiseman, Howard M.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate whether quantum theory can be understood as the continuum limit of a mechanical theory, in which there is a huge, but finite, number of classical "worlds," and quantum effects arise solely from a universal interaction between these worlds, without reference to any wave function. Here, a "world" means an entire universe with well-defined properties, determined by the classical configuration of its particles and fields. In our approach, each world evolves deterministically, probabilities arise due to ignorance as to which world a given observer occupies, and we argue that in the limit of infinitely many worlds the wave function can be recovered (as a secondary object) from the motion of these worlds. We introduce a simple model of such a "many interacting worlds" approach and show that it can reproduce some generic quantum phenomena—such as Ehrenfest's theorem, wave packet spreading, barrier tunneling, and zero-point energy—as a direct consequence of mutual repulsion between worlds. Finally, we perform numerical simulations using our approach. We demonstrate, first, that it can be used to calculate quantum ground states, and second, that it is capable of reproducing, at least qualitatively, the double-slit interference phenomenon.

  4. Quantum phenomena modelled by interactions between many classical worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Howard; Hall, Michael; Deckert, Dirk-Andre

    2015-03-01

    We investigate how quantum theory can be understood as the continuum limit of a mechanical theory, in which there is a huge, but countable, number of classical ``worlds,'' and quantum effects arise solely from a universal interaction between these worlds, without reference to any wave function. Here a ``world'' means an entire universe with well-defined properties, determined by the classical configuration of its particles and fields. In our approach each world evolves deterministically; probabilities arise due to ignorance as to which world a given observer occupies; and we argue that in the limit of infinitely many worlds the wave function can be recovered (as a secondary object) from the motion of these worlds. We introduce a simple model of such a ``many interacting worlds'' approach and show that it can reproduce some generic quantum phenomena-such as Ehrenfest's theorem, wavepacket spreading, barrier tunneling and zero point energy-as a direct consequence of mutual repulsion between worlds. Finally, we perform numerical simulations using our approach. We demonstrate, first, that it can be used to calculate quantum ground states, and second, that it is capable of reproducing, at least qualitatively, the double-slit interference phenomenon.

  5. PIV validation of blood-heart valve leaflet interaction modelling.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, R; Dumont, K; Weber, H; Schroll, M; Verdonck, P

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results of a moving heart valve based on a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) algorithm with experimental measurements. Firstly, a pulsatile laminar flow through a monoleaflet valve model with a stiff leaflet was visualized by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The inflow data sets were applied to a CFD simulation including blood-leaflet interaction. The measurement section with a fixed leaflet was enclosed into a standard mock loop in series with a Harvard Apparatus Pulsatile Blood Pump, a compliance chamber and a reservoir. Standard 2D PIV measurements were made at a frequency of 60 bpm. Average velocity magnitude results of 36 phase-locked measurements were evaluated at every 10 degrees of the pump cycle. For the CFD flow simulation, a commercially available package from Fluent Inc. was used in combination with inhouse developed FSI code based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method. Then the CFD code was applied to the leaflet to quantify the shear stress on it. Generally, the CFD results are in agreement with the PIV evaluated data in major flow regions, thereby validating the FSI simulation of a monoleaflet valve with a flexible leaflet. The applicability of the new CFD code for quantifying the shear stress on a flexible leaflet is thus demonstrated.

  6. Simulations of Bluff Body Flow Interaction for Noise Source Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Medi R.; Lockard David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Neuhart, Dan H.; McGinley, Catherine B.

    2006-01-01

    The current study is a continuation of our effort to characterize the details of flow interaction between two cylinders in a tandem configuration. This configuration is viewed to possess many of the pertinent flow features of the highly interactive unsteady flow field associated with the main landing gear of large civil transports. The present effort extends our previous two-dimensional, unsteady, Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes computations to three dimensions using a quasilaminar, zonal approach, in conjunction with a two-equation turbulence model. Two distinct separation length-to-diameter ratios of L/D = 3.7 and 1.435, representing intermediate and short separation distances between the two cylinders, are simulated. The Mach 0.166 simulations are performed at a Reynolds number of Re = 1.66 105 to match the companion experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. Extensive comparisons with the measured steady and unsteady surface pressure and off-surface particle image velocimetry data show encouraging agreement. Both prominent and some of the more subtle trends in the mean and fluctuating flow fields are correctly predicted. Both computations and the measured data reveal a more robust and energetic shedding process at L/D = 3.7 in comparison with the weaker shedding in the shorter separation case of L/D = 1.435. The vortex shedding frequency based on the computed surface pressure spectra is in reasonable agreement with the measured Strouhal frequency.

  7. Timing Interactions in Social Simulations: The Voter Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Gracia, Juan; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Miguel, Maxi San

    The recent availability of huge high resolution datasets on human activities has revealed the heavy-tailed nature of the interevent time distributions. In social simulations of interacting agents the standard approach has been to use Poisson processes to update the state of the agents, which gives rise to very homogeneous activity patterns with a well defined characteristic interevent time. As a paradigmatic opinion model we investigate the voter model and review the standard update rules and propose two new update rules which are able to account for heterogeneous activity patterns. For the new update rules each node gets updated with a probability that depends on the time since the last event of the node, where an event can be an update attempt (exogenous update) or a change of state (endogenous update). We find that both update rules can give rise to power law interevent time distributions, although the endogenous one more robustly. Apart from that for the exogenous update rule and the standard update rules the voter model does not reach consensus in the infinite size limit, while for the endogenous update there exist a coarsening process that drives the system toward consensus configurations.

  8. A physical model of sensorimotor interactions during locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Theresa J.; Lewis, M. Anthony

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a bipedal robot that models the neuromuscular architecture of human walking. The body is based on principles derived from human muscular architecture, using muscles on straps to mimic agonist/antagonist muscle action as well as bifunctional muscles. Load sensors in the straps model Golgi tendon organs. The neural architecture is a central pattern generator (CPG) composed of a half-center oscillator combined with phase-modulated reflexes that is simulated using a spiking neural network. We show that the interaction between the reflex system, body dynamics and CPG results in a walking cycle that is entrained to the dynamics of the system. We also show that the CPG helped stabilize the gait against perturbations relative to a purely reflexive system, and compared the joint trajectories to human walking data. This robot represents a complete physical, or ‘neurorobotic’, model of the system, demonstrating the usefulness of this type of robotics research for investigating the neurophysiological processes underlying walking in humans and animals.

  9. Fluid-Structure interaction modeling in deformable porous arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakerzadeh, Rana; Zunino, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    A computational framework is developed to study the coupling of blood flow in arteries interacting with a poroelastic arterial wall featuring possibly large deformations. Blood is modeled as an incompressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid using the Navier-Stokes equations and the arterial wall consists of a thick material which is modeled as a Biot system that describes the mechanical behavior of a homogeneous and isotropic elastic skeleton, and connecting pores filled with fluid. Discretization via finite element method leads to the system of nonlinear equations and a Newton-Raphson scheme is adopted to solve the resulting nonlinear system through consistent linearization. Moreover, interface conditions are imposed on the discrete level via mortar finite elements or Nitsche's coupling. The discrete linearized coupled FSI system is solved by means of a splitting strategy, which allows solving the Navier-Stokes and Biot equations separately. The numerical results investigate the effects of proroelastic parameters on the pressure wave propagation in arteries, filtration of incompressible fluids through the porous media, and the structure displacement. The fellowship support from the Computational Modeling & Simulation PhD program at University of Pittsburgh for Rana Zakerzadeh is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. A model of hydrodynamic interaction between swimming bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Gyrya, V.; Aranson, I. G.; Berlyand, L. V.; Karpeev, D.; Penn State Univ.

    2010-01-01

    We study the dynamics and interaction of two swimming bacteria, modeled by self-propelled dumbbell-type structures. We focus on alignment dynamics of a coplanar pair of elongated swimmers, which propel themselves either by 'pushing' or 'pulling' both in three- and quasi-two-dimensional geometries of space. We derive asymptotic expressions for the dynamics of the pair, which complemented by numerical experiments, indicate that the tendency of bacteria to swim in or swim off depends strongly on the position of the propulsion force. In particular, we observe that positioning of the effective propulsion force inside the dumbbell results in qualitative agreement with the dynamics observed in experiments, such as mutual alignment of converging bacteria.

  11. Description of Exotic Nuclei with the Interacting Boson Model

    SciTech Connect

    Boeyuekata, M.; Van Isacker, P.; Uluer, I.

    2008-11-11

    Even--even nuclei in the A{approx}100 mass region are investigated within the framework of the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1). The study includes energy spectra and electric quadrupole transition properties of zirconium, molybdenum, ruthenium and palladium isotopes with neutron number N{>=}54. A global parametrization of the IBM-1 hamiltonian is found leading to a description of 301 collective levels in 30 nuclei with a root-mean-square deviation from the observed level energies of 119 keV. The geometric character of the nuclei can be visualized by plotting the potential energy surface V({beta},{gamma}) obtained from the IBM-1 hamiltonian in the classical limit. The parametrization established on the basis of known elements is then used to predict properties of the unknown, neutron-rich isotopes {sup 106}Zr, {sup 112}Mo, {sup 116}Ru and {sup 120}Pd.

  12. Exploring the Hubbard model: the interplay of geometry and interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbuquois, Rémi; Messer, Michael; Uehlinger, Thomas; Jotzu, Gregor; Görg, Frederik; Greif, Daniel; Huber, Sebastian; Esslinger, Tilman

    2016-05-01

    The nature of the ground state of many-body systems not only depends on the relative strength of kinetic and interaction energies, but also on the geometry imposed by the Hamiltonian. We show here two different experiments performed with ultracold fermions, where the geometry of the optical lattice strongly influences the many-body state. In the Ionic Hubbard model, a new energy scale associated with the breaking of the inversion symmetry of the lattice can be tuned to shift from a Mott insulating to a band insulating state. In the spin sector as well, the geometry of the lattice also plays an important role. Even above the transition temperature, the influence of the lattice geometry is revealed by nearest-neighbour (NN) magnetic correlations, and provides key insights on their formation.

  13. a Global Model for Long-Range Interaction `DAMPING Functions'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myatt, Philip Thomas; McCourt, Frederick R. W.; Le Roy, Robert J.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, `damping functions', which characterize the weakening of inverse-power-sum long-range interatomic interaction energies with increasing electron overlap, have become an increasing important component of models for diatomic molecule interaction potentials. However, a key feature of models for damping functions, their portability, has received little scrutiny. The present work set out to examine all available ab initio induction and dispersion damping function data and to attempt to devise a `global' scheme for diatomic molecule damping functions. It appears that while neutral (H, He, Li, and Ne, homonuclear and mixed) and anion (H^- with H, He and Li) species obey (approximately) one common rule, proton plus neutral (H^+ with H, He and Li) and non-proton-cation plus neutral systems (He^+ and Li^+ with H, He and Li), must each be treated separately. However, for all three cases, a version of the Douketis-Scoles-Thakkar (ionization potential)power factor is a key scaling parameter. R.J. Le Roy, C. C. Haugen, J. Tao and Hui Li, Mol. Phys. 109,435 (2011). P.J. Knowles and W.J. Meath,J. Mol. Phys. 60, 1143 (1987); R.J. Wheatley and W.J. Meath,J. Mol. Phys. 80, 25 (1993); R.J. Wheatley and W.J. Meath J. Chem. Phys. 179, 341 (1994); R.J. Wheatley and W.J. Meath,J. Chem. Phys. 203, 209 (1996). C. Douketis,G. Scoles, S. Marchetti, M. Zen and A. J. Thakkar, J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982).

  14. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  15. Models of interacting supernovae and their spectral diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Audit, Edouard; Livne, Eli; Waldman, Roni

    2016-05-01

    Using radiation hydrodynamics and radiative transfer simulations, we explore the origin of the spectral diversity of interacting supernovae (SNe) of Type IIn. We revisit SN 1994W and investigate the dynamical configurations that can give rise to spectra with narrow lines at all times. We find that a standard ˜10 M⊙ 1051 erg SN ejecta ramming into a 0.4 M⊙ dense circumstellar material is inadequate for SN 1994W, as it leads to the appearance of broad lines at late times. This structure, however, generates spectra that exhibit the key morphological changes seen in SN 1998S. For SN 1994W, we consider a completely different configuration, which involves the interaction at a large radius of a low-mass inner shell with a high-mass outer shell. Such a structure may arise in an 8-12 M⊙ star from a nuclear flash (e.g. of Ne) followed within a few years by core collapse. Our simulations show that the large mass of the outer shell leads to the complete braking of the inner shell material, the formation of a slow dense shell, and the powering of a luminous SN IIn, even for a low inner shell energy. Early on, our model line profiles are typical of SNe IIn, exhibiting narrow cores and broad electron-scattering wings. As observed in SN 1994W, they also remain narrow at late times. Our SN 1994W model invokes two low-energy ejections, both atypical of observed massive stars, and illustrates the diversity of configurations leading to SNe IIn. These results also highlight the importance of spectra to constrain the dynamical properties and understand the origin of SNe IIn.

  16. Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model for Complex Material Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    Complex material behavior is represented by a single equation of product form to account for interaction among the various factors. The factors are selected by the physics of the problem and the environment that the model is to represent. For example, different factors will be required for each to represent temperature, moisture, erosion, corrosion, etc. It is important that the equation represent the physics of the behavior in its entirety accurately. The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from the external launch tanks. The multi-factor has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points - the initial and final points. The exponent describes a monotonic path from the initial condition to the final. The exponent values are selected so that the described path makes sense in the absence of experimental data. In the present investigation, the data used were obtained by testing simulated specimens in launching conditions. Results show that the MFIM is an effective method of describing the divot weight ejected under the conditions investigated. The problem lies in how to represent the divot weight with a single equation. A unique solution to this problem is a multi-factor equation of product form. Each factor is of the following form (1 xi/xf)ei, where xi is the initial value, usually at ambient conditions, xf the final value, and ei the exponent that makes the curve represented unimodal that meets the initial and final values. The exponents are either evaluated by test data or by technical judgment. A minor disadvantage may be the selection of exponents in the absence of any empirical data. This form has been used successfully in describing the foam ejected in simulated space environmental conditions. Seven factors were required

  17. Models of Yukawa interaction in the two Higgs doublet model, and their collider phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Yagyu, Kei; Tsumura, Koji

    2009-07-01

    Possible models of Yukawa interaction are discussed in the two Higgs doublet model (THDM) under the discrete symmetry imposed to avoid the flavor changing neutral current at the leading order. It is known that there are four types of such models corresponding to the possible different assignment of charges for the discrete symmetry on quarks and leptons. We first examine the decay properties of Higgs bosons in each type model, and summarize constraints on the models from current experimental data. We then shed light on the differences among these models in collider phenomenology. In particular, we mainly discuss the so-called type-II THDM and type-X THDM. The type-II THDM corresponds to the model with the same Yukawa interaction as the minimal supersymmetric standard model. On the other hand, in the type-X THDM, additional Higgs bosons can predominantly decay into leptons. This scenario may be interesting because of the motivation for a light charged Higgs boson scenario such as in the TeV-scale model of neutrinos, dark matter, and baryogenesis. We study how we can distinguish the type-X THDM from the minimal supersymmetric standard model at the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider.

  18. Computational models for predicting interactions with membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Shen, Q; Liu, X; Lu, J; Li, S; Luo, C; Gong, L; Luo, X; Zheng, M; Jiang, H

    2013-01-01

    Membrane transporters, including two members: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and solute carrier (SLC) transporters are proteins that play important roles to facilitate molecules into and out of cells. Consequently, these transporters can be major determinants of the therapeutic efficacy, toxicity and pharmacokinetics of a variety of drugs. Considering the time and expense of bio-experiments taking, research should be driven by evaluation of efficacy and safety. Computational methods arise to be a complementary choice. In this article, we provide an overview of the contribution that computational methods made in transporters field in the past decades. At the beginning, we present a brief introduction about the structure and function of major members of two families in transporters. In the second part, we focus on widely used computational methods in different aspects of transporters research. In the absence of a high-resolution structure of most of transporters, homology modeling is a useful tool to interpret experimental data and potentially guide experimental studies. We summarize reported homology modeling in this review. Researches in computational methods cover major members of transporters and a variety of topics including the classification of substrates and/or inhibitors, prediction of protein-ligand interactions, constitution of binding pocket, phenotype of non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and the conformation analysis that try to explain the mechanism of action. As an example, one of the most important transporters P-gp is elaborated to explain the differences and advantages of various computational models. In the third part, the challenges of developing computational methods to get reliable prediction, as well as the potential future directions in transporter related modeling are discussed.

  19. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 1: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  20. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 2: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  1. Effective pairing interaction in semi-infinite nuclear matter in the Brueckner approach: Model {delta}-shaped NN interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.; Lombardo, U.; Saperstein, E.E.; Zverev, M.V.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of pairing in semi-infinite nuclear matter is considered in the Brueckner approach. Equations for effective pairing interaction in semi-infinite matter are derived for the case of the separable representation of realistic NN interaction. The propagator of two noninteracting particles in a semi-infinite potential well is calculated numerically. The equation for effective interaction is solved for a model 8-shaped NN interaction, which correctly reproduces NN scattering in the low-energy limit. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Modeling and analysis of vegetation-climate interactions using neutral networks and generalized logit models

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, E.; Kandikar, M.; Dowlatabadi, H.

    1995-12-31

    The importance of biosphere-climate interactions for energy and moisture balances and major biogeochemical cycles is well recognized. Climate change is expected to alter the functioning and distribution of major ecosystems. These changes have been investigated using global vegetation transfer models.

  3. Improved Full Configuration Interaction Monte Carlo for the Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changlani, Hitesh; Holmes, Adam; Petruzielo, Frank; Chan, Garnet; Henley, C. L.; Umrigar, C. J.

    2012-02-01

    We consider the recently proposed full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCI-QMC) method and its ``initiator'' extension, both of which promise to ameliorate the sign problem by utilizing the cancellation of positive and negative walkers in the Hilbert space of Slater determinants. While the method has been primarily used for quantum chemistry by A.Alavi and his co-workers [1,2], its application to lattice models in solid state physics has not been tested. We propose an improvement in the form of choosing a basis to make the wavefunction more localized in Fock space, which potentially also reduces the sign problem. We perform calculations on the 4x4 and 8x8 Hubbard models in real and momentum space and in a basis motivated by the reduced density matrix of a 2x2 real space patch obtained from the exact diagonalization of a larger system in which it is embedded. We discuss our results for a range of fillings and U/t and compare them with previous Auxiliary Field QMC and Fixed Node Green's Function Monte Carlo calculations. [4pt] [1] George Booth, Alex Thom, Ali Alavi, J Chem Phys, 131, 050106,(2009)[0pt] [2] D Cleland, GH Booth, Ali Alavi, J Chem Phys 132, 041103, (2010)

  4. Interacting boson model descriptions of high-spin states

    SciTech Connect

    Kuyucak, S.

    1995-10-01

    The I/N expansion technique for the interacting boson model (IBM) has recently been extended to higher orders using computer algebra. This allows, for the first time, a realistic description of high-spin states in the framework of the sdg-IBM. Systematic studies of moment of inertia show that the problems with its spin dependence are due to the energy surface being too rigid against rotations which can be remedied by including the d-boson energy in the Hamiltonian. The d-boson energy is also instrumental in resolving two other problems in the IBM first raised by Bohr and Mottelson, namely, energy scale mismatch in the ground and gamma bands, and the boson cutoff in B(E2) values. We apply the results to describe the high-spin states in rare-earth and actinide nuclei where the ground band has been followed up to spins L=30, and hence provide unique test cases for collective models. The same formalism can also be used in a phenomenological description of superdeformed states as will be demonstrated with examples in the Hg-Pb region.

  5. Simulation and modeling techniques for parachute fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Keith Robert

    This thesis is on advanced flow simulation and modeling techniques for fluid-structure interactions (FSI) encountered in parachute systems. The main fluid dynamics solver is based on the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space-Time (DSD/SST) finite element formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations of incompressible flows. The DSD/SST formulation, which was introduced earlier for flow computations involving moving boundaries and interfaces, gives us the capability to handle parachute structural deformations. The structural dynamics solver is based on a total Lagrangian finite element formulation of the equilibrium equations for a "tension structure" composed of membranes, cables, and concentrated masses. The fluid and structure are coupled iteratively within a nonlinear iteration loop, with multiple nonlinear iterations improving the convergence of the coupled system. Unstructured mesh generation and mesh moving techniques for handling of parachute deformations are developed and/or adapted to address the challenges posed by the coupled problem. The FSI methodology was originally implemented on the Thinking Machines CM-5 supercomputer and is now actively used on the CRAY T3E-1200. Applications to a variety of round and cross parachutes used by the US Army are presented, and different stages of the parachute operations, including inflation and terminal descent, are modeled.

  6. Microscopic formulation of the interacting boson model for rotational nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Kosuke; Shimizu, Noritaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Guo, Lu

    2011-04-15

    We propose a novel formulation of the interacting boson model (IBM) for rotational nuclei with axially symmetric, strong deformation. The intrinsic structure represented by the potential-energy surface (PES) of a given multinucleon system has a certain similarity to that of the corresponding multiboson system. Based on this feature, one can derive an appropriate boson Hamiltonian, as already reported. This prescription, however, has a major difficulty in the rotational spectra of strongly deformed nuclei: the bosonic moment of inertia is significantly smaller than the corresponding nucleonic one. We present that this difficulty originates in the difference between the rotational response of a nucleon system and that of the corresponding boson system, and could arise even if the PESs of the two systems were identical. We further suggest that the problem can be solved by implementing the L{center_dot}L term into the IBM Hamiltonian, with the coupling constant derived from the cranking approach of Skyrme mean-field models. The validity of the method is confirmed for rare-earth and actinoid nuclei, as their experimental rotational yrast bands are reproduced nicely.

  7. Mechanical model of the Lorentz force and Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriyev, Valery

    2008-09-01

    The centripetal and Coriolis accelerations experienced by a cart traveling over a rotating turntable are usually calculated proceeding from the known kinematics of the problem. Respective forces can be regarded as due to the entrainment of the cart in the moving solid environs. We extend the approach to the general case of a particle entrained in the flow of the surrounding medium. The expression for the driving force on the particle obtained from the kinematics of the entrainment prescribed appears to be isomorphic to the Lorentz and Coulomb force on a positive electric charge. The inverse direction of the electromagnetic force on a negative charge implies that a growing applied flow induces the upstream motion of the particle. A possible microscopic mechanism for it may be the Magnus force dynamics of a kink in a vortex tangle. The loop on a straight vortex filament can be taken as a model of the electron, the loop with a cavitation models the positron. The Lorentz force is concerned with the Coriolis acceleration. The Coulomb interaction is due to the centripetal or centrifugal force that arises in the turbophoresis of the kink in the perturbation field generated in the medium by the center of pressure.

  8. Nanoparticles meet cell membranes: probing nonspecific interactions using model membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai Loon; Bothun, Geoffrey D

    2014-01-21

    Nanotoxicity studies have shown that both carbon-based and inorganic engineered nanoparticles can be toxic to microorganisms. Although the pathways for cytotoxicity are diverse and dependent upon the nature of the engineered nanoparticle and the chemical environment, numerous studies have provided evidence that direct contact between nanoparticles and bacterial cell membranes is necessary for cell inactivation or damage, and may in fact be a primary mechanism for cytotoxicity. The propensities for nanoparticles to attach to and disrupt cell membranes are still not well understood due to the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of biological membranes. Model biological membranes can be employed for systematic investigations of nanoparticle-membrane interactions. In this article, current and emerging experimental approaches to identify the key parameters that control the attachment of ENPs on model membranes and the disruption of membranes by ENPs will be discussed. This critical information will help enable the "safe-by-design" production of engineered nanoparticles that are nontoxic or biocompatible, and also allow for the design of antimicrobial nanoparticles for environmental and biomedical applications.

  9. Modeling Wave-Ice Interactions in the Marginal Ice Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Mark; Shi, Fengyan; Bateman, Sam; Veeramony, Jay; Calantoni, Joe

    2015-04-01

    The small-scale (O(m)) interactions between waves and ice floes in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) are investigated with a coupled model system. Waves are simulated with the non-hydrostatic finite-volume model NHWAVE (Ma et al., 2012) and ice floes are represented as bonded collections of smaller particles with the discrete element system LIGGGHTS (Kloss et al., 2012). The physics of fluid and ice are recreated as authentically as possible, to allow the coupled system to supplement and/or substitute for more costly and demanding field experiments. The presentation will first describe the development and validation of the coupled system, then discuss the results of a series of virtual experiments in which ice floe and wave characteristics are varied to examine their effects on energy dissipation, MIZ floe size distribution, and ice pack retreat rates. Although Wadhams et al. (1986) suggest that only a small portion (roughly 10%) of wave energy entering the MIZ is reflected, dissipation mechanisms for the remaining energy have yet to be delineated or measured. The virtual experiments are designed to focus on specific properties and processes - such as floe size and shape, collision and fracturing events, and variations in wave climate - and measure their relative roles the transfer of energy and momentum from waves to ice. Questions to be examined include: How is energy dissipated by ice floe collisions, fracturing, and drag, and how significant is the wave attenuation associated with each process? Do specific wave/floe length scale ratios cause greater wave attenuation? How does ice material strength affect the rate of wave energy loss? The coupled system will ultimately be used to test and improve upon wave-ice parameterizations for large-scale climate models. References: >Kloss, C., C. Goniva, A. Hager, S. Amberger, and S. Pirker (2012). Models, algorithms and validation for opensource DEM and CFD-DEM. Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics 12(2/3), 140-152. >Ma, G

  10. Pattern formation through spatial interactions in a modified Daisyworld model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Tommaso; Primavera, Leonardo; Lepreti, Fabio; Vecchio, Antonio; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    The Daisyworld model is based on a hypothetical planet, like the Earth, which receives the radiant energy coming from a Sun-like star, and populated by two kinds of identical plants differing by their colour: white daisies reflecting light and black daisies absorbing light. The interactions and feedbacks between the collective biota of the planet and the incoming radiation form a self-regulating system where the conditions for life are maintained. We investigate a modified version of the Daisyworld model where a spatial dependency on latitude is introduced, and both a variable heat diffusivity along latitude and a simple greenhouse model are included. We show that the spatial interactions between the variables of the system can generate some equilibrium patterns which can locally stabilize the coexistence of the two vegetation types. The feedback on albedo is able to generate new equilibrium solutions which can efficiently self-regulate the planet climate, even for values of the solar luminosity relatively far from the current Earth conditions. The extension to spatial Daisyworld gives room to the possibility of inhomogeneous solar forcing in a curved planet, with explicit differences between poles and equator and the direct use of the heat diffusion equation. As a first approach, to describe a spherical planet, we consider the temperature T(θ,t) and the surface coverage as depending only on time and on latitude θ (-90° ≤ θ ≤ 90°). A second step is the introduction of the greenhouse effect in the model, the process by which outgoing infrared radiation is partly screened by greenhouse gases. This effect can be described by relaxing the black-body radiation hypothesis and by introducing a grayness function g(T) in the heat equation. As a third step, we consider a latitude dependence of the Earth's conductivity, χ = χ(θ). Considering these terms, using spherical coordinates and symmetry with respect to θ, the modified Daisyworld equations reduce to the

  11. How Levels of Interactivity in Tutorials Affect Students' Learning of Modeling Transportation Problems in a Spreadsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seal, Kala Chand; Przasnyski, Zbigniew H.; Leon, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    Do students learn to model OR/MS problems better by using computer-based interactive tutorials and, if so, does increased interactivity in the tutorials lead to better learning? In order to determine the effect of different levels of interactivity on student learning, we used screen capture technology to design interactive support materials for…

  12. Molecular Interaction between Magainin 2 and Model Membranes in Situ

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoi; Le Clair, Stéphanie V.; Ye, Shuji; Chen, Zhan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the molecular interactions of Magainin 2 with model cell membranes using Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and Attenuated Total Reflectance – Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Symmetric 1-Palmitoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-[Phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (POPG) and 1-Palmitoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (POPC) bilayers, which model the bacterial and mammalian cell membranes respectively, were used in the studies. It was observed by SFG that Magainin 2 orients relatively parallel to the POPG lipid bilayer surface at low solution concentrations, around 200 nM. When increasing the Magainin 2 concentration to 800 nM, both SFG and ATR-FTIR results indicate that Magainin 2 molecules insert into the POPG bilayer and adopt a transmembrane orientation with an angle of about 20 degrees from the POPG bilayer normal. For the POPC bilayer, even at a much higher peptide concentration of 2.0 µM, no ATR-FTIR signal was detected. For this concentration on POPC, SFG studies indicated that Magainin 2 molecules adopt an orientation nearly parallel to the bilayer surface, with an orientation angle of 75 degrees from the surface normal. This shows that SFG has a much better detection limit than ATR-FTIR and can therefore be applied to study interfacial molecules with much lower surface coverage. This Magainin 2 orientation study and further investigation of the lipid bilayer SFG signals support the proposed toroidal pore model for the antimicrobial activity of Magainin 2. PMID:19728722

  13. SIMPLIFIED MODELS FOR PHOTOHADRONIC INTERACTIONS IN COSMIC ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Huemmer, S.; Rueger, M.; Spanier, F.; Winter, W. E-mail: mlrueger@astro.uni-wuerzburg.d E-mail: winter@physik.uni-wuerzburg.d

    2010-09-20

    We discuss simplified models for photo-meson production in cosmic accelerators, such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Our self-consistent models are directly based on the underlying physics used in the SOPHIA software and can be easily adapted if new data are included. They allow for the efficient computation of neutrino and photon spectra (from {pi}{sup 0} decays) as a major requirement of modern time-dependent simulations of the astrophysical sources and parameter studies. In addition, the secondaries (pions and muons) are explicitly generated, a necessity if cooling processes are to be included. For the neutrino production, we include the helicity dependence of the muon decays which in fact leads to larger corrections than the details of the interaction model. The separate computation of the {pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup +}, and {pi}{sup -} fluxes allows, for instance, for flavor ratio predictions of the neutrinos at the source, which are a requirement of many tests of neutrino properties using astrophysical sources. We confirm that for charged pion generation, the often used production by the {Delta}(1232)-resonance is typically not the dominant process in AGNs and GRBs, and we show, for arbitrary input spectra, that the number of neutrinos are underestimated by at least a factor of two if they are obtained from the neutral-to-charged pion ratio. We compare our results for several levels of simplification using isotropic synchrotron and thermal spectra and demonstrate that they are sufficiently close to the SOPHIA software.

  14. Assessing Spurious Interaction Effects in Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Weiss, Brandi A.; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have stressed the importance of simultaneously estimating interaction and quadratic effects in multiple regression analyses, even if theory only suggests an interaction effect should be present. Specifically, past studies suggested that failing to simultaneously include quadratic effects when testing for interaction effects could…

  15. Experimental modelling of flow - bed interactions in Jökulhlaups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrivick, J. L.; Xie, Z.; Sleigh, A.; Hubbard, M.

    2009-04-01

    Jökulhlaups (glacial outburst floods) are a sudden release and advancing wave of water and sediment from a glacier, with a peak discharge that is often several orders of magnitude greater than perennial flows. Jökulhlaup hazards are regularly incorporated into risk assessments for glaciated areas because the associated flood hazards are numerous. Jökulhlaup hazards are primarily due to direct impacts, caused by a frontal surge wave, from debris within a flow body, and from the mass and consistency of the flows. A number of secondary impacts also pose hazards, including widespread deposition of sediment and blocked tributary streams. It is rapid landscape change, which is achieved the mobilization and redistribution of sediment that causes one of the greatest hazards due to jökulhlaups. However, direct measurement of such phenomena is virtually impossible. The aim of this project is therefore to parameterise hydrodynamic - sedimentary interactions in experimental jökulhlaups. Specifically, this project applies laboratory flume modelling, which offers a hitherto untapped opportunity for examining complex interactions between water and sediment within outburst floods. The experimental set-up is of a tradition lock-gate design with a straight 4 m long tank. Hydraulics are scaled at 1:20 froude scale and the following controls on frontal wave flow-bed interactions and hence on rapid landscape change are being investigated: 1. Pre-existing mobile sediment effects, fixed bed roughness effects, sediment concentration effects, mobile bed effects. An emphasis is being maintained on examining the downstream temporal and spatial change in physical character of the water / sediment frontal wave. Facilities are state-of-the-art with a fully-automated laser bed-profiler to measure bed elevation after a run, Seatek arrays to measure transient flow depths, 0.5 Hz Ultrasonic Velocimeter Profiling to measure within-flow velocities, and Ultrasonic High-Concentration Meter (UHCM

  16. Modeling neuron-glia interactions: from parametric model to neuromorphic hardware.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Viviane S; Allam, Sushmita L; Ambert, N; Bouteiller, J-M C; Choma, J; Berger, T W

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental evidence suggests that glial cells are more than just supporting cells to neurons - they play an active role in signal transmission in the brain. We herein propose to investigate the importance of these mechanisms and model neuron-glia interactions at synapses using three approaches: A parametric model that takes into account the underlying mechanisms of the physiological system, a non-parametric model that extracts its input-output properties, and an ultra-low power, fast processing, neuromorphic hardware model. We use the EONS (Elementary Objects of the Nervous System) platform, a highly elaborate synaptic modeling platform to investigate the influence of astrocytic glutamate transporters on postsynaptic responses in the detailed micro-environment of a tri-partite synapse. The simulation results obtained using EONS are then used to build a non-parametric model that captures the essential features of glutamate dynamics. The structure of the non-parametric model we use is specifically designed for efficient hardware implementation using ultra-low power subthreshold CMOS building blocks. The utilization of the approach described allows us to build large-scale models of neuron/glial interaction and consequently provide useful insights on glial modulation during normal and pathological neural function. PMID:22255113

  17. Interactive 4D Visualization of Sediment Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkiewicz, T.; Englert, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal sediment transport models simulate the effects that waves, currents, and tides have on near-shore bathymetry and features such as beaches and barrier islands. Understanding these dynamic processes is integral to the study of coastline stability, beach erosion, and environmental contamination. Furthermore, analyzing the results of these simulations is a critical task in the design, placement, and engineering of coastal structures such as seawalls, jetties, support pilings for wind turbines, etc. Despite the importance of these models, there is a lack of available visualization software that allows users to explore and perform analysis on these datasets in an intuitive and effective manner. Existing visualization interfaces for these datasets often present only one variable at a time, using two dimensional plan or cross-sectional views. These visual restrictions limit the ability to observe the contents in the proper overall context, both in spatial and multi-dimensional terms. To improve upon these limitations, we use 3D rendering and particle system based illustration techniques to show water column/flow data across all depths simultaneously. We can also encode multiple variables across different perceptual channels (color, texture, motion, etc.) to enrich surfaces with multi-dimensional information. Interactive tools are provided, which can be used to explore the dataset and find regions-of-interest for further investigation. Our visualization package provides an intuitive 4D (3D, time-varying) visualization of sediment transport model output. In addition, we are also integrating real world observations with the simulated data to support analysis of the impact from major sediment transport events. In particular, we have been focusing on the effects of Superstorm Sandy on the Redbird Artificial Reef Site, offshore of Delaware Bay. Based on our pre- and post-storm high-resolution sonar surveys, there has significant scour and bedform migration around the

  18. COTHERM: Modelling fluid-rock interactions in Icelandic geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thien, Bruno; Kosakowski, Georg; Kulik, Dmitrii

    2014-05-01

    field by Gudmundsson & Arnorsson [3] and by Icelandic partners of the COTHERM project suggests that the concept of partial equilibrium with instantaneous precipitation of secondary minerals is not sufficient to satisfactorily describe the experimental data. Considering kinetic controls also for secondary minerals appears as indispensable to properly describe the geothermal system evolution using a reactive transport modelling approach [4]. [1] Kulik D.A., Wagner T., Dmytrieva S.V., Kosakowski G., Hingerl F.F., Chudnenko K.V., Berner U., 2013. GEM-Selektor geochemical modeling package: revised algorithm and GEMS3K numerical kernel for coupled simulation codes. Computational Geosciences 17, 1-24. http://gems.web.psi.ch. [2] Palandri, J.L., Kharaka, Y.K., 2004. A compilation of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics for application to geochemical modelling. U.S.Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA, pp. 1-64. [3] Gudmundsson B.T., Arnorsson S., 2005. Secondary mineral-fluid equilibria in the Krafla and Namafjall geothermal systems, Iceland. Applied Geochememistry 20, 1607-1625. [4] Kosakowski, G., & Watanabe, N., 2013. OpenGeoSys-Gem: A numerical tool for calculating geochemical and porosity changes in saturated and partially saturated media. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Parts A/B/C. doi:10.1016/j.pce.2013.11.008

  19. Learning with Interactive Whiteboards: Determining the Factors on Promoting Interactive Whiteboards to Students by Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Eylem; Güler, Çetin; Çelik, H. Eray; Tatli, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors which might affect the intention to use interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by university students, using Technology Acceptance Model by the structural equation modeling approach. The following hypothesis guided the current study: H1. There is a positive relationship between IWB…

  20. Modelling interactions of toxicants and density dependence in wildlife populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schipper, Aafke M.; Hendriks, Harrie W.M.; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Hendriks, A. Jan; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.

    2013-01-01

    1. A major challenge in the conservation of threatened and endangered species is to predict population decline and design appropriate recovery measures. However, anthropogenic impacts on wildlife populations are notoriously difficult to predict due to potentially nonlinear responses and interactions with natural ecological processes like density dependence. 2. Here, we incorporated both density dependence and anthropogenic stressors in a stage-based matrix population model and parameterized it for a density-dependent population of peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus exposed to two anthropogenic toxicants [dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)]. Log-logistic exposure–response relationships were used to translate toxicant concentrations in peregrine falcon eggs to effects on fecundity. Density dependence was modelled as the probability of a nonbreeding bird acquiring a breeding territory as a function of the current number of breeders. 3. The equilibrium size of the population, as represented by the number of breeders, responded nonlinearly to increasing toxicant concentrations, showing a gradual decrease followed by a relatively steep decline. Initially, toxicant-induced reductions in population size were mitigated by an alleviation of the density limitation, that is, an increasing probability of territory acquisition. Once population density was no longer limiting, the toxicant impacts were no longer buffered by an increasing proportion of nonbreeders shifting to the breeding stage, resulting in a strong decrease in the equilibrium number of breeders. 4. Median critical exposure concentrations, that is, median toxicant concentrations in eggs corresponding with an equilibrium population size of zero, were 33 and 46 μg g−1 fresh weight for DDE and PBDEs, respectively. 5. Synthesis and applications. Our modelling results showed that particular life stages of a density-limited population may be relatively insensitive to

  1. MODELING THE INTERACTION OF AGROCHEMICALS WITH ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES: PESTICIDES ON RUTILE AND ORGANO-RUTILE SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-bonded interactions between model pesticides and organo-mineral surfaces have been studied using molecular mechanical conformational calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. The minimum energy conformations and relative binding energies for the interaction of atrazine...

  2. Discrete Variational Approach for Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J. Paxon; Shadwick, B. A.

    2014-10-01

    The traditional approach for fluid models of laser-plasma interactions begins by approximating fields and derivatives on a grid in space and time, leading to difference equations that are manipulated to create a time-advance algorithm. In contrast, by introducing the spatial discretization at the level of the action, the resulting Euler-Lagrange equations have particular differencing approximations that will exactly satisfy discrete versions of the relevant conservation laws. For example, applying a spatial discretization in the Lagrangian density leads to continuous-time, discrete-space equations and exact energy conservation regardless of the spatial grid resolution. We compare the results of two discrete variational methods using the variational principles from Chen and Sudan and Brizard. Since the fluid system conserves energy and momentum, the relative errors in these conserved quantities are well-motivated physically as figures of merit for a particular method. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008382 and by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY-1104683.

  3. Optimization Model for Web Based Multimodal Interactive Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Halic, Tansel; Ahn, Woojin; De, Suvranu

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for optimizing the performance of web based multimodal interactive simulations. For such applications where visual quality and the performance of simulations directly influence user experience, overloading of hardware resources may result in unsatisfactory reduction in the quality of the simulation and user satisfaction. However, optimization of simulation performance on individual hardware platforms is not practical. Hence, we present a mixed integer programming model to optimize the performance of graphical rendering and simulation performance while satisfying application specific constraints. Our approach includes three distinct phases: identification, optimization and update. In the identification phase, the computing and rendering capabilities of the client device are evaluated using an exploratory proxy code. This data is utilized in conjunction with user specified design requirements in the optimization phase to ensure best possible computational resource allocation. The optimum solution is used for rendering (e.g. texture size, canvas resolution) and simulation parameters (e.g. simulation domain) in the update phase. Test results are presented on multiple hardware platforms with diverse computing and graphics capabilities to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. PMID:26085713

  4. Interaction of gentamicin polycation with model and cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Eugenia; Savopol, Tudor; Iordache, Maria-Minodora; Săplăcan, Lavinia; Sobaru, Iuliana; Istrate, Claudia; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Moisescu, Mihaela-Georgeta

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of positively-charged antibiotic gentamicin with cell membranes was studied to determine if any changes in membrane organization were induced by the drug. Opossum kidney epithelia (OK) cells were used as models of eukaryotic cells. Two methods were used: laurdan fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy recordings on 1-(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene p-toluenesulfonate (TMA-DPH) labeled cell suspensions. Both methods showed an altered membrane hydration and fluidity of gentamicin treated cells. Liposomes prepared from dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) mixed with cardiolipin, which mimics the heterogeneous charge composition of the natural cell membrane, were used to determine the effect of gentamicin on artificial bilayers. The membrane lipid packing as revealed by generalized polarization (GP) and fluorescence anizotropy variation with increasing temperature was studied. It was found that the generalized polarization of liposomal membranes containing a negatively charged lipid (cardiolipin) is higher in the presence of gentamicin; in the membrane of living cell (OK), gentamicin induces, on the contrary, a decrease of general polarization. Considering the role of membrane organization in the function of transmembrane channels and receptors, our findings suggest hypotheses that may explain the permeation of gentamicin through the living cell membrane by using these channels.

  5. Biotic Interactions in the Face of Climate Change: A Comparison of Three Modelling Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Jaeschke, Anja; Bittner, Torsten; Jentsch, Anke; Reineking, Björn; Schlumprecht, Helmut; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is expected to alter biotic interactions, and may lead to temporal and spatial mismatches of interacting species. Although the importance of interactions for climate change risk assessments is increasingly acknowledged in observational and experimental studies, biotic interactions are still rarely incorporated in species distribution models. We assessed the potential impacts of climate change on the obligate interaction between Aeshna viridis and its egg-laying plant Stratiotes aloides in Europe, based on an ensemble modelling technique. We compared three different approaches for incorporating biotic interactions in distribution models: (1) We separately modelled each species based on climatic information, and intersected the future range overlap (‘overlap approach’). (2) We modelled the potential future distribution of A. viridis with the projected occurrence probability of S. aloides as further predictor in addition to climate (‘explanatory variable approach’). (3) We calibrated the model of A. viridis in the current range of S. aloides and multiplied the future occurrence probabilities of both species (‘reference area approach’). Subsequently, all approaches were compared to a single species model of A. viridis without interactions. All approaches projected a range expansion for A. viridis. Model performance on test data and amount of range gain differed depending on the biotic interaction approach. All interaction approaches yielded lower range gains (up to 667% lower) than the model without interaction. Regarding the contribution of algorithm and approach to the overall uncertainty, the main part of explained variation stems from the modelling algorithm, and only a small part is attributed to the modelling approach. The comparison of the no-interaction model with the three interaction approaches emphasizes the importance of including obligate biotic interactions in projective species distribution modelling. We recommend the use of

  6. The design-by-treatment interaction model: a unifying framework for modelling loop inconsistency in network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dan; Boddington, Paul; White, Ian R

    2016-09-01

    In this note, we clarify and prove the claim made Higgins et al. () that the design-by-treatment interaction model contains all possible loop inconsistency models. This claim provides a strong argument for using the design-by-treatment interaction model to describe loop inconsistencies in network meta-analysis. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Atmospheric numerical modeling resource enhancement and model convective parameterization/scale interaction studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushman, Paula P.

    1993-01-01

    Research will be undertaken in this contract in the area of Modeling Resource and Facilities Enhancement to include computer, technical and educational support to NASA investigators to facilitate model implementation, execution and analysis of output; to provide facilities linking USRA and the NASA/EADS Computer System as well as resident work stations in ESAD; and to provide a centralized location for documentation, archival and dissemination of modeling information pertaining to NASA's program. Additional research will be undertaken in the area of Numerical Model Scale Interaction/Convective Parameterization Studies to include implementation of the comparison of cloud and rain systems and convective-scale processes between the model simulations and what was observed; and to incorporate the findings of these and related research findings in at least two refereed journal articles.

  8. Modelling land-atmosphere interactions in tropical African wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadson, S.

    2012-04-01

    Wetlands interact with the climate system in two ways. First, the availability of water at the land surface introduces important feedbacks on climate via surface fluxes of energy and water [1]. Over wet surfaces, high daytime evaporation rates and suppressed sensible heat fluxes induce a shallower, moister planetary boundary layer, which affects atmospheric instability and favours the initiation of new storms [2]. Second, wetlands form a key link between the hydrological and carbon cycles, via anoxic degradation of organic matter to release methane (CH4). Wetlands are the largest, but least well quantified, single source of CH4, with recent emission estimates ranging from 105-278 Tg yr-1, ~75% of which comes from the tropics [3]. Although the emissions of methane from boreal wetlands and lakes are less than those from tropical wetlands [3], their size and remoteness pose significant challenges to the quantification of their feedbacks to regional and global climate. In this paper, I present a summary of recent work on modelling hydrological and biogeochemical aspects of wetland formation and the associated land-atmosphere feedbacks in African and boreal environments. We have added an overbank inundation model to the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES). Sub-grid topographic data were used to derive a two-parameter frequency distribution of inundated areas. Our predictions of inundated area are in good agreement with observed estimates of the extent of inundation obtained using satellite infrared and microwave remote sensing [4,5]. The model predicts significant evaporative losses from the inundated region accounting for doubling of the total land-atmosphere water flux during periods of greatest flooding. I also present new parameterisations of methane generation from wetlands. 1. Koster, R.D., et al., 2004, Science, 305(5687): 1138-40. 2. Taylor, C.M., 2010, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37: L05406. 3. US EPA, 2010, Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Natural

  9. A Dual Aspect Process Model of Intensive Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firth, Graham

    2009-01-01

    Intensive Interaction is an empirically researched approach to developing fundamental communication and sociability for people with severe and profound learning disabilities and/or autism. However, it is the author's contention that certain aspects of Intensive Interaction are not universally conceptualised in a uniform manner, and that there are…

  10. MODELING STREAM-AQUIFIER INTERACTIONS WITH LINEAR RESPONSE FUNCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The problem of stream-aquifer interactions is pertinent to conjunctive-use management of water resources and riparian zone hydrology. Closed form solutions are derived for stream-aquifer interactions in rates and volumes expressed as convolution integrals of impulse response and ...

  11. Tournament Management via Interactive Video Communication Systems: Models and Motives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Robert S.; Pawlowski, Donna R.

    In response to tighter school budgets and improved technology, a two-way interactive video was successfully used to provide an alternative "delivery system" for forensic competition. Two university sites were selected to organize and host an interactive video speech and debate tournament for area high school students. The program was completed…

  12. 2D DEM model of sand transport with wind interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oger, L.; Valance, A.

    2013-06-01

    The advance of the dunes in the desert is a threat to the life of the local people. The dunes invade houses, agricultural land and perturb the circulation on the roads. It is therefore very important to understand the mechanism of sand transport in order to fight against desertification. Saltation in which sand grains are propelled by the wind along the surface in short hops, is the primary mode of blown sand movement [1]. The saltating grains are very energetic and when impact a sand surface, they rebound and consequently eject other particles from the sand bed. The ejected grains, called reptating grains, contribute to the augmentation of the sand flux. Some of them can be promoted to the saltation motion. We use a mechanical model based on the Discrete Element Method to study successive collisions of incident energetic beads with granular packing in the context of Aeolian saltation transport. We investigate the collision process for the case where the incident bead and those from the packing have identical mechanical properties. We analyze the features of the consecutive collision processes made by the transport of the saltating disks by a wind in which its profile is obtained from the counter-interaction between air flow and grain flows. We used a molecular dynamics method known as DEM (soft Discrete Element Method) with a initial static packing of 20000 2D particles. The dilation of the upper surface due to the consecutive collisions is responsible for maintaining the flow at a given energy input due to the wind.

  13. Three Approaches to Modeling Gene-Environment Interactions in Longitudinal Family Data: Gene-Smoking Interactions in Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Basson, Jacob; Sung, Yun Ju; de Las Fuentes, Lisa; Schwander, Karen L; Vazquez, Ana; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) has been shown to be substantially heritable, yet identified genetic variants explain only a small fraction of the heritability. Gene-smoking interactions have detected novel BP loci in cross-sectional family data. Longitudinal family data are available and have additional promise to identify BP loci. However, this type of data presents unique analysis challenges. Although several methods for analyzing longitudinal family data are available, which method is the most appropriate and under what conditions has not been fully studied. Using data from three clinic visits from the Framingham Heart Study, we performed association analysis accounting for gene-smoking interactions in BP at 31,203 markers on chromosome 22. We evaluated three different modeling frameworks: generalized estimating equations (GEE), hierarchical linear modeling, and pedigree-based mixed modeling. The three models performed somewhat comparably, with multiple overlaps in the most strongly associated loci from each model. Loci with the greatest significance were more strongly supported in the longitudinal analyses than in any of the component single-visit analyses. The pedigree-based mixed model was more conservative, with less inflation in the variant main effect and greater deflation in the gene-smoking interactions. The GEE, but not the other two models, resulted in substantial inflation in the tail of the distribution when variants with minor allele frequency <1% were included in the analysis. The choice of analysis method should depend on the model and the structure and complexity of the familial and longitudinal data.

  14. Experience with turbulence interaction and turbulence-chemistry models at Fluent Inc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, D.; Kim, S. E.; Tselepidakis, D. P.; Missaghi, M.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses (1) turbulence modeling: challenges in turbulence modeling, desirable attributes of turbulence models, turbulence models in FLUENT, and examples using FLUENT; and (2) combustion modeling: turbulence-chemistry interaction and FLUENT equilibrium model. As of now, three turbulence models are provided: the conventional k-epsilon model, the renormalization group model, and the Reynolds-stress model. The renormalization group k-epsilon model has broadened the range of applicability of two-equation turbulence models. The Reynolds-stress model has proved useful for strongly anisotropic flows such as those encountered in cyclones, swirlers, and combustors. Issues remain, such as near-wall closure, with all classes of models.

  15. New TVD Hydro Code for Modeling Disk-Planet Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudryk, Lawrence; Murray, Norman

    2004-06-01

    We present test simulations of a TVD hydrodynamical code designed with very few calculations per time step. The code is to be used to preform simulations of proto-planet interactions within gas disks in early solar systems.

  16. MODELING THE INTERACTION OF AGROCHEMICALS WITH ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interactions between agrochemicals and organo-mineral surfaces were studied using molecular mechanical conformational calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine), 2,4-D (1, 2-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), and DD...

  17. Interaction of peptides with cell membranes: insights from molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen-lu; Ding, Hong-ming; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2016-03-01

    The investigation of the interaction of peptides with cell membranes is the focus of active research. It can enhance the understanding of basic membrane functions such as membrane transport, fusion, and signaling processes, and it may shed light on potential applications of peptides in biomedicine. In this review, we will present current advances in computational studies on the interaction of different types of peptides with the cell membrane. Depending on the properties of the peptide, membrane, and external environment, the peptide-membrane interaction shows a variety of different forms. Here, on the basis of recent computational progress, we will discuss how different peptides could initiate membrane pores, translocate across the membrane, induce membrane endocytosis, produce membrane curvature, form fibrils on the membrane surface, as well as interact with functional membrane proteins. Finally, we will present a conclusion summarizing recent progress and providing some specific insights into future developments in this field.

  18. Modelling soil-plant-atmosphere interactions by coupling the regional weather model WRF to mechanistic plant models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, C.; Hoffmann, P.; Priesack, E.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change causes altering distributions of meteorological factors influencing plant growth and its interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere. Recent studies show, that uncertainties in regional and global climate simulations are also caused by lacking descriptions of the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Therefore, we couple a mechanistic soil-plant model to a regional climate and forecast model. The detailed simulation of the water and energy exchanges, especially the transpiration of grassland and forests stands, are the key features of the modelling framework. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) (Skamarock 2008) is an open source mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. The WRF model was modified in a way, to either choose its native, static land surface model NOAH or the mechanistic eco-system model Expert-N 5.0 individually for every single grid point within the simulation domain. The Expert-N 5.0 modelling framework provides a highly modular structure, enabling the development and use of a large variety of different plant and soil models, including heat transfer, nitrogen uptake/turnover/transport as well as water uptake/transport and crop management. To represent the key landuse types grassland and forest, we selected two mechanistic plant models: The Hurley Pasture model (Thornley 1998) and a modified TREEDYN3 forest simulation model (Bossel 1996). The models simulate plant growth, water, nitrogen and carbon flows for grassland and forest stands. A mosaic approach enables Expert-N to use high resolution land use data e.g. CORINE Land Cover data (CLC, 2006) for the simulation, making it possible to simulate different land use distributions within a single grid cell. The coupling results are analyzed for plausibility and compared with the results of the default land surface model NOAH (Fei Chen and Jimy Dudhia 2010). We show differences between the mechanistic and the static model coupling, with focus on the feedback effects

  19. Hubbard model for ultracold bosonic atoms interacting via zero-point-energy-induced three-body interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Saurabh; Johnson, P. R.; Tiesinga, Eite

    2016-04-01

    We show that, for ultracold neutral bosonic atoms held in a three-dimensional periodic potential or optical lattice, a Hubbard model with dominant, attractive three-body interactions can be generated. In fact, we derive that the effect of pairwise interactions can be made small or zero starting from the realization that collisions occur at the zero-point energy of an optical lattice site and the strength of the interactions is energy dependent from effective-range contributions. We determine the strength of the two- and three-body interactions for scattering from van der Waals potentials and near Fano-Feshbach resonances. For van der Waals potentials, which for example describe scattering of alkaline-earth atoms, we find that the pairwise interaction can only be turned off for species with a small negative scattering length, leaving the 88Sr isotope a possible candidate. Interestingly, for collisional magnetic Feshbach resonances this restriction does not apply and there often exist magnetic fields where the two-body interaction is small. We illustrate this result for several known narrow resonances between alkali-metal atoms as well as chromium atoms. Finally, we compare the size of the three-body interaction with hopping rates and describe limits due to three-body recombination.

  20. Interactive computer modeling of combustion chemistry and coalescence-dispersion modeling of turbulent combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive computer code for simulation of a high-intensity turbulent combustor as a single point inhomogeneous stirred reactor was developed from an existing batch processing computer code CDPSR. The interactive CDPSR code was used as a guide for interpretation and direction of DOE-sponsored companion experiments utilizing Xenon tracer with optical laser diagnostic techniques to experimentally determine the appropriate mixing frequency, and for validation of CDPSR as a mixing-chemistry model for a laboratory jet-stirred reactor. The coalescence-dispersion model for finite rate mixing was incorporated into an existing interactive code AVCO-MARK I, to enable simulation of a combustor as a modular array of stirred flow and plug flow elements, each having a prescribed finite mixing frequency, or axial distribution of mixing frequency, as appropriate. Further increase the speed and reliability of the batch kinetics integrator code CREKID was increased by rewriting in vectorized form for execution on a vector or parallel processor, and by incorporating numerical techniques which enhance execution speed by permitting specification of a very low accuracy tolerance.

  1. Universal electric current of interacting resonant-level models with asymmetric interactions: An extension of the Landauer formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Akinori; Hatano, Naomichi; Ordonez, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    We study the electron transport in open quantum-dot systems described by the interacting resonant-level models with Coulomb interactions. We consider the situation in which the quantum dot is connected to the left and right leads asymmetrically. We exactly construct many-electron scattering eigenstates for the two-lead system, where two-body bound states appear as a consequence of one-body resonances and the Coulomb interactions. By using an extension of the Landauer formula, we calculate the average electric current for the system under bias voltages in the first order of the interaction parameters. Through a renormalization-group technique, we arrive at the universal electric current, where we observe the suppression of the electric current for large bias voltages, i.e., negative differential conductance. We find that the suppressed electric current is restored by the asymmetry of the system parameters.

  2. RevBayes: Bayesian Phylogenetic Inference Using Graphical Models and an Interactive Model-Specification Language

    PubMed Central

    Höhna, Sebastian; Landis, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Programs for Bayesian inference of phylogeny currently implement a unique and fixed suite of models. Consequently, users of these software packages are simultaneously forced to use a number of programs for a given study, while also lacking the freedom to explore models that have not been implemented by the developers of those programs. We developed a new open-source software package, RevBayes, to address these problems. RevBayes is entirely based on probabilistic graphical models, a powerful generic framework for specifying and analyzing statistical models. Phylogenetic-graphical models can be specified interactively in RevBayes, piece by piece, using a new succinct and intuitive language called Rev. Rev is similar to the R language and the BUGS model-specification language, and should be easy to learn for most users. The strength of RevBayes is the simplicity with which one can design, specify, and implement new and complex models. Fortunately, this tremendous flexibility does not come at the cost of slower computation; as we demonstrate, RevBayes outperforms competing software for several standard analyses. Compared with other programs, RevBayes has fewer black-box elements. Users need to explicitly specify each part of the model and analysis. Although this explicitness may initially be unfamiliar, we are convinced that this transparency will improve understanding of phylogenetic models in our field. Moreover, it will motivate the search for improvements to existing methods by brazenly exposing the model choices that we make to critical scrutiny. RevBayes is freely available at http://www.RevBayes.com. [Bayesian inference; Graphical models; MCMC; statistical phylogenetics.] PMID:27235697

  3. RevBayes: Bayesian Phylogenetic Inference Using Graphical Models and an Interactive Model-Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Höhna, Sebastian; Landis, Michael J; Heath, Tracy A; Boussau, Bastien; Lartillot, Nicolas; Moore, Brian R; Huelsenbeck, John P; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    Programs for Bayesian inference of phylogeny currently implement a unique and fixed suite of models. Consequently, users of these software packages are simultaneously forced to use a number of programs for a given study, while also lacking the freedom to explore models that have not been implemented by the developers of those programs. We developed a new open-source software package, RevBayes, to address these problems. RevBayes is entirely based on probabilistic graphical models, a powerful generic framework for specifying and analyzing statistical models. Phylogenetic-graphical models can be specified interactively in RevBayes, piece by piece, using a new succinct and intuitive language called Rev. Rev is similar to the R language and the BUGS model-specification language, and should be easy to learn for most users. The strength of RevBayes is the simplicity with which one can design, specify, and implement new and complex models. Fortunately, this tremendous flexibility does not come at the cost of slower computation; as we demonstrate, RevBayes outperforms competing software for several standard analyses. Compared with other programs, RevBayes has fewer black-box elements. Users need to explicitly specify each part of the model and analysis. Although this explicitness may initially be unfamiliar, we are convinced that this transparency will improve understanding of phylogenetic models in our field. Moreover, it will motivate the search for improvements to existing methods by brazenly exposing the model choices that we make to critical scrutiny. RevBayes is freely available at http://www.RevBayes.com [Bayesian inference; Graphical models; MCMC; statistical phylogenetics.].

  4. RevBayes: Bayesian Phylogenetic Inference Using Graphical Models and an Interactive Model-Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Höhna, Sebastian; Landis, Michael J; Heath, Tracy A; Boussau, Bastien; Lartillot, Nicolas; Moore, Brian R; Huelsenbeck, John P; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    Programs for Bayesian inference of phylogeny currently implement a unique and fixed suite of models. Consequently, users of these software packages are simultaneously forced to use a number of programs for a given study, while also lacking the freedom to explore models that have not been implemented by the developers of those programs. We developed a new open-source software package, RevBayes, to address these problems. RevBayes is entirely based on probabilistic graphical models, a powerful generic framework for specifying and analyzing statistical models. Phylogenetic-graphical models can be specified interactively in RevBayes, piece by piece, using a new succinct and intuitive language called Rev. Rev is similar to the R language and the BUGS model-specification language, and should be easy to learn for most users. The strength of RevBayes is the simplicity with which one can design, specify, and implement new and complex models. Fortunately, this tremendous flexibility does not come at the cost of slower computation; as we demonstrate, RevBayes outperforms competing software for several standard analyses. Compared with other programs, RevBayes has fewer black-box elements. Users need to explicitly specify each part of the model and analysis. Although this explicitness may initially be unfamiliar, we are convinced that this transparency will improve understanding of phylogenetic models in our field. Moreover, it will motivate the search for improvements to existing methods by brazenly exposing the model choices that we make to critical scrutiny. RevBayes is freely available at http://www.RevBayes.com [Bayesian inference; Graphical models; MCMC; statistical phylogenetics.]. PMID:27235697

  5. IBAR: Interacting boson model calculations for large system sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casperson, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    Scaling the system size of the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1) into the realm of hundreds of bosons has many interesting applications in the field of nuclear structure, most notably quantum phase transitions in nuclei. We introduce IBAR, a new software package for calculating the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the IBM-1 Hamiltonian, for large numbers of bosons. Energies and wavefunctions of the nuclear states, as well as transition strengths between them, are calculated using these values. Numerical errors in the recursive calculation of reduced matrix elements of the d-boson creation operator are reduced by using an arbitrary precision mathematical library. This software has been tested for up to 1000 bosons using comparisons to analytic expressions. Comparisons have also been made to the code PHINT for smaller system sizes. Catalogue identifier: AELI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 28 734 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 104 467 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Any computer system with a C++ compiler Operating system: Tested under Linux RAM: 150 MB for 1000 boson calculations with angular momenta of up to L=4 Classification: 17.18, 17.20 External routines: ARPACK (http://www.caam.rice.edu/software/ARPACK/) Nature of problem: Construction and diagonalization of large Hamiltonian matrices, using reduced matrix elements of the d-boson creation operator. Solution method: Reduced matrix elements of the d-boson creation operator have been stored in data files at machine precision, after being recursively calculated with higher than machine precision. The Hamiltonian matrix is calculated and diagonalized, and the requested transition strengths are calculated

  6. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): scenarios for comparing dose-assessment models. Vol. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Poeton, R.W.; Moeller, M.P.; Laughlin, G.J.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    The Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program designed to provide rapid assessments of the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. The main body of this document consists of 28 examples of IRDAM input and output, representing various types of accidents and releases. These examples are intended to provide a basis for comparison with other models or for testing IRDAM itself. Figures are included which show dose rates calculated by IRDAM for each scenario. Figures are also included which show calculations made using the computer codes WRAITH (Scherpelz, Borst and Hoenes, 1980) and RADPUR (Dabbert, et. al., 1982). Two other companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. The User's Guide (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 1) describes the setup and operation of equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Reactor Accident Assessment Methods (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 2) describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations.

  7. An immune system-tumour interactions model with discrete time delay: Model analysis and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska, Monika Joanna

    2016-05-01

    In this article a generalised mathematical model describing the interactions between malignant tumour and immune system with discrete time delay incorporated into the system is considered. Time delay represents the time required to generate an immune response due to the immune system activation by cancer cells. The basic mathematical properties of the considered model, including the global existence, uniqueness, non-negativity of the solutions, the stability of steady sates and the possibility of the existence of the stability switches, are investigated when time delay is treated as a bifurcation parameter. The model is validated with the sets of the experimental data and additional numerical simulations are performed to illustrate, extend, interpret and discuss the analytical results in the context of the tumour progression.

  8. Optimal Hubbard models for materials with nonlocal Coulomb interactions: graphene, silicene, and benzene.

    PubMed

    Schüler, M; Rösner, M; Wehling, T O; Lichtenstein, A I; Katsnelson, M I

    2013-07-19

    To understand how nonlocal Coulomb interactions affect the phase diagram of correlated electron materials, we report on a method to approximate a correlated lattice model with nonlocal interactions by an effective Hubbard model with on-site interactions U(*) only. The effective model is defined by the Peierls-Feynman-Bogoliubov variational principle. We find that the local part of the interaction U is reduced according to U(*)=U-V[over ¯], where V[over ¯] is a weighted average of nonlocal interactions. For graphene, silicene, and benzene we show that the nonlocal Coulomb interaction can decrease the effective local interaction by more than a factor of 2 in a wide doping range. PMID:23909346

  9. New approach to the theory of electromagnetic interactions with a fundamental length

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyshevskii, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic interactions is discussed in a gauge-invariant formulation that contains not only h and c but a further universal scale, namely, a fundamental length l. The new equations of motion of the fields, which generalize the Dirac--Maxwell equations, predict that charged Dirac particles should have intrinsic electric dipole moments; this results in violation of the P and CP symmetries, and also intrinsic anomalous magnetic moments. In this approach, there arises naturally a new internal symmetry group (SU/sub tau/(2)), which can be used to describe e..mu.. universality of the electromagnetic interactions. The total Lagrangian of the theory contains a four-fermion interaction, which violates the SU/sub tau/(2) symmetry and renders possible the decays ..mu -->..3e, ..mu -->..e..gamma.., etc. An upper bound for the fundamental length l is obtained by comparing the theoretical predictions and experimental data.

  10. Detecting phylogenetic signal in mutualistic interaction networks using a Markov process model

    PubMed Central

    Minoarivelo, H. O.; Hui, C.; Terblanche, J. S.; Pond, S. L. Kosakovsky; Scheffler, K.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological interaction networks, such as those describing the mutualistic interactions between plants and their pollinators or between plants and their frugivores, exhibit non-random structural properties that cannot be explained by simple models of network formation. One factor affecting the formation and eventual structure of such a network is its evolutionary history. We argue that this, in many cases, is closely linked to the evolutionary histories of the species involved in the interactions. Indeed, empirical studies of interaction networks along with the phylogenies of the interacting species have demonstrated significant associations between phylogeny and network structure. To date, however, no generative model explaining the way in which the evolution of individual species affects the evolution of interaction networks has been proposed. We present a model describing the evolution of pairwise interactions as a branching Markov process, drawing on phylogenetic models of molecular evolution. Using knowledge of the phylogenies of the interacting species, our model yielded a significantly better fit to 21% of a set of plant – pollinator and plant – frugivore mutualistic networks. This highlights the importance, in a substantial minority of cases, of inheritance of interaction patterns without excluding the potential role of ecological novelties in forming the current network architecture. We suggest that our model can be used as a null model for controlling evolutionary signals when evaluating the role of other factors in shaping the emergence of ecological networks. PMID:25294947

  11. A componential model of human interaction with graphs: 1. Linear regression modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillan, Douglas J.; Lewis, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Task analyses served as the basis for developing the Mixed Arithmetic-Perceptual (MA-P) model, which proposes (1) that people interacting with common graphs to answer common questions apply a set of component processes-searching for indicators, encoding the value of indicators, performing arithmetic operations on the values, making spatial comparisons among indicators, and repsonding; and (2) that the type of graph and user's task determine the combination and order of the components applied (i.e., the processing steps). Two experiments investigated the prediction that response time will be linearly related to the number of processing steps according to the MA-P model. Subjects used line graphs, scatter plots, and stacked bar graphs to answer comparison questions and questions requiring arithmetic calculations. A one-parameter version of the model (with equal weights for all components) and a two-parameter version (with different weights for arithmetic and nonarithmetic processes) accounted for 76%-85% of individual subjects' variance in response time and 61%-68% of the variance taken across all subjects. The discussion addresses possible modifications in the MA-P model, alternative models, and design implications from the MA-P model.

  12. The Yale Interactive terrestrial Biosphere model: description, evaluation and implementation into NASA GISS ModelE2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, X.; Unger, N.

    2015-04-01

    The land biosphere, atmospheric chemistry and climate are inextricably interconnected. We describe the Yale Interactive terrestrial Biosphere (YIBs) model, a land carbon cycle model that has been developed for coupling to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE2 global chemistry-climate model. The YIBs model adapts routines from the mature TRIFFID and CASA models to simulate interactive carbon assimilation, allocation, and autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. Dynamic daily leaf area index is simulated based on carbon allocation and temperature- and drought-dependent prognostic phenology. YIBs incorporates a semi-mechanistic ozone vegetation damage scheme. Here, we validate the present day YIBs land carbon fluxes for three increasingly complex configurations: (i) off-line local site-level (ii) off-line global forced with WFDEI (WATCH Forcing Data methodology applied to ERA-Interim data) meteorology (iii) on-line coupled to the NASA ModelE2 (NASA ModelE2-YIBs). Off-line YIBs has hourly and on-line YIBs has half-hourly temporal resolution. The large observational database used for validation includes carbon fluxes from 145 flux tower sites and multiple satellite products. At the site level, YIBs simulates reasonable seasonality (correlation coefficient R > 0.8) of gross primary productivity (GPP) at 121 out of 145 sites with biases in magnitude ranging from -19 to 7% depending on plant function type. On the global scale, the off-line model simulates an annual GPP of 125 ± 3 petagrams of carbon (Pg C) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of -2.5 ± 0.7 Pg C for 1982-2011, with seasonality and spatial distribution consistent with the satellite observations. We assess present day global ozone vegetation damage using the off-line YIBs configuration. Ozone damage reduces global GPP by 2-5% annually with regional extremes of 4-10% in East Asia. The on-line model simulates annual GPP of 123 ± 1 Pg C and NEE of -2.7 ± 0.7 Pg C. NASA ModelE2-YIBs is a

  13. Mathematical Analysis of a Coarsening Model with Local Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmers, Michael; Niethammer, Barbara; Velázquez, Juan J. L.

    2016-10-01

    We consider particles on a one-dimensional lattice whose evolution is governed by nearest-neighbor interactions where particles that have reached size zero are removed from the system. Concentrating on configurations with infinitely many particles, we prove existence of solutions under a reasonable density assumption on the initial data and show that the vanishing of particles and the localized interactions can lead to non-uniqueness. Moreover, we provide a rigorous upper coarsening estimate and discuss generic statistical properties as well as some non-generic behavior of the evolution by means of heuristic arguments and numerical observations.

  14. Study of {beta}-Decay in the Proton-Neutron Interacting Boson-Fermion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zuffi, L.; Brant, S.; Yoshida, N.

    2006-04-26

    We study {beta}-decay in odd-A nuclei together with the energy levels and other properties in the proton-neutron interacting-boson-fermion model. We also report on the preliminary results in the odd-odd nuclei in the proton-neutron interacting boson-fermion-fermion model.

  15. Special Interest Groups and Mass Communication as Political Participation: A Model for Interaction Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielian, Lucig H.

    A review of the literature reveals that a complete model, within a political framework, for what takes place when special interest groups and mass media interact does not exist. Since media access is more successful for groups with specific goals and resources, a model for the interaction of special interest groups and the mass media focuses on…

  16. Interactions of Metacognition with Motivation and Affect in Self-Regulated Learning: The MASRL Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efklides, Anastasia

    2011-01-01

    Metacognition, motivation, and affect are components of self-regulated learning (SRL) that interact. The "metacognitive and affective model of self-regulated learning" (the MASRL model) distinguishes two levels of functioning in SRL, namely, the Person level and the Task x Person level. At the Person level interactions between trait-like…

  17. Modelling interactions of carbon dioxide, forests, and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Luxmoore, R.J.; Baldocchi, D.D.

    1994-09-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide is rising and forests and climate is changing! This combination of fact and premise may be evaluated at a range of temporal and spatial scales with the aid of computer simulators describing the interrelationships between forest vegetation, litter and soil characteristics, and appropriate meteorological variables. Some insights on the effects of climate on the transfers of carbon and the converse effect of carbon transfer on climate are discussed as a basis for assessing the significance of feedbacks between vegetation and climate under conditions of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide. Three main classes of forest models are reviewed. These are physiologically-based models, forest succession simulators based on the JABOWA model, and ecosystem-carbon budget models that use compartment transfer rates with empirically estimated coefficients. Some regression modeling approaches are also outlined. Energy budget models applied to forests and grasslands are also reviewed. This review presents examples of forest models; a comprehensive discussion of all available models is not undertaken.

  18. Theoretical modelling of exchange interactions in metal-phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Fisher, Andrew; Harrison, Nic; Serri, Michele; Wu, Zhenlin; Heutz, Sandrine; Jones, Tim; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2012-02-01

    The theoretical understanding of exchange interactions in organics provides a key foundation for quantum molecular magnetism. Recent SQUID magnetometry of a well know organic semiconductor, copper-phthalocyanine [1,2] (CuPc) shows that it forms quasi-one-dimensional spin chains. Green's function perturbation theory calculation [3] is used to find the dominant exchange mechanism. Hybrid density functional theory simulations [4] give a quantitative insight to exchange interactions and electronic structures. Both calculations are performed for different stacking and sliding angles for lithium-Pc, cobalt-Pc, chromium-Pc, and copper-Pc. The exchange interactions depend strongly on stacking angles, but weakly on sliding angles. Our results qualitatively agree with the experiments, and remarkably α-cobalt-Pc has a very large exchange above liquid-Nitrogen temperature. Our theoretical predictions on the exchange interactions can guide experimentalists to design novel organic semiconductors. [0pt] [1] S. Heutz, et. al., Adv. Mat., 19, 3618 (2007) [2] Hai Wang, et. al., ACS Nano, 4, 3921 (2010) [3] Wei Wu, et. al., Phys. Rev. B 77, 184403 (2008) [4] Wei Wu, et. al., Phys. Rev. B 84, 024427 (2011)

  19. Instructional Systems Development Model for Interactive Videodisc. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. Olin; And Others

    This third and final report on a 3-year project, which developed authoring and production procedures for interactive videodisc based on the Interservice Procedures for Instructional Systems Development (IPISD), reviews the current state of the art, provides an overview of the project, and describes two videodiscs made for the project and the…

  20. An interacting dark energy model with nonminimal derivative coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Kourosh; Behrouz, Noushin

    2016-09-01

    We study cosmological dynamics of an extended gravitational theory that gravity is coupled non-minimally with derivatives of a dark energy component and there is also a phenomenological interaction between the dark energy and dark matter. Depending on the direction of energy flow between the dark sectors, the phenomenological interaction gets two different signs. We show that this feature affects the existence of attractor solution, the rate of growth of perturbations and stability of the solutions. By considering an exponential potential as a self-interaction potential of the scalar field, we obtain accelerated scaling solutions that are attractors and have the potential to alleviate the coincidence problem. While in the absence of the nonminimal derivative coupling there is no attractor solution for phantom field when energy transfers from dark matter to dark energy, we show an attractor solution exists if one considers an explicit nonminimal derivative coupling for phantom field in this case of energy transfer. We treat the cosmological perturbations in this setup with details to show that with phenomenological interaction, perturbations can grow faster than the minimal case.

  1. Model-Driven Development of Interactive Multimedia Applications with MML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleuss, Andreas; Hussmann, Heinrich

    There is an increasing demand for high-quality interactive applications which combine complex application logic with a sophisticated user interface, making use of individual media objects like graphics, animations, 3D graphics, audio or video. Their development is still challenging as it requires the integration of software design, user interface design, and media design.

  2. Modeling Heterogeneity in Social Interaction Processes Using Multilevel Survival Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoolmiller, Mike; Snyder, James

    2006-01-01

    More than 15 years ago, survival or hazard regression analyses were introduced to psychology (W. Gardner & W. A. Griffin, 1989; W. A. Griffin & W. Gardner, 1989) as powerful methodological tools for studying real time social interaction processes among dyads. Almost no additional published applications have appeared, although such data are…

  3. The Asthma Dialogues: A Model of Interactive Education for Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Robert; Fletcher, Jason; Mulvihill, Michael; Park, Heidi

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: A gap exists between asthma guidelines and actual care delivered. We developed an educational intervention using simulated physician-patient encounters as part of a project to improve asthma management by community-based primary care providers. We hypothesized that this type of skills-based interactive training would improve…

  4. The Interaction Model of Anxiety: Some Possible Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endler, Norman S.

    In this paper differing theories on behavioral psychology are examined as they relate to individual reactions to anxiety producing situations. The focus is on athletes and how personality traits and stress situations influence their behavior and performance. The basic question asked is "How do persons and situations interact in promoting or…

  5. Connecting Protein Structure to Intermolecular Interactions: A Computer Modeling Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abualia, Mohammed; Schroeder, Lianne; Garcia, Megan; Daubenmire, Patrick L.; Wink, Donald J.; Clark, Ginevra A.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of protein folding relies on a solid foundation of a number of critical chemical concepts, such as molecular structure, intra-/intermolecular interactions, and relating structure to function. Recent reports show that students struggle on all levels to achieve these understandings and use them in meaningful ways. Further, several…

  6. Using Threshold Autoregressive Models to Study Dyadic Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamaker, Ellen L.; Zhang, Zhiyong; van der Maas, Han L. J.

    2009-01-01

    Considering a dyad as a dynamic system whose current state depends on its past state has allowed researchers to investigate whether and how partners influence each other. Some researchers have also focused on how differences between dyads in their interaction patterns are related to other differences between them. A promising approach in this area…

  7. A DIAGENETIC MODEL FOR SEDIMENT-SEAGRASS INTERACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this modeling effort was to better understand the dynamic relationship between seagrass beds and their sedimentary environment using a diagenetic model. The model was developed and optimized for sediments in the Laguna Madre, TX, which is one of the world's larg...

  8. A Goal-Oriented Model of Natural Language Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, James A.; And Others

    This report summarizes a research program in modeling human communication ability. The methodology involved selecting a single, naturally occurring dialogue, instructing a human observer to extract certain aspects relative to its comprehension, and then using these aspects to guide the construction and verification of the model. The model assumes…

  9. Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaem, Hossein Y.; Ahmadian, Alireza; Saberi, Hooshangh; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Khodadad, Davood

    2011-10-01

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  10. Model-experiment interaction to improve representation of phosphorus limitation in land models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norby, R. J.; Yang, X.; Cabugao, K. G. M.; Childs, J.; Gu, L.; Haworth, I.; Mayes, M. A.; Porter, W. S.; Walker, A. P.; Weston, D. J.; Wright, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon-nutrient interactions play important roles in regulating terrestrial carbon cycle responses to atmospheric and climatic change. None of the CMIP5 models has included routines to represent the phosphorus (P) cycle, although P is commonly considered to be the most limiting nutrient in highly productive, lowland tropical forests. Model simulations with the Community Land Model (CLM-CNP) show that inclusion of P coupling leads to a smaller CO2 fertilization effect and warming-induced CO2 release from tropical ecosystems, but there are important uncertainties in the P model, and improvements are limited by a dearth of data. Sensitivity analysis identifies the relative importance of P cycle parameters in determining P availability and P limitation, and thereby helps to define the critical measurements to make in field campaigns and manipulative experiments. To improve estimates of P supply, parameters that describe maximum amount of labile P in soil and sorption-desorption processes are necessary for modeling the amount of P available for plant uptake. Biochemical mineralization is poorly constrained in the model and will be improved through field observations that link root traits to mycorrhizal activity, phosphatase activity, and root depth distribution. Model representation of P demand by vegetation, which currently is set by fixed stoichiometry and allometric constants, requires a different set of data. Accurate carbon cycle modeling requires accurate parameterization of the photosynthetic machinery: Vc,max and Jmax. Relationships between the photosynthesis parameters and foliar nutrient (N and P) content are being developed, and by including analysis of covariation with other plant traits (e.g., specific leaf area, wood density), we can provide a basis for more dynamic, trait-enabled modeling. With this strong guidance from model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, field studies are underway in Puerto Rico and Panama to collect model-relevant data on P

  11. Three dimensional modeling of Laser-Plasma interaction: benchmarking our predictive modeling tools vs. experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Divol, L; Berger, R; Meezan, N; Froula, D H; Dixit, S; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H

    2007-11-08

    We have developed a new target platform to study Laser Plasma Interaction in ignition-relevant condition at the Omega laser facility (LLE/Rochester)[1]. By shooting an interaction beam along the axis of a gas-filled hohlraum heated by up to 17 kJ of heater beam energy, we were able to create a millimeter-scale underdense uniform plasma at electron temperatures above 3 keV. Extensive Thomson scattering measurements allowed us to benchmark our hydrodynamic simulations performed with HYDRA[2]. As a result of this effort, we can use with much confidence these simulations as input parameters for our LPI simulation code pF3d[3]. In this paper, we show that by using accurate hydrodynamic profiles and full three-dimensional simulations including a realistic modeling of the laser intensity pattern generated by various smoothing options, whole beam three-dimensional linear kinetic modeling of stimulated Brillouin scattering reproduces quantitatively the experimental measurements(SBS thresholds, reflectivity values and the absence of measurable SRS). This good agreement was made possible by the recent increase in computing power routinely available for such simulations. These simulations accurately predicted the strong reduction of SBS measured when polarization smoothing is used.

  12. Three-dimensional modeling of laser-plasma interaction: Benchmarking our predictive modeling tools versus experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Divol, L.; Berger, R. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Froula, D. H.; Dixit, S.; Michel, P.; London, R.; Strozzi, D.; Ross, J.; Williams, E. A.; Still, B.; Suter, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-05-15

    New experimental capabilities [Froula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 085001 (2007)] have been developed to study laser-plasma interaction (LPI) in ignition-relevant condition at the Omega laser facility (LLE/Rochester). By shooting an interaction beam along the axis of a gas-filled hohlraum heated by up to 17 kJ of heater beam energy, a millimeter-scale underdense uniform plasma at electron temperatures above 3 keV was created. Extensive Thomson scattering measurements allowed to benchmark hydrodynamic simulations performed with HYDRA [Meezan et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 056304 (2007)]. As a result of this effort, these simulations can be used with much confidence as input parameters for the LPI simulation code PF3D [Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 4337 (1998)]. In this paper, it is shown that by using accurate hydrodynamic profiles and full three-dimensional simulations including a realistic modeling of the laser intensity pattern generated by various smoothing options, whole beam three-dimensional linear kinetic modeling of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) reproduces quantitatively the experimental measurements (SBS thresholds, reflectivity values, and the absence of measurable stimulated Raman scattering). This good agreement was made possible by the recent increase in computing power routinely available for such simulations. These simulations accurately predicted the strong reduction of SBS measured when polarization smoothing is used.

  13. Decoupling macronutrient interactions during heating of model infant milk formulas.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Eoin G; Fenelon, Mark A; Roos, Yrjö H; Hogan, Sean A

    2014-10-29

    Understanding macronutrient interactions during heating is important for controlling viscosity during infant milk formula (IMF) manufacture. Thermal behavior of macronutrients (casein, whey, lactose, fat) was studied, in isolation and combination, over a range of concentrations. Addition of phosphocasein to whey protein solutions elevated denaturation temperature (Td) of β-lactoglobulin and the temperature at which viscosity started to increase upon heating (Tv). Secondary structural changes in whey proteins occurred at higher temperatures in dispersions containing phosphocasein; the final extent of viscosity increase was similar to that of whey protein alone. Addition of lactose to whey protein solutions delayed secondary structural changes, increased Td and Tv, and reduced post heat treatment viscosity. This study demonstrated that heat-induced changes in IMF associated with whey protein (denaturation, viscosity) are not only a function of concentration but are also dependent on interactions between macronutrients. PMID:25251787

  14. Smoking and the Eysenck personality dimensions: an interactive model.

    PubMed

    Parkes, K R

    1984-11-01

    Evidence relating smoking and neuroticism is inconsistent; some studies report no significant relationship, while others report a positive association. The present study examined smoking in relation to neuroticism (N), extraversion (E) and psychoticism (P), in the light of predictions that interactions between N and E, and between N and P, could underly these inconsistent findings. The subjects were female student nurses (N = 270), of whom 34.1% were smokers. Discriminant analyses revealed that E differentiated most strongly between smokers and non-smokers. N and P did not add to the predictive power of the discriminant function, but the N x P and N x E interactions did make significant contributions. Among extraverts, and among subjects low in psychoticism, N was not related to smoking; but among introverts, and among subjects high in psychoticism, the relationship was significant and positive.

  15. Learning the Rescorla-Wagner Model of Pavlovian Conditioning: An Interactive Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The Rescorla-Wagner model is one of the cornerstones of learning theory. However, many students in undergraduate courses find the model's concepts difficult to grasp, and the model is often the students' first exposure to computational models in psychology. This article describes an interactive simulation based on an Excel(r) spreadsheet program…

  16. Unveiling Bacterial Interactions through Multidimensional Scaling and Dynamics Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dorado-Morales, Pedro; Vilanova, Cristina; P. Garay, Carlos; Martí, Jose Manuel; Porcar, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new strategy to identify and visualize bacterial consortia by conducting replicated culturing of environmental samples coupled with high-throughput sequencing and multidimensional scaling analysis, followed by identification of bacteria-bacteria correlations and interactions. We conducted a proof of concept assay with pine-tree resin-based media in ten replicates, which allowed detecting and visualizing dynamical bacterial associations in the form of statistically significant and yet biologically relevant bacterial consortia. PMID:26671778

  17. A Framework for Modeling Human-Machine Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafto, Michael G.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Modern automated flight-control systems employ a variety of different behaviors, or modes, for managing the flight. While developments in cockpit automation have resulted in workload reduction and economical advantages, they have also given rise to an ill-defined class of human-machine problems, sometimes referred to as 'automation surprises'. Our interest in applying formal methods for describing human-computer interaction stems from our ongoing research on cockpit automation. In this area of aeronautical human factors, there is much concern about how flight crews interact with automated flight-control systems, so that the likelihood of making errors, in particular mode-errors, is minimized and the consequences of such errors are contained. The goal of the ongoing research on formal methods in this context is: (1) to develop a framework for describing human interaction with control systems; (2) to formally categorize such automation surprises; and (3) to develop tests for identification of these categories early in the specification phase of a new human-machine system.

  18. Anxiety, depression, and oscillatory dynamics in a social interaction model.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Savostyanov, Alexander N; Bocharov, Andrey V; Rimareva, Julia M

    2016-08-01

    Although anxiety and depression frequently co-occur and share a substantial part of genetic vulnerability and other risk factors, they are distinct disorders and their effect on social functioning and accompanying cognitive and emotional processing could be different. In this study, in a nonclinical sample, we compared effects of trait anxiety and depressive symptoms on oscillatory dynamics accompanying perception of emotional facial expressions in the context of social interactions. Anxiety was associated with a longer reaction time, with preference of avoidance behavior, and with enhanced event-related alpha desynchronization and diminished theta synchronization. Depression did not show significant behavioral effects and was associated with diminished alpha desynchronization and augmented delta and theta synchronization in prefrontal cortical regions. Thus, in spite of frequent comorbidity, anxiety and depression show opposite patterns of associations with oscillatory dynamics accompanying social interactions. These patterns imply that anxiety is associated with hyper-reactive attentional system, whereas depression show signs of diminished cognitive reactivity. Depression-related enhancement of low-frequency synchronization in prefrontal cortex may reflect a compensatory mechanism of cognitive and emotional upregulation, which depression-prone individuals engage in the process of social interactions.

  19. Evaluation of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in GISS ModelE Using ASR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, G.; Menon, S.; Bauer, S. E.; Toto, T.; Bennartz, R.; Cribb, M.

    2011-12-01

    The impacts of aerosol particles on clouds continue to rank among the largest uncertainties in global climate simulation. In this work we assess the capability of the NASA GISS ModelE, coupled to MATRIX aerosol microphysics, in correctly representing warm-phase aerosol-cloud interactions. This evaluation is completed through the analysis of a nudged, multi-year global simulation using measurements from various US Department of Energy sponsored measurement campaigns and satellite-based observations. Campaign observations include the Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (Aerosol IOP) and Routine ARM Arial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) at the Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma, the Marine Stratus Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) campaign at Pt. Reyes, California, and the ARM mobile facility's 2008 deployment to China. This combination of datasets provides a variety of aerosol and atmospheric conditions under which to test ModelE parameterizations. In addition to these localized comparisons, we provide the results of global evaluations completed using measurements derived from satellite remote sensors. We will provide a basic overview of simulation performance, as well as a detailed analysis of parameterizations relevant to aerosol indirect effects.

  20. On the relation between E(5)--models and the interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Ramos, Jose Enrique; Arias, Jose M.

    2009-01-28

    The connections between the E(5)--models (the original E(5) using an infinite square well, E(5)-{beta}{sup 4}, E(5)-{beta}{sup 6} and E(5)-{beta}{sup 8}), based on particular solutions of the geometrical Bohr Hamiltonian with {gamma}-unstable potentials, and the interacting boson model (IBM) are explored. For that purpose, the general IBM Hamiltonian for the U(5)-O(6) transition line is used and a numerical fit to the different E(5)--models energies is performed. It is shown that within the IBM one can reproduce very well all these E(5)--models. The agreement is the best for E(5)-{beta}{sup 4} and reduces when passing through E(5)-{beta}{sup 6}, E(5)-{beta}{sup 8} and E(5), where the worst agreement is obtained (although still very good for a restricted set of lowest lying states). The fitted IBM Hamiltonians correspond to energy surfaces close to those expected for the critical point.

  1. Use of RNA polymerase molecular beacon assay to measure RNA polymerase interactions with model promoter fragments.

    PubMed

    Mekler, Vladimir; Severinov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase-promoter interactions that keep the transcription initiation complex together are complex and multipartite, and formation of the RNA polymerase-promoter complex proceeds through multiple intermediates. Short promoter fragments can be used as a tool to dissect RNA polymerase-promoter interactions and to pinpoint elements responsible for specific properties of the entire promoter complex. A recently developed fluorometric molecular beacon assay allows one to monitor the enzyme interactions with various DNA probes and quantitatively characterize partial RNA polymerase-promoter interactions. Here, we present detailed protocols for the preparation of an Escherichia coli molecular beacon and its application to study RNA polymerase interactions with model promoter fragments.

  2. Long-range order for the spin-1 Heisenberg model with a small antiferromagnetic interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, Benjamin

    2014-09-15

    We look at the general SU(2) invariant spin-1 Heisenberg model. This family includes the well-known Heisenberg ferromagnet and antiferromagnet as well as the interesting nematic (biquadratic) and the largely mysterious staggered-nematic interaction. Long range order is proved using the method of reflection positivity and infrared bounds on a purely nematic interaction. This is achieved through the use of a type of matrix representation of the interaction making clear several identities that would not otherwise be noticed. Using the reflection positivity of the antiferromagnetic interaction one can then show that the result is maintained if we also include an antiferromagnetic interaction that is sufficiently small.

  3. An accurate binding interaction model in de novo computational protein design of interactions: if you build it, they will bind.

    PubMed

    London, Nir; Ambroggio, Xavier

    2014-02-01

    Computational protein design efforts aim to create novel proteins and functions in an automated manner and, in the process, these efforts shed light on the factors shaping natural proteins. The focus of these efforts has progressed from the interior of proteins to their surface and the design of functions, such as binding or catalysis. Here we examine progress in the development of robust methods for the computational design of non-natural interactions between proteins and molecular targets such as other proteins or small molecules. This problem is referred to as the de novo computational design of interactions. Recent successful efforts in de novo enzyme design and the de novo design of protein-protein interactions open a path towards solving this problem. We examine the common themes in these efforts, and review recent studies aimed at understanding the nature of successes and failures in the de novo computational design of interactions. While several approaches culminated in success, the use of a well-defined structural model for a specific binding interaction in particular has emerged as a key strategy for a successful design, and is therefore reviewed with special consideration.

  4. Interaction of methotrexate with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Cao, Jian; Zhou, Qiuhua

    2013-11-01

    Trypsin is one of important digestive enzymes that have intimate correlation with human health and illness. In this work, the interaction of trypsin with methotrexate was investigated by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The results revealed that methotrexate could interact with trypsin with about one binding site. Methotrexate molecule could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis implied that electrostatic force, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions were the main interactions for stabilizing the trypsin-methotrexate system, which agreed well with the results from the molecular modeling study.

  5. Nonlinear Model of the Specificity of DNA-Protein Interactions and Its Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwiputra, D.; Hidayat, W.; Khairani, R.; Zen, F. P.

    2016-08-01

    Specific DNA-protein interactions are fundamental processes of living cells. We propose a new model of DNA-protein interactions to explain the site specificity of the interactions. The hydrogen bonds between DNA base pairs and between DNA-protein peptide groups play a significant role in determination of the specific binding site. We adopt the Morse potential with coupling terms to construct the Hamiltonian of coupled oscillators representing the hydrogen bonds in which the depth of the potentials vary in the DNA chain. In this paper we investigate the stability of the model to determine the conditions satisfying the biological circumstances of the DNA-protein interactions.

  6. An Interactive Flow Model for Projecting School Enrolments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Edward

    1993-01-01

    Presents a mathematical model for projecting class cohort sizes for districts and schools via demographic data. The model allows entry of estimates for local preschool data to predict first-grade entrants, which are progressed through the school system. Average retention rates, school apportionments and national demographic projections can be…

  7. Analyzing Interaction Patterns to Verify a Simulation/Game Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Rodney Dean

    2012-01-01

    In order for simulations and games to be effective for learning, instructional designers must verify that the underlying computational models being used have an appropriate degree of fidelity to the conceptual models of their real-world counterparts. A simulation/game that provides incorrect feedback is likely to promote misunderstanding and…

  8. An Interactive Multi-Model for Consensus on Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Kocarev, Ljupco

    2014-07-02

    This project purports to develop a new scheme for forming consensus among alternative climate models, that give widely divergent projections as to the details of climate change, that is more intelligent than simply averaging the model outputs, or averaging with ex post facto weighting factors. The method under development effectively allows models to assimilate data from one another in run time with weights that are chosen in an adaptive training phase using 20th century data, so that the models synchronize with one another as well as with reality. An alternate approach that is being explored in parallel is the automated combination of equations from different models in an expert-system-like framework.

  9. a Gaussian Process Based Multi-Person Interaction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, T.; Rottensteiner, F.; Heipke, C.

    2016-06-01

    Online multi-person tracking in image sequences is commonly guided by recursive filters, whose predictive models define the expected positions of future states. When a predictive model deviates too much from the true motion of a pedestrian, which is often the case in crowded scenes due to unpredicted accelerations, the data association is prone to fail. In this paper we propose a novel predictive model on the basis of Gaussian Process Regression. The model takes into account the motion of every tracked pedestrian in the scene and the prediction is executed with respect to the velocities of all interrelated persons. As shown by the experiments, the model is capable of yielding more plausible predictions even in the presence of mutual occlusions or missing measurements. The approach is evaluated on a publicly available benchmark and outperforms other state-of-the-art trackers.

  10. Indoor environment modeling for interactive robot security application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Sangwoo; Shahab, Qonita M.; Kwon, Yong-Moo; Ahn, Sang Chul

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents our simple and easy to use method to obtain a 3D textured model. For expression of reality, we need to integrate the 3D models and real scenes. Most of other cases of 3D modeling method consist of two data acquisition devices. One is for getting a 3D model and another for obtaining realistic textures. In this case, the former device would be 2D laser range-finder and the latter device would be common camera. Our algorithm consists of building a measurement-based 2D metric map which is acquired by laser range-finder, texture acquisition/stitching and texture-mapping to corresponding 3D model. The algorithm is implemented with laser sensor for obtaining 2D/3D metric map and two cameras for gathering texture. Our geometric 3D model consists of planes that model the floor and walls. The geometry of the planes is extracted from the 2D metric map data. Textures for the floor and walls are generated from the images captured by two 1394 cameras which have wide Field of View angle. Image stitching and image cutting process is used to generate textured images for corresponding with a 3D model. The algorithm is applied to 2 cases which are corridor and space that has the four walls like room of building. The generated 3D map model of indoor environment is shown with VRML format and can be viewed in a web browser with a VRML plug-in. The proposed algorithm can be applied to 3D model-based remote surveillance system through WWW.

  11. The Thirring interaction in the two-dimensional axial-current-pseudoscalar derivative coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, L.V. . E-mail: armflavio@if.uff.br

    2006-12-15

    We reexamine the two-dimensional model of massive fermions interacting with a massless pseudoscalar field via axial-current derivative coupling. The hidden Thirring interaction in the axial-derivative coupling model is exhibited compactly by performing a canonical field transformation on the Bose field algebra and the model is mapped into the Thirring model with an additional vector-current-scalar derivative interaction (Schroer-Thirring model). The Fermi field operator is rewritten in terms of the Mandelstam soliton operator coupled to a free massless scalar field. The charge sectors of the axial-derivative model are mapped into the charge sectors of the massive Thirring model. The complete bosonized version of the model is presented. The bosonized composite operators of the quantum Hamiltonian are obtained as the leading operators in the Wilson short distance expansions.

  12. Hard-sphere interactions in velocity-jump models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Benjamin; Taylor-King, Jake P.; Yates, Christian; Erban, Radek

    2016-07-01

    Group-level behavior of particles undergoing a velocity-jump process with hard-sphere interactions is investigated. We derive N -particle transport equations that include the possibility of collisions between particles and apply different approximation techniques to get expressions for the dependence of the collective diffusion coefficient on the number of particles and their diameter. The derived approximations are compared with numerical results obtained from individual-based simulations. The theoretical results compare well with Monte Carlo simulations providing the excluded-volume fraction is small.

  13. Modeling of interactions between nanoparticles and cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Young-Min

    Rapid development of nanotechnology and ability to manufacture materials and devices with nanometer feature size leads to exciting innovations in many areas including the medical and electronic fields. However, the possible health and environmental impacts of manufactured nanomaterials are not fully known. Recent experimental reports suggest that some of the manufactured nanomaterials, such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, are highly toxic even in small concentrations. The goal of the current work is to understand the mechanisms responsible for the toxicity of nanomaterials. In the current study coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the interactions between NPs and cellular membranes at a molecular level. One of the possible toxicity mechanisms of the nanomaterials is membrane disruption. Possibility of membrane disruption exposed to the manufactured nanomaterials are examined by considering chemical reactions and non-reactive physical interactions as chemical as well as physical mechanisms. Mechanisms of transport of carbon-based nanoparticles (fullerene and its derivative) across a phospholipid bilayer are investigated. The free energy profile is obtained using constrained simulations. It is shown that the considered nanoparticles are hydrophobic and therefore they tend to reside in the interior of the lipid bilayer. In addition, the dynamics of the membrane fluctuations is significantly affected by the nanoparticles at the bilayer-water interface. The hydrophobic interaction between the particles and membrane core induces the strong coupling between the nanoparticle motion and membrane deformation. It is observed that the considered nanoparticles affect several physical properties of the membrane. The nanoparticles embedded into the membrane interior lead to the membrane softening, which becomes more significant with increase in CNT length and concentration. The lateral pressure profile and membrane energy in the membrane

  14. Theoretical modelling of AFM for bimetallic tip-substrate interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new technique for calculating the defect energetics of alloys based on Equivalent Crystal Theory was developed. This new technique successfully predicts the bulk properties for binary alloys as well as segregation energies in the dilute limit. The authors apply this limit for the calculation of energy and force as a function of separation of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and substrate. The study was done for different combinations of tip and sample materials. The validity of the universality discovered for the same metal interfaces is examined for the case of different metal interactions.

  15. Hard-sphere interactions in velocity-jump models.

    PubMed

    Franz, Benjamin; Taylor-King, Jake P; Yates, Christian; Erban, Radek

    2016-07-01

    Group-level behavior of particles undergoing a velocity-jump process with hard-sphere interactions is investigated. We derive N-particle transport equations that include the possibility of collisions between particles and apply different approximation techniques to get expressions for the dependence of the collective diffusion coefficient on the number of particles and their diameter. The derived approximations are compared with numerical results obtained from individual-based simulations. The theoretical results compare well with Monte Carlo simulations providing the excluded-volume fraction is small. PMID:27575098

  16. Application of large eddy interaction model to channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. K.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure utilizing an expansion of proper orthogonal functions (or modes) to predict a fully developed flow in channel is derived. To examine numerical and conceptual difficulties, preliminary computations are performed with assigned mean velocity, and turbulence is expressed with only the first mode. The nonlinear interactions of the components of the first mode are treated specifically, with the influence of higher modes neglected; this treatment required adjustment of the skewness and effective Reynolds number to assure energy equilibrium of the first mode. Computational results show that the first mode possesses the structural character similar to that of the entire flow.

  17. Full-potential modeling of blade-vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, H. E.; Caradonna, F. X.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison is made of four different models for predicting the unsteady loading induced by a vortex passing close to an airfoil. (1) The first model approximates the vortex effect as a change in the airfoil angle of attack. (2) The second model is related to the first but, instead of imposing only a constant velocity on the airfoil, the distributed effect of the vortex is computed and used. This is analogous to a lifting surface method. (3) The third model is to specify a branch cut discontinuity in the potential field. The vortex is modeled as a jump in potential across the branch cut, the edge of which represents the center of the vortex. (4) The fourth method models the vortex expressing the potential as the sum of a known potential due to the vortex and an unknown perturbation due to the airfoil. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the four vortex models described above and to determine their relative merits and suitability for use in large three-dimensional codes.

  18. Modeling human diseases: an education in interactions and interdisciplinary approaches.

    PubMed

    Zon, Leonard

    2016-06-01

    Traditionally, most investigators in the biomedical arena exploit one model system in the course of their careers. Occasionally, an investigator will switch models. The selection of a suitable model system is a crucial step in research design. Factors to consider include the accuracy of the model as a reflection of the human disease under investigation, the numbers of animals needed and ease of husbandry, its physiology and developmental biology, and the ability to apply genetics and harness the model for drug discovery. In my lab, we have primarily used the zebrafish but combined it with other animal models and provided a framework for others to consider the application of developmental biology for therapeutic discovery. Our interdisciplinary approach has led to many insights into human diseases and to the advancement of candidate drugs to clinical trials. Here, I draw on my experiences to highlight the importance of combining multiple models, establishing infrastructure and genetic tools, forming collaborations, and interfacing with the medical community for successful translation of basic findings to the clinic.

  19. Modeling human diseases: an education in interactions and interdisciplinary approaches.

    PubMed

    Zon, Leonard

    2016-06-01

    Traditionally, most investigators in the biomedical arena exploit one model system in the course of their careers. Occasionally, an investigator will switch models. The selection of a suitable model system is a crucial step in research design. Factors to consider include the accuracy of the model as a reflection of the human disease under investigation, the numbers of animals needed and ease of husbandry, its physiology and developmental biology, and the ability to apply genetics and harness the model for drug discovery. In my lab, we have primarily used the zebrafish but combined it with other animal models and provided a framework for others to consider the application of developmental biology for therapeutic discovery. Our interdisciplinary approach has led to many insights into human diseases and to the advancement of candidate drugs to clinical trials. Here, I draw on my experiences to highlight the importance of combining multiple models, establishing infrastructure and genetic tools, forming collaborations, and interfacing with the medical community for successful translation of basic findings to the clinic. PMID:27483497

  20. Interactive Tooth Separation from Dental Model Using Segmentation Field

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tooth segmentation on dental model is an essential step of computer-aided-design systems for orthodontic virtual treatment planning. However, fast and accurate identifying cutting boundary to separate teeth from dental model still remains a challenge, due to various geometrical shapes of teeth, complex tooth arrangements, different dental model qualities, and varying degrees of crowding problems. Most segmentation approaches presented before are not able to achieve a balance between fine segmentation results and simple operating procedures with less time consumption. In this article, we present a novel, effective and efficient framework that achieves tooth segmentation based on a segmentation field, which is solved by a linear system defined by a discrete Laplace-Beltrami operator with Dirichlet boundary conditions. A set of contour lines are sampled from the smooth scalar field, and candidate cutting boundaries can be detected from concave regions with large variations of field data. The sensitivity to concave seams of the segmentation field facilitates effective tooth partition, as well as avoids obtaining appropriate curvature threshold value, which is unreliable in some case. Our tooth segmentation algorithm is robust to dental models with low quality, as well as is effective to dental models with different levels of crowding problems. The experiments, including segmentation tests of varying dental models with different complexity, experiments on dental meshes with different modeling resolutions and surface noises and comparison between our method and the morphologic skeleton segmentation method are conducted, thus demonstrating the effectiveness of our method. PMID:27532266