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Sample records for four-level cell population

  1. Tumor-Volume Simulation During Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer Using a Four-Level Cell Population Model

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, Alexei V. Dong Lei; Palta, Jantinder R.; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a fast computational radiobiologic model for quantitative analysis of tumor volume during fractionated radiotherapy. The tumor-volume model can be useful for optimizing image-guidance protocols and four-dimensional treatment simulations in proton therapy that is highly sensitive to physiologic changes. Methods: The analysis is performed using two approximations: (1) tumor volume is a linear function of total cell number and (2) tumor-cell population is separated into four subpopulations: oxygenated viable cells, oxygenated lethally damaged cells, hypoxic viable cells, and hypoxic lethally damaged cells. An exponential decay model is used for disintegration and removal of oxygenated lethally damaged cells from the tumor. Results: We tested our model on daily volumetric imaging data available for 14 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with an integrated computed tomography/linear accelerator system. A simulation based on the averaged values of radiobiologic parameters was able to describe eight cases during the entire treatment and four cases partially (50% of treatment time) with a maximum 20% error. The largest discrepancies between the model and clinical data were obtained for small tumors, which may be explained by larger errors in the manual tumor volume delineation procedure. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the change in gross tumor volume for head-and-neck cancer can be adequately described by a relatively simple radiobiologic model. In future research, we propose to study the variation of model parameters by fitting to clinical data for a cohort of patients with head-and-neck cancer and other tumors. The potential impact of other processes, like concurrent chemotherapy, on tumor volume should be evaluated.

  2. Coherent population transfer and optical dipole force by chirped Gaussian femtosecond pulses in four level {sup 87}Rb

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Subhadeep Sarma, Amarendra K.

    2014-10-15

    We report coherent population transfer(CPT) in a four level atomic system, coupled by three chirped Gaussian femtosecond pulses. CPT is studied under two specific conditions beyond the RWA. It is observed that nearly complete population transfer to the states |3> and |4> can be achieved by maintaining proper resonance condition and judiciously choosing the laser parameters. In addition to this, the transverse optical dipole force on the four-level atomic system is numerically studied. The transverse force provides an acceleration to an atom which is eight order of magnitude higher than earth’s gravitational acceleration g. The force changes from a focusing force to a defocusing one as the initial population changes from the ground states to the excited states.

  3. Coherence generation and population transfer by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage and π pulse in a four-level ladder system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Wu, Jin-Hui; Yan, Xi-Zhang; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2011-06-20

    We propose a new scheme for achieving the complete population transfer and the optimal coherence generation between the ground state and the Rydberg state in a four-level ladder system by combining the STIRAP or fractional STIRAP technique and the π pulse technique. We consider, in particular, two different situations where spontaneous emission from the two highest states are neglected or not. Our numerical calculations show that the time width and the delay time of the π pulse are two critical parameters for attaining the maximal population transfer and coherence generation in this scheme.

  4. Four-level refrigerator driven by photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhui; Lai, Yiming; Ye, Zhuolin; He, Jizhou; Ma, Yongli; Liao, Qinghong

    2015-05-01

    We propose a quantum absorption refrigerator driven by photons. The model uses a four-level system as its working substance and couples simultaneously to hot, cold, and solar heat reservoirs. Explicit expressions for the cooling power Q˙c and coefficient of performance (COP) ηCOP are derived, with the purpose of revealing and optimizing the performance of the device. Our model runs most efficiently under the tight coupling condition, and it is consistent with the third law of thermodynamics in the limit T →0 .

  5. Four-level refrigerator driven by photons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhui; Lai, Yiming; Ye, Zhuolin; He, Jizhou; Ma, Yongli; Liao, Qinghong

    2015-05-01

    We propose a quantum absorption refrigerator driven by photons. The model uses a four-level system as its working substance and couples simultaneously to hot, cold, and solar heat reservoirs. Explicit expressions for the cooling power Q̇(c) and coefficient of performance (COP) η(COP) are derived, with the purpose of revealing and optimizing the performance of the device. Our model runs most efficiently under the tight coupling condition, and it is consistent with the third law of thermodynamics in the limit T→0.

  6. Evaluating a Training Using the "Four Levels Model"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steensma, Herman; Groeneveld, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: to present a training evaluation based on the "four levels model"; to demonstrate the value of experimental designs in evaluation studies; and to take a first step in the development of an evidence-based training program. Design/methodology/approach: The Kirkpatrick four levels model was used to…

  7. Estimating cell populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. S.; Castleman, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    An important step in the diagnosis of a cervical cytology specimen is estimating the proportions of the various cell types present. This is usually done with a cell classifier, the error rates of which can be expressed as a confusion matrix. We show how to use the confusion matrix to obtain an unbiased estimate of the desired proportions. We show that the mean square error of this estimate depends on a 'befuddlement matrix' derived from the confusion matrix, and how this, in turn, leads to a figure of merit for cell classifiers. Finally, we work out the two-class problem in detail and present examples to illustrate the theory.

  8. Simulating Heterogeneous Tumor Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Mishra, Bud

    2016-01-01

    Certain tumor phenomena, like metabolic heterogeneity and local stable regions of chronic hypoxia, signify a tumor’s resistance to therapy. Although recent research has shed light on the intracellular mechanisms of cancer metabolic reprogramming, little is known about how tumors become metabolically heterogeneous or chronically hypoxic, namely the initial conditions and spatiotemporal dynamics that drive these cell population conditions. To study these aspects, we developed a minimal, spatially-resolved simulation framework for modeling tissue-scale mixed populations of cells based on diffusible particles the cells consume and release, the concentrations of which determine their behavior in arbitrarily complex ways, and on stochastic reproduction. We simulate cell populations that self-sort to facilitate metabolic symbiosis, that grow according to tumor-stroma signaling patterns, and that give rise to stable local regions of chronic hypoxia near blood vessels. We raise two novel questions in the context of these results: (1) How will two metabolically symbiotic cell subpopulations self-sort in the presence of glucose, oxygen, and lactate gradients? We observe a robust pattern of alternating striations. (2) What is the proper time scale to observe stable local regions of chronic hypoxia? We observe the stability is a function of the balance of three factors related to O2—diffusion rate, local vessel release rate, and viable and hypoxic tumor cell consumption rate. We anticipate our simulation framework will help researchers design better experiments and generate novel hypotheses to better understand dynamic, emergent whole-tumor behavior. PMID:28030620

  9. A four level silicon microstructure fabrication by DRIE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahiminejad, S.; Cegielski, P.; Abassi, M.; Enoksson, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present a four level Si microstructure fabrication process with depths ranging from 70-400 μm. All four levels are etched from the same side, by using four hard masks (\\text{Si}{{\\text{O}}2} , Al, AZ4562 photo resist, and Al). The choice of the hard masks and their relative selectivity will be discussed. Also two different deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) processes, performed in two different machines, are compared and evaluated. The process evaluation and discussions are based on the vertical walls deviation from a right angle, the surface roughness and the resolution. In the end, a solution is proposed to remove spikes and grassing which appeared during both DRIE processes, and the impact of removing them from the surfaces is discussed.

  10. Unequally spaced four levels phase encoding in holographic data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ke; Huang, Yong; Lin, Xiao; Cheng, Yabin; Li, Xiaotong; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-12-01

    Holographic data storage system is a candidate for the information recording due to its large storage capacity and high transfer rate. We propose an unequally spaced four levels phase encoding in the holographic data storage system here. Compared with two levels or three levels phase encoding, four levels phase encoding effectively improves the code rate. While more phase levels can further improve code rate, it also puts higher demand for the camera to differentiate the resulting smaller grayscale difference. Unequally spaced quaternary level phases eliminates the ambiguity of pixels with same phase difference relative to reference light compared to equally spaced quaternary levels. Corresponding encoding pattern design with phase pairs as the data element and decoding method were developed. Our encoding improves the code rate up to 0.875, which is 1.75 times of the conventional amplitude method with an error rate of 0.13 % according to our simulation results.

  11. Quasi four-level Tm:LuAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor); Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Hutcheson, Ralph L. (Inventor); Rodriguez, Waldo J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A quasi four-level solid-state laser is provided. A laser crystal is disposed in a laser cavity. The laser crystal has a LuAG-based host material doped to a final concentration between about 2% and about 7% thulium (Tm) ions. For the more heavily doped final concentrations, the LuAG-based host material is a LuAG seed crystal doped with a small concentration of Tm ions. Laser diode arrays are disposed transversely to the laser crystal for energizing the Tm ions.

  12. Three-dimensional atom localization by laser fields in a four-level tripod system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir S.; Rozhdestvensky, Yuri V.; Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2014-12-01

    We present a scheme for high-precision three-dimensional (3D) localization by the measurement of the atomic-level population. The scheme is applied to a four-level tripod-type atom coupled by three strong standing waves and a probe running wave. As a result, the atom can be localized in volumes that are substantially smaller than a cubic optical wavelength, which is achieved by the increase of standing-wave intensities. The upper-level distribution depends crucially on the atom-field coupling and it forms 3D periodic structures composed of spheres, hourglasses, bowls, donuts, or deformed barrels.

  13. Great Ideas Revisited. Techniques for Evaluating Training Programs. Revisiting Kirkpatrick's Four-Level Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Donald

    1996-01-01

    Kirkpatrick reviews his 1959 article presenting his four-level model of evaluation. He suggests that training professionals should evaluate their programs and understanding those four levels is a good start. The text of the original article is included. (JOW)

  14. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  15. Reconstruction of cell population dynamics using CFSE

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Andrew; Chan, Cliburn; Strid, Jessica; Moon, Simon; Callard, Robin; George, Andrew JT; Stark, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Background Quantifying cell division and death is central to many studies in the biological sciences. The fluorescent dye CFSE allows the tracking of cell division in vitro and in vivo and provides a rich source of information with which to test models of cell kinetics. Cell division and death have a stochastic component at the single-cell level, and the probabilities of these occurring in any given time interval may also undergo systematic variation at a population level. This gives rise to heterogeneity in proliferating cell populations. Branching processes provide a natural means of describing this behaviour. Results We present a likelihood-based method for estimating the parameters of branching process models of cell kinetics using CFSE-labeling experiments, and demonstrate its validity using synthetic and experimental datasets. Performing inference and model comparison with real CFSE data presents some statistical problems and we suggest methods of dealing with them. Conclusion The approach we describe here can be used to recover the (potentially variable) division and death rates of any cell population for which division tracking information is available. PMID:17565685

  16. Phase dependence of optical bistability and multistability in a four-level quantum system near a plasmonic nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein; Rahimpour Soleimani, H.

    2016-01-14

    The optical bistability and multistability properties of a four-level quantum system near a plasmonic nanostructure embedded in a unidirectional ring cavity are studied theoretically. Two orthogonal circularly polarized laser fields with the same frequency, different phases and electric fields amplitude are interacted by four-level quantum system. It is found that in the presence of the plasmonic nanostructure, the bistable behaviors related to one of the laser fields propagating through the unidirectional ring cavity can be modified by relative phase and amplitude control of another laser fields. Our obtained results show that the optical bistability can be converted into the optical multistability by varying the value of distance between the quantum system and the surface of the plasmonic nanostructure. Moreover, it is shown that under specific condition related to the distance, the lasing without population inversion can be obtained.

  17. Interval scanning photomicrography of microbial cell populations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A single reproducible area of the preparation in a fixed focal plane is photographically scanned at intervals during incubation. The procedure can be used for evaluating the aerobic or anaerobic growth of many microbial cells simultaneously within a population. In addition, the microscope is not restricted to the viewing of any one microculture preparation, since the slide cultures are incubated separately from the microscope.

  18. Programming microbial population dynamics by engineered cell-cell communication.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Payne, Stephen; Tan, Cheemeng; You, Lingchong

    2011-07-01

    A major aim of synthetic biology is to program novel cellular behavior using engineered gene circuits. Early endeavors focused on building simple circuits that fulfill simple functions, such as logic gates, bistable toggle switches, and oscillators. These gene circuits have primarily focused on single-cell behaviors since they operate intracellularly. Thus, they are often susceptible to cell-cell variations due to stochastic gene expression. Cell-cell communication offers an efficient strategy to coordinate cellular behavior at the population level. To this end, we review recent advances in engineering cell-cell communication to achieve reliable population dynamics, spanning from communication within single species to multispecies, from one-way sender-receiver communication to two-way communication in synthetic microbial ecosystems. These engineered systems serve as well-defined model systems to better understand design principles of their naturally occurring counterparts and to facilitate novel biotechnology applications.

  19. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Tom E C; Faas, Marijke M; Scherjon, Sicco A; Prins, Jelmer R

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the constitution, size and activation status of peripheral human memory T-lymphocyte populations. Effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) T-lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry of peripheral blood from 14 nulligravid, 12 primigravid and 15 parous women that were on average 18 months postpartum. The short term effects were shown by the significantly higher CD4+ EM cell and activated CD4+ memory cell proportions in primigravid women compared to nulligravid women. The persistent effects found in this study were the significantly higher proportions of CD4+ EM, CD4+ CM and activated memory T cells in parous women compared to nulligravid women. In contrast to CD4+ cells, activation status of CD8+ memory cells did not differ between the groups. This study shows that pregnancy persistently affects the pre-pregnancy CD4+ memory cell pool in human peripheral blood. During pregnancy, CD4+ T-lymphocytes might differentiate into EM cells followed by persistent higher proportions of CD4+ CM and EM cells postpartum. The persistent effects of pregnancy on memory T cells found in this study support the hypothesis that memory T cells are generated during pregnancy and that these cells could be involved in the lower complication risks in multiparous pregnancies in humans.

  20. Phase transitions in unstable cancer cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé, R. V.

    2003-09-01

    The dynamics of cancer evolution is studied by means of a simple quasispecies model involving cells displaying high levels of genetic instability. Both continuous, mean-field and discrete, bit-string models are analysed. The string model is simulated on a single-peak landscape. It is shown that a phase transition exists at high levels of genetic instability, thus separating two phases of slow and rapid growth. The results suggest that, under a conserved level of genetic instability the cancer cell population will be close to the threshold level. Implications for therapy are outlined.

  1. SU(4) based classification of four-level systems and their semiclassical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Surajit Ahmed, Helal

    2014-12-15

    We present a systematic method to classify the four-level system using SU(4) symmetry as the basis group. It is shown that this symmetry allows three dipole transitions which eventually leads to six possible configurations of the four-level system. Using a dressed atom approach, the semi-classical version of each configuration is exactly solved under rotating wave approximation and the symmetry among the Rabi oscillation among various models is studied.

  2. Electromagnetically induced left handedness in optically excited four-level atomic media.

    PubMed

    Thommen, Quentin; Mandel, Paul

    2006-02-10

    We show that left-handed properties can be electromagnetically induced in a general four-level atomic medium for a finite spectral range. We use an electric (magnetic) atomic transition as an electric (magnetic) resonator to modify the permittivity (permeability), both at the same frequency. The implementation of the four-level model is carried out in atomic hydrogen and neon. In each case the existence of left-handed properties is predicted inside an experimentally reachable domain of parameters.

  3. The regulation of hematopoietic stem cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Mayani, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Evidence presented over the last few years indicates that the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment comprises not just one but a number of different cell populations. Based on HSCs’ proliferation and engraftment potential, it has been suggested that there are two classes of HSC, with long- and short-term engraftment potential. HSC heterogeneity seems to involve differentiation capacities as well, since it has been shown that some HSC clones are able to give rise to both myeloid and lymphoid progeny, whereas others are lymphoid deficient. It has been recognized that HSC function depends on intrinsic cell regulators, which are modulated by external signals. Among the former, we can include transcription factors and non-coding RNAs as well as epigenetic modifiers. Among the latter, cytokines and extracellular matrix molecules have been implicated. Understanding the elements and mechanisms that regulate HSC populations is of significant relevance both in biological and in clinical terms, and research in this area still has to face several complex and exciting challenges. PMID:27408695

  4. Population dynamics of cancer cells with cell state conversions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Da; Wu, Dingming; Li, Zhe; Qian, Minping; Zhang, Michael Q.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory suggests a cell-lineage structure in tumor cells in which CSCs are capable of giving rise to the other non-stem cancer cells (NSCCs) but not vice versa. However, an alternative scenario of bidirectional interconversions between CSCs and NSCCs was proposed very recently. Here we present a general population model of cancer cells by integrating conventional cell divisions with direct conversions between different cell states, namely, not only can CSCs differentiate into NSCCs by asymmetric cell division, NSCCs can also dedifferentiate into CSCs by cell state conversion. Our theoretical model is validated when applying the model to recent experimental data. It is also found that the transient increase in CSCs proportion initiated from the purified NSCCs subpopulation cannot be well predicted by the conventional CSC model where the conversion from NSCCs to CSCs is forbidden, implying that the cell state conversion is required especially for the transient dynamics. The theoretical analysis also gives the condition such that our general model can be equivalently reduced into a simple Markov chain with only cell state transitions keeping the same cell proportion dynamics. PMID:26085954

  5. Assessing Academic and Creative Abilities in Mathematics at Four Levels of Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livne, Nava L.; Livne, Oren E.; Milgram, Roberta M.

    1999-01-01

    Develops a mapping sentence to construct test items measuring academic and creative abilities in mathematics at four levels. Describes the three stages of the process of developing the mapping sentence and presents examples of test items representing each ability/level combination. Contains 63 references. (Author/ASK)

  6. Interior of sump/sewerage room looking up four levels, ladder on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of sump/sewerage room looking up four levels, ladder on pipe, view facing southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Dry Dock No. 1, Pumpwell, By-Pass Valve & Saltwater Pumphouse, North end of Fifth Street, between Dry Dock No. 1 & Facility GD2 , Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems. PMID:27226981

  8. Goos-Hänchen shifts in a four-level quantum system near plasmonic nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, M.

    2016-05-01

    Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts of the reflected and transmitted probe beams through a cavity with a four-level quantum system and plasmonic nanostructure is investigated. It is realized that for different values of distance between plasmonic nanostructure and quantum system, the negative and positive GH shifts of the reflected and transmitted probe beams can be controlled. In addition, it is found that the relative phase of applied fields in the presence of plasmonic nanostructure can be used as an important parameter for controlling the GH shifts in reflected and transmitted light through the cavity. Moreover, the distance effect between four-level quantum system and plasmonic nanostructure has also been discussed on lateral shifts of reflected and transmitted light.

  9. Variations of dispersion and transparency in four level N-scheme atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi-Salloum, T. Y.; Snell, S.; Davis, J. P.; Narducci, F. A.

    2011-12-01

    Systems that exhibit positive and negative dispersion are of interest for numerous applications especially when accompanied by transparency. In this work, we study the variation of the sign of the dispersion in the case of a four-level 'N-Scheme' system. The different dynamics of the sign and value of dispersion and transparency are first explored in light of three resonances that we have previously introduced, then studied as a function of the varying strengths of the fields. As an application we consider in this work both passive and active optical gyroscopes.

  10. Control of Four-Level Quantum Coherence via Discrete Spectral Shaping of an Optical Frequency Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, Matthew C.; Peer, Avi; Ye Jun

    2008-05-23

    We present experiments demonstrating high-resolution and wide-bandwidth coherent control of a four-level atomic system in a diamond configuration. A femtosecond frequency comb is used to excite a specific pair of two-photon transitions in cold {sup 87}Rb. The optical-phase-sensitive response of the closed-loop diamond system is studied by controlling the phase of the comb modes with a pulse shaper. Finally, the pulse shape is optimized resulting in a 256% increase in the two-photon transition rate by forcing constructive interference between the mode pairs detuned from an intermediate resonance.

  11. Four-level polarization discriminator based on a surface plasmon polaritonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetou, M. I.; Thomsen, B. C.; Bayvel, P.; Dickson, W.; Zayats, A. V.

    2011-03-01

    A compact, four-level polarization discriminator based on a surface plasmon polaritonic crystal (SPPC) has been experimentally demonstrated. It is able to uniquely resolve and spatially separate four signals that have been linearly polarized at azimuth angles 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°. It exploits the excitation of multiple surface plasmon polariton eigenmodes in nondegenerate directions when the SPPC is illuminated with monochromatic light. The device is planar and of micrometer scale, which makes it suitable for on-chip integration and miniaturization of photonic circuits.

  12. Effects of pump modulation on a four-level laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Chakmakjian, S.H.; Koch, K.; Papademetriou, S.; Stroud, C.R. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A theory is developed to describe the way in which modulations in the pump intensity produce modulations in the gain of a four-level, homogeneously broadened laser amplifier. The theory is tested by carrying out an experiment using an alexandrite crystal pumped by a c-w dye laser. A second dye laser is used to measure the gain in the inverted laser transition. The dependence of the magnitude and the bandwidth of the gain on the pumping rate is determined. Agreement between theory and experiment is good.

  13. Effects of pump modulation on a four-level laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Chakmakjian, S.H.; Koch, K.; Papademetriou, S.; Stroud, C.R. Jr. )

    1989-09-01

    A theory is developed to describe the way in which modulations in the pump intensity produce modulations in the gain of a four-level, homogeneously broadened laser amplifier. The theory is tested by carrying out an experiment using an alexandrite crystal pumped by a cw dye laser. A second dye laser is used to measure the gain in the inverted laser transition. The dependence of the magnitude and the bandwidth of the gain on the pumping rate is determined. Agreement between theory and experiment is good.

  14. Dynamics of N-configuration four-level atom interacting with one-mode cavity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, N. H.; Thabet, Lamia

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a model is presented to investigate the interaction between a four-level atom and a single mode of the radiation field. The relative phase, the detuning and the Kerr-like medium are taken into consideration. The exact solution is given when the atom is initially prepared in superposition coherent state. The influences of the relative phase, and the Kerr-like medium on the collapses-revivals, the field entropy and the amplitude-squared squeezing phenomena for the considered system are examined. It is found that these parameters have important effects on the properties of these phenomena.

  15. Electromagnetically induced transparency in the four-level system driven by bichromatic microwave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lijun; Sun, Ke-jia; Zhang, Su-heng; Feng, Xiao-min

    2014-11-01

    We present a theoretical study on the nonlinear behaviors of the electromagnetically induced transparency resonance subject to two microwave driving fields in a four-level atom system. The probe absorption spectrum is obtained by solving numerically the relevant equations of density matrix. It is shown that there are two pairs of the EIT windows in the probe absorption spectrum. The two pairs of EIT windows have symmetry with respect to the resonance frequency of the probe field, and the separation is equal to the Rabi frequency of the resonant microwave driving field. But in each pair, the splitting of two EIT windows is dominated to the strength of detuning microwave driving field.

  16. Electromagnetically Induced Grating via Coherently Driven Four-Level Atoms in a N-Type Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu; Li, Jia-Yu; Liu, Ming

    2015-03-01

    We propose a scheme to generate an electromagnetically induced grating via coherently driven four-level atoms in a N-type configuration in the presence of a standing signal field, a coupling field and a probe field. We show that a nearly ideal phase grating can be realized by adjusting the frequency detuning of signal field, the interaction length of atomic medium, and the ratio of the intensity between the signal field and the coupling field. The first-order diffraction efficiency of the grating is about 29.9 %, which is close to that of an ideal sinusoidal phase grating.

  17. Raman scattering in a four-level atomic system with hyperfine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia-Hua; Yang, Wen-Xing; Peng, Ju-Cun

    2005-04-01

    We propose and analyse an efficient Raman scheme for suppressing the absorption of a weak probe beam in a typical four-level atomic system with a nearly hyperfine doublet structure of two higher-lying excited levels for the two cases of transient regime and steady-state process. For the transient process, using the numerical calculations by a nice MATHEMATICA code, we find that the magnitude of the probe absorption at line centre of the probe transition is small compared to the standard three-level atomic system based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). In particular, our results show that the probe absorption can be completely eliminated under the condition of Raman resonance, i.e. we only require that two-photon detuning is zero within the range of the hyperfine two-level frequency gap for the case of the steady state. In contrast to the standard three-level EIT scheme, one of the key advantages of our four-level Raman scheme is that under the Raman resonance condition we can observe one transparency window without the need of exact vanishing of one- and two-photon detuning. As a consequence, the atomic hyperfine structure cannot be a hindrance for obtaining EIT.

  18. Four-level N -scheme crossover resonances in Rb saturation spectroscopy in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotto, S.; Ciampini, D.; Rizzo, C.; Arimondo, E.

    2015-12-01

    We perform saturated absorption spectroscopy on the D2 line for room temperature rubidium atoms immersed in magnetic fields within the 0.05-0.13 T range. At those medium-high field values the hyperfine structure in the excited state is broken by the Zeeman effect, while in the ground-state hyperfine structure and Zeeman shifts are comparable. The observed spectra are composed by a large number of absorption lines. We identify them as saturated absorptions on two-level systems, on three-level systems in a V configuration, and on four-level systems in an N or double-N configuration where two optical transitions not sharing a common level are coupled by spontaneous emission decays. We analyze the intensity of all those transitions within a unified simple theoretical model. We concentrate our attention on the double-N crossovers signals whose intensity is very large because of the symmetry in the branching ratios of the four levels. We point out that these structures, present in all alkali-metal atoms at medium-high magnetic fields, have interesting properties for electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light applications.

  19. Noise property of a four-level system in vee + ladder configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Ying; Liu, Hong-Yu; Yang, Rong-Can

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical study of the output amplitude noises of a four-level atomic system in vee + ladder configuration. The difference and connection of electromagnetically induced transparency and Autler-Townes splitting effects are investigated theoretically. The output amplitude noise of the probe field of two effects were compared, the quantum properties of the input field of the thin medium and the thick medium under Autler-Townes splitting or electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) condition are maintained, the higher fidelity is obtained in the storage of the thick medium under the condition of EIT in non-classical states. The noise characteristics of the squeezed vacuum field after four-level coherent medium are studied; the noise of the output field is lowest when the detection light is far away from detuning. The double split of EIT window was made by the dynamic Stark splitting on the ground state of control field, the quantum properties of the input field in the strong-control field and strong-coupling field were maintained. The output noise spectrum is divided with the increase in the field strength, the maximum output squeezing is far away from the resonance.

  20. Transparency and slow light in a four-level quantum system near a plasmonic nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelou, Sofia; Yannopapas, Vassilios; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2012-11-01

    We study theoretically the effects of a plasmonic nanostructure on the linear absorption and dispersion spectrum of a four-level double- V-type quantum system. In the quantum system under study one V-type transition is influenced by the interaction with surface plasmons while the other V-type transition interacts with free-space vacuum. As plasmonic nanostructure we consider a two-dimensional array of metal-coated dielectric nanospheres. We analyze the optical properties of a linearly polarized laser field that couples the lowest state with the upper states in the free-space transitions. We show that, due to the presence of the plasmonic nanostructure, effects of optical transparency are created. These effects are also complemented by the existence of slow light.

  1. Shifts from a distant neighboring resonance for a four-level atom

    SciTech Connect

    Horbatsch, M.; Hessels, E. A.

    2011-09-15

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. A 82, 052519 (2010)], the systematic shifts of a resonance due to quantum-mechanical interference from a distant neighboring resonance were derived. In that paper, the simplest three-level closed system was used to calculate analytic expressions for shifts in the resonant line centers. Here, we extend the analysis to the more relevant four-level system, which consists of two ground states and two excited states and which incorporates the physics of dark states. The shifts are shown to depend on the type of experiment performed and can be much larger than the shifts for the three-level system. The analytic formulas obtained are applied to the {sup 23}S-to-{sup 23}P transitions in atomic helium, where significant shifts are found.

  2. Extracortical origin of some murine subplate cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, María; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Albert-Maestro, María Amparo; Molnár, Zoltán; De Carlos, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    The subplate layer, the deepest cortical layer in mammals, has important roles in cerebral cortical development. The subplate contains heterogeneous cell populations that are morphologically diverse, with several projection targets. It is currently assumed that these cells are generated in the germinative zone of the earliest cortical neuroepithelium. Here we identify a pallial but extracortical area located in the rostromedial telencephalic wall (RMTW) that gives rise to several cell populations. Postmitotic neurons migrate tangentially from the RMTW toward the cerebral cortex. Most RMTW-derived cells are incorporated into the subplate layer throughout its rostrocaudal extension, with others contributing to the GABAergic interneuron pool of cortical layers V and VI. PMID:24778253

  3. Four-level atom dynamics and emission statistics using a quantum jump approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhya, S. N.

    2007-01-01

    Four-level atom dynamics is studied in a ladder system in the nine parameter space consisting of driving field strengths, detunings and decay constants, {Ω1,Ω2,Ω3,Δ1,Δ2,Δ3,Γ2,Γ3,Γ4} . One can selectively excite or induce two-level behavior between particular levels of ones choice by appropriately tuning the driving field strengths at three-photon resonance. The dynamics may be classified into two main regions of interest (i) small Ω2 coupling the ∣2⟩-∣3⟩ transition and (ii) large Ω2 . In case (i) one sees two-level behavior consisting of adjacent levels and in a particular region in the parameter space, there is an intermittent shelving of the electrons in one of the two subsystems. In case (ii) the levels consist of the ground state and the upper most level. Emission statistics is studied using the delay function approach in both the cases. In case (i), the behavior of the second order correlation function g2(t) , is similar to that of two-level emission for low Ω1 coupling the ∣1⟩-∣2⟩ transition, and the correlation increases with Ω1 for smaller time delays. While, in case (ii) when, in addition, Ω3 coupling the ∣3⟩-∣4⟩ transitionis kept low, g2(t) shows superpoissonian distribution, which may be attributed to three-photon processes.

  4. Study of the crossing of quasi-energy levels in a four-level system

    SciTech Connect

    Arushanyan, S; Melikyan, A; Saakyan, S

    2011-05-31

    It was shown previously that in taking into account only dipole transitions, the crossing of quasi-energy levels is possible in the system if any of the transitions forms a closed loop. It followed herefrom that for the analysis of the crossing conditions, it is necessary to consider a system which has at least four levels. In this paper we show that we can uniquely specify which quasi-energy levels cross at the given values of the parameters of the atomic system and radiation field, without solving an algebraic quartic equation. It was found that the most suitable system for the implementation of the crossing is the group of energy levels {sup 5}S{sub 1/2}, {sup 5}P{sub 1/2}, {sup 5}P{sub 3/2} and {sup 5}D{sub 3/2} of a rubidium atom. The performed calculations of the laser field intensity and frequency values at which crossing takes place in this system show that they are easily attainable. It turned out that in this system there occur crossing of quasi-energy levels corresponding to the excited atomic levels. (intersection of quasi-energy levels)

  5. Spontaneous emission from a microwave-driven four-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Wan, Ren-Gang; Yao, Zhi-Hai

    2016-10-01

    The spontaneous emission from a microwave-driven four-level atom embedded in an anisotropic photonic crystal is studied. Due to the modified density of state (DOS) in the anisotropic photonic band gap (PBG) and the coherent control induced by the coupling fields, spontaneous emission can be significantly enhanced when the position of the spontaneous emission peak gets close to the band gap edge. As a result of the closed-loop interaction between the fields and the atom, the spontaneous emission depends on the dynamically induced Autler-Townes splitting and its position relative to the PBG. Interesting phenomena, such as spectral-line suppression, enhancement and narrowing, and fluorescence quenching, appear in the spontaneous emission spectra, which are modulated by amplitudes and phases of the coherently driven fields and the effect of PBG. This theoretical study can provide us with more efficient methods to manipulate the atomic spontaneous emission. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11447232, 11204367, 11447157, and 11305020).

  6. Optical pumping and coherence effects in fluorescence from a four level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, A.

    2006-07-01

    An effective four-level system around the D2 line of 85Rb at room temperature, is experimentally investigated by fluorescent studies under the action of two driving fields L1 and L2. This system exhibits unique features in fluorescence as a function of frequency separation between L1 and L2. In particular, at two-photon resonance, when the Rabi frequency of L1 exceeds that of L2, signatures of Electromagnetically Induced Transperancy effect (EIT) arising from the three-level Λ sub-system is present as a sub-natural dip in fluorescence from the fourth level. At comparable strengths of L1 and L2 the fluorescence features indicate a regime, where the effects arising from optical pumping and EIT effect due to ground hyperfine level coherence coexist. We see in the coexistence regime, saturation effects arising from difference frequency crossing (DFC) resonances and optical pumping around the EIT window. At low strengths of L1, all signs of coherence vanishes from the system and the fluorescent features result from incoherent optical pumping through the Autler-Townes split states of the excited state hyperfine levels, which are split due to the stronger L2 laser. The dominant role of the L1 laser in creating a robust transparency signal even in the presence of an off-resonant excitation is brought out. The results are supported by density matrix calculations.

  7. Coherent manipulation of absorption by intense fields in four level ladder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pardeep; Dasgupta, Shubhrangshu

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear optical processes attributed to the dependence of the susceptibility of the medium on the input fluence can be remarkably manipulated by the quantum interference and coherence. One of these processes, the optical bistability (OB), that refers to the possibilities of two stable outputs for the same input fields, can also be modified by quantum coherence. Further, the nonlinear dependence of the absorption on the power of the input light gives rise to interesting processes like saturable absorption (SA) and reverse saturable absorption (RSA). While the SA corresponds to the decrease in the absorption coefficient with the increase of intensity of input light, the RSA corresponds to otherwise, that finds applications in optical limiting. We show, using a four-level Ladder system, how a control field manipulates these processes for an intense probe field applied in the excited state transition. The nonlinear absorption increases whereas the threshold of OB decreases in presence of a control field. We further delineates how the control field and the decay rates modifies SA and RSA. The control of these processes find applications in optical switching, optical limiting and optical communications.

  8. Concise Review: Stem Cell Population Biology: Insights from Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Adam L; Lo Celso, Cristina; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are fundamental to human life and offer great therapeutic potential, yet their biology remains incompletely-or in cases even poorly-understood. The field of stem cell biology has grown substantially in recent years due to a combination of experimental and theoretical contributions: the experimental branch of this work provides data in an ever-increasing number of dimensions, while the theoretical branch seeks to determine suitable models of the fundamental stem cell processes that these data describe. The application of population dynamics to biology is amongst the oldest applications of mathematics to biology, and the population dynamics perspective continues to offer much today. Here we describe the impact that such a perspective has made in the field of stem cell biology. Using hematopoietic stem cells as our model system, we discuss the approaches that have been used to study their key properties, such as capacity for self-renewal, differentiation, and cell fate lineage choice. We will also discuss the relevance of population dynamics in models of stem cells and cancer, where competition naturally emerges as an influential factor on the temporal evolution of cell populations. Stem Cells 2017;35:80-88.

  9. Cancer stem cells as a target population for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bouvard, Claire; Barefield, Colleen; Zhu, Shoutian

    2014-09-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in a growing list of malignancies and are believed to be responsible for cancer initiation, metastasis and relapse following certain therapies, even though they may only represent a small fraction of the cells in a given cancer. Like somatic stem cells and embryonic stem cells, CSCs are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into more mature, less tumorigenic cells that make up the bulk populations of cancer cells. Elimination of CSCs promises intriguing therapeutic potential and this concept has been adopted in preclinical drug discovery programs. Herein we will discuss the progress of these efforts, general considerations in practice, major challenges and possible solutions.

  10. Somitic origin of limb muscle satellite and side population cells

    PubMed Central

    Schienda, Jaclyn; Engleka, Kurt A.; Jun, Susan; Hansen, Mark S.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Tabin, Clifford J.; Kunkel, Louis M.; Kardon, Gabrielle

    2006-01-01

    Repair of mature skeletal muscle is mediated by adult muscle progenitors. Satellite cells have long been recognized as playing a major role in muscle repair, whereas side population (SP) cells have more recently been identified as contributing to this process. The developmental source of these two progenitor populations has been considerably debated. We explicitly tested and quantified the contribution of embryonic somitic cells to these progenitor populations. Chick somitic cells were labeled by using replication-defective retroviruses or quail/chick chimeras, and mouse cells were labeled by crossing somite-specific, Pax3-derived Cre driver lines with a Cre-dependent reporter line. We show that the majority of, if not all, limb muscle satellite cells arise from cells expressing Pax3 specifically in the hypaxial somite and their migratory derivatives. We also find that a significant number of, but not all, limb muscle SP cells are derived from the hypaxial somite. Notably, the heterogeneity in the developmental origin of SP cells is reflected in their functional heterogeneity; somitically derived SP cells are intrinsically more myogenic than nonsomitically derived ones. Thus, we show that the somites, which supply embryonic and fetal myoblasts, are also an important source of highly myogenic adult muscle progenitors. PMID:16418263

  11. Bacterial Programmed Cell Death as a Population Phenomenon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-11

    Moving in for the kil:Activation of an endoribonuclease toxin by quorum sensing peptide, Molecular Cell, (03 2011): . doi: 06/11/2013 11.00...shown that E. coli mazEF-mediated cell death is a population phenomenon requiring the E. coli quorum sensing factor EDF (Extracellular Death Factor... quorum - sensing factor required for mazEF-mediated cell death in Escherichia coli. Science 318: 652-655. 7) Kolodkin-Gal I, Engelberg-Kulka, H (2008

  12. Metabolic Differences in Microbial Cell Populations Revealed by Nanophotonic Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Bennett; Antonakos, Cory; Retterer, Scott T; Vertes, Akos

    2013-01-01

    ellular differences are linked to cell differentiation, the proliferation of cancer and to the development of drug resistance in microbial infections. Due to sensitivity limitations, however, large- scale metabolic analysis at the single cell level is only available for cells significantly larger in volume than Saccharomyces cerevisiae (~30 fL). Here we demonstrate that by a nanophotonic ionization platform and mass spectrometry, over one hundred up to 108 metabolites, or up to 18% of the known S. cerevisiae metabolome, can be identified in very small cell populations (n < 100). Under ideal conditions, r Relative quantitation of up to 4% of the metabolites is achieved at the single cell level.

  13. Experimental depletion of different renal interstitial cell populations

    SciTech Connect

    Bohman, S.O.; Sundelin, B.; Forsum, U.; Tribukait, B.

    1988-04-01

    To define different populations of renal interstitial cells and investigate some aspects of their function, we studied the kidneys of normal rats and rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus (DI, Brattleboro) after experimental manipulations expected to alter the number of interstitial cells. DI rats showed an almost complete loss of interstitial cells in their renal papillae after treatment with a high dose of vasopressin. In spite of the lack of interstitial cells, the animals concentrated their urine to the same extent as vasopressin-treated normal rats, indicating that the renomedullary interstitial cells do not have an important function in concentrating the urine. The interstitial cells returned nearly to normal within 1 week off vasopressin treatment, suggesting a rapid turnover rate of these cells. To further distinguish different populations of interstitial cells, we studied the distribution of class II MHC antigen expression in the kidneys of normal and bone-marrow depleted Wistar rats. Normal rats had abundant class II antigen-positive interstitial cells in the renal cortex and outer medulla, but not in the inner medulla (papilla). Six days after 1000 rad whole body irradiation, the stainable cells were almost completely lost, but electron microscopic morphometry showed a virtually unchanged volume density of interstitial cells in the cortex and outer medulla, as well as the inner medulla. Thus, irradiation abolished the expression of the class II antigen but caused no significant depletion of interstitial cells.

  14. [Sorting of side population cells from multiple myeloma cell lines and analysis of their biological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Li-Na; Huang, Hong-Ming; Ding, Run-Sheng; Shi, Wei; Xu, Rui-Rong; Yu, Xiao-Tang; Jiang, Sheng-Hua

    2014-06-01

    This study was aimed to sort the side population (SP) cells from human multiple myeloma cell lines, then detect the biological characteristics of those SP cells. After Hoechst33342 staining, intracellular Hoechst33342 fluorescence staining differences of myeloma cell lines observed by the fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) technology was used to isolate SP cells and main population (MP) cells; proliferative capacity in vitro was determined by cell growth curve; the cell colony forming ability was compared by colony forming test. The CD138 expression was detected by flow cytometry. The expression of ABCG2 mRNA was detected by reverse transcription PCR; CCK-8 assay and colony forming test were used to evaluate the effect of bortezomib on the cell proliferation, vitality and colony forming ability of the two populations. The results showed that the myeloma cell lines had a small proportion of SP cells, especially, RPMI 8226 cells accounted for the highest proportion of SP cells (7.10 ± 2.69)%, which have also been confirmed under the fluorescence microscope; the proliferative activity and cell colony forming ability of SP cells were significantly higher than those of MP cells (P < 0.05). The expression levels of CD138 in SP and MP cells were not significantly different (P > 0.05). RT-PCR results showed that SP cells expressed the drug-resistance gene ABCG2, but MP cells hardly express these genes. The inhibition rate of bortezomib on SP cells was significantly lower than that on MP cells (P < 0.05), however, the difference was not significant (P > 0.05) at bortezomib 40 nmol/L. Bortezomib could reduce colony formation in the both two cell populations, but more severe reduction appeared in the MP cells. It is concluded that the myeloma cell line contain a small amount of SP cells with the cancer stem cell characteristics.

  15. Trail networks formed by populations of immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Kwon, Tae Goo; Park, Jin-sung; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2014-02-01

    Populations of biological cells that communicate with each other can organize themselves to generate large-scale patterns. Examples can be found in diverse systems, ranging from developing embryos, cardiac tissues, chemotaxing ameba and swirling bacteria. The similarity, often shared by the patterns, suggests the existence of some general governing principle. On the other hand, rich diversity and system-specific properties are exhibited, depending on the type of involved cells and the nature of their interactions. The study on the similarity and the diversity constitutes a rapidly growing field of research. Here, we introduce a new class of self-organized patterns of cell populations that we term as ‘cellular trail networks’. They were observed with populations of rat microglia, the immune cells of the brain and the experimental evidence suggested that haptotaxis is the key element responsible for them. The essential features of the observed patterns are well captured by the mathematical model cells that actively crawl and interact with each other through a decomposing but non-diffusing chemical attractant laid down by the cells. Our finding suggests an unusual mechanism of socially cooperative long-range signaling for the crawling immune cells.

  16. The Variance of Intraclass Correlations in Three- and Four-Level Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.; Hedberg, E. C.; Kuyper, Arend M.

    2012-01-01

    Intraclass correlations are used to summarize the variance decomposition in populations with multilevel hierarchical structure. There has recently been considerable interest in estimating intraclass correlations from surveys or designed experiments to provide design parameters for planning future large-scale randomized experiments. The large…

  17. Lung regeneration: mechanisms, applications and emerging stem cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kotton, Darrell N; Morrisey, Edward E

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the respiratory system has an extensive ability to respond to injury and regenerate lost or damaged cells. The unperturbed adult lung is remarkably quiescent, but after insult or injury progenitor populations can be activated or remaining cells can re-enter the cell cycle. Techniques including cell-lineage tracing and transcriptome analysis have provided novel and exciting insights into how the lungs and trachea regenerate in response to injury and have allowed the identification of pathways important in lung development and regeneration. These studies are now informing approaches for modulating the pathways that may promote endogenous regeneration as well as the generation of exogenous lung cell lineages from pluripotent stem cells. The emerging advances, highlighted in this Review, are providing new techniques and assays for basic mechanistic studies as well as generating new model systems for human disease and strategies for cell replacement. PMID:25100528

  18. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  19. Modeling Bacterial Population Growth from Stochastic Single-Cell Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ignacio; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    A few bacterial cells may be sufficient to produce a food-borne illness outbreak, provided that they are capable of adapting and proliferating on a food matrix. This is why any quantitative health risk assessment policy must incorporate methods to accurately predict the growth of bacterial populations from a small number of pathogens. In this aim, mathematical models have become a powerful tool. Unfortunately, at low cell concentrations, standard deterministic models fail to predict the fate of the population, essentially because the heterogeneity between individuals becomes relevant. In this work, a stochastic differential equation (SDE) model is proposed to describe variability within single-cell growth and division and to simulate population growth from a given initial number of individuals. We provide evidence of the model ability to explain the observed distributions of times to division, including the lag time produced by the adaptation to the environment, by comparing model predictions with experiments from the literature for Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Salmonella enterica. The model is shown to accurately predict experimental growth population dynamics for both small and large microbial populations. The use of stochastic models for the estimation of parameters to successfully fit experimental data is a particularly challenging problem. For instance, if Monte Carlo methods are employed to model the required distributions of times to division, the parameter estimation problem can become numerically intractable. We overcame this limitation by converting the stochastic description to a partial differential equation (backward Kolmogorov) instead, which relates to the distribution of division times. Contrary to previous stochastic formulations based on random parameters, the present model is capable of explaining the variability observed in populations that result from the growth of a small number of initial cells as well as the lack of it compared to

  20. Modeling bacterial population growth from stochastic single-cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Antonio A; Molina, Ignacio; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2014-09-01

    A few bacterial cells may be sufficient to produce a food-borne illness outbreak, provided that they are capable of adapting and proliferating on a food matrix. This is why any quantitative health risk assessment policy must incorporate methods to accurately predict the growth of bacterial populations from a small number of pathogens. In this aim, mathematical models have become a powerful tool. Unfortunately, at low cell concentrations, standard deterministic models fail to predict the fate of the population, essentially because the heterogeneity between individuals becomes relevant. In this work, a stochastic differential equation (SDE) model is proposed to describe variability within single-cell growth and division and to simulate population growth from a given initial number of individuals. We provide evidence of the model ability to explain the observed distributions of times to division, including the lag time produced by the adaptation to the environment, by comparing model predictions with experiments from the literature for Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Salmonella enterica. The model is shown to accurately predict experimental growth population dynamics for both small and large microbial populations. The use of stochastic models for the estimation of parameters to successfully fit experimental data is a particularly challenging problem. For instance, if Monte Carlo methods are employed to model the required distributions of times to division, the parameter estimation problem can become numerically intractable. We overcame this limitation by converting the stochastic description to a partial differential equation (backward Kolmogorov) instead, which relates to the distribution of division times. Contrary to previous stochastic formulations based on random parameters, the present model is capable of explaining the variability observed in populations that result from the growth of a small number of initial cells as well as the lack of it compared to

  1. Analysis of individual cell trajectories in lattice-gas cellular automaton models for migrating cell populations.

    PubMed

    Mente, Carsten; Voss-Böhme, Anja; Deutsch, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Collective dynamics of migrating cell populations drive key processes in tissue formation and maintenance under normal and diseased conditions. Collective cell behavior at the tissue level is typically characterized by considering cell density patterns such as clusters and moving cell fronts. However, there are also important observables of collective dynamics related to individual cell behavior. In particular, individual cell trajectories are footprints of emergent behavior in populations of migrating cells. Lattice-gas cellular automata (LGCA) have proven successful to model and analyze collective behavior arising from interactions of migrating cells. There are well-established methods to analyze cell density patterns in LGCA models. Although LGCA dynamics are defined by cell-based rules, individual cells are not distinguished. Therefore, individual cell trajectories cannot be analyzed in LGCA so far. Here, we extend the classical LGCA framework to allow labeling and tracking of individual cells. We consider cell number conserving LGCA models of migrating cell populations where cell interactions are regulated by local cell density and derive stochastic differential equations approximating individual cell trajectories in LGCA. This result allows the prediction of complex individual cell trajectories emerging in LGCA models and is a basis for model-experiment comparisons at the individual cell level.

  2. Cell Population Tracking and Lineage Construction with Spatiotemporal Context 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang; Chen, Mei; Kanade, Takeo; Miller, Eric D.; Weiss, Lee E.; Campbell, Phil G.

    2008-01-01

    Automated visual-tracking of cell populations in vitro using phase contrast time-lapse microscopy enables quantitative, systematic and high-throughput measurements of cell behaviors. These measurements include the spatiotemporal quantification of cell migration, mitosis, apoptosis, and the construction of cell lineages. The combination of low signal-to-noise ratio of phase contrast microscopy images, high and varying densities of the cell cultures, topological complexities of cell shapes, and wide range of cell behaviors pose many challenges to existing tracking techniques. This paper presents a fully-automated multi-target tracking system that can efficiently cope with these challenges while simultaneously tracking and analyzing thousands of cells observed using time-lapse phase contrast microscopy. The system combines bottom-up and top-down image analysis by integrating multiple collaborative modules, which exploit a fast geometric active contour tracker in conjunction with adaptive interacting multiple models (IMM) motion filtering and spatiotemporal trajectory optimization. The system, which was tested using a variety of cell populations, achieved tracking accuracy in the range of 86.9%–92.5%. PMID:18656418

  3. [Identification of a multihit model for nonhomogeneous cell population].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, L V; Khanin, L G; Iakovlev, A Iu

    1992-01-01

    A generalized multihit-multitarget model for a nonhomogeneous, with respect to radiosensitivity, population of irradiated cells is presented. The least squares and the maximum likelihood estimation of the model parameters is given. The estimates quality is evaluated by the computer-based study. The results obtained show the possibility of the parametric identification of cell radiosensitivity distribution according to the "dose-response" data.

  4. Ventrally emigrating neural tube (VENT) cells: a second neural tube-derived cell population.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Douglas P; Machnicki, Michal; Ali, Mohammed M; Zhang, Zhanying; Sohal, Gurkirpal S

    2004-08-01

    Two embryological fates for cells of the neural tube are well established. Cells from the dorsal part of the developing neural tube emigrate and become neural crest cells, which in turn contribute to the development of the peripheral nervous system and a variety of non-neural structures. Other neural tube cells form the neurons and glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS). This has led to the neural crest being treated as the sole neural tube-derived emigrating cell population, with the remaining neural tube cells assumed to be restricted to forming the CNS. However, this restriction has not been tested fully. Our investigations of chick, quail and duck embryos utilizing a variety of different labelling techniques (DiI, LacZ, GFP and quail chimera) demonstrate the existence of a second neural tube-derived emigrating cell population. These cells originate from the ventral part of the cranial neural tube, emigrate at the exit/entry site of the cranial nerves, migrate in association with the nerves and populate their target tissues. On the basis of its site of origin and route of migration we have named this cell population the ventrally emigrating neural tube (VENT) cells. VENT cells also differ from neural crest cells in that they emigrate considerably after the emigration of neural crest cells, and lack expression of the neural crest cell antigen HNK-1. VENT cells are multipotent, differentiating into cell types belonging to all four basic tissues in the body: the nerve, muscle, connective and epithelium. Thus, the neural tube provides at least two cell populations--neural crest and VENT cells--that contribute to the development of the peripheral nervous system and various non-neural structures. This review describes the origin of the idea of VENT cells, and discusses evidence for their existence and subsequent fates.

  5. Purification of specific cell population by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Basu, Sreemanti; Campbell, Hope M; Dittel, Bonnie N; Ray, Avijit

    2010-07-10

    Experimental and clinical studies often require highly purified cell populations. FACS is a technique of choice to purify cell populations of known phenotype. Other bulk methods of purification include panning, complement depletion and magnetic bead separation. However, FACS has several advantages over other available methods. FACS is the preferred method when very high purity of the desired population is required, when the target cell population expresses a very low level of the identifying marker or when cell populations require separation based on differential marker density. In addition, FACS is the only available purification technique to isolate cells based on internal staining or intracellular protein expression, such as a genetically modified fluorescent protein marker. FACS allows the purification of individual cells based on size, granularity and fluorescence. In order to purify cells of interest, they are first stained with fluorescently-tagged monoclonal antibodies (mAb), which recognize specific surface markers on the desired cell population (1). Negative selection of unstained cells is also possible. FACS purification requires a flow cytometer with sorting capacity and the appropriate software. For FACS, cells in suspension are passed as a stream in droplets with each containing a single cell in front of a laser. The fluorescence detection system detects cells of interest based on predetermined fluorescent parameters of the cells. The instrument applies a charge to the droplet containing a cell of interest and an electrostatic deflection system facilitates collection of the charged droplets into appropriate collection tubes (2). The success of staining and thereby sorting depends largely on the selection of the identifying markers and the choice of mAb. Sorting parameters can be adjusted depending on the requirement of purity and yield. Although FACS requires specialized equipment and personnel training, it is the method of choice for isolation of

  6. Functional heterogeneity of side population cells in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Ojima, Koichi; Fukada, So-ichiro; Ikemoto, Madoka; Masuda, Satoru; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi . E-mail: takeda@ncnp.go.jp

    2006-03-17

    Skeletal muscle regeneration has been exclusively attributed to myogenic precursors, satellite cells. A stem cell-rich fraction referred to as side population (SP) cells also resides in skeletal muscle, but its roles in muscle regeneration remain unclear. We found that muscle SP cells could be subdivided into three sub-fractions using CD31 and CD45 markers. The majority of SP cells in normal non-regenerating muscle expressed CD31 and had endothelial characteristics. However, CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells, which are a minor subpopulation in normal muscle, actively proliferated upon muscle injury and expressed not only several regulatory genes for muscle regeneration but also some mesenchymal lineage markers. CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells showed the greatest myogenic potential among three SP sub-fractions, but indeed revealed mesenchymal potentials in vitro. These SP cells preferentially differentiated into myofibers after intramuscular transplantation in vivo. Our results revealed the heterogeneity of muscle SP cells and suggest that CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells participate in muscle regeneration.

  7. γδ T Cells Shape Pre-Immune Peripheral B Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yafei; Getahun, Andrew; Heiser, Ryan A.; Detanico, Thiago O.; Aviszus, Katja; Kirchenbaum, Greg A.; Casper, Tamara L.; Huang, Chunjian; Aydintug, M. Kemal; Carding, Simon R.; Ikuta, Koichi; Huang, Hua; Wysocki, Lawrence J.; Cambier, John C.; O’Brien, Rebecca L.; Born, Willi K.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that selective ablation of certain γδ T cell subsets rather than removal of all γδ T cells, strongly affects serum antibody levels in non-immunized mice. This type of manipulation also changed T cells including residual γδ T cells, revealing some interdependence of γδ T cell populations. For example, in mice lacking Vγ4+ and Vγ6+ γδ T cells (B6.TCR-Vγ4−/−/6−/−), we observed expanded Vγ1+ cells, which changed in composition and activation and produced more IL-4 upon stimulation in vitro, increased IL-4 production by αβ T cells as well as spontaneous germinal center formation in the spleen, elevated serum Ig and autoantibodies. We therefore examined B cell populations in this and other γδ-deficient mouse strains. Whereas immature bone marrow B cells remained largely unchanged, peripheral B cells underwent several changes. Specifically, transitional and mature B cells in the spleen of B6.TCR-Vγ4−/−/6−/− mice and other peripheral B cell populations were diminished, most of all splenic marginal zone (MZ) B cells. However, relative frequencies and absolute numbers of antibody-producing cells, and serum levels of antibodies, IL-4 and BAFF, were increased. Cell transfers confirmed that these changes are directly dependent on the altered γδ T cells in this strain, and their enhanced potential of producing IL-4. Further evidence suggests the possibility of direct interactions between γδ T cells and B cells in the splenic MZ. Together, these data demonstrate the capability of γδ T cells of modulating size and productivity of pre-immune peripheral B cell populations. PMID:26582947

  8. Modeling circadian clock-cell cycle interaction effects on cell population growth rates.

    PubMed

    El Cheikh, R; Bernard, S; El Khatib, N

    2014-12-21

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are two tightly coupled oscillators. Recent analytical studies have shown counter-intuitive effects of circadian gating of the cell cycle on growth rates of proliferating cells which cannot be explained by a molecular model or a population model alone. In this work, we present a combined molecular-population model that studies how coupling the circadian clock to the cell cycle, through the protein WEE1, affects a proliferating cell population. We show that the cell cycle can entrain to the circadian clock with different rational period ratios and characterize multiple domains of entrainment. We show that coupling increases the growth rate for autonomous periods of the cell cycle around 24 h and above 48 h. We study the effect of mutation of circadian genes on the growth rate of cells and show that disruption of the circadian clock can lead to abnormal proliferation. Particularly, we show that Cry 1, Cry 2 mutations decrease the growth rate of cells, Per 2 mutation enhances it and Bmal 1 knockout increases it for autonomous periods of the cell cycle less than 21 h and decreases it elsewhere. Combining a molecular model to a population model offers new insight on the influence of the circadian clock on the growth of a cell population. This can help chronotherapy which takes benefits of physiological rhythms to improve anti-cancer efficacy and tolerance to drugs by administering treatments at a specific time of the day.

  9. Limits to collaborative concentration sensing in cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fancher, Sean; Mugler, Andrew

    Cells sense chemical concentrations with a precision that approaches the physical limit set by molecular diffusion. Recent experiments have vividly shown that cells can beat this limit when they communicate. We derive the physical limits to concentration sensing for cells that communicate over short distances by directly exchanging small molecules across their membranes (juxtacrine signaling), and over long distances by secreting and absorbing a diffusive messenger molecule (paracrine signaling). In the latter case, we find that the cell spacing that optimizes precision can be large, due to a tradeoff between maintaining communication strength and reducing signal cross-correlations. This leads to the surprising result that paracrine signaling allows more precise sensing than juxtacrine signaling for sufficiently large populations, even though this means that the cells are spaced far apart. We compare our results to recent experiments. This work is supported by a Grant from the Simons Foundation (376198 to A.M.).

  10. Transcriptional and phenotypical heterogeneity of Trypanosoma cruzi cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Seco-Hidalgo, Víctor; De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Osuna, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex life cycle comprising pools of cell populations which circulate among humans, vectors, sylvatic reservoirs and domestic animals. Recent experimental evidence has demonstrated the importance of clonal variations for parasite population dynamics, survival and evolution. By limiting dilution assays, we have isolated seven isogenic clonal cell lines derived from the Pan4 strain of T. cruzi. Applying different molecular techniques, we have been able to provide a comprehensive characterization of the expression heterogeneity in the mucin-associated surface protein (MASP) gene family, where all the clonal isogenic populations were transcriptionally different. Hierarchical cluster analysis and sequence comparison among different MASP cDNA libraries showed that, despite the great variability in MASP expression, some members of the transcriptome (including MASP pseudogenes) are conserved, not only in the life-cycle stages but also among different strains of T. cruzi. Finally, other important aspects for the parasite, such as growth, spontaneous metacyclogenesis or excretion of different catabolites, were also compared among the clones, demonstrating that T. cruzi populations of cells are also phenotypically heterogeneous. Although the evolutionary strategy that sustains the MASP expression polymorphism remains unknown, we suggest that MASP clonal variability and phenotypic heterogeneities found in this study might provide an advantage, allowing a rapid response to environmental pressure or changes during the life cycle of T. cruzi. PMID:26674416

  11. A microfluidic device for depositing and addressing two cell populations with intercellular population communication capability.

    PubMed

    Lovchik, Robert D; Tonna, Noemi; Bianco, Fabio; Matteoli, Michela; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2010-04-01

    We present a method for depositing cells in the microchambers of a sealed microfluidic device and establishing flow across the chambers independently and serially. The device comprises a transparent poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic network (MFN) having 2 cell chambers with a volume of 0.49 microL, 6 microchannels for servicing the chambers, and 1 microchannel linking both chambers. The MFN is sealed with a Si chip having 6 vias and ports that can be left open or connected to high-precision pumps. Liquids are drawn through each chamber in parallel or sequentially at flow rates from 0.1 to 10 microL min(-1). Plugs of liquid as small as 0.5 microL can be passed in one chamber within 5 s to 5 min. Plugs of liquid can also be introduced into a chamber for residence times of up to 30 min. By injecting different liquids into 3 ports, 3 adjacent laminar streams of liquid can be drawn inside one chamber with lateral concentration gradients between the streams ranging from 20 to 500 microm. The flexibility of this device for depositing cells and exposing them to liquids in parallel or serially is illustrated by depositing two types of cells, murine N9 microglia and human SH-S5Y5 neuroblastoma. Microfluidic communication between the chambers is illustrated by stimulating N9 microglia using ATP to induce these cells to release plasma membrane vesicles. The vesicles are drawn through the second chamber containing neuroblastoma and collected in a port of the device for off-chip analysis using confocal fluorescence microscopy. Cells in the MFN can also be fixed using a solution of formaldehyde for further analysis after disassembly of the MFN and Si lid. This microfluidic device offers a simple, flexible, and powerful method for depositing two cell populations in separate chambers and may help investigating pathways between the cells populations.

  12. Stem cell populations in the heart and the role of Isl1 positive cells.

    PubMed

    Di Felice, V; Zummo, G

    2013-05-09

    Cardiac progenitor cells are multipotent stem cells isolated from both embryonic and adult hearts in several species and are able to differentiate at least into smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. The embryonic origin of these cells has not yet been demonstrated, but it has been suggested that these cells may derive from the first and secondary heart fields and from the neural crest. In the last decade, two diffe-rent populations of cardiac progenitor or stem cells have been identified and isolated, i.e., the Islet1 positive (Isl1+) and c-Kit positive (c-Kit+)/Stem Cell Antigen-1 positive (Sca-1+) cells. Until 2012, these two populations have been considered two separate entities with different roles and a different origin, but new evidence now suggests a con-nection between the two populations and that the two populations may represent two subpopulations of a unique pool of cardiac stem cells, derived from a common immature primitive cell. To find a common consensus on this concept is very important in furthe-ring the application of stem cells to cardiac tissue engineering.

  13. Intraocular pressure (IOP) in relation to four levels of daily geomagnetic and extreme yearly solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoupel, E.; Goldenfeld, M.; Shimshoni, M.; Siegel, R.

    1993-03-01

    The link between geomagnetic field activity (GMA), solar activity and intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy individuals was investigated. The IOP of 485 patients (970 eyes) was recorded over three nonconsecutive years (1979, 1986, 1989) which were characterized by maximal solar activity (1979, 1989) or minimal solar activity (1986). The measurements were also correlated with four categories of GMA activity: quiet (level I0), unsettled (II0), active (III0), and stormy (IV0). Participants were also differentiated by age and sex. We found that IOP was lowest on days of level IV0 (stormy) GMA. The drop in IOP concomitant with a decrease in GMA level was more significant during periods of low solar activity and in persons over 65 years of age. There was a trend towards higher IOP values on days of levels II0 and IV0 GMA in years of high solar activity. Differences between the sexes and among individuals younger than 65 years were not significant. Our results show an interesting aspect of environmental influence on the healthy population.

  14. T Regulatory Cells Support Plasma Cell Populations in the Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Glatman Zaretsky, Arielle; Konradt, Christoph; Dépis, Fabien; Wing, James B; Goenka, Radhika; Atria, Daniela Gomez; Silver, Jonathan S; Cho, Sunglim; Wolf, Amaya I; Quinn, William J; Engiles, Julie B; Brown, Dorothy C; Beiting, Daniel; Erikson, Jan; Allman, David; Cancro, Michael P; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Lu, Li-Fan; Benoist, Christophe O; Hunter, Christopher A

    2017-02-21

    Long-lived plasma cells (PCs) in the bone marrow (BM) are a critical source of antibodies after infection or vaccination, but questions remain about the factors that control PCs. We found that systemic infection alters the BM, greatly reducing PCs and regulatory T (Treg) cells, a population that contributes to immune privilege in the BM. The use of intravital imaging revealed that BM Treg cells display a distinct behavior characterized by sustained co-localization with PCs and CD11c-YFP(+) cells. Gene expression profiling indicated that BM Treg cells express high levels of Treg effector molecules, and CTLA-4 deletion in these cells resulted in elevated PCs. Furthermore, preservation of Treg cells during systemic infection prevents PC loss, while Treg cell depletion in uninfected mice reduced PC populations. These studies suggest a role for Treg cells in PC biology and provide a potential target for the modulation of PCs during vaccine-induced humoral responses or autoimmunity.

  15. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein alters endothelial progenitor cell populations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuqi; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala A; Liu, Lingjuan; Li, Xin; Xiao, Yuan; Zhang, Jia; Xie, Xiaoyun; Hao, Hong; Liu, Jason Z; He, Guanglong; Cowan, Peter J; Cui, Lianqun; Zhu, Hua; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Liu, Zhenguo

    2015-06-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is critical to atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemia. Bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are important to preventing atherosclerosis, and significantly decreased in hyperlipidemia. This study was to demonstrate ox-LDL and hyperlipidemia could exhibit similar effect on EPC population and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS production in BM and blood was significantly increased in male C57BL/6 mice with intravenous ox-LDL treatment, and in hyperlipidemic LDL receptor knockout mice with 4-month high-fat diet. ROS formation was effectively blocked with overexpression of antioxidant enzymes or N-acetylcysteine treatment. In hyperlipidemic and ox-LDL-treated mice, c-Kit(+)/CD31(+) cell number in BM and blood, and Sca-1(+)/Flk-1(+) cell number in blood, not in BM, were significantly decreased, which were not affected by inhibiting ROS production, while blood CD34(+)/Flk-1(+) cell number was significantly increased that was prevented with reduced ROS formation. However, blood CD34(+)/CD133(+) cell number increased in ox-LDL-treated mice, while decreased in hyperlipidemic mice. These data suggested that ox-LDL produced significant changes in BM and blood EPC populations similar (but not identical) to chronic hyperlipidemia with predominantly ROS-independent mechanism(s).

  16. Rejuvenation in distinct cell populations - What does it mean?

    PubMed

    Hass, Ralf

    2009-10-01

    Rejuvenation represents a well organized and tightly regulated cellular process in vitro and in vivo, whereby senescent and/or certain differentiated cells revert specific properties acquired during previous steps of maturation to restore again a younger phenotype. Effects of the microenvironment and cellular mechanisms including asymmetric mitosis or retrodifferentiation can contribute to rejuvenation during a dynamic cellular development in contrast to terminally differentiated cells like unicellular organisms, which appear unable to retrodifferentiate and to rejuvenate. The process of rejuvenation is observed in distinct cell populations and includes a coordinated multistep network of transduction cascades with extracellular signaling and cell-to-cell communication to relay intracellular pathways. This provides a certain tissue homeostasis by a regenerative potential and renewal upon tissue-specific repair requirements in addition to residual stem cells, which can vary among different organs and species to extend their life span. However, dysfunctions within a rejuvenation program may also include the risk of neoplastic growth during such a retrograde development. In contrast to rejuvenation in certain cell types, a life span extension - also termed longevity - does not represent a retrograde development but an overall prolonged function of tissues, organs and/or whole organisms. Thus, rejuvenation of a distinct cell population could contribute to longevity of the corresponding organism but may not necessarily be required since longevity could also be achieved mechanistically by inhibition of the mTOR-mediated signaling pathway or by sufficient supply of anti-oxidative defence compounds, physiologically by nutrient restrictions, genetically by the induction of longevity genes or environmentally by the inhibition of aging.

  17. T-cell receptor variable region gene usage in T-cell populations.

    PubMed Central

    Garman, R D; Ko, J L; Vulpe, C D; Raulet, D H

    1986-01-01

    We have examined T-cell receptor alpha- and beta-chain variable (V) region gene usage in T-cell populations predicted to have different major histocompatibility complex-restriction specificities. Using a sensitive ribonuclease protection assay to measure T-cell receptor mRNA levels, we found no striking differences in the usage of three V alpha genes and three V beta genes in T-cell populations from three congeneic H-2-disparate strains of mice and between the mutually exclusive Ly2+ L3T4- and Ly2- L3T4+ T-cell subpopulations. These results suggest that major histocompatibility complex restriction cannot be explained by the differential usage of nonoverlapping V alpha or V beta gene pools. In contrast, striking but unpredictable differences were seen in V gene usage in populations of T cells selected by activation with particular alloantigens. Images PMID:3487085

  18. Quantitative single cell analysis of cell population dynamics during submandibular salivary gland development and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Deirdre A.; Manhardt, Charles; Kamath, Vidya; Sui, Yunxia; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Can, Ali; Bello, Musodiq; Corwin, Alex; Dinn, Sean R.; Lazare, Michael; Gervais, Elise M.; Sequeira, Sharon J.; Peters, Sarah B.; Ginty, Fiona; Gerdes, Michael J.; Larsen, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Summary Epithelial organ morphogenesis involves reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cell types to balance progenitor cell retention and expansion with cell differentiation for evolution of tissue architecture. Underlying submandibular salivary gland branching morphogenesis is the regulated proliferation and differentiation of perhaps several progenitor cell populations, which have not been characterized throughout development, and yet are critical for understanding organ development, regeneration, and disease. Here we applied a serial multiplexed fluorescent immunohistochemistry technology to map the progressive refinement of the epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations throughout development from embryonic day 14 through postnatal day 20. Using computational single cell analysis methods, we simultaneously mapped the evolving temporal and spatial location of epithelial cells expressing subsets of differentiation and progenitor markers throughout salivary gland development. We mapped epithelial cell differentiation markers, including aquaporin 5, PSP, SABPA, and mucin 10 (acinar cells); cytokeratin 7 (ductal cells); and smooth muscle α-actin (myoepithelial cells) and epithelial progenitor cell markers, cytokeratin 5 and c-kit. We used pairwise correlation and visual mapping of the cells in multiplexed images to quantify the number of single- and double-positive cells expressing these differentiation and progenitor markers at each developmental stage. We identified smooth muscle α-actin as a putative early myoepithelial progenitor marker that is expressed in cytokeratin 5-negative cells. Additionally, our results reveal dynamic expansion and redistributions of c-kit- and K5-positive progenitor cell populations throughout development and in postnatal glands. The data suggest that there are temporally and spatially discreet progenitor populations that contribute to salivary gland development and homeostasis. PMID:23789091

  19. Quantum interference in a four-level system of a {sup 87}Rb atom: Effects of spontaneously generated coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dongsheng; Zheng Yujun

    2011-01-15

    In this work, the effects of quantum interference and spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) are theoretically analyzed in a four-level system of a {sup 87}Rb atom. For the effects of SGC, we find that a new kind of electromagnetically induced transparency channel can be induced due to destructive interference, and the nonlinear Kerr absorption can be coherently narrowed or eliminated under different strengths of the coupling and switching fields.

  20. Coherent Control of the Goos—Hänchen Shifts in a Four-Level N Type Atomic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisa, Maboodi; Soheila, Hemmatzadeh; Seyyed, Hossein Asadpour; H. Rahimpour, Soleimani

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the Goos—Hänchen (GH) shifts of the reflected and transmitted probe light beams is theoretically investigated. In a fixed geometrical configuration, the effect of quantum interference induced by spontaneous emission on the phase control of the GH shifts is analyzed in this paper. It is found that in a four-level N-type atomic system as an intracavity medium, the GH shifts of the reflected and transmitted probe light beam are completely phase dependent.

  1. Population genetics inside a cell: Mutations and mitochondrial genome maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sidhartha; Shraiman, Boris; Gottschling, Dan

    2012-02-01

    In realistic ecological and evolutionary systems natural selection acts on multiple levels, i.e. it acts on individuals as well as on collection of individuals. An understanding of evolutionary dynamics of such systems is limited in large part due to the lack of experimental systems that can challenge theoretical models. Mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) are subjected to selection acting on cellular as well as organelle levels. It is well accepted that mtDNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unstable and can degrade over time scales comparable to yeast cell division time. We utilize a recent technology designed in Gottschling lab to extract DNA from populations of aged yeast cells and deep sequencing to characterize mtDNA variation in a population of young and old cells. In tandem, we developed a stochastic model that includes the essential features of mitochondrial biology that provides a null model for expected mtDNA variation. Overall, we find approximately 2% of the polymorphic loci that show significant increase in frequency as cells age providing direct evidence for organelle level selection. Such quantitative study of mtDNA dynamics is absolutely essential to understand the propagation of mtDNA mutations linked to a spectrum of age-related diseases in humans.

  2. Cell population structure prior to bifurcation predicts efficiency of directed differentiation in human induced pluripotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Bargaje, Rhishikesh; Trachana, Kalliopi; Shelton, Martin N.; McGinnis, Christopher S.; Zhou, Joseph X.; Chadick, Cora; Cook, Savannah; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Huang, Sui; Hood, Leroy

    2017-01-01

    Steering the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) toward specific cell types is crucial for patient-specific disease modeling and drug testing. This effort requires the capacity to predict and control when and how multipotent progenitor cells commit to the desired cell fate. Cell fate commitment represents a critical state transition or “tipping point” at which complex systems undergo a sudden qualitative shift. To characterize such transitions during iPSC to cardiomyocyte differentiation, we analyzed the gene expression patterns of 96 developmental genes at single-cell resolution. We identified a bifurcation event early in the trajectory when a primitive streak-like cell population segregated into the mesodermal and endodermal lineages. Before this branching point, we could detect the signature of an imminent critical transition: increase in cell heterogeneity and coordination of gene expression. Correlation analysis of gene expression profiles at the tipping point indicates transcription factors that drive the state transition toward each alternative cell fate and their relationships with specific phenotypic readouts. The latter helps us to facilitate small molecule screening for differentiation efficiency. To this end, we set up an analysis of cell population structure at the tipping point after systematic variation of the protocol to bias the differentiation toward mesodermal or endodermal cell lineage. We were able to predict the proportion of cardiomyocytes many days before cells manifest the differentiated phenotype. The analysis of cell populations undergoing a critical state transition thus affords a tool to forecast cell fate outcomes and can be used to optimize differentiation protocols to obtain desired cell populations. PMID:28167799

  3. Side Population Cells in the Mouse Thyroid Exhibit Stem/Progenitor Cell-Like Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Hoshi, Nobuo; Kusakabe, Takashi; Taylor, Barbara J.; Kimura, Shioko

    2008-01-01

    Side population (SP) cells are characterized by their ability to efflux the vital dye Hoechst 33342 (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) due to expression of the ATP binding cassette (ABC)-dependent transporter ABCG2, and are highly enriched for stem/progenitor cell activity. In this study we identified SP cells in murine thyroid, which are composed of two populations of cells: CD45(−)/c-kit(−)/Sca1(+) and CD45(−)/c-kit(−)/Sca1(−) cells. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that SP cells highly express ABCG2 and the stem cell marker genes encoding nucleostemin and Oct4, whereas the expression of genes encoding the thyroid differentiation markers, thyroid peroxidase, thyroglobulin (TG), and TSH receptor, and two transcription factors, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TITF1) and paired PAX8, critical for thyroid specific gene expression, are low in SP cells as compared with the main population cells. In situ hybridization and double immunofluorescence demonstrated that cells expressing Abcg2 gene reside in the interfollicular space of the thyroid gland. Approximately half and a small percentage of the ABCG2-positive cells were also positive for vimentin and calcitonin, respectively. After 9 wk under three-dimensional thyroid primary culture conditions, main population cells formed an epithelial arrangement and follicle-like structures that are immunoreactive for TITF1 and TG. In contrast, SP cells demonstrated very few morphological changes without any epithelial or follicle-like structure and negative immunostaining for TITF1 and TG. These results demonstrate that thyroid possesses SP cells that may represent stem/progenitor cells. PMID:17584961

  4. Collective Decision-Making and Oscillatory Behaviors in Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Koichi; Sawai, Satoshi

    2013-12-01

    Many examples of oscillations are known in multicellular dynamics, however how properties of individual cells can account for the collective rhythmic behaviors at the tissue level remain elusive. Recently, studies in chemical reactions, synthetic gene circuits, yeast and social amoeba Dictyostelium have greatly enhanced our understanding of collective oscillations in cell populations. From these relatively simple systems, a unified view of how excitable and oscillatory regulations could be tuned and coupled to give rise to tissue-level oscillations is emerging. This chapter reviews recent progress in these and other experimental systems and highlight similarities and differences. We will show how group-level information can be encoded in the oscillations depending on degree of autonomy of single cells and discuss some of their possible biological roles.

  5. PopulationProfiler: A Tool for Population Analysis and Visualization of Image-Based Cell Screening Data.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Damian J; Wählby, Carolina; Puigvert, Jordi Carreras; Sintorn, Ida-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Image-based screening typically produces quantitative measurements of cell appearance. Large-scale screens involving tens of thousands of images, each containing hundreds of cells described by hundreds of measurements, result in overwhelming amounts of data. Reducing per-cell measurements to the averages across the image(s) for each treatment leads to loss of potentially valuable information on population variability. We present PopulationProfiler-a new software tool that reduces per-cell measurements to population statistics. The software imports measurements from a simple text file, visualizes population distributions in a compact and comprehensive way, and can create gates for subpopulation classes based on control samples. We validate the tool by showing how PopulationProfiler can be used to analyze the effect of drugs that disturb the cell cycle, and compare the results to those obtained with flow cytometry.

  6. Muscle Interstitial Cells: A Brief Field Guide to Non-satellite Cell Populations in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Moyle, Louise A; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is mainly enabled by a population of adult stem cells known as satellite cells. Satellite cells have been shown to be indispensable for adult skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last two decades, other stem/progenitor cell populations resident in the skeletal muscle interstitium have been identified as "collaborators" of satellite cells during regeneration. They also appear to have a key role in replacing skeletal muscle with adipose, fibrous, or bone tissue in pathological conditions. Here, we review the role and known functions of these different interstitial skeletal muscle cell types and discuss their role in skeletal muscle tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and disease, including their therapeutic potential for cell transplantation protocols.

  7. Single-cell Migration Chip for Chemotaxis-based Microfluidic Selection of Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Allen, Steven G.; Ingram, Patrick N.; Buckanovich, Ronald; Merajver, Sofia D.; Yoon, Euisik

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cell migration toward and intravasation into capillaries is an early and key event in cancer metastasis, yet not all cancer cells are imbued with the same capability to do so. This heterogeneity within a tumor is a fundamental property of cancer. Tools to help us understand what molecular characteristics allow a certain subpopulation of cells to spread from the primary tumor are thus critical for overcoming metastasis. Conventional in vitro migration platforms treat populations in aggregate, which leads to a masking of intrinsic differences among cells. Some migration assays reported recently have single-cell resolution, but these platforms do not provide for selective retrieval of the distinct migrating and non-migrating cell populations for further analysis. Thus, to study the intrinsic differences in cells responsible for chemotactic heterogeneity, we developed a single-cell migration platform so that individual cells’ migration behavior can be studied and the heterogeneous population sorted based upon chemotactic phenotype. Furthermore, after migration, the highly chemotactic and non-chemotactic cells were retrieved and proved viable for later molecular analysis of their differences. Moreover, we modified the migration channel to resemble lymphatic capillaries to better understand how certain cancer cells are able to move through geometrically confining spaces.

  8. Biological characteristics of side population cells in a self-established human ovarian cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    WEI, ZHENTONG; LV, SHUANG; WANG, YISHU; SUN, MEIYU; CHI, GUANGFAN; GUO, JUN; SONG, PEIYE; FU, XIAOYU; ZHANG, SONGLING; LI, YULIN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish an ovarian cancer (OC) cell line from ascites of an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma patient and investigate the biological characteristics of its side population (SP) cells. The OC cell line was established by isolating, purifying and subculturing primary cells from ascites of an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma patient (stage IIIc; grade 3). SP and non-SP (NSP) cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and cultured in serum-free medium and soft agar to compare the tumorsphere and colony formation capacities. Furthermore, SP and NSP cell tumorigenesis was examined by subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injection of the cells to non-obese diabetic/severe combined immune deficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. Drug resistance to cisplatin was examined by cell counting kit-8. The OC cell line was successfully established from ascites of an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma patient, which exhibited properties similar to primary tumors subsequent to >50 passages and >2 years of culture. The SP cell ratio was 0.38% in the OC cell line, and a similar SP cell ratio (0.39%) was observed when sorted SP cells were cultured for 3 weeks. Compared with NSP cells, SP cells exhibited increased abilities in differentiation and tumorsphere and colony formation, in addition to the formation of xenografted tumors and ascites and metastasis of the tumors in NOD/SCID mice, even at low cell numbers (3.0×103 cells). The xenografted tumors demonstrated histological features similar to primary tumors and expressed the ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma marker CA125. In addition, SP cells demonstrated a significantly stronger drug resistance to cisplatin compared with NSP and unsorted cells, while treatment with verapamil, an inhibitor of ATP-binding cassette transporters, potently abrogated SP cell drug resistance. In conclusion, the present study verified SP cells from an established OC cell line and characterized the cells with self

  9. Multi-population model of a microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Pinto, R P; Srinivasan, B; Escapa, A; Tartakovsky, B

    2011-06-01

    This work presents a multi-population dynamic model of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). The model describes the growth and metabolic activity of fermentative, electricigenic, methanogenic acetoclastic, and methanogenic hydrogenophilic microorganisms and is capable of simulating hydrogen production in a MEC fed with complex organic matter, such as wastewater. The model parameters were estimated with the experimental results obtained in continuous flow MECs fed with acetate or synthetic wastewater. Following successful model validation with an independent data set, the model was used to analyze and discuss the influence of applied voltage and organic load on hydrogen production and COD removal.

  10. Two-dimensional electromagnetically induced cross-grating in a four-level N-type atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianchun; Ai, Baoquan

    2015-06-01

    We propose a scheme for a two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetically induced cross-grating (EICG) in a four-level N-type atomic system. By employing standing-wave fields interacting with the atomic system, the absorption and dispersion of the probe field will change with the spatial periodical modulation. The first-order diffraction intensity sensitively depends on the parameters (the probe detuning, and the amplitude and detuning of the standing-wave fields), and can reach its maximum on varying the system parameters. The present studies may be instructive to design new devices in all-optical switching and optical imaging.

  11. Phase-dependent high refractive index without absorption in a four-level inverted-Y atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Qiang Zeng; Fu-Ti Liu; Yu-Ping Wang; Zeng-Hui Gao

    2015-01-31

    We consider a closed four-level inverted-Y system in the presence and the absence of a microwave field. It is found that due to the quantum coherence between the two lower levels, either induced by the spontaneous decay or by the microwave field, the refraction – absorption properties of the system can be modulated by controlling the relative phase of the applied fields in both driven ways. In particular, by properly setting the values of the relative phase, the desirable high index of refraction without absorption can be achieved. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  12. Influence of Fano interference and incoherent processes on optical bistability in a four-level quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyyed, Hossein Asadpour; G, Solookinejad; M, Panahi; E Ahmadi, Sangachin

    2016-03-01

    Role of Fano interference and incoherent pumping field on optical bistability in a four-level designed InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure embedded in a unidirectional ring cavity are analyzed. It is found that intensity threshold of optical bistability can be manipulated by Fano interference. It is shown that incoherent pumping fields make the threshold of optical bistability behave differently by Fano interference. Moreover, in the presence of Fano interference the medium becomes phase-dependent. Therefore, the relative phase of applied fields can affect the behaviors of optical bistability and intensity threshold can be controlled easily.

  13. All-optical demultiplexing of 16-QAM signals into QPSK tributaries using four-level optical phase quantizers.

    PubMed

    Bogris, Adonis

    2014-04-01

    The potential of four-level optical phase quantizers toward coherent processing of advanced modulation formats, such as 16-QAM, is proposed and numerically demonstrated. The work shows that phase quantization achieved in fiber-based phase-sensitive amplifiers can demultiplex 16-QAM into two quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) signals, enabling subchannel switching. The numerical study highlights the impact of the quantizer transfer function on the performance of the demultiplexing process and numerically calculates the bit error rate for each QPSK tributary after the demultiplexing procedure.

  14. Influence of incoherent pumping field on spatial evolution of gain without inversion in a four-level quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, R.; Asadpour, S. H.; Batebi, S.; Rahimpour Soleimani, H.

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the propagation effect on gain without inversion (GWI) phenomena in an open four level quantum dot nanostructure in the presence and absence of incoherent pumping field. The simulation results show that, the ratio of the injection rates and strength of incoherent pumping field has remarkable effect on spatial evolution of GWI and output. We can obtain the optimal GWI and output by choosing appropriate values of parameters. The theoretical results show that, in the open system the value of gain (output) in the absence of incoherent pumping field is much larger than that in the presence of incoherent pumping field.

  15. Effect of gain anisotropy on low-frequency dynamics in four-level solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Dae; McKay, Aaron M; Dawes, Judith M

    2009-04-13

    Our anisotropic rate equation model outlines the relationship between the relaxation dynamics in a four-level solid-state laser and its anisotropic gain properties. Anisotropic pump rates and stimulated emission cross-sections were included to account for specific atom orientations in the gain material. The model is compared with experimental measurements of two relaxation oscillation frequencies which are related to the anisotropic atom-laser interaction in orthogonally polarized dual-mode lasers. The model predicts that crystal orientation and pump polarization affect the laser operation characteristics, as found experimentally. The gain anisotropy influences the fast laser dynamics, as in single-mode relaxation oscillations.

  16. Dynamic equilibrium of reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    O'Quigley, John

    2010-12-01

    Clonal dominance in hematopoietic stem cell populations is an important question of interest but not one we can directly answer. Any estimates are based on indirect measurement. For marked populations, we can equate empirical and theoretical moments for binomial sampling, in particular we can use the well-known formula for the sampling variation of a binomial proportion. The empirical variance itself cannot always be reliably estimated and some caution is needed. We describe the difficulties here and identify ready solutions which only require appropriate use of variance-stabilizing transformations. From these we obtain estimators for the steady state, or dynamic equilibrium, of the number of hematopoietic stem cells involved in repopulating the marrow. The calculations themselves are not too involved. We give the distribution theory for the estimator as well as simple approximations for practical application. As an illustration, we rework on data recently gathered to address the question as to whether or not reconstitution of marrow grafts in the clinical setting might be considered to be oligoclonal.

  17. Sickle cell disease in tribal populations in India

    PubMed Central

    Colah, Roshan B.; Mukherjee, Malay B.; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-01-01

    The sickle gene is widespread among many tribal population groups in India with prevalence of heterozygotes varying from 1-40 per cent. Co-inheritance of the sickle gene with β-thalassaemia, HbD Punjab and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has also been reported. Most of the screening programmes in India now use high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis although the solubility test is also sensitive and cheap. Sickle cell disease (SCD) among tribal populations is generally milder than among non-tribal groups with fewer episodes of painful crises, infections, acute chest syndrome and need for hospitalization. This has partly been attributed to the very high prevalence of α-thalassaemia among these tribes as well as higher foetal haemoglobin levels. However, the clinical presentation is variable with many cases having a severe presentation. There is not much information available on maternal and perinatal outcome in tribal women with sickle cell disease. Newborn screening programmes for SCD have recently been initiated in Maharashtra, Gujarat, Odisha and Chattisgarh and monitoring these birth cohorts will help to understand the natural history of SCD in India. Prenatal diagnosis is acceptable by tribal families in India. The Indian Council of Medical Research and the National Rural Health Mission in different States are undertaking outreach programmes for better management and control of the disease. PMID:26139766

  18. TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population in murine epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Qiao, Liangjun; Du, Jia; Li, Shuang; Zhao, Hengguang; Wang, Fangfang; Huang, Qiaorong; Meng, Wentong; Zhu, Hongyan; Bu, Hong; Li, Hui; Xu, Hong; Mo, Xianming

    2014-01-01

    Normal interfollicular epidermis (IFE) homeostasis is maintained throughout the entire life by its own stem cells that self-renew and generate progeny that undergo terminal differentiation. However, the fine markers of the stem cells in interfollicular epidermis are not well defined yet. Here we found that TLR7 identified the existence of progenitors and interfollicular epidermal stem cells in murine skin. In vitro, TLR7-expressing cells comprised of two subpopulations that were competent to proliferate and exhibited distinct differentiation potentials. Three-dimensional (3D) organotypic culture and skin reconstitution assays showed that TLR7-expressing cells were able to reconstruct the interfollicular epidermis. Finally, TLR7-expressing cells maintained the intact interfollicular epidermal structures revealed in serial transplantation assays in vivo in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population. PMID:25060222

  19. [Th17 cells, a novel proinflammatory effector CD4 T cell population].

    PubMed

    Leung-Theung-Long, Stéphane; Guerder, Sylvie

    2008-11-01

    After more than 20 years of hegemony, the Th1-Th2 paradigm was recently shaken by the discovery of a novel population of CD4 effector T cells, the Th17 cells. Th17 effector cells produce IL-17 and IL-22 and thus have pro-inflammatory properties notably favoring neutrophils recruitment and thus control of extracellular bacteria mainly at the epithelium surface. Th17 cells appear also as the major inducer of organ specific autoimmune pathologies such as EAE or rheumatoid arthritis, a function previously attributed to Th1 effector cells. The discovery of Th17 cells further supports the notion that effector CD4 T cells responses are diverse in vivo and that fine tuning of these different effector cells is critical to maintain tissue integrity.

  20. Cross-Presentation of Cell-Associated Antigens by Mouse Splenic Dendritic Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Robert I.; Janssen, Edith M.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens (Ag) plays an important role in the induction of anti-tumor responses, autoimmune diseases, and transplant rejection. While several dendritic cell (DC) populations can induce pro-inflammatory CD8+ T cell responses to cell-associated Ag during infection, in the absence of infection, cross-priming of naïve CD8+ T cells is highly restricted. Comparison of the main splenic DC populations in mice – including the classic, cross-presenting CD8α DC and the recently described merocytic DC (mcDC) – reveals that cross-priming DCs display a distinct phenotype in cell-associated Ag uptake, endosomal/lysosomal trafficking, lysosomal acidification, and Ag persistence compared to non-cross-priming DC populations. Although the CD8α DC and mcDC subsets utilize similar processing pathways to cross-present cell-associated Ag, cross-priming by CD8α DCs is associated with IL-12 production, while the superior priming of the mcDC is critically dependent on type I IFN production. This discussion illustrates how subtle differences in internal processing pathways and their signaling sequelae significantly affect the duration of Ag cross-presentation and cytokine production by DCs, thereby shaping the ensuing CD8+ T cell response. PMID:22566924

  1. Sickle cell disease in the Kurdish population of northern Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Allawi, Nasir A S; Jalal, Sana D; Nerwey, Farida F; Al-Sayan, Galawezh O O; Al-Zebari, Sahima S M; Alshingaly, Awny A; Markous, Raji D; Jubrael, Jaladet M S; Hamamy, Hanan

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that sickle cell disease patients are clustered in two geographical areas in Iraq, one among the Arabs in the extreme south, another among the Kurdish population in the extreme north, where they constitute major health problems. However, no studies have focused on the genotypes responsible for sickle cell disease or the β-globin gene haplotypes associated with it. For the latter purpose, a total of 103 unrelated Kurdish sickle cell disease patients were evaluated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for the sickle cell mutation, followed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse hybridization for β- and α-thalassemia (β- and α-thal) mutations, whenever indicated. Results showed that the most common genotype was sickle cell anemia (68.0%) followed by Hb S/β(0)-thal and Hb S/β(+)-thal at frequencies of 24.2 and 7.8%, respectively. Eight β-thal mutations were associated with the latter two genotypes including: IVS-II-1 (G>A), IVS-I-110 (G>A), codon 8 (-AA), codon 44 (-C), codon 22 (-7 bp), IVS-I-1 (G>A), codon 30 (G>C) and IVS-I-6 (T>C). In Hb SS patients, the -α(3.7) deletion was documented in 10.0% and was the only α-thal mutation detected. Furthermore, 5' β-globin gene cluster haplotyping of 128 β(S) chromosomes revealed that the most common haplotype seen in 69.5% was the Benin haplotype, followed by the Arab-Indian haplotype in 12.5%. These latter findings closely resemble reports from neighboring Turkey, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Mediterranean countries, suggesting a possible common origin, but are in contrast to findings from the Eastern Arabian Peninsula and Iran.

  2. Dielectrophoretic capture of low abundance cell population using thick electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Marchalot, Julien; Chateaux, Jean-François; Faivre, Magalie; Mertani, Hichem C.; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment of rare cell populations such as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) is a critical step before performing analysis. This paper presents a polymeric microfluidic device with integrated thick Carbon-PolyDimethylSiloxane composite (C-PDMS) electrodes designed to carry out dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of low abundance biological cells. Such conductive composite material presents advantages over metallic structures. Indeed, as it combines properties of both the matrix and doping particles, C-PDMS allows the easy and fast integration of conductive microstructures using a soft-lithography approach while preserving O2 plasma bonding properties of PDMS substrate and avoiding a cumbersome alignment procedure. Here, we first performed numerical simulations to demonstrate the advantage of such thick C-PDMS electrodes over a coplanar electrode configuration. It is well established that dielectrophoretic force (FDEP) decreases quickly as the distance from the electrode surface increases resulting in coplanar configuration to a low trapping efficiency at high flow rate. Here, we showed quantitatively that by using electrodes as thick as a microchannel height, it is possible to extend the DEP force influence in the whole volume of the channel compared to coplanar electrode configuration and maintaining high trapping efficiency while increasing the throughput. This model was then used to numerically optimize a thick C-PDMS electrode configuration in terms of trapping efficiency. Then, optimized microfluidic configurations were fabricated and tested at various flow rates for the trapping of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We reached trapping efficiencies of 97% at 20 μl/h and 78.7% at 80 μl/h, for 100 μm thick electrodes. Finally, we applied our device to the separation and localized trapping of CTCs (MDA-MB-231) from a red blood cells sample (concentration ratio of 1:10). PMID:26392836

  3. The Analysis of Cell Population Dynamics in Mammary Gland Development and Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    processes of mammary epithelial cell differentiation during developmentand tumorigenesis. Using FACS, mammary epithelial cell ( MEC ) populations from tumors...developed techniques for viral transduction andtransplantation of primary MECs . 15. SUBJECT TERMS mammary, stem cell, lentivirus, FACS, cancer, imaging 16...epithelial cell ( MEC ) populations from tumors and wildtype tissue was investigated for their outgrowth potential or tumorigenic capacity. We also developed

  4. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo; Yoo, Young-Do; Park, Won-Bong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. {yields} The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. {yields} The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. {yields} P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. {yields} Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC{sup -/-} cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC{sup -/-} clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  5. Immunophenotyping of immune cell populations in the raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Franziska; Jungwirth, Nicole; Carlson, Regina; Tipold, Andrea; Böer, Michael; Scheibe, Thomas; Molnár, Viktor; von Dörnberg, Katja; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Puff, Christina; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2015-12-15

    The raccoon (Procyon lotor) is a highly adaptable carnivore that has rapidly conquered Europe over the last decades and represents a potential candidate as pathogen reservoir, bearing the risk for transmission of infectious agents, as zoonosis or spill-over, to other wild life and domestic animals and man. Comprehensive investigations of infectious diseases in raccoons require a detailed knowledge of the participating immune cell populations. To close this gap of knowledge, various antibodies were tested for cross-reactivity with leukocytes in lymphoid organs and peripheral blood of raccoons using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, respectively. Eight out of 16 antibodies, directed against CD3, CD79α, Pax-5, IgG, CD44, MHC class II, myeloid/histiocyte antigen (MAC387), and Iba-1 exhibited a specific immunoreaction with cells in distinct anatomical compartments in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymphoid tissues. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that 7 out of 18 antibodies directed against CD11c, CD14, CD21, CD44, CD79α, MHC class I and II cross-reacted with peripheral blood-derived raccoon leukocytes. Summarized, the usefulness of several cross-reacting antibodies was determined for the characterization of raccoon immune cells in immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, offering the opportunity to study the raccoon immune system under normal and diseased conditions.

  6. The side population of ovarian cancer cells defines a heterogeneous compartment exhibiting stem cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G; Reimer, Daniel; Schmidt, Stefan; Gastl, Guenther; Parson, Walther; Spoeck, Franziska; Hatina, Jiri; Wolf, Dominik; Sopper, Sieghart

    2014-08-30

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to be involved in tumor evasion of classical antitumor therapies and have thus become an attractive target for further improvement of anticancer strategies. However, the existence and identity of CSC are still a matter of controversy. In a systematic screen of 13 ovarian cancer cell lines we show that cells with stem cell properties are reliably detectable as a minor population, characterized by ABC transporter expression resulting in the side population (SP) phenotype. In different cell lines, either ABCG2 or ABCB1 was found to be responsible for this effect. Purified SP cells featured virtually all characteristics of bona fide CSC, including clonogenicity, asymmetric division and high tumorigenicity in vivo. Using in-depth phenotyping by multicolor flow cytometry, we found that among the investigated ovarian cancer cell lines the SP compartment exhibits tremendous heterogeneity and is composed of multiple phenotypically distinct subpopulations. Thus, our study confirms previous results showing that CSC are contained within the SP. However, the exact identity of the CSC is still disguised by the high complexity of the CSC-containing compartment. Further functional studies are needed to determine whether a single cellular subset can unambiguously be defined as CSC or whether multiple stem cell-like cells with different properties coexist. Moreover, the observed heterogeneity may reflect a high level of plasticity and likely influences tumor progression, escape from immune-surveillance and development of resistance to anticancer therapies and should therefore be considered in the development of new treatment strategies.

  7. The side population of ovarian cancer cells defines a heterogeneous compartment exhibiting stem cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Reimer, Daniel; Schmidt, Stefan; Gastl, Guenther; Parson, Walther; Spoeck, Franziska; Hatina, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to be involved in tumor evasion of classical antitumor therapies and have thus become an attractive target for further improvement of anticancer strategies. However, the existence and identity of CSC are still a matter of controversy. In a systematic screen of 13 ovarian cancer cell lines we show that cells with stem cell properties are reliably detectable as a minor population, characterized by ABC transporter expression resulting in the side population (SP) phenotype. In different cell lines, either ABCG2 or ABCB1 was found to be responsible for this effect. Purified SP cells featured virtually all characteristics of bona fide CSC, including clonogenicity, asymmetric division and high tumorigenicity in vivo. Using in-depth phenotyping by multicolor flow cytometry, we found that among the investigated ovarian cancer cell lines the SP compartment exhibits tremendous heterogeneity and is composed of multiple phenotypically distinct subpopulations. Thus, our study confirms previous results showing that CSC are contained within the SP. However, the exact identity of the CSC is still disguised by the high complexity of the CSC-containing compartment. Further functional studies are needed to determine whether a single cellular subset can unambiguously be defined as CSC or whether multiple stem cell-like cells with different properties coexist. Moreover, the observed heterogeneity may reflect a high level of plasticity and likely influences tumor progression, escape from immune-surveillance and development of resistance to anticancer therapies and should therefore be considered in the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:25216521

  8. Transcriptome analysis of a microbial coculture in which the cell populations are separated by a membrane.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Kazufumi; Ono, Naoaki; Suzuki, Shingo; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    The microbial coculture of multiple cell populations is used to study community evolution and for bioengineering applications. The cells in coculture undergo dynamic changes because of cell-cell and cell-environment interactions. Transcriptome analysis allows us to study the molecular basis of these changes in cell physiology. For transcriptome analysis, it is essential that the cell populations in the coculture are harvested separately. Here, we describe a method for transcriptome analysis of a microbial coculture in which two different cell populations are separated by a porous membrane.

  9. Cell dualism: presence of cells with alternative membrane potentials in growing populations of bacteria and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Volodymyr; Rezaeinejad, Saeid; Chu, Jian

    2013-10-01

    It is considered that all growing cells, for exception of acidophilic bacteria, have negatively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁻-cells). Here we show that growing populations of microbial cells contain a small portion of cells with positively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁺-cells). These cells were detected after simultaneous application of the fluorescent probes for positive membrane potential (anionic dye DIBAC⁻) and membrane integrity (propidium iodide, PI). We found in exponentially growing cell populations of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae that the content of live Δψ⁻-cells was 93.6 ± 1.8 % for bacteria and 90.4 ± 4.0 % for yeasts and the content of live Δψ⁺-cells was 0.9 ± 0.3 % for bacteria and 2.4 ± 0.7 % for yeasts. Hypothetically, existence of Δψ⁺-cells could be due to short-term, about 1 min for bacteria and 5 min for yeasts, change of membrane potential from negative to positive value during the cell cycle. This change has been shown by the reversions of K⁺, Na⁺, and Ca²⁺ ions fluxes across the cell membrane during synchronous yeast culture. The transformation of Δψ(⁻-cells to Δψ⁺-cells can be explained by slow influx of K⁺ ions into Δψ⁻-cell to the trigger level of K⁺ concentration ("compression of potassium spring"), which is forming "alternative" Δψ⁺-cell for a short period, following with fast efflux of K⁺ ions out of Δψ⁺-cell ("release of potassium spring") returning cell to normal Δψ⁻ state. We anticipate our results to be a starting point to reveal the biological role of cell dualism in form of Δψ⁻- and Δψ⁺- cells.

  10. Characterization of electrothermal actuators and arrays fabricated in a four-level, planarized surface-micromachined polycrystalline silicon process

    SciTech Connect

    Comtois, J.H.; Michalicek, M.A.; Barron, C.C.

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents the results of tests performed on a variety of electrothermal microactuators and arrays of these actuators recently fabricated in the four-level planarized polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) SUMMiT process at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Sandia National Laboratories. These results are intended to aid designers of thermally actuated mechanisms, and will apply to similar actuators made in other polysilicon MEMS processes. The measurements include force and deflection versus input power, maximum operating frequency, effects of long term operation, and ideal actuator and array geometries for different design criteria. A typical application in a stepper motor is shown to illustrate the utility of these actuators and arrays.

  11. Preface of the "Symposium on Mathematical Models and Methods to investigate Heterogeneity in Cell and Cell Population Biology"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clairambault, Jean

    2016-06-01

    This session investigates hot topics related to mathematical representations of cell and cell population dynamics in biology and medicine, in particular, but not only, with applications to cancer. Methods in mathematical modelling and analysis, and in statistical inference using single-cell and cell population data, should contribute to focus this session on heterogeneity in cell populations. Among other methods are proposed: a) Intracellular protein dynamics and gene regulatory networks using ordinary/partial/delay differential equations (ODEs, PDEs, DDEs); b) Representation of cell population dynamics using agent-based models (ABMs) and/or PDEs; c) Hybrid models and multiscale models to integrate single-cell dynamics into cell population behaviour; d) Structured cell population dynamics and asymptotic evolution w.r.t. relevant traits; e) Heterogeneity in cancer cell populations: origin, evolution, phylogeny and methods of reconstruction; f) Drug resistance as an evolutionary phenotype: predicting and overcoming it in therapeutics; g) Theoretical therapeutic optimisation of combined drug treatments in cancer cell populations and in populations of other organisms, such as bacteria.

  12. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  13. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  14. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Pat; Landahl, John

    This pamphlet has been prepared in response to a new problem, a rapidly increasing population, and a new need, population education. It is designed to help teachers provide their students with some basic population concepts with stress placed on the elements of decision making. In the first section of the pamphlet, some of the basic concepts of…

  15. [Population].

    PubMed

    1979-01-01

    Data on the population of Venezuela between 1975 and 1977 are presented in descriptive tables and graphs. Information is included on the employed population according to category, sex, and type of economic activity, and by sex, age, and area on the employment rate and the total, the economically active, and the unemployed population.

  16. Characterization of human skeletal stem and bone cell populations using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A; Hughes, M P; Mulhall, H J; Oreffo, R O C; Labeed, F H

    2015-02-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is a non-invasive cell analysis method that uses differences in electrical properties between particles and surrounding medium to determine a unique set of cellular properties that can be used as a basis for cell separation. Cell-based therapies using skeletal stem cells are currently one of the most promising areas for treating a variety of skeletal and muscular disorders. However, identifying and sorting these cells remains a challenge in the absence of unique skeletal stem cell markers. DEP provides an ideal method for identifying subsets of cells without the need for markers by using their dielectric properties. This study used a 3D dielectrophoretic well chip device to determine the dielectric characteristics of two osteosarcoma cell lines (MG-63 and SAOS-2) and an immunoselected enriched skeletal stem cell fraction (STRO-1 positive cell) of human bone marrow. Skeletal cells were exposed to a series of different frequencies to induce dielectrophoretic cell movement, and a model was developed to generate the membrane and cytoplasmic properties of the cell populations. Differences were observed in the dielectric properties of MG-63, SAOS-2 and STRO-1 enriched skeletal populations, which could potentially be used to sort cells in mixed populations. This study provide evidence of the ability to characterize different human skeletal stem and mature cell populations, and acts as a proof-of-concept that dielectrophoresis can be exploited to detect, isolate and separate skeletal cell populations from heterogeneous bone marrow cell populations.

  17. Abcg2-Labeled Cells Contribute to Different Cell Populations in the Embryonic and Adult Heart.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Michelle J; Maher, Travis J; Li, Qinglu; Garry, Mary G; Sorrentino, Brian P; Martin, Cindy M

    2016-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily G member 2 (Abcg2)-expressing cardiac-side population cells have been identified in the developing and adult heart, although the role they play in mammalian heart growth and regeneration remains unclear. In this study, we use genetic lineage tracing to follow the cell fate of Abcg2-expressing cells in the embryonic and adult heart. During cardiac embryogenesis, the Abcg2 lineage gives rise to multiple cardiovascular cell types, including cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells. This capacity for Abcg2-expressing cells to contribute to cardiomyocytes decreases rapidly during the postnatal period. We further tested the role of the Abcg2 lineage following myocardial injury. One month following ischemia reperfusion injury, Abcg2-expressing cells contributed significantly to the endothelial cell lineage, however, there was no contribution to regenerated cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, consistent with previous results showing that Abcg2 plays an important cytoprotective role during oxidative stress, we show an increase in Abcg2 labeling of the vasculature, a decrease in the scar area, and a moderate improvement in cardiac function following myocardial injury. We have uncovered a difference in the capacity of Abcg2-expressing cells to generate the cardiovascular lineages during embryogenesis, postnatal growth, and cardiac regeneration.

  18. Phenotype overlap in glial cell populations: astroglia, oligodendroglia and NG-2(+) cells

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Badrah; Fern, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which NG-2(+) cells form a distinct population separate from astrocytes is central to understanding whether this important cell class is wholly an oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) or has additional functions akin to those classically ascribed to astrocytes. Early immuno-staining studies indicate that NG-2(+) cells do not express the astrocyte marker GFAP, but orthogonal reconstructions of double-labeled confocal image stacks here reveal a significant degree of co-expression in individual cells within post-natal day 10 (P10) and adult rat optic nerve (RON) and rat cortex. Extensive scanning of various antibody/fixation/embedding approaches identified a protocol for selective post-embedded immuno-gold labeling. This first ultrastructural characterization of identified NG-2(+) cells revealed populations of both OPCs and astrocytes in P10 RON. NG-2(+) astrocytes had classic features including the presence of glial filaments but low levels of glial filament expression were also found in OPCs and myelinating oligodendrocytes. P0 RONs contained few OPCs but positively identified astrocytes were observed to ensheath pre-myelinated axons in a fashion previously described as a definitive marker of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Astrocyte ensheathment was also apparent in P10 RONs, was absent from developing nodes of Ranvier and was never associated with compact myelin. Astrocyte processes were also shown to encapsulate some oligodendrocyte somata. The data indicate that common criteria for delineating astrocytes and oligodendroglia are insufficiently robust and that astrocyte features ascribed to OPCs may arise from misidentification. PMID:26106302

  19. Mouse adipose tissue stromal cells give rise to skeletal and cardiomyogenic cell sub-populations

    PubMed Central

    Dromard, Cécile; Barreau, Corinne; André, Mireille; Berger-Müller, Sandra; Casteilla, Louis; Planat-Benard, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that adipose tissue could generate cardiomyocyte-like cells from crude stromal vascular fraction (SVF) in vitro that improved cardiac function in a myocardial infarction context. However, it is not clear whether these adipose-derived cardiomyogenic cells (AD-CMG) constitute a homogenous population and if AD-CMG progenitors could be isolated as a pure population from the SVF of adipose tissue. This study aims to characterize the different cell types that constitute myogenic clusters and identify the earliest AD-CMG progenitors in vitro for establishing a complete phenotype and use it to sort AD-CMG progenitors from crude SVF. Here, we report cell heterogeneity among adipose-derived clusters during their course of maturation and highlighted sub-populations that exhibit original mixed cardiac/skeletal muscle phenotypes with a progressive loss of cardiac phenotype with time in liquid culture conditions. Moreover, we completed the phenotype of AD-CMG progenitors but we failed to sort them from the SVF. We demonstrated that micro-environment is required for the maturation of myogenic phenotype by co-culture experiments. These findings bring complementary data on AD-CMG and suggest that their emergence results from in vitro events. PMID:25364749

  20. Regional Cell Specific RNA Expression Profiling of FACS Isolated Drosophila Intestinal Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Devanjali; Buchon, Nicolas; Xiang, Jinyi; Edgar, Bruce A

    2015-08-03

    The adult Drosophila midgut is built of five distinct cell types, including stem cells, enteroblasts, enterocytes, enteroendocrine cells, and visceral muscles, and is divided into five major regions (R1 to R5), which are morphologically and functionally distinct from each other. This unit describes a protocol for the isolation of Drosophila intestinal cell populations for the purpose of cell type-specific transcriptome profiling from the five different regions. A method to select a cell type of interest labeled with green or yellow fluorescent protein (GFP, YFP) by making use of the GAL4-UAS bipartite system and fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) is presented. Total RNA is isolated from the sorted cells of each region, and linear RNA amplification is used to obtain sufficient amounts of high-quality RNA for analysis by microarray, RT-PCR, or RNA sequencing. This method will be useful for quantitative transcriptome comparison across intestinal cell types in the different regions under normal and various experimental conditions.

  1. A Millifluidic Study of Cell-to-Cell Heterogeneity in Growth-Rate and Cell-Division Capability in Populations of Isogenic Cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Damodaran, Shima P.; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes. PMID:25760649

  2. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  3. Analysis of cell viability in intervertebral disc: Effect of endplate permeability on cell population.

    PubMed

    Shirazi-Adl, A; Taheri, M; Urban, J P G

    2010-05-07

    Responsible for making and maintaining the extracellular matrix, the cells of intervertebral discs are supplied with essential nutrients by diffusion from the blood supply through mainly the cartilaginous endplates (CEPs) and disc tissue. Decrease in transport rate and increase in cellular activity may adversely disturb the intricate supply-demand balance leading ultimately to cell death and disc degeneration. The present numerical study aimed to introduce for the first time cell viability criteria into nonlinear coupled nutrition transport equations thereby evaluating the dynamic nutritional processes governing viable cell population and concentrations of oxygen, glucose and lactic acid in the disc as CEP exchange area dropped from a fully permeable condition to an almost impermeable one. A uniaxial model of an in vitro cell culture analogue of the disc is first employed to examine and validate cell viability criteria. An axisymmetric model of the disc with four distinct regions was subsequently used to investigate the survival of cells at different CEP exchange areas. In agreement with measurements, predictions of the diffusion chamber model demonstrated substantial cell death as essential nutrient concentrations fell to levels too low to support cells. Cells died away from the nutrient supply and at higher cell densities. In the disc model, the nucleus region being farthest away from supply sources was most affected; cell death initiated first as CEP exchange area dropped below approximately 40% and continued exponentially thereafter to depletion as CEP calcified further. In cases with loss of endplate permeability and/or disruptions therein, as well as changes in geometry and fall in diffusivity associated with fluid outflow, the nutrient concentrations could fall to levels inadequate to maintain cellular activity or viability, resulting in cell death and disc degeneration.

  4. Phase control of probe response in a Doppler-broadened N-type four-level system

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Xijun; Liu Zhongbo; Liang Ying; Jia Kening; Tong Dianmin

    2011-04-15

    In this paper, we investigate theoretically the effect of the relative phase ({phi}) between the probe and driving fields on gain (absorption) and dispersion of the probe field in a Doppler-broadened N-type four-level system with spontaneously generated coherence from different respects. It is shown that gain (absorption) and dispersion are very sensitive to variations in the relative phase, and changing the Doppler width also has an obvious effect on the phase-dependent gain (absorption) and dispersion. When the probe and driving fields have the same propagation directions (copropagating), for the same Doppler width, the dispersion curve with {phi}={alpha} is the same as the gain (absorption) curve with {phi}={alpha}+{pi}/2; however, when the probe and driving fields have opposite propagation directions (counterpropagating), the dispersion curve and gain (absorption) curve are different and the difference becomes more considerable with an increase in Doppler width. In the co- and counterpropagating cases, gain (absorption) and dispersion always vary periodically with varying {phi}, and the period is 2{pi}. By adjusting the value of {phi}, the largest gain (absorption) and dispersion can be obtained, and a large index of refraction without absorption can be realized. Generally speaking, gain decreases with an increase in Doppler width, but by adjusting value of {phi}, at some special values of Doppler width, a larger gain than that without Doppler broadening can be obtained. Our study also shows that gain in the copropagating case is much larger than that in the counterpropagating case.

  5. Integrin-β4 identifies cancer stem cell-enriched populations of partially mesenchymal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bierie, Brian; Pierce, Sarah E.; Kroeger, Cornelia; Stover, Daniel G.; Pattabiraman, Diwakar R.; Thiru, Prathapan; Liu Donaher, Joana; Reinhardt, Ferenc; Chaffer, Christine L.; Keckesova, Zuzana; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Neoplastic cells within individual carcinomas often exhibit considerable phenotypic heterogeneity in their epithelial versus mesenchymal-like cell states. Because carcinoma cells with mesenchymal features are often more resistant to therapy and may serve as a source of relapse, we sought to determine whether such cells could be further stratified into functionally distinct subtypes. Indeed, we find that a basal epithelial marker, integrin-β4 (ITGB4), can be used to enable stratification of mesenchymal-like triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells that differ from one another in their relative tumorigenic abilities. Notably, we demonstrate that ITGB4+ cancer stem cell (CSC)-enriched mesenchymal cells reside in an intermediate epithelial/mesenchymal phenotypic state. Among patients with TNBC who received chemotherapy, elevated ITGB4 expression was associated with a worse 5-year probability of relapse-free survival. Mechanistically, we find that the ZEB1 (zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1) transcription factor activity in highly mesenchymal SUM159 TNBC cells can repress expression of the epithelial transcription factor TAp63α (tumor protein 63 isoform 1), a protein that promotes ITGB4 expression. In addition, we demonstrate that ZEB1 and ITGB4 are important in modulating the histopathological phenotypes of tumors derived from mesenchymal TNBC cells. Hence, mesenchymal carcinoma cell populations are internally heterogeneous, and ITGB4 is a mechanistically driven prognostic biomarker that can be used to identify the more aggressive subtypes of mesenchymal carcinoma cells in TNBC. The ability to rapidly isolate and mechanistically interrogate the CSC-enriched, partially mesenchymal carcinoma cells should further enable identification of novel therapeutic opportunities to improve the prognosis for high-risk patients with TNBC. PMID:28270621

  6. Development of a novel cell sorting method that samples population diversity in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Geoffrey W; Andersen, Stacey B; Battye, Francis L

    2015-11-01

    Flow cytometry based electrostatic cell sorting is an important tool in the separation of cell populations. Existing instruments can sort single cells into multi-well collection plates, and keep track of cell of origin and sorted well location. However currently single sorted cell results reflect the population distribution and fail to capture the population diversity. Software was designed that implements a novel sorting approach, "Slice and Dice Sorting," that links a graphical representation of a multi-well plate to logic that ensures that single cells are sampled and sorted from all areas defined by the sort region/s. Therefore the diversity of the total population is captured, and the more frequently occurring or rarer cell types are all sampled. The sorting approach was tested computationally, and using functional cell based assays. Computationally we demonstrate that conventional single cell sorting can sample as little as 50% of the population diversity dependant on the population distribution, and that Slice and Dice sorting samples much more of the variety present within a cell population. We then show by sorting single cells into wells using the Slice and Dice sorting method that there are cells sorted using this method that would be either rarely sorted, or not sorted at all using conventional single cell sorting approaches. The present study demonstrates a novel single cell sorting method that samples much more of the population diversity than current methods. It has implications in clonal selection, stem cell sorting, single cell sequencing and any areas where population heterogeneity is of importance.

  7. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    In an effort to help meet the growing interest and concern about the problems created by the rapid growth of population, The International Planned Parenthood Federation has prepared this booklet with the aim of assisting the study of the history and future trends of population growth and its impact on individual and family welfare, national,…

  8. Spectrophotometric analysis at the single-cell level: elucidating dispersity within melanic immortalized cell populations.

    PubMed

    Polo-Parada, Luis; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Gerardo; Cywiak, David; Pérez-Solano, Rafael; Baker, Gary A

    2017-03-28

    that when a single or few cancer cells are present within a blood droplet, the photoacoustic signal is indistinguishable from that measured from blood alone. These outcomes have important ramifications for the early photoacoustic detection of cancer cells and circulating tumor emboli, while pointing to the potential of single-cell imaging spectrophotometry to assess heterogeneity within cell populations in more quantitative terms.

  9. The cell-stretcher: A novel device for the mechanical stimulation of cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seriani, S.; Del Favero, G.; Mahaffey, J.; Marko, D.; Gallina, P.; Long, C. S.; Mestroni, L.; Sbaizero, O.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation appears to be a critical modulator for many aspects of biology, both of living tissue and cells. The cell-stretcher, a novel device for the mechanical uniaxial stimulation of populations of cells, is described. The system is based on a variable stroke cam-lever-tappet mechanism which allows the delivery of cyclic stimuli with frequencies of up to 10 Hz and deformation between 1% and 20%. The kinematics is presented and a simulation of the dynamics of the system is shown, in order to compute the contact forces in the mechanism. The cells, following cultivation and preparation, are plated on an ad hoc polydimethylsiloxane membrane which is then loaded on the clamps of the cell-stretcher via force-adjustable magnetic couplings. In order to show the viability of the experimentation and biocompatibility of the cell-stretcher, a set of two in vitro tests were performed. Human epithelial carcinoma cell line A431 and Adult Mouse Ventricular Fibroblasts (AMVFs) from a dual reporter mouse were subject to 0.5 Hz, 24 h cyclic stretching at 15% strain, and to 48 h stimulation at 0.5 Hz and 15% strain, respectively. Visual analysis was performed on A431, showing definite morphological changes in the form of cellular extroflections in the direction of stimulation compared to an unstimulated control. A cytometric analysis was performed on the AMVF population. Results show a post-stimulation live-dead ratio deviance of less than 6% compared to control, which proves that the environment created by the cell-stretcher is suitable for in vitro experimentation.

  10. β-escin selectively targets the glioblastoma-initiating cell population and reduces cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Bidère, Nicolas; Gavard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive tumour of the central nervous system and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Within GBM exists a subpopulation of cells, glioblastoma-initiating cells (GIC), which possess the characteristics of progenitor cells, have the ability to initiate tumour growth and resist to current treatment strategies. We aimed at identifying novel specific inhibitors of GIC expansion through use of a large-scale chemical screen of approved small molecules. Here, we report the identification of the natural compound β-escin as a selective inhibitor of GIC viability. Indeed, β-escin was significantly cytotoxic in nine patient-derived GIC, whilst exhibiting no substantial effect on the other human cancer or control cell lines tested. In addition, β-escin was more effective at reducing GIC growth than current clinically used cytotoxic agents. We further show that β-escin triggers caspase-dependent cell death combined with a loss of stemness properties. However, blocking apoptosis could not rescue the β-escin-induced reduction in sphere formation or stemness marker activity, indicating that β-escin directly modifies the stem identity of GIC, independent of the induction of cell death. Thus, this study has repositioned β-escin as a promising potential candidate to selectively target the aggressive population of initiating cells within GBM. PMID:27589691

  11. The role and modulation of CCR6+ Th17 cell populations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Paulissen, Sandra M J; van Hamburg, Jan Piet; Dankers, Wendy; Lubberts, Erik

    2015-07-01

    The IL-17A producing T-helper-17 (Th17) cell population plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and has gained wide interest as treatment target. IL-17A expressing Th cells are characterized by the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6 and the transcription factor RORC. In RA, CCR6+ Th cells were identified in peripheral blood, synovial fluid and inflamed synovial tissue. CCR6+ Th cells might drive the progression of an early inflammation towards a persistent arthritis. The CCR6+ Th cell population is heterogeneous and several subpopulations can be distinguished, including Th17, Th22, Th17.1 (also called non-classic Th1 cells), and unclassified or intermediate populations. Interestingly, some of these populations produce low levels of IL-17A but are still very pathogenic. Furthermore, the CCR6+ Th cells phenotype is unstable and plasticity exists between CCR6+ Th cells and T-regulatory (Treg) cells and within the CCR6+ Th cell subpopulations. In this review, characteristics of the different CCR6+ Th cell populations, their plasticity, and their potential impact on rheumatoid arthritis are discussed. Moreover, current approaches to target CCR6+ Th cells and future directions of research to find specific CCR6+ Th cell targets in the treatment of patients with RA and other CCR6+ Th cell mediated autoimmune diseases are highlighted.

  12. A cell sorting protocol for selecting high-producing sub-populations of Sf9 and High Five™ cells.

    PubMed

    Vidigal, João; Dias, Mafalda M; Fernandes, Fabiana; Patrone, Marco; Bispo, Cláudia; Andrade, Cláudia; Gardner, Rui; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Teixeira, Ana P

    2013-12-01

    Insect cell lines such as Sf9 and High Five™ have been widely used to produce recombinant proteins mostly by the lytic baculovirus vector system. We have recently established an expression platform in Sf9 cells using a fluorescence-based recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) strategy which has similar development timelines but avoids baculovirus infection. To expedite cell engineering efforts, a robust fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) protocol optimized for insect cells was developed here. The standard sorting conditions used for mammalian cells proved to be unsuitable, resulting in post-sorting viabilities below 10% for both cell lines. We found that the extreme sensitivity to the shear stress displayed by Sf9 and High Five™ cells was the limiting factor, and using Pluronic F-68 in the cell suspension could increase post-sorting viabilities in a dose dependent manner. The newly developed protocol was then used to sort stable populations of both cell lines tagged with a DsRed-expressing cassette. Before sorting, the average fluorescence intensity of the Sf9 cell population was 3-fold higher than that of the High Five™ cell population. By enriching with the 10% strongest DsRed-fluorescent cells, the productivity of both cell populations could be successfully improved. The established sorting protocol potentiates the use of RMCE technology for recombinant protein production in insect cells.

  13. Unipotent, Atoh1+ progenitors maintain the Merkel cell population in embryonic and adult mice.

    PubMed

    Wright, Margaret C; Reed-Geaghan, Erin G; Bolock, Alexa M; Fujiyama, Tomoyuki; Hoshino, Mikio; Maricich, Stephen M

    2015-02-02

    Resident progenitor cells in mammalian skin generate new cells as a part of tissue homeostasis. We sought to identify the progenitors of Merkel cells, a unique skin cell type that plays critical roles in mechanosensation. We found that some Atoh1-expressing cells in the hairy skin and whisker follicles are mitotically active at embryonic and postnatal ages. Genetic fate-mapping revealed that these Atoh1-expressing cells give rise solely to Merkel cells. Furthermore, selective ablation of Atoh1(+) skin cells in adult mice led to a permanent reduction in Merkel cell numbers, demonstrating that other stem cell populations are incapable of producing Merkel cells. These data identify a novel, unipotent progenitor population in the skin that gives rise to Merkel cells both during development and adulthood.

  14. Identification of various testicular cell populations in pubertal and adult cockerels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precise identification of the male germinal stem cell population is important for their practical use in programs dedicated to the integration of exogenous genetic material in testicular tissues. In the present study, our aim was to identify germinal cell populations in the testes of pubertal and ad...

  15. Population of Vibrational State of Carotenoid Molecules in Living Cells of Chlorella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Shuichi; Hirata, Kuniko; Kushida, Takashi

    1980-07-01

    Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra have been measured in living cells of Chlorella vulgaris as well as in chloroform, toluene, benzene and β-carotene. Population in the vibrational state has been determined by taking account of resonance Raman effect. The result shows that this population is well explained by thermal distribution even in the case of living biological cells, contrary to recently reported observation of some population enhancement. Possible experimental artifacts are discussed.

  16. Identification of a distinct population of CD133(+)CXCR4(+) cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Michele; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Camerlingo, Rosalba; Tirino, Virginia; Consales, Claudia; Riccio, Anna; Ieranò, Caterina; Cecere, Sabrina Chiara; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Greggi, Stefano; Pignata, Sandro; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Scala, Stefania

    2015-05-28

    CD133 and CXCR4 were evaluated in the NCI-60 cell lines to identify cancer stem cell rich populations. Screening revealed that, ovarian OVCAR-3, -4 and -5 and colon cancer HT-29, HCT-116 and SW620 over expressed both proteins. We aimed to isolate cells with stem cell features sorting the cells expressing CXCR4(+)CD133(+) within ovarian cancer cell lines. The sorted population CD133(+)CXCR4(+) demonstrated the highest efficiency in sphere formation in OVCAR-3, OVCAR-4 and OVCAR-5 cells. Moreover OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and NANOG were highly expressed in CD133(+)CXCR4(+) sorted OVCAR-5 cells. Most strikingly CXCR4(+)CD133(+) sorted OVCAR-5 and -4 cells formed the highest number of tumors when inoculated in nude mice compared to CD133(-)CXCR4(-), CD133(+)CXCR4(-), CD133(-)CXCR4(+) cells. CXCR4(+)CD133(+) OVCAR-5 cells were resistant to cisplatin, overexpressed the ABCG2 surface drug transporter and migrated toward the CXCR4 ligand, CXCL12. Moreover, when human ovarian cancer cells were isolated from 37 primary ovarian cancer, an extremely variable level of CXCR4 and CD133 expression was detected. Thus, in human ovarian cancer cells CXCR4 and CD133 expression identified a discrete population with stem cell properties that regulated tumor development and chemo resistance. This cell population represents a potential therapeutic target.

  17. Fundamental Limits to Collective Concentration Sensing in Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fancher, Sean; Mugler, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    The precision of concentration sensing is improved when cells communicate. Here we derive the physical limits to concentration sensing for cells that communicate over short distances by directly exchanging small molecules (juxtacrine signaling), or over longer distances by secreting and sensing a diffusive messenger molecule (autocrine signaling). In the latter case, we find that the optimal cell spacing can be large, due to a trade-off between maintaining communication strength and reducing signal cross-correlations. This leads to the surprising result that sparsely packed communicating cells sense concentrations more precisely than densely packed communicating cells. We compare our results to data from a wide variety of communicating cell types.

  18. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  19. A Mathematical and Computational Approach for Integrating the Major Sources of Cell Population Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Stamatakis, Michail; Zygourakis, Kyriacos

    2010-01-01

    Several approaches have been used in the past to model heterogeneity in bacterial cell populations, with each approach focusing on different source(s) of heterogeneity. However, a holistic approach that integrates all the major sources into a comprehensive framework applicable to cell populations is still lacking. In this work we present the mathematical formulation of a cell population master equation (CPME) that describes cell population dynamics and takes into account the major sources of heterogeneity, namely stochasticity in reaction, DNA-duplication, and division, as well as the random partitioning of species contents into the two daughter cells. The formulation also takes into account cell growth and respects the discrete nature of the molecular contents and cell numbers. We further develop a Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the stochastic processes considered here. To benchmark our new framework, we first use it to quantify the effect of each source of heterogeneity on the intrinsic and the extrinsic phenotypic variability for the well-known two-promoter system used experimentally by Elowitz et al. (2002). We finally apply our framework to a more complicated system and demonstrate how the interplay between noisy gene expression and growth inhibition due to protein accumulation at the single cell level can result in complex behavior at the cell population level. The generality of our framework makes it suitable for studying a vast array of artificial and natural genetic networks. Using our Monte Carlo algorithm, cell population distributions can be predicted for the genetic architecture of interest, thereby quantifying the effect of stochasticity in intracellular reactions or the variability in the rate of physiological processes such as growth and division. Such in silico experiments can give insight into the behavior of cell populations and reveal the major sources contributing to cell population heterogeneity. PMID:20685607

  20. Lin28a is a putative factor in regulating cancer stem cell-like properties in side population cells of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, S.; Tanaka, J.; Okada, S.; Isobe, T.; Yamamoto, G.; Yasuhara, R.; Irie, T.; Akiyama, C.; Kohno, Y.; Tachikawa, T.; Mishima, K.

    2013-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are among the target cells of cancer therapy because they are uniquely involved in both cancer progression and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. We identified side population (SP) cells, which are known to be an enriched population of CSC, in five oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC9, SCC25, TOSCC7, TOSCC17, and TOSCC23). The percentages of SP cells ranged from 0% to 3.3%, with TOSCC23 cells showing the highest percentages of SP cells (3.3% of the total cell population). The SP cells isolated from TOSCC23 cells also showed greater cell proliferation and invasion compared to non-SP (MP) cells. Therefore, our initial findings suggested that SP cells were enriched for CSC-like cells. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of cell proliferation-related and anti-apoptotic genes was greater in SP cells compared to MP cells. We focused on Lin28a, which showed the highest expression (approximately 22-fold) among the upregulated genes. The overexpression of Lin28a in TOSCC23 cells increased their proliferation, colony formation, and invasion. These findings suggest that Lin28a is an appropriate CSC target molecule for OSCC treatment - Highlights: ► Lin28a is a SP cell-specific factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. ► SP cells in OSCC cells show cancer stem cell-like properties. ► Lin28a regulates OSCC proliferative and invasive activities.

  1. Coculture with endothelial cells reduces the population of cycling LeX neural precursors but increases that of quiescent cells with a side population phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Celine . E-mail: marc-andre.mouthon@cea.fr

    2006-04-01

    Neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation are regulated by external cues from their microenvironment. As endothelial cells are closely associated with neural stem cell in brain germinal zones, we investigated whether endothelial cells may interfere with neurogenesis. Neural precursor cells (NPC) from telencephalon of EGFP mouse embryos were cocultured in direct contact with endothelial cells. Endothelial cells did not modify the overall proliferation and apoptosis of neural cells, albeit they transiently delayed spontaneous apoptosis. These effects appeared to be specific to endothelial cells since a decrease in proliferation and a raise in apoptosis were observed in cocultures with fibroblasts. Endothelial cells stimulated the differentiation of NPC into astrocytes and into neurons, whereas they reduced differentiation into oligodendrocytes in comparison to adherent cultures on polyornithine. Determination of NPC clonogenicity and quantification of LeX expression, a marker for NPC, showed that endothelial cells decreased the number of cycling NPC. On the other hand, the presence of endothelial cells increased the number of neural cells having 'side population' phenotype, another marker reported on NPC, which we have shown to contain quiescent cells. Thus, we show that endothelial cells may regulate neurogenesis by acting at different level of NPC differentiation, proliferation and quiescence.

  2. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in CD133+ population in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-Qiang; Tan, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Bao-Wei; Wu, Tao; Liu, Ping; Sun, Shao-Jun; Cao, Yin-Guang

    2016-03-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the role of 3-bromopyruvate in inhibition of CD133+ U87 human glioma cell population growth. The results demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate inhibited the viability of both CD133+ and parental cells derived from U87 human glioma cell line. However, the 3-bromopyruvate-induced inhibition in viability was more prominent in CD133+ cells at 10 μM concentration after 48 h. Treatment of CD133+ cells with 3-bromopyruvate caused reduction in cell population and cell size, membrane bubbling, and degradation of cell membranes. Hoechst 33258 staining showed condensation of chromatin material and fragmentation of DNA in treated CD133+ cells after 48 h. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited the migration rate of CD133+ cells significantly compared to the parental cells. Flow cytometry revealed that exposure of CD133+ cells to 3-bromopyruvate increased the cell population in S phase from 24.5 to 37.9 % with increase in time from 12 to 48 h. In addition, 3-bromopyruvate significantly enhanced the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3 in CD133+ cells compared to the parental cells. Therefore, 3-bromopyruvate is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of glioma by targeting stem cells selectively.

  3. Detection and characterization of side population in Ewing's sarcoma SK-ES-1 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Min; Zhang, Rui; Yan, Ming; Ye, Zhengxu; Liang, Wei; Luo, Zhuojing

    2010-01-01

    Dye exclusion is a valuable technique to isolate cancer stem cells (CSCs) based on an ability of stem cell to efflux fluorescent DNA-binding dye, especially for tumors without unique surface markers. It has been proven that side population (SP) cells that exclude Hoechst 33342 dye are enriched with stem-like cells in several cancer cell lines. In this study, we isolated and characterized SP cells from human Ewing's sarcoma cell line SK-ES-1 in vitro. SP cells were detected in SK-ES-1 and comprised 1.2% of total cell population. Only SP cells had the capacity to regenerate both SP and non-SP cells. The proliferation rates were similar between SP and non-SP cells. However, the clonogenicity and invasiveness of SP cells were significantly higher than that of non-SP cells. Further characterization of this SP phenotype presented other properties. SP cells exhibited increased multi-drug resistance and the ATP binding cassette protein (ABC) transporters were up-regulated in SP population. These findings suggest that SP cells derived from Ewing's sarcoma play the critical role in tumor metastasis and recurrence and might be an ideal target for clinical therapy.

  4. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of cancer stem-like side population cells in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Long; Wu, Jian-Bing; Yi, Feng-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies in cancer biology suggest that chemotherapeutic drug resistance and tumor relapse are driven by cells within a tumor termed 'cancer stem cells'. In the present study, a Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion technique was used to identify cancer stem‑like side population (SP) cells in colon carcinoma, which accounted for 3.4% of the total cell population. Following treatment with verapamil, the population of SP cells was reduced to 0.6%. In addition, the sorted SP cells exhibited marked multidrug resistance and enhanced cell survival rates compared with non‑SP cells. The SP cells were able to generate more tumor spheres and were CD133 positive. Subsequent biochemical analysis revealed that the levels of the adenosine triphosphate‑binding cassette sub‑family G member 2 transporter protein, B‑cell lymphoma anti‑apoptotic factor and autocrine production of interleukin‑4 were significantly enhanced in the colon cancer SP cells, which contributed to drug resistance, protection of the cells from apoptosis and tumor recurrence. Therefore, the findings suggested that treatment failure and colon tumorigenesis is dictated by a small population of SP cells, which indicate a potential target in future therapies.

  5. Pax3/Pax7 mark a novel population of primitive myogenic cells during development

    PubMed Central

    Kassar-Duchossoy, Lina; Giacone, Ellen; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Jory, Aurélie; Gomès, Danielle; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle serves as a paradigm for the acquisition of cell fate, yet the relationship between primitive cell populations and emerging myoblasts has remained elusive. We identify a novel population of resident Pax3+/Pax7+, muscle marker-negative cells throughout development. Using mouse mutants that uncouple myogenic progression, we show that these Pax+ cells give rise to muscle progenitors. In the absence of skeletal muscle, they apoptose after down-regulation of Pax7. Furthermore, they mark the emergence of satellite cells during fetal development, and do not require Pax3 function. These findings identify critical cell populations during lineage restriction, and provide a framework for defining myogenic cell states for therapeutic studies. PMID:15964993

  6. Pax3/Pax7 mark a novel population of primitive myogenic cells during development.

    PubMed

    Kassar-Duchossoy, Lina; Giacone, Ellen; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Jory, Aurélie; Gomès, Danielle; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2005-06-15

    Skeletal muscle serves as a paradigm for the acquisition of cell fate, yet the relationship between primitive cell populations and emerging myoblasts has remained elusive. We identify a novel population of resident Pax3+/Pax7+, muscle marker-negative cells throughout development. Using mouse mutants that uncouple myogenic progression, we show that these Pax+ cells give rise to muscle progenitors. In the absence of skeletal muscle, they apoptose after down-regulation of Pax7. Furthermore, they mark the emergence of satellite cells during fetal development, and do not require Pax3 function. These findings identify critical cell populations during lineage restriction, and provide a framework for defining myogenic cell states for therapeutic studies.

  7. Single Cell Dynamics Causes Pareto-Like Effect in Stimulated T Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cosette, Jérémie; Moussy, Alice; Onodi, Fanny; Auffret-Cariou, Adrien; Neildez-Nguyen, Thi My Anh; Paldi, Andras; Stockholm, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cell fate choice during the process of differentiation may obey to deterministic or stochastic rules. In order to discriminate between these two strategies we used time-lapse microscopy of individual murine CD4 + T cells that allows investigating the dynamics of proliferation and fate commitment. We observed highly heterogeneous division and death rates between individual clones resulting in a Pareto-like dominance of a few clones at the end of the experiment. Commitment to the Treg fate was monitored using the expression of a GFP reporter gene under the control of the endogenous Foxp3 promoter. All possible combinations of proliferation and differentiation were observed and resulted in exclusively GFP–, GFP+ or mixed phenotype clones of very different population sizes. We simulated the process of proliferation and differentiation using a simple mathematical model of stochastic decision-making based on the experimentally observed parameters. The simulations show that a stochastic scenario is fully compatible with the observed Pareto-like imbalance in the final population. PMID:26648396

  8. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric... public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations.'' The purpose... therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders regarding best practices related to cell and...

  9. Basal p21 controls population heterogeneity in cycling and quiescent cell cycle states

    PubMed Central

    Overton, K. Wesley; Spencer, Sabrina L.; Noderer, William L.; Meyer, Tobias; Wang, Clifford L.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity within a population of genetically identical cells is emerging as a common theme in multiple biological systems, including human cell biology and cancer. Using live-cell imaging, flow cytometry, and kinetic modeling, we showed that two states—quiescence and cell cycling—can coexist within an isogenic population of human cells and resulted from low basal expression levels of p21, a Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor (CKI). We attribute the p21-dependent heterogeneity in cell cycle activity to double-negative feedback regulation involving CDK2, p21, and E3 ubiquitin ligases. In support of this mechanism, analysis of cells at a point before cell cycle entry (i.e., before the G1/S transition) revealed a p21–CDK2 axis that determines quiescent and cycling cell states. Our findings suggest a mechanistic role for p21 in generating heterogeneity in both normal tissues and tumors. PMID:25267623

  10. Relationship of total viable and culturable cells in epiphytic populations of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M; Lindow, S E

    1992-12-01

    The direct viable count method, used to detect viable but nonculturable bacteria in aquatic systems, was modified to examine epiphytic populations of Pseudomonas syringae. Viable-population sizes determined from the number of cells that elongated when incubated with yeast extract and nalidixic acid were compared with those determined by the conventional plate count method. The plate count method accurately determined the number of viable cells in epiphytic P. syringae populations in a state of active growth under conditions of high relative humidity. The plate count method also accurately determined the number of viable cells in P. syringae inoculum, or a growing P. syringae population, subject to desiccation stress under conditions of low relative humidity. In epiphytic populations of P. syringae older than 80 h, however, the plate count underestimated the viable-population size by about two- to fourfold, suggesting that up to 75% of the P. syringae population was nonculturable. These nonculturable cells may have entered a starvation-survival state, induced by low nutrient availability in the phyllosphere environment. Epiphytic P. syringae populations undergoing rapid size changes due to growth and death under fluctuating environmental conditions in the field should be accurately enumerated by the plate count method. However, the possible underestimation of viable-population size under some circumstances should be considered in epidemiological studies of phytopathogenic bacteria and when genetically engineered microorganisms in terrestrial ecosystems are monitored.

  11. Adult Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation at the Cell Population and Single-Cell Levels Under Alternating Electric Current

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Marissa E.; Hermann, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells, precursors that can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, have tremendous potential for derivation of cells with specific (e.g., osteogenic) phenotypes for tissue engineering and tissue regeneration applications. To date, the predominant strategy to achieve directed differentiation of MSCs into osteoblasts was to recapitulate the normal developmental ontogeny of osteoblasts using growth factors (e.g., bone morphogenetic proteins). In contrast, the effects of biophysical stimuli alone on such outcomes remain, at best, partially understood. This in vitro study examined and optimized the effects of alternating electric current alone on the differentiation of adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) at the cell population and single-cell levels. hMSCs, cultured on flat, indium-tin-oxide-coated glass in the absence of supplemented exogenous growth factors were exposed to alternating electric current (5–40 μA, 5–10 Hz frequency, sinusoidal waveform), for 1–24 h daily for up to 21 consecutive days. Compared to results obtained from the respective controls, hMSC populations exposed to the alternating electric current alone (in the absence of exogenous growth factors) expressed genes at various stages of differentiation (specifically, TAZ, Runx-2, Osterix, Osteopontin, and Osteocalcin). Optimal osteogenic differentiation was achieved when hMSCs were exposed to a 10 μA, 10 Hz alternating electric current for 6 h daily for up to 21 days. Exclusive osteodifferentiation was observed since genes for the chondrocyte (Collagen Type II) and adipocyte (FABP-4) lineages were not expressed under all conditions of the biophysical stimulus tested. Single cell mRNAs for 45 genes (indicative of hMSC differentiation) were monitored using Fluidigm Systems. Homogeneous expression of the early osteodifferentiation genes (specifically, TAZ and Runx-2) was observed in hMSCs exposed to the alternating electric current at 7 and

  12. STATs Shape the Active Enhancer Landscape of T Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Vahedi, Golnaz; Takahashi, Hayato; Nakayamada, Shingo; Sun, Hong-wei; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Kanno, Yuka; O’Shea, John J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Signaling pathways are intimately involved in cellular differentiation, allowing cells to respond to their environment by regulating gene expression. While enhancers are recognized as key elements that regulate selective gene expression, the interplay between signaling pathways and actively used enhancer elements is not clear. Here, we use CD4+ T cells as a model of differentiation, mapping the acquisition of cell-type-specific enhancer elements in T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cells. Our data establish that STAT proteins have a major impact on the acquisition of lineage-specific enhancers and the suppression of enhancers associated with alternative cell fates. Transcriptome analysis further supports a functional role for enhancers regulated by STATs. Importantly, expression of lineage-defining master regulators in STAT-deficient cells fails to fully recover the chromatin signature of STAT-dependent enhancers. Thus, these findings point to a critical role of STATs as environmental sensors in dynamically molding the specialized enhancer architecture of differentiating cells. PMID:23178119

  13. Topological defects in confined populations of spindle-shaped cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Most spindle-shaped cells (including smooth muscles and sarcomas) organize in vivo into well-aligned `nematic’ domains, creating intrinsic topological defects that may be used to probe the behaviour of these active nematic systems. Active non-cellular nematics have been shown to be dominated by activity, yielding complex chaotic flows. However, the regime in which live spindle-shaped cells operate, and the importance of cell-substrate friction in particular, remains largely unexplored. Using in vitro experiments, we show that these active cellular nematics operate in a regime in which activity is effectively damped by friction, and that the interaction between defects is controlled by the system’s elastic nematic energy. Due to the activity of the cells, these defects behave as self-propelled particles and pairwise annihilate until all displacements freeze as cell crowding increases. When confined in mesoscopic circular domains, the system evolves towards two identical +1/2 disclinations facing each other. The most likely reduced positions of these defects are independent of the size of the disk, the cells’ activity or even the cell type, but are well described by equilibrium liquid crystal theory. These cell-based systems thus operate in a regime more stable than other active nematics, which may be necessary for their biological function.

  14. Two biochemically distinct populations of histaminocytes separated by isokinetic sedimentation of dispersed rat gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Lemmi, C A; Wojdani, A; Adomian, G E; Lechago, J; Dascanio, G; Narhi, L O

    1985-07-01

    Two populations of histaminocytes, with different sedimentation rates (SR), were separated by a computer developed isokinetic gradient using dispersed rat gastric mucosal cells. Histamine content, histidine decarboxylase (HDC) activity and incorporation of radiolabelled histidine metabolites were used to assess the migration of specific cells throughout the gradients. One histaminocyte population, with cells of lower SR, contained high HDC activity and undetectable levels of histamine, whereas the other population, with cells of higher SR, contained lower HDC activity and high concentration of histamine. Both types of histaminocytes incorporated 3H-histidine metabolites. Electron microscopy showed that the fractions containing histaminocytes with lower SR had 3.5 times more endocrine ECL cells than the original population of dispersed fundic cells and lacked A and D cells, whereas the fractions with histaminocytes of higher SR were associated with a 2.7 times higher concentration of A and D cells and with a 7.7 times higher ratio of a variety of partial cells with a distinct mitochondrial morphology. These results are consistent with prior novel information regarding the separation of two populations of rat histaminocytes using different sedimentation techniques.

  15. Microplate cell-retaining methodology for high-content analysis of individual non-adherent unanchored cells in a population.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Assaf; Zurgil, Naomi; Hurevich, Ihar; Shafran, Yana; Afrimzon, Elena; Lebovich, Pnina; Deutsch, Mordechai

    2006-12-01

    A high throughput Microtiter plate Cell Retainer (MCR) has been developed to enable, for the first time, high-content, time-dependent analysis of the same single non-adherent and non-anchored cells in a large cell population, while bio-manipulating the cells. The identity of each cell in the investigated population is secured, even during bio-manipulation, by cell retention in a specially designed concave microlens, acting as a picoliter well (PW). The MCR technique combines micro-optical features and microtiter plate methodology. The array of PWs serves as the bottom of a microtiter plate, fitted with a unique flow damper element. The latter enables rapid fluid exchange without dislodging the cells from their original PWs, thus maintaining the cells' identity. Loading cell suspensions and reagents into the MCR is performed by simple pouring, followed by gravitational sedimentation and settling of cells into the PWs. Cell viability and cell division within the MCR were shown to be similar to those obtained under similar conditions in a standard microtiter plate. The efficiency of single cell occupancy in the MCR exceeded 90%. No cell dislodging was observed when comparing images before and after bio-manipulations (rinsing, staining, etc.). The MCR permits the performance of kinetic measurements on an individual cell basis. Data acquisition is governed by software, controlling microscope performance, stage position and image acquisition and analysis. The PW's unique micro-optical features enable rapid, simultaneous signal analysis of each individual cell, bypassing lengthy image analysis.

  16. Size distribution of retrovirally marked lineages matches prediction from population measurements of cell cycle behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Li; Hayes, Nancy L.; Takahashi, Takao; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Nowakowski, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate neuron production in the developing mouse neocortex were examined by using a retroviral lineage marking method to determine the sizes of the lineages remaining in the proliferating population of the ventricular zone during the period of neuron production. The distribution of clade sizes obtained experimentally in four different injection-survival paradigms (E11-E13, E11-E14, E11-E15, and E12-E15) from a total of over 500 labeled lineages was compared with that obtained from three models in which the average behavior of the proliferating population [i.e., the proportion of cells remaining in the proliferative population (P) vs. that exiting the proliferative population (Q)] was quantitatively related to lineage size distribution. In model 1, different proportions of asymmetric, symmetric terminal, and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions coexisted during the entire developmental period. In model 2, the developmental period was divided into two epochs: During the first, asymmetric and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions occurred, but, during the second, asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions occurred. In model 3, the shifts in P and Q are accounted for by changes in the proportions of the two types of symmetric cell divisions without the inclusion of any asymmetric cell divisions. The results obtained from the retroviral experiments were well accounted for by model 1 but not by model 2 or 3. These findings demonstrate that: 1) asymmetric and both types of symmetric cell divisions coexist during the entire period of neurogenesis in the mouse, 2) neuron production is regulated in the proliferative population by the independent decisions of the two daughter cells to reenter S phase, and 3) neurons are produced by both asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions. In addition, the findings mean that cell death and/or tangential movements of cells in the proliferative population occur at only a low rate and that there are no

  17. Tumourigenic canine osteosarcoma cell lines associated with frizzled-6 up-regulation and enhanced side population cell frequency

    PubMed Central

    de Sá Rodrigues, L. C.; Holmes, K. E.; Thompson, V.; Newton, M. A.; Stein, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    An increased serum alkaline phosphatase concentration is known to be associated with a negative prognosis in canine and human osteosarcoma. To expand upon previous studies regarding the biological relevance of increased serum alkaline phosphatase as a negative prognostic factor, xenogeneic heterotopic transplants were performed using six canine primary osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients with differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations (three normal and three increased). Three of the six cell lines were capable of generating tumours and tumour formation was independent of the serum alkaline phosphatase status of the cell line. Microarray analysis identified 379 genes as being differentially expressed between the tumourigenic and non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6 was upregulated to the greatest extent (7.78-fold) in tumourigenic cell lines compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6, a co-receptor for Wnt ligands has been associated with enhanced tumour-initiating cells and poor prognosis for other tumours. The increased expression of frizzled-6 was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and Western blot analysis. Additionally, the tumourigenic cell lines also had an increase in the percentage of side population cells compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines (5.89% versus 1.58%, respectively). There were no differences in tumourigenicity, frizzled-6 or percentage of side population cells noted between osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients of differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentration. However, to our knowledge this is the first study to identified frizzled-6 as a possible marker of osteosarcoma cell populations with enhanced tumourigenicity and side population cells. Future work will focus on defining the role of frizzled-6 in osteosarcoma tumourigenesis and tumour-initiating cells. PMID:25689105

  18. Tumourigenic canine osteosarcoma cell lines associated with frizzled-6 up-regulation and enhanced side population cell frequency.

    PubMed

    de Sá Rodrigues, L C; Holmes, K E; Thompson, V; Newton, M A; Stein, T J

    2017-03-01

    An increased serum alkaline phosphatase concentration is known to be associated with a negative prognosis in canine and human osteosarcoma. To expand upon previous studies regarding the biological relevance of increased serum alkaline phosphatase as a negative prognostic factor, xenogeneic heterotopic transplants were performed using six canine primary osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients with differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations (three normal and three increased). Three of the six cell lines were capable of generating tumours and tumour formation was independent of the serum alkaline phosphatase status of the cell line. Microarray analysis identified 379 genes as being differentially expressed between the tumourigenic and non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6 was upregulated to the greatest extent (7.78-fold) in tumourigenic cell lines compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6, a co-receptor for Wnt ligands has been associated with enhanced tumour-initiating cells and poor prognosis for other tumours. The increased expression of frizzled-6 was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and Western blot analysis. Additionally, the tumourigenic cell lines also had an increase in the percentage of side population cells compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines (5.89% versus 1.58%, respectively). There were no differences in tumourigenicity, frizzled-6 or percentage of side population cells noted between osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients of differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentration. However, to our knowledge this is the first study to identified frizzled-6 as a possible marker of osteosarcoma cell populations with enhanced tumourigenicity and side population cells. Future work will focus on defining the role of frizzled-6 in osteosarcoma tumourigenesis and tumour-initiating cells.

  19. Novel Microchip-Based Tools Facilitating Live Cell Imaging and Assessment of Functional Heterogeneity within NK Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Elin; Guldevall, Karolin; Olofsson, Per E; Frisk, Thomas; Christakou, Athanasia E; Wiklund, Martin; Onfelt, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Each individual has a heterogeneous pool of NK cells consisting of cells that may be specialized towards specific functional responses such as secretion of cytokines or killing of tumor cells. Many conventional methods are not fit to characterize heterogeneous populations as they measure the average response of all cells. Thus, there is a need for experimental platforms that provide single cell resolution. In addition, there are transient and stochastic variations in functional responses at the single cell level, calling for methods that allow studies of many events over extended periods of time. This paper presents a versatile microchip platform enabling long-term microscopic studies of individual NK cells interacting with target cells. Each microchip contains an array of microwells, optimized for medium or high-resolution time-lapse imaging of single or multiple NK and target cells, or for screening of thousands of isolated NK-target cell interactions. Individual NK cells confined with target cells in small microwells is a suitable setup for high-content screening and rapid assessment of heterogeneity within populations, while microwells of larger dimensions are appropriate for studies of NK cell migration and sequential interactions with multiple target cells. By combining the chip technology with ultrasonic manipulation, NK and target cells can be forced to interact and positioned with high spatial accuracy within individual microwells. This setup effectively and synchronously creates NK-target conjugates at hundreds of parallel positions in the microchip. Thus, this facilitates assessment of temporal aspects of NK-target cell interactions, e.g., conjugation, immune synapse formation, and cytotoxic events. The microchip platform presented here can be used to effectively address questions related to fundamental functions of NK cells that can lead to better understanding of how the behavior of individual cells add up to give a functional response at the

  20. An altered endometrial CD8 tissue resident memory T cell population in recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Southcombe, J. H.; Mounce, G.; McGee, K.; Elghajiji, A.; Brosens, J.; Quenby, S.; Child, T.; Granne, I.

    2017-01-01

    When trying to conceive 1% of couples have recurrent miscarriages, defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses. This is not accounted for by the known incidence of chromosomal aneuploidy in miscarriage, and it has been suggested that there is an immunological aetiology. The endometrial mucosa is populated by a variety of immune cells which in addition to providing host pathogen immunity must facilitate pregnancy. Here we characterise the endometrial CD8-T cell population during the embryonic window of implantation and find that the majority of cells are tissue resident memory T cells with high levels of CD69 and CD103 expression, proteins that prevent cells egress. We demonstrate that unexplained recurrent miscarriage is associated with significantly decreased expression of the T-cell co-receptor CD8 and tissue residency marker CD69. These cells differ from those found in control women, with less expression of CD127 indicating a lack of homeostatic cell control through IL-7 signalling. Nevertheless this population is resident in the endometrium of women who have RM, more than three months after the last miscarriage, indicating that the memory CD8-T cell population is altered in RM patients. This is the first evidence of a differing pre-pregnancy phenotype in endometrial immune cells in RM. PMID:28112260

  1. An altered endometrial CD8 tissue resident memory T cell population in recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Southcombe, J H; Mounce, G; McGee, K; Elghajiji, A; Brosens, J; Quenby, S; Child, T; Granne, I

    2017-01-23

    When trying to conceive 1% of couples have recurrent miscarriages, defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses. This is not accounted for by the known incidence of chromosomal aneuploidy in miscarriage, and it has been suggested that there is an immunological aetiology. The endometrial mucosa is populated by a variety of immune cells which in addition to providing host pathogen immunity must facilitate pregnancy. Here we characterise the endometrial CD8-T cell population during the embryonic window of implantation and find that the majority of cells are tissue resident memory T cells with high levels of CD69 and CD103 expression, proteins that prevent cells egress. We demonstrate that unexplained recurrent miscarriage is associated with significantly decreased expression of the T-cell co-receptor CD8 and tissue residency marker CD69. These cells differ from those found in control women, with less expression of CD127 indicating a lack of homeostatic cell control through IL-7 signalling. Nevertheless this population is resident in the endometrium of women who have RM, more than three months after the last miscarriage, indicating that the memory CD8-T cell population is altered in RM patients. This is the first evidence of a differing pre-pregnancy phenotype in endometrial immune cells in RM.

  2. From the cell cycle to population cycles in phytoplankton-nutrient interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pascual, M.; Caswell, H.

    1997-04-01

    The internal demographic structure of a population influences its dynamics and its response to the environment. Most models for phytoplankton ignore internal structure and group all cells in a single variable such as total biomass or density. However, a cell does have a life history, the cell division cycle. We investigate the significance of the cell cycle to phytoplankton population dynamics in a variable nutrient environment, using chemostate models. Following the transition point hypothesis, nutrient uptake affects cell development only within a limited segment of the cell cycle. Simulation results demonstrate oscillations in cell numbers and population structure generated by this interaction. When nutrient input is varied periodically, the population displays an aperiodic response with frequencies different from that of the forcing. These results also hold for a model that includes nutrient storage by the cells. These dynamics differ from those of traditional chemostate models and from cell cycle models driven by light cycles. Resource control of cell cycle progression may explain the time delays previously postulated to explain oscillatory transients in chemostate experiments. 78 refs., 22 figs.

  3. A Stochastic Cellular Automata Approach to Population Dynamics of Cells in a HIV Immune Response Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras B.

    1998-03-01

    A stochastic cellular automata (SCA) approach is introduced to study the growth and decay of cellular population in an immune response model relevant to HIV. Four cell types are considered: macrophages (M), helper cells (H), cytotoxic cells (C), and viral infected cells (V). Mobility of the cells is introduced and viral mutation is considered probabilistically. In absence of mutation, the population of the host cells, helper (N_H) and cytotxic (N_C) cells in particular, dominates over the viral population (N_V), i.e., N_H, NC > N_V, the immune system wins over the viral infection. Variation of cellular population with time exhibits oscillations. The amplitude of oscillations in variation of N_H, NC and NV with time decreases at high mobility even at low viral mutation; the rate of viral growth is nonmonotonic with NV > N_H, NC in the long time regime. The viral population is much higher than that of the host cells at higher mutation rate, a possible cause of AIDS.

  4. A general mathematical framework to model generation structure in a population of asynchronously dividing cells.

    PubMed

    León, Kalet; Faro, Jose; Carneiro, Jorge

    2004-08-21

    In otherwise homogeneous cell populations, individual cells undergo asynchronous cell cycles. In recent years, interest in this fundamental observation has been boosted by the wide usage of CFSE, a fluorescent dye that allows the precise estimation by flow cytometry of the number of divisions performed by different cells in a population, and thus the generation structure. In this work, we propose two general mathematical frameworks to model the time evolution of generation structure in a cell population. The first modeling framework is more descriptive and assumes that cell division time is distributed in the cell population, due to intrinsic noise in the molecular machinery in individual cells; while the second framework assumes that asynchrony in cell division stems from randomness in the interactions individual cells make with environmental agents. We reduce these formalisms to recover two preexistent models, which build on each of the hypotheses. When confronted to kinetics data on CFSE labeled cells taken from literature, these models can fit precursor frequency distributions at each measured time point. However, they fail to fit the whole kinetics of precursor frequency distributions. In contrast, two extensions of those models, derived also from our general formalisms, fit equally well both the whole kinetics and individual profiles at each time point, providing a biologically reasonable estimation of parameters. We prove that the distribution of cell division times is not Gaussian, as previously proposed, but is better described by an asymmetric distribution such as the Gamma distribution. We show also that the observed cell asynchrony could be explained by the existence of a single transitional event during cell division. Based on these results, we suggest new ways of combining theoretical and experimental work to assess how much of noise in internal machinery of the cell and interactions with the environmental agents contribute to the asynchrony in cell

  5. Distinctions Among Circulating Antibody Secreting Cell Populations, Including B-1 Cells, in Human Adult Peripheral Blood1

    PubMed Central

    Quách, Tâm D.; Rodríguez-Zhurbenko, Nely; Hopkins, Thomas J.; Guo, Xiaoti; Vázquez, Ana María Hernández; Li, Wentian; Rothstein, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Human antibody secreting cell (ASC) populations in circulation are not well studied. In addition to B-1 (CD20+CD27+CD38lo/intCD43+) cell and the conventional plasmablast (CD20-CD27hiCD38hi) cell populations, here we identified a novel B cell population termed 20+38hi B cells (CD20+CD27hiCD38hi) that spontaneously secretes antibody. At steady state, 20+38hi B cells are distinct from plasmablasts on the basis of CD20 expression, amount of antibody production, frequency of mutation, and diversity of B cell receptor repertoire. However, cytokine treatment of 20+38hi B cells induces loss of CD20 and acquisition of CD138, suggesting that 20+38hi B cells are precursors to plasmablasts, or pre-plasmablasts. We then evaluated similarities and differences between CD20+CD27+CD38lo/intCD43+ B-1 cells, CD20+CD27hiCD38hi 20+38hi B cells, CD20-CD27hiCD38hi plasmablasts, and CD20+CD27+CD38lo/intCD43- memory B cells. We found that B-1 cells differ from 20+38hi B cells and plasmablasts in numbers of ways, including antigen expression, morphological appearance, transcriptional profiling, antibody skewing, antibody repertoire, and secretory response to stimulation. In terms of gene expression, B-1 cells align more closely with memory B cells than with 20+38hi B cells or plasmablasts, but differ in that memory B cells do not express antibody secretion related genes. We found that, B-1 cell antibodies utilize Vh4-34, which is often associated with autoreactivity, 3 to 6-fold more often than other B cell populations. Along with selective production of IgM anti-PC, this data suggests that human B-1 cells might be preferentially selected for autoreactivity/natural-specificity. In sum, our results indicate that human healthy adult peripheral blood at steady state consists of 3 distinct ASC populations. PMID:26740107

  6. Aligning bona fide dendritic cell populations across species.

    PubMed

    Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Wang, Lin-Fa; Ginhoux, Florent

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen sensing and presenting cells that link innate and adaptive immunity. Consisting of functionally specialized subsets, they form a complex cellular network capable of integrating multiple environmental signals leading to immunity or tolerance. Much of DC research so far has been carried out in mice and increasing efforts are now being devoted to translating the findings into humans and other species. Recent studies have aligned these cellular networks across species at multiple levels from phenotype, gene expression program, ontogeny and functional specializations. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the definition of bona fide DC subsets across species. The understanding of functional similarities and differences of specific DC subsets in different animals not only brings light in the field of DC biology, but also paves the way for the design of future effective therapeutic strategies targeting these cells.

  7. Assessing Four Levels of Creative Mathematical Ability in Israeli Adolescents Utilizing Out-of-School Activities: A Circular Three-Stage Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livne, Nava L.; Milgram, Roberta M.

    2000-01-01

    A questionnaire of out-of-school activities was developed to assess mathematical creative ability at four levels using a three-stage circular technique. Israeli high school students (n=139) reported whether they had performed the activities. Resulting data provided evidence of the construct validity of a 12-item scale for assessing creative…

  8. The Flawed Four-Level Evaluation Model [and] Invited Reaction: Reaction to Holton Article [and] Final Word: Response to Reaction to Holton Article.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holton, Elwood F., III; Kirkpatrick, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    Holton critiques Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation model and presents a new model that accounts for primary intervening variables. Kirkpatrick argues that the criticism fails to account for his model's practical utility. Holton elaborates on the distinction between a model and a taxonomy. (SK)

  9. Primmorphs from archaeocytes-dominant cell population of the sponge hymeniacidon perleve: improved cell proliferation and spiculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Cao, Xupeng; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Xingju; Jin, Meifang

    2003-12-05

    Marine sponges (Porifera) possess an extraordinary diversity of bioactive metabolites for new drug discovery and development. In vitro cultivation of sponge cells in a bioreactor system is very attractive for the sustainable production of sponge-derived bioactive metabolites; however, it is still a challenging task. The recent establishment of sponge primmorphs, multicellular aggregates from dissociated mixed-cell population (MCP), has been widely acknowledged to hold great promise for cultivation in vitro. Here we present a new method to establish an in vitro sponge primmorph culture from archaeocyte-dominant cell population (ADCP) enriched by a Ficoll gradient, rather than a mixed-cell population (MCP). Our rationale is based upon the totipotency (the ability of a cell to differentiate into other cell types) of archaeocyte cells and the different biological functions of various sponge cell types. A sponge, Hymeniacidon perleve collected from the China Yellow Sea was used as a model system for this investigation. Distinct dynamics of primmorph formation were observed while significant increases in DNA synthesis, cell proliferation (up to threefold), and cell growth (up to fourfold) were achieved. Furthermore, a time-dependent spiculogenesis was clearly demonstrated in our longterm culture, indicating high metabolic activity of primmorphs from the ADCP. This new method represents an important step forward to advance sponge cell culture in vitro that may lead to commercial exploitation of sponge-derived drugs.

  10. Simultaneous Isolation of Three Different Stem Cell Populations from Murine Skin

    PubMed Central

    Forni, Maria Fernanda; Ramos Maia Lobba, Aline; Pereira Ferreira, Alexandre Hamilton; Sogayar, Mari Cleide

    2015-01-01

    The skin is a rich source of readily accessible stem cells. The level of plasticity afforded by these cells is becoming increasingly important as the potential of stem cells in Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine continues to be explored. Several protocols described single type stem cell isolation from skin; however, none of them afforded simultaneous isolation of more than one population. Herein, we describe the simultaneous isolation and characterization of three stem cell populations from the dermis and epidermis of murine skin, namely Epidermal Stem Cells (EpiSCs), Skin-derived Precursors (SKPs) and Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs). The simultaneous isolation was possible through a simple protocol based on culture selection techniques. These cell populations are shown to be capable of generating chondrocytes, adipocytes, osteocytes, terminally differentiated keratinocytes, neurons and glia, rendering this protocol suitable for the isolation of cells for tissue replenishment and cell based therapies. The advantages of this procedure are far-reaching since the skin is not only the largest organ in the body, but also provides an easily accessible source of stem cells for autologous graft. PMID:26462205

  11. Simultaneous Isolation of Three Different Stem Cell Populations from Murine Skin.

    PubMed

    Forni, Maria Fernanda; Ramos Maia Lobba, Aline; Pereira Ferreira, Alexandre Hamilton; Sogayar, Mari Cleide

    2015-01-01

    The skin is a rich source of readily accessible stem cells. The level of plasticity afforded by these cells is becoming increasingly important as the potential of stem cells in Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine continues to be explored. Several protocols described single type stem cell isolation from skin; however, none of them afforded simultaneous isolation of more than one population. Herein, we describe the simultaneous isolation and characterization of three stem cell populations from the dermis and epidermis of murine skin, namely Epidermal Stem Cells (EpiSCs), Skin-derived Precursors (SKPs) and Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs). The simultaneous isolation was possible through a simple protocol based on culture selection techniques. These cell populations are shown to be capable of generating chondrocytes, adipocytes, osteocytes, terminally differentiated keratinocytes, neurons and glia, rendering this protocol suitable for the isolation of cells for tissue replenishment and cell based therapies. The advantages of this procedure are far-reaching since the skin is not only the largest organ in the body, but also provides an easily accessible source of stem cells for autologous graft.

  12. Regulatory effects on the population dynamics and wave propagation in a cell lineage model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Xiang; Ma, Yu-Qiang; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2016-03-21

    We consider the interplay of cell proliferation, cell differentiation (and de-differentiation), cell movement, and the effect of feedback regulations on the population and propagation dynamics of different cell types in a cell lineage model. Cells are assumed to secrete and respond to negative feedback molecules which act as a control on the cell lineage. The cell densities are described by coupled reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, and the propagating wave front solutions in one dimension are investigated analytically and by numerical solutions. In particular, wavefront propagation speeds are obtained analytically and verified by numerical solutions of the equations. The emphasis is on the effects of the feedback regulations on different stages in the cell lineage. It is found that when the progenitor cell is negatively regulated, the populations of the cell lineage are strongly down-regulated with the steady growth rate of the progenitor cell being driven to zero beyond a critical regulatory strength. An analytic expression for the critical regulation strength in terms of the model parameters is derived and verified by numerical solutions. On the other hand, if the inhibition is acting on the differentiated cells, the change in the population dynamics and wave propagation speed is small. In addition, it is found that only the propagating speed of the progenitor cells is affected by the regulation when the diffusion of the differentiated cells is large. In the presence of de-differentiation, the effect on down-regulating the progenitor population is weakened and there is no effect on the propagation speed due to regulation, suggesting that the effect of regulatory control is diminished by de-differentiation pathways.

  13. Microfluidic isolation of cancer-cell-derived microvesicles from hetergeneous extracellular shed vesicle populations

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Steven M.; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles, including exosomes and microvesicles, are disseminated throughout the body and represent an important conduit of cell communication. Cancer-cell-derived microvesicles have potential as a cancer biomarker as they help shape the tumor microenvironment to promote the growth of the primary tumor and prime the metastatic niche. It is likely that, in cancer cell cultures, the two constituent extracellular shed vesicle subpopulations, observed in dynamic light scattering, represent an exosome population and a cancer-cell-specific microvesicle population and that extracellular shed vesicle size provides information about provenance and cargo. We have designed and implemented a novel microfluidic technology that separates microvesicles, as a function of diameter, from heterogeneous populations of cancer-cell-derived extracellular shed vesicles. We measured cargo carried by the microvesicle subpopulation processed through this microfluidic platform. Such analyses could enable future investigations to more accurately and reliably determine provenance, functional activity, and mechanisms of transformation in cancer. PMID:25342569

  14. Simulating invasion with cellular automata: connecting cell-scale and population-scale properties.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Matthew J; Merrifield, Alistair; Landman, Kerry A; Hughes, Barry D

    2007-08-01

    Interpretive and predictive tools are needed to assist in the understanding of cell invasion processes. Cell invasion involves cell motility and proliferation, and is central to many biological processes including developmental morphogenesis and tumor invasion. Experimental data can be collected across a wide range of scales, from the population scale to the individual cell scale. Standard continuum or discrete models used in isolation are insufficient to capture this wide range of data. We develop a discrete cellular automata model of invasion with experimentally motivated rules. The cellular automata algorithm is applied to a narrow two-dimensional lattice and simulations reveal the formation of invasion waves moving with constant speed. The simulation results are averaged in one dimension-these data are used to identify the time history of the leading edge to characterize the population-scale wave speed. This allows the relationship between the population-scale wave speed and the cell-scale parameters to be determined. This relationship is analogous to well-known continuum results for Fisher's equation. The cellular automata algorithm also produces individual cell trajectories within the invasion wave that are analogous to cell trajectories obtained with new experimental techniques. Our approach allows both the cell-scale and population-scale properties of invasion to be predicted in a way that is consistent with multiscale experimental data. Furthermore we suggest that the cellular automata algorithm can be used in conjunction with individual data to overcome limitations associated with identifying cell motility mechanisms using continuum models alone.

  15. Clonal analysis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with "cytogenetically independent" cell populations.

    PubMed Central

    Pui, C H; Raskind, W H; Kitchingman, G R; Raimondi, S C; Behm, F G; Murphy, S B; Crist, W M; Fialkow, P J; Williams, D L

    1989-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is generally regarded as a clonal disease in which a single abnormal progenitor cell gives rise to neoplastic progeny. Five of 463 cases of childhood ALL with adequately banded leukemic cells were found to have two cytogenetically independent cell populations. In addition, two of the four cases tested had more than two rearranged immunoglobulin genes and (or) T cell receptor genes. To investigate the clonality of these unusual leukemias, we examined the neoplastic cells for X-linked markers extrinsic to the disease. Leukemic cells from each of the three patients heterozygous for an X-linked, restriction fragment length polymorphism showed a single active parental allele, suggesting that both apparently independent cell populations developed from a common progenitor. These cases provide evidence that leukemogenesis involves a multistep process of mutation and suggest that karyotypic abnormalities may be a late event of malignant transformation. Images PMID:2566623

  16. Infection Spread and Virus Release in Vitro in Cell Populations as a System with Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Juan G. Diaz

    The comprehension of the innate immune system of cell populations is not only of interest to understand systems in vivo but also in vitro, for example, in the control of the release of viral particles for the production of vaccines. In this report I introduce a model, based on dynamical networks, that simulates the cell signaling responsible for this innate immune response and its effect on the infection spread and virus production. The central motivation is to represent a cell population that is constantly mixed in a bio-reactor where there is a cell-to-cell signaling of cytokines (which are proteins responsible for the activation of the antiviral response inside the cell). Such signaling allows the definition of clusters of linked immune cells. Additionally, depending on the density of links, it is possible to identify critical threshold parameters associated to a percolation phase transition. I show that the control of this antiviral response is equivalent to a percolation process.

  17. Variability in Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population in Cultured Chicken Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Vaughn, Jeffrey R.

    1998-01-01

    Investigations into expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) in chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture were initiated because several beta-adrenergic receptor agonists are known to increase skeletal muscle protein deposition in avian and mammalian species. During initial attempts to study the bAR population on the surface of chicken skeletal muscle cells, we observed a high degree of variability that was later found to be the result of using different batches of horse serum in the cell culture media. The separation between total binding and nonspecific binding in cells grown in two serum samples was approximately two-fold The number of nuclei within multinucleated myotubes was not significantly different in cells grown in the two serum samples. To investigate whether these two sera had an effect on coupling efficiency between bAR population and cAMP production, the ability of these cells to synthesize cAMP was also assessed. Despite the two-fold difference in receptor population, the ability of these cells to synthesize cAMP was not significantly different. Because of the possible link between bAR population and muscle protein, we also determined if the quantity of the major skeletal muscle protein, myosin, was affected by conditions that so drastically affected the bAR population. The quantity of myosin heavy chain was not significantly different.

  18. Distinct populations of quiescent and proliferative pancreatic β-cells identified by HOTcre mediated labeling

    PubMed Central

    Hesselson, Daniel; Anderson, Ryan M.; Beinat, Marine; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are critical regulators of glucose homeostasis, and they vary dramatically in their glucose stimulated metabolic response and levels of insulin secretion. It is unclear whether these parameters are influenced by the developmental origin of individual β-cells. Using HOTcre, a Cre-based genetic switch that uses heat-induction to precisely control the temporal expression of transgenes, we labeled two populations of β-cells within the developing zebrafish pancreas. These populations originate in distinct pancreatic buds and exhibit gene expression profiles suggesting distinct functions during development. We find that the dorsal bud derived β-cells are quiescent and exhibit a marked decrease in insulin expression postembryonically. In contrast, ventral bud derived β-cells proliferate actively, and maintain high levels of insulin expression compared with dorsal bud derived β-cells. Therapeutic strategies to regulate β-cell proliferation and function are required to cure pathological states that result from excessive β-cell proliferation (e.g., insulinoma) or insufficient β-cell mass (e.g., diabetes mellitus). Our data reveal the existence of distinct populations of β-cells in vivo and should help develop better strategies to regulate β-cell differentiation and proliferation. PMID:19706417

  19. Proteomics analysis reveals a Th17-prone cell population in presymptomatic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Liu, Liangyi; Gomez, Aurelie; Zhang, Jilu; Zhang, Qing; Choi, Sung W.; Greenson, Joel K.; Liu, Chen; Jiang, Di; Virts, Elizabeth; Kelich, Stephanie L.; Chu, Hong Wei; Flynn, Ryan; Blazar, Bruce R.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Hanash, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal graft-versus-host-disease (GI-GVHD) is a life-threatening complication occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and a blood biomarker that permits stratification of HCT patients according to their risk of developing GI-GVHD would greatly aid treatment planning. Through in-depth, large-scale proteomic profiling of presymptomatic samples, we identified a T cell population expressing both CD146, a cell adhesion molecule, and CCR5, a chemokine receptor that is upregulated as early as 14 days after transplantation in patients who develop GI-GVHD. The CD4+CD146+CCR5+ T cell population is Th17 prone and increased by ICOS stimulation. shRNA knockdown of CD146 in T cells reduced their transmigration through endothelial cells, and maraviroc, a CCR5 inhibitor, reduced chemotaxis of the CD4+CD146+CCR5+ T cell population toward CCL14. Mice that received CD146 shRNA–transduced human T cells did not lose weight, showed better survival, and had fewer CD4+CD146+CCR5+ T cells and less pathogenic Th17 infiltration in the intestine, even compared with mice receiving maraviroc with control shRNA–transduced human T cells. Furthermore, the frequency of CD4+CD146+CCR5+ Tregs was increased in GI-GVHD patients, and these cells showed increased plasticity toward Th17 upon ICOS stimulation. Our findings can be applied to early risk stratification, as well as specific preventative therapeutic strategies following HCT. PMID:27195312

  20. HLA-targeted flow cytometric sorting of blood cells allows separation of pure and viable microchimeric cell populations.

    PubMed

    Drabbels, Jos J M; van de Keur, Carin; Kemps, Berit M; Mulder, Arend; Scherjon, Sicco A; Claas, Frans H J; Eikmans, Michael

    2011-11-10

    Microchimerism is defined by the presence of low levels of nonhost cells in a person. We developed a reliable method for separating viable microchimeric cells from the host environment. For flow cytometric cell sorting, HLA antigens were targeted with human monoclonal HLA antibodies (mAbs). Optimal separation of microchimeric cells (present at a proportion as low as 0.01% in artificial mixtures) was obtained with 2 different HLA mAbs, one targeting the chimeric cells and the other the background cells. To verify purity of separated cell populations, flow-sorted fractions of 1000 cells were processed for DNA analysis by HLA-allele-specific and Y-chromosome-directed real-time quantitative PCR assays. After sorting, PCR signals of chimeric DNA markers in the positive fractions were significantly enhanced compared with those in the presort samples, and they were similar to those in 100% chimeric control samples. Next, we demonstrate applicability of HLA-targeted FACS sorting after pregnancy by separating chimeric maternal cells from child umbilical cord mononuclear cells. Targeting allelic differences with anti-HLA mAbs with FACS sorting allows maximal enrichment of viable microchimeric cells from a background cell population. The current methodology enables reliable microchimeric cell detection and separation in clinical specimens.

  1. Antibiotic regimen based on population analysis of residing persister cells eradicates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shoufeng; Hay, Iain D; Cameron, David R; Speir, Mary; Cui, Bintao; Su, Feifei; Peleg, Anton Y; Lithgow, Trevor; Deighton, Margaret A; Qu, Yue

    2015-12-21

    Biofilm formation is a major pathogenicity strategy of Staphylococcus epidermidis causing various medical-device infections. Persister cells have been implicated in treatment failure of such infections. We sought to profile bacterial subpopulations residing in S. epidermidis biofilms, and to establish persister-targeting treatment strategies to eradicate biofilms. Population analysis was performed by challenging single biofilm cells with antibiotics at increasing concentrations ranging from planktonic minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) to biofilm MBCs (MBCbiofilm). Two populations of "persister cells" were observed: bacteria that survived antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for 24/48 hours were referred to as dormant cells; those selected with antibiotics at 8 X MICs for 3 hours (excluding dormant cells) were defined as tolerant-but-killable (TBK) cells. Antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells were tested in vitro for their efficacies in eradicating persister cells and intact biofilms. This study confirmed that there are at least three subpopulations within a S. epidermidis biofilm: normal cells, dormant cells, and TBK cells. Biofilms comprise more TBK cells and dormant cells than their log-planktonic counterparts. Using antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells, i.e. effective antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for an extended period, might eradicate S. epidermidis biofilms. Potential uses for this strategy are in antibiotic lock techniques and inhaled aerosolized antibiotics.

  2. Middle ear adenomas stain for two cell populations and lack myoepithelial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lott Limbach, Abberly A; Hoschar, Aaron P; Thompson, Lester D R; Stelow, Edward B; Chute, Deborah J

    2012-09-01

    Middle ear adenomas (MEAs) are benign neoplasms along a spectrum with neuroendocrine neoplasms (carcinoid tumors). Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for myoepithelial markers has not been reported in these tumors. The archives of the Cleveland Clinic, University of Virginia and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology were retrospectively searched for tumors arising within the middle ear with material available for IHC staining. Twelve cases of MEAs, four cases of jugulotympanic paragangliomas (JPGs), 10 cases of ceruminous adenomas (CAs) and four cases of ceruminous adenocarcinomas (CACs) were obtained. IHC staining was performed for smooth muscle actin (SMA), p63, S-100 protein, cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6), and cytokeratin 7 (CK7). The MEAs were positive for: CK7 (92 %, luminal), CK5/6 (92 %, abluminal), p63 (83 %, abluminal), and negative for SMA and S-100 protein. The JPGs were negative for CK7, CK5/6, p63 and SMA; S-100 protein highlighted sustentacular cells. The CAs were positive for: CK7 (100 %, luminal), CK5/6 (100 %, abluminal), S-100 protein (80 %, abluminal), p63 (100 %, abluminal), and SMA (90 %, abluminal). CACs demonstrated two patterns, (1) adenoid cystic carcinoma-type: positive for CK7 (100 %, luminal), CK5/6, S-100 protein, p63, and SMA (all 100 %, abluminal); and (2) conventional-type: CK7 (50 % luminal), and no CK5/6, SMA, S-100 protein, or p63 expression. The IHC profile of MEAs suggests that these tumors harbor at least two cell populations, including luminal and basal cells. However, unlike ceruminous adenomas, MEAs lack true myoepithelial differentiation given the absence of S-100 protein and SMA staining in all cases.

  3. Predators inhibit brain cell proliferation in natural populations of electric fish, Brachyhypopomus occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Kent D; Tran, Alex; Ragazzi, Michael A; Krahe, Rüdiger; Salazar, Vielka L

    2016-02-10

    Compared with laboratory environments, complex natural environments promote brain cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Predators are one important feature of many natural environments, but, in the laboratory, predatory stimuli tend to inhibit brain cell proliferation. Often, laboratory predatory stimuli also elevate plasma glucocorticoids, which can then reduce brain cell proliferation. However, it is unknown how natural predators affect cell proliferation or whether glucocorticoids mediate the neurogenic response to natural predators. We examined brain cell proliferation in six populations of the electric fish, Brachyhypopomus occidentalis, exposed to three forms of predator stimuli: (i) natural variation in the density of predatory catfish; (ii) tail injury, presumably from predation attempts; and (iii) the acute stress of capture. Populations with higher predation pressure had lower density of proliferating (PCNA+) cells, and fish with injured tails had lower proliferating cell density than those with intact tails. However, plasma cortisol did not vary at the population level according to predation pressure or at the individual level according to tail injury. Capture stress significantly increased cortisol, but only marginally decreased cell proliferation. Thus, it appears that the presence of natural predators inhibits brain cell proliferation, but not via mechanisms that depend on changes in basal cortisol levels. This study is the first demonstration of predator-induced alteration of brain cell proliferation in a free-living vertebrate.

  4. Optimized Stem Cell Detection Using the DyeCycle-Triggered Side Population Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Maximilian; Wolf, Dominik; Sopper, Sieghart

    2016-01-01

    Tissue and cancer stem cells are highly attractive target populations for regenerative medicine and novel potentially curative anticancer therapeutics. In order to get a better understanding of stem cell biology and function, it is essential to reproducibly identify these stem cells from biological samples for subsequent characterization or isolation. ABC drug transporter expression is a hallmark of stem cells. This is utilized to identify (cancer) stem cells by exploiting their dye extrusion properties, which is referred to as the "side population assay." Initially described for high-end flow cytometers equipped with ultraviolet lasers, this technique is now also amenable for a broader scientific community, owing to the increasing availability of violet laser-furnished cytometers and the advent of DyeCycle Violet (DCV). Here, we describe important technical aspects of the DCV-based side population assay and discuss potential pitfalls and caveats helping scientists to establish a valid and reproducible DCV-based side population assay. In addition, we investigate the suitability of blue laser-excitable DyeCycle dyes for side population detection. This knowledge will help to improve and standardize detection and isolation of stem cells based on their expression of ABC drug transporters.

  5. Skin telocytes versus fibroblasts: two distinct dermal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yuli; Zhu, Zaihua; Zheng, Yonghua; Wan, Weiguo; Manole, Catalin G; Zhang, Qiangqiang

    2015-01-01

    It is already accepted that telocytes (TCs) represent a new type of interstitial cells in human dermis. In normal skin, TCs have particular spatial relations with different dermal structures such as blood vessels, hair follicles, arrector pili muscles or segments of sebaceous and/or eccrine sweat glands. The distribution and the density of TCs is affected in various skin pathological conditions. Previous studies mentioned the particular (ultra)structure of TCs and also their immunophenotype, miR imprint or proteome, genome or secretome features. As fibroblast is the most common intersitital cell (also in human dermis), a dedicated comparison between human skin TCs and fibroblasts (Fbs) was required to be performed. In this study, using different techniques, we document several points of difference between human dermis TCs and Fbs. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we demonstrated TCs with their hallmark cellular prolongations – telopodes. Thus, we showed their ultrastructural distinctiveness from Fbs. By RayBio Human Cytokine Antibody Array V analyses performed on the supernatant from separately cultured TCs and Fbs, we detected the cytokine profile of both cell types, individually. Two of 79 detected cytokines – epithelial-derived neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 – were 1.5 times higher in the supernatant of TCs (comparing with Fbs). On the other hand, 37 cytokines were at least 1.5 higher in Fbs supernatant (comparing with TCs), and among them six cytokines – interleukin 5, monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3), MCP-4, macrophage inflammatory protein-3, angiogenin, thrombopoietin – being 9.5 times higher (results also confirmed by ELISA testing). In summary, using different techniques, we showed that human dermal TCs and Fbs are different in terms of ultrastructure and cytokine profile. PMID:26414534

  6. Sensitivity of bone cell populations to weightlessness and simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. E.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Gonsalves, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    A rat suspension model for simulating certain aspects of weightlessness is discussed. Perturbations in physiological systems induced by this head down suspension model are verified by flight data. Findings of a suppression of osteoblast differentiation help explain the inhibition of bone formation inflight and during Earth-bound simulations. Since the anatomical site for these studies was in the maxilla, which is gravity loaded but non weightbearing in ground-based simulations, the similarity of bone cell kinetic changes, both inflight and in the ground-based model, suggest that fluid shifts rather than unloading may play an important role in bone alterations, at least at this sampling site.

  7. Outcomes Evaluation of Zero-Profile Devices Compared to Stand-Alone PEEK Cages for the Treatment of Three- and Four-Level Cervical Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paschel, Erin; Mashaly, Hazem; Sabry, Hatem; Jalalod'din, Hasan; Saoud, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a well-accepted treatment option for patients with cervical spine disease. Three- and four-level discectomies are known to be associated with a higher complication rate and lower fusion rate than single-level surgery. This study was performed to evaluate and compare zero-profile fixation and stand-alone PEEK cages for three- and four-level ACDF. Methods: Two cohorts of patients who underwent ACDF for the treatment of three- and four-level disease were compared. Thirty-three patients underwent implantation of zero-profile devices that included titanium screw fixation (Group A). Thirty-five patients underwent implantation of stand-alone PEEK cages without any form of screw fixation (Group B). Results: In Group A, twenty-seven patients underwent a three-level and six patients a four-level ACDF, with a total of 105 levels. In Group B, thirty patients underwent a three-level and five patients underwent a four-level ACDF, with a total number of 110 levels. In Group A, the mean preoperative visual analog scale score (VAS) for arm pain was 6.4 (range 3-8), and the mean postoperative VAS for arm pain decreased to 2.5 (range 1-7). In group B, the mean preoperative VAS of arm pain was 7.1 (range 3-10), and the mean postoperative VAS of arm pain decreased to 2 (range 0-4). In Group A, four patients (12%) developed dysphagia, and in Group B, three patients (9%) developed dysphagia.  Conclusions: This study found zero-profile instrumentation and PEEK cages to be both safe and effective for patients who underwent three- and four-level ACDF, comparable to reported series using plate devices. Rates of dysphagia for the cohort were much lower than reports using plate devices. Zero-profile segmental fixation devices and PEEK cages may be considered as viable alternatives over plate fixation for patients requiring multi-level anterior cervical fusion surgery. PMID:27738574

  8. Dual-color HIV reporters trace a population of latently infected cells and enable their purification.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Vincenzo; Chavez, Leonard; Laurent, Timothy; Ding, Sheng; Verdin, Eric

    2013-11-01

    HIV latency constitutes the main barrier for clearing HIV infection from patients. Our inability to recognize and isolate latently infected cells hinders the study of latent HIV. We engineered two HIV-based viral reporters expressing different fluorescent markers: one HIV promoter-dependent marker for productive HIV infection, and a second marker under a constitutive promoter independent of HIV promoter activity. Infection of cells with these viruses allows the identification and separation of latently infected cells from uninfected and productively infected cells. These reporters are sufficiently sensitive and robust for high-throughput screening to identify drugs that reactivate latent HIV. These reporters can be used in primary CD4 T lymphocytes and reveal a rare population of latently infected cells responsive to physiological stimuli. In summary, our HIV-1 reporters enable visualization and purification of latent-cell populations and open up new perspectives for studies of latent HIV infection.

  9. Dual-Color HIV Reporters Trace a Population of Latently Infected Cells and Enable Their Purification

    PubMed Central

    Calvanese, Vincenzo; Chavez, Leonard; Laurent, Timothy; Ding, Sheng; Verdin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY HIV latency constitutes the main barrier for clearing HIV infection from patients. Our inability to recognize and isolate latently infected cells hinders the study of latent HIV. We engineered two HIV-based viral reporters expressing different fluorescent markers: one HIV promoter-dependent marker for productive HIV infection, and a second marker under a constitutive promoter independent of HIV promoter activity. Infection of cells with these viruses allows the identification and separation of latently-infected cells from uninfected and productively infected cells. These reporters are sufficiently sensitive and robust for high-throughput screening to identify drugs that reactivate latent HIV. These reporters can be used in primary CD4 T lymphocytes and reveal a rare population of latently infected cells responsive to physiological stimuli. In summary, our HIV-1 reporters enable visualization and purification of latent cell populations and open up new perspectives for studies of latent HIV infection. PMID:24074592

  10. Notch inhibition suppresses nasopharyngeal carcinoma by depleting cancer stem-like side population cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shudong; Zhang, Ruxin; Liu, Fenye; Wang, Hong; Wu, Jing; Wang, Yanqing

    2012-08-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) is responsible for the initiation, proliferation and radiation resistance. Side population (SP) cells are a rare subset of cells enriched with CSCs. The targeting of key signaling pathways that are active in CSCs is a therapeutic approach to treating cancer. Notch signaling is important for the self-renewal and maintenance of stem cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that downregulation of Notch signaling could enhance radiosensitivity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells. In this study, we found that Notch signaling was highly activated in SP cells compared with that of non-SP (NSP) cells of NPC. Therefore, Notch inhibition could reduce the proportion of SP cells. As SP cells decreased, proliferation, anti-apoptosis and tumorigenesis were also decreased. This study shows that Notch inhibition may be a promising clinical approach in CSC-targeting therapy for NPC.

  11. a Simple Evolutionary Model for Cancer Cell Population and its Implications on Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Peng; Wen, Shutang; Li, Baoshun; Li, Yuxiao

    We established a simple evolutionary model based on the cancer stem cell hypothesis. By taking cellular interactions into consideration, we introduced the evolutionary games theory into the quasispecies model. The fitness values are determined by both genotypes and cellular interactions. In the evolutionary model, a cancer cell population can evolve in different patterns. For single peak intrinsic fitness landscape, the evolution pattern can transit with increasing differentiation probability from malignant cells to benign cells in four different modes. For a large enough value of differentiation probability, the evolution is always the case that the malignant cells extinct ultimately, which might give some implications on cancer therapy.

  12. Eukaryotic transcriptional dynamics: from single molecules to cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, Antoine; Chow, Carson C.; Singer, Robert H.; Larson, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is achieved through combinatorial interactions between regulatory elements in the human genome and a vast range of factors that modulate the recruitment and activity of RNA polymerase. Experimental approaches for studying transcription in vivo now extend from single-molecule techniques to genome-wide measurements. Parallel to these developments is the need for testable quantitative and predictive models for understanding gene regulation. These conceptual models must also provide insight into the dynamics of transcription and the variability that is observed at the single-cell level. In this Review, we discuss recent results on transcriptional regulation and also the models those results engender. We show how a non-equilibrium description informs our view of transcription by explicitly considering time-and energy-dependence at the molecular level. PMID:23835438

  13. Influence of Molecular Noise on the Growth of Single Cells and Bacterial Populations

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Mischa; Creutziger, Martin; Lenz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    During the last decades experimental studies have revealed that single cells of a growing bacterial population are significantly exposed to molecular noise. Important sources for noise are low levels of metabolites and enzymes that cause significant statistical variations in the outcome of biochemical reactions. In this way molecular noise affects biological processes such as nutrient uptake, chemotactic tumbling behavior, or gene expression of genetically identical cells. These processes give rise to significant cell-to-cell variations of many directly observable quantities such as protein levels, cell sizes or individual doubling times. In this study we theoretically explore if there are evolutionary benefits of noise for a growing population of bacteria. We analyze different situations where noise is either suppressed or where it affects single cell behavior. We consider two specific examples that have been experimentally observed in wild-type Escherichia coli cells: (i) the precision of division site placement (at which molecular noise is highly suppressed) and (ii) the occurrence of noise-induced phenotypic variations in fluctuating environments. Surprisingly, our analysis reveals that in these specific situations both regulatory schemes [i.e. suppression of noise in example (i) and allowance of noise in example (ii)] do not lead to an increased growth rate of the population. Assuming that the observed regulatory schemes are indeed caused by the presence of noise our findings indicate that the evolutionary benefits of noise are more subtle than a simple growth advantage for a bacterial population in nutrient rich conditions. PMID:22238678

  14. Different populations of Wnt-containing vesicles are individually released from polarized epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuhong; Takada, Ritsuko; Noda, Chiyo; Kobayashi, Satoru; Takada, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that exosomes are heterogeneous in molecular composition and physical properties. Here we examined whether epithelial cells secrete a heterogeneous population of exosomes, and if that is the case, whether epithelial cell polarity affects release of different populations of exosomes, especially that of those carrying Wnt. Sucrose-density ultracentrifugation and molecular marker analysis revealed that different populations of exosomes or exosome-like vesicles were released from MDCK cells depending on the cell polarity. Wnt3a associated with these vesicles were detectable in culture media collected from both apical and basolateral sides of the cells. Basolaterally secreted Wnt3a were co-fractionated with a typical exosomal protein TSG101 in fractions having typical exosome densities. In contrast, most of apically secreted Wnt3a, as well as Wnt11, were co-fractionated with CD63 and Hsp70, which are also common to the most exosomes, but recovered in higher density fractions. Wnt3a exhibiting similar floatation behavior to the apically secreted ones were also detectable in the culture media of Wnt3a-expressing L and HEK293 cells. The lipidation of Wnt3a was required for its basolateral secretion in exosomes but was dispensable for the apical one. Thus, epithelial cells release Wnt via distinct populations of vesicles differing in secretion polarity and lipidation dependency. PMID:27765945

  15. Acute B lymphoblastic leukaemia-propagating cells are present at high frequency in diverse lymphoblast populations.

    PubMed

    Rehe, Klaus; Wilson, Kerrie; Bomken, Simon; Williamson, Daniel; Irving, Julie; den Boer, Monique L; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Hall, Andrew G; Heidenreich, Olaf; Vormoor, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Leukaemia-propagating cells are more frequent in high-risk acute B lymphoblastic leukaemia than in many malignancies that follow a hierarchical cancer stem cell model. It is unclear whether this characteristic can be more universally applied to patients from non-'high-risk' sub-groups and across a broad range of cellular immunophenotypes. Here, we demonstrate in a wide range of primary patient samples and patient samples previously passaged through mice that leukaemia-propagating cells are found in all populations defined by high or low expression of the lymphoid differentiation markers CD10, CD20 or CD34. The frequency of leukaemia-propagating cells and their engraftment kinetics do not differ between these populations. Transcriptomic analysis of CD34(high) and CD34(low) blasts establishes their difference and their similarity to comparable normal progenitors at different stages of B-cell development. However, consistent with the functional similarity of these populations, expression signatures characteristic of leukaemia propagating cells in acute myeloid leukaemia fail to distinguish between the different populations. Together, these findings suggest that there is no stem cell hierarchy in acute B lymphoblastic leukaemia.

  16. Fast estimation of motion from selected populations of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Cerquera, Alexander; Freund, Jan

    2011-02-01

    We explore how the reconstruction efficiency of fast spike population codes varies with population size, population composition and code complexity. Our study is based on experiments with moving light patterns which are projected onto the isolated retina of a turtle Pseudemys scripta elegans. The stimulus features to reconstruct are sequences of velocities kept constant throughout segments of 500 ms. The reconstruction is based on the spikes of a retinal ganglion cell (RGC) population recorded extracellularly via a multielectrode array. Subsequent spike sorting yields the parallel spike trains of 107 RGCs as input to the reconstruction method, here a discriminant analysis trained and tested in jack-knife fashion. Motivated by behavioral response times, we concentrate on fast reconstruction, i.e., within 150 ms following a trigger event defined via significant changes of the population spike rate. Therefore, valid codes involve only few (≤3) spikes per cell. Using only the latency t(1) of each cell (with reference to the trigger event) corresponds to the most parsimonious population code considered. We evaluate the gain in reconstruction efficiency when supplementing t(1) by spike times t(2) and t(3). Furthermore, we investigate whether sub-populations of smaller size benefit significantly from a selection process or whether random compilations are equally efficient. As selection criteria we try different concepts (directionality, reliability, and discriminability). Finally, we discuss the implications of a selection process and its inter-relation with code complexity for optimized reconstruction.

  17. Repeated cisplatin treatment can lead to a multiresistant tumor cell population with stem cell features and sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Wintzell, My; Löfstedt, Lina; Johansson, Joel; Pedersen, Anne B; Fuxe, Jonas; Shoshan, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Cisplatin is used in treatment of several types of cancer, including epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). In order to mimic clinical treatment and to investigate longterm effects of cisplatin in surviving cancer cells, two EOC cell lines were repeatedly treated with low doses. In the SKOV-3 cell line originating from malignant ascites, but not in A2780 cells from a primary tumor, this led to emergence of a stable population (SKOV-3-R) which in the absence of cisplatin showed increased motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expression of cancer stem cell markers CD117, CD44 and ALDH1. Accordingly, the cells formed self-renewing spheres in serum-free stem cell medium. Despite upregulation of mitochondrial mass and cytochrome c, and no upregulation of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, SKOV-3-R were multiresistant to antineoplastic drugs. Cancer stem cells, or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are highly chemoresistant and are believed to cause relapse into disseminated and resistant EOC. Our second aim was therefore to target resistance in these TIC-like cells. Resistance could be correlated with upregulation of hexokinase-II and VDAC, which are known to form a survival-promoting mitochondrial complex. The cells were thus sensitive to 3-bromopyruvate, which dissociates hexokinase-II from this complex, and were particularly sensitive to combination treatment with cisplatin at doses down to 0.1 x IC 50. 3-bromopyruvate might thus be of use in targeting the especially aggressive TIC populations.

  18. Changes in the population of perivascular cells in the bone tissue remodeling zones under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkova, Olena; Rodionova, Natalia; Shevel, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Microgravity and long-term hypokinesia induce reduction both in bone mass and mineral saturation, which can lead to the development of osteoporosis and osteopenia. (Oganov, 2003). Reorganizations and adaptive remodeling processes in the skeleton bones occur in the topographical interconnection with blood capillaries and perivascular cells. Radioautographic studies with 3H- thymidine (Kimmel, Fee, 1980; Rodionova, 1989, 2006) have shown that in osteogenesis zones there is sequential differentiation process of the perivascular cells into osteogenic. Hence the study of populations of perivascular stromal cells in areas of destructive changes is actual. Perivascular cells from metaphysis of the rat femoral bones under conditions of modeling microgravity were studied using electron microscopy and cytochemistry (hindlimb unloading, 28 days duration) and biosatellite «Bion-M1» (duration of flight from April 19 till May 19, 2013 on C57, black mice). It was revealed that both control and test groups populations of the perivascular cells are not homogeneous in remodeling adaptive zones. These populations comprise of adjacent to endothelium poorly differentiated forms and isolated cells with signs of differentiation (specific increased volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm). Majority of the perivascular cells in the control group (modeling microgravity) reveals reaction to alkaline phosphatase (marker of the osteogenic differentiation). In poorly differentiated cells this reaction is registered in nucleolus, nucleous and cytoplasm. In differentiating cells activity of the alkaline phosphatase is also detected on the outer surface of the cellular membrane. Unlike the control group in the bones of experimental animals reaction to the alkaline phosphatase is registered not in all cells of perivascular population. Part of the differentiating perivascular cells does not contain a product of the reaction. Under microgravity some poorly differentiated perivascular

  19. CD24 and CD44 mark human intestinal epithelial cell populations with characteristics of active and facultative stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gracz, Adam D.; Fuller, Megan K.; Wang, Fengchao; Li, Linheng; Stelzner, Matthias; Dunn, James C.Y.; Martin, Martin G.; Magness, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent seminal studies have rapidly advanced the understanding of intestinal epithelial stem cell (IESC) biology in murine models. However, the lack of techniques suitable for isolation and subsequent downstream analysis of IESCs from human tissue has hindered the application of these findings toward the development of novel diagnostics and therapies with direct clinical relevance. This study demonstrates that the cluster of differentiation genes CD24 and CD44 are differentially expressed across LGR5 positive “active” stem cells as well as HOPX positive “facultative” stem cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting enables differential enrichment of LGR5 cells (CD24−/CD44+) and HOPX (CD24+/CD44+) cells for gene expression analysis and culture. These findings provide the fundamental methodology and basic cell surface signature necessary for isolating and studying intestinal stem cell populations in human physiology and disease. PMID:23553902

  20. Comparison of nonciliated tracheal epithelial cells in six mammalian species: ultrastructure and population densities.

    PubMed

    Plopper, C G; Mariassy, A T; Wilson, D W; Alley, J L; Nishio, S J; Nettesheim, P

    1983-12-01

    Three types of nonciliated epithelial cells in mammalian conducting respiratory airways are thought to be secretory: mucous (goblet) cells, serous epithelial cells, and Clara cells. Mucous and serous cells are considered to be the secretory cells of the trachea. Clara cells are considered to be the secretory cells of the most distal conducting airways or bronchioles. To ascertain if mucous and serous epithelial cells are common to the tracheal epithelium of mammalian species, we characterized the ultrastructure and population densities of tracheal epithelial cells in six species: hamster (H), rat (Rt), rabbit (Rb), cat (C), Bonnet monkey (M. radiata) (B), and sheep (S). Following fixation by airway infusion with glutaraldehyde/paraformaldehyde, tracheal tissue was processed for light and electron microscopy (EM) by a selective embedding technique. Tracheal epithelium over cartilage was quantitated by light microscopy and characterized by transmission EM. Mucous cells were defined by abundant large nonhomogeneous granules, numerous Golgi complexes, basally located nuclei and granular endoplasmic reticulum (GER). The percentage of mucous cells in the tracheal epithelium was: H (0%), Rt (0.5%), Rb (1.3%), C (20.2%), B (8%), S (5.1%). Serous cells had homogeneous, electron-dense granules and extensive GER. Serous cells were present only in rats (39.2%). Clara cells had homogeneous electron-dense granules, abundant agranular endoplasmic reticulum (AER) and basal GER. Clara cells were found in hamsters (41.4%) and rabbits (17.6%). In sheep trachea, 35.9% of the epithelial cells had small electron-lucent granules, abundant AER and numerous Golgi complexes. In Bonnet monkey trachea, 16% of the epithelial cells had small electron-lucent granules, numerous polyribosomes, perinuclear Golgi apparatus and moderate GER. In cat trachea, 5.4% of the epithelial cells lacked granules, and had moderate numbers of mitochondria, moderate amounts of polyribosomes, a central nucleus, and

  1. Characterization of immune cell populations in oral mucosal tissue of healthy adult cats.

    PubMed

    Harley, R; Gruffydd-Jones, T J; Day, M J

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the leucocyte subsets present in the oral mucosa of healthy cats. Immunohistochemical labelling and computer-assisted morphometric analysis was used to identify expression of MHC class II, CD3, CD79a, IgG, IgM, IgA, and leucocyte antigen L1 (L1) by cells in sections from 19 cats, and expression of CD4 and CD8 by cells in sections from 17 cats. Mast cells were detected by toluidine blue staining. In the epithelial compartment, CD3(+) intraepithelial lymphocytes were detected, and CD8(+) cells were more common than CD4(+) cells. MHC class II labelling revealed intraepithelial and subepithelial cells with a characteristic dendritic morphology. In some sections these dendritic cells were closely associated with subepithelial clusters of CD3(+) T cells containing both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. In the lamina propria and submucosal compartments, the cells most commonly identified were mast cells. CD3(+) T-lymphocytes were also observed, and CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells were detected in similar numbers. L1(+) and CD79(+) cells were detected least frequently. The few plasma cells present were generally found to be either IgG(+) or IgA(+). Within the stroma surrounding the salivary glands, CD79a(+) and IgA(+) cells predominated. Slight epithelial labelling for L1 was seen in some sections. The normal feline oral mucosa clearly contains a range of immune cell populations.

  2. Controlling of group velocity via terahertz signal radiation in a defect medium doped by four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, Hossein; Sangachin, Elnaz Ahmadi; Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel scheme for controlling the group velocity of transmitted and reflected pulse from defect medium doped with four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure. Quantum dot nanostructure is designed numerically by Schrödinger and Poisson equations which solve self consistently. By size control of quantum dot and external voltage, one can design a four-level quantum dot with appropriate energy levels which can be suitable for controlling the group velocity of pulse transmission and reflection from defect slab with terahertz signal field. It is found that in the presence and absence of terahertz signal field the behaviors of transmission and reflection pulses are completely different. Moreover, it is shown that for strong terahertz signal field, by changing the thickness of the slab, simultaneous peak and dip for transmission and reflection pulse are obtained.

  3. The evolution of carrying capacity in constrained and expanding tumour cell populations.

    PubMed

    Gerlee, Philip; Anderson, Alexander R A

    2015-08-12

    Cancer cells are known to modify their micro-environment such that it can sustain a larger population, or, in ecological terms, they construct a niche which increases the carrying capacity of the population. It has however been argued that niche construction, which benefits all cells in the tumour, would be selected against since cheaters could reap the benefits without paying the cost. We have investigated the impact of niche specificity on tumour evolution using an individual based model of breast tumour growth, in which the carrying capacity of each cell consists of two components: an intrinsic, subclone-specific part and a contribution from all neighbouring cells. Analysis of the model shows that the ability of a mutant to invade a resident population depends strongly on the specificity. When specificity is low selection is mostly on growth rate, while high specificity shifts selection towards increased carrying capacity. Further, we show that the long-term evolution of the system can be predicted using adaptive dynamics. By comparing the results from a spatially structured versus well-mixed population we show that spatial structure restores selection for carrying capacity even at zero specificity, which poses a solution to the niche construction dilemma. Lastly, we show that an expanding population exhibits spatially variable selection pressure, where cells at the leading edge exhibit higher growth rate and lower carrying capacity than those at the centre of the tumour.

  4. The evolution of carrying capacity in constrained and expanding tumour cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlee, Philip; Anderson, Alexander R. A.

    2015-10-01

    Cancer cells are known to modify their micro-environment such that it can sustain a larger population, or, in ecological terms, they construct a niche which increases the carrying capacity of the population. It has however been argued that niche construction, which benefits all cells in the tumour, would be selected against since cheaters could reap the benefits without paying the cost. We have investigated the impact of niche specificity on tumour evolution using an individual based model of breast tumour growth, in which the carrying capacity of each cell consists of two components: an intrinsic, subclone-specific part and a contribution from all neighbouring cells. Analysis of the model shows that the ability of a mutant to invade a resident population depends strongly on the specificity. When specificity is low selection is mostly on growth rate, while high specificity shifts selection towards increased carrying capacity. Further, we show that the long-term evolution of the system can be predicted using adaptive dynamics. By comparing the results from a spatially structured versus well-mixed population we show that spatial structure restores selection for carrying capacity even at zero specificity, which poses a solution to the niche construction dilemma. Lastly, we show that an expanding population exhibits spatially variable selection pressure, where cells at the leading edge exhibit higher growth rate and lower carrying capacity than those at the centre of the tumour.

  5. Enhanced bone-forming activity of side population cells in the periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Tadashi; Hiraga, Toru; Hosoya, Akihiro; Ohnuma, Kiyoshi; Ito, Yuzuru; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ito, Susumu; Asashima, Makoto; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2014-04-01

    Regeneration of alveolar bone is critical for the successful treatment of periodontal diseases. The periodontal ligament (PDL) has been widely investigated as a source of cells for the regeneration of periodontal tissues. In the present study where we attempted to develop an effective strategy for alveolar bone regeneration, we examined the osteogenic potential of side population (SP) cells, a stem cell-containing population that has been shown to be highly abundant in several kinds of tissues, in PDL cells. Isolated SP cells from the rat PDL exhibited a superior ability to differentiate into osteoblastic cells compared with non-SP (NSP) and unsorted PDL cells in vitro. The mRNA expressions of osteoblast markers and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 were significantly upregulated in SP cells and were further increased by osteogenic induction. To examine the bone-forming activity of SP cells in vivo, PDL SP cells isolated from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic rats were transplanted with hydroxyapatite (HA) disks into wild-type animals. SP cells exhibited a high ability to induce the mineralized matrix compared with NSP and unsorted PDL cells. At 12 weeks after the implantation, some of the pores in the HA disks with SP cells were filled with mineralized matrices, which were positive for bone matrix proteins, such as osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin. Furthermore, osteoblast- and osteocyte-like cells on and in the bone-like mineralized matrices were GFP positive, suggesting that the matrices were directly formed by the transplanted cells. These results suggest that PDL SP cells possess enhanced osteogenic potential and could be a potential source for cell-based regenerative therapy for alveolar bone.

  6. Attenuated Toxoplasma gondii Stimulates Immunity to Pancreatic Cancer by Manipulation of Myeloid Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kiah L; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2015-08-01

    Suppressive myeloid cells represent a significant barrier to the generation of productive antitumor immune responses to many solid tumors. Eliminating or reprogramming suppressive myeloid cells to abrogate tumor-associated immune suppression is a promising therapeutic approach. We asked whether treatment of established aggressive disseminated pancreatic cancer with the immunotherapeutic attenuated Toxoplasma gondii vaccine strain CPS would trigger tumor-associated myeloid cells to generate therapeutic antitumor immune responses. CPS treatment significantly decreased tumor-associated macrophages and markedly increased dendritic cell infiltration of the pancreatic tumor microenvironment. Tumor-resident macrophages and dendritic cells, particularly cells actively invaded by CPS, increased expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 and concomitantly boosted their production of IL12. CPS treatment increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell infiltration into the tumor microenvironment, activated tumor-resident T cells, and increased IFNγ production by T-cell populations. CPS treatment provided a significant therapeutic benefit in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice. This therapeutic benefit depended on IL12 and IFNγ production, MyD88 signaling, and CD8(+) T-cell populations. Although CD4(+) T cells exhibited activated effector phenotypes and produced IFNγ, CD4(+) T cells as well as natural killer cells were not required for the therapeutic benefit. In addition, CD8(+) T cells isolated from CPS-treated tumor-bearing mice produced IFNγ after re-exposure to pancreatic tumor antigen, suggesting this immunotherapeutic treatment stimulated tumor cell antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. This work highlights the potency and immunotherapeutic efficacy of CPS treatment and demonstrates the significance of targeting tumor-associated myeloid cells as a mechanism to stimulate more effective immunity to pancreatic cancer.

  7. Functional and phenotypic differences of pure populations of stem cell-derived astrocytes and neuronal precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Kleiderman, Susanne; Sá, João V; Teixeira, Ana P; Brito, Catarina; Gutbier, Simon; Evje, Lars G; Hadera, Mussie G; Glaab, Enrico; Henry, Margit; Sachinidis, Agapios; Alves, Paula M; Sonnewald, Ursula; Leist, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    Availability of homogeneous astrocyte populations would facilitate research concerning cell plasticity (metabolic and transcriptional adaptations; innate immune responses) and cell cycle reactivation. Current protocols to prepare astrocyte cultures differ in their final content of immature precursor cells, preactivated cells or entirely different cell types. A new method taking care of all these issues would improve research on astrocyte functions. We found here that the exposure of a defined population of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSC) to BMP4 results in pure, nonproliferating astrocyte cultures within 24-48 h. These murine astrocytes generated from embryonic stem cells (mAGES) expressed the positive markers GFAP, aquaporin 4 and GLT-1, supported neuronal function, and acquired innate immune functions such as the response to tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1. The protocol was applicable to several normal or disease-prone pluripotent cell lines, and the corresponding mAGES all exited the cell cycle and lost most of their nestin expression, in contrast to astrocytes generated by serum-addition or obtained as primary cultures. Comparative gene expression analysis of mAGES and NSC allowed quantification of differences between the two cell types and a definition of an improved marker set to define astrocytes. Inclusion of several published data sets in this transcriptome comparison revealed the similarity of mAGES with cortical astrocytes in vivo. Metabolic analysis of homogeneous NSC and astrocyte populations revealed distinct neurochemical features: both cell types synthesized glutamine and citrate, but only mature astrocytes released these metabolites. Thus, the homogeneous cultures allowed an improved definition of NSC and astrocyte features.

  8. Salamander limb regeneration involves the activation of a multipotent skeletal muscle satellite cell population.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jamie I; Lööf, Sara; He, Pingping; Simon, András

    2006-01-30

    In contrast to mammals, salamanders can regenerate complex structures after injury, including entire limbs. A central question is whether the generation of progenitor cells during limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair occur via separate or overlapping mechanisms. Limb regeneration depends on the formation of a blastema, from which the new appendage develops. Dedifferentiation of stump tissues, such as skeletal muscle, precedes blastema formation, but it was not known whether dedifferentiation involves stem cell activation. We describe a multipotent Pax7+ satellite cell population located within the skeletal muscle of the salamander limb. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation involves satellite cell activation and that these cells can contribute to new limb tissues. Activation of salamander satellite cells occurs in an analogous manner to how the mammalian myofiber mobilizes stem cells during skeletal muscle tissue repair. Thus, limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair share common cellular and molecular programs. Our findings also identify satellite cells as potential targets in promoting mammalian blastema formation.

  9. Three distinct cell populations express extracellular matrix proteins and increase in number during skeletal muscle fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Mark A; Mukund, Kavitha; Subramaniam, Shankar; Brenner, David; Lieber, Richard L

    2017-02-01

    Tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural support and creates unique environments for resident cells (Bateman JF, Boot-Handford RP, Lamandé SR. Nat Rev Genet 10: 173-183, 2009; Kjaer M. Physiol Rev 84: 649-98, 2004). However, the identities of cells responsible for creating specific ECM components have not been determined. In striated muscle, the identity of these cells becomes important in disease when ECM changes result in fibrosis and subsequent increased tissue stiffness and dysfunction. Here we describe a novel approach to isolate and identify cells that maintain the ECM in both healthy and fibrotic muscle. Using a collagen I reporter mouse, we show that there are three distinct cell populations that express collagen I in both healthy and fibrotic skeletal muscle. Interestingly, the number of collagen I-expressing cells in all three cell populations increases proportionally in fibrotic muscle, indicating that all cell types participate in the fibrosis process. Furthermore, while some profibrotic ECM and ECM-associated genes are significantly upregulated in fibrotic muscle, the fibrillar collagen gene expression profile is not qualitatively altered. This suggests that muscle fibrosis in this model results from an increased number of collagen I-expressing cells and not the initiation of a specific fibrotic collagen gene expression program. Finally, in fibrotic muscle, we show that these collagen I-expressing cell populations differentially express distinct ECM proteins-fibroblasts express the fibrillar components of ECM, fibro/adipogenic progenitors cells differentially express basal laminar proteins, and skeletal muscle progenitor cells differentially express genes important for the satellite cell.

  10. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI. PMID:27005516

  11. The MYpop toolbox: Putting yeast stress responses in cellular context on single cell and population scales.

    PubMed

    Spiesser, Thomas; Kühn, Clemens; Krantz, Marcus; Klipp, Edda

    2016-09-01

    Systems biology holds the promise to integrate multiple sources of information in order to build ever more complete models of cellular function. To do this, the field must overcome two significant challenges. First, the current strategy to model average cells must be replaced with population based models accounting for cell-to-cell variability. Second, models must be integrated with each other and with basic cellular function. This requires a core model of cellular physiology as well as a multiscale simulation platform to support large-scale simulation of culture or tissues from single cells. Here, we present such a simulation platform with a core model of yeast physiology as scaffold to integrate and simulate SBML models. The software automates this integration helping users simulate their model of choice in context of the cell division cycle. We benchmark model merging, simulation and analysis by integrating a minimal model of osmotic stress into the core model and analyzing it. We characterize the effect of single cell differences on the dynamics of osmoadaptation, estimating when normal cell growth is resumed and obtaining an explanation for experimentally observed glycerol dynamics based on population dynamics. Hence, the platform can be used to reconcile single cell and population level data.

  12. Unique spectral markers discern recurrent Glioblastoma cells from heterogeneous parent population

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ekjot; Sahu, Aditi; Hole, Arti R.; Rajendra, Jacinth; Chaubal, Rohan; Gardi, Nilesh; Dutt, Amit; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Krishna, C. Murali; Dutt, Shilpee

    2016-01-01

    An inability to discern resistant cells from bulk tumour cell population contributes to poor prognosis in Glioblastoma. Here, we compared parent and recurrent cells generated from patient derived primary cultures and cell lines to identify their unique molecular hallmarks. Although morphologically similar, parent and recurrent cells from different samples showed variable biological properties like proliferation and radiation resistance. However, total RNA-sequencing revealed transcriptional landscape unique to parent and recurrent populations. These data suggest that global molecular differences but not individual biological phenotype could differentiate parent and recurrent cells. We demonstrate that Raman Spectroscopy a label-free, non-invasive technique, yields global information about biochemical milieu of recurrent and parent cells thus, classifying them into distinct clusters based on Principal-Component-Analysis and Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant-Analysis. Additionally, higher lipid related spectral peaks were observed in recurrent population. Importantly, Raman spectroscopic analysis could further classify an independent set of naïve primary glioblastoma tumour tissues into non-responder and responder groups. Interestingly, spectral features from the non-responder patient samples show a considerable overlap with the in-vitro generated recurrent cells suggesting their similar biological behaviour. This feasibility study necessitates analysis of a larger cohort of naïve primary glioblastoma samples to fully envisage clinical utility of Raman spectroscopy in predicting therapeutic response. PMID:27221528

  13. Population dynamics during cell proliferation and neuronogenesis in the developing murine neocortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowakowski, Richard S.; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Takahashi, Takao; Hayes, Nancy L.

    2002-01-01

    During the development of the neocortex, cell proliferation occurs in two specialized zones adjacent to the lateral ventricle. One of these zones, the ventricular zone, produces most of the neurons of the neocortex. The proliferating population that resides in the ventricular zone is a pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE) that looks uniform in routine histological preparations, but is, in fact, an active and dynamically changing population. In the mouse, over the course of a 6-day period, the PVE produces approximately 95% of the neurons of the adult neocortex. During this time, the cell cycle of the PVE population lengthens from about 8 h to over 18 h and the progenitor population passes through a total of 11 cell cycles. This 6-day, 11-cell cycle period comprises the "neuronogenetic interval" (NI). At each passage through the cell cycle, the proportion of daughter cells that exit the cell cycle (Q cells) increases from 0 at the onset of the NI to 1 at the end of the NI. The proportion of daughter cells that re-enter the cell cycle (P cells) changes in a complementary fashion from 1 at the onset of the NI to 0 at the end of the NI. This set of systematic changes in the cell cycle and the output from the proliferative population of the PVE allows a quantitative and mathematical treatment of the expansion of the PVE and the growth of the cortical plate that nicely accounts for the observed expansion and growth of the developing neocortex. In addition, we show that the cells produced during a 2-h window of development during specific cell cycles reside in a specific set of laminae in the adult cortex, but that the distributions of the output from consecutive cell cycles overlap. These dynamic events occur in all areas of the PVE underlying the neocortex, but there is a gradient of maturation that begins in the rostrolateral neocortex near the striatotelencephalic junction and which spreads across the surface of the neocortex over a period of 24-36 h. The

  14. A study of the genetical structure of the Cuban population: red cell and serum biochemical markers.

    PubMed Central

    González, R; Ballester, J M; Estrada, M; Lima, F; Martínez, G; Wade, M; Colombo, B; Vento, R

    1976-01-01

    Gene frequencies of several red cell and serum gentic markers were determined in the three main racial groups--whites, mulattoes and Negroes--of the Cuban population. The results were used to estimate the relative contribution of Caucasian and Negro genes to the genetic makeup of these three groups and to calculate the frequencies of these genes in the general Cuban population. PMID:1008061

  15. Differentiating quiescent cancer cell populations in heterogeneous samples with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaster, Tiffany M.; Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of relative fluorescence intensities of NAD(P)H and FAD with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) allows metabolic characterization of cancerous populations and correlation to treatment response. However, quiescent populations of cancer cells introduce heterogeneity to the tumor and exhibit resistance to standard therapies, requiring a better understanding of this influence on treatment outcome. Significant differences were observed between proliferating and quiescent cell populations upon comparison of respective redox ratios (p<0.05) and FAD lifetimes (p<0.05) across monolayers and in mixed samples. These results demonstrate that metabolic activity may function as a marker for separation and characterization of proliferating and quiescent cancer cells within mixed samples, contributing to comprehensive investigation of heterogeneity-dependent drug resistance.

  16. Cytotoxic effects induced by docetaxel, gefitinib and cyclopamine on side population and non-side population cell fractions from human invasive prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, Murielle; Johansson, Sonny L.; Henichart, Jean-Pierre; Depreux, Patrick; Batra, Surinder K.

    2011-01-01

    The present study has been undertaken to establish the therapeutic benefit of co-targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and sonic hedgehog pathways by using gefitinib and cyclopamine, respectively, for improving the efficacy of the current chemotherapeutic drug, docetaxel, to counteract the prostate cancer (PC) progression from locally invasive to metastatic and recurrent disease stages. The data from immuofluorescence analyses revealed that EGFR/Tyr1173-pEGFR, sonic hedgehog ligand (SHH), smoothened co-receptor (SMO) and GLI-1 were co-localized with the CD133+ stem cell-like marker in a small subpopulation of PC cells. These signaling molecules were also present in the bulk tumor mass of CD133− PC cells with a luminal phenotype detected in patient’s adenocarcinoma tissues. Importantly, the results revealed that the CD133+/CD44high/AR−/low side population (SP) cell fraction endowed with a high self-renewal potential isolated from tumorigenic and invasive WPE1-NB26 cells by Hoechst dye technique was insensitive to current chemotherapeutic drug, docetaxel. In contrast, the docetaxel treatment induced significant anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on the CD133−/CD44low/AR+ non-SP cell fraction isolated from WPE1-NB26 cell line. Of therapeutic interest, the results have also indicated that combined docetaxel, gefitinib and cyclopamine induced greater anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on SP and non-SP cell fractions isolated from WPE1-NB26 cells than individual drugs or two-drug combinations. Altogether, these observations suggest that EGFR and sonic hedgehog cascades may represent the potential therapeutic targets of great clinical interest to eradicate the total PC cell mass and improve the current docetaxel-based therapies against locally advanced and invasive PCs, and thereby prevent metastases and disease relapse. PMID:20179163

  17. ERBB3 Positively Correlates with Intestinal Stem Cell Markers but Marks a Distinct Non Proliferative Cell Population in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jardé, Thierry; Kass, Lisa; Staples, Margaret; Lescesen, Helen; Carne, Peter; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J.; Abud, Helen E.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested ERBB3/HER3 may be a useful prognostic marker for colorectal cancer. Tumours with an intestinal stem cell signature have also been shown to be more aggressive. Here, we investigate whether ERBB3 is associated with intestinal stem cell markers in colorectal cancer and if cancer stem cells within tumours are marked by expression of ERBB3. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers (LGR5, EPHB2, CD44s and CD44v6) was assessed by qRT-PCR in primary colorectal tumours (stages 0 to IV) and matched normal tissues from 53 patients. The localisation of ERBB3, EPHB2 and KI-67 within tumours was investigated using co-immunofluorescence. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers were significantly elevated in adenomas and colorectal tumours compared to normal tissue. Positive correlations were found between ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers. However, co-immunofluorescence analysis showed that ERBB3 and EPHB2 marked specific cell populations that were mutually exclusive within tumours with distinct proliferative potentials, the majority of ERBB3+ve cells being non-proliferative. This pattern resembles cellular organisation within normal colonic epithelium where EPHB2 labelled proliferative cells reside at the crypt base and ERBB3+ve cells mark differentiated cells at the top of crypts. Our results show that ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers correlate in colorectal cancers. ERBB3 localises to differentiated cell populations within tumours that are non-proliferative and distinct from cancer stem cells. These data support the concept that tumours contain discrete stem, proliferative and differentiation compartments similar to that present in normal crypts. PMID:26367378

  18. ERBB3 Positively Correlates with Intestinal Stem Cell Markers but Marks a Distinct Non Proliferative Cell Population in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jardé, Thierry; Kass, Lisa; Staples, Margaret; Lescesen, Helen; Carne, Peter; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J; Abud, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested ERBB3/HER3 may be a useful prognostic marker for colorectal cancer. Tumours with an intestinal stem cell signature have also been shown to be more aggressive. Here, we investigate whether ERBB3 is associated with intestinal stem cell markers in colorectal cancer and if cancer stem cells within tumours are marked by expression of ERBB3. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers (LGR5, EPHB2, CD44s and CD44v6) was assessed by qRT-PCR in primary colorectal tumours (stages 0 to IV) and matched normal tissues from 53 patients. The localisation of ERBB3, EPHB2 and KI-67 within tumours was investigated using co-immunofluorescence. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers were significantly elevated in adenomas and colorectal tumours compared to normal tissue. Positive correlations were found between ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers. However, co-immunofluorescence analysis showed that ERBB3 and EPHB2 marked specific cell populations that were mutually exclusive within tumours with distinct proliferative potentials, the majority of ERBB3+ve cells being non-proliferative. This pattern resembles cellular organisation within normal colonic epithelium where EPHB2 labelled proliferative cells reside at the crypt base and ERBB3+ve cells mark differentiated cells at the top of crypts. Our results show that ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers correlate in colorectal cancers. ERBB3 localises to differentiated cell populations within tumours that are non-proliferative and distinct from cancer stem cells. These data support the concept that tumours contain discrete stem, proliferative and differentiation compartments similar to that present in normal crypts.

  19. Identification and visualization of multidimensional antigen-specific T-cell populations in polychromatic cytometry data.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Frelinger, Jacob; Jiang, Wenxin; Finak, Greg; Seshadri, Chetan; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; McElrath, Julie; DeRosa, Steve; Gottardo, Raphael

    2015-07-01

    An important aspect of immune monitoring for vaccine development, clinical trials, and research is the detection, measurement, and comparison of antigen-specific T-cells from subject samples under different conditions. Antigen-specific T-cells compose a very small fraction of total T-cells. Developments in cytometry technology over the past five years have enabled the measurement of single-cells in a multivariate and high-throughput manner. This growth in both dimensionality and quantity of data continues to pose a challenge for effective identification and visualization of rare cell subsets, such as antigen-specific T-cells. Dimension reduction and feature extraction play pivotal role in both identifying and visualizing cell populations of interest in large, multi-dimensional cytometry datasets. However, the automated identification and visualization of rare, high-dimensional cell subsets remains challenging. Here we demonstrate how a systematic and integrated approach combining targeted feature extraction with dimension reduction can be used to identify and visualize biological differences in rare, antigen-specific cell populations. By using OpenCyto to perform semi-automated gating and features extraction of flow cytometry data, followed by dimensionality reduction with t-SNE we are able to identify polyfunctional subpopulations of antigen-specific T-cells and visualize treatment-specific differences between them.

  20. Bet-hedging in bacteriocin producing Escherichia coli populations: the single cell perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayramoglu, Bihter; Toubiana, David; van Vliet, Simon; Inglis, R. Fredrik; Shnerb, Nadav; Gillor, Osnat

    2017-02-01

    Production of public goods in biological systems is often a collaborative effort that may be detrimental to the producers. It is therefore sustainable only if a small fraction of the population shoulders the cost while the majority reap the benefits. We modelled this scenario using Escherichia coli populations producing colicins, an antibiotic that kills producer cells’ close relatives. Colicin expression is a costly trait, and it has been proposed that only a small fraction of the population actively expresses the antibiotic. Colicinogenic populations were followed at the single-cell level using time-lapse microscopy, and showed two distinct, albeit dynamic, subpopulations: the majority silenced colicin expression, while a small fraction of elongated, slow-growing cells formed colicin-expressing hotspots, placing a significant burden on expressers. Moreover, monitoring lineages of individual colicinogenic cells showed stochastic switching between expressers and non-expressers. Hence, colicin expressers may be engaged in risk-reducing strategies—or bet-hedging—as they balance the cost of colicin production with the need to repel competitors. To test the bet-hedging strategy in colicin-mediated interactions, competitions between colicin-sensitive and producer cells were simulated using a numerical model, demonstrating a finely balanced expression range that is essential to sustaining the colicinogenic population.

  1. Bet-hedging in bacteriocin producing Escherichia coli populations: the single cell perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bayramoglu, Bihter; Toubiana, David; van Vliet, Simon; Inglis, R. Fredrik; Shnerb, Nadav; Gillor, Osnat

    2017-01-01

    Production of public goods in biological systems is often a collaborative effort that may be detrimental to the producers. It is therefore sustainable only if a small fraction of the population shoulders the cost while the majority reap the benefits. We modelled this scenario using Escherichia coli populations producing colicins, an antibiotic that kills producer cells’ close relatives. Colicin expression is a costly trait, and it has been proposed that only a small fraction of the population actively expresses the antibiotic. Colicinogenic populations were followed at the single-cell level using time-lapse microscopy, and showed two distinct, albeit dynamic, subpopulations: the majority silenced colicin expression, while a small fraction of elongated, slow-growing cells formed colicin-expressing hotspots, placing a significant burden on expressers. Moreover, monitoring lineages of individual colicinogenic cells showed stochastic switching between expressers and non-expressers. Hence, colicin expressers may be engaged in risk-reducing strategies—or bet-hedging—as they balance the cost of colicin production with the need to repel competitors. To test the bet-hedging strategy in colicin-mediated interactions, competitions between colicin-sensitive and producer cells were simulated using a numerical model, demonstrating a finely balanced expression range that is essential to sustaining the colicinogenic population. PMID:28165017

  2. Sorting and biological characteristics analysis for side population cells in human primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yegui; Gao, Hucheng; Liu, Mingdong; Mao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cause of the tumor worldwide, its incidence is increasing year by year. This study aims to investigate the sorting and biological characteristics of side population (SP) cells. Human HCC tissues used were obtained from patients undergoing surgical resection. SP cells were sorted using flow cytometry. Cell cycle assay, apoptosis assay and colony formation assay were performed to detect cell proliferation and apoptosis. Invasion assay was employed to examine SP cell invasion. Tumorigenicity assay was used to evaluate tumorigenicity. HCC related microRNAs (miRNA) were analyzed using Micro-array analysis. Target genes were predicted using miRNA database. GO analsis was employed to predict target gene function. Apoptosis percentage was lower and cell viability was higher in SP cells than non-SP (NSP) cells. Colony forming ability of SP cells was significantly higher than NSP cells. Transwell assay positive cells in SP cells were higher significantly than NSP cells. Tumorigenicity of SP cells was higher significantly than NSP cells. 107 differentially expression miRNA were discovered, including 45 up-expressed miRNAs and 62 down-expressed miRNAs in SP cells. Up-regulated hsa-miR-193b-3p and hsa-miR-505-3p predict 25 and 35 target genes, and correlated with 4 and 42 GO terms, respectively. Down-regulated hsa-miR-200a-3p, hsa-miR-194-5p, hsa-miR-130b-3p predict 133, 48 and 127 target genes, and correlate with 10, 7 and 109 GO terms, respectively. In conclusion, proliferation, colony formation, anti-apoptosis, self-renewal capavility, invasive characteristic and tumorigenicity in SP cells isolated from HCC tissues was higher compared to NSP cells. Therefore, sorted SP cells could characterize with biological functions of cancer stem cells. PMID:27725897

  3. Vaccination Recommendations for the Hematology and Oncology and Post–Stem Cell Transplant Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination is a simple yet important process used to prevent many infections in the general population. For patients with suppressed immune systems, especially those who are undergoing chemotherapy or who have undergone stem cell transplant, repeat vaccination or boosters may be crucial in prolonging and/or extending immunity. The purpose of this review is to examine the need for each vaccine in two separate oncology populations: patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy and post–stem cell transplant patients. In addition, the importance of avoiding live vaccines and criteria for reconsideration at a future time will also be discussed. PMID:25031932

  4. Identification of a population of cells with hematopoietic stem cell properties in mouse aorta-gonad-mesonephros cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Nobuhisa, Ikuo; Ohtsu, Naoki; Okada, Seiji; Nakagata, Naomi; Taga, Tetsuya . E-mail: taga@kaiju.medic.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-10

    The aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region is a primary source of definitive hematopoietic cells in the midgestation mouse embryo. In cultures of dispersed AGM regions, adherent cells containing endothelial cells are observed first, and then non-adherent hematopoietic cells are produced. Here we report on the characterization of hematopoietic cells that emerge in the AGM culture. Based on the expression profiles of CD45 and c-Kit, we defined three cell populations: CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells that had the ability to form hematopoietic cell colonies in methylcellulose media and in co-cultures with stromal cells; CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup -} cells that showed a granulocyte morphology; CD45{sup high} c-Kit{sup low/-} that exhibited a macrophage morphology. In co-cultures of OP9 stromal cells and freshly prepared AGM cultures, CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells from the AGM culture had the abilities to reproduce CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells and differentiate into CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup -} and CD45{sup high} c-Kit{sup low/-} cells, whereas CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup -} and CD45{sup high} c-Kit{sup low/-} did not produce CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells. Furthermore, CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells displayed a long-term repopulating activity in adult hematopoietic tissue when transplanted into the liver of irradiated newborn mice. These results indicate that CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells from the AGM culture have the potential to reconstitute multi-lineage hematopoietic cells.

  5. Characterization of a population of neural progenitor cells in the infant hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Paine, S M L; Willsher, A R; Nicholson, S L; Sebire, N J; Jacques, T S

    2014-01-01

    Aims Abnormalities of the hippocampus are associated with a range of diseases in children, including epilepsy and sudden death. A population of rod cells in part of the hippocampus, the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus, has long been recognized in infants. Previous work suggested that these cells were microglia and that their presence was associated with chronic illness and sudden infant death syndrome. Prompted by the observations that a sensitive immunohistochemical marker of microglia used in diagnostic practice does not typically stain these cells and that the hippocampus is a site of postnatal neurogenesis, we hypothesized that this transient population of cells were not microglia but neural progenitors. Methods Using archived post mortem tissue, we applied a broad panel of antibodies to establish the immunophenotype of these cells in 40 infants dying suddenly of causes that were either explained or remained unexplained, following post mortem investigation. Results The rod cells were consistently negative for the microglial markers CD45, CD68 and HLA-DR. The cells were positive, in varying proportions, for the neural progenitor marker, doublecortin, the neural stem cell marker, nestin and the neural marker, TUJ1. Conclusions These data support our hypothesis that the rod cells of the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus in the infant hippocampus are not microglia but a population of neural progenitors. These findings advance our understanding of postnatal neurogenesis in the human hippocampus in health and disease and are of diagnostic importance, allowing reactive microglia to be distinguished from the normal population of neural progenitors. PMID:23742713

  6. Numerical modelling of label-structured cell population growth using CFSE distribution data

    PubMed Central

    Luzyanina, Tatyana; Roose, Dirk; Schenkel, Tim; Sester, Martina; Ehl, Stephan; Meyerhans, Andreas; Bocharov, Gennady

    2007-01-01

    Background The flow cytometry analysis of CFSE-labelled cells is currently one of the most informative experimental techniques for studying cell proliferation in immunology. The quantitative interpretation and understanding of such heterogenous cell population data requires the development of distributed parameter mathematical models and computational techniques for data assimilation. Methods and Results The mathematical modelling of label-structured cell population dynamics leads to a hyperbolic partial differential equation in one space variable. The model contains fundamental parameters of cell turnover and label dilution that need to be estimated from the flow cytometry data on the kinetics of the CFSE label distribution. To this end a maximum likelihood approach is used. The Lax-Wendroff method is used to solve the corresponding initial-boundary value problem for the model equation. By fitting two original experimental data sets with the model we show its biological consistency and potential for quantitative characterization of the cell division and death rates, treated as continuous functions of the CFSE expression level. Conclusion Once the initial distribution of the proliferating cell population with respect to the CFSE intensity is given, the distributed parameter modelling allows one to work directly with the histograms of the CFSE fluorescence without the need to specify the marker ranges. The label-structured model and the elaborated computational approach establish a quantitative basis for more informative interpretation of the flow cytometry CFSE systems. PMID:17650320

  7. Taxonomic Separation of Hippocampal Networks: Principal Cell Populations and Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, R. Maarten; Huang, Shih-Hui; Slomianka, Lutz; Amrein, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    While many differences in hippocampal anatomy have been described between species, it is typically not clear if they are specific to a particular species and related to functional requirements or if they are shared by species of larger taxonomic units. Without such information, it is difficult to infer how anatomical differences may impact on hippocampal function, because multiple taxonomic levels need to be considered to associate behavioral and anatomical changes. To provide information on anatomical changes within and across taxonomic ranks, we present a quantitative assessment of hippocampal principal cell populations in 20 species or strain groups, with emphasis on rodents, the taxonomic group that provides most animals used in laboratory research. Of special interest is the importance of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) in species-specific adaptations relative to other cell populations. Correspondence analysis of cell numbers shows that across taxonomic units, phylogenetically related species cluster together, sharing similar proportions of principal cell populations. CA3 and hilus are strong separators that place rodent species into a tight cluster based on their relatively large CA3 and small hilus while non-rodent species (including humans and non-human primates) are placed on the opposite side of the spectrum. Hilus and CA3 are also separators within rodents, with a very large CA3 and rather small hilar cell populations separating mole-rats from other rodents that, in turn, are separated from each other by smaller changes in the proportions of CA1 and granule cells. When adult neurogenesis is included, the relatively small populations of young neurons, proliferating cells and hilar neurons become main drivers of taxonomic separation within rodents. The observations provide challenges to the computational modeling of hippocampal function, suggest differences in the organization of hippocampal information streams in rodent and non-rodent species, and

  8. Towards the rational design of synthetic cells with prescribed population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dalchau, Neil; Smith, Matthew J; Martin, Samuel; Brown, James R; Emmott, Stephen; Phillips, Andrew

    2012-11-07

    The rational design of synthetic cell populations with prescribed behaviours is a long-standing goal of synthetic biology, with the potential to greatly accelerate the development of biotechnological applications in areas ranging from medical research to energy production. Achieving this goal requires well-characterized components, modular implementation strategies, simulation across temporal and spatial scales and automatic compilation of high-level designs to low-level genetic parts that function reliably inside cells. Many of these steps are incomplete or only partially understood, and methods for integrating them within a common design framework have yet to be developed. Here, we address these challenges by developing a prototype framework for designing synthetic cells with prescribed population dynamics. We extend the genetic engineering of cells (GEC) language, originally developed for programming intracellular dynamics, with cell population factors such as cell growth, division and dormancy, together with spatio-temporal simulation methods. As a case study, we use our framework to design synthetic cells with predator-prey interactions that, when simulated, produce complex spatio-temporal behaviours such as travelling waves and spatio-temporal chaos. An analysis of our design reveals that environmental factors such as density-dependent dormancy and reduced extracellular space destabilize the population dynamics and increase the range of genetic variants for which complex spatio-temporal behaviours are possible. Our findings highlight the importance of considering such factors during the design process. We then use our analysis of population dynamics to inform the selection of genetic parts, which could be used to obtain the desired spatio-temporal behaviours. By identifying, integrating and automating key stages of the design process, we provide a computational framework for designing synthetic systems, which could be tested in future laboratory studies.

  9. Further analyses of human kidney cell populations separated on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Robin M.; Todd, Paul; Cole, Kenneth D.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1992-01-01

    Cultured human embryonic kidney cells were separated into electrophoretic subpopulations in laboratory experiments and in two separation experiments on the STS-8 (Challenger) Space Shuttle flight using the mid-deck Continuous Flow Electrophoretic Separator (CFES). Populations of cells from each fraction were cultured for the lifetime of the cells, and supernatant medium was withdrawn and replaced at 4-day intervals. Withdrawn medium was frozen at -120 C for subsequent analysis. Enzyme assays, antibodies and gel electrophoresis were used as analytical tools for the detection and quantization of plasminogen activators in these samples. These assays of frozen-culture supernatant fluids confirmed the electrophoretic separation of plasminogen-activator-producing cells from nonproducing cells, the isolation of cells capable of sustained production, and the separation of cells that produce different plasminogen activators from one other.

  10. Inhibition of hedgehog signaling reduces the side population in human malignant mesothelioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-A; Kim, M-C; Kim, N-Y; Kim, Y

    2015-08-01

    Deregulation of crucial embryonic pathways, including hedgehog signaling, has been frequently implicated in a variety of human cancers and is emerging as an important target for anticancer therapy. This study evaluated the potential anticancer effects of cyclopamine, a chemical inhibitor of hedgehog signaling, in human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) cell lines. Cyclopamine treatment significantly decreased the proliferation of HMM cells by promoting apoptosis and shifting the cell cycle toward dormant phase. The clonogenicity and mobility of HMM cells were significantly decreased by cyclopamine treatment. Treatment of HMM cells with cyclopamine significantly reduced the abundance of side population cells, which were measured using an assay composed of Hoechst 33342 dye staining and subsequent flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression levels of stemness-related genes were significantly affected by cyclopamine treatment. Taken together, the present study showed that targeting hedgehog signaling could reduce a more aggressive subpopulation of the cancer cells, suggesting an alternative approach for HMM therapy.

  11. Inhibition of hedgehog signaling reduces the side population in human malignant mesothelioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H-A; Kim, M-C; Kim, N-Y; Kim, Y

    2015-01-01

    Deregulation of crucial embryonic pathways, including hedgehog signaling, has been frequently implicated in a variety of human cancers and is emerging as an important target for anticancer therapy. This study evaluated the potential anticancer effects of cyclopamine, a chemical inhibitor of hedgehog signaling, in human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) cell lines. Cyclopamine treatment significantly decreased the proliferation of HMM cells by promoting apoptosis and shifting the cell cycle toward dormant phase. The clonogenicity and mobility of HMM cells were significantly decreased by cyclopamine treatment. Treatment of HMM cells with cyclopamine significantly reduced the abundance of side population cells, which were measured using an assay composed of Hoechst 33342 dye staining and subsequent flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression levels of stemness-related genes were significantly affected by cyclopamine treatment. Taken together, the present study showed that targeting hedgehog signaling could reduce a more aggressive subpopulation of the cancer cells, suggesting an alternative approach for HMM therapy. PMID:26206198

  12. Further analyses of human kidney cell populations separated on the space shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robin M.; Todd, Paul; Cole, Kenneth D.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    Cultured human embryonic kidney cells were separated into electrophoretic subpopulations in laboratory experiments and in two separation experiments on the STS-8 (Challenger) Space Shuttle flight using the mid-deck Continuous Flow Electrophoretic Separator (CFES). Populations of cells from each fraction were cultured for the lifetime of the cells, and supernatant medium was withdrawn and replaced at 4-day intervals. Withdrawn medium was frozen at -120°C for subsequent analysis. Enzyme assays, antibodies and gel electrophoresis were used as analytical tools for the detection and quantitation of plasminogen activators in these samples. These assays of frozen culture supernatant fluids confirmed the electrophoretic separation of plasminogen-activator producing cells from non-producing cells, the isolation of cells capable of sustained production, and the separation of cells that produce different plasminogen activators from one another.

  13. Flow Cytometric Single-Cell Identification of Populations in Synthetic Bacterial Communities.

    PubMed

    Rubbens, Peter; Props, Ruben; Boon, Nico; Waegeman, Willem

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial cells can be characterized in terms of their cell properties using flow cytometry. Flow cytometry is able to deliver multiparametric measurements of up to 50,000 cells per second. However, there has not yet been a thorough survey concerning the identification of the population to which bacterial single cells belong based on flow cytometry data. This paper not only aims to assess the quality of flow cytometry data when measuring bacterial populations, but also suggests an alternative approach for analyzing synthetic microbial communities. We created so-called in silico communities, which allow us to explore the possibilities of bacterial flow cytometry data using supervised machine learning techniques. We can identify single cells with an accuracy >90% for more than half of the communities consisting out of two bacterial populations. In order to assess to what extent an in silico community is representative for its synthetic counterpart, we created so-called abundance gradients, a combination of synthetic (i.e., in vitro) communities containing two bacterial populations in varying abundances. By showing that we are able to retrieve an abundance gradient using a combination of in silico communities and supervised machine learning techniques, we argue that in silico communities form a viable representation for synthetic bacterial communities, opening up new opportunities for the analysis of synthetic communities and bacterial flow cytometry data in general.

  14. Molecular noise can minimize the collective sensitivity of a clonal heterogeneous cell population.

    PubMed

    Forment, Marzo; Rodrigo, Guillermo

    2017-03-07

    It is now widely accepted that molecular noise, rather than be always detrimental, introduces in many circumstances the required boost to reach fundamental cellular activities or strategies otherwise unattainable. In threshold-like genetic systems, molecular noise serves to generate heterogeneous responses in a clonal population, also in a tissue, due to cell-to-cell variability. Here, we derived a mathematical framework from which we could study in detail this effect. We focused on a minimal decision-making gene circuit implemented as a transcriptional positive-feedback loop. We evidenced that when the individual responses of each cell within the population are averaged, a sort of collective behavior, the resulting dose-response curve is linearized. In other words, the population is less sensitive than the individuals, which otherwise enhances the information transfer from signal to response. We found that the distance to the ideal linear response of the cell population is minimized for a particular noise level, and also characterized the interplay between intrinsic and extrinsic noise. Overall, our results highlight how cells could, by acting as a collective, entangle their genetic systems with their environments by adjusting the intracellular noise levels.

  15. Flow Cytometric Single-Cell Identification of Populations in Synthetic Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Nico; Waegeman, Willem

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial cells can be characterized in terms of their cell properties using flow cytometry. Flow cytometry is able to deliver multiparametric measurements of up to 50,000 cells per second. However, there has not yet been a thorough survey concerning the identification of the population to which bacterial single cells belong based on flow cytometry data. This paper not only aims to assess the quality of flow cytometry data when measuring bacterial populations, but also suggests an alternative approach for analyzing synthetic microbial communities. We created so-called in silico communities, which allow us to explore the possibilities of bacterial flow cytometry data using supervised machine learning techniques. We can identify single cells with an accuracy >90% for more than half of the communities consisting out of two bacterial populations. In order to assess to what extent an in silico community is representative for its synthetic counterpart, we created so-called abundance gradients, a combination of synthetic (i.e., in vitro) communities containing two bacterial populations in varying abundances. By showing that we are able to retrieve an abundance gradient using a combination of in silico communities and supervised machine learning techniques, we argue that in silico communities form a viable representation for synthetic bacterial communities, opening up new opportunities for the analysis of synthetic communities and bacterial flow cytometry data in general. PMID:28122063

  16. Quantitative determination of transformed cells in a mixed population by stimultaneous fluorescence analysis of cell surface and DNA an individual cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, S P; Bartholomew, J C

    1977-01-01

    Cell-surface labeling with fluorescamine indicates that the fluorescence of Balb 3T3 A31 cells in considerably decreased after both viral and chemical transformation. This phenomenon, coupled with the technique of flow microfluorometry, enabled nontransformed and transformed cells to be distinguished. A second fluroescent probe, propidium iodide, which intercalates into DNA, was used in combination with fluorescamine in order to obtain a ratio of cell-surface labeling to DNA content. This manipulation allowed enhanced resolution of two populations and the detection of small numbers of transformants in a predominantly normal population. PMID:193110

  17. The effect of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1973-01-01

    The problem studied involved cell proliferation in mice thymus undergoing irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roetgens/day for 105 days. Specifically, the aim was to determine wheather or not a steady state of cell population can be established for the indicated period of time and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population are involved.

  18. Peripheral Immune Cell Populations Associated with Cognitive Deficits and Negative Symptoms of Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Lorinda; Mustafa, Syed; Hatton, Alex; Smith, Kenneth G. C.; Lyons, Paul A.; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothetically, psychotic disorders could be caused or conditioned by immunological mechanisms. If so, one might expect there to be peripheral immune system phenotypes that are measurable in blood cells as biomarkers of psychotic states. Methods We used multi-parameter flow cytometry of venous blood to quantify and determine the activation state of 73 immune cell subsets for 18 patients with chronic schizophrenia (17 treated with clozapine), and 18 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex, BMI and smoking. We used multivariate methods (partial least squares) to reduce dimensionality and define populations of differentially co-expressed cell counts in the cases compared to controls. Results Schizophrenia cases had increased relative numbers of NK cells, naïve B cells, CXCR5+ memory T cells and classical monocytes; and decreased numbers of dendritic cells (DC), HLA-DR+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs), and CD4+ memory T cells. Likewise, within the patient group, more severe negative and cognitive symptoms were associated with decreased relative numbers of dendritic cells, HLA-DR+ Tregs, and CD4+ memory T cells. Motivated by the importance of central nervous system dopamine signalling for psychosis, we measured dopamine receptor gene expression in separated CD4+ cells. Expression of the dopamine D3 (DRD3) receptor was significantly increased in clozapine-treated schizophrenia and covaried significantly with differentiated T cell classes in the CD4+ lineage. Conclusions Peripheral immune cell populations and dopaminergic signalling are disrupted in clozapine-treated schizophrenia. Immuno-phenotypes may provide peripherally accessible and mechanistically specific biomarkers of residual cognitive and negative symptoms in this treatment-resistant subgroup of patients. PMID:27244229

  19. Phototheranostics of CD44-positive cell populations in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jiefu; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Mironchik, Yelena; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one of the most lethal subtypes of breast cancer that has limited treatment options. Its high rates of recurrence and metastasis have been associated, in part, with a subpopulation of breast cancer stem-like cells that are resistant to conventional therapies. A compendium of markers such as CD44high/CD24low, and increased expression of the ABCG2 transporter and increased aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1), have been associated with these cells. We developed a CD44-targeted monoclonal antibody photosensitizer conjugate for combined fluorescent detection and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of CD44 expressing cells in TNBC. The CD44-targeted conjugate demonstrated acute cell killing of breast cancer cells with high CD44 expression. This cell death process was dependent upon CD44-specific cell membrane binding combined with near-infrared irradiation. The conjugate selectively accumulated in CD44-positive tumors and caused dramatic tumor shrinkage and efficient elimination of CD44-positive cell populations following irradiation. This novel phototheranostic strategy provides a promising opportunity for the destruction of CD44-positive populations that include cancer stem-like cells, in locally advanced primary and metastatic TNBC. PMID:27302409

  20. Generation of highly enriched populations of optic vesicle-like retinal cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ohlemacher, Sarah K; Iglesias, Clara L; Sridhar, Akshayalakshmi; Gamm, David M; Meyer, Jason S

    2015-02-02

    The protocol outlined below is used to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into retinal cell types through a process that faithfully recapitulates the stepwise progression observed in vivo. From pluripotency, cells are differentiated to a primitive anterior neural fate, followed by progression into two distinct populations of retinal progenitors and forebrain progenitors, each of which can be manually separated and purified. The hPSC-derived retinal progenitors are found to self-organize into three-dimensional optic vesicle-like structures, with each aggregate possessing the ability to differentiate into all major retinal cell types. The ability to faithfully recapitulate the stepwise in vivo development in a three-dimensional cell culture system allows for the study of mechanisms underlying human retinogenesis. Furthermore, this methodology allows for the study of retinal dysfunction and disease modeling using patient-derived cells, as well as high-throughput pharmacological screening and eventually patient-specific therapies.

  1. Normalizing for individual cell population context in the analysis of high-content cellular screens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background High-content, high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) offers unprecedented possibilities to elucidate gene function and involvement in biological processes. Microscopy based screening allows phenotypic observations at the level of individual cells. It was recently shown that a cell's population context significantly influences results. However, standard analysis methods for cellular screens do not currently take individual cell data into account unless this is important for the phenotype of interest, i.e. when studying cell morphology. Results We present a method that normalizes and statistically scores microscopy based RNAi screens, exploiting individual cell information of hundreds of cells per knockdown. Each cell's individual population context is employed in normalization. We present results on two infection screens for hepatitis C and dengue virus, both showing considerable effects on observed phenotypes due to population context. In addition, we show on a non-virus screen that these effects can be found also in RNAi data in the absence of any virus. Using our approach to normalize against these effects we achieve improved performance in comparison to an analysis without this normalization and hit scoring strategy. Furthermore, our approach results in the identification of considerably more significantly enriched pathways in hepatitis C virus replication than using a standard analysis approach. Conclusions Using a cell-based analysis and normalization for population context, we achieve improved sensitivity and specificity not only on a individual protein level, but especially also on a pathway level. This leads to the identification of new host dependency factors of the hepatitis C and dengue viruses and higher reproducibility of results. PMID:22185194

  2. Threshold effect of growth rate on population variability of Escherichia coli cell lengths

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A long-standing question in biology is the effect of growth on cell size. Here, we estimate the effect of Escherichia coli growth rate (r) on population cell size distributions by estimating the coefficient of variation of cell lengths (CVL) from image analysis of fixed cells in DIC microscopy. We find that the CVL is constant at growth rates less than one division per hour, whereas above this threshold, CVL increases with an increase in the growth rate. We hypothesize that stochastic inhibition of cell division owing to replication stalling by a RecA-dependent mechanism, combined with the growth rate threshold of multi-fork replication (according to Cooper and Helmstetter), could form the basis of such a threshold effect. We proceed to test our hypothesis by increasing the frequency of stochastic stalling of replication forks with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment and find that cell length variability increases only when the growth rate exceeds this threshold. The population effect is also reproduced in single-cell studies using agar-pad cultures and ‘mother machine’-based experiments to achieve synchrony. To test the role of RecA, critical for the repair of stalled replication forks, we examine the CVL of E. coli ΔrecA cells. We find cell length variability in the mutant to be greater than wild-type, a phenotype that is rescued by plasmid-based RecA expression. Additionally, we find that RecA-GFP protein recruitment to nucleoids is more frequent at growth rates exceeding the growth rate threshold and is further enhanced on HU treatment. Thus, we find growth rates greater than a threshold result in increased E. coli cell lengths in the population, and this effect is, at least in part, mediated by RecA recruitment to the nucleoid and stochastic inhibition of division. PMID:28386413

  3. Ab initio phenomenological simulation of the growth of large tumor cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignola, Roberto; DelFabbro, Alessio; Dalla Pellegrina, Chiara; Milotti, Edoardo

    2007-06-01

    In a previous paper we have introduced a phenomenological model of cell metabolism and of the cell cycle to simulate the behavior of large tumor cell populations (Chignola and Milotti 2005 Phys. Biol. 2 8). Here we describe a refined and extended version of the model that includes some of the complex interactions between cells and their surrounding environment. The present version takes into consideration several additional energy-consuming biochemical pathways such as protein and DNA synthesis, the tuning of extracellular pH and of the cell membrane potential. The control of the cell cycle, which was previously modeled by means of ad hoc thresholds, has been directly addressed here by considering checkpoints from proteins that act as targets for phosphorylation on multiple sites. As simulated cells grow, they can now modify the chemical composition of the surrounding environment which in turn acts as a feedback mechanism to tune cell metabolism and hence cell proliferation: in this way we obtain growth curves that match quite well those observed in vitro with human leukemia cell lines. The model is strongly constrained and returns results that can be directly compared with actual experiments, because it uses parameter values in narrow ranges estimated from experimental data, and in perspective we hope to utilize it to develop in silico studies of the growth of very large tumor cell populations (106 cells or more) and to support experimental research. In particular, the program is used here to make predictions on the behavior of cells grown in a glucose-poor medium: these predictions are confirmed by experimental observation.

  4. TRIM28 multi-domain protein regulates cancer stem cell population in breast tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Czerwińska, Patrycja; Shah, Parantu K.; Tomczak, Katarzyna; Klimczak, Marta; Mazurek, Sylwia; Sozańska, Barbara; Biecek, Przemysław; Korski, Konstanty; Filas, Violetta; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Andersen, Jannik N.; Wiznerowicz, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    The expression of Tripartite motif-containing protein 28 (TRIM28)/Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-associated protein 1 (KAP1), is elevated in at least 14 tumor types, including solid and hematopoietic tumors. High level of TRIM28 is associated with triple-negative subtype of breast cancer (TNBC), which shows higher aggressiveness and lower survival rates. Interestingly, TRIM28 is essential for maintaining the pluripotent phenotype in embryonic stem cells. Following on that finding, we evaluated the role of TRIM28 protein in the regulation of breast cancer stem cells (CSC) populations and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of TRIM28 expression in xenografts led to deceased expression of pluripotency and mesenchymal markers, as well as inhibition of signaling pathways involved in the complex mechanism of CSC maintenance. Moreover, TRIM28 depletion reduced the ability of cancer cells to induce tumor growth when subcutaneously injected in limiting dilutions. Our data demonstrate that the downregulation of TRIM28 gene expression reduced the ability of CSCs to self-renew that resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth. Loss of function of TRIM28 leads to dysregulation of cell cycle, cellular response to stress, cancer cell metabolism, and inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. All these mechanisms directly regulate maintenance of CSC population. Our original results revealed the role of the TRIM28 in regulating the CSC population in breast cancer. These findings may pave the way to novel and more effective therapies targeting cancer stem cells in breast tumors. PMID:27845900

  5. Muscle satellite cells are a functionally heterogeneous population in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yusuke; Boldrin, Luisa; Knopp, Paul; Morgan, Jennifer E; Zammit, Peter S

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscles of body and limb are derived from somites, but most head muscles originate from cranial mesoderm. The resident stem cells of muscle are satellite cells, which have the same embryonic origin as the muscle in which they reside. Here, we analysed satellite cells with a different ontology, comparing those of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of the limb with satellite cells from the masseter of the head. Satellite cell-derived myoblasts from MAS and EDL muscles had distinct gene expression profiles and masseter cells usually proliferated more and differentiated later than those from EDL. When transplanted, however, masseter-derived satellite cells regenerated limb muscles as efficiently as those from EDL. Clonal analysis showed that functional properties differed markedly between satellite cells: ranging from clones that proliferated extensively and gave rise to both differentiated and self-renewed progeny, to others that divided minimally before differentiating completely. Generally, masseter-derived clones were larger and took longer to differentiate than those from EDL. This distribution in cell properties was preserved in both EDL-derived and masseter-derived satellite cells from old mice, although clones were generally less proliferative. Satellite cells, therefore, are a functionally heterogeneous population, with many occupants of the niche exhibiting stem cell characteristics in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

  6. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) locus profiles in the Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Meriem, Bani; Jihen, Seket; Houda, Kaabi; Ghaya, Cherif; Manel, Chaabane; Hedi, Bellali; Slama, Hmida

    2015-05-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are a family of inhibitory and activatory receptors that are expressed by most natural killer (NK) cells. The KIR gene family is polymorphic: genomic diversity is achieved through differences in gene content and allelic polymorphism. The number of KIR loci has been reported to vary among individuals, resulting in different KIR haplotypes. In this study we report the genotypic structure of KIRs in 267 unrelated and healthy Tunisian subjects by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) method. All 16 KIR genes were observed in the population with different frequencies; framework genes KIR3DP1 and KIR3DL2 and the nonframework genes KIR2DL1 and KIR2DP1 were present in all individuals. A total of 26 different KIR gene profiles and 54 subgenotypes were observed in the tested population samples. Genotype 1, with a frequency of 36.6%, is the most commonly observed in the Tunisian population. Our results showed that the Tunisian population possesses the previously reported general features of the Caucasian as well as African populations, with some additional interesting differences. Such knowledge of the KIR gene distribution in populations is very useful in the study of associations with diseases and in selection of donors for haploidentical bone marrow transplantation.

  7. Cancer stem cells and cisplatin-resistant cells isolated from non-small-lung cancer cell lines constitute related cell populations.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Ayllon, Blanca D; Moncho-Amor, Veronica; Abarrategi, Ander; Ibañez de Cáceres, Inmaculada; Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the top cause of cancer-related deceases. One of the reasons is the development of resistance to the chemotherapy treatment. In particular, cancer stem cells (CSCs), can escape treatment and regenerate the bulk of the tumor. In this article, we describe a comparison between cancer cells resistant to cisplatin and CSCs, both derived from the non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines H460 and A549. Cisplatin-resistant cells were obtained after a single treatment with the drug. CSCs were isolated by culture in defined media, under nonadherent conditions. The isolated CSCs were clonogenic, could be differentiated into adherent cells and were less sensitive to cisplatin than the original cells. Cisplatin resistant and CSCs were able to generate primary tumors and to metastasize when injected into immunodeficient Nu/Nu mice, although they formed smaller tumors with a larger latency than untreated cells. Notably, under appropriated proportions, CSCs synergized with differentiated cells to form larger tumors. CSCs also showed increased capacity to induce angiogenesis in Nu/Nu mice. Conversely, H460 cisplatin-resistant cells showed increased tendency to develop bone metastasis. Gene expression analysis showed that several genes involved in tumor development and metastasis (EGR1, COX2, MALAT1, AKAP12, ADM) were similarly induced in CSC and cisplatin-resistant H460 cells, in agreement with a close similarity between these two cell populations. Cells with the characteristic growth properties of CSCs were also isolated from surgical samples of 18 out of 44 lung cancer patients. A significant correlation (P = 0.028) was found between the absence of CSCs and cisplatin sensitivity.

  8. Melanopsin‐expressing ganglion cells on macaque and human retinas form two morphologically distinct populations

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hsi‐Wen; Ren, Xiaozhi; Peterson, Beth B.; Marshak, David W.; Yau, King‐Wai; Gamlin, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The long‐term goal of this research is to understand how retinal ganglion cells that express the photopigment melanopsin, also known as OPN4, contribute to vision in humans and other primates. Here we report the results of anatomical studies using our polyclonal antibody specifically against human melanopsin that confirm and extend previous descriptions of melanopsin cells in primates. In macaque and human retina, two distinct populations of melanopsin cells were identified based on dendritic stratification in either the inner or the outer portion of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Variation in dendritic field size and cell density with eccentricity was confirmed, and dendritic spines, a new feature of melanopsin cells, were described. The spines were the sites of input from DB6 diffuse bipolar cell axon terminals to the inner stratifying type of melanopsin cells. The outer stratifying melanopsin type received inputs from DB6 bipolar cells via a sparse outer axonal arbor. Outer stratifying melanopsin cells also received inputs from axon terminals of dopaminergic amacrine cells. On the outer stratifying melanopsin cells, ribbon synapses from bipolar cells and conventional synapses from amacrine cells were identified in electron microscopic immunolabeling experiments. Both inner and outer stratifying melanopsin cell types were retrogradely labeled following tracer injection in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). In addition, a method for targeting melanopsin cells for intracellular injection using their intrinsic fluorescence was developed. This technique was used to demonstrate that melanopsin cells were tracer coupled to amacrine cells and would be applicable to electrophysiological experiments in the future. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2845–2872, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26972791

  9. Effects of radiation on rat respiratory epithelial cells: Critical target cell populations and the importance of cell-cell interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzaghi-Howe, M.; Ford, J.

    1994-10-01

    The oncongenic effects of radiation on rat respiratory tissues are modulated in vivo within the intact tissue. The degree of modulation as well as the mechanism whereby modulation occurs appears to be different for different types of ionizing radiations. A combined cell culture -in vivo model is described. This model has been developed to evaluate the influence of the host and tissue environment on development and expression of the neoplastic phenotype in irradiated rat trachea. Our data indicates that the potentially oncogenic effects of neutrons, X Rays, and α-particles are different depending on the exposure conditions employed and the conditions under which exposed cells are maintained following exposure.

  10. Differential Clonal Expansion in an Invading Cell Population: Clonal Advantage or Dumb Luck?

    PubMed

    Newgreen, Donald F; Zhang, Dongcheng; Cheeseman, Bevan L; Binder, Benjamin J; Landman, Kerry A

    2017-01-01

    In neoplastic cell growth, clones and subclones are variable both in size and mutational spectrum. The largest of these clones are believed to represent those cells with mutations that make them the most "fit," in a Darwinian sense, for expansion in their microenvironment. Thus, the degree of quantitative clonal expansion is regarded as being determined by innate qualitative differences between the cells that originate each clone. Here, using a combination of mathematical modelling and clonal labelling experiments applied to the developmental model system of the forming enteric nervous system, we describe how cells which are qualitatively identical may consistently produce clones of dramatically different sizes: most clones are very small while a few clones we term "superstars" contribute most of the cells to the final population. The basis of this is minor stochastic variations ("luck") in the timing and direction of movement and proliferation of individual cells, which builds a local advantage for daughter cells that is cumulative. This has potentially important consequences. In cancers, especially before strongly selective cytotoxic therapy, the assumption that the largest clones must be the cells with deterministic proliferative ability may not always hold true. In development, the gradual loss of clonal diversity as "superstars" take over the population may erode the resilience of the system to somatic mutations, which may have occurred early in clonal growth.

  11. Highly dissipative Hénon map behavior in the four-level model of the CO 2 laser with modulated losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pando L., C. L.; Acosta, G. A. Luna; Meucci, R.; Ciofini, M.

    1995-02-01

    We show that the four-level model for the CO 2 laser with modulated losses behaves in a qualitatively similar way as the highly dissipative Hénon map. The ubiquity of elements of the universal sequence, their related symbolic dynamics, and the presence of reverse bifurcations of chaotic bands in the model are reminiscent of the logistic map which is the limit of the Hénon map when the Jacobian equals zero. The coexistence of attractors, its dynamics related to contraction of volumes in phase space and the associated return maps can be correlated with those of the highly dissipative Hénon map.

  12. Induced dual EIT and EIA resonances with optical trapping phenomenon in near/far fields in the N-type four-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Kariman I.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2017-01-01

    The optical trapping phenomenon is investigated in the probe absorptive susceptibility spectra, during the interaction of four-level N-type atomic system with three transverse Gaussian fields, in a Doppler broadened medium. The system was studied under different temperature settings of 87Rb atomic vapor as well as different non-radiative decay rate. The system exhibits a combination of dual electromagnetically induced transparency with electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) or transparency (EIT) resonances simultaneously in near/far field. Also, the optical trapping phenomenon is considerably affected by the non-radiative decay rate.

  13. Manipulation of pulse propagation in a four-level quantum system via an elliptically polarized light in the presence of external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, R.; Asadpour, S. H.; Batebi, S.; Soleimani, H. Rahimpour

    2015-10-01

    The influence of external magnetic field and relative phase between two electric field components of the probe field on absorption-dispersion and group index of a four-level atomic system with two degenerate sublevels are investigated. The results show that, the behaviors of weak probe light can be controlled by an external magnetic field. It is shown that in the presence of the external magnetic field the additional electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) window can be obtained. Our result also reveal that the switching from slow to fast light or vice versa can be manipulated by changing the phase difference between the two circularly polarized components of a single coherent field.

  14. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-08-12

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  15. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  16. Temporal patterns of cortical proliferation of glial cell populations after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Susarla, Bala T.S.; Villapol, Sonia; Yi, Jae-Hyuk; Geller, Herbert M.; Symes, Aviva J.

    2014-01-01

    TBI (traumatic brain injury) triggers an inflammatory cascade, gliosis and cell proliferation following cell death in the pericontusional area and surrounding the site of injury. In order to better understand the proliferative response following CCI (controlled cortical impact) injury, we systematically analyzed the phenotype of dividing cells at several time points post-lesion. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to mild to moderate CCI over the left sensory motor cortex. At different time points following injury, mice were injected with BrdU (bromodeoxyuridine) four times at 3-h intervals and then killed. The greatest number of proliferating cells in the pericontusional region was detected at 3 dpi (days post-injury). At 1 dpi, NG2+ cells were the most proliferative population, and at 3 and 7 dpi the Iba-1+ microglial cells were proliferating more. A smaller, but significant number of GFAP+ (glial fibrillary acidic protein) astrocytes proliferated at all three time points. Interestingly, at 3 dpi we found a small number of proliferating neuroblasts [DCX+ (doublecortin)] in the injured cortex. To determine the cell fate of proliferative cells, mice were injected four times with BrdU at 3 dpi and killed at 28 dpi. Approximately 70% of proliferative cells observed at 28 dpi were GFAP+ astrocytes. In conclusion, our data suggest that the specific glial cell types respond differentially to injury, suggesting that each cell type responds to a specific pattern of growth factor stimulation at each time point after injury. PMID:24670035

  17. Defining Sickle Cell Disease Mortality Using a Population-Based Surveillance System, 2004 through 2008

    PubMed Central

    Paulukonis, Susan T.; Eckman, James R.; Snyder, Angela B.; Hagar, Ward; Feuchtbaum, Lisa B.; Zhou, Mei; Grant, Althea M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Population-based surveillance data from California and Georgia for years 2004 through 2008 were linked to state death record files to determine the all-cause death rate among 12,143 patients identified with sickle cell disease (SCD). Methods All-cause death rates, by age, among these SCD patients were compared with all-cause death rates among both African Americans and the total population in the two states. All-cause death rates were also compared with death rates for SCD derived from publicly available death records: the compressed mortality files and multiple cause of death files. Results Of 12,143 patients identified with SCD, 615 patients died. The all-cause mortality rate for the SCD population was lower than the all-cause mortality rate among African Americans and similar to the total population all-cause mortality rates from birth through age 4 years, but the rate was higher among those with SCD than both the African American and total population rates from ages 5 through 74 years. The count of deceased patients identified by using population-based surveillance data (n=615) was more than twice as high as the count identified in compressed mortality files using SCD as the underlying cause of death alone (n=297). Conclusion Accurate assessment of all-cause mortality and age at death requires long-term surveillance via population-based registries of patients with accurately diagnosed SCD. PMID:26957672

  18. Single-cell analysis reveals a nestin+ tendon stem/progenitor cell population with strong tenogenic potentiality

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zi; Hu, Jia-jie; Yang, Long; Zheng, Ze-Feng; An, Cheng-rui; Wu, Bing-bing; Zhang, Can; Shen, Wei-Liang; Liu, Huan-huan; Chen, Jia-lin; Heng, Boon Chin; Guo, Guo-ji; Chen, Xiao; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The repair of injured tendons remains a formidable clinical challenge because of our limited understanding of tendon stem cells and the regulation of tenogenesis. With single-cell analysis to characterize the gene expression profiles of individual cells isolated from tendon tissue, a subpopulation of nestin+ tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) was identified within the tendon cell population. Using Gene Expression Omnibus datasets and immunofluorescence assays, we found that nestin expression was activated at specific stages of tendon development. Moreover, isolated nestin+ TSPCs exhibited superior tenogenic capacity compared to nestin− TSPCs. Knockdown of nestin expression in TSPCs suppressed their clonogenic capacity and reduced their tenogenic potential significantly both in vitro and in vivo. Hence, these findings provide new insights into the identification of subpopulations of TSPCs and illustrate the crucial roles of nestin in TSPC fate decisions and phenotype maintenance, which may assist in future therapeutic strategies to treat tendon disease. PMID:28138519

  19. Doped overoxidized polypyrrole microelectrodes as sensors for the detection of dopamine released from cell populations.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Luigi; Heiskanen, Arto; Diazzi, Francesco; Dimaki, Maria; Castillo-León, Jaime; Vergani, Marco; Landini, Ettore; Raiteri, Roberto; Ferrari, Giorgio; Carminati, Marco; Sampietro, Marco; Svendsen, Winnie E; Emnéus, Jenny

    2013-07-07

    A surface modification of interdigitated gold microelectrodes (IDEs) with a doped polypyrrole (PPy) film for detection of dopamine released from populations of differentiated PC12 cells is presented. A thin PPy layer was potentiostatically electropolymerized from an aqueous pyrrole solution onto electrode surfaces. The conducting polymer film was doped during electropolymerization by introducing counter-ions in the monomer solution. Several counter-ions were tested and the resulting electrode modifications were characterized electrochemically to find the optimal dopant that increases sensitivity in dopamine detection. Overoxidation of the PPy films was shown to contribute to a significant enhancement in sensitivity to dopamine. The changes caused by overoxidation in the electrochemical behavior and electrode morphology were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and SEM as well as AFM, respectively. The optimal dopant for dopamine detection was found to be polystyrene sulfonate anion (PSS(-)). Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, a suitable model to study exocytotic dopamine release, were differentiated on IDEs functionalized with an overoxidized PSS(-)-doped PPy film. The modified electrodes were used to amperometrically detect dopamine released by populations of cells upon triggering cellular exocytosis with an elevated K(+) concentration. A comparison between the generated current on bare gold electrodes and gold electrodes modified with overoxidized doped PPy illustrates the clear advantage of the modification, yielding 2.6-fold signal amplification. The results also illustrate how to use cell population based dopamine exocytosis measurements to obtain biologically significant information that can be relevant in, for instance, the study of neural stem cell differentiation into dopaminergic neurons.

  20. Molecular and functional heterogeneity of early postnatal porcine satellite cell populations is associated with bioenergetic profile

    PubMed Central

    Miersch, Claudia; Stange, Katja; Hering, Silvio; Kolisek, Martin; Viergutz, Torsten; Röntgen, Monika

    2017-01-01

    During postnatal development, hyperplastic and hypertrophic processes of skeletal muscle growth depend on the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and fusion of satellite cells (SC). Therefore, molecular and functional SC heterogeneity is an important component of muscle plasticity and will greatly affect long-term growth performance and muscle health. However, its regulation by cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is far from clear. In particular, there is only minor information on the early postnatal period which is critical for muscle maturation and the establishment of adult SC pools. Here, we separated two SC subpopulations (P40/50, P50/70) from muscle of 4-day-old piglets. Our results characterize P40/50 as homogeneous population of committed (high expression of Myf5), fast-proliferating muscle progenitors. P50/70 constituted a slow-proliferating phenotype and contains high numbers of differentiated SC progeny. During culture, P50/70 is transformed to a population with lower differentiation potential that contains 40% Pax7-positive cells. A reversible state of low mitochondrial activity that results from active down-regulation of ATP-synthase is associated with the transition of some of the P50/70 cells to this more primitive fate typical for a reserve cell population. We assume that P40/50 and P50/70 subpopulations contribute unequally in the processes of myofiber growth and maintenance of the SC pool. PMID:28344332

  1. Molecular and functional heterogeneity of early postnatal porcine satellite cell populations is associated with bioenergetic profile.

    PubMed

    Miersch, Claudia; Stange, Katja; Hering, Silvio; Kolisek, Martin; Viergutz, Torsten; Röntgen, Monika

    2017-03-27

    During postnatal development, hyperplastic and hypertrophic processes of skeletal muscle growth depend on the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and fusion of satellite cells (SC). Therefore, molecular and functional SC heterogeneity is an important component of muscle plasticity and will greatly affect long-term growth performance and muscle health. However, its regulation by cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is far from clear. In particular, there is only minor information on the early postnatal period which is critical for muscle maturation and the establishment of adult SC pools. Here, we separated two SC subpopulations (P40/50, P50/70) from muscle of 4-day-old piglets. Our results characterize P40/50 as homogeneous population of committed (high expression of Myf5), fast-proliferating muscle progenitors. P50/70 constituted a slow-proliferating phenotype and contains high numbers of differentiated SC progeny. During culture, P50/70 is transformed to a population with lower differentiation potential that contains 40% Pax7-positive cells. A reversible state of low mitochondrial activity that results from active down-regulation of ATP-synthase is associated with the transition of some of the P50/70 cells to this more primitive fate typical for a reserve cell population. We assume that P40/50 and P50/70 subpopulations contribute unequally in the processes of myofiber growth and maintenance of the SC pool.

  2. Pentoxifylline Inhibits WNT Signalling in β-Cateninhigh Patient-Derived Melanoma Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Talar, Beata; Gajos-Michniewicz, Anna; Talar, Marcin; Chouaib, Salem; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Background The heterogeneity of melanoma needs to be addressed and combination therapies seem to be necessary to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to newly developed immunotherapies and targeted therapies. Although the role of WNT/β-catenin pathway in melanoma was early demonstrated, its contribution to the lack of the melanoma patient response to treatment was only recently recognized. Using patient-derived melanoma cell populations, we investigated the influence of pentoxifylline on melanoma cells with either high or low expression of β-catenin. Findings Our results indicate that pentoxifylline inhibits the activity of the canonical WNT pathway in melanoma cell populations with high basal activity of this signalling. This is supported by lowered overall activity of transcription factors TCF/LEF and reduced nuclear localisation of active β-catenin. Moreover, treatment of β-cateninhigh melanoma cell populations with pentoxifylline induces downregulation of genes that are targets of the WNT/β-catenin pathway including connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF-M), a melanocyte- and melanoma cell-specific regulator. Conclusions These results suggest that pentoxifylline, a drug approved by the FDA in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, might be tested in a subset of melanoma patients with elevated activity of β-catenin. This pharmaceutical might be tested as an adjuvant drug in combination therapies when the response to immunotherapy is prevented by high activity of the WNT/β-catenin pathway. PMID:27351373

  3. An equation-free approach to analyzing heterogeneous cell population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bold, Katherine A; Zou, Yu; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Henson, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    We propose a computational approach to modeling the collective dynamics of populations of coupled, heterogeneous biological oscillators. We consider the synchronization of yeast glycolytic oscillators coupled by the membrane exchange of an intracellular metabolite; the heterogeneity consists of a single random parameter, which accounts for glucose influx into each cell. In contrast to Monte Carlo simulations, distributions of intracellular species of these yeast cells are represented by a few leading order generalized Polynomial Chaos (gPC) coefficients, thus reducing the dynamics of an ensemble of oscillators to dynamics of their (typically significantly fewer) representative gPC coefficients. Equation-free (EF) methods are employed to efficiently evolve this coarse description in time and compute the coarse-grained stationary state and/or limit cycle solutions, circumventing the derivation of explicit, closed-form evolution equations. Coarse projective integration and fixed-point algorithms are used to compute collective oscillatory solutions for the cell population and quantify their stability. These techniques are extended to the special case of a "rogue" oscillator; a cell sufficiently different from the rest "escapes" the bulk synchronized behavior and oscillates with a markedly different amplitude. The approach holds promise for accelerating the computer-assisted analysis of detailed models of coupled heterogeneous cell or agent populations.

  4. A population of mitochondrion-rich cells in the pars recta of mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Forbes, M S; Thornhill, B A; Galarreta, C I; Chevalier, R L

    2016-03-01

    Following perfusion of adult mouse kidney with a solution of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), certain epithelial cells in the pars recta (S3) segments of proximal tubules react to form cytoplasmic deposits of blue diformazan particles. Such cells are characterized by dark cytoplasm, small and often elliptical nuclei, elaborate, process-bearing profiles, and abundant mitochondria. The atypical epithelial cells display the additional characteristic of immunoreactivity for a wide spectrum of antigens, including mesenchymal proteins such as vimentin. Though present in kidneys of untreated or sham-operated animals, they are particularly evident under experimental conditions such as unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), appearing in both contralateral and obstructed kidneys over the course of a week's duration, but disappearing from the obstructed kidney as it undergoes the profound atrophy attributable to deterioration of the population of its proximal tubules. The cells do not appear in neonatal kidneys, even those undergoing UUO, but begin to be recognizable soon after weaning (28 days). It is possible that diformazan-positive cells in the mouse S3 tubular segment constitute a resident population of cells that can replenish or augment the tubule. Although somewhat similar cells, with dark cytoplasm and vimentin expression, have been described in human, rat, and transgenic mouse kidney (Smeets et al. in J Pathol 229: 645-659, 2013; Berger et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111: 1533-1538, 2014), those cells-known as "scattered tubule cells" or "proximal tubule rare cells"- differ from the S3-specific cells in that they are present throughout the entire proximal tubule, often lack a brush border, and have only a few mitochondria.

  5. Pituitary tumors contain a side population with tumor stem cell-associated characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Freya; Gremeaux, Lies; Chen, Jianghai; Fu, Qiuli; Willems, Christophe; Roose, Heleen; Govaere, Olivier; Roskams, Tania; Cristina, Carolina; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; Jorissen, Mark; Poorten, Vincent Vander; Bex, Marie; van Loon, Johannes; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2015-08-01

    Pituitary adenomas cause significant endocrine and mass-related morbidity. Little is known about the mechanisms that underlie pituitary tumor pathogenesis. In the present study, we searched for a side population (SP) in pituitary tumors representing cells with high efflux capacity and potentially enriched for tumor stem cells (TSCs). Human pituitary adenomas contain a SP irrespective of hormonal phenotype. This adenoma SP, as well as the purified SP (pSP) that is depleted from endothelial and immune cells, is enriched for cells that express 'tumor stemness' markers and signaling pathways, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-linked factors. Pituitary adenomas were found to contain self-renewing sphere-forming cells, considered to be a property of TSCs. These sphere-initiating cells were recovered in the pSP. Because benign pituitary adenomas do not grow in vitro and have failed to expand in immunodeficient mice, the pituitary tumor cell line AtT20 was further used. We identified a SP in this cell line and found it to be more tumorigenic than the non-SP 'main population'. Of the two EMT regulatory pathways tested, the inhibition of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) signaling reduced EMT-associated cell motility in vitro as well as xenograft tumor growth, whereas the activation of TGFβ had no effect. The human adenoma pSP also showed upregulated expression of the pituitary stem cell marker SOX2. Pituitaries from dopamine receptor D2 knockout (Drd2(-/-)) mice that bear prolactinomas contain more pSP, Sox2(+), and colony-forming cells than WT glands. In conclusion, we detected a SP in pituitary tumors and identified TSC-associated characteristics. The present study adds new elements to the unraveling of pituitary tumor pathogenesis and may lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  6. A colitogenic memory CD4+ T cell population mediates gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Vivian; Agle, Kimberle; Chen, Xiao; Beres, Amy; Komorowski, Richard; Belle, Ludovic; Taylor, Carolyn; Zhu, Fenlu; Haribhai, Dipica; Williams, Calvin B.; Verbsky, James; Blumenschein, Wendy; Sadekova, Svetlana; Bowman, Eddie; Ballantyne, Christie; Weaver, Casey; Serody, David A.; Vincent, Benjamin; Serody, Jonathan; Cua, Daniel J.; Drobyski, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Damage to the gastrointestinal tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and is attributable to T cell–mediated inflammation. In this work, we identified a unique CD4+ T cell population that constitutively expresses the β2 integrin CD11c and displays a biased central memory phenotype and memory T cell transcriptional profile, innate-like properties, and increased expression of the gut-homing molecules α4β7 and CCR9. Using several complementary murine GVHD models, we determined that adoptive transfer and early accumulation of β2 integrin–expressing CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract initiated Th1-mediated proinflammatory cytokine production, augmented pathological damage in the colon, and increased mortality. The pathogenic effect of this CD4+ T cell population critically depended on coexpression of the IL-23 receptor, which was required for maximal inflammatory effects. Non–Foxp3-expressing CD4+ T cells produced IL-10, which regulated colonic inflammation and attenuated lethality in the absence of functional CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. Thus, the coordinate expression of CD11c and the IL-23 receptor defines an IL-10–regulated, colitogenic memory CD4+ T cell subset that is poised to initiate inflammation when there is loss of tolerance and breakdown of mucosal barriers. PMID:27500496

  7. Incoherent control of Goos-Hänchen shifts in a four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solookinejad, G.; Panahi, M.; Ahmadi Sangachin, E.; Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new configuration for manipulating Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts in reflected and transmitted probe beams in a fixed geometrical scheme with a confined four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure. Here, the four-level quantum dot nanostructure is driven by a weak probe light, a coherent coupling field, and two broadband polarized fields that serve as the incoherent pumping fields. We theoretically show that by modulation of the external coupling field, incoherent pumping rates, and detuning of the probe light, the GH shifts in the reflected and transmitted probe light can be controlled. Our results show that enhanced GH shifts of reflected and transmitted probe beams can be obtained by simultaneous use of incoherent pumping rates and detuning of the probe light. Moreover, we find that the GH shifts in both reflected and transmitted probe beams can be negative or positive at certain angles of the incident probe field. Thus, these results may provide some new possibilities for technological applications in all-optical systems based on nanostructure devices.

  8. Revisiting the four-level inverted-Y system under both Doppler-free and Doppler-broadened conditions: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Islam, Khairul; Bhattacharyya, Dipankar; Bandyopadhyay, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    We report the occurrence of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the simulated probe response signal for a four-level inverted-Y type system that is being acted upon by a weak coherent probe field, a strong coherent pump field and a coherent repump field. There are two ground energy levels, one intermediate energy level and one uppermost energy level. The weak probe field couples the lowest ground level to the intermediate level whereas the repump field connects the other ground level with the intermediate level. The strong control field couples the intermediate level with the uppermost energy level, thereby forming an inverted-Y type system. The density matrix based theoretical model has been developed and solved analytically for this four-level system and the probe response signal has been simulated at different values of the control and repump Rabi frequencies, control and repump frequency detunings and under both Doppler-free and Doppler-broadened conditions using the parameters of 87Rb D2 transition. Extremely low line width (few tens of kHz) for the EIT signal has been noticed under thermal averaging for copropagating probe, control and repump field configuration. The EIT signal is found to be immune to the variation in the control Rabi frequency.

  9. Simultaneous electromagnetically induced transparency for two circularly polarized lasers coupled to the same linearly polarized laser in a four-level atomic system in the W scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrim, Cristian; Nelson, Chris

    2011-03-15

    Electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT) can be produced in a four-level atomic system in the W scheme using a linearly polarized optical field for simultaneously slowing down two {sigma}{sup +} and {sigma}{sup -} circularly polarized optical fields. This four-level atomic system can be set up with a |{sup 1}S{sub 0}> ground state and three Zeeman levels of the |{sup 1}P{sub 1}> excited state of any alkali-metal atom placed in a weak magnetic field. We apply our W scheme to ultracold magnesium atoms for neglecting the collisional dephasing. Atomic coherences are reported after solving a density matrix master equation including radiative relaxations from Zeeman states of the |{sup 1}P{sub 1}> multiplet to the |{sup 1}S{sub 0}> ground state. The EIT feature is analyzed using the transit time between the normal dispersive region and the EIT region. The evolution of the EIT feature with the variation of the coupling field is discussed using an intuitive dressed-state representation. We analyze the sensitivity of an EIT feature to pressure broadening of the excited Zeeman states.

  10. Malignant behaviorial characteristics of CD133(+/-) glioblastoma cells from a Northern Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaozhi; Chen, Lei; Jiang, Zhongmin; Wang, Junfei; Su, Zhiguo; Li, Gang; Yu, Shizhu; Liu, Zhenlin

    2013-01-01

    Following emergence of the tumor stem cell theory, the increasing number of related studies demonstrates the theory's growing importance in cancer research and its potential for clinical applications. Few studies have addressed the in vitro or in vivo properties of glioma stem cells from a Han Chinese population. In the present study, surgically obtained glioblastoma tissue was classified into two subtypes, CD133(+) and CD133(-). The hierarchy, invasiveness, growth tolerance under low nutrient conditions and colony forming abilities of the tissue samples were analyzed. Additionally, the characteristics of tumor cells transplanted subcutaneously or re-transplanted into nude mice were observed. The results demonstrated that CD133(+) glioblastoma cells derived from Han Chinese glioma specimens were more prone to primitive cell differentiation and more invasive than CD133(-) glioblastoma cells, leading to increased tumor malignancy compared with CD133(-) cells. The tumor formation rates of CD133(+) and CD133(-) cells in mice were 26/30 and 2/30, respectively. A comparison of tumor subtypes demonstrated that CD133(+) glioblastoma cells had a lower incidence of cell apoptosis in the tumor tissue and higher protein expression levels of Oct4, Sox2, PCNA, EGFR, Ang2, MMP2 and MMP9 compared with CD133(-) cells. Flow cytometry revealed that in the CD133(+) and CD133(-) glioblastoma cell-induced tumors, the percentage of CD133(+) cells was 2.47±0.67 and 0.44±0.14%, respectively. The tumor formation rates following the re-transplantation of CD133(+) or CD133(-) tumors into nude mice were 10/10 and 4/10, respectively. These findings suggest that the CD133(+) glioblastoma cell subpopulation has a stronger malignant cell phenotype than the CD133(-) subpopulation and that its recurrence rate is increased compared with the primitive tumorigenic rate following in vivo transplantation.

  11. Muscle side population cells from dystrophic or injured muscle adopt a fibro-adipogenic fate.

    PubMed

    Penton, Christopher M; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Johnson, Eric K; McAllister, Cynthia; Montanaro, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Muscle side population (SP) cells are rare multipotent stem cells that can participate in myogenesis and muscle regeneration upon transplantation. While they have been primarily studied for the development of cell-based therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, little is known regarding their non-muscle lineage choices or whether the dystrophic muscle environment affects their ability to repair muscle. Unfortunately, the study of muscle SP cells has been challenged by their low abundance and the absence of specific SP cell markers. To address these issues, we developed culture conditions for the propagation and spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation of muscle SP cells. Using this approach, we show that SP cells from wild type muscle robustly differentiate into satellite cells and form myotubes without requiring co-culture with myogenic cells. Furthermore, this myogenic activity is associated with SP cells negative for immune (CD45) and vascular (CD31) markers but positive for Pax7, Sca1, and the mesenchymal progenitor marker PDGFRα. Additionally, our studies revealed that SP cells isolated from dystrophic or cardiotoxin-injured muscle fail to undergo myogenesis. Instead, these SP cells rapidly expand giving rise to fibroblast and adipocyte progenitors (FAPs) and to their differentiated progeny, fibroblasts and adipocytes. Our findings indicate that muscle damage affects the lineage choices of muscle SP cells, promoting their differentiation along fibro-adipogenic lineages while inhibiting myogenesis. These results have implications for a possible role of muscle SP cells in fibrosis and fat deposition in muscular dystrophy. In addition, our studies provide a useful in vitro system to analyze SP cell biology in both normal and pathological conditions.

  12. Analysis of immune cell populations in atrial myocardium of patients with atrial fibrillation or sinus rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Smorodinova, Natalia; Bláha, Martin; Melenovský, Vojtěch; Rozsívalová, Karolína; Přidal, Jaromír; Ďurišová, Mária; Pirk, Jan; Kautzner, Josef; Kučera, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and despite obvious clinical importance remains its pathogenesis only partially explained. A relation between inflammation and AF has been suggested by findings of increased inflammatory markers in AF patients. Objective The goal of this study was to characterize morphologically and functionally CD45-positive inflammatory cell populations in atrial myocardium of patients with AF as compared to sinus rhythm (SR). Methods We examined 46 subjects (19 with AF, and 27 in SR) undergoing coronary bypass or valve surgery. Peroperative bioptic samples of the left and the right atrial tissue were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results The number of CD3+ T-lymphocytes and CD68-KP1+ cells were elevated in the left atrial myocardium of patients with AF compared to those in SR. Immune cell infiltration of LA was related to the rhythm, but not to age, body size, LA size, mitral regurgitation grade, type of surgery, systemic markers of inflammation or presence of diabetes or hypertension. Most of CD68-KP1+ cells corresponded to dendritic cell population based on their morphology and immunoreactivity for DC-SIGN. The numbers of mast cells and CD20+ B-lymphocytes did not differ between AF and SR patients. No foci of inflammation were detected in any sample. Conclusions An immunohistochemical analysis of samples from patients undergoing open heart surgery showed moderate and site-specific increase of inflammatory cells in the atrial myocardium of patients with AF compared to those in SR, with prevailing population of monocyte-macrophage lineage. These cells and their cytokine products may play a role in atrial remodeling and AF persistence. PMID:28225836

  13. Cell Differentiation in a Bacillus thuringiensis Population during Planktonic Growth, Biofilm Formation, and Host Infection

    PubMed Central

    Verplaetse, Emilie; Slamti, Leyla; Gohar, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is armed to complete a full cycle in its insect host. During infection, virulence factors are expressed under the control of the quorum sensor PlcR to kill the host. After the host’s death, the quorum sensor NprR controls a necrotrophic lifestyle, allowing the vegetative cells to use the insect cadaver as a bioincubator and to survive. Only a part of the Bt population sporulates in the insect cadaver, and the precise composition of the whole population and its evolution over time are unknown. Using fluorescent reporters to record gene expression at the single-cell level, we have determined the differentiation course of a Bt population and explored the lineage existing among virulent, necrotrophic, and sporulating cells. The dynamics of cell differentiation were monitored during growth in homogenized medium, biofilm formation, and colonization of insect larvae. We demonstrated that in the insect host and in planktonic culture in rich medium, the virulence, necrotrophism, and sporulation regulators are successively activated in the same cell. In contrast, in biofilms, activation of PlcR is dispensable for NprR activation and we observed a greater heterogeneity than under the other two growth conditions. We also showed that sporulating cells arise almost exclusively from necrotrophic cells. In biofilm and in the insect cadaver, we identified an as-yet-uncharacterized category of cells that do not express any of the reporters used. Overall, we showed that PlcR, NprR, and Spo0A act as interconnected integrators to allow finely tuned adaptation of the pathogen to its environment. PMID:25922389

  14. Responses of retinal ganglion cells to extracellular electrical stimulation, from single cell to population: model-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, David; Chen, Spencer; Protti, Dario A; Morley, John W; Suaning, Gregg J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which survive in large numbers following neurodegenerative diseases, could be stimulated with extracellular electric pulses to elicit artificial percepts. How do the RGCs respond to electrical stimulation at the sub-cellular level under different stimulus configurations, and how does this influence the whole-cell response? At the population level, why have experiments yielded conflicting evidence regarding the extent of passing axon activation? We addressed these questions through simulations of morphologically and biophysically detailed computational RGC models on high performance computing clusters. We conducted the analyses on both large-field RGCs and small-field midget RGCs. The latter neurons are unique to primates. We found that at the single cell level the electric potential gradient in conjunction with neuronal element excitability, rather than the electrode center location per se, determined the response threshold and latency. In addition, stimulus positioning strongly influenced the location of RGC response initiation and subsequent activity propagation through the cellular structure. These findings were robust with respect to inhomogeneous tissue resistivity perpendicular to the electrode plane. At the population level, RGC cellular structures gave rise to low threshold hotspots, which limited axonal and multi-cell activation with threshold stimuli. Finally, due to variations in neuronal element excitability over space, following supra-threshold stimulation some locations favored localized activation of multiple cells, while others favored axonal activation of cells over extended space.

  15. In vivo regulation of murine hair growth: insights from grafting defined cell populations onto nude mice.

    PubMed

    Lichti, U; Weinberg, W C; Goodman, L; Ledbetter, S; Dooley, T; Morgan, D; Yuspa, S H

    1993-07-01

    The nude mouse graft model for testing the hair-forming ability of selected cell populations has considerable potential for providing insights into factors that are important for hair follicle development and proper hair formation. We have developed a minimal component system consisting of immature hair follicle buds from newborn pigmented C57BL/6 mice and adenovirus E1A-immortalized rat vibrissa dermal papilla cells. Hair follicle buds contribute to formation of hairless skin when grafted alone or with Swiss 3T3 cells, but produce densely haired skin when grafted with a fresh dermal cell preparation. The fresh dermal cell preparation represents the single cell fraction after hair follicles have been removed from a collagenase digest of newborn mouse dermis. It provides dermal papilla cells, fibroblasts, and possibly other important growth factor-producing cell types. Rat vibrissa dermal papilla cells supported dense hair growth at early passage in culture but progressively lost this potential during repeated passage in culture. Of 19 E1A-immortalized, clonally derived rat vibrissa dermal papilla cell lines, the four most positive clones supported hair growth to the extent of approximately 200 to 300 hairs per 1-2 cm2 graft area. The remaining clones were moderately positive (five clones), weakly positive (three clones), or negative (seven clones). Swiss 3T3 cells prevented contraction of the graft area but did not appear to affect the number of hairs in the graft site produced by dermal papilla cells plus hair follicle buds alone. The relatively low hair density (estimated 1-5% of normal) resulting from grafts of hair follicle buds with the most positive of the immortalized dermal papilla cell clones compared to fresh dermal cells suggests that optimal reconstitution of hair growth requires some function of dermal papilla cells partially lost during the immortalization process and possibly the contribution of other cell types present in the fresh dermal cell

  16. B cells populating the multiple sclerosis brain mature in the draining cervical lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Joel N. H.; Yaari, Gur; Vander Heiden, Jason A.; Church, George; Donahue, William F.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; Huttner, Anita J.; Laman, Jon D.; Nagra, Rashed M.; Nylander, Alyssa; Pitt, David; Ramanan, Sriram; Siddiqui, Bilal A.; Vigneault, Francois; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Hafler, David A.; O’Connor, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by autoimmune mediated demyelination and neurodegeneration. The CNS of patients with MS harbors expanded clones of antigen-experienced B cells that reside in distinct compartments including the meninges, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and parenchyma. It is not understood whether this immune infiltrate initiates its development in the CNS or in peripheral tissues. B cells in the CSF can exchange with those in peripheral blood, implying that CNS B cells may have access to lymphoid tissue that may be the specific compartment(s) in which CNS resident B cells encounter antigen and experience affinity maturation. In this study, paired tissues were used to determine whether the B cells that populate the CNS mature in the draining cervical lymph nodes (CLNs). High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire demonstrated that clonally expanded B cells were present in both compartments. Founding members of clonal families were more often found in the draining CLNs. More mature clonal family members derived from these founders were observed in the draining CLNs and also in the CNS, including lesions. These data provide new evidence that B cells traffic freely across the tissue barrier with the majority of B cell maturation occurring outside of the CNS in the secondary lymphoid tissue. Our study may aid in further defining the mechanisms of immunomodulatory therapies that either deplete circulating B cells or impact the intrathecal B cell compartment by inhibiting lymphocyte transmigration into the CNS. PMID:25100741

  17. Robust detection of alternative splicing in a population of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Joshua D.; Hu, Yin; Prins, Jan F.

    2016-01-01

    Single cell RNA-seq experiments provide valuable insight into cellular heterogeneity but suffer from low coverage, 3′ bias and technical noise. These unique properties of single cell RNA-seq data make study of alternative splicing difficult, and thus most single cell studies have restricted analysis of transcriptome variation to the gene level. To address these limitations, we developed SingleSplice, which uses a statistical model to detect genes whose isoform usage shows biological variation significantly exceeding technical noise in a population of single cells. Importantly, SingleSplice is tailored to the unique demands of single cell analysis, detecting isoform usage differences without attempting to infer expression levels for full-length transcripts. Using data from spike-in transcripts, we found that our approach detects variation in isoform usage among single cells with high sensitivity and specificity. We also applied SingleSplice to data from mouse embryonic stem cells and discovered a set of genes that show significant biological variation in isoform usage across the set of cells. A subset of these isoform differences are linked to cell cycle stage, suggesting a novel connection between alternative splicing and the cell cycle. PMID:26740580

  18. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F; Gomez, Marcus V; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Ronglih

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration.

  19. Murine peripheral NK-cell populations originate from site-specific immature NK cells more than from BM-derived NK cells.

    PubMed

    Pinhas, Nissim; Sternberg-Simon, Michal; Chiossone, Laura; Shahaf, Gitit; Walzer, Thierry; Vivier, Eric; Mehr, Ramit

    2016-05-01

    Murine NK cells can be divided by the expression of two cell surface markers, CD27 and Mac-1 (a.k.a. CD11b), into four separate subsets. These subsets suggest a linear development model: CD27(-) Mac-1(-) → CD27(+) Mac-1(-) → CD27(+) Mac-1(+) → CD27(-) Mac-1(+) . Here, we used a combination of BrdU labeling experiments and mathematical modeling to gain insights regarding NK-cell development in mouse bone marrow (BM), spleen and liver. The modeling results that best fit the experimental data show that the majority of NK cells already express CD27 upon entering the NK-cell developmental pathway. Additionally, only a small fraction of NK cells exit the BM to other sites, suggesting that peripheral NK-cell populations originate from site-specific immature NK cells more than from BM-derived mature NK cells.

  20. Impairment in natural killer cells editing of immature dendritic cells by infection with a virulent Trypanosoma cruzi population.

    PubMed

    Batalla, Estela I; Pino Martínez, Agustina M; Poncini, Carolina V; Duffy, Tomás; Schijman, Alejandro G; González Cappa, Stella M; Alba Soto, Catalina D

    2013-01-01

    Early interactions between natural killer (NK) and dendritic cells (DC) shape the immune response at the frontier of innate and adaptive immunity. Activated NK cells participate in maturation or deletion of DCs that remain immature. We previously demonstrated that infection with a high virulence (HV) population of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi downmodulates DC maturation and T-cell activation capacity. Here, we evaluated the role of NK cells in regulating the maturation level of DCs. Shortly after infection with HV T. cruzi, DCs in poor maturation status begin to accumulate in mouse spleen. Although infection induces NK cell cytotoxicity and cytokine production, NK cells from mice infected with HV T. cruzi exhibit reduced ability to lyse and fail to induce maturation of bone marrow-derived immature DCs (iDCs). NK-mediated lysis of iDCs is restored by in vitro blockade of the IL-10 receptor during NK-DC interaction or when NK cells are obtained from T. cruzi-infected IL-10 knockout mice. These results suggest that infection with a virulent T. cruzi strain alters NK cell-mediated regulation of the adaptive immune response induced by DCs. This regulatory circuit where IL-10 appears to participate might lead to parasite persistence but can also limit the induction of a vigorous tissue-damaging T-cell response.

  1. Enrichment of diluted cell populations from large sample volumes using 3D carbon-electrode dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Islam, Monsur; Natu, Rucha; Larraga-Martinez, Maria Fernanda; Martinez-Duarte, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    Here, we report on an enrichment protocol using carbon electrode dielectrophoresis to isolate and purify a targeted cell population from sample volumes up to 4 ml. We aim at trapping, washing, and recovering an enriched cell fraction that will facilitate downstream analysis. We used an increasingly diluted sample of yeast, 10(6)-10(2) cells/ml, to demonstrate the isolation and enrichment of few cells at increasing flow rates. A maximum average enrichment of 154.2 ± 23.7 times was achieved when the sample flow rate was 10 μl/min and yeast cells were suspended in low electrically conductive media that maximizes dielectrophoresis trapping. A COMSOL Multiphysics model allowed for the comparison between experimental and simulation results. Discussion is conducted on the discrepancies between such results and how the model can be further improved.

  2. A Framework for Image-Based Classification of Mitotic Cells in Asynchronous Populations

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Scott D.; Newberg, Justin Y.; Szafran, Adam T.; Hall, Rebecca M.; Brinkley, Bill R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract High content screening (HCS) has emerged an important tool for drug discovery because it combines rich readouts of cellular responses in a single experiment. Inclusion of cell cycle analysis into HCS is essential to identify clinically suitable anticancer drugs that disrupt the aberrant mitotic activity of cells. One challenge for integration of cell cycle analysis into HCS is that cells must be chemically synchronized to specific phases, adding experimental complexity to high content screens. To address this issue, we have developed a rules-based method that utilizes mitotic phosphoprotein monoclonal 2 (MPM-2) marker and works consistently in different experimental conditions and in asynchronous populations. Further, the performance of the rules-based method is comparable to established machine learning approaches for classifying cell cycle data, indicating the robustness of the features we use in the framework. As such, we suggest the use of MPM-2 analysis and its associated expressive features for integration into HCS approaches. PMID:22084958

  3. Population activity changes during a trial-to-trial adaptation of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Jing, Wei; Zhang, Pu-Ming; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-07-09

    A 'trial-to-trial adaptation' of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells in response to a repetitive light stimulus was investigated in the present study. Using the multielectrode recording technique, we studied the trial-to-trial adaptive properties of ganglion cells and explored the activity of population neurons during this adaptation process. It was found that the ganglion cells adapted with different degrees: their firing rates were decreased in different extents from early-adaptation to late-adaptation stage, and this was accompanied by a decrease in cross-correlation strength. In addition, adaptation behavior was different for ON-response and OFF-response, which implied that the mechanism of the trial-to-trial adaptation might involve bipolar cells and/or their synapses with other neurons and the stronger adaptation in the ganglion cells' OFF-responses might reflect the requirement to avoid possible saturation in the OFF circuit.

  4. A label-retaining but unipotent cell population resides in biliary compartment of mammalian liver

    PubMed Central

    Viil, Janeli; Klaas, Mariliis; Valter, Kadri; Belitškin, Denis; Ilmjärv, Sten; Jaks, Viljar

    2017-01-01

    Cells with slow proliferation kinetics that retain the nuclear label over long time periods–the label-retaining cells (LRCs)–represent multipotent stem cells in a number of adult tissues. Since the identity of liver LRCs (LLRCs) had remained elusive we utilized a genetic approach to reveal LLRCs in normal non-injured livers and characterized their regenerative properties in vivo and in culture. We found that LLRCs were located in biliary vessels and participated in the regeneration of biliary but not hepatocyte injury. In culture experiments the sorted LLRCs displayed an enhanced self-renewal capacity but a unipotent biliary differentiation potential. Transcriptome analysis revealed a unique set of tumorigenesis- and nervous system-related genes upregulated in LLRCs when compared to non-LRC cholangiocytes. We conclude that the LLRCs established during the normal morphogenesis of the liver do not represent a multipotent primitive somatic stem cell population but act as unipotent biliary progenitor cells. PMID:28084309

  5. Stable Heterogeneity for the Production of Diffusible Factors in Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Archetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The production of diffusible molecules that promote survival and growth is common in bacterial and eukaryotic cell populations, and can be considered a form of cooperation between cells. While evolutionary game theory shows that producers and non-producers can coexist in well-mixed populations, there is no consensus on the possibility of a stable polymorphism in spatially structured populations where the effect of the diffusible molecule extends beyond one-step neighbours. I study the dynamics of biological public goods using an evolutionary game on a lattice, taking into account two assumptions that have not been considered simultaneously in existing models: that the benefit of the diffusible molecule is a non-linear function of its concentration, and that the molecule diffuses according to a decreasing gradient. Stable coexistence of producers and non-producers is observed when the benefit of the molecule is a sigmoid function of its concentration, while strictly diminishing returns lead to coexistence only for very specific parameters and linear benefits never lead to coexistence. The shape of the diffusion gradient is largely irrelevant and can be approximated by a step function. Since the effect of a biological molecule is generally a sigmoid function of its concentration (as described by the Hill equation), linear benefits or strictly diminishing returns are not an appropriate approximations for the study of biological public goods. A stable polymorphism of producers and non-producers is in line with the predictions of evolutionary game theory and likely to be common in cell populations. PMID:25268125

  6. The Notch Pathway Is Important in Maintaining the Cancer Stem Cell Population in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Ethan V.; Kim, Edward J.; Wu, Jingjiang; Hynes, Mark; Bednar, Filip; Proctor, Erica; Wang, Lidong; Dziubinski, Michele L.; Simeone, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells that have the capacity to initiate and propagate tumor formation. However, the mechanisms by which pancreatic CSCs are maintained are not well understood or characterized. Methods Expression of Notch receptors, ligands, and Notch signaling target genes was quantitated in the CSC and non-CSC populations from 8 primary human pancreatic xenografts. A gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI) that inhibits the Notch pathway and a shRNA targeting the Notch target gene Hes1 were used to assess the role of the Notch pathway in CSC population maintenance and pancreatic tumor growth. Results Notch pathway components were found to be upregulated in pancreatic CSCs. Inhibition of the Notch pathway using either a gamma secretase inhibitor or Hes1 shRNA in pancreatic cancer cells reduced the percentage of CSCs and tumorsphere formation. Conversely, activation of the Notch pathway with an exogenous Notch peptide ligand increased the percentage of CSCs as well as tumorsphere formation. In vivo treatment of orthotopic pancreatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice with GSI blocked tumor growth and reduced the CSC population. Conclusion The Notch signaling pathway is important in maintaining the pancreatic CSC population and is a potential therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24647545

  7. Electrochemical manipulation of cell populations supported by biodegradable polymeric nanosheets for cell transplantation therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jin; Nagai, Nobuhiro; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko; Abe, Toshiaki; Kaji, Hirokazu

    2017-01-31

    We describe an electrochemical method of harvesting cells cultured on a biodegradable polymeric nanosheet (cell/nanosheet construct), which is stabilized on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thiol molecules. A poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanosheet was attached by hydrophobic interactions onto the surface of a SAM of l-cysteine coated onto a gold electrode. Retinal pigment epithelial cell lines (RPE-J cells) were cultured on the nanosheet to form a monolayer. An AA-size dry battery was used to apply a negative electrical potential, causing reductive desorption of the SAM from the gold surface. Within one minute of application of the voltage, the cell/nanosheet of several mm in diameter was successfully detached without the loss of cell viability in a gentle stream of the electrolyte solution. The use of a porous electrode shortened the detachment time due to the more efficient permeation of the electrolyte solution to the electrode surface. Cell transplantation following the harvesting process was demonstrated by the local delivery of RPE-J cell/nanosheet constructs into the subretinal space of rat eyes through a capillary needle. This nanosheet-based approach that allows the on-demand harvesting of cell/nanosheet constructs and their subsequent transplantation in a minimally-invasive manner could play an important role in cell transplantation therapy.

  8. Studies on T cell maturation on defined thymic stromal cell populations in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We describe an in vitro system in which positive selection of developing T cells takes place on defined stromal cell preparations, which include major histocompatibility complex class II+ epithelial cells but exclude cells of bone marrow origin. In this system, maturation of double-positive T cell receptor negative (TCR-), CD4+8+ thymocytes into single-positive TCR+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells takes place together with the development of functional competence. As in vivo, this maturation is associated with the upregulation of TCR levels as cells progress from double-positive to single-positive status. We also show that class II+ epithelial cells in these cultures are less efficient than dendritic cells in mediating the deletion (negative selection) of V beta 8+ cells by the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B. For the first time, this approach provides a model in which the cellular interactions involved in both positive and negative selection can be studied under controlled in vitro conditions. PMID:1512547

  9. Characterization of a Fetal Liver Cell Population Endowed with Long-Term Multiorgan Endothelial Reconstitution Potential.

    PubMed

    Cañete, Ana; Comaills, Valentine; Prados, Isabel; Castro, Ana María; Hammad, Seddik; Ybot-Gonzalez, Patricia; Bockamp, Ernesto; Hengstler, Jan G; Gottgens, Bertie; Sánchez, María José

    2017-02-01

    Stable reconstitution of vascular endothelial beds upon transplantation of progenitor cells represents an important challenge due to the paucity and generally limited integration/expansion potential of most identified vascular related cell subsets. We previously showed that mouse fetal liver (FL) hemato/vascular cells from day 12 of gestation (E12), expressing the Stem Cell Leukaemia (SCL) gene enhancer transgene (SCL-PLAP(+) cells), had robust endothelial engraftment potential when transferred to the blood stream of newborns or adult conditioned recipients, compared to the scarce vascular contribution of adult bone marrow cells. However, the specific SCL-PLAP(+) hematopoietic or endothelial cell subset responsible for the long-term reconstituting endothelial cell (LTR-EC) activity and its confinement to FL developmental stages remained unknown. Using a busulfan-treated newborn transplantation model, we show that LTR-EC activity is restricted to the SCL-PLAP(+) VE-cadherin(+) CD45(-) cell population, devoid of hematopoietic reconstitution activity and largely composed by Lyve1(+) endothelial-committed cells. SCL-PLAP(+) Ve-cadherin(+) CD45(-) cells contributed to the liver sinusoidal endothelium and also to the heart, kidney and lung microvasculature. LTR-EC activity was detected at different stages of FL development, yet marginal activity was identified in the adult liver, revealing unknown functional differences between fetal and adult liver endothelial/endothelial progenitors. Importantly, the observations that expanding donor-derived vascular grafts colocalize with proliferating hepatocyte-like cells and participate in the systemic circulation, support their functional integration into young livers. These findings offer new insights into the engraftment, phonotypical, and developmental characterization of a novel endothelial/endothelial progenitor cell subtype with multiorgan LTR-EC activity, potentially instrumental for the treatment/genetic correction of

  10. The unforeseen challenge: from genotype-to-phenotype in cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Erez

    2015-02-01

    Biological cells present a paradox, in that they show simultaneous stability and flexibility, allowing them to adapt to new environments and to evolve over time. The emergence of stable cell states depends on genotype-to-phenotype associations, which essentially reflect the organization of gene regulatory modes. The view taken here is that cell-state organization is a dynamical process in which the molecular disorder manifests itself in a macroscopic order. The genome does not determine the ordered cell state; rather, it participates in this process by providing a set of constraints on the spectrum of regulatory modes, analogous to boundary conditions in physical dynamical systems. We have developed an experimental framework, in which cell populations are exposed to unforeseen challenges; novel perturbations they had not encountered before along their evolutionary history. This approach allows an unbiased view of cell dynamics, uncovering the potential of cells to evolve and develop adapted stable states. In the last decade, our experiments have revealed a coherent set of observations within this framework, painting a picture of the living cell that in many ways is not aligned with the conventional one. Of particular importance here, is our finding that adaptation of cell-state organization is essentially an efficient exploratory dynamical process rather than one founded on random mutations. Based on our framework, a set of concepts underlying cell-state organization—exploration evolving by global, non-specific, dynamics of gene activity—is presented here. These concepts have significant consequences for our understanding of the emergence and stabilization of a cell phenotype in diverse biological contexts. Their implications are discussed for three major areas of biological inquiry: evolution, cell differentiation and cancer. There is currently no unified theoretical framework encompassing the emergence of order, a stable state, in the living cell. Hopefully

  11. Characterization of a Fetal Liver Cell Population Endowed with Long‐Term Multiorgan Endothelial Reconstitution Potential

    PubMed Central

    Cañete, Ana; Comaills, Valentine; Prados, Isabel; Castro, Ana María; Hammad, Seddik; Ybot‐Gonzalez, Patricia; Bockamp, Ernesto; Hengstler, Jan G.; Gottgens, Bertie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stable reconstitution of vascular endothelial beds upon transplantation of progenitor cells represents an important challenge due to the paucity and generally limited integration/expansion potential of most identified vascular related cell subsets. We previously showed that mouse fetal liver (FL) hemato/vascular cells from day 12 of gestation (E12), expressing the Stem Cell Leukaemia (SCL) gene enhancer transgene (SCL‐PLAP+ cells), had robust endothelial engraftment potential when transferred to the blood stream of newborns or adult conditioned recipients, compared to the scarce vascular contribution of adult bone marrow cells. However, the specific SCL‐PLAP+ hematopoietic or endothelial cell subset responsible for the long‐term reconstituting endothelial cell (LTR‐EC) activity and its confinement to FL developmental stages remained unknown. Using a busulfan‐treated newborn transplantation model, we show that LTR‐EC activity is restricted to the SCL‐PLAP+VE‐cadherin+CD45− cell population, devoid of hematopoietic reconstitution activity and largely composed by Lyve1+ endothelial‐committed cells. SCL‐PLAP+ Ve‐cadherin+CD45− cells contributed to the liver sinusoidal endothelium and also to the heart, kidney and lung microvasculature. LTR‐EC activity was detected at different stages of FL development, yet marginal activity was identified in the adult liver, revealing unknown functional differences between fetal and adult liver endothelial/endothelial progenitors. Importantly, the observations that expanding donor‐derived vascular grafts colocalize with proliferating hepatocyte‐like cells and participate in the systemic circulation, support their functional integration into young livers. These findings offer new insights into the engraftment, phonotypical, and developmental characterization of a novel endothelial/endothelial progenitor cell subtype with multiorgan LTR‐EC activity, potentially instrumental for the treatment

  12. Predicting population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Sidney, John; Dinh, Kenny; Southwood, Scott; Newman, Mark J; Sette, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Background T cells recognize a complex between a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule and a particular pathogen-derived epitope. A given epitope will elicit a response only in individuals that express an MHC molecule capable of binding that particular epitope. MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and over a thousand different human MHC (HLA) alleles are known. A disproportionate amount of MHC polymorphism occurs in positions constituting the peptide-binding region, and as a result, MHC molecules exhibit a widely varying binding specificity. In the design of peptide-based vaccines and diagnostics, the issue of population coverage in relation to MHC polymorphism is further complicated by the fact that different HLA types are expressed at dramatically different frequencies in different ethnicities. Thus, without careful consideration, a vaccine or diagnostic with ethnically biased population coverage could result. Results To address this issue, an algorithm was developed to calculate, on the basis of HLA genotypic frequencies, the fraction of individuals expected to respond to a given epitope set, diagnostic or vaccine. The population coverage estimates are based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data, although the tool can be utilized in a more general fashion. The algorithm was implemented as a web-application available at . Conclusion We have developed a web-based tool to predict population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data. Accordingly, epitope-based vaccines or diagnostics can be designed to maximize population coverage, while minimizing complexity (that is, the number of different epitopes included in the diagnostic or vaccine), and also minimizing the variability of coverage obtained or projected in different ethnic groups. PMID:16545123

  13. A two-population bio-electrochemical model of a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Pinto, R P; Srinivasan, B; Manuel, M-F; Tartakovsky, B

    2010-07-01

    This work presents a two-population model describing the competition of anodophilic and methanogenic microbial populations for a common substrate in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). Fast numerical solution of the model is provided by using ordinary differential equations to describe biomass growth and retention in the anodic compartment. The model parameters are estimated and validated using experimental results obtained in four continuous-flow air-cathode MFCs operated at various external resistances and organic loads. Model analysis demonstrates the influence of operating conditions on MFC performance and suggests ways to maximize MFC power output. The model is suitable both for process optimization and on-line control applications.

  14. The CD44+ALDH+ Population of Human Keratinocytes Is Enriched for Epidermal Stem Cells with Long-Term Repopulating Ability

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Akos Z.; Fong, Stephen; Yue, Lili; Zhang, Kai; Strachan, Lauren R.; Scalapino, Kenneth; Mancianti, Maria Laura; Ghadially, Ruby

    2014-01-01

    Like for other somatic tissues, isolation of a pure population of stem cells has been a primary goal in epidermal biology. We isolated discrete populations of freshly obtained human neonatal keratinocytes (HNKs) using previously untested candidate stem cell markers aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and CD44 as well as the previously studied combination of integrin α6 and CD71. An in vivo transplantation assay combined with limiting dilution analysis was used to quantify enrichment for long-term repopulating cells in the isolated populations. The ALDH+CD44+ population was enriched 12.6-fold for long-term repopulating epidermal stem cells (EpiSCs) and the integrin α6hiCD71lo population was enriched 5.6-fold, over unfractionated cells. In addition to long-term repopulation, CD44+ALDH+ keratinocytes exhibited other stem cell properties. CD44+ALDH+ keratinocytes had self-renewal ability, demonstrated by increased numbers of cells expressing nuclear Bmi-1, serial transplantation of CD44+ALDH+ cells, and holoclone formation in vitro. CD44+ALDH+ cells were multipotent, producing greater numbers of hair follicle-like structures than CD44−ALDH− cells. Furthermore, 58% ± 7% of CD44+ALDH+ cells exhibited label-retention. In vitro, CD44+ALDH+ cells showed enhanced colony formation, in both keratinocyte and embryonic stem cell growth media. In summary, the CD44+ALDH+ population exhibits stem cell properties including long-term epidermal regeneration, multipotency, label retention, and holoclone formation. This study shows that it is possible to quantify the relative number of EpiSCs in human keratinocyte populations using long-term repopulation as a functional test of stem cell nature. Future studies will combine isolation strategies as dictated by the results of quantitative transplantation assays, in order to achieve a nearly pure population of EpiSCs. PMID:23335266

  15. Population based model of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiation during endoderm induction.

    PubMed

    Task, Keith; Jaramillo, Maria; Banerjee, Ipsita

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which human embryonic stem cells (hESC) differentiate to endodermal lineage have not been extensively studied. Mathematical models can aid in the identification of mechanistic information. In this work we use a population-based modeling approach to understand the mechanism of endoderm induction in hESC, performed experimentally with exposure to Activin A and Activin A supplemented with growth factors (basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4)). The differentiating cell population is analyzed daily for cellular growth, cell death, and expression of the endoderm proteins Sox17 and CXCR4. The stochastic model starts with a population of undifferentiated cells, wherefrom it evolves in time by assigning each cell a propensity to proliferate, die and differentiate using certain user defined rules. Twelve alternate mechanisms which might describe the observed dynamics were simulated, and an ensemble parameter estimation was performed on each mechanism. A comparison of the quality of agreement of experimental data with simulations for several competing mechanisms led to the identification of one which adequately describes the observed dynamics under both induction conditions. The results indicate that hESC commitment to endoderm occurs through an intermediate mesendoderm germ layer which further differentiates into mesoderm and endoderm, and that during induction proliferation of the endoderm germ layer is promoted. Furthermore, our model suggests that CXCR4 is expressed in mesendoderm and endoderm, but is not expressed in mesoderm. Comparison between the two induction conditions indicates that supplementing FGF2 and BMP4 to Activin A enhances the kinetics of differentiation than Activin A alone. This mechanistic information can aid in the derivation of functional, mature cells from their progenitors. While applied to initial endoderm commitment of hESC, the model is general enough to be applicable either to a system of

  16. Characterization of Cs vapor cell coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane using coherent population trapping spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hafiz, Moustafa Abdel; Maurice, Vincent; Chutani, Ravinder; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Guérandel, Stéphane; Clercq, Emeric de

    2015-05-14

    We report the realization and characterization using coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy of an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-coated centimeter-scale Cs vapor cell. The dual-structure of the resonance lineshape, with presence of a narrow structure line at the top of a Doppler-broadened structure, is clearly observed. The linewidth of the narrow resonance is compared to the linewidth of an evacuated Cs cell and of a buffer gas Cs cell of similar size. The Cs-OTS adsorption energy is measured to be (0.42 ± 0.03) eV, leading to a clock frequency shift rate of 2.7 × 10{sup −9}/K in fractional unit. A hyperfine population lifetime, T{sub 1}, and a microwave coherence lifetime, T{sub 2}, of 1.6 and 0.5 ms are reported, corresponding to about 37 and 12 useful bounces, respectively. Atomic-motion induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances is observed in Cs-OTS cells by reducing the optical beam diameter. Ramsey CPT fringes are detected using a pulsed CPT interrogation scheme. Potential applications of the Cs-OTS cell to the development of a vapor cell atomic clock are discussed.

  17. A quantitative proteomics analysis of MCF7 breast cancer stem and progenitor cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Song; McDermott, Sean P.; Deol, Yadwinder; Tan, Zhijing; Wicha, Max S.; Lubman, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that breast cancers are initiated and develop from a small population of stem-like cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). These cells are hypothesized to mediate tumor metastasis and contribute to therapeutic resistance. However, the molecular regulatory networks responsible for maintaining CSCs in an undifferentiated state have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we used CSC markers to isolate pure breast CSCs fractions (ALDH+ and CD44+CD24− cell populations) and the mature luminal cells (CD49f− EpCAM+) from the MCF7 cell line. Proteomic analysis was performed on these samples and a total of 3304 proteins were identified. A label-free quantitative method was applied to analyze differentially expressed proteins. Using the criteria of greater than twofold changes and p value <0.05, 305, 322 and 98 proteins were identified as significantly different in three pairwise comparisons of ALDH+ versus CD44+CD24−, ALDH+ versus CD49f−EpCAM+ and CD44+CD24− versus CD49f−EpCAM+, respectively. Pathway analysis of differentially expressed proteins by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) revealed potential molecular regulatory networks that may regulate CSCs. Selected differential proteins were validated by Western blot assay and immunohistochemical staining. The use of proteomics analysis may increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of breast CSCs. This may be of importance in the future development of anti-CSC therapeutics. PMID:26332018

  18. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression. PMID:21521500

  19. A quantitative proteomics analysis of MCF7 breast cancer stem and progenitor cell populations.

    PubMed

    Nie, Song; McDermott, Sean P; Deol, Yadwinder; Tan, Zhijing; Wicha, Max S; Lubman, David M

    2015-11-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that breast cancers are initiated and develop from a small population of stem-like cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). These cells are hypothesized to mediate tumor metastasis and contribute to therapeutic resistance. However, the molecular regulatory networks responsible for maintaining CSCs in an undifferentiated state have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we used CSC markers to isolate pure breast CSCs fractions (ALDH+ and CD44+CD24- cell populations) and the mature luminal cells (CD49f-EpCAM+) from the MCF7 cell line. Proteomic analysis was performed on these samples and a total of 3304 proteins were identified. A label-free quantitative method was applied to analyze differentially expressed proteins. Using the criteria of greater than twofold changes and p value <0.05, 305, 322 and 98 proteins were identified as significantly different in three pairwise comparisons of ALDH+ versus CD44+CD24-, ALDH+ versus CD49f-EpCAM+ and CD44+CD24- versus CD49f-EpCAM+, respectively. Pathway analysis of differentially expressed proteins by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) revealed potential molecular regulatory networks that may regulate CSCs. Selected differential proteins were validated by Western blot assay and immunohistochemical staining. The use of proteomics analysis may increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of breast CSCs. This may be of importance in the future development of anti-CSC therapeutics.

  20. Accounting for randomness in measurement and sampling in studying cancer cell population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, Siavash; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Lahouti, Farshad; Ullah, Mukhtar; Linnebacher, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Knowing the expected temporal evolution of the proportion of different cell types in sample tissues gives an indication about the progression of the disease and its possible response to drugs. Such systems have been modelled using Markov processes. We here consider an experimentally realistic scenario in which transition probabilities are estimated from noisy cell population size measurements. Using aggregated data of FACS measurements, we develop MMSE and ML estimators and formulate two problems to find the minimum number of required samples and measurements to guarantee the accuracy of predicted population sizes. Our numerical results show that the convergence mechanism of transition probabilities and steady states differ widely from the real values if one uses the standard deterministic approach for noisy measurements. This provides support for our argument that for the analysis of FACS data one should consider the observed state as a random variable. The second problem we address is about the consequences of estimating the probability of a cell being in a particular state from measurements of small population of cells. We show how the uncertainty arising from small sample sizes can be captured by a distribution for the state probability.

  1. Individual-based and continuum models of growing cell populations: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Helen; Drasdo, Dirk

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we compare two alternative theoretical approaches for simulating the growth of cell aggregates in vitro: individual cell (agent)-based models and continuum models. We show by a quantitative analysis of both a biophysical agent-based and a continuum mechanical model that for densely packed aggregates the expansion of the cell population is dominated by cell proliferation controlled by mechanical stress. The biophysical agent-based model introduced earlier (Drasdo and Hoehme in Phys Biol 2:133-147, 2005) approximates each cell as an isotropic, homogeneous, elastic, spherical object parameterised by measurable biophysical and cell-biological quantities and has been shown by comparison to experimental findings to explain the growth patterns of dense monolayers and multicellular spheroids. Both models exhibit the same growth kinetics, with initial exponential growth of the population size and aggregate diameter followed by linear growth of the diameter and power-law growth of the cell population size. Very sparse monolayers can be explained by a very small or absent cell-cell adhesion and large random cell migration. In this case the expansion speed is not controlled by mechanical stress but by random cell migration and can be modelled by the Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskounov (FKPP) reaction-diffusion equation. The growth kinetics differs from that of densely packed aggregates in that the initial spread, as quantified by the radius of gyration, is diffusive. Since simulations of the lattice-free agent-based model in the case of very large random migration are too long to be practical, lattice-based cellular automaton (CA) models have to be used for a quantitative analysis of sparse monolayers. Analysis of these dense monolayers leads to the identification of a critical parameter of the CA model so that eventually a hierarchy of three model types (a detailed biophysical lattice-free model, a rule-based cellular automaton and a continuum approach

  2. Connecting multiple spatial scales to decode the population activity of grid cells

    PubMed Central

    Stemmler, Martin; Mathis, Alexander; Herz, Andreas V. M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian grid cells fire when an animal crosses the points of an imaginary hexagonal grid tessellating the environment. We show how animals can navigate by reading out a simple population vector of grid cell activity across multiple spatial scales, even though neural activity is intrinsically stochastic. This theory of dead reckoning explains why grid cells are organized into discrete modules within which all cells have the same lattice scale and orientation. The lattice scale changes from module to module and should form a geometric progression with a scale ratio of around 3/2 to minimize the risk of making large-scale errors in spatial localization. Such errors should also occur if intermediate-scale modules are silenced, whereas knocking out the module at the smallest scale will only affect spatial precision. For goal-directed navigation, the allocentric grid cell representation can be readily transformed into the egocentric goal coordinates needed for planning movements. The goal location is set by nonlinear gain fields that act on goal vector cells. This theory predicts neural and behavioral correlates of grid cell readout that transcend the known link between grid cells of the medial entorhinal cortex and place cells of the hippocampus. PMID:26824061

  3. Two-Step Regulation of a Meristematic Cell Population Acting in Shoot Branching in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Caihuan; Wang, Jin; Xu, Tengfei; Xu, Yan; Ohno, Carolyn; Sablowski, Robert; Heisler, Marcus G.; Theres, Klaus; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Shoot branching requires the establishment of new meristems harboring stem cells; this phenomenon raises questions about the precise regulation of meristematic fate. In seed plants, these new meristems initiate in leaf axils to enable lateral shoot branching. Using live-cell imaging of leaf axil cells, we show that the initiation of axillary meristems requires a meristematic cell population continuously expressing the meristem marker SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM). The maintenance of STM expression depends on the leaf axil auxin minimum. Ectopic expression of STM is insufficient to activate axillary buds formation from plants that have lost leaf axil STM expressing cells. This suggests that some cells undergo irreversible commitment to a developmental fate. In more mature leaves, REVOLUTA (REV) directly up-regulates STM expression in leaf axil meristematic cells, but not in differentiated cells, to establish axillary meristems. Cell type-specific binding of REV to the STM region correlates with epigenetic modifications. Our data favor a threshold model for axillary meristem initiation, in which low levels of STM maintain meristematic competence and high levels of STM lead to meristem initiation. PMID:27398935

  4. Characterization of nonmalignant and malignant prostatic stem/progenitor cells by Hoechst side population method.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K

    2009-01-01

    Recent technical progress in the field of cancer stem/progenitor cell research revealed that these malignant cells may provide critical roles for primary tumor growth, metastases at distant tissues and organs, treatment resistance, and disease relapse. The precise molecular oncogenic events that frequently occur in cancer stem/progenitor cells and their early progenies during the early and late stages of cancer progression as well as their contribution to the treatment resistance and disease recurrence remain poorly defined. This lack of information on the deregulated gene products that may be involved in the malignant transformation of tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells into highly tumorigenic and/or migrating cancer stem/progenitor cells emphasizes the urgent need to perform future investigations. Toward this direction, we describe in this book chapter the characterization of nonmalignant and malignant prostatic stem/progenitor cells from well-established cell lines by Hoechst side population method. This novel approach should help to establish novel in vitro and in vivo models of human cancer stem/progenitor cell mimicking more closely the genetic and phenotypic changes occurring during the different stages of prostate carcinogenesis and disease progression in clinical settings. Of therapeutic interest, the identification of new biomarkers and molecular targets specific to these prostatic cancer-initiating cells should also help to develop more effective diagnostic and prognostic tests and chemopreventive and therapeutic treatments for the patients diagnosed at early and late stages of disease progression.

  5. Enhancement of B cell and monocyte populations in rats exposed to chlorpheniramine.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Woo-Hyuck; Park, Shin-Young; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Yoo, Jin-San; Koh, Woo Suk

    2012-12-01

    Chlorpheniramine is an anti-histamine agent on IgE-mediated inflammation. In order to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of chlorpheniramine, we assessed the changes of peripheral mononuclear cell populations and other general clinical parameters, including hematology and clinical chemistry, following chlorpheniramine administration in rats. Since prednisolone is commonly co-prescribed with anti-histamine in many hypersensitive reactions, we also examined the changes to compare the results after the prednisolone administration. Chlorpheniramine (50, 100 and 200 μg/kg) and prednisolone (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg) were intramuscularly administered to female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats 3 times, at intervals of 1 week. Except the clinical signs, such as stiffness and abnormal gait due to the local toxicity at injection sites, no other significant changes in body weights, urinalysis, and macroscopic examination were noted in the animals given chlorpheniramine. On the other hand, white blood cells, especially B cells and monocytes, showed a dose-dependent increase in the chlorpheniramine-treated animals; whereas, the numbers of both B and T cells (helper T and cytotoxic T, NKT cells) were decreased in the prednisolone-treated animals. Taken together, these results suggest that chloropheniramine administration enhances white blood cells in the peripheral blood, mostly due to increases of the B cells and monocytes, but no T cells and NK cells.

  6. Characterization of the natural suppressor cell population in adult rat bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Noga, S J; Wagner, J E; Horwitz, L R; Donnenberg, A D; Santos, G W; Hess, A D

    1988-03-01

    Natural suppressor cell activity (NSCA) has been ascribed to a subset of cells present in human and murine hematopoietic tissues which can suppress a variety of lymphocyte responses without MHC restriction. We investigated NSCA in lymphocyte-depleted rat bone marrow (BM) which is used as a model for prevention of graft vs host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic BM transplantation (BMT). The T-cell depleted fraction obtained after elutriation contained higher levels of NSCA than the unseparated BM. Further separation of this graft fraction by discontinuous Percoll gradient centrifugation revealed high levels of radiosensitive NSCA in the low density (less than 1.070) fraction which represented 0.5% of the original BM population. These cells were of blast morphology, stained intensely with a dansylated derivative of cyclosporine A (dans CsA) and weakly expressed macrophage/granulocyte antigens and non-specific esterase (NSE). These cells were initially non-adherent but proliferated in culture to produce intensely NSE positive, adherent, phagocytic cells of macrophage morphology. We conclude that the highly suppressive, radiosensitive cell present in rat BM may be of early progenitor or monocyte lineage. The grafting of natural suppressor (NS) cells and progenitor cells may affect graft/host immunoregulation and their characterization may provide insight into GVH biology and graft rejection.

  7. Pien Tze Huang suppresses the stem-like side population in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lihui; Chen, Pangyu; Chen, Youqin; Shen, Aling; Chen, Hongwei; Lin, Wei; Hong, Zhenfeng; Sferra, Thomas J; Peng, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that a small population of cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) are crucial in tumor development and drug resistance, leading to cancer relapse and metastasis and eventually the failure of clinical cancer treatment. Therefore, targeting CSCs is a promising approach for anticancer therapies. Due to the drug resistance and adverse effects of currently used chemotherapies, traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) have recently received attention due to the relatively few side-effects. Thus, they have been used as important alternative remedies for various diseases, including cancer. Pien Tze Huang (PZH), a well-known TCM formula that was first prescribed more than 450 years ago in the Ming Dynasty, has been used in China and Southeast Asia for centuries as a folk remedy for various types of cancer. Previously, it was reported that PZH inhibits colon cancer growth via the promotion of cancer cell apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis, which is probably mediated by its regulatory effect on multiple intracellular signaling pathways. To elucidate the mechanism of the tumoricidal activity of PZH, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of PZH on CSCs that were isolated as the side population (SP) from the HT-29 colorectal cancer cell line. The results demonstrated that PZH significantly and dose-dependently reduced the percentage of the colorectal cancer stem-like SP cells, decreased the viability and sphere-forming capacity of HT-29 SP cells, indicating that PZH is potent in suppressing the growth of colorectal cancer stem cells. Moreover, PZH treatment in HT-29 SP cells markedly inhibited the mRNA levels of ABCB1 and ABCG2, which are members of the ABC transporter superfamily, thereby contributing to the SP phenotype and multi-drug resistance. Findings of the present study suggest that inhibiting the growth of CSCs is a potential mechanism by which PZH can be used in cancer treatment.

  8. Engineering of pseudoislets: effect on insulin secretion activity by cell number, cell population, and microchannel networks.

    PubMed

    Kojima, N; Takeuchi, S; Sakai, Y

    2014-05-01

    Engineered pseudoislets reconstituted from a suspension of pancreatic α and β cells have the potential to relieve the shortage of donor islets for transplantation in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, the methods to fabricate pseudoislets are not well developed. In this study, we attempted to generate pseudoislets, which show a higher potential for glucose-induced insulin secretion, by altering total cell number, adjusting the cell ratio of pancreatic α and β cells, and fabricating microchannel networks with the use of alginate hydrogel beads. To effectively aggregate α and β cells and hydrogel beads, we used a previously established rapid aggregation method. When pseudoislets were reconstituted with 8,000 cells in a 1:8 α/β-cell ratio, we observed that the glucose-induced insulin secretion was enhanced by 3.1 times compared with the pseudoislets formed with β cells only. In addition, embedding of microchannel networks increased the insulin secretion rate by 4.4 times compared with the pseudoislets without the microstructures. These findings demonstrated that active modification was effective in reconstituting higher functional pseudoislets, which may be useful for islet transplantation.

  9. Cell density-regulated recovery of starved biofilm populations of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, S E; Cooper, M; Chhabra, S R; Glover, L A; Stewart, G S; Williams, P; Prosser, J I

    1997-01-01

    The speed of recovery of cell suspensions and biofilm populations of the ammonia oxidizer Nitrosomonas europaea, following starvation was determined. Stationary-phase cells, washed and resuspended in ammoniumfree inorganic medium, were starved for periods of up to 42 days, after which the medium was supplemented with ammonium and subsequent growth was monitored by measuring nitrite concentration changes. Cultures exhibited a lag phase prior to exponential nitrite production, which increased from 8.72 h (no starvation) to 153 h after starvation for 42 days. Biofilm populations of N. europaea colonizing sand or soil particles in continuous-flow, fixed column reactors were starved by continuous supply of ammonium-free medium. Following resupply of ammonium, starved biofilms exhibited no lag phase prior to nitrite production, even after starvation for 43.2 days, although there was evidence of cell loss during starvation. Biofilm formation will therefore provide a significant ecological advantage for ammonia oxidizers in natural environments in which the substrate supply is intermittent. Cell density-dependent phenomena in a number of gram-negative bacteria are mediated by N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL), including N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OHHL). Addition of both ammonium and OHHL to cell suspensions starved for 28 days decreased the lag phase in a concentration-dependent manner from 53.4 h to a minimum of 10.8 h. AHL production by N. europaea was detected by using a luxR-luxAB AHL reporter system. The results suggest that rapid recovery of high-density biofilm populations may be due to production and accumulation of OHHL to levels not possible in relatively low-density cell suspensions. PMID:9172348

  10. Goos-Hänchen shifts of partially coherent light beams from a cavity with a four-level Raman gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziauddin; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically investigate spatial and angular Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts (both negative and positive) in the reflected light for a partial coherent light incident on a cavity. A four-level Raman gain atomic medium is considered in a cavity. The effects of spatial coherence, beam width, and mode index of partial coherent light fields on spatial and angular GH shifts are studied. Our results reveal that a large magnitude of negative and positive GH shifts in the reflected light is achievable with the introduction of partial coherent light fields. Furthermore, the amplitude of spatial (negative and positive) GH shifts are sharply affected by the partial coherent light beam as compared to angular (negative and positive) GH shifts in the reflected light.

  11. On a moving four-level N-type atom interacting with two-mode cavity field in the presence of the cross-Kerr medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, N. H.; Thabet, Lamia E.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, some properties through the moving four-level N-type atom interacting with a two-mode radiation field are presented. We study this system in the presence of the nonlinearity. The exact solution of this model is given by using the Schrödinger equation when the atom and the field are initially in an excited state and a squeezed state, respectively. We employed the results to perform a careful investigation of the temporal evolution of the cross-correlation function, the momentum increment, the difference mean photon numbers and the normal squeezing. The influence of the Kerr and the cross-Kerr medium parameters on these aspects is examined. It is found that the atom-field properties are affected by the changing of these parameters.

  12. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  13. Dual-modality wide-field photothermal quantitative phase microscopy and depletion of cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turko, Nir A.; Barnea, Itay; Blum, Omry; Korenstein, Rafi; Shaked, Natan T.

    2015-03-01

    We review our dual-modality technique for quantitative imaging and selective depletion of populations of cells based on wide-field photothermal (PT) quantitative phase imaging and simultaneous PT cell extermination. The cells are first labeled by plasmonic gold nanoparticles, which evoke local plasmonic resonance when illuminated by light in a wavelength corresponding to their specific plasmonic resonance peak. This reaction creates changes of temperature, resulting in changes of phase. This phase changes are recorded by a quantitative phase microscope (QPM), producing specific imaging contrast, and enabling bio-labeling in phase microscopy. Using this technique, we have shown discrimination of EGFR over-expressing (EGFR+) cancer cells from EGFR under-expressing (EGFR-) cancer cells. Then, we have increased the excitation power in order to evoke greater temperatures, which caused specific cell death, all under real-time phase acquisition using QPM. Close to 100% of all EGFR+ cells were immediately exterminated when illuminated with the strong excitation beam, while all EGFR- cells survived. For the second experiment, in order to simulate a condition where circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are present in blood, we have mixed the EGFR+ cancer cells with white blood cells (WBCs) from a healthy donor. Here too, we have used QPM to observe and record the phase of the cells as they were excited for selective visualization and then exterminated. The WBCs survival rate was over 95%, while the EGFR+ survival rate was under 5%. The technique may be the basis for real-time detection and controlled treatment of CTCs.

  14. A phenomenological approach to the simulation of metabolism and proliferation dynamics of large tumour cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignola, Roberto; Milotti, Edoardo

    2005-03-01

    A major goal of modern computational biology is to simulate the collective behaviour of large cell populations starting from the intricate web of molecular interactions occurring at the microscopic level. In this paper we describe a simplified model of cell metabolism, growth and proliferation, suitable for inclusion in a multicell simulator, now under development (Chignola R and Milotti E 2004 Physica A 338 261-6). Nutrients regulate the proliferation dynamics of tumour cells which adapt their behaviour to respond to changes in the biochemical composition of the environment. This modelling of nutrient metabolism and cell cycle at a mesoscopic scale level leads to a continuous flow of information between the two disparate spatiotemporal scales of molecular and cellular dynamics that can be simulated with modern computers and tested experimentally.

  15. Identification of a new stem cell population that generates Drosophila flight muscles.

    PubMed

    Gunage, Rajesh D; Reichert, Heinrich; VijayRaghavan, K

    2014-08-18

    How myoblast populations are regulated for the formation of muscles of different sizes is an essentially unanswered question. The large flight muscles of Drosophila develop from adult muscle progenitor (AMP) cells set-aside embryonically. The thoracic segments are all allotted the same small AMP number, while those associated with the wing-disc proliferate extensively to give rise to over 2500 myoblasts. An initial amplification occurs through symmetric divisions and is followed by a switch to asymmetric divisions in which the AMPs self-renew and generate post-mitotic myoblasts. Notch signaling controls the initial amplification of AMPs, while the switch to asymmetric division additionally requires Wingless, which regulates Numb expression in the AMP lineage. In both cases, the epidermal tissue of the wing imaginal disc acts as a niche expressing the ligands Serrate and Wingless. The disc-associated AMPs are a novel muscle stem cell population that orchestrates the early phases of adult flight muscle development.

  16. Genomically Encoded Analog Memory with Precise In vivo DNA Writing in Living Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Farzadfard, Fahim; Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular memory is crucial to many natural biological processes and for sophisticated synthetic-biology applications. Existing cellular memories rely on epigenetic switches or recombinases, which are limited in scalability and recording capacity. Here, we use the DNA of living cell populations as genomic ‘tape recorders’ for the analog and distributed recording of long-term event histories. We describe a platform for generating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in vivo in response to arbitrary transcriptional signals. When co-expressed with a recombinase, these intracellularly expressed ssDNAs target specific genomic DNA addresses, resulting in precise mutations that accumulate in cell populations as a function of the magnitude and duration of the inputs. This platform could enable long-term cellular recorders for environmental and biomedical applications, biological state machines, and enhanced genome engineering strategies. PMID:25395541

  17. Concentrations of individual RNA sequences in polyadenylated nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA populations of Drosophila cells.

    PubMed Central

    Biessmann, H

    1980-01-01

    Steady state concentrations of individual RNA sequences in poly(A) nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA populations of Drosophila Kc cells were determined using cloned cDNA fragments. These cDNAs represent poly(A) RNA sequences of different abundance in the cytoplasm of Kc cells, but their steady state concentrations in poly(A) hnRNA was always lower. Of ten different sequences analysed, eight showed some four-fold lower concentration in hnRNA mRNA, two were underrepresented in hnRNA relative to the others. The obvious clustering of mRNA/hnRNA ratios is discussed in relation to sequence complexity and turnover rates of these RNA populations. Images PMID:6162158

  18. Effect of murine recombinant interleukin-5 on the cell population in guinea-pig airways.

    PubMed Central

    Iwama, T.; Nagai, H.; Suda, H.; Tsuruoka, N.; Koda, A.

    1992-01-01

    1. An intratracheal injection of murine recombinant interleukin 5 (mrIL-5, 2-15 microgram/0.25 ml/animal) induced a dose-dependent increase in the number of macrophages, eosinophils, neutrophils and epithelial cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of guinea-pigs 24 h after administration. Bovine serum albumin (15 micrograms/0.25 ml/animal), used as a reference material, did not cause any change of this type. 2. The intratracheal administration of mrIL-5 at a dose of 15 microgram showed a tendency to increase the number of these pulmonary inflammatory cells and epithelial cells in the BALF at 12 h with a significant increase observed at 24 h. 3. Prednisolone (20 mg kg-1, i.p.) inhibited the mrIL-5-induced increase in macrophages, eosinophils, neutrophils and epithelial cells. Ketotifen (2 mg kg-1, i.p.) reduced the mrIL-5-induced increase in the eosinophil, neutrophil and epithelial cell populations. The simultaneous injection of 2% disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) into the trachea prevented the mrIL-5-induced increase in the number of airway epithelial cells, without affecting changes in the other inflammatory leukocytes. 4. These results suggest that mrIL-5 is a potent inducer of lung inflammation, in terms of increased inflammatory leukocytes and epithelial cells in guinea-pig BALF. Prednisolone, DSCG and ketotifen are effective against mrIL-5-induced pulmonary inflammation, especially the desquamation of bronchial epithelial cells. PMID:1596681

  19. Distinct populations of innate CD8+ T cells revealed in a CXCR3 reporter mouse.

    PubMed

    Oghumu, Steve; Dong, Ran; Varikuti, Sanjay; Shawler, Todd; Kampfrath, Thomas; Terrazas, Cesar A; Lezama-Davila, Claudio; Ahmer, Brian M M; Whitacre, Caroline C; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Locksley, Richard; Sharpe, Arlene H; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2013-03-01

    CXCR3, expressed mainly on activated T and NK cells, is implicated in a host of immunological conditions and can contribute either to disease resolution or pathology. We report the generation and characterization of a novel CXCR3 internal ribosome entry site bicistronic enhanced GFP reporter (CIBER) mouse in which enhanced GFP expression correlates with surface levels of CXCR3. Using CIBER mice, we identified two distinct populations of innate CD8(+) T cells based on constitutive expression of CXCR3. We demonstrate that CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells preferentially express higher levels of Ly6C and CD122, but lower levels of CCR9 compared with CXCR3(-) innate CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, we show that CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells express higher transcript levels of antiapoptotic but lower levels of proapoptotic factors, respond more robustly to IL-2 and IL-15, and produce significantly more IFN-γ and granzyme B. Interestingly, CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells do not respond to IL-12 or IL-18 alone, but produce significant amounts of IFN-γ on stimulation with a combination of these cytokines. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that CXCR3(+) and CXCR3(-) innate CD8(+) T cells are phenotypically and functionally distinct. These newly generated CIBER mice provide a novel tool for studying the role of CXCR3 and CXCR3-expressing cells in vivo.

  20. Clonal Dynamics Reveal Two Distinct Populations of Basal Cells in Slow-Turnover Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Julie K.; Rulands, Steffen; Wilkinson, Adam C.; Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Göttgens, Berthold; Blanpain, Cédric; Simons, Benjamin D.; Rawlins, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epithelial lineages have been studied at cellular resolution in multiple organs that turn over rapidly. However, many epithelia, including those of the lung, liver, pancreas, and prostate, turn over slowly and may be regulated differently. We investigated the mouse tracheal epithelial lineage at homeostasis by using long-term clonal analysis and mathematical modeling. This pseudostratified epithelium contains basal cells and secretory and multiciliated luminal cells. Our analysis revealed that basal cells are heterogeneous, comprising approximately equal numbers of multipotent stem cells and committed precursors, which persist in the basal layer for 11 days before differentiating to luminal fate. We confirmed the molecular and functional differences within the basal population by using single-cell qRT-PCR and further lineage labeling. Additionally, we show that self-renewal of short-lived secretory cells is a feature of homeostasis. We have thus revealed early luminal commitment of cells that are morphologically indistinguishable from stem cells. PMID:26119728

  1. Elucidating population-wide mycobacterial replication dynamics at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Mouton, Jacoba M.; Helaine, Sophie; Holden, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections result in a spectrum of clinical outcomes, and frequently the infection persists in a latent, clinically asymptomatic state. The within-host bacterial population is likely to be heterogeneous, and it is thought that persistent mycobacteria arise from a small population of viable, but non-replicating (VBNR) cells. These are likely to be antibiotic tolerant and necessitate prolonged treatment. Little is known about these persistent mycobacteria, since they are very difficult to isolate. To address this, we have successfully developed a replication reporter system for use in M. tuberculosis. This approach, termed fluorescence dilution, exploits two fluorescent reporters; a constitutive reporter allows the tracking of bacteria, while an inducible reporter enables the measurement of bacterial replication. The application of fluorescence single-cell analysis to characterize intracellular M. tuberculosis identified a distinct subpopulation of non-growing mycobacteria in murine macrophages. The presence of VBNR and actively replicating mycobacteria was observed within the same macrophage after 48 h of infection. Furthermore, our results suggest that macrophage uptake resulted in enrichment of non- or slowly replicating bacteria (as revealed by d-cycloserine treatment); this population is likely to be highly enriched for persisters, based on its drug-tolerant phenotype. These results demonstrate the successful application of the novel dual fluorescence reporter system both in vitro and in macrophage infection models to provide a window into mycobacterial population heterogeneity. PMID:27027532

  2. Gene Expression in Single Cells Isolated from the CWR-R1 Prostate Cancer Cell Line and Human Prostate Tissue Based on the Side Population Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gangavarapu, Kalyan J; Miller, Austin; Huss, Wendy J

    2016-01-01

    Defining biological signals at the single cell level can identify cancer initiating driver mutations. Techniques to isolate single cells such as microfluidics sorting and magnetic capturing systems have limitations such as: high cost, labor intense, and the requirement of a large number of cells. Therefore, the goal of our current study is to identify a cost and labor effective, reliable, and reproducible technique that allows single cell isolation for analysis to promote regular laboratory use, including standard reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). In the current study, we utilized single prostate cells isolated from the CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line and human prostate clinical specimens, based on the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter efflux of dye cycle violet (DCV), side population assay. Expression of four genes: ABCG2; Aldehyde dehydrogenase1A1 (ALDH1A1); androgen receptor (AR); and embryonic stem cell marker, Oct-4, were determined. Results from the current study in the CWR-R1 cell line showed ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 gene expression in 67% of single side population cells and in 17% or 100% of non-side population cells respectively. Studies using single cells isolated from clinical specimens showed that the Oct-4 gene is detected in only 22% of single side population cells and in 78% of single non-side population cells. Whereas, AR gene expression is in 100% single side population and non-side population cells isolated from the same human prostate clinical specimen. These studies show that performing RT-PCR on single cells isolated by FACS can be successfully conducted to determine gene expression in single cells from cell lines and enzymatically digested tissue. While these studies provide a simple yes/no expression readout, the more sensitive quantitative RT-PCR would be able to provide even more information if necessary. PMID:27785389

  3. Isolation of distinct cell populations from the developing cerebellum by microdissection.

    PubMed

    Yuelling, Larra W; Du, Fang; Li, Peng; Muradimova, Renata E; Yang, Zeng-Jie

    2014-09-21

    Microdissection is a novel technique that can isolate specific regions of a tissue and eliminate contamination from cellular sources in adjacent areas. This method was first utilized in the study of Nestin-expressing progenitors (NEPs), a newly identified population of cells in the cerebellar external germinal layer (EGL). Using microdissection in combination with fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS), a pure population of NEPs was collected separately from conventional granule neuron precursors in the EGL and from other contaminating Nestin-expressing cells in the cerebellum. Without microdissection, functional analyses of NEPs would not have been possible with the current methods available, such as Percoll gradient centrifugation and laser capture microdissection. This technique can also be applied for use with various tissues that contain either recognizable regions or fluorescently-labeled cells. Most importantly, a major advantage of this microdissection technique is that isolated cells are living and can be cultured for further experimentation, which is currently not possible with other described methods.

  4. Rejuvenation of the muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D; Gilbert, Penney M; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P; Corbel, Stephane Y; Llewellyn, Michael E; Delp, Scott L; Blau, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    The elderly often suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging owing in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of MuSCs from aged mice are intrinsically defective relative to MuSCs from young mice, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation. This deficiency is correlated with a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and is due to elevated activity of the p38α and p38β mitogen-activated kinase pathway. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the MuSC population from aged mice to transient inhibition of p38α and p38β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional MuSC population from aged mice, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration and serial transplantation as well as strengthening of damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy for the elderly.

  5. Rejuvenation of the aged muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; Gilbert, Penney M.; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P.; Corbel, Stephane Y.; Llewellyn, Michael E.; Delp, Scott L.; Blau, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    The aged suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging due in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of aged MuSCs are intrinsically defective relative to young MuSCs, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation due to a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and that have elevated p38α/β MAPK activity. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the aged MuSC population to transient inhibition of p38α/β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional aged MuSC population, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration, serial transplantation, and strengthening damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy in aged individuals. PMID:24531378

  6. Distinct Intervertebral Disc Cell Populations Adopt Similar Phenotypes in Three-Dimensional Culture

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Alice I.; Reza, Anna T.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies have the potential to improve upon current techniques for intervertebral disc repair. However, determining a suitable biomaterial scaffold for disc regeneration is difficult due to the complex fibrocartilaginous structure of the tissue. In this study, cells isolated from three distinct regions of the intervertebral disc, the outer and inner annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, were expanded and seeded on resorbable polyester fiber meshes and encapsulated in calcium crosslinked alginate hydrogels, both chosen to approximate the native tissue architecture. Three-dimensional (3D) constructs were cultured for 14 days in vitro and evaluated histologically and quantitatively for gene expression and production of types I and II collagen and proteoglycans. During monolayer expansion, the cell populations maintained their distinct phenotypic morphology and gene expression profiles. However, after 14 days in 3D culture, there were no significant differences in morphology, gene expression, or protein production between all three cell populations grown in either alginate or polyester fiber meshes. The results of this study indicate that the culture environment may have a greater impact on cellular behavior than the intrinsic origin of the cells, and suggest that only a single-cell type may be required for intervertebral disc regenerative therapies. PMID:18636941

  7. Accurate prediction of drug-induced liver injury using stem cell-derived populations.

    PubMed

    Szkolnicka, Dagmara; Farnworth, Sarah L; Lucendo-Villarin, Baltasar; Storck, Christopher; Zhou, Wenli; Iredale, John P; Flint, Oliver; Hay, David C

    2014-02-01

    Despite major progress in the knowledge and management of human liver injury, there are millions of people suffering from chronic liver disease. Currently, the only cure for end-stage liver disease is orthotopic liver transplantation; however, this approach is severely limited by organ donation. Alternative approaches to restoring liver function have therefore been pursued, including the use of somatic and stem cell populations. Although such approaches are essential in developing scalable treatments, there is also an imperative to develop predictive human systems that more effectively study and/or prevent the onset of liver disease and decompensated organ function. We used a renewable human stem cell resource, from defined genetic backgrounds, and drove them through developmental intermediates to yield highly active, drug-inducible, and predictive human hepatocyte populations. Most importantly, stem cell-derived hepatocytes displayed equivalence to primary adult hepatocytes, following incubation with known hepatotoxins. In summary, we have developed a serum-free, scalable, and shippable cell-based model that faithfully predicts the potential for human liver injury. Such a resource has direct application in human modeling and, in the future, could play an important role in developing renewable cell-based therapies.

  8. Ex vivo generation of a highly potent population of circulating angiogenic cells using a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Kuraitis, Drew; Hou, Chenchen; Zhang, Yan; Vulesevic, Branka; Sofrenovic, Tanja; McKee, Daniel; Sharif, Zahra; Ruel, Marc; Suuronen, Erik J

    2011-08-01

    Biomaterials that have the ability to augment angiogenesis are highly sought-after for applications in regenerative medicine, particularly for revascularization of ischemic and infarcted tissue. We evaluated the culture of human circulating angiogenic cells (CAC) on collagen type I-based matrices, and compared this to traditional selective-adhesion cultures on fibronectin. Culture on a collagen matrix supported the proliferation of CD133(+) and CD34(+)CD133(+) CACs. When subjected to serum starvation, the matrix conferred a resistance to cell death for CD34(+) and CD133(+) progenitors and increased phosphorylation of Akt. After 4days of culture, phenotypically enriched populations of endothelial cells (CD31(+)CD144(+)) and progenitor cells (CD34(+)CD133(+)) emerged. Culture on matrix upregulated the phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/2 pathway members, and matrix-cultured cells also had an enhanced functional capacity for adhesion and invasion. These functional improvements were abrogated when cultured in the presence of ERK inhibitors. The formation of vessel-like structures in an angiogenesis assay was augmented with matrix-cultured cells, which were also more likely to physically associate with such structures compared to CACs taken from culture on fibronectin. In vivo, treatment with matrix-cultured cells increased the size and density of arterioles, and was superior at restoring perfusion in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia, compared to fibronectin-cultured cell treatment. This work suggests that a collagen-based matrix, as a novel substrate for CAC culture, possesses the ability to enrich endothelial and angiogenic populations and lead to clinically relevant functional enhancements.

  9. Elutriation of bone marrow delineates two distinct natural suppressor cell populations.

    PubMed

    Noga, S J; Fischer, A C; Horwitz, L R; Donnenberg, A D; Wagner, J E; Hess, A D

    1990-01-01

    It appears that part of the confusion surrounding the lineage of NS cells could be due, in part, to the presence of more than one cell population in normal BM. Whether other cell populations exist in other organ compartments, or can be induced, is presently unknown. This is of particular interest in allogeneic BMT where various lymphocyte depletion techniques have been employed to reduce the incidence of AGVHD. When CCE is used for depletion, the NS lymphocyte component is entirely removed. Since the incidence of AGVHD is significantly reduced with CCE lymphocyte-depleted rat and human BM, it appears that this subpopulation need not be present to abrogate AGVHD. Quite surprisingly, preliminary studies in rats indicates that this lymphocyte subpopulation may actually induce acute syngeneic GVHD (Fischer et al., 1989). That a cell(s) in the clonogenic compartment has the ability to suppress or down-regulate a variety of immune responses is not altogether surprising. This cell is better thought of as an auto-regulatory cell which has the ability to control the cellular interactions in its immediate micro-environment. Indeed, R/O NSCA can be augmented by GM-CSF, IL-3, and CsA (NoGa et al., 1988a). In vitro, this cell differentiates into the mono-myeloid series using a variety of stimulatory agents and can acquire tumoricidal activity. The ability to express NSCA is lost however, being present only during a brief window of early maturation. Only IL-3 can sustain NSCA in culture.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Regulation of Hemopoietic Stem Cell Turnover and Population Size in Neonatal Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    spleen and liver cells. Pregnant females at various stages of gestation were euthanatized by cervical dislocation and their fetuses dissected free of...performed on 5 to 12 animals ± One determination on five animals The day of birth, usually the 20th day of gestation , was considered the zero day of...neonatal life. From the 19th day of gestation to the 6th day of neonatal life the CFU population of the fetal and neonatal liver declines with a

  11. Mononucleated Blood Cell Populations Display Different Abilities To Transmit Prion Disease by the Transfusion Route

    PubMed Central

    Douet, Jean-Yves; Lacroux, Caroline; Litaise, Claire; Lugan, Séverine; Corbière, Fabien; Arnold, Mark; Simmons, Hugh; Aron, Naima; Costes, Pierrette; Tillier, Cécile; Cassard, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous experiments carried out in a sheep scrapie model demonstrated that the transfusion of 200 μl of prion-infected whole blood has an apparent 100% efficacy for disease transmission. These experiments also indicated that, despite the apparent low infectious titer, the intravenous administration of white blood cells (WBC) resulted in efficient disease transmission. In the study presented here, using the same transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal model, our aim was to determine the minimal number of white blood cells and the specific abilities of mononucleated cell populations to transmit scrapie by the transfusion route. Our results confirmed that the transfusion of 100 μl, but not 10 μl, of fresh whole blood collected in asymptomatic scrapie-infected donor sheep can transmit the disease. The data also show that the intravenous administration of 105 WBCs is sufficient to cause scrapie in recipient sheep. Cell-sorted CD45R+ (predominantly B lymphocytes), CD4+/CD8+ (T lymphocytes), and CD14+ (monocytes/macrophages) blood cell subpopulations all were shown to contain prion infectivity by bioassays in ovine PrP transgenic mice. However, while the intravenous administration of 106 CD45+ or CD4+/8+ living cells was able to transmit the disease, similar numbers of CD14+ cells failed to infect the recipients. These data support the contention that mononucleated blood cell populations display different abilities to transmit TSE by the transfusion route. They also represent an important input for the risk assessment of blood-borne prion disease transmission and for refining the target performance of leukoreduction processes that currently are applied to mitigate the transmission risk in transfusion medicine. IMPORTANCE Interindividual variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) transmission through blood and blood-derived products is considered a major public health issue in transfusion medicine. Over the last decade, TSE in sheep has emerged as a

  12. Identification of two IgD+ B cell populations in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Bengtén, Eva; Stafford, James L; Sahoo, Manoranjan; Taylor, Erin B; Miller, Norman W; Wilson, Melanie

    2010-10-01

    Channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus express two Ig isotypes: IgM and IgD. Although catfish IgM has been extensively studied at the functional and structural levels, much less is known about IgD. In this study, IgM(+)/IgD(+) and IgM(-)/IgD(+) catfish B cell populations were identified through the use of anti-IgM and anti-IgD mAbs. Catfish IgM(+)/IgD(+) B cells are small and agranular. In contrast, IgM(-)/IgD(+) B cells are larger and exhibit a plasmablast morphology. The use of cell sorting, flow cytometry, and RT-PCR demonstrated that IgD(+) B cell expression varies among individuals. For example, some catfish have <5% IgM(-)/IgD(+) B cells in their PBLs, whereas in others the IgM(-)/IgD(+) B cell population can represent as much as 72%. Furthermore, IgD expressed by IgM(-)/IgD(+) B cells preferentially associates with IgL σ. Comparatively, IgM(+)/IgD(+) B cells can express any of the four catfish IgL isotypes. Also, transfection studies show that IgD functions as a typical BCR, because Igδ-chains associate with CD79a and CD79b molecules, and all membrane IgD transcripts from sorted IgM(-)/IgD(+) B cells contain viable VDJ rearrangements, with no bias in family member usage. Interestingly, all secreted IgD transcripts from IgM(+)/IgD(+) and IgM(-)/IgD(+) B cells were V-less and began with a leader spliced to Cδ1. Importantly, transfection of catfish clonal B cells demonstrated that this leader mediated IgD secretion. Together, these findings imply that catfish IgM(-)/IgD(+) B cells likely expand in response to certain pathogens and that the catfish IgD Fc-region, as has been suggested for human IgD, may function as a pattern recognition molecule.

  13. Ablation and analysis of small cell populations and single cells by consecutive laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Bindesh; Nemes, Peter; Vertes, Akos

    2010-10-01

    Laser ablation of single cells through a sharpened optical fiber is used for the detection of metabolites by laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry (MS). Ablation of the same Allium cepa epidermal cell by consecutive pulses indicates the rupture of the cell wall by the second shot. Intracellular sucrose heterogeneity is detected by subsequent laser pulses pointing to rupturing the vacuolar membrane by the third exposure. Ion production by bursts of laser pulses shows that the drying of ruptured A. cepa cells occurs in ˜50 s at low pulse rates (10 pulses/s bursts) and significantly faster at high pulse rates (100 pulses/s bursts). These results point to the competing role of cytoplasm ejection and evaporative drying in diminishing the LAESI-MS signal in ˜50 s or 100 laser pulses, whichever occurs first.

  14. Adrenomedullary progenitor cells: Isolation and characterization of a multi-potent progenitor cell population.

    PubMed

    Vukicevic, Vladimir; Rubin de Celis, Maria Fernandez; Pellegata, Natalia S; Bornstein, Stefan R; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika

    2015-06-15

    The adrenal is a highly plastic organ with the ability to adjust to physiological needs by adapting hormone production but also by generating and regenerating both adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tissue. It is now apparent that many adult tissues maintain stem and progenitor cells that contribute to their maintenance and adaptation. Research from the last years has proven the existence of stem and progenitor cells also in the adult adrenal medulla throughout life. These cells maintain some neural crest properties and have the potential to differentiate to the endocrine and neural lineages. In this article, we discuss the evidence for the existence of adrenomedullary multi potent progenitor cells, their isolation and characterization, their differentiation potential as well as their clinical potential in transplantation therapies but also in pathophysiology.

  15. Joint modeling and registration of cell populations in cohorts of high-dimensional flow cytometric data.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Saumyadipta; Lee, Sharon X; Wang, Kui; Irish, Jonathan; Tamayo, Pablo; Nazaire, Marc-Danie; Duong, Tarn; Ng, Shu-Kay; Hafler, David; Levy, Ronald; Nolan, Garry P; Mesirov, Jill; McLachlan, Geoffrey J

    2014-01-01

    In biomedical applications, an experimenter encounters different potential sources of variation in data such as individual samples, multiple experimental conditions, and multivariate responses of a panel of markers such as from a signaling network. In multiparametric cytometry, which is often used for analyzing patient samples, such issues are critical. While computational methods can identify cell populations in individual samples, without the ability to automatically match them across samples, it is difficult to compare and characterize the populations in typical experiments, such as those responding to various stimulations or distinctive of particular patients or time-points, especially when there are many samples. Joint Clustering and Matching (JCM) is a multi-level framework for simultaneous modeling and registration of populations across a cohort. JCM models every population with a robust multivariate probability distribution. Simultaneously, JCM fits a random-effects model to construct an overall batch template--used for registering populations across samples, and classifying new samples. By tackling systems-level variation, JCM supports practical biomedical applications involving large cohorts. Software for fitting the JCM models have been implemented in an R package EMMIX-JCM, available from http://www.maths.uq.edu.au/~gjm/mix_soft/EMMIX-JCM/.

  16. Mobilization of Endogenous Stem Cell Populations Enhances Fracture Healing in a Murine Femoral Fracture Model

    PubMed Central

    Toupadakis, Chrisoula A.; Granick, Jennifer L.; Sagy, Myrrh; Wong, Alice; Ghassemi, Ehssan; Chung, Dai-Jung; Borjesson, Dori L.; Yellowley, Clare E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delivery of bone marrow derived stem and progenitor cells to the site of injury is an effective strategy to enhance bone healing. An alternate approach is to mobilize endogenous, heterogeneous stem cells that will home to the site of injury. AMD3100 is an antagonist of the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) that rapidly mobilizes stem cell populations into peripheral blood. Our hypothesis was that increasing circulating numbers of stem and progenitor cells using AMD3100 will improve bone fracture healing. Methods A transverse femoral fracture was induced in C57BL/6 mice, after which they were subcutaneously injected for 3 days with AMD3100 or saline control. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the peripheral blood and bone marrow were evaluated via flow cytometry, automated hematology analysis, and cell culture 24 hours after injection and/or fracture. Healing was assessed up to 84 days after fracture by histomorphometry and µCT. Results AMD3100 injection resulted in higher numbers of circulating MSCs, HSCs, and EPCs. µCT data demonstrated that the fracture callus was significantly larger compared to the saline controls at day 21 and significantly smaller (remodeled) at day 84. AMD3100-treated mice have a significantly higher bone mineral density than saline-treated counterparts at day 84. Discussion Our data demonstrate that early cell mobilization had significant positive effects on healing throughout the regenerative process. Rapid mobilization of endogenous stem cells could provide an effective alternative strategy to cell transplantation for enhancing tissue regeneration. PMID:23831362

  17. Cell mass and cell cycle dynamics of an asynchronous budding yeast population: experimental observations, flow cytometry data analysis, and multi-scale modeling.

    PubMed

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Carlquist, Magnus; Lundin, Luisa; Heins, Anna-Lena; Dutta, Abhishek; Sørensen, Søren J; Jensen, Anker D; Nopens, Ingmar; Lantz, Anna Eliasson; Gernaey, Krist V

    2013-03-01

    Despite traditionally regarded as identical, cells in a microbial cultivation present a distribution of phenotypic traits, forming a heterogeneous cell population. Moreover, the degree of heterogeneity is notably enhanced by changes in micro-environmental conditions. A major development in experimental single-cell studies has taken place in the last decades. It has however not been fully accompanied by similar contributions within data analysis and mathematical modeling. Indeed, literature reporting, for example, quantitative analyses of experimental single-cell observations and validation of model predictions for cell property distributions against experimental data is scarce. This study focuses on the experimental and mathematical description of the dynamics of cell size and cell cycle position distributions, of a population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in response to the substrate consumption observed during batch cultivation. The good agreement between the proposed multi-scale model (a population balance model [PBM] coupled to an unstructured model) and experimental data (both the overall physiology and cell size and cell cycle distributions) indicates that a mechanistic model is a suitable tool for describing the microbial population dynamics in a bioreactor. This study therefore contributes towards the understanding of the development of heterogeneous populations during microbial cultivations. More generally, it consists of a step towards a paradigm change in the study and description of cell cultivations, where average cell behaviors observed experimentally now are interpreted as a potential joint result of various co-existing single-cell behaviors, rather than a unique response common to all cells in the cultivation.

  18. Flow cytometry and cell sorting of heterogeneous microbial populations: the importance of single-cell analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, H M; Kell, D B

    1996-01-01

    The most fundamental questions such as whether a cell is alive, in the sense of being able to divide or to form a colony, may sometimes be very hard to answer, since even axenic microbial cultures are extremely heterogeneous. Analyses that seek to correlate such things as viability, which is a property of an individual cell, with macroscopic measurements of culture variables such as ATP content, respiratory activity, and so on, must inevitably fail. It is therefore necessary to make physiological measurements on individual cells. Flow cytometry is such a technique, which allows one to analyze cells rapidly and individually and permits the quantitative analysis of microbial heterogeneity. It therefore offers many advantages over conventional measurements for both routine and more exploratory analyses of microbial properties. While the technique has been widely applied to the study of mammalian cells, is use in microbiology has until recently been much more limited, largely because of the smaller size of microbes and the consequently smaller optical signals obtainable from them. Since these technical barriers no longer hold, flow cytometry with appropriate stains has been used for the rapid discrimination and identification of microbial cells, for the rapid assessment of viability and of the heterogeneous distributions of a wealth of other more detailed physiological properties, for the analysis of antimicrobial drug-cell interactions, and for the isolation of high-yielding strains of biotechnological interest. Flow cytometric analyses provide an abundance of multivariate data, and special methods have been devised to exploit these. Ongoing advances mean that modern flow cytometers may now be used by nonspecialists to effect a renaissance in our understanding of microbial heterogeneity. PMID:8987359

  19. Grid cells analysis of urban growth using remote sensing and population census data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagan, H.; Yamagata, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Urban growth and sprawl have drastically altered the ecosystems and ecosystem services. Urban areas are an increasingly important component of the global environment, yet they remain one of the most challenging areas for conducting research. Remote sensing based information is one of the most important resources to support urban planning and administration in megacities. It is possible to provide the up-to-date information regarding the extent, growth, and physical characteristics of urban land. Remote sensing provides spatially consistent image information that covers broad areas with both high spatial resolution and high temporal frequency. Therefore, remote sensing is an important tool for providing information on urban land-cover characteristics and their changes over time at various spatial and temporal scales. Urban land-use and land-cover changes are linked to socio-economic activities. Urbanization includes both the physical growth of a city and the movement of people to urban areas. As a consequence, it is essential to combine remote sensing derived parameters with socio-economic parameter to analyze the spatial-temporal changes and interaction of both factors. The aim of the research was to use1-km2 grid cells to investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics of urban growth in the world mega cities. The research was conducted in the 50 global cities using Landsat ETM/TM remote sensing imagery from 1985 - 2011, and time series population census data (1-km2 resolution gridded population census data of Japan and 2.5 arc-minute resolutions Gridded Population of the World). First, maximum likelihood classification (MLC) method were used to produce land cover maps by using Landsat images. Then intersect the land cover maps with 1-km2 grid cell maps to represents the proportion of each land cover category within each 1-km2 grid cell. Finally, we combined the proportional land cover maps with gridded population census data on 1-km2 resolution grid cells to

  20. Epitope specific T-cell responses against influenza A in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Savic, Miloje; Dembinski, Jennifer L; Kim, Yohan; Tunheim, Gro; Cox, Rebecca J; Oftung, Fredrik; Peters, Bjoern; Mjaaland, Siri

    2016-02-01

    Pre-existing human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity may be a useful correlate of protection against severe influenza disease. Identification and evaluation of common epitopes recognized by T cells with broad cross-reactivity is therefore important to guide universal influenza vaccine development, and to monitor immunological preparedness against pandemics. We have retrieved an optimal combination of MHC class I and class II restricted epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database (www.iedb.org), by defining a fitness score function depending on prevalence, sequence conservancy and HLA super-type coverage. Optimized libraries of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell epitopes were selected from influenza antigens commonly present in seasonal and pandemic influenza strains from 1934 to 2009. These epitope pools were used to characterize human T-cell responses in healthy donors using interferon-γ ELISPOT assays. Upon stimulation, significant CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were induced, primarily recognizing epitopes from the conserved viral core proteins. Furthermore, the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were phenotypically characterized regarding functionality, cytotoxic potential and memory phenotype using flow cytometry. Optimized sets of T-cell peptide epitopes may be a useful tool to monitor the efficacy of clinical trials, the immune status of a population to predict immunological preparedness against pandemics, as well as being candidates for universal influenza vaccines.

  1. Quorum sensing influences phage infection efficiency via affecting cell population and physiological state.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xuying; Sun, Qinghui; Yang, Baixue; Pan, Xuewei; He, Yang; Yang, Hongjiang

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial growth phase has been reported affecting phage infection. To underpin the related mechanism, infection efficiency of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage K5 is characterized. When infecting the logarithmic cells, phage K5 produced significantly more infection centers than the stationary cells, well concordant with the viable cell ratio in the different growth phases. Additionally, the burst size decreased dramatically in the stationary cells, implying that the physiological state of the viable cells contributed to the productivity of phage K5, and it was consistent with the expression variation of the phage RNA polymerase. Quorum sensing inhibitor penicillic acid was applied and could significantly improve the viable cell proportion and the infection center numbers, but had less effect on the corresponding burst sizes. Moreover, the effect of penicillic acid and the quorum sensing regulator mutants on the production of phage C11 was also analyzed. Taken together, our data suggest that quorum sensing is involved in the defense of phage K5 infection by influencing the viable cell population and their physiological state, and it is an efficient and intrinsic pathway allowing bacteria to resist phage attacks in natural environment.

  2. Novel cell population data from a haematology analyzer can predict timing and efficiency of stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Golubeva, Vera; Mikhalevich, Juliana; Novikova, Julia; Tupizina, Olga; Trofimova, Svetlana; Zueva, Yekaterina

    2014-02-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a necessary component for many oncohematological diseases treatment. For a successful result of AHSCT a sufficient quantity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is needed. It has been proposed that morphological changes of myeloid cells could reflect the processes of bone marrow stimulation and may provide useful information to predict the stimulation efficiency and expected outcome of CD34(+) stem cells. The Beckman Coulter Cellular Analysis System DxH800 performs Flow Cytometric Digital Morphology analysis of leukocytes. All leukocyte cellular measurements can be reported as numerical values called Cell Population Data (CPD), which are able to detect morphological changes in the cell size and distribution of neutrophils. Our findings suggest that the changes in neutrophil CPD were detectable 2-4days before the observed increase in CD34(+) count in the peripheral blood and can potentially improve the management of patients. There was also a good correlation between MN-V-NE and ImmNeIndex with the CD34(+) count suggesting they can be used as a surrogate for the CD34(+) count (r=0.67 and 0.65 p<0.005 respectively).

  3. I Want More and Better Cells! – An Outreach Project about Stem Cells and Its Impact on the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Varela Amaral, Sara; Forte, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João; Girão da Cruz, M. Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Although science and technology impact every aspect of modern societies, there is still an extensive gap between science and society, which impairs the full exercise of citizenship. In the particular case of biomedical research increased investment should be accompanied by parallel efforts in terms of public information and engagement. We have carried out a project involving the production and evaluation of educational contents focused on stem cells - illustrated newspaper chronicles, radio interviews, a comic book, and animated videos - and monitored their impact on the Portuguese population. The study of the outreach materials in a heterogeneous sample of the population suggests that they are valuable tools to disseminate scientific messages, and that this is especially true for the comic-book format. Furthermore, the data showed that clear and stimulating outreach materials, that are able to teach new concepts and to promote critical thinking, increase engagement in science at different levels, depending on the depth of the concepts involved. Additionally, these materials can influence political, social and personal attitudes toward science. These results, together with the importance attributed to scientific research in stem cells by the population sampled, validates the diffusion of such materials as a significant contribution towards an overall public understanding and engagement in contemporary science, and this strategy should thus be considered in future projects. Regardless, stringent quality control must be implemented in order to efficiently communicate accurate scientific developments, and the public stimulated in terms of finding additional sources of reliable information. PMID:26222053

  4. I Want More and Better Cells! - An Outreach Project about Stem Cells and Its Impact on the General Population.

    PubMed

    Varela Amaral, Sara; Forte, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João; Girão da Cruz, M Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Although science and technology impact every aspect of modern societies, there is still an extensive gap between science and society, which impairs the full exercise of citizenship. In the particular case of biomedical research increased investment should be accompanied by parallel efforts in terms of public information and engagement. We have carried out a project involving the production and evaluation of educational contents focused on stem cells - illustrated newspaper chronicles, radio interviews, a comic book, and animated videos - and monitored their impact on the Portuguese population. The study of the outreach materials in a heterogeneous sample of the population suggests that they are valuable tools to disseminate scientific messages, and that this is especially true for the comic-book format. Furthermore, the data showed that clear and stimulating outreach materials, that are able to teach new concepts and to promote critical thinking, increase engagement in science at different levels, depending on the depth of the concepts involved. Additionally, these materials can influence political, social and personal attitudes toward science. These results, together with the importance attributed to scientific research in stem cells by the population sampled, validates the diffusion of such materials as a significant contribution towards an overall public understanding and engagement in contemporary science, and this strategy should thus be considered in future projects. Regardless, stringent quality control must be implemented in order to efficiently communicate accurate scientific developments, and the public stimulated in terms of finding additional sources of reliable information.

  5. Adherence, accumulation, and cell division of a natural adherent bacterial population.

    PubMed Central

    Bloomquist, C G; Reilly, B E; Liljemark, W F

    1996-01-01

    Developing dental bacterial plaques formed in vivo on enamel surfaces were examined in specimens from 18 adult volunteers during the first day of plaque formation. An intraoral model placing enamel pieces onto teeth was used to study bacterial plaque populations developing naturally to various cell densities per square millimeter of surface area of the enamel (W. F. Liljemark, C. G. Bloomquist, C. L. Bandt, B. L. Philstrom, J. E. Hinrichs, and L. F. Wolff, Oral Microbiol. Immunol. 8:5-15, 1993). Radiolabeled nucleoside incorporation was used to measure DNA synthesis concurrent with the taking of standard viable cell counts of the plaque samples. Results showed that in vivo plaque formation began with the rapid adherence of bacteria until ca. 12 to 32% of the enamel's salivary pellicle was saturated (ca. 2.5 x 10(5) to 6.3 x 10(5) cells per mm2). The pioneer adherent species were predominantly those of the "sanguis streptococci." At the above-noted density, the bacteria present on the salivary pellicle incorporated low levels of radiolabeled nucleoside per viable cell. As bacterial numbers reached densities between 8.0 x 10(5) and 2.0 x 10(6) cells per mm2, there was a small increase in the incorporation of radiolabeled nucleosides per cell. At 2.5 x 10(6) to 4.0 x 10(6) cells per mm2 of enamel surface, there was a marked increase in the incorporation of radiolabeled nucleosides per cell which appeared to be cell-density dependent. The predominant species group in developing dental plaque films during density-dependent growth was the sanguis streptococci; however, most other species present showed similar patterns of increased DNA synthesis as the density noted above approached 2.5 x 10(6) to 4.0 x 10(6) cells per mm2. PMID:8576054

  6. Cellular and Molecular Characterization of Microglia: A Unique Immune Cell Population

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Carole; Biber, Knut; Michelucci, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are essential for the development and function of the adult brain. Microglia arise from erythro-myeloid precursors in the yolk sac and populate the brain rudiment early during development. Unlike monocytes that are constantly renewed from bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells throughout life, resident microglia in the healthy brain persist during adulthood via constant self-renewal. Their ontogeny, together with the absence of turnover from the periphery and the singular environment of the central nervous system, make microglia a unique cell population. Supporting this notion, recent genome-wide transcriptional studies revealed specific gene expression profiles clearly distinct from other brain and peripheral immune cells. Here, we highlight the breakthrough studies that, over the last decades, helped elucidate microglial cell identity, ontogeny, and function. We describe the main techniques that have been used for this task and outline the crucial milestones that have been achieved to reach our actual knowledge of microglia. Furthermore, we give an overview of the “microgliome” that is currently emerging thanks to the constant progress in the modern profiling techniques. PMID:28303137

  7. FGFR signaling maintains a drug persistent cell population following epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Wells S.; Akhand, Saeed Salehin; Wendt, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    An emerging characteristic of drug resistance in cancer is the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the mechanisms of EMT-mediated drug resistance remain poorly defined. Therefore, we conducted long-term treatments of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her2)-transformed breast cancer cells with either the EGFR/Her2 kinase inhibitor, Lapatinib or TGF-β, a known physiological inducer of EMT. Both of these treatment regimes resulted in robust EMT phenotypes, but upon withdrawal a subpopulation of TGF-β induced cells readily underwent mesenchymal-epithelial transition, where as Lapatinib-induced cells failed to reestablish an epithelial population. The mesenchymal population that remained following TGF-β stimulation and withdrawal was quickly selected for during subsequent Lapatinib treatment, manifesting in inherent drug resistance. The Nanostring cancer progression gene panel revealed a dramatic upregulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and its cognate ligand FGF2 in both acquired and inherent resistance. Mechanistically, FGF:Erk1/2 signaling functions to stabilize the EMT transcription factor Twist and thus maintain the mesenchymal and drug resistant phenotype. Finally, Lapatinib resistant cells could be readily eliminated using recently characterized covalent inhibitors of FGFR. Overall our data demonstrate that next-generation targeting of FGFR can be used in combination with Her2-targeted therapies to overcome resistance in this breast cancer subtype. PMID:27825137

  8. FGFR signaling maintains a drug persistent cell population following epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Wells S; Akhand, Saeed Salehin; Wendt, Michael K

    2016-12-13

    An emerging characteristic of drug resistance in cancer is the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the mechanisms of EMT-mediated drug resistance remain poorly defined. Therefore, we conducted long-term treatments of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her2)-transformed breast cancer cells with either the EGFR/Her2 kinase inhibitor, Lapatinib or TGF-β, a known physiological inducer of EMT. Both of these treatment regimes resulted in robust EMT phenotypes, but upon withdrawal a subpopulation of TGF-β induced cells readily underwent mesenchymal-epithelial transition, where as Lapatinib-induced cells failed to reestablish an epithelial population. The mesenchymal population that remained following TGF-β stimulation and withdrawal was quickly selected for during subsequent Lapatinib treatment, manifesting in inherent drug resistance. The Nanostring cancer progression gene panel revealed a dramatic upregulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and its cognate ligand FGF2 in both acquired and inherent resistance. Mechanistically, FGF:Erk1/2 signaling functions to stabilize the EMT transcription factor Twist and thus maintain the mesenchymal and drug resistant phenotype. Finally, Lapatinib resistant cells could be readily eliminated using recently characterized covalent inhibitors of FGFR. Overall our data demonstrate that next-generation targeting of FGFR can be used in combination with Her2-targeted therapies to overcome resistance in this breast cancer subtype.

  9. Correlating single cell motility with population growth dynamics for flagellated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sucheta; Bhat, Vidya; Mittal, Aditya

    2007-08-15

    Many bacteria used for biotechnological applications are naturally motile. Their "bio-nanopropeller" driven movement allows searching for better environments in a process called chemotaxis. Since bacteria are extremely small in size compared to the bulk fluid volumes in bioreactors, single cell motility is not considered to influence bioreactor operations. However, with increasing interest in localized fluid flow inside reactors, it is important to ask whether individual motility characteristics of bacteria are important in bioreactor operations. The first step in this direction is to try to correlate single cell measurements with population data of motile bacteria in a bioreactor. Thus, we observed the motility behavior of individual bacterial cells, using video microscopy with 33 ms time resolution, as a function of population growth dynamics of batch cultures in shake flasks. While observing the motility behavior of the most intensively studied bacteria, Escherichia coli, we find that overall bacterial motility decreases with progression of the growth curve. Remarkably, this is due to a decrease in a specific motility behavior called "running". Our results not only have direct implications on biofilm formations, but also provide a new direction in bioprocess design research highlighting the role of individual bacterial cell motility as an important parameter.

  10. Role of resident CNS cell populations in HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Lepoutre, Veronique; Jain, Pooja; Quann, Kevin; Wigdahl, Brian; Khan, Zafar K

    2009-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the etiologic agent for a number of disorders; the two most common pathologies include adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and a progressive demyelinating neuroinflammatory disease, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The neurologic dysfunction associated with HAM/TSP is a result of viral intrusion into the central nervous system (CNS) and the generation of a hyperstimulated host response within the peripheral and central nervous system that includes expanded populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This robust, yet detrimental immune response likely contributes to the death of myelin producing oligodendrocytes and degeneration of neuronal axons. The mechanisms of neurological degeneration in HAM/TSP have yet to be fully delineated in vivo and may involve the immunogenic properties of the HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax. This comprehensive review characterizes the available knowledge to date concerning the effects of HTLV-1 on CNS resident cell populations with emphasis on both viral and host factors contributing to the genesis of HAM/TSP.

  11. Projection specificity in heterogeneous locus coeruleus cell populations: implications for learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Akira; Tan, Bao Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) play a critical role in many functions including learning and memory. This relatively small population of cells sends widespread projections throughout the brain including to a number of regions such as the amygdala which is involved in emotional associative learning and the medial prefrontal cortex which is important for facilitating flexibility when learning rules change. LC noradrenergic cells participate in both of these functions, but it is not clear how this small population of neurons modulates these partially distinct processes. Here we review anatomical, behavioral, and electrophysiological studies to assess how LC noradrenergic neurons regulate these different aspects of learning and memory. Previous work has demonstrated that subpopulations of LC noradrenergic cells innervate specific brain regions suggesting heterogeneity of function in LC neurons. Furthermore, noradrenaline in mPFC and amygdala has distinct effects on emotional learning and cognitive flexibility. Finally, neural recording data show that LC neurons respond during associative learning and when previously learned task contingencies change. Together, these studies suggest a working model in which distinct and potentially opposing subsets of LC neurons modulate particular learning functions through restricted efferent connectivity with amygdala or mPFC. This type of model may provide a general framework for understanding other neuromodulatory systems, which also exhibit cell type heterogeneity and projection specificity. PMID:26330494

  12. Isolation and characterization of human trophoblast side-population (SP) cells in primary villous cytotrophoblasts and HTR-8/SVneo cell line.

    PubMed

    Takao, Tomoka; Asanoma, Kazuo; Kato, Kiyoko; Fukushima, Kotaro; Tsunematsu, Ryosuke; Hirakawa, Toshio; Matsumura, Sueo; Seki, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Satoru; Wake, Norio

    2011-01-01

    Recently, numerous studies have identified that immature cell populations including stem cells and progenitor cells can be found among "side-population" (SP) cells. Although SP cells isolated from some adult tissues have been reported elsewhere, isolation and characterization of human trophoblast SP remained to be reported. In this study, HTR-8/SVneo cells and human primary villous cytotrophoblasts (vCTBs) were stained with Hoechst 33342 and SP and non-SP (NSP) fractions were isolated using a cell sorter. A small population of SP cells was identified in HTR-8/SVneo cells and in vCTBs. SP cells expressed several vCTB-specific markers and failed to express syncytiotrophoblast (STB) or extravillous cytotrophopblast (EVT)-specific differentiation markers. SP cells formed colonies and proliferated on mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) feeder cells or in MEF conditioned medium supplemented with heparin/FGF2, and they also showed long-term repopulating property. SP cells could differentiate into both STB and EVT cell lineages and expressed several differentiation markers. Microarray analysis revealed that IL7R and IL1R2 were exclusively expressed in SP cells and not in NSP cells. vCTB cells sorted as positive for both IL7R and IL1R2 failed to express trophoblast differentiation markers and spontaneously differentiated into both STB and EVT in basal medium. These features shown by the SP cells suggested that IL7R and IL1R2 are available as markers to detect the SP cells and that vCTB progenitor cells and trophoblast stem cells were involved in the SP cell population.

  13. Interacting linear and nonlinear characteristics produce population coding asymmetries between ON and OFF cells in the retina.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Zachary; Nirenberg, Sheila; Victor, Jonathan

    2013-09-11

    The early visual system is a model for understanding the roles of cell populations in parallel processing. Cells in this system can be classified according to their responsiveness to different stimuli; a prominent example is the division between cells that respond to stimuli of opposite contrasts (ON vs OFF cells). These two cell classes display many asymmetries in their physiological characteristics (including temporal characteristics, spatial characteristics, and nonlinear characteristics) that, individually, are known to have important roles in population coding. Here we describe a novel distinction between the information that ON and OFF ganglion cell populations carry in mouse--that OFF cells are able to signal motion information about both light and dark objects, while ON cells have a selective deficit at signaling the motion of dark objects. We found that none of the previously reported asymmetries in physiological characteristics could account for this distinction. We therefore analyzed its basis via a recently developed linear-nonlinear-Poisson model that faithfully captures input/output relationships for a broad range of stimuli (Bomash et al., 2013). While the coding differences between ON and OFF cell populations could not be ascribed to the linear or nonlinear components of the model individually, they had a simple explanation in the way that these components interact. Sensory transformations in other systems can likewise be described by these models, and thus our findings suggest that similar interactions between component properties may help account for the roles of cell classes in population coding more generally.

  14. The influence of gut function on lymphoid cell populations in the intestinal mucosa of lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J D; Morris, B

    1983-01-01

    The number and type of lymphoid cells in the intestinal mucosa of lambs change during the first weeks after birth. The influence of gut function on these changes was examined by comparing the evolution of lymphoid cell populations in normal ileum with that in lengths of ileum which had been isolated surgically from the functional intestinal tract of the lamb before birth. The isolated lengths of ileum had a normal blood and nerve supply and they remained healthy throughout a period of at least 2 years, although they did not have a normal histological development. In comparison with normal ileum, the villi of the isolated ileal segments were much smaller and there were many fewer intraepithelial lymphocytes; the lamina propria had significantly fewer lymphocytes than the functional ileum and only a few plasma cells. When isolated ileal segments were reconnected into the intestinal tract after having been isolated from it for 1-3 months, the histology of the mucosa reverted to that of the normal gut, with the same number and types of lymphoid cells. Radiolabelled lymphoblasts collected from intestinal lymph and injected intravenously accumulated to only a small extent in isolated segments of ileum compared with either the normal or the reconnected segments of ileum. This suggested that the paucity of lymphocytes in the mucosa of the isolated segments was due to a reduced extravasation of these cells there. The influence which the gut contents exert on the lymphoid cell population in the mucosa is probably associated with antigenic stimulation but may also be related to other factors concerned in the normal digestive functions of the gut. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6862523

  15. Extracellular electrical recording of pH-triggered bursts in C6 glioma cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Paulo R. F.; Medeiros, Maria C. R.; Kintzel, Ulrike; Vogt, Johannes; Araújo, Inês M.; Mestre, Ana L. G.; Mailänder, Volker; Schlett, Paul; Dröge, Melanie; Schneider, Leonid; Biscarini, Fabio; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Gomes, Henrique L.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma patients often suffer from epileptic seizures because of the tumor’s impact on the brain physiology. Using the rat glioma cell line C6 as a model system, we performed long-term live recordings of the electrical activity of glioma populations in an ultrasensitive detection method. The transducer exploits large-area electrodes that maximize double-layer capacitance, thus increasing the sensitivity. This strategy allowed us to record glioma electrical activity. We show that although glioma cells are nonelectrogenic, they display a remarkable electrical burst activity in time. The low-frequency current noise after cell adhesion is dominated by the flow of Na+ ions through voltage-gated ion channels. However, after an incubation period of many hours, the current noise markedly increased. This electric bursting phenomenon was not associated with apoptosis because the cells were viable and proliferative during the period of increased electric activity. We detected a rapid cell culture medium acidification accompanying this event. By using specific inhibitors, we showed that the electrical bursting activity was prompted by extracellular pH changes, which enhanced Na+ ion flux through the psalmotoxin 1–sensitive acid-sensing ion channels. Our model of pH-triggered bursting was unambiguously supported by deliberate, external acidification of the cell culture medium. This unexpected, acidosis-driven electrical activity is likely to directly perturb, in vivo, the functionality of the healthy neuronal network in the vicinity of the tumor bulk and may contribute to seizures in glioma patients. PMID:28028533

  16. A comparative study of lymph node mast cell populations in five marsupial species.

    PubMed

    Chiarini-Garcia, H; Pereira, F M

    1999-06-01

    In order to determine whether different subpopulations of mast cells exist, mast cells of mandibular and axillary lymph nodes from five species (Didelphis aurita, Metachirus nudicaudatus, Philander opossum, Marmosops incanus and Gracilinanus agilis) of South American marsupials were studied. Our results showed that mast cells present in the connective tissue of the capsule and septa (CTMC) were similar to those described for eutherian mammals. However, a population of mast cells that was present in the lymphatic sinuses and bathed by the lymph, plus in direct contact with granulocytes, lymphocytes, macrophages, and reticular cells, were morphologically and histochemically different from the CTMC. In the five species studied, these cellular types, called lymphatic-sinus mast cells (LSMC), had a lower concentration of intragranular heparin and, in four of the five species, the cytoplasmic granules appeared to be larger than those in CTMC. Although LSMC have been rarely described in eutherian mammals, it was verified, in this study, that LSMC are nevertheless present in lymphatic sinuses of the five metatherian species studied. These observations suggest that the presence of LSMC may be a characteristic of the marsupials and important in the immune response and adaptive success of the Didelphidae.

  17. Slow-growing cells within isogenic populations have increased RNA polymerase error rates and DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, David; Dhar, Riddhiman; Missarova, Alsu M.; Espinar, Lorena; Blevins, William R.; Lehner, Ben; Carey, Lucas B.

    2015-01-01

    Isogenic cells show a large degree of variability in growth rate, even when cultured in the same environment. Such cell-to-cell variability in growth can alter sensitivity to antibiotics, chemotherapy and environmental stress. To characterize transcriptional differences associated with this variability, we have developed a method—FitFlow—that enables the sorting of subpopulations by growth rate. The slow-growing subpopulation shows a transcriptional stress response, but, more surprisingly, these cells have reduced RNA polymerase fidelity and exhibit a DNA damage response. As DNA damage is often caused by oxidative stress, we test the addition of an antioxidant, and find that it reduces the size of the slow-growing population. More generally, we find a significantly altered transcriptome in the slow-growing subpopulation that only partially resembles that of cells growing slowly due to environmental and culture conditions. Slow-growing cells upregulate transposons and express more chromosomal, viral and plasmid-borne transcripts, and thus explore a larger genotypic—and so phenotypic — space. PMID:26268986

  18. Ovarian cancer stem cell like side populations are enriched following chemotherapy and overexpress EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Siân; Hersey, Jenny M.; Mellor, Paul; Dai, Wei; Santos-Silva, Alessandra; Liber, Daniel; Luk, Louisa; Titley, Ian; Carden, Craig P; Box, Garry; Hudson, David L.; Kaye, Stanley B.; Brown, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy, with cytoreductive surgery, is the cornerstone of treatment of advanced ovarian cancer, however acquired drug resistance is a major clinical obstacle. It has been proposed that subpopulations of tumour cells with stem-cell like properties, such as so-called side populations (SP) which over-express ABC drug-transporters, can sustain the growth of drug resistant tumour cells, leading to tumour recurrence following chemotherapy. The histone methyltransferase EZH2 is a key component of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) required for maintenance of a stem cell state and overexpression has been implicated in drug resistance and shorter survival of ovarian cancer patients. We observe higher percentage SP in ascites from patients that have relapsed following chemotherapy compared to chemonaive patients, consistent with selection for this subpopulation during platinum-based chemotherapy. Furthermore, ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) and EZH2 are consistently over-expressed in SP compared to non-SP from patients’ tumour cells. SiRNA knockdown of EZH2 leads to loss of SP in ovarian tumour models, reduced anchorage-independent growth and reduced tumour growth in vivo. Together these data support a key role for EZH2 in the maintenance of a drug-resistant tumour-sustaining subpopulation of cells in ovarian cancers undergoing chemotherapy. As such, EZH2 is an important target for anticancer drug development. PMID:21216927

  19. Single cell genomics indicates horizontal gene transfer and viral infections in a deep subsurface Firmicutes population

    PubMed Central

    Labonté, Jessica M.; Field, Erin K.; Lau, Maggie; Chivian, Dylan; Van Heerden, Esta; Wommack, K. Eric; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, Tullis C.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-01-01

    A major fraction of Earth's prokaryotic biomass dwells in the deep subsurface, where cellular abundances per volume of sample are lower, metabolism is slower, and generation times are longer than those in surface terrestrial and marine environments. How these conditions impact biotic interactions and evolutionary processes is largely unknown. Here we employed single cell genomics to analyze cell-to-cell genome content variability and signatures of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and viral infections in five cells of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, which were collected from a 3 km-deep fracture water in the 2.9 Ga-old Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa. Between 0 and 32% of genes recovered from single cells were not present in the original, metagenomic assembly of Desulforudis, which was obtained from a neighboring subsurface fracture. We found a transposable prophage, a retron, multiple clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and restriction-modification systems, and an unusually high frequency of transposases in the analyzed single cell genomes. This indicates that recombination, HGT and viral infections are prevalent evolutionary events in the studied population of microorganisms inhabiting a highly stable deep subsurface environment. PMID:25954269

  20. IL-10 expression defines an immunosuppressive dendritic cell population induced by antitumor therapeutic vaccination.

    PubMed

    Llopiz, Diana; Ruiz, Marta; Infante, Stefany; Villanueva, Lorea; Silva, Leyre; Hervas-Stubbs, Sandra; Alignani, Diego; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Lasarte, Juan J; Sarobe, Pablo

    2017-01-10

    Vaccination induces immunostimulatory signals that are often accompanied by regulatory mechanisms such as IL-10, which control T-cell activation and inhibit vaccine-dependent antitumor therapeutic effect. Here we characterized IL-10-producing cells in different tumor models treated with therapeutic vaccines. Although several cell subsets produced IL-10 irrespective of treatment, an early vaccine-dependent induction of IL-10 was detected in dendritic cells (DC). IL-10 production defined a DC population characterized by a poorly mature phenotype, lower expression of T-cell stimulating molecules and upregulation of PD-L1. These IL-10+ DC showed impaired in vitro T-cell stimulatory capacity, which was rescued by incubation with IL-10R and PD-L1-inhibiting antibodies. In vivo IL-10 blockade during vaccination decreased the proportion of IL-10+ DC and improved their maturation, without modifying PD-L1 expression. Similarly, PD-L1 blockade did not affect IL- 10 expression. Interestingly, vaccination combined with simultaneous blockade of IL-10 and PD-L1 induced stronger immune responses, resulting in a higher therapeutic efficacy in tumor-bearing mice. These results show that vaccine-induced immunoregulatory IL- 10+ DC impair priming of antitumor immunity, suggesting that therapeutic vaccination protocols may benefit from combined targeting of inhibitory molecules expressed by this DC subset.

  1. Novel population of small tumour-initiating stem cells in the ovaries of women with borderline ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Virant-Klun, Irma; Stimpfel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Small stem cells with diameters of up to 5 μm previously isolated from adult human ovaries indicated pluripotency and germinal lineage, especially primordial germ cells, and developed into primitive oocyte-like cells in vitro. Here, we show that a comparable population of small stem cells can be found in the ovarian tissue of women with borderline ovarian cancer, which, in contrast to small stem cells in “healthy” ovaries, formed spontaneous tumour-like structures and expressed some markers related to pluripotency and germinal lineage. The gene expression profile of these small putative cancer stem cells differed from similar cells sorted from “healthy” ovaries by 132 upregulated and 97 downregulated genes, including some important forkhead box and homeobox genes related to transcription regulation, developmental processes, embryogenesis, and ovarian cancer. These putative cancer stem cells are suggested to be a novel population of ovarian tumour-initiating cells in humans. PMID:27703207

  2. Modelling the effects of cell-to-cell variability on the output of interconnected gene networks in bacterial populations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The interconnection of quantitatively characterized biological devices may lead to composite systems with apparently unpredictable behaviour. Context-dependent variability of biological parts has been investigated in several studies, measuring its entity and identifying the factors contributing to variability. Such studies rely on the experimental analysis of model systems, by quantifying reporter genes via population or single-cell approaches. However, cell-to-cell variability is not commonly included in predictability analyses, thus relying on predictive models trained and tested on central tendency values. This work aims to study in silico the effects of cell-to-cell variability on the population-averaged output of interconnected biological circuits. Methods The steady-state deterministic transfer function of individual devices was described by Hill equations and lognormal synthetic noise was applied to their output. Two- and three-module networks were studied, where individual devices implemented inducible/repressible functions. The single-cell output of such networks was simulated as a function of noise entity; their population-averaged output was computed and used to investigate the expected variability in transfer function identification. The study was extended by testing different noise models, module logic, intrinsic/extrinsic noise proportions and network configurations. Results First, the transfer function of an individual module was identified from simulated data of a two-module network. The estimated parameter variability among different noise entities was limited (14%), while a larger difference was observed (up to 62%) when estimated and true parameters were compared. Thus, low-variability parameter estimates can be obtained for different noise entities, although deviating from the true parameters, whose measurement requires noise knowledge. Second, the black-box input-output function of a two/three-module network was predicted from the

  3. 'Stealth' nanoparticles evade neural immune cells but also evade major brain cell populations: Implications for PEG-based neurotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Stuart I; Weinberg, Daniel; Al-Shakli, Arwa F; Fernandes, Alinda R; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Telling, Neil D; Roach, Paul; Chari, Divya M

    2016-02-28

    Surface engineering to control cell behavior is of high interest across the chemical engineering, drug delivery and biomaterial communities. Defined chemical strategies are necessary to tailor nanoscale protein interactions/adsorption, enabling control of cell behaviors for development of novel therapeutic strategies. Nanoparticle-based therapies benefit from such strategies but particle targeting to sites of neurological injury remains challenging due to circulatory immune clearance. As a strategy to overcome this barrier, the use of stealth coatings can reduce immune clearance and prolong circulatory times, thereby enhancing therapeutic capacity. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is the most widely-used stealth coating and facilitates particle accumulation in the brain. However, once within the brain, the mode of handling of PEGylated particles by the resident immune cells of the brain itself (the 'microglia') is unknown. This is a critical question as it is well established that microglia avidly sequester nanoparticles, limiting their bioavailability and posing a major translational barrier. If PEGylation can be proved to promote evasion of microglia, then this information will be of high value in developing tailored nanoparticle-based therapies for neurological applications. Here, we have conducted the first comparative study of uptake of PEGylated particles by all the major (immune and non-immune) brain cell types. We prove for the first time that PEGylated nanoparticles evade major brain cell populations - a phenomenon which will enhance extracellular bioavailability. We demonstrate changes in protein coronas around these particles within biological media, and discuss how surface chemistry presentation may affect this process and subsequent cellular interactions.

  4. Heterogeneity of breast cancer stem cells as evidenced with Notch-dependent and Notch-independent populations.

    PubMed

    Wong, Nelson K Y; Fuller, Megan; Sung, Sandy; Wong, Fred; Karsan, Aly

    2012-10-01

    Studies have suggested the potential importance of Notch signaling to the cancer stem cell population in some tumors, but it is not known whether all cells in the cancer stem cell fraction require Notch activity. To address this issue, we blocked Notch activity in MCF-7 cells by expressing a dominant-negative MAML-GFP (dnMAML) construct, which inhibits signaling through all Notch receptors, and quantified the effect on tumor-initiating activity. Inhibition of Notch signaling reduced primary tumor sphere formation and side population. Functional quantification of tumor-initiating cell numbers in vivo showed a significant decrease, but not a complete abrogation, of these cells in dnMAML-expressing cells. Interestingly, when assessed in secondary assays in vitro or in vivo, there was no difference in tumor-initiating activity between the dnMAML-expressing cells and control cells. The fact that a subpopulation of dnMAML-expressing cells was capable of forming primary and secondary tumors indicates that there are Notch-independent tumor-initiating cells in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Our findings thus provide direct evidence for a heterogeneous cancer stem cell pool, which will require combination therapies against multiple oncogenic pathways to eliminate the tumor-initiating cell population.

  5. Temperature-dependent growth rates and gene expression patterns of various medaka Oryzias latipes cell lines derived from different populations.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Makoto; Mitani, Hiroshi; Watabe, Shugo

    2006-05-01

    Medaka Oryzias latipes has several geographically and genetically distinct populations. We examined temperature acclimation response in various medaka cell lines derived from different populations. Measurement of cell growth at various temperatures suggested that 15 degrees Celsius was the permissive growth temperature in all cell lines from the Northern Japanese and East Korean populations, but not in those from the Southern Japanese population and medaka-related species Oryzias celebensis, which inhabits a tropical zone. RT-PCR for 102 temperature-responsive genes, previously reported in other species, revealed that the accumulated mRNA level of a gene encoding HSP47 was lower at 25 degrees Celsius than at 33 degrees Celsius, and vice versa for 12 genes including IkappaBalpha and Rab-1c, in OLHNI-1 cell line from the Northern Japanese population. Further analysis by real-time PCR demonstrated that the accumulated mRNA levels of IkappaBalpha and Rab-1c in OLHNI-1 and OLSOK-e7 cell lines from the East Korean population were increased when the culture temperature was shifted from 33 to 15 degrees Celsius, but not in OLHdrR-e3 cell line from the Southern Japanese population. Since IkappaBalpha and Rab-1c are related to the NFkappaB cascade and endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi transport, respectively, it is inferred that immune responses and intracellular transport are possibly critical to temperature adaptation for medaka.

  6. Phenotypic equilibrium as probabilistic convergence in multi-phenotype cell population dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Da-Quan; Zhou, Da

    2017-01-01

    We consider the cell population dynamics with n different phenotypes. Both the Markovian branching process model (stochastic model) and the ordinary differential equation (ODE) system model (deterministic model) are presented, and exploited to investigate the dynamics of the phenotypic proportions. We will prove that in both models, these proportions will tend to constants regardless of initial population states (“phenotypic equilibrium”) under weak conditions, which explains the experimental phenomenon in Gupta et al.’s paper. We also prove that Gupta et al.’s explanation is the ODE model under a special assumption. As an application, we will give sufficient and necessary conditions under which the proportion of one phenotype tends to 0 (die out) or 1 (dominate). We also extend our results to non-Markovian cases. PMID:28182672

  7. Stochastic Responses May Allow Genetically Diverse Cell Populations to Optimize Performance with Simpler Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Govern, Christopher C.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-01-01

    Two theories have emerged for the role that stochasticity plays in biological responses: first, that it degrades biological responses, so the performance of biological signaling machinery could be improved by increasing molecular copy numbers of key proteins; second, that it enhances biological performance, by enabling diversification of population-level responses. Using T cell biology as an example, we demonstrate that these roles for stochastic responses are not sufficient to understand experimental observations of stochastic response in complex biological systems that utilize environmental and genetic diversity to make cooperative responses. We propose a new role for stochastic responses in biology: they enable populations to make complex responses with simpler biochemical signaling machinery than would be required in the absence of stochasticity. Thus, the evolution of stochastic responses may be linked to the evolvability of different signaling machineries. PMID:23950860

  8. Steady-state linear optical properties and Kerr nonlinear optical response of a four-level quantum dot with phonon-assisted transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Chao, She; Ting-Ting, Luo; Wei-Xi, Zhang; Mao-Wu, Ran; Deng-Long, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The linear optical properties and Kerr nonlinear optical response in a four-level loop configuration GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor quantum dot are analytically studied with the phonon-assisted transition (PAT). It is shown that the changes among a single electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) window, a double EIT window and the amplification of the probe field in the absorption curves can be controlled by varying the strength of PAT κ. Meanwhile, double switching from the anomalous dispersion regime to the normal dispersion regime can likely be achieved by increasing the Rabi energy of the external optical control field. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the group velocity of the probe field can be practically regulated by varying the PAT and the intensity of the optical control field. In the nonlinear case, it is shown that the large SPM and XPM can be achieved as linear absorption vanishes simultaneously, and the PAT can suppress both third-order self-Kerr and the cross-Kerr nonlinear effect of the QD. Our study is much more practical than its atomic counterpart due to its flexible design and the controllable interference strength, and may provide some new possibilities for technological applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61367003), the Scientific Research Fund of Hunan Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. 12A140), and the Scientific Research Fund of Guizhou Provincial Education Department, China (Grant Nos. KY[2015]384 and KY[2015]446).

  9. The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD) v.5: a metadata management system based on a four level (meta)genome project classification.

    PubMed

    Reddy, T B K; Thomas, Alex D; Stamatis, Dimitri; Bertsch, Jon; Isbandi, Michelle; Jansson, Jakob; Mallajosyula, Jyothi; Pagani, Ioanna; Lobos, Elizabeth A; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-01-01

    The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD; http://www.genomesonline.org) is a comprehensive online resource to catalog and monitor genetic studies worldwide. GOLD provides up-to-date status on complete and ongoing sequencing projects along with a broad array of curated metadata. Here we report version 5 (v.5) of the database. The newly designed database schema and web user interface supports several new features including the implementation of a four level (meta)genome project classification system and a simplified intuitive web interface to access reports and launch search tools. The database currently hosts information for about 19,200 studies, 56,000 Biosamples, 56,000 sequencing projects and 39,400 analysis projects. More than just a catalog of worldwide genome projects, GOLD is a manually curated, quality-controlled metadata warehouse. The problems encountered in integrating disparate and varying quality data into GOLD are briefly highlighted. GOLD fully supports and follows the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Minimum Information standards.

  10. Design and Characterization of Next-Generation Micromirrors Fabricated in a Four-Level, Planarized Surface-Micromachined Polycrystalline Silicon Process

    SciTech Connect

    Michalicek, M.A.; Comtois, J.H.; Barron, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the design and characterization of several types of micromirror devices to include process capabilities, device modeling, and test data resulting in deflection versus applied potential curves. These micromirror devices are the first to be fabricated in the state-of-the-art four-level planarized polysilicon process available at Sandia National Laboratories known as the Sandia Ultra-planar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiT). This enabling process permits the development of micromirror devices with near-ideal characteristics which have previously been unrealizable in standard three-layer polysilicon processes. This paper describes such characteristics as elevated address electrodes, individual address wiring beneath the device, planarized mirror surfaces using Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP), unique post-process metallization, and the best active surface area to date. This paper presents the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of several variations of Flexure-Beam (FBMD) and Axial-Rotation Micromirror Devices (ARMD). The released devices are first metallized using a standard sputtering technique relying on metallization guards and masks that are fabricated next to the devices. Such guards are shown to enable the sharing of bond pads between numerous arrays of micromirrors in order to maximize the number of on-chip test arrays. The devices are modeled and then empirically characterized using a laser interferometer setup located at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio. Unique design considerations for these devices and the process are also discussed.

  11. The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD) v.5: a metadata management system based on a four level (meta)genome project classification

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, T.B.K.; Thomas, Alex D.; Stamatis, Dimitri; Bertsch, Jon; Isbandi, Michelle; Jansson, Jakob; Mallajosyula, Jyothi; Pagani, Ioanna; Lobos, Elizabeth A.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2015-01-01

    The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD; http://www.genomesonline.org) is a comprehensive online resource to catalog and monitor genetic studies worldwide. GOLD provides up-to-date status on complete and ongoing sequencing projects along with a broad array of curated metadata. Here we report version 5 (v.5) of the database. The newly designed database schema and web user interface supports several new features including the implementation of a four level (meta)genome project classification system and a simplified intuitive web interface to access reports and launch search tools. The database currently hosts information for about 19 200 studies, 56 000 Biosamples, 56 000 sequencing projects and 39 400 analysis projects. More than just a catalog of worldwide genome projects, GOLD is a manually curated, quality-controlled metadata warehouse. The problems encountered in integrating disparate and varying quality data into GOLD are briefly highlighted. GOLD fully supports and follows the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Minimum Information standards. PMID:25348402

  12. The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD) v.5: a metadata management system based on a four level (meta)genome project classification

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Tatiparthi B. K.; Thomas, Alex D.; Stamatis, Dimitri; Bertsch, Jon; Isbandi, Michelle; Jansson, Jakob; Mallajosyula, Jyothi; Pagani, Ioanna; Lobos, Elizabeth A.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2014-10-27

    The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD; http://www.genomesonline.org) is a comprehensive online resource to catalog and monitor genetic studies worldwide. GOLD provides up-to-date status on complete and ongoing sequencing projects along with a broad array of curated metadata. Within this paper, we report version 5 (v.5) of the database. The newly designed database schema and web user interface supports several new features including the implementation of a four level (meta)genome project classification system and a simplified intuitive web interface to access reports and launch search tools. The database currently hosts information for about 19 200 studies, 56 000 Biosamples, 56 000 sequencing projects and 39 400 analysis projects. More than just a catalog of worldwide genome projects, GOLD is a manually curated, quality-controlled metadata warehouse. The problems encountered in integrating disparate and varying quality data into GOLD are briefly highlighted. Lastly, GOLD fully supports and follows the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Minimum Information standards.

  13. A Nonlocal Model for Contact Attraction and Repulsion in Heterogeneous Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Painter, K J; Bloomfield, J M; Sherratt, J A; Gerisch, A

    2015-06-01

    Instructing others to move is fundamental for many populations, whether animal or cellular. In many instances, these commands are transmitted by contact, such that an instruction is relayed directly (e.g. by touch) from signaller to receiver: for cells, this can occur via receptor-ligand mediated interactions at their membranes, potentially at a distance if a cell extends long filopodia. Given that commands ranging from attractive to repelling can be transmitted over variable distances and between cells of the same (homotypic) or different (heterotypic) type, these mechanisms can clearly have a significant impact on the organisation of a tissue. In this paper, we extend a system of nonlocal partial differential equations (integrodifferential equations) to provide a general modelling framework to explore these processes, performing linear stability and numerical analyses to reveal its capacity to trigger the self-organisation of tissues. We demonstrate the potential of the framework via two illustrative applications: the contact-mediated dispersal of neural crest populations and the self-organisation of pigmentation patterns in zebrafish.

  14. Cell population kinetics of collagen scaffolds in ex vivo oral wound repair.

    PubMed

    Agis, Hermann; Collins, Amy; Taut, Andrei D; Jin, Qiming; Kruger, Laura; Görlach, Christoph; Giannobile, William V

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable collagen scaffolds are used clinically for oral soft tissue augmentation to support wound healing. This study sought to provide a novel ex vivo model for analyzing healing kinetics and gene expression of primary human gingival fibroblasts (hGF) within collagen scaffolds. Sponge type and gel type scaffolds with and without platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF) were assessed in an hGF containing matrix. Morphology was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy, and hGF metabolic activity using MTT. We quantitated the population kinetics within the scaffolds based on cell density and distance from the scaffold border of DiI-labled hGFs over a two-week observation period. Gene expression was evaluated with gene array and qPCR. The sponge type scaffolds showed a porous morphology. Absolute cell number and distance was higher in sponge type scaffolds when compared to gel type scaffolds, in particular during the first week of observation. PDGF incorporated scaffolds increased cell numbers, distance, and formazan formation in the MTT assay. Gene expression dynamics revealed the induction of key genes associated with the generation of oral tissue. DKK1, CYR61, CTGF, TGFBR1 levels were increased and integrin ITGA2 levels were decreased in the sponge type scaffolds compared to the gel type scaffold. The results suggest that this novel model of oral wound healing provides insights into population kinetics and gene expression dynamics of biodegradable scaffolds.

  15. Defining CD8+ T cell determinants during human viral infection in populations of Asian ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Rivino, Laura; Tan, Anthony T; Chia, Adeline; Kumaran, Emmanuelle A P; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; MacAry, Paul A; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2013-10-15

    The identification of virus-specific CD8(+) T cell determinants is a fundamental requirement for our understanding of viral disease pathogenesis. T cell epitope mapping strategies increasingly rely on algorithms that predict the binding of peptides to MHC molecules. There is, however, little information on the reliability of predictive algorithms in the context of human populations, in particular, for those expressing HLA class I molecules for which there are limited experimental data available. In this study, we evaluate the ability of NetMHCpan to predict antiviral CD8(+) T cell epitopes that we identified with a traditional approach in patients of Asian ethnicity infected with Dengue virus, hepatitis B virus, or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. We experimentally demonstrate that the predictive power of algorithms defining peptide-MHC interaction directly correlates with the amount of training data on which the predictive algorithm has been constructed. These results highlight the limited applicability of the NetMHCpan algorithm for populations expressing HLA molecules for which there are little or no experimental binding data, such as those of Asian ethnicity.

  16. Effect of Mutation on Immune Response in an HIV Response Model via Population Dynamics of Cell - A Monte Carlo Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras; Ruskin, Heather; Mannion, Rachel

    2001-03-01

    Using a direct Monte Carlo method we study the population dynamics of cells, i.e., macrophages (N_M), helper T-cells (N_H), cytotoxic cells (N_C), and antigens (N_V), with an HIV immune response model. Cells interact with eact other with a set of rules based on known HIV response. Cells can be mobile with a probability P_mob with a local motility-bias and viruses can mutate with a probability P_mut. Computer simulations are performed on cubic lattices with a number of independent runs. Population of cellular elements with the Monte Carlo time steps are monitored at a function of mutation at two extreme values of mobility, P_mob = 0, 1. We find that, in absence of mobility (P_mob = 0), the helper T-cells grow nonmonotonically before reaching saturation while the viral population grows monotonically to a constant value. On the other hand, cellular mobility (P_mob=1) enhances the viral growth and reduces the stimulative T-cell growth. The relative magnitude of the steady-state density of helper cell and viral infected cells determine the level of infection. Viral population dominates over the helper T-Cells above a critical mutation threshold (p_c) while helper T-Cells dominates below p_c. Nature of transition depends on mobility.

  17. A Monte Carlo Approach to Population Dynamics of Cell in an HIV Immune Response Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannion, Rachel; Ruskin, Heather; Pandey, Ras

    2000-03-01

    A direct Monte Carlo method is used to study the growth and decay of celluar elements, macrophages (N_H), helper T-cells (N_H), cytotoxic cells (N_C), and antigens (N_V), with an HIV immune response model. A set of rule-based logical interactions among the cells are considered. Cells divide and decay on a discrete lattice as a result of immune mechanism implemented via the inter- and intra-cellular interactions. Viral mutation is considered probabilistically (P_mut). Cells are mobile with their local motility-bias and the overall mobility is controlled by cellular mobility (P_mob). Computer simulations are performed on different lattice sizes with a number of independent runs for each parameter for averaging. Cellular mobility (P_mob=1) enhances the viral growth and reduces the stimulative T-cell growth. As a function of viral mutation rate, the interplay between the steady- state density of helper T-cells (ρ_H) and the viruses (ρ_V), leads to interesting predictions regarding the degree of infection including AIDS. For example, below a mutation threshold, (P_mut <= P_c), while the relative T-cell count (- Δ0 = ρ_H-ρV > 0) is not as alarming, above the threshold, viral population increasingly dominates as a function of the mutation rate with the onset of a continuous transition Δ ρ0 ∝ (P_mut - P_c)^β β ~= 0.574 ± 0.016 as P_mut → Pc in absence cellular mobility.

  18. Altered TGF-α/β signaling drives cooperation between breast cancer cell populations.

    PubMed

    Franco, Omar E; Tyson, Darren R; Konvinse, Katherine C; Udyavar, Akshata R; Estrada, Lourdes; Quaranta, Vito; Crawford, Susan E; Hayward, Simon W

    2016-10-01

    The role of tumor heterogeneity in regulating disease progression is poorly understood. We hypothesized that interactions between subpopulations of cancer cells can affect the progression of tumors selecting for a more aggressive phenotype. We developed an in vivo assay based on the immortalized nontumorigenic breast cell line MCF10A and its Ras-transformed derivatives AT1 (mildly tumorigenic) and CA1d (highly tumorigenic). CA1d cells outcompeted MCF10A, forming invasive tumors. AT1 grafts were approximately 1% the size of CA1d tumors when initiated using identical cell numbers. In contrast, CA1d/AT1 mixed tumors were larger than tumors composed of AT1 alone (100-fold) or CA1d (3-fold), suggesting cooperation in tumor growth. One of the mechanisms whereby CA1d and AT1 were found to cooperate was by modulation of TGF-α and TGF-β signaling. Both of these molecules were sufficient to induce changes in AT1 proliferative potential in vitro. Reisolation of AT1 tumor-derived (AT1(-TD)) cells from these mixed tumors revealed that AT1(-TD) cells grew in vivo, forming tumors as large as tumorigenic CA1d cells. Cooperation between subpopulations of cancer epithelium is an understudied mechanism of tumor growth and invasion that may have implications on tumor resistance to current therapies.-Franco, O. E., Tyson, D. R., Konvinse, K. C., Udyavar, A. R., Estrada, L., Quaranta, V., Crawford, S. E., Hayward, S. W. Altered TGF-α/β signaling drives cooperation between breast cancer cell populations.

  19. Spatiotemporal response properties of cerebellar Purkinje cells to animal displacement: a population analysis.

    PubMed

    Pompeiano, O; Andre, P; Manzoni, D

    1997-12-01

    The hypothesis that corticocerebellar units projecting to vestibulospinal neurons contribute to the spatiotemporal response characteristics of forelimb extensors to animal displacement was tested in decerebrate cats in which the activity of Purkinje cells and unidentified cells located in the cerebellar anterior vermis was recorded during wobble of the whole animal. This stimulus imposed to the animal a tilt of fixed amplitude (5 degrees) with a direction moving at a constant angular velocity (56.2 degrees/s), both in the clockwise and counterclockwise directions over the horizontal plane. Eighty-three percent (143/173) of Purkinje cells and 81% (42/52) of unidentified cells responded to clockwise and/or counterclockwise rotations. In particular, 116/143 Purkinje cells (81%) and 32/42 unidentified cells (76%) responded to both clockwise and counterclockwise rotations (bidirectional units), while 27/143 Purkinje cells (19%) and 10/42 unidentified cells (24%) responded to wobble in one direction only (unidirectional units). For the bidirectional units, the direction of maximum sensitivity to tilt (Smax) was identified. Among these units, 24% of the Purkinje cells and 26% of the unidentified cells displayed an equal amplitude of modulation during clockwise and counterclockwise rotations, indicating a cosine-tuned behavior. For this unit type, the temporal phase of the response to a given direction of tilt should remain constant, while the sensitivity would be maximal along the Smax direction, declining with the cosine of the angle between Smax and the tilt direction. The remaining bidirectional units, i.e. 57% of the Purkinje cells and 50% of the unidentified cells displayed unequal amplitudes of modulation during clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. For these neurons, a non-zero sensitivity along the null direction is expected, with a response phase varying as a function of stimulus direction. As to the unidirectional units, their responses to wobble in one

  20. Suppressor T-cell population induced by Junin virus in adult mice.

    PubMed Central

    Campetella, O E; Barrios, H A; Galassi, N V

    1988-01-01

    Intracerebral (i.c.) Junin virus (JV) infection of adult BALB/c mice is characterized by the absence of morbidity and a low mortality (barely 8-10%). In contrast, the suckling mouse model exhibits almost 100% mortality following central nervous system (CNS) alterations consistent with a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH)-like immune response. Besides, JV infection of adult (resistant) mice leads to immunosuppression of DTH to unrelated antigens. Here we present evidence demonstrating that such suppression is mediated by JV-induced cells present in spleen from 24 hr to 24 days post-infection, bearing the Thy-1+, Ly-1+2- phenotype and reactive to an unrelated antigen such as sheep red blood cells (SRBC). No evidence of suppressor factors was found. A relatively low number of total splenic cells (5 x 10(6) cells/mouse) was enough to transfer suppression. Therefore, this cell population may be involved in adult mouse survival to JV infection. PMID:2970429

  1. Coherent population trapping in small- and chip-scale 87Rb vapor cells with buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermak, S. V.; Semenov, V. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Pyatyshev, E. N.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics of coherent population trapping (CPT) signal were investigated in small-size glass vapor cells containing 87Rb and Ne buffer gas with narrow line-width laser pumping on D2 line. The parameters of CPT signals were measured using small-size vapor cells with Ne buffer gas pressure in the range of 200-400 Torr, cell temperature in the range of 65-120 ∘C and the values of laser pumping power of 30-400 μW/cm2. Optimal conditions, under which the minimal value of short-term instability of resonance line is achieved, were obtained in experiments. Orientation frequency shifts of CPT resonance using glass 87Rb vapor cells containing buffer gas and anti-relaxation coating were compared. CPT signals using vapor cells based on integrated technologies containing 87Rb in atmosphere of Ne were also investigated. The CPT signals with typical line widths of 2-3 kHz and signal-to-noise ratio of 1500 in 1 Hz bandwidth are observed, which allows one to provide relative frequency instability of 10-11 at 100 s.

  2. Computational Model of Population Dynamics Based on the Cell Cycle and Local Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprisan, Sorinel Adrian; Oprisan, Ana

    2005-03-01

    Our study bridges cellular (mesoscopic) level interactions and global population (macroscopic) dynamics of carcinoma. The morphological differences and transitions between well and smooth defined benign tumors and tentacular malignat tumors suggest a theoretical analysis of tumor invasion based on the development of mathematical models exhibiting bifurcations of spatial patterns in the density of tumor cells. Our computational model views the most representative and clinically relevant features of oncogenesis as a fight between two distinct sub-systems: the immune system of the host and the neoplastic system. We implemented the neoplastic sub-system using a three-stage cell cycle: active, dormant, and necrosis. The second considered sub-system consists of cytotoxic active (effector) cells — EC, with a very broad phenotype ranging from NK cells to CTL cells, macrophages, etc. Based on extensive numerical simulations, we correlated the fractal dimensions for carcinoma, which could be obtained from tumor imaging, with the malignat stage. Our computational model was able to also simulate the effects of surgical, chemotherapeutical, and radiotherapeutical treatments.

  3. Toward compression of small cell population: harnessing stress in passive regions of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Alexandre; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2014-03-01

    We present a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) for in vitro analysis of mm2 biological samples under periodic compressive stress. Understanding how mechanical stimuli affect cell functions could lead to significant advances in diseases diagnosis and drugs development. We previously reported an array of 72 micro-DEAs on a chip to apply a periodic stretch to cells. To diversify our cell mechanotransduction toolkit we have developed an actuator for periodic compression of small cell populations. The device is based on a novel design which exploits the effects of non-equibiaxial pre-stretch and takes advantage of the stress induced in passive regions of DEAs. The device consists of two active regions separated by a 2mm x 2mm passive area. When connected to an AC high-voltage source, the two active regions periodically compress the passive region. Due to the non-equibiaxial pre-stretch it induces uniaxial compressive strain greater than 10%. Cells adsorbed on top of this passive gap would experience the same uniaxial compressive stain. The electrodes configuration confines the electric field and prevents it from reaching the biological sample. A thin layer of silicone is casted on top of the device to ensure a biocompatible environment. This design provides several advantages over alternative technologies such as high optical transparency of the area of interest (passive region under compression) and its potential for miniaturization and parallelization.

  4. Computational Model of Population Dynamics Based on the Cell Cycle and Local Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Oprisan, Sorinel Adrian; Oprisan, Ana

    2005-03-31

    Our study bridges cellular (mesoscopic) level interactions and global population (macroscopic) dynamics of carcinoma. The morphological differences and transitions between well and smooth defined benign tumors and tentacular malignat tumors suggest a theoretical analysis of tumor invasion based on the development of mathematical models exhibiting bifurcations of spatial patterns in the density of tumor cells. Our computational model views the most representative and clinically relevant features of oncogenesis as a fight between two distinct sub-systems: the immune system of the host and the neoplastic system. We implemented the neoplastic sub-system using a three-stage cell cycle: active, dormant, and necrosis. The second considered sub-system consists of cytotoxic active (effector) cells -- EC, with a very broad phenotype ranging from NK cells to CTL cells, macrophages, etc. Based on extensive numerical simulations, we correlated the fractal dimensions for carcinoma, which could be obtained from tumor imaging, with the malignat stage. Our computational model was able to also simulate the effects of surgical, chemotherapeutical, and radiotherapeutical treatments.

  5. Pulmonary artery endothelial cell dysfunction and decreased populations of highly proliferative endothelial cells in experimental congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Acker, Shannon N; Seedorf, Gregory J; Abman, Steven H; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Partrick, David A; Gien, Jason

    2013-12-01

    Decreased lung vascular growth and pulmonary hypertension contribute to poor outcomes in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Mechanisms that impair angiogenesis in CDH are poorly understood. We hypothesize that decreased vessel growth in CDH is caused by pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) dysfunction with loss of a highly proliferative population of PAECs (HP-PAEC). PAECs were harvested from near-term fetal sheep that underwent surgical disruption of the diaphragm at 60-70 days gestational age. Highly proliferative potential was measured via single cell assay. PAEC function was assessed by assays of growth and tube formation and response to known proangiogenic stimuli, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and nitric oxide (NO). Western blot analysis was used to measure content of angiogenic proteins, and superoxide production was assessed. By single cell assay, the proportion of HP-PAEC with growth of >1,000 cells was markedly reduced in the CDH PAEC, from 29% (controls) to 1% (CDH) (P < 0.0001). Compared with controls, CDH PAEC growth and tube formation were decreased by 31% (P = 0.012) and 54% (P < 0.001), respectively. VEGF and NO treatments increased CDH PAEC growth and tube formation. VEGF and VEGF-R2 proteins were increased in CDH PAEC; however, eNOS and extracellular superoxide dismutase proteins were decreased by 29 and 88%, respectively. We conclude that surgically induced CDH in fetal sheep causes endothelial dysfunction and marked reduction of the HP-PAEC population. We speculate that this CDH PAEC phenotype contributes to impaired vascular growth in CDH.

  6. Pulmonary artery endothelial cell dysfunction and decreased populations of highly proliferative endothelial cells in experimental congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Seedorf, Gregory J.; Abman, Steven H.; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Partrick, David A.; Gien, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Decreased lung vascular growth and pulmonary hypertension contribute to poor outcomes in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Mechanisms that impair angiogenesis in CDH are poorly understood. We hypothesize that decreased vessel growth in CDH is caused by pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) dysfunction with loss of a highly proliferative population of PAECs (HP-PAEC). PAECs were harvested from near-term fetal sheep that underwent surgical disruption of the diaphragm at 60–70 days gestational age. Highly proliferative potential was measured via single cell assay. PAEC function was assessed by assays of growth and tube formation and response to known proangiogenic stimuli, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and nitric oxide (NO). Western blot analysis was used to measure content of angiogenic proteins, and superoxide production was assessed. By single cell assay, the proportion of HP-PAEC with growth of >1,000 cells was markedly reduced in the CDH PAEC, from 29% (controls) to 1% (CDH) (P < 0.0001). Compared with controls, CDH PAEC growth and tube formation were decreased by 31% (P = 0.012) and 54% (P < 0.001), respectively. VEGF and NO treatments increased CDH PAEC growth and tube formation. VEGF and VEGF-R2 proteins were increased in CDH PAEC; however, eNOS and extracellular superoxide dismutase proteins were decreased by 29 and 88%, respectively. We conclude that surgically induced CDH in fetal sheep causes endothelial dysfunction and marked reduction of the HP-PAEC population. We speculate that this CDH PAEC phenotype contributes to impaired vascular growth in CDH. PMID:24124189

  7. Growth and sex effects on the expression of syndecan-4 and glypican-1 in turkey myogenic satellite cell populations.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; McFarland, Douglas C; Velleman, Sandra G

    2013-06-01

    The adult skeletal muscle stem cells, satellite cells, are responsible for skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. Satellite cells represent a heterogeneous cell population that differentially express cell surface markers. The membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycans, syndecan-4, and glypican-1, are differentially expressed by satellite cells during the proliferation and differentiation stages of satellite cells. However, how the population of syndecan-4- or glypican-1-positive satellite cells changes during proliferation and differentiation, and how sex and muscle growth potential affect the expression of these genes is unknown. Differences in the amount of satellite cells positive for syndecan-4 or glypican-1 would affect the process of proliferation and differentiation which would impact both muscle mass accretion and the regeneration of muscle. In the current study, the percentage of satellite cells positive for syndecan-4 or glypican-1 from male and female turkeys from a Randombred Control Line 2 and a line (F) selected for increased 16-week body weight were measured during proliferation and differentiation. Growth selection altered the population of syndecan-4- and glypican-1-positive satellite cells and there were sex differences in the percentage of syndecan-4- and glypican-1-positive satellite cells. This study provides new information on dynamic changes in syndecan-4- and glypican-1-positive satellite cells showing that they are differentially expressed during myogenesis and growth selection and sex affects their expression.

  8. Aging of the inceptive cellular population: the relationship between stem cells and aging.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Catherine E; Galderisi, Umberto; Giordano, Antonio

    2009-04-02

    The average life expectancy worldwide has about doubled and the global population has increased six fold over the past century. With improving health care in the developed world there is a proportional augmentation in the treatment necessary for elderly patients occasioning the call for increased research in the area of aging and age-related diseases. The manifestation of this research has been focalized on the causative cellular processes and molecular mechanisms involved. Here we will discuss the efforts of this research in the area of stem cells, delving into the regulatory mechanisms and how their de-regulation could be attributed to aging and age-related diseases.

  9. Light microscopic analysis of mitochondrial heterogeneity in cell populations and within single cells.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Stefan; Stoldt, Stefan; Neumann, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneity in the shapes of individual multicellular organisms is a daily experience. Likewise, even a quick glance through the ocular of a light microscope reveals the morphological heterogeneities in genetically identical cultured cells, whereas heterogeneities on the level of the organelles are much less obvious. This short review focuses on intracellular heterogeneities at the example of the mitochondria and their analysis by fluorescence microscopy. The overall mitochondrial shape as well as mitochondrial dynamics can be studied by classical (fluorescence) light microscopy. However, with an organelle diameter generally close to the resolution limit of light, the heterogeneities within mitochondria cannot be resolved with conventional light microscopy. Therefore, we briefly discuss here the potential of subdiffraction light microscopy (nanoscopy) to study inner-mitochondrial heterogeneities.

  10. Cardiac Repair With a Novel Population of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Resident in the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Sivakumaran, Priyadharshini; Newcomb, Andrew E; Hernandez, Damián; Harris, Nicole; Khanabdali, Ramin; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Kelly, Darren J; Pébay, Alice; Hewitt, Alex W; Boyle, Andrew; Harvey, Richard; Morrison, Wayne A; Elliott, David A; Dusting, Gregory J; Lim, Shiang Y

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac resident stem cells (CRSCs) hold much promise to treat heart disease but this remains a controversial field. Here, we describe a novel population of CRSCs, which are positive for W8B2 antigen and were obtained from adult human atrial appendages. W8B2(+) CRSCs exhibit a spindle-shaped morphology, are clonogenic and capable of self-renewal. W8B2(+) CRSCs show high expression of mesenchymal but not hematopoietic nor endothelial markers. W8B2(+) CRSCs expressed GATA4, HAND2, and TBX5, but not C-KIT, SCA-1, NKX2.5, PDGFRα, ISL1, or WT1. W8B2(+) CRSCs can differentiate into cardiovascular lineages and secrete a range of cytokines implicated in angiogenesis, chemotaxis, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, cell growth, and survival. In vitro, conditioned medium collected from W8B2(+) CRSCs displayed prosurvival, proangiogenic, and promigratory effects on endothelial cells, superior to that of other adult stem cells tested, and additionally promoted survival and proliferation of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Intramyocardial transplantation of human W8B2(+) CRSCs into immunocompromised rats 1 week after myocardial infarction markedly improved cardiac function (∼40% improvement in ejection fraction) and reduced fibrotic scar tissue 4 weeks after infarction. Hearts treated with W8B2(+) CRSCs showed less adverse remodeling of the left ventricle, a greater number of proliferating cardiomyocytes (Ki67(+) cTnT(+) cells) in the remote region, higher myocardial vascular density, and greater infiltration of CD163(+) cells (a marker for M2 macrophages) into the border zone and scar regions. In summary, W8B2(+) CRSCs are distinct from currently known CRSCs found in human hearts, and as such may be an ideal cell source to repair myocardial damage after infarction.

  11. Systematic analysis of reportedly distinct populations of multipotent bone marrow-derived stem cells reveals a lack of distinction.

    PubMed

    Lodie, Tracey A; Blickarz, Courtney E; Devarakonda, Tara J; He, Chufa; Dash, Ajeeta B; Clarke, Jennifer; Gleneck, Kristen; Shihabuddin, Lamya; Tubo, Ross

    2002-10-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells, having the ability to differentiate into cells of multiple lineages, have been isolated and propagated by varied protocols, including positive (CD105(+))/negative (CD45(-)GlyA(-)) selection with immunomagnetic beads, or direct plating into selective culture media. Each substratum-adherent cell population was subjected to a systematic analysis of their cell surface markers and differentiation potential. In the initial stages of culture, each cell population proliferated slowly, reaching confluence in 10-14 days. Adherent cells proliferated at similar rates whether cultured in serum-free medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor, medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS) supplemented with epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, or medium containing 10% FBS alone. Cell surface marker analysis revealed that more than 95% of the cells were positive for CD105/endoglin, a putative mesenchymal stem cell marker, and negative for CD34, CD31, and CD133, markers of hematopoietic, endothelial, and neural stem cells, respectively, regardless of cell isolation and propagation method. CD44 expression was variable, apparently dependent on serum concentration. Functional similarity of the stem cell populations was also observed, with each different cell population expressing the cell type-specific markers beta-tubulin, type II collagen, and desmin, and demonstrating endothelial tube formation when cultured under conditions favoring neural, cartilage, muscle, and endothelial cell differentiation, respectively. On the basis of these data, adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells cultured in adherent monolayer are virtually indistinguishable, both physically and functionally, regardless of the method of isolation or proliferative expansion.

  12. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Indonesian populations of Java, Kalimantan, Timor and Irian Jaya.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, M; Velickovic, Z; Panigoro, R; Dunckley, H

    2009-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate the activity of natural killer and T cells through interactions with specific human leucocyte antigen class I molecules on target cells. Population studies performed over the last several years have established that KIR gene frequencies (GFs) and genotype content vary considerably among different ethnic groups, indicating the extent of KIR diversity, some of which have also shown the effect of the presence or absence of specific KIR genes in human disease. We have determined the frequencies of 16 KIR genes and pseudogenes and genotypes in 193 Indonesian individuals from Java, East Timor, Irian Jaya (western half of the island of New Guinea) and Kalimantan provinces of Indonesian Borneo. All 16 KIR genes were observed in all four populations. Variation in GFs between populations was observed, except for KIR2DL4, KIR3DL2, KIR3DL3, KIR2DP1 and KIR3DP1 genes, which were present in every individual tested. When comparing KIR GFs between populations, both principal component analysis and a phylogenetic tree showed close clustering of the Kalimantan and Javanese populations, while Irianese populations were clearly separated from the other three populations. Our results indicate a high level of KIR polymorphism in Indonesian populations that probably reflects the large geographical spread of the Indonesian archipelago and the complex evolutionary history and population migration in this region.

  13. Interleukin-35-mediated induction of a novel regulatory T cell population

    PubMed Central

    Collison, Lauren W.; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Henderson, Abigail L.; Giacomin, Paul R.; Guy, Cliff; Bankoti, Jaishree; Finkelstein, David; Forbes, Karen; Workman, Creg J.; Brown, Scott A.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Jones, Michael L.; Ni, Hsiao-Tzu; Artis, David; Turk, Mary Jo; Vignali, Dario A. A.

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance. Naïve human or murine T cell treatment with the inhibitory cytokine IL-35 induces a regulatory population, termed iTR35, that mediates suppression via IL-35, but not IL-10 or TGFβ, neither express nor require Foxp3, are strongly suppressive in five in vivo models, and exhibit in vivo stability. Treg-mediated suppression induces iTR35 generation in an IL-35- and IL-10-dependent manner in vitro, and in inflammatory conditions in vivo in Trichuris-infected intestines and within the tumor microenvironment, where they appear to contribute to the regulatory milieu. iTR35 may constitute a key mediator of infectious tolerance, may contribute to Treg-mediated tumor progression, and ex vivo generated iTR35 may possess therapeutic utility. PMID:20953201

  14. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.; Argoul, F.; Rappailles, A.; Guilbaud, G.; Petryk, N.; Kahli, M.; Hyrien, O.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a non-local model of DNA replication that takes into account the observed uncertainty on the position and time of replication initiation in eukaryote cell populations. By picturing replication initiation as a two-state system and considering all possible transition configurations, and by taking into account the chromatin’s fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement with corresponding experimental data from both S. cerevisiae and human cells and provides a quantitative estimate of initiation site redundancy. This study shows that, to a large extent, the program that regulates the dynamics of eukaryotic DNA replication is a collective phenomenon that emerges from the stochastic nature of replication origins initiation.

  15. Dose Dependent Side Effect of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Labeling on Cell Motility in Two Fetal Stem Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Diana, Valentina; Bossolasco, Patrizia; Moscatelli, Davide; Silani, Vincenzo; Cova, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells (SCs) could substitute damaged cells and also rescue degeneration through the secretion of trophic factors able to activate the endogenous SC compartment. Therefore, fetal SCs, characterized by high proliferation rate and devoid of ethical concern, appear promising candidate, particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide nanoparticles (SPIOn), routinely used for pre-clinical cell imaging and already approved for clinical practice, allow tracking of transplanted SCs and characterization of their fate within the host tissue, when combined with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In this work we investigated how SPIOn could influence cell migration after internalization in two fetal SC populations: human amniotic fluid and chorial villi SCs were labeled with SPIOn and their motility was evaluated. We found that SPIOn loading significantly reduced SC movements without increasing production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Moreover, motility impairment was directly proportional to the amount of loaded SPIOn while a chemoattractant-induced recovery was obtained by increasing serum levels. Interestingly, the migration rate of SPIOn labeled cells was also significantly influenced by a degenerative surrounding. In conclusion, this work highlights how SPIOn labeling affects SC motility in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, shedding the light on an important parameter for the creation of clinical protocols. Establishment of an optimal SPIOn dose that enables both a good visualization of grafted cells by MRI and the physiological migration rate is a main step in order to maximize the effects of SC therapy in both animal models of neurodegeneration and clinical studies. PMID:24244310

  16. Can manipulation of differentiation conditions eliminate proliferative cells from a population of ES cell-derived forebrain cells?

    PubMed Central

    Precious, Sophie V.; Kelly, Claire M.; Allen, Nicholas D.; Rosser, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is preliminary evidence that implantation of primary fetal striatal cells provides functional benefit in patients with Huntington's disease, a neurodegenerative condition resulting in loss of medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN) of the striatum. Scarcity of primary fetal tissue means it is important to identify a renewable source of cells from which to derive donor MSNs. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, which predominantly default to telencephalic-like precursors in chemically defined medium (CDM), offer a potentially inexhaustible supply of cells capable of generating the desired neurons. Using an ES cell line, with the forebrain marker FoxG1 tagged to the LacZ reporter, we assessed effects of known developmental factors on the yield of forebrain-like precursor cells in CDM suspension culture. Addition of FGF2, but not DKK1, increased the proportion of FoxG1-expressing cells at day 8 of neural induction. Oct4 was expressed at day 8, but was undetectable by day 16. Differentiation of day 16 precursors generated GABA-expressing neurons, with few DARPP32 positive MSNs. Transplantation of day 8 precursor cells into quinolinic acid-lesioned striata resulted in generation of teratomas. However, transplantation of day 16 precursors yielded grafts expressing neuronal markers including NeuN, calbindin and parvalbumin, but no DARPP32 6 weeks post-transplantation. Manipulation of fate of ES cells requires optimization of both concentration and timing of addition of factors to culture systems to generate the desired phenotypes. Furthermore, we highlight the value of increasing the precursor phase of ES cell suspension culture when directing differentiation toward forebrain fate, so as to dramatically reduce the risk of teratoma formation. PMID:27606335

  17. Concurrent Vaccination with two distinct vaccine platforms targeting the same antigen generates phenotypically and functionally distinct T-cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Amanda L.; Higgins, Jack; Franzusoff, Alex; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Studies comparing two or more vaccine platforms have historically evaluated each platform based on its ability to induce an immune response and may conclude that one vaccine is more efficacious than the other(s), leading to a recommendation for development of the more effective vaccine for clinical studies. Alternatively, these studies have documented the advantages of a diversified prime and boost regimen due to amplification of the antigen-specific T-cell population. We hypothesize here that two vaccine platforms targeting the same antigen might induce shared and distinct antigen-specific T-cell populations, and examined the possibility that two distinct vaccines could be used concomitantly. Experimental design Using recombinant poxvirus and yeast vaccines, we compared the T-cell populations induced by these two platforms in terms of serum cytokine response, T-cell gene expression, T-cell receptor phenotype, antigen-specific cytokine expression, T-cell avidity, and T-cell antigen-specific tumor cell lysis. Results These studies demonstrate for the first time that vaccination with a recombinant poxvirus platform (rV/F-CEA/TRICOM) or a heat-killed yeast vaccine platform (yeast-CEA) elicits T-cell populations with both shared and unique phenotypic and functional characteristics. Furthermore, both the antigen and the vector play a role in the induction of distinct T-cell populations. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate that concurrent administration of two vaccines targeting the same antigen induces a more diverse T-cell population that leads to enhanced antitumor efficacy. These studies provide the rationale for future clinical studies investigating concurrent administration of vaccine platforms targeting a single antigen to enhance the antigen-specific immune response. PMID:19756595

  18. T cell ontogeny. Organ location of maturing populations as defined by surface antigen markers is similar in neonates and adults

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Earlier studies have suggested that splenic T cell populations in nursling mice (less than 18 d of age) have Lyt cell surface antigens that identify them as less mature than their adult counterparts. Studies presented here, however, demonstrate that the expression of the Thy-1, Lyt-1, Lyt-2, and Lyt-3 T cell antigens is virtually identical in 14-d-old and adult T cell populations even though at 14 d, T cells constitute less than 10% of the total spleen cell population. Because the expression of these antigens on the immature (cortical) thymocyte population differs substantially from their expression on peripheral T cells, the maturity of splenic T cells as judged by these criteria is similar in nurslings and adults. Very few cells in the neonatal thymus 4 h after birth correspond, in terms of antigen expression, to the more mature (medullary) thymocyte population of adults, but such cells develop rapidly during the first few days of life. They are present, therefore, sufficiently early to serve as the immediate source of peripheral T cells, as they apparently do in the adult. This then suggests that the locations for the major T cell maturational events are established within the first 2 wk of life of the mouse and maintained as such thereafter. The use of monoclonal antibodies and quantitative immunofluorescence analysis in our studies probably explains the differences between our findings and those reported previously, which relied on cytotoxic depletion by alloantisera and complement to estimate the frequencies of cells carrying the Lyt differentiation antigens in nurslings. PMID:6972987

  19. T cell ontogeny. Organ location of maturing populations as defined by surface antigen markers is similar in neonates and adults.

    PubMed

    Haaijman, J J; Micklem, H S; Ledbetter, J A; Dangl, J L; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1981-03-01

    Earlier studies have suggested that splenic T cell populations in nursling mice (less than 18 d of age) have Lyt cell surface antigens that identify them as less mature than their adult counterparts. Studies presented here, however, demonstrate that the expression of the Thy-1, Lyt-1, Lyt-2, and Lyt-3 T cell antigens is virtually identical in 14-d-old and adult T cell populations even though at 14 d, T cells constitute less than 10% of the total spleen cell population. Because the expression of these antigens on the immature (cortical) thymocyte population differs substantially from their expression on peripheral T cells, the maturity of splenic T cells as judged by these criteria is similar in nurslings and adults. Very few cells in the neonatal thymus 4 h after birth correspond, in terms of antigen expression, to the more mature (medullary) thymocyte population of adults, but such cells develop rapidly during the first few days of life. They are present, therefore, sufficiently early to serve as the immediate source of peripheral T cells, as they apparently do in the adult. This then suggests that the locations for the major T cell maturational events are established within the first 2 wk of life of the mouse and maintained as such thereafter. The use of monoclonal antibodies and quantitative immunofluorescence analysis in our studies probably explains the differences between our findings and those reported previously, which relied on cytotoxic depletion by alloantisera and complement to estimate the frequencies of cells carrying the Lyt differentiation antigens in nurslings.

  20. [Regulation of potential-dependant calcium channels by 5-HT1B serotonin receptors in various populations of hippocampal cells].

    PubMed

    Kononov, A V; Ivanov, S V; Zinchenko, V P

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic serotonin receptors of 5HT1-type in brain neurons participate in regulation of such human emotional states as aggression, fear and dependence on alcohol. Activated presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors suppress the Ca2+ influx through the potential-dependent calcium channels in certain neurons. The Ca2+ influx into the cells has been measured by increase of calcium ions concentration in cytoplasm in reply to the depolarization caused by 35mM KC1. Using system of image analysis in hippocampal cells culture we found out that Ca2+-signals to depolarization oin various populations of neurons differed in form, speed and amplitude. 5HT1B receptor agonists in 86 +/- 3 % of neurons slightly suppressed the activity of potential-dependent calcium channels. Two minor cell populations (5-8 % of cells each) were found out, that strongly differed in Ca2+ signal desensitization. Calcium signal caused by depolarization in one cells population differed in characteristic delay and high rate of decay. 5HT1B receptor agonists strongly inhibited the amplitude of the Ca2+ response on KCl only in this population of neurons. The calcium signal in second cell population differed by absence desensitization and smaller amplitude which constantly increased during depolarization. 5HT 1 B receptor agonists increased the calcium response amplitude to depolarization in this population of neurons. Thus we show various sensitivity of potential-dependent calcium channels of separate neurons to 5HTB1 receptor agonist.

  1. Analysis of spiral ganglion cell populations in children with normal and pathological ears.

    PubMed

    Miura, Makoto; Sando, Isamu; Hirsch, Barry E; Orita, Yorihisa

    2002-12-01

    This study analyzed features of total and segmental spiral ganglion cell populations in children with normal ears and those with various pathological conditions. Sixty-three human temporal bone specimens, obtained from 43 children 4 days to 9 years of age, were studied histopathologically. These specimens were divided into 5 diagnostic groups: group 1, normal ears (13 ears); group 2, congenital infectious diseases (13 ears); group 3, chromosomal aberrations (11 ears); group 4, multiple craniofacial anomalies with hereditary or genetic causes (21 ears); and group 5, perinatal and postnatal asphyxia (5 ears). Eighteen of the 63 ears had documented profound deafness. In either normal ears (group 1) or those with various pathological conditions (groups 2 through 5), the total number of ganglion cells did not change as a function of age during the first 10 years. The total number of ganglion cells was significantly larger in group 1 (33,702) than in each of groups 2, 3, 4, and 5 (p < .01), and the number was significantly larger in group 2 than in each of groups 4 and 5 (p < .01 and p < .05, respectively). The ratio of basal to apical ganglion cell populations remained constant in both normal and pathological ears. Each ratio of the number of basal and apical ganglion cells in groups 2, 3, 4, and 5 to the mean number in group 1 (basal and apical survival ratios) was at least approximately 40%. There was no statistical difference between these two ratios in groups 2, 3, 4, and 5. The mean (+/-SD) total number of ganglion cells in ears with documented profound deafness was 15,417 +/- 5,944, which is approximately 40% of those present in normal ears. Our results suggest that normally, cochlear neurons are completely present at birth and minimally regress during the first decade of life. In addition, although intergroup differences among various pathological groups were present, the majority of pathological ears had more than 10,000 spiral ganglion cells present. Cochlear

  2. Analysis of gene expression profiles of microdissected cell populations indicates that testicular carcinoma in situ is an arrested gonocyte.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Si Brask; Almstrup, Kristian; Dalgaard, Marlene; Juncker, Agnieszka Sierakowska; Edsgard, Daniel; Ruban, Ludmila; Harrison, Neil J; Schwager, Christian; Abdollahi, Amir; Huber, Peter E; Brunak, Søren; Gjerdrum, Lise Mette; Moore, Harry D; Andrews, Peter W; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Leffers, Henrik

    2009-06-15

    Testicular germ cell cancers in young adult men derive from a precursor lesion called carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the testis. CIS cells were suggested to arise from primordial germ cells or gonocytes. However, direct studies on purified samples of CIS cells are lacking. To overcome this problem, we performed laser microdissection of CIS cells. Highly enriched cell populations were obtained and subjected to gene expression analysis. The expression profile of CIS cells was compared with microdissected gonocytes, oogonia, and cultured embryonic stem cells with and without genomic aberrations. Three samples of each tissue type were used for the analyses. Unique expression patterns for these developmentally very related cell types revealed that CIS cells were very similar to gonocytes because only five genes distinguished these two cell types. We did not find indications that CIS was derived from a meiotic cell, and the similarity to embryonic stem cells was modest compared with gonocytes. Thus, we provide new evidence that the molecular phenotype of CIS cells is similar to that of gonocytes. Our data are in line with the idea that CIS cells may be gonocytes that survived in the postnatal testis. We speculate that disturbed development of somatic cells in the fetal testis may play a role in allowing undifferentiated cells to survive in the postnatal testes. The further development of CIS into invasive germ cell tumors may depend on signals from their postpubertal niche of somatic cells, including hormones and growth factors from Leydig and Sertoli cells.

  3. Trophic transfer of lead through a model marine four-level food chain: Tetraselmis suecica, Artemia franciscana, Litopenaeus vannamei, and Haemulon scudderi.

    PubMed

    Soto-Jiménez, M F; Arellano-Fiore, C; Rocha-Velarde, R; Jara-Marini, M E; Ruelas-Inzunza, J; Páez-Osuna, F

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to assess the transfer of lead (Pb) along an experimental, four-level food chain: Tetraselmis suecica (phytoplankton) → Artemia franciscana (crustacean, brine shrimp) → Litopenaeus vannamei (crustacean, white shrimp) → Haemulon scudderi (fish, grunt). T. suecica was exposed to a sublethal dose of Pb in solution and then used as the base of a marine food chain. Significant differences in Pb concentrations were found between exposed organisms of the different trophic levels and the control. Particularly, Pb concentrations in fish of the simulated trophic chain were two-to three times higher in the exposed specimens than in the control. Levels of Pb in phytoplankton showed a substantial increase with respect to the solution (level I), with bioconcentration factors averaging from 930 to 3630. In contrast, a strong decrease in Pb concentration from phytoplankton to zooplankton (level II) and from zooplankton to shrimp tissues (level III) was evidenced by bioaccumulation factors <1. Despite the decrease in the assimilation efficiency of metal transfer observed in these two predators, Pb concentration in the grunt fish (level IV) was higher than in the shrimp (level III) (bioaccumulation factor >1.0). Some of the added Pb is transferred from the phytoplankton along the food chain, thus producing a net accumulation of Pb mainly in fish and, to a lesser extent, in shrimp tissues. Because Pb is one of the most pervasive contaminants in coastal ecosystems, its transference by way of diet and potential net accumulation in higher predators is of ecologic importance for marine life. In addition, because shrimp and adult Haemulon scudderi are commercially important resources, this issue is of particular relevance to the safety of marine products.

  4. Characterization of p53 gene mutations in a Brazilian population with oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Anna C M; Cherubini, Karen; Herter, Nilton; Furian, Roque; Santos, Diogenes S; Squier, Christopher; Domann, Frederick E

    2004-02-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are present in approximately 50% of all human cancers. We sought to determine the frequency and type of p53 mutations in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the oral cavity in a Brazilian population. To identify p53 mutations we used PCR-SSCP in tumor tissue microdissected from paraffin- embedded and from fresh-frozen sections followed by direct sequencing of SSCP bands with altered electrophoretic mobility. We identified p53 mutations in 40% of the human SCC analyzed. The mutations were of a broad spectrum, with a preponderance of G --> A and A --> G transitions with an apparent hotspot at the CpG dinucleotide at codon 290. Patient samples were stratified according to tobacco and alcohol consumption as well as by anatomic location of the tumor, and although trends did emerge, no statistically significant associations were obtained between the occurance of TP53 mutations and these lifestyle habits. We conclude that p53 mutations are common among oral cavity cancers in this population, and stress the significance of this study since it is the first analysis of p53 mutation in oral cancer in a southern Brazilian population.

  5. Hoxb4 Overexpression in CD4 Memory Phenotype T Cells Increases the Central Memory Population upon Homeostatic Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Marilaine; Labrecque, Nathalie; Bijl, Janet J.

    2013-01-01

    Memory T cell populations allow a rapid immune response to pathogens that have been previously encountered and thus form the basis of success in vaccinations. However, the molecular pathways underlying the development and maintenance of these cells are only starting to be unveiled. Memory T cells have the capacity to self renew as do hematopoietic stem cells, and overlapping gene expression profiles suggested that these cells might use the same self-renewal pathways. The transcription factor Hoxb4 has been shown to promote self-renewal divisions of hematopoietic stem cells resulting in an expansion of these cells. In this study we investigated whether overexpression of Hoxb4 could provide an advantage to CD4 memory phenotype T cells in engrafting the niche of T cell deficient mice following adoptive transfer. Competitive transplantation experiments demonstrated that CD4 memory phenotype T cells derived from mice transgenic for Hoxb4 contributed overall less to the repopulation of the lymphoid organs than wild type CD4 memory phenotype T cells after two months. These proportions were relatively maintained following serial transplantation in secondary and tertiary mice. Interestingly, a significantly higher percentage of the Hoxb4 CD4 memory phenotype T cell population expressed the CD62L and Ly6C surface markers, characteristic for central memory T cells, after homeostatic proliferation. Thus Hoxb4 favours the maintenance and increase of the CD4 central memory phenotype T cell population. These cells are more stem cell like and might eventually lead to an advantage of Hoxb4 T cells after subjecting the cells to additional rounds of proliferation. PMID:24324706

  6. Engineering Spatial Control of Multiple Differentiation Fates within a Stem Cell Population

    PubMed Central

    Ker, Dai Fei Elmer; Chu, Bur; Phillippi, Julie A.; Gharaibeh, Burhan; Huard, Johnny; Weiss, Lee E.; Campbell, Phil G.

    2011-01-01

    The capability to engineer microenvironmental cues to direct a stem cell population toward multiple fates, simultaneously, in spatially defined regions is important for understanding the maintenance and repair of multi-tissue units. We have previously developed an inkjet-based bioprinter to create patterns of solid-phase growth factors (GFs) immobilized to an extracellular matrix (ECM) substrate, and applied this approach to drive muscle-derived stem cells toward osteoblasts ‘on–pattern’ and myocytes ‘off–pattern’ simultaneously. Here this technology is extended to spatially control osteoblast, tenocyte and myocyte differentiation simultaneously. Utilizing immunofluorescence staining to identify tendon-promoting GFs, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was shown to upregulate the tendon marker Scleraxis (Scx) in C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal fibroblasts, C2C12 myoblasts and primary muscle-derived stem cells, while downregulating the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Quantitative PCR studies indicated that FGF-2 may direct stem cells towards a tendon fate via the Ets family members of transcription factors such as pea3 and erm. Neighboring patterns of FGF-2 and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) printed onto a single fibrin-coated coverslip upregulated Scx and the osteoblast marker ALP, respectively, while non-printed regions showed spontaneous myotube differentiation. This work illustrates spatial control of multi-phenotype differentiation and may have potential in the regeneration of multi-tissue units. PMID:21316755

  7. A stochastic model of chromatin modification: cell population coding of winter memory in plants.

    PubMed

    Satake, Akiko; Iwasa, Yoh

    2012-06-07

    Biological memory, a sustained cellular response to a transient stimulus, has been found in many natural systems. The best example in plants is the winter memory by which plants can flower in favorable conditions in spring. For this winter memory, epigenetic regulation of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), which acts as a floral repressor, plays a key role. Exposure to prolonged periods of cold results in the gradual suppression of FLC, which allows plants to measure the length of cold and to flower only after a sufficiently long winter. Although many genes involved in histone modifications have been isolated, molecular mechanisms of winter memory are not well understood. Here, we develop a model for chromatin modification, in which the dynamics of a single nucleosome are aggregated to on/off behavior of FLC expression at the cellular level and further integrated to a change of FLC expression at the whole-plant level. We propose cell-population coding of winter memory: each cell is described as a bistable system that shows heterogeneous timing of the transition from on to off in FLC expression under cold and measures the length of cold as the proportion of cells in the off state. This mechanism well explains robust FLC regulation and stable inheritance of winter memory after cell division in response to noisy signals. Winter memory lasts longer if deposition of the repressive histone mark occurs faster. A difference in deposition speed would discriminate between stable maintenance of FLC repression in annuals and transient expression in perennials.

  8. Distribution of lipid nanocapsules in different cochlear cell populations after round window membrane permeation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Saulnier, Patrick; Perrier, Thomas; Zhang, Ya; Manninen, Tommi; Toppila, Esko; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2008-10-01

    Hearing loss is a major public health problem, and its treatment with traditional therapy strategies is often unsuccessful due to limited drug access deep in the temporal bone. Multifunctional nanoparticles that are targeted to specified cell populations, biodegradable, traceable in vivo, and equipped with controlled drug/gene release may resolve this problem. We developed lipid core nanocapsules (LNCs) with sizes below 50 nm. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the ability of the LNCs to pass through the round window membrane and reach inner ear targets. FITC was incorporated as a tag for the LNCs and Nile Red was encapsulated inside the oily core to assess the integrity of the LNCs. The capability of LNCs to pass through the round window membrane and the distribution of the LNCs inside the inner ear were evaluated in rats via confocal microscopy in combination with image analysis using ImageJ. After round window membrane administration, LNCs reached the spiral ganglion cells, nerve fibers, and spiral ligament fibrocytes within 30 min. The paracellular pathway was the main approach for LNC penetration of the round window membrane. LNCs can also reach the vestibule, middle ear mucosa, and the adjacent artery. Nuclear localization was detected in the spiral ganglion, though infrequently. These results suggest that LNCs are potential vectors for drug delivery into the spiral ganglion cells, nerve fibers, hair cells, and spiral ligament.

  9. Investigation of coherent population trapping signals in 87Rb cells with buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, M. I.; Ermak, S. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Pyatyshev, E. N.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    Characteristics of CPT (coherent population trapping) signal are investigated in small-size glass vapor cells containing 87Rb and Ne buffer gas with narrow linewidth laser pumping on D2 line. Parameters of CPT absorption signals are measured using small-size vapor cells with Ne buffer gas pressure in range of 200-400 Torr, cell temperature in range of 65-120 °C and values of laser pumping power of 30-400 μW/cm2. Optimum conditions, under which the minimal value of short-term instability of resonance line is achieved, are obtained in experiments. CPT signals using vapor cells based on integrated technologies containing 87Rb in atmosphere of Ne are also investigated. The CPT signals with typical linewidths of 2-3 kHz and signal-to-noise ratio of 1500 in 1 Hz bandwidth are observed, which allows one to provide relative frequency instability of 10-11 at 100 s.

  10. Advances in automated 3-D image analyses of cell populations imaged by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ancin, H; Roysam, B; Dufresne, T E; Chestnut, M M; Ridder, G M; Szarowski, D H; Turner, J N

    1996-11-01

    Automated three-dimensional (3-D) image analysis methods are presented for rapid and effective analysis of populations of fluorescently labeled cells or nuclei in thick tissue sections that have been imaged three dimensionally using a confocal microscope. The methods presented here greatly improve upon our earlier work (Roysam et al.:J Microsc 173: 115-126, 1994). The principal advances reported are: algorithms for efficient data pre-processing and adaptive segmentation, effective handling of image anisotrophy, and fast 3-D morphological algorithms for separating overlapping or connected clusters utilizing image gradient information whenever available. A particular feature of this method is its ability to separate densely packed and connected clusters of cell nuclei. Some of the challenges overcome in this work include the efficient and effective handling of imaging noise, anisotrophy, and large variations in image parameters such as intensity, object size, and shape. The method is able to handle significant inter-cell, intra-cell, inter-image, and intra-image variations. Studies indicate that this method is rapid, robust, and adaptable. Examples were presented to illustrate the applicability of this approach to analyzing images of nuclei from densely packed regions in thick sections of rat liver, and brain that were labeled with a fluorescent Schiff reagent.

  11. Population Structure of Endomicrobia in Single Host Cells of Termite Gut Flagellates (Trichonympha spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hao; Dietrich, Carsten; Thompson, Claire L.; Meuser, Katja; Brune, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota of many phylogenetically lower termites is dominated by the cellulolytic flagellates of the genus Trichonympha, which are consistently associated with bacterial symbionts. In the case of Endomicrobia, an unusual lineage of endosymbionts of the Elusimicrobia phylum that is also present in other gut flagellates, previous studies have documented strict host specificity, leading to the cospeciation of “Candidatus Endomicrobium trichonymphae” with their respective flagellate hosts. However, it currently remains unclear whether one Trichonympha species is capable of harboring more than one Endomicrobia phylotype. In the present study, we selected single Trichonympha cells from the guts of Zootermopsis nevadensis and Reticulitermes santonensis and characterized their Endomicrobia populations based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences. We found that each host cell harbored a homogeneous population of symbionts that were specific to their respective host species, but phylogenetically distinct between each host lineage, corroborating cospeciation being caused by vertical inheritance. The experimental design of the present study also allowed for the identification of an unexpectedly large amount of tag-switching between samples, which indicated that any high-resolution analysis of microbial community structures using the pyrosequencing technique has to be interpreted with great caution. PMID:25739443

  12. Assessing the potential of colony morphology for dissecting the CFU-F population from human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Gothard, D; Dawson, J I; Oreffo, R O C

    2013-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide an ideal cell source for bone tissue engineering strategies. However, bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) populations that contain MSCs are highly heterogeneous expressing a wide variety of proliferative and differentiation potentials. Current MSC isolation methods employing magnetic-activated and fluorescent-activated cell sorting can be expensive and time consuming and, in the absence of specific MSC markers, fail to generate homogeneous populations. We have investigated the potential of various colony morphology descriptors to provide correlations with cell growth potential. Density-independent colony forming unit-fibroblastic (CFU-F) capacity is a MSC prerequisite and resultant colonies display an array of shapes and sizes that might be representative of cell function. Parent colonies were initially categorised according to their diameter and cell density and grouped before passage for the subsequent assessment of progeny colonies. Whereas significant morphological differences between distinct parent populations indicated a correlation with immunophenotype, enhanced CFU-F capacity was not observed when individual colonies were isolated according to these morphological parameters. Colony circularity, an alternative morphological measure, displayed a strong correlation with subsequent cell growth potential. The current study indicates the potential of morphological descriptors for predicting cell growth rate and suggests new directions for research into dissection of human BMSC CFU-F populations.

  13. Establishment and characterization of lymphoid and myeloid mixed-cell populations from mouse late embryoid bodies, "embryonic-stem-cell fetuses".

    PubMed Central

    Chen, U; Kosco, M; Staerz, U

    1992-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells have the potential to differentiate into embryoid bodies in vitro and mimic normal embryonic development. The "ES fetus" is a specific development at a late stage seen under our culture conditions. We have established several mixed populations from ES fetuses by using combinations of retroviruses carrying different oncogenes (v-abl, v-raf, c-myc), interleukins 2 and 3, and Con A. Six groups of mixed populations were characterized by immunophenotyping. For some groups, transfer of cells into sublethally irradiated mice resulted in the development of macrophages, mature T and B lymphocytes, and plasma cells of donor origin. Thus, these mixed populations may contain immortalized precursors of hematopoietic lineages. These mixed populations should be valuable for defining hematopoietic stem cells and their committed progenitors. Images PMID:1557357

  14. IGF1 stimulates crypt expansion via differential activation of 2 intestinal stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Santoro, M Agostina; Mah, Amanda T; Krebs, Adrienne E; Dehmer, Jeffrey J; McNaughton, Kirk K; Helmrath, Michael A; Magness, Scott T; Lund, P Kay

    2015-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has potent trophic effects on normal or injured intestinal epithelium, but specific effects on intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are undefined. We used Sox9-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter mice that permit analyses of both actively cycling ISCs (Sox9-EGFP(Low)) and reserve/facultative ISCs (Sox9-EGFP(High)) to study IGF1 action on ISCs in normal intestine or during crypt regeneration after high-dose radiation-induced injury. We hypothesized that IGF1 differentially regulates proliferation and gene expression in actively cycling and reserve/facultative ISCs. IGF1 was delivered for 5 days using subcutaneously implanted mini-pumps in uninjured mice or after 14 Gy abdominal radiation. ISC numbers, proliferation, and transcriptome were assessed. IGF1 increased epithelial growth in nonirradiated mice and enhanced crypt regeneration after radiation. In uninjured and regenerating intestines, IGF1 increased total numbers of Sox9-EGFP(Low) ISCs and percentage of these cells in M-phase. IGF1 increased percentages of Sox9-EGFP(High) ISCs in S-phase but did not expand this population. Microarray revealed that IGF1 activated distinct gene expression signatures in the 2 Sox9-EGFP ISC populations. In vitro IGF1 enhanced enteroid formation by Sox9-EGFP(High) facultative ISCs but not Sox9-EGFP(Low) actively cycling ISCs. Our data provide new evidence that IGF1 activates 2 ISC populations via distinct regulatory pathways to promote growth of normal intestinal epithelium and crypt regeneration after irradiation.

  15. High mitochondrial mass identifies a sub-population of stem-like cancer cells that are chemo-resistant.

    PubMed

    Farnie, Gillian; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2015-10-13

    Chemo-resistance is a clinical barrier to more effective anti-cancer therapy. In this context, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are thought to be chemo-resistant, resulting in tumor recurrence and distant metastasis. Our hypothesis is that chemo-resistance in CSCs is driven, in part, by enhanced mitochondrial function. Here, we used breast cell lines and metastatic breast cancer patient samples to begin to dissect the role of mitochondrial metabolism in conferring the CSC phenotype. More specifically, we employed fluorescent staining with MitoTracker (MT) to metabolically fractionate these cell lines into mito-high and mito-low sub-populations, by flow-cytometry. Interestingly, cells with high mitochondrial mass (mito-high) were specifically enriched in a number of known CSC markers, such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, and they were ESA+/CD24-/low and formed mammospheres with higher efficiency. Large cell size is another independent characteristic of the stem cell phenotype; here, we observed a >2-fold increase in mitochondrial mass in large cells (>12-μm), relative to the smaller cell population (4-8-μm). Moreover, the mito-high cell population showed a 2.4-fold enrichment in tumor-initiating cell activity, based on limiting dilution assays in murine xenografts. Importantly, primary human breast CSCs isolated from patients with metastatic breast cancer or a patient derived xenograft (PDX) also showed the co-enrichment of ALDH activity and mitochondrial mass. Most significantly, our investigations demonstrated that mito-high cells were resistant to paclitaxel, resulting in little or no DNA damage, as measured using the comet assay. In summary, increased mitochondrial mass in a sub-population of breast cancer cells confers a stem-like phenotype and chemo-resistance. As such, our current findings have important clinical implications for over-coming drug resistance, by therapeutically targeting the mito-high CSC population.

  16. Identification of co-expressed gene signatures in mouse B1, marginal zone and B2 B-cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Mabbott, Neil A; Gray, David

    2014-01-01

    In mice, three major B-cell subsets have been identified with distinct functionalities: B1 B cells, marginal zone B cells and follicular B2 B cells. Here, we used the growing body of publicly available transcriptomics data to create an expression atlas of 84 gene expression microarray data sets of distinct mouse B-cell subsets. These data were subjected to network-based cluster analysis using BioLayout Express3D. Using this analysis tool, genes with related functions clustered together in discrete regions of the network graph and enabled the identification of transcriptional networks that underpinned the functional activity of distinct cell populations. Some gene clusters were expressed highly by most of the cell populations included in this analysis (such as those with activity related to house-keeping functions). Others contained genes with expression patterns specific to distinct B-cell subsets. While these clusters contained many genes typically associated with the activity of the cells they were specifically expressed in, many novel B-cell-subset-specific candidate genes were identified. A large number of uncharacterized genes were also represented in these B-cell lineage-specific clusters. Further analysis of the activities of these uncharacterized candidate genes will lead to the identification of novel B-cell lineage-specific transcription factors and regulators of B-cell function. We also analysed 36 microarray data sets from distinct human B-cell populations. These data showed that mouse and human germinal centre B cells shared similar transcriptional features, whereas mouse B1 B cells were distinct from proposed human B1 B cells. PMID:24032749

  17. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    SciTech Connect

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal {beta} III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  18. Levels of dendritic cell populations and regulatory T cells vary significantly between two commonly used mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, Petra; Hovden, Arnt-Ove; Jonsson, Roland; Appel, Silke

    2009-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are a heterogeneous group of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) involved in both initiating immune responses and maintaining tolerance. Roughly, DC can be divided into plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and conventional DC (cDC). By controlling regulatory T cells (Treg), DC can influence the outcome of both immunity and autoimmunity. Since the use of mice as in vivo models became a practical tool for researchers studying pathological events in all kind of human diseases, we decided to compare levels of cDC, pDC and Treg in both spleen and blood between two inbred mouse strains. Here we show that two commonly used mouse strains, BALB/c and C57BL/10J mice, have significantly different levels of distinct CD11c(+)/CD4(-)/CD8a(+), CD11c(+)/CD4(+)/CD8a(-) and CD11c(+)/CD4(-)/CD8a(-) cDC populations, pDC and Treg. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of considering the proper model when comparing data sets from different mouse strains.

  19. Proceedings: human leukocyte antigen haplo-homozygous induced pluripotent stem cell haplobank modeled after the california population: evaluating matching in a multiethnic and admixed population.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Derek James; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Le Gall, Caroline; Laurent, Julie; Trounson, Alan; DeWitt, Natalie; Talib, Sohel

    2015-05-01

    The development of a California-based induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) bank based on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype matching represents a significant challenge and a valuable opportunity for the advancement of regenerative medicine. However, previously published models of iPSC banks have neither addressed the admixed nature of populations like that of California nor evaluated the benefit to the population as a whole. We developed a new model for evaluating an iPSC haplobank based on demographic and immunogenetic characteristics reflecting California. The model evaluates haplolines or cell lines from donors homozygous for a single HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 haplotype. We generated estimates of the percentage of the population matched under various combinations of haplolines derived from six ancestries (black/African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic, and white/not Hispanic) and data available from the U.S. Census Bureau, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and the National Marrow Donor Program. The model included both cis (haplotype-level) and trans (genotype-level) matching between a modeled iPSC haplobank and the recipient population following resampling simulations. We showed that serving a majority (>50%) of a simulated California population through cis matching would require the creation, redundant storage, and maintenance of almost 207 different haplolines representing the top 60 most frequent haplotypes from each ancestry group. Allowances for trans matching reduced the haplobank to fewer than 141 haplolines found among the top 40 most frequent haplotypes. Finally, we showed that a model optimized, custom haplobank was able to serve a majority of the California population with fewer than 80 haplolines.

  20. Emulating native periosteum cell population and subsequent paracrine factor production to promote tissue engineered periosteum-mediated allograft healing.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Michael D; Benoit, Danielle S W

    2015-06-01

    Emulating autograft healing within the context of decellularized bone allografts has immediate clinical applications in the treatment of critical-sized bone defects. The periosteum, a thin, osteogenic tissue that surrounds bone, houses a heterogenous population of stem cells and osteoprogenitors. There is evidence that periosteum-cell derived paracrine factors, specifically vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), orchestrate autograft healing through host cell recruitment and subsequent tissue elaboration. In previous work, we demonstrated that the use of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels as a tissue engineered (T.E.) periosteum to localize mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the surface of decellularized bone enhances allograft healing and integration. Herein, we utilize a mixed population of 50:50 MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells to better mimic native periosteum cell population and paracrine factor production to further promote allograft healing. This mixed cell population was localized to the surface of decellularized allografts within degradable hydrogels and shown to expedite allograft healing. Specifically, bone callus formation and biomechanical graft-host integration are increased as compared to unmodified allografts. These results demonstrate the dual importance of periosteum-mediated paracrine factors orchestrating host cell recruitment as well as new bone formation while developing clinically translatable strategies for allograft healing and integration.

  1. Double-Staining Epifluorescence Technique to Assess Frequency of Dividing Cells and Bacteriovory in Natural Populations of Heterotrophic Microprotozoa †

    PubMed Central

    Sherr, Evelyn B.; Sherr, Barry F.

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a double-staining procedure for use with epifluorescence microscopy which allows the detection both of dividing cells and of ingested bacteria in food vacuoles of heterotrophic microprotozoa. Microprotozoan cells are stained sequentially with the DNA-specific fluorochrome DAPI (4′,6-diami-dino-2-phenylindole) and the nonspecific protein stain fluorescein isothiocyanate. During microscopic examination, heterotrophic microprotozoan cells are first located with fluorescein isothiocyanate fluorescence and then epifluorescence filter sets are switched to permit inspection under DAPI fluorescence of the cell nuclei and of the contents of food vacuoles. Among in situ populations of estuarine microprotozoa sampled over a tidal cycle, we found from 2.2 to 5.2% of the heterotrophic cells in a recognizable stage of division (nuclei elongated or double). Batch culture growth experiments were also carried out both with natural populations and with two isolated species of estuarine microprotozoa. In these experiments, the frequency of dividing cells ranged from 1.2 to 3.8% and appeared to be negatively correlated with growth rate. Microprotozoan populations sampled in continental shelf waters off Savannah, Ga., had mean frequencies of dividing cells ranging from 2.0 to 5.0%. A large fraction of cells in heterotrophic microprotozoan populations (an average of 27.4 ± 1.0% in estuarine water and of 30.1 ± 4.8% in shelf water) had DAPI-stained inclusions, presumably recently ingested bacteria, in their food vacuoles. Images PMID:16346446

  2. Kinetic Modeling of ABCG2 Transporter Heterogeneity: A Quantitative, Single-Cell Analysis of the Side Population Assay

    PubMed Central

    Prasanphanich, Adam F.; White, Douglas E.; Gran, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    The side population (SP) assay, a technique used in cancer and stem cell research, assesses the activity of ABC transporters on Hoechst staining in the presence and absence of transporter inhibition, identifying SP and non-SP cell (NSP) subpopulations by differential staining intensity. The interpretation of the assay is complicated because the transporter-mediated mechanisms fail to account for cell-to-cell variability within a population or adequately control the direct role of transporter activity on staining intensity. We hypothesized that differences in dye kinetics at the single-cell level, such as ABCG2 transporter-mediated efflux and DNA binding, are responsible for the differential cell staining that demarcates SP/NSP identity. We report changes in A549 phenotype during time in culture and with TGFβ treatment that correlate with SP size. Clonal expansion of individually sorted cells re-established both SP and NSPs, indicating that SP membership is dynamic. To assess the validity of a purely kinetics-based interpretation of SP/NSP identity, we developed a computational approach that simulated cell staining within a heterogeneous cell population; this exercise allowed for the direct inference of the role of transporter activity and inhibition on cell staining. Our simulated SP assay yielded appropriate SP responses for kinetic scenarios in which high transporter activity existed in a portion of the cells and little differential staining occurred in the majority of the population. With our approach for single-cell analysis, we observed SP and NSP cells at both ends of a transporter activity continuum, demonstrating that features of transporter activity as well as DNA content are determinants of SP/NSP identity. PMID:27851764

  3. Novel B cell population producing functional IgG in the absence of membrane IgM expression.

    PubMed

    Orinska, Zane; Osiak, Anna; Löhler, Jürgen; Bulanova, Elena; Budagian, Vadim; Horak, Ivan; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2002-12-01

    Surface expression of IgM is a characteristic feature of the development of most B cells. Only pre-B cells bearing functional IgM heavy chains mu chains) are selected for clonal expansion and differentiation. Cells lacking mu chains are normally eliminated. muMT mice carrying a deletion of the first exon coding for the transmembrane domain of the immunoglobulin mu chain gene were described as mice deficient for mature B cells, plasma cells and immunoglobulins in serum. In this study, we describe in muMT/BALB/c mice the presence of a novel B cell population, producing IgG, IgA and IgE in the absence of IgM membrane expression. Moreover, this small population of B cells is able to recognize antigens and to differentiate into plasma cells. These "non-conventional" mu(- / -) B cells produce functional immunoglobulins after immunization, undergo germinal center reactions, and maintain B cell memory. Our findings support the concept, that a small percentage of mu -non-expressing pre-B cells can escape elimination, switch to downstream immunoglobulin heavy chains and respond to antigens. It remains an open question how the reactivity of these B cells is regulated and in which extent such B cells play a role in physiological and pathological processes such as autoantibody production and autoimmunity.

  4. Mycobacterial Cultures Contain Cell Size and Density Specific Sub-populations of Cells with Significant Differential Susceptibility to Antibiotics, Oxidative and Nitrite Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Nair, Rashmi Ravindran; Sharan, Deepti; Jakkala, Kishor; Mukkayyan, Nagaraja; Swaminath, Sharmada; Pradhan, Atul; Joshi, Niranjan V.; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2017-01-01

    The present study shows the existence of two specific sub-populations of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis cells differing in size and density, in the mid-log phase (MLP) cultures, with significant differential susceptibility to antibiotic, oxidative, and nitrite stress. One of these sub-populations (~10% of the total population), contained short-sized cells (SCs) generated through highly-deviated asymmetric cell division (ACD) of normal/long-sized mother cells and symmetric cell divisions (SCD) of short-sized mother cells. The other sub-population (~90% of the total population) contained normal/long-sized cells (NCs). The SCs were acid-fast stainable and heat-susceptible, and contained high density of membrane vesicles (MVs, known to be lipid-rich) on their surface, while the NCs possessed negligible density of MVs on the surface, as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Percoll density gradient fractionation of MLP cultures showed the SCs-enriched fraction (SCF) at lower density (probably indicating lipid-richness) and the NCs-enriched fraction (NCF) at higher density of percoll fractions. While live cell imaging showed that the SCs and the NCs could grow and divide to form colony on agarose pads, the SCF, and NCF cells could independently regenerate MLP populations in liquid and solid media, indicating their full genomic content and population regeneration potential. CFU based assays showed the SCF cells to be significantly more susceptible than NCF cells to a range of concentrations of rifampicin and isoniazid (antibiotic stress), H2O2 (oxidative stress),and acidified NaNO2 (nitrite stress). Live cell imaging showed significantly higher susceptibility of the SCs of SC-NC sister daughter cell pairs, formed from highly-deviated ACD of normal/long-sized mother cells, to rifampicin and H2O2, as compared to the sister daughter NCs, irrespective of their comparable growth rates. The SC-SC sister daughter cell pairs, formed

  5. A Few Autoreactive Cells in an Autoimmune Infiltrate Control a Vast Population of Nonspecific Cells: A Tale of Smart Bombs and the Infantry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinman, Lawrence

    1996-03-01

    Inflammatory infiltrates in tissue-specific autoimmune disease comprise a collection of T cells with specificity for an antigen in the target organ. These specific cells recruit a population of nonspecific T cells and macrophages. The rare tissue-specific T cells in the infiltrate have the capacity to regulate both the influx and the efflux of cells from the tissue. Administration of an altered peptide ligand for the specific T cell which triggers autoimmunity can lead to the regression of the entire inflammatory ensemble in a few hours. Interleukin 4 is a critical cytokine involved in the regression of the inflammatory infiltrate.

  6. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    PubMed

    Cetinbaş, Murat; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI) network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics.

  7. The tumour microenvironment harbours ontogenically distinct dendritic cell populations with opposing effects on tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    Laoui, Damya; Keirsse, Jiri; Morias, Yannick; Van Overmeire, Eva; Geeraerts, Xenia; Elkrim, Yvon; Kiss, Mate; Bolli, Evangelia; Lahmar, Qods; Sichien, Dorine; Serneels, Jens; Scott, Charlotte L.; Boon, Louis; De Baetselier, Patrick; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Guilliams, Martin; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.

    2016-01-01

    Various steady state and inflamed tissues have been shown to contain a heterogeneous DC population consisting of developmentally distinct subsets, including cDC1s, cDC2s and monocyte-derived DCs, displaying differential functional specializations. The identification of functionally distinct tumour-associated DC (TADC) subpopulations could prove essential for the understanding of basic TADC biology and for envisaging targeted immunotherapies. We demonstrate that multiple mouse tumours as well as human tumours harbour ontogenically discrete TADC subsets. Monocyte-derived TADCs are prominent in tumour antigen uptake, but lack strong T-cell stimulatory capacity due to NO-mediated immunosuppression. Pre-cDC-derived TADCs have lymph node migratory potential, whereby cDC1s efficiently activate CD8+ T cells and cDC2s induce Th17 cells. Mice vaccinated with cDC2s displayed a reduced tumour growth accompanied by a reprogramming of pro-tumoural TAMs and a reduction of MDSCs, while cDC1 vaccination strongly induces anti-tumour CTLs. Our data might prove important for therapeutic interventions targeted at specific TADC subsets or their precursors. PMID:28008905

  8. Immunohistochemistry for Merkel cell polyomavirus is highly specific but not sensitive for the diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma in the Australian population.

    PubMed

    Paik, Julie Y; Hall, Geoffrey; Clarkson, Adele; Lee, Lianne; Toon, Christopher; Colebatch, Andrew; Chou, Angela; Gill, Anthony J

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a high frequency of detection of Merkel cell polyomavirus in Merkel cell carcinoma. However, most of these studies are from European or North American centers that have relatively low sun exposure and may have a higher incidence of virus-driven oncogenesis compared with the highly sun-exposed but predominantly fair-skinned Australian population. We performed immunohistochemistry for Merkel cell polyomavirus on 104 cases of Merkel cell carcinoma and 74 cases of noncutaneous small cell-undifferentiated carcinoma from 3 major Australian centers. Nineteen (18.3%) cases of Merkel cell carcinoma showed positive staining for Merkel cell polyomavirus versus 1 (1.3%) of small cell-undifferentiated carcinoma. All 15 cases (14.3%) of Merkel cell carcinoma with areas of mixed squamous differentiation showed negative staining. We found positive staining in only 3 (7.7%) of 39 Merkel cell carcinoma from the head and neck (the most sun-exposed area) versus 16 (24.6%) of 65 of tumors from other sites (P < .05). Our findings support the concept of a Merkel cell polyomavirus-driven and a non-Merkel cell polyomavirus-driven (primarily sun-dependent) pathway in Merkel cell carcinoma carcinogenesis, with the latter being significantly more frequent in Australia and in mixed squamous-Merkel cell carcinoma (which is also more frequent in Australia). Although immunohistochemistry for Merkel cell polyomavirus seems to be highly specific in all populations, the low incidence of Merkel cell polyomavirus-positive Merkel cell carcinoma in a highly sun-exposed population limits its diagnostic utility in this setting.

  9. Cell-cycle fate-monitoring distinguishes individual chemosensitive and chemoresistant cancer cells in drug-treated heterogeneous populations demonstrated by real-time FUCCI imaging.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Kimura, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Mako; Toneri, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Murakami, Takashi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Essentially every population of cancer cells within a tumor is heterogeneous, especially with regard to chemosensitivity and resistance. In the present study, we utilized the fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) imaging system to investigate the correlation between cell-cycle behavior and apoptosis after treatment of cancer cells with chemotherapeutic drugs. HeLa cells expressing FUCCI were treated with doxorubicin (DOX) (5 μM) or cisplatinum (CDDP) (5 μM) for 3 h. Cell-cycle progression and apoptosis were monitored by time-lapse FUCCI imaging for 72 h. Time-lapse FUCCI imaging demonstrated that both DOX and CDDP could induce cell cycle arrest in S/G2/M in almost all the cells, but a subpopulation of the cells could escape the block and undergo mitosis. The subpopulation which went through mitosis subsequently underwent apoptosis, while the cells arrested in S/G2/M survived. The present results demonstrate that chemoresistant cells can be readily identified in a heterogeneous population of cancer cells by S/G2/M arrest, which can serve in future studies as a visible target for novel agents that kill cell-cycle-arrested cells.

  10. In vivo replication of pathogenic and attenuated strains of Junin virus in different cell populations of lymphatic tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Laguens, M; Chambó, J G; Laguens, R P

    1983-01-01

    Lymphatic tissue is one of the main sites for replication of Junin virus. To characterize which cells are involved in that replication, the presence of Junin virus in purified populations of macrophages and dendritic cells from the spleens of guinea pigs infected with pathogenic and attenuated strains was investigated by immunofluorescence and intracerebral inoculation into newborn mice. The pathogenic strain was present both in macrophages and in dendritic cells, but the attenuated strain selectively infected dendritic cells. These observations suggest that the pathogenic behavior and replication efficiency of these two strains of Junin virus may be related to a difference in cell targets. Images PMID:6309667

  11. One-Carbon Metabolism Pathway Gene Variants and Risk of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hongzhou; Li, Pu; Cao, Qiang; Shao, Pengfei; Qin, Chao; Yin, Changjun

    2013-01-01

    Background One-carbon metabolism is the basement of nucleotide synthesis and the methylation of DNA linked to cancer risk. Variations in one-carbon metabolism genes are reported to affect the risk of many cancers, including renal cancer, but little knowledge about this mechanism is known in Chinese population. Methods Each subject donated 5 mL venous blood after signing the agreement. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. 18 SNPs in six one-carbon metabolism-related genes (CBS, MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, SHMT1, and TYMS) were genotyped in 859 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients and 1005 cancer-free controls by the Snapshot. Results Strong associations with ccRCC risk were observed for rs706209 (P = 0.006) in CBS and rs9332 (P = 0.027) in MTRR. Compared with those carrying none variant allele, individuals carrying one or more variant alleles in these two genes had a statistically significantly decreased risk of ccRCC [P = 0.001, adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.06–0.90]. In addition, patients carrying one or more variant alleles were more likely to develop localized stage disease (P = 0.002, adjusted OR = 1.37, 95%CI = 1.11–1.69) and well-differentiated ccRCC (P<0.001, adjusted OR = 1.42, 95%CI = 0.87–1.68). In the subgroup analysis, individuals carrying none variant allele in older group (P = 0.007, adjusted OR = 0.67, 95%CI = 0.49–0.91), male group (P = 0.007, adjusted OR = 0.71, 95%CI = 0.55–0.92), never smoking group (P = 0.002, adjusted OR = 0.68, 95%CI = 0.53–0.88) and never drinking group (P<0.001, adjusted OR = 0.68, 95%CI = 0.53–0.88) had an increased ccRCC risk. Conclusions Our results suggest that the polymorphisms of the one-carbon metabolism-related genes are associated with ccRCC risk in Chinese population. Future population-based prospective studies

  12. A flow cytometric method for enumeration of lymphocyte sub-populations in sample containing lysis-resistant red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2003-05-01

    Determination of lymphocyte sub-populations is usually carried out by flow cytometry using two-color immunophenotyping reagent. By this technique, however, the combination of FSC and SSC with CD45-FITC/CD14-PE is unable to identify the lymphocyte population in a sample containing lysis-resistant red blood cells (RBC). The actual values of lymphocyte sub-populations, therefore, cannot be determined in these RBC contaminated samples. To overcome this problem, we describe here the use of 7-aminoactinomycin D (7-AAD) to exclude lysis-resistant RBC from white blood cells (WBC). By adding 7-AAD, lymphocytes of samples containing RBC could be identified by using FL3/SSC, therefore, the actual number of lymphocyte sub-populations of the stained cells was obtained. We have proved that 7-AAD can be used to exclude contaminated RBC and has no effect on the measurement of lymphocyte sub-populations by using two-color immunophenotyping reagent. In routine blood samples that contain lysis-resistant RBC, 7-AAD markedly increased the purity of lymphocytes in the lymphocyte gate to >95% and the lymphocyte sub-populations therefore could be correctly determined. The described method is inexpensive, simple and gives successful analysis of lymphocyte sub-populations in a sample containing lysis-resistant RBC.

  13. Identification of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the reactive stroma of a prostate cancer xenograft by side population analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria-Martinez, Albert; Barquinero, Jordi; Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hurtado, Antoni; Pinos, Tomas; Seoane, Joan; Poupon, Marie-France; Morote, Joan; Reventos, Jaume; Munell, Francina

    2009-10-15

    Cancer stem cells are a distinct cellular population that is believed to be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Recent data suggest that solid tumors also contain another type of stem cells, the mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which contribute to the formation of tumor-associated stroma. The Hoechst 33342 efflux assay has proved useful to identify a rare cellular fraction, named Side Population (SP), enriched in cells with stem-like properties. Using this assay, we identified SP cells in a prostate cancer xenograft containing human prostate cancer cells and mouse stromal cells. The SP isolation, subculture and sequential sorting allowed the generation of single-cell-derived clones of murine origin that were recognized as MSC by their morphology, plastic adherence, proliferative potential, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability and immunophenotype (CD45{sup -}, CD81{sup +} and Sca-1{sup +}). We also demonstrated that SP clonal cells secrete transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and that their inhibition reduces proliferation and accelerates differentiation. These results reveal the existence of SP cells in the stroma of a cancer xenograft, and provide evidence supporting their MSC nature and the role of TGF-{beta}1 in maintaining their proliferation and undifferentiated status. Our data also reveal the usefulness of the SP assay to identify and isolate MSC cells from carcinomas.

  14. Understanding the link between single cell and population scale responses of Escherichia coli in differing ligand gradients

    PubMed Central

    Edgington, Matthew P.; Tindall, Marcus J.

    2015-01-01

    We formulate an agent-based population model of Escherichia coli cells which incorporates a description of the chemotaxis signalling cascade at the single cell scale. The model is used to gain insight into the link between the signalling cascade dynamics and the overall population response to differing chemoattractant gradients. Firstly, we consider how the observed variation in total (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated) signalling protein concentration affects the ability of cells to accumulate in differing chemoattractant gradients. Results reveal that a variation in total cell protein concentration between cells may be a mechanism for the survival of cell colonies across a wide range of differing environments. We then study the response of cells in the presence of two different chemoattractants. In doing so we demonstrate that the population scale response depends not on the absolute concentration of each chemoattractant but on the sensitivity of the chemoreceptors to their respective concentrations. Our results show the clear link between single cell features and the overall environment in which cells reside. PMID:26693274

  15. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor genes in the Mongolian population.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Aili; Ju, Zhong; Zhang, Yonghong

    2013-06-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor (KIR) is highly polymorphic in genotype, haplotype and allele levels. This study was done to investigate KIR genes frequencies, genotypes and inheritance in Mongolian. Gene-specific PCR amplification was used to identify the presence or absence of 16 KIR loci.KIR genotypes were obtained by a KIR genotypes website. The KIR genes frequencies of Mongolian were compared to 24 different populations around the world. The distribution of haplotype B in Mongolian was higher than that in Mongoloid and less than that in Caucasian. Thirty discovered genotypes and five novel genotypes were identified from 1 to 34 individuals. 37.8% of Mongolian carried KIR haplotype AA.Mongolian was exhibited between North Mongoloid and Caucasus by principal component and genetic tree analysis.

  16. Effects of Voltage-Bias Annealing on Metastable Defect Populations in CIGS and CZTSe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Steven P.; Johnston, Steve; Teeter, Glenn

    2016-11-21

    We report on voltage-bias annealing (VBA) experiments performed on CIGS and CZTSe solar cells. In these experiments, completed devices were annealed at moderate temperatures and subsequently quenched with continuously applied voltage bias. These treatments resulted in substantial reversible changes in device characteristics. Photovoltaic (PV) conversion efficiency of the CIGS device varied from below 3% to above 15%, with corresponding changes in CIGS hole density from ~1014 cm-3 to ~1017 cm-3. In the CZTSe device, open-circuit voltage varied from 289 meV to 446 meV, caused by an approximately factor of fifty change in the CZTSe hole density. We interpret these findings in terms of reversible changes to the metastable point-defect populations that control key properties in these materials. Implications for optimization of PV materials and connections to long-term stability of PV devices are discussed.

  17. Ramsey effect of coherent population trapping in anti-relaxation-coated Rb vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Joon; Moon, Han Seb

    2013-08-01

    We examine experimentally and theoretically the Ramsey effects on the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance in a paraffin-coated Rb vapor cell. The observed CPT spectrum in the Hanle configuration of the 5 S 1/2( F = 2)-5 P 1/2( F' = 1) transition of 87Rb atoms consists of a narrow structure with a spectral width of 0.10 mG due to the wall-induced Ramsey effect and a broad structure with a spectral width of 23 mG due to the transit effect. Considering the velocity distribution of atoms and the number of wall-atom collisions, we numerically calculated the transmittance of the laser beam as a function of the longitudinal magnetic field. The experimental results of the CPT Ramsey interference were in good agreement with the theoretical results, and the dependences of the CPT Ramsey effects on the atom-laser interaction time were investigated in detail.

  18. Self-efficacy, transition, and patient outcomes in the sickle cell disease population.

    PubMed

    Molter, Brittany L; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Severe pain is a common symptom of sickle cell disease (SCD). Transitions between adult and pediatric care are a point of particular vulnerability for patients, increasing the risk for poor pain management. The purpose of this literature review was to investigate the relationships among self-efficacy, transition, and SCD health outcomes. A systematic literature search was performed within CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, MEDLINE, and PubMed on published papers between 2003 and 2013. After applying exclusion criteria, 20 articles were used in the final review. Few studies were identified that directly tested the relationship between self-efficacy and SCD outcomes. Although there are few studies on this topic, most demonstrated positive correlations between self-efficacy during transition and positive patient outcomes in the SCD population. Additional studies are needed to support causation. Studies were commonly limited by small sample sizes and attrition. Furthermore, there is a large gap in the literature regarding how self-efficacy can be increased in these patients. Interventions that promote self-efficacy have the potential to improve SCD pain outcomes, but more research is needed to develop interventions to increase these adolescents' self-efficacy. If providers can identify individuals in this population with low self-efficacy, they may be able to intervene early to improve patient outcomes. Most identified studies point to the positive correlation between self-efficacy and positive health outcomes in adolescents with SCD. Self-efficacy has the potential to guide self-care interventions and further research with the SCD population.

  19. Genetic polymorphisms of cell adhesion molecules in Behcet’s disease in a Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Minming; Zhang, Lijun; Yu, Hongsong; Hu, Jiayue; Cao, Qingfeng; Huang, Guo; Huang, Yang; Yuan, Gangxiang; Kijlstra, Aize; Yang, Peizeng

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are involved in various immune-mediated diseases. This study was conducted to investigate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CAMs with Behçet’s disease (BD) in a Chinese Han population. A two-stage association study was carried out in 1149 BD patients and 2107 normal controls. Genotyping of 43 SNPs was performed using MassARRAY System (Sequenom), polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and TaqMan SNP assays. The expression of CD6 and CD11c was examined by real-time PCR and cytokine production was measured by ELISA. A significantly higher frequency of the CT genotype, and a lower frequency of the CC genotype and C allele of CD6 rs11230563 were observed in BD as compared with controls. Analysis of CD11c rs2929 showed that patients with BD had a significantly higher frequency of the GG genotype and G allele, and a lower frequency of the AG genotype as compared with controls. Functional experiments showed an increased CD11c expression and increased production of TNF-α and IL-1beta by LPS stimulated PBMCs in GG carriers of CD11c rs2929 compared to AA/AG carriers. Our study provides evidence that CD6 and CD11c are involved in the susceptibility to BD in a Chinese Han population. PMID:27108704

  20. Interferon (IFN) production by peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells of an elderly population

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, B.J.; Murasko, D.M.

    1986-03-05

    Previous investigations in the laboratory have reported decreased mitogen responses of PBM's from elderly individuals compared to responses of young adults to PHA and ConA. Current studies have investigated the role of IFN in this decreased T cell responsiveness of the elderly. Supernatants of PBM's from 80 elderly (mean age 85) and 50 young individuals (mean age 28) were assayed for antiviral activity, after incubation with optimum and supraoptimum concentrations of mitogen for 24-120 hrs. IFN levels were maximum for both elderly and young populations at 72 hrs coinciding with time of maximum proliferation as determined by uptake of /sup 3/H thymidine. IFN levels declined with longer incubation periods. All IFN produced was IFN-gamma as determined by sensitivity to pH 2 and by neutralizations with monoclonal antibody specific for human IFN-gamma and polyclonal antiserum specific for IFN-alpha. The elderly population's mean IFN titers for both PHA and ConA were about 39% of the mean titers of the young (p less than or equal to 0.02). Both elderly and young groups displayed significant positive correlation between the amount of IFN produced and the level of proliferation in response to the mitogens (p less than or equal to 0.036). Therefore, the above data suggests the decreased levels of IFN produced by elderly PBM's may be one of the factors responsible for the observed decreased proliferative response to mitogens.

  1. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4+SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, 2) IB4−SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato+ cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04660.001 PMID:25525749

  2. Numerical rate function determination in partial differential equations modeling cell population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Groh, Andreas; Kohr, Holger; Louis, Alfred K

    2017-02-01

    This paper introduces a method to solve the inverse problem of determining an unknown rate function in a partial differential equation (PDE) based on discrete measurements of the modeled quantity. The focus is put on a size-structured population balance equation (PBE) predicting the evolution of the number distribution of a single cell population as a function of the size variable. Since the inverse problem at hand is ill-posed, an adequate regularization scheme is required to avoid amplification of measurement errors in the solution method. The technique developed in this work to determine a rate function in a PBE is based on the approximate inverse method, a pointwise regularization scheme, which employs two key ideas. Firstly, the mollification in the directions of time and size variables are separated. Secondly, instable numerical data derivatives are circumvented by shifting the differentiation to an analytically given function. To examine the performance of the introduced scheme, adapted test scenarios have been designed with different levels of data disturbance simulating the model and measurement errors in practice. The success of the method is substantiated by visualizing the results of these numerical experiments.

  3. Characterization of distinct mesenchymal-like cell populations from human skeletal muscle in situ and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Lecourt, Severine; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Fromigue, Olivia; Vauchez, Karine; Andriamanalijaona, Rina; Ternaux, Brigitte; Lacassagne, Marie-Noelle; Robert, Isabelle; Boumediene, Karim; Chereau, Frederic; Marie, Pierre; and others

    2010-09-10

    Human skeletal muscle is an essential source of various cellular progenitors with potential therapeutic perspectives. We first used extracellular markers to identify in situ the main cell types located in a satellite position or in the endomysium of the skeletal muscle. Immunohistology revealed labeling of cells by markers of mesenchymal (CD13, CD29, CD44, CD47, CD49, CD62, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146, and CD15 in this study), myogenic (CD56), angiogenic (CD31, CD34, CD106, CD146), hematopoietic (CD10, CD15, CD34) lineages. We then analysed cell phenotypes and fates in short- and long-term cultures of dissociated muscle biopsies in a proliferation medium favouring the expansion of myogenic cells. While CD56{sup +} cells grew rapidly, a population of CD15{sup +} cells emerged, partly from CD56{sup +} cells, and became individualized. Both populations expressed mesenchymal markers similar to that harboured by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In differentiation media, both CD56{sup +} and CD15{sup +} cells shared osteogenic and chondrogenic abilities, while CD56{sup +} cells presented a myogenic capacity and CD15{sup +} cells presented an adipogenic capacity. An important proportion of cells expressed the CD34 antigen in situ and immediately after muscle dissociation. However, CD34 antigen did not persist in culture and this initial population gave rise to adipogenic cells. These results underline the diversity of human muscle cells, and the shared or restricted commitment abilities of the main lineages under defined conditions.

  4. Development of a population of cancer cells: Observation and modeling by a Mixed Spatial Evolutionary Games approach.

    PubMed

    Świerniak, Andrzej; Krześlak, Michał; Student, Sebastian; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2016-09-21

    Living cells, like whole living organisms during evolution, communicate with their neighbors, interact with the environment, divide, change their phenotypes, and eventually die. The development of specific ways of communication (through signaling molecules and receptors) allows some cellular subpopulations to survive better, to coordinate their physiological status, and during embryonal development to create tissues and organs or in some conditions to become tumors. Populations of cells cultured in vitro interact similarly, also competing for space and nutrients and stimulating each other to better survive or to die. The results of these intercellular interactions of different types seem to be good examples of biological evolutionary games, and have been the subjects of simulations by the methods of evolutionary game theory where individual cells are treated as players. Here we present examples of intercellular contacts in a population of living human cancer HeLa cells cultured in vitro and propose an evolutionary game theory approach to model the development of such populations. We propose a new technique termed Mixed Spatial Evolutionary Games (MSEG) which are played on multiple lattices corresponding to the possible cellular phenotypes which gives the possibility of simulating and investigating the effects of heterogeneity at the cellular level in addition to the population level. Analyses performed with MSEG suggested different ways in which cellular populations develop in the case of cells communicating directly and through factors released to the environment.

  5. Lin- CD34hi CD117int/hi FcεRI+ cells in human blood constitute a rare population of mast cell progenitors.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Malinovschi, Andrei; Öhrvik, Helena; Sandelin, Martin; Janson, Christer; Alving, Kjell; Hallgren, Jenny

    2016-01-28

    Mast cells are rare tissue-resident immune cells that are involved in allergic reactions, and their numbers are increased in the lungs of asthmatics. Murine lung mast cells arise from committed bone marrow-derived progenitors that enter the blood circulation, migrate through the pulmonary endothelium, and mature in the tissue. In humans, mast cells can be cultured from multipotent CD34(+) progenitor cells. However, a population of distinct precursor cells that give rise to mast cells has remained undiscovered. To our knowledge, this is the first report of human lineage-negative (Lin(-)) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) progenitor cells, which represented only 0.0053% of the isolated blood cells in healthy individuals. These cells expressed integrin β7 and developed a mast cell-like phenotype, although with a slow cell division capacity in vitro. Isolated Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood cells had an immature mast cell-like appearance and expressed high levels of many mast cell-related genes as compared with human blood basophils in whole-transcriptome microarray analyses. Furthermore, serglycin, tryptase, and carboxypeptidase A messenger RNA transcripts were detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Altogether, we propose that the Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood cells are closely related to human tissue mast cells and likely constitute an immediate precursor population, which can give rise to predominantly mast cells. Furthermore, asthmatics with reduced lung function had a higher frequency of Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood mast cell progenitors than asthmatics with normal lung function.

  6. Separation of SSEA-4 and TRA-1-60 labelled undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells from a heterogeneous cell population using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Fong, Chui Yee; Peh, Gary S L; Gauthaman, Kalamegam; Bongso, Ariff

    2009-03-01

    A major concern in human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived cell replacement therapy is the risk of tumorigenesis from undifferentiated hESCs residing in the population of hESC-derived cells. Separation of these undifferentiated hESCs from the differentiated derivatives using cell sorting methods may be a plausible approach in overcoming this problem. We therefore explored magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to separate labelled undifferentiated hESCs from a heterogeneous population of hESCs and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) deliberately mixed respectively at different ratios (10:90, 20:80, 30:70, 40:60 and 50:50) to mimic a standard in vitro differentiation protocol, instead of using a hESC-differentiated cell population, so that we could be sure of the actual number of cells separated. HES-3 and HES-4 cells were labelled in separate experiments for the stem cell markers SSEA-4 and TRA-1-60 using primary antibodies. Anti-PE magnetic microbeads that recognize the PE-conjugated SSEA-4 labelled hESCs was added to the heterogeneous cell mixture and passed through the MACS column. The cells that passed through the column ('flow-through' fraction) and those retained ('labelled' fraction') were subsequently analysed using FACS. The maximum efficacy of hESCs retention using MACS was 81.0 +/- 2.9% (HES-3) and 83.6 +/- 4.2% (HES-4). Using FACS, all the undifferentiated hESCs labelled with the two cell-surface markers could be removed by selective gating. Both hESCs and HepG2 cells in the 'flow-through' fraction following MACS separation were viable in culture whereas by FACS separation only the HepG2 cells were viable. FACS efficiently helps to eliminate the undifferentiated hESCs based on their cell-surface antigens expressed.

  7. Alterations in Peripheral Blood B-cell Populations in SHIV89.6P-infected Macaques (Macacca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Kling, Heather M; Shipley, Timothy W; Norris, Karen A

    2011-01-01

    In addition to CD4+ T cell depletion, the B cell compartment of HIV-infected patients exhibits abnormalities, including deficits and diminished responses to ex vivo antigenic stimulation and in vivo vaccination. We used chimeric simian–human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection of cynomolgus macaques to determine the dynamics of peripheral blood B cell alterations in this model of HIV infection. During the course of infection, we observed progressive loss of total and memory (CD27+) B cells, increased percentages of activated (CD95+) B cells, hypergammaglobulinemia, and deficits in the CD21+ B cell population. In addition, we noted declines in subsets of memory B cells, including both IgM+ and class-switched (IgD–IgM– CD27+) cells, with sustained deficits in the IgM+ memory (IgM+CD27+) B cell population. The similarity of the B cell alterations in these studies to those observed in HIV+ subjects supports the utility of the SHIV macaque model for examination of HIV-related B cell dysfunction. PMID:21819698

  8. IL-10 distinguishes a unique population of activated, effector-like CD8(+) T cells in murine acute liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rood, Julia E; Canna, Scott W; Weaver, Lehn K; Tobias, John W; Behrens, Edward M

    2017-04-01

    Immune-mediated liver injury is a central feature of hyperinflammatory diseases, such as hemophagocytic syndromes, yet the immunologic mechanisms underlying those processes are incompletely understood. In this study, we used the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-mediated model of a hemophagocytic syndrome known as macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) to dissect the predominant immune cell populations infiltrating the liver during inflammation. We identified CD8(+) T cells that unexpectedly produce interleukin-10 (IL-10) in addition to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) as a major hepatic population induced by TLR9 stimulation. Despite their ability to produce this anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10(+) hepatic CD8(+) T cells in TLR9-MAS mice did not resemble CD8(+) T suppressor cells. Instead, the induction of these cells occurred independently of antigen stimulation and was partially dependent on IFN-γ. IL-10(+) hepatic CD8(+) T cells demonstrated an activated phenotype and high turnover rate, consistent with an effector-like identity. Transcriptional analysis of this population confirmed a gene signature of effector CD8(+) T cells yet suggested responsiveness to liver injury-associated growth factors. Together, these findings suggest that IL-10(+) CD8(+) T cells induced by systemic inflammation to infiltrate the liver have initiated an inflammatory, rather than regulatory, program and may thus have a pathogenic role in severe, acute hepatitis.

  9. Measurement of the electronic transition dipole moment by Autler-Townes splitting: Comparison of three- and four-level excitation schemes for the Na2 A 1Σu+-X 1Σg+ system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, E.; Hansson, A.; Qi, P.; Kirova, T.; Lazoudis, A.; Kotochigova, S.; Lyyra, A. M.; Li, L.; Qi, J.; Magnier, S.

    2006-02-01

    We present a fundamentally new approach for measuring the transition dipole moment of molecular transitions, which combines the benefits of quantum interference effects, such as the Autler-Townes splitting, with the familiar R-centroid approximation. This method is superior to other experimental methods for determining the absolute value of the R-dependent electronic transition dipole moment function μe(R), since it requires only an accurate measurement of the coupling laser electric field amplitude and the determination of the Rabi frequency from an Autler-Townes split fluorescence spectral line. We illustrate this method by measuring the transition dipole moment matrix element for the Na2AΣu+1(v'=25,J'=20e)-XΣg+1(v″=38,J″=21e) rovibronic transition and compare our experimental results with our ab initio calculations. We have compared the three-level (cascade) and four-level (extended Λ) excitation schemes and found that the latter is preferable in this case for two reasons. First, this excitation scheme takes advantage of the fact that the coupling field lower level is outside the thermal population range. As a result vibrational levels with larger wave function amplitudes at the outer turning point of vibration lead to larger transition dipole moment matrix elements and Rabi frequencies than those accessible from the equilibrium internuclear distance of the thermal population distribution. Second, the coupling laser can be "tuned" to different rovibronic transitions in order to determine the internuclear distance dependence of the electronic transition dipole moment function in the region of the R-centroid of each coupling laser transition. Thus the internuclear distance dependence of the transition moment function μe(R) can be determined at several very different values of the R centroid. The measured transition dipole moment matrix element for the Na2AΣu+1(v'=25,J'=20e)-XΣg+1(v″=38,J″=21e) transition is 5.5±0.2D compared to our ab initio value

  10. Measurement of the electronic transition dipole moment by Autler-Townes splitting: Comparison of three- and four-level excitation schemes for the Na2 A 1Sigma(u)+ - X 1Sigma(g)+ system.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, E; Hansson, A; Qi, P; Kirova, T; Lazoudis, A; Kotochigova, S; Lyyra, A M; Li, L; Qi, J; Magnier, S

    2006-02-28

    We present a fundamentally new approach for measuring the transition dipole moment of molecular transitions, which combines the benefits of quantum interference effects, such as the Autler-Townes splitting, with the familiar R-centroid approximation. This method is superior to other experimental methods for determining the absolute value of the R-dependent electronic transition dipole moment function mu(e)(R), since it requires only an accurate measurement of the coupling laser electric field amplitude and the determination of the Rabi frequency from an Autler-Townes split fluorescence spectral line. We illustrate this method by measuring the transition dipole moment matrix element for the Na2 A 1Sigma(u)+ (v' = 25, J' = 20e)-X 1Sigma(g)+ (v" = 38, J" = 21e) rovibronic transition and compare our experimental results with our ab initio calculations. We have compared the three-level (cascade) and four-level (extended Lambda) excitation schemes and found that the latter is preferable in this case for two reasons. First, this excitation scheme takes advantage of the fact that the coupling field lower level is outside the thermal population range. As a result vibrational levels with larger wave function amplitudes at the outer turning point of vibration lead to larger transition dipole moment matrix elements and Rabi frequencies than those accessible from the equilibrium internuclear distance of the thermal population distribution. Second, the coupling laser can be "tuned" to different rovibronic transitions in order to determine the internuclear distance dependence of the electronic transition dipole moment function in the region of the R-centroid of each coupling laser transition. Thus the internuclear distance dependence of the transition moment function mu(e)(R) can be determined at several very different values of the R centroid. The measured transition dipole moment matrix element for the Na2 A 1Sigma(u)+ (v' = 25, J' = 20e)-X 1Sigma(g)+ (v" = 38, J" = 21e

  11. Identification of a novel microRNA that regulates the proliferation and differentiation in muscle side population cells.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Norio; Alexander, Matthew S; Casar, Juan Carlos; Kunkel, Louis M

    2012-11-01

    Muscle satellite cells are largely responsible for skeletal muscle regeneration following injury. Side population (SP) cells, which are thought to be muscle stem cells, also contribute to muscle regeneration. SP cells exhibit high mesenchymal potential, and are a possible cell source for therapy of muscular dystrophy. However, the mechanism by which muscle SP cells are committed to differentiation is poorly understood. microRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in modulating a variety of cellular processes through repression of their mRNA targets. In skeletal muscle, miRNAs are known to be involved in myoblast proliferation and differentiation. To investigate mechanisms of SP cell regulation, we profiled miRNA expression in SP cells and main population (MP) cells in muscles using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction-based expression assays. We identified a set of miRNAs that was highly expressed in SP cells as compared with MP cells. One miRNA, miR-128a, was elevated in expression in SP cells, but decreased in expression during continued culture in vitro. Overexpression of miR-128a in SP cells resulted in inhibited cell proliferation. The differentiation potential of SP cells was also decreased when miR-128a was overexpressed. MiR-128a was found to regulate the target genes involved in the regulation of adipogenic-, osteogenic- and myogenic genes that include: PPARγ, Runx1, and Pax3. Overexpression of miR-128a suppressed the activity of a luciferase reporter fused to the 3'-untranslated region of each gene. These results demonstrate that miR-128a contributes to the maintenance of the quiescent state, and it regulates cellular differentiation by repressing individual genes in SP cells.

  12. On the dynamics of neutral mutations in a mathematical model for a homogeneous stem cell population.

    PubMed

    Traulsen, Arne; Lenaerts, Tom; Pacheco, Jorge M; Dingli, David

    2013-02-01

    The theory of the clonal origin of cancer states that a tumour arises from one cell that acquires mutation(s) leading to the malignant phenotype. It is the current belief that many of these mutations give a fitness advantage to the mutant population allowing it to expand, eventually leading to disease. However, mutations that lead to such a clonal expansion need not give a fitness advantage and may in fact be neutral--or almost neutral--with respect to fitness. Such mutant clones can be eliminated or expand stochastically, leading to a malignant phenotype (disease). Mutations in haematopoietic stem cells give rise to diseases such as chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH). Although neutral drift often leads to clonal extinction, disease is still possible, and in this case, it has important implications both for the incidence of disease and for therapy, as it may be more difficult to eliminate neutral mutations with therapy. We illustrate the consequences of such dynamics, using CML and PNH as examples. These considerations have implications for many other tumours as well.

  13. Heterogeneous cell-cycle behavior in response to UVB irradiation by a population of single cancer cells visualized by time-lapse FUCCI imaging.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Kimura, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Mako; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The present study analyzed the heterogeneous cell-cycle dependence and fate of single cancer cells in a population treated with UVB using a fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell-cycle (FUCCI) imaging system. HeLa cells expressing FUCCI were irradiated by 100 or 200 J/m(2) UVB. Modulation of the cell-cycle and apoptosis were observed by time-lapse confocal microscopy imaging every 30 min for 72 h. Correlation between cell survival and factors including cell-cycle phase at the time of the irradiation of UVB, mitosis and the G1/S transition were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method along with the log rank test. Time-lapse FUCCI imaging of HeLa cells demonstrated that UVB irradiation induced cell-cycle arrest in S/G2/M phase in the majority of the cells. The cells irradiated by 100 or 200 J/m(2) UVB during G0/G1 phase had a higher survival rate than the cells irradiated during S/G2/M phase. A minority of cells could escape S/G2/M arrest and undergo mitosis which significantly correlated with decreased survival of the cells. In contrast, G1/S transition significantly correlated with increased survival of the cells after UVB irradiation. UVB at 200 J/m(2) resulted in a greater number of apoptotic cells.

  14. Automated Quantification of DNA Demethylation Effects in Cells via 3D Mapping of Nuclear Signatures and Population Homogeneity Assessment1

    PubMed Central

    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Wawrowsky, Kolja A.; Lindsley, Erik; Vishnevsky, Eugene; Farkas, Daniel L.; Tajbakhsh, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Background Today’s advanced microscopic imaging applies to the preclinical stages of drug discovery that employ high-throughput and high-content three-dimensional (3D) analysis of cells to more efficiently screen candidate compounds. Drug efficacy can be assessed by measuring response homogeneity to treatment within a cell population. In this study topologically quantified nuclear patterns of methylated cytosine and global nuclear DNA are utilized as signatures of cellular response to the treatment of cultured cells with the demethylating anti-cancer agents: 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) and octreotide (OCT). Methods Mouse pituitary folliculostellate TtT-GF cells treated with 5-AZA and OCT for 48 hours, and untreated populations, were studied by immunofluorescence with a specific antibody against 5-methylcytosine (MeC), and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) for delineation of methylated sites and global DNA in nuclei (n=163). Cell images were processed utilizing an automated 3D analysis software that we developed by combining seeded watershed segmentation to extract nuclear shells with measurements of Kullback-Leibler’s (K-L) divergence to analyze cell population homogeneity in the relative nuclear distribution patterns of MeC versus DAPI stained sites. Each cell was assigned to one of the four classes: similar, likely similar, unlikely similar and dissimilar. Results Evaluation of the different cell groups revealed a significantly higher number of cells with similar or likely similar MeC/DAPI patterns among untreated cells (~100%), 5-AZA-treated cells (90%), and a lower degree of same type of cells (64%) in the OCT-treated population. The latter group contained (28%) of unlikely similar or dissimilar (7%) cells. Conclusion Our approach was successful in the assessment of cellular behavior relevant to the biological impact of the applied drugs, i.e. the reorganization of MeC/DAPI distribution by demethylation. In a comparison with other metrics, K-L divergence has

  15. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in `hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  16. Relation between sonic hedgehog pathway gene polymorphisms and basal cell carcinoma development in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Lesiak, Aleksandra; Sobolewska-Sztychny, Dorota; Majak, Paweł; Sobjanek, Michał; Wodz, Karolina; Sygut, Karolina Przybyłowska-; Majsterek, Ireneusz; Wozniacka, Anna; Narbutt, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, increases have been observed in the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma. BCC is the most common neoplasm in Caucasian populations. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway impairment plays a key role in BCC pathogenesis, and there is evidence that Shh pathway genetic variations may predispose to BCC development. We genotyped 22 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 4 Shh pathway genes: SHH, GLI, SMO, and PTCH. The study group consisted of 142 BCC patients and 142 age-matched, sex-matched healthy subjects (controls). SNPs were assessed using the PCR-RFLP method. The genotype distribution for the polymorphisms in the rs104894049 331 A/T SHH, rs104894040 349 T/C SHH, and rs41303402 385 G/A SMO genes differed significantly between the BCC patients