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Sample records for fr18fe10n denali commission

  1. 78 FR 51207 - Kobuk Valley National Park Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) and the Denali National Park SRC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... National Park Service Kobuk Valley National Park Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) and the Denali National Park SRC; Meetings AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: As required by the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Public Law 92-463, 86 Stat. 770), the National Park...

  2. 76 FR 35426 - Denali Commission Fiscal Year 2011 Draft Work Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... sustainable economy, and to build and ensure the operation and maintenance of Alaska's basic infrastructure... and innovative solutions to the unique infrastructure and economic development challenges in America's... Commission's Federal and State Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and the Sustainable Rural...

  3. 75 FR 7256 - Denali Commission Fiscal Year 2010 Draft Work Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... employed in a diversified and sustainable economy, and to build and ensure the operation and maintenance of... Indian Health Service, the Alaska State Hospital and Nursing Home Association, the Rasmuson Foundation... diligence standards of the Commission. As denoted above, if viable, sustainable, and vetted projects in...

  4. Death on Denali

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rodman; Mills, William J.; Rogers, Donald R.; Propst, Michael T.

    1978-01-01

    Between 1903 and 1975 about 1 percent of climbers on Mount McKinley (Denali) and Mount Foraker in Alaska died. In 1976 a total of ten (1.7 percent) of 587 mountaineers died, but this rate of death was not significantly higher than previously. Nineteen percent of climbers in 1976 suffered major or minor injuries, illness or death. Acute mountain sickness (AMS), frostbite and fractures were common. Thirty-three rescues or retrievals of bodies were mounted at a cost of more than $82,000. Inexperience (particularly with arctic mountaineering), poor leadership, faulty equipment and undue reliance on rescue by helicopter contributed to the alarming incidence of accident, illness and death on big peaks in Mount McKinley National Park in 1976. PMID:664648

  5. 77 FR 39253 - Final Environmental Impact Statement on the Denali Park Road Vehicle Management Plan, Denali...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... NATIONAL PARK SERVICE Final Environmental Impact Statement on the Denali Park Road Vehicle Management Plan... of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Denali Park Road Vehicle Management Plan. SUMMARY... Denali Park Road Vehicle Management Plan (Plan/FEIS), for Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska....

  6. Denali Commission Reauthorization Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Young, Don [R-AK-At Large

    2012-09-20

    09/21/2012 Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Tracking the movements of Denali's wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, T.J.; Burch, J.W.; Adams, L.G.

    2006-01-01

    The wolves of Denali National Park (formerly Mount McKinley National Park) were the subject of some of the earliest research on wolf ecology. From 1939 to 1941, Adolph Murie performed groundbreaking studies of wolves, observing wolves and their prey and collecting wolf scats and prey remains. His work resulted in one of the first major scientific publications about wolves, The Wolves of Mount McKinley (Murie 1944). Continuing the research started by Murie, the National Park Service (NPS) began using aircraft to locate and count wolves in the 1960s (Prasil 1967, Singer 1986). Beginnin g in 1969, Go r d o n Haber used aircraft to make prolonged observations of wolf packs, studying their behavior and relations with prey species (Haber 1977).

  8. Afterslip, tremor, and the Denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan; Prejean, Stephanie; Ruppert, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that afterslip should be accompanied by tremor using observations of seismic and aseismic deformation surrounding the 2002 M 7.9 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake (DFE). Afterslip happens more frequently than spontaneous slow slip and has been observed in a wider range of tectonic environments, and thus the existence or absence of tremor accompanying afterslip may provide new clues about tremor generation. We also searched for precursory tremor, as a proxy for posited accelerating slip leading to rupture. Our search yielded no tremor during the five days prior to the DFE or in several intervals in the three months after. This negative result and an array of other observations all may be explained by rupture penetrating below the presumed locked zone into the frictional transition zone. While not unique, such an explanation corroborates previous models of megathrust and transform earthquake ruptures that extend well into the transition zone.

  9. Comparing the November 2002 Denali and November 2001 Kunlun earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bufe, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    Major strike-slip earthquakes recently occurred in Alaska on the central Denali fault (M 7.9) on 3 November 2002, and in Tibet on the central Kunlun fault (M 7.8) on 14 November 2001. Both earthquakes generated large surface waves with Ms [U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)] of 8.5 (Denali) and 8.0 (Kunlun). Each event occurred on an east-west-trending strike-slip fault situated near the northern boundary of an intense deformation zone that is characterized by lateral extrusion and rotation of crustal blocks. Each earthquake produced east-directed nearly unilateral ruptures that propagated 300 to 400 km. Maximum lateral surface offsets and maximum moment release occurred well beyond 100 km from the rupture initiation, with the events exhibiting by far the largest separations of USGS hypocenter and Harvard Moment Tensor Centroid (CMT) for strike-slip earthquakes in the 27-year CMT catalog. In each sequence, the largest aftershock was more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the mainshock. Regional moment release had been accelerating prior to the main shocks. The close proximity in space and time of the 1964 Prince William Sound and 2002 Denali earthquakes, relative to their rupture lengths and estimated return times, suggests that these events may be part of a recurrent cluster in the vicinity of a complex plate boundary.

  10. Preliminary paleoseismic observations along the western Denali fault, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, R. D.; Schwartz, D. P.; Rood, D. H.; Reger, R.; Wolken, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Denali fault in south-central Alaska, from Mt. McKinley to the Denali-Totschunda fault branch point, accommodates ~9-12 mm/yr of the right-lateral component of oblique convergence between the Pacific/Yakutat and North American plates. The eastern 226 km of this fault reach was part of the source of the 2002 M7.9 Denali fault earthquake. West of the 2002 rupture there is evidence of two large earthquakes on the Denali fault during the past ~550-700 years but the paleoearthquake chronology prior to this time is largely unknown. To better constrain fault rupture parameters for the western Denali fault and contribute to improved seismic hazard assessment, we performed helicopter and ground reconnaissance along the southern flank of the Alaska Range between the Nenana Glacier and Pyramid Peak, a distance of ~35 km, and conducted a site-specific paleoseismic study. We present a Quaternary geologic strip map along the western Denali fault and our preliminary paleoseismic results, which include a differential-GPS survey of a displaced debris flow fan, cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure ages for boulders on this fan, and an interpretation of a trench across the main trace of the fault at the same site. Between the Nenana Glacier and Pyramid Peak, the Denali fault is characterized by prominent tectonic geomorphic features that include linear side-hill troughs, mole tracks, anastamosing composite scarps, and open left-stepping fissures. Measurements of offset rills and gullies indicate that slip during the most recent earthquake was between ~3 and 5 meters, similar to the average displacement in the 2002 earthquake. At our trench site, ~ 25 km east of the Parks Highway, a steep debris fan is displaced along a series of well-defined left-stepping linear fault traces. Multi-event displacements of debris-flow and snow-avalanche channels incised into the fan range from 8 to 43 m, the latter of which serves as a minimum cumulative fan offset estimate. The trench, excavated into

  11. 75 FR 65377 - Denali National Park and Preserve Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... National Park Service Denali National Park and Preserve Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting for the Denali National Park and Preserve Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council within the Alaska Region. SUMMARY: The National Park...

  12. 77 FR 16857 - Denali National Park and Preserve Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... National Park Service Denali National Park and Preserve Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council; Meeting ACTION: Notice of meeting for the Denali National Park and Preserve Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council within the Alaska Region. SUMMARY: The National Park Service (NPS) announces a meeting of the...

  13. 75 FR 1404 - Denali National Park and Preserve Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... National Park Service Denali National Park and Preserve Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of renewal. SUMMARY: The Secretary of the Interior is giving notice of the renewal of the Denali National Park and Preserve Aircraft Overflights...

  14. 77 FR 12878 - Denali National Park and Preserve Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... National Park Service Denali National Park and Preserve Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council; Meeting ACTION: Notice of meeting for the Denali National Park and Preserve Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council within the Alaska Region. SUMMARY: The National Park Service (NPS) announces a meeting of the...

  15. Seismic velocity models for the Denali fault zone along the Richardson Highway, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Fuis, G.S.; Lutter, W.J.; Christensen, N.I.; Ratchkovski, N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Crustal-scale seismic-velocity models across the Denali fault zone along the Richardson Highway show a 50-km-thick crust, a near vertical fault trace, and a 5-km-wide damage zone associated with the fault near Trans-Alaska Pipeline Pump Station 10, which provided the closest strong ground motion recordings of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake. We compare models, derived from seismic reflection and refraction surveys acquired in 1986 and 1987, to laboratory measurements of seismic velocities for typical metamorphic rocks exposed along the profiles. Our model for the 1986 seismic reflection profile indicates a 5-km-wide low-velocity zone in the upper 1 km of the Denali fault zone, which we interpret as fault gouge. Deeper refractions from our 1987 line image a 40-km wide, 5-km-deep low-velocity zone along the Denali fault and nearby associated fault strands, which we attribute to a composite damage zone along several strands of the Denali fault zone and to the obliquity of the seismic line to the fault zone. Our velocity model and other geophysical data indicate a nearly vertical Denali fault zone to a depth of 30 km. After-shocks of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake and our velocity model provide evidence for a flower structure along the fault zone consisting of faults dipping toward and truncated by the Denali fault. Wide-angle reflections indicate that the crustal thickness beneath the Denali fault is transitional between the 60-km-thick crust beneath the Alaska Range to the south, and the extended, 30-km-thick crust of the Yukon-Tanana terrane to the north.

  16. Geophysical investigation of the Denali fault and Alaska Range orogen within the aftershock zone of the October-November 2002, M = 7.9 Denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Ratchkovski, N.A.; Pellerin, L.; Glen, J.M.; Brocher, T.M.; Booker, J.

    2004-01-01

    The aftershock zone of the 3 November 2002, M = 7.9 earthquake that ruptured along the right-slip Denali fault in south-central Alaska has been investigated by using gravity and magnetic, magnetotelluric, and deep-crustal, seismic reflection data as well as outcrop geology and earthquake seismology. Strong seismic reflections from within the Alaska Range orogen north of the Denali fault dip as steeply as 25°N and extend to depths as great as 20 km. These reflections outline a relict crustal architecture that in the past 20 yr has produced little seismicity. The Denali fault is nonreflective, probably because this fault dips steeply to vertical. The most intriguing finding from geophysical data is that earthquake aftershocks occurred above a rock body, with low electrical resistivity (>10 Ω·m), that is at depths below ∼10 km. Aftershocks of the Denali fault earthquake have mainly occurred shallower than 10 km. A high geothermal gradient may cause the shallow seismicity. Another possibility is that the low resistivity results from fluids, which could have played a role in locating the aftershock zone by reducing rock friction within the middle and lower crust.

  17. 77 FR 34997 - Notice of June 30, 2012, Meeting for Denali National Park Subsistence Resource Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... includes the following: 1. Call to order--Confirm Quorum 2. Welcome and Introductions (SRC Chair and... under Title VIII, Section 808 of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, Public Law...

  18. Late quaternary environments, Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, S.A.; Short, S.K.; Waythomas, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    Late Quaternary pollen, plant macrofossils, and insect fossils were studied from sites along three rivers in the foothills north of the Alaska Range in Denali National Park and Preserve. The aim was to carry out a reconaissance of late Quaternary organic sediments in the region, emphasizing the mid-Wisconsin, or Boutellier interstadial interval. Samples of probable early- to mid-Boutellier age (ca. 60 000 to 40 000 B.P.) from Unit 2 at the Toklat High Bluffs site indicate open boreal woodland with dense alder shrub vegetation. Organic Unit 1 at the Foraker River Slump site indicates open taiga with shrubs of probable Boutellier age. Fossil evidence from the youngest horizon in this unit indicates graminoid tundra environments, marking the transition from interstadial to late Wisconsin glacial environments. Early Holocene samples from the Foraker exposures suggest birch shrub tundra; coniferous forest apparently became established only alter 6500 B.P. Local variations in forest composition at the Foraker and Sushana sites were probably the result of disturbances, such as fire.

  19. Geotechnical reconnaissance of the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, R.; Thompson, E.; Minasian, D.; Moss, R.E.S.; Collins, B.D.; Sitar, N.; Dreger, D.; Carver, G.

    2004-01-01

    The 2002 M7.9 Denali fault earthquake resulted in 340 km of ruptures along three separate faults, causing widespread liquefaction in the fluvial deposits of the alpine valleys of the Alaska Range and eastern lowlands of the Tanana River. Areas affected by liquefaction are largely confined to Holocene alluvial deposits, man-made embankments, and backfills. Liquefaction damage, sparse surrounding the fault rupture in the western region, was abundant and severe on the eastern rivers: the Robertson, Slana, Tok, Chisana, Nabesna and Tanana Rivers. Synthetic seismograms from a kinematic source model suggest that the eastern region of the rupture zone had elevated strong-motion levels due to rupture directivity, supporting observations of elevated geotechnical damage. We use augered soil samples and shear-wave velocity profiles made with a portable apparatus for the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) to characterize soil properties and stiffness at liquefaction sites and three trans-Alaska pipeline pump station accelerometer locations. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  20. Crustal structure of the alaska range orogen and denali fault along the richardson highway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Pellerin, L.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Ratchkovski, N.A.; Glen, J.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    A suite of geophysical data obtained along the Richardson Highway crosses the eastern Alaska Range and Denali fault and reveals the crustal structure of the orogen. Strong seismic reflections from within the orogen north of the Denali fault dip as steeply as 25?? north and extend downward to depths between 20 and 25 km. These reflections reveal what is probably a shear zone that transects most of the crust and is part of a crustal-scale duplex structure that probably formed during the Late Cretaceous. These structures, however, appear to be relict because over the past 20 years, they have produced little or no seismicity despite the nearby Mw = 7.9 Denali fault earthquake that struck in 2002. The Denali fault is nonreflective, but we interpret modeled magnetotelluric (MT), gravity, and magnetic data to propose that the fault dips steeply to vertically. Modeling of MT data shows that aftershocks of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake occurred above a rock body that has low electrical resistivity (>10 ohm-m), which might signify the presence of fluids in the middle and lower crust. Copyright ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  1. Denali fault slip rates and Holocene-late Pleistocene kinematics of central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matmon, A.; Schwartz, D.P.; Haeussler, P.J.; Finkel, R.; Lienkaemper, J.J.; Stenner, H.D.; Dawson, T.E.

    2006-01-01

    The Denali fault is the principal intracontinental strike-slip fault accommodating deformation of interior Alaska associated with the Yakutat plate convergence. We obtained the first quantitative late Pleistocene-Holocene slip rates on the Denali fault system from dating offset geomorphic features. Analysis of cosmogenic 10Be concentrations in boulders (n = 27) and sediment (n = 13) collected at seven sites, offset 25-170 m by the Denali and Totschunda faults, gives average ages that range from 2.4 ± 0.3 ka to 17.0 ± 1.8 ka. These offsets and ages yield late Pleistocene-Holocene average slip rates of 9.4 ± 1.6, 12.1 ± 1.7, and 8.4 ± 2.2 mm/yr-1 along the western, central, and eastern Denali fault, respectively, and 6.0 ± 1.2 mm/yr-1 along the Totschunda fault. Our results suggest a westward decrease in the mean Pleistocene-Holocene slip rate. This westward decrease likely results from partitioning of slip from the Denali fault system to thrust faults to the north and west. 2006 Geological Society of America.

  2. 36 CFR 13.954 - Where can I operate a snowmachine in Denali National Park and Preserve?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... snowmachine in Denali National Park and Preserve? 13.954 Section 13.954 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.954 Where can I operate...

  3. 36 CFR 13.954 - Where can I operate a snowmachine in Denali National Park and Preserve?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... snowmachine in Denali National Park and Preserve? 13.954 Section 13.954 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.954 Where can I operate...

  4. 36 CFR 13.954 - Where can I operate a snowmachine in Denali National Park and Preserve?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... snowmachine in Denali National Park and Preserve? 13.954 Section 13.954 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.954 Where can I operate...

  5. 36 CFR 13.954 - Where can I operate a snowmachine in Denali National Park and Preserve?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... snowmachine in Denali National Park and Preserve? 13.954 Section 13.954 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.954 Where can I operate...

  6. 36 CFR 13.954 - Where can I operate a snowmachine in Denali National Park and Preserve?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... snowmachine in Denali National Park and Preserve? 13.954 Section 13.954 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.954 Where can I operate...

  7. Caribou calf mortality in Denali National Park, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, L.G.; Singer, F.J.; Dale, B.W.

    1995-01-01

    Calf mortality is major component of caribou population dynamics, but little is known about the timing or causes of calf losses, or of characteristics that predispose calves to mortality. During 1984-87, we radiocollared 226 calves (less than or equal to 3 days old) in the Denali Caribou Herd (DCH), an unhunted population utilized by a natural complement of predators, to determine the extent, timing, and causes of calf mortality and to evaluate influences of year, sex, birthdate, and birth mass on those losses. Overall, 39% of radio-collared calves died as neonates (less than or equal to 15 days old), and 98% of those deaths were attributed to predation. Most neonatal deaths (85%) occurred within 8 days of birth. Few deaths occurred after the neonatal period (5, 10, and 0% of calves instrumented died during 16-30, 31-150, and greater than 150 days of age, respectively). Survival of neonates was lower (P = 0.038) in 1985, following a severe winter, than during the other 3 years. In years other than 1985, calves born during the peak of calving (approx 50% of the total, born 5-8 days after calving onset) experienced higher (P less than 0.001) neonatal survival than did other calves. Grizzly bears, wolves, and unknown large predators (i.e., grizzly bears or wolves) accounted for 49, 29, and 16% of the neonatal deaths, respectively. The rate of bear-caused mortalities declined (P less than 0.001) with calf age, and bears killed few calves greater than 10 days old. Wolf predation was not related (P greater than 0.05) to calf age and peaked 10 days after onset of calving. Grizzly bear and wolf predation on neonates during the calving season was a limiting factor for the DCH.

  8. Inverse kinematic and forward dynamic models of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oglesby, D.D.; Dreger, Douglas S.; Harris, R.A.; Ratchkovski, N.; Hansen, R.

    2004-01-01

    We perform inverse kinematic and forward dynamic models of the M 7.9 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake to shed light on the rupture process and dynamics of this event, which took place on a geometrically complex fault system in central Alaska. We use a combination of local seismic and Global Positioning System (GPS) data for our kinematic inversion and find that the slip distribution of this event is characterized by three major asperities on the Denali fault. The rupture nucleated on the Susitna Glacier thrust fault, and after a pause, propagated onto the strike-slip Denali fault. Approximately 216 km to the east, the rupture abandoned the Denali fault in favor of the more southwesterly directed Totschunda fault. Three-dimensional dynamic models of this event indicate that the abandonment of the Denali fault for the Totschunda fault can be explained by the Totschunda fault's more favorable orientation with respect to the local stress field. However, a uniform tectonic stress field cannot explain the complex slip pattern in this event. We also find that our dynamic models predict discontinuous rupture from the Denali to Totschunda fault segments. Such discontinuous rupture helps to qualitatively improve our kinematic inverse models. Two principal implications of our study are (1) a combination of inverse and forward modeling can bring insight into earthquake processes that are not possible with either technique alone, and (2) the stress field on geometrically complex fault systems is most likely not due to a uniform tectonic stress field that is resolved onto fault segments of different orientations; rather, other forms of stress heterogeneity must be invoked to explain the observed slip patterns.

  9. The 2002 Denali fault earthquake, Alaska: A large magnitude, slip-partitioned event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberhart-Phillips, D.; Haeussler, P.J.; Freymueller, J.T.; Frankel, A.D.; Rubin, C.M.; Craw, P.; Ratchkovski, N.A.; Anderson, G.; Carver, G.A.; Crone, A.J.; Dawson, T.E.; Fletcher, H.; Hansen, R.; Harp, E.L.; Harris, R.A.; Hill, D.P.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Jibson, R.W.; Jones, L.M.; Kayen, R.; Keefer, D.K.; Larsen, C.F.; Moran, S.C.; Personius, S.F.; Plafker, G.; Sherrod, B.; Sieh, K.; Sitar, N.; Wallace, W.K.

    2003-01-01

    The MW (moment magnitude) 7.9 Denali fault earthquake on 3 November 2002 was associated with 340 kilometers of surface rupture and was the largest strike-slip earthquake in North America in almost 150 years. It illuminates earthquake mechanics and hazards of large strike-slip faults. It began with thrusting on the previously unrecognized Susitna Glacier fault, continued with right-slip on the Denali fault, then took a right step and continued with right-slip on the Totschunda fault. There is good correlation between geologically observed and geophysically inferred moment release. The earthquake produced unusually strong distal effects in the rupture propagation direction, including triggered seismicity.

  10. Field guide to the geology of the Denali National Park Road and the Parks Highway from Cantwell to Healy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hults, Chad P.; Capps, Danny L.; Brease, Phil F.

    2013-01-01

    The Denali National Park & Preserve area provides one of the few opportunities in Alaska for road-side access to good rock outcrops. The rocks and surficial deposits exposed in the Denali area span from the Paleozoic to the Quaternary. It is a structurally complex area that contains a history of rifting, accretion, and orogeny. There is evidence of multiple metamorphic events in the Mesozoic, mountain building in the Tertiary, and faulting in the present day. The region is the site of active faulting along one of the largest intra-continental fault systems, the Denali Fault system, which was the locus of a 7.9 M earthquake in 2002. This guidebook describes the key outcrops viewable along the Denali Park Road from the entrance to the Eielson Visitor Center, and along the Parks Highway from Healy to Cantwell.

  11. Coulomb stress transfer and tectonic loading preceding the 2002 Denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bufe, C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Pre-2002 tectonic loading and Coulomb stress transfer are modeled along the rupture zone of the M 7.9 Denali fault earthquake (DFE) and on adjacent segments of the right-lateral Denali-Totschunda fault system in central Alaska, using a three-dimensional boundary-element program. The segments modeled closely follow, for about 95??, the arc of a circle of radius 375 km centered on an inferred asperity near the northeastern end of the intersection of the Patton Bay fault with the Alaskan megathrust under Prince William Sound. The loading model includes slip of 6 mm/yr below 12 km along the fault system, consistent with rotation of the Wrangell block about the asperity at a rate of about 1??/m.y. as well as slip of the Pacific plate at 5 cm/yr at depth along the Fairweather-Queen Charlotte transform fault system and on the Alaska megathrust. The model is consistent with most available pre-2002 Global Positioning System (GPS) displacement rate data. Coulomb stresses induced on the Denali-Totschunda fault system (locked above 12 km) by slip at depth and by transfer from the M 9.2 Prince William Sound earthquake of 1964 dominated the changing Coulomb stress distribution along the fault. The combination of loading (???70-85%) and coseismic stress transfer from the great 1964 earthquake (???15-30%) were the principal post-1900 stress factors building toward strike-slip failure of the northern Denali and Totschunda segments in the M 7.9 earthquake of November 2002. Postseismic stresses transferred from the 1964 earthquake may also have been a significant factor. The M 7.2-7.4 Delta River earthquake of 1912 (Carver et al., 2004) may have delayed or advanced the timing of the DFE, depending on the details and location of its rupture. The initial subevent of the 2002 DFE earthquake was on the 40-km Susitna Glacier thrust fault at the western end of the Denali fault rupture. The Coulomb stress transferred from the 1964 earthquake moved the Susitna Glacier thrust fault uniformly

  12. Surface rupture and revised slip distribution on the Denali and Totschunda faults from the M 7.9 Denali fault earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeussler, P. J.

    2003-12-01

    We revised the preliminary slip distribution (Science, 2003, v. 300, p. 1037ff) along the Denali and Totschunda faults after additional fieldwork this summer. Features of the surface trace had degraded in places due to melting of snow, permafrost, and soil. However, without snow cover, offset of fine-scale features was much clearer at many new localities. We were also able to add additional measurements on glaciers, where offset snow-filled crevasses could be observed. As a result, the revised slip distribution provides considerably more detail and a higher level of confidence than that inferred solely from measurements collected immediately after the earthquake. The primary features of the revised slip distribution are: 1) a broad plateau of roughly 5-m offsets extending from 70 to 170 km east of the epicenter along the central part of the Denali fault, 2) high-slip values of 6.5-8+ m between 170 and 212 km east of the epicenter, 3) the step up from the 5 m plateau to the higher is sharp, occurring over a lateral distance of one kilometer, 4) there are three new, and anomalously high, measurements of 7.2-8.2 m along a 7-km length of the fault within the plateau of 5-m slip values, 5) there was a maximum 3-m offset on the Totschunda fault, which is 0.9-m higher than previously measured; 6) A previously inferred region of high slip in the vicinity of the Trans Alaska Pipeline is less obvious or absent. However, slip in that area is higher than the region to the west of the Delta River, 7) In contrast to geodetic and seismologic slip models that infer low slip and moment release in a zone 100-160 km east of the epicenter, we find continuous surface offsets of about 5 m; 8) A drop to zero slip, previously inferred at the Totschunda-Denali junction appears to be a result of slip values obtained from transfer structures. The smallest robust measurements of lateral slip in the transition zone were about a meter. Denali Fault Earthquake Geology Working Group : T. Dawson

  13. Deformation of the 2002 Denali Fault earthquakes, mapped by Radarsat-1 interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Wright, Tim; Wicks, Chuck

    2003-01-01

    The magnitude 7.9 earthquake that struck central Alaska on 3 November 2002 was the largest strike-slip earthquake in North America for more than 150 years. The earthquake ruptured about 340 km of the Denali Fault system with observed right-lateral offsets of up to 9 m [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 2003] (Figure l). The rupture initiated with slip on a previously unknown thrust fault, the 40-km-long Susitna Glacier Fault. The rupture propagated eastward for about 220 km along the right-lateral Denali Fault where right-lateral slip averaged ˜5 m, before stepping southeastward onto the Totschunda Fault for about 70 km, with offsets as large as 2 m. The 3 November earthquake was preceded by a magnitude 6.7 shock on 23 October—the Nenana Mountain Earthquake—which was located about 25 km to the west of the 3 November earthquake.

  14. Major Ion Content of Aerosols from Denali Base Camp during Summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, C. P.; Burakowski, E. A.; Osterberg, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol samples were collected on Teflon filters at a site up-glacier from Denali Base Camp (2380 m) in Denali National Park, Alaska during May and June of 2013 using an autonomous aerosol sampler powered by solar panels and batteries. The samples were analyzed for major ions via ion chromatography. Surface and fresh snow samples were also collected over the same time period and analyzed for major ions. Ion concentrations in the aerosol samples are completely dominated by NH4+ (mean concentration of 6.6 nmol/m3) and SO4= (mean concentration of 4.0 nmol/m3). Overall, the ion burden in aerosol samples from Denali Base Camp was much lower compared to aerosol samples collected from the Denali National Park and Trapper Creek IMPROVE sites over the same time period. In contrast to the aerosol chemistry, the snow chemistry is more balanced, with NH4+, Ca2+, and Na+ dominating the cation concentrations and NO3-, Cl-, and SO4= dominating the anion concentrations. The higher levels of Ca2+, Na+, and Cl- in the snow (relative to NH4+ and SO4=) compared to relative concentrations in the aerosol samples suggest that dry deposition of sea salt and dust are important contributors to the major ion signals preserved in the snow. This has important ramifications for improving our understanding of the reconstruction of North Pacific climate variability and change from glaciochemical records currently being developed from the 208 m ice cores recovered from the Mt. Hunter plateau (3900 m) during the summer of 2013.

  15. Aftershock Recordings of Nenana Mt. and Denali Fault Earthquakes of 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estes, S. A.; Stachnik, J.; Hansen, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    Recent large earthquakes (M6.7, M7.9) in central Alaska ruptured the Denali Fault in late 2002. This rare opportunity to study this complex fault system required a substantial effort to obtain quality seismic data through the installation of a temporary seismic network. Less than one month after the M7.9 earthquake on November 3, 2002 twenty-six temporary sites were installed within 100 km of the Denali Fault. Of these 26 stations, 12 were Guralp 5-TD strong motion accelerometers recording triggered signals based on site-specific STA/LTA parameters to flash memory. The remaining 14 sites contained broadband seismometers (Guralp 40T or Guralp 3T) recording continuously to Reftek 72A-08 digital acquisition systems with 16- or 24-bit digitization and stored on Reftek 72A-05 hard drives. Stations were visited about every three weeks and remained in operation until the end of June 2003. The success of data recovery was inhibited by faulty power systems and inoperative equipment in harsh, remote Alaskan conditions. Installation and maintenance of this temporary network was performed by Alaska Earthquake Information Center (AEIC) personnel, with equipment provided by AEIC, PASSCAL, and the USGS. Data collected from the Denali Fault temporary network proved indispensable for the location of over 16,000 aftershocks between October 23 and the end of November 2002. Subsequently, we expanded the permanent broadband array along the Denali Fault westward of the 2002 rupture zone. In addition, one of the temporary sites (HARP) has become permanent. Data from this expanded network is recorded in real-time.

  16. Neogene exhumation in the eastern Alaska Range and its relationship to splay fault activity in the Denali fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldien, T.; Roeske, S.; Benowitz, J.; Allen, W. K.; Ridgway, K.

    2015-12-01

    Dextral oblique convergence in the Denali fault system results from subduction zone strain in the Alaska syntaxis that is partitioned into the upper plate. This convergence is accommodated by dextral-reverse oblique slip on segments of the main strand of the Denali fault in the center of the Alaska Range and by splay faults north and south of the Denali fault at the margins of the Alaska Range. Low-temp. thermochronometry applied to basement rocks bounded by faults within the Denali fault system aids stratigraphic data to determine the timing and locations of exhumation in the Alaska Range, which augment regional seismicity studies aimed at resolving modern fault activity in the Denali fault system. The McCallum Creek and Broxson Gulch faults are north-dipping faults that splay southward from the Denali fault near the Delta River and mark the southern margin of the eastern Alaska Range. Apatite fission track thermochronometry on rocks north of the McCallum Creek fault shows rapid cooling in the hanging wall coeval with basin development in the footwall initiating at the Miocene-Pliocene boundary. Apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th)/He ages from plutonic rocks in the hanging wall of the Broxson Gulch fault, west of the McCallum Creek fault, show final cooling in the Miocene, slightly younger than hanging wall cooling associated with the Susitna Glacier thrust further to the west. Neogene low-temp. cooling ages in the hanging walls of the Susitna Glacier thrust, Broxson Gulch, and McCallum Creek faults suggest that these structures have been accommodating convergence in the Denali fault system throughout the Neogene. More recent cooling in the hanging wall of the McCallum Creek compared to the Susitna Glacier thrust suggests that this fault-related exhumation has migrated eastward throughout the Neogene. Convergence on these splay faults south of the Denali fault results in internal contraction of the crust south of the Denali fault, implying that the Southern

  17. Surface Rupture Map of the 2002 M7.9 Denali Fault Earthquake, Alaska: Digital Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    The November 3, 2002, Mw7.9 Denali Fault earthquake produced about 340 km of surface rupture along the Susitna Glacier Thrust Fault and the right-lateral, strike-slip Denali and Totschunda Faults. Digital photogrammetric methods were primarily used to create a 1:500-scale, three-dimensional surface rupture map, and 1:6,000-scale aerial photographs were used for three-dimensional digitization in ESRI's ArcMap GIS software, using Leica's StereoAnalyst plug in. Points were digitized 4.3 m apart, on average, for the entire surface rupture. Earthquake-induced landslides, sackungen, and unruptured Holocene fault scarps on the eastern Denali Fault were also digitized where they lay within the limits of air photo coverage. This digital three-dimensional fault-trace map is superior to traditional maps in terms of relative and absolute accuracy, completeness, and detail and is used as a basis for three-dimensional visualization. Field work complements the air photo observations in locations of dense vegetation, on bedrock, or in areas where the surface trace is weakly developed. Seventeen km of the fault trace, which broke through glacier ice, were not digitized in detail due to time constraints, and air photos missed another 10 km of fault rupture through the upper Black Rapids Glacier, so that was not mapped in detail either.

  18. Strain accumulation across the Denali fault in the Delta River canyon, Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lisowski, M.; Prescott, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Deformation along the Denali fault in the Delta River canyon was determined from geodetic surveys in 1941/1942, 1970, 1975, and 1979. The data were best for the 1975-79 interval; in that period the average strain accumulation was essentially pure right lateral shear at a rate of 0.6+-0.1 murad/a (a is years) (engineering shear) across a vertical plane striking N87oE. The plane of maximum shear is rotated about 30o countercloskwise from the local strike of the Denali fault but closely coincides with the strike of a major linear segment of the fault that begins 50 km farther W. The deformation between 1941-42 and 1970 is consistent with a similar rate of strain accumulation if one removes the coseismic strain step contributed by the 1964 Alaska earthquake. The 1970-75 deformation is poorly defined owing to uncertainties in the 1970 survey, but the strain accumulation during that period is certainly much less than during the 1975-79 interval. The 1975-79 strain accumulation is interpreted by means of a dislocation model which suggests that the Denali fault in the vicinity of the Delta River Canyon behaves as a leaky transform fault.-Authors

  19. Earthquake nucleation by transient deformations caused by the M = 7.9 Denali, Alaska, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Bodin, P.; Larson, K.; Dragert, H.

    2004-01-01

    The permanent and dynamic (transient) stress changes inferred to trigger earthquakes are usually orders of magnitude smaller than the stresses relaxed by the earthquakes themselves, implying that triggering occurs on critically stressed faults. Triggered seismicity rate increases may therefore be most likely to occur in areas where loading rates are highest and elevated pore pressures, perhaps facilitated by high-temperature fluids, reduce frictional stresses and promote failure. Here we show that the 2002 magnitude M = 7.9 Denali, Alaska, earthquake triggered wide-spread seismicity rate increases throughout British Columbia and into the western United States. Dynamic triggering by seismic waves should be enhanced in directions where rupture directivity focuses radiated energy, and we verify this using seismic and new high-sample GPS recordings of the Denali mainshock. These observations are comparable in scale only to the triggering caused by the 1992 M = 7.4 Landers, California, earthquake, and demonstrate that Landers triggering did not reflect some peculiarity of the region or the earthquake. However, the rate increases triggered by the Denali earthquake occurred in areas not obviously tectonically active, implying that even in areas of low ambient stressing rates, faults may still be critically stressed and that dynamic triggering may be ubiquitous and unpredictable.

  20. A watershed approach to ecosystem monitoring in Denali National Park and preserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorsteinson, L.K.; Taylor, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    The National Park Service and the National Biological Service initiated research in Denali National Park and Preserve, a 2.4 million-hectare park in southcentral Alaska, to develop ecological monitoring protocols for national parks in the Arctic/Subarctic biogeographic area. We are focusing pilot studies on design questions, on scaling issues and regionalization, ecosystem structure and function, indicator selection and evaluation, and monitoring technologies. Rock Creek, a headwater stream near Denali headquarters, is the ecological scale for initial testing of a watershed ecosystem approach. Our conceptual model embraces principles of the hydrological cycle, hypotheses of global climate change, and biological interactions of organisms occupying intermediate, but poorly studied, positions in Alaskan food webs. The field approach includes hydrological and depositional considerations and a suite of integrated measures linking key aquatic and terrestrial biota, environmental variables, or defined ecological processes, in order to establish ecological conditions and detect, track, and understand mechanisms of environmental change. Our sampling activities include corresponding measures of physical, chemical, and biological attributes in four Rock Creek habitats believed characteristic of the greater system diversity of Denali. This paper gives examples of data sets, program integration and scaling, and research needs.

  1. Seismological evidence for a sub-volcanic arc mantle wedge beneath the Denali volcanic gap, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.E.; Pasyanos, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Arc volcanism in Alaska is strongly correlated with the 100 km depth contour of the western Aluetian Wadati-Benioff zone. Above the eastern portion of the Wadati-Benioff zone however, there is a distinct lack of volcanism (the Denali volcanic gap). We observe high Poisson's ratio values (0.29-0.33) over the entire length of the Alaskan subduction zone mantle wedge based on regional variations of Pn and Sn velocities. High Poisson's ratios at this depth (40-70 km), adjacent to the subducting slab, are attributed to melting of mantle-wedge peridotites, caused by fluids liberated from the subducting oceanic crust and sediments. Observations of high values of Poisson's ratio, beneath the Denali volcanic gap suggest that the mantle wedge contains melted material that is unable to reach the surface. We suggest that its inability to migrate through the overlying crust is due to increased compression in the crust at the northern apex of the curved Denali fault.

  2. Testing Theory for Fault Branching: Denali to Totschunda, Alaska, November 3, 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, H. S.; Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Kame, N.

    2002-12-01

    Theoretical stress analysis for a propagating shear rupture shows that the propensity of the rupture path to follow a fault branch is determined by rupture speed, branch angle and preexisting stress state (Poliakov, Dmowska and Rice [JGR, 2002], http://esag.harvard.edu/dmowska/PDR.pdf, and Kame, Rice and Dmowska [JGR in press, 2003], http://esag.harvard.edu/dmowska/KRD.pdf). The major transfer of rupture from the Denali to Totschunda fault, during the Denali M 7.9 November 3, 2002 earthquake, is a branch through about 15 degrees to the extensional side. Such branch geometry is predicted to always capture the rupture path when the tectonic pre-stress has maximum compression at a steep angle to the fault, say, 55 degrees or more, and to capture the path exclusively (no continuation of rupture along the initial fault) when the stress angle is very steep, say, 70 degrees or more or when the rupture velocity is not very close to the Rayleigh speed limit. We have no evidence on pre-stress directions very near the branch, but Ratchkovski and Hansen [BSSA, 2002] have recently evaluated stress directions for interior Alaska including near the Denali fault, showing that the maximum principal compression direction rotates clockwise from NW to NNE as one moves from west to east along the fault, whose normal rotates in the same sense. The principal stress direction in the measurement sector closest to the branch makes an angle of 70 degrees with the local direction of the Denali fault at the Totschunda branch site. Further, the average rupture velocity seems to be about 0.8 of the shear wave speed (M. Kikuchi and Y. Yamanaka), although the velocity as the branch was approached is not yet constrained. We have simulated those parameters by the methodology of Kame et al. [JGR, 2003] which uses a 2D elastodynamic boundary integral equation model of mode II rupture with self-chosen path along a branched fault system. Strength of the faults is assumed to follow a Coulomb law with

  3. Eastern Denali Fault Slip Rate and Paleoseismic History, Kluane Lake Area, Yukon Territory, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, G. J.; Haeussler, P. J.; Crone, A. J.; Lipovsky, P.; Schwartz, D. P.

    2008-12-01

    In 2002, the central part of the dextral-slip Denali fault (DF) system generated a M 7.9 earthquake in central Alaska. This rupture included the section of the Denali fault with the highest measured late Pleistocene slip rate, of 12.1±1.7 mm/yr, and the Totschunda fault, with a slip rate of 6.0±1.2 mm/yr. Immediately east of the Denali-Totschunda fault juncture, the slip rate on the eastern Denali fault (EDF) decreases to 8.4±2.2 mm/yr. We present observations of Holocene fault activity on the Yukon part of the EDF (Shakwak segment), which is located about 280 km southeast of the Denali-Totschunda intersection in the vicinity of Kluane Lake. Aerial reconnaissance in 2007, from the Denali-Totschunda fault juncture to the Kluane Lake region revealed a nearly continuously identifiable fault trace, which is occasionally obscured where it is subparallel to glacial landforms. In addition to geomorphic features associated with strike-slip faults, such as shutter ridges and sag ponds, the fault is commonly expressed by a chain of elongate mounds, likely tectonic pushups, 20-70 m in length, 10-50 m wide, and locally up to 10 m high. These appear to have formed by shortening between en echelon left-stepping fault strands that developed in layered glacial sediments. At one location (61°18'30.12" N, 139°01'02.54"W) we measured on the ground a channel offset of 20-25 m. An aerial view showed that other channels in the vicinity, as well as the margins of two mounds, were offset by similar amounts. These channels likely developed after deglaciation 10-12 ka. Using this age and the offset yields a slip-rate range of 1.7-2.5 mm/yr, a minimum value but one that may be close to the actual rate. However, because of uncertainties in age relations between construction of the uplift mounds and channel incision the offset could be younger and we estimate an upper limit of about 5 mm/yr. Adjacent to and south of the Duke River, an approximately 2-km-long section of the fault is

  4. Denali Ice Core Record of North Pacific Hydroclimate, Temperature and Atmospheric Circulation over the Past Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterberg, E. C.; Wake, C. P.; Kreutz, K. J.; Winski, D.; Ferris, D. G.; Introne, D.; Campbell, S.; Birkel, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    While tree ring and lake sediment core studies have revealed a great deal about North Pacific (e.g. Alaska) surface temperature variability over the past millennium, we do not have an equivalent understanding of North Pacific hydroclimate variability or temperatures at high elevations. A millennial-length precipitation proxy record is needed to place late 20th century Alaskan precipitation increases into longer context, and to evaluate hydroclimate changes during the Little Ice Age and Medieval Climate Anomaly. High-elevation summer temperature records would be valuable for understanding the sensitivity of Alaskan glaciers to past warm and cool periods. Here we present an overview of the new Denali Ice Core record collected from the summit plateau (4000 m a.s.l.) of Mt. Hunter (63° N, 151° W) in Denali National Park, Alaska. Two parallel ice cores were collected to bedrock (208 m in length) in May-June 2013, sampled using the Dartmouth continuous melter system, and analyzed for major ions, trace elements, particle concentration and size distribution, and stable isotope ratios at Dartmouth and the Universities of Maine and New Hampshire. The cores are dated using robust annual oscillations in dust elements, methanesulfonate, ammonium, and stable isotopes, and validated using major volcanic eruptions recorded as sulfate, chloride and heavy metal spikes, and the 1963 nuclear weapons testing 137Cs spike. Preliminary analyses indicate a significant increase in both summer temperature and annual accumulation over the 20th century, and significant relationships with major ocean-atmospheric modes including the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. We compare the new Denali record to the Eclipse Icefield and Mt. Logan ice core records and develop composite records of North Pacific hydroclimate and atmospheric circulation variability over the past millennium.

  5. Postseismic Transient after the 2002 Denali Fault Earthquake from VLBI Measurements at Fairbanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacMillan, Daniel; Cohen, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The VLBI antenna (GILCREEK) at Fairbanks, Alaska observes in networks routinely twice a week with operational networks and on additional days with other networks on a more uneven basis. The Fairbanks antenna position is about 150 km north of the Denali fault and from the earthquake epicenter. We examine the transient behavior of the estimated VLBI position during the year following the earthquake to determine how the rate of change of postseismic deformation has changed. This is compared with what is seen in the GPS site position series.

  6. Using 1-Hz GPS data to measure deformations caused by the denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, K.M.; Bodin, P.; Gomberg, J.

    2003-01-01

    The 3 November 2002 moment magnitude 7.9 Denali fault earthquake generated large, permanent surface displacements in Alaska and large-amplitude surface waves throughout western North America. We find good agreement between strong ground-motion records integrated to displacement and 1-hertz Global Positioning System (GPS) position estimates collected ??? 140 kilometers from the earthquake epicenter. One-hertz GPS receivers also detected seismic surface waves 750 to 3800 kilometers from the epicenter, whereas these waves saturated many of the seismic instruments in the same region. High-frequency GPS increases the dynamic range and frequency bandwidth of ground-motion observations, providing another tool for studying earthquake processes.

  7. RETAS Stochastic Model to Study Aftershock Rate Decay of the Denali Fault M7.9 Earthquake, November 3, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Gospodinov, D. K.; Marekova, E. G.; Marinov, A. T.

    2007-04-23

    A RETAS model is used to analyze aftershock rate decay after the Denaly Fault earthquake with a main shock magnitude MS=7.9. We verify different variants of the RETAS model ranging from the limit case Mth = Mmain (main shock) to the case when Mth=Mo (lower magnitude cut-off). We first test the model on simulated data following the MOF (modified Omori formula) model. The results for the Denali Fault sequence reveal the best fit model to be RETAS with a triggering threshold Mth =3.2.

  8. Commissioning MMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Paul; Gramling, Cheryl; Stone, John; Smith, Patrick; Reiter, Jenifer

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses commissioning of NASAs Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission. The mission includes four identical spacecraft with a large, complex set of instrumentation. The planning for and execution of commissioning for this mission is described. The paper concludes by discussing lessons learned.

  9. Extraordinary movements of the Denali caribou herd following the perfect storm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2005-01-01

    Although historic literature is replete with anecdotes about atypical and far-reaching movements of caribou(Rangifer tarandus granti) herds in Alaska, very few such events have been described since the late 1970s proliferation of radio telemetry studies in the region. In September 1992, several herds in Alaska made unusual movements away from their typical year-round ranges as a result of highly unusual weather conditions that affected a broad swath of the state. We describe the movements of 113 radio collared caribou from the Denali caribou herd during this phenomenon and the subsequent year. The majority of caribou in the Denali Herd left their typical range during 26—28 September 1992, traveling distances up to 221 km and remained out of the area through much of the winter. While the out migration was highly consolidated and easily noticed, the return was protracted with caribou drifting back to their typical range from October 1992 to early September 1993. All radio collared caribou that survived the 1992—93 winter ultimately returned to their typical year-round range.

  10. Reproductive characteristics of migratory golden eagles in Denali National Park, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIntyre, C.L.; Adams, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    We describe reproductive characteristics of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) breeding in Denali National Park, Alaska during an entire snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) cycle, 1988-1997. Data on nesting eagles were collected at 58 to 72 nesting areas annually using two aerial surveys. Surveys were conducted during the incubation period to determine occupancy and nesting activities and late in the nestling period to count nestlings and determine nesting success. Annual occupancy rates of nesting areas did not vary significantly, whereas laying rates, success rates, and mean brood size varied significantly over the study period. Fledgling production for the study population varied sevenfold during the ten-year period. Laying rates, mean brood size, and overall population productivity were significantly correlated with abundance of cyclic snowshoe hare and Willow Ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus) populations. Reproductive rates of Golden Eagles in Denali were similar to those of Golden Eagles from other high latitude study areas in North America, but lower than for Golden Eagles from temperate zone study areas in North America.

  11. Reproductive characteristics of migratory golden eagles in Denali National Park, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIntyre, Carol L.; Adams, Layne G.

    1999-01-01

    We describe reproductive characteristics of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) breeding in Denali National Park, Alaska during an entire snowshoe hare( Lepus americanus) cycle, 1988-1997. Data on nesting eagles were collected at 58 to 72 nesting areas annually using two aerial surveys. Surveys were conducted during the incubation period to determine occupancy and nesting activities and late in the nestling period to count nestlings and determine nesting success. Annual occupancy rates of nesting areas did not vary significantly, whereas laying rates, success rates, and mean brood size varied significantly over the study period. Fledgling production for the study population varied sevenfold during the ten-year period. Laying rates, mean brood size, and overall population productivity were significantly correlated with abundance of cyclic snowshoe hare and Willow Ptarmigan (Lugopus lagopus) populations. Reproductive rates of Golden Eagles in Denali were similar to those of Golden Eagles from other high latitude study areas in North America, but lower than for Golden Eagles from temperate zone study areas in North America.

  12. Multi-interferogram method for measuring interseismic deformation: Denali Fault, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biggs, Juliet; Wright, Tim; Lu, Zhong; Parsons, Barry

    2007-01-01

    Studies of interseismic strain accumulation are crucial to our understanding of continental deformation, the earthquake cycle and seismic hazard. By mapping small amounts of ground deformation over large spatial areas, InSAR has the potential to produce continental-scale maps of strain accumulation on active faults. However, most InSAR studies to date have focused on areas where the coherence is relatively good (e.g. California, Tibet and Turkey) and most analysis techniques (stacking, small baseline subset algorithm, permanent scatterers, etc.) only include information from pixels which are coherent throughout the time-span of the study. In some areas, such as Alaska, where the deformation rate is small and coherence very variable, it is necessary to include information from pixels which are coherent in some but not all interferograms. We use a three-stage iterative algorithm based on distributed scatterer interferometry. We validate our method using synthetic data created using realistic parameters from a test site on the Denali Fault, Alaska, and present a preliminary result of 10.5 ?? 5.0 mm yr-1 for the slip rate on the Denali Fault based on a single track of radar data from ERS1/2. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  13. Joint Commission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sunday 1:00 CST, November 6, 2016 Workplace Violence Prevention Resources The Joint Commission has launched “Workplace Violence Prevention Resources,” an online resource center dedicated to ...

  14. Dynamic rupture modeling of the transition from thrust to strike-slip motion in the 2002 Denali fault earthquake, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aagaard, B.T.; Anderson, G.; Hudnut, K.W.

    2004-01-01

    We use three-dimensional dynamic (spontaneous) rupture models to investigate the nearly simultaneous ruptures of the Susitna Glacier thrust fault and the Denali strike-slip fault. With the 1957 Mw 8.3 Gobi-Altay, Mongolia, earthquake as the only other well-documented case of significant, nearly simultaneous rupture of both thrust and strike-slip faults, this feature of the 2002 Denali fault earthquake provides a unique opportunity to investigate the mechanisms responsible for development of these large, complex events. We find that the geometry of the faults and the orientation of the regional stress field caused slip on the Susitna Glacier fault to load the Denali fault. Several different stress orientations with oblique right-lateral motion on the Susitna Glacier fault replicate the triggering of rupture on the Denali fault about 10 sec after the rupture nucleates on the Susitna Glacier fault. However, generating slip directions compatible with measured surface offsets and kinematic source inversions requires perturbing the stress orientation from that determined with focal mechanisms of regional events. Adjusting the vertical component of the principal stress tensor for the regional stress field so that it is more consistent with a mixture of strike-slip and reverse faulting significantly improves the fit of the slip-rake angles to the data. Rotating the maximum horizontal compressive stress direction westward appears to improve the fit even further.

  15. Geophysical data reveal the crustal structure of the Alaska Range orogen within the aftershock zone of the Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Ratchkovski, N.A.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Pellerin, L.; Glen, J.M.G.

    2004-01-01

    Geophysical information, including deep-crustal seismic reflection, magnetotelluric (MT), gravity, and magnetic data, cross the aftershock zone of the 3 November 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake. These data and aftershock seismicity, jointly interpreted, reveal the crustal structure of the right-lateral-slip Denali fault and the eastern Alaska Range orogen, as well as the relationship between this structure and seismicity. North of the Denali fault, strong seismic reflections from within the Alaska Range orogen show features that dip as steeply as 25?? north and extend downward to depths between 20 and 25 km. These reflections reveal crustal structures, probably ductile shear zones, that most likely formed during the Late Cretaceous, but these structures appear to be inactive, having produced little seismicity during the past 20 years. Furthermore, seismic reflections mainly dip north, whereas alignments in aftershock hypocenters dip south. The Denali fault is nonreflective, but modeling of MT, gravity, and magnetic data suggests that the Denali fault dips steeply to vertically. However, in an alternative structural model, the Denali fault is defined by one of the reflection bands that dips to the north and flattens into the middle crust of the Alaska Range orogen. Modeling of MT data indicates a rock body, having low electrical resistivity (>10 ??-m), that lies mainly at depths greater than 10 km, directly beneath aftershocks of the Denali fault earthquake. The maximum depth of aftershocks along the Denali fault is 10 km. This shallow depth may arise from a higher-than-normal geothermal gradient. Alternatively, the low electrical resistivity of deep rocks along the Denali fault may be associated with fluids that have weakened the lower crust and helped determine the depth extent of the after-shock zone.

  16. Stress transfer to the Denali and other regional faults from the M 9.2 Alaska earthquake of 1964

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bufe, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    Stress transfer from the great 1964 Prince William Sound earthquake is modeled on the Denali fault, including the Denali-Totschunda fault segments that ruptured in 2002, and on other regional fault systems where M 7.5 and larger earthquakes have occurred since 1900. The results indicate that analysis of Coulomb stress transfer from the dominant earthquake in a region is a potentially powerful tool in assessing time-varying earthquake hazard. Modeled Coulomb stress increases on the northern Denali and Totschunda faults from the great 1964 earthquake coincide with zones that ruptured in the 2002 Denali fault earthquake, although stress on the Susitna Glacier thrust plane, where the 2002 event initiated, was decreased. A southeasterlytrending Coulomb stress transect along the right-lateral Totschunda-Fairweather-Queen Charlotte trend shows stress transfer from the 1964 event advancing slip on the Totschunda, Fairweather, and Queen Charlotte segments, including the southern Fairweather segment that ruptured in 1972. Stress transfer retarding right-lateral strike slip was observed from the southern part of the Totschunda fault to the northern end of the Fairweather fault (1958 rupture). This region encompasses a gap with shallow thrust faulting but with little evidence of strike-slip faulting connecting the segments to the northwest and southeast. Stress transfer toward failure was computed on the north-south trending right-lateral strike-slip faults in the Gulf of Alaska that ruptured in 1987 and 1988, with inhibitory stress changes at the northern end of the northernmost (1987) rupture. The northern Denali and Totschunda faults, including the zones that ruptured in the 2002 earthquakes, follow very closely (within 3%), for about 90??, an arc of a circle of radius 375 km. The center of this circle is within a few kilometers of the intersection at depth of the Patton Bay fault with the Alaskan megathrust. This inferred asperity edge may be the pole of counterclockwise

  17. Denali Ice Core Record of North Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polashenski, D.; Osterberg, E. C.; Winski, D.; Ferris, D. G.; Kreutz, K. J.; Wake, C. P.; Introne, D.

    2015-12-01

    Ice cores collected from high elevation alpine glaciers in the Alaska Range provide a unique opportunity to investigate changes in the regional climate of southern Alaska and the north Pacific over the past millennium. In this study, we seek to investigate changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in the north-central Pacific Ocean using the deuterium excess (d-excess) record from the Mt. Hunter ice cores collected in Denali National Park, Alaska. A collaborative research team from Dartmouth College and the Universities of Maine and New Hampshire collected two parallel ice cores to bedrock (208 m long) in May-June 2013 from the Mt. Hunter summit plateau (63º N, 151º W, 4,000 m above sea level). The cores were melted on a continuous melter system in the Dartmouth ice core lab and then analyzed for concentrations of major ions and trace elements, as well as stable water isotope ratios. The depth-age scale of the cores was determined using annual layer counting of δ18O and the concentrations of Mg, NH4, and Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) obtained by ion chromatography. The depth-age scale was validated using large, well-dated volcanic eruptions and the spike in 137Cs concentrations associated with nuclear weapons testing in 1963. Preliminary analyses indicate that the full record spans the past millennium. Analysis of the isotope data set extending back to 1938 using reanalysis data shows a positive correlation (p<0.05) between d-excess at the core site and the north-central Pacific SST. The north-central Pacific region of positive SST-d-excess correlation occurs at one node of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and thus the Denali cores are sensitive to PDO variability with low (high) d-excess associated with positive (negative) PDO index values. We also note a significant (p<0.05) declining trend in d-excess from 1938-2012, which we hypothesize to represent a rising proportion of Arctic moisture sources influencing Denali as Arctic temperatures and evaporation

  18. Viscoelastic Postseismic Deformation Following the 2002 Mw7.9 Denali Fault Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Burgmann, R.; Freymueller, J.; Wang, K.

    2015-12-01

    The 2002 Mw7.9 Denali earthquake ruptured over 350 km with coseismic slip of up to ~10 m. Stress-driven relaxation of the upper mantle and afterslip of the fault cause postseismic crustal deformation that has been recorded at GPS stations. We analyze the time series of seven continuous and more than 150 campaign-mode GPS stations. We calculate the cumulative postseismic displacements in every three-year time window since 2003. The obtained postseismic displacements in a similar direction as the coseismic motions are up to ~15 cm in 2003 - 2006 and decrease with time to less than 5 cm in 2012 - 2015. The significant postseismic deformation provides a unique opportunity to better constrain the viscosity structure in the continental upper mantle in central Alaska and to test the contribution of afterslip following the earthquake. We have developed three-dimensional viscoelastic finite element models of the Denali earthquake to study these problems. The model includes an elastic lithosphere and a viscoelastic upper mantle. We assume that the upper mantle is characterized by a bi-viscous Burgers rheology. For simplicity, we assume that the transient Kelvin viscosity is one order of magnitude lower than that of the steady-state Maxwell viscosity. The stress-driven, time-dependent afterslip of the fault is modeled by a 2-km thick weak shear zone. Locked portions of the fault, that is, where no afterslip is allowed, are assumed to be outlined by the 5-m coseismic contours. Our preliminary model indicates that areas within ~100 km to the fault are controlled mainly by the afterslip, and the far-field is controlled mainly by the viscoelastic relaxation of the upper mantle. The modeled afterslip is up to more than 1 m in the first three years after the earthquake. The stead-state viscosity of the upper mantle between the Denali fault and the trench is determined to be on the order of 8 × 1018 Pa s. The viscosity of the upper mantle north of the fault has to be at least one

  19. Patterns of prey selection by wolves in Denali National Park, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Meier, T.J.; Burch, J.W.; Adams, L.G.; Carbyn, L.N.; Fritts, S.H.; Seip, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    The patterns of selection by wolves (Canis lupus) preying on moose (Alces alces), caribou (Rangifer tarandus), and Dall sheep (Ovis dalli) in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska were studied from 1986 through early 1992. Wolves and their prey are legally protected or relatively unharvested in most of the area, and wolf numbers doubled during the study. Based on remains of 294 moose, 225 caribou, and 63 sheep, wolves killed calves and old adults disproportionately, and individuals with low marrow fat, jaw necrosis, or arthritis. Seasonal trends in proportions of various species, ages, and sex of kills were found. During the winters following winters of deep snowfalls, wolves greatly increased the proportion of caribou cows and calves taken. We conclude that in a natural system, wolves can survive on vulnerable prey even during moderate weather, and when snowfall exceeds average, they can respond by switching to newly vulnerable prey and greatly increasing their numbers.

  20. A Record of Rising 20th Century Snow Accumulation from the Denali Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterberg, E. C.; Winski, D.; Ferris, D. G.; Wake, C. P.; Kreutz, K. J.; Campbell, S.

    2015-12-01

    Snow accumulation records derived from ice cores are one of the only direct archives of precipitation changes that extend prior to the instrumental period. In Alaska, the development of centennial scale precipitation records is needed to contextualize the current rapid changes in precipitation and glacial mass balance occurring along the North Pacific margin. Here, we investigate precipitation changes over the last three centuries using an ice core collected to bedrock from Mt. Hunter (63° N, 151° W, 4,000 meters above sea level) in Denali National Park, Alaska. To develop the snow accumulation record, we calculated water equivalent annual layer thicknesses in the ice core by identification of annual peaks in major ions (MSA, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) and water isotopes. We then corrected the annual layer thickness for thinning using three different flow models (Nye, Hooke and Dansgaard-Johnsen) that have been widely used to simulate layer thickness with depth near an ice divide. Each of these models is optimized such that the discrepancy between the annual layer counted age scale and the modeled age scale is minimized. Our results show that water equivalent annual accumulation has increased from 1.43 meters in 1900 to 2.03 meters by 2012, an increase of 42%. The Mt. Hunter accumulation record is regionally representative of precipitation in southwest and central Alaska based on strong correlations with reanalysis precipitation data. Comparisons with ERA-Interim reanalysis data show that years of high accumulation on Denali are associated with stronger southerly winds, warmer sea surface and air temperatures, and pressure anomalies resembling a positive phase of the East Pacific-North Pacific Pattern. Together, this analysis shows that precipitation on Mt. Hunter has a strong positive correlation (R2=0.73) with annual average meridional wind strength in southwestern Alaska, which is related to atmospheric pressure gradients between the

  1. Establishing a Reliable Depth-Age Relationship for the Denali Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, C. P.; Osterberg, E. C.; Winski, D.; Ferris, D.; Kreutz, K. J.; Introne, D.; Dalton, M.

    2015-12-01

    Reliable climate reconstruction from ice core records requires the development of a reliable depth-age relationship. We have established a sub-annual resolution depth-age relationship for the upper 198 meters of a 208 m ice core recovered in 2013 from Mt. Hunter (3,900 m asl), Denali National Park, central Alaska. The dating of the ice core was accomplished via annual layer counting of glaciochemical time-series combined with identification of reference horizons from volcanic eruptions and atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. Using the continuous ice core melter system at Dartmouth College, sub-seasonal samples have been collected and analyzed for major ions, liquid conductivity, particle size and concentration, and stable isotope ratios. Annual signals are apparent in several of the chemical species measured in the ice core samples. Calcium and magnesium peak in the spring, ammonium peaks in the summer, methanesulfonic acid (MSA) peaks in the autumn, and stable isotopes display a strong seasonal cycle with the most depleted values occurring during the winter. Thin ice layers representing infrequent summertime melt were also used to identify summer layers in the core. Analysis of approximately one meter sections of the core via nondestructive gamma spectrometry over depths from 84 to 124 m identified a strong radioactive cesium-137 peak at 89 m which corresponds to the 1963 layer deposited during extensive atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. Peaks in the sulfate and chloride record have been used for the preliminary identification of volcanic signals preserved in the ice core, including ten events since 1883. We are confident that the combination of robust annual layers combined with reference horizons provides a timescale for the 20th century that has an error of less than 0.5 years, making calibrations between ice core records and the instrumental climate data particularly robust. Initial annual layer counting through the entire 198 m suggests the Denali Ice

  2. Paleoseismology of the Denali fault system at the Schist Creek site, central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; Burns, Patricia A.C.; Rozell, Ned

    2016-01-06

    Two hand-dug trenches at the Schist Creek site on the Denali fault system in central Alaska exposed evidence of four surface-rupturing earthquakes on the basis of upward terminations of fault strands and at least one buried, scarp-derived colluvial wedge. Limited radiocarbon ages provide some constraints on times of the ruptures. The youngest rupture (PE1) likely occurred about 200–400 years ago, the penultimate rupture (PE2) is younger than 1,200 years old, the third event back (PE3) occurred between 1,200 and 2,700 years ago, and the oldest rupture (PE4) occurred more than 2,700 and less than 17,000 years ago. Evidence for a possible additional rupture (PE4?) is equivocal and probably is related to earthquake PE4. On the basis of a nearby measured slip rate of 9.4 ± 1.6 millimeters per year and the long interevent times between our documented ruptures, we believe that our paleoseismic record at this site is incomplete. We suspect one undocumented earthquake between PE1 and PE2 and one or perhaps two more earthquakes between PE2 and PE3. We found stratigraphic evidence in the trenches for only four or possibly five (PE4?) earthquakes, but the addition of two or three inferred earthquakes yields a record of eight possible surface ruptures at the Schist Creek site. Our interpretation of the paleoseismic history at the site is consistent with recurrence intervals of several hundred years on this section of the Denali fault system.

  3. Static stress transfer modeling and aftershock statistics for the 2002 Nenana Mountain-Denali Park, Alaska, sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G.; Jones, L. M.; Ji, C.

    2002-12-01

    On October 23, 2002, the Mw 6.7 Nenana Mountain earthquake occurred in central Alaska. While this was a significant event, it became even more interesting as a foreshock to the Mw 7.9 Denali Park mainshock of November 3, 2002, which was the largest earthquake to occur on land in the United States since the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake in southern California. Using a finite-fault rupture model and the theory of deformation from dislocations in an elastic half-space, we have modeled static Coulomb stress transfer from the Nenana Mountain event to the hypocentral region of the Denali Park event and find that the Nenana Mountain event transferred about 0.05--0.1 MPa (0.5--1 bar) of Coulomb stress to that area, encouraging failure of the later event. We have also computed the combined stress transferred to several large regional faults from the Nenana Mountain and Denali Park events using our Nenana Mountain and Denali Park rupture models. We find that the two main events combined transferred more than 0.05 MPa (0.5 bar) of Coulomb stress to the northern 50 km of the Cross Creek fault, a 150-km-long right-lateral strike slip fault in east-central Alaska, and up to 0.05 MPa of Coulomb stress to the Muldrow segment of the Denali fault, west of the Nenana Mountain rupture. It is worth noting, however, that these faults are nearest to the mainshock rupture and thus most prone to errors in the stress transfer modeling. Other major faults in the region, including the Tonzona, Farewell, and Boss Creek segments of the Denali fault, the Castle Mountain fault near Anchorage, and the Yakataga subduction interface, experienced insignificant static Coulomb stress changes, though dynamic stresses were probably much larger. Although the stress changes from these events are significant, the rates of aftershocks triggered by the Nenana Mountain foreshock and by the Denali Park mainshock are extremely low. We describe the rate of aftershocks with the Reasenberg and Jones formulation for

  4. Local amplification of seismic waves from the Denali earthquake and damaging seiches in Lake Union, Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barberopoulou, A.; Qamar, A.; Pratt, T.L.; Creager, K.C.; Steele, W.P.

    2004-01-01

    The Mw7.9 Denali, Alaska earthquake of 3 November, 2002, caused minor damage to at least 20 houseboats in Seattle, Washington by initiating water waves in Lake Union. These water waves were likely initiated during the large amplitude seismic surface waves from this earthquake. Maps of spectral amplification recorded during the Denali earthquake on the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) strong-motion instruments show substantially increased shear and surface wave amplitudes coincident with the Seattle sedimentary basin. Because Lake Union is situated on the Seattle basin, the size of the water waves may have been increased by local amplification of the seismic waves by the basin. Complete hazard assessments require understanding the causes of these water waves during future earthquakes. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Three-dimensional numerical models of flat slab subduction and the Denali fault driving deformation in south-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, Margarete A.; Billen, Magali I.; Roeske, Sarah M.

    2013-08-01

    Early theories of plate tectonics assumed plates were rigid with deformation limited to within a few tens of kilometers of the plate boundary. However, observations indicate most continental plates defy such rigid behavior with deformation extending over 1000 kilometers inboard. We construct three-dimensional (3D) numerical models of the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates in Alaska to investigate the relative controls of flat slab subduction, continental scale faulting, and a non-linear rheology on deformation in the overriding plate. The models incorporate a realistic slab shape based on seismicity and seismic tomography and a variable thermal structure for both the subducting and overriding plates based on geologic and geophysical observables. The inclusion of the Denali fault in the models allows for the portion of south-central Alaska between the Denali fault and the trench to partially decouple from the rest of North America, forming an independently moving region that correlates to what has been described from geologic and geodetic studies as the Wrangell block. The motion of the Wrangell block tracks the motion of the flat slab in the subsurface indicating the subducting plate is driving the motion of the Wrangell block. Models using a composite (Newtonian and non-Newtonian) viscosity predict compressional motion along the northern bend in the Denali fault, consistent with thermochronologic data that show significant late Neogene exhumation in the central Alaska Range, including at Mt. McKinley, the tallest mountain in North America. These 3D numerical models of the Pacific-North American margin in Alaska show the subducting slab is the main driver of overriding plate deformation in south-central Alaska and combined with the Denali fault can reproduce several first order tectonic features of the region including the motion of the Wrangell block, uplift in the central Alaska Range, subsidence in the Cook Inlet-Susitna Basins, and upwelling

  6. Long-period effects of the Denali earthquake on water bodies in the Puget Lowland: Observations and modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barberopoulou, A.; Qamar, A.; Pratt, T.L.; Steele, W.P.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of strong-motion instrument recordings in Seattle, Washington, resulting from the 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali, Alaska, earthquake reveals that amplification in the 0.2-to 1.0-Hz frequency band is largely governed by the shallow sediments both inside and outside the sedimentary basins beneath the Puget Lowland. Sites above the deep sedimentary strata show additional seismic-wave amplification in the 0.04- to 0.2-Hz frequency range. Surface waves generated by the Mw 7.9 Denali, Alaska, earthquake of 3 November 2002 produced pronounced water waves across Washington state. The largest water waves coincided with the area of largest seismic-wave amplification underlain by the Seattle basin. In the current work, we present reports that show Lakes Union and Washington, both located on the Seattle basin, are susceptible to large water waves generated by large local earthquakes and teleseisms. A simple model of a water body is adopted to explain the generation of waves in water basins. This model provides reasonable estimates for the water-wave amplitudes in swimming pools during the Denali earthquake but appears to underestimate the waves observed in Lake Union.

  7. Remotely triggered seismicity on the United States west coast following the Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prejean, S.G.; Hill, D.P.; Brodsky, E.E.; Hough, S.E.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Malone, S.D.; Oppenheimer, D.H.; Pitt, A.M.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.

    2004-01-01

    The Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake in central Alaska of 3 November 2002 triggered earthquakes across western North America at epicentral distances of up to at least 3660 km. We describe the spatial and temporal development of triggered activity in California and the Pacific Northwest, focusing on Mount Rainier, the Geysers geothermal field, the Long Valley caldera, and the Coso geothermal field. The onset of triggered seismicity at each of these areas began during the Love and Raleigh waves of the Mw 7.9 wave train, which had dominant periods of 15 to 40 sec, indicating that earthquakes were triggered locally by dynamic stress changes due to low-frequency surface wave arrivals. Swarms during the wave train continued for ???4 min (Mount Rainier) to ???40 min (the Geysers) after the surface wave arrivals and were characterized by spasmodic bursts of small (M ??? 2.5) earthquakes. Dynamic stresses within the surface wave train at the time of the first triggered earthquakes ranged from 0.01 MPa (Coso) to 0.09 MPa (Mount Rainier). In addition to the swarms that began during the surface wave arrivals, Long Valley caldera and Mount Rainier experienced unusually large seismic swarms hours to days after the Denali fault earthquake. These swarms seem to represent a delayed response to the Denali fault earthquake. The occurrence of spatially and temporally distinct swarms of triggered seismicity at the same site suggests that earthquakes may be triggered by more than one physical process.

  8. The Road Less Traveled: Why the 2002 Denali Rupture Took the Totschunda Exit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. P.; Haeussler, P. J.; Seitz, G. G.; Dawson, T. E.

    2010-12-01

    A particularly interesting aspect of the 2002 M7.9 Denali fault earthquake was the propagation of the rupture from the central Denali fault (CDF) onto the Totschunda fault (TF). New LiDAR data and paleoseismic data provide the basis to more clearly map the structure of the intersection and evaluate controls of fault branching. LiDAR data reveal the CDF-TF intersection is structurally simple. At km 225.7 east of the 2002 epicenter the CDF rupture (trending 125°) bends slightly (5°) south and an unruptured fault trace extends eastward from it. Both faults parallel each other for 1.5 km through a 170 m-wide right bend, with the surface traces 40-90 m apart. At km 227.2 the two faults are 65 m apart. Here, the 2002 rupture, which is now the TF, diverges southeast (138°); the unruptured fault, which is the eastern Denali fault (EDF), continues eastward with a trend of 121°. There is no step or jump; one fault simply becomes two. 2D analyses and numerical simulations (Kame et al, 2003) suggest three key parameters influence branching: orientation of the principal maximum stress with regard to the main fault, rupture velocity near the branch point, and orientation of the branch relative to the main fault. Varying these, Bhat et al (2004) find that for most simulations the CDF rupture continues on the TF. Oglesby et al (2004) performed inverse kinematic and 3D forward dynamic modeling and conclude that a combination of a more favorable orientation to the local stress field and dynamic changes in shear and normal stress favored rupture onto the TF. In contrast, we use paleoseismic data to propose that the state of stress at the intersection, as defined by the accumulated strain on each fault (estimated from slip rate and elapsed time since the most recent event), is the primary control of the branching direction and whether propagation beyond the branch point occurs at all. The EDF slip rate is 8.4 (± 2.0) mm/yr; the TF slip rate is 6 (±1.1) mm/yr (Matmon et al, 2006

  9. Denali Rocks - An Innovative Geology Module for High School Students at the Alaska Summer Research Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, J. S.; Henton, S.; Chebul, E.; White, E.; Johnson, P.; Briggs, D.; Webley, P. W.; Drake, J.

    2011-12-01

    Scientific summer camps give high school students the unique opportunity to interact within the university environment. During July 2011, the Alaska Summer Research Academy (ASRA) provided such an opportunity for over 100 high school students. University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) instructors led a two-week long ASRA module, called 'Denali Rocks', where six student participants from across the USA learned the fundamentals of geology and went on a field expedition to Denali National Park and Preserve, with assistance from the National Park Service. The students documented their field experiences through photography and video recordings. For the videos, they were both news reporters and experts in the field. The module educated students in three important aspects of geosciences: natural hazards, natural resources, and the formation of geological landscapes. Students learned about natural hazards in Alaska by visiting two world leading monitoring facilities at UAF. Day excursions as part of the module included the Fort Knox Gold Mine and the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. The students learned how to identify major rock types, their emplacement, and their deposition in the field. They learned how to read topographic and geologic maps as well as how to use a geologic compass to take strike and dip measurements. Students also used technological equipment such as GPS to track the hikes, a Gigapan camera to create panoramic photos, and a handheld Niton X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for compositional analyses. All observations were documented in their field notebooks. By the end of the field camp, the six students were seasoned naturalists. The video and photographic documentation was used in a final presentation to 150 of their peers and instructors in the other ASRA modules. This was in the format of an evening news program complete with anchors, meteorologists, and lighting and camera crews. The students performed all duties during the presentation, and prepared all the footage

  10. A system for monitoring impact of Denali National Park road traffic on wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Dale L.; Vogt, Kenneth D.; Warburton, Janet

    1997-01-01

    The Denali National Park and Preserve (DENA) is a 6.03 million acre reserve lying between Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska.  The park was established in 1917 as a wildlife refuge, and is managed to maintain the wilderness character.  With the highest mountain in North America, Mt. McKinley, and the easy availability of wildlife for viewing, the park is Alaska's most favored destination point.  From 1972 through 1984, visitation grew from 88, 615 to 394, 426 visitor days per year (GMP, 1986), and then increased by 50,000 per year to 596,000 visitors in 1988.  This demand for motorized access to the park, especially along the 92.5 mile-long park road, has resulted in controversy and claims of traffic disturbance to wildlife [(letter from Superintendent, DENA July 13, 1988) (Anchorage Daily News, May 14, 1995; May 26, 1995; February 5, 1996; June 18, 1996) Leo (1987); Lee Rue (1996)].

  11. The susitna glacier thrust fault: Characteristics of surface ruptures on the fault that initiated the 2002 denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; Personius, S.F.; Craw, P.A.; Haeussler, P.J.; Staft, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    The 3 November 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake sequence initiated on the newly discovered Susitna Glacier thrust fault and caused 48 km of surface rupture. Rupture of the Susitna Glacier fault generated scarps on ice of the Susitna and West Fork glaciers and on tundra and surficial deposits along the southern front of the central Alaska Range. Based on detailed mapping, 27 topographic profiles, and field observations, we document the characteristics and slip distribution of the 2002 ruptures and describe evidence of pre-2002 ruptures on the fault. The 2002 surface faulting produced structures that range from simple folds on a single trace to complex thrust-fault ruptures and pressure ridges on multiple, sinuous strands. The deformation zone is locally more than 1 km wide. We measured a maximum vertical displacement of 5.4 m on the south-directed main thrust. North-directed backthrusts have more than 4 m of surface offset. We measured a well-constrained near-surface fault dip of about 19?? at one site, which is considerably less than seismologically determined values of 35??-48??. Surface-rupture data yield an estimated magnitude of Mw 7.3 for the fault, which is similar to the seismological value of Mw 7.2. Comparison of field and seismological data suggest that the Susitna Glacier fault is part of a large positive flower structure associated with northwest-directed transpressive deformation on the Denali fault. Prehistoric scarps are evidence of previous rupture of the Sustina Glacier fault, but additional work is needed to determine if past failures of the Susitna Glacier fault have consistently induced rupture of the Denali fault.

  12. Earthquake triggering at alaskan volcanoes following the 3 November 2002 denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Power, J.A.; Stihler, S.D.; Sanchez, J.J.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.

    2004-01-01

    The 3 November 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake provided an excellent opportunity to investigate triggered earthquakes at Alaskan volcanoes. The Alaska Volcano Observatory operates short-period seismic networks on 24 historically active volcanoes in Alaska, 247-2159 km distant from the mainshock epicenter. We searched for evidence of triggered seismicity by examining the unfiltered waveforms for all stations in each volcano network for ???1 hr after the Mw 7.9 arrival time at each network and for significant increases in located earthquakes in the hours after the mainshock. We found compelling evidence for triggering only at the Katmai volcanic cluster (KVC, 720-755 km southwest of the epicenter), where small earthquakes with distinct P and 5 arrivals appeared within the mainshock coda at one station and a small increase in located earthquakes occurred for several hours after the mainshock. Peak dynamic stresses of ???0.1 MPa at Augustine Volcano (560 km southwest of the epicenter) are significantly lower than those recorded in Yellowstone and Utah (>3000 km southeast of the epicenter), suggesting that strong directivity effects were at least partly responsible for the lack of triggering at Alaskan volcanoes. We describe other incidents of earthquake-induced triggering in the KVC, and outline a qualitative magnitude/distance-dependent triggering threshold. We argue that triggering results from the perturbation of magmatic-hydrothermal systems in the KVC and suggest that the comparative lack of triggering at other Alaskan volcanoes could be a result of differences in the nature of magmatic-hydrothermal systems.

  13. Moose, caribou, and grizzly bear distribution in relation to road traffic in Denali National Park, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, A.C.; Wright, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    Park managers are concerned that moose (Alces alces), caribou (Rangifer tarandus), and grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) may be avoiding areas along the 130 km road through Denali National Park as a result of high traffic volume, thus decreasing opportunities for visitors to view wildlife. A wildlife monitoring system was developed in 1996 that used 19 landscape level viewsheds, stratified into four sections based on decreasing traffic along the road corridor. Data were collected from 22 samplings of all viewsheds during May-August in 1996 and 1997. In 1997, nine backcountry viewsheds were established in three different areas to determine whether density estimates for each species in the backcountry were higher than those for the same animals in similar road-corridor areas. Densities higher than those in the road corridor were found in one backcountry area for moose and in two backcountry areas for grizzly bears. None of the backcountry areas showed a higher density of caribou. We tested hypotheses that moose, caribou, and grizzly bear distributions were unrelated to the road and traffic. Moose sightings were lower than expected within 300 m of the road. More caribou and grizzly bears than expected occurred between 601 and 900 m from the road, while more moose and fewer caribou than expected occurred between 900 and 1200 m from the road. Bull moose in stratum 1 were distributed farther from the road than bulls and cows in stratum 4; cows in stratum 1 and bulls in stratum 2 were distributed farther from the road than cows in stratum 4. Grizzly bears in stratum 2 were distributed farther from the road than bears in stratum 3. The distribution of moose sightings suggests traffic avoidance, but the spatial pattern of preferred forage may have had more of an influence. Caribou and grizzly bear distributions indicated no pattern of traffic avoidance.

  14. Tectonic tremor and brittle seismic events triggered along the Eastern Denali Fault in northwest Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, J. P.; Aiken, C.; Peng, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Deep tectonic tremor has been observed in a number of plate-bounding tectonic environments around the world. It can occur both spontaneously (i.e. ambient) and as a result of small stress perturbations from passing seismic waves (i.e. triggered). Because tremor occurs beneath the seismogenic zone (> 15 km), it is important to understand where and how tremor occurs to discern its relationship with shallower earthquakes. In this study, we search for triggered tremor and brittle seismic events along the Eastern Denali Fault (EDF) in northwest Canada, an intraplate strike-slip region where previously tremor has not been observed. We retrieve seismic data for 19 distant earthquakes from 9 broadband stations monitored by the Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN). We apply high-pass or band-pass filters to the seismic data to suppress signals from distant events and search for local sources. Triggered tremor signals exhibit high-frequency contents, have long duration (> 15 s), are coincident with passing surface waves of the distant earthquakes, and are observable among nearby stations. Using this simple approach, we have identified 4 mainshocks that triggered tremor in our study region: the 2011/03/11 Mw9.1 Tohoku, 2012/04/11 Mw8.6 Sumatra, 2012/10/28 Mw7.7 Haida Gwaii, and 2013/01/05 Mw7.5 Craige earthquakes. Our initial locations indicate that the tremor source occurs on or near the southeastern portion of the EDF near the fault trace. In addition to the triggered tremor sources, we also identified many 'brittle' events with very short durations triggered by the Rayleigh waves of the 2012/10/28 Mw7.7 Haida Gwaii earthquake. While we were unable to locate these brittle events, they appear to be seismically similar to triggered icequakes observed in Antarctica (Peng et al., 2013) and occur during the dilatational strain changes caused by the Rayleigh waves.

  15. Ground motion in Anchorage, Alaska, from the 2002 Denali fault earthquake: Site response and Displacement Pulses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Data from the 2002 Denali fault earthquake recorded at 26 sites in and near Anchorage, Alaska, show a number of systematic features important in studies of site response and in constructing long-period spectra for use in earthquake engineering. The data demonstrate that National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classes are a useful way of grouping stations according to site amplification. In general, the sites underlain by lower shear-wave velocities have higher amplification. The amplification on NEHRP class D sites exceeds a factor of 2 relative to an average of motions on class C sites. The amplifications are period dependent. They are in rough agreement with those from previous studies, but the new data show that the amplifications extend to at least 10 sec, periods longer than considered in previous studies. At periods longer than about 14 sec, all sites have motion of similar amplitude, and the ground displacements are similar in shape, polarization, and amplitude for all stations. The displacement ground motion is dominated by a series of four pulses, which are associated with the three subevents identified in inversion studies (the first pulse is composed of P waves from the first subevent). Most of the high-frequency ground motion is associated with the S waves from subevent 1. The pulses from subevents 1 and 2, with moment releases corresponding to M 7.1 and 7.0, are similar to the pulse of displacement radiated by the M 7.1 Hector Mine earthquake. The signature from the largest subevent (M 7.6) is more subdued than those from the first two subevents. The two largest pulses produce response spectra with peaks at a period of about 15 sec. The spectral shape at long periods is in good agreement with the recent 2003 NEHRP code spectra but is in poor agreement with the shape obtained from Eurocode 8.

  16. Surface rupture of the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake and comparison with other strike-slip ruptures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, P.J.; Schwartz, D.P.; Dawson, T.E.; Stenner, H.D.; Lienkaemper, J.J.; Cinti, F.; Montone, P.; Sherrod, B.; Craw, P.

    2004-01-01

    On 3 November 2002, an M7.9 earthquake produced 340 km of surface rupture on the Denali and two related faults in Alaska. The rupture proceeded from west to east and began with a 40-km-long break on a previously unknown thrust fault. Estimates of surface slip on this thrust are 3-6 m. Next came the principal surface break along ???218 km of the Denali fault. Right-lateral offsets averaged around 5 m and increased eastward to a maximum of nearly 9 m. The fault also ruptured beneath the trans-Alaska oil pipeline, which withstood almost 6 m of lateral offset. Finally, slip turned southeastward onto the Totschunda fault. Right-lateral offsets are up to 3 m, and the surface rupture is about 76 km long. This three-part rupture ranks among the longest strike-slip events of the past two centuries. The earthquake is typical when compared to other large earthquakes on major intracontinental strike-slip faults. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  17. Transient rheology of the upper mantle beneath central Alaska inferred from the crustal velocity field following the 2002 Denali earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2005-01-01

    The M7.9 2002 Denali earthquake, Alaska, is one of the largest strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded. The postseismic GPS velocity field around the 300-km-long rupture is characterized by very rapid horizontal velocity up to ???300 mm/yr for the first 0.1 years and slower but still elevated horizontal velocity up to ???100 mm/yr for the succeeding 1.5 years. I find that the spatial and temporal pattern of the displacement field may be explained by a transient mantle rheology. Representing the regional upper mantle as a Burghers body, I infer steady state and transient viscosities of ??1 = 2.8 ?? 1018 Pa s and ??2 = 1.0 ?? 1017 Pa s, respectively, corresponding to material relaxation times of 1.3 and 0.05 years. The lower crustal viscosity is poorly constrained by the considered horizontal velocity field, and the quoted mantle viscosities assume a steady state lower crust viscosity that is 7??1. Systematic bias in predicted versus observed velocity vectors with respect to a fixed North America during the first 3-6 months following the earthquake is reduced when all velocity vectors are referred to a fixed site. This suggests that the post-Denali GPS time series for the first 1.63 years are shaped by a combination of a common mode noise source during the first 3-6 months plus viscoelastic relaxation controlled by a transient mantle rheology.

  18. Source Apportionment of sub-Arctic Pollutants at Denali National Park, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The "bromine (Br) explosion" in the springtime Arctic region, associated with rapid ozone depletion events, is now a well-documented phenomenon. The source of Br appears to be sea salt but its cycling between the aerosol and gas phase is not well understood. In this study, we observed the occurrence of elevated aerosol-phase Br concentrations in springtime IMPROVE network PM2.5 measurements in the sub-Arctic Denali National Park (DNP; site elevation, 658 MASL). Episodic elevated aerosol Br levels were observed from February to May in all years in the data record, 1988 to 2013. Anti-correlation (R=-0.54) between O3 and Br for high-concentration Br samples (Br>2 ng/m3, 130 out of 730 springtime samples) implied its possible link to ozone depletion events in the Arctic region. To further identify the sources influencing aerosol observed at DNP, source apportionment using the EPA Positive Matrix Factorization 5.0 model was applied to the entire PM2.5 speciated data from the DNP site. Six sources were derived, including secondary sulfate, a factor containing both Br and NO3-, dust, sea salt, smelting, and a mixture of wildfire and other combustion sources. Concentration weighted trajectory analysis, which was employed to identify the possible source origins, suggested that the Br/NO3- factor originated from northern Alaska in the springtime, and the secondary sulfate was largely associated with Asian sources that included Russian Norilsk Nickel. Sea salt, also originating from northern and northwestern coastal Alaska, was highest in the wintertime when high surface winds and low surface temperatures are expected. Dust, generally enhanced in April, May and June, was traced back to Eurasian sources. The smelting factor had a decreasing trend from 1988 to 2013, consistent with other studies of aerosol metal concentrations in the Arctic. The combustion factor was usually highest in the summertime, originated from near the surface in central Alaska, and was linked to

  19. Calibration of Alyeska Seismographs for the Denali Fault Earthquake of 3 November 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. R.; Jensen, E. G.; Stephens, C. D.; Nyman, D. J.; Hamilton, R. C.

    2003-12-01

    Several of the most important records yet obtained of a large continental strike slip earthquake were produced by some of the 11 strong-motion seismographs operated by the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, six of which recorded the event along the 800-mile Trans-Alaska Pipeline System corridor. These 200 sample/s instruments were designed for detecting strong shaking and generating alarms for the Pipeline Control System, evaluating the potential for damage to the pipeline and supporting facilities, and guiding shutdown, inspection, and other emergency responses in the event of strong shaking. While these instruments, particularly the one at Pump Station 10 (PS10), less than 3 km from the Denali fault, were very well placed to record the Mw7.9 event of 03 November 2002 and its rare examples of high-velocity, low-acceleration records from likely supershear rupture in a large event, they were not intended for seismological and engineering use at very low frequencies and require retrospective calibration for optimal application at these periods. In particular, they require calibration for the accurate recovery of permanent displacements and computing the responses of structures affected by long-period motions. Calibration of the 0.1- to 40-Hz 4-pole Butterworth bandpass filters and Honeywell Sundstrand Q-Flex TM QA1100 TM and QA1200 TM accelerometers from a nearly identical spare Alyeska instrument demonstrated that the low-cut corner frequency differed by 10 to 16% from the nominal value which can cause as much as 20% variation in the recovery of displacement signals from acceleration records. Therefore, we are retrieving the PS10 instrument and both of the neighboring Alyeska instruments in September, 2003, and calibrating their filters, amplifiers, and accelerometers in an effort to recover the most accurate ground motions to about 0.05 Hz, and possibly below. We will verify instrument orientations in the field, test instrument and site noise levels and baseline

  20. 36 CFR 13.930 - Do I need a permit to operate a motor vehicle on the Denali Park road west of the Savage River?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Motor Vehicle Permits § 13.930 Do I... 14.8) and continues to the former Mt. McKinley National Park boundary north of Wonder Lake (mile 87.9)....

  1. 36 CFR 13.930 - Do I need a permit to operate a motor vehicle on the Denali Park road west of the Savage River?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Motor Vehicle Permits § 13.930 Do I... 14.8) and continues to the former Mt. McKinley National Park boundary north of Wonder Lake (mile 87.9)....

  2. 36 CFR 13.930 - Do I need a permit to operate a motor vehicle on the Denali Park road west of the Savage River?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Motor Vehicle Permits § 13.930 Do I... 14.8) and continues to the former Mt. McKinley National Park boundary north of Wonder Lake (mile 87.9)....

  3. 36 CFR 13.930 - Do I need a permit to operate a motor vehicle on the Denali Park road west of the Savage River?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Motor Vehicle Permits § 13.930 Do I... 14.8) and continues to the former Mt. McKinley National Park boundary north of Wonder Lake (mile 87.9)....

  4. 36 CFR 13.930 - Do I need a permit to operate a motor vehicle on the Denali Park road west of the Savage River?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve Motor Vehicle Permits § 13.930 Do I... 14.8) and continues to the former Mt. McKinley National Park boundary north of Wonder Lake (mile 87.9)....

  5. Paleoecology and Paleoenvironmental Interpretations of the Late Cretaceous Lower Cantwell Formation, Denali National Park, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsich, C. S.; Salazar Jaramillo, S.; Jacobus, R. T.; McCarthy, P. J.; Fowell, S. J.; Fiorillo, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The level of diversity of an ancient high-latitude fauna or flora is of interest not just for the study of species evolution and paleogeographic migration patterns, but also for the imminent response to an amplified climate change rate. Climate modelers thus focus increasingly on proxies of Polar Regions. A rich floral and faunal record indicative of a warm high-latitude paleoclimate is presently emerging from the late Campanian-Maastrichtian lower Cantwell Formation in Denali National Park, south-central Alaska. This thick (up to 4000m) alluvial fan succession was deposited during the latest accretionary phase of the Wrangellia terrane to the former southern margin of Alaska. Facies descriptions from outcrops near Sable Mountain and Polychrome Mountain record heterogeneous and laterally discontinuous lithologies characteristic of alluvial and marginal alluvial fan environments: braided channel, sandy channel, crevasse splay, sheetflood, floodplain, and lacustrine. Trace and plant fossils occur predominantly at lithological boundaries. The vertebrate fossil record encompasses tracks that can be attributed to fishes, pterosaurs, large and small non-avian theropods, birds, hadrosaurs, and ceratopsians. Hadrosaur footprints are abundant and record populations with multiple generations present. The pterosaur tracks constitute the northernmost fossil occurrence for these flying reptiles. Bird traces range from small, shore-wading bird tracks to those of a large crane-like bird. Diverse invertebrate tracks include freshwater bivalve, ostracode and gastropod trails, crayfish burrows, beetle and mole cricket tracks, wood borings and feeding traces on angiosperm leaves. Plant impression fossils represent dicotyledonous angiosperm leaves referable to nymphaealean, menispermoid, platanoid, trochodendroid and higher hamamelid groups; magnoliid seeds; diverse broad-leaved and blade-like monocot leaf fragments; the leafy shoots, leaves, cones, seeds and wood of cupressaceous and

  6. Dynamic multistate site occupancy models to evaluate hypotheses relevant to conservation of Golden Eagles in Denali National Park, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; McIntyre, Carol L.; Hines, James E.; Nichols, James D.; Schmutz, Joel A.; MacCluskie, Maggie C.

    2009-01-01

    The recent development of multistate site occupancy models offers great opportunities to frame and solve decision problems for conservation that can be viewed in terms of site occupancy. These models have several characteristics (e.g., they account for detectability) that make them particularly well suited for addressing management and conservation problems. We applied multistate site occupancy models to evaluate hypotheses related to the conservation and management of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in Denali National Park, Alaska, and provided estimates of transition probabilities among three occupancy states for nesting areas (occupied with successful reproduction, occupied with unsuccessful reproduction, and unoccupied). Our estimation models included the effect of potential recreational activities (hikers) and environmental covariates such as a snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) index on transition probabilities among the three occupancy states. Based on the most parsimonious model, support for the hypothesis of an effect of potential human disturbance on site occupancy dynamics was equivocal. There was some evidence that potential human disturbance negatively affected local colonization of territories, but there was no evidence of an effect on reproductive performance parameters. In addition, models that assume a positive relationship between the hare index and successful reproduction were well supported by the data. The statistical approach that we used is particularly useful to parameterize management models that can then be used to make optimal decisions related to the management of Golden Eagles in Denali. Although in our case we were particularly interested in managing recreational activities, we believe that such models should be useful to for a broad class of management and conservation problems.

  7. Recurring Swarms of Deep Long Period Earthquakes in the Denali Volcanic Gap Suggest a Continuation of Volcanic Processes in the Absence of Active Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkamp, S. G.; Ruppert, N. A.; Silwal, V.; Christensen, D. H.; Nye, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Seismicity in the northern segment of the Denali Volcanic Gap clusters bimodally with depth, with dense clusters of earthquakes occurring in the subducting slab at >100 km depth beneath Denali, and within the crust north of the Denali fault at <20 km depth. On January 22, 2014, the Alaska Earthquake Center recorded a Deep Long Period earthquake (DLP), magnitude 1.7, at 40 km depth north of the Denali Fault. The epicenter for this event was <5 km of broadband station TRF, so the depth is well constrained. The DLP event is almost devoid of energy above 5 Hz. Receiver functions for stations TRF and SBL, both <10 km of the epicenter, show Moho depths of 36-40 km.We used waveforms of this DLP as a template event for network matched filtering, which identifies similar signals in continuous time series. We processed this template event from June 1999 to July 2014. We use several matches produced by this template as additional templates, iterating the process. Using this methodology, we identify over 300 DLP's. Events typically come in swarms lasting hours to days with no events exceeding magnitude 2. Swarms are separated by months to years of little detectable activity. A swarm of events on June 30, 2001 coincides with the Broadband Experiment Across the Alaska Range (BEAAR) seismic deployment, and was recorded by 15 broadband seismometers within 100 km of the epicenter. A preliminary waveform inversion for the focal mechanism of this event results in isotropic (implosive) and double couple components.We argue that these DLP's are evidence of magmatic or volatile movement through the sub-arc mantle wedge, even though there is no active volcanism at the surface. Relative relocations, utilizing cross correlated p- and s- waveforms, highlight a nest of seismicity with no structures such as planes or conduits. Lack of planar features, as well as the isotopic component and lack of strike slip to the focal mechanism, may argue against a deep extension of the Hines Creek or

  8. Present-Day Strain Transfer Across the Yakutat Collision in SW Yukon - SE Alaska: The Death of the Southern Denali Fault?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marechal, A.; Mazzotti, S.; Ritz, J. F.; Ferry, M. A.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    In SW Yukon-SE Alaska, the present-day Pacific-North America relative motion is highly oblique to the main plate boundary, resulting in strong strain-partitioning tectonics that link the Aleutian subduction to the west to Queen Charlotte transform to the south. This transition region is also the site of present-day orogeny and accretion of the Yakutat Terrane to the Northern Cordillera. Multiple datasets (GPS, geomorphology, seismicity) are integrated to characterize and quantify strain patterns, with particular emphasis on strain partitioning between strike-slip and shortening deformation. New GPS data straddling the main faults (Denali, Totschunda, Fairweather) indicate that, south of the collision corner, 95% of the Pacific-North America strike-slip motion is accommodated on the plate-boundary Fairweather Fault, leaving near-zero motion on the Denali Fault only ~100 km inboard. In contrast, the fault-perpendicular component is strongly distributed between shortening offshore, in the orogen, and inland outward motion. In the region of highest convergence obliquity, GPS data show a diffuse indentor-like deformation, with strong along-strike variations of the main fault slip rates. Preliminary results of a regional geomorphology study give further information about the Denali Fault, where previous data suggest a velocity decrease from 8 mm/yr (Matmon et al.,2006) to 4 mm/yr (Seitz et al., 2010). A high resolution DEM processed from Pleiades satellite imagery highlights a significant vertical component on the Denali Fault and very little to no strike-slip movement in its southern part. Metric-scale displacements are measured along the "inactive" part of the fault showing recent vertical deformation since the Last Glacial Maximum (~20 kyrs ago). In contrast, significant dextral offsets on post-LGM structures are measured on the southern Totschunda Fault. Ongoing datation of geomorphological markers (Be10, OSL) will give us new slip-rate estimates along the southern

  9. Origin of narrow terranes and adjacent major terranes occurring along the denali fault in the eastern and central alaska range, alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nokleberg, W.J.; Richter, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    Several narrow terranes occur along the Denali fault in the Eastern and Central Alaska Range in Southern Alaska. These terranes are the Aurora Peak, Cottonwood Creek, Maclaren, Pingston, and Windy terranes, and a terrane of ultramafic and associated rocks. Exterior to the narrow terranes to the south is the majorWrangellia island arc composite terrane, and to the north is the major Yukon Tanana metamorphosed continental margin terrane. Overlying mainly the northern margin of the Wrangellia composite terrane are the Kahiltna overlap assemblage to the west, and the Gravina- Nutzotin-Gambier volcanic-plutonic- sedimentary belt to the east and southeast. The various narrow terranes are interpreted as the result of translation of fragments of larger terranes during two major tectonic events: (1) Late Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous accretion of the Wrangellia island arc composite terrane (or superterrane composed of the Wrangellia, Peninsular, and Alexander terranes) and associated subduction zone complexes; and (2) starting in about the Late Cretaceous, dextral transport of the Wrangellia composite terrane along the Denali fault. These two major tectonic events caused: (1) entrapment of a lens of oceanic lithosphere along the suture belt between the Wrangellia composite terrane and the North American Craton Margin and outboard accreted terranes to form the ultramafic and mafic part of the terrane of ultramafic and associated rocks, (2) subsequent dextral translation along the Denali fault of the terrane of ultramafic and associated rocks, (3) dextral translation along the Denali fault of the Aurora Peak, Cottonwood Creek, and Maclaren and continental margin arc terranes from part of the Coast plutonic-metamorphic complex (Coast-North Cascade plutonic belt) in the southwest Yukon Territory or Southeastern Alaska, (4) dextral translation along the Denali fault of the Pingston passive continental margin from a locus along the North American Continental Margin, and (5

  10. Economic Commission Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Summarizing presentations and discussions of the Economic Commission of the International Non-Governmental Organizations Conference on Discrimination Against Indigenous Populations (1977), this report addresses: multinational corporations; the land question; and the Commission's recommended "Plan of Action". (JC)

  11. Radiated energy and the rupture process of the Denali fault earthquake sequence of 2002 from broadband teleseismic body waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Boatwright, J.

    2004-01-01

    Displacement, velocity, and velocity-squared records of P and SH body waves recorded at teleseismic distances are analyzed to determine the rupture characteristics of the Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake of 3 November 2002 (MW 7.9, Me 8.1). Three episodes of rupture can be identified from broadband (???0.1-5.0 Hz) waveforms. The Denali fault earthquake started as a MW 7.3 thrust event. Subsequent right-lateral strike-slip rupture events with centroid depths of 9 km occurred about 22 and 49 sec later. The teleseismic P waves are dominated by energy at intermediate frequencies (0.1-1 Hz) radiated by the thrust event, while the SH waves are dominated by energy at lower frequencies (0.05-0.2 Hz) radiated by the strike-slip events. The strike-slip events exhibit strong directivity in the teleseismic SH waves. Correcting the recorded P-wave acceleration spectra for the effect of the free surface yields an estimate of 2.8 ?? 1015 N m for the energy radiated by the thrust event. Correcting the recorded SH-wave acceleration spectra similarly yields an estimate of 3.3 ?? 10 16 N m for the energy radiated by the two strike-slip events. The average rupture velocity for the strike-slip rupture process is 1.1??-1.2??. The strike-slip events were located 90 and 188 km east of the epicenter. The rupture length over which significant or resolvable energy is radiated is, thus, far shorter than the 340-km fault length over which surface displacements were observed. However, the seismic moment released by these three events, 4 ?? 1020 N m, was approximately half the seismic moment determined from very low-frequency analyses of the earthquake. The difference in seismic moment can be reasonably attributed to slip on fault segments that did not radiate significant or coherent seismic energy. These results suggest that very large and great strike-slip earthquakes can generate stress pulses that rapidly produce substantial slip with negligible stress drop and little discernible radiated

  12. Denali in a box: analog experiments modeled after a natural setting provide insight on gentle restraining bend deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendick, Anne; Bemis, Sean; Toeneboehn, Kevin; Cooke, Michele; Benowitz, Jeff

    2016-04-01

    Despite restraining bends along strike-slip faults creating zones of focused uplift, the relative contributions from parameters such as fault geometry and scale, obliquity, rheological contrasts, and deformation rates are not well-constrained. Similarities between simple analog models (conducted with homogenous materials) and natural restraining bend systems (typically associated with heterogeneous crust) suggest that there are first-order controls on restraining bend deformation that operate independent of heterogeneity in the upper crust. To investigate these controls we examine the Mount McKinley restraining bend (MMRB) of the Denali fault system in south-central Alaska. The MMRB is associated with an ~18 degree bend in the Denali fault and exhibits strongly asymmetric topography and rock uplift. The viscous relaxation time and the ratio of crustal thickness to the restraining bend stepover distance are scaled within the analog model to that of the MMRB. We compare uplift patterns, localization of deformation, formation of new faults, and displacement fields for the model set up and the natural bend to understand the influence of different variables on the overall system to determine what controls the deformation. As shown in previous analog model studies, asymmetric topography characteristically forms with restraining bend angles of <20°. In our model, a continuous, through-going fault within the restraining bend accompanies a narrow zone of deformation on one side of the bend and a broader zone of deformation the opposite side. However, the active thrust faults of the MMRB are purely dip-slip, whereas the thrust faults formed in the model appear to be oblique-slip. The geometry and slip rates of active faults in the MMRB, as well as preliminary thermochronometric data, suggest that the restraining bend itself is migrating relative to previously deformed deposits. Conventional understanding of restraining bends is that fixed bends produce the highest

  13. Denali Geographic 2012 : A University led scientific field experience for High School students at the Alaska Summer Research Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, J. S.; Webley, P. W.; Burke, S.; Chebul, E.; Dempsey, A.; Hastings, H.; Terry, R.; Drake, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Alaska Summer Research Academy (ASRA) annually provides the opportunity for ~150 exceptional high school students to engage in scientific exploration at the university level. In July 2012, University of Alaska Fairbanks instructors led a two-week long ASRA module, called 'Denali Geographic', where eight student participants from across the USA and Canada learned how to observe changes in the natural world and design their own experiments for a field expedition to Denali National Park and Preserve, with assistance from the National Park Service. Each student designed an experiment/observational project prior to the expedition to investigate changes across the expanse of the park. Projects included wildlife documentation; scat and track observations; soil ph and moisture with elevation and vegetation changes; wildflowers species distribution; waterborne insect populations; atmospheric pressure and temperature variations; construction of sustainable buildings to minimize human impact on the park; and park geology comparisons between outcrop and distal stream deposits. The students learned how to design experiments, purchase supplies needed to conduct the work, and select good locations in which to sample in the park. Students used equipment such as GPS to mark field locations; a range finder to determine distance from wildlife; a hygrometer for temperature and pressure; nets and sorting equipments to analyze insects; and the preparation of Plaster of Paris for creating casts of animal tracks. All observations were documented in their field notebooks and blog entries made to share their experiences. Day excursions as part of the module included Poker Flats Research Range, where students learned about the use of unmanned aerial vehicles in scientific exploration; Alaska Volcano Observatory, where students learned about volcanic hazards in Alaska and the North Pacific; Chena Hot Springs and the Ice Museum, where students learned about thermal imaging using a Forward

  14. Braided River Response to Eight Decades of Human Disturbance, Toklat River, Denali National Park and Preserve, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M. E.; Rathburn, S. L.; Booth, D. B.; Capps, D.; Wohl, E.

    2015-12-01

    The spatially complex and stochastic nature of braided rivers complicates quantifying natural rates of sediment transport and limits our understanding of braided river response to human disturbance. The Toklat River in Denali National Park and Preserve, a 135-km-long braided tributary of the Kantishna River draining the north-facing slopes of the Alaska Range, exemplifies these challenges. Eight decades of localized channel confinement due to installation of a causeway in the 1930's and over three decades of gravel extraction since the 1980's have occurred on the Toklat River where it crosses the Denali Park Road. Research associated with these disturbances has developed a unique multi-scalar and temporally diverse dataset that records the responses of the river over a 10-km reach. We have evaluated trends in short-term sediment storage through lidar differencing and analyzed long-term planform change through morphologic metrics such as braiding index, active braidplain width, and percentage of occupied floodplain derived from aerial photographs. Two reference reaches along comparable adjacent braided rivers, with varying levels of confinement and no gravel extraction, illuminate the relative influence of confinement and gravel extraction on sediment flux and planform changes. Preliminary comparisons of lidar-derived DEMs show volumetric decrease in sediment within the active braidplain within the gravel extraction area and downstream of the causeway, suggesting enhanced degradation due to both extraction and confinement. Areas of braidplain degradation also show increasing variance in surface elevations and decreasing braidplain width and braiding index with time. These data support the usage of morphologic metrics to identify long-term degradation trends in large, braided systems where detailed elevation data are unavailable. Despite the pronounced local expression of sediment discontinuity, watershed topography and zones of long-term sediment storage in this

  15. Multi-mineral detrital geochronology applied to a glaciated strike-slip fault system: A case study along a ~250 km transect of the Denali Fault, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benowitz, J.; Layer, P. W.; O Sullivan, P. B.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Roeske, S.

    2013-12-01

    Many applications of detrital geochronology are hampered by issues of provenance leading to limited constraints on sediment source. In particular detrital geochronology investigations on glacial outwash sand from glacier ice fields can be handicapped by the inability to map a basin's sub-glacial geology. More generally, sub-basin scale non-unique magmatic and exhumation bedrock histories can be a factor. Issues can also arise due to lithological variations in bedrock mineral fertility. The use of multiple mineral phase (light e.g., biotite and heavy e.g.., zircon) geochronology approach can help overcome transport and fertility issues. Glaciated strike slip faults, with axial drainages, juxtaposed translated crustal blocks, and across strike asymmetrical rock cooling histories potentially provide a unique geological and hydrological environment to overcome some of the issues of provenance in detrital geochronology while addressing general process questions. The Denali Fault is a right-lateral strike-slip fault system, with up to ~400 km of slip in the Cenozoic. The Alaska Range formed along the Denali Fault and variations in magmatic and rock cooling (exhumation) histories exist across and along the Fault. Most of the sub-arctic fault zone is glaciated, hence is an ideal location to test a multi-mineral detrital geochronology approach on modern sediment from a glaciated strike-slip fault system. Specifically we are interested in constraining the sub-glacial exhumation record along the Denali Fault to evaluate if there is a positive feedback between highly efficient glacial erosion processes and an active fault zone leading to long-term sub-glacial exhumation at rates significantly higher than experienced by the exposed bedrock of the Alaska Range. Modern river and glacial outwash sands were collected at single sites along a ~250 km transect of the Denali Fault, to compare to an existing data set of over 150 bedrock 40Ar/39Ar muscovite, biotite, and K

  16. A teleseismic study of the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake and implications for rapid strong-motion estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, C.; Helmberger, D.V.; Wald, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Slip histories for the 2002 M7.9 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake are derived rapidly from global teleseismic waveform data. In phases, three models improve matching waveform data and recovery of rupture details. In the first model (Phase I), analogous to an automated solution, a simple fault plane is fixed based on the preliminary Harvard Centroid Moment Tensor mechanism and the epicenter provided by the Preliminary Determination of Epicenters. This model is then updated (Phase II) by implementing a more realistic fault geometry inferred from Digital Elevation Model topography and further (Phase III) by using the calibrated P-wave and SH-wave arrival times derived from modeling of the nearby 2002 M6.7 Nenana Mountain earthquake. These models are used to predict the peak ground velocity and the shaking intensity field in the fault vicinity. The procedure to estimate local strong motion could be automated and used for global real-time earthquake shaking and damage assessment. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  17. An adaptive-management framework for optimal control of hiking near golden eagle nests in Denali National Park.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julien; Fackler, Paul L; Nichols, James D; Runge, Michael C; McIntyre, Carol L; Lubow, Bruce L; McCluskie, Maggie C; Schmutz, Joel A

    2011-04-01

    Unintended effects of recreational activities in protected areas are of growing concern. We used an adaptive-management framework to develop guidelines for optimally managing hiking activities to maintain desired levels of territory occupancy and reproductive success of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in Denali National Park (Alaska, U.S.A.). The management decision was to restrict human access (hikers) to particular nesting territories to reduce disturbance. The management objective was to minimize restrictions on hikers while maintaining reproductive performance of eagles above some specified level. We based our decision analysis on predictive models of site occupancy of eagles developed using a combination of expert opinion and data collected from 93 eagle territories over 20 years. The best predictive model showed that restricting human access to eagle territories had little effect on occupancy dynamics. However, when considering important sources of uncertainty in the models, including environmental stochasticity, imperfect detection of hares on which eagles prey, and model uncertainty, restricting access of territories to hikers improved eagle reproduction substantially. An adaptive management framework such as ours may help reduce uncertainty of the effects of hiking activities on Golden Eagles.

  18. An adaptive-management framework for optimal control of hiking near golden eagle nests in Denali National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; Fackler, Paul L.; Nichols, James D.; Runge, Michael C.; McIntyre, Carol L.; Lubow, Bruce L.; McCluskie, Maggie C.; Schmutz, Joel A.

    2011-01-01

    Unintended effects of recreational activities in protected areas are of growing concern. We used an adaptive-management framework to develop guidelines for optimally managing hiking activities to maintain desired levels of territory occupancy and reproductive success of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in Denali National Park (Alaska, U.S.A.). The management decision was to restrict human access (hikers) to particular nesting territories to reduce disturbance. The management objective was to minimize restrictions on hikers while maintaining reproductive performance of eagles above some specified level. We based our decision analysis on predictive models of site occupancy of eagles developed using a combination of expert opinion and data collected from 93 eagle territories over 20 years. The best predictive model showed that restricting human access to eagle territories had little effect on occupancy dynamics. However, when considering important sources of uncertainty in the models, including environmental stochasticity, imperfect detection of hares on which eagles prey, and model uncertainty, restricting access of territories to hikers improved eagle reproduction substantially. An adaptive management framework such as ours may help reduce uncertainty of the effects of hiking activities on Golden Eagles

  19. Landslides triggered by the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake and the inferred nature of the strong shaking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, R.W.; Harp, E.L.; Schulz, W.; Keefer, D.K.

    2004-01-01

    The 2002 M7.9 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake triggered thousands of landslides, primarily rock falls and rock slides, that ranged in volume from rock falls of a few cubic meters to rock avalanches having volumes as great as 15 ?? 106 m3. The pattern of landsliding was unusual; the number of slides was less than expected for an earthquake of this magnitude, and the landslides were concentrated in a narrow zone 30-km wide that straddled the fault rupture over its entire 300-km length. The large rock avalanches all clustered along the western third of the rupture zone where acceleration levels and ground-shaking frequencies are thought to have been the highest. Inferences about near-field strong shaking characteristics drawn from the interpretation of the landslide distribution are consistent with results of recent inversion modeling that indicate high-frequency energy generation was greatest in the western part of the fault rupture zone and decreased markedly to the east. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  20. Large rock avalanches triggered by the M 7.9 Denali Fault, Alaska, earthquake of 3 November 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, R.W.; Harp, E.L.; Schulz, W.; Keefer, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    The moment magnitude (M) 7.9 Denali Fault, Alaska, earthquake of 3 November 2002 triggered thousands of landslides, primarily rock falls and rock slides, that ranged in volume from rock falls of a few cubic meters to rock avalanches having volumes as great as 20 ?? 106 m3. The pattern of landsliding was unusual: the number and concentration of triggered slides was much less than expected for an earthquake of this magnitude, and the landslides were concentrated in a narrow zone about 30-km wide that straddled the fault-rupture zone over its entire 300-km length. Despite the overall sparse landslide concentration, the earthquake triggered several large rock avalanches that clustered along the western third of the rupture zone where acceleration levels and ground-shaking frequencies are thought to have been the highest. Inferences about near-field strong-shaking characteristics drawn from interpretation of the landslide distribution are strikingly consistent with results of recent inversion modeling that indicate that high-frequency energy generation was greatest in the western part of the fault-rupture zone and decreased markedly to the east. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Landslides and liquefaction triggered by the M 7.9 denali fault earthquake of 3 November 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harp, E.L.; Jibson, R.W.; Kayen, R.E.; Keefer, D.K.; Sherrod, B.L.; Carver, G.A.; Collins, B.D.; Moss, R.E.S.; Sitar, N.

    2003-01-01

    The moment magnitude (M) 7.9 Denali Fault earthquake in Alaska of 3 November 2002 triggered an unusual pattern of landslides and liquefaction effects. The landslides were primarily rock falls and rock slides that ranged in volume from a few cubic meters to the 40 million-cubic-meter rock avalanche that covered much of the McGinnis Glacier. Landslides were concentrated in a narrow zone ???30 km wide that straddled the fault rupture zone over its entire 300 km length. Large rock avalanches all clustered at the western end of the rupture zone where acceleration levels are reported to have been the highest. Liquefaction effects, consisting of sand blows, lateral spreads, and settlement, were widespread within susceptible alluvial deposits extending from Fairbanks eastward several hundred kilometers. The liquefaction effects displayed a pattern of increasing concentration and severity from west to east and extended well beyond the zone of landslides, which is unusual. The contrasting patterns formed by the distributions of landslides and liquefaction effects initially seemed to be inconsistent; however, preliminary analyses of strong-motion records from the earthquake offer a possible explanation for the unusual ground-failure patterns that are related to three subevents that have been discerned from the earthquake records.

  2. Response of a 14-story Anchorage, Alaska, building in 2002 to two close earthquakes and two distant Denali fault earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    2004-01-01

    The recorded responses of an Anchorage, Alaska, building during four significant earthquakes that occurred in 2002 are studied. Two earthquakes, including the 3 November 2002 M7.9 Denali fault earthquake, with epicenters approximately 275 km from the building, generated long trains of long-period (>1 s) surface waves. The other two smaller earthquakes occurred at subcrustal depths practically beneath Anchorage and produced higher frequency motions. These two pairs of earthquakes have different impacts on the response of the building. Higher modes are more pronounced in the building response during the smaller nearby events. The building responses indicate that the close-coupling of translational and torsional modes causes a significant beating effect. It is also possible that there is some resonance occurring due to the site frequency being close to the structural frequency. Identification of dynamic characteristics and behavior of buildings can provide important lessons for future earthquake-resistant designs and retrofit of existing buildings. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  3. An adaptive-management framework for optimal control of hiking near golden eagle nests in Denali National Park.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julien; Fackler, Paul L; Nichols, James D; Runge, Michael C; McIntyre, Carol L; Lubow, Bruce L; McCluskie, Maggie C; Schmutz, Joel A

    2011-04-01

    Unintended effects of recreational activities in protected areas are of growing concern. We used an adaptive-management framework to develop guidelines for optimally managing hiking activities to maintain desired levels of territory occupancy and reproductive success of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in Denali National Park (Alaska, U.S.A.). The management decision was to restrict human access (hikers) to particular nesting territories to reduce disturbance. The management objective was to minimize restrictions on hikers while maintaining reproductive performance of eagles above some specified level. We based our decision analysis on predictive models of site occupancy of eagles developed using a combination of expert opinion and data collected from 93 eagle territories over 20 years. The best predictive model showed that restricting human access to eagle territories had little effect on occupancy dynamics. However, when considering important sources of uncertainty in the models, including environmental stochasticity, imperfect detection of hares on which eagles prey, and model uncertainty, restricting access of territories to hikers improved eagle reproduction substantially. An adaptive management framework such as ours may help reduce uncertainty of the effects of hiking activities on Golden Eagles. PMID:21342265

  4. Guidelines for residential commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-31

    Currently, houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict, largely because they are field assembled and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Residential commissioning is a solution to this problem. This guide is the culmination of a 30-month project that began in September 1999. The ultimate objective of the project is to increase the number of houses that undergo commissioning, which will improve the quality, comfort, and safety of homes for California citizens. The project goal is to lay the groundwork for a residential commissioning industry in California focused on end-use energy and non-energy issues. As such, we intend this guide to be a beginning and not an end. Our intent is that the guide will lead to the programmatic integration of commissioning with other building industry processes, which in turn will provide more value to a single site visit for people such as home energy auditors and raters, home inspectors, and building performance contractors. Project work to support the development of this guide includes: a literature review and annotated bibliography, which facilitates access to 469 documents related to residential commissioning published over the past 20 years (Wray et al. 2000), an analysis of the potential benefits one can realistically expect from commissioning new and existing California houses (Matson et al. 2002), and an assessment of 107 diagnostic tools for evaluating residential commissioning metrics (Wray et al. 2002). In this guide, we describe the issues that non-experts should consider in developing a commissioning program to achieve the benefits we have identified. We do this by providing specific recommendations about: how to structure the commissioning process, which diagnostics to use, and how to use them to commission new and existing houses. Using examples, we also demonstrate the potential benefits of applying the recommended whole-house commissioning approach to

  5. The Building Commissioning Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, John A.; Casault, Rick

    This book discusses building commissioning, which is the process of certifying that a new facility meets the required specifications. As buildings have become more complex, the traditional methods for building start-up and final acceptance have been proven inadequate, and building commissioning has been developed, which often necessitates the use…

  6. Get into Commission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limback, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Teachers may be apprehensive about commissioning, and frequently directors do not see it as realistic for their programs. It took the author a while to commission a piece, even though he is often on the composer side. The author asserts that there's already plenty of high-quality literature out there to keep teachers busy, but a bigger factor is…

  7. THE COLLEGE COMMISSIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOOKS, JOYCE LANE

    THE HISTORIES, ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES, MODES OF OPERATION, GOALS, AND SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES OF EIGHT COLLEGE SCIENCE COMMISSIONS ARE PRESENTED. THE GOAL OF THE EIGHT COLLEGE SCIENCE COMMISSIONS IS TO BRING UNDERGRADUATE SCIENCE INSTRUCTION CLOSER TO THE RESEARCH FRONTIER, UPDATE COURSES, AND FOSTER THE SPIRIT OF INQUIRY. INTERCOMMISSION…

  8. Investigating the 'Iron Hypothesis' in the North Pacific: Trans-Pacific Dust and Methanesulfonate (MSA) in the Denali Ice Core, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, P. L.; Osterberg, E. C.; Winski, D.; Ferris, D. G.; Koffman, B. G.; Kreutz, K. J.; Wake, C. P.; Campbell, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Oceanic deposition of Asian-sourced, Iron-rich dust particulate has been linked to enhanced phytoplankton productivity in regions of the Pacific Ocean. High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) ocean regions, such as the North Pacific, are hypothesized to play a significant role in changing atmospheric CO­2 concentrations on glacial-interglacial timescales. Phytoplankton blooms generate methanesulfonate (MSA), an atmospheric oxidation product of dimethylsulfide (DMS) that is readily aerosolized and deposited in nearby glacial ice. In the summer of 2013, an NSF-funded team from Dartmouth College and the Universities of Maine and New Hampshire collected two 1000 year-long parallel ice cores to bedrock from the summit plateau of Mount Hunter in Denali National Park, Alaska (62.940° N, 151.088° W, 3912 m elevation). The Mt. Hunter ice core site is well situated to record changes in trans-Pacific dust flux and MSA emissions in the North Pacific. Here we investigate the history of dust flux to Denali over the last millennium using major and trace element chemistry and microparticle concentration and size distribution data from the Mt. Hunter cores. We evaluate potential controlling mechanisms on Denali dust flux including conditions at Asian dust sources (storminess, wind speed, precipitation), the strength of the Aleutian Low, and large-scale climate modes such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. We also evaluate the Mt. Hunter record for relationships between dust flux and MSA concentrations to investigate whether dust fertilization enhanced North Pacific phytoplankton production over the past 1000 years. Future work will create a composite North Pacific dust record using new and existing Mt. Logan ice core records to evaluate these relationships over the entire Holocene.

  9. Water Quality of Camp Creek, Costello Creek, and Other Selected Streams on the South Side of Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabets, Timothy P.; Whitman, Matthew S.

    2002-01-01

    The Camp and Costello Creek watersheds are located on the south side of Denali National Park and Preserve. The Dunkle Mine, an abandoned coal mine, is located near the mouth of Camp Creek. Due to concern about runoff from the mine and its possible effects on the water quality and aquatic habitat of Camp Creek and its receiving stream, Costello Creek, these two streams were studied during the summer runoff months (June to September) in 1999 and 2000 as part of a cooperative study with the National Park Service. Since the south side of Denali National Park and Preserve is part of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment Cook Inlet Basin study unit, an additional part of this study included analysis of existing water-quality data at 23 sites located throughout the south side of Denali National Park and Preserve to compare with the water quality of Camp and Costello Creeks and to obtain a broader understanding of the water quality in this area of the Cook Inlet Basin. Analysis of water column, bed sediment, fish, invertebrate, and algae data indicate no effects on the water quality of Camp Creek from the Dunkle Mine. Although several organic compounds were found in the streambed of Camp Creek, all concentrations were below recommended levels for aquatic life and most of the concentrations were below the minimum reporting level of 50 ?g/kg. Trace element concentrations of arsenic, chromium, and nickel in the bed sediments of Camp Creek exceeded threshold effect concentrations (TEC), but concentrations of these trace elements were also exceeded in streambed sediments of Costello Creek above Camp Creek. Since the percent organic carbon in Camp Creek is relatively high, the toxicity quotient of 0.55 is only slightly above the threshold value of 0.5. Costello Creek has a relatively low organic carbon content and has a higher toxicity quotient of 1.19. Analysis of the water-quality data for other streams located in the south side of Denali National Park

  10. Commission 53: Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan; Lecavelier des Etangs, Alain; Mayor, Michel; Bodenheimer, Peter; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Mardling, Rosemary; Minniti, Dante; Queloz, Didier

    2012-04-01

    Commission 53 was created at the 2006 Prague General Assembly (GA) of the IAU, in recognition of the outburst of astronomical progress in the field of extrasolar planet discovery, characterization, and theoretical work that has occurred since the discovery of the first planet in orbit around a solar-type star in 1995. Commission 53 is the logical successor to the IAU Working Group on Extrasolar Planets (WGESP), which ended its six years of existence in August 2006. The founding President of Commission 53 was Michael Mayor, in honor of his seminal contributions to this new field of astronomy. The current President is Alan Boss, the former chair of the WGESP. The current members of the Commission 53 (C53) Organizing Committee (OC) began their service in August 2009 at the conclusion of the Rio de Janeiro IAU GA.

  11. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

  13. Commissioning the LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, R.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Schmerge, J.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently under construction at SLAC. The injector section, from drive laser and RF photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in fall 2006. Initial system commissioning with an electron beam was completed in August 2007, with the goal of a 1.2-micron emittance in a 1-nC bunch clearly demonstrated. The second phase of commissioning, including second bunch compressor and full linac, is planned for 2008, with FEL commissioning in 2009. We report experimental results and experience gained in the first phase of commissioning, including the photo-cathode drive laser, RF gun, photocathode, S-band and X-band RF systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  14. Commission 4: Ephemerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio; Kaplan, George H.; Krasinsky, George A.; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Bangert, John A.; Hohenkerk, Catherine; Lara, Martin; Pitjeva, Elena V.; Urban, Sean E.; Vondrak, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Dr. George Kaplan, the current Vice-President of the Commission was nominated to be the new President. Dr. Catherine Hohenkerk was elected to be the next Vice-President of the Commission. As for the Membership of the Organizing Committee, Dr. Vondrak stepped down and Drs William Folkner of JPL and Steve Bell of HMNAO have been added. In the below, we present summaries of the reports from various institutions presented at the business session.

  15. Commissioning Experience of SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2007-07-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex consists of a 2.5 MeV H{sup -} front-end injector system, a 186 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, and associated beam transport lines. The linac was commissioned in five discrete runs, starting in 2002 and completed in 2005. The accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines were commissioned in two runs in January-February and April 2006. With the completed commissioning of the SNS accelerator, the facility has begun initial low-power operations. In the course of beam commissioning, most beam performance parameters and beam intensity goals have been achieved at low duty factor. A number of beam dynamics measurements have been performed, including emittance evolution, transverse coupling in the ring, beam instability thresholds, and beam distributions on the target. The commissioning results, achieved beam performance and initial operating experience of the SNS linac will be presented.

  16. Spatial variations in focused exhumation along a continental-scale strike-slip fault: The Denali fault of the eastern Alaska Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benowitz, J.A.; Layer, P.W.; Armstrong, P.; Perry, S.E.; Haeussler, P.J.; Fitzgerald, P.G.; VanLaningham, S.

    2011-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission-track, and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronological techniques were used to determine the Neogene exhumation history of the topographically asymmetric eastern Alaska Range. Exhumation cooling ages range from ~33 Ma to ~18 Ma for 40Ar/39Ar biotite, ~18 Ma to ~6 Ma for K-feldspar minimum closure ages, and ~15 Ma to ~1 Ma for apatite fission-track ages, and apatite (U-Th)/He cooling ages range from ~4 Ma to ~1 Ma. There has been at least ~11 km of exhumation adjacent to the north side of Denali fault during the Neogene inferred from biotite 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology. Variations in exhumation history along and across the strike of the fault are influenced by both far-field effects and local structural irregularities. We infer deformation and rapid exhumation have been occurring in the eastern Alaska Range since at least ~22 Ma most likely related to the continued collision of the Yakutat microplate with the North American plate. The Nenana Mountain region is the late Pleistocene to Holocene (~past 1 Ma) primary locus of tectonically driven exhumation in the eastern Alaska Range, possibly related to variations in fault geometry. During the Pliocene, a marked increase in climatic instability and related global cooling is temporally correlated with an increase in exhumation rates in the eastern Alaska Range north of the Denali fault system.

  17. Commissioning of CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Hutton

    1994-06-01

    Construction of the CEBAF accelerator, a 4 GeV CW recirculating linac, is virtually complete. The 338 power sources and superconducting RF cavities, which have all run above nominal operating gradient in vertical tests (average 10.7 MeV/m), are installed. All the major components of the nine recirculation arcs are installed and aligned. Pre-commissioning was performed in parallel with construction. Ninety-nine superconducting cavities were operated simultaneously at the nominal gradient of 5 MeV/m. A maximum beam current of 110 PA CW (ZOO PA design) was reached. A cryomodule with eight cavities has operated at 8 MeV/m. Commissioning of the entire machine began in May 94. Results obtained during commissioning of the two linacs and the first arc are presented. 600 MeV beam is ready to be brought to the first experimental hall meeting a DOE milestone established in 1988.

  18. ATF2 Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, A.; Christian, G.; Parker, B.; Schulte, D.; Delahaye, J.-P.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.; Wolski, A.; Elsen, E.; Sanuki, T.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Ross, M.; Wendt, M.; Takahashi, T.; Bai, S.; Gao, J.; Bolzon, B.; Geffroy, N.; Jeremie, A.; Apsimon, R.; Burrows, P.; /Oxford U., JAI /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Orsay, LAL /Phang Accelerator Lab /Royal Holloway, U. of London /SLAC /Daresbury /University Coll. London /Manchester U. /Univ. of Tokyo U.

    2009-10-30

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line that aims to focus the low-emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a beam size of about 37 nm, and at the same time to demonstrate nm beam stability, using numerous advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools. The construction has been finished at the end of 2008 and the beam commissioning of ATF2 has started in December of 2008. ATF2 is constructed and commissioned by ATF international collaborations with strong US, Asian and European participation.

  19. Application of threshold concepts to ecological management problems: occupancy of Golden Eagles in Denali National Park, Alaska: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Mitchell J.; Martin, Julien; Nichols, James D.; McIntyre, Carol; McCluskie, Maggie C.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Lubow, Bruce L.; Runge, Michael C.; Edited by Guntenspergen, Glenn R.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we demonstrate the application of the various classes of thresholds, detailed in earlier chapters and elsewhere, via an actual but simplified natural resource management case study. We intend our example to provide the reader with the ability to recognize and apply the theoretical concepts of utility, ecological and decision thresholds to management problems through a formalized decision-analytic process. Our case study concerns the management of human recreational activities in Alaska’s Denali National Park, USA, and the possible impacts of such activities on nesting Golden Eagles, Aquila chrysaetos. Managers desire to allow visitors the greatest amount of access to park lands, provided that eagle nesting-site occupancy is maintained at a level determined to be acceptable by the managers themselves. As these two management objectives are potentially at odds, we treat minimum desired occupancy level as a utility threshold which, then, serves to guide the selection of annual management alternatives in the decision process. As human disturbance is not the only factor influencing eagle occupancy, we model nesting-site dynamics as a function of both disturbance and prey availability. We incorporate uncertainty in these dynamics by considering several hypotheses, including a hypothesis that site occupancy is affected only at a threshold level of prey abundance (i.e., an ecological threshold effect). By considering competing management objectives and accounting for two forms of thresholds in the decision process, we are able to determine the optimal number of annual nesting-site restrictions that will produce the greatest long-term benefits for both eagles and humans. Setting a utility threshold of 75 occupied sites, out of a total of 90 potential nesting sites, the optimization specified a decision threshold at approximately 80 occupied sites. At the point that current occupancy falls below 80 sites, the recommended decision is to begin restricting

  20. 78 FR 12412 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Commission on February 14, 2013, and identified in the notice for such hearing, which was published in 78 FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  1. 77 FR 70204 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... Commission on November 15, 2012, and identified in the notice for such hearing, which was published in 77 FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance.

  3. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

  4. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance.

  5. Commission on Liberal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazzard, George W.

    1976-01-01

    Study emphasis within the Commission on Liberal Learning during the year was on the role of liberal education in the society of the future. The relationship of undergraduate liberal education to the world macro-problem--population growth, industrial production, food, materials and energy scarcities, pollution and environmental degradation--was…

  6. The role of thrust faulting in the formation of the eastern Alaska Range: Thermochronological constraints from the Susitna Glacier Thrust Fault region of the intracontinental strike-slip Denali Fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Steven J.; Fitzgerald, Paul G.; Benowitz, Jeff A.; Roeske, Sarah M.

    2014-11-01

    Horizontal-slip along restraining bends of strike-slip faults is often partitioned into a vertical component via splay faults. The active Susitna Glacier Thrust Fault (SGTF), as shown by its initiation of the 2002 M7.9 Denali Fault earthquake, lies south of, and intersects the dextral strike-slip Denali Fault. Geochronology and thermochronology data from samples across the SGTF constrain the region's tectonic history and the role of thrusting in the formation of the eastern Alaska Range south of the Denali fault. U-Pb zircon ages indicate intrusion of plutons in the footwall (~57 Ma) and hanging wall (~98 Ma). These U-Pb zircon ages correlate to those from the Ruby Batholith/Kluane Terrane ~400 km east along the Denali Fault, supporting geologic correlations and hence constraints on long-term slip rates. 40Ar/39Ar mica and K-feldspar data from footwall and hanging wall samples (~54 to ~46 Ma) reflect cooling following magmatism and/or regional Eocene metamorphism related to ridge subduction. Combined with apatite fission track data (ages 43-28 Ma) and thermal models, both sides of the SGTF acted as a coherent block during the Eocene and early Oligocene. Contrasting apatite (U-Th)/He ages across the Susitna Glacier (~25 Ma footwall, ~15 Ma hanging wall) suggest initiation of faulting during the middle Miocene. Episodic cooling and exhumation is related to thrusting on known or hypothesized faults that progressively activate due to varying partition of strain along the Denali Fault associated with changing kinematics and plate interaction (Yakutat microplate collision, flat-slab subduction and relative plate motion change) at the southern Alaskan plate margin.

  7. Rupture process of the M 7.9 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake: Subevents, directivity, and scaling of high-frequency ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.

    2004-01-01

    Displacement waveforms and high-frequency acceleration envelopes from stations at distances of 3-300 km were inverted to determine the source process of the M 7.9 Denali fault earthquake. Fitting the initial portion of the displacement waveforms indicates that the earthquake started with an oblique thrust subevent (subevent # 1) with an east-west-striking, north-dipping nodal plane consistent with the observed surface rupture on the Susitna Glacier fault. Inversion of the remainder of the waveforms (0.02-0.5 Hz) for moment release along the Denali and Totschunda faults shows that rupture proceeded eastward on the Denali fault, with two strike-slip subevents (numbers 2 and 3) centered about 90 and 210 km east of the hypocenter. Subevent 2 was located across from the station at PS 10 (Trans-Alaska Pipeline Pump Station #10) and was very localized in space and time. Subevent 3 extended from 160 to 230 km east of the hypocenter and had the largest moment of the subevents. Based on the timing between subevent 2 and the east end of subevent 3, an average rupture velocity of 3.5 km/sec, close to the shear wave velocity at the average rupture depth, was found. However, the portion of the rupture 130-220 km east of the epicenter appears to have an effective rupture velocity of about 5.0 km/ sec, which is supershear. These two subevents correspond approximately to areas of large surface offsets observed after the earthquake. Using waveforms of the M 6.7 Nenana Mountain earthquake as empirical Green's functions, the high-frequency (1-10 Hz) envelopes of the M 7.9 earthquake were inverted to determine the location of high-frequency energy release along the faults. The initial thrust subevent produced the largest high-frequency energy release per unit fault length. The high-frequency envelopes and acceleration spectra (>0.5 Hz) of the M 7.9 earthquake can be simulated by chaining together rupture zones of the M 6.7 earthquake over distances from 30 to 180 km east of the

  8. Commissioning the Majorana Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenqin; Majorana Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator deploys high purity germanium (HPGe) detector modules to search for neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decay in 76Ge. The experiment is aimed at demonstrating the technical feasibility and low backgrounds for a next generation Ge-based BBz experiment. The program of testing and commissioning the Demonstrator modules is a critical step to debug and improve the experimental apparatus, to establish and refine operational procedures, and to develop data analysis tools. In this talk, we will discuss our experience commissioning the Demonstrator modules and show how this program leads to successful data-taking. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the April 1996 reporting period from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors` Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking. Included are issuances pertaining to: (1) Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (2) Georgia Tech Research Reactor, (3) River Bend Station, (4) Millstone Unit 1, (5) Thermo-Lag fire barrier material, and (6) Louisiana Energy Services.

  10. Limnological and water-quality data from Wonder Lake, Chilchukabena Lake, and Lake Minchumina, Denali National Park and Preserve and surrounding area, Alaska, June 2006-August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, D.A.; Arp, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Growing visitor traffic and resource use, as well as natural and anthropogenic land and climatic changes, can place increasing stress on lake ecosystems in Denali National Park and Preserve. Baseline data required to substantiate impact assessment in this sub-arctic region is sparse to non-existent. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, conducted a water-quality assessment of several large lakes in and around the Park from June 2006 to August 2008. Discrete water-quality samples, lake profiles of pH, specific conductivity, dissolved-oxygen concentration, water temperature, turbidity, and continuous-record temperature profile data were collected from Wonder Lake, Chilchukabena Lake, and Lake Minchumina. In addition, zooplankton, snow chemistry data, fecal coliform, and inflow/outflow water-quality samples also were collected from Wonder Lake.

  11. Mid-infrared emission prior to the October-November 2002 Earthquake Sequence on the Denali Fault, Alaska analyzed by remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzounov, D.; Freund, F. T.

    2002-12-01

    Earth-atmosphere interactions during and prior to the 2002 Denali (Alaska) earthquake sequence are the subject of this preliminary study. Slow changes in temperature before large earthquakes have been reported for a long time [Milne, 1913]. Global satellite thermal imaging data indicate long-lived thermal fields associated with large linear structures and fault systems [Carreno at al, 2001] but also short-lived "thermal anomalies" prior to major earthquakes. There is still is no comprehensive explanation for this short-lived increase in IR emission that has been accepted in the science community. A new mechanism has recently been proposed BASED ON the appearance of hole-type electronic charge carriers in rocks subjected to transient stress [Freund, 2002]. If such charge carriers are activated in a stressed rock volume and reach the earth's surface, they should lead to an enhanced emission in the 8-12 µm region similar to the "thermal anomalies"[ Tronin, 2000, Ouzounov and al, 2002] and to the laboratory rock deformation experiments [Geng et al., 1999, Freund at al, 2002]. Using data from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) onboard NASA's TERRA satellite, we have begun analyzing surface emissivity and land surface temperatures for THE entire Alaska region during 2002. Specifically, we look for correlations between atmospheric dynamics and solid Earth processes prior to the Oct. 23 and Nov. 3, 2002 earthquakes. With TERRA/MODIS covering the entire Earth every 1-2 days in 36 wavelength bands (20 visible and 16 infrared) we find evidence for anomalous thermal emission pattern apparently related to pre-seismic activity along the Denali. We also find changes in the aerosol content and in atmospheric instability parameters, possibly due to ion emission and to changes in the ground surface potential.

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  13. A Guide to Building Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    Commissioning is the process of verifying that a building's heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting systems perform correctly and efficiently. Without commissioning, system and equipment problems can result in higher than necessary utility bills and unexpected and costly equipment repairs. This report reviews the benefits of commissioning, why it is a requirement for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, and why building codes are gradually adopting commissioning activities into code.

  14. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hatfield; F. Casagrande; I. Campisi; P. Gurd; M. Howell; D. Stout; H. Strong; D. Arenius; J. Creel; K. Dixon; V. Ganni; and P. Knudsen

    2005-08-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  15. SNS Cryogenic Systems Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, D.; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Gurd, P.; Howell, M.; Stout, D.; Strong, H.; Arenius, D.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2006-04-27

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The cold section of the Linac consists of 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities cooled to 2.1K by a 2400 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. The major cryogenic system components include warm helium compressors with associated oil removal and gas management, 4.5K cold box, 7000L liquid helium dewar, 2.1K cold box (consisting of 4 stages of cold compressors), gaseous helium storage, helium purification and gas impurity monitoring system, liquid nitrogen storage and the cryogenic distribution transfer line system. The overall system commissioning and future plans will be presented.

  16. 78 FR 32295 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... notice for such hearing, which was published in 78 FR 24785, April 26, 2013. Please note that the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  17. 77 FR 28420 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... the notice for such hearing, which was published in 77 FR 23319, April 18, 2012. Authority: Pub. L. 91... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  18. Future of multistate regional commissions

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, M.

    1980-04-01

    Multistate regional commissions in the United States have been used since 1965. The largest program has been that of the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC). Institutional and financial barriers have been the most difficult problems encountered by the ARC and other programs (such as Title V commissions). Despite the imperfect performance of the existing regional commissions, they offer a demonstration that some improvement in governmental performance can be achieved. There is virtual unanimity among the nation's governors that this is the route for Federal state relations to follow. Also, the commission route is viewed privately as the most socially acceptable means to have a beneficial impact on government performance. (SAC)

  19. Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2012-04-01

    Commission 10 of the International Astronomical Union has more than 650 members who study a wide range of activity phenomena produced by our nearest star, the Sun. Solar activity is intrinsically related to solar magnetic fields and encompasses events from the smallest energy releases (nano- or even picoflares) to the largest eruptions in the Solar System, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which propagate into the Heliosphere reaching the Earth and beyond. Solar activity is manifested in the appearance of sunspot groups or active regions, which are the principal sources of activity phenomena from the emergence of their magnetic flux through their dispersion and decay. The period 2008-2009 saw an unanticipated extended solar cycle minimum and unprecedentedly weak polar-cap and heliospheric field. Associated with that was the 2009 historical maximum in galactic cosmic rays flux since measurements begun in the middle of the 20th Century. Since then Cycle 24 has re-started solar activity producing some spectacular eruptions observed with a fleet of spacecraft and ground-based facilities. In the last triennium major advances in our knowledge and understanding of solar activity were due to continuing success of space missions as SOHO, Hinode, RHESSI and the twin STEREO spacecraft, further enriched by the breathtaking images of the solar atmosphere produced by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) launched on 11 February 2010 in the framework of NASA's Living with a Star program. In August 2012, at the time of the IAU General Assembly in Beijing when the mandate of this Commission ends, we will be in the unique position to have for the first time a full 3-D view of the Sun and solar activity phenomena provided by the twin STEREO missions about 120 degrees behind and ahead of Earth and other spacecraft around the Earth and ground-based observatories. These new observational insights are continuously posing new questions, inspiring and advancing theoretical analysis and

  20. Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Melrose, Donald B.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk; Harrison, Richard A.; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Tsuneta, Saku; Vršnak, Bojan; Wang, Jing-Xiu

    Commission 10 deals with solar activity in all of its forms, ranging from the smallest nanoflares to the largest coronal mass ejections. This report reviews scientific progress over the roughly two-year period ending in the middle of 2008. This has been an exciting time in solar physics, highlighted by the launches of the Hinode and STEREO missions late in 2006. The report is reasonably comprehensive, though it is far from exhaustive. Limited space prevents the inclusion of many significant results. The report is divided into the following sections: Photosphere and chromosphere; Transition region; Corona and coronal heating; Coronal jets; flares; Coronal mass ejection initiation; Global coronal waves and shocks; Coronal dimming; The link between low coronal CME signatures and magnetic clouds; Coronal mass ejections in the heliosphere; and Coronal mass ejections and space weather. Primary authorship is indicated at the beginning of each section.

  1. SSCL Commissioning and Operations

    SciTech Connect

    1992-03-31

    The SSC, with an energy of 20 TeV/Beam, requires a sequence of individual accelerators of increasing energy in the injector chain. These are the Linac, Low Energy Booster, Medium Energy Booster, and High Energy Booster. Each accelerator system must be completed in sequence in order to provide beam to the next higher energy accelerator. The collider itself is comprised of ten sectors, each of which in terms of superconducting magnet bending strength, is equivalent to two HEB injectors. The completion of all injectors and collider sectors is required before stored beams can circulate in preparation for colliding beam operation. Four experimental halls are planned for the detector systems. Each major detector will be assembled in one of the halls by a world-wide collaboration of scientists. In addition, above ground facilities provide shops and test facilities for accelerator technical systems, superconducting magnet and materials research and development, and for detector assembly and operations. The purpose of this report is to present a plan for the sequential commissioning and operation of these individual accelerators and other technical facilities of the SSC. A central objective of this plan is to describe the activities at the SSCL that are not included as part of the construction project TPC, even though they occur during the overall project construction time-frame. Examples of such activities include the operation of general laboratory facilities and services not specifically related to construction, the operating costs for the individual accelerators in the injector chain once these facilities have been commissioned, and the costs of SSCL physics research groups. The Department of Energy has provided the following decision with regard to these operations categories for the SSCL.

  2. Commissioning a materials research laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    SAVAGE,GERALD A.

    2000-03-28

    This presentation covers the process of commissioning a new 150,000 sq. ft. research facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The laboratory being constructed is a showcase of modern design methods being built at a construction cost of less than $180 per sq. ft. This is possible in part because of the total commissioning activities that are being utilized for this project. The laboratory's unique approach to commissioning will be presented in this paper. The process will be followed through from the conceptual stage on into the actual construction portion of the laboratory. Lessons learned and cost effectiveness will be presented in a manner that will be usable for others making commissioning related decisions. Commissioning activities at every stage of the design will be presented along with the attributed benefits. Attendees will hear answers to the what, when, who, and why questions associated with commissioning of this exciting project.

  3. Imaging the M7.9 Denali Fault Earthquake 2002 rupture at the Delta River using LiDAR, RADAR, and SASW Surface Wave Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R.; Barnhardt, W.; Carkin, B.; Collins, B. D.; Grossman, E. E.; Minasian, D.; Thompson, E.

    2004-12-01

    The Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake of 3 November 2002 resulted in approximately 5.5 meters of right-lateral offset and sub-meter (0.6m average) up-to-the north vertical displacement of alluvial deposits of the Delta River. We characterize the surface rupture and shallow fault structure of the Denali fault zone at the Delta River in order to better understand these most recent displacements and to estimate the total vertical offset of alluvium above glacially scoured bedrock. To analyze deformations along the fault-trace, we performed tripod-mounted ground-based LiDAR surveys, and Spectral analysis of Surface Wave (SASW) and Ground Penetrating RADAR (GPR) geophysical investigations. These studies were performed between the Trans-Alaska Pipeline (TAPS) corridor on the terrace deposits of the eastern flanks of the Delta River valley and the steeply sloping bedrock surface on the western side of the river. To produce digital terrain models (DTM) of the surface break we used a Riegl Z210i Laser-scanner to image eight independent LiDAR scans, and ISite3D modeling software to merge these scans into three DTM surfaces. We find that using a rotating scanning-laser allows us to produce ultra-high resolution quantitative DTMs for geomorphic analysis that can be used to resolve features and detect topographic changes on a fine-scale (0.9-2.5cm). Local geo-referencing control points are established using fixed auto reflectors. The near subsurface alluvium was imaged using reflection-based (GPR). A suite of parallel and orthogonal GPR reflection lines were measured to develop block models of the surface rupture at two locations. Radar imagery clearly delineates a plane of chaotic reflectors across the rupture zone. To characterize the depth of alluvium over bedrock on either side of the fault, we used the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) approach to invert the near-surface shear wave velocity profile. An Alyeska Co. Catepillar D9N track-mounted dozer was used as a high

  4. Engaging student nurses in commissioning.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Jackie; Fagan, Debbie; Prescott, Brendan; Thomson, Yvonne; McCann, Stacey

    Commissioning is an important element of healthcare provision, but is often not understood or considered in depth by students. It is vital that the workforce of the future understands the machinations of service development and commissioning, so one higher education establishment decided to offer its students a placement in a clinical commissioning group. This article outlines how a university partnered with local CCGs and a regional placement network to develop the CCG clinical placement and its benefits. PMID:27295802

  5. Joint Commission on rock properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A joint commission on Rock Properties for Petroleum Engineers (RPPE) has been established by the International Society of Rock Mechanics and the Society of Petroleum Engineers to set up data banks on the properties of sedimentary rocks encountered during drilling. Computer-based data banks of complete rock properties will be organized for sandstones (GRESA), shales (ARSHA) and carbonates (CARCA). The commission hopes to access data sources from members of the commission, private companies and the public domain.

  6. Model Commissioning Plan and Guide Specifications

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of Model Commissioning Plan and Guide Specifications are to ensure that the design team applies commissioning concepts to the design and prepares commissioning specifications and a commission plan for inclusion in the bid construction documents.

  7. Commissioning of NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Willeke, F.

    2015-05-03

    NSLS-II, the new 3rd generation light source at BNL was designed for a brightness of 1022 photons s-1mm-2mrad-2 (0.1%BW)-1. It was constructed between 2009 and 2014. The storage ring was commissioned in April 2014 which was followed by insertion device and beamline commissioning in the fall of 2014. All ambitious design parameters of the facility have already been achieved except for commissioning the full beam intensity of 500mA which requires more RF installation. This paper reports on the results of commissioning.

  8. Liberalism, authority, and bioethics commissions.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, D Robert

    2013-12-01

    Bioethicists working on national ethics commissions frequently think of themselves as advisors to the government, but distance themselves from any claims to actual authority. Governments however may find it beneficial to appear to defer to the authority of these commissions when designing laws and policies, and might appoint such commissions for exactly this reason. Where does the authority for setting laws and policies come from? This question is best answered from within a normative political philosophy. This paper explains the locus of moral authority as understood within one family of normative political theories--liberal political theories--and argues that most major "liberal" commentators have understood both the source and scope of ethics commissions' authority in a manner at odds with liberalism, rightly interpreted. The author argues that reexamining the implications of liberalism for bioethics commissions would mean changing what are considered valid criticisms of such commissions and also changing the content of national bioethics commission mandates. The author concludes that bioethicists who participate in such commissions ought to carefully examine their own views about the normative limits of governmental authority because such limits have important implications for the contribution that bioethicists can legitimately make to government commissions.

  9. National Knowledge Commission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitroda, Sam

    2007-04-01

    India's National Knowledge Commission (NKC) established by the prime minister is focused on building institutions and infrastructure in Education, Science and Technology, Innovation etc. to meet the challenges of the knowledge economy in the 21st century and increase India's competitive advantage in the global market. India today stands poised to reap the benefits of a rapidly growing economy and a major demographic advantage, with 550 million young people below the age of 25 years, the largest in the world. The NKC is focused on five critical areas of knowledge related to access, concepts, creation, applications and services. This includes a variety of subject areas such as language, translations, libraries, networks, portals, affirmative action, distance learning, intellectual property, Entrepreneurship, application in Agriculture, health, small and medium scale industries, e-governance etc. One of the keys to this effort is to build a national broadband gigabit of networks of 500 nodes to connect universities, Libraries, Laboratories, Hospitals, Agriculture institutions etc. to share resources and collaborate on multidisciplinary activities. This presentation will introduce the NKC, discuss methodology, subject areas, specific recommendation and outline a plan to build knowledge networks and specifics on network architecture, applications, and utilities.

  10. ALICE TPC commissioning results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, D. T.; Alice Tpc Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy-ion experiment at CERN LHC aiming to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. A lead-lead collision might produce several 10 00 new particles. Detailed study of the event requires precise measurements of the particle tracks. A 90 m3 Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with more than 500 000 read-out pads was built as the main central barrel tracker. Collisions can be recorded at a rate of up to about 1 kHz. The front-end electronics, designed from FPGAs and custom ASICs, performs shaping, amplification, digitisation and digital filtering of the signals. The data are forwarded to DAQ via 216 1.25 Gb/s fibre-optical links. Configuration, control and monitoring is done by an embedded Linux system on the front-end electronics. Before production runs with beam, extensive commissioning using tracks from cosmics and from the laser system as well as clusters from radioactive krypton gas is needed. Extensive results have been obtained with respect to the performance of the TPC including its sub-systems.

  11. Ozone transport commission developments

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    On September 27, 1994, the states of the Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) signed an important memorandum of understanding (MOU) agreeing to develop a regional strategy for controlling stationary sources of nitrogen oxide emissions. Specifically, the states of the Ozone Transport Region, OTR, agreed to propose regulations for the control of NOx emissions from boilers and other indirect heat exchangers with a maximum gross heat input rate of at least 250 million BTU per hour. The Ozone Transport Region was divided into Inner, Outer and Northern Zones. States in the Outer Zone agreed to reduce NOx emissions by 55%. States in the Inner Zone agreed to reduce NOx emissions 65%. Facilities in both zones have the option to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.2 pounds per million Btu by May 1, 1999. This option provides fairness for the gas-fired plants which already have relatively low NOx emissions. Additionally, States in the Inner and Outer Zones agreed to reduce their NOx emissions by 75% or to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.15 pounds per million BTU by May 1, 2003. The Northern Zone States agree to reduce their rate of NOx emissions by 55% from base year levels by May 1, 2003, or to emit NOx at a rate no greater than 0.2 pounds per million BTU. As part of this MOU, States also agreed to develop a regionwide trading mechanism to provide a cost-effective mechanism for implementing the reductions.

  12. Reflections on the Gordon Commission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haertel, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Background:This brief reflection on the work of the Gordon Commission calls out significant themes and implications found in the various papers authored by the commissioners and other scholars, especially those included in this special issue of Teachers College Record. Purpose: The forward-looking vision of the Gordon Commission is contrasted with…

  13. Vermont Technical Education Commission Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont State Technical Education Commission, Montpelier.

    A 1968 New England Regional Commission grant to the Vermont Department of Administration financed a feasibility study for a technical college at the postsecondary level. The commission undertook two specific studies: an examination of ultimate career destinations of Vermont secondary students and a survey of Vermont industry to determine immediate…

  14. Illinois State Scholarship Commission Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Scholarship Commission, Deerfield.

    The Illinois State Scholarship Commission (ISSC) is responsible for the administration of 9 state authorized and funded financial aid programs for Illinois postsecondary students. The major programs consist of: (1) nonrepayable monetary awards, and (2) guaranteed educational loans. The purposes of the Commission's programs are to: (1) equalize…

  15. Evaluating methods used for fission track dating of tephras: examples from the Afar Depression, Ethiopia, and the Denali fault zone, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, A. E.; Warfel, T. S.; Phillips, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although fission track geochronology has been successfully used to date volcanic glasses and tephras in several studies, a variety of approaches have been used (see Westgate et al., 2013), and no consensus for a standardized methodology has emerged. As a result, this technique is rarely employed, despite having the potential to date tephras and glasses that cannot be dated by other methods, such as K-Ar dating. We have been evaluating the various approaches used to address the technical issues in fission track dating of tephras, by applying them to standards of known ages, including Moldavite tektite, and Huckleberry and Bishop Tuffs. Some of these issues include track etching and counting protocol, and corrections for the effects of track fading at low temperatures. Track etching is generally done in 24% HF for 75 or more seconds, but the time necessary for optimal etching appears to vary according to sample composition and grain size. To correct for track fading, we are using the diameter correction technique of Sandhu and Westgate (1995). We have obtained tephra samples from two regions, the Afar Depression in Ethiopia, an area with significant early hominid fossils, and the Denali fault zone in Alaska, an area with a complicated tectonic evolution. For both of these regions, we have samples that have been dated by other methods for calibration purposes, and we will explore the application of a Zeta correction to the technique. This underutilized technique can provide powerful constraints on studies of timing in diverse geologic environments.

  16. The postseismic response to the 2002 M 7.9 Denali Fault earthquake: Constraints from InSAR 2003-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biggs, J.; Burgmann, R.; Freymueller, J.T.; Lu, Zhiming; Parsons, B.; Ryder, I.; Schmalzle, G.; Wright, Tim

    2009-01-01

    InSAR is particularly sensitive to vertical displacements, which can be important in distinguishing between mechanisms responsible for the postseismic response to large earthquakes (afterslip, viscoelastic relaxation). We produce maps of the surface displacements resulting from the postseismic response to the 2002 Denali Fault earthquake, using data from the Canadian Radarsat-1 satellite from the periods summer 2003, summer 2004 and summer 2005. A peak-to-trough signal of amplitude 4 cm in the satellite line of sight was observed between summer 2003 and summer 2004. By the period between summer 2004 and summer 2005, the displacement rate had dropped below the threshold required for observation with InSAR over a single year. The InSAR observations show that the principal postseismic relaxation process acted at a depth of ???50 km, equivalent to the top of the mantle. However, the observations are still incapable of distinguishing between distributed (viscoelastic relaxation) and localized (afterslip) deformation. The imposed coseismic stresses are highest in the lower crust and, assuming a Maxwell rheology, a viscosity ratio of at least 5 between lower crust and upper mantle is required to explain the contrast in behaviour. The lowest misfits are produced by mixed models of viscoelastic relaxation in the mantle and shallow afterslip in the upper crust. Profiles perpendicular to the fault show significant asymmetry, which is consistent with differences in rheological structure across the fault. ?? 2008 The Author Journal compilation ?? 2008 RAS.

  17. Hydraulic and channel characteristics of selected streams in the Kantishna Hills area, Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska, 1982-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Maanen, J.L.; Solin, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Kantishna Hills area of the Denali National Park and Preserve contains extensive placer gold deposits. In order to develop plans for the management of this natural resource, and to assess the effects of placer mining on aquatic systems, documentation of the physical characteristics of the streams in the area is needed. Channel morphology, streamflow and streambed composition data were collected at 14 stream reaches in the Kantishna Hills area in September 1982 and in June, July, August , and September of 1983 and 1984. The reaches selected include locations of historical and current mining activity and locations which are undisturbed. The data indicate only minor differences in the physical properties of the streams in mined and unmined drainage basins. The composition of streambeds below mined areas tended to consist of finer sized particles and exhibited less variation in mean particle size than streambed in unmined basins. This may be due in part to the natural sorting of material in stream channels because mined areas, and thus study reaches below them, tended to be located relatively farther downstream (nearer the stream mouth) than were study reaches in basins where no mining has occurred. Changes in the physical properties of the streams which could be directly attributed to mining activity were noted at only one location, Rainy Creek near Kantishna, where the stream had been diverted from its natural channel by the construction of settling ponds. (Author 's abstract)

  18. Commission 31: Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakis, Demetrios; Defraigne, Pascale; Hosokawa, M.; Leschiutta, S.; Petit, G.; Zhai, Z.-C.

    2007-03-01

    The most intensely discussed and controversial issue in time keeping has been the proposal before the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) to redefine Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) so as to replace leap seconds by leap hours. Should this proposal be adopted, the practice of inserting leap seconds would cease after a specific date. Should the Earth's rotation continue to de-accelerate at its historical rate, the next discontinuity in UTC would be an hour inserted several centuries from now. Advocates of this proposal cite the need to synchronize satellite and other systems, such as GPS, Galileo, and GLONASS, which did not exist and were not envisioned when the current system was adopted. They note that leap second insertions can be and have been incorrectly implemented or accounted for. Such errors have to date had localized impact, but they could cause serious mishaps involving loss of life. For example, some GPS receivers have been known to fail simply because there was no leap second after a long enough interval, other GPS receivers failed because the leap second information was broadcast more than three months in advance, and some commercial software used for internet time-transfer Network Time Protocol (NTP) could either discard all data received after a leap second or interpret it as a frequency change. The ambiguity associated with the extra second could also disrupt financial accounting and certain forms of encryption. Those opposed to the proposal question the need for a change, and also point out the costs of adjusting to the proposed change and its inconvenience to amateur astronomers and others who rely upon astronomical calculations published in advance. Reports have been circulated that the cost of checking and correcting software to accommodate the new definition of UTC would be many millions of dollars for some systems. In October 2005 American Astronomical Society asked the ITU for a year's time to study the issue. This commission has

  19. 16 CFR 1000.4 - Commission address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Commission address. 1000.4 Section 1000.4 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.4 Commission address. The principal Offices of the Commission are at 4330 East West...

  20. 47 CFR 0.1 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The Commission. 0.1 Section 0.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Organization General § 0.1 The Commission. The Federal Communications Commission is composed of five (5) members who are appointed by...

  1. Federal Trade Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Part XX Federal Trade Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION (FTC) FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Ch. I Semiannual Regulatory Agenda AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission... published in accordance with section 22(d)(1) of the Federal Trade Commission Act, 15 U.S.C.......

  2. 11 CFR 9032.3 - Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Commission. 9032.3 Section 9032.3 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND DEFINITIONS § 9032.3 Commission. Commission means the Federal Election Commission, 999 E Street...

  3. 18 CFR 375.101 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false The Commission. 375.101... OF ENERGY REVISED GENERAL RULES THE COMMISSION General Provisions § 375.101 The Commission. (a) Establishment. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is an independent regulatory commission within...

  4. 47 CFR 0.1 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false The Commission. 0.1 Section 0.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Organization General § 0.1 The Commission. The Federal Communications Commission is composed of five (5) members who are appointed by...

  5. 47 CFR 0.1 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false The Commission. 0.1 Section 0.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Organization General § 0.1 The Commission. The Federal Communications Commission is composed of five (5) members who are appointed by...

  6. 47 CFR 0.1 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false The Commission. 0.1 Section 0.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Organization General § 0.1 The Commission. The Federal Communications Commission is composed of five (5) members who are appointed by...

  7. 18 CFR 375.101 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false The Commission. 375.101... OF ENERGY REVISED GENERAL RULES THE COMMISSION General Provisions § 375.101 The Commission. (a) Establishment. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is an independent regulatory commission within...

  8. 11 CFR 9002.3 - Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Commission. 9002.3 Section 9002.3 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: GENERAL ELECTION FINANCING DEFINITIONS § 9002.3 Commission. Commission means the Federal Election Commission, 999 E Street,...

  9. 11 CFR 9032.3 - Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Commission. 9032.3 Section 9032.3 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND DEFINITIONS § 9032.3 Commission. Commission means the Federal Election Commission, 999 E Street...

  10. NSF commission holds first meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Richard M.

    There has been considerable discussion in Washington science policy circles over the past few weeks about the newly established National Science Board Commission on the Future of the National Science Foundation. The commission, chaired by William Danforth, chancellor of Washington University, and Robert Galvin, former chief executive officer of Motorola, held its first meeting on September 17. Unfortunately, this meeting offered few indications of what changes might result from this exercise.

  11. Wisconsin SRF Electron Gun Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, Joseph J.; Bissen, M.; Bosch, R.; Efremov, M.; Eisert, D.; Fisher, M.; Green, M.; Jacobs, K.; Keil, R.; Kleman, K.; Rogers, G.; Severson, M.; Yavuz, D. D.; Legg, Robert A.; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Hovater, J. Curtis; Plawski, Tomasz; Powers, Thomas J.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin has completed fabrication and commissioning of a low frequency (199.6 MHz) superconducting electron gun based on a quarter wave resonator (QWR) cavity. Its concept was optimized to be the source for a CW free electron laser facility. The gun design includes active tuning and a high temperature superconducting solenoid. We will report on the status of the Wisconsin SRF electron gun program, including commissioning experience and first beam measurements.

  12. Triggered deformation and seismic activity under Mammoth Mountain in long Valley caldera by the 3 November 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, M.J.S.; Prejean, S.G.; Hill, D.P.

    2004-01-01

    The 3 November 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake triggered deformational offsets and microseismicity under Mammoth Mountain (MM) on the rim of Long Valley caldera, California, some 3460 km from the earthquake. Such strain offsets and microseismicity were not recorded at other borehole strain sites along the San Andreas fault system in California. The Long Valley offsets were recorded on borehole strainmeters at three sites around the western part of the caldera that includes Mammoth Mountain - a young volcano on the southwestern rim of the caldera. The largest recorded strain offsets were -0.1 microstrain at PO on the west side of MM, 0.05 microstrain at MX to the southeast of MM, and -0.025 microstrain at BS to the northeast of MM with negative strain extensional. High sample rate strain data show initial triggering of the offsets began at 22:30 UTC during the arrival of the first Rayleigh waves from the Alaskan earthquake with peak-to-peak dynamic strain amplitudes of about 2 microstrain corresponding to a stress amplitude of about 0.06 MPa. The strain offsets grew to their final values in the next 10 min. The associated triggered seismicity occurred beneath the south flank of MM and also began at 22:30 UTC and died away over the next 15 min. This relatively weak seismicity burst included some 60 small events with magnitude all less than M = 1. While poorly constrained, these strain observations are consistent with triggered slip and intrusive opening on a north-striking normal fault centered at a depth of 8 km with a moment of l016 N m, or the equivalent of a M 4.3 earthquake. The cumulative seismic moment for the associated seismicity burst was more than three orders of magnitude smaller. These observations and this model resemble those for the triggered deformation and slip that occurred beneath the north side of MM following the 16 October 1999 M 7.1 Hector Mine, California, earthquake. However, in this case, we see little post-event slip decay reflected in

  13. 76 FR 4369 - Special Law Enforcement Commissions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Special Law Enforcement Commissions AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces the online publication of the Interim Special Law Enforcement Commission Policy, Rules and Procedures, the Interim Special Law Enforcement Commission...

  14. The significance of shifts in precipitation patterns: modelling the impacts of climate change and glacier retreat on extreme flood events in Denali National Park, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Crossman, Jill; Futter, Martyn N; Whitehead, Paul G

    2013-01-01

    In glacier-fed systems climate change may have various effects over a range of time scales, including increasing river discharge, flood frequency and magnitude. This study uses a combination of empirical monitoring and modelling to project the impacts of climate change on the glacial-fed Middle Fork Toklat River, Denali National Park, Alaska. We use a regional calibration of the model HBV to account for a paucity of long term observed flow data, validating a local application using glacial mass balance data and summer flow records. Two Global Climate Models (HADCM3 and CGCM2) and two IPCC scenarios (A2 and B2) are used to ascertain potential changes in meteorological conditions, river discharge, flood frequency and flood magnitude. Using remote sensing methods this study refines existing estimates of glacial recession rates, finding that since 2000, rates have increased from 24 m per year to 68.5m per year, with associated increases in ablation zone ice loss. GCM projections indicate that over the 21(st) century these rates will increase still further, most extensively under the CGCM2 model, and A2 scenarios. Due to greater winter precipitation and ice and snow accumulation, glaciers release increasing meltwater quantities throughout the 21(st) century. Despite increases in glacial melt, results indicate that it is predominantly precipitation that affects river discharge. Three of the four IPCC scenarios project increases in flood frequency and magnitude, events which were primarily associated with changing precipitation patterns, rather than extreme temperature increases or meltwater release. Results suggest that although increasing temperatures will significantly increase glacial melt and winter baseflow, meltwater alone does not pose a significant flood hazard to the Toklat River catchment. Projected changes in precipitation are the primary concern, both through changing snow volumes available for melt, and more directly through increasing catchment runoff.

  15. The Significance of Shifts in Precipitation Patterns: Modelling the Impacts of Climate Change and Glacier Retreat on Extreme Flood Events in Denali National Park, Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Crossman, Jill; Futter, Martyn N.; Whitehead, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    In glacier-fed systems climate change may have various effects over a range of time scales, including increasing river discharge, flood frequency and magnitude. This study uses a combination of empirical monitoring and modelling to project the impacts of climate change on the glacial-fed Middle Fork Toklat River, Denali National Park, Alaska. We use a regional calibration of the model HBV to account for a paucity of long term observed flow data, validating a local application using glacial mass balance data and summer flow records. Two Global Climate Models (HADCM3 and CGCM2) and two IPCC scenarios (A2 and B2) are used to ascertain potential changes in meteorological conditions, river discharge, flood frequency and flood magnitude. Using remote sensing methods this study refines existing estimates of glacial recession rates, finding that since 2000, rates have increased from 24m per year to 68.5m per year, with associated increases in ablation zone ice loss. GCM projections indicate that over the 21st century these rates will increase still further, most extensively under the CGCM2 model, and A2 scenarios. Due to greater winter precipitation and ice and snow accumulation, glaciers release increasing meltwater quantities throughout the 21st century. Despite increases in glacial melt, results indicate that it is predominantly precipitation that affects river discharge. Three of the four IPCC scenarios project increases in flood frequency and magnitude, events which were primarily associated with changing precipitation patterns, rather than extreme temperature increases or meltwater release. Results suggest that although increasing temperatures will significantly increase glacial melt and winter baseflow, meltwater alone does not pose a significant flood hazard to the Toklat River catchment. Projected changes in precipitation are the primary concern, both through changing snow volumes available for melt, and more directly through increasing catchment runoff. PMID

  16. The significance of shifts in precipitation patterns: modelling the impacts of climate change and glacier retreat on extreme flood events in Denali National Park, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Crossman, Jill; Futter, Martyn N; Whitehead, Paul G

    2013-01-01

    In glacier-fed systems climate change may have various effects over a range of time scales, including increasing river discharge, flood frequency and magnitude. This study uses a combination of empirical monitoring and modelling to project the impacts of climate change on the glacial-fed Middle Fork Toklat River, Denali National Park, Alaska. We use a regional calibration of the model HBV to account for a paucity of long term observed flow data, validating a local application using glacial mass balance data and summer flow records. Two Global Climate Models (HADCM3 and CGCM2) and two IPCC scenarios (A2 and B2) are used to ascertain potential changes in meteorological conditions, river discharge, flood frequency and flood magnitude. Using remote sensing methods this study refines existing estimates of glacial recession rates, finding that since 2000, rates have increased from 24 m per year to 68.5m per year, with associated increases in ablation zone ice loss. GCM projections indicate that over the 21(st) century these rates will increase still further, most extensively under the CGCM2 model, and A2 scenarios. Due to greater winter precipitation and ice and snow accumulation, glaciers release increasing meltwater quantities throughout the 21(st) century. Despite increases in glacial melt, results indicate that it is predominantly precipitation that affects river discharge. Three of the four IPCC scenarios project increases in flood frequency and magnitude, events which were primarily associated with changing precipitation patterns, rather than extreme temperature increases or meltwater release. Results suggest that although increasing temperatures will significantly increase glacial melt and winter baseflow, meltwater alone does not pose a significant flood hazard to the Toklat River catchment. Projected changes in precipitation are the primary concern, both through changing snow volumes available for melt, and more directly through increasing catchment runoff. PMID

  17. Paleoearthquakes of the past ~2500 years at the Dead Mouse site, west-central Denali fault at the Nenana River, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, K.; Bemis, S. P.; Toke, N. A.; Bishop, B.; Taylor, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the record of earthquakes along the Denali Fault (DF) is important for resource and infrastructure development and presents the potential to test earthquake rupture models in a tectonic environment with a larger ratio of event recurrence to geochronological uncertainty than well studied plate boundary faults such as the San Andreas. However, the fault system is over 1200 km in length and has proven challenging to identify paleoseismic sites that preserve more than 2-3 Paleoearthquakes (PEQ). In 2012 and 2015 we developed the 'Dead Mouse' site, providing the first long PEQ record west of the 2002 rupture extent. This site is located on the west-central segment of the DF near the southernmost intersection of the George Parks Hwy and the Nenana River (63.45285, -148.80249). We hand-excavated three fault-perpendicular trenches, including a fault-parallel extension that we excavated and recorded in a progressive sequence. We used Structure from Motion software to build mm-scale 3D models of the exposures. These models allowed us to produce orthorectified photomosaics for hand logging at 1:5 scale. We document evidence for 4-5 surface rupturing earthquakes that have deformed the upper 2.5 m of stratigraphy. Age control from our preliminary 2012 investigation indicates these events occurred within the past ~2,500 years. Evidence for these events include offset units, filled fissures, upward fault terminations, angular unconformities and minor scarp-derived colluvial deposits. Multiple lines of evidence from the primary fault zones and fault splays are apparent for each event. We are testing these correlations by constructing a georeferenced 3D site model and running an additional 20 geochronology samples including woody macrofossils, detrital and in-situ charcoal, and samples for post-IR IRSL from positions that should closely constrain stratigraphic evidence for earthquakes. We expect this long PEQ history to provide a critical test for future modeling of

  18. Law sets up oceans commission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    In an anticipated move, U.S. President Bill Clinton on August 7 signed into law the Oceans Act of 2000.The bipartisan legislation, which takes effect on January 20,2001, establishes a commission on ocean policy to examine federal ocean policy and environmental and economic trends affecting oceans and coasts.The act—which grew out of a call issued by Clinton at the National Oceans Conference in Monterey, California in 1998—requires the commission to submit recommendations to Congress and the president within 18 months of its appointment, and for the President to submit proposals to Congress about the use and stewardship of ocean and coastal resources.

  19. Division a Commission 8: Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Norbert; Brown, Anthony; Evans, Dafydd; Chen, Li; Gouda, Naoteru; Makarov, Valeri; Shulga, Aleksandr; Souchay, Jean; Teixeira, Rama; Unwin, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Commission 8 has regularly published triennial reports in the past and the current OC therefore voted to adopt a traditional format also for this special Legacy issue of the IAU Transactions. The outgoing President is grateful for the support of many Commission members who contributed to this report. Our contribution consists of 3 parts: 1) this introduction, providing a general overview and highlights of recent research in astrometry, 2) a summary of the astrometry business & science meeting at the 2015 IAU General Assembly, and 3) the activity report of our Commisson covering the mid-2012 to mid-2015 period.

  20. 77 FR 29317 - Fiscal Year 2011 Draft Work Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... Year 2011 Draft Work Plan AGENCY: Denali Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denali Commission....C. 3121). The Denali Commission Act requires that the Commission develop proposed work plans for future spending and that the annual Work Plan be published in the Federal Register, providing...

  1. 16 CFR 0.1 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.1 The Commission. The Federal Trade Commission is an independent administrative agency which was organized in 1915 pursuant to the Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 (38 Stat. 717, as amended; 15 U.S.C. 41-58). It...

  2. 16 CFR 0.1 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.1 The Commission. The Federal Trade Commission is an independent administrative agency which was organized in 1915 pursuant to the Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 (38 Stat. 717, as amended; 15 U.S.C. 41-58). It...

  3. 16 CFR 0.1 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.1 The Commission. The Federal Trade Commission is an independent administrative agency which was organized in 1915 pursuant to the Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 (38 Stat. 717, as amended; 15 U.S.C. 41-58). It...

  4. 16 CFR 0.1 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.1 The Commission. The Federal Trade Commission is an independent administrative agency which was organized in 1915 pursuant to the Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 (38 Stat. 717, as amended; 15 U.S.C. 41-58). It...

  5. 16 CFR 0.1 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.1 The Commission. The Federal Trade Commission is an independent administrative agency which was organized in 1915 pursuant to the Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 (38 Stat. 717, as amended; 15 U.S.C. 41-58). It...

  6. 25 CFR 700.47 - Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commission. 700.47 Section 700.47 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.47 Commission. The Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission is that...

  7. 25 CFR 700.47 - Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Commission. 700.47 Section 700.47 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.47 Commission. The Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission is that...

  8. 25 CFR 700.47 - Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Commission. 700.47 Section 700.47 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.47 Commission. The Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission is that...

  9. 25 CFR 700.47 - Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Commission. 700.47 Section 700.47 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.47 Commission. The Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission is that...

  10. The Bowdoin College Experience with Commissioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Angelo, David; Greim, Clifton W.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how Bowdoin College (Maine) lessened the volume of typical new building occupancy problems by commissioning its new facility prior to use. The school's decision to commission is discussed, the commissioning process is examined, the types of problems commissioning can find and the process used to correct them are described. (GR)

  11. 32 CFR 9.4 - Commission personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Commission personnel. 9.4 Section 9.4 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM § 9.4 Commission personnel. (a)...

  12. 47 CFR 1.1528 - Commission review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Commission review. 1.1528 Section 1.1528... Applications § 1.1528 Commission review. Either the applicant or Bureau counsel may seek Commission review of the initial decision on the application, or the Commission may decide to review the decision on...

  13. 10 CFR 1.11 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The Commission. 1.11 Section 1.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.11 The Commission. (a) The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, composed of five members, one of whom is designated by...

  14. 17 CFR 140.10 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Commission. 140.10 Section...) ORGANIZATION, FUNCTIONS, AND PROCEDURES OF THE COMMISSION Functions § 140.10 The Commission. The Commission is composed of a Chairman and four other Commissioners, not more than three of whom may be members of the...

  15. 10 CFR 1.11 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false The Commission. 1.11 Section 1.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.11 The Commission. (a) The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, composed of five members, one of whom is designated by...

  16. 18 CFR 375.101 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The Commission. 375.101 Section 375.101 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REVISED GENERAL RULES THE COMMISSION General Provisions § 375.101 The Commission....

  17. 18 CFR 375.101 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The Commission. 375.101 Section 375.101 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REVISED GENERAL RULES THE COMMISSION General Provisions § 375.101 The Commission....

  18. 18 CFR 375.101 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Commission. 375.101 Section 375.101 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REVISED GENERAL RULES THE COMMISSION General Provisions § 375.101 The Commission....

  19. 10 CFR 110.91 - Commission consultations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Commission consultations. 110.91 Section 110.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Public Participation Procedures Concerning License Applications § 110.91 Commission consultations. The Commission...

  20. 77 FR 31605 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education. ACTION...- ] coming meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes the..., Equity and Excellence Commission, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., Washington,...

  1. 76 FR 41233 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. ACTION... meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes the functions of... INFORMATION CONTACT: Stephen Chen, Designated Federal Official, Equity and Excellence Commission,...

  2. 76 FR 62394 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education. ACTION...-coming meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes the... Excellence Commission, ] U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20202....

  3. 75 FR 48661 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. ACTION: Notice of Establishment of the Equity and Excellence Commission. SUMMARY: The U.S. Secretary of Education (Secretary) announces the establishment of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Equity Commission...

  4. 77 FR 29621 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. ACTION...-coming meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes the... and Excellence Commission, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., Washington, DC...

  5. 77 FR 484 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education. ACTION...-coming meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes the..., Equity and Excellence Commission, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington,...

  6. 76 FR 6774 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice... meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes the functions of... Chen, Designated Federal Official, Equity and Excellence Commission, U.S. Department of Education,...

  7. 75 FR 48662 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education. ACTION: Request for Nominations to Serve on the Equity and Excellence Commission. SUMMARY: The Secretary of... Equity and Excellence Commission. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Equity and Excellence Commission...

  8. 77 FR 49441 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education. ACTION...-coming meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes the... Excellence Commission, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20202....

  9. Commission 12: Solar Radiation & Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Thomas. J.; Martínez Pillet, Valentin; Asplund, M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Cauzzi, G.; Cram, L. E.; Dravins, D.; Gan, W.; Henzl, P.; Kosovichev, A.; Mariska, J. T.; Rovira, M. G.; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2007-03-01

    Commission 12 covers research on the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun, the "quiet" solar atmosphere, solar radiation and its variability, and the nature of relatively stable magnetic structures like sunspots, faculae and the magnetic network. There is considerable productive overlap with the other Commissions of Division II as investigations move progressively toward the fertile intellectual boundaries between traditional research disciplines. In large part, the solar magnetic field provides the linkage that connects these diverse themes. The same magnetic field that produces the more subtle variations of solar structure and radiative output over the 11 yr activity cycle is also implicated in rapid and often violent phenomena such as flares, coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and episodes of sporadic magnetic reconnection.The last three years have again brought significant progress in nearly all the research endeavors touched upon by the interests of Commission 12. The underlying causes for this success remain the same: sustained advances in computing capabilities coupled with diverse observations with increasing levels of spatial, temporal and spectral resolution. It is all but impossible to deal with these many advances here in anything except a cursory and selective fashion. Thankfully, the Living Reviews in Solar Physics; has published several extensive reviews over the last two years that deal explicitly with issues relevant to the purview of Commission 12. The reader who is eager for a deeper and more complete understanding of some of these advances is directed to http://www.livingreviews.org for access to these articles.

  10. 77 FR 10599 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ..., identifies the project sponsor and facility as Water Treatment Solutions, LLC (South Mountain Lake) as being... use of lesser quality water; (2) approval for Susquehanna River Flow Management project expenditures... conducted by the Commission on February 16, 2012; notice of which was published in 77 FR 3321, January...

  11. Calibration of PS09, PS10, and PS11 trans-Alaska pipeline system strong-motion instruments, with acceleration, velocity, and displacement records of the Denali fault earthquake, 03 November 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, John R.; Jensen, E. Gray; Sell, Russell; Stephens, Christopher D.; Nyman, Douglas J.; Hamilton, Robert C.; Hager, William C.

    2006-01-01

    In September, 2003, the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company (APSC) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) embarked on a joint effort to extract, test, and calibrate the accelerometers, amplifiers, and bandpass filters from the earthquake monitoring systems (EMS) at Pump Stations 09, 10, and 11 of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS). These were the three closest strong-motion seismographs to the Denali fault when it ruptured in the MW 7.9 earthquake of 03 November 2002 (22:12:41 UTC). The surface rupture is only 3.0 km from PS10 and 55.5 km from PS09 but PS11 is 124.2 km away from a small rupture splay and 126.9 km from the main trace. Here we briefly describe precision calibration results for all three instruments. Included with this report is a link to the seismograms reprocessed using these new calibrations: http://nsmp.wr.usgs.gov/data_sets/20021103_2212_taps.html Calibration information in this paper applies at the time of the Denali fault earthquake (03 November 2002), but not necessarily at other times because equipment at these stations is changed by APSC personnel at irregular intervals. In particular, the equipment at PS09, PS10, and PS11 was changed by our joint crew in September, 2003, so that we could perform these calibrations. The equipment stayed the same from at least the time of the earthquake until that retrieval, and these calibrations apply for that interval.

  12. Intermediate-Term Declines in Seismicity at Mt. Wrangell and Mt. Veniaminof Volcanoes, Alaska, Following the November 3, 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali Fault Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, J. J.; McNutt, S. R.

    2003-12-01

    On November 3, 2002 a Mw 7.9 earthquake ruptured segments of the Denali Fault and adjacent faults in interior Alaska providing a unique opportunity to look for intermediate-term (days to weeks) responses of Alaskan volcanoes to shaking from a large regional earthquake. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors 24 volcanoes with seismograph networks. We examined one station per volcano, generally the closest to the vent (typically within 5 km) unless noise, or other factors made the data unusable. Data were digitally filtered between 0.8 and 5 Hz to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. Data for the period four weeks before to four weeks after the Mw 7.9 earthquake were then plotted at a standard scale used for AVO routine monitoring. Mt. Veniaminof volcano, which has had recent mild eruptions and a rate of ten earthquakes per day on station VNNF, suffered a drop in seismicity by a factor of two after the earthquake; this lasted for 15 days. Wrangell, the closest volcano to the epicenter, had a background rate of about 16 earthquakes per day. Data from station WANC could not be measured for 3 days after the Mw 7.9 earthquake because the large number and size of aftershocks impeded identification of local earthquakes. For the following 30 days, however, its seismicity rate dropped by a factor of two. Seismicity then remained low for an additional 4 months at Wrangell, whereas that at Veniaminof returned to normal within weeks. The seismicity at both Mt. Veniaminof and Mt. Wrangell is dominated by low-frequency volcanic events. The detection thresholds for both seismograph networks are low and stations VNNF and WANC operated normally during the time of our study, thus we infer that the changes in seismicity may be related to the earthquake. It is known that Wrangell increased its heat output after the Mw 9.2 Alaska earthquake of 1964 and again after the Ms 7.1 St.Elias earthquake of 1979. The other volcanoes showed no changes in seismicity that can be attributable to

  13. Stable isotope (C and N) and sedimentary facies analyses of the Cantwell Formation, Denali National Park, Alaska as indicators of Maastrichtian paleoenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Jaramillo, S.; Fowell, S. J.; Wooller, M. J.; Mccarthy, P. J.; Benowitz, J.

    2012-12-01

    Sedimentary facies and stable isotope analyses of Lower Cantwell Formation outcrops on the East Fork of the Toklat River in Denali National Park, Alaska, reveal a correlation between positive δ13C excursions and carbonaceous facies. 238U/206Pb zircon dating of a bentonite layer from our measured sections yields a crystallization age of 69.5 ± 0.69 Ma, indicating that dinosaur tracks identified in this part of the Cantwell Formation are of early Maastrichtian age. This date establishes the coeval nature of dinosaur bones from the Prince Creek Formation on Alaska's North Slope, allows reconstruction of Late Cretaceous climate gradients, and brackets the age of the Lower Cantwell-Upper Cantwell unconformity (~69 Ma to ~60 Ma) linked to the final docking of the Wrangell Composite Terrane. The Late Cretaceous Cantwell Formation is composed of nonmarine sandstone, siltstone, shale, carbonaceous mudstone and, locally, weakly developed paleosols. Facies associations are interpreted as levees, crevasse channels, crevasse splays, and floodplains, which were part of an anastomosed river system. δ13C, δ15N, C/N and TOC values of bulk organic matter were measured in order to reconstruct the local paleoenvironment and facilitate chemostratigraphic correlation with dinosaur-bearing strata on Alaska's North Slope. C/N ratios fall between 5 and 33, indicating that the organic matter is likely comprised of terrestrial plants and lacustrine algae. Throughout the 123 m section, δ13C values of bulk organic matter from sandstone, siltstone, and shale range between -27.1 and -24.9‰. Wood fragments and bulk organic samples from carbonaceous mudstone have higher TOC values and more positive δ13C values, ranging from -24.1 to -22.4‰. Positive δ13C excursions could reflect one or a combination of: 1) changes in composition of the vegetation (e.g., conifers vs. more mixed organic matter); 2) changes in sources of organic material (lacustrine vs. terrestrial); 3) changes in past

  14. A Storm-by-Storm Analysis of Alpine and Regional Precipitation Dynamics at the Mount Hunter Ice Core Site, Denali National Park, Central Alaska Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, P. L.; Osterberg, E. C.; Kreutz, K. J.; Wake, C. P.; Winski, D.

    2014-12-01

    In May-June 2013, an NSF-funded team from Dartmouth College and the Universities of Maine and New Hampshire collected two 1000-year ice cores to bedrock from the summit plateau of Mount Hunter in Denali National Park, Alaska (62.940291, -151.087616, 3912 m). The snow accumulation record from these ice cores will provide key insight into late Holocene precipitation variability in central Alaska, and compliment existing precipitation paleorecords from the Mt. Logan and Eclipse ice cores in coastal SE Alaska. However, correct interpretation of the Mt. Hunter accumulation record requires an understanding of the relationships between regional meteorological events and micrometeorological conditions at the Mt. Hunter ice core collection site. Here we analyze a three-month window of snow accumulation and meteorological conditions recorded by an Automatic Weather Station (AWS) at the Mt. Hunter site during the summer of 2013. Snow accumulation events are identified in the Mt. Hunter AWS dataset, and compared on a storm-by-storm basis to AWS data collected from the adjacent Kahiltna glacier 2000 m lower in elevation, and to regional National Weather Service (NWS) station data. We also evaluate the synoptic conditions associated with each Mt. Hunter accumulation event using NWS surface maps, NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis data, and the NOAA HYSPLIT back trajectory model. We categorize each Mt. Hunter accumulation event as pure snow accumulation, drifting, or blowing snow events based on snow accumulation, wind speed and temperature data using the method of Knuth et al (2009). We analyze the frequency and duration of events within each accumulation regime, in addition to the overall contribution of each event to the snowpack. Preliminary findings indicate that a majority of Mt. Hunter accumulation events are of pure accumulation nature (55.5%) whereas drifting (28.6%) and blowing (15.4%) snow events play a secondary role. Our results will characterize the local accumulation dynamics on

  15. Commissioning: perspectives from the ground.

    PubMed

    Dawda, Paresh; True, Angelene; Wells, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    Primary Health Networks (PHNs) have been tasked with two key objectives to be achieved through commissioning. Public value aims can be achieved by developing operational capability in the context of an authorising environment. Public value will need to focus on system level outcomes from multiple perspectives, including a consumer perspective. The authorising environment will require policymakers to allow time for PHNs to mature into their role. It will require an environment of effective collaboration amongst multiple stakeholders including consumers. The operational capability will need to ensure highly competent managers and clinical leadership working in a symbiotic relationship. Although some Medicare Locals demonstrated commissioning capacity and capability, this will need to be scaled up at-pace in the new healthcare landscape in order for PHNs to optimally fulfil their roles. PMID:27469048

  16. Commissioning of the LCLS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Miahnahri, A.; Molloy, S.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2010-06-11

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray free electron laser project is currently under construction at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). A new injector and upgrades to the existing accelerator were installed in two phases in 2006 and 2007. We report on the commissioning of the injector, the two new bunch compressors at 250MeV and 4.3 GeV, and transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics up to the end of the existing linac at 13.6 GeV. The commissioning of the new transfer line from the end of the linac to the undulator is scheduled to start in November 2008 and for the undulator in March 2009 with first light to be expected in July 2009.

  17. Guidance on future art commissioning.

    PubMed

    2009-05-01

    Delegates at Building Better Healthcare's recent "National Patient Environment and the Arts Conference 2009" in London heard how national public arts think tank ixia has appointed Bristol-based arts and wellbeing development agency Willis Newson to write "concise and convincing guidance" on commissioning art for new healthcare facilities. A key message, during a joint presentation, was that integrating artwork into hospitals and other healthcare premises requires the earliest possible consideration to reap the maximum rewards.

  18. MAGNET PERFORMANCE AND RHIC COMMISSIONING.

    SciTech Connect

    HARRISON,M.

    2001-09-24

    The RHIC accelerator complex completed commissioning activities in 2000 and is presently operating for the first physics run. The complete ensemble of magnets was thus operating over an extended period for the first time. We review the magnet performance as well as relate machine performance characteristics and accelerator physics results to the various magnetic measurements made during the construction phase. The conclusions may be useful for the LHC Project.

  19. Population commission discusses international migration.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    At the 30th session of the Commission on Population and Development during February 24-28, 1997, international migration was the main topic, with special linkages between migration and development and on gender issues and the family. New and emerging issues were also considered. Members stressed the need for more reliable data on migration, the direction of migrants flows, and the characteristics of migrants. The Commission requested a task force on basic social services to hold a technical symposium of experts on international migration in 1998. Its chair, Dr. Nafis Sadik, said that migration issues should based on the reality of choice not on coercive measures or quotas. Almost half of the migrants globally are women. The Commission was given a new impetus by the International Conference on Population and Development held at Cairo in 1994. Migration pressures intensified in the second half of the 1980s and in the early 1990s, creating areas of concern: the negative impact of short-term migration on working conditions in host countries; migration pressures emanating from climatic change; the protection of migrant women and their children; the right of receiving countries to regulate access to their territory; the adverse consequences of forced migration; the situation of persons whose asylum claims have been rejected; the trafficking in women and children, prostitution and coercive adoption; and the sudden and massive arrival of refugees in need of international protection. The 1998 session of the Commission will feature the theme of health and mortality, with special emphasis on the linkages between health and development and on gender and age.

  20. Blue Ribbon Commission Tour of Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Saueressig

    2010-07-14

    The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future toured the Department of Energy's Hanford Site on July 14, 2010. Commission members, invited guests, and members of the public visited facilities that store high-level, radioactive waste.

  1. Blue Ribbon Commission Tour of Hanford Site

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Saueressig

    2016-07-12

    The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future toured the Department of Energy's Hanford Site on July 14, 2010. Commission members, invited guests, and members of the public visited facilities that store high-level, radioactive waste.

  2. Commissioning New Construction at Emory University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robin

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the process of "commissioning" for effectively maintaining and verifying new construction needs for campus facilities on a continuous improvement basis. The Emory University facility management program illustrates how to develop and manage a building commissioning process. (GR)

  3. Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1989-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the Commission. This is the first of an annual publication for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. The Digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  4. Bioethics commission to review gene patenting

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenburg, L.

    1995-12-01

    In October, in an unexpected development, U.S. President Bill Clinton created a national ethics advisory board, the National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC, Washington, DC), to study both research ethics and the management and use of genetic information. Of particular interest to biotechnology companies and researchers is the fact that the commission`s brief encompasses issues about human gene patenting, a subject not contained in earlier proposals for the commission.

  5. Commissioning Instrument for the GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas, S.; Sánchez, B.; Bringas, V.; Espejo, C.; Flores, R.; Chapa, O.; Lara, G.; Chavolla, A.; Anguiano, G.; Arciniega, S.; Dorantes, A.; González, J. L.; Montoya, J. M.; Toral, R.; Hernández, H.; Nava, R.; Devaney, N.; Castro, J.; Cavaller-Marqués, L.

    2005-12-01

    During the GTC integration phase, the Commissioning Instrument (CI) will be a diagnostic tool for performance verification. The CI features four operation modes: imaging, pupil imaging, Curvature WFS, and high resolution Shack-Hartmann WFS. This instrument was built by the Instituto de Astronomía UNAM and the Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial (CIDESI) under GRANTECAN contract after a public bid. In this paper we made a general instrument overview and we show some of the performance final results obtained when the Factory Acceptance tests previous to its transport to La Palma.

  6. Division J Commission 28: Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, John S.; Davies, Roger L.; Courteau, Stéphane; Dekel, Avishai; Franx, Marijn; Jog, Chanda J.; Jogee, Sardha; Nakai, Naomasa; Rubio, Monica; Tacconi, Linda; Terlevich, Elena

    2016-04-01

    IAU Commission 28 (IAU C28: Galaxies) was founded in the late 1930s at which time it had only a small membership (see the historical notes by Sadler et al. 2007). When C28 ended its existence in 2015 there were well over 1000 members on its books. The membership had grown to the point where the effort to keep track of active participants had become a major task. During the C28s tenure 27 IAU Symposia have been devoted to galaxies, the third highest number (Mickaelian 2014)

  7. Denali National Park Improvement Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Young, Don [R-AK-At Large

    2013-02-06

    09/20/2013 Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 157. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.157, which became Public Law 113-33 on 9/18/2013. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. 78 FR 44927 - 101st Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCTIC RESEARCH COMMISSION 101st Commission Meeting Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Arctic Research Commission will hold its... presentations concerning Arctic research activities The focus of the meeting will be Arctic research...

  9. The Commission on Magnet® Recognition.

    PubMed

    Moran, Janice W

    2016-09-01

    The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Commission on Magnet® Recognition is a voluntary governing body that oversees the Magnet Recognition Program®. Commission members are appointed by the ANCC Board of Directors and are expert representatives from various sectors of the nursing community. In addition, 1 commission member represents public consumers. PMID:27556648

  10. 75 FR 18469 - April 2010 Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ...; ] EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform April 2010...), the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform announces the following meeting: Name: National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform April 2010 Meeting. Time and Date: Tuesday,...

  11. 10 CFR 9.105 - Commission procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Commission procedures. 9.105 Section 9.105 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Government in the Sunshine Act Regulations § 9.105 Commission procedures. (a) Action under § 9.104 shall be taken only when a majority of the entire membership of...

  12. 46 CFR 502.161 - Commission's files.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commission's files. 502.161 Section 502.161 Shipping...; Presiding Officers; Evidence § 502.161 Commission's files. Where any matter contained in a tariff, report, or other document on file with the Commission is offered in evidence, such document need not...

  13. 10 CFR 110.113 - Commission action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Commission action. 110.113 Section 110.113 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Hearings § 110.113... available at the NRC Web site, http://www.nrc.gov, and furnished to the participants. (d) The Commission...

  14. 39 CFR 3060.42 - Commission review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commission review. 3060.42 Section 3060.42 Postal... COMPETITIVE PRODUCTS ENTERPRISE § 3060.42 Commission review. (a) Interested persons shall be provided an... documentation. (b) The Commission will review the calculation of the assumed Federal income tax...

  15. 45 CFR 2101.10 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false The Commission. 2101.10 Section 2101.10 Public... ORGANIZATION General Organization § 2101.10 The Commission. The Commission is composed of seven members, each of whom is appointed by the President and serves for a period of four years or until his or...

  16. 45 CFR 2101.10 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false The Commission. 2101.10 Section 2101.10 Public... ORGANIZATION General Organization § 2101.10 The Commission. The Commission is composed of seven members, each of whom is appointed by the President and serves for a period of four years or until his or...

  17. 45 CFR 2101.10 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The Commission. 2101.10 Section 2101.10 Public... ORGANIZATION General Organization § 2101.10 The Commission. The Commission is composed of seven members, each of whom is appointed by the President and serves for a period of four years or until his or...

  18. 16 CFR 1000.1 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false The Commission. 1000.1 Section 1000.1....1 The Commission. (a) The Consumer Product Safety Commission is an independent regulatory agency formed on May 14, 1973, under the provisions of the Consumer Product Safety Act (Pub. L. 92-573, 86...

  19. 16 CFR 1000.1 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The Commission. 1000.1 Section 1000.1....1 The Commission. (a) The Consumer Product Safety Commission is an independent regulatory agency formed on May 14, 1973, under the provisions of the Consumer Product Safety Act (Pub. L. 92-573, 86...

  20. Iowa College Student Aid Commission Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Rachel A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive case study was to trace the policy production process of a state agency, the Iowa College Student Aid Commission (Commission), to its function today. This case study relied on a review of federal and state statutes, a news article search, biennium reports of the Commission, and information obtained from the…

  1. 32 CFR 9.4 - Commission personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commission personnel. 9.4 Section 9.4 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM §...

  2. 39 CFR 3060.42 - Commission review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commission review. 3060.42 Section 3060.42 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL ACCOUNTING PRACTICES AND TAX RULES FOR THE THEORETICAL COMPETITIVE PRODUCTS ENTERPRISE § 3060.42 Commission review. (a) Interested persons shall be provided...

  3. The Truman Commission's Vision of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutcheson, Philo A.

    2007-01-01

    Looking back over three centuries of American higher education, one can see both strengths and weaknesses in the changing attitudes toward teaching goals. In this article, the author discusses the Truman Commission's (President Harry Truman appointed the higher education commission in July 1946, and charged the commission members to examine…

  4. 76 FR 55059 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education. ACTION...-coming meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes the... Auditorium. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jim Eichner, Designated Federal Official, Equity and...

  5. 77 FR 18798 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: U.S. Department of Education. ACTION: Notice; Advisory Committee... of the Equity and Excellence Commission scheduled for March 29, 2012 and announced in the Federal... Excellence Commission, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20202....

  6. 76 FR 27034 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education. ACTION... upcoming meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes the... Auditorium. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Stephen Chen, Designated Federal Official, Equity and...

  7. Water quality of streams draining abandoned and reclaimed mined lands in the Kantishna Hills area, Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska, 2008–11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabets, Timothy P.; Ourso, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    The Kantishna Hills are an area of low elevation mountains in the northwest part of Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska. Streams draining the Kantishna Hills are clearwater streams that support several species of fish and are derived from rain, snowmelt, and subsurface aquifers. However, the water quality of many of these streams has been degraded by mining. Past mining practices generated acid mine drainage and excessive sediment loads that affected water quality and aquatic habitat. Because recovery through natural processes is limited owing to a short growing season, several reclamation projects have been implemented on several streams in the Kantishna Hills region. To assess the current water quality of streams in the Kantishna Hills area and to determine if reclamation efforts have improved water quality, a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service was undertaken during 2008-11. High levels of turbidity, an indicator of high concentrations of suspended sediment, were documented in water-quality data collected in the mid-1980s when mining was active. Mining ceased in 1985 and water-quality data collected during this study indicate that levels of turbidity have declined significantly. Turbidity levels generally were less than 2 Formazin Nephelometric Units and suspended sediment concentrations generally were less than 1 milligram per liter during the current study. Daily turbidity data at Rock Creek, an unmined stream, and at Caribou Creek, a mined stream, documented nearly identical patterns of turbidity in 2009, indicating that reclamation as well as natural revegetation in mined streams has improved water quality. Specific conductance and concentrations of dissolved solids and major ions were highest from streams that had been mined. Most of these streams flow into Moose Creek, which functions as an integrator stream, and dilutes the specific conductance and ion concentrations. Calcium and magnesium are the

  8. Commissioning Measurements of ORRUBA Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, C. T.; Cizewski, J. A.; O'Malley, P. D.; Pain, S. D.

    2008-10-01

    The Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) is a silicon detector array being developed by the Center of Excellence for Stewardship Science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The array is comprised of two rings of position-sensitive detectors in a cylindrical setup designed to maximize solid angle coverage for (d,p) measurements in inverse kinematics. Each detector has 4 resistive strips, with readout from each strip-end. At forward angles, detector telescopes are used, comprised of a thin non-resistive detector (65μm) for transmission backed by the thicker resistive detector (1000μm) for stopping, allowing particle identification in addition to measurement of the angle and energy of the detected particles. For commissioning, the profile of each detector must be tested to insure that it is functioning properly, and to understand its optimal bias voltage and energy resolution. Measurements of leakage current profiles, full-depletion voltages and energy resolution measurements have been completed. The details of the array, its motivation and these commissioning measurements will be reported.

  9. Constraining the slip distribution and fault geometry of the Mw 7.9, 3 November 2002, Denali fault earthquake with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar and Global Positioning System data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Tim J.; Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Mw 7.9, Denali fault earthquake (DFE) is the largest continental strike-slip earthquake to occur since the development of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). We use five interferograms, constructed using radar images from the Canadian Radarsat-1 satellite, to map the surface deformation at the western end of the fault rupture. Additional geodetic data are provided by displacements observed at 40 campaign and continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) sites. We use the data to determine the geometry of the Susitna Glacier fault, thrusting on which initiated the DFE, and to determine a slip model for the entire event that is consistent with both the InSAR and GPS data. We find there was an average of 7.3 ± 0.4 m slip on the Susitna Glacier fault, between 1 and 9.5 km depth on a 29 km long fault that dips north at 41 ± 0.7° and has a surface projection close to the mapped rupture. On the Denali fault, a simple model with large slip patches finds a maximum of 8.7 ± 0.7 m of slip between the surface and 14.3 ± 0.2 km depth. A more complex distributed slip model finds a peak of 12.5 ± 0.8 m in the upper 4 km, significantly higher than the observed surface slip. We estimate a geodetic moment of 670 ± 10 × 1018 N m (Mw 7.9), consistent with seismic estimates. Lack of preseismic data resulted in an absence of InSAR coverage for the eastern half of the DFE rupture. A dedicated geodetic InSAR mission could obviate coverage problems in the future.

  10. Beyond Commissioning: The Role of Automation

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2005-02-01

    This article takes a brief look at the benefits of commissioning and describes a vision of the future where most of the objectives of commissioning will be accomplished automatically by capabilities built into the building systems themselves. Commissioning will become an activity that's performed continuously rather than periodically, and only repairs requiring replacement or overhaul of equipment will require manual intervention. The article then identifies some of the technologies that will be needed to realize this vision and ends with a call for all involved in the enterprise of building commissioning and automation to embrace and dedicate themselves to a future of automated commissioning.

  11. 47 CFR 51.803 - Procedures for Commission notification of a state commission's failure to act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the state commission and the other parties to the proceeding or matter for which preemption is sought... commission and the parties to a proceeding or matter in which the Commission has taken notice of the state... determining whether it is required to preempt the state commission's jurisdiction of a proceeding or...

  12. Commission 19: Rotation of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, Aleksander; Ma, Chopo; Dehant, Véronique; Defraigne, Pascale; Dickey, Jean O.; Huang, Cheng-Li; Souchay, Jean; Vondrák, Jan; Charlot, Patrick; Richter, Bernd; Schuh, Harald

    The Commission supports and coordinates scientific investigations in the Earth rotation and related reference frames. Several changes had been introduced to the structure of Commission 19 since the IAU XXVI General Assembly in Prague, 2006. The Organizing Committee of Commission 19 has been substantially reduced. It consists now of six ex-officio members, the Commission president, vice-president, past president and representatives from the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS), International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), and five members at-large who are nominated by the OC, selected by the Commission members and elected by the IAU GA for a maximum of two terms. The modified terms of reference of Commission 19, the list of members and other details can be found at the Commission website .

  13. Commissioning neuropsychiatry services: barriers and lessons.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Rahul; Rickards, Hugh; Agrawal, Niruj

    2015-12-01

    Aims and method Previous studies have shown variations in commissioning of neuropsychiatry services and this makes access to neuropsychiatric services a post-code lottery. In this survey, we approached all mental health and neuropsychiatric service commissioners within London to map current funding and commissioning arrangements, and explored perceived barriers to neuropsychiatric service commissioning. Results 83% of commissioners within London responded. There was significant variability between neuropsychiatric services commissioned through the mental health stream. Contracting arrangements were variable. Lack of earmarked fund for neuropsychiatry and disjointed funding stream for such services were identified by commissioners as a barrier, as was the critical mass of neuropsychiatric cases. Clinical implications Neuropsychiatric service development continues to be hindered by lack of clear commissioning process. Strategic drive is needed to promote more equitable neuropsychiatric services. National or regional commissioning covering a large population will provide a better model for neuropsychiatric services to be commissioned. PMID:26755989

  14. 75 FR 19645 - Denali-The Alaska Gas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Request for Approval of Plan for Conducting an Open...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... for Conducting an Open Season April 8, 2010. Take notice that on April 7, 2010, pursuant to section 157.38 of the Commission's Regulations governing Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation... for Conducting an Open Season. The proposed Open Season is being held to solicit binding...

  15. Division A Commission 31: Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Mizuhiko; Arias, Elisa Felicitas; Manchester, Richard; Tuckey, Philip; Matsakis, Demetrios; Zhang, Shougang; Zharov, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Time is an essential element of fundamental astronomy. In recent years there have been many time-related issues, in scientific and technological aspects as well as in conventions and definitions. At the Commission 31 (Time) business meeting at the XXIX General Assembly, recent progress and many topics, including Pulsar Time Scales WG and Future UTC WG activities, were reviewed and discussed. In this report, we will review the progress of these topics in the past three years. There are many remarkable topics, such as Time scales, Atomic clock development, Time transfer, Future UTC and future redefinition of the second. Among them, scientific highlights are the progress of pulsar time scales and the optical frequency standards. On the other hand, as the social convention, change in the definition of UTC and the second is important.

  16. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

  17. Large Hadron Collider commissioning and first operation.

    PubMed

    Myers, S

    2012-02-28

    A history of the commissioning and the very successful early operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The accident that interrupted the first commissioning, its repair and the enhanced protection system put in place are fully described. The LHC beam commissioning and operational performance are reviewed for the period from 2010 to mid-2011. Preliminary plans for operation and future upgrades for the LHC are given for the short and medium term.

  18. Commissioning Results on the JWST Testbed Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.; Acton, D. Scott

    2006-01-01

    The one-meter 18 segment JWST Testbed Telescope (TBT) has been developed at Ball Aerospace to facilitate commissioning operations for the JWST Observatory. Eight different commissioning activities were tested on the TBT: telescope focus sweep, segment ID and Search, image array, global alignment, image stacking, coarse phasing, fine phasing, and multi-field phasing. This paper describes recent commissioning results from experiments performed on the TBT.

  19. Commission 26: Double and Multiple Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartkopf, William I.; Allen, Christine; Davis, J. A.; Fekel, F. C.; Lampens, P.; Ling, J. F.; Oblak, E.; Oswalt, T. D.; Scarfe, C.

    2007-03-01

    While Commission 26 remains one of the smallest in the IAU, it maintains an active program which belies its size, as highlighted below. Further information on the commission may be found at our website: http://ad.usno.navy.mil/wds/dsl.html#iau. This site includes links to other sites and to major databases and catalogues, as well as bibliographies of recent double star papers, an archive of the Commission's Information Circulars, and a list of upcoming meetings.

  20. 78 FR 44165 - Nuclear Regulatory Commission Enforcement Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Nuclear Regulatory Commission Enforcement Policy AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Enforcement policy; request for comment. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is...

  1. SNS BEAM COMMISSIONING TOOLS AND EXPERIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Galambos, John D

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) successfully met the primary construction project completion milestones in April 2006. An important ingredient of this successful commissioning was the development and use of software tools. With the increasing digitalization of beam diagnostics and increasing complexity of Integrated Control Systems of large accelerators, the need for high level software tools is critical for smooth commissioning. At SNS a special Java based infrastructure called XAL was prepared for beam commissioning. XAL provides a hierarchal view of the accelerator, is data base configured, and includes a physics model of the beam. This infrastructure and individual applications development along with a historical time line of the SNS commissioning will be discussed.

  2. 11 CFR 7.17 - Use of Commission employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of Commission employment. 7.17 Section 7.17 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Conduct and Responsibilities of Special Commission Employees § 7.17 Use of Commission employment. A special Commission employee shall not use his or her Commission employment for...

  3. 29 CFR 1603.304 - Commission decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EXEMPT STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION UNDER SECTION 304 OF... consideration by the Commission. (b) When an administrative law judge certifies a matter for interlocutory review under § 1603.213, the Commission may, in its discretion, issue a decision on the matter or...

  4. 76 FR 63325 - National Indian Gaming Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ...). II. Definitions--Net Revenues--management fee The NOI asked whether the Commission should consider whether the definition of net revenues for the purposes of calculating the management fees should be... Register on November 18, 2010. 75 FR 70680. The Commission's regulatory review process established a...

  5. Commissioning MMS: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Paul; Gramling, Cheryl; Reiter, Jennifer; Smith, Patrick; Stone, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses commissioning of NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission. The mission includes four identical spacecraft with a large, complex set of instrumentation. The planning for and execution of commissioning for this mission is described. The paper concludes by discussing lessons learned.

  6. Women Appointed to State Boards and Commissions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. Center for the American Woman and Politics.

    The report analyzed the average proportions of women on 2,134 state boards and commissions in ten areas of state government. Data were collected in 1975 at the request of the Women in Power Committee of the National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year. The ten functional areas of government were business regulation, economic…

  7. Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    The Commission on Preservation and Access was established to foster and support collaboration among libraries and allied organizations in order to ensure the preservation of the published and documentary record in all formats and to provide enhanced access to scholarly information. The Commission's newsletter keeps preservation and access…

  8. Appalachian Regional Commission Annual Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachian Regional Commission, Washington, DC.

    In fiscal year 2001, the Appalachian Regional Commission invested $63.6 million in 469 economic and human development (nonhighway) projects and $389.6 million in highway projects in Appalachia. The Commission launched a new initiative to promote the development of telecommunications infrastructure, especially in distressed counties. The Commission…

  9. 77 FR 48429 - Commission Address Change

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION 29 CFR Parts 2700, 2701, 2702, 2704, 2705, 2706 Commission Address Change AGENCY... to inform the public of the address change. DATES: This final rule will take effect on August 27... because the amendments are of a minor and administrative nature dealing with only a change in address....

  10. A Custom Fit with a Commissioned Song.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strempel, Eileen

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of commissioning a work for a choral group. Provides guidelines for music educators who commission a piece: (1) know your own needs; (2) find a composer who interests you; (3) help the composer select appropriate lyrics; (4) set a tentative schedule; (5) consider the costs. (CMK)

  11. 10 CFR 1.11 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false The Commission. 1.11 Section 1.11 Energy NUCLEAR.... (a) The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, composed of five members, one of whom is designated by the... for licensing and regulating nuclear facilities and materials and for conducting research in...

  12. 10 CFR 1.11 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false The Commission. 1.11 Section 1.11 Energy NUCLEAR.... (a) The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, composed of five members, one of whom is designated by the... for licensing and regulating nuclear facilities and materials and for conducting research in...

  13. 18 CFR 35.31 - Commission review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the ASC methodology set forth at 18 CFR 301.1. If the ASC is not in accord with the methodology, the... Commission under this subpart is computed in accordance with 18 CFR 35.19a. Interest on any increase ordered... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Commission review....

  14. 17 CFR 201.57 - Commission review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Regulations Pertaining to the Equal Access to Justice Act § 201.57 Commission review. In accordance with the procedures set forth in 17 CFR 201.410 and 201.411, either the applicant or counsel for the Office or... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commission review....

  15. Commission 25: Stellar Photometry and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Peter; Milone, Eugene; Landolt, Arlo; Jordi, Carme; Mironov, Aleksey; Shenbang, Qian; Schmidt, Edward; Sterken, Christiaan

    2010-05-01

    The Business Meeting for Commission 25 was held on the 6th of August 2009. The meeting was chaired by Dr Eugene Milone, Vice President for the 2006-2009 triennium, and incoming President for the 2009-2011 triennium. Dr Milone presented an apology from the President of the Commission, Dr Peter Martinez, who was unable to attend the meeting.

  16. Report of the Commission on University Purpose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Univ., Edmonton. The Senate.

    A report of the Commission on University Purpose of The University of Alberta, Canada, is presented. Based on the perceptions of the various publics, the Commission sought to clarify the purposes and functions of the university. After an introductory section on the historical development of universities and The University of Alberta, changing…

  17. 77 FR 39560 - International Joint Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... International Joint Commission International Joint Commission Invites Public Comment on Upper Great Lakes Report... final report of its International Upper Great Lakes Study Board, Lake Superior Regulation: Addressing Uncertainty in Upper Great Lakes Water Levels. Comments will be accepted at public hearings and by mail,...

  18. 10 CFR 1.11 - The Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., protecting and safeguarding nuclear materials and nuclear power plants in the interest of national security... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The Commission. 1.11 Section 1.11 Energy NUCLEAR.... (a) The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, composed of five members, one of whom is designated by...

  19. 77 FR 2711 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... Register (FR Doc. 2011-33800 Filed 1-4-12; 8:45 a.m.) a notice of open meeting on January 23, 2012 for the Equity and Excellence Commission. This notice amends the January 5, 2012 notice by providing notice of a... Equity and Excellence Commission AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, Education. ACTION: Notice of...

  20. Commission 12: Solar Radiation and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander; Cauzzi, Gianna; Pillet, Valentin Martinez; Asplund, Martin; Brandenburg, Axel; Chou, Dean-Yi; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Gan, Weiqun; Kuznetsov, Vladimir D.; Rovira, Marta G.; Shchukina, Nataliya; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2012-04-01

    Commission 12 of the International Astronomical Union encompasses investigations of the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun, mostly accessible through the techniques of local and global helioseismology, the quiet solar atmosphere, solar radiation and its variability, and the nature of relatively stable magnetic structures like sunspots, faculae and the magnetic network. The Commission sees participation of over 350 scientists worldwide.

  1. A Practical Guide for Commissioning Existing Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Haasl, T.

    1999-05-11

    Although this guide focuses on the retrocommissioning process and its advantages, all three types of commissioning--retrocommissioning, commissioning, and recommissioning--play an equally important role in ensuring that buildings perform efficiently and provide comfortable, safe, and productive work environments for owners and occupants. For new construction and retrofit projects, commissioning should be incorporated early, during design, and last throughout the length of the project. For buildings that were never commissioned, the retrocommissioning process can yield a wealth of cost-saving opportunities while enhancing a building's environment. Finally, once a building is commissioned or retrocommissioned, incorporating recommissioning into the organization's O and M program (by periodically reapplying the original diagnostic testing and checklist procedures) helps ensure that cost savings and other benefits gained from the original process persist over time.

  2. A Practical Guide for Commissioning Existing Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Haasl, T.; Sharp, T.

    1999-04-01

    Although this guide focuses on the retrocommissioning process and its advantages, all three types of commissioning--retrocommissioning, commissioning, and recommissioning--play an equally important role in ensuring that buildings perform efficiently and provide comfortable, safe, and productive work environments for owners and occupants. For new construction and retrofit projects, commissioning should be incorporated early, during design, and last throughout the length of the project. For buildings that were never commissioned, the retrocommissioning process can yield a wealth of cost-saving opportunities while enhancing a building's environment. Finally, once a building is commissioned or retrocommissioned, incorporating recommissioning into the organization's O and M program (by periodically reapplying the original diagnostic testing and checklist procedures) helps ensure that cost savings and other benefits gained from the original process persist over time.

  3. 78 FR 45068 - Commission's Rules of Practice and Procedure; Practice Before the Commission, Parties to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... amendments to Subparts E and L, effective November 12, 2012. See 76 FR 10258, Feb. 24, 2011 and 77 FR 61519... Commission, Parties to Proceedings, and Rulemakings AGENCY: Federal Maritime Commission. ACTION: Final rule... regarding practice before the Commission, parties to proceedings, and rulemakings, to update, clarify,...

  4. 33 CFR 209.50 - Mississippi River Commission: Public observation of Commission meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mississippi River Commission... ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.50 Mississippi River... of the Mississippi River Commission and to open all meetings of the Mississippi River Commission...

  5. 33 CFR 209.50 - Mississippi River Commission: Public observation of Commission meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... criminal investigation or by an agency conducting a lawful national-security intelligence investigation... Commission. (2) President means the duly appointed President and Executive Officer of the Commission. (3... Commission. (5) Chief Legal Officer means the Division Counsel or the acting Division Counsel of the...

  6. 33 CFR 209.50 - Mississippi River Commission: Public observation of Commission meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... criminal investigation or by an agency conducting a lawful national-security intelligence investigation... Commission. (2) President means the duly appointed President and Executive Officer of the Commission. (3... Commission. (5) Chief Legal Officer means the Division Counsel or the acting Division Counsel of the...

  7. 33 CFR 209.50 - Mississippi River Commission: Public observation of Commission meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... criminal investigation or by an agency conducting a lawful national-security intelligence investigation... Commission. (2) President means the duly appointed President and Executive Officer of the Commission. (3... Commission. (5) Chief Legal Officer means the Division Counsel or the acting Division Counsel of the...

  8. 47 CFR 51.803 - Procedures for Commission notification of a state commission's failure to act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for Commission notification of a state commission's failure to act. 51.803 Section 51.803 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Procedures for Implementation...

  9. Automated Commissioning for Lower-cost, Widely Deployed Building Commissioning of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2011-08-16

    This chapter takes a brief look at the benefits of commissioning and describes a vision of the future where most of the objectives of commissioning will be accomplished automatically by capabilities built into the building systems themselves. Commissioning will become an activity that is performed continuously rather than periodically, and only repairs requiring replacement or overhaul of equipment will require manual intervention. This chapter then identifies some of the technologies that will be needed to realize this vision and ends with a call for all involved in the enterprise of building commissioning and automation to embrace and dedicate themselves to a future of automated commissioning.

  10. Instrumented home energy rating and commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-05-01

    Currently, houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict, largely because they are field assembled and there is no consistent process to identify deficiencies or to correct them. Solving this problem requires field performance evaluations using appropriate and agreed upon procedures in the form of a new process called residential commissioning. The purpose of this project is to develop and document these procedures and to demonstrate the value that applying them could provide in both new and existing California houses. This project has four specific objectives: to develop metrics and diagnostics for assessing house performance, to provide information on the potential benefits of commissioning using a whole-house approach, to develop programmatic guidelines for commissioning, and to conduct outreach efforts to transfer project results to industry stakeholders. The primary outcomes from this project are the development of residential commissioning guidelines and the analytical confirmation that there are significant potential benefits associated with commissioning California houses, particularly existing ones. In addition, we have made substantial advances in understanding the accuracy and usability of diagnostics for commissioning houses. In some cases, we have been able to work with equipment manufacturers to improve these aspects of their diagnostic tools. These outcomes provide a solid foundation on which to build a residential commissioning program in California. We expect that a concerted effort will be necessary to integrate such a program with existing building industry efforts and to demonstrate its use in the field.

  11. Remote sensing investigation into the correlation between landslides caused by the 2002 November 3rd, 7.9M Denali Fault earthquake and a surge of the SE fork of McGinnis Peak Glacier.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benowitz, J.

    2007-12-01

    The 2002 November 3rd, 7.9 M Denali Fault caused a large landslide that deposited 11.4 x 106m3 feet of rock and ice onto the SE fork of McGinnis Peak Glacier. The landslide left a large mass on the upper ice reservoir of the glacier and blocked the terminus outlet of the glacier with debris. Satellite images and historic photos were used to examine the terminus history of the glacier. Further landslides/mass wasting events during the spring of 2003, documented via Land Sat 7 images, covered the same upper ice reservoir as the 2002 landslides. Between 2004 and 2006 the SE fork Glacier of McGinnis Peak experienced a dramatic surge. There is no known history of such dramatic surge occurrences on the glacier of interest. Though causation is difficult to prove preliminary evidence points towards the implication that the landslides generated by the 2002 earthquake most likely either caused or contributed to the documented glacial surge. Examination of more satellite images is planned to further examine McGinnis Peak's glacier history and to refine the timing of the possible correlation between the earthquake generated landslides and the dramatic surge of the SE glacial fork of McGinnis Peak

  12. Commissioning the Linac Coherent Light Source injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akre, R.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Schmerge, J.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.

    2008-03-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is a SASE x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) project presently under construction at SLAC [J. Arthur , SLAC-R-593, 2002.]. The injector section, from drive laser and rf photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in the fall of 2006. The initial system commissioning with an electron beam was completed in August of 2007, with the goal of a 1.2-micron emittance in a 1-nC bunch demonstrated. The second phase of commissioning, including second bunch compressor and full linac, is planned for 2008, with FEL commissioning in 2009. We report experimental results and experience gained in the first phase of commissioning, including the photocathode drive laser, rf gun, photocathode, S-band and X-band rf systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  13. 29 CFR 1603.304 - Commission decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EXEMPT STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION UNDER SECTION 304 OF THE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Appeals § 1603.304 Commission decision. (a) On behalf...

  14. 29 CFR 2704.308 - Commission review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT IN COMMISSION PROCEEDINGS Procedures for Considering Applications... presentation of views by opposing parties, review the case and issue its own order affirming, modifying...

  15. 16 CFR 4.15 - Commission meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mailing list, and will be issued as a press release to interested media. (b) Open meetings. (1) Commission... to be discussed will have any of the effects enumerated in 5 U.S.C. 552b(c). Requests shall...

  16. 43 CFR 10010.41 - Commission responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MITIGATION AND CONSERVATION COMMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL... applicant may print it provided the applicant is bearing the cost of the document pursuant to other laws....

  17. Commissioning medical education: principles for best practice.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kieran

    2016-04-01

    We need to ensure that we get value for money for our investments in medical education. Commissioning is one method of ensuring that we get value. However, like any other tool, it needs to be used properly. PMID:27071431

  18. 29 CFR 1603.304 - Commission decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EXEMPT STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION UNDER SECTION 304 OF THE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Appeals § 1603.304 Commission decision. (a) On behalf...

  19. Psychosurgery: National Commission Issues Surprisingly Favorable Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culliton, Barbara J.

    1976-01-01

    Presents results of a national commission's investigation of psychosurgery. Results indicate the procedure to be effective in the cure of patients suffering from pain accompanied by depression, while avoiding the destruction caused by prefrontal lobotomies. (SL)

  20. 76 FR 53159 - CFC-50 Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... ``watchdog'' groups. The Commission is co- chaired by Thomas Davis and Beverly Byron. The meeting is open to... 20415. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Keith Willingham, Director, Combined Federal Campaign,...

  1. 77 FR 10004 - CFC-50 Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ...'' groups. The Commission is co- chaired by Thomas Davis and Beverly Byron. The meeting is open to the..., 78205. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Keith Willingham, Director, Combined Federal Campaign,...

  2. 76 FR 72452 - CFC-50 Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ...'' groups. The Commission is co-chaired by Thomas Davis and Beverly Byron. The meeting is open to the public... INFORMATION CONTACT: Keith Willingham, Director, Combined Federal Campaign, U.S. Office of...

  3. 47 CFR 0.416 - The Federal Communications Commission Record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The Federal Communications Commission Record. 0.416 Section 0.416 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION General Information Printed Publications § 0.416 The Federal Communications Commission Record. Texts adopted by the Commission or a member of...

  4. 75 FR 81592 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ..., processing, and disposal of civilian and defense spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The Commission is... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy... Commission on America's Nuclear Future (the Commission). The Commission was organized pursuant to the...

  5. 47 CFR 0.416 - The Federal Communications Commission Record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The Federal Communications Commission Record. 0.416 Section 0.416 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION General Information Printed Publications § 0.416 The Federal Communications Commission Record. Texts adopted by the Commission or a member of...

  6. Division II: Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Scrijver, Karel J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2015-08-01

    The Business Meeting of Commission 10 was held as part of the Business Meeting of Division II (Sun and Heliosphere), chaired by Valentin Martínez-Pillet, the President of the Division. The President of Commission 10 (C10; Solar activity), Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, took the chair for the business meeting of C10. She summarised the activities of C10 over the triennium and the election of the incoming OC.

  7. Building commissioning: The key to quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This Guide is written to aid building owners and retrofit project managers currently participating in the Rebuild America program. The Guide provides information on implementing building commissioning projects that will optimize the results of existing building equipment improvements and retrofits projects. It should be used in coordination with Rebuild America`s Community Partnership Handbook. The Handbook describes, in detail, eight important steps necessary for planning and carrying out a community-wide energy-efficiency program. In step number 7 of the Handbook, commissioning is shown to be an integral aspect of implementing a building retrofit. The commissioning process ensures that a facility is safe, efficient, comfortable, and conducive to the presumed activities for which it was constructed. Rebuild America strongly encourages its partners to incorporate commissioning into their retrofit projects. By verifying the correct installation, functioning, operation, and maintenance of equipment, the commissioning process ensures that efficiency measures will continue to deliver benefits over the long term. Although commissioning can take place after the equipment has been installed, it is more effective when it takes place over the entire equipment installation process.

  8. 76 FR 7839 - Notice of Commission and Commission Staff Attendance at ISO/RTO Council and Regional State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission and Commission Staff Attendance at ISO/RTO Council and... of the Commission and Commission staff may attend the following ISO/RTO Council and Regional State..., RTO/ISO Performance Metrics. For more information, contact Sandra Waldstein, Office of...

  9. 75 FR 3448 - Federal Advisory Committee; Military Leadership Diversity Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Military Leadership Diversity Commission AGENCY... the Military Leadership Diversity Commission (hereafter referred to as the Commission) on January 15... leadership position with either a Military Department command or combatant command; (b) a retired general...

  10. 39 CFR 3002.10 - The Commission and its offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reading room where the Commission's public records are available for inspection and copying; a library... are held on matters before the Commission. The Commission also maintains an electronic reading...

  11. 75 FR 6339 - California Public Utilities Commission Petition for Rulemaking

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (1998). Electronic Filers: Comments may be filed electronically using the... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 4 California Public Utilities Commission Petition for Rulemaking AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Petition for rulemaking. SUMMARY: The California Public Utilities...

  12. Division G Commission 45: Stellar Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Richard; Soubiran, Caroline; Nordström, Birgitta; Burgasser, Adam; Gupta, Ranjan; Hanson, Margaret; Leggett, Sandy K.; Soubiran, Caroline; Singh, Harinder P.; Nordström, Birgitta

    2016-04-01

    Commission 45 is solidly anchored in the beginnings of the IAU. It evolved out of Commission 29, which was one of the original commissions and whose title and emphasis was the Spectral Classification of Stars (Transactions of the IAU, Volume I, 1922). C29 was formed with W.S. Adams (Pasadena) as president. Its first members were Miss Cannon, R.H. Curtiss, A. Fowler, A. de Gramont, M. Hamy, H.F. Newall, J.S. Plaskett, H.N. Russell, all very much part of the history of stellar spectroscopy. In the 1922 Transactions report it was recognized the Harvard System of spectral classification ``has already been adopted by international agreement. . .''

  13. VINCI: the VLT Interferometer commissioning instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, Pierre; Coudé du Foresto, Vincent; Glindemann, Andreas; Hofmann, Reiner

    2000-07-01

    The Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) is a complex system, made of a large number of separated elements. To prepare an early successful operation, it will require a period of extensive testing and verification to ensure that the many devices involved work properly together, and can produce meaningful data. This paper describes the concept chosen for the VLTI commissioning instrument, LEONARDO da VINCI, and details its functionalities. It is a fiber based two-way beam combiner, associated with an artificial star and an alignment verification unit. The technical commissioning of the VLTI is foreseen as a stepwise process: fringes will first be obtained with the commissioning instrument in an autonomous mode (no other parts of the VLTI involved); then the VLTI telescopes and optical trains will be tested in autocollimation; finally fringes will be observed on the sky.

  14. Legislative Priorities of the Commission, 1988. Commission Report 88-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    An outline is provided, for its staff, of the seven priorities of the California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC), during the second half of the California State Legislature's 1987-88 session. The report states that the Commission's staff will: (1) work with legislators and the Governor's staff to develop and implement appropriate…

  15. Boys' Reading Commission 2012: A Review of Existing Research Conducted to Underpin the Commission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The gender gap has been a hotly debated issue, both nationally and internationally. In 2000, the then Department for Education and Schools commissioned a four-year study into raising boys' achievement. The commission worked with over 60 primary, secondary and special schools in England to identify and evaluate the strategies highlighted to be…

  16. 78 FR 57818 - Commission Participation and Commission Employee Involvement in Voluntary Standards Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... the development of voluntary standards (43 FR 19216 (May 4, 1978)). Acknowledging the contribution... Commission Employee Involvement in Voluntary Standards Activities. 54 FR 6646 (Feb. 14, 1989). In 2006, the Commission amended several provisions of part 1031. 71 FR 38754 (July 10, 2006). Among other things, the...

  17. National Commission on Excellence in Teacher Education: Commissioned Papers from the Regional Hearings. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Catherine

    The National Commission on Excellence in Teacher Education was appointed in 1983 to describe the present state of teacher education, identify problem issues, and make recommendations for the improvement of teacher education. The final report of the Commission, "A Call for Change in Teacher Education," was based on information gathered at the…

  18. 33 CFR 209.50 - Mississippi River Commission: Public observation of Commission meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agenda of meetings. (1) The meetings of the Commission, except those held on Government boats during... the Commissioners, prepare a detailed agenda for planned Commission meetings at the earliest practicable time. Suggestions from the public of proposed agenda items are invited. (d) Public notices...

  19. Division XII: Commission 6: Astronomical Telegrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus, N. N.; Yamaoka, H.; Gilmore, A. C.; Aksnes, K.; Green, D. W. E.; Marsden, B. G.; Nakano, S.; Lara, Martin; Pitjeva, Elena V.; Sphar, T.; Ticha, J.; Williams, G.

    2015-08-01

    IAU Commission 6 ``Astronomical Telegrams'' had a single business meeting during the Beijing General Assembly of the IAU. It took place on Friday, August 24, 2012. The meeting was attended by five C6 members (N. N. Samus; D. W. E. Green; S. Nakano; J. Ticha; and H. Yamaoka). Also present was Prof. F. Genova as a representative of the IAU Division B. She told the audience about the current restructuring of IAU Commissions and Divisions and consequences for the future of C6.

  20. COMMISSIONING OF RHIC AT 100 GEV / NUCLEON.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC,D.; AHRENS,L.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BAI,M.; CAMERON,P.; CARDONA,J.; CONNOLLY,R.; DREES,A.; FLILLER,R.P.; ET AL

    2002-06-02

    This report describes commissioning of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) for 100 GeV/nucleon collisions at designed luminosity. To achieve these goals new systems had to be commissioned: Gamma-t transition crossing jump quadrupoles, rebucketing with the new RF storage cavities, phase lock loop feedback, betatron and crystal collimation, beta squeeze along the ramp, Siberian snake magnets for the proton polarization run, AC dipole system chromaticity measurements along the acceleration ramp, orbit correction, new ramp management system, upgraded sequencer, new data instrumentation and logger acquisition system etc.

  1. Commission 26: Double and Multiple Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Christine; Docobo, Jose A. D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Balega, Yuri I.; Davis, John; Mason, Brian D.; Oblak, Edouard; Oswalt, Terry D.; Pourbaix, Dimitri; Scarfe, Colin D.

    Although we were happy to welcome over 20 new members at the Prague meeting, Commission 26 is still one of the smallest in the IAU. Notwithstanding its size, it continues to carry on an active and diversified program of activities. Our web site, maintained at the US Naval Observatory, contains further information on the Commission. The site includes links to other relevant sites, to databases and catalogues, an archive of our Information Circulars, a list of upcoming meetings of interest, as well as an extensive bibliography of recently published papers on double and multiple stars. The site can be accessed at .

  2. Commission on Child Online Protection (COPA) Report to Congress. Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    The appendices for the Commission on Child Online Protection (COPA) Report to Congress, October 20, 2000, include the following: Commission overview, which includes scope and timeline, original statute, amended statute, technologies and methods, and biographies of the commissioners; Commission finances; Commission meetings for the year 2000;…

  3. 29 CFR 2200.93 - Briefs before the Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Briefs before the Commission. 2200.93 Section 2200.93 Labor... Posthearing Procedures § 2200.93 Briefs before the Commission. (a) Requests for briefs. The Commission ordinarily will request the parties to file briefs on issues before the Commission. After briefs...

  4. 76 FR 1608 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy... and nuclear waste. The Commission is scheduled to submit a draft report to the Secretary of Energy by... to CommissionDFO@nuclear.energy.gov , or post comments on the Commission Web site at...

  5. 75 FR 25850 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy...- 0544; e-mail CommissionDFO@nuclear.energy.gov . Additional information may also be available at http... to CommissionDFO@nuclear.energy.gov , or post comments on the Commission Web site at...

  6. 76 FR 4646 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy... facsimile (202) 586- 0544; e-mail CommissionDFO@nuclear.energy.gov . Additional information will be... to CommissionDFO@nuclear.energy.gov , or post comments on the Commission Web site at...

  7. 76 FR 31307 - Commission of Fine Arts; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS Commission of Fine Arts; Notice of Meeting The next meeting of the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts is scheduled... oral statements should be addressed to Thomas Luebke, Secretary, U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, at...

  8. 28 CFR 0.124 - United States Parole Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States Parole Commission. 0.124 Section 0.124 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE United States Parole Commission § 0.124 United States Parole Commission. The U.S. Parole Commission...

  9. 28 CFR 0.124 - United States Parole Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States Parole Commission. 0.124 Section 0.124 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE United States Parole Commission § 0.124 United States Parole Commission. The U.S. Parole Commission...

  10. 28 CFR 0.124 - United States Parole Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States Parole Commission. 0.124 Section 0.124 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE United States Parole Commission § 0.124 United States Parole Commission. The U.S. Parole Commission...

  11. 28 CFR 0.124 - United States Parole Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States Parole Commission. 0.124 Section 0.124 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE United States Parole Commission § 0.124 United States Parole Commission. The U.S. Parole Commission...

  12. 17 CFR 144.1 - Service upon the Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RESPONSE TO SUBPOENAS OR OTHER DEMANDS OF A COURT § 144.1 Service upon the Commission. (a) Subject to... service of a demand directed to the Commission or to an employee of the Commission for documentary... demand must be addressed to the Secretary of the Commission, Three Lafayette Centre, 1155 21st Street,...

  13. 47 CFR 1.1 - Proceedings before the Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Proceedings before the Commission. 1.1 Section 1.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules of Practice and Procedure General § 1.1 Proceedings before the Commission. The Commission may on...

  14. 47 CFR 1.1 - Proceedings before the Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Proceedings before the Commission. 1.1 Section 1.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules of Practice and Procedure General § 1.1 Proceedings before the Commission. The Commission may on...

  15. 47 CFR 1.1 - Proceedings before the Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Proceedings before the Commission. 1.1 Section 1.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules of Practice and Procedure General § 1.1 Proceedings before the Commission. The Commission may on...

  16. Historical Reflections on the Work of Commission 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenkerk, Catherine; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Kaplan, George; Bangert, John A.; Bell, Steven A.; Ferrandiz, Jose M.; Fienga, Agnes; Folkner, William; Lukashova, Marina; Pitjeva, Elena V.; Soma, Mitsuru; Thuillot, William; Urban, Sean E.

    2016-04-01

    Commission 4 was among the first set of commissions formed within the IAU at its founding in 1919. (Commissions were originally called ``Standing Committees.'') During its 96 years of service to the IAU and astronomical community in general, the commission has been fortunate to have been led by many distinguished scientists - see the list of presidents below.

  17. 16 CFR 1000.6 - Commission decisions and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... action, if known. (b) Other records in the custody of the Commission may be requested by e-mail (cpsc-os... Record of Commission Action. Copies of Minutes or of a Record of Commission Action may be obtained by e-mail (cpsc-os@cpsc.gov) or written request to the Secretary, Consumer Product Safety Commission,...

  18. 22 CFR 401.8 - Decision by the whole Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Decision by the whole Commission. 401.8 Section 401.8 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE General § 401.8 Decision by the whole Commission. The whole Commission shall consider and determine...

  19. 28 CFR 0.124 - United States Parole Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States Parole Commission. 0.124 Section 0.124 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE United States Parole Commission § 0.124 United States Parole Commission. The U.S. Parole Commission...

  20. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1986-87 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    This annual report includes a list of commission membership and staff; a map of state Indian reservations; a table of reservation acreages and populations; a list of commission meetings and those in attendance; a list of 1986-87 commission publications and an agency financial report. A section of "commission highlights" summarizes nine issues…

  1. 18 CFR 401.89 - Action by the Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Action by the Commission. 401.89 Section 401.89 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... to law. (b) Commission Counsel shall assist the Commission with its review of the hearing record...

  2. 18 CFR 401.89 - Action by the Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Action by the Commission. 401.89 Section 401.89 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... to law. (b) Commission Counsel shall assist the Commission with its review of the hearing record...

  3. 16 CFR 1000.6 - Commission decisions and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... action, if known. (b) Other records in the custody of the Commission may be requested by e-mail (cpsc-os... Record of Commission Action. Copies of Minutes or of a Record of Commission Action may be obtained by e-mail (cpsc-os@cpsc.gov) or written request to the Secretary, Consumer Product Safety Commission,...

  4. 47 CFR 1.1 - Proceedings before the Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Proceedings before the Commission. 1.1 Section 1.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules of Practice and Procedure General § 1.1 Proceedings before the Commission. The Commission may on...

  5. 47 CFR 1.1 - Proceedings before the Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Proceedings before the Commission. 1.1 Section 1.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules of Practice and Procedure General § 1.1 Proceedings before the Commission. The Commission may on...

  6. 77 FR 43819 - Equity and Excellence Commission; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission; Meeting AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education... up-coming meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes the... Excellence Commission, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20202....

  7. 77 FR 15089 - Equity and Excellence Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission Meeting AGENCY: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education... up-coming meeting of the Equity and ] Excellence Commission (Commission). The notice also describes... and Excellence Commission, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., Washington, DC...

  8. Appalachian Regional Commission Annual Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachian Regional Commission, Washington, DC.

    In 2000, the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), in cooperation with local development districts, nonprofit organizations, and many small municipalities, expanded programs to help Appalachia's distressed counties become economically competitive. The effort calls for increased funding for technical assistance and capacity building in distressed…

  9. Appalachian Regional Commission: 1981 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachian Regional Commission, Washington, DC.

    Although fiscal year 1981 was a time of uncertainty for the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), Congress did appropriate $218.2 million for the highway program and $87 million for area development, research and local development districts (LDDs), and administrative costs. Coupled with other federal funds and funds from state and local sources,…

  10. The ALMA Commissioning and Science Verification Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, A.; Sheth, K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of Commissioning is to take ALMA from the stage reached at the end of AIV, that is, a system that functions at an engineering level to an instrument that meets the science / astronomy requirements. Science Verification is the quantitative confirmation that the data produced by the instrument is valid and has the required characteristics in terms of sensitivity, image quality and accuracy.

  11. Commission 19: ROTATION OF THE EARTH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Aleksander; Ma, Chopo; Dehant, Véronique; Defraigne, Pascale; Dickey, Jean O.; Huang, Cheng-Li; Souchay, Jean; Vondrák, Jan; Charlot, Patrick; Richter, Bernd; Schuh, Harald

    2010-05-01

    The IAU Commission 19 meeting during the XXVII IAU General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro was held on Wednesday 5 August 2009, sessions 3 (14:00-15:30) and 4 (16:00-17:30). It was attended by about 40 participants. The meeting was split into three sessions.

  12. The Truman Commission: International Developments for Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Kenneth M.

    2008-01-01

    Research briefly details the purpose of the Harry S. Truman administration's Commission on Higher Education for Democracy to support community colleges. Contrary to histories that define later origins in the 1960s, this paper makes an argument that the historical foundations of ideation for international education in community colleges originate…

  13. Privacy commission report contains serious flaws.

    PubMed

    Murphy, S S

    1979-01-01

    Few will argue that confidentiality of the patient medical record is a real concern, particularly at a time when demands for information from the medical record are numerous and constantly increasing. However, the recommendations of the Privacy Protection Study Commission, if implemented, could cause severe problems for hospitals. The author discusses those recommendations and why they cause concern.

  14. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reactors, gives Chris Fallon, vice president of new nuclear development at Duke Energy Florida, … more… Spotlight Strategic Plan Baffle-Former Bolts Open-Phase Electrical Issue Response to GAO Materials Licensing Audit Additional ... Plant Project Aim Commission Documents Fire Protection ...

  15. NEA and the Educational Policies Commission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    In 1957, the year the National Education Association (NEA) celebrated its 100th anniversary, the Educational Policies Commission (EPC)--a prestigious group co-sponsored by NEA and the American Association of School Administrators--published a document titled "Higher Education in a Decade of Decision." NEA intended the report to address…

  16. Report of Programme Commission II (Natural Sciences).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). General Conference.

    As the first part of the report of the Programme Commission II, a summary of discussions on plans for natural sciences and their applications is presented in this document. The two agenda items are: (1) detailed consideration of the 1973-74 draft program and budget and of the 1973-78 draft medium-term outline, and (2) desirability of adopting an…

  17. Solar Dynamics Observatory Launch and Commissioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, James R., Jr.; Kristin, D.; Bourkland, L.; Hsu, Oscar C.; Liu, Kuo-Chia; Mason, Paul A. C.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.; Russo, Angela M.; Starin, Scott R.; Vess, Melissa F.

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched on February 11, 2010. Over the next three months, the spacecraft was raised from its launch orbit into its final geosynchronous orbit and its systems and instruments were tested and calibrated in preparation for its desired ten year science mission studying the Sun. A great deal of activity during this time involved the spacecraft attitude control system (ACS); testing control modes, calibrating sensors and actuators, and using the ACS to help commission the spacecraft instruments and to control the propulsion system as the spacecraft was maneuvered into its final orbit. This paper will discuss the chronology of the SDO launch and commissioning, showing the ACS analysis work performed to diagnose propellant slosh transient and attitude oscillation anomalies that were seen during commissioning, and to determine how to overcome them. The simulations and tests devised to demonstrate correct operation of all onboard ACS modes and the activities in support of instrument calibration will be discussed and the final maneuver plan performed to bring SDO on station will be shown. In addition to detailing these commissioning and anomaly resolution activities, the unique set of tests performed to characterize SDO's on-orbit jitter performance will be discussed.

  18. Appalachian Regional Commission: 1986 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Jack, Ed.; And Others

    The Appalachian Regional Commission used its $120 million appropriation for fiscal year 1986 to create and retain jobs under the jobs and private investment program, provide basic public facilities to the worst-off Appalachian counties under the distressed counties program, and to work toward closing the gaps in the Appalachian Development Highway…

  19. Report of the Commission on Quantum Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thor, Linda; And Others

    The Commission on Quantum Quality was established by the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) in February, 1992, to investigate total quality management (TQM) programs in community colleges, universities, the government sector, and business and industry in order to recommend an appropriate program for MCCCD. To gather information,…

  20. Wyoming Community College Commission Agency Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community Coll. Commission, Cheyenne.

    This paper reports on outcomes of community college programs monitored by the Wyoming Community College Commission (WCCC). The document covers the following WCCC objectives: (1) Study of tuition rates for the community colleges; (2) Negotiation of contracts and provision of financial support for administrative computing system components and…

  1. 18 CFR 35.31 - Commission review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... determine whether the ASC set by BPA for the applicable exchange period was determined in accordance with the ASC methodology set forth at 18 CFR 301.1. If the ASC is not in accord with the methodology, the... Commission under this subpart is computed in accordance with 18 CFR 35.19a. Interest on any increase...

  2. 18 CFR 35.31 - Commission review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... determine whether the ASC set by BPA for the applicable exchange period was determined in accordance with the ASC methodology set forth at 18 CFR 301.1. If the ASC is not in accord with the methodology, the... Commission under this subpart is computed in accordance with 18 CFR 35.19a. Interest on any increase...

  3. 18 CFR 35.31 - Commission review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... determine whether the ASC set by BPA for the applicable exchange period was determined in accordance with the ASC methodology set forth at 18 CFR 301.1. If the ASC is not in accord with the methodology, the... Commission under this subpart is computed in accordance with 18 CFR 35.19a. Interest on any increase...

  4. 18 CFR 35.31 - Commission review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... determine whether the ASC set by BPA for the applicable exchange period was determined in accordance with the ASC methodology set forth at 18 CFR 301.1. If the ASC is not in accord with the methodology, the... Commission under this subpart is computed in accordance with 18 CFR 35.19a. Interest on any increase...

  5. 10 CFR 110.113 - Commission action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... its decision on the license application, the reasons for the decision and any dissenting views. (b... available at the NRC Web site, http://www.nrc.gov, and furnished to the participants. (d) The Commission may... public interest, particularly the common defense and security; and (2) A participant establishing...

  6. 17 CFR 30.13 - Commission certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... access to its electronic trading system without seeking designation as a designated contract market... the Act. (1) This notification will briefly specify the nature of the issues raised and the specific... complex issues that require additional time for review, in which case, the Commission will notify...

  7. 17 CFR 30.13 - Commission certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... access to its electronic trading system without seeking designation as a designated contract market... the Act. (1) This notification will briefly specify the nature of the issues raised and the specific... complex issues that require additional time for review, in which case, the Commission will notify...

  8. 10 CFR 110.113 - Commission action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... its decision on the license application, the reasons for the decision and any dissenting views. (b... public interest, particularly the common defense and security; and (2) A participant establishing that... Commission may: (1) Defer any hearing; (2) Consolidate applications for hearing; (3) Narrow or broaden...

  9. Bicentennial Commission Busy with Exciting Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Kirk

    1989-01-01

    Based on an interview with U.S. Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, this article surveys several of the projects launched by the Commission on the Bicentennial of the Constitution. These projects include: the National Historical Pictorial Map Contest; the Bicentennial School Recognition Program; the Bicentennial Educational Grant Program; and the…

  10. 19 CFR 127.34 - Auctioneer's commissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Auctioneer's commissions. 127.34 Section 127.34 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GENERAL ORDER, UNCLAIMED, AND ABANDONED MERCHANDISE Proceeds of Sale § 127.34...

  11. Appalachian Regional Commission. Annual Report 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachian Regional Commission, Washington, DC.

    After 4 years of operation, the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) presents this 1969 annual report and evaluation of its activities as required by the Appalachian Regional Development Act of 1965. A brief overview is given of the history of the program, the Federal-state relationship, and strategies for regional development. Appalachia is then…

  12. Commissioning the polarized beam in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L.G.; Brown, H.; Chiang, I.H.; Courant, E.; Gardner, C.; Lazarus, D.; Lee, Y.Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Sidhu, S.; Skelly, J.

    1985-01-01

    After the successful operation of a high energy polarized proton beam at the Argonne Laboratory Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) was terminated, plans were made to commission such a beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). On February 23, 1984, 2 ..mu..A of polarized H/sup -/ was accelerated through the Linac to 200 MeV with a polarization of about 65%. 1 ..mu..A was injected into the AGS and acceleration attempts began. Several relatively short runs were then made during the next three months. Dedicated commissioning began in early June, and on June 26 the AGS polarized beam reached 13.8 GeV/c to exceed the previous ZGS peak momentum of 12.75 GeV/c. Commissioning continued to the point where 10/sup 10/ polarized protons were accelerated to 16.5 GeV/c with 40% polarization. Then, two experiments had a short polarized proton run. We plan to continue commissioning efforts in the fall of this year to reach higher energy, higher intensity, and higher polarization levels. We present a brief description of the facility and of the methods used for preserving the polarization of the accelerating beam.

  13. Commission 14: Atomic and Molecular Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Federman, Steven R.; Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Adelman, Saul J.; Biémont, Emile; Lawler, James E.; Mickelson, Michael E.; Morton, Donald C.; Ryabchikova, Tanya A.; Smith, Peter L.; Stehle, Chantal

    2007-12-01

    In our commission the vice-president (VP) becomes the president, and a new VP is chosen from members of the Organizing Committee. The position of secretary was discontinued and its responsibilities incorporated into the VP position. The president announced that the new officers are Steven R. Federman (president) and Glenn M. Wahlgren (vice-president).

  14. Appalachian Regional Commission: 1987 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Jack, Ed.; And Others

    The Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) used its $105 million appropriation for fiscal year 1987 to support three major program areas in the 13 state region: (1) creating and retaining regional jobs; (2) assisting in construction of basic facilities, particularly water and sewer systems, in the region's 90 poorest counties; and (3) working…

  15. Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, Nance; Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2002-01-01

    Commissioning California's houses can result in better performing systems and houses. In turn, this will result in more efficient use of energy, carbon emission reductions, and improved occupant comfort. In particular, commissioning houses can save a significant amount of HVAC-related energy (15 to 30% in existing houses, 10 to 20% in new conventional houses, and up to 8% in advanced energy efficiency houses). The process that we considered includes corrective measures that could be implemented together during construction or during a single site visit (e.g., air tightening, duct sealing, and refrigerant and air handler airflow corrections in a new or existing house). Taking advantage of additional, more complex opportunities (e.g., installing new windows in an existing house, replacing the heating and air conditioning system in a new or existing house) can result in additional HVAC-related energy savings (60 to 75% in existing houses, and 50 to 60% in new conventional houses). The commissioning-related system and house performance improvements and energy savings translate to additional benefits throughout California and beyond. By applying commissioning principles to their work, the building community (builders and contractors) benefit from reduced callbacks and lower warranty costs. HERS raters and inspectors will have access to an expanded market sector. As the commissioning process rectifies construction defects and code problems, building code officials benefit from better compliance with codes. The utilities benefit from reduced peak demand, which can translate into lower energy acquisition costs. As houses perform closer to expectations, governmental bodies (e.g., the California Energy Commission and the Air Resources Board) benefit from greater assurance that actual energy consumption and carbon emissions are closer to the levels mandated in codes and standards, resulting in better achievement of state energy conservation and environmental goals. California

  16. 47 CFR 51.801 - Commission action upon a state commission's failure to act to carry out its responsibility under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... matter under section 252 of the Act, the Commission shall issue an order preempting the state commission... Act with respect to the proceeding or matter and shall act for the state commission. (b) For purposes... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Commission action upon a state...

  17. Curriculum for Commissioning Energy Efficient Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Lia

    2012-09-30

    In July 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded funding to PECI to develop training curriculum in commercial energy auditing and building commissioning. This program was created in response to the high demand for auditing and commissioning services in the U.S. commercial buildings market and to bridge gaps and barriers in existing training programs. Obstacles addressed included: lack of focus on entry level candidates; prohibitive cost and time required for training; lack of hands-on training; trainings that focus on certifications & process overviews; and lack of comprehensive training. PECI organized several other industry players to create a co-funded project sponsored by DOE, PECI, New York State Energy and Research Development Authority (NYSERDA), California Energy Commission (CEC), Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) and California Commissioning Collaborative (CCC). After awarded, PECI teamed with another DOE awardee, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), to work collaboratively to create one comprehensive program featuring two training tracks. NJIT’s Center for Building Knowledge is a research and training institute affiliated with the College of Architecture and Design, and provided e-learning and video enhancements. This project designed and developed two training programs with a comprehensive, energy-focused curriculum to prepare new entrants to become energy auditors or commissioning authorities (CxAs). The following are the key elements of the developed trainings, which is depicted graphically in Figure 1: • Online classes are self-paced, and can be completed anywhere, any time • Commissioning Authority track includes 3 online modules made up of 24 courses delivered in 104 individual lessons, followed by a 40 hour hands-on lab. Total time required is between 75 and 100 hours, depending on the pace of the independent learner. • Energy Auditor track includes 3 online modules made up of 18 courses delivered in 72 individual

  18. North American Commission on Stratigraphic Nomenclature Note 66: records of Stratigraphic Commission, 2003-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Easton, Robert M.; Catuneanu, Octavian; Donovan, Art D.; Fluegeman, Richard H.; Hamblin, A.P.; Harper, Howard; Lasca, Norman P.; Morrow, Jared R.; Orndorff, Randall C.; Sadler, Peter; Scott, Robert W.; Tew, Berry H.

    2014-01-01

    Note 66 summarizes activities of the North American Commission on Stratigraphic Nomenclature (NACSN) from November 2003 to October 2013 and is condensed from the minutes of the NACSN’s 58th to 68th annual meetings1. The purposes of the Commission are to develop statements of stratigraphic principles,recommend procedures applicable to the classification and nomenclature of stratigraphic and related units, review problems in classifying and naming stratigraphic and related units, and formulate expressions of judgment on these matters.

  19. Commissioning Results of the LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Akre, R.; Ding, Y.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Schmerge, J.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; Frohlich, L.; Limberg, T.; Prat, E.; /DESY

    2007-11-16

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE xray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently under construction at SLAC. The injector section, from drive-laser and RF photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in fall 2006. Initial system commissioning with an electron beam has recently been completed. The second phase of construction, including second bunch compressor and full linac, is planned for 2008. In this paper, we report experimental results and experience gained during the first phase of machine commissioning. This includes the cathode, drive laser, RF photocathode gun, linac booster section, S-band and X-band RF systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  20. A History of the Atomic Energy Commission

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Buck, Alice L.

    1983-07-01

    This pamphlet traces the history of the US Atomic Energy Commission's twenty-eight year stewardship of the Nation's nuclear energy program, from the signing of the Atomic Energy Act on August 1, 1946 to the signing of the Energy Reorganization Act on October 11, 1974. The Commission's early concentration on the military atom produced sophisticated nuclear weapons for the Nation's defense and made possible the creation of a fleet of nuclear submarines and surface ships. Extensive research in the nuclear sciences resulted in the widespread application of nuclear technology for scientific, medical and industrial purposes, while the passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 made possible the development of a nuclear industry, and enabled the United States to share the new technology with other nations.

  1. Status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, T.; Angot, J.; Barué, C.; Bertrand, P.; Biarrotte, J. L.; Canet, C.; Denis, J.-F.; Ferdinand, R.; Flambard, J.-L.; Jacob, J.; Jardin, P.; Lamy, T.; Lemagnen, F.; Maunoury, L.; Osmond, B.; Peaucelle, C.; Roger, A.; Sole, P.; Touzery, R.; Tuske, O.; Uriot, D.

    2016-02-01

    The SPIRAL2 injector, installed in its tunnel, is currently under commissioning at GANIL, Caen, France. The injector is composed of two low energy beam transport lines: one is dedicated to the light ion beam production, the other to the heavy ions. The first light ion beam, created by a 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, has been successfully produced in December 2014. The first beam of the PHOENIX V2 18 GHz heavy ion source was analyzed on 10 July 2015. A status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning is given. An upgrade of the heavy ion source, named PHOENIX V3 aimed to replace the V2, is presented. The new version features a doubled plasma chamber volume and the high charge state beam intensity is expected to increase by a factor of 1.5 to 2 up to the mass ˜50. A status of its assembly is proposed.

  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest, 1991 edition

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, K L

    1991-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, and the areas NRC licenses. This digest is a compilation of NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1990, with exceptions noted. For operating US commercial nuclear power reactors, information on generating capacity and average capacity factor is obtained from Monthly Operating Reports submitted to the NRC directly by the licensee. This information is reviewed for consistency only. No independent validation and/or verification is performed by the NRC. For detailed and complete information about tables and figures, refer to the source publications. This digest is published annually for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. 30 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning.

    PubMed

    Thuillier, T; Angot, J; Barué, C; Bertrand, P; Biarrotte, J L; Canet, C; Denis, J-F; Ferdinand, R; Flambard, J-L; Jacob, J; Jardin, P; Lamy, T; Lemagnen, F; Maunoury, L; Osmond, B; Peaucelle, C; Roger, A; Sole, P; Touzery, R; Tuske, O; Uriot, D

    2016-02-01

    The SPIRAL2 injector, installed in its tunnel, is currently under commissioning at GANIL, Caen, France. The injector is composed of two low energy beam transport lines: one is dedicated to the light ion beam production, the other to the heavy ions. The first light ion beam, created by a 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, has been successfully produced in December 2014. The first beam of the PHOENIX V2 18 GHz heavy ion source was analyzed on 10 July 2015. A status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning is given. An upgrade of the heavy ion source, named PHOENIX V3 aimed to replace the V2, is presented. The new version features a doubled plasma chamber volume and the high charge state beam intensity is expected to increase by a factor of 1.5 to 2 up to the mass ∼50. A status of its assembly is proposed.

  4. The Federal Trade Commission and physician practice.

    PubMed

    Graham, Jon

    2005-01-01

    Obtaining the best possible managed care contracts is important to physicians. Banding together with other practices to obtain more favorable payment could seem a legitimate business prac tice. Physicians competing in the same specialty in a market area must be acutely aware of federal antitrust rules to avoid improper collusion. The Federal Trade Commission is reviewing collaborative activities and seeking settlement agreements with physician organizations it determines have violated antitrust laws and regulations. Physicians and administrators should be aware of these actions, know what triggers a review, and understand what collaborative activities they may participate in to further their business interests. This article reviews Federal Trade Commission application of federal antitrust rules and recent advisory opinions, and their implications for practice.

  5. Commissioning of the PRIOR proton microscope

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Varentsov, D.; Antonov, O.; Bakhmutova, A.; Barnes, C. W.; Bogdanov, A.; Danly, C. R.; Efimov, S.; Endres, M.; Fertman, A.; Golubev, A. A.; et al

    2016-02-18

    Recently, a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) has been designed, constructed, and successfully commissioned at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany). As a result of the experiments with 3.5–4.5 GeV proton beams delivered by the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 of GSI, 30 μm spatial and 10 ns temporal resolutions of the proton microscope have been demonstrated. A new pulsed power setup for studying properties of matter under extremes has been developed for the dynamic commissioning of the PRIOR facility. This study describes the PRIOR setup as well asmore » the results of the first static and dynamic protonradiography experiments performed at GSI.« less

  6. Division V: Commission 42: Close Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, Ignasi; Richards, Mercedes T.; Rucinski, Slavek; Bradstreet, David H.; Harmanec, Petr; Kaluzny, Janusz; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Munari, Ulisse; Niarchos, Panagiotis; Olah, Katalin; Pribulla, Theodor; Scarfe, Colin D.; Torres, Guillermo

    2015-08-01

    Commission 42 (C42) co-organized, together with Commission 27 (C27) and Division V (Div V) as a whole, a full day of science and business sessions that were held on 24 August 2012. The program included time slots for discussion of business matters related to Div V, C27 and C42, and two sessions of 2 hours each devoted to science talks of interest to both C42 and C27. In addition, we had a joint session between Div IV and Div V motivated by the proposal to reformulate the division structure of the IAU and the possible merger of the two divisions into a new Div G. The current report gives an account of the matters discussed during the business session of C42.

  7. NIF Commissioning and Initial Performance Results

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wonterghem, B M; Burkhart, S C; Haynam, C A; Manes, K R; Marshall, C D; Murray, J E; Spaeth, M L; Speck, D R; Sutton, S B; Wegner, P J

    2003-12-19

    The National Ignition Facility at LLNL recently commissioned the first set of four beam lines into the target chamber. This effort, also called NIF Early Light, demonstrated the entire laser system architecture from master oscillator through target and initial X-ray diagnostics. This paper describes the detailed commissioning and installation steps for one of NIF's 48 beam quads. Using a dedicated single beam line Precision Diagnostic System, performance was explored over the entire power versus energy space from 6.4 TW/beam for sub-nanosecond pulses to 25 kJ/beam for 23 ns pulses at 1 {omega}. NEL also demonstrated record single beam line frequency converted Nd:Glass laser energies of 11.3 kJ at 2 {omega} and 10.4 kJ at 3{omega}.

  8. Commissioning of the PRIOR proton microscope.

    PubMed

    Varentsov, D; Antonov, O; Bakhmutova, A; Barnes, C W; Bogdanov, A; Danly, C R; Efimov, S; Endres, M; Fertman, A; Golubev, A A; Hoffmann, D H H; Ionita, B; Kantsyrev, A; Krasik, Ya E; Lang, P M; Lomonosov, I; Mariam, F G; Markov, N; Merrill, F E; Mintsev, V B; Nikolaev, D; Panyushkin, V; Rodionova, M; Schanz, M; Schoenberg, K; Semennikov, A; Shestov, L; Skachkov, V S; Turtikov, V; Udrea, S; Vasylyev, O; Weyrich, K; Wilde, C; Zubareva, A

    2016-02-01

    Recently, a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) has been designed, constructed, and successfully commissioned at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany). As a result of the experiments with 3.5-4.5 GeV proton beams delivered by the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 of GSI, 30 μm spatial and 10 ns temporal resolutions of the proton microscope have been demonstrated. A new pulsed power setup for studying properties of matter under extremes has been developed for the dynamic commissioning of the PRIOR facility. This paper describes the PRIOR setup as well as the results of the first static and dynamic proton radiography experiments performed at GSI. PMID:26931841

  9. Commissioning of the PRIOR proton microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varentsov, D.; Antonov, O.; Bakhmutova, A.; Barnes, C. W.; Bogdanov, A.; Danly, C. R.; Efimov, S.; Endres, M.; Fertman, A.; Golubev, A. A.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Ionita, B.; Kantsyrev, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Lang, P. M.; Lomonosov, I.; Mariam, F. G.; Markov, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Mintsev, V. B.; Nikolaev, D.; Panyushkin, V.; Rodionova, M.; Schanz, M.; Schoenberg, K.; Semennikov, A.; Shestov, L.; Skachkov, V. S.; Turtikov, V.; Udrea, S.; Vasylyev, O.; Weyrich, K.; Wilde, C.; Zubareva, A.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) has been designed, constructed, and successfully commissioned at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany). As a result of the experiments with 3.5-4.5 GeV proton beams delivered by the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 of GSI, 30 μm spatial and 10 ns temporal resolutions of the proton microscope have been demonstrated. A new pulsed power setup for studying properties of matter under extremes has been developed for the dynamic commissioning of the PRIOR facility. This paper describes the PRIOR setup as well as the results of the first static and dynamic proton radiography experiments performed at GSI.

  10. Initial Commissioning Experience With the LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, R.; Castro, J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.H.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, A.; Hays, G.; Hering, P.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Rivetta, C.; Saleski, M.; Schmerge, J.F.; Schultz, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; /SLAC /DESY

    2007-11-02

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE xray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently under construction at SLAC [1]. The injector section, from drive-laser and RF photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in fall 2006. Initial system commissioning with an electron beam is taking place during the spring and summer of 2007. The second phase of construction, including second bunch compressor and full linac, will begin later, in the fall of 2007. We report here on experience gained during the first phase of machine commissioning, including RF photocathode gun, linac booster section, S-band and X-band RF systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  11. COMMISSIONING OF THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC,D.; AHRENS,L.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,M.; BAI,M.; CAMERON,P.; CARDONA,J.; CONNOLLY,R.; ET AL; TSOUPAS,N.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    This report describes in detail steps performed in bringing the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) from the commissioning into the operational stage when collisions between 60 bunches of fully striped gold ions, were routinely provided. Corrections of the few power supplies connections by the beam measurements are described. Beam lifetime improvements at injection, along the acceleration are shown. The beam diagnostic results; like Schottky detector, beam profile monitor, beam position monitors, tune meter and others, are shown [1].

  12. The ATLAS trigger - commissioning with cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, J.

    2008-07-01

    The ATLAS detector at CERN's LHC will be exposed to proton-proton collisions from beams crossing at 40 MHz. At the design luminosity there are roughly 23 collisions per bunch crossing. ATLAS has designed a three-level trigger system to select potentially interesting events. The first-level trigger, implemented in custom-built electronics, reduces the incoming rate to less than 100 kHz with a total latency of less than 2.5μs. The next two trigger levels run in software on commercial PC farms. They reduce the output rate to 100-200 Hz. In preparation for collision data-taking which is scheduled to commence in May 2008, several cosmic-ray commissioning runs have been performed. Among the first sub-detectors available for commissioning runs are parts of the barrel muon detector including the RPC detectors that are used in the first-level trigger. Data have been taken with a full slice of the muon trigger and readout chain, from the detectors in one sector of the RPC system, to the second-level trigger algorithms and the data-acquisition system. The system is being prepared to include the inner-tracking detector in the readout and second-level trigger. We will present the status and results of these cosmic-ray based commissioning activities. This work will prove to be invaluable not only during the commissioning phase but also for cosmic-ray data-taking during the normal running for detector performance studies.

  13. European Commission activities in eHealth.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Silas; Lymberis, Andreas; Whitehouse, Diane

    2004-12-01

    Health-care is an information-intensive and knowledge-demanding sector, which is why eHealth solutions are so important in this field. The European Commission (EC) has been initiating and funding research and development activities regarding Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) for health, or "eHealth", since 1988. These programmes covered priority topics like electronic health-care records, regional and national health networks, telemedicine in homecare and care-at-the-point-of-need to support continuity of care concepts, systems to support people to stay healthy, and systems and tools to support health professionals to work more efficiently and safely on patients. During the 15-year span of the programmes, the European Union (EU) has contributed about 500 million Euro to approximately 400 R&D projects, support activities, best practice and studies covering technical, clinical, ethical, legal, organisational and market issues. eHealth has shown proven benefits in application fields like improved access to care, care at the point-of-need, citizen-centred care, improved quality and cost containment. Such applications were on show at the EU High Level eHealth Conferences in Brussels, Belgium, in 2003, and in Cork, Ireland, in 2004. eHealth is now on the governmental agenda of EU Member States to be implemented on a broader scale. In line with this development, the Commission has taken a number of policy initiatives. A European Union Action Plan for a European eHealth Area was published by the Commission in April 2004 and endorsed by the EU health ministers in June 2004. This means that, for the first time, Europe has a coherent agenda for the implementation of eHealth. This report will concentrate on eHealth activities initiated by the Information Society Directorate-General of the European Commission. PMID:15709306

  14. Commissioning an Engineering Scale Coal Gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Douglas J.; Bearden, Mark D.; Cabe, James E.

    2010-07-01

    This report explains the development, commissioning, and testing of an engineering scale slagging coal gasifier at PNNL. The initial objective of this project was to commission the gasifier with zero safety incidents. The commissioning work was primarily an empirical study that required an engineering design approach. After bringing the gasifier on-line, tests were conducted to assess the impact of various operating parameters on the synthesis gas (syngas) product composition. The long-term intent of this project is to produce syngas product for use by internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers in catalyst, materials, and instrumentation development. Future work on the project will focus on improving the reliability and performance of the gasifier, with a goal of continuous operation for greater than 4 hours using coal feedstock. In addition, alternate designs that allow for increased flexibility regarding the fuel sources that can be used for syngas production is desired. Continued modifications to the fuel feed system will be pursued to address these goals. Alternative feed mechanisms such as a coal/methanol slurry are being considered.

  15. Commissioning Experience for the SNS Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, A.; Assadi, S.; Campisi, I.; Chu, P.; Cousineau, S.; Danilov, V.; Dodson, B.G.; Galambos, J.; Jeon, D.; Henderson, S.; Holtkamp, N.; Kravchuk, L.; Kim, S.; Plum, M.; Tanke, E.; Stockli, M.

    2005-06-08

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator systems will deliver a 1 GeV, 1.44 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron scattering research. The accelerator complex consists of an H- injector, capable of producing one-ms-long pulses at 60 Hz repetition rate with 38 mA peak current, a 1 GeV linear accelerator, an accumulator ring and associated transport lines. A 2.5 MeV beam from the Front End is accelerated to 86 MeV in a Drift Tube Linac, then to 185 MeV in a Coupled-Cavity Linac and then to 1 GeV in a Superconducting Linac. The staged beam commissioning of the accelerator complex is proceeding as component installation progresses. The Front End, Drift Tube Linac and part of the Coupled-Cavity Linac have been commissioned at ORNL. The primary design goals of peak current, transverse emittance and beam energy have been achieved. Results and status of the beam commissioning program will be presented.

  16. Commissioning of the CMS Forward Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashish; /SUNY, Buffalo

    2008-12-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is scheduled for physics data taking in summer 2009 after the commissioning of high energy proton-proton collisions at Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the core of the CMS all-silicon tracker is the silicon pixel detector, comprising three barrel layers and two pixel disks in the forward and backward regions, accounting for a total of 66 million channels. The pixel detector will provide high-resolution, 3D tracking points, essential for pattern recognition and precise vertexing, while being embedded in a hostile radiation environment. The end disks of the pixel detector, known as the Forward Pixel detector, has been assembled and tested at Fermilab, USA. It has 18 million pixel cells with dimension 100 x 150 {micro}m{sup 2}. The complete forward pixel detector was shipped to CERN in December 2007, where it underwent extensive system tests for commissioning prior to the installation. The pixel system was put in its final place inside the CMS following the installation and bake out of the LHC beam pipe in July 2008. It has been integrated with other sub-detectors in the readout since September 2008 and participated in the cosmic data taking. This report covers the strategy and results from commissioning of CMS forward pixel detector at CERN.

  17. Practical Diagnostics for Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Siegel, Jeff; Sherman, Max

    2002-06-11

    In this report, we identify and describe 24 practical diagnostics that are ready now to evaluate residential commissioning metrics, and that we expect to include in the commissioning guide. Our discussion in the main body of this report is limited to existing diagnostics in areas of particular concern with significant interactions: envelope and HVAC systems. These areas include insulation quality, windows, airtightness, envelope moisture, fan and duct system airflows, duct leakage, cooling equipment charge, and combustion appliance backdrafting with spillage. Appendix C describes the 83 other diagnostics that we have examined in the course of this project, but that are not ready or are inappropriate for residential commissioning. Combined with Appendix B, Table 1 in the main body of the report summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of all 107 diagnostics. We first describe what residential commissioning is, its characteristic elements, and how one might structure its process. Our intent in this discussion is to formulate and clarify these issues, but is largely preliminary because such a practice does not yet exist. Subsequent sections of the report describe metrics one can use in residential commissioning, along with the consolidated set of 24 practical diagnostics that the building industry can use now to evaluate them. Where possible, we also discuss the accuracy and usability of diagnostics, based on recent laboratory work and field studies by LBNL staff and others in more than 100 houses. These studies concentrate on evaluating diagnostics in the following four areas: the DeltaQ duct leakage test, air-handler airflow tests, supply and return grille airflow tests, and refrigerant charge tests. Appendix A describes those efforts in detail. In addition, where possible, we identify the costs to purchase diagnostic equipment and the amount of time required to conduct the diagnostics. Table 1 summarizes these data. Individual equipment costs for the 24

  18. Investigation of the persistence of new building commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Amanda; Friedman, Hannah; Haasl, Tudi; Claridge, David

    2002-03-17

    Commissioning is gaining increasing recognition as a cost-effective strategy for reducing commercial building energy use. Although the success and cost-effectiveness of commissioning projects depends on how well the benefits of commissioning persist over time, this aspect of commissioning is not well understood. The persistence of commissioning benefits was recently studied in a PIER project evaluating ten buildings that were commissioned at building start-up at least two years ago. The researchers examined the commissioning reports, control algorithms, EMCS point measurements, and energy use data, and conducted operator and commissioning provider interviews to investigate the persistence of commissioning benefits. In addition, they conducted site visits in a sample of the buildings. A set of commissioning measures was selected for each building to compare the persistence of benefits. Persistence was measured both qualitatively through a discussion of occupant comfort and decreased maintenance and quantitatively through estimations of energy savings. This paper reports the results of the study. The discussion includes how well the benefits of commissioning persisted over time, reasons for declining performance, and methods for improving persistence. The results provide valuable insight into how to estimate the persistence of commissioning information central to the cost benefit analyses routinely performed for commissioning measures.

  19. Closer view looking to the Interstate Commerce Commission building and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Closer view looking to the Interstate Commerce Commission building and Ariel Rios Federal building - Interstate Commerce Commission, Constitution Avenue between Twelfth and Fourteenth streets, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. Environmental view looking to the Federal Trade Commission Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Environmental view looking to the Federal Trade Commission Building - Federal Trade Commission Building, Bounded by Sixth and Seventh streets, Pennsylvania and Constitution avenues, NW, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. 32 CFR 9.2 - Establishment of Military Commissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM § 9.2 Establishment of Military Commissions. In accordance with the President's Military...

  2. 47 CFR 18.113 - Inspection by Commission representatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....113 Section 18.113 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT General Information § 18.113 Inspection by Commission representatives. Upon... information as may be required to indicate that the equipment complies with this part....

  3. C46 `ASTRONOMY Education and Development': a Peculiar Commission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Greve, Jean-Pierre; García, Beatriz; Gerbaldi, Michèle; Ferlet, Roger; Guinan, Edward; Hearnshaw, John; Jones, Barrie; Marschall, Laurence; Miley, George; Pasachoff, Jay; Ros, Rosa; Stavinschi, Magda; Torres-Peimbert, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    C46 was a Commission of the Executive Committee of the IAU under Division XII (Union-Wide Activities), then after 2012 under Division C (Education, Outreach, and Heritage). It was the only commission dealing exclusively with astronomy education; a previous Commission 38 (Exchange of Astronomers), which allocated travel grants to astronomers who needed them, and a Working Group on the Worldwide Development of Astronomy, have been absorbed by Commission 46.

  4. Division B Commission 5: Documentation and Astronomical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, Robert; Wise, Michael; Ohishi, Masatoshi; Andernach, Heinz; Bishop, Marsha; Egret, Daniel; Griffin, Elizabeth; Kembhavi, Ajit; Murphy, Tara; Pasian, Fabio; Schroeder, Anja; Tody, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    IAU Commission 5, Documentation and Astronomical Data, continued its mission of promoting and supporting sound practices of data management, data dissemination, and data preservation over the past three years. The Commission also prepared its proposal for continuation, with some changes in emphasis, after the IAU's commission restructuring program. Below we report on the activities of the various Working Groups and the one Task Force in Commission 5.

  5. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission fiscal year 1997 annual financial statements

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-24

    This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Federal Energy Regulatory commission`s statements of financial position, and the related statements of operations and changes in net position. The auditors` work was conducted in accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards. An independent public accounting firm conducted the audit. The auditors` reports on the Commission`s internal control structure and compliance with laws and regulations disclosed no reportable conditions or instances of noncompliance.

  6. Division IX: Commission 30: Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Guillermo; Pourbaix, Dimitri; Udry, Stephane; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Mazeh, Tsevi; Minniti, Dante; Moutou, Claire; Pepe, Francesco; Turon, Catherine; Zwitter, Tomaz

    2015-08-01

    The meeting was attended by the President and Vice-President of the Commission, along with approximately 15 other members. The President reported on the election of new officers that took place at the end of March 2012, for four new members of the Organizing Committee as well as a new Vice-President, and thanked the outgoing members. Tomaz Zwitter (Slovenia) was elected as the new VP (2012-2015), and the new OC members for the period 2012-2018 are Alceste Bonanos (Greece), Alain Jorissen (Belgium), David Katz (France), and Matthias Steinmetz (Germany). The current VP, Dimitri Pourbaix, became the President through 2015.

  7. Commission 22: Meters, Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Junichi; Jenniskens, Peter; Spurný, Pavel; Borovička, Jiří; Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Consolmagno, Guy; Jopek, Tadeusz; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Williams, Iwan P.; Zhu, Jin

    2010-05-01

    The business meeting of commission 22 was held at the room 5 in the SulAmerica Convention Center in Rio de Janeiro(14:00-15:30). Fifteen people attended at this meeting:J.Borovička, E.Bowell, G.Consolmagno, D.Green, P. Jenniskens, A. Pellinen-Wannberg, R. Rudawska, J. Watanabe, J. Zhu, P. H. A. Hasselmann, F. Ostroviski, D. A. Oszkiewicz, W. Thuillot, P. Mahajani, and A. Sule. This meeting was managed by Junichi Watanabe, the current C22 Vice-President. The summary of the meeting is described.

  8. Division G Commission 35: Stellar Constitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limongi, Marco; Lattanzio, John C.; Charbonnel, Corinne; Dominguez, Inma; Isern, Jordi; Karakas, Amanda; Leitherer, Claus; Marconi, Marcella; Shaviv, Giora; van Loon, Jacco

    2016-04-01

    Commission 35 (C35), ``Stellar Constitution'', consists of members of the International Astronomical Union whose research spans many aspects of theoretical and observational stellar physics and it is mainly focused on the comprehension of the properties of stars, stellar populations and galaxies. The number of members of C35 increased progressively over the last ten years and currently C35 comprises about 400 members. C35 was part of Division IV (Stars) until 2014 and then became part of Division G (Stars and Stellar Physics), after the main IAU reorganisation in 2015. Four Working Groups have been created over the years under Division IV, initially, and Division G later: WG on Active B Stars, WG on Massive Stars, WG on Abundances in Red Giant and WG on Chemically Peculiar and Related Stars. In the last decade the Commission had 4 presidents, Wojciech Dziembowski (2003-2006), Francesca D'Antona (2006-2009), Corinne Charbonnel (2009-2012) and Marco Limongi (2012-2015), who were assisted by an Organizing Committee (OC), usually composed of about 10 members, all of them elected by the C35 members and holding their positions for three years. The C35 webpage (http://iau-c35.stsci.edu) has been designed and continuously maintained by Claus Leitherer from the Space Telescope Institute, who deserves our special thanks. In addition to the various general information on the Commission structure and activities, it contains links to various resources, of interest for the members, such as stellar models, evolutionary tracks and isochrones, synthetic stellar populations, stellar yields and input physics (equation of state, nuclear cross sections, opacity tables), provided by various groups. The main activity of the C35 OC is that of evaluating, ranking and eventually supporting the proposals for IAU sponsored meetings. In the last decade the Commission has supported several meetings focused on topics more or less relevant to C35. Since the primary aim of this document is to

  9. HIRFL-CSR electron cooler commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, V.; Bubley, A.; Boimelstein, Yu.; Veremeenko, V.; Voskoboinikov, V.; Goncharov, A.; Grishanov, V.; Dranichnikov, A.; Evtushenko, Yu.; Zapiatkin, N.; Zakhvatkin, M.; Ivanov, A.; Kokoulin, V.; Kolmogorov, V.; Kondaurov, M.; Konstantinov, E.; Konstantinov, S.; Krainov, G.; Kriuchkov, A.; Kuper, E.; Medvedko, A.; Mironenko, L.; Panasiuk, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Petrov, S.; Reva, V.; Svischev, P.; Skarbo, B.; Smirnov, B.; Sukhina, B.; Tiunov, M.; Shirokov, V.; Shrainer, K.; Yang, X. D.; Zhao, H. W.; Wang, Z. X.; Li, J.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, W.; Yan, H. B.; Yan, H. H.; Xia, G. X.

    2004-10-01

    HIRFL-CSR, a new ion cooler-storage ring, is under construction at IMP. It is equipped with two electron cooling devices. The technical parameters of the project will be reviewed briefly. The HIRFL-CSR cooler could be a new generation cooler with some unique features such as a new electron gun capable to produce hollow electron beam, electrostatic bending plates and a new structure of solenoid coils at the cooling section. The commissioning of the first cooler with electron beam at IMP was completed. The second cooler with energy 300 keV is under final assembling.

  10. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS Collaboration; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented.

  11. 76 FR 71558 - Notice of Commission Meeting and Public Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Notice of Commission Meeting and Public Hearing Notice is hereby given that the Delaware River... Delaware River Basin Commission fiscal year 2013 operating budget; and (c) a show cause hearing...

  12. 77 FR 51787 - Notice of Commission Meeting and Public Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Notice of Commission Meeting and Public Hearing Notice is hereby given that the Delaware River Basin Commission will hold an informal conference followed by a public hearing on Wednesday,...

  13. 78 FR 10160 - Notice of Commission Meeting and Public Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Notice of Commission Meeting and Public Hearing Notice is hereby given that the Delaware River Basin Commission will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. A business meeting will be...

  14. 16 CFR 312.12 - Voluntary Commission Approval Processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Parental consent methods. An interested party may file a written request for Commission approval of... request. The Commission shall issue a written determination within 120 days of the filing of the request... file a written request for Commission approval of additional activities to be included within...

  15. 19 CFR 213.5 - Access to Commission resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Access to Commission resources. 213.5 Section 213... IMPORT TRADE TRADE REMEDY ASSISTANCE § 213.5 Access to Commission resources. Commission resources, in addition to the Office's resources, are available to an eligible small business to the same extent as...

  16. 19 CFR 213.5 - Access to Commission resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Access to Commission resources. 213.5 Section 213... IMPORT TRADE TRADE REMEDY ASSISTANCE § 213.5 Access to Commission resources. Commission resources, in addition to the Office's resources, are available to an eligible small business to the same extent as...

  17. 19 CFR 213.5 - Access to Commission resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Access to Commission resources. 213.5 Section 213... IMPORT TRADE TRADE REMEDY ASSISTANCE § 213.5 Access to Commission resources. Commission resources, in addition to the Office's resources, are available to an eligible small business to the same extent as...

  18. 77 FR 8257 - Sunshine Act Open Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... COMMISSION Sunshine Act Open Commission Meeting Date: February 8, 2012. The Federal Communications Commission will hold an Open Meeting on the subjects listed below on Wednesday, February 15, 2012 which is... wheelchairs or other mobility aids. Sign language interpreters, open captioning, and assistive...

  19. 28 CFR 524.25 - U.S. Parole Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. Parole Commission. 524.25 Section..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Youth Corrections Act (YCA) Programs § 524.25 U.S. Parole Commission. The U.S. Parole Commission is the releasing authority for all YCA inmates except for full...

  20. 28 CFR 524.25 - U.S. Parole Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false U.S. Parole Commission. 524.25 Section..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Youth Corrections Act (YCA) Programs § 524.25 U.S. Parole Commission. The U.S. Parole Commission is the releasing authority for all YCA inmates except for full...

  1. 28 CFR 524.25 - U.S. Parole Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false U.S. Parole Commission. 524.25 Section..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Youth Corrections Act (YCA) Programs § 524.25 U.S. Parole Commission. The U.S. Parole Commission is the releasing authority for all YCA inmates except for full...

  2. 28 CFR 524.25 - U.S. Parole Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false U.S. Parole Commission. 524.25 Section..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Youth Corrections Act (YCA) Programs § 524.25 U.S. Parole Commission. The U.S. Parole Commission is the releasing authority for all YCA inmates except for full...

  3. 28 CFR 524.25 - U.S. Parole Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false U.S. Parole Commission. 524.25 Section..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Youth Corrections Act (YCA) Programs § 524.25 U.S. Parole Commission. The U.S. Parole Commission is the releasing authority for all YCA inmates except for full...

  4. 10 CFR 9.107 - Public announcement of Commission meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public announcement of Commission meetings. 9.107 Section 9.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Government in the Sunshine Act Regulations... if: (1) A majority of the entire membership of the Commission determines by a recorded vote...

  5. 36 CFR 401.8 - Requirement for Commission approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requirement for Commission approval. 401.8 Section 401.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS § 401.8 Requirement for Commission approval. No administrative agency of the...

  6. 36 CFR 401.8 - Requirement for Commission approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Requirement for Commission approval. 401.8 Section 401.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS § 401.8 Requirement for Commission approval. No administrative agency of the...

  7. 36 CFR 401.8 - Requirement for Commission approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirement for Commission approval. 401.8 Section 401.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS § 401.8 Requirement for Commission approval. No administrative agency of the...

  8. 36 CFR 401.8 - Requirement for Commission approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirement for Commission approval. 401.8 Section 401.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS § 401.8 Requirement for Commission approval. No administrative agency of the...

  9. 36 CFR 401.8 - Requirement for Commission approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirement for Commission approval. 401.8 Section 401.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS § 401.8 Requirement for Commission approval. No administrative agency of the...

  10. 77 FR 9220 - Commission Information Collection Activities; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... Commission (Commission or FERC) is submitting the information collection FERC-550, Oil Pipeline Rates: Tariff...). Jurisdiction over oil pipelines as it relates to the establishment of valuations for pipelines was transferred... oil pipeline rates. The data that oil pipelines file is the basis for Commission analyses of the......

  11. 75 FR 36647 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ...This notice announces an open meeting of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (the Commission). The Commission was organized pursuant to the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) (the Act). This notice is provided in accordance with the...

  12. 75 FR 41451 - Commission Agenda and Priorities; Notice of Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... of each fiscal year. Section 4(j) of the CPSA provides further that before establishing its agenda... COMMISSION Commission Agenda and Priorities; Notice of Hearing AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission... conduct a public hearing to receive views from all interested parties about its agenda and priorities...

  13. 77 FR 32951 - Commission Agenda and Priorities; Notice of Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... COMMISSION Commission Agenda and Priorities; Notice of Hearing AGENCY: U.S. Consumer Product Safety... (``Commission'') will conduct a public hearing to receive views from all interested parties about its agenda and priorities for fiscal year 2014, which begins on October 1, 2013. Participation by members of the public...

  14. 78 FR 37797 - Commission Agenda and Priorities; Notice of Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... presentations concerning the Commission's agenda and priorities for fiscal years 2014 and 2015 will become part... fiscal year 2014 and/or fiscal year 2015 agendas. Persons who desire to make oral presentations at the... COMMISSION Commission Agenda and Priorities; Notice of Hearing AGENCY: U.S. Consumer Product...

  15. 76 FR 38117 - Commission Agenda and Priorities; Notice of Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... COMMISSION Commission Agenda and Priorities; Notice of Hearing AGENCY: U.S. Consumer Product Safety... (``Commission'') will conduct a public hearing to receive views from all interested parties about its agenda and priorities for fiscal year 2013, which begins on October 1, 2012. Participation by members of the public...

  16. 75 FR 67958 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future AGENCY: Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy... CommissionDFO@nuclear.energy.gov . Additional information will be available at http://www.brc.gov... cycle policies that have been established by other leading nuclear energy nations. The Commission...

  17. 76 FR 2891 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future AGENCY: Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy...-4243 or facsimile (202) 586- 0544; e-mail CommissionDFO@nuclear.energy.gov . Additional information... and nuclear waste. The Commission is scheduled to submit a draft report to the Secretary of Energy...

  18. 75 FR 10791 - Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy...-4243 or facsimile (202) 586- 0544; e-mail CommissionDFO@nuclear.energy.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... knowledge of issues pertaining to nuclear energy. Purpose of the Meeting: Inform the Commission...

  19. The Consumer Product Safety Commission: Benefit or Boondoggle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Laurence P.

    1977-01-01

    The Consumer Product Safety Commission has been subject to the criticism of all parties involved in the regulation of the safety of consumer products. Evaluates the Commission's performance, examining both the sources of the Commission's regulatory problems and the extent to which recent amendments to the Consumer Product Safety Act will solve…

  20. 78 FR 70959 - Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... Office of the Secretary Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Renewal of the Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform... Secretary of the Interior is renewing the Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform. FOR...

  1. 75 FR 81244 - Military Leadership Diversity Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... of the Secretary Military Leadership Diversity Commission Meeting AGENCY: Office of the Under...: Military Leadership Diversity Commission (MLDC). 2. Date: January 13, 2011 through January 14, 2011. 3...: The purpose of the meeting is for the commissioners of the Military Leadership Diversity Commission...

  2. 75 FR 2114 - Military Leadership Diversity Commission (MLDC); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... Office of the Secretary Military Leadership Diversity Commission (MLDC); Meeting AGENCY: Office of the... announces that the Military Leadership Diversity Commission (MLDC) will meet from February 10-12, 2010... Military Leadership Diversity Commission to continue their efforts to address congressional concerns...

  3. NASA Construction of Facilities Validation Processes - Total Building Commissioning (TBCx)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Jay C.

    2004-01-01

    Key Atributes include: Total Quality Management (TQM) System that looks at all phases of a project. A team process that spans boundaries. A Commissioning Authority to lead the process. Commissioning requirements in contracts. Independent design review to verify compliance with Facility Project Requirements (FPR). Formal written Commissioning Plan with Documented Results. Functional performance testing (FPT) against the requirements document.

  4. 32 CFR 9.2 - Establishment of Military Commissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Establishment of Military Commissions. 9.2 Section 9.2 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR...

  5. 32 CFR 9.2 - Establishment of Military Commissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Establishment of Military Commissions. 9.2 Section 9.2 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR...

  6. 78 FR 3325 - Appointing Authority for Military Commissions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 18 Appointing Authority for Military Commissions AGENCY: Department of... Authority for Military Commissions. This rule pertains to a military function of the United States and is.... As a result of the enactment of Military Commissions Act of 2009, the Deputy Secretary's issuance...

  7. 32 CFR 9.2 - Establishment of Military Commissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Establishment of Military Commissions. 9.2 Section 9.2 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR...

  8. 32 CFR 9.2 - Establishment of Military Commissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Establishment of Military Commissions. 9.2 Section 9.2 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR...

  9. 10 CFR 9.107 - Public announcement of Commission meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... matter of the meeting, whether it is to be open or closed to the public, and the name and phone number of... of the preceding, and the name and phone number of the official designated by the Commission to... Commission finds that the public interest in prompt Commission action or the need to protect the...

  10. 19 CFR 213.5 - Access to Commission resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Access to Commission resources. 213.5 Section 213... IMPORT TRADE TRADE REMEDY ASSISTANCE § 213.5 Access to Commission resources. Commission resources, in addition to the Office's resources, are available to an eligible small business to the same extent as...

  11. 19 CFR 213.5 - Access to Commission resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Access to Commission resources. 213.5 Section 213... IMPORT TRADE TRADE REMEDY ASSISTANCE § 213.5 Access to Commission resources. Commission resources, in addition to the Office's resources, are available to an eligible small business to the same extent as...

  12. 47 CFR 1.282 - Final decision of the Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final decision of the Commission. 1.282 Section 1.282 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hearing Proceedings Review Proceedings § 1.282 Final decision of the Commission. (a) After opportunity has...

  13. 78 FR 4366 - Appeal Proceedings Before the Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... before the Commission into the current subchapter H (Appeal Proceedings Before the Commission). 77 FR... Commission's minimum internal control standards contained in part 543 (77 FR 58708, Sept. 21, 2012). In its... technical standards contained in part 547 (77 FR 58473, Sept. 21, 2012). III. Development of the...

  14. 16 CFR 456.4 - Declaration of Commission Intent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Declaration of Commission Intent. 456.4 Section 456.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES OPHTHALMIC PRACTICE RULES (EYEGLASS RULE) § 456.4 Declaration of Commission Intent. In prohibiting the use of waivers...

  15. 16 CFR 456.4 - Declaration of Commission Intent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Declaration of Commission Intent. 456.4 Section 456.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES OPHTHALMIC PRACTICE RULES (EYEGLASS RULE) § 456.4 Declaration of Commission Intent. In prohibiting the use of waivers...

  16. 16 CFR 456.4 - Declaration of Commission Intent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Declaration of Commission Intent. 456.4 Section 456.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES OPHTHALMIC PRACTICE RULES (EYEGLASS RULE) § 456.4 Declaration of Commission Intent. In prohibiting the use of waivers...

  17. 16 CFR 456.4 - Declaration of Commission Intent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Declaration of Commission Intent. 456.4 Section 456.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES OPHTHALMIC PRACTICE RULES (EYEGLASS RULE) § 456.4 Declaration of Commission Intent. In prohibiting the use of waivers...

  18. 16 CFR 456.4 - Declaration of Commission Intent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Declaration of Commission Intent. 456.4 Section 456.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES OPHTHALMIC PRACTICE RULES (EYEGLASS RULE) § 456.4 Declaration of Commission Intent. In prohibiting the use of waivers...

  19. Report and Recommendations of the Commission for Occupational Education Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steuben-Allegany Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Bath, NY.

    The Commission for Occupational Education Excellence was formed by the Steuben-Allegany (New York) Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES). The commission included representatives from schools, businesses, parents and students, labor and teacher unions, other public agencies, postsecondary schools, and the BOCES. The commission's mission…

  20. Cognitive Enhancement and Beyond: Recommendations from the Bioethics Commission.

    PubMed

    Allen, Anita L; Strand, Nicolle K

    2015-10-01

    Media outlets are reporting that cognitive enhancement is reaching epidemic levels, but evidence is lacking and ethical questions remain. The US Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has examined the issue, and we lay out the commission's findings and their relevance for the scientific community.

  1. 16 CFR 1018.23 - Designated Commission employee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Designated Commission employee. 1018.23 Section 1018.23 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT Operation of Advisory Committees § 1018.23 Designated Commission employee. (a) The Chairman...

  2. 7 CFR 1217.2 - Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. 1217.2 Section 1217.2... Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.2 Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC means the 21-member committee representing businesses that manufacture softwood lumber...

  3. 7 CFR 1217.2 - Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. 1217.2 Section 1217.2... Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.2 Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC means the 21-member committee representing businesses that manufacture softwood lumber...

  4. 7 CFR 1217.2 - Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. 1217.2 Section 1217.2... Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.2 Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC means the 21-member committee representing businesses that manufacture softwood lumber...

  5. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1990-1991 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    This annual report describes the goals and activities of the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs for fiscal year 1990-91. The commission is made up of seven tribal representatives, two non-Indians, and six ex-officio members from state government. In October 1990, the commission held a 2-day Indian Town Hall in Phoenix (Arizona) on the future of…

  6. 47 CFR 18.113 - Inspection by Commission representatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inspection by Commission representatives. 18.113 Section 18.113 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT General Information § 18.113 Inspection by Commission representatives....

  7. 47 CFR 18.113 - Inspection by Commission representatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inspection by Commission representatives. 18.113 Section 18.113 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT General Information § 18.113 Inspection by Commission representatives....

  8. 47 CFR 18.113 - Inspection by Commission representatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inspection by Commission representatives. 18.113 Section 18.113 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT General Information § 18.113 Inspection by Commission representatives....

  9. 47 CFR 18.113 - Inspection by Commission representatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inspection by Commission representatives. 18.113 Section 18.113 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT General Information § 18.113 Inspection by Commission representatives....

  10. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1975-76 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    The Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs' annual report is issued to inform the Governor, State Legislature, and tribal governments of the proceedings, transactions, findings, and recommendations made by the Commission, and this 1975-76 report presents the following: (1) Commission membership; (2) a map of the American Indian reservation areas in…

  11. 22 CFR 401.26 - Presentation to Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Presentation to Commission. 401.26 Section 401.26 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE... Canada is to be referred to the Commission under Article IX of the Treaty, the method of brining...

  12. 22 CFR 401.12 - Presentation to Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Presentation to Commission. 401.12 Section 401.12 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE Applications § 401.12 Presentation to Commission. (a) Where one or the other of the Governments on its...

  13. 7 CFR 1780.48 - Regional commission grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to ARC. RUS Bulletin 1780-23 will be used to develop a separate project management agreement between... Regional commission grants. Grants are sometimes made by regional commissions for projects eligible for RUS...) When RUS has funds in the project, no charge will be made for administering regional commission...

  14. 7 CFR 1780.48 - Regional commission grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to ARC. RUS Bulletin 1780-23 will be used to develop a separate project management agreement between... Regional commission grants. Grants are sometimes made by regional commissions for projects eligible for RUS...) When RUS has funds in the project, no charge will be made for administering regional commission...

  15. 7 CFR 1780.48 - Regional commission grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to ARC. RUS Bulletin 1780-23 will be used to develop a separate project management agreement between... Regional commission grants. Grants are sometimes made by regional commissions for projects eligible for RUS...) When RUS has funds in the project, no charge will be made for administering regional commission...

  16. 7 CFR 1780.48 - Regional commission grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to ARC. RUS Bulletin 1780-23 will be used to develop a separate project management agreement between... Regional commission grants. Grants are sometimes made by regional commissions for projects eligible for RUS...) When RUS has funds in the project, no charge will be made for administering regional commission...

  17. 7 CFR 1780.48 - Regional commission grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to ARC. RUS Bulletin 1780-23 will be used to develop a separate project management agreement between... Regional commission grants. Grants are sometimes made by regional commissions for projects eligible for RUS...) When RUS has funds in the project, no charge will be made for administering regional commission...

  18. 75 FR 3488 - Flight 93 National Memorial Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... National Park Service Flight 93 National Memorial Advisory Commission AGENCY: National Park Service. ACTION... meeting of the Flight 93 Advisory Commission. DATES: The public meeting of the Advisory Commission will be... with the Flight 93 Memorial Task Force. Location: The meeting will be held at the Somerset...

  19. 77 FR 24220 - Flight 93 National Memorial Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... National Park Service Flight 93 National Memorial Advisory Commission AGENCY: National Park Service... meeting of the Flight 93 Advisory Commission. DATES: The public meeting of the Advisory Commission will be... the Flight 93 National Memorial Office, 109 West Main Street, Suite 104, Somerset, PA 15501....

  20. 16 CFR 4.8 - Costs for obtaining Commission records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Costs for obtaining Commission records. 4.8 Section 4.8 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE MISCELLANEOUS RULES § 4.8 Costs for obtaining Commission records. (a) Definitions. For the purpose of this section: (1) The term search...

  1. 76 FR 25685 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 15, 2011, Orlando Utilities Commission submitted its tariff filing per 35.25(e): Order 890 compliance to...

  2. 76 FR 35209 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 26, 2011, Orlando Utilities Commission submitted its tariff filing per 35.17(b): Amendment to...

  3. 75 FR 37789 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing June 23, 2010. Take notice that on June 11, 2010, the Orlando Utilities Commission filed, pro forma revised tariff sheets...

  4. 76 FR 49469 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on July 29, 2011, Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC), pursuant to section 205 of the Federal Power Act (FPA)...

  5. 78 FR 78352 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 18, 2013, Orlando Utilities Commission submitted its tariff filing per 35.28(e): Order No....

  6. 77 FR 33203 - Equity and Excellence Commission, Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... Equity and Excellence Commission, Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: U.S. Department of Education. ACTION... cancellation of the Meeting of the Equity and Excellence Commission scheduled for June 4, 2012 and announced in..., Equity and Excellence Commission, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., Washington,...

  7. 16 CFR 4.8 - Costs for obtaining Commission records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Costs for obtaining Commission records. 4.8 Section 4.8 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE MISCELLANEOUS RULES § 4.8 Costs for obtaining Commission records. (a) Definitions. For the purpose of...

  8. 25 CFR 513.33 - Will the Commission issue a certification when the Commission is the creditor agency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 513.33 Will the Commission... established in this subpart and pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 5514, the Commission will submit a certification...

  9. Leadership of healthcare commissioning networks in England: a mixed-methods study on clinical commissioning groups

    PubMed Central

    Zachariadis, Markos; Oborn, Eivor; Barrett, Michael; Zollinger-Read, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the relational challenges for general practitioner (GP) leaders setting up new network-centric commissioning organisations in the recent health policy reform in England, we use innovation network theory to identify key network leadership practices that facilitate healthcare innovation. Design Mixed-method, multisite and case study research. Setting Six clinical commissioning groups and local clusters in the East of England area, covering in total 208 GPs and 1 662 000 population. Methods Semistructured interviews with 56 lead GPs, practice managers and staff from the local health authorities (primary care trusts, PCT) as well as various healthcare professionals; 21 observations of clinical commissioning group (CCG) board and executive meetings; electronic survey of 58 CCG board members (these included GPs, practice managers, PCT employees, nurses and patient representatives) and subsequent social network analysis. Main outcome measures Collaborative relationships between CCG board members and stakeholders from their healthcare network; clarifying the role of GPs as network leaders; strengths and areas for development of CCGs. Results Drawing upon innovation network theory provides unique insights of the CCG leaders’ activities in establishing best practices and introducing new clinical pathways. In this context we identified three network leadership roles: managing knowledge flows, managing network coherence and managing network stability. Knowledge sharing and effective collaboration among GPs enable network stability and the alignment of CCG objectives with those of the wider health system (network coherence). Even though activities varied between commissioning groups, collaborative initiatives were common. However, there was significant variation among CCGs around the level of engagement with providers, patients and local authorities. Locality (sub) groups played an important role because they linked commissioning decisions with

  10. MINER{nu}A Test Beam Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Higuera, A.; Castorena, J.; Urrutia, Z.; Felix, J.; Zavala, G.

    2009-12-17

    MINER{nu}A Main INjector ExpeRiment {nu}-A is a high-statistic neutrino scattering experiment that will ran in the NuMI Beam Hall at Fermilab. To calibrate the energy response of the MINER{nu}A detector, a beamline is being designed for the MINER{nu}A Test Beam Detector (TBD). The TBD is a replica of the full MINER{nu}A detector at small scale for calibration studies of the main detector. The beamline design consists of the following parts: a copper target, used to generate tertiaries from an incoming secondary beam; a steel collimator for tertiaries, which also serves as a dump for the incoming beam; a time of fight system (scintillator planes); four wire chambers, for angle measurements and tracking; and two dipole magnets, used as an spectrometer. During last October, the first commissioning run of the MINER{nu}A Test Beam took place in the Meson Test Beam Facility at Fermilab. We commissioned the target and collimator of the new tertiary beamline.

  11. Open commit protocols tolerating commission failures

    SciTech Connect

    Rothermel, K.; Pappe, S. )

    1993-06-01

    To ensure atomicity of transactions in disturbed systems so-called 2-phase commit (2PC) protocols have been proposed. The basic assumption of these protocols is that the processing nodes involved in transactions are [open quotes]sane,[close quotes] i.e., they only fail with omission failures, and nodes eventually recover from failures. Unfortunately, this assumption is not realistic for so-called Open Distributed Systems (ODSs), in which nodes may have totally different reliability characteristics. In ODSs, nodes can be classified into trusted nodes (e.g., a banking server) and nontrusted nodes (e.g., a home PC requesting a remote banking service). While trusted nodes are assumed to be sane, nontrusted nodes may fail permanently and even cause commission failures to occur. In this paper, we propose a family of 2PC protocols that tolerate any number of omission failures at trusted nodes and any number of commission and omission failures at nontrusted nodes. The proposed protocols ensure that (at least) the trusted nodes participating in a transaction eventually terminate the transaction in a consistent manner. Unlike Byzantine commit protocols, our protocols do not incorporate mechanisms for achieving Byzantine agreement, which has advantages in terms of complexity: Our protocols have the same or only a slightly higher message complexity than traditional 2PC protocols. 31 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Implications of the Qweak Commissioning Result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Greg; Qweak Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The commissioning results of the Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab, which constituted approximately 4% of the total results obtained in that experiment, were recently published. After a brief review of the experiment, new, unpublished results derived from that publication will be presented. The sensitivity of the fit used to extract the proton's weak charge to the choice of electromagnetic form factors, to the proton radius puzzle, and to the dipole mass used for the Q2 evolution will be examined. The running of sin2 (θw) and the experiment's mass reach will be discussed. The status of the ongoing effort to complete the analysis of the full experiment will also be shown. The commissioning results of the Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab, which constituted approximately 4% of the total results obtained in that experiment, were recently published. After a brief review of the experiment, new, unpublished results derived from that publication will be presented. The sensitivity of the fit used to extract the proton's weak charge to the choice of electromagnetic form factors, to the proton radius puzzle, and to the dipole mass used for the Q2 evolution will be examined. The running of sin2 (θw) and the experiment's mass reach will be discussed. The status of the ongoing effort to complete the analysis of the full experiment will also be shown. This work was supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177, under which Jefferson Science Associates, LLC operates Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  13. Division XII / Commission 5 / Working Group Designations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Marion; Andernach, Heinz J.; Borde, Suzanne; Borne, Kirk D.; Cowley, Anne P.; Dickel, Helene R.; Dubois, Pascal; Gallagher, John S.; Genova, Françoise; Hodge, Paul W.; Hunstead, Richard W.; Lortet, Marie-Claire; Lubowich, Donald A.; Malkov, Oleg Yu.; Nagata, Tetsuya; Ochsenbein, François; Urban, Sean E.; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Warren, Wayne H.; Zacharias, Norbert

    2007-12-01

    At the 2003 Sydney IAU meeting, Marion Schmitz (Caltech, USA) took over the chair of the Commission 5 Working Group Designations, succeeding Helene Dickel. The Working Group Designations of IAU Commission 5 clarifies existing astronomical nomenclature and helps astronomers avoid potential problems when designating their sources. The most important function of WG Designations during the period 2003-2005 was overseeing the IAU REGISTRY FOR ACRONYMS (for newly discovered astronomical sources of radiation: see the website ) which is sponsored by the WG and operated by the Centre de Données de Strasbourg (CDS). The Clearing House, a subgroup of the WG, screens the submissions for accuracy and conformity to the IAU Recommendations for Nomenclature (). From its beginning in 1997 through August 2006, there have been 132 submissions and 111 acceptances. Attempts to register asterisms, common star names, and suspected variable stars were rejected. The past three years saw 61 acronyms submitted with 50 of them being accepted. (GIRL - yes; WOMEN - no).

  14. GRETINA commissioning and engineering run resolution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarlow, Thomas; Beausang, Con; Ross, Tim; Hughes, Richard; Gell, Kristen; Good, Erin

    2012-10-01

    GRETINA, the first stage in the full Gamma Ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETA), consists of seven modules covering approximately 1 solid angle. Each module is made up of four large, highly-segmented germanium detectors capable of measuring the interaction points of individual gamma-rays. GRETINA has recently been assembled and commissioned in LBNL via a series of engineering and commissioning runs. Here we report on an analysis of data from the first engineering run (ER01) which was intended to probe the response of the data acquisition system to high multiplicity gamma-ray cascades. For this experiment the 122Sn(40Ar, 4n) reaction at a beam energy of 210 MeV was utilized to populate high spin states in 158Er. A variety of beam currents, targets and trigger conditions were utilized to test the acquisition. Here we report on the measured energy resolution, both with calibration and in-beam sources as well as a gamma-gamma coincidence analysis to confirm the known level scheme and the capability of the data acquisition system for high fold coincidence measurements. This work was partly supported by the US Department of Energy via grant numbers DE-FG52-09NA29454 and DE-FG02-05-ER41379.

  15. Development and commissioning of the CARIBU project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Savard, G.; Pardo, R. C.; Baker, S.; Davids, C. N.; Levand, A.; Peterson, D.; Phillips, D. R.; Vondrasek, R.; Zabransky, B.; Zinkann, G. P.

    2010-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) will enhance the radioactive beam capability of the ATLAS accelerator by providing high quality neutron-rich beam from a ^252Cf fission. The whole apparatus consists of four main components: 1)A Helium filled gas catcher and RFQ ion cooler that thermalizes fission products and forms a low-energy ion beam; 2)An isobar separator that magnetically purifies ion cocktails to a mass resolution of approximately 1/20000; 3)A charge breeder ECR ion source where ions of low charge states are further ionized by electron bombardment in the plasma; 4)A low energy experimental area where ions are trapped and bunched to suit high precision experiments. Ion optical simulations for CARIBU ion cooling, bunching and transmission will be presented. Experimental results from commissioning will be compared with the corresponding calculations. Other technical details of the facility and insight gained in its commissioning will also be presented. Current status of CARIBU will be given. )

  16. 18 CFR 388.106 - Requests for Commission records available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Requests for Commission records available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's web site, http://www.ferc.gov... available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's web site, http://www.ferc.gov. (a)(1)...

  17. 18 CFR 388.106 - Requests for Commission records available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Requests for Commission records available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's web site, http://www.ferc.gov... available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's web site, http://www.ferc.gov. (a)(1)...

  18. 18 CFR 388.106 - Requests for Commission records available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Requests for Commission records available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's web site, http://www.ferc.gov... available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's web site, http://www.ferc.gov. (a)(1)...

  19. 18 CFR 388.106 - Requests for Commission records available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Requests for Commission records available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's web site, http://www.ferc.gov... available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's web site, http://www.ferc.gov. (a)(1)...

  20. 18 CFR 388.106 - Requests for Commission records available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requests for Commission records available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's web site, http://www.ferc.gov... available in the Public Reference Room and from the Commission's web site, http://www.ferc.gov. (a)(1)...