Science.gov

Sample records for fractal em mercados

  1. Fractal Bread.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbenshade, Donald H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Develops the idea of fractals through a laboratory activity that calculates the fractal dimension of ordinary white bread. Extends use of the fractal dimension to compare other complex structures as other breads and sponges. (MDH)

  2. Fractal Bread.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbenshade, Donald H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Develops the idea of fractals through a laboratory activity that calculates the fractal dimension of ordinary white bread. Extends use of the fractal dimension to compare other complex structures as other breads and sponges. (MDH)

  3. Fractal astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, M.

    1989-02-01

    The author discusses some of the more recent research on fractal astronomy and results presented in several astronomical studies. First, the large-scale structure of the universe is considered, while in another section one drops in scale to examine some of the smallest bodies in our solar system; the comets and meteoroids. The final section presents some thoughts on what influence the fractal ideology might have on astronomy, focusing particularly on the question recently raised by Kadanoff, "Fractals: where's the physics?"

  4. Measuring Fractality

    PubMed Central

    Stadnitski, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    When investigating fractal phenomena, the following questions are fundamental for the applied researcher: (1) What are essential statistical properties of 1/f noise? (2) Which estimators are available for measuring fractality? (3) Which measurement instruments are appropriate and how are they applied? The purpose of this article is to give clear and comprehensible answers to these questions. First, theoretical characteristics of a fractal pattern (self-similarity, long memory, power law) and the related fractal parameters (the Hurst coefficient, the scaling exponent α, the fractional differencing parameter d of the autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average methodology, the power exponent β of the spectral analysis) are discussed. Then, estimators of fractal parameters from different software packages commonly used by applied researchers (R, SAS, SPSS) are introduced and evaluated. Advantages, disadvantages, and constrains of the popular estimators (d^ML, power spectral density, detrended fluctuation analysis, signal summation conversion) are illustrated by elaborate examples. Finally, crucial steps of fractal analysis (plotting time series data, autocorrelation, and spectral functions; performing stationarity tests; choosing an adequate estimator; estimating fractal parameters; distinguishing fractal processes from short-memory patterns) are demonstrated with empirical time series. PMID:22586408

  5. Fractal Movies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Because fractal images are by nature very complex, it can be inspiring and instructive to create the code in the classroom and watch the fractal image evolve as the user slowly changes some important parameter or zooms in and out of the image. Uses programming language that permits the user to store and retrieve a graphics image as a disk file.…

  6. Exploring Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewdney, A. K.

    1991-01-01

    Explores the subject of fractal geometry focusing on the occurrence of fractal-like shapes in the natural world. Topics include iterated functions, chaos theory, the Lorenz attractor, logistic maps, the Mandelbrot set, and mini-Mandelbrot sets. Provides appropriate computer algorithms, as well as further sources of information. (JJK)

  7. Fractal Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Shirley B.

    1992-01-01

    This article traces the historical development of fractal geometry from early in the twentieth century and offers an explanation of the mathematics behind the recursion formulas and their representations within computer graphics. Also included are the fundamentals behind programing for fractal graphics in the C Language with appropriate…

  8. Exploring Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewdney, A. K.

    1991-01-01

    Explores the subject of fractal geometry focusing on the occurrence of fractal-like shapes in the natural world. Topics include iterated functions, chaos theory, the Lorenz attractor, logistic maps, the Mandelbrot set, and mini-Mandelbrot sets. Provides appropriate computer algorithms, as well as further sources of information. (JJK)

  9. Measuring fractality.

    PubMed

    Stadnitski, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    WHEN INVESTIGATING FRACTAL PHENOMENA, THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS ARE FUNDAMENTAL FOR THE APPLIED RESEARCHER: (1) What are essential statistical properties of 1/f noise? (2) Which estimators are available for measuring fractality? (3) Which measurement instruments are appropriate and how are they applied? The purpose of this article is to give clear and comprehensible answers to these questions. First, theoretical characteristics of a fractal pattern (self-similarity, long memory, power law) and the related fractal parameters (the Hurst coefficient, the scaling exponent α, the fractional differencing parameter d of the autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average methodology, the power exponent β of the spectral analysis) are discussed. Then, estimators of fractal parameters from different software packages commonly used by applied researchers (R, SAS, SPSS) are introduced and evaluated. Advantages, disadvantages, and constrains of the popular estimators ([Formula: see text] power spectral density, detrended fluctuation analysis, signal summation conversion) are illustrated by elaborate examples. Finally, crucial steps of fractal analysis (plotting time series data, autocorrelation, and spectral functions; performing stationarity tests; choosing an adequate estimator; estimating fractal parameters; distinguishing fractal processes from short-memory patterns) are demonstrated with empirical time series.

  10. Fractal Movies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Because fractal images are by nature very complex, it can be inspiring and instructive to create the code in the classroom and watch the fractal image evolve as the user slowly changes some important parameter or zooms in and out of the image. Uses programming language that permits the user to store and retrieve a graphics image as a disk file.…

  11. The Language of Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurgens, Hartmut; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The production and application of images based on fractal geometry are described. Discussed are fractal language groups, fractal image coding, and fractal dialects. Implications for these applications of geometry to mathematics education are suggested. (CW)

  12. The Language of Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurgens, Hartmut; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The production and application of images based on fractal geometry are described. Discussed are fractal language groups, fractal image coding, and fractal dialects. Implications for these applications of geometry to mathematics education are suggested. (CW)

  13. A Brief Historical Introduction to Fractals and Fractal Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with a brief historical introduction to fractals, fractal dimension and fractal geometry. Many fractals including the Cantor fractal, the Koch fractal, the Minkowski fractal, the Mandelbrot and Given fractal are described to illustrate self-similar geometrical figures. This is followed by the discovery of dynamical systems and…

  14. A Brief Historical Introduction to Fractals and Fractal Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with a brief historical introduction to fractals, fractal dimension and fractal geometry. Many fractals including the Cantor fractal, the Koch fractal, the Minkowski fractal, the Mandelbrot and Given fractal are described to illustrate self-similar geometrical figures. This is followed by the discovery of dynamical systems and…

  15. Music and fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuorinen, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Any of the arts may produce exemplars that have fractal characteristics. There may be fractal painting, fractal poetry, and the like. But these will always be specific instances, not necessarily displaying intrinsic properties of the art-medium itself. Only music, I believe, of all the arts possesses an intrinsically fractal character, so that its very nature is fractally determined. Thus, it is reasonable to assert that any instance of music is fractal...

  16. Fractal Stiffening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, David William (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A structural support having fractal-stiffening and method of fabricating the support is presented where an optimized location of at least three nodes is predetermined prior to fabricating the structural support where a first set of webs is formed on one side of the support and joined to the nodes to form a first pocket region. A second set of webs is formed within the first pocket region forming a second pocket region where the height of the first set of webs extending orthogonally from the side of the support is greater than the second set of webs extending orthogonally from the support.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamics of fractal media

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2006-05-15

    The fractal distribution of charged particles is considered. An example of this distribution is the charged particles that are distributed over the fractal. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. These integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Typical turbulent media could be of a fractal structure and the corresponding equations should be changed to include the fractal features of the media. The magnetohydrodynamics equations for fractal media are derived from the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equations and integral hydrodynamics (balance) equations. Possible equilibrium states for these equations are considered.

  18. Dynamics of fractal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbach, R.

    1986-02-01

    Random structures often exhibit fractal geometry, defined in terms of the mass scaling exponent, D, the fractal dimension. The vibrational dynamics of fractal networks are expressed in terms of the exponent d double bar, the fracton dimensionality. The eigenstates on a fractal network are spatially localized for d double bar less than or equal to 2. The implications of fractal geometry are discussed for thermal transport on fractal networks. The electron-fracton interaction is developed, with a brief outline given for the time dependence of the electronic relaxation on fractal networks. It is suggested that amorphous or glassy materials may exhibit fractal properties at short length scales or, equivalently, at high energies. The calculations of physical properties can be used to test the fractal character of the vibrational excitations in these materials.

  19. Fractal antenna and fractal resonator primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Self-similarity and fractals have opened new and important avenues for antenna and electronic solutions over the last 25 years. This primer provides an introduction to the benefits provided by fractal geometry in antennas, resonators, and related structures. Such benefits include, among many, wider bandwidths, smaller sizes, part-less electronic components, and better performance. Fractals also provide a new generation of optimized design tools, first used successfully in antennas but applicable in a general fashion.

  20. Fractal nematic colloids

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, S. M.; Jagodič, U.; Mozaffari, M. R.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Muševič, I.; Ravnik, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter. PMID:28117325

  1. Fractals for physicians.

    PubMed

    Thamrin, Cindy; Stern, Georgette; Frey, Urs

    2010-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the study of fractals in medicine. In this review, we provide an overview of fractals, of techniques available to describe fractals in physiological data, and we propose some reasons why a physician might benefit from an understanding of fractals and fractal analysis, with an emphasis on paediatric respiratory medicine where possible. Among these reasons are the ubiquity of fractal organisation in nature and in the body, and how changes in this organisation over the lifespan provide insight into development and senescence. Fractal properties have also been shown to be altered in disease and even to predict the risk of worsening of disease. Finally, implications of a fractal organisation include robustness to errors during development, ability to adapt to surroundings, and the restoration of such organisation as targets for intervention and treatment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chaos and Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Ray

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an educational game called "The Chaos Game" which produces complicated fractal images. Two basic computer programs are included. The production of fractal images by the Sierpinski gasket and the Chaos Game programs is discussed. (CW)

  3. Chaos, Fractals, and Polynomials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tylee, J. Louis; Tylee, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses chaos theory; linear algebraic equations and the numerical solution of polynomials, including the use of the Newton-Raphson technique to find polynomial roots; fractals; search region and coordinate systems; convergence; and generating color fractals on a computer. (LRW)

  4. Fractal nematic colloids.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, S M; Jagodič, U; Mozaffari, M R; Ejtehadi, M R; Muševič, I; Ravnik, M

    2017-01-24

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter.

  5. Fractal nematic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. M.; Jagodič, U.; Mozaffari, M. R.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Muševič, I.; Ravnik, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter.

  6. Chaos and Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Ray

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an educational game called "The Chaos Game" which produces complicated fractal images. Two basic computer programs are included. The production of fractal images by the Sierpinski gasket and the Chaos Game programs is discussed. (CW)

  7. Chaos, Fractals, and Polynomials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tylee, J. Louis; Tylee, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses chaos theory; linear algebraic equations and the numerical solution of polynomials, including the use of the Newton-Raphson technique to find polynomial roots; fractals; search region and coordinate systems; convergence; and generating color fractals on a computer. (LRW)

  8. Fractal interpretation of intermittency

    SciTech Connect

    Hwa, R.C.

    1991-12-01

    Implication of intermittency in high-energy collisions is first discussed. Then follows a description of the fractal interpretation of intermittency. A basic quantity with asymptotic fractal behavior is introduced. It is then shown how the factorial moments and the G moments can be expressed in terms of it. The relationship between the intermittency indices and the fractal indices is made explicit.

  9. Fractals in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraboni, Michael; Moller, Trisha

    2008-01-01

    Fractal geometry offers teachers great flexibility: It can be adapted to the level of the audience or to time constraints. Although easily explained, fractal geometry leads to rich and interesting mathematical complexities. In this article, the authors describe fractal geometry, explain the process of iteration, and provide a sample exercise.…

  10. Fractals in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraboni, Michael; Moller, Trisha

    2008-01-01

    Fractal geometry offers teachers great flexibility: It can be adapted to the level of the audience or to time constraints. Although easily explained, fractal geometry leads to rich and interesting mathematical complexities. In this article, the authors describe fractal geometry, explain the process of iteration, and provide a sample exercise.…

  11. Fractal image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnsley, Michael F.; Sloan, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    Fractals are geometric or data structures which do not simplify under magnification. Fractal Image Compression is a technique which associates a fractal to an image. On the one hand, the fractal can be described in terms of a few succinct rules, while on the other, the fractal contains much or all of the image information. Since the rules are described with less bits of data than the image, compression results. Data compression with fractals is an approach to reach high compression ratios for large data streams related to images. The high compression ratios are attained at a cost of large amounts of computation. Both lossless and lossy modes are supported by the technique. The technique is stable in that small errors in codes lead to small errors in image data. Applications to the NASA mission are discussed.

  12. Exploring Fractals in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Describes an activity involving six investigations. Introduces students to fractals, allows them to study the properties of some famous fractals, and encourages them to create their own fractal artwork. Contains 14 references. (ASK)

  13. Exploring Fractals in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Describes an activity involving six investigations. Introduces students to fractals, allows them to study the properties of some famous fractals, and encourages them to create their own fractal artwork. Contains 14 references. (ASK)

  14. Fractals: To Know, to Do, to Simulate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente; Irazoque, Glinda

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the development of fractal theory and suggests fractal aggregates as an attractive alternative for introducing fractal concepts. Describes methods for producing metallic fractals and a computer simulation for drawing fractals. (MVL)

  15. Fractals: To Know, to Do, to Simulate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente; Irazoque, Glinda

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the development of fractal theory and suggests fractal aggregates as an attractive alternative for introducing fractal concepts. Describes methods for producing metallic fractals and a computer simulation for drawing fractals. (MVL)

  16. Fractals in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Paul; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2003-10-01

    In examples of fractals such as moon craters, rivers,2 cauliflower,3 and bread,4 the actual growth process of the fractal object is missed. In the simple experiment described here, one can observe and record the growth of calcium carbonate crystals — a ubiquitous material found in marble and seashells — in real time. The video frames can be digitized and analyzed to determine the fractal dimension.

  17. Fractal Geometry of Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Wolfgang E.

    In Fractals smaller parts and the whole are linked together. Fractals are self-similar, as those parts are, at least approximately, scaled-down copies of the rough whole. In architecture, such a concept has also been known for a long time. Not only architects of the twentieth century called for an overall idea that is mirrored in every single detail, but also Gothic cathedrals and Indian temples offer self-similarity. This study mainly focuses upon the question whether this concept of self-similarity makes architecture with fractal properties more diverse and interesting than Euclidean Modern architecture. The first part gives an introduction and explains Fractal properties in various natural and architectural objects, presenting the underlying structure by computer programmed renderings. In this connection, differences between the fractal, architectural concept and true, mathematical Fractals are worked out to become aware of limits. This is the basis for dealing with the problem whether fractal-like architecture, particularly facades, can be measured so that different designs can be compared with each other under the aspect of fractal properties. Finally the usability of the Box-Counting Method, an easy-to-use measurement method of Fractal Dimension is analyzed with regard to architecture.

  18. Line graphs for fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warchalowski, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Malgorzata J.

    2017-03-01

    We found the Lindenmayer systems for line graphs built on selected fractals. We show that the fractal dimension of such obtained graphs in all analysed cases is the same as for their original graphs. Both for the original graphs and for their line graphs we identified classes of nodes which reflect symmetry of the graph.

  19. Fractal structures and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bassingthwaighte, J.B.; Beard, D.A.; Percival, D.B.; Raymond, G.M.

    1996-06-01

    Fractals and chaos are closely related. Many chaotic systems have fractal features. Fractals are self-similar or self-affine structures, which means that they look much of the same when magnified or reduced in scale over a reasonably large range of scales, at least two orders of magnitude and preferably more (Mandelbrot, 1983). The methods for estimating their fractal dimensions or their Hurst coefficients, which summarize the scaling relationships and their correlation structures, are going through a rapid evolutionary phase. Fractal measures can be regarded as providing a useful statistical measure of correlated random processes. They also provide a basis for analyzing recursive processes in biology such as the growth of arborizing networks in the circulatory system, airways, or glandular ducts. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Fractal images induce fractal pupil dilations and constrictions.

    PubMed

    Moon, P; Muday, J; Raynor, S; Schirillo, J; Boydston, C; Fairbanks, M S; Taylor, R P

    2014-09-01

    Fractals are self-similar structures or patterns that repeat at increasingly fine magnifications. Research has revealed fractal patterns in many natural and physiological processes. This article investigates pupillary size over time to determine if their oscillations demonstrate a fractal pattern. We predict that pupil size over time will fluctuate in a fractal manner and this may be due to either the fractal neuronal structure or fractal properties of the image viewed. We present evidence that low complexity fractal patterns underlie pupillary oscillations as subjects view spatial fractal patterns. We also present evidence implicating the autonomic nervous system's importance in these patterns. Using the variational method of the box-counting procedure we demonstrate that low complexity fractal patterns are found in changes within pupil size over time in millimeters (mm) and our data suggest that these pupillary oscillation patterns do not depend on the fractal properties of the image viewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermodynamics of fractal universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykhi, Ahmad; Teimoori, Zeinab; Wang, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamical properties of the apparent horizon in a fractal universe. We find that one can always rewrite the Friedmann equation of the fractal universe in the form of the entropy balance relation δQ=ThdSh, where δQ and Th are the energy flux and Unruh temperature seen by an accelerated observer just inside the apparent horizon. We find that the entropy Sh consists two terms, the first one which obeys the usual area law and the second part which is the entropy production term due to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of fractal universe. This shows that in a fractal universe, a treatment with nonequilibrium thermodynamics of spacetime may be needed. We also study the generalized second law of thermodynamics in the framework of fractal universe. When the temperature of the apparent horizon and the matter fields inside the horizon are equal, i.e. T=Th, the generalized second law of thermodynamics can be fulfilled provided the deceleration and the equation of state parameters ranges either as -1⩽q<0, -1⩽w<-1/3 or as q<-1, w<-1 which are consistent with recent observations. We also find that for Th=bT, with b<1, the GSL of thermodynamics can be secured in a fractal universe by suitably choosing the fractal parameter β.

  2. SOC and Fractal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAteer, R. T. J.

    2013-06-01

    When Mandelbrot, the father of modern fractal geometry, made this seemingly obvious statement he was trying to show that we should move out of our comfortable Euclidean space and adopt a fractal approach to geometry. The concepts and mathematical tools of fractal geometry provides insight into natural physical systems that Euclidean tools cannot do. The benet from applying fractal geometry to studies of Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) are even greater. SOC and fractal geometry share concepts of dynamic n-body interactions, apparent non-predictability, self-similarity, and an approach to global statistics in space and time that make these two areas into naturally paired research techniques. Further, the iterative generation techniques used in both SOC models and in fractals mean they share common features and common problems. This chapter explores the strong historical connections between fractal geometry and SOC from both a mathematical and conceptual understanding, explores modern day interactions between these two topics, and discusses how this is likely to evolve into an even stronger link in the near future.

  3. Modeling Fractal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.

    The proper methodology for describing the dynamics of certain complex phenomena and fractal time series is the fractional calculus through the fractional Langevin equation discussed herein and applied in a biomedical context. We show that a fractional operator (derivative or integral) acting on a fractal function, yields another fractal function, allowing us to construct a fractional Langevin equation to describe the evolution of a fractal statistical process, for example, human gait and cerebral blood flow. The goal of this talk is to make clear how certain complex phenomena, such as those that are abundantly present in human physiology, can be faithfully described using dynamical models involving fractional differential stochastic equations. These models are tested against existing data sets and shown to describe time series from complex physiologic phenomena quite well.

  4. Fractals and Transformations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannon, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are several different transformations based on the generation of fractals including self-similar designs, the chaos game, the koch curve, and the Sierpinski Triangle. Three computer programs which illustrate these concepts are provided. (CW)

  5. Splines on fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strichartz, Robert S.; Usher, Michael

    2000-09-01

    A general theory of piecewise multiharmonic splines is constructed for a class of fractals (post-critically finite) that includes the familiar Sierpinski gasket, based on Kigami's theory of Laplacians on these fractals. The spline spaces are the analogues of the spaces of piecewise Cj polynomials of degree 2j + 1 on an interval, with nodes at dyadic rational points. We give explicit algorithms for effectively computing multiharmonic functions (solutions of [Delta]j+1u = 0) and for constructing bases for the spline spaces (for general fractals we need to assume that j is odd), and also for computing inner products of these functions. This enables us to give a finite element method for the approximate solution of fractal differential equations. We give the analogue of Simpson's method for numerical integration on the Sierpinski gasket. We use splines to approximate functions vanishing on the boundary by functions vanishing in a neighbourhood of the boundary.

  6. Foolin' with Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Garry

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a mathematical investigation of fractals and highlights the thinking involved, problem solving strategies used, generalizing skills required, the role of technology, and the role of mathematics. (ASK)

  7. Fractal Tectonics and Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    Tectonic processes build landforms that are subsequently destroyed by erosional processes. Landforms exhibit fractal statistics in a variety of ways; examples include (1) lengths of coast lines; (2) number-size statistics of lakes and islands; (3) spectral behavior of topography and bathymetry both globally and locally; and (4) branching statistics of drainage networks. Erosional processes are dominant in the development of many landforms on this planet, but similar fractal statistics are also applicable to the surface of Venus where minimal erosion has occurred. A number of dynamical systems models for landforms have been proposed, including (1) cellular automata; (2) diffusion limited aggregation; (3) self-avoiding percolation; and (4) advective-diffusion equations. The fractal statistics and validity of these models will be discussed. Earthquakes also exhibit fractal statistics. The frequency-magnitude statistics of earthquakes satisfy the fractal Gutenberg-Richter relation both globally and locally. Earthquakes are believed to be a classic example of self-organized criticality. One model for earthquakes utilizes interacting slider-blocks. These slider block models have been shown to behave chaotically and to exhibit self-organized criticality. The applicability of these models will be discussed and alternative approaches will be presented. Fragmentation has been demonstrated to produce fractal statistics in many cases. Comminution is one model for fragmentation that yields fractal statistics. It has been proposed that comminution is also responsible for much of the deformation in the earth's crust. The brittle disruption of the crust and the resulting earthquakes present an integrated problem with many fractal aspects.

  8. Fractal Geometry of Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Radlinski, A.P.; Radlinska, E.Z.; Agamalian, M.; Wignall, G.D.; Lindner, P.; Randl, O.G.

    1999-04-01

    The analysis of small- and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering data for sedimentary rocks shows that the pore-rock fabric interface is a surface fractal (D{sub s}=2.82) over 3 orders of magnitude of the length scale and 10 orders of magnitude in intensity. The fractal dimension and scatterer size obtained from scanning electron microscopy image processing are consistent with neutron scattering data. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Fractals and cancer.

    PubMed

    Baish, J W; Jain, R K

    2000-07-15

    Recent studies have shown that fractal geometry, a vocabulary of irregular shapes, can be useful for describing the pathological architecture of tumors and, perhaps more surprisingly, for yielding insights into the mechanisms of tumor growth and angiogenesis that complement those obtained by modern molecular methods. This article outlines the basic methods of fractal geometry and discusses the value and limitations of applying this new tool to cancer research.

  10. Fractals in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Iván; Uzcátegui, Gladys

    2011-04-01

    To systematically review applications of fractal geometry in different aspects of dental practice. In this review, we present a short introduction to fractals and specifically address the following topics: treatment and healing monitoring, dental materials, dental tissue, caries, osteoporosis, periodontitis, cancer, Sjögren's syndrome, diagnosis of several other conditions and a discussion on the reliability of FD determinations from dental radiographs. Google Scholar, Ovid MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, etc. (up to August 2010). The review considered original studies, reviews and conference proceedings, published in English or Spanish. Abstracts and posters were not taken into account. Fractal geometry has found plenty of applications in several branches of dental practice. It provides a way to quantify the complexity of structures. Whereas one desires to study a radiograph, an histological section or the signal from a transducer, there are several methods available to determine the degree of complexity using fractal analysis. Several pathological conditions can alter the complexity of anatomical structures, and this change can be detectable with the help of fractal parameters. Although during the last two decades there have been plenty of works on the field, reported cases having enough reproducibility, with different groups showing similar results are not very common. Further replications are needed before we can establish statistically significant correlations amongst fractal parameters and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The language of fractals

    SciTech Connect

    Juergens, H.; Peitgen, H.O.; Saupe, D. )

    1990-08-01

    The pathological structures conjured up by 19th-century mathematicians have, in recent years, taken the form of fractals, mathematical figures that have fractional dimension rather than the integral dimensions of familiar geometric figures (such as one-dimensional lines or two-dimensional planes). Fractals are much more than a mathematical curiosity. They offer an extremely compact method for describing objects and formations. Many structures have an underlying geometric regularity, known as scale invariance or self-similarity. If one examines these objects at different size scales, one repeatedly encounters the same fundamental elements. The repetitive pattern defines the fractional, or fractal, dimension of the structure. Fractal geometry seems to describe natural shapes and forms more gracefully and succinctly than does Euclidean geometry. Scale invariance has a noteworthy parallel in contemporary chaos theory, which reveals that many phenomena, even though they follow strict deterministic rules, are in principle unpredictable. Chaotic events, such as turbulence in the atmosphere or the beating of a human heart, show similar patterns of variation on different time scales, much as scale-invariant objects show similar structural patterns on different spatial scales. The correspondence between fractals and chaos is no accident. Rather it is a symptom of a deep-rooted relation: fractal geometry is the geometry of chaos.

  12. On Why Fractals Everywhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, V. C.

    2004-05-01

    Fractal is a ubiquitous phenomenon. It can be classified as deterministic or stochastic. Deterministic fractals have been commonly generated by iterative function systems (e.g., Cantor set, Sierpinski carpet and Koch snowflake) or recurrence relation (e.g., Lyapunov fractal). Stochastic fractals involve random processes and they have been used to describe some highly irregular real-world phenomena (e.g., clouds and turbulence). Stochastic fractals have been investigated with local models (e.g., Diffusion Limited Aggregation, and Percolation), as well as non-local models (e.g., Dielectric Breakdown Model and Self Organization). The objective of this study is to construct a universal non-local model to provide a plausible explanation of the origination of fractal characteristic in a wide variety of natural phenomena, without taking into account the underlying microscopic physics on a detailed level. The natural phenomena under consideration include turbulence, river networks, soil hydrology, lightning, avalanches, earthquakes, volcanic activities and distribution of leaves, updrafts/downdrafts, rain areas, clouds, interstellar clouds, sunspots or galaxies.

  13. The fractal forest: fractal geometry and applications in forest science.

    Treesearch

    Nancy D. Lorimer; Robert G. Haight; Rolfe A. Leary

    1994-01-01

    Fractal geometry is a tool for describing and analyzing irregularity. Because most of what we measure in the forest is discontinuous, jagged, and fragmented, fractal geometry has potential for improving the precision of measurement and description. This study reviews the literature on fractal geometry and its applications to forest measurements.

  14. Fractal Patterns and Chaos Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaney, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Teachers incorporate the chaos game and the concept of a fractal into various areas of the algebra and geometry curriculum. The chaos game approach to fractals provides teachers with an opportunity to help students comprehend the geometry of affine transformations.

  15. Building Fractal Models with Manipulatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coes, Loring

    1993-01-01

    Uses manipulative materials to build and examine geometric models that simulate the self-similarity properties of fractals. Examples are discussed in two dimensions, three dimensions, and the fractal dimension. Discusses how models can be misleading. (Contains 10 references.) (MDH)

  16. Fractal Patterns and Chaos Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaney, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Teachers incorporate the chaos game and the concept of a fractal into various areas of the algebra and geometry curriculum. The chaos game approach to fractals provides teachers with an opportunity to help students comprehend the geometry of affine transformations.

  17. Building Fractal Models with Manipulatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coes, Loring

    1993-01-01

    Uses manipulative materials to build and examine geometric models that simulate the self-similarity properties of fractals. Examples are discussed in two dimensions, three dimensions, and the fractal dimension. Discusses how models can be misleading. (Contains 10 references.) (MDH)

  18. Fractals for Geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleshko, Klaudia; de Jesús Correa López, María; Romero, Alejandro; Ramírez, Victor; Pérez, Olga

    2016-04-01

    The effectiveness of fractal toolbox to capture the scaling or fractal probability distribution, and simply fractal statistics of main hydrocarbon reservoir attributes, was highlighted by Mandelbrot (1995) and confirmed by several researchers (Zhao et al., 2015). Notwithstanding, after more than twenty years, it's still common the opinion that fractals are not useful for the petroleum engineers and especially for Geoengineering (Corbett, 2012). In spite of this negative background, we have successfully applied the fractal and multifractal techniques to our project entitled "Petroleum Reservoir as a Fractal Reactor" (2013 up to now). The distinguishable feature of Fractal Reservoir is the irregular shapes and rough pore/solid distributions (Siler, 2007), observed across a broad range of scales (from SEM to seismic). At the beginning, we have accomplished the detailed analysis of Nelson and Kibler (2003) Catalog of Porosity and Permeability, created for the core plugs of siliciclastic rocks (around ten thousand data were compared). We enriched this Catalog by more than two thousand data extracted from the last ten years publications on PoroPerm (Corbett, 2012) in carbonates deposits, as well as by our own data from one of the PEMEX, Mexico, oil fields. The strong power law scaling behavior was documented for the major part of these data from the geological deposits of contrasting genesis. Based on these results and taking into account the basic principles and models of the Physics of Fractals, introduced by Per Back and Kan Chen (1989), we have developed new software (Muukíl Kaab), useful to process the multiscale geological and geophysical information and to integrate the static geological and petrophysical reservoir models to dynamic ones. The new type of fractal numerical model with dynamical power law relations among the shapes and sizes of mesh' cells was designed and calibrated in the studied area. The statistically sound power law relations were established

  19. Utilizing Fractal Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    Linear concepts of time plus the modern capacity to track history emerged out of circular conceptions characteristic of ancient and traditional cultures. A fractal concept of time lies implicitly within the analog clock, where each moment is treated as unique. With fractal geometry the best descriptor of nature, qualities of self-similarity and scale invariance easily model her endless variety and recursive patterning, both in time and across space. To better manage temporal aspects of our lives, a fractal concept of time is non-reductive, based more on the fullness of being than on fragments of doing. By using a fractal concept of time, each activity or dimension of life is multiply and vertically nested. Each nested cycle remains simultaneously present, operating according to intrinsic dynamics and time scales. By adding the vertical axis of simultaneity to the horizontal axis of length, time is already full and never needs to be filled. To attend to time's vertical dimension is to tap into the imaginary potential for infinite depth. To switch from linear to fractal time allows us to relax into each moment while keeping in mind the whole.

  20. Fractal dynamics of earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, P.; Chen, K.

    1995-05-01

    Many objects in nature, from mountain landscapes to electrical breakdown and turbulence, have a self-similar fractal spatial structure. It seems obvious that to understand the origin of self-similar structures, one must understand the nature of the dynamical processes that created them: temporal and spatial properties must necessarily be completely interwoven. This is particularly true for earthquakes, which have a variety of fractal aspects. The distribution of energy released during earthquakes is given by the Gutenberg-Richter power law. The distribution of epicenters appears to be fractal with dimension D {approx} 1--1.3. The number of after shocks decay as a function of time according to the Omori power law. There have been several attempts to explain the Gutenberg-Richter law by starting from a fractal distribution of faults or stresses. But this is a hen-and-egg approach: to explain the Gutenberg-Richter law, one assumes the existence of another power-law--the fractal distribution. The authors present results of a simple stick slip model of earthquakes, which evolves to a self-organized critical state. Emphasis is on demonstrating that empirical power laws for earthquakes indicate that the Earth`s crust is at the critical state, with no typical time, space, or energy scale. Of course the model is tremendously oversimplified; however in analogy with equilibrium phenomena they do not expect criticality to depend on details of the model (universality).

  1. Fractal radar scattering from soil.

    PubMed

    Oleschko, Klaudia; Korvin, Gabor; Figueroa, Benjamin; Vuelvas, Marco Antonio; Balankin, Alexander S; Flores, Lourdes; Carreón, Dora

    2003-04-01

    A general technique is developed to retrieve the fractal dimension of self-similar soils through microwave (radar) scattering. The technique is based on a mathematical model relating the fractal dimensions of the georadargram to that of the scattering structure. Clear and different fractal signatures have been observed over four geosystems (soils and sediments) compared in this work.

  2. Backbone fractal dimension and fractal hybrid orbital of protein structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xin; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2013-12-01

    Fractal geometry analysis provides a useful and desirable tool to characterize the configuration and structure of proteins. In this paper we examined the fractal properties of 750 folded proteins from four different structural classes, namely (1) the α-class (dominated by α-helices), (2) the β-class (dominated by β-pleated sheets), (3) the (α/β)-class (α-helices and β-sheets alternately mixed) and (4) the (α + β)-class (α-helices and β-sheets largely segregated) by using two fractal dimension methods, i.e. "the local fractal dimension" and "the backbone fractal dimension" (a new and useful quantitative parameter). The results showed that the protein molecules exhibit a fractal behavior in the range of 1 ⩽ N ⩽ 15 (N is the number of the interval between two adjacent amino acid residues), and the value of backbone fractal dimension is distinctly greater than that of local fractal dimension for the same protein. The average value of two fractal dimensions decreased in order of α > α/β > α + β > β. Moreover, the mathematical formula for the hybrid orbital model of protein based on the concept of backbone fractal dimension is in good coincidence with that of the similarity dimension. So it is a very accurate and simple method to analyze the hybrid orbital model of protein by using the backbone fractal dimension.

  3. FRACTAL DIMENSION OF GALAXY ISOPHOTES

    SciTech Connect

    Thanki, Sandip; Rhee, George; Lepp, Stephen E-mail: grhee@physics.unlv.edu

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we investigate the use of the fractal dimension of galaxy isophotes in galaxy classification. We have applied two different methods for determining fractal dimensions to the isophotes of elliptical and spiral galaxies derived from CCD images. We conclude that fractal dimension alone is not a reliable tool but that combined with other parameters in a neural net algorithm the fractal dimension could be of use. In particular, we have used three parameters to segregate the ellipticals and lenticulars from the spiral galaxies in our sample. These three parameters are the correlation fractal dimension D {sub corr}, the difference between the correlation fractal dimension and the capacity fractal dimension D {sub corr} - D {sub cap}, and, thirdly, the B - V color of the galaxy.

  4. A Fractal Excursion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Dane R.

    1991-01-01

    After introducing the two-dimensional Koch curve, which is generated by simple recursions on an equilateral triangle, the process is extended to three dimensions with simple recursions on a regular tetrahedron. Included, for both fractal sequences, are iterative formulae, illustrations of the first several iterations, and a sample PASCAL program.…

  5. Focus on Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Tim K.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a three-lesson unit that uses fractal geometry to measure the coastline of Massachusetts. Two lessons provide hands-on activities utilizing compass and grid methods to perform the measurements and the third lesson analyzes and explains the results of the activities. (MDH)

  6. Fractal geometry of music.

    PubMed Central

    Hsü, K J; Hsü, A J

    1990-01-01

    Music critics have compared Bach's music to the precision of mathematics. What "mathematics" and what "precision" are the questions for a curious scientist. The purpose of this short note is to suggest that the mathematics is, at least in part, Mandelbrot's fractal geometry and the precision is the deviation from a log-log linear plot. PMID:11607061

  7. Multilayer adsorption on fractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Péter; Felinger, Attila

    2014-01-10

    Multilayer adsorption is often observed in liquid chromatography. The most frequently employed model for multilayer adsorption is the BET isotherm equation. In this study we introduce an interpretation of multilayer adsorption measured on liquid chromatographic stationary phases based on the fractal theory. The fractal BET isotherm model was successfully used to determine the apparent fractal dimension of the adsorbent surface. The nonlinear fitting of the fractal BET equation gives us the estimation of the adsorption equilibrium constants and the monolayer saturation capacity of the adsorbent as well. In our experiments, aniline and proline were used as test molecules on reversed phase and normal phase columns, respectively. Our results suggest an apparent fractal dimension 2.88-2.99 in the case of reversed phase adsorbents, in the contrast with a bare silica column with a fractal dimension of 2.54. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fractal dust grains in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.; Peng, R. D.; Liu, Y. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Ye, M. F.; Wang, L.

    2012-09-15

    Fractal dust grains of different shapes are observed in a radially confined magnetized radio frequency plasma. The fractal dimensions of the dust structures in two-dimensional (2D) horizontal dust layers are calculated, and their evolution in the dust growth process is investigated. It is found that as the dust grains grow the fractal dimension of the dust structure decreases. In addition, the fractal dimension of the center region is larger than that of the entire region in the 2D dust layer. In the initial growth stage, the small dust particulates at a high number density in a 2D layer tend to fill space as a normal surface with fractal dimension D = 2. The mechanism of the formation of fractal dust grains is discussed.

  9. Fractals in geology and geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    The definition of a fractal distribution is that the number of objects N with a characteristic size greater than r scales with the relation N of about r exp -D. The frequency-size distributions for islands, earthquakes, fragments, ore deposits, and oil fields often satisfy this relation. This application illustrates a fundamental aspect of fractal distributions, scale invariance. The requirement of an object to define a scale in photograhs of many geological features is one indication of the wide applicability of scale invariance to geological problems; scale invariance can lead to fractal clustering. Geophysical spectra can also be related to fractals; these are self-affine fractals rather than self-similar fractals. Examples include the earth's topography and geoid.

  10. Diffusion on regular random fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarão Reis, Fábio D. A.

    1996-12-01

    We study random walks on structures intermediate to statistical and deterministic fractals called regular random fractals, constructed introducing randomness in the distribution of lacunas of Sierpinski carpets. Random walks are simulated on finite stages of these fractals and the scaling properties of the mean square displacement 0305-4470/29/24/007/img1 of N-step walks are analysed. The anomalous diffusion exponents 0305-4470/29/24/007/img2 obtained are very near the estimates for the carpets with the same dimension. This result motivates a discussion on the influence of some types of lattice irregularity (random structure, dead ends, lacunas) on 0305-4470/29/24/007/img2, based on results on several fractals. We also propose to use these and other regular random fractals as models for real self-similar structures and to generalize results for statistical systems on fractals.

  11. Fractals in geology and geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    The definition of a fractal distribution is that the number of objects N with a characteristic size greater than r scales with the relation N of about r exp -D. The frequency-size distributions for islands, earthquakes, fragments, ore deposits, and oil fields often satisfy this relation. This application illustrates a fundamental aspect of fractal distributions, scale invariance. The requirement of an object to define a scale in photograhs of many geological features is one indication of the wide applicability of scale invariance to geological problems; scale invariance can lead to fractal clustering. Geophysical spectra can also be related to fractals; these are self-affine fractals rather than self-similar fractals. Examples include the earth's topography and geoid.

  12. Fractal surface finish

    SciTech Connect

    Church, E.L.

    1988-04-15

    Surface finish measurements are usually fitted to models of the finish correlation function which are parametrized in terms of root-mean-square roughnesses, sigma, and correlation lengths, l. Highly finished optical surfaces, however, are frequently better described by fractal models, which involve inverse power-law spectra and are parametrized by spectral strengths, K/sub n/, and spectral indices, n. Analyzing measurements of fractal surfaces in terms of sigma and l gives results which are not intrinsic surface parameters but which depend on the bandwidth parameters of the measurement process used. This paper derives expressions for these pseudoparameters and discusses the errors involved in using them for the characterization and specification of surface finish.

  13. Fractal surface finish

    SciTech Connect

    Church, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    Surface finish measurements are usually fitted to models of the finish correlation function which are parameterized in terms of root-mean-square roughness, sigma, and correlation lengths, l. Highly-finished optical surfaces, however, are frequently better described by fractal models, which involve inverse-power-law spectra and are parameterized by spectral strengths, K/sub n/, and spectral indices, n. Analyzing measurements of fractal surfaces in terms of sigma and l gives results which are not intrinsic surface parameters but which depend on the bandwidth parameters of the measurement process used. This paper derives expressions for these pseudo parameters and discusses the errors involved in using them for the characterization and specification of surface finish. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Fractal polyzirconosiloxane cluster coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1992-08-01

    Fractal polyzirconosiloxane (PZS) cluster films were prepared through the hydrolysis-polycondensation-pyrolysis synthesis of two-step HCl acid-NaOH base catalyzed sol precursors consisting of N-[3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl]-4,5-dihydroimidazole, Zr(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4}, methanol, and water. When amorphous PZSs were applied to aluminum as protective coatings against NaCl-induced corrosion, the effective film was that derived from the sol having a pH near the isoelectric point in the positive zeta potential region. The following four factors played an important role in assembling the protective PZS coating films: (1) a proper rate of condensation, (2) a moderate ratio of Si-O-Si to Si-O-Zr linkages formed in the PZS network, (3) hydrophobic characteristics, and (4) a specific microstructural geometry, in which large fractal clusters were linked together.

  15. Fractal polyzirconosiloxane cluster coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1992-01-01

    Fractal polyzirconosiloxane (PZS) cluster films were prepared through the hydrolysis-polycondensation-pyrolysis synthesis of two-step HCl acid-NaOH base catalyzed sol precursors consisting of N-(3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazole, Zr(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4}, methanol, and water. When amorphous PZSs were applied to aluminum as protective coatings against NaCl-induced corrosion, the effective film was that derived from the sol having a pH near the isoelectric point in the positive zeta potential region. The following four factors played an important role in assembling the protective PZS coating films: (1) a proper rate of condensation, (2) a moderate ratio of Si-O-Si to Si-O-Zr linkages formed in the PZS network, (3) hydrophobic characteristics, and (4) a specific microstructural geometry, in which large fractal clusters were linked together.

  16. Fractal rigidity in migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Latka, Dariusz; West, Bruce J.

    2004-04-01

    We study the middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAfv) in humans using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). Scaling properties of time series of the axial flow velocity averaged over a cardiac beat interval may be characterized by two exponents. The short time scaling exponent (STSE) determines the statistical properties of fluctuations of blood flow velocities in short-time intervals while the Hurst exponent describes the long-term fractal properties. In many migraineurs the value of the STSE is significantly reduced and may approach that of the Hurst exponent. This change in dynamical properties reflects the significant loss of short-term adaptability and the overall hyperexcitability of the underlying cerebral blood flow control system. We call this effect fractal rigidity.

  17. Turbulent wakes of fractal objects.

    PubMed

    Staicu, Adrian; Mazzi, Biagio; Vassilicos, J C; van de Water, Willem

    2003-06-01

    Turbulence of a windtunnel flow is stirred using objects that have a fractal structure. The strong turbulent wakes resulting from three such objects which have different fractal dimensions are probed using multiprobe hot-wire anemometry in various configurations. Statistical turbulent quantities are studied within inertial and dissipative range scales in an attempt to relate changes in their self-similar behavior to the scaling of the fractal objects.

  18. Langevin Equation on Fractal Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satin, Seema; Gangal, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze random motion of a particle on a fractal curve, using Langevin approach. This involves defining a new velocity in terms of mass of the fractal curve, as defined in recent work. The geometry of the fractal curve, plays an important role in this analysis. A Langevin equation with a particular model of noise is proposed and solved using techniques of the Fα-Calculus.

  19. Fractal multifiber microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Lee M.; Feller, W. B.; Kenter, Almus T.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and performance of microchannel plates (MCPs) made using fractal tiling mehtods are reviewed. MCPs with 40 mm active areas having near-perfect channel ordering were produced. These plates demonstrated electrical performance characteristics equivalent to conventionally constructed MCPs. These apparently are the first MCPs which have a sufficiently high degree of order to permit single channel addressability. Potential applications for these devices and the prospects for further development are discussed.

  20. Fractals and humor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Demetri

    2015-03-01

    Demetri Maritn prepared this palindromic poem as his project for Michael Frame's fractal geometry class at Yale. Notice the first, fourth, and seventh words in the second and next-to-second lines are palindromes, the first two and last two lines are palindromes, the middle line, "Be still if I fill its ebb" minus its last letter is a palindrome, and the entire poem is a palindrome...

  1. Darwinian Evolution and Fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Paul H.

    2009-05-01

    Did nature's beauty emerge by chance or was it intelligently designed? Richard Dawkins asserts that evolution is blind aimless chance. Michael Behe believes, on the contrary, that the first cell was intelligently designed. The scientific evidence is that nature's creativity arises from the interplay between chance AND design (laws). Darwin's ``Origin of the Species,'' published 150 years ago in 1859, characterized evolution as the interplay between variations (symbolized by dice) and the natural selection law (design). This is evident in recent discoveries in DNA, Madelbrot's Fractal Geometry of Nature, and the success of the genetic design algorithm. Algorithms for generating fractals have the same interplay between randomness and law as evolution. Fractal statistics, which are not completely random, characterize such phenomena such as fluctuations in the stock market, the Nile River, rainfall, and tree rings. As chaos theorist Joseph Ford put it: God plays dice, but the dice are loaded. Thus Darwin, in discovering the evolutionary interplay between variations and natural selection, was throwing God's dice!

  2. Fractals in biology and medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havlin, S.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Mantegna, R. N.; Ossadnik, S. M.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    Our purpose is to describe some recent progress in applying fractal concepts to systems of relevance to biology and medicine. We review several biological systems characterized by fractal geometry, with a particular focus on the long-range power-law correlations found recently in DNA sequences containing noncoding material. Furthermore, we discuss the finding that the exponent alpha quantifying these long-range correlations ("fractal complexity") is smaller for coding than for noncoding sequences. We also discuss the application of fractal scaling analysis to the dynamics of heartbeat regulation, and report the recent finding that the normal heart is characterized by long-range "anticorrelations" which are absent in the diseased heart.

  3. Fractals in physiology and medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; West, Bruce J.

    1987-01-01

    The paper demonstrates how the nonlinear concepts of fractals, as applied in physiology and medicine, can provide an insight into the organization of such complex structures as the tracheobronchial tree and heart, as well as into the dynamics of healthy physiological variability. Particular attention is given to the characteristics of computer-generated fractal lungs and heart and to fractal pathologies in these organs. It is shown that alterations in fractal scaling may underlie a number of pathophysiological disturbances, including sudden cardiac death syndromes.

  4. Fractals in biology and medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havlin, S.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Mantegna, R. N.; Ossadnik, S. M.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    Our purpose is to describe some recent progress in applying fractal concepts to systems of relevance to biology and medicine. We review several biological systems characterized by fractal geometry, with a particular focus on the long-range power-law correlations found recently in DNA sequences containing noncoding material. Furthermore, we discuss the finding that the exponent alpha quantifying these long-range correlations ("fractal complexity") is smaller for coding than for noncoding sequences. We also discuss the application of fractal scaling analysis to the dynamics of heartbeat regulation, and report the recent finding that the normal heart is characterized by long-range "anticorrelations" which are absent in the diseased heart.

  5. Dimension of fractal basin boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Park, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    In many dynamical systems, multiple attractors coexist for certain parameter ranges. The set of initial conditions that asymptotically approach each attractor is its basin of attraction. These basins can be intertwined on arbitrary small scales. Basin boundary can be either smooth or fractal. Dynamical systems that have fractal basin boundary show final state sensitivity of the initial conditions. A measure of this sensitivity (uncertainty exponent {alpha}) is related to the dimension of the basin boundary d = D - {alpha}, where D is the dimension of the phase space and d is the dimension of the basin boundary. At metamorphosis values of the parameter, there might happen a conversion from smooth to fractal basin boundary (smooth-fractal metamorphosis) or a conversion from fractal to another fractal basin boundary characteristically different from the previous fractal one (fractal-fractal metamorphosis). The dimension changes continuously with the parameter except at the metamorphosis values where the dimension of the basin boundary jumps discontinuously. We chose the Henon map and the forced damped pendulum to investigate this. Scaling of the basin volumes near the metamorphosis values of the parameter is also being studied for the Henon map. Observations are explained analytically by using low dimensional model map.

  6. Investigating Fractal Geometry Using LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses dimensionality in Euclidean geometry. Presents methods to produce fractals using LOGO. Uses the idea of self-similarity. Included are program listings and suggested extension activities. (MVL)

  7. Fractals in physiology and medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; West, Bruce J.

    1987-01-01

    The paper demonstrates how the nonlinear concepts of fractals, as applied in physiology and medicine, can provide an insight into the organization of such complex structures as the tracheobronchial tree and heart, as well as into the dynamics of healthy physiological variability. Particular attention is given to the characteristics of computer-generated fractal lungs and heart and to fractal pathologies in these organs. It is shown that alterations in fractal scaling may underlie a number of pathophysiological disturbances, including sudden cardiac death syndromes.

  8. Fractal analysis: methodologies for biomedical researchers.

    PubMed

    Ristanović, Dusan; Milosević, Nebojsa T

    2012-01-01

    Fractal analysis has become a popular method in all branches of scientific investigations including biology and medicine. Although there is a growing interest in the application of fractal analysis in biological sciences, questions about the methodology of fractal analysis have partly restricted its wider and comprehensible application. It is a notable fact that fractal analysis is derived from fractal geometry, but there are some unresolved issues that need to be addressed. In this respect, we discuss several related underlying principles for fractal analysis and establish the meaningful relationship between fractal analysis and fractal geometry. Since some concepts in fractal analysis are determined descriptively and/or qualitatively, this paper provides their exact mathematical definitions or explanations. Another aim of this study is to show that nowadays fractal analysis is an independent mathematical and experimental method based on Mandelbrot's fractal geometry, Euclidean traditiontal geometry and Richardson's coastline method.

  9. [Fractal art in separative sciences].

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Y C

    2002-01-01

    Fractal geometry has provided a mathematical formalism for describing complex and dynamical structures. It has been applied successfully in a variety of areas such as astronomy, economics and biology. Because of its success in such a variety of areas it is natural to develop fractal application in separative sciences.

  10. The nature of fractal music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, Harlan J.

    2015-03-01

    Benoit Mandelbrot always had a strong feeling that music could be viewed from a fractal perspective. However, without our eyes to guide us, how do we gain this perspective? Here we discuss precisely what it means to say that a piece of music is fractal.

  11. A Double-Minded Fractal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a fun activity of generating a double-minded fractal image for a linear algebra class once the idea of rotation and scaling matrices are introduced. In particular the fractal flip-flops between two words, depending on the level at which the image is viewed. (Contains 5 figures.)

  12. A Double-Minded Fractal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a fun activity of generating a double-minded fractal image for a linear algebra class once the idea of rotation and scaling matrices are introduced. In particular the fractal flip-flops between two words, depending on the level at which the image is viewed. (Contains 5 figures.)

  13. Terahertz spectroscopy of plasmonic fractals.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, A; Matsui, T; Zhu, W; Nahata, A; Vardeny, Z V

    2009-03-20

    We use terahertz time-domain spectroscopy to study the transmission properties of metallic films perforated with aperture arrays having deterministic or stochastic fractal morphologies ("plasmonic fractals"), and compare them with random aperture arrays. All of the measured plasmonic fractals show transmission resonances and antiresonances at frequencies that correspond to prominent features in their structure factors in k space. However, in sharp contrast to periodic aperture arrays, the resonant transmission enhancement decreases with increasing array size. This property is explained using a density-density correlation function, and is utilized for determining the underlying fractal dimensionality, D(<2). Furthermore, a sum rule for the transmission resonances and antiresonances in plasmonic fractals relative to the transmission of the corresponding random aperture arrays is obtained, and is shown to be universal.

  14. Fractals analysis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohammed

    2005-09-06

    Heart rhythms are generated by complex self-regulating systems governed by the laws of chaos. Consequently, heart rhythms have fractal organization, characterized by self-similar dynamics with long-range order operating over multiple time scales. This allows for the self-organization and adaptability of heart rhythms under stress. Breakdown of this fractal organization into excessive order or uncorrelated randomness leads to a less-adaptable system, characteristic of aging and disease. With the tools of nonlinear dynamics, this fractal breakdown can be quantified with potential applications to diagnostic and prognostic clinical assessment. In this paper, I review the methodologies for fractal analysis of cardiac rhythms and the current literature on their applications in the clinical context. A brief overview of the basic mathematics of fractals is also included. Furthermore, I illustrate the usefulness of these powerful tools to clinical medicine by describing a novel noninvasive technique to monitor drug therapy in atrial fibrillation.

  15. Contour fractal analysis of grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, Giulia; Casini, Francesca; Viggiani, Giulia MB

    2017-06-01

    Fractal analysis has been shown to be useful in image processing to characterise the shape and the grey-scale complexity in different applications spanning from electronic to medical engineering (e.g. [1]). Fractal analysis consists of several methods to assign a dimension and other fractal characteristics to a dataset describing geometric objects. Limited studies have been conducted on the application of fractal analysis to the classification of the shape characteristics of soil grains. The main objective of the work described in this paper is to obtain, from the results of systematic fractal analysis of artificial simple shapes, the characterization of the particle morphology at different scales. The long term objective of the research is to link the microscopic features of granular media with the mechanical behaviour observed in the laboratory and in situ.

  16. Jupiter Fractal Art

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-10

    See Jupiter's Great Red Spot as you've never seen it before in this new Jovian work of art. Artist Mik Petter created this unique, digital artwork using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft. The art form, known as fractals, uses mathematical formulas to create art with an infinite variety of form, detail, color and light. The tumultuous atmospheric zones in and around the Great Red Spot are highlighted by the author's use of colorful fractals. Vibrant colors of various tints and hues, combined with the almost organic-seeming shapes, make this image seem to be a colorized and crowded petri dish of microorganisms, or a close-up view of microscopic and wildly-painted seashells. The original JunoCam image was taken on July 10, 2017 at 7:10 p.m. PDT (10:10 p.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed its seventh close flyby of Jupiter. The spacecraft captured the image from about 8,648 miles (13,917 kilometers) above the tops of the clouds of the planet at a latitude of -32.6 degrees. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21777

  17. Bone fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Feltrin, Gian Pietro; Stramare, Roberto; Miotto, Diego; Giacomini, Dario; Saccavini, Claudio

    2004-06-01

    Fractal analysis is a quantitative method used to evaluate complex anatomic findings in their elementary component. Its application to biologic images, particularly to cancellous bones, has been well practiced within the past few years. The aims of these applications are to assess changes in bone and the loss of spongious architecture, indicate bone fragility, and to show the increased risk for fracture in primary or secondary osteoporosis. The applications are very promising to help complete the studies that can define bone density (bone mineral density by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry or quantitative computed tomography), and also have the capacity to distinguish the patients with a high or low risk for fracture. Their extension to the clinical fields, to define a test for fracture risk, is still limited by difficult application to the medical quantitative imaging of bones, between correct application at superficial bones and unreliable application to deep bones. The future evolution and validity do not depend upon fractal methods but upon well-detailed imaging of the bones in clinical conditions.

  18. Fractal structure of asphaltene aggregates.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Nazmul H G; Dabros, Tadeusz; Masliyah, Jacob H

    2005-05-15

    A photographic technique coupled with image analysis was used to measure the size and fractal dimension of asphaltene aggregates formed in toluene-heptane solvent mixtures. First, asphaltene aggregates were examined in a Couette device and the fractal-like aggregate structures were quantified using boundary fractal dimension. The evolution of the floc structure with time was monitored. The relative rates of shear-induced aggregation and fragmentation/restructuring determine the steady-state floc structure. The average floc structure became more compact or more organized as the floc size distribution attained steady state. Moreover, the higher the shear rate is, the more compact the floc structure is at steady state. Second, the fractal dimensions of asphaltene aggregates were also determined in a free-settling test. The experimentally determined terminal settling velocities and characteristic lengths of the aggregates were utilized to estimate the 2D and 3D fractal dimensions. The size-density fractal dimension (D(3)) of the asphaltene aggregates was estimated to be in the range from 1.06 to 1.41. This relatively low fractal dimension suggests that the asphaltene aggregates are highly porous and very tenuous. The aggregates have a structure with extremely low space-filling capacity.

  19. Target Detection Using Fractal Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, J. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The concepts and theory of fractal geometry were applied to the problem of segmenting a 256 x 256 pixel image so that manmade objects could be extracted from natural backgrounds. The two most important measurements necessary to extract these manmade objects were fractal dimension and lacunarity. Provision was made to pass the manmade portion to a lookup table for subsequent identification. A computer program was written to construct cloud backgrounds of fractal dimensions which were allowed to vary between 2.2 and 2.8. Images of three model space targets were combined with these backgrounds to provide a data set for testing the validity of the approach. Once the data set was constructed, computer programs were written to extract estimates of the fractal dimension and lacunarity on 4 x 4 pixel subsets of the image. It was shown that for clouds of fractal dimension 2.7 or less, appropriate thresholding on fractal dimension and lacunarity yielded a 64 x 64 edge-detected image with all or most of the cloud background removed. These images were enhanced by an erosion and dilation to provide the final image passed to the lookup table. While the ultimate goal was to pass the final image to a neural network for identification, this work shows the applicability of fractal geometry to the problems of image segmentation, edge detection and separating a target of interest from a natural background.

  20. The fractal geometry of life.

    PubMed

    Losa, Gabriele A

    2009-01-01

    The extension of the concepts of Fractal Geometry (Mandelbrot [1983]) toward the life sciences has led to significant progress in understanding complex functional properties and architectural / morphological / structural features characterising cells and tissues during ontogenesis and both normal and pathological development processes. It has even been argued that fractal geometry could provide a coherent description of the design principles underlying living organisms (Weibel [1991]). Fractals fulfil a certain number of theoretical and methodological criteria including a high level of organization, shape irregularity, functional and morphological self-similarity, scale invariance, iterative pathways and a peculiar non-integer fractal dimension [FD]. Whereas mathematical objects are deterministic invariant or self-similar over an unlimited range of scales, biological components are statistically self-similar only within a fractal domain defined by upper and lower limits, called scaling window, in which the relationship between the scale of observation and the measured size or length of the object can be established (Losa and Nonnenmacher [1996]). Selected examples will contribute to depict complex biological shapes and structures as fractal entities, and also to show why the application of the fractal principle is valuable for measuring dimensional, geometrical and functional parameters of cells, tissues and organs occurring within the vegetal and animal realms. If the criteria for a strict description of natural fractals are met, then it follows that a Fractal Geometry of Life may be envisaged and all natural objects and biological systems exhibiting self-similar patterns and scaling properties may be considered as belonging to the new subdiscipline of "fractalomics".

  1. The transience of virtual fractals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R P

    2012-01-01

    Artists have a long and fruitful tradition of exploiting electronic media to convert static images into dynamic images that evolve with time. Fractal patterns serve as an example: computers allow the observer to zoom in on virtual images and so experience the endless repetition of patterns in a matter that cannot be matched using static images. This year's featured cover artist, Susan Lowedermilk, instead plans to employ persistence of human vision to bring virtual fractals to life. This will be done by incorporating her prints of fractal patterns into zoetropes and phenakistoscopes.

  2. Exterior dimension of fat fractals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebogi, C.; Mcdonald, S. W.; Ott, E.; Yorke, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Geometric scaling properties of fat fractal sets (fractals with finite volume) are discussed and characterized via the introduction of a new dimension-like quantity which is called the exterior dimension. In addition, it is shown that the exterior dimension is related to the 'uncertainty exponent' previously used in studies of fractal basin boundaries, and it is shown how this connection can be exploited to determine the exterior dimension. Three illustrative applications are described, two in nonlinear dynamics and one dealing with blood flow in the body. Possible relevance to porous materials and ballistic driven aggregation is also noted.

  3. Fractal features of seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caserta, A.; Consolini, G.; Michelis, P. De

    2003-04-01

    We present experimental observations and data analysis concerning the fractal features of seismic noise in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 40 Hz. In detail, we investigate the 3D average squared soil displacement and the distribution function of its fluctuations for different near-surface geological structures. We found that the seismic noise is consistent with a persistent fractal brownian motion characterized by a Hurst exponent grather than 1/2. Moreover, a clear dependence of the fractal nature of the seismic noise on the near-surface local geology has been found.

  4. Thermal collapse of snowflake fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, T.; Jurjiu, A.; Biscarini, F.; Volta, A.; Zerbetto, F.

    2012-08-01

    Snowflakes are thermodynamically unstable structures that would ultimately become ice balls. To investigate their dynamics, we mapped atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of small ice crystals - built as filled von Koch fractals - onto a discrete-time random walk model. Then the walkers explored the thermal evolution of high fractal generations. The in silico experiments showed that the evolution is not entirely random. The flakes step down one fractal generation before forfeiting their architecture. The effect may be used to trace the thermal history of snow.

  5. Thermodynamics of Photons on Fractals

    SciTech Connect

    Akkermans, Eric; Dunne, Gerald V.; Teplyaev, Alexander

    2010-12-03

    A thermodynamical treatment of a massless scalar field (a photon) confined to a fractal spatial manifold leads to an equation of state relating pressure to internal energy, PV{sub s}=U/d{sub s}, where d{sub s} is the spectral dimension and V{sub s} defines the 'spectral volume'. For regular manifolds, V{sub s} coincides with the usual geometric spatial volume, but on a fractal this is not necessarily the case. This is further evidence that on a fractal, momentum space can have a different dimension than position space. Our analysis also provides a natural definition of the vacuum (Casimir) energy of a fractal. We suggest ways that these unusual properties might be probed experimentally.

  6. Fractal analysis of Mesoamerican pyramids.

    PubMed

    Burkle-Elizondo, Gerardo; Valdez-Cepeda, Ricardo David

    2006-01-01

    A myth of ancient cultural roots was integrated into Mesoamerican cult, and the reference to architecture denoted a depth religious symbolism. The pyramids form a functional part of this cosmovision that is centered on sacralization. The space architecture works was an expression of the ideological necessities into their conception of harmony. The symbolism of the temple structures seems to reflect the mathematical order of the Universe. We contemplate two models of fractal analysis. The first one includes 16 pyramids. We studied a data set that was treated as a fractal profile to estimate the Df through variography (Dv). The estimated Fractal Dimension Dv = 1.383 +/- 0.211. In the second one we studied a data set to estimate the Dv of 19 pyramids and the estimated Fractal Dimension Dv = 1.229 +/- 0.165.

  7. Steady laminar flow of fractal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Mena, Baltasar; Susarrey, Orlando; Samayoa, Didier

    2017-02-01

    We study laminar flow of a fractal fluid in a cylindrical tube. A flow of the fractal fluid is mapped into a homogeneous flow in a fractional dimensional space with metric induced by the fractal topology. The equations of motion for an incompressible Stokes flow of the Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. It is found that the radial distribution for the velocity in a steady Poiseuille flow of a fractal fluid is governed by the fractal metric of the flow, whereas the pressure distribution along the flow direction depends on the fractal topology of flow, as well as on the fractal metric. The radial distribution of the fractal fluid velocity in a steady Couette flow between two concentric cylinders is also derived.

  8. Applications of fractals in ecology.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, G; M May, R

    1990-03-01

    Fractal models describe the geometry of a wide variety of natural objects such as coastlines, island chains, coral reefs, satellite ocean-color images and patches of vegetation. Cast in the form of modified diffusion models, they can mimic natural and artificial landscapes having different types of complexity of shape. This article provides a brief introduction to fractals and reports on how they can be used by ecologists to answer a variety of basic questions, about scale, measurement and hierarchy in, ecological systems.

  9. Fractal pattern of canine trichoblastoma.

    PubMed

    De Vico, Gionata; Cataldi, Marielda; Maiolino, Paola; Carella, Francesca; Beltraminelli, Stefano; Losa, Gabriele A

    2011-06-01

    To assess by fractal analysis the specific architecture, growth pattern, and tissue distribution that characterize subtypes of canine trichoblastoma, a benign tumor derived from or reduplicating the primitive hair germ of embryonic follicular development. Tumor masks and outlines obtained from immunohistologic images by gray threshold segmentation of epithelial components were analyzed by fractal and conventional morphometry. The fractal dimension [FD] of each investigated case was determined from the slope of the regression line describing the fractal region within a bi-asymptotic curve experimentally established. All tumor masks and outlines obtained by gray threshold segmentation of epithelial components showed fractal self-similar properties that were evaluated by peculiar FDs. However, only masks revealed significantly different FD values, ranging from 1.75 to 1.85, enabling the discrimination of canine trichoblastoma subtypes. The FD data suggest that an iterative morphogenetic process, involving both the air germ and associated dermal papilla, may be responsible of the peculiar tissue architecture of trichoblastoma. The present study emphasized the reliability of fractal analysis in achieving the objective characterization of canine trichoblastoma.

  10. Diffusion, Dispersion, and Uncertainty in Anisotropic Fractal Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnig, N. D.; Benson, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Motivated by field measurements of aquifer hydraulic conductivity (K), recent techniques were developed to construct anisotropic fractal random fields, in which the scaling, or self-similarity parameter, varies with direction and is defined by a matrix. Ensemble numerical results are analyzed for solute transport through these 2-D "operator-scaling" fractional Brownian motion (fBm) ln(K) fields. Contrary to some analytic stochastic theories for monofractal K fields, the plume growth rates never exceed Mercado's (1967) purely stratified aquifer growth rate of plume apparent dispersivity proportional to mean distance. Apparent super-stratified growth must be the result of other demonstrable factors, such as initial plume size. The addition of large local dispersion and diffusion does not significantly change the effective longitudinal dispersivity of the plumes. In the presence of significant local dispersion or diffusion, the concentration coefficient of variation CV={σc}/{\\langle c \\rangle} remains large at the leading edge of the plumes. This indicates that even with considerable mixing due to dispersion or diffusion, there is still substantial uncertainty in the leading edge of a plume moving in fractal porous media.

  11. Fractal processes in soil water retention

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, S.W.; Wheatcraft, S.W. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors propose a physical conceptual model for soil texture and pore structure that is based on the concept of fractal geometry. The motivation for a fractal model of soil texture is that some particle size distributions in granular soils have already been shown to display self-similar scaling that is typical of fractal objects. Hence it is reasonable to expect that pore size distributions may also display fractal scaling properties. The paradigm that they used for the soil pore size distribution is the Sierpinski carpet, which is a fractal that contains self similar holes (or pores) over a wide range of scales. The authors evaluate the water retention properties of regular and random Sierpinski carpets and relate these properties directly to the Brooks and Corey (or Campbell) empirical water retention model. They relate the water retention curves directly to the fractal dimension of the Sierpinski carpet and show that the fractal dimension strongly controls the water retention properties of the Sierpinski carpet soil. Higher fractal dimensions are shown to mimic clay-type soils, with very slow dewatering characteristics and relatively low fractal dimensions are shown to mimic a sandy soil with relatively rapid dewatering characteristics. Their fractal model of soil water retention removes the empirical fitting parameters from the soil water retention models and provides paramters which are intrinsic to the nature of the fractal porous structure. The relative permeability functions of Burdine and Mualem are also shown to be fractal directly from fractal water retention results.

  12. The topological insulator in a fractal space

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Yan-Yang; Li, Shu-Shen

    2014-06-09

    We investigate the band structures and transport properties of a two-dimensional model of topological insulator, with a fractal edge or a fractal bulk. A fractal edge does not affect the robust transport even when the fractal pattern has reached the resolution of the atomic-scale, because the bulk is still well insulating against backscattering. On the other hand, a fractal bulk can support the robust transport only when the fractal resolution is much larger than a critical size. Smaller resolution of bulk fractal pattern will lead to remarkable backscattering and localization, due to strong couplings of opposite edge states on narrow sub-edges which appear almost everywhere in the fractal bulk.

  13. Fractal study and simulation of fracture roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Bodvarsson, G.S. )

    1990-05-01

    This study examines the roughness profiles of the surfaces of fractures and faults by using concepts from fractal geometry. Relationships between fractal characteristics of profiles and isotropic surfaces are analytically developed and a deterministic representation of the roughness is examined.

  14. Analysis of fractals with combined partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedovich, T. G.; Tokarev, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    The space—time properties in the general theory of relativity, as well as the discreteness and non-Archimedean property of space in the quantum theory of gravitation, are discussed. It is emphasized that the properties of bodies in non-Archimedean spaces coincide with the properties of the field of P-adic numbers and fractals. It is suggested that parton showers, used for describing interactions between particles and nuclei at high energies, have a fractal structure. A mechanism of fractal formation with combined partition is considered. The modified SePaC method is offered for the analysis of such fractals. The BC, PaC, and SePaC methods for determining a fractal dimension and other fractal characteristics (numbers of levels and values of a base of forming a fractal) are considered. It is found that the SePaC method has advantages for the analysis of fractals with combined partition.

  15. Fractal structures in nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Jacobo; Viana, Ricardo L.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the striking beauty inherent in their complex nature, fractals have become a fundamental ingredient of nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory since they were defined in the 1970s. Moreover, fractals have been detected in nature and in most fields of science, with even a certain influence in the arts. Fractal structures appear naturally in dynamical systems, in particular associated with the phase space. The analysis of these structures is especially useful for obtaining information about the future behavior of complex systems, since they provide fundamental knowledge about the relation between these systems and uncertainty and indeterminism. Dynamical systems are divided into two main groups: Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. The concepts of the attractor and basin of attraction are related to dissipative systems. In the case of open Hamiltonian systems, there are no attractors, but the analogous concepts of the exit and exit basin exist. Therefore basins formed by initial conditions can be computed in both Hamiltonian and dissipative systems, some of them being smooth and some fractal. This fact has fundamental consequences for predicting the future of the system. The existence of this deterministic unpredictability, usually known as final state sensitivity, is typical of chaotic systems, and makes deterministic systems become, in practice, random processes where only a probabilistic approach is possible. The main types of fractal basin, their nature, and the numerical and experimental techniques used to obtain them from both mathematical models and real phenomena are described here, with special attention to their ubiquity in different fields of physics.

  16. The fractal aggregation of asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Hoepfner, Michael P; Fávero, Cláudio Vilas Bôas; Haji-Akbari, Nasim; Fogler, H Scott

    2013-07-16

    This paper discusses time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering results that were used to investigate asphaltene structure and stability with and without a precipitant added in both crude oil and model oil. A novel approach was used to isolate the scattering from asphaltenes that are insoluble and in the process of aggregating from those that are soluble. It was found that both soluble and insoluble asphaltenes form fractal clusters in crude oil and the fractal dimension of the insoluble asphaltene clusters is higher than that of the soluble clusters. Adding heptane also increases the size of soluble asphaltene clusters without modifying the fractal dimension. Understanding the process of insoluble asphaltenes forming fractals with higher fractal dimensions will potentially reveal the microscopic asphaltene destabilization mechanism (i.e., how a precipitant modifies asphaltene-asphaltene interactions). It was concluded that because of the polydisperse nature of asphaltenes, no well-defined asphaltene phase stability envelope exists and small amounts of asphaltenes precipitated even at dilute precipitant concentrations. Asphaltenes that are stable in a crude oil-precipitant mixture are dispersed on the nanometer length scale. An asphaltene precipitation mechanism is proposed that is consistent with the experimental findings. Additionally, it was found that the heptane-insoluble asphaltene fraction is the dominant source of small-angle scattering in crude oil and the previously unobtainable asphaltene solubility at low heptane concentrations was measured.

  17. Synthesis, Analysis, and Processing of Fractal Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    fractal dimension of the underlying signal , when defined. Robust estimation of the fractal dimension of 1/f processes is important in a number of...modeling errors. The resulting parameter estimation algorithms, which compute both fractal dimension parameters and the accompanying signal and noise...Synthesis, Analysis, and Processing of Fractal Signals RLE Technical Report No. 566 Gregory W. Wornell October 1991 Research Laboratory of

  18. A Novel Triangular Shaped UWB Fractal Antenna Using Circular Slot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahu, Babu Lal; Pal, Srikanta; Chattoraj, Neela

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the design of triangular shaped fractal based antenna with circular slot for ultra wideband (UWB) application. The antenna is fed using microstrip line and has overall dimension of 24×24×1.6 mm3. The proposed antenna is covering the wide frequency bandwidth of 2.99-11.16 GHz and is achieved using simple fractal based triangular-circular geometries and asymmetrical ground plane. The antenna is designed and parametrical studies are performed using method of moment (MOM) based Full Wave Electromagnetic (EM) software Simulator Zeland IE3D. The prototype of proposed antenna is fabricated and tested to compare the simulated and measured results of various antenna parameters. The antenna has good impedance bandwidth, nearly constant gain and stable radiation pattern. Measured return loss shows fair agreement with simulated one. Also measured group delay variation obtained is less than 1.0 ns, which proves good time domain behavior of the proposed antenna.

  19. A Novel Triangular Shaped UWB Fractal Antenna Using Circular Slot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahu, Babu Lal; Pal, Srikanta; Chattoraj, Neela

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the design of triangular shaped fractal based antenna with circular slot for ultra wideband (UWB) application. The antenna is fed using microstrip line and has overall dimension of 24×24×1.6 mm3. The proposed antenna is covering the wide frequency bandwidth of 2.99-11.16 GHz and is achieved using simple fractal based triangular-circular geometries and asymmetrical ground plane. The antenna is designed and parametrical studies are performed using method of moment (MOM) based Full Wave Electromagnetic (EM) software Simulator Zeland IE3D. The prototype of proposed antenna is fabricated and tested to compare the simulated and measured results of various antenna parameters. The antenna has good impedance bandwidth, nearly constant gain and stable radiation pattern. Measured return loss shows fair agreement with simulated one. Also measured group delay variation obtained is less than 1.0 ns, which proves good time domain behavior of the proposed antenna.

  20. Fractal characterization of fracture surfaces in concrete

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saouma, V.E.; Barton, C.C.; Gamaleldin, N.A.

    1990-01-01

    Fractal geometry is used to characterize the roughness of cracked concrete surfaces through a specially built profilometer, and the fractal dimension is subsequently correlated to the fracture toughness and direction of crack propagation. Preliminary results indicate that the fracture surface is indeed fractal over two orders of magnitudes with a dimension of approximately 1.20. ?? 1990.

  1. Fractal analysis of time varying data

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Sadana, Ajit

    2002-01-01

    Characteristics of time varying data, such as an electrical signal, are analyzed by converting the data from a temporal domain into a spatial domain pattern. Fractal analysis is performed on the spatial domain pattern, thereby producing a fractal dimension D.sub.F. The fractal dimension indicates the regularity of the time varying data.

  2. Image Segmentation via Fractal Dimension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    statistical expectation K = a proportionality constant H = the Hurst exponent , in interval [0,1] (14:249) Eq (4) is a mathematical generalization of...ease, negatively correlated (24:16). The Hurst exponent is directly related to the fractal diment.ion of the process being modelled by the relation (24...24) DzE.I -H (5) where D = the fractal dimension E m the Euclidean dimension H = the Hurst exponent The effect of N1 on a typical trace can be seen

  3. Fractal universe and quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2010-06-25

    We propose a field theory which lives in fractal spacetime and is argued to be Lorentz invariant, power-counting renormalizable, ultraviolet finite, and causal. The system flows from an ultraviolet fixed point, where spacetime has Hausdorff dimension 2, to an infrared limit coinciding with a standard four-dimensional field theory. Classically, the fractal world where fields live exchanges energy momentum with the bulk with integer topological dimension. However, the total energy momentum is conserved. We consider the dynamics and the propagator of a scalar field. Implications for quantum gravity, cosmology, and the cosmological constant are discussed.

  4. Fractal aggregates in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabane, M.; Rannou, P.; Chassefiere, E.; Israel, G.

    1993-04-01

    The cluster structure of Titan's atmosphere was modeled by using an Eulerian microphysical model with the specific formulation of microphysical laws applying to fractal particles. The growth of aggregates in the settling phase was treated by introducing the fractal dimension as a parameter of the model. The model was used to obtain a vertical distribution of size and number density of the aggregates for different production altitudes. Results confirm previous estimates of the formation altitude of photochemical aerosols. The vertical profile of the effective radius of aggregates was calculated as a function of the visible optical depth.

  5. Hydrodynamic behavior of fractal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltzius, Pierre

    1987-02-01

    Measurements of the radius of gyration RG and the hydrodynamic radius RH of colloidal silica aggregates are reported. These aggregates have fractal geometry and RH is proportional to RG for 500 Å<=RH<=7000 Å, with a ratio RH/RG=0.72+/-0.02. The results are compared with predictions for macromolecules of various shapes. The proportionality of the two radii can be understood with use of the pair correlation function of fractal objects and hydrodynamic interactions on the Oseen level. The value of the ratio remains to be explained.

  6. Roughness Perception of Haptically Displayed Fractal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Michael A.; Cutkosky, Mark R.; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Surface profiles were generated by a fractal algorithm and haptically rendered on a force feedback joystick, Subjects were asked to use the joystick to explore pairs of surfaces and report to the experimenter which of the surfaces they felt was rougher. Surfaces were characterized by their root mean square (RMS) amplitude and their fractal dimension. The most important factor affecting the perceived roughness of the fractal surfaces was the RMS amplitude of the surface. When comparing surfaces of fractal dimension 1.2-1.35 it was found that the fractal dimension was negatively correlated with perceived roughness.

  7. Astrophysical fractals - An overview and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdang, J.

    1990-01-01

    Different astrophysical circumstances under which fractal structures have been identified so far, or are likely to be identified in the future, are reviewed. The observed fractals can be classified into 2 main groups: (1) fractal configurations in space-time, materializing as fractals defined over the time axis at a given position in space, or over the physical configuration space at a fixed instant in time; and (2) fractals in parameter spaces. The theoretical interpretation of the origin of the spatial fractal geometry of the most conspicuous 'irregular' astronomical bodies is still wanting in the context of standard continuum models. In contrast, the less conventional discrete models (cellular automata) naturally produce such spatially fractal structures.

  8. Astrophysical fractals - An overview and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdang, J.

    1990-01-01

    Different astrophysical circumstances under which fractal structures have been identified so far, or are likely to be identified in the future, are reviewed. The observed fractals can be classified into 2 main groups: (1) fractal configurations in space-time, materializing as fractals defined over the time axis at a given position in space, or over the physical configuration space at a fixed instant in time; and (2) fractals in parameter spaces. The theoretical interpretation of the origin of the spatial fractal geometry of the most conspicuous 'irregular' astronomical bodies is still wanting in the context of standard continuum models. In contrast, the less conventional discrete models (cellular automata) naturally produce such spatially fractal structures.

  9. Emergence of fractal scaling in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-09-01

    Some real-world networks are shown to be fractal or self-similar. It is widespread that such a phenomenon originates from the repulsion between hubs or disassortativity. Here we show that this common belief fails to capture the causality. Our key insight to address it is to pinpoint links critical to fractality. Those links with small edge betweenness centrality (BC) constitute a special architecture called fractal reference system, which gives birth to the fractal structure of those reported networks. In contrast, a small amount of links with high BC enable small-world effects, hiding the intrinsic fractality. With enough of such links removed, fractal scaling spontaneously arises from nonfractal networks. Our results provide a multiple-scale view on the structure and dynamics and place fractality as a generic organizing principle of complex networks on a firmer ground.

  10. Emergence of fractal scaling in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-09-01

    Some real-world networks are shown to be fractal or self-similar. It is widespread that such a phenomenon originates from the repulsion between hubs or disassortativity. Here we show that this common belief fails to capture the causality. Our key insight to address it is to pinpoint links critical to fractality. Those links with small edge betweenness centrality (BC) constitute a special architecture called fractal reference system, which gives birth to the fractal structure of those reported networks. In contrast, a small amount of links with high BC enable small-world effects, hiding the intrinsic fractality. With enough of such links removed, fractal scaling spontaneously arises from nonfractal networks. Our results provide a multiple-scale view on the structure and dynamics and place fractality as a generic organizing principle of complex networks on a firmer ground.

  11. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  12. Exploring Fractal Geometry with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nancy Nesbitt

    1999-01-01

    Heightens the awareness of elementary school teachers, teacher educators, and teacher-education researchers of possible applications of fractal geometry with children and, subsequently, initiates discussion about the appropriateness of including this new mathematics in the elementary curriculum. Presents activities for exploring children's…

  13. Fractal Characterization of Hyperspectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Hon-Iie; Lam, Nina Siu-Ngan; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Gamon, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Two Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) hyperspectral images selected from the Los Angeles area, one representing urban and the other, rural, were used to examine their spatial complexity across their entire spectrum of the remote sensing data. Using the ICAMS (Image Characterization And Modeling System) software, we computed the fractal dimension values via the isarithm and triangular prism methods for all 224 bands in the two AVIRIS scenes. The resultant fractal dimensions reflect changes in image complexity across the spectral range of the hyperspectral images. Both the isarithm and triangular prism methods detect unusually high D values on the spectral bands that fall within the atmospheric absorption and scattering zones where signature to noise ratios are low. Fractal dimensions for the urban area resulted in higher values than for the rural landscape, and the differences between the resulting D values are more distinct in the visible bands. The triangular prism method is sensitive to a few random speckles in the images, leading to a lower dimensionality. On the contrary, the isarithm method will ignore the speckles and focus on the major variation dominating the surface, thus resulting in a higher dimension. It is seen where the fractal curves plotted for the entire bandwidth range of the hyperspectral images could be used to distinguish landscape types as well as for screening noisy bands.

  14. The Fractal Self at Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author draws on contemporary science to illuminate the relationship between early play experiences, processes of self-development, and the later emergence of the fractal self. She argues that orientation within social space is a primary function of early play and developmentally a two-step process. With other people and with…

  15. Exploring Fractal Geometry with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nancy Nesbitt

    1999-01-01

    Heightens the awareness of elementary school teachers, teacher educators, and teacher-education researchers of possible applications of fractal geometry with children and, subsequently, initiates discussion about the appropriateness of including this new mathematics in the elementary curriculum. Presents activities for exploring children's…

  16. Fractal statistics of cloud fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Joseph, Joachim H.

    1989-01-01

    Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) and Thematic Mapper (TM) data, with 80 and 30 m spatial resolution, respectively, have been employed to study the spatial structure of boundary-layer and intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) clouds. The probability distributions of cloud areas and cloud perimeters are found to approximately follow a power-law, with a different power (i.e., fractal dimension) for each cloud type. They are better approximated by a double power-law behavior, indicating a change in the fractal dimension at a characteristic size which depends upon cloud type. The fractal dimension also changes with threshold. The more intense cloud areas are found to have a higher perimeter fractal dimension, perhaps indicative of the increased turbulence at cloud top. A detailed picture of the inhomogeneous spatial structure of various cloud types will contribute to a better understanding of basic cloud processes, and also has implications for the remote sensing of clouds, for their effects on remote sensing of other parameters, and for the parameterization of clouds in general circulation models, all of which rely upon plane-parallel radiative transfer algorithms.

  17. Fractal morphometry of cell complexity.

    PubMed

    Losa, Gabriele A

    2002-01-01

    Irregularity and self-similarity under scale changes are the main attributes of the morphological complexity of both normal and abnormal cells and tissues. In other words, the shape of a self-similar object does not change when the scale of measurement changes, because each part of it looks similar to the original object. However, the size and geometrical parameters of an irregular object do differ when it is examined at increasing resolution, which reveals more details. Significant progress has been made over the past three decades in understanding how irregular shapes and structures in the physical and biological sciences can be analysed. Dominant influences have been the discovery of a new practical geometry of Nature, now known as fractal geometry, and the continuous improvements in computation capabilities. Unlike conventional Euclidean geometry, which was developed to describe regular and ideal geometrical shapes which are practically unknown in nature, fractal geometry can be used to measure the fractal dimension, contour length, surface area and other dimension parameters of almost all irregular and complex biological tissues. We have used selected examples to illustrate the application of the fractal principle to measuring irregular and complex membrane ultrastructures of cells at specific functional and pathological stage.

  18. Electromagnetic field of fractal distribution of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2005-08-15

    Electric and magnetic fields of fractal distribution of charged particles are considered. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. The fractional integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Using the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equation, the simple examples of the fields of homogeneous fractal distribution are considered. The electric dipole and quadrupole moments for fractal distribution are derived.

  19. Lung cancer-a fractal viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Frances E; Cianci, Gianguido C; Cipriani, Nicole A; Hensing, Thomas A; Zhang, Hannah J; Chen, Chin-Tu; Murgu, Septimiu D; Vokes, Everett E; Vannier, Michael W; Salgia, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Fractals are mathematical constructs that show self-similarity over a range of scales and non-integer (fractal) dimensions. Owing to these properties, fractal geometry can be used to efficiently estimate the geometrical complexity, and the irregularity of shapes and patterns observed in lung tumour growth (over space or time), whereas the use of traditional Euclidean geometry in such calculations is more challenging. The application of fractal analysis in biomedical imaging and time series has shown considerable promise for measuring processes as varied as heart and respiratory rates, neuronal cell characterization, and vascular development. Despite the advantages of fractal mathematics and numerous studies demonstrating its applicability to lung cancer research, many researchers and clinicians remain unaware of its potential. Therefore, this Review aims to introduce the fundamental basis of fractals and to illustrate how analysis of fractal dimension (FD) and associated measurements, such as lacunarity (texture) can be performed. We describe the fractal nature of the lung and explain why this organ is particularly suited to fractal analysis. Studies that have used fractal analyses to quantify changes in nuclear and chromatin FD in primary and metastatic tumour cells, and clinical imaging studies that correlated changes in the FD of tumours on CT and/or PET images with tumour growth and treatment responses are reviewed. Moreover, the potential use of these techniques in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of lung cancer are discussed.

  20. Order-fractal transitions in abstract paintings

    SciTech Connect

    Calleja, E.M. de la; Cervantes, F.; Calleja, J. de la

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we determined the degree of order for 22 Jackson Pollock paintings using the Hausdorff–Besicovitch fractal dimension. Based on the maximum value of each multi-fractal spectrum, the artworks were classified according to the year in which they were painted. It has been reported that Pollock’s paintings are fractal and that this feature was more evident in his later works. However, our results show that the fractal dimension of these paintings ranges among values close to two. We characterize this behavior as a fractal-order transition. Based on the study of disorder-order transition in physical systems, we interpreted the fractal-order transition via the dark paint strokes in Pollock’s paintings as structured lines that follow a power law measured by the fractal dimension. We determined self-similarity in specific paintings, thereby demonstrating an important dependence on the scale of observations. We also characterized the fractal spectrum for the painting entitled Teri’s Find. We obtained similar spectra for Teri’s Find and Number 5, thereby suggesting that the fractal dimension cannot be rejected completely as a quantitative parameter for authenticating these artworks. -- Highlights: •We determined the degree of order in Jackson Pollock paintings using the Hausdorff–Besicovitch dimension. •We detected a fractal-order transition from Pollock’s paintings between 1947 and 1951. •We suggest that Jackson Pollock could have painted Teri’s Find.

  1. Lung cancer—a fractal viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Frances E.; Cianci, Gianguido C.; Cipriani, Nicole A.; Hensing, Thomas A.; Zhang, Hannah J.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Murgu, Septimiu D.; Vokes, Everett E.; W. Vannier, Michael; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Fractals are mathematical constructs that show self-similarity over a range of scales and non-integer (fractal) dimensions. Owing to these properties, fractal geometry can be used to efficiently estimate the geometrical complexity, and the irregularity of shapes and patterns observed in lung tumour growth (over space or time), whereas the use of traditional Euclidean geometry in such calculations is more challenging. The application of fractal analysis in biomedical imaging and time series has shown considerable promise for measuring processes as varied as heart and respiratory rates, neuronal cell characterization, and vascular development. Despite the advantages of fractal mathematics and numerous studies demonstrating its applicability to lung cancer research, many researchers and clinicians remain unaware of its potential. Therefore, this Review aims to introduce the fundamental basis of fractals and to illustrate how analysis of fractal dimension (FD) and associated measurements, such as lacunarity (texture) can be performed. We describe the fractal nature of the lung and explain why this organ is particularly suited to fractal analysis. Studies that have used fractal analyses to quantify changes in nuclear and chromatin FD in primary and metastatic tumour cells, and clinical imaging studies that correlated changes in the FD of tumours on CT and/or PET images with tumour growth and treatment responses are reviewed. Moreover, the potential use of these techniques in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of lung cancer are discussed. PMID:26169924

  2. Fractal patterns of fractures in granites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Velde, B.; Dubois, J.; Moore, D.; Touchard, G.

    1991-01-01

    Fractal measurements using the Cantor's dust method in a linear one-dimensional analysis mode were made on the fracture patterns revealed on two-dimensional, planar surfaces in four granites. This method allows one to conclude that: 1. (1)|The fracture systems seen on two-dimensional surfaces in granites are consistent with the part of fractal theory that predicts a repetition of patterns on different scales of observation, self similarity. Fractal analysis gives essentially the same values of D on the scale of kilometres, metres and centimetres (five orders of magnitude) using mapped, surface fracture patterns in a Sierra Nevada granite batholith (Mt. Abbot quadrangle, Calif.). 2. (2)|Fractures show the same fractal values at different depths in a given batholith. Mapped fractures (main stage ore veins) at three mining levels (over a 700 m depth interval) of the Boulder batholith, Butte, Mont. show the same fractal values although the fracture disposition appears to be different at different levels. 3. (3)|Different sets of fracture planes in a granite batholith, Central France, and in experimental deformation can have different fractal values. In these examples shear and tension modes have the same fractal values while compressional fractures follow a different fractal mode of failure. The composite fracture patterns are also fractal but with a different, median, fractal value compared to the individual values for the fracture plane sets. These observations indicate that the fractal method can possibly be used to distinguish fractures of different origins in a complex system. It is concluded that granites fracture in a fractal manner which can be followed at many scales. It appears that fracture planes of different origins can be characterized using linear fractal analysis. ?? 1991.

  3. Quantum Fractals: From Heisenberg's Uncertainty to Barnsley's Fractality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadczyk, Arkadiusz

    2014-07-01

    This book brings together two concepts. The first is over a hundred years old -- the "quantum", while the second, "fractals", is newer, achieving popularity after the pioneering work of Benoit Mandelbrot. Both areas of research are expanding dramatically day by day. It is somewhat amazing that quantum theory, in spite of its age, is still a boiling mystery as we see in some quotes from recent publications addressed to non-expert readers:...

  4. Fractal structures and fractal functions as disease indicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Escos, J.M; Alados, C.L.; Emlen, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental instability is an early indicator of stress, and has been used to monitor the impacts of human disturbance on natural ecosystems. Here we investigate the use of different measures of developmental instability on two species, green peppers (Capsicum annuum), a plant, and Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica), an animal. For green peppers we compared the variance in allometric relationship between control plants, and a treatment group infected with the tomato spotted wilt virus. The results show that infected plants have a greater variance about the allometric regression line than the control plants. We also observed a reduction in complexity of branch structure in green pepper with a viral infection. Box-counting fractal dimension of branch architecture declined under stress infection. We also tested the reduction in complexity of behavioral patterns under stress situations in Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica). Fractal dimension of head-lift frequency distribution measures predator detection efficiency. This dimension decreased under stressful conditions, such as advanced pregnancy and parasitic infection. Feeding distribution activities reflect food searching efficiency. Power spectral analysis proves to be the most powerful tool for character- izing fractal behavior, revealing a reduction in complexity of time distribution activity under parasitic infection.

  5. Study on Huber fractal image compression.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Jyh-Horng; Tseng, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, Jer-Guang

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, a new similarity measure for fractal image compression (FIC) is introduced. In the proposed Huber fractal image compression (HFIC), the linear Huber regression technique from robust statistics is embedded into the encoding procedure of the fractal image compression. When the original image is corrupted by noises, we argue that the fractal image compression scheme should be insensitive to those noises presented in the corrupted image. This leads to a new concept of robust fractal image compression. The proposed HFIC is one of our attempts toward the design of robust fractal image compression. The main disadvantage of HFIC is the high computational cost. To overcome this drawback, particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique is utilized to reduce the searching time. Simulation results show that the proposed HFIC is robust against outliers in the image. Also, the PSO method can effectively reduce the encoding time while retaining the quality of the retrieved image.

  6. Fractal Weyl law for Linux Kernel architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermann, L.; Chepelianskii, A. D.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    We study the properties of spectrum and eigenstates of the Google matrix of a directed network formed by the procedure calls in the Linux Kernel. Our results obtained for various versions of the Linux Kernel show that the spectrum is characterized by the fractal Weyl law established recently for systems of quantum chaotic scattering and the Perron-Frobenius operators of dynamical maps. The fractal Weyl exponent is found to be ν ≈ 0.65 that corresponds to the fractal dimension of the network d ≈ 1.3. An independent computation of the fractal dimension by the cluster growing method, generalized for directed networks, gives a close value d ≈ 1.4. The eigenmodes of the Google matrix of Linux Kernel are localized on certain principal nodes. We argue that the fractal Weyl law should be generic for directed networks with the fractal dimension d < 2.

  7. Fractal applications to complex crustal problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    Complex scale-invariant problems obey fractal statistics. The basic definition of a fractal distribution is that the number of objects with a characteristic linear dimension greater than r satisfies the relation N = about r exp -D where D is the fractal dimension. Fragmentation often satisfies this relation. The distribution of earthquakes satisfies this relation. The classic relationship between the length of a rocky coast line and the step length can be derived from this relation. Power law relations for spectra can also be related to fractal dimensions. Topography and gravity are examples. Spectral techniques can be used to obtain maps of fractal dimension and roughness amplitude. These provide a quantitative measure of texture analysis. It is argued that the distribution of stress and strength in a complex crustal region, such as the Alps, is fractal. Based on this assumption, the observed frequency-magnitude relation for the seismicity in the region can be derived.

  8. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  9. Fractals, malware, and data models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Potter, Andrew N.; Williams, Deborah; Handley, James W.

    2012-06-01

    We examine the hypothesis that the decision boundary between malware and non-malware is fractal. We introduce a novel encoding method derived from text mining for converting disassembled programs first into opstrings and then filter these into a reduced opcode alphabet. These opcodes are enumerated and encoded into real floating point number format and used for characterizing frequency of occurrence and distribution properties of malware functions to compare with non-malware functions. We use the concept of invariant moments to characterize the highly non-Gaussian structure of the opcode distributions. We then derive Data Model based classifiers from identified features and interpolate and extrapolate the parameter sample space for the derived Data Models. This is done to examine the nature of the parameter space classification boundary between families of malware and the general non-malware category. Preliminary results strongly support the fractal boundary hypothesis, and a summary of our methods and results are presented here.

  10. Surface fractals in liposome aggregation.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the aggregation of charged liposomes induced by magnesium is investigated. Static and dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and cryotransmission electron microscopy are used as experimental techniques. In particular, multiple intracluster scattering is reduced to a negligible amount using a cross-correlation light scattering scheme. The analysis of the cluster structure, probed by means of static light scattering, reveals an evolution from surface fractals to mass fractals with increasing magnesium concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy micrographs of the aggregates are consistent with this interpretation. In addition, a comparative analysis of these results with those previously reported in the presence of calcium suggests that the different hydration energy between lipid vesicles when these divalent cations are present plays a fundamental role in the cluster morphology. This suggestion is also supported by infrared spectroscopy data. The kinetics of the aggregation processes is also analyzed through the time evolution of the mean diffusion coefficient of the aggregates.

  11. Fractal properties of financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinski-Petković, Lj.; Lončarević, I.; Jakšić, Z. M.; Vrhovac, S. B.

    2014-09-01

    We present an analysis of the USA stock market using a simple fractal function. Financial bubbles preceding the 1987, 2000 and 2007 crashes are investigated using the Besicovitch-Ursell fractal function. Fits show a good agreement with the S&P 500 data when a complete financial growth is considered, starting at the threshold of the abrupt growth and ending at the peak. Moving the final time of the fitting interval towards earlier dates causes growing discrepancy between two curves. On the basis of a detailed analysis of the financial index behavior we propose a method for identifying the stage of the current financial growth and estimating the time in which the index value is going to reach the maximum.

  12. Chaos, Fractals and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. Michael T.

    2016-12-01

    This paper gives an up-to-date account of chaos and fractals, in a popular pictorial style for the general scientific reader. A brief historical account covers the development of the subject from Newton’s laws of motion to the astronomy of Poincaré and the weather forecasting of Lorenz. Emphasis is given to the important underlying concepts, embracing the fractal properties of coastlines and the logistics of population dynamics. A wide variety of applications include: NASA’s discovery and use of zero-fuel chaotic “superhighways” between the planets; erratic chaotic solutions generated by Euler’s method in mathematics; atomic force microscopy; spontaneous pattern formation in chemical and biological systems; impact mechanics in offshore engineering and the chatter of cutting tools; controlling chaotic heartbeats. Reference is made to a number of interactive simulations and movies accessible on the web.

  13. The topology of fractal universes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown how the genus per unit volume of isodensity surfaces in general nonlinear universes is related to the entire hierarchy of correlation functions. The general relation between the correlation function, the probability distribution of densities at several points, and the probability distributions of density and its derivatives at a point are given. Formulas for the area and genus per unit volume of isodensity surfaces are presented. As an application, after first reviewing the case of Gaussian fields, analytic results are reported for one particular example of a thoroughly nonlinear universe, Mandelbrot's Rayleigh-Levy random-walk fractal. While this fractal bears little resemblance to the real universe of galaxies, it possesses the singular and theoretically interesting property that in it cluster-cluster correlations are identically equal to galaxy-galaxy correlations to all orders.

  14. Power dissipation in fractal AC circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Joe P.; Rogers, Luke G.; Anderson, Loren; Andrews, Ulysses; Brzoska, Antoni; Coffey, Aubrey; Davis, Hannah; Fisher, Lee; Hansalik, Madeline; Loew, Stephen; Teplyaev, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    We extend Feynman’s analysis of an infinite ladder circuit to fractal circuits, providing examples in which fractal circuits constructed with purely imaginary impedances can have characteristic impedances with positive real part. Using (weak) self-similarity of our fractal structures, we provide algorithms for studying the equilibrium distribution of energy on these circuits. This extends the analysis of self-similar resistance networks introduced by Fukushima, Kigami, Kusuoka, and more recently studied by Strichartz et al.

  15. Comparison of two fractal interpolation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yang; Zheng, Zeyu; Xiao, Rui; Shi, Haibo

    2017-03-01

    As a tool for studying complex shapes and structures in nature, fractal theory plays a critical role in revealing the organizational structure of the complex phenomenon. Numerous fractal interpolation methods have been proposed over the past few decades, but they differ substantially in the form features and statistical properties. In this study, we simulated one- and two-dimensional fractal surfaces by using the midpoint displacement method and the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot fractal function method, and observed great differences between the two methods in the statistical characteristics and autocorrelation features. From the aspect of form features, the simulations of the midpoint displacement method showed a relatively flat surface which appears to have peaks with different height as the fractal dimension increases. While the simulations of the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot fractal function method showed a rough surface which appears to have dense and highly similar peaks as the fractal dimension increases. From the aspect of statistical properties, the peak heights from the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot simulations are greater than those of the middle point displacement method with the same fractal dimension, and the variances are approximately two times larger. When the fractal dimension equals to 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, and 1.8, the skewness is positive with the midpoint displacement method and the peaks are all convex, but for the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot fractal function method the skewness is both positive and negative with values fluctuating in the vicinity of zero. The kurtosis is less than one with the midpoint displacement method, and generally less than that of the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot fractal function method. The autocorrelation analysis indicated that the simulation of the midpoint displacement method is not periodic with prominent randomness, which is suitable for simulating aperiodic surface. While the simulation of the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot fractal function method has

  16. Fractal scattering of microwaves from soils.

    PubMed

    Oleschko, K; Korvin, G; Balankin, A S; Khachaturov, R V; Flores, L; Figueroa, B; Urrutia, J; Brambila, F

    2002-10-28

    Using a combination of laboratory experiments and computer simulation we show that microwaves reflected from and transmitted through soil have a fractal dimension correlated to that of the soil's hierarchic permittivity network. The mathematical model relating the ground-penetrating radar record to the mass fractal dimension of soil structure is also developed. The fractal signature of the scattered microwaves correlates well with some physical and mechanical properties of soils.

  17. Fractal globule as a molecular machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avetisov, V. A.; Ivanov, V. A.; Meshkov, D. A.; Nechaev, S. K.

    2013-10-01

    A fractal (crumpled) polymer globule, which is an unusual equilibrium state of a condensed unknotted macromolecule that is experimentally found in the DNA folding in human chromosomes, has been formed through the hierarchical collapse of a polymer chain. The relaxation dynamics of the elastic network constructed through the contact matrix of the fractal globule has been studied. It has been found that the fractal globule in its dynamic properties is similar to a molecular machine.

  18. Fractal forest: Fractal geometry and applications in forest science. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lorimer, N.D.; Haight, R.G.; Leary, R.A.

    1994-07-20

    Fractal geometry is a tool for describing and analyzing irregularity. Because most of what we measure in the forest is discontinuous, jagged, and fragmented, fractal geometry has potential for improving the precision of measurement and description. The study reviews the literature on fractal geometry and its applications to forest measurements.

  19. Fractal properties of quantum spacetime.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Dario

    2009-03-20

    We show that, in general, a spacetime having a quantum group symmetry has also a scale-dependent fractal dimension which deviates from its classical value at short scales, a phenomenon that resembles what is observed in some approaches to quantum gravity. In particular, we analyze the cases of a quantum sphere and of kappa-Minkowski spacetime, the latter being relevant in the context of quantum gravity.

  20. Fractal metrology for biogeosystems analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Argüelles, V.; Oleschko, K.; Tarquis, A. M.; Korvin, G.; Gaona, C.; Parrot, J.-F.; Ventura-Ramos, E.

    2010-06-01

    The solid-pore distribution pattern plays an important role in soil functioning being related with the main physical, chemical and biological multiscale and multitemporal processes. In the present research, this pattern is extracted from the digital images of three soils (Chernozem, Solonetz and "Chocolate'' Clay) and compared in terms of roughness of the gray-intensity distribution (the measurand) quantified by several measurement techniques. Special attention was paid to the uncertainty of each of them and to the measurement function which best fits to the experimental results. Some of the applied techniques are known as classical in the fractal context (box-counting, rescaling-range and wavelets analyses, etc.) while the others have been recently developed by our Group. The combination of all these techniques, coming from Fractal Geometry, Metrology, Informatics, Probability Theory and Statistics is termed in this paper Fractal Metrology (FM). We show the usefulness of FM through a case study of soil physical and chemical degradation applying the selected toolbox to describe and compare the main structural attributes of three porous media with contrasting structure but similar clay mineralogy dominated by montmorillonites.

  1. Fractal Metrology for biogeosystems analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Argüelles, V.; Oleschko, K.; Tarquis, A. M.; Korvin, G.; Gaona, C.; Parrot, J.-F.; Ventura-Ramos, E.

    2010-11-01

    The solid-pore distribution pattern plays an important role in soil functioning being related with the main physical, chemical and biological multiscale and multitemporal processes of this complex system. In the present research, we studied the aggregation process as self-organizing and operating near a critical point. The structural pattern is extracted from the digital images of three soils (Chernozem, Solonetz and "Chocolate" Clay) and compared in terms of roughness of the gray-intensity distribution quantified by several measurement techniques. Special attention was paid to the uncertainty of each of them measured in terms of standard deviation. Some of the applied methods are known as classical in the fractal context (box-counting, rescaling-range and wavelets analyses, etc.) while the others have been recently developed by our Group. The combination of these techniques, coming from Fractal Geometry, Metrology, Informatics, Probability Theory and Statistics is termed in this paper Fractal Metrology (FM). We show the usefulness of FM for complex systems analysis through a case study of the soil's physical and chemical degradation applying the selected toolbox to describe and compare the structural attributes of three porous media with contrasting structure but similar clay mineralogy dominated by montmorillonites.

  2. Estimation of Surface Soil Moisture Using Fractal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen Chang; He, Chun Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    This study establishes the relationship between surface soil moisture and fractal dimension. The surface soil moisture is one of important factors in the hydrological cycle of surface evaporation. It could be used in many fields, such as reservoir management, early drought warning systems, irrigation scheduling and management, and crop yield estimations. Soil surface cracks due to dryness can be used to describe drought conditions. Soil cracking phenomenon and moisture have a certain relationship, thus this study makes used the fractal theory to interpret the soil moisture represented by soil cracks. The fractal dimension of surface soil cracking is a measure of the surface soil moisture. Therefore fractal dimensions can also be used to indicate how dry of the surface soil is. This study used the sediment in the Shimen Reservoir to establish the fractal dimension and soil moisture relation. The soil cracking is created under the control of temperature and thickness of surface soil layers. The results show the increase in fractal dimensions is accompanied by a decreases in surface soil moisture. However the fractal dimensions will approach a constant even the soil moisture continually decreases. The sigmoid function is used to fit the relation of fractal dimensions and surface soil moistures. The proposed method can be successfully applied to estimate surface soil moisture. Only a photo taken from the field is needed and is sufficient to provide the fractal dimension. Consequently, the surface soil moisture can be estimated quickly and accurately.

  3. Stability limits for bioconvective fractals - Microgravity prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Fractal objects are delicate aggregates which show self-similar behavior and vanishing density for increasing length scales. In practice real fractals in nature however possess only a limited region of verifiable self-similarity. As natural fractal objects increase in size, they become easier to disrupt mechanically. Herein the effects of thermal vibrations and gravity are investigated as deforming forces on fractal aggregation. Example calculations are carried out on a biological fractal formed from the surface aggregation of various cells such as alga and bacteria. For typical cell parameters, the predicted diameter of this so-called 'bioconvective' fractal agrees well with the observed limits of about 5 cm. On earth, this size represents an experimental maximum for finding bioconvective fractal objects. To extend this size range of fractals available for statistical study, a reduced gravity environment offers one way to achieve larger fractals. For these enhanced sizes, the present scaling predicts that microgravity can yield up to a 35-fold improvement in extending statistical resolution.

  4. Stability limits for bioconvective fractals - Microgravity prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Fractal objects are delicate aggregates which show self-similar behavior and vanishing density for increasing length scales. In practice real fractals in nature however possess only a limited region of verifiable self-similarity. As natural fractal objects increase in size, they become easier to disrupt mechanically. Herein the effects of thermal vibrations and gravity are investigated as deforming forces on fractal aggregation. Example calculations are carried out on a biological fractal formed from the surface aggregation of various cells such as alga and bacteria. For typical cell parameters, the predicted diameter of this so-called 'bioconvective' fractal agrees well with the observed limits of about 5 cm. On earth, this size represents an experimental maximum for finding bioconvective fractal objects. To extend this size range of fractals available for statistical study, a reduced gravity environment offers one way to achieve larger fractals. For these enhanced sizes, the present scaling predicts that microgravity can yield up to a 35-fold improvement in extending statistical resolution.

  5. Generalized Mandelbrot rule for fractal sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, L. V.

    1992-01-01

    Mandelbrot's rule for sections is generalized to apply to the Hentschel and Procaccia fractal dimension at arbitrary q and on arbitrary sections. It is shown that for almost all (n-m)-dimensional sections, Dn(q)=Dn-m(q)+m, where the Dr(q) are box-counting, Hentschel, and Procaccia generalized fractal dimensions of r-dimensional sections of homogeneous fractal point sets in Rn and Dn-m(q)>0. The rule applies for finite ``thickness'' sections as well as ``true'' sections and can be interpreted for inhomogenous fractal sets.

  6. Fractal analysis of complex microstructure in castings

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.Z.; Lipp, D.C.; Hellawell, A.

    1995-12-31

    Complex microstructures in castings are usually characterized descriptively which often raises ambiguity and makes it difficult to relate the microstructure to the growth kinetics or mechanical properties in processing modeling. Combining the principle of fractal geometry and computer image processing techniques, it is feasible to characterize the complex microstructures numerically by the parameters of fractal dimension, D, and shape factor, a, without ambiguity. Procedures of fractal measurement and analysis are described, and a test case of its application to cast irons is provided. The results show that the irregular cast structures may all be characterized numerically by fractal analysis.

  7. Fractal zone plates with variable lacunarity.

    PubMed

    Monsoriu, Juan; Saavedra, Genaro; Furlan, Walter

    2004-09-06

    Fractal zone plates (FZPs), i.e., zone plates with fractal structure, have been recently introduced in optics. These zone plates are distinguished by the fractal focusing structure they provide along the optical axis. In this paper we study the effects on this axial response of an important descriptor of fractals: the lacunarity. It is shown that this parameter drastically affects the profile of the irradiance response along the optical axis. In spite of this fact, the axial behavior always has the self-similarity characteristics of the FZP itself.

  8. Fractal signatures in the aperiodic Fibonacci grating.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rupesh; Banerjee, Varsha; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam

    2014-05-01

    The Fibonacci grating (FbG) is an archetypal example of aperiodicity and self-similarity. While aperiodicity distinguishes it from a fractal, self-similarity identifies it with a fractal. Our paper investigates the outcome of these complementary features on the FbG diffraction profile (FbGDP). We find that the FbGDP has unique characteristics (e.g., no reduction in intensity with increasing generations), in addition to fractal signatures (e.g., a non-integer fractal dimension). These make the Fibonacci architecture potentially useful in image forming devices and other emerging technologies.

  9. Computer simulation of microwave propagation in heterogeneous and fractal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korvin, Gabor; Khachaturov, Ruben V.; Oleschko, Klaudia; Ronquillo, Gerardo; Correa López, María de jesús; García, Juan-josé

    2017-03-01

    Maxwell's equations (MEs) are the starting point for all calculations involving surface or borehole electromagnetic (EM) methods in Petroleum Industry. In well-log analysis numerical modeling of resistivity and induction tool responses has became an indispensable step of interpretation. We developed a new method to numerically simulate electromagnetic wave propagation through heterogeneous and fractal slabs taking into account multiple scattering in the direction of normal incidence. In simulation, the gray-scale image of the porous medium is explored by monochromatic waves. The gray-tone of each pixel can be related to the dielectric permittivity of the medium at that point by two different equations (linear dependence, and fractal or power law dependence). The wave equation is solved in second order difference approximation, using a modified sweep technique. Examples will be shown for simulated EM waves in carbonate rocks imaged at different scales by electron microscopy and optical photography. The method has wide ranging applications in remote sensing, borehole scanning and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) exploration.

  10. [Molecular structure and fractal analysis of oligosaccharide].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-long; Wang, Lu-man; He, Dong-qi; Zhang, Tian-lan; Gou, Bao-di; Li, Qing

    2014-10-18

    To propose a calculation method of oligosaccharides' fractal dimension, and to provide a new approach to studying the drug molecular design and activity. By using the principle of energy optimization and computer simulation technology, the steady structures of oligosaccharides were found, and an effective way of oligosaccharides fractal dimension's calculation was further established by applying the theory of box dimension to the chemical compounds. By using the proposed method, 22 oligosaccharides' fractal dimensions were calculated, with the mean 1.518 8 ± 0.107 2; in addition, the fractal dimensions of the two activity multivalent oligosaccharides which were confirmed by experiments, An-2 and Gu-4, were about 1.478 8 and 1.516 0 respectively, while C-type lectin-like receptor Dectin-1's fractal dimension was about 1.541 2. The experimental and computational results were expected to help to find a class of glycoside drugs whose target receptor was Dectin-1. Fractal dimension, differing from other known macro parameters, is a useful tool to characterize the compound molecules' microscopic structure and function, which may play an important role in the molecular design and biological activity study. In the process of oligosaccharides drug screening, the fractal dimension of receptor and designed oligosaccharides or glycoclusters can be calculated respectively. The oligosaccharides with fractal dimension close to that of target receptor should then take priority compared with others, to get the drug molecules with latent activity.

  11. Fractals in petroleum geology and earth processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Christopher C.; La Pointe, Paul R.

    1995-01-01

    In this unique volume, renowned experts discuss the applications of fractals in petroleum research-offering an excellent introduction to the subject. Contributions cover a broad spectrum of applications from petroleum exploration to production. Papers also illustrate how fractal geometry can quantify the spatial heterogeneity of different aspects of geology and how this information can be used to improve exploration and production results.

  12. Fractal Trigonometric Polynomials for Restricted Range Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, A. K. B.; Navascués, M. A.; Viswanathan, P.; Katiyar, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    One-sided approximation tackles the problem of approximation of a prescribed function by simple traditional functions such as polynomials or trigonometric functions that lie completely above or below it. In this paper, we use the concept of fractal interpolation function (FIF), precisely of fractal trigonometric polynomials, to construct one-sided uniform approximants for some classes of continuous functions.

  13. Undergraduate Experiment with Fractal Diffraction Gratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Furlan, Walter D.; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C.; Gimenez, Marcos H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics…

  14. Undergraduate Experiment with Fractal Diffraction Gratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Furlan, Walter D.; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C.; Gimenez, Marcos H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics…

  15. The Fractal Nature of Relevance: A Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottaviani, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses precision and recall in information science and proposes a new model based on fractal geometry for clusters of relevant documents. Search strategies for retrieving a group of relevant documents are reviewed; fractal sets and chaotic processes are described; and the new model is explained. (Contains 43 references.) (LRW)

  16. Fractal Geometry in Elementary School Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nancy Nesbitt

    1992-01-01

    Reports a case study to evaluate whether basic concepts of fractal geometry are teachable to elementary school children and to determine the effectiveness of having an elementary school student present a lesson to inservice and preservice teachers. Concludes that simple concepts of fractal geometry appear appropriate for the elementary school…

  17. Fractal nanoparticle plasmonics: the Cayley tree.

    PubMed

    Gottheim, Samuel; Zhang, Hui; Govorov, Alexander O; Halas, Naomi J

    2015-03-24

    There has been strong, ongoing interest over the past decade in developing strategies to design and engineer materials with tailored optical properties. Fractal-like nanoparticles and films have long been known to possess a remarkably broad-band optical response and are potential nanoscale components for realizing spectrum-spanning optical effects. Here we examine the role of self-similarity in a fractal geometry for the design of plasmon line shapes. By computing and fabricating simple Cayley tree nanostructures of increasing fractal order N, we are able to identify the principle behind how the multimodal plasmon spectrum of this system develops as the fractal order is increased. With increasing N, the fractal structure acquires an increasing number of modes with certain degeneracies: these modes correspond to plasmon oscillations on the different length scales inside a fractal. As a result, fractals with large N exhibit broad, multipeaked spectra from plasmons with large degeneracy numbers. The Cayley tree serves as an example of a more general, fractal-based route for the design of structures and media with highly complex optical line shapes.

  18. A Classroom Demonstration of Electrodeposited Fractal Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Edelfredo; Liu, C. H.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an inexpensive laboratory experiment that combines the recommended techniques for teaching fractal geometry in the classroom with the standard procedures for studying electrochemical deposition of ramified patterns in the regime of low solution concentration and low applied constant driving force. Introduces students to fractal growth…

  19. Segmentation of histological structures for fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Vanessa; Kouznetsov, Alexei; Tambasco, Mauro

    2009-02-01

    Pathologists examine histology sections to make diagnostic and prognostic assessments regarding cancer based on deviations in cellular and/or glandular structures. However, these assessments are subjective and exhibit some degree of observer variability. Recent studies have shown that fractal dimension (a quantitative measure of structural complexity) has proven useful for characterizing structural deviations and exhibits great potential for automated cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Computing fractal dimension relies on accurate image segmentation to capture the architectural complexity of the histology specimen. For this purpose, previous studies have used techniques such as intensity histogram analysis and edge detection algorithms. However, care must be taken when segmenting pathologically relevant structures since improper edge detection can result in an inaccurate estimation of fractal dimension. In this study, we established a reliable method for segmenting edges from grayscale images. We used a Koch snowflake, an object of known fractal dimension, to investigate the accuracy of various edge detection algorithms and selected the most appropriate algorithm to extract the outline structures. Next, we created validation objects ranging in fractal dimension from 1.3 to 1.9 imitating the size, structural complexity, and spatial pixel intensity distribution of stained histology section images. We applied increasing intensity thresholds to the validation objects to extract the outline structures and observe the effects on the corresponding segmentation and fractal dimension. The intensity threshold yielding the maximum fractal dimension provided the most accurate fractal dimension and segmentation, indicating that this quantitative method could be used in an automated classification system for histology specimens.

  20. Fractal Music: The Mathematics Behind "Techno" Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padula, Janice

    2005-01-01

    This article describes sound waves, their basis in the sine curve, Fourier's theorem of infinite series, the fractal equation and its application to the composition of music, together with algorithms (such as those employed by meteorologist Edward Lorenz in his discovery of chaos theory) that are now being used to compose fractal music on…

  1. On the Topological Classification of Fractal Squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Feng; Wang, Xiaohua; Wen, Shengyou

    A fractal square is a nonempty compact set in the plane satisfying F = (F + D)/n, where n > 1 is an integer and D ⊂{0, 1, 2,…,n - 1}2 is nonempty. We give the topological classification of fractal squares with n = 3 and Card(D) = 6.

  2. A continuum framework for mechanics of fractal materials I: from fractional space to continuum with fractal metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.

    2015-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the mechanics of fractally heterogeneous media. A model of fractal continuum with a fractional number of spatial degrees of freedom and a fractal metric is suggested. The Jacobian matrix of the fractal continuum deformation is defined and the kinematics of deformations is elucidated. The symmetry of the Cauchy stress tensor for continua with the fractal metric is established. A homogenization framework accounting for the connectivity, topological, and metric properties of fractal domains in heterogeneous materials is developed. The mapping of mechanical problems for fractal media into the corresponding problems for the fractal continuum is discussed. Stress and strain distributions in elastic fractal bars are analyzed. An approach to fractal bar optimization is proposed. Some features of acoustic wave propagation and localization in fractal media are briefly highlighted.

  3. Designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengchao; Wang, Shutao

    2014-06-06

    Fractal structures in nature offer a unique "fractal contact mode" that guarantees the efficient working of an organism with an optimized style. Fractal nanostructured biointerfaces have shown great potential for the ultrasensitive detection of disease-relevant biomarkers from small biomolecules on the nanoscale to cancer cells on the microscale. This review will present the advantages of fractal nanostructures, the basic concept of designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces, and their biomedical applications for the ultrasensitive detection of various disease-relevant biomarkers, such microRNA, cancer antigen 125, and breast cancer cells, from unpurified cell lysates and the blood of patients. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Fractal structures in nonlinear plasma physics.

    PubMed

    Viana, R L; da Silva, E C; Kroetz, T; Caldas, I L; Roberto, M; Sanjuán, M A F

    2011-01-28

    Fractal structures appear in many situations related to the dynamics of conservative as well as dissipative dynamical systems, being a manifestation of chaotic behaviour. In open area-preserving discrete dynamical systems we can find fractal structures in the form of fractal boundaries, associated to escape basins, and even possessing the more general property of Wada. Such systems appear in certain applications in plasma physics, like the magnetic field line behaviour in tokamaks with ergodic limiters. The main purpose of this paper is to show how such fractal structures have observable consequences in terms of the transport properties in the plasma edge of tokamaks, some of which have been experimentally verified. We emphasize the role of the fractal structures in the understanding of mesoscale phenomena in plasmas, such as electromagnetic turbulence.

  5. Designing Phoxonic Metamaterials with Fractal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Sisi; Koh, Cheong Yang; Kooi, Steve; Thomas, Edwin

    2012-02-01

    Recently, the concepts of fractal geometry have been introduced into electromagnetic and plasmonic metamaterials. With their self-similarity, structures based on fractal geometry should exhibit multi-band character with high Q factors due to the scaling law. However, there exist few studies of phononic metamaterials based on fractal geometry. We use COMSOL to investigate the wave propagation in two dimensional systems possessing fractal geometries. The simulations of these systems, guided by our recently developed general design framework, help to understand the role of design in determining the phononic properties of the structures. Proposed structures are being fabricated via standard lithographic or 3D printing techniques. The wave behavior of the structures can be characterized using Brillouin Light Scattering, Scanning Acoustic Microscope and Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy. Due to their sparse spatial distribution, fractal phononic structures show potential fir ``smart skin'', where multifunctional components can be fabricated on the same platform.

  6. Applications of Variance Fractal Dimension: a Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phinyomark, Angkoon; Phukpattaranont, Pornchai; Limsakul, Chusak

    2012-04-01

    Chaotic dynamical systems are pervasive in nature and can be shown to be deterministic through fractal analysis. There are numerous methods that can be used to estimate the fractal dimension. Among the usual fractal estimation methods, variance fractal dimension (VFD) is one of the most significant fractal analysis methods that can be implemented for real-time systems. The basic concept and theory of VFD are presented. Recent research and the development of several applications based on VFD are reviewed and explained in detail, such as biomedical signal processing and pattern recognition, speech communication, geophysical signal analysis, power systems and communication systems. The important parameters that need to be considered in computing the VFD are discussed, including the window size and the window increment of the feature, and the step size of the VFD. Directions for future research of VFD are also briefly outlined.

  7. Fractal dimension of bioconvection patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Shallow cultures of the motile algal strain, Euglena gracilis, were concentrated to 2 x 10 to the 6th organisms per ml and placed in constant temperature water baths at 24 and 38 C. Bioconvective patterns formed an open two-dimensional structure with random branches, similar to clusters encountered in the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model. When averaged over several example cultures, the pattern was found to have no natural length scale, self-similar branching, and a fractal dimension (d about 1.7). These agree well with the two-dimensional DLA.

  8. Fractal Dimension of Bioconvection Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-10-01

    Shallow cultures of the motile algal strain, Euglena gracilis, were concentrated to 2× 106 organisms per ml and placed in constant temperature water baths at 24 and 38 C. Bioconvective patterns formed an open two-dimensional structure with random branches, similar to clusters encountered in the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model. When averaged over several example cultures, the pattern was found to have no natural length scale, self-similar branching and a fractal dimension (d˜1.7). These agree well with the two-dimensional DLA.

  9. Fractal lattice of gelatin nanoglobules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, D. V.; Krasovskii, A. N.

    2012-11-01

    The globular structure of polymer coatings on a glass, which were obtained from micellar solutions of gelatin in the isooctane-water-sodium (bis-2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate system, has been studied using electron microscopy. It has been shown that an increase in the average globule size is accompanied by the formation of a fractal lattice of nanoglobules and a periodic physical network of macromolecules in the coating. The stability of such system of the "liquid-in-a-solid" type is limited by the destruction of globules and the formation of a homogeneous network structure of the coating.

  10. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  11. Fragmentation of Fractal Random Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elçi, Eren Metin; Weigel, Martin; Fytas, Nikolaos G.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the fragmentation behavior of random clusters on the lattice under a process where bonds between neighboring sites are successively broken. Modeling such structures by configurations of a generalized Potts or random-cluster model allows us to discuss a wide range of systems with fractal properties including trees as well as dense clusters. We present exact results for the densities of fragmenting edges and the distribution of fragment sizes for critical clusters in two dimensions. Dynamical fragmentation with a size cutoff leads to broad distributions of fragment sizes. The resulting power laws are shown to encode characteristic fingerprints of the fragmented objects.

  12. Pre-Service Teachers' Concept Images on Fractal Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakus, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of pre-service teachers' concept images can provide information about their mental schema of fractal dimension. There is limited research on students' understanding of fractal and fractal dimension. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the pre-service teachers' understandings of fractal dimension based on concept image. The…

  13. Pre-Service Teachers' Concept Images on Fractal Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakus, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of pre-service teachers' concept images can provide information about their mental schema of fractal dimension. There is limited research on students' understanding of fractal and fractal dimension. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the pre-service teachers' understandings of fractal dimension based on concept image. The…

  14. Fractal gait patterns are retained after entrainment to a fractal stimulus.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Christopher K; Kiefer, Adam W; Wittstein, Matthew W; Leonard, Kelsey B; MacPherson, Ryan P; Wright, W Geoffrey; Haran, F Jay

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has shown that fractal patterns in gait can be altered by entraining to a fractal stimulus. However, little is understood about how long those patterns are retained or which factors may influence stronger entrainment or retention. In experiment one, participants walked on a treadmill for 45 continuous minutes, which was separated into three phases. The first 15 minutes (pre-synchronization phase) consisted of walking without a fractal stimulus, the second 15 minutes consisted of walking while entraining to a fractal visual stimulus (synchronization phase), and the last 15 minutes (post-synchronization phase) consisted of walking without the stimulus to determine if the patterns adopted from the stimulus were retained. Fractal gait patterns were strengthened during the synchronization phase and were retained in the post-synchronization phase. In experiment two, similar methods were used to compare a continuous fractal stimulus to a discrete fractal stimulus to determine which stimulus type led to more persistent fractal gait patterns in the synchronization and post-synchronization (i.e., retention) phases. Both stimulus types led to equally persistent patterns in the synchronization phase, but only the discrete fractal stimulus led to retention of the patterns. The results add to the growing body of literature showing that fractal gait patterns can be manipulated in a predictable manner. Further, our results add to the literature by showing that the newly adopted gait patterns are retained for up to 15 minutes after entrainment and showed that a discrete visual stimulus is a better method to influence retention.

  15. An Approach to Study Elastic Vibrations of Fractal Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Lev; Zepeda, Mario

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents our study of dynamics of fractal solids. Concepts of fractal continuum and time had been used in definitions of a fractal body deformation and motion, formulation of conservation of mass, balance of momentum, and constitutive relationships. A linearized model, which was written in terms of fractal time and spatial derivatives, has been employed to study the elastic vibrations of fractal circular cylinders. Fractal differential equations of torsional, longitudinal and transverse fractal wave equations have been obtained and solution properties such as size and time dependence have been revealed.

  16. Snow metamorphism: A fractal approach.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Anna; Chiaia, Bernardino M; Frigo, Barbara; Türk, Christian

    2010-09-01

    Snow is a porous disordered medium consisting of air and three water phases: ice, vapor, and liquid. The ice phase consists of an assemblage of grains, ice matrix, initially arranged over a random load bearing skeleton. The quantitative relationship between density and morphological characteristics of different snow microstructures is still an open issue. In this work, a three-dimensional fractal description of density corresponding to different snow microstructure is put forward. First, snow density is simulated in terms of a generalized Menger sponge model. Then, a fully three-dimensional compact stochastic fractal model is adopted. The latter approach yields a quantitative map of the randomness of the snow texture, which is described as a three-dimensional fractional Brownian field with the Hurst exponent H varying as continuous parameters. The Hurst exponent is found to be strongly dependent on snow morphology and density. The approach might be applied to all those cases where the morphological evolution of snow cover or ice sheets should be conveniently described at a quantitative level.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of fractal aggregate diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranami, Gaurav; Lamm, Monica H.; Vigil, R. Dennis

    2010-11-01

    The diffusion of fractal aggregates constructed with the method by Thouy and Jullien [J. Phys. A 27, 2953 (1994)10.1088/0305-4470/27/9/012] comprised of Np spherical primary particles was studied as a function of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that finite-size effects have a strong impact on the apparent value of the diffusion coefficient (D) , but these can be corrected by carrying out simulations using different simulation box sizes. Specifically, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the length of a cubic simulation box, and the constant of proportionality appears to be independent of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension. Using this result, it is possible to compute infinite dilution diffusion coefficients (Do) for aggregates of arbitrary size and fractal dimension, and it was found that Do∝Np-1/df , as is often assumed by investigators simulating Brownian aggregation of fractal aggregates. The ratio of hydrodynamic radius to radius of gyration is computed and shown to be independent of mass for aggregates of fixed fractal dimension, thus enabling an estimate of the diffusion coefficient for a fractal aggregate based on its radius of gyration.

  18. Kinetic properties of fractal stellar media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumak, O. V.; Rastorguev, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic processes in fractal stellar media are analysed in terms of the approach developed in our earlier paper involving a generalization of the nearest neighbour and random force distributions to fractal media. Diffusion is investigated in the approximation of scale-dependent conditional density based on an analysis of the solutions of the corresponding Langevin equations. It is shown that kinetic parameters (time-scales, coefficients of dynamic friction, diffusion, etc.) for fractal stellar media can differ significantly both qualitatively and quantitatively from the corresponding parameters for a quasi-uniform random media with limited fluctuations. The most important difference is that in the fractal case, kinetic parameters depend on spatial scalelength and fractal dimension of the medium studied. A generalized kinetic equation for stellar media (fundamental equation of stellar dynamics) is derived in the Fokker-Planck approximation with the allowance for the fractal properties of the spatial stellar density distribution. Also derived are its limit forms that can be used to describe small departures of fractal gravitating medium from equilibrium.

  19. Antenna Miniaturization Using Koch Snowflake Fractal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minal, Dhama, Nitin

    2010-11-01

    The Wireless Industry is witnessing an volatile emergence today in present era. Also requires the performance over several frequency bands or are reconfigurable as the demands on the system changes. This Paper Presents Rectangular, Koch Fractal Patch Antennas on Single and Multilayer Substrate With and Without Air-Gap using Advanced Design System Simulator (ADS). Fractal Antenna provides Miniaturization over conventional microstrip Antennas. The Antennas Have Been Designed on FR4 substrate with ∈ = 4.2, h = 1.53 and the initial Dimension of the simple Rectangular Patch is 36.08 * 29.6 mm. The experimental Resonant Frequencies of the Fractal Patch with 1st, 2nd & 3rd are observed 2.22, 2.14 & 2.02 GHz Respectively in comparison to Rectangular Patch with 2.43 GHz. The reduced Impedance bandwidth of the Fractal Patch has been improved by designing the patch over multilayer substrate with varying Air-gap between two Substrate. As we increase the air- gap between the two substrate layer further enhancement in impedance bandwidth of Fractal antenna has been Obtained. The Radiation pattern of Koch Fractal antenna is as similar to rectangular patch antenna but with better H-plane Cross Polarization for fractal patch. The all simulated Results are in close Agreement with experimental Results.

  20. Hexagonal and Pentagonal Fractal Multiband Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Philip W.; Wahid, Parveen

    2005-01-01

    Multiband dipole antennas based on hexagonal and pentagonal fractals have been analyzed by computational simulations and functionally demonstrated in experiments on prototypes. These antennas are capable of multiband or wide-band operation because they are subdivided into progressively smaller substructures that resonate at progressively higher frequencies by virtue of their smaller dimensions. The novelty of the present antennas lies in their specific hexagonal and pentagonal fractal configurations and the resonant frequencies associated with them. These antennas are potentially applicable to a variety of multiband and wide-band commercial wireless-communication products operating at different frequencies, including personal digital assistants, cellular telephones, pagers, satellite radios, Global Positioning System receivers, and products that combine two or more of the aforementioned functions. Perhaps the best-known prior multiband antenna based on fractal geometry is the Sierpinski triangle antenna (also known as the Sierpinski gasket), shown in the top part of the figure. In this antenna, the scale length at each iteration of the fractal is half the scale length of the preceding iteration, yielding successive resonant frequencies related by a ratio of about 2. The middle and bottom parts of the figure depict the first three iterations of the hexagonal and pentagonal fractals along with typical dipole-antenna configuration based on the second iteration. Successive resonant frequencies of the hexagonal fractal antenna have been found to be related by a ratio of about 3, and those of the pentagonal fractal antenna by a ratio of about 2.59.

  1. On the ubiquitous presence of fractals and fractal concepts in pharmaceutical sciences: a review.

    PubMed

    Pippa, Natassa; Dokoumetzidis, Aristides; Demetzos, Costas; Macheras, Panos

    2013-11-18

    Fractals have been very successful in quantifying nature's geometrical complexity, and have captured the imagination of scientific community. The development of fractal dimension and its applications have produced significant results across a wide variety of biomedical applications. This review deals with the application of fractals in pharmaceutical sciences and attempts to account the most important developments in the fields of pharmaceutical technology, especially of advanced Drug Delivery nano Systems and of biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics. Additionally, fractal kinetics, which has been applied to enzyme kinetics, drug metabolism and absorption, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are presented. This review also considers the potential benefits of using fractal analysis along with considerations of nonlinearity, scaling, and chaos as calibration tools to obtain information and more realistic description on different parts of pharmaceutical sciences. As a conclusion, the purpose of the present work is to highlight the presence of fractal geometry in almost all fields of pharmaceutical research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Towards a physics on fractals: Differential vector calculus in three-dimensional continuum with fractal metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Bory-Reyes, Juan; Shapiro, Michael

    2016-02-01

    One way to deal with physical problems on nowhere differentiable fractals is the mapping of these problems into the corresponding problems for continuum with a proper fractal metric. On this way different definitions of the fractal metric were suggested to account for the essential fractal features. In this work we develop the metric differential vector calculus in a three-dimensional continuum with a non-Euclidean metric. The metric differential forms and Laplacian are introduced, fundamental identities for metric differential operators are established and integral theorems are proved by employing the metric version of the quaternionic analysis for the Moisil-Teodoresco operator, which has been introduced and partially developed in this paper. The relations between the metric and conventional operators are revealed. It should be emphasized that the metric vector calculus developed in this work provides a comprehensive mathematical formalism for the continuum with any suitable definition of fractal metric. This offers a novel tool to study physics on fractals.

  3. Fractal-based image edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Huiguo; Zhu, Yaoting; Zhu, Guang-Xi; Wan, Faguang; Zhang, Ping

    1993-08-01

    Image edge is an important feature of image. Usually, we use Laplacian or Sober operator to get an image edge. In this paper, we use fractal method to get the edge. After introducing Fractal Brownian Random (FBR) field, we give the definition of Discrete Fractal Brownian Increase Random (DFBIR) field and discuss its properties, then we apply the DFBIR field to detect the edge of an image. According to the parameters H and D of DFBIR, we give a measure M equals (alpha) H + (beta) D. From the M value of each pixel, we can detect the edge of image.

  4. The Dimension of Projections of Fractal Percolations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rams, Michał; Simon, Károly

    2014-02-01

    Fractal percolation or Mandelbrot percolation is one of the most well studied families of random fractals. In this paper we study some of the geometric measure theoretical properties (dimension of projections and structure of slices) of these random sets. Although random, the geometry of those sets is quite regular. Our results imply that, denoting by a typical realization of the fractal percolation on the plane, If then for all lines ℓ the orthogonal projection E ℓ of E to ℓ has the same Hausdorff dimension as E,

  5. Characterization of strange attractors as inhomogeneous fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladin, G.; Vulpiani, A.

    1984-09-01

    The geometry of strange attractors of chaotic dynamical systems is investigated analytically within the framework of fractal theory. A set of easily computable exponents which generalize the fractal dimensionality and characterize the inhomogeneity of the fractals of strange attractors is derived, and sample computations are shown. It is pointed out that the fragmentation process described is similar to models of intermittency in fully developed turbulence. The exponents for the sample problems are computed in the same amount of CPU time as the computation of nu by the method of Grassberger and Procaccia (1983) but provide more information; less time is required than for the nu(n) computation of Hentschel and Procaccia (1983).

  6. Fractal and multifractal analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Lopes, R; Betrouni, N

    2009-08-01

    Over the last years, fractal and multifractal geometries were applied extensively in many medical signal (1D, 2D or 3D) analysis applications like pattern recognition, texture analysis and segmentation. Application of this geometry relies heavily on the estimation of the fractal features. Various methods were proposed to estimate the fractal dimension or multifractal spectral of a signal. This article presents an overview of these algorithms, the way they work, their benefits and their limits. The aim of this review is to explain and to categorize the various algorithms into groups and their application in the field of medical signal analysis.

  7. A Diffusion on a Fractal State Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    00I A -rSd for pubic reloaa.; 8~ L0 201 7 DiLreub’tionl uJnlU 8 0 0 7 A Diffusion Defined on A Fractal State Space William Bernard Krebs Abstract: We... define a fractal in the plane known as the Vicsek Snowflake by constructing a skeletal lattice graph and then rescaling spatial dimensions to give a...sequence of lattices that converges to a fractal. By defining a simple random walk on the skeletal lattice and then rescaling both time and space, we

  8. Fractal-based wideband invisibility cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Nathan; Okoro, Obinna; Earle, Dan; Salkind, Phil; Unger, Barry; Yen, Sean; McHugh, Daniel; Polterzycki, Stefan; Shelman-Cohen, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    A wideband invisibility cloak (IC) at microwave frequencies is described. Using fractal resonators in closely spaced (sub wavelength) arrays as a minimal number of cylindrical layers (rings), the IC demonstrates that it is physically possible to attain a `see through' cloaking device with: (a) wideband coverage; (b) simple and attainable fabrication; (c) high fidelity emulation of the free path; (d) minimal side scattering; (d) a near absence of shadowing in the scattering. Although not a practical device, this fractal-enabled technology demonstrator opens up new opportunities for diverted-image (DI) technology and use of fractals in wideband optical, infrared, and microwave applications.

  9. Application of Fractal Dimension on Palsar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dharmendra; Pant, Triloki

    Study of land cover is the primal task of remote sensing where microwave imaging plays an important role. As an alternate of optical imaging, microwave, in particular, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging is very popular. With the advancement of technology, multi-polarized images are now available, e.g., ALOS-PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band SAR), which are beneficial because each of the polarization channel shows different sensitivity to various land features. Further, using the textural features, various land classes can be classified on the basis of the textural measures. One of the textural measure is fractal dimension. It is noteworthy that fractal dimension is a measure of roughness and thus various land classes can be distinguished on the basis of their roughness. The value of fractal dimension for the surfaces lies between 2.0 and 3.0 where 2.0 represents a smooth surface while 3.0 represents drastically rough surface. The study area covers subset images lying between 2956'53"N, 7750'32"E and 2950'40"N, 7757'19"E. The PALSAR images of the year 2007 and 2009 are considered for the study. In present paper a fractal based classification of PALSAR images has been performed for identification of Water, Urban and Agricultural Area. Since fractals represent the image texture, hence the present study attempts to find the fractal properties of land covers to distinguish them from one another. For the purpose a context has been defined on the basis of a moving window, which is used to estimate the local fractal dimension and then moved over the whole image. The size of the window is an important issue for estimation of textural measures which is considered to be 55 in present study. This procedure, in response, produces a textural map called fractal map. The fractal map is constituted with the help of local fractal dimension values and can be used for contextual classification. In order to study the fractal properties of PALSAR images, the three polarization images

  10. Fractal cartography of urban areas.

    PubMed

    Encarnação, Sara; Gaudiano, Marcos; Santos, Francisco C; Tenedório, José A; Pacheco, Jorge M

    2012-01-01

    In a world in which the pace of cities is increasing, prompt access to relevant information is crucial to the understanding and regulation of land use and its evolution in time. In spite of this, characterization and regulation of urban areas remains a complex process, requiring expert human intervention, analysis and judgment. Here we carry out a spatio-temporal fractal analysis of a metropolitan area, based on which we develop a model which generates a cartographic representation and classification of built-up areas, identifying (and even predicting) those areas requiring the most proximate planning and regulation. Furthermore, we show how different types of urban areas identified by the model co-evolve with the city, requiring policy regulation to be flexible and adaptive, acting just in time. The algorithmic implementation of the model is applicable to any built-up area and simple enough to pave the way for the automatic classification of urban areas worldwide.

  11. Fractal cartography of urban areas

    PubMed Central

    Encarnação, Sara; Gaudiano, Marcos; Santos, Francisco C.; Tenedório, José A.; Pacheco, Jorge M.

    2012-01-01

    In a world in which the pace of cities is increasing, prompt access to relevant information is crucial to the understanding and regulation of land use and its evolution in time. In spite of this, characterization and regulation of urban areas remains a complex process, requiring expert human intervention, analysis and judgment. Here we carry out a spatio-temporal fractal analysis of a metropolitan area, based on which we develop a model which generates a cartographic representation and classification of built-up areas, identifying (and even predicting) those areas requiring the most proximate planning and regulation. Furthermore, we show how different types of urban areas identified by the model co-evolve with the city, requiring policy regulation to be flexible and adaptive, acting just in time. The algorithmic implementation of the model is applicable to any built-up area and simple enough to pave the way for the automatic classification of urban areas worldwide. PMID:22829981

  12. Recurrence Quantification of Fractal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    By definition, fractal structures possess recurrent patterns. At different levels repeating patterns can be visualized at higher magnifications. The purpose of this chapter is threefold. First, general characteristics of dynamical systems are addressed from a theoretical mathematical perspective. Second, qualitative and quantitative recurrence analyses are reviewed in brief, but the reader is directed to other sources for explicit details. Third, example mathematical systems that generate strange attractors are explicitly defined, giving the reader the ability to reproduce the rich dynamics of continuous chaotic flows or discrete chaotic iterations. The challenge is then posited for the reader to study for themselves the recurrent structuring of these different dynamics. With a firm appreciation of the power of recurrence analysis, the reader will be prepared to turn their sights on real-world systems (physiological, psychological, mechanical, etc.). PMID:23060808

  13. Fractal characteristics of ozonometric network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruzdev, Alexander N.

    1994-01-01

    The fractal (correlation) dimensions are calculated which characterize the distribution of stations in the ground-based total ozone measuring network and the distribution of nodes in a latitude-longitude grid. The dimension of the ground-based ozonometric network equals 1.67 +/- 0.1 with an appropriate scaling in the 60 to 400 km range. For the latitude-longitude grid two scaling regimes are revealed. One regime, with the dimension somewhat greater than one, is peculiar to smaller scales and limited from a larger scale by the latitudinal resolution of the grid. Another scaling regime, with the dimension equal 1.84, ranges up to 15,000 km scale. The fact that the dimension of a measuring network is less than two possesses problems in observing sparse phenomena. This has to have important consequences for ozone statistics.

  14. Nanoflow over a fractal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, Michail; Frank, Michael; Drikakis, Dimitris

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of surface roughness on nanoflows using molecular dynamics simulations. A fractal model is employed to model wall roughness, and simulations are performed for liquid argon confined by two solid walls. It is shown that the surface roughness reduces the velocity in the proximity of the walls with the reduction being accentuated when increasing the roughness depth and wettability of the solid wall. It also makes the flow three-dimensional and anisotropic. In flows over idealized smooth surfaces, the liquid forms parallel, well-spaced layers, with a significant gap between the first layer and the solid wall. Rough walls distort the orderly distribution of fluid layers resulting in an incoherent formation of irregularly shaped fluid structures around and within the wall cavities.

  15. Fractal Signals & Space-Time Cartoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetama, -Hc, Jakob, , Dr; Maksoed, Wh-

    2016-03-01

    In ``Theory of Scale Relativity'', 1991- L. Nottale states whereas ``scale relativity is a geometrical & fractal space-time theory''. It took in comparisons to ``a unified, wavelet based framework for efficiently synthetizing, analyzing ∖7 processing several broad classes of fractal signals''-Gregory W. Wornell:``Signal Processing with Fractals'', 1995. Furthers, in Fig 1.1. a simple waveform from statistically scale-invariant random process [ibid.,h 3 ]. Accompanying RLE Technical Report 566 ``Synthesis, Analysis & Processing of Fractal Signals'' as well as from Wornell, Oct 1991 herewith intended to deducts =a Δt + (1 - β Δ t) ...in Petersen, et.al: ``Scale invariant properties of public debt growth'',2010 h. 38006p2 to [1/{1- (2 α (λ) /3 π) ln (λ/r)}depicts in Laurent Nottale,1991, h 24. Acknowledgment devotes to theLates HE. Mr. BrigadierGeneral-TNI[rtd].Prof. Ir. HANDOJO.

  16. Generalized fragmentation functions for fractal jet observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Benjamin T.; Procura, Massimiliano; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J.; Zhou, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a broad class of fractal jet observables that recursively probe the collective properties of hadrons produced in jet fragmentation. To describe these collinear-unsafe observables, we generalize the formalism of fragmentation functions, which are important objects in QCD for calculating cross sections involving identified final-state hadrons. Fragmentation functions are fundamentally nonperturbative, but have a calculable renormalization group evolution. Unlike ordinary fragmentation functions, generalized fragmentation functions exhibit nonlinear evolution, since fractal observables involve correlated subsets of hadrons within a jet. Some special cases of generalized fragmentation functions are reviewed, including jet charge and track functions. We then consider fractal jet observables that are based on hierarchical clustering trees, where the nonlinear evolution equations also exhibit tree-like structure at leading order. We develop a numeric code for performing this evolution and study its phenomenological implications. As an application, we present examples of fractal jet observables that are useful in discriminating quark jets from gluon jets.

  17. Fractal Geometry in the High School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Dane R.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses classroom activities that involve applications of fractal geometry. Includes an activity sheet that explores Pascal's triangle, Sierpinsky's gasket, and modular arithmetic in two and three dimensions. (Author/MKR)

  18. Fractal geometry is heritable in trees.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Joseph K; Bangert, Randy K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Trotter, R Talbot; Shuster, Stephen M; Whitham, Thomas G

    2004-09-01

    Understanding the genetic basis to landscape vegetation structure is an important step that will allow us to examine ecological and evolutionary processes at multiple spatial scales. Here for the first time we show that the fractal architecture of a dominant plant on the landscape exhibits high broad-sense heritability and thus has a genetic basis. The fractal architecture of trees is known to influence ecological communities associated with them. In a unidirectional cottonwood-hybridizing complex (Populus angustifolia x P. fremontii) pure and hybrid cottonwoods differed significantly in their fractal architecture, with phenotypic variance among backcross hybrids exceeding that of F1 hybrids and of pure narrowleaf cottonwoods by two-fold. This result provides a crucial link between genes and fractal scaling theory, and places the study of landscape ecology within an evolutionary framework.

  19. Fractal analysis of fracture in glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Mecholsky, J.J. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    The application of fractal geometry offers the potential to establish the scaling relationships between critical energies at all levels during fracture. The fracture energy, {gamma}, is directly related to the fractal dimensional increment, D*, and the elastic modulus, E: {gamma} = 0.5 E D* a{sub 0}, where the characteristic atomic parameter, a{sub 0}, can be interpreted as the fractal generator (on the atomic scale) or the process zone size. D* can be shown to be related to the crack/fracture-mirror size ratio. The purpose of this paper is to show the relationship between fractal geometry, fractography and the fracture process in the analysis of the fracture of glass ceramics. Examples of the fracture analysis of glass ceramics used as materials for dental restorations, radomes and electron generators will be presented.

  20. Riemann zeros, prime numbers, and fractal potentials.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Brandon P; Hutchinson, David A W

    2003-06-01

    Using two distinct inversion techniques, the local one-dimensional potentials for the Riemann zeros and prime number sequence are reconstructed. We establish that both inversion techniques, when applied to the same set of levels, lead to the same fractal potential. This provides numerical evidence that the potential obtained by inversion of a set of energy levels is unique in one dimension. We also investigate the fractal properties of the reconstructed potentials and estimate the fractal dimensions to be D=1.5 for the Riemann zeros and D=1.8 for the prime numbers. This result is somewhat surprising since the nearest-neighbor spacings of the Riemann zeros are known to be chaotically distributed, whereas the primes obey almost Poissonlike statistics. Our findings show that the fractal dimension is dependent on both level statistics and spectral rigidity, Delta(3), of the energy levels.

  1. Multiplexing of encrypted data using fractal masks.

    PubMed

    Barrera, John F; Tebaldi, Myrian; Amaya, Dafne; Furlan, Walter D; Monsoriu, Juan A; Bolognini, Néstor; Torroba, Roberto

    2012-07-15

    In this Letter, we present to the best of our knowledge a new all-optical technique for multiple-image encryption and multiplexing, based on fractal encrypting masks. The optical architecture is a joint transform correlator. The multiplexed encrypted data are stored in a photorefractive crystal. The fractal parameters of the key can be easily tuned to lead to a multiplexing operation without cross talk effects. Experimental results that support the potential of the method are presented.

  2. Fractals in petroleum geology and earth processes

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, C.C.; La Pointe, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    The editors of this book chose a diverse spectrum of papers written by pioneers in the field of fractals and their application to the exploration and production of hydrocarbons. The geology of the Earth`s crust is complex, chaotic, and unpredictable. Fractal geometry can quantify the spatial heterogeneity of the different geologic patterns and ultimately help improve the results of both production and exploration. To this goal the book has accomplished such an objective with diverse, well-chosen contributions from a variety of experts in the field. The book starts with a chapter introducing the basics, with a short historical foot-note by Benoit Mandelbrot, who is considered the {open_quotes}father of fractals.{close_quotes} Mandelbrot emphasized that geologic processes not only exhibit fractal properties but also are strongly connected to the economic system. This paved the way for the next three chapters that deal with the size and spatial distribution of hydrocarbon reserves and their importance in economic evaluations. The following four chapters deal with the fractal processes as related to sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geomorphologic systems. Chapter five is an interesting one that deals with stratigraphic models and how their fractal processes can be tied with the inter-well correlation and reconstruct depositional environments. The next three chapters are concerned with porous and fractured rocks and how they affect the flow of fluids. The last two chapters (chapters 13 and 14) are of particular interest. Chapter 13 deals with the vertical vs. horizontal well-log variability and application to fractal reservoir modeling. Chapter 14 illustrates how fractal geometry brings mathematical order to geological and geophysical disorder. This is evident when dealing with geophysical modeling and inversion.

  3. BOX DIMENSIONS OF α-FRACTAL FUNCTIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Md. Nasim; Prasad, M. Guru Prem; Navascués, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The box dimension of the graph of non-affine, continuous, nowhere differentiable function fα which is a fractal analogue of a continuous function f corresponding to a certain iterated function system (IFS), is investigated in the present paper. The estimates for box dimension of the graph of α-fractal function fα for equally spaced as well as arbitrary data sets are found.

  4. Fractal dimension and architecture of trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Fazzalari, N L; Parkinson, I H

    1996-01-01

    The fractal dimension of trabecular bone was determined for biopsies from the proximal femur of 25 subjects undergoing hip arthroplasty. The average age was 67.7 years. A binary profile of the trabecular bone in the biopsy was obtained from a digitized image. A program written for the Quantimet 520 performed the fractal analysis. The fractal dimension was calculated for each specimen, using boxes whose sides ranged from 65 to 1000 microns in length. The mean fractal dimension for the 25 subjects was 1.195 +/- 0.064 and shows that in Euclidean terms the surface extent of trabecular bone is indeterminate. The Quantimet 520 was also used to perform bone histomorphometric measurements. These were bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) (per cent) = 11.05 +/- 4.38, bone surface/total volume (BS/TV) (mm2/mm3) = 1.90 +/- 0.51, trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) (mm) = 0.12 +/- 0.03, trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp) (mm) = 1.03 +/- 0.36, and trabecular number (Tb.N) (number/mm) = 0.95 +/- 0.25. Pearsons' correlation coefficients showed a statistically significant relationship between the fractal dimension and all the histomorphometric parameters, with BV/TV (r = 0.85, P < 0.0001), BS/TV (r = 0.74, P < 0.0001), Tb.Th (r = 0.50, P < 0.02), Tb.Sp (r = -0.81, P < 0.0001), and Tb.N (r = 0.76, P < 0.0001). This method for calculating fractal dimension shows that trabecular bone exhibits fractal properties over a defined box size, which is within the dimensions of a structural unit for trabecular bone. Therefore, the fractal dimension of trabecular bone provides a measure which does not rely on Euclidean descriptors in order to describe a complex geometry.

  5. Fractal analysis of DNA sequence data

    SciTech Connect

    Berthelsen, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    DNA sequence databases are growing at an almost exponential rate. New analysis methods are needed to extract knowledge about the organization of nucleotides from this vast amount of data. Fractal analysis is a new scientific paradigm that has been used successfully in many domains including the biological and physical sciences. Biological growth is a nonlinear dynamic process and some have suggested that to consider fractal geometry as a biological design principle may be most productive. This research is an exploratory study of the application of fractal analysis to DNA sequence data. A simple random fractal, the random walk, is used to represent DNA sequences. The fractal dimension of these walks is then estimated using the [open quote]sandbox method[close quote]. Analysis of 164 human DNA sequences compared to three types of control sequences (random, base-content matched, and dimer-content matched) reveals that long-range correlations are present in DNA that are not explained by base or dimer frequencies. The study also revealed that the fractal dimension of coding sequences was significantly lower than sequences that were primarily noncoding, indicating the presence of longer-range correlations in functional sequences. The multifractal spectrum is used to analyze fractals that are heterogeneous and have a different fractal dimension for subsets with different scalings. The multifractal spectrum of the random walks of twelve mitochondrial genome sequences was estimated. Eight vertebrate mtDNA sequences had uniformly lower spectra values than did four invertebrate mtDNA sequences. Thus, vertebrate mitochondria show significantly longer-range correlations than to invertebrate mitochondria. The higher multifractal spectra values for invertebrate mitochondria suggest a more random organization of the sequences. This research also includes considerable theoretical work on the effects of finite size, embedding dimension, and scaling ranges.

  6. Electronic properties of fractal-glass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, William A.; Schwalm, Mizuho K.

    1989-06-01

    Analytic results are presented for four new fractal lattices. A basic similarity between fractals and homogeneous glassy networks is the fluctuating environments of the lattice sites. The fractals are classified in terms of their local bonding geometry by comparison with glassy networks: (1) amorphous graphite, (2) two-dimensional and (3) three-dimensional Zachariasen glasses of two components, and (4) a three-component, infinitely ramified glass model with fractal dimension d¯~=3 and spectral dimension d¯¯>2.5. Localization and size scaling of corner-to-corner propagation are investigated, and it is found that there is a transition from power-law to exponential dependence in the case of model (1) at a correlation length λ~=64. Edge states appear to play an important role in propagation over distances longer than λ. Effects of ring closure and site variety are studied by making two modifications to model (1). In the first, branch cuts unroll the ring structure into a Bethe lattice. In the second, the rings are severed, resulting in a fractal tree. Results suggest that noncontinuum spectral structure is more closely related to site variety than to connectedness or ring closure in these fractal-glass models. This is similar to Anderson localization in the homogeneous random case.

  7. Pulse regime in formation of fractal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-11-01

    The pulse regime of vaporization of a bulk metal located in a buffer gas is analyzed as a method of generation of metal atoms under the action of a plasma torch or a laser beam. Subsequently these atoms are transformed into solid nanoclusters, fractal aggregates and then into fractal fibers if the growth process proceeds in an external electric field. We are guided by metals in which transitions between s and d-electrons of their atoms are possible, since these metals are used as catalysts and filters in interaction with gas flows. The resistance of metal fractal structures to a gas flow is evaluated that allows one to find optimal parameters of a fractal structure for gas flow propagation through it. The thermal regime of interaction between a plasma pulse or a laser beam and a metal surface is analyzed. It is shown that the basic energy from an external source is consumed on a bulk metal heating, and the efficiency of atom evaporation from the metal surface, that is the ratio of energy fluxes for vaporization and heating, is 10-3-10-4 for transient metals under consideration. A typical energy flux ( 106 W/cm2), a typical surface temperature ( 3000 K), and a typical pulse duration ( 1 μs) provide a sufficient amount of evaporated atoms to generate fractal fibers such that each molecule of a gas flow collides with the skeleton of fractal fibers many times.

  8. Fractal Image Informatics: from SEM to DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleschko, K.; Parrot, J.-F.; Korvin, G.; Esteves, M.; Vauclin, M.; Torres-Argüelles, V.; Salado, C. Gaona; Cherkasov, S.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new branch of Fractal Geometry: Fractal Image Informatics, devoted to the systematic and standardized fractal analysis of images of natural systems. The methods of this discipline are based on the properties of multiscale images of selfaffine fractal surfaces. As proved in the paper, the image inherits the scaling and lacunarity of the surface and of its reflectance distribution [Korvin, 2005]. We claim that the fractal analysis of these images must be done without any smoothing, thresholding or binarization. Two new tools of Fractal Image Informatics, firmagram analysis (FA) and generalized lacunarity (GL), are presented and discussed in details. These techniques are applicable to any kind of image or to any observed positive-valued physical field, and can be used to correlate between images. It will be shown, by a modified Grassberger-Hentschel-Procaccia approach [Phys. Lett. 97A, 227 (1983); Physica 8D, 435 (1983)] that GL obeys the same scaling law as the Allain-Cloitre lacunarity [Phys. Rev. A 44, 3552 (1991)] but is free of the problems associated with gliding boxes. Several applications are shown from Soil Physics, Surface Science, and other fields.

  9. Pulse regime in formation of fractal fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-11-15

    The pulse regime of vaporization of a bulk metal located in a buffer gas is analyzed as a method of generation of metal atoms under the action of a plasma torch or a laser beam. Subsequently these atoms are transformed into solid nanoclusters, fractal aggregates and then into fractal fibers if the growth process proceeds in an external electric field. We are guided by metals in which transitions between s and d-electrons of their atoms are possible, since these metals are used as catalysts and filters in interaction with gas flows. The resistance of metal fractal structures to a gas flow is evaluated that allows one to find optimal parameters of a fractal structure for gas flow propagation through it. The thermal regime of interaction between a plasma pulse or a laser beam and a metal surface is analyzed. It is shown that the basic energy from an external source is consumed on a bulk metal heating, and the efficiency of atom evaporation from the metal surface, that is the ratio of energy fluxes for vaporization and heating, is 10{sup –3}–10{sup –4} for transient metals under consideration. A typical energy flux (~10{sup 6} W/cm{sup 2}), a typical surface temperature (~3000 K), and a typical pulse duration (~1 μs) provide a sufficient amount of evaporated atoms to generate fractal fibers such that each molecule of a gas flow collides with the skeleton of fractal fibers many times.

  10. The utility of fractal analysis in clinical neuroscience.

    PubMed

    John, Ann M; Elfanagely, Omar; Ayala, Carlos A; Cohen, Michael; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Physicians and scientists can use fractal analysis as a tool to objectively quantify complex patterns found in neuroscience and neurology. Fractal analysis has the potential to allow physicians to make predictions about clinical outcomes, categorize pathological states, and eventually generate diagnoses. In this review, we categorize and analyze the applications of fractal theory in neuroscience found in the literature. We discuss how fractals are applied and what evidence exists for fractal analysis in neurodegeneration, neoplasm, neurodevelopment, neurophysiology, epilepsy, neuropharmacology, and cell morphology. The goal of this review is to introduce the medical community to the utility of applying fractal theory in clinical neuroscience.

  11. Fractal analysis of deformation-induced dislocation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Zaiser, M. ); Bay, K. . Inst. fuer Theoretische und Angewandte Physik); Haehner, P. . Joint Research Centre TU Braunschweig . Inst. fuer Metallphysik und Nukleare Festkoerperphysik)

    1999-06-22

    The paper reports extensive analyses of the fractal geometry of cellular dislocation structures observed in Cu deformed in multiple-slip orientation. Several methods presented for the determination of fractal dimensions are shown to give consistent results. Criteria are formulated which allow the distinguishing of fractal from non-fractal patterns, and implications of fractal dislocation patterning for quantitative metallography are discussed in detail. For an interpretation of the findings a theoretical model is outlined according to which dislocation cell formation is associated to a noise-induced structural transition far from equilibrium. This allows relating the observed fractal dimensions to the stochastic properties of deformation by collective dislocation glide.

  12. Fractal Dimension in Epileptic EEG Signal Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthayakumar, R.

    Fractal Analysis is the well developed theory in the data analysis of non-linear time series. Especially Fractal Dimension is a powerful mathematical tool for modeling many physical and biological time signals with high complexity and irregularity. Fractal dimension is a suitable tool for analyzing the nonlinear behaviour and state of the many chaotic systems. Particularly in analysis of chaotic time series such as electroencephalograms (EEG), this feature has been used to identify and distinguish specific states of physiological function.Epilepsy is the main fatal neurological disorder in our brain, which is analyzed by the biomedical signal called Electroencephalogram (EEG). The detection of Epileptic seizures in the EEG Signals is an important tool in the diagnosis of epilepsy. So we made an attempt to analyze the EEG in depth for knowing the mystery of human consciousness. EEG has more fluctuations recorded from the human brain due to the spontaneous electrical activity. Hence EEG Signals are represented as Fractal Time Series.The algorithms of fractal dimension methods have weak ability to the estimation of complexity in the irregular graphs. Divider method is widely used to obtain the fractal dimension of curves embedded into a 2-dimensional space. The major problem is choosing initial and final step length of dividers. We propose a new algorithm based on the size measure relationship (SMR) method, quantifying the dimensional behaviour of irregular rectifiable graphs with minimum time complexity. The evidence for the suitability (equality with the nature of dimension) of the algorithm is illustrated graphically.We would like to demonstrate the criterion for the selection of dividers (minimum and maximum value) in the calculation of fractal dimension of the irregular curves with minimum time complexity. For that we design a new method of computing fractal dimension (FD) of biomedical waveforms. Compared to Higuchi's algorithm, advantages of this method include

  13. Fractal Gait Patterns Are Retained after Entrainment to a Fractal Stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Rhea, Christopher K.; Kiefer, Adam W.; Wittstein, Matthew W.; Leonard, Kelsey B.; MacPherson, Ryan P.; Wright, W. Geoffrey; Haran, F. Jay

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has shown that fractal patterns in gait can be altered by entraining to a fractal stimulus. However, little is understood about how long those patterns are retained or which factors may influence stronger entrainment or retention. In experiment one, participants walked on a treadmill for 45 continuous minutes, which was separated into three phases. The first 15 minutes (pre-synchronization phase) consisted of walking without a fractal stimulus, the second 15 minutes consisted of walking while entraining to a fractal visual stimulus (synchronization phase), and the last 15 minutes (post-synchronization phase) consisted of walking without the stimulus to determine if the patterns adopted from the stimulus were retained. Fractal gait patterns were strengthened during the synchronization phase and were retained in the post-synchronization phase. In experiment two, similar methods were used to compare a continuous fractal stimulus to a discrete fractal stimulus to determine which stimulus type led to more persistent fractal gait patterns in the synchronization and post-synchronization (i.e., retention) phases. Both stimulus types led to equally persistent patterns in the synchronization phase, but only the discrete fractal stimulus led to retention of the patterns. The results add to the growing body of literature showing that fractal gait patterns can be manipulated in a predictable manner. Further, our results add to the literature by showing that the newly adopted gait patterns are retained for up to 15 minutes after entrainment and showed that a discrete visual stimulus is a better method to influence retention. PMID:25221981

  14. Fractal analysis of yeast cell optical speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamholz, A.; Schneider, P. S.; Subramaniam, R.; Wong, P. K.; Lieberman, D. H.; Cheung, T. D.; Burgos, J.; Leon, K.; Romero, J.

    2006-02-01

    Steady state laser light propagation in diffuse media such as biological cells generally provide bulk parameter information, such as the mean free path and absorption, via the transmission profile. The accompanying optical speckle can be analyzed as a random spatial data series and its fractal dimension can be used to further classify biological media that show similar mean free path and absorption properties, such as those obtained from a single population. A population of yeast cells can be separated into different portions by centrifuge, and microscope analysis can be used to provide the population statistics. Fractal analysis of the speckle suggests that lower fractal dimension is associated with higher cell packing density. The spatial intensity correlation revealed that the higher cell packing gives rise to higher refractive index. A calibration sample system that behaves similar as the yeast samples in fractal dimension, spatial intensity correlation and diffusion was selected. Porous silicate slabs with different refractive index values controlled by water content were used for system calibration. The porous glass as well as the yeast random spatial data series fractal dimension was found to depend on the imaging resolution. The fractal method was also applied to fission yeast single cell fluorescent data as well as aging yeast optical data; and consistency was demonstrated. It is concluded that fractal analysis can be a high sensitivity tool for relative comparison of cell structure but that additional diffusion measurements are necessary for determining the optimal image resolution. Practical application to dental plaque bio-film and cam-pill endoscope images was also demonstrated.

  15. Box-covering algorithm for fractal dimension of weighted networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dai-Jun; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Hai-Xin; Hu, Yong; Deng, Yong; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2013-10-01

    Box-covering algorithm is a widely used method to measure the fractal dimension of complex networks. Existing researches mainly deal with the fractal dimension of unweighted networks. Here, the classical box covering algorithm is modified to deal with the fractal dimension of weighted networks. Box size length is obtained by accumulating the distance between two nodes connected directly and graph-coloring algorithm is based on the node strength. The proposed method is applied to calculate the fractal dimensions of the ``Sierpinski'' weighted fractal networks, the E.coli network, the Scientific collaboration network, the C.elegans network and the USAir97 network. Our results show that the proposed method is efficient when dealing with the fractal dimension problem of complex networks. We find that the fractal property is influenced by the edge-weight in weighted networks. The possible variation of fractal dimension due to changes in edge-weights of weighted networks is also discussed.

  16. Fractal analysis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fabrizii, Markus; Moinfar, Farid; Jelinek, Herbert F; Karperien, Audrey; Ahammer, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) represent precursor lesions of cervical cancer. These neoplastic lesions are traditionally subdivided into three categories CIN 1, CIN 2, and CIN 3, using microscopical criteria. The relation between grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and its fractal dimension was investigated to establish a basis for an objective diagnosis using the method proposed. Classical evaluation of the tissue samples was performed by an experienced gynecologic pathologist. Tissue samples were scanned and saved as digital images using Aperio scanner and software. After image segmentation the box counting method as well as multifractal methods were applied to determine the relation between fractal dimension and grades of CIN. A total of 46 images were used to compare the pathologist's neoplasia grades with the predicted groups obtained by fractal methods. Significant or highly significant differences between all grades of CIN could be found. The confusion matrix, comparing between pathologist's grading and predicted group by fractal methods showed a match of 87.1%. Multifractal spectra were able to differentiate between normal epithelium and low grade as well as high grade neoplasia. Fractal dimension can be considered to be an objective parameter to grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

  17. Fractal and multifractal analyses of bipartite networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jian; Yu, Zu-Guo; Xie, Xian-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Bipartite networks have attracted considerable interest in various fields. Fractality and multifractality of unipartite (classical) networks have been studied in recent years, but there is no work to study these properties of bipartite networks. In this paper, we try to unfold the self-similarity structure of bipartite networks by performing the fractal and multifractal analyses for a variety of real-world bipartite network data sets and models. First, we find the fractality in some bipartite networks, including the CiteULike, Netflix, MovieLens (ml-20m), Delicious data sets and (u, v)-flower model. Meanwhile, we observe the shifted power-law or exponential behavior in other several networks. We then focus on the multifractal properties of bipartite networks. Our results indicate that the multifractality exists in those bipartite networks possessing fractality. To capture the inherent attribute of bipartite network with two types different nodes, we give the different weights for the nodes of different classes, and show the existence of multifractality in these node-weighted bipartite networks. In addition, for the data sets with ratings, we modify the two existing algorithms for fractal and multifractal analyses of edge-weighted unipartite networks to study the self-similarity of the corresponding edge-weighted bipartite networks. The results show that our modified algorithms are feasible and can effectively uncover the self-similarity structure of these edge-weighted bipartite networks and their corresponding node-weighted versions. PMID:28361962

  18. Fractal and multifractal analyses of bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jian; Yu, Zu-Guo; Xie, Xian-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Bipartite networks have attracted considerable interest in various fields. Fractality and multifractality of unipartite (classical) networks have been studied in recent years, but there is no work to study these properties of bipartite networks. In this paper, we try to unfold the self-similarity structure of bipartite networks by performing the fractal and multifractal analyses for a variety of real-world bipartite network data sets and models. First, we find the fractality in some bipartite networks, including the CiteULike, Netflix, MovieLens (ml-20m), Delicious data sets and (u, v)-flower model. Meanwhile, we observe the shifted power-law or exponential behavior in other several networks. We then focus on the multifractal properties of bipartite networks. Our results indicate that the multifractality exists in those bipartite networks possessing fractality. To capture the inherent attribute of bipartite network with two types different nodes, we give the different weights for the nodes of different classes, and show the existence of multifractality in these node-weighted bipartite networks. In addition, for the data sets with ratings, we modify the two existing algorithms for fractal and multifractal analyses of edge-weighted unipartite networks to study the self-similarity of the corresponding edge-weighted bipartite networks. The results show that our modified algorithms are feasible and can effectively uncover the self-similarity structure of these edge-weighted bipartite networks and their corresponding node-weighted versions.

  19. Characterization of branch complexity by fractal analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alados, C.L.; Escos, J.; Emlen, J.M.; Freeman, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    The comparison between complexity in the sense of space occupancy (box-counting fractal dimension D(c) and information dimension D1) and heterogeneity in the sense of space distribution (average evenness index f and evenness variation coefficient J(cv)) were investigated in mathematical fractal objects and natural branch structures. In general, increased fractal dimension was paired with low heterogeneity. Comparisons between branch architecture in Anthyllis cytisoides under different slope exposure and grazing impact revealed that branches were more complex and more homogeneously distributed for plants on northern exposures than southern, while grazing had no impact during a wet year. Developmental instability was also investigated by the statistical noise of the allometric relation between internode length and node order. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that fractal dimension of branch structure can be used to analyze the structural organization of plants, especially if we consider not only fractal dimension but also shoot distribution within the canopy (lacunarity). These indexes together with developmental instability analyses are good indicators of growth responses to the environment.

  20. Fractal and multifractal analyses of bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jian; Yu, Zu-Guo; Xie, Xian-Hua

    2017-03-31

    Bipartite networks have attracted considerable interest in various fields. Fractality and multifractality of unipartite (classical) networks have been studied in recent years, but there is no work to study these properties of bipartite networks. In this paper, we try to unfold the self-similarity structure of bipartite networks by performing the fractal and multifractal analyses for a variety of real-world bipartite network data sets and models. First, we find the fractality in some bipartite networks, including the CiteULike, Netflix, MovieLens (ml-20m), Delicious data sets and (u, v)-flower model. Meanwhile, we observe the shifted power-law or exponential behavior in other several networks. We then focus on the multifractal properties of bipartite networks. Our results indicate that the multifractality exists in those bipartite networks possessing fractality. To capture the inherent attribute of bipartite network with two types different nodes, we give the different weights for the nodes of different classes, and show the existence of multifractality in these node-weighted bipartite networks. In addition, for the data sets with ratings, we modify the two existing algorithms for fractal and multifractal analyses of edge-weighted unipartite networks to study the self-similarity of the corresponding edge-weighted bipartite networks. The results show that our modified algorithms are feasible and can effectively uncover the self-similarity structure of these edge-weighted bipartite networks and their corresponding node-weighted versions.

  1. Rheological and fractal hydrodynamics of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Tijani, H I; Abdullah, N; Yuzir, A; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-06-01

    The structural and hydrodynamic features for granules were characterized using settling experiments, predefined mathematical simulations and ImageJ-particle analyses. This study describes the rheological characterization of these biologically immobilized aggregates under non-Newtonian flows. The second order dimensional analysis defined as D2=1.795 for native clusters and D2=1.099 for dewatered clusters and a characteristic three-dimensional fractal dimension of 2.46 depicts that these relatively porous and differentially permeable fractals had a structural configuration in close proximity with that described for a compact sphere formed via cluster-cluster aggregation. The three-dimensional fractal dimension calculated via settling-fractal correlation, U∝l(D) to characterize immobilized granules validates the quantitative measurements used for describing its structural integrity and aggregate complexity. These results suggest that scaling relationships based on fractal geometry are vital for quantifying the effects of different laminar conditions on the aggregates' morphology and characteristics such as density, porosity, and projected surface area.

  2. Fractal modeling of natural fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ferer, M.; Dean, B.; Mick, C.

    1995-06-01

    West Virginia University will implement procedures for a fractal analysis of fractures in reservoirs. This procedure will be applied to fracture networks in outcrops and to fractures intersecting horizontal boreholes. The parameters resulting from this analysis will be used to generate synthetic fracture networks with the same fractal characteristics as the real networks. Recovery from naturally fractured, tight-gas reservoirs is controlled by the fracture network. Reliable characterization of the actual fracture network in the reservoir is severely limited. The location and orientation of fractures intersecting the borehole can be determined, but the length of these fractures cannot be unambiguously determined. Because of the lack of detailed information about the actual fracture network, modeling methods must represent the porosity and permeability associated with the fracture network, as accurately as possible with very little a priori information. In the sections following, the authors will (1) present fractal analysis of the MWX site, using the box-counting procedure; (2) review evidence testing the fractal nature of fracture distributions and discuss the advantages of using the fractal analysis over a stochastic analysis; and (3) present an efficient algorithm for producing a self-similar fracture networks which mimic the real MWX outcrop fracture network.

  3. Characterizing Hyperspectral Imagery (AVIRIS) Using Fractal Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Hong-Lie; Lam, Nina Siu-Ngan; Quattrochi, Dale

    1997-01-01

    With the rapid increase in hyperspectral data acquired by various experimental hyperspectral imaging sensors, it is necessary to develop efficient and innovative tools to handle and analyze these data. The objective of this study is to seek effective spatial analytical tools for summarizing the spatial patterns of hyperspectral imaging data. In this paper, we (1) examine how fractal dimension D changes across spectral bands of hyperspectral imaging data and (2) determine the relationships between fractal dimension and image content. It has been documented that fractal dimension changes across spectral bands for the Landsat-TM data and its value [(D)] is largely a function of the complexity of the landscape under study. The newly available hyperspectral imaging data such as that from the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) which has 224 bands, covers a wider spectral range with a much finer spectral resolution. Our preliminary result shows that fractal dimension values of AVIRIS scenes from the Santa Monica Mountains in California vary between 2.25 and 2.99. However, high fractal dimension values (D > 2.8) are found only from spectral bands with high noise level and bands with good image quality have a fairly stable dimension value (D = 2.5 - 2.6). This suggests that D can also be used as a summary statistics to represent the image quality or content of spectral bands.

  4. Characterizing Hyperspectral Imagery (AVIRIS) Using Fractal Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Hong-Lie; Lam, Nina Siu-Ngan; Quattrochi, Dale

    1997-01-01

    With the rapid increase in hyperspectral data acquired by various experimental hyperspectral imaging sensors, it is necessary to develop efficient and innovative tools to handle and analyze these data. The objective of this study is to seek effective spatial analytical tools for summarizing the spatial patterns of hyperspectral imaging data. In this paper, we (1) examine how fractal dimension D changes across spectral bands of hyperspectral imaging data and (2) determine the relationships between fractal dimension and image content. It has been documented that fractal dimension changes across spectral bands for the Landsat-TM data and its value [(D)] is largely a function of the complexity of the landscape under study. The newly available hyperspectral imaging data such as that from the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) which has 224 bands, covers a wider spectral range with a much finer spectral resolution. Our preliminary result shows that fractal dimension values of AVIRIS scenes from the Santa Monica Mountains in California vary between 2.25 and 2.99. However, high fractal dimension values (D > 2.8) are found only from spectral bands with high noise level and bands with good image quality have a fairly stable dimension value (D = 2.5 - 2.6). This suggests that D can also be used as a summary statistics to represent the image quality or content of spectral bands.

  5. MRI Image Processing Based on Fractal Analysis

    PubMed

    Marusina, Mariya Y; Mochalina, Alexandra P; Frolova, Ekaterina P; Satikov, Valentin I; Barchuk, Anton A; Kuznetcov, Vladimir I; Gaidukov, Vadim S; Tarakanov, Segrey A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cancer is one of the most common causes of human mortality, with about 14 million new cases and 8.2 million deaths reported in in 2012. Early diagnosis of cancer through screening allows interventions to reduce mortality. Fractal analysis of medical images may be useful for this purpose. Materials and Methods: In this study, we examined magnetic resonance (MR) images of healthy livers and livers containing metastases from colorectal cancer. The fractal dimension and the Hurst exponent were chosen as diagnostic features for tomographic imaging using Image J software package for image processings FracLac for applied for fractal analysis with a 120x150 pixel area. Calculations of the fractal dimensions of pathological and healthy tissue samples were performed using the box-counting method. Results: In pathological cases (foci formation), the Hurst exponent was less than 0.5 (the region of unstable statistical characteristics). For healthy tissue, the Hurst index is greater than 0.5 (the zone of stable characteristics). Conclusions: The study indicated the possibility of employing fractal rapid analysis for the detection of focal lesions of the liver. The Hurst exponent can be used as an important diagnostic characteristic for analysis of medical images.

  6. Construction of fractal nanostructures based on Kepler-Shubnikov nets

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V. V. Talanov, V. M.

    2013-05-15

    A system of information codes for deterministic fractal lattices and sets of multifractal curves is proposed. An iterative modular design was used to obtain a series of deterministic fractal lattices with generators in the form of fragments of 2D structures and a series of multifractal curves (based on some Kepler-Shubnikov nets) having Cantor set properties. The main characteristics of fractal structures and their lacunar spectra are determined. A hierarchical principle is formulated for modules of regular fractal structures.

  7. Evolution of Fractal Patterns during a Classical-Quantum Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Micolich, A. P.; Taylor, R. P.; Davies, A. G.; Bird, J. P.; Newbury, R.; Fromhold, T. M.; Ehlert, A.; Linke, H.; Macks, L. D.; Tribe, W. R.

    2001-07-16

    We investigate how fractals evolve into nonfractal behavior as the generation process is gradually suppressed. Fractals observed in the conductance of semiconductor billiards are of particular interest because the generation process is semiclassical and can be suppressed by transitions towards either fully classical or fully quantum-mechanical conduction. Investigating a range of billiards, we identify a ''universal'' behavior in the changeover from fractal to nonfractal conductance, which is described by a smooth evolution rather than deterioration in the fractal scaling properties.

  8. Investigation into How 8th Grade Students Define Fractals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakus, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of 8th grade students' concept definitions and concept images can provide information about their mental schema of fractals. There is limited research on students' understanding and definitions of fractals. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the elementary students' definitions of fractals based on concept image and concept…

  9. Fresnel diffraction of fractal grating and self-imaging effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhong; Zhang, Wei; Cui, Yuwei; Teng, Shuyun

    2014-04-01

    Based on the self-similarity property of fractal, two types of fractal gratings are produced according to the production and addition operations of multiple periodic gratings. Fresnel diffractions of fractal grating are analyzed theoretically, and the general mathematic expressions of the diffraction intensity distributions of fractal grating are deduced. The gray-scale patterns of the 2D diffraction distributions of fractal grating are provided through numerical calculations. The diffraction patterns take on the periodicity along the longitude and transverse directions. The 1D diffraction distribution at some certain distances shows the same structure as the fractal grating. This indicates that the self-image of fractal grating is really formed in the Fresnel diffraction region. The experimental measurement of the diffraction intensity distribution of fractal grating with different fractal dimensions and different fractal levels is performed, and the self-images of fractal grating are obtained successfully in experiments. The conclusions of this paper are helpful for the development of the application of fractal grating.

  10. Dynamics of fractals in Euclidean and measure spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahidul Islam, Md.; Jahurul Islam, Md.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we formulate iterated function system of the square fractal and three dimensional fractals such as the Mensger sponge and the Sierpinski tetrahedron using affine transformation method and fixed points method of Devaney [1]. We show that these functions are asymptotically stable and also the Lebesgue measures of these fractals are zero.

  11. Fractals and the irreducibility of consciousness in plants and animals

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, John

    2013-01-01

    In both plants and animals consciousness is fractal. Since fractals can only pass information in one direction it is impossible to extrapolate backward to find the rule that governs the fractal. Thus, similarly, it will be impossible to completely determine the rule or rules that govern consciousness. PMID:23759545

  12. Fractals and the irreducibility of consciousness in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, John

    2013-08-01

    In both plants and animals consciousness is fractal. Since fractals can only pass information in one direction it is impossible to extrapolate backward to find the rule that governs the fractal. Thus, similarly, it will be impossible to completely determine the rule or rules that govern consciousness.

  13. Fractal Image Filters for Specialized Image Recognition Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-11

    The Fractal Geometry of Nature, [24], Mandelbrot argues that random frac- tals provide geometrical models for naturally occurring shapes and forms...Fractal Properties of Number Systems, Period. Math. Hungar 42 (2001) 51-68. [24] Benoit Mandelbrot , The Fractal Geometry of Nature, W. H. Freeman, San

  14. Multiscale differential fractal feature with application to target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zelin; Wei, Ying; Huang, Shabai

    2004-07-01

    A multiscale differential fractal feature of an image is proposed and a small target detection method from complex nature clutter is presented. Considering the speciality that the fractal features of man-made objects change much more violently than that of nature's when the scale is varied, fractal features at multiple scales used for distinguishing man-made target from nature clutter should have more advantages over standard fractal dimensions. Multiscale differential fractal dimensions are deduced from typical fractal model and standard covering-blanket method is improved and used to estimate multiscale fractal dimensions. A multiscale differential fractal feature is defined as the variation of fractal dimensions between two scales at a rational scale range. It can stand out the fractal feature of man-made object from natural clutters much better than the fractal dimension by standard covering-blanket method. Meanwhile, the calculation and the storage amount are reduced greatly, they are 4/M and 2/M that of the standard covering-blanket method respectively (M is scale). In the image of multiscale differential fractal feature, local gray histogram statistical method is used for target detection. Experiment results indicate that this method is suitable for both kinds background of land and sea. It also can be appropriate in both kinds of infrared and TV images, and can detect small targets from a single frame correctly. This method is with high speed and is easy to be implemented.

  15. Fractal analysis: fractal dimension and lacunarity from MR images for differentiating the grades of glioma.

    PubMed

    Smitha, K A; Gupta, A K; Jayasree, R S

    2015-09-07

    Glioma, the heterogeneous tumors originating from glial cells, generally exhibit varied grades and are difficult to differentiate using conventional MR imaging techniques. When this differentiation is crucial in the disease prognosis and treatment, even the advanced MR imaging techniques fail to provide a higher discriminative power for the differentiation of malignant tumor from benign ones. A powerful image processing technique applied to the imaging techniques is expected to provide a better differentiation. The present study focuses on the fractal analysis of fluid attenuation inversion recovery MR images, for the differentiation of glioma. For this, we have considered the most important parameters of fractal analysis, fractal dimension and lacunarity. While fractal analysis assesses the malignancy and complexity of a fractal object, lacunarity gives an indication on the empty space and the degree of inhomogeneity in the fractal objects. Box counting method with the preprocessing steps namely binarization, dilation and outlining was used to obtain the fractal dimension and lacunarity in glioma. Statistical analysis such as one-way analysis of variance and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis helped to compare the mean and to find discriminative sensitivity of the results. It was found that the lacunarity of low and high grade gliomas vary significantly. ROC curve analysis between low and high grade glioma for fractal dimension and lacunarity yielded 70.3% sensitivity and 66.7% specificity and 70.3% sensitivity and 88.9% specificity, respectively. The study observes that fractal dimension and lacunarity increases with an increase in the grade of glioma and lacunarity is helpful in identifying most malignant grades.

  16. Trabecular Pattern Analysis Using Fractal Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Takayuki; Yamashita, Kazuya; Takigawa, Atsushi; Kariya, Komyo; Itoh, Hiroshi

    1993-04-01

    Feature extraction from a digitized image is advantageous for the detection of signs of disease. In this work, we attempted to evaluate bone trabecular pattern changes in osteoporosis using the fractal dimension and the root mean square (RMS) values. The relationship between the fractal dimension and the 1st moment of the power spectrum is explored, and we investigated the relationship between the results of this analysis and the bone mineral density (BMD) value which was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). As a result, we were able to extract useful information, using the fractal dimension and the RMS value of the radiographs (lateral view of the lumbar vertebrae), for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Abnormal clinical cases were separated from normal cases based on the evaluation values. Negligible correlation between the BMD value and these indexes was observed.

  17. Chaos, fractals, and our concept of disease.

    PubMed

    Varela, Manuel; Ruiz-Esteban, Raul; Mestre de Juan, Maria Jose

    2010-01-01

    The classic anatomo-clinic paradigm based on clinical syndromes is fraught with problems. Nevertheless, for multiple reasons, clinicians are reluctant to embrace a more pathophysiological approach, even though this is the prevalent paradigm under "which basic sciences work. In recent decades, nonlinear dynamics ("chaos theory") and fractal geometry have provided powerful new tools to analyze physiological systems. However, these tools are embedded in the pathophysiological perspective and are not easily translated to our classic syndromes. This article comments on the problems raised by the conventional anatomo-clinic paradigm and reviews three areas in which the influence of nonlinear dynamics and fractal geometry can be especially prominent: disease as a loss of complexity, the idea of homeostasis, and fractals in pathology.

  18. Retinal fractals and acute lacunar stroke.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ning; Liew, Gerald; Lindley, Richard I; Liu, Erica Y; Wang, Jie Jin; Hand, Peter; Baker, Michelle; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Y

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to determine whether retinal fractal dimension, a quantitative measure of microvascular branching complexity and density, is associated with lacunar stroke. A total of 392 patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke had retinal fractal dimension measured from digital photographs, and lacunar infarct ascertained from brain imaging. After adjusting for age, gender, and vascular risk factors, higher retinal fractal dimension (highest vs lowest quartile and per standard deviation increase) was independently and positively associated with lacunar stroke (odds ratio [OR], 4.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-12.17 and OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.20-2.84, respectively). Increased retinal microvascular complexity and density is associated with lacunar stroke.

  19. ``the Human BRAIN & Fractal quantum mechanics''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    In mtDNA ever retrieved from Iman Tuassoly, et.al:Multifractal analysis of chaos game representation images of mtDNA''.Enhances the price & valuetales of HE. Prof. Dr-Ing. B.J. HABIBIE's N-219, in J. Bacteriology, Nov 1973 sought:'' 219 exist as separate plasmidDNA species in E.coli & Salmonella panama'' related to ``the brain 2 distinct molecular forms of the (Na,K)-ATPase..'' & ``neuron maintains different concentration of ions(charged atoms'' thorough Rabi & Heisenber Hamiltonian. Further, after ``fractal space time are geometric analogue of relativistic quantum mechanics''[Ord], sought L.Marek Crnjac: ``Chaotic fractals at the root of relativistic quantum physics''& from famous Nottale: ``Scale relativity & fractal space-time:''Application to Quantum Physics , Cosmology & Chaotic systems'',1995. Acknowledgements to HE. Mr. H. TUK SETYOHADI, Jl. Sriwijaya Raya 3, South-Jakarta, INDONESIA.

  20. Higuchi fractal properties of onset epilepsy electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Khoa, Truong Quang Dang; Ha, Vo Quang; Toi, Vo Van

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is a medical term which indicates a common neurological disorder characterized by seizures, because of abnormal neuronal activity. This leads to unconsciousness or even a convulsion. The possible etiologies should be evaluated and treated. Therefore, it is necessary to concentrate not only on finding out efficient treatment methods, but also on developing algorithm to support diagnosis. Currently, there are a number of algorithms, especially nonlinear algorithms. However, those algorithms have some difficulties one of which is the impact of noise on the results. In this paper, in addition to the use of fractal dimension as a principal tool to diagnose epilepsy, the combination between ICA algorithm and averaging filter at the preprocessing step leads to some positive results. The combination which improved the fractal algorithm become robust with noise on EEG signals. As a result, we can see clearly fractal properties in preictal and ictal period so as to epileptic diagnosis.

  1. Finite transformers for construction of fractal curves

    SciTech Connect

    Lisovik, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we continue the study of infinite R{sup n}-transformers that can be used to define real functions and three-dimensional curves. An R{sup n}-transformer A generates an output n-tuple A(x) = (Y{sub 1},...,Y{sub n}), consisting of output binary representations. We have previously shown that finite R{sup n}-transformers with n = 1, 2 can be used to define a continuous, nowhere differentiable function and a Peano curve. Curves of this kind are objects of fractal geometry. Here we show that some other fractal curves, which are analogs of the Koch curve and the Sierpinski napkin, can be defined by finite R{sup 2}-transformers. R{sup n}-transformers (and also finite R{sup n}-transformers) thus provide a convenient tool for definition of fractal curves.

  2. Fractal dynamics in chaotic quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Kotimäki, V; Räsänen, E; Hennig, H; Heller, E J

    2013-08-01

    Despite several experiments on chaotic quantum transport in two-dimensional systems such as semiconductor quantum dots, corresponding quantum simulations within a real-space model have been out of reach so far. Here we carry out quantum transport calculations in real space and real time for a two-dimensional stadium cavity that shows chaotic dynamics. By applying a large set of magnetic fields we obtain a complete picture of magnetoconductance that indicates fractal scaling. In the calculations of the fractality we use detrended fluctuation analysis-a widely used method in time-series analysis-and show its usefulness in the interpretation of the conductance curves. Comparison with a standard method to extract the fractal dimension leads to consistent results that in turn qualitatively agree with the previous experimental data.

  3. Fractal characterization of wear-erosion surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.; Tylczak, J.

    1999-12-01

    Wear erosion is a complex phenomenon resulting in highly distorted and deformed surface morphologies. Most wear surface features have been described only qualitatively. In this study wear surfaces features were quantified using fractal analysis. The ability to assign numerical values to wear-erosion surfaces makes possible mathematical expressions that will enable wear mechanisms to be predicted and understood. Surface characterization came from wear-erosion experiments that included varying the erosive materials, the impact velocity, and the impact angle. Seven fractal analytical techniques were applied to micrograph images of wear-erosion surfaces. Fourier analysis was the most promising. Fractal values obtained were consistent with visual observations and provided a unique wear-erosion parameter unrelated to wear rate. In this study stainless steel was evaluated as a function of wear erosion conditions.

  4. Fractal characterization of wear-erosion surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, James C.; Tylczak, Joseph H.

    1999-12-01

    Wear erosion is a complex phenomenon resulting in highly distorted and deformed surface morphologies. Most wear surface features have been described only qualitatively. In this study wear surfaces features were quantified using fractal analysis. The ability to assign numerical values to wear-erosion surfaces makes possible mathematical expressions that will enable wear mechanisms to be predicted and understood. Surface characterization came from wear-erosion experiments that included varying the erosive materials, the impact velocity, and the impact angle. Seven fractal analytical techniques were applied to micrograph images of wear-erosion surfaces. Fourier analysis was the most promising. Fractal values obtained were consistent with visual observations and provided a unique wear-erosion parameter unrelated to wear rate.

  5. Scaling and fractal behaviour underlying meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Waxman, D; Stoletzki, N

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate some of the mathematical properties of meiotic recombination. Working within the framework of a genetic model with n loci, where alpha alleles are possible at each locus, we find that the proportion of all possible diploid parental genotypes that can produce a particular haploid gamete is exp[-n log(alpha(2)/[2alpha-1])]. We show that this proportion connects recombination with a fractal geometry of dimension log(2alpha-1)/log(alpha). The fractal dimension of a geometric object manifests itself when it is measured at increasingly smaller length scales. Decreasing the length scale of a geometric object is found to be directly analogous, in a genetics problem, to specifying a multilocus haplotype at a larger number of loci, and it is here that the fractal dimension reveals itself.

  6. Fractal structure of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Under some conditions, time series of the interplanetary magnetic field strength and components have the properties of fractal curves. Magnetic field measurements made near 8.5 AU by Voyager 2 from June 5 to August 24, 1981 were self-similar over time scales from approximately 20 sec to approximately 3 x 100,000 sec, and the fractal dimension of the time series of the strength and components of the magnetic field was D = 5/3, corresponding to a power spectrum P(f) approximately f sup -5/3. Since the Kolmogorov spectrum for homogeneous, isotropic, stationary turbulence is also f sup -5/3, the Voyager 2 measurements are consistent with the observation of an inertial range of turbulence extending over approximately four decades in frequency. Interaction regions probably contributed most of the power in this interval. As an example, one interaction region is discussed in which the magnetic field had a fractal dimension D = 5/3.

  7. Edges of Saturn's rings are fractal.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The images recently sent by the Cassini spacecraft mission (on the NASA website http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/halloffame/) show the complex and beautiful rings of Saturn. Over the past few decades, various conjectures were advanced that Saturn's rings are Cantor-like sets, although no convincing fractal analysis of actual images has ever appeared. Here we focus on four images sent by the Cassini spacecraft mission (slide #42 "Mapping Clumps in Saturn's Rings", slide #54 "Scattered Sunshine", slide #66 taken two weeks before the planet's Augus't 200'9 equinox, and slide #68 showing edge waves raised by Daphnis on the Keeler Gap) and one image from the Voyager 2' mission in 1981. Using three box-counting methods, we determine the fractal dimension of edges of rings seen here to be consistently about 1.63 ~ 1.78. This clarifies in what sense Saturn's rings are fractal.

  8. Exotic topological order from quantum fractal code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Beni

    2014-03-01

    We present a large class of three-dimensional spin models that possess topological order with stability against local perturbations, but are beyond description of topological quantum field theory. Conventional topological spin liquids, on a formal level, may be viewed as condensation of string-like extended objects with discrete gauge symmetries, being at fixed points with continuous scale symmetries. In contrast, ground states of fractal spin liquids are condensation of highly-fluctuating fractal objects with certain algebraic symmetries, corresponding to limit cycles under real-space renormalization group transformations which naturally arise from discrete scale symmetries of underlying fractal geometries. A particular class of three-dimensional models proposed in this paper may potentially saturate quantum information storage capacity for local spin systems.

  9. Exotic topological order in fractal spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Beni

    2013-09-01

    We present a large class of three-dimensional spin models that possess topological order with stability against local perturbations, but are beyond description of topological quantum field theory. Conventional topological spin liquids, on a formal level, may be viewed as condensation of stringlike extended objects with discrete gauge symmetries, being at fixed points with continuous scale symmetries. In contrast, ground states of fractal spin liquids are condensation of highly fluctuating fractal objects with certain algebraic symmetries, corresponding to limit cycles under real-space renormalization group transformations which naturally arise from discrete scale symmetries of underlying fractal geometries. A particular class of three-dimensional models proposed in this paper may potentially saturate quantum information storage capacity for local spin systems.

  10. Fractal and Multifractal Analysis of Human Gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; del Río Correa, J. L.; Angulo-Brown, F.

    2003-09-01

    We carried out a fractal and multifractal analysis of human gait time series of young and old individuals, and adults with three illnesses that affect the march: The Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We obtained cumulative plots of events, the correlation function, the Hurst exponent and the Higuchi's fractal dimension of these time series and found that these fractal markers could be a factor to characterize the march, since we obtained different values of these quantities for youths and adults and they are different also for healthy and ill persons and the most anomalous values belong to ill persons. In other physiological signals there is complexity lost related with the age and the illness, in the case of the march the opposite occurs. The multifractal analysis could be also a useful tool to understand the dynamics of these and other complex systems.

  11. Fractal design concepts for stretchable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jonathan A.; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Su, Yewang; Hattori, Yoshiaki; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sung-Young; Zhang, Yihui; Liu, Zhuangjian; Cheng, Huanyu; Falgout, Leo; Bajema, Mike; Coleman, Todd; Gregoire, Dan; Larsen, Ryan J.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-02-01

    Stretchable electronics provide a foundation for applications that exceed the scope of conventional wafer and circuit board technologies due to their unique capacity to integrate with soft materials and curvilinear surfaces. The range of possibilities is predicated on the development of device architectures that simultaneously offer advanced electronic function and compliant mechanics. Here we report that thin films of hard electronic materials patterned in deterministic fractal motifs and bonded to elastomers enable unusual mechanics with important implications in stretchable device design. In particular, we demonstrate the utility of Peano, Greek cross, Vicsek and other fractal constructs to yield space-filling structures of electronic materials, including monocrystalline silicon, for electrophysiological sensors, precision monitors and actuators, and radio frequency antennas. These devices support conformal mounting on the skin and have unique properties such as invisibility under magnetic resonance imaging. The results suggest that fractal-based layouts represent important strategies for hard-soft materials integration.

  12. Fractal design concepts for stretchable electronics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jonathan A; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Su, Yewang; Hattori, Yoshiaki; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sung-Young; Zhang, Yihui; Liu, Zhuangjian; Cheng, Huanyu; Falgout, Leo; Bajema, Mike; Coleman, Todd; Gregoire, Dan; Larsen, Ryan J; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-01-01

    Stretchable electronics provide a foundation for applications that exceed the scope of conventional wafer and circuit board technologies due to their unique capacity to integrate with soft materials and curvilinear surfaces. The range of possibilities is predicated on the development of device architectures that simultaneously offer advanced electronic function and compliant mechanics. Here we report that thin films of hard electronic materials patterned in deterministic fractal motifs and bonded to elastomers enable unusual mechanics with important implications in stretchable device design. In particular, we demonstrate the utility of Peano, Greek cross, Vicsek and other fractal constructs to yield space-filling structures of electronic materials, including monocrystalline silicon, for electrophysiological sensors, precision monitors and actuators, and radio frequency antennas. These devices support conformal mounting on the skin and have unique properties such as invisibility under magnetic resonance imaging. The results suggest that fractal-based layouts represent important strategies for hard-soft materials integration.

  13. Dynamic structure factor of vibrating fractals.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Klafter, Joseph; Granek, Rony

    2012-02-10

    Motivated by novel experimental work and the lack of an adequate theory, we study the dynamic structure factor S(k,t) of large vibrating fractal networks at large wave numbers k. We show that the decay of S(k,t) is dominated by the spatially averaged mean square displacement of a network node, which evolves subdiffusively in time, ((u[over →](i)(t)-u[over →](i)(0))(2))∼t(ν), where ν depends on the spectral dimension d(s) and fractal dimension d(f). As a result, S(k,t) decays as a stretched exponential S(k,t)≈S(k)e(-(Γ(k)t)(ν)) with Γ(k)∼k(2/ν). Applications to a variety of fractal-like systems are elucidated.

  14. Fractal dynamics in chaotic quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotimäki, V.; Räsänen, E.; Hennig, H.; Heller, E. J.

    2013-08-01

    Despite several experiments on chaotic quantum transport in two-dimensional systems such as semiconductor quantum dots, corresponding quantum simulations within a real-space model have been out of reach so far. Here we carry out quantum transport calculations in real space and real time for a two-dimensional stadium cavity that shows chaotic dynamics. By applying a large set of magnetic fields we obtain a complete picture of magnetoconductance that indicates fractal scaling. In the calculations of the fractality we use detrended fluctuation analysis—a widely used method in time-series analysis—and show its usefulness in the interpretation of the conductance curves. Comparison with a standard method to extract the fractal dimension leads to consistent results that in turn qualitatively agree with the previous experimental data.

  15. On the Classification of Fractal Squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun Jason; Liu, Jing-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In the previous paper [K. S. Lau, J. J. Luo and H. Rao, Topological structure of fractal squares, Math. Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 155 (2013) 73-86], Lau, Luo and Rao completely classified the topological structure of so called fractal square F defined by F = (F + 𝒟)/n, where 𝒟 ⊊ {0, 1,…,n - 1}2,n ≥ 2. In this paper, we further provide simple criteria for the F to be totally disconnected, then we discuss the Lipschitz classification of F in the case n = 3, which is an attempt to consider non-totally disconnected sets.

  16. Fractal characterization of neural correlates of consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibañez-Molina, A. J.; Iglesias-Parro, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present a novel experimental paradigm, based on binocular rivalry, to address the study of internally and externally generated conscious percepts. Assuming the nonlinear nature of the EEG signals, we propose the use of fractal dimension to characterize the complexity of the EEG associated with each percept. Data analysis showed significant differences in complexity between the internally and externally generated percepts. Moreover, EEG complexity of auditory and visual percepts was unequal. These results support fractal dimension analyses as a new tool to characterize conscious perception.

  17. Estimation of fractal dimensions from transect data

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C.

    1994-04-01

    Fractals are a useful tool for analyzing the topology of objects such as coral reefs, forest canopies, and landscapes. Transects are often studied in these contexts, and fractal dimensions computed from them. An open question is how representative a single transect is. Transects may also be used to estimate the dimensionality of a surface. Again the question of representativeness of the transect arises. These two issues are related. This note qualifies the conditions under which transect data may be considered to be representative or may be extrapolated, based on both theoretical and empirical results.

  18. Unifying iteration rule for fractal objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, A.; Parisi, J.; Peinke, J.; Baier, G.; Klein, M.; Rössler, O. E.

    1997-03-01

    We introduce an iteration rule for real numbers capable to generate attractors with dragon-, snowflake-, sponge-, or Swiss-flag-like cross sections. The idea behind it is the mapping of a torus into two (or more) shrunken and twisted tori located inside the previous one. Three distinct parameters define the symmetry, the dimension, and the connectedness or disconnectedness of the fractal object. For some selected triples of parameter values, a couple of well known fractal geometries (e.g. the Cantor set, the Sierpinski gasket, or the Swiss flag) can be gained as special cases.

  19. The Fractal Simulation Of Biological Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    1989-04-01

    This paper provides a light introduction to simple graphics techniques for visualizing a large class of biological shapes generated from recursive algorithms. In order to capture some of the structural richness inherent in organisms, the algorithms produce not only extreme variability but also a high level of organization. The material primarily comes from previous published works of the author. For a general background on fractal methods in mathematics and science, see Mandelbrot's famous book. For research on the fractal characterization of other biological structures, such as the lung's bronchial tree and the surfaces of protein molecules.

  20. Fractal boundaries in magnetotail particle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Rexford, J. L.; Lee, Y. C.

    1990-01-01

    It has been recently established that particle dynamics in the magnetotail geometry can be described as a nonintegrable Hamiltonian system with well-defined entry and exit regions through which stochastic orbits can enter and exit the system after repeatedly crossing the equatorial plane. It is shown that the phase space regions occupied by orbits of different numbers of equatorial crossings or different exit modes are separated by fractal boundaries. The fractal boundaries in an entry region for stochastic orbits are examined and the capacity dimension is determined.

  1. Preparation and characterization of fractal elastomer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Yoshimune; Seino, Eri; Abe, Saya; Mayama, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The elastomer materials with hierarchical structure and suitable wettability are useful as biological surface model. In the present study, urethane resin and silicone resin elastomers with hierarchical rough surfaces were prepared and referred to as "fractal elastomers". We found a hierarchy of small projections that existed over larger ones on these surfaces. These elastomers were synthesized by transferring a fractal surface structure of alkylketene dimer. The rough structure enhanced the hydrophobicity and weakened friction resistance of the elastomer surfaces. These materials can be useful for artificial skin with biomimetic surface properties.

  2. Fractal dynamics in chaotic quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasanen, Esa; Kotimaki, Ville; Hennig, Holger; Heller, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Despite several experiments on chaotic quantum transport, corresponding ab initio quantum simulations have been out of reach so far. Here we carry out quantum transport calculations in real space and real time for a two-dimensional stadium cavity that shows chaotic dynamics. Applying a large set of magnetic fields yields a complete picture of the magnetoconductance that indicates fractal scaling on intermediate time scales. Two methods that originate from different fields of physics are used to analyze the scaling exponent and the fractal dimension. They lead to consistent results that, in turn, qualitatively agree with the previous experimental data.

  3. [Fractal analysis of trabecular architecture: with special reference to slice thickness and pixel size of the image].

    PubMed

    Tomomitsu, Tatsushi; Mimura, Hiroaki; Murase, Kenya; Tamada, Tsutomu; Sone, Teruki; Fukunaga, Masao

    2005-06-20

    Many analyses of bone microarchitecture using three-dimensional images of micro CT (microCT) have been reported recently. However, as extirpated bone is the subject of measurement on microCT, various kinds of information are not available clinically. Our aim is to evaluate usefulness of fractal dimension as an index of bone strength different from bone mineral density in in-vivo, to which microCT could not be applied. In this fundamental study, the relation between pixel size and the slice thickness of images was examined when fractal analysis was applied to clinical images. We examined 40 lumbar spine specimens extirpated from 16 male cadavers (30-88 years; mean age, 60.8 years). Three-dimensional images of the trabeculae of 150 slices were obtained by a microCT system under the following conditions: matrix size, 512 x 512; slice thickness, 23.2 em; and pixel size, 18.6 em. Based on images of 150 slices, images of four different matrix sizes and nine different slice thicknesses were made using public domain software (NIH Image). The threshold value for image binarization, and the relation between pixel size and the slice thickness of an image used for two-dimensional and three-dimensional fractal analyses were studied. In addition, the box counting method was used for fractal analysis. One hundred forty-five in box counting was most suitable as the threshold value for image binarization on the 256 gray levels. The correlation coefficients between two-dimensional fractal dimensions of processed images and three-dimensional fractal dimensions of original images were more than 0.9 for pixel sizes < or =148.8 microm at a slice thickness of 1 mm, and < or =74.4 microm at one of 2 mm. In terms of the relation between the three-dimensional fractal dimension of processed images and three-dimensional fractal dimension of original images, when pixel size was less than 74.4 microm, a correlation coefficient of more than 0.9 was obtained even for the maximal slice thickness

  4. Experiments in the use of fractal in computer pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Firooz A.

    1993-10-01

    The results of a study in the uses of fractal for the automatic detection of man made objects in infrared (IR) and millimeter wave (MMW) radar imagery are discussed in this paper. The fractal technique that is used is based on the estimation of the fractal dimensions of sequential blocks of an image of a scene and then by slicing the histogram of the computed fractal dimensions. The fractal dimension is computed by a Fourier regression approach. The technique is shown to be effective for the detection of tactical military vehicles in IR, and for the detection of airport attributes in MMW radar imagery.

  5. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model.

    PubMed

    Nicolás-Carlock, J R; Carrillo-Estrada, J L; Dossetti, V

    2016-01-19

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters' fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension.

  6. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolás-Carlock, J. R.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Dossetti, V.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters’ fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension.

  7. [Chaos and fractals and their applications in electrocardial signal research].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qing; Guo, Yongxin; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2009-06-01

    Chaos and fractals are ubiquitous phenomena of nature. A system with fractal structure usually behaves chaos. As a complicated nonlinear dynamics system, heart has fractals structure and behaves as chaos. The deeper inherent mechanism of heart can be opened out when the chaos and fractals theory is utilized in the research of the electrical activity of heart. Generally a time series of a system was used for describing the status of the strange attractor of the system. The indices include Poincare plot, fractals dimension, Lyapunov exponent, entropy, scaling exponent, Hurst index and so on. In this article, the basic concepts and the methods of chaos and fractals were introduced firstly. Then the applications of chaos and fractals theories in the study of electrocardial signal were expounded with example of how they are used for ventricular fibrillation.

  8. Plant microtubule cytoskeleton complexity: microtubule arrays as fractals.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, John; Overall, Robyn; Marc, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Biological systems are by nature complex and this complexity has been shown to be important in maintaining homeostasis. The plant microtubule cytoskeleton is a highly complex system, with contributing factors through interactions with microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), expression of multiple tubulin isoforms, and post-translational modification of tubulin and MAPs. Some of this complexity is specific to microtubules, such as a redundancy in factors that regulate microtubule depolymerization. Plant microtubules form partial helical fractals that play a key role in development. It is suggested that, under certain cellular conditions, other categories of microtubule fractals may form including isotropic fractals, triangular fractals, and branched fractals. Helical fractal proteins including coiled-coil and armadillo/beta-catenin repeat proteins and the actin cytoskeleton are important here too. Either alone, or in combination, these fractals may drive much of plant development.

  9. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás-Carlock, J. R.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Dossetti, V.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters’ fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension. PMID:26781204

  10. Resistance Scaling Factor of the Pillow and Fractalina Fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatowich, Michael J.; Kelleher, Daniel J.; Maloney, Catherine E.; Miller, David J.; Serhiyenko, Khrystyna

    2015-04-01

    Much is known in the analysis of a finitely ramified self-similar fractal when the fractal has a harmonic structure: a Dirichlet form which respects the self-similarity of a fractal. What is still an open question is when such a structure exists in general. In this paper, we introduce two fractals, the fractalina and the pillow, and compute their resistance scaling factor. This is the factor which dictates how the Dirichlet form scales with the self-similarity of the fractal. By knowing this factor one can compute the harmonic structure on the fractal. The fractalina has scaling factor (3+√ {41})/16, and the pillow fractal has scaling factor 1/√ [3]{2}.

  11. Lightning and the Heart: Fractal Behavior in Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    BASSINGTHWAIGHTE, JAMES B.; van BEEK, J. H. G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Physical systems, from galactic clusters to diffusing molecules, often show fractal behavior. Likewise, living systems might often be well described by fractal algorithms. Such fractal descriptions in space and time imply that there is order in chaos, or put the other way around, chaotic dynamical systems in biology are more constrained and orderly than seen at first glance. The vascular network, the syncytium of cells, the processes of diffusion and transmembrane transport might be fractal features of the heart. These fractal features provide a basis which enables one to understand certain aspects of more global behavior such as atrial or ventricular fibrillation and perfusion heterogeneity. The heart might be regarded as a prototypical organ from these points of view. A particular example of the use of fractal geometry is in explaining myocardial flow heterogeneity via delivery of blood through an asymmetrical fractal branching network. PMID:21938081

  12. Exploring fractal behaviour of blood oxygen saturation in preterm babies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahari, Marina; Hui, Tan Xin; Zainuri, Nuryazmin Ahmat; Darlow, Brian A.

    2017-04-01

    Recent evidence has been emerging that oxygenation instability in preterm babies could lead to an increased risk of retinal injury such as retinopathy of prematurity. There is a potential that disease severity could be better understood using nonlinear methods for time series data such as fractal theories [1]. Theories on fractal behaviours have been employed by researchers in various disciplines who were motivated to look into the behaviour or structure of irregular fluctuations in temporal data. In this study, an investigation was carried out to examine whether fractal behaviour could be detected in blood oxygen time series. Detection for the presence of fractals in oxygen data of preterm infants was performed using the methods of power spectrum, empirical probability distribution function and autocorrelation function. The results from these fractal identification methods indicate the possibility that these data exhibit fractal nature. Subsequently, a fractal framework for future research was suggested for oxygen time series.

  13. Fractal superconductivity near localization threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Feigel'man, M.V.; Ioffe, L.B.; Kravtsov, V.E.; Cuevas, E.

    2010-07-15

    We develop a semi-quantitative theory of electron pairing and resulting superconductivity in bulk 'poor conductors' in which Fermi energy E{sub F} is located in the region of localized states not so far from the Anderson mobility edge E{sub c}. We assume attractive interaction between electrons near the Fermi surface. We review the existing theories and experimental data and argue that a large class of disordered films is described by this model. Our theoretical analysis is based on analytical treatment of pairing correlations, described in the basis of the exact single-particle eigenstates of the 3D Anderson model, which we combine with numerical data on eigenfunction correlations. Fractal nature of critical wavefunction's correlations is shown to be crucial for the physics of these systems. We identify three distinct phases: 'critical' superconductive state formed at E{sub F} = E{sub c}, superconducting state with a strong pseudo-gap, realized due to pairing of weakly localized electrons and insulating state realized at E{sub F} still deeper inside a localized band. The 'critical' superconducting phase is characterized by the enhancement of the transition temperature with respect to BCS result, by the inhomogeneous spatial distribution of superconductive order parameter and local density of states. The major new feature of the pseudo-gapped state is the presence of two independent energy scales: superconducting gap {Delta}, that is due to many-body correlations and a new 'pseudo-gap' energy scale {Delta}{sub P} which characterizes typical binding energy of localized electron pairs and leads to the insulating behavior of the resistivity as a function of temperature above superconductive T{sub c}. Two gap nature of the pseudo-gapped superconductor is shown to lead to specific features seen in scanning tunneling spectroscopy and point-contact Andreev spectroscopy. We predict that pseudo-gapped superconducting state demonstrates anomalous behavior of the optical

  14. Fractal nature of hydrocarbon deposits. 2. Spatial distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, C.C.; Schutter, T.A; Herring, P.R.; Thomas, W.J. ); Scholz, C.H. )

    1991-03-01

    Hydrocarbons are unevenly distributed within reservoirs and are found in patches whose size distribution is a fractal over a wide range of scales. The spatial distribution of the patches is also fractal and this can be used to constrain the design of drilling strategies also defined by a fractal dimension. Fractal distributions are scale independent and are characterized by a power-law scaling exponent termed the fractal dimension. The authors have performed fractal analyses on the spatial distribution of producing and showing wells combined and of dry wells in 1,600-mi{sup 2} portions of the Denver and Powder River basins that were nearly completely drilled on quarter-mile square-grid spacings. They have limited their analyses to wells drilled to single stratigraphic intervals so that the map pattern revealed by drilling is representative of the spatial patchiness of hydrocarbons at depth. The fractal dimensions for the spatial patchiness of hydrocarbons in the two basins are 1.5 and 1.4, respectively. The fractal dimension for the pattern of all wells drilled is 1.8 for both basins, which suggests a drilling strategy with a fractal dimension significantly higher than the dimensions 1.5 and 1.4 sufficient to efficiently and economically explore these reservoirs. In fact, the fractal analysis reveals that the drilling strategy used in these basins approaches a fractal dimension of 2.0, which is equivalent to random drilling with no geologic input. Knowledge of the fractal dimension of a reservoir prior to drilling would provide a basis for selecting and a criterion for halting a drilling strategy for exploration whose fractal dimension closely matches that of the spatial fractal dimension of the reservoir, such a strategy should prove more efficient and economical than current practice.

  15. Measuring fractal dimension of metro systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, S.; Li, W.; Gu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhao, L.; Han, J.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss cluster growing method and box-covering method as well as their connection to fractal geometry. Our measurements show that for small network systems, box-covering method gives a better scaling relation. We then measure both unweighted and weighted metro networks with optimal box-covering method.

  16. Fractality in selfsimilar minimal mass structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Tommasi, D.; Maddalena, F.; Puglisi, G.; Trentadue, F.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we study the diffusely observed occurrence of Fractality and Self-organized Criticality in mechanical systems. We analytically show, based on a prototypical compressed tensegrity structure, that these phenomena can be viewed as the result of the contemporary attainment of mass minimization and global stability in elastic systems.

  17. Pond fractals in a tidal flat.

    PubMed

    Cael, B B; Lambert, Bennett; Bisson, Kelsey

    2015-11-01

    Studies over the past decade have reported power-law distributions for the areas of terrestrial lakes and Arctic melt ponds, as well as fractal relationships between their areas and coastlines. Here we report similar fractal structure of ponds in a tidal flat, thereby extending the spatial and temporal scales on which such phenomena have been observed in geophysical systems. Images taken during low tide of a tidal flat in Damariscotta, Maine, reveal a well-resolved power-law distribution of pond sizes over three orders of magnitude with a consistent fractal area-perimeter relationship. The data are consistent with the predictions of percolation theory for unscreened perimeters and scale-free cluster size distributions and are robust to alterations of the image processing procedure. The small spatial and temporal scales of these data suggest this easily observable system may serve as a useful model for investigating the evolution of pond geometries, while emphasizing the generality of fractal behavior in geophysical surfaces.

  18. An Introduction to Fractals and Chaos

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    Maridelbrst ioct lines, pllmcs _id cubes oft Euclid, Mindelbrot. fie is to fractal geometry Frttals h.:e corni po~pulzrc he corn - %liuh ha)’v ben part of our...shape, such ing could never reproduce it without a .)F a tree !r , hill, could require hun- computer. More important, the moun- JreJs of 9 h tusa -nds cr

  19. Is volcanic phenomena of fractal nature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo, R.; Lopez, D. A. L.; Alparone, S.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Sagiya, T.; Barrancos, J.; Rodriguez-Santana, A. A.; Ramos, A.; Calvari, S.; Perez, N. M.

    2016-12-01

    A particular resonance waveform pattern has been detected beneath different physical volcano manifestations from recent 2011-2012 period of volcanic unrest at El Hierro Island, Canary Islands, and also from other worldwide volcanoes with different volcanic typology. This mentioned pattern appears to be a fractal time dependent waveform repeated in different time scales (periods of time). This time dependent feature suggests this resonance as a new approach to volcano phenomena for predicting such interesting matters as earthquakes, gas emission, deformation etc. as this fractal signal has been discovered hidden in a wide typical volcanic parameters measurements. It is known that the resonance phenomenon occurring in nature usually denote a structure, symmetry or a subjacent law (Fermi et al., 1952; and later -about enhanced cross-sections symmetry in protons collisions), which, in this particular case, may be indicative of some physical interactions showing a sequence not completely chaotic but cyclic provided with symmetries. The resonance and fractal model mentioned allowed the authors to make predictions in cycles from a few weeks to months. In this work an equation for this waveform has been described and also correlations with volcanic parameters and fractal behavior demonstration have been performed, including also some suggestive possible explanations of this signal origin.

  20. Do-It-Yourself Fractal Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriver, Janet; Willard, Teri; McDaniel, Mandy

    2017-01-01

    In the set of fractal activities described in this article, students will accomplish much more than just creating a fun set of cards that simply resemble an art project. Goals of this activity, designed for an algebra 1 class, are to encourage students to generate data, look for and analyze patterns, and create their own models--all from a set of…

  1. Fractal analysis of the Navassa Island seascape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This release provides the numerical results of the fractal analyses discussed in Zawada and others (2010) for the Navassa Island reefscape. The project represents the continuation of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research effort begun in 2006 (Zawada and others, 2006) to understand the patterns and scalability of roughness and topographic complexity from individual corals to complete reefscapes.

  2. Fractals Illustrate the Mathematical Way of Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nievergelt, Yves

    1991-01-01

    Presented are exercises that demonstrate the application of standard concepts in the design of algorithms for plotting certain fractals. The exercises can be used in any course that explains the concepts of bounded or unbounded planar sets and may serve as an application in a course on complex analysis. (KR)

  3. Light Scattering From Fractal Titania Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Rajiv; Sorensen, Christopher M.

    1996-03-01

    We studied the fractal morphology of titania aggregates by light scattering. Titanium dioxide particles were generated by the thermal decomposition of titanium tetra-isopropoxide(TTIP) in a glass furnace at various temperatures in the range of 100 - 500^o C. We scattered vertically polarized He-Ne laser (λ = 6328Ålight from a laminar aerosol stream of particles and measured the optical structure factor. This structure factor shows Rayleigh, Guinier, fractal and Porod regimes. The radius of gyration Rg was determined from the Guinier analysis. The data were then fit to the Fisher-Burford form to determine the fractal dimension of about 2.0. This fit also delineated the crossover from the fractal to Porod regime, which can be used to determine the monomer particle size of about 0.1 μm. These optical measurements will be compared to electron microscope analysis of aggregates collected from the aerosol. This work was supported by NSF grant CTS-9908153.

  4. Pond fractals in a tidal flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cael, B. B.; Lambert, Bennett; Bisson, Kelsey

    2015-11-01

    Studies over the past decade have reported power-law distributions for the areas of terrestrial lakes and Arctic melt ponds, as well as fractal relationships between their areas and coastlines. Here we report similar fractal structure of ponds in a tidal flat, thereby extending the spatial and temporal scales on which such phenomena have been observed in geophysical systems. Images taken during low tide of a tidal flat in Damariscotta, Maine, reveal a well-resolved power-law distribution of pond sizes over three orders of magnitude with a consistent fractal area-perimeter relationship. The data are consistent with the predictions of percolation theory for unscreened perimeters and scale-free cluster size distributions and are robust to alterations of the image processing procedure. The small spatial and temporal scales of these data suggest this easily observable system may serve as a useful model for investigating the evolution of pond geometries, while emphasizing the generality of fractal behavior in geophysical surfaces.

  5. Ghost DBI-essence in fractal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acikgoz, I.; Binbay, F.; Salti, M.; Aydogdu, O.

    2016-05-01

    Focusing on a fractal geometric ghost dark energy, we reconstruct the Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI)-essence-type scalar field and find exact solutions of the potential and warped brane tension. We also discuss statefinders for the selected dark energy description to make it distinguishable among others.

  6. Generating Fractals through Self-Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinstein, David; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity designed to give students hands-on experience using technology and geometric visualization, as well as to explore fractal geometry in a cooperative classroom environment. Natural phenomena is the context of these activities. Enriches understanding of Euclidean geometry and infinite sequences. Lists materials,…

  7. A Fractal Perspective on Scale in Geography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Brandt, S.

    2016-06-01

    Scale is a fundamental concept that has attracted persistent attention in geography literature over the past several decades. However, it creates enormous confusion and frustration, particularly in the context of geographic information science, because of scale-related issues such as image resolution, and the modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP). This paper argues that the confusion and frustration mainly arise from Euclidean geometric thinking, with which locations, directions, and sizes are considered absolute, and it is time to reverse this conventional thinking. Hence, we review fractal geometry, together with its underlying way of thinking, and compare it to Euclidean geometry. Under the paradigm of Euclidean geometry, everything is measurable, no matter how big or small. However, geographic features, due to their fractal nature, are essentially unmeasurable or their sizes depend on scale. For example, the length of a coastline, the area of a lake, and the slope of a topographic surface are all scale-dependent. Seen from the perspective of fractal geometry, many scale issues, such as the MAUP, are inevitable. They appear unsolvable, but can be dealt with. To effectively deal with scale-related issues, we introduce topological and scaling analyses based on street-related concepts such as natural streets, street blocks, and natural cities. We further contend that spatial heterogeneity, or the fractal nature of geographic features, is the first and foremost effect of two spatial properties, because it is general and universal across all scales. Keywords: Scaling, spatial heterogeneity, conundrum of length, MAUP, topological analysis

  8. Flames in fractal grid generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, K. H. H.; Geipel, P.; Hampp, F.; Lindstedt, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Twin premixed turbulent opposed jet flames were stabilized for lean mixtures of air with methane and propane in fractal grid generated turbulence. A density segregation method was applied alongside particle image velocimetry to obtain velocity and scalar statistics. It is shown that the current fractal grids increase the turbulence levels by around a factor of 2. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was applied to show that the fractal grids produce slightly larger turbulent structures that decay at a slower rate as compared to conventional perforated plates. Conditional POD (CPOD) was also implemented using the density segregation technique and the results show that CPOD is essential to segregate the relative structures and turbulent kinetic energy distributions in each stream. The Kolmogorov length scales were also estimated providing values ∼0.1 and ∼0.5 mm in the reactants and products, respectively. Resolved profiles of flame surface density indicate that a thin flame assumption leading to bimodal statistics is not perfectly valid under the current conditions and it is expected that the data obtained will be of significant value to the development of computational methods that can provide information on the conditional structure of turbulence. It is concluded that the increase in the turbulent Reynolds number is without any negative impact on other parameters and that fractal grids provide a route towards removing the classical problem of a relatively low ratio of turbulent to bulk strain associated with the opposed jet configuration.

  9. Fractal analysis of narwhal space use patterns.

    PubMed

    Laidre, Kristin L; Heide-Jørgensen, Mads P; Logsdon, Miles L; Hobbs, Roderick C; Dietz, Rune; VanBlaricom, Glenn R

    2004-01-01

    Quantifying animal movement in response to a spatially and temporally heterogeneous environment is critical to understanding the structural and functional landscape influences on population viability. Generalities of landscape structure can easily be extended to the marine environment, as marine predators inhabit a patchy, dynamic system, which influences animal choice and behavior. An innovative use of the fractal measure of complexity, indexing the linearity of movement paths over replicate temporal scales, was applied to satellite tracking data collected from narwhals (Monodon monoceros) (n = 20) in West Greenland and the eastern Canadian high Arctic. Daily movements of individuals were obtained using polar orbiting satellites via the ARGOS data location and collection system. Geographic positions were filtered to obtain a daily good quality position for each whale. The length of total pathway was measured over seven different temporal length scales (step lengths), ranging from one day to one week, and a seasonal mean was calculated. Fractal dimension (D) was significantly different between seasons, highest during summer (D = 1.61, SE 0.04) and winter (D = 1.69, SE 0.06) when whales made convoluted movements in focal areas. Fractal dimension was lowest during fall (D = 1.34, SE 0.03) when whales were migrating south ahead of the forming sea ice. There were no significant effects of size category or sex on fractal dimension by season. The greater linearity of movement during the migration period suggests individuals do not intensively forage on patchy resources until they arrive at summer or winter sites. The highly convoluted movements observed during summer and winter suggest foraging or searching efforts in localized areas. Significant differences between the fractal dimensions on two separate wintering grounds in Baffin Bay suggest differential movement patterns in response to the dynamics of sea ice.

  10. Verifying the Dependence of Fractal Coefficients on Different Spatial Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Gospodinov, Dragomir; Marekova, Elisaveta; Marinov, Alexander

    2010-01-21

    A fractal distribution requires that the number of objects larger than a specific size r has a power-law dependence on the size N(r) = C/r{sup D}propor tor{sup -D} where D is the fractal dimension. Usually the correlation integral is calculated to estimate the correlation fractal dimension of epicentres. A 'box-counting' procedure could also be applied giving the 'capacity' fractal dimension. The fractal dimension can be an integer and then it is equivalent to a Euclidean dimension (it is zero of a point, one of a segment, of a square is two and of a cube is three). In general the fractal dimension is not an integer but a fractional dimension and there comes the origin of the term 'fractal'. The use of a power-law to statistically describe a set of events or phenomena reveals the lack of a characteristic length scale, that is fractal objects are scale invariant. Scaling invariance and chaotic behavior constitute the base of a lot of natural hazards phenomena. Many studies of earthquakes reveal that their occurrence exhibits scale-invariant properties, so the fractal dimension can characterize them. It has first been confirmed that both aftershock rate decay in time and earthquake size distribution follow a power law. Recently many other earthquake distributions have been found to be scale-invariant. The spatial distribution of both regional seismicity and aftershocks show some fractal features. Earthquake spatial distributions are considered fractal, but indirectly. There are two possible models, which result in fractal earthquake distributions. The first model considers that a fractal distribution of faults leads to a fractal distribution of earthquakes, because each earthquake is characteristic of the fault on which it occurs. The second assumes that each fault has a fractal distribution of earthquakes. Observations strongly favour the first hypothesis.The fractal coefficients analysis provides some important advantages in examining earthquake spatial

  11. Verifying the Dependence of Fractal Coefficients on Different Spatial Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gospodinov, Dragomir; Marekova, Elisaveta; Marinov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    A fractal distribution requires that the number of objects larger than a specific size r has a power-law dependence on the size N(r) = C/rD∝r-D where D is the fractal dimension. Usually the correlation integral is calculated to estimate the correlation fractal dimension of epicentres. A `box-counting' procedure could also be applied giving the `capacity' fractal dimension. The fractal dimension can be an integer and then it is equivalent to a Euclidean dimension (it is zero of a point, one of a segment, of a square is two and of a cube is three). In general the fractal dimension is not an integer but a fractional dimension and there comes the origin of the term `fractal'. The use of a power-law to statistically describe a set of events or phenomena reveals the lack of a characteristic length scale, that is fractal objects are scale invariant. Scaling invariance and chaotic behavior constitute the base of a lot of natural hazards phenomena. Many studies of earthquakes reveal that their occurrence exhibits scale-invariant properties, so the fractal dimension can characterize them. It has first been confirmed that both aftershock rate decay in time and earthquake size distribution follow a power law. Recently many other earthquake distributions have been found to be scale-invariant. The spatial distribution of both regional seismicity and aftershocks show some fractal features. Earthquake spatial distributions are considered fractal, but indirectly. There are two possible models, which result in fractal earthquake distributions. The first model considers that a fractal distribution of faults leads to a fractal distribution of earthquakes, because each earthquake is characteristic of the fault on which it occurs. The second assumes that each fault has a fractal distribution of earthquakes. Observations strongly favour the first hypothesis. The fractal coefficients analysis provides some important advantages in examining earthquake spatial distribution, which are

  12. Aesthetic Responses to Exact Fractals Driven by Physical Complexity.

    PubMed

    Bies, Alexander J; Blanc-Goldhammer, Daryn R; Boydston, Cooper R; Taylor, Richard P; Sereno, Margaret E

    2016-01-01

    Fractals are physically complex due to their repetition of patterns at multiple size scales. Whereas the statistical characteristics of the patterns repeat for fractals found in natural objects, computers can generate patterns that repeat exactly. Are these exact fractals processed differently, visually and aesthetically, than their statistical counterparts? We investigated the human aesthetic response to the complexity of exact fractals by manipulating fractal dimensionality, symmetry, recursion, and the number of segments in the generator. Across two studies, a variety of fractal patterns were visually presented to human participants to determine the typical response to exact fractals. In the first study, we found that preference ratings for exact midpoint displacement fractals can be described by a linear trend with preference increasing as fractal dimension increases. For the majority of individuals, preference increased with dimension. We replicated these results for other exact fractal patterns in a second study. In the second study, we also tested the effects of symmetry and recursion by presenting asymmetric dragon fractals, symmetric dragon fractals, and Sierpinski carpets and Koch snowflakes, which have radial and mirror symmetry. We found a strong interaction among recursion, symmetry and fractal dimension. Specifically, at low levels of recursion, the presence of symmetry was enough to drive high preference ratings for patterns with moderate to high levels of fractal dimension. Most individuals required a much higher level of recursion to recover this level of preference in a pattern that lacked mirror or radial symmetry, while others were less discriminating. This suggests that exact fractals are processed differently than their statistical counterparts. We propose a set of four factors that influence complexity and preference judgments in fractals that may extend to other patterns: fractal dimension, recursion, symmetry and the number of segments in a

  13. Paradigms of Complexity: Fractals and Structures in the Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Miroslav M.

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * The Origin of Complexity (invited talk) * On the Existence of Spatially Uniform Scaling Laws in the Climate System * Multispectral Backscattering: A Fractal-Structure Probe * Small-Angle Multiple Scattering on a Fractal System of Point Scatterers * Symmetric Fractals Generated by Cellular Automata * Bispectra and Phase Correlations for Chaotic Dynamical Systems * Self-Organized Criticality Models of Neural Development * Altered Fractal and Irregular Heart Rate Behavior in Sick Fetuses * Extract Multiple Scaling in Long-Term Heart Rate Variability * A Semi-Continous Box Counting Method for Fractal Dimension Measurement of Short Single Dimension Temporal Signals - Preliminary Study * A Fractional Brownian Motion Model of Cracking * Self-Affine Scaling Studies on Fractography * Coarsening of Fractal Interfaces * A Fractal Model of Ocean Surface Superdiffusion * Stochastic Subsurface Flow and Transport in Fractal Fractal Conductivity Fields * Rendering Through Iterated Function Systems * The σ-Hull - The Hull Where Fractals Live - Calculating a Hull Bounded by Log Spirals to Solve the Inverse IFS-Problem by the Detected Orbits * On the Multifractal Properties of Passively Convected Scalar Fields * New Statistical Textural Transforms for Non-Stationary Signals: Application to Generalized Mutlifractal Analysis * Laplacian Growth of Parallel Needles: Their Mullins-Sekerka Instability * Entropy Dynamics Associated with Self-Organization * Fractal Properties in Economics (invited talk) * Fractal Approach to the Regional Seismic Event Discrimination Problem * Fractal and Topological Complexity of Radioactive Contamination * Pattern Selection: Nonsingular Saffman-Taylor Finger and Its Dynamic Evolution with Zero Surface Tension * A Family of Complex Wavelets for the Characterization of Singularities * Stabilization of Chaotic Amplitude Fluctuations in Multimode, Intracavity-Doubled Solid-State Lasers * Chaotic

  14. Aesthetic Responses to Exact Fractals Driven by Physical Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Bies, Alexander J.; Blanc-Goldhammer, Daryn R.; Boydston, Cooper R.; Taylor, Richard P.; Sereno, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Fractals are physically complex due to their repetition of patterns at multiple size scales. Whereas the statistical characteristics of the patterns repeat for fractals found in natural objects, computers can generate patterns that repeat exactly. Are these exact fractals processed differently, visually and aesthetically, than their statistical counterparts? We investigated the human aesthetic response to the complexity of exact fractals by manipulating fractal dimensionality, symmetry, recursion, and the number of segments in the generator. Across two studies, a variety of fractal patterns were visually presented to human participants to determine the typical response to exact fractals. In the first study, we found that preference ratings for exact midpoint displacement fractals can be described by a linear trend with preference increasing as fractal dimension increases. For the majority of individuals, preference increased with dimension. We replicated these results for other exact fractal patterns in a second study. In the second study, we also tested the effects of symmetry and recursion by presenting asymmetric dragon fractals, symmetric dragon fractals, and Sierpinski carpets and Koch snowflakes, which have radial and mirror symmetry. We found a strong interaction among recursion, symmetry and fractal dimension. Specifically, at low levels of recursion, the presence of symmetry was enough to drive high preference ratings for patterns with moderate to high levels of fractal dimension. Most individuals required a much higher level of recursion to recover this level of preference in a pattern that lacked mirror or radial symmetry, while others were less discriminating. This suggests that exact fractals are processed differently than their statistical counterparts. We propose a set of four factors that influence complexity and preference judgments in fractals that may extend to other patterns: fractal dimension, recursion, symmetry and the number of segments in a

  15. Link between truncated fractals and coupled oscillators in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Paar, V; Pavin, N; Rosandić, M

    2001-09-07

    This article aims at providing a new theoretical insight into the fundamental question of the origin of truncated fractals in biological systems. It is well known that fractal geometry is one of the characteristics of living organisms. However, contrary to mathematical fractals which are self-similar at all scales, the biological fractals are truncated, i.e. their self-similarity extends at most over a few orders of magnitude of separation. We show that nonlinear coupled oscillators, modeling one of the basic features of biological systems, may generate truncated fractals: a truncated fractal pattern for basin boundaries appears in a simple mathematical model of two coupled nonlinear oscillators with weak dissipation. This fractal pattern can be considered as a particular hidden fractal property. At the level of sufficiently fine precision technique the truncated fractality acts as a simple structure, leading to predictability, but at a lower level of precision it is effectively fractal, limiting the predictability of the long-term behavior of biological systems. We point out to the generic nature of our result. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  16. Solar Flare Geometries. I. The Area Fractal Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Aschwanden, Pascal D.

    2008-02-01

    In this study we investigate for the first time the fractal dimension of solar flares and find that the flare area observed in EUV wavelengths exhibits a fractal scaling. We measure the area fractal dimension D2, also called the Hausdorff dimension, with a box-counting method, which describes the fractal area as A(L) ~ LD2. We apply the fractal analysis to a statistical sample of 20 GOES X- and M-class flares, including the Bastille Day 2000 July 14 flare, one of the largest flares ever recorded. We find that the fractal area (normalized by the time-integrated flare area Af) varies from near zero at the beginning of the flare to a maximum of A(t)/Af = 0.65 +/- 0.12 after the peak time of the flare, which corresponds to an area fractal dimension in the range of 1.0lesssim D2(t) lesssim 1.89 +/- 0.05. We find that the total EUV flux Ftot(t) is linearly correlated with the fractal area A(t) . From the area fractal dimension D2, the volume fractal dimension D3 can be inferred (subject of Paper II), which is crucial to inferring a realistic volume filling factor, which affects the derived electron densities, thermal energies, and cooling times of solar and stellar flares.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of midpalatal suture maturation via fractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Yong-Deok

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether the results of fractal analysis can be used as criteria for midpalatal suture maturation evaluation. Methods The study included 131 subjects aged over 18 years of age (range 18.1–53.4 years) who underwent cone-beam computed tomography. Skeletonized images of the midpalatal suture were obtained via image processing software and used to calculate fractal dimensions. Correlations between maturation stage and fractal dimensions were calculated using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Optimal fractal dimension cut-off values were determined using a receiver operating characteristic curve. Results The distribution of maturation stages of the midpalatal suture according to the cervical vertebrae maturation index was highly variable, and there was a strong negative correlation between maturation stage and fractal dimension (−0.623, p < 0.001). Fractal dimension was a statistically significant indicator of dichotomous results with regard to maturation stage (area under curve = 0.794, p < 0.001). A test in which fractal dimension was used to predict the resulting variable that splits maturation stages into ABC and D or E yielded an optimal fractal dimension cut-off value of 1.0235. Conclusions There was a strong negative correlation between fractal dimension and midpalatal suture maturation. Fractal analysis is an objective quantitative method, and therefore we suggest that it may be useful for the evaluation of midpalatal suture maturation. PMID:27668195

  18. Fractals in art and nature: why do we like them?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spehar, Branka; Taylor, Richard P.

    2013-03-01

    Fractals have experienced considerable success in quantifying the visual complexity exhibited by many natural patterns, and continue to capture the imagination of scientists and artists alike. Fractal patterns have also been noted for their aesthetic appeal, a suggestion further reinforced by the discovery that the poured patterns of the American abstract painter Jackson Pollock are also fractal, together with the findings that many forms of art resemble natural scenes in showing scale-invariant, fractal-like properties. While some have suggested that fractal-like patterns are inherently pleasing because they resemble natural patterns and scenes, the relation between the visual characteristics of fractals and their aesthetic appeal remains unclear. Motivated by our previous findings that humans display a consistent preference for a certain range of fractal dimension across fractal images of various types we turn to scale-specific processing of visual information to understand this relationship. Whereas our previous preference studies focused on fractal images consisting of black shapes on white backgrounds, here we extend our investigations to include grayscale images in which the intensity variations exhibit scale invariance. This scale-invariance is generated using a 1/f frequency distribution and can be tuned by varying the slope of the rotationally averaged Fourier amplitude spectrum. Thresholding the intensity of these images generates black and white fractals with equivalent scaling properties to the original grayscale images, allowing a direct comparison of preferences for grayscale and black and white fractals. We found no significant differences in preferences between the two groups of fractals. For both set of images, the visual preference peaked for images with the amplitude spectrum slopes from 1.25 to 1.5, thus confirming and extending the previously observed relationship between fractal characteristics of images and visual preference.

  19. Entrainment to a real time fractal visual stimulus modulates fractal gait dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Christopher K; Kiefer, Adam W; D'Andrea, Susan E; Warren, William H; Aaron, Roy K

    2014-08-01

    Fractal patterns characterize healthy biological systems and are considered to reflect the ability of the system to adapt to varying environmental conditions. Previous research has shown that fractal patterns in gait are altered following natural aging or disease, and this has potential negative consequences for gait adaptability that can lead to increased risk of injury. However, the flexibility of a healthy neurological system to exhibit different fractal patterns in gait has yet to be explored, and this is a necessary step toward understanding human locomotor control. Fifteen participants walked for 15min on a treadmill, either in the absence of a visual stimulus or while they attempted to couple the timing of their gait with a visual metronome that exhibited a persistent fractal pattern (contained long-range correlations) or a random pattern (contained no long-range correlations). The stride-to-stride intervals of the participants were recorded via analog foot pressure switches and submitted to detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to determine if the fractal patterns during the visual metronome conditions differed from the baseline (no metronome) condition. DFA α in the baseline condition was 0.77±0.09. The fractal patterns in the stride-to-stride intervals were significantly altered when walking to the fractal metronome (DFA α=0.87±0.06) and to the random metronome (DFA α=0.61±0.10) (both p<.05 when compared to the baseline condition), indicating that a global change in gait dynamics was observed. A variety of strategies were identified at the local level with a cross-correlation analysis, indicating that local behavior did not account for the consistent global changes. Collectively, the results show that a gait dynamics can be shifted in a prescribed manner using a visual stimulus and the shift appears to be a global phenomenon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Multispectral image fusion based on fractal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jie; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Chunhua

    2004-01-01

    Imagery sensors have been one indispensable part of the detection and recognition systems. They are widely used to the field of surveillance, navigation, control and guide, et. However, different imagery sensors depend on diverse imaging mechanisms, and work within diverse range of spectrum. They also perform diverse functions and have diverse circumstance requires. So it is unpractical to accomplish the task of detection or recognition with a single imagery sensor under the conditions of different circumstances, different backgrounds and different targets. Fortunately, the multi-sensor image fusion technique emerged as important route to solve this problem. So image fusion has been one of the main technical routines used to detect and recognize objects from images. While, loss of information is unavoidable during fusion process, so it is always a very important content of image fusion how to preserve the useful information to the utmost. That is to say, it should be taken into account before designing the fusion schemes how to avoid the loss of useful information or how to preserve the features helpful to the detection. In consideration of these issues and the fact that most detection problems are actually to distinguish man-made objects from natural background, a fractal-based multi-spectral fusion algorithm has been proposed in this paper aiming at the recognition of battlefield targets in the complicated backgrounds. According to this algorithm, source images are firstly orthogonally decomposed according to wavelet transform theories, and then fractal-based detection is held to each decomposed image. At this step, natural background and man-made targets are distinguished by use of fractal models that can well imitate natural objects. Special fusion operators are employed during the fusion of area that contains man-made targets so that useful information could be preserved and features of targets could be extruded. The final fused image is reconstructed from the

  1. Fractal-feature distance analysis of contrast-detail phantom image and meaning of pseudo fractal dimension and complexity.

    PubMed

    Imai, K; Ikeda, M; Enchi, Y; Niimi, T

    2009-12-01

    The purposes of our studies are to examine whether or not fractal-feature distance deduced from virtual volume method can simulate observer performance indices and to investigate the physical meaning of pseudo fractal dimension and complexity. Contrast-detail (C-D) phantom radiographs were obtained at various mAs values (0.5 - 4.0 mAs) and 140 kVp with a computed radiography system, and the reference image was acquired at 13 mAs. For all C-D images, fractal analysis was conducted using the virtual volume method that was devised with a fractional Brownian motion model. The fractal-feature distances between the considered and reference images were calculated using pseudo fractal dimension and complexity. Further, we have performed the C-D analysis in which ten radiologists participated, and compared the fractal-feature distances with the image quality figures (IQF). To clarify the physical meaning of the pseudo fractal dimension and complexity, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and standard deviation (SD) of images noise were calculated for each mAs and compared with the pseudo fractal dimension and complexity, respectively. A strong linear correlation was found between the fractal-feature distance and IQF. The pseudo fractal dimensions became large as CNR increased. Further, a linear correlation was found between the exponential complexity and image noise SD.

  2. Automatic detection of microcalcifications with multi-fractal spectrum.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yong; Dai, Hang; Zhang, Hang

    2014-01-01

    For improving the detection of micro-calcifications (MCs), this paper proposes an automatic detection of MC system making use of multi-fractal spectrum in digitized mammograms. The approach of automatic detection system is based on the principle that normal tissues possess certain fractal properties which change along with the presence of MCs. In this system, multi-fractal spectrum is applied to reveal such fractal properties. By quantifying the deviations of multi-fractal spectrums between normal tissues and MCs, the system can identify MCs altering the fractal properties and finally locate the position of MCs. The performance of the proposed system is compared with the leading automatic detection systems in a mammographic image database. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system is statistically superior to most of the compared systems and delivers a superior performance.

  3. Acoustic-elastodynamic interaction in isotropic fractal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joumaa, H.; Ostoja-Starzewski, M.

    2013-09-01

    This research explores the acoustic-elastodynamic interaction in isotropic fractal media. The analysis discusses the direct coupling of two constitutive models under dynamic loading: a continuous solid and an isotropic fractal medium. We consider two situations where in the first, the fractal medium is enclosed within a thin spherical shell (interior problem), while in the second, the fractal medium extends infinitely outside the shell (exterior problem). The two problems are simulated analytically, and the exact solution for the shell displacement is expressed in closed form in the Laplace domain. The formulation of the radiation condition for infinite fractal media is essential to derive the exterior problem's solution. This study represents a meaningful idealization of real-application problems involving the interaction of multi-constitutive media, e.g. the human brain, whereby fractal features affect the response of this body under various excitations.

  4. Fractal dimension analysis of complexity in Ligeti piano pieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Rolf

    2005-04-01

    Fractal correlation dimensional analysis has been performed with whole solo piano pieces by Gyrgy Ligeti at every 50ms interval of the pieces. The resulting curves of development of complexity represented by the fractal dimension showed up a very reasonable correlation with the perceptional density of events during these pieces. The seventh piece of Ligeti's ``Musica ricercata'' was used as a test case. Here, each new part of the piece was followed by an increase of the fractal dimension because of the increase of information at the part changes. The second piece ``Galamb borong,'' number seven of the piano Etudes was used, because Ligeti wrote these Etudes after studying fractal geometry. Although the piece is not fractal in the strict mathematical sense, the overall structure of the psychoacoustic event-density as well as the detailed event development is represented by the fractal dimension plot.

  5. After notes on self-similarity exponent for fractal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martínez, Manuel; Caravaca Garratón, Manuel

    2017-06-01

    Previous works have highlighted the suitability of the concept of fractal structure, which derives from asymmetric topology, to propound generalized definitions of fractal dimension. The aim of the present article is to collect some results and approaches allowing to connect the self-similarity index and the fractal dimension of a broad spectrum of random processes. To tackle with, we shall use the concept of induced fractal structure on the image set of a sample curve. The main result in this paper states that given a sample function of a random process endowed with the induced fractal structure on its image, it holds that the self-similarity index of that function equals the inverse of its fractal dimension.

  6. Fractality and degree correlations in scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, Yuka; Mizutaka, Shogo; Yakubo, Kousuke

    2017-07-01

    Fractal scale-free networks are empirically known to exhibit disassortative degree mixing. It is, however, not obvious whether a negative degree correlation between nearest neighbor nodes makes a scale-free network fractal. Here we examine the possibility that disassortativity in complex networks is the origin of fractality. To this end, maximally disassortative (MD) networks are prepared by rewiring edges while keeping the degree sequence of an initial uncorrelated scale-free network. We show that there are many MD networks with different topologies if the degree sequence is the same with that of the (u,v)-flower but most of them are not fractal. These results demonstrate that disassortativity does not cause the fractal property of networks. In addition, we suggest that fractality of scale-free networks requires a long-range repulsive correlation, in the sense of the shortest path distance, in similar degrees.

  7. Evaluation of 3D Printer Accuracy in Producing Fractal Structure.

    PubMed

    Kikegawa, Kana; Takamatsu, Kyuuichirou; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2017-01-01

    Hierarchical structures, also known as fractal structures, exhibit advantageous material properties, such as water- and oil-repellency as well as other useful optical characteristics, owing to its self-similarity. Various methods have been developed for producing hierarchical geometrical structures. Recently, fractal structures have been manufactured using a 3D printing technique that involves computer-aided design data. In this study, we confirmed the accuracy of geometrical structures when Koch curve-like fractal structures with zero to three generations were printed using a 3D printer. The fractal dimension was analyzed using a box-counting method. This analysis indicated that the fractal dimension of the third generation hierarchical structure was approximately the same as that of the ideal Koch curve. These findings demonstrate that the design and production of fractal structures can be controlled using a 3D printer. Although the interior angle deviated from the ideal value, the side length could be precisely controlled.

  8. [Fractal analysis in the diagnosis of breast tumors].

    PubMed

    Crişan, D A; Lesaru, M; Dobrescu, R; Vasilescu, C

    2007-01-01

    Last years studies made by researchers from over the world show that fractal geometry is a viable alternative for image analysis. Fractal features of natural forms give to fractal analysis new valences in various fields, medical imaging being a very important one. This paper intend to prove that fractal dimension, as a way to characterize the complexity of a form, can be used for diagnosis of mammographic lesions classified BI-RADS 4, further investigations being not necessary. The experiments made on 30 cases classified BI-RADS 4 confirmed that 89% of benign lesions have an average fractal dimension under the threshold 1.4, meanwhile malign lesions are characterized, in a similar percentage, by an average fractal dimension over that threshold.

  9. ZnS:Cr Nanostructures Building Fractals and Their Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoi, D. P.; Das, U.; Mohanta, D.; Ahmed, G. A.; Choudhury, A.

    2010-10-04

    Cr doped ZnS nanostructures have been fabricated through colloidal solution route by using Polyvinyl alcohol (-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub n} and Polyvinyl pyrrolidone k30 (C{sub 6}H{sub 9}NO){sub x} as dielectric hosts. Growth of fractal structures have been observed through Transmission Electron Microscopy. Higher magnification TEM study reveals that these fractals actually a organize structure of ZnS:Cr nanostructures. The structural study of these nanostructures in the fractals is done by X-Ray Diffraction, UV-Visible spectroscopy, Photoluminescence spectroscopy AFM and MFM. These investigations allow us to form a comprehensive explanation of fractal as well as nanostructure growth. We have done dimensional study of these fractals and the reason behind the formation of these fractals.

  10. Investigations of human EEG response to viewing fractal patterns.

    PubMed

    Hagerhall, Caroline M; Laike, Thorbjörn; Taylor, Richard P; Küller, Marianne; Küller, Rikard; Martin, Theodore P

    2008-01-01

    Owing to the prevalence of fractal patterns in natural scenery and their growing impact on cultures around the world, fractals constitute a common feature of our daily visual experiences, raising an important question: what responses do fractals induce in the observer? We monitored subjects' EEG while they were viewing fractals with different fractal dimensions, and the results show that significant effects could be found in the EEG even by employing relatively simple silhouette images. Patterns with a fractal dimension of 1.3 elicited the most interesting EEG, with the highest alpha in the frontal lobes but also the highest beta in the parietal area, pointing to a complicated interplay between different parts of the brain when experiencing this pattern.

  11. Fractal image compression: A resolution independent representation for imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, Alan D.

    1993-01-01

    A deterministic fractal is an image which has low information content and no inherent scale. Because of their low information content, deterministic fractals can be described with small data sets. They can be displayed at high resolution since they are not bound by an inherent scale. A remarkable consequence follows. Fractal images can be encoded at very high compression ratios. This fern, for example is encoded in less than 50 bytes and yet can be displayed at resolutions with increasing levels of detail appearing. The Fractal Transform was discovered in 1988 by Michael F. Barnsley. It is the basis for a new image compression scheme which was initially developed by myself and Michael Barnsley at Iterated Systems. The Fractal Transform effectively solves the problem of finding a fractal which approximates a digital 'real world image'.

  12. A tutorial introduction to adaptive fractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Michael A.; Bonnette, Scott; Kuznetsov, Nikita; Wallot, Sebastian; Gao, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a tutorial description of adaptive fractal analysis (AFA). AFA utilizes an adaptive detrending algorithm to extract globally smooth trend signals from the data and then analyzes the scaling of the residuals to the fit as a function of the time scale at which the fit is computed. The authors present applications to synthetic mathematical signals to verify the accuracy of AFA and demonstrate the basic steps of the analysis. The authors then present results from applying AFA to time series from a cognitive psychology experiment on repeated estimation of durations of time to illustrate some of the complexities of real-world data. AFA shows promise in dealing with many types of signals, but like any fractal analysis method there are special challenges and considerations to take into account, such as determining the presence of linear scaling regions. PMID:23060804

  13. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A. H.; Flores-Johnson, E. A.; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  14. Fractal Tempo Fluctuation and Pulse Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Summer K.; Large, Edward W.; Fink, Philip W.

    2010-01-01

    WE INVESTIGATED PEOPLES’ ABILITY TO ADAPT TO THE fluctuating tempi of music performance. In Experiment 1, four pieces from different musical styles were chosen, and performances were recorded from a skilled pianist who was instructed to play with natural expression. Spectral and rescaled range analyses on interbeat interval time-series revealed long-range (1/f type) serial correlations and fractal scaling in each piece. Stimuli for Experiment 2 included two of the performances from Experiment 1, with mechanical versions serving as controls. Participants tapped the beat at ¼- and ⅛-note metrical levels, successfully adapting to large tempo fluctuations in both performances. Participants predicted the structured tempo fluctuations, with superior performance at the ¼-note level. Thus, listeners may exploit long-range correlations and fractal scaling to predict tempo changes in music. PMID:25190901

  15. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  16. Region-based fractal video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shiping; Belloulata, Kamel

    2008-10-01

    A novel video sequence compression scheme is proposed in order to realize the efficient and economical transmission of video sequence, and also the region-based functionality of MPEG-4. The CPM and NCIM fractal coding scheme is applied on each region independently by a prior image segmentation map (alpha plane) which is exactly the same as defined in MPEG-4. The first n frames of video sequence are encoded as a "set" using the Circular Prediction Mapping (CPM) and encode the remaining frames using the Non Contractive Interframe Mapping (NCIM). The CPM and NCIM accomplish the motion estimation and compensation, which can exploit the high temporal correlations between the adjacent frames of video sequence. The experimental results with the monocular video sequences provide promising performances at low bit rate coding, such as the application in video conference. We believe the proposed fractal video codec will be a powerful and efficient technique for the region-based video sequence coding.

  17. A tutorial introduction to adaptive fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Riley, Michael A; Bonnette, Scott; Kuznetsov, Nikita; Wallot, Sebastian; Gao, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a tutorial description of adaptive fractal analysis (AFA). AFA utilizes an adaptive detrending algorithm to extract globally smooth trend signals from the data and then analyzes the scaling of the residuals to the fit as a function of the time scale at which the fit is computed. The authors present applications to synthetic mathematical signals to verify the accuracy of AFA and demonstrate the basic steps of the analysis. The authors then present results from applying AFA to time series from a cognitive psychology experiment on repeated estimation of durations of time to illustrate some of the complexities of real-world data. AFA shows promise in dealing with many types of signals, but like any fractal analysis method there are special challenges and considerations to take into account, such as determining the presence of linear scaling regions.

  18. Fractal characterization of bpn weights evolution.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, S; Venkatesh, B; Sagar, B S D

    2004-04-01

    Training methodology of the Back Propagation Network (BPN) is well documented. One aspect of BPN that requires investigation is whether or not the BPN would get trained for a given training data set and architecture. In this paper the behavior of the BPN is analyzed during its training phase considering convergent and divergent training data sets. Evolution of the weights during the training phase was monitored for the purpose of analysis. The evolution of weights was plotted as return map and was characterized by means of fractal dimension. This fractal dimensional analysis of the weight evolution trajectories is used to provide a new insight to understand the behavior of BPN and dynamics in the evolution of weights.

  19. Fractal characteristics for binary noise radar waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing C.

    2016-05-01

    Noise radars have many advantages over conventional radars and receive great attentions recently. The performance of a noise radar is determined by its waveforms. Investigating characteristics of noise radar waveforms has significant value for evaluating noise radar performance. In this paper, we use binomial distribution theory to analyze general characteristics of binary phase coded (BPC) noise waveforms. Focusing on aperiodic autocorrelation function, we demonstrate that the probability distributions of sidelobes for a BPC noise waveform depend on the distances of these sidelobes to the mainlobe. The closer a sidelobe to the mainlobe, the higher the probability for this sidelobe to be a maximum sidelobe. We also develop Monte Carlo framework to explore the characteristics that are difficult to investigate analytically. Through Monte Carlo experiments, we reveal the Fractal relationship between the code length and the maximum sidelobe value for BPC waveforms, and propose using fractal dimension to measure noise waveform performance.

  20. Fractal structures in centrifugal flywheel governor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Xiao-Bo; Chu, Yan-Dong; Lu-Xu; Chang, Ying-Xiang; Zhang, Jian-Gang

    2017-09-01

    The global structure of nonlinear response of mechanical centrifugal governor, forming in two-dimensional parameter space, is studied in this paper. By using three kinds of phases, we describe how responses of periodicity, quasi-periodicity and chaos organize some self-similarity structures with parameters varying. For several parameter combinations, the regular vibration shows fractal characteristic, that is, the comb-shaped self-similarity structure is generated by alternating periodic response with intermittent chaos, and Arnold's tongues embedded in quasi-periodic response are organized according to Stern-Brocot tree. In particular, a new type of mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) is found in the periodic response. These unique structures reveal the natural connection of various responses between part and part, part and the whole in parameter space based on self-similarity of fractal. Meanwhile, the remarkable and unexpected results are to contribute a valid dynamic reference for practical applications with respect to mechanical centrifugal governor.

  1. Fractal energy carpets in non-Hermitian Hofstadter quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, Maxim N.; Ouvry, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    We study the non-Hermitian Hofstadter dynamics of a quantum particle with biased motion on a square lattice in the background of a magnetic field. We show that in quasimomentum space, the energy spectrum is an overlap of infinitely many inequivalent fractals. The energy levels in each fractal are space-filling curves with Hausdorff dimension 2. The band structure of the spectrum is similar to a fractal spider web in contrast to the Hofstadter butterfly for unbiased motion.

  2. The Correlation Fractal Dimension of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingyuan; Liu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Mogei

    2013-05-01

    The fractality of complex networks is studied by estimating the correlation dimensions of the networks. Comparing with the previous algorithms of estimating the box dimension, our algorithm achieves a significant reduction in time complexity. For four benchmark cases tested, that is, the Escherichia coli (E. Coli) metabolic network, the Homo sapiens protein interaction network (H. Sapiens PIN), the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction network (S. Cerevisiae PIN) and the World Wide Web (WWW), experiments are provided to demonstrate the validity of our algorithm.

  3. The albedo of fractal stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Ridgway, William; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Bell, Thomas L.; Snider, Jack B.

    1994-01-01

    An increase in the planetary albedo of the earth-atmosphere system by only 10% can decrease the equilibrium surface temperature to that of the last ice age. Nevertheless, albedo biases of 10% or greater would be introduced into large regions of current climate models if clouds were given their observed liquid water amounts, because of the treatment of clouds as plane parallel. The focus on marine stratocumulus clouds is due to their important role in cloud radiative forcing and also that, of the wide variety of earth's cloud types, they are most nearly plane parallel, so that they have the least albedo bias. The fractal model employed here reproduces both the probability distribution and the wavenumber spectrum of the stratocumulus liquid water path, as observed during the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE). A single new fractal parameter 0 less than or equal to f less than or equal to 1, is introduced and determined empirically by the variance of the logarithm of the vertically integrated liquid water. The reduced reflectivity of fractal stratocumulus clouds is approximately given by the plane-parallel reflectivity evaluated at a reduced 'effective optical thickness,' which when f = 0.5 is tau(sub eff) approximately equal to 10. Study of the diurnal cycle of stratocumulus liquid water during FIRE leads to a key unexpected result: the plane-parallel albedo bias is largest when the cloud fraction reaches 100%, that is, when any bias associated with the cloud fraction vanishes. This is primarily due to the variability increase with cloud fraction. Thus, the within-cloud fractal structure of stratocumulus has a more significant impact on estimates of its mesoscale-average albedo than does the cloud fraction.

  4. Fractal aggregates in tennis ball systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, J.; Bandín, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-09-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the images of the cluster of balls, following Forrest and Witten's pioneering studies on the aggregation of smoke particles, to estimate their fractal dimension.

  5. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics on Fractals Subset of Real-Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmankhaneh, Alireza Khalili; Golmankhaneh, Ali Khalili; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2013-11-01

    A discontinuous media can be described by fractal dimensions. Fractal objects has special geometric properties, which are discrete and discontinuous structure. A fractal-time diffusion equation is a model for subdiffusive. In this work, we have generalized the Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics on fractal using the fractional local derivative, so one can use as a new mathematical model for the motion in the fractal media. More, Poisson bracket on fractal subset of real line is suggested.

  6. Retinal vascular fractals and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Ong, Yi-Ting; Hilal, Saima; Cheung, Carol Yim-Lui; Xu, Xin; Chen, Christopher; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Wong, Tien Yin; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran

    2014-05-01

    Retinal microvascular network changes have been found in patients with age-related brain diseases such as stroke and dementia including Alzheimer's disease. We examine whether retinal microvascular network changes are also present in preclinical stages of dementia. This is a cross-sectional study of 300 Chinese participants (age: ≥60 years) from the ongoing Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore study who underwent detailed clinical examinations including retinal photography, brain imaging and neuropsychological testing. Retinal vascular parameters were assessed from optic disc-centered photographs using a semiautomated program. A comprehensive neuropsychological battery was administered, and cognitive function was summarized as composite and domain-specific Z-scores. Cognitive impairment no dementia (CIND) and dementia were diagnosed according to standard diagnostic criteria. Among 268 eligible nondemented participants, 78 subjects were categorized as CIND-mild and 69 as CIND-moderate. In multivariable adjusted models, reduced retinal arteriolar and venular fractal dimensions were associated with an increased risk of CIND-mild and CIND-moderate. Reduced fractal dimensions were associated with poorer cognitive performance globally and in the specific domains of verbal memory, visuoconstruction and visuomotor speed. A sparser retinal microvascular network, represented by reduced arteriolar and venular fractal dimensions, was associated with cognitive impairment, suggesting that early microvascular damage may be present in preclinical stages of dementia.

  7. Simulation of geological surfaces using fractals

    SciTech Connect

    Yfantis, E.A.; Flatman, G.T.; Englund, E.J.

    1988-08-01

    Methods suggests in the past for simulated ore concentration or pollution concentration over an area of interest, subject to the condition that the simulated surface is passing through specifying points, are based on the assumption of normality. A new method is introduced here which is a generalization of the subdivision method used in fractals. This method is based on the construction of a fractal plane-to-line function f(x, y, R, e, u), where (x, y) is in (a, b) x (c, d), R is the autocorrelation function, e is the resolution limit, and u is a random real function on (-l, l). The simulation using fractals escapes from any distribution assumptions of the data. The given network of points is connected to form quadrilaterals; each one of the quadrilaterals is split based on ways which are extensions of the well-known subdivision method. The quadrilaterals continue to split and grow until resolution obtained in both x and y directions is smaller than a prespecified resolution. If the x coordinate of the ith quadrilateral is in (a/sub i/, b/sub i/) and the y coordinate is in (c/sub i/, d/sub i/), the growth of this quadrilateral is a function of (b/sub i/ - a/sub i/) and (d/sub i/ - c/sub i/); the quadrilateral could grow toward the positive or negative z axis with equal probability forming four new quadrilaterals having a common vertex.

  8. Interfacial contact stiffness of fractal rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dayi; Xia, Ying; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Hong, Jie; Ma, Yanhong

    2017-10-09

    In this work we describe a theoretical model that predicts the interfacial contact stiffness of fractal rough surfaces by considering the effects of elastic and plastic deformations of the fractal asperities. We also develop an original test rig that simulates dovetail joints for turbo machinery blades, which can fine tune the normal contact load existing between the contacting surfaces of the blade root. The interfacial contact stiffness is obtained through an inverse identification method in which finite element simulations are fitted to the experimental results. Excellent agreement is observed between the contact stiffness predicted by the theoretical model and by the analogous experimental results. We demonstrate that the contact stiffness is a power law function of the normal contact load with an exponent α within the whole range of fractal dimension D(1 < D < 2). We also show that for 1 < D < 1.5 the Pohrt-Popov behavior (α = 1/(3 - D)) is valid, however for 1.5 < D < 2, the exponent α is different and equal to 2(D - 1)/D. The diversity between the model developed in the work and the Pohrt-Popov one is explained in detail.

  9. Dynamic contact interactions of fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Tamonash; Mitra, Anirban; Sahoo, Prasanta

    2017-01-01

    Roughness parameters and material properties have significant influence on the static and dynamic properties of a rough surface. In the present paper, fractal surface is generated using the modified two-variable Weierstrass-Mandelbrot function in MATLAB and the same is imported to ANSYS to construct the finite element model of the rough surface. The force-deflection relationship between the deformable rough fractal surface and a contacting rigid flat is studied by finite element analysis. For the dynamic analysis, the contacting system is represented by a single degree of freedom spring mass-damper-system. The static force-normal displacement relationship obtained from FE analysis is used to determine the dynamic characteristics of the rough surface for free, as well as for forced damped vibration using numerical methods. The influence of fractal surface parameters and the material properties on the dynamics of the rough surface is also analyzed. The system exhibits softening property for linear elastic surface and the softening nature increases with rougher topography. The softening nature of the system increases with increase in tangent modulus value. Above a certain value of yield strength the nature of the frequency response curve is observed to change its nature from softening to hardening.

  10. The contact mechanics of fractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Buzio, Renato; Boragno, Corrado; Biscarini, Fabio; Buatier de Mongeot, Francesco; Valbusa, Ugo

    2003-04-01

    The role of surface roughness in contact mechanics is relevant to processes ranging from adhesion to friction, wear and lubrication. It also promises to have a deep impact on applied science, including coatings technology and design of microelectromechanical systems. Despite the considerable results achieved by indentation experiments, particularly in the measurement of bulk hardness on nanometre scales, the contact behaviour of realistic surfaces, showing random multiscale roughness, remains largely unknown. Here we report experimental results concerning the mechanical response of self-affine thin films indented by a micrometric flat probe. The specimens, made of cluster-assembled carbon or of sexithienyl, an organic molecular material, were chosen as prototype systems for the broad class of self-affine fractal interfaces, today including surfaces grown under non-equilibrium conditions, fractures, manufactured metal surfaces and solidified liquid fronts. We observe that a regime exists in which roughness drives the contact mechanics: in this range surface stiffness varies by a few orders of magnitude on small but significant changes of fractal parameters. As a consequence, we demonstrate that soft solid interfaces can be appreciably strengthened by reducing both fractal dimension and surface roughness. This indicates a general route for tailoring the mechanical properties of solid bodies.

  11. Fractal analysis of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, A. L. D.; Lorite, G. S.; Rodrigues, C. M.; Souza, A. A.; Cotta, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated the growth process of Xylella fastidiosa biofilms inoculated on a glass. The size and the distance between biofilms were analyzed by optical images; a fractal analysis was carried out using scaling concepts and atomic force microscopy images. We observed that different biofilms show similar fractal characteristics, although morphological variations can be identified for different biofilm stages. Two types of structural patterns are suggested from the observed fractal dimensions Df. In the initial and final stages of biofilm formation, Df is 2.73±0.06 and 2.68±0.06, respectively, while in the maturation stage, Df=2.57±0.08. These values suggest that the biofilm growth can be understood as an Eden model in the former case, while diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) seems to dominate the maturation stage. Changes in the correlation length parallel to the surface were also observed; these results were correlated with the biofilm matrix formation, which can hinder nutrient diffusion and thus create conditions to drive DLA growth.

  12. The role of the circadian system in fractal neurophysiological control

    PubMed Central

    Pittman-Polletta, Benjamin R.; Scheer, Frank A.J.L.; Butler, Matthew P.; Shea, Steven A.; Hu, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Many neurophysiological variables such as heart rate, motor activity, and neural activity are known to exhibit intrinsic fractal fluctuations - similar temporal fluctuation patterns at different time scales. These fractal patterns contain information about health, as many pathological conditions are accompanied by their alteration or absence. In physical systems, such fluctuations are characteristic of critical states on the border between randomness and order, frequently arising from nonlinear feedback interactions between mechanisms operating on multiple scales. Thus, the existence of fractal fluctuations in physiology challenges traditional conceptions of health and disease, suggesting that high levels of integrity and adaptability are marked by complex variability, not constancy, and are properties of a neurophysiological network, not individual components. Despite the subject's theoretical and clinical interest, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying fractal regulation remain largely unknown. The recent discovery that the circadian pacemaker (suprachiasmatic nucleus) plays a crucial role in generating fractal patterns in motor activity and heart rate sheds an entirely new light on both fractal control networks and the function of this master circadian clock, and builds a bridge between the fields of circadian biology and fractal physiology. In this review, we sketch the emerging picture of the developing interdisciplinary field of fractal neurophysiology by examining the circadian system’s role in fractal regulation. PMID:23573942

  13. Fractal analysis of scatter imaging signatures to distinguish breast pathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguizabal, Alma; Laughney, Ashley M.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Wells, Wendy A.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2013-02-01

    Fractal analysis combined with a label-free scattering technique is proposed for describing the pathological architecture of tumors. Clinicians and pathologists are conventionally trained to classify abnormal features such as structural irregularities or high indices of mitosis. The potential of fractal analysis lies in the fact of being a morphometric measure of the irregular structures providing a measure of the object's complexity and self-similarity. As cancer is characterized by disorder and irregularity in tissues, this measure could be related to tumor growth. Fractal analysis has been probed in the understanding of the tumor vasculature network. This work addresses the feasibility of applying fractal analysis to the scattering power map (as a physical modeling) and principal components (as a statistical modeling) provided by a localized reflectance spectroscopic system. Disorder, irregularity and cell size variation in tissue samples is translated into the scattering power and principal components magnitude and its fractal dimension is correlated with the pathologist assessment of the samples. The fractal dimension is computed applying the box-counting technique. Results show that fractal analysis of ex-vivo fresh tissue samples exhibits separated ranges of fractal dimension that could help classifier combining the fractal results with other morphological features. This contrast trend would help in the discrimination of tissues in the intraoperative context and may serve as a useful adjunct to surgeons.

  14. The role of the circadian system in fractal neurophysiological control.

    PubMed

    Pittman-Polletta, Benjamin R; Scheer, Frank A J L; Butler, Matthew P; Shea, Steven A; Hu, Kun

    2013-11-01

    Many neurophysiological variables such as heart rate, motor activity, and neural activity are known to exhibit intrinsic fractal fluctuations - similar temporal fluctuation patterns at different time scales. These fractal patterns contain information about health, as many pathological conditions are accompanied by their alteration or absence. In physical systems, such fluctuations are characteristic of critical states on the border between randomness and order, frequently arising from nonlinear feedback interactions between mechanisms operating on multiple scales. Thus, the existence of fractal fluctuations in physiology challenges traditional conceptions of health and disease, suggesting that high levels of integrity and adaptability are marked by complex variability, not constancy, and are properties of a neurophysiological network, not individual components. Despite the subject's theoretical and clinical interest, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying fractal regulation remain largely unknown. The recent discovery that the circadian pacemaker (suprachiasmatic nucleus) plays a crucial role in generating fractal patterns in motor activity and heart rate sheds an entirely new light on both fractal control networks and the function of this master circadian clock, and builds a bridge between the fields of circadian biology and fractal physiology. In this review, we sketch the emerging picture of the developing interdisciplinary field of fractal neurophysiology by examining the circadian system's role in fractal regulation. © 2013 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2013 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  15. Fractal analysis of electroviscous effect in charged porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Mingchao; Yang, Shanshan; Cui, Xiaomin; Li, Yongfeng

    2017-04-01

    An electroviscous effect is an important phenomenon making flow resistance larger in electrically charged capillaries or porous media. Thus, the study of this phenomenon is very meaningful in various scientific and engineering fields. In this work, based on the fractal characteristics of porous media, a theoretical apparent viscosity model is expressed in terms of the solid surface zeta potential, physical properties (viscosity, dielectric constant, and conductivity) of the electrolyte solution, maximum pore radius, pore fractal dimension, and tortuosity fractal dimension of porous media. A reasonably good match is found between the results from the fractal model and the available experimental data reported in the literature.

  16. Application study of fractal theory in mechanical transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Han; Wu, Qilin

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical transmissions are applied widely in various electrical and mechanical products, but some qualities of some high-end products can't meet people's demand, and need to be improved with some new methods or theories. The fractal theory is a new mathematic tool, which provides a new approach for the further study in the area of the mechanical transmission, and helps to solve some problems. The basic contents of the fractal theory are introduced firstly, especially the two important concepts, the self-similar fractal and the fractal dimension. Then, the deferent application of the fractal theory in this area are given to display how to further the study and improve some important characteristics of the mechanical transmission, such as contact surfaces, manufacturing precise, friction and wear, stiffness, strength, dynamics, fault diagnosis, etc. Finally, the problems of the fractal theory and its application are discussed, and some weaknesses, such as the calculation capacity of the fractal theory is not strong, are pointed out. Some new solutions are suggested, such as combining the fractal theory with the fuzzy theory, the chaos theory and so on. The new application fields of the fractal theory in the area of the mechanical transmission are proposed.

  17. Fractal dimension analyses of lava surfaces and flow boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, Timothy F.

    1993-01-01

    An improved method of estimating fractal surface dimensions has been developed. The accuracy of this method is illustrated using artificially generated fractal surfaces. A slightly different from usual concept of linear dimension is developed, allowing a direct link between that and the corresponding surface dimension estimate. These methods are applied to a series of images of lava flows, representing a variety of physical and chemical conditions. These include lavas from California, Idaho, and Hawaii, as well as some extraterrestrial flows. The fractal surface dimension estimations are presented, as well as the fractal line dimensions where appropriate.

  18. Adhesion and Disintegration Phenomena on Fractal Agar Gel Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Ayano; Sato, Marika; Sawaguchi, Haruna; Hotta, Jun-Ichi; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, mechanical phenomena on fractal agar gel were analyzed to understand the interfacial properties of hydrophilic biosurfaces. The evaluation of adhesion strength between the fractal agar gel surfaces showed that the fractal structure inhibits the adhesion between the agar gel surfaces. In addition, when the disintegration behavior of an agar gel block was observed between fractal agar gel substrates, the rough structure prevented the sliding of an agar gel block. These findings are useful for understanding the biological significance of rough structure on the biological surfaces.

  19. SANS spectra of the fractal supernucleosomal chromatin structure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilatovskiy, Andrey V.; Lebedev, Dmitry V.; Filatov, Michael V.; Petukhov, Michael G.; Isaev-Ivanov, Vladimir V.

    2012-03-01

    The eukaryotic genome consists of chromatin—a nucleoprotein complex with hierarchical architecture based on nucleosomes, the organization of higher-order chromatin structures still remains unknown. Available experimental data, including SANS spectra we had obtained for whole nuclei, suggested fractal nature of chromatin. Previously we had built random-walk supernucleosomal models (up to 106 nucleosomes) to interpret our SANS spectra. Here we report a new method to build fractal supernucleosomal structure of a given fractal dimension or two different dimensions. Agreement between calculated and experimental SANS spectra was significantly improved, especially for model with two fractal dimensions—3 and 2.

  20. GENERATING FRACTAL PATTERNS BY USING p-CIRCLE INVERSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, José L.; Rubiano, Gustavo N.; Zlobec, Borut Jurčič

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the p-circle inversion which generalizes the classical inversion with respect to a circle (p = 2) and the taxicab inversion (p = 1). We study some basic properties and we also show the inversive images of some basic curves. We apply this new transformation to well-known fractals such as Sierpinski triangle, Koch curve, dragon curve, Fibonacci fractal, among others. Then we obtain new fractal patterns. Moreover, we generalize the method called circle inversion fractal be means of the p-circle inversion.

  1. Modelling Fractal Growth of Bacillus subtilis on Agar Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogedby, Hans C.

    1991-02-01

    The observed fractal growth of a bacterial colony of Bacillus subtilis on agar plates is simulated by a simple computer model in two dimensions. Growth morphologies are shown and the fractal dimension is computed. The concentration of nutrients and the time scale ratio of bacterial multiplication and nutrient diffusion are the variable parameters in the model. Fractal growth is observed in the simulations for moderate concentrations and time scale ratios. The simulated morphologies are similar to the ones grown in the biological experiment. The phenomenon is analogous to the fractal morphologies of lipid layers grown on a water surface.

  2. Sierpiński fractal plasmonic antenna: a fractal abstraction of the plasmonic bowtie antenna.

    PubMed

    Sederberg, Shawn; Elezzabi, A Y

    2011-05-23

    A new class of bowtie antennas with Sierpiński fractal features is proposed for sensing molecular vibration modes in the near- to mid-infrared. These antennas offer a compact device footprint and an enhanced confinement factor compared to a bowtie antenna. Through extensive simulations, it is shown that these characteristics are related to the ability of this fractal geometry to become polarized. Simulation results demonstrate that these antennas may be tuned between 700 nm ≤ λ ≤ 3.4 µm and that electric field enhancement by 56 is possible at the center of the antenna gap.

  3. Reinforcement of rubber by fractal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, T. A.; Rubinstein, M.; Colby, R. H.

    1993-03-01

    Rubber is commonly reinforced with colloidal aggregates of carbon or silica, whose structure has the scale invariance of a fractal object. Reinforced rubbers support large stresses, which often grow faster than linearly with the strain. We argue that under strong elongation the stress arises through lateral compression of the aggregates, driven by the large bulk modulus of the rubber. We derive a power-law relationship between stress and elongation λ when λgg 1. The predicted power p depends on the fractal dimension D and a second structural scaling exponent C. For diffusion-controlled aggregates this power p should lie beween 0.9 and 1.1 ; for reaction-controlled aggregates p should lie between 1.8 and 2.4. For uniaxial compression the analogous powers lie near 4. Practical rubbers filled with fractal aggregates should approach the conditions of validity for these scaling laws. On renforce souvent le caoutchouc avec des agrégats de carbone ou de silice dont la structure a l'invariance par dilatation d'un objet fractal. Les caoutchoucs ainsi renforcés supportent de grandes contraintes qui croissent souvent plus vite que l'élongation. Nous prétendons que, sous élongation forte, cette contrainte apparaît à cause d'une compression latérale des agrégats induite par le module volumique important du caoutchouc. Nous établissons une loi de puissance reliant la contrainte et l'élongation λ quand λgg 1. Cet exposant p dépend de la dimension fractale D et d'un deuxième exposant structural C. Pour des agrégats dont la cinétique de formation est limitée par diffusion, p vaut entre 0,9 et 1,1. Si la cinétique est limitée par le soudage local des particules, p vaut entre 1,8 et 2,4. Sous compression uniaxiale, les puissances homologues valent environ 4. Des caoutchoucs pratiques chargés de tels agrégats devraient approcher des conditions où ces lois d'échelle sont valables.

  4. Influence of buoyancy on drainage of a fractal porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huinink, H. P.; Michels, M. A.

    2002-10-01

    The influence of stabilizing hydrostatic pressure gradients on the drainage of a fractal porous medium is studied. The invasion process is treated with invasion percolation (IP) in a gradient. Fractality is mimicked by randomly closing bonds of a network. Two length scales govern the problem: the characteristic length of the pore structure ξs and a length scale ξg above which buoyancy determines the structure of the cluster. When ξs<ξg the local structure of the invading cluster is governed by the interplay of capillarity and the fractal properties of the pore space. Only parts of the backbone of the pore structure can be invaded. Therefore, the obtained fractal dimension for small systems L<ξs is much lower (1.40) than the one for ordinary IP (1.82). On larger length scales, ξsfractality of the pore space is no longer important and the cluster grows as in ordinary IP. When L>ξg, gravity becomes important and ξg scales with the bond number B as ξg~B-0.57, as in ordinary IP, while the fractal dimension becomes equal to the Euclidean one. When ξg<ξs gravity is already important on length scales where the fractality of the medium has to be considered too. On small scales L<ξg, where only capillarity and fractality play a role the cluster structure is again characterized by the fractal dimension of 1.40. On larger length scales, ξgfractal dimension of 1.52 is found. The length scale ξg no longer follows ordinary IP scaling: ξg~B-0.69. When L>ξs the fractal dimension of the invading cluster equals the Euclidean one and ξg~B-0.69.

  5. Definition of fractal topography to essential understanding of scale-invariance

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yi; Wu, Ying; Li, Hui; Zhao, Mengyu; Pan, Jienan

    2017-01-01

    Fractal behavior is scale-invariant and widely characterized by fractal dimension. However, the cor-respondence between them is that fractal behavior uniquely determines a fractal dimension while a fractal dimension can be related to many possible fractal behaviors. Therefore, fractal behavior is independent of the fractal generator and its geometries, spatial pattern, and statistical properties in addition to scale. To mathematically describe fractal behavior, we propose a novel concept of fractal topography defined by two scale-invariant parameters, scaling lacunarity (P) and scaling coverage (F). The scaling lacunarity is defined as the scale ratio between two successive fractal generators, whereas the scaling coverage is defined as the number ratio between them. Consequently, a strictly scale-invariant definition for self-similar fractals can be derived as D = log F /log P. To reflect the direction-dependence of fractal behaviors, we introduce another parameter Hxy, a general Hurst exponent, which is analytically expressed by Hxy = log Px/log Py where Px and Py are the scaling lacunarities in the x and y directions, respectively. Thus, a unified definition of fractal dimension is proposed for arbitrary self-similar and self-affine fractals by averaging the fractal dimensions of all directions in a d-dimensional space, which . Our definitions provide a theoretical, mechanistic basis for understanding the essentials of the scale-invariant property that reduces the complexity of modeling fractals. PMID:28436450

  6. Definition of fractal topography to essential understanding of scale-invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yi; Wu, Ying; Li, Hui; Zhao, Mengyu; Pan, Jienan

    2017-04-01

    Fractal behavior is scale-invariant and widely characterized by fractal dimension. However, the cor-respondence between them is that fractal behavior uniquely determines a fractal dimension while a fractal dimension can be related to many possible fractal behaviors. Therefore, fractal behavior is independent of the fractal generator and its geometries, spatial pattern, and statistical properties in addition to scale. To mathematically describe fractal behavior, we propose a novel concept of fractal topography defined by two scale-invariant parameters, scaling lacunarity (P) and scaling coverage (F). The scaling lacunarity is defined as the scale ratio between two successive fractal generators, whereas the scaling coverage is defined as the number ratio between them. Consequently, a strictly scale-invariant definition for self-similar fractals can be derived as D = log F /log P. To reflect the direction-dependence of fractal behaviors, we introduce another parameter Hxy, a general Hurst exponent, which is analytically expressed by Hxy = log Px/log Py where Px and Py are the scaling lacunarities in the x and y directions, respectively. Thus, a unified definition of fractal dimension is proposed for arbitrary self-similar and self-affine fractals by averaging the fractal dimensions of all directions in a d-dimensional space, which . Our definitions provide a theoretical, mechanistic basis for understanding the essentials of the scale-invariant property that reduces the complexity of modeling fractals.

  7. Definition of fractal topography to essential understanding of scale-invariance.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Wu, Ying; Li, Hui; Zhao, Mengyu; Pan, Jienan

    2017-04-24

    Fractal behavior is scale-invariant and widely characterized by fractal dimension. However, the cor-respondence between them is that fractal behavior uniquely determines a fractal dimension while a fractal dimension can be related to many possible fractal behaviors. Therefore, fractal behavior is independent of the fractal generator and its geometries, spatial pattern, and statistical properties in addition to scale. To mathematically describe fractal behavior, we propose a novel concept of fractal topography defined by two scale-invariant parameters, scaling lacunarity (P) and scaling coverage (F). The scaling lacunarity is defined as the scale ratio between two successive fractal generators, whereas the scaling coverage is defined as the number ratio between them. Consequently, a strictly scale-invariant definition for self-similar fractals can be derived as D = log F /log P. To reflect the direction-dependence of fractal behaviors, we introduce another parameter Hxy, a general Hurst exponent, which is analytically expressed by Hxy = log Px/log Py where Px and Py are the scaling lacunarities in the x and y directions, respectively. Thus, a unified definition of fractal dimension is proposed for arbitrary self-similar and self-affine fractals by averaging the fractal dimensions of all directions in a d-dimensional space, which . Our definitions provide a theoretical, mechanistic basis for understanding the essentials of the scale-invariant property that reduces the complexity of modeling fractals.

  8. Fractal behavior of traffic volume on urban expressway through adaptive fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-di; Wang, Jun-li; Wei, Hai-rui; Ye, Cheng; Ding, Yi

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the fractal behavior of traffic volume in urban expressway based on a newly developed adaptive fractal analysis (AFA), which has a number of advantages over traditional method of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Before fractal analysis, autocorrelation function was first adopted on traffic volume data and the long-range correlation behavior was found to be existed in both on-ramp and off-ramp situations. Then AFA as well as DFA was applied to further examine the fractal behavior. The results showed that the multifractality and the long-range anti-persistent behavior existed on both on-ramp and off-ramp. Additionally, multifractal analysis on weekdays and weekends are performed respectively and the results show that the degree of multifractality on weekdays is higher than that on weekends, implying that long-range correlation behaviors were more obvious on weekdays. Finally, the source of multifractality is examined with randomly shuffled and the surrogated series. Long-range correlation behaviors are identified in both on-ramp and off-ramp situations and fat-tail distributions were found to make little in the contributions of multifractality.

  9. The Calculation of Fractal Dimension in the Presence of Non-Fractal Clutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    1999-01-01

    The area of information processing has grown dramatically over the last 50 years. In the areas of image processing and information storage the technology requirements have far outpaced the ability of the community to meet demands. The need for faster recognition algorithms and more efficient storage of large quantities of data has forced the user to accept less than lossless retrieval of that data for analysis. In addition to clutter that is not the object of interest in the data set, often the throughput requirements forces the user to accept "noisy" data and to tolerate the clutter inherent in that data. It has been shown that some of this clutter, both the intentional clutter (clouds, trees, etc) as well as the noise introduced on the data by processing requirements can be modeled as fractal or fractal-like. Traditional methods using Fourier deconvolution on these sources of noise in frequency space leads to loss of signal and can, in many cases, completely eliminate the target of interest. The parameters that characterize fractal-like noise (predominately the fractal dimension) have been investigated and a technique to reduce or eliminate noise from real scenes has been developed. Examples of clutter reduced images are presented.

  10. The Calculation of Fractal Dimension in the Presence of Non-Fractal Clutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    1999-01-01

    The area of information processing has grown dramatically over the last 50 years. In the areas of image processing and information storage the technology requirements have far outpaced the ability of the community to meet demands. The need for faster recognition algorithms and more efficient storage of large quantities of data has forced the user to accept less than lossless retrieval of that data for analysis. In addition to clutter that is not the object of interest in the data set, often the throughput requirements forces the user to accept "noisy" data and to tolerate the clutter inherent in that data. It has been shown that some of this clutter, both the intentional clutter (clouds, trees, etc) as well as the noise introduced on the data by processing requirements can be modeled as fractal or fractal-like. Traditional methods using Fourier deconvolution on these sources of noise in frequency space leads to loss of signal and can, in many cases, completely eliminate the target of interest. The parameters that characterize fractal-like noise (predominately the fractal dimension) have been investigated and a technique to reduce or eliminate noise from real scenes has been developed. Examples of clutter reduced images are presented.

  11. The fractal nature of vacuum arc cathode spots

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-05-27

    Cathode spot phenomena show many features of fractals, for example self-similar patterns in the emitted light and arc erosion traces. Although there have been hints on the fractal nature of cathode spots in the literature, the fractal approach to spot interpretation is underutilized. In this work, a brief review of spot properties is given, touching the differences between spot type 1 (on cathodes surfaces with dielectric layers) and spot type 2 (on metallic, clean surfaces) as well as the known spot fragment or cell structure. The basic properties of self-similarity, power laws, random colored noise, and fractals are introduced. Several points of evidence for the fractal nature of spots are provided. Specifically power laws are identified as signature of fractal properties, such as spectral power of noisy arc parameters (ion current, arc voltage, etc) obtained by fast Fourier transform. It is shown that fractal properties can be observed down to the cutoff by measurement resolution or occurrence of elementary steps in physical processes. Random walk models of cathode spot motion are well established: they go asymptotically to Brownian motion for infinitesimal step width. The power spectrum of the arc voltage noise falls as 1/f {sup 2}, where f is frequency, supporting a fractal spot model associated with Brownian motion.

  12. Fractal and Multifractal Models Applied to Porous Media - Editorial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Given the current high level of interest in the use of fractal geometry to characterize natural porous media, a special issue of the Vadose Zone Journal was organized in order to expose established fractal analysis techniques and cutting-edge new developments to a wider Earth science audience. The ...

  13. Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems - Editorial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The special issue of Ecological complexity journal on Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems contains representative examples of the status and evolution of data-driven research into fractals and scaling in complex natural systems. The editorial discusses contributions to understanding rela...

  14. a Fractal Network Model for Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Li, Cuihong; Qiu, Shuxia; Sasmito, Agus Pulung

    2016-04-01

    The transport properties and mechanisms of fractured porous media are very important for oil and gas reservoir engineering, hydraulics, environmental science, chemical engineering, etc. In this paper, a fractal dual-porosity model is developed to estimate the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media, where a fractal tree-like network model is used to characterize the fracture system according to its fractal scaling laws and topological structures. The analytical expressions for the effective permeability of fracture system and fractured porous media, tortuosity, fracture density and fraction are derived. The proposed fractal model has been validated by comparisons with available experimental data and numerical simulation. It has been shown that fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture have significant effect on the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media. The effective permeability of fracture system can be increased with the increase of fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture, while it can be remarkably lowered by introducing tortuosity at large branching angle. Also, a scaling law between the fracture density and fractal dimension for fracture length has been found, where the scaling exponent depends on the fracture number. The present fractal dual-porosity model may shed light on the transport physics of fractured porous media and provide theoretical basis for oil and gas exploitation, underground water, nuclear waste disposal and geothermal energy extraction as well as chemical engineering, etc.

  15. A comparison of the fractal and JPEG algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, K.-M.; Shahshahani, M.

    1991-01-01

    A proprietary fractal image compression algorithm and the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) industry standard algorithm for image compression are compared. In every case, the JPEG algorithm was superior to the fractal method at a given compression ratio according to a root mean square criterion and a peak signal to noise criterion.

  16. An application of geostatistics and fractal geometry for reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Aasum, Y.; Kelkar, M.G. ); Gupta, S.P. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper presents an application of geostatistics and fractal geometry concepts for 2D characterization of rock properties (k and {phi}) in a dolomitic, layered-cake reservoir. The results indicate that lack of closely spaced data yield effectively random distributions of properties. Further, incorporation of geology reduces uncertainties in fractal interpolation of wellbore properties.

  17. Universal fractality of morphological transitions in stochastic growth processes.

    PubMed

    Nicolás-Carlock, J R; Carrillo-Estrada, J L; Dossetti, V

    2017-06-14

    Stochastic growth processes give rise to diverse and intricate structures everywhere in nature, often referred to as fractals. In general, these complex structures reflect the non-trivial competition among the interactions that generate them. In particular, the paradigmatic Laplacian-growth model exhibits a characteristic fractal to non-fractal morphological transition as the non-linear effects of its growth dynamics increase. So far, a complete scaling theory for this type of transitions, as well as a general analytical description for their fractal dimensions have been lacking. In this work, we show that despite the enormous variety of shapes, these morphological transitions have clear universal scaling characteristics. Using a statistical approach to fundamental particle-cluster aggregation, we introduce two non-trivial fractal to non-fractal transitions that capture all the main features of fractal growth. By analyzing the respective clusters, in addition to constructing a dynamical model for their fractal dimension, we show that they are well described by a general dimensionality function regardless of their space symmetry-breaking mechanism, including the Laplacian case itself. Moreover, under the appropriate variable transformation this description is universal, i.e., independent of the transition dynamics, the initial cluster configuration, and the embedding Euclidean space.

  18. On the Relation Between Lacunarity and Fractal Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borys, P.

    2009-05-01

    I discuss the relation between fractal dimension and lacunarity. Commenting the known results, I propose a method for estimation of the scaling constant in the power law dependency. Additionally, I provide a simple new derivation of a known experimental relation for lacunarity and fractal dimension.

  19. Laser light scattering as a probe of fractal colloid aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, David A.; Lin, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The extensive use of laser light scattering is reviewed, both static and dynamic, in the study of colloid aggregation. Static light scattering enables the study of the fractal structure of the aggregates, while dynamic light scattering enables the study of aggregation kinetics. In addition, both techniques can be combined to demonstrate the universality of the aggregation process. Colloidal aggregates are now well understood and therefore represent an excellent experimental system to use in the study of the physical properties of fractal objects. However, the ultimate size of fractal aggregates is fundamentally limited by gravitational acceleration which will destroy the fractal structure as the size of the aggregates increases. This represents a great opportunity for spaceborne experimentation, where the reduced g will enable the growth of fractal structures of sufficient size for many interesting studies of their physical properties.

  20. Enhancement of dielectrophoresis using fractal gold nanostructured electrodes.

    PubMed

    Koklu, Anil; Sabuncu, Ahmet C; Beskok, Ali

    2017-06-01

    Dielectrophoretic motions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) cells and colloidal gold are investigated using electrochemically modified electrodes exhibiting fractal topology. Electrodeposition of gold on electrodes generated repeated patterns with a fern-leaf type self-similarity. A particle tracking algorithm is used to extract dielectrophoretic particle velocities using fractal and planar electrodes in two different medium conductivities. The results show increased dielectrophoretic force when using fractal electrodes. Strong negative dielectrophoresis of yeast cells in high-conductivity media (1.5 S/m) is observed using fractal electrodes, while no significant motion is present using planar electrodes. Electrical impedance at the electrode/electrolyte interface is measured using impedance spectroscopy technique. Stronger electrode polarization (EP) effects are reported for planar electrodes. Decreased EP in fractal electrodes is considered as a reason for enhanced dielectrophoretic response. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Laser light scattering as a probe of fractal colloid aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, David A.; Lin, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The extensive use of laser light scattering is reviewed, both static and dynamic, in the study of colloid aggregation. Static light scattering enables the study of the fractal structure of the aggregates, while dynamic light scattering enables the study of aggregation kinetics. In addition, both techniques can be combined to demonstrate the universality of the aggregation process. Colloidal aggregates are now well understood and therefore represent an excellent experimental system to use in the study of the physical properties of fractal objects. However, the ultimate size of fractal aggregates is fundamentally limited by gravitational acceleration which will destroy the fractal structure as the size of the aggregates increases. This represents a great opportunity for spaceborne experimentation, where the reduced g will enable the growth of fractal structures of sufficient size for many interesting studies of their physical properties.

  2. Multi-Scale Fractal Analysis of Image Texture and Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerson, Charles W.; Lam, Nina Siu-Ngan; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of the fractal dimension of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) images of homogeneous land covers near Huntsville, Alabama revealed that the fractal dimension of an image of an agricultural land cover indicates greater complexity as pixel size increases, a forested land cover gradually grows smoother, and an urban image remains roughly self-similar over the range of pixel sizes analyzed (10 to 80 meters). A similar analysis of Landsat Thematic Mapper images of the East Humboldt Range in Nevada taken four months apart show a more complex relation between pixel size and fractal dimension. The major visible difference between the spring and late summer NDVI images of the absence of high elevation snow cover in the summer image. This change significantly alters the relation between fractal dimension and pixel size. The slope of the fractal dimensional-resolution relation provides indications of how image classification or feature identification will be affected by changes in sensor spatial resolution.

  3. Physics, Perception, and Physiological of Jackson Pollock's Fractals

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Fractals have experienced considerable success in quantifying the visual complexity exhibited by many natural patterns and have captured the imagination of scientists and artists alike. Our research has shown that the poured patterns of the American abstract painter Jackson Pollock are also fractal. This discovery raises an intriguing possibility—are the visual characteristics of fractals responsible for the long-term appeal of Pollock's work? To address this question, we have conducted ten years of scientific investigation of human response to fractals and here we present, for the first time, a review of this research that examines the inter-relationship between the various results. The investigations include eye-tracking, visual preference, skin conductance, EEG and preliminary fMRI measurement techniques. We discuss the artistic implications of the positive perceptual, physiological, and neurological responses to fractal patterns.

  4. Multi-Scale Fractal Analysis of Image Texture and Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerson, Charles W.; Lam, Nina Siu-Ngan; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of the fractal dimension of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) images of homogeneous land covers near Huntsville, Alabama revealed that the fractal dimension of an image of an agricultural land cover indicates greater complexity as pixel size increases, a forested land cover gradually grows smoother, and an urban image remains roughly self-similar over the range of pixel sizes analyzed (10 to 80 meters). A similar analysis of Landsat Thematic Mapper images of the East Humboldt Range in Nevada taken four months apart show a more complex relation between pixel size and fractal dimension. The major visible difference between the spring and late summer NDVI images is the absence of high elevation snow cover in the summer image. This change significantly alters the relation between fractal dimension and pixel size. The slope of the fractal dimension-resolution relation provides indications of how image classification or feature identification will be affected by changes in sensor spatial resolution.

  5. Perceptual and Physiological Responses to Jackson Pollock's Fractals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Richard P; Spehar, Branka; Van Donkelaar, Paul; Hagerhall, Caroline M

    2011-01-01

    Fractals have been very successful in quantifying the visual complexity exhibited by many natural patterns, and have captured the imagination of scientists and artists alike. Our research has shown that the poured patterns of the American abstract painter Jackson Pollock are also fractal. This discovery raises an intriguing possibility - are the visual characteristics of fractals responsible for the long-term appeal of Pollock's work? To address this question, we have conducted 10 years of scientific investigation of human response to fractals and here we present, for the first time, a review of this research that examines the inter-relationship between the various results. The investigations include eye tracking, visual preference, skin conductance, and EEG measurement techniques. We discuss the artistic implications of the positive perceptual and physiological responses to fractal patterns.

  6. Perceptual and Physiological Responses to Jackson Pollock's Fractals

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Richard P.; Spehar, Branka; Van Donkelaar, Paul; Hagerhall, Caroline M.

    2011-01-01

    Fractals have been very successful in quantifying the visual complexity exhibited by many natural patterns, and have captured the imagination of scientists and artists alike. Our research has shown that the poured patterns of the American abstract painter Jackson Pollock are also fractal. This discovery raises an intriguing possibility – are the visual characteristics of fractals responsible for the long-term appeal of Pollock's work? To address this question, we have conducted 10 years of scientific investigation of human response to fractals and here we present, for the first time, a review of this research that examines the inter-relationship between the various results. The investigations include eye tracking, visual preference, skin conductance, and EEG measurement techniques. We discuss the artistic implications of the positive perceptual and physiological responses to fractal patterns. PMID:21734876

  7. Fractal analysis of motor imagery recognition in the BCI research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Tzu; Huang, Han-Pang; Huang, Tzu-Hao

    2011-12-01

    A fractal approach is employed for the brain motor imagery recognition and applied to brain computer interface (BCI). The fractal dimension is used as feature extraction and SVM (Support Vector Machine) as feature classifier for on-line BCI applications. The modified Inverse Random Midpoint Displacement (mIRMD) is adopted to calculate the fractal dimensions of EEG signals. The fractal dimensions can effectively reflect the complexity of EEG signals, and are related to the motor imagery tasks. Further, the SVM is employed as the classifier to combine with fractal dimension for motor-imagery recognition and use mutual information to show the difference between two classes. The results are compared with those in the BCI 2003 competition and it shows that our method has better classification accuracy and mutual information (MI).

  8. Comparison of ictal and interictal EEG signals using fractal features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zhou, Weidong; Yuan, Qi; Li, Xueli; Meng, Qingfang; Zhao, Xiuhe; Wang, Jiwen

    2013-12-01

    The feature analysis of epileptic EEG is very significant in diagnosis of epilepsy. This paper introduces two nonlinear features derived from fractal geometry for epileptic EEG analysis. The features of blanket dimension and fractal intercept are extracted to characterize behavior of EEG activities, and then their discriminatory power for ictal and interictal EEGs are compared by means of statistical methods. It is found that there is significant difference of the blanket dimension and fractal intercept between interictal and ictal EEGs, and the difference of the fractal intercept feature between interictal and ictal EEGs is more noticeable than the blanket dimension feature. Furthermore, these two fractal features at multi-scales are combined with support vector machine (SVM) to achieve accuracies of 97.58% for ictal and interictal EEG classification and 97.13% for normal, ictal and interictal EEG classification.

  9. Computerized analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns using fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Huo, Zhimin; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Chinander, Michael R.; Lan, Li; Bonta, Ioana R.

    2003-05-01

    Mammographic parenchymal patterns have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk. Fractal-based texture analyses, including box-counting methods and Minkowski dimension, were performed within parenchymal regions of normal mammograms of BRCA1/BRCA2 gene mutation carriers and within those of women at low risk for developing breast cancer. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the performance of the computerized radiographic markers in the task of distinguishing between high and low-risk subjects. A multifractal phenomenon was observed with the fractal analyses. The high frequency component of fractal dimension from the conventional box-counting technique yielded an Az value of 0.84 in differentiating between two groups, while using the LDA to estimate the fractal dimension yielded an Az value of 0.91 for the high frequency component. An Az value of 0.82 was obtained with fractal dimensions extracted using the Minkowski algorithm.

  10. A Fractal Dimension Survey of Active Region Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Gallagher, Peter; Ireland, Jack

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to quantifying the magnetic complexity of active regions using a fractal dimension measure is presented. This fully-automated approach uses full disc MDI magnetograms of active regions from a large data set (2742 days of the SoHO mission; 9342 active regions) to compare the calculated fractal dimension to both Mount Wilson classification and flare rate. The main Mount Wilson classes exhibit no distinct fractal dimension distribution, suggesting a self-similar nature of all active regions. Solar flare productivity exhibits an increase in both the frequency and GOES X-ray magnitude of flares from regions with higher fractal dimensions. Specifically a lower threshold fractal dimension of 1.2 and 1.25 exists as a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for an active region to produce M- and X-class flares respectively .

  11. Fractal digital image synthesis and application in security holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hanqiang; Zhu, Guang-Xi; Zhu, Yaoting; Zhang, Zhaoqun; Cao, Yulin; Ge, Hongwei; Li, Xuan

    2000-10-01

    Conventional method to generate a view angle combining rainbow hologram used a camera to record the sequence of pictures of an object. The object could be a model or a real object. It cost time and money. In recent years, computer-generated holograms have been investigated intensively because of their wide application range and their advantages in term of flexibility, accuracy, light weight and cost. In this paper, a new kind of fractal digital hologram is introduced. The fractal digital holograms are produced with the hyper-complex number model, the fractal hyper-texture model and the self-similar image model based on multi-scale Hurst parameters. The fractal digital holograms have been used in security holograms. In a security hologram, the more complex the model is, the more security the hologram has. The results indicate that fractal digital holograms have a good prospect for application in security holograms.

  12. A Tutorial Review on Fractal Spacetime and Fractional Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ji-Huan

    2014-11-01

    This tutorial review of fractal-Cantorian spacetime and fractional calculus begins with Leibniz's notation for derivative without limits which can be generalized to discontinuous media like fractal derivative and q-derivative of quantum calculus. Fractal spacetime is used to elucidate some basic properties of fractal which is the foundation of fractional calculus, and El Naschie's mass-energy equation for the dark energy. The variational iteration method is used to introduce the definition of fractional derivatives. Fractal derivative is explained geometrically and q-derivative is motivated by quantum mechanics. Some effective analytical approaches to fractional differential equations, e.g., the variational iteration method, the homotopy perturbation method, the exp-function method, the fractional complex transform, and Yang-Laplace transform, are outlined and the main solution processes are given.

  13. Multi-Scale Fractal Analysis of Image Texture and Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerson, Charles W.; Lam, Nina Siu-Ngan; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of the fractal dimension of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) images of homogeneous land covers near Huntsville, Alabama revealed that the fractal dimension of an image of an agricultural land cover indicates greater complexity as pixel size increases, a forested land cover gradually grows smoother, and an urban image remains roughly self-similar over the range of pixel sizes analyzed (10 to 80 meters). A similar analysis of Landsat Thematic Mapper images of the East Humboldt Range in Nevada taken four months apart show a more complex relation between pixel size and fractal dimension. The major visible difference between the spring and late summer NDVI images is the absence of high elevation snow cover in the summer image. This change significantly alters the relation between fractal dimension and pixel size. The slope of the fractal dimension-resolution relation provides indications of how image classification or feature identification will be affected by changes in sensor spatial resolution.

  14. A Fractal Dimension Survey of Active Region Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Gallagher, Peter; Ireland, Jack

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to quantifying the magnetic complexity of active regions using a fractal dimension measure is presented. This fully-automated approach uses full disc MDI magnetograms of active regions from a large data set (2742 days of the SoHO mission; 9342 active regions) to compare the calculated fractal dimension to both Mount Wilson classification and flare rate. The main Mount Wilson classes exhibit no distinct fractal dimension distribution, suggesting a self-similar nature of all active regions. Solar flare productivity exhibits an increase in both the frequency and GOES X-ray magnitude of flares from regions with higher fractal dimensions. Specifically a lower threshold fractal dimension of 1.2 and 1.25 exists as a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for an active region to produce M- and X-class flares respectively .

  15. Determining Effective Thermal Conductivity of Fabrics by Using Fractal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fanglong; Li, Kejing

    2010-03-01

    In this article, a fractal effective thermal conductivity model for woven fabrics with multiple layers is developed. Structural models of yarn and plain woven fabric are derived based on the fractal characteristics of macro-pores (gap or channel) between the yarns and micro-pores inside the yarns. The fractal effective thermal conductivity model can be expressed as a function of the pore structure (fractal dimension) and architectural parameters of the woven fabric. Good agreement is found between the fractal model and the thermal conductivity measurements in the general porosity ranges. It is expected that the model will be helpful in the evaluation of thermal comfort for woven fabric in the whole range of porosity.

  16. Fractal branching pattern of the monopodial canine airway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping M; Kraman, Steve S

    2004-06-01

    Unlike the human lung, monopodial canine airway branching follows an irregular dichotomized pattern with fractal features. We studied three canine airway molds and found a self-similarity feature from macro- to microscopic scales, which formed a fractal set up to seven scales in the airways. At each fractal scale, lateral branches evenly lined up along an approximately straight main trunk to form three to four two-dimensional structures, and each lateral branch was the monopodial main trunk of the next fractal scale. We defined this pattern as the fractal main lateral-branching pattern, which exhibited similar structures from macro- to microscopic scales, including lobes, sublobes, sub-sublobes, etc. We speculate that it, rather than a mother-daughter pattern, could better describe the actual asymmetrical architecture of the monopodial canine airway.

  17. A fractal approach to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The definition of a fractal distribution is that the number of objects (events) N with a characteristic size greater than r satisfies the relation N proportional to r exp - D is the fractal dimension. The applicability of a fractal relation implies that the underlying physical process is scale-invariant over the range of applicability of the relation. The empirical frequency-magnitude relation for earthquakes defining a b-value is a fractal relation with D = 2b. Accepting the fractal distribution, the level of regional seismicity can be related to the rate of regional strain and the magnitude of the largest characteristic earthquake. High levels of seismic activity indicate either a large regional strain or a low-magnitude maximum characteristic earthquake (or both). If the regional seismicity has a weak time dependence, the approach can be used to make probabilistic seismic hazard assessments.

  18. Pyramidal fractal dimension for high resolution images.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Fractal analysis (FA) should be able to yield reliable and fast results for high-resolution digital images to be applicable in fields that require immediate outcomes. Triggered by an efficient implementation of FA for binary images, we present three new approaches for fractal dimension (D) estimation of images that utilize image pyramids, namely, the pyramid triangular prism, the pyramid gradient, and the pyramid differences method (PTPM, PGM, PDM). We evaluated the performance of the three new and five standard techniques when applied to images with sizes up to 8192 × 8192 pixels. By using artificial fractal images created by three different generator models as ground truth, we determined the scale ranges with minimum deviations between estimation and theory. All pyramidal methods (PM) resulted in reasonable D values for images of all generator models. Especially, for images with sizes ≥1024×1024 pixels, the PMs are superior to the investigated standard approaches in terms of accuracy and computation time. A measure for the possibility to differentiate images with different intrinsic D values did show not only that the PMs are well suited for all investigated image sizes, and preferable to standard methods especially for larger images, but also that results of standard D estimation techniques are strongly influenced by the image size. Fastest results were obtained with the PDM and PGM, followed by the PTPM. In terms of absolute D values best performing standard methods were magnitudes slower than the PMs. Concluding, the new PMs yield high quality results in short computation times and are therefore eligible methods for fast FA of high-resolution images.

  19. A Fractal Nature for Polymerized Laminin

    PubMed Central

    Hochman-Mendez, Camila; Cantini, Marco; Moratal, David; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel; Coelho-Sampaio, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Polylaminin (polyLM) is a non-covalent acid-induced nano- and micro-structured polymer of the protein laminin displaying distinguished biological properties. Polylaminin stimulates neuritogenesis beyond the levels achieved by ordinary laminin and has been shown to promote axonal regeneration in animal models of spinal cord injury. Here we used confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize its three-dimensional structure. Renderization of confocal optical slices of immunostained polyLM revealed the aspect of a loose flocculated meshwork, which was homogeneously stained by the antibody. On the other hand, an ordinary matrix obtained upon adsorption of laminin in neutral pH (LM) was constituted of bulky protein aggregates whose interior was not accessible to the same anti-laminin antibody. SEM and AFM analyses revealed that the seed unit of polyLM was a flat polygon formed in solution whereas the seed structure of LM was highly heterogeneous, intercalating rod-like, spherical and thin spread lamellar deposits. As polyLM was visualized at progressively increasing magnifications, we observed that the morphology of the polymer was alike independently of the magnification used for the observation. A search for the Hausdorff dimension in images of the two matrices showed that polyLM, but not LM, presented fractal dimensions of 1.55, 1.62 and 1.70 after 1, 8 and 12 hours of adsorption, respectively. Data in the present work suggest that the intrinsic fractal nature of polymerized laminin can be the structural basis for the fractal-like organization of basement membranes in the neurogenic niches of the central nervous system. PMID:25296244

  20. A fractal nature for polymerized laminin.

    PubMed

    Hochman-Mendez, Camila; Cantini, Marco; Moratal, David; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel; Coelho-Sampaio, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Polylaminin (polyLM) is a non-covalent acid-induced nano- and micro-structured polymer of the protein laminin displaying distinguished biological properties. Polylaminin stimulates neuritogenesis beyond the levels achieved by ordinary laminin and has been shown to promote axonal regeneration in animal models of spinal cord injury. Here we used confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize its three-dimensional structure. Renderization of confocal optical slices of immunostained polyLM revealed the aspect of a loose flocculated meshwork, which was homogeneously stained by the antibody. On the other hand, an ordinary matrix obtained upon adsorption of laminin in neutral pH (LM) was constituted of bulky protein aggregates whose interior was not accessible to the same anti-laminin antibody. SEM and AFM analyses revealed that the seed unit of polyLM was a flat polygon formed in solution whereas the seed structure of LM was highly heterogeneous, intercalating rod-like, spherical and thin spread lamellar deposits. As polyLM was visualized at progressively increasing magnifications, we observed that the morphology of the polymer was alike independently of the magnification used for the observation. A search for the Hausdorff dimension in images of the two matrices showed that polyLM, but not LM, presented fractal dimensions of 1.55, 1.62 and 1.70 after 1, 8 and 12 hours of adsorption, respectively. Data in the present work suggest that the intrinsic fractal nature of polymerized laminin can be the structural basis for the fractal-like organization of basement membranes in the neurogenic niches of the central nervous system.

  1. Diffusion on fractals with interacting internal boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    1999-07-01

    We studied random walks interacting with the internal boundaries (borders of lacunas) of Sierpinski carpets (SC), which are infinitely ramified fractals with fractal dimensions DF between 1 and 2. The probability of steps along the borders is u=exp(-E/kBT) times the probability of steps in the bulk, where E<0 represents attraction and E>0 represents repulsion. The mean-square displacement and the mean fraction of adsorbed steps of N-step walks were calculated using numerical simulations and extrapolations to the fractal limit considering the expected forms of finite-size corrections. The asymptotic fraction of adsorbed steps m (N→∞) is exactly calculated and confirms the accuracy of the simulations' results. m varies continuously with u, and then there is no adsorption-desorption transition. As N→∞, ≈AN2ν, thus we estimated the diffusion exponents νA and νR and the coefficients A(A) and A(R) in the attractive and in the repulsive cases, respectively, and the noninteracting exponent ν0. νR is universal and smaller than ν0, and A(R) decreases with the temperature. ν(A) is universal and larger than ν0 because the attraction helps the diffusing particles to contour the obstacles of the disordered substrate. In a SC with DF≈1.9, A(A) decreases with the temperature T, for all T; in a SC with DF≈1.7, A(A) is maximum for T˜|E|/kB, which consequently provides a condition for fastest diffusion. We suggest the investigation of these features in real systems.

  2. Fractals and dynamics in art and design.

    PubMed

    Guastello, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Many styles of visual art that build on fractal imagery and chaotic dynamics in the creative process have been examined in NDPLS in recent years. This article presents a gallery of artwork turned into design that appeared in the promotional products of the Society for Chaos Theory in Psychology & Life Sciences. The gallery showcases a variety of new imaging styles, including photography, that reflect a deepening perspective on nonlinear dynamics and art. The contributing artworks in design formats combine to render the verve that transcends the boundaries between the artistic and scientific communities.

  3. Geological Control of Fractal Groundwater Residence Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, L.; Wörman, A.

    2009-12-01

    Groundwater transports and distributes heat, particles and solutes both in the subsurface and to and from surficial ecosystems. Therefore, understanding groundwater circulation is a key issue for biogeochemical cycles, water resource management and CO2 sequestration. Fractal scaling relationships have been found in distributions of both land surface topography and solute efflux from watersheds and it have been shown that the fractal nature of the land surface produces fractal distributions of recharge, discharge, and associated subsurface flow patterns in humid regions with low-permeability rock, where the groundwater flow is controlled by landscape topography. In this paper, we relate the groundwater circulation to extensive topographic and geological data sets from Scandinavia and North America using spectral analysis. Especially, we have systematized the spatial distribution of groundwater flow utilizing an exact solution for 3D groundwater flow based on spectral analysis of the topography. This approach is an efficient way to analyze multi-scaled topography-controlled groundwater flow, because the impact of individual topographic scales on the groundwater flow can be analyzed separately. The fractal nature of topography yields a single scale-independent distribution of subsurface water residence times for both near-surface fluvial systems and deeper hydrogeological flows. Large-scale topography mainly controls deeper and larger flow cells and small-scale topography controls smaller and shallower flow cells. This scaling behavior holds at all scales, from small fluvial bedforms (tens of centimeters) to the continental landscape (hundreds of kilometers). However, the geological conditions within a specific region modify the topographic control of the groundwater circulation pattern. For instance, layers of Quaternary deposits and decaying permeability with depth increase the importance of smaller topographic scales. At the groundwater surface, the water flux is

  4. On the Conditional Matching of Fractal Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanchun; Sun, Weigang; Zhang, Jingyuan; Qin, Sen

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new matching (called a conditional matching), where the condition refers to the matching of the new constructed network which includes all the nodes in the original network. We then enumerate the conditional matchings of the new network and prove that the number of conditional matchings is just the product of degree sequences of the original network. We choose two families of fractal networks to show our obtained results, including the pseudofractal network and Cayley tree. Finally, we calculate the entropy of the conditional matchings on the considered networks and see that the entropy of Cayley tree is smaller than that of the pseudofractal network.

  5. Fractal dimension in nonhyperbolic chaotic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Yun-Tung; Finn, John M.; Ott, Edward

    1991-01-01

    In chaotic scattering there is a Cantor set of input-variable values of zero Lebesgue measure (i.e., zero total length) on which the scattering function is singular. For cases where the dynamics leading to chaotic scattering is nonhyperbolic (e.g., there are Kolmogorov-Arnol'd-Moser tori), the nature of this singular set is fundamentally different from that in the hyperbolic case. In particular, for the nonhyperbolic case, although the singular set has zero total length, strong evidence is presented to show that its fractal dimension is 1.

  6. Trabecular Bone Mechanical Properties and Fractal Dimension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Harry A.

    1996-01-01

    Countermeasures for reducing bone loss and muscle atrophy due to extended exposure to the microgravity environment of space are continuing to be developed and improved. An important component of this effort is finite element modeling of the lower extremity and spinal column. These models will permit analysis and evaluation specific to each individual and thereby provide more efficient and effective exercise protocols. Inflight countermeasures and post-flight rehabilitation can then be customized and targeted on a case-by-case basis. Recent Summer Faculty Fellowship participants have focused upon finite element mesh generation, muscle force estimation, and fractal calculations of trabecular bone microstructure. Methods have been developed for generating the three-dimensional geometry of the femur from serial section magnetic resonance images (MRI). The use of MRI as an imaging modality avoids excessive exposure to radiation associated with X-ray based methods. These images can also detect trabecular bone microstructure and architecture. The goal of the current research is to determine the degree to which the fractal dimension of trabecular architecture can be used to predict the mechanical properties of trabecular bone tissue. The elastic modulus and the ultimate strength (or strain) can then be estimated from non-invasive, non-radiating imaging and incorporated into the finite element models to more accurately represent the bone tissue of each individual of interest. Trabecular bone specimens from the proximal tibia are being studied in this first phase of the work. Detailed protocols and procedures have been developed for carrying test specimens through all of the steps of a multi-faceted test program. The test program begins with MRI and X-ray imaging of the whole bones before excising a smaller workpiece from the proximal tibia region. High resolution MRI scans are then made and the piece further cut into slabs (roughly 1 cm thick). The slabs are X-rayed again

  7. Fractal Effects in Lanchester Models of Combat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    collecting terms according to the fractal dimension of side X or side Y. Taking their geometric mean gives: 14/)(8/)(4/)( 0 0   yxxyyx DDDDDD ...gives the right hand side below: )(log 2 1 0 02/)( 0 2/)( 0 2/)( 0 0 )( ’ ’’ tI DDDDDD t xyxyxy y xRtIR b aR           (39) Similarly

  8. Marginally compact fractal trees with semiflexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgushev, Maxim; Hauber, Adrian L.; Pelagejcev, Philipp; Wittmer, Joachim P.

    2017-07-01

    We study marginally compact macromolecular trees that are created by means of two different fractal generators. In doing so, we assume Gaussian statistics for the vectors connecting nodes of the trees. Moreover, we introduce bond-bond correlations that make the trees locally semiflexible. The symmetry of the structures allows an iterative construction of full sets of eigenmodes (notwithstanding the additional interactions that are present due to semiflexibility constraints), enabling us to get physical insights about the trees' behavior and to consider larger structures. Due to the local stiffness, the self-contact density gets drastically reduced.

  9. Three-dimensional tumor perfusion reconstruction using fractal interpolation functions.

    PubMed

    Craciunescu, O I; Das, S K; Poulson, J M; Samulski, T V

    2001-04-01

    It has been shown that the perfusion of blood in tumor tissue can be approximated using the relative perfusion index determined from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) of the tumor blood pool. Also, it was concluded in a previous report that the blood perfusion in a two-dimensional (2-D) tumor vessel network has a fractal structure and that the evolution of the perfusion front can be characterized using invasion percolation. In this paper, the three-dimensional (3-D) tumor perfusion is reconstructed from the 2-D slices using the method of fractal interpolation functions (FIF), i.e., the piecewise self-affine fractal interpolation model (PSAFIM) and the piecewise hidden variable fractal interpolation model (PHVFIM). The fractal models are compared to classical interpolation techniques (linear, spline, polynomial) by means of determining the 2-D fractal dimension of the reconstructed slices. Using FIFs instead of classical interpolation techniques better conserves the fractal-like structure of the perfusion data. Among the two FIF methods, PHVFIM conserves the 3-D fractality better due to the cross correlation that exists between the data in the 2-D slices and the data along the reconstructed direction. The 3-D structures resulting from PHVFIM have a fractal dimension within 3%-5% of the one reported in literature for 3-D percolation. It is, thus, concluded that the reconstructed 3-D perfusion has a percolation-like scaling. As the perfusion term from bio-heat equation is possibly better described by reconstruction via fractal interpolation, a more suitable computation of the temperature field induced during hyperthermia treatments is expected.

  10. The analysis of the influence of fractal structure of stimuli on fractal dynamics in fixational eye movements and EEG signal

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.; Akrami, Amin

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in vision research is to analyze the effect of visual stimuli on human vision. However, no relationship has been yet discovered between the structure of the visual stimulus, and the structure of fixational eye movements. This study reveals the plasticity of human fixational eye movements in relation to the ‘complex’ visual stimulus. We demonstrated that the fractal temporal structure of visual dynamics shifts towards the fractal dynamics of the visual stimulus (image). The results showed that images with higher complexity (higher fractality) cause fixational eye movements with lower fractality. Considering the brain, as the main part of nervous system that is engaged in eye movements, we analyzed the governed Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal during fixation. We have found out that there is a coupling between fractality of image, EEG and fixational eye movements. The capability observed in this research can be further investigated and applied for treatment of different vision disorders. PMID:27217194

  11. The analysis of the influence of fractal structure of stimuli on fractal dynamics in fixational eye movements and EEG signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.; Akrami, Amin

    2016-05-01

    One of the major challenges in vision research is to analyze the effect of visual stimuli on human vision. However, no relationship has been yet discovered between the structure of the visual stimulus, and the structure of fixational eye movements. This study reveals the plasticity of human fixational eye movements in relation to the ‘complex’ visual stimulus. We demonstrated that the fractal temporal structure of visual dynamics shifts towards the fractal dynamics of the visual stimulus (image). The results showed that images with higher complexity (higher fractality) cause fixational eye movements with lower fractality. Considering the brain, as the main part of nervous system that is engaged in eye movements, we analyzed the governed Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal during fixation. We have found out that there is a coupling between fractality of image, EEG and fixational eye movements. The capability observed in this research can be further investigated and applied for treatment of different vision disorders.

  12. Fractal Physiology and the Fractional Calculus: A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    West, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a restricted overview of Fractal Physiology focusing on the complexity of the human body and the characterization of that complexity through fractal measures and their dynamics, with fractal dynamics being described by the fractional calculus. Not only are anatomical structures (Grizzi and Chiriva-Internati, 2005), such as the convoluted surface of the brain, the lining of the bowel, neural networks and placenta, fractal, but the output of dynamical physiologic networks are fractal as well (Bassingthwaighte et al., 1994). The time series for the inter-beat intervals of the heart, inter-breath intervals and inter-stride intervals have all been shown to be fractal and/or multifractal statistical phenomena. Consequently, the fractal dimension turns out to be a significantly better indicator of organismic functions in health and disease than the traditional average measures, such as heart rate, breathing rate, and stride rate. The observation that human physiology is primarily fractal was first made in the 1980s, based on the analysis of a limited number of datasets. We review some of these phenomena herein by applying an allometric aggregation approach to the processing of physiologic time series. This straight forward method establishes the scaling behavior of complex physiologic networks and some dynamic models capable of generating such scaling are reviewed. These models include simple and fractional random walks, which describe how the scaling of correlation functions and probability densities are related to time series data. Subsequently, it is suggested that a proper methodology for describing the dynamics of fractal time series may well be the fractional calculus, either through the fractional Langevin equation or the fractional diffusion equation. A fractional operator (derivative or integral) acting on a fractal function, yields another fractal function, allowing us to construct a fractional Langevin equation to describe the evolution of a

  13. Fractal Profit Landscape of the Stock Market

    PubMed Central

    Grönlund, Andreas; Yi, Il Gu; Kim, Beom Jun

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the structure of the profit landscape obtained from the most basic, fluctuation based, trading strategy applied for the daily stock price data. The strategy is parameterized by only two variables, p and q Stocks are sold and bought if the log return is bigger than p and less than –q, respectively. Repetition of this simple strategy for a long time gives the profit defined in the underlying two-dimensional parameter space of p and q. It is revealed that the local maxima in the profit landscape are spread in the form of a fractal structure. The fractal structure implies that successful strategies are not localized to any region of the profit landscape and are neither spaced evenly throughout the profit landscape, which makes the optimization notoriously hard and hypersensitive for partial or limited information. The concrete implication of this property is demonstrated by showing that optimization of one stock for future values or other stocks renders worse profit than a strategy that ignores fluctuations, i.e., a long-term buy-and-hold strategy. PMID:22558079

  14. Wireless Fractal Ultra-Dense Cellular Networks.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yixue; Chen, Min; Hu, Long; Song, Jeungeun; Volk, Mojca; Humar, Iztok

    2017-04-12

    With the ever-growing number of mobile devices, there is an explosive expansion in mobile data services. This represents a challenge for the traditional cellular network architecture to cope with the massive wireless traffic generated by mobile media applications. To meet this challenge, research is currently focused on the introduction of a small cell base station (BS) due to its low transmit power consumption and flexibility of deployment. However, due to a complex deployment environment and low transmit power of small cell BSs, the coverage boundary of small cell BSs will not have a traditional regular shape. Therefore, in this paper, we discuss the coverage boundary of an ultra-dense small cell network and give its main features: aeolotropy of path loss fading and fractal coverage boundary. Simple performance analysis is given, including coverage probability and transmission rate, etc., based on stochastic geometry theory and fractal theory. Finally, we present an application scene and discuss challenges in the ultra-dense small cell network.

  15. Fractal avalanche ruptures in biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gözen, Irep; Dommersnes, Paul; Czolkos, Ilja; Jesorka, Aldo; Lobovkina, Tatsiana; Orwar, Owe

    2010-11-01

    Bilayer membranes envelope cells as well as organelles, and constitute the most ubiquitous biological material found in all branches of the phylogenetic tree. Cell membrane rupture is an important biological process, and substantial rupture rates are found in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells under a mechanical load. Rupture can also be induced by processes such as cell death, and active cell membrane repair mechanisms are essential to preserve cell integrity. Pore formation in cell membranes is also at the heart of many biomedical applications such as in drug, gene and short interfering RNA delivery. Membrane rupture dynamics has been studied in bilayer vesicles under tensile stress, which consistently produce circular pores. We observed very different rupture mechanics in bilayer membranes spreading on solid supports: in one instance fingering instabilities were seen resulting in floral-like pores and in another, the rupture proceeded in a series of rapid avalanches causing fractal membrane fragmentation. The intermittent character of rupture evolution and the broad distribution in avalanche sizes is consistent with crackling-noise dynamics. Such noisy dynamics appear in fracture of solid disordered materials, in dislocation avalanches in plastic deformations and domain wall magnetization avalanches. We also observed similar fractal rupture mechanics in spreading cell membranes.

  16. Fractal avalanche ruptures in biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Gözen, Irep; Dommersnes, Paul; Czolkos, Ilja; Jesorka, Aldo; Lobovkina, Tatsiana; Orwar, Owe

    2010-11-01

    Bilayer membranes envelope cells as well as organelles, and constitute the most ubiquitous biological material found in all branches of the phylogenetic tree. Cell membrane rupture is an important biological process, and substantial rupture rates are found in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells under a mechanical load. Rupture can also be induced by processes such as cell death, and active cell membrane repair mechanisms are essential to preserve cell integrity. Pore formation in cell membranes is also at the heart of many biomedical applications such as in drug, gene and short interfering RNA delivery. Membrane rupture dynamics has been studied in bilayer vesicles under tensile stress, which consistently produce circular pores. We observed very different rupture mechanics in bilayer membranes spreading on solid supports: in one instance fingering instabilities were seen resulting in floral-like pores and in another, the rupture proceeded in a series of rapid avalanches causing fractal membrane fragmentation. The intermittent character of rupture evolution and the broad distribution in avalanche sizes is consistent with crackling-noise dynamics. Such noisy dynamics appear in fracture of solid disordered materials, in dislocation avalanches in plastic deformations and domain wall magnetization avalanches. We also observed similar fractal rupture mechanics in spreading cell membranes.

  17. Fractal Fluctuations of Groundwater Levels: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Li, Z.; Zhang, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Numerical simulations were carried out to study temporal variations and scaling of the water table fluctuations in one- and two-dimensional unconfined heterogeneous aquifers under spatially and temporally varied groundwater recharge. The recharge process was taken to be either a white noise or temporally and spatially correlated process and field with an exponential covariance function. The results were compared with the observed water levels in monitoring wells as well as the theoretical results derived using non-stationary spectral methods and the detrended fluctuation analyses. The simulation results further verify the findings in our previous studies that scaling of groundwater levels does exist in many aquifers and that the hydraulic head in an aquifer may fluctuate as a temporal fractal in response to a white-noise or stationary or a fractal recharge process, depending on how quickly the hydraulic head responds to recharge events and the physical parameters of the aquifer (i.e., transmissivity and specific yield). The recharge process at the Walnut Creek watershed was shown to have a white-noise spectrum based on the observed head spectrum. The effect of aquifer heterogeneity on the water level fluctuations and scaling was also investigated and will be presented in the meeting.

  18. Fractal aircraft trajectories and nonclassical turbulent exponents.

    PubMed

    Lovejoy, S; Schertzer, D; Tuck, A F

    2004-09-01

    The dimension (D) of aircraft trajectories is fundamental in interpreting airborne data. To estimate D, we studied data from 18 trajectories of stratospheric aircraft flights 1600 km long taken during a "Mach cruise" (near constant Mach number) autopilot flight mode of the ER-2 research aircraft. Mach cruise implies correlated temperature and wind fluctuations so that DeltaZ approximately Deltax (H(z) ) where Z is the (fluctuating) vertical and x the horizontal coordinate of the aircraft. Over the range approximately 3-300 km , we found H(z) approximately 0.58+/-0.02 close to the theoretical 5/9=0.56 and implying D=1+ H(z) =14/9 , i.e., the trajectories are fractal. For distances <3 km aircraft inertia smooths the trajectories, for distances >300 km , D=1 again because of a rise of 1 m/km due to fuel consumption. In the fractal regime, the horizontal velocity and temperature exponents are close to the nonclassical value 1/2 (rather than 1/3 ). We discuss implications for aircraft measurements as well as for the structure of the atmosphere.

  19. Drawing conformal diagrams for a fractal landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Winitzki, Sergei

    2005-06-15

    Generic models of cosmological inflation and the recently proposed scenarios of a recycling universe and the string theory landscape predict spacetimes whose global geometry is a stochastic, self-similar fractal. To visualize the complicated causal structure of such a universe, one usually draws a conformal (Carter-Penrose) diagram. I develop a new method for drawing conformal diagrams, applicable to arbitrary 1+1-dimensional spacetimes. This method is based on a qualitative analysis of intersecting lightrays and thus avoids the need for explicit transformations of the spacetime metric. To demonstrate the power and simplicity of this method, I present derivations of diagrams for spacetimes of varying complication. I then apply the lightray method to three different models of an eternally inflating universe (scalar-field inflation, recycling universe, and string theory landscape) involving the nucleation of nested asymptotically flat, de Sitter and/or anti-de Sitter bubbles. I show that the resulting diagrams contain a characteristic fractal arrangement of lines.

  20. Fractal profit landscape of the stock market.

    PubMed

    Grönlund, Andreas; Yi, Il Gu; Kim, Beom Jun

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the structure of the profit landscape obtained from the most basic, fluctuation based, trading strategy applied for the daily stock price data. The strategy is parameterized by only two variables, p and q Stocks are sold and bought if the log return is bigger than p and less than -q, respectively. Repetition of this simple strategy for a long time gives the profit defined in the underlying two-dimensional parameter space of p and q. It is revealed that the local maxima in the profit landscape are spread in the form of a fractal structure. The fractal structure implies that successful strategies are not localized to any region of the profit landscape and are neither spaced evenly throughout the profit landscape, which makes the optimization notoriously hard and hypersensitive for partial or limited information. The concrete implication of this property is demonstrated by showing that optimization of one stock for future values or other stocks renders worse profit than a strategy that ignores fluctuations, i.e., a long-term buy-and-hold strategy.

  1. Fractal frontiers in cardiovascular magnetic resonance: towards clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Captur, Gabriella; Karperien, Audrey L; Li, Chunming; Zemrak, Filip; Tobon-Gomez, Catalina; Gao, Xuexin; Bluemke, David A; Elliott, Perry M; Petersen, Steffen E; Moon, James C

    2015-09-07

    Many of the structures and parameters that are detected, measured and reported in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) have at least some properties that are fractal, meaning complex and self-similar at different scales. To date however, there has been little use of fractal geometry in CMR; by comparison, many more applications of fractal analysis have been published in MR imaging of the brain.This review explains the fundamental principles of fractal geometry, places the fractal dimension into a meaningful context within the realms of Euclidean and topological space, and defines its role in digital image processing. It summarises the basic mathematics, highlights strengths and potential limitations of its application to biomedical imaging, shows key current examples and suggests a simple route for its successful clinical implementation by the CMR community.By simplifying some of the more abstract concepts of deterministic fractals, this review invites CMR scientists (clinicians, technologists, physicists) to experiment with fractal analysis as a means of developing the next generation of intelligent quantitative cardiac imaging tools.

  2. Comprehensive fractal description of porosity of coal of different ranks.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiangang; Zhang, Guocheng; Song, Zhimin; Liu, Gaofeng; Li, Bing

    2014-01-01

    We selected, as the objects of our research, lignite from the Beizao Mine, gas coal from the Caiyuan Mine, coking coal from the Xiqu Mine, and anthracite from the Guhanshan Mine. We used the mercury intrusion method and the low-temperature liquid nitrogen adsorption method to analyze the structure and shape of the coal pores and calculated the fractal dimensions of different aperture segments in the coal. The experimental results show that the fractal dimension of the aperture segment of lignite, gas coal, and coking coal with an aperture of greater than or equal to 10 nm, as well as the fractal dimension of the aperture segment of anthracite with an aperture of greater than or equal to 100 nm, can be calculated using the mercury intrusion method; the fractal dimension of the coal pore, with an aperture range between 2.03 nm and 361.14 nm, can be calculated using the liquid nitrogen adsorption method, of which the fractal dimensions bounded by apertures of 10 nm and 100 nm are different. Based on these findings, we defined and calculated the comprehensive fractal dimensions of the coal pores and achieved the unity of fractal dimensions for full apertures of coal pores, thereby facilitating, overall characterization for the heterogeneity of the coal pore structure.

  3. Small-Angle Scattering from Nanoscale Fat Fractals.

    PubMed

    Anitas, E M; Slyamov, A; Todoran, R; Szakacs, Z

    2017-12-01

    Small-angle scattering (of neutrons, x-ray, or light; SAS) is considered to describe the structural characteristics of deterministic nanoscale fat fractals. We show that in the case of a polydisperse fractal system, with equal probability for any orientation, one obtains the fractal dimensions and scaling factors at each structural level. This is in agreement with general results deduced in the context of small-angle scattering analysis of a system of randomly oriented, non-interacting, nano-/micro-fractals. We apply our results to a two-dimensional fat Cantor-like fractal, calculating analytic expressions for the scattering intensities and structure factors. We explain how the structural properties can be computed from experimental data and show their correlation to the variation of the scaling factor with the iteration number. The model can be used to interpret recorded experimental SAS data in the framework of fat fractals and can reveal structural properties of materials characterized by a regular law of changing of the fractal dimensions. It can describe successions of power-law decays, with arbitrary decreasing values of the scattering exponents, and interleaved by regions of constant intensity.

  4. Fractal dust constrains the collisional history of comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulle, M.; Blum, J.

    2017-07-01

    The fractal dust particles observed by Rosetta cannot form in the physical conditions observed today in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P hereinafter), being instead consistent with models of the pristine dust aggregates coagulated in the solar nebula. Since bouncing collisions in the protoplanetary disc restructure fractals into compact aggregates (pebbles), the only way to preserve fractals in a comet is the gentle gravitational collapse of a mixture of pebbles and fractals, which must occur before their mutual collision speeds overcome ≈1 m s-1. This condition fixes the pebble radius to ≲1 cm, as confirmed by Comet Nucleus Infrared and Visible Analyser onboard Philae. Here, we show that the flux of fractal particles measured by Rosetta constrains the 67P nucleus in a random packing of cm-sized pebbles, with all the voids among them filled by fractal particles. This structure is inconsistent with any catastrophic collision, which would have compacted or dispersed most fractals, thus leaving empty most voids in the reassembled nucleus. Comets are less numerous than current estimates, as confirmed by lacking small craters on Pluto and Charon. Bilobate comets accreted at speeds <1 m s-1 from cometesimals born in the same disc stream.

  5. Comprehensive Fractal Description of Porosity of Coal of Different Ranks

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiangang; Zhang, Guocheng; Song, Zhimin; Liu, Gaofeng; Li, Bing

    2014-01-01

    We selected, as the objects of our research, lignite from the Beizao Mine, gas coal from the Caiyuan Mine, coking coal from the Xiqu Mine, and anthracite from the Guhanshan Mine. We used the mercury intrusion method and the low-temperature liquid nitrogen adsorption method to analyze the structure and shape of the coal pores and calculated the fractal dimensions of different aperture segments in the coal. The experimental results show that the fractal dimension of the aperture segment of lignite, gas coal, and coking coal with an aperture of greater than or equal to 10 nm, as well as the fractal dimension of the aperture segment of anthracite with an aperture of greater than or equal to 100 nm, can be calculated using the mercury intrusion method; the fractal dimension of the coal pore, with an aperture range between 2.03 nm and 361.14 nm, can be calculated using the liquid nitrogen adsorption method, of which the fractal dimensions bounded by apertures of 10 nm and 100 nm are different. Based on these findings, we defined and calculated the comprehensive fractal dimensions of the coal pores and achieved the unity of fractal dimensions for full apertures of coal pores, thereby facilitating, overall characterization for the heterogeneity of the coal pore structure. PMID:24955407

  6. Small-Angle Scattering from Nanoscale Fat Fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitas, E. M.; Slyamov, A.; Todoran, R.; Szakacs, Z.

    2017-06-01

    Small-angle scattering (of neutrons, x-ray, or light; SAS) is considered to describe the structural characteristics of deterministic nanoscale fat fractals. We show that in the case of a polydisperse fractal system, with equal probability for any orientation, one obtains the fractal dimensions and scaling factors at each structural level. This is in agreement with general results deduced in the context of small-angle scattering analysis of a system of randomly oriented, non-interacting, nano-/micro-fractals. We apply our results to a two-dimensional fat Cantor-like fractal, calculating analytic expressions for the scattering intensities and structure factors. We explain how the structural properties can be computed from experimental data and show their correlation to the variation of the scaling factor with the iteration number. The model can be used to interpret recorded experimental SAS data in the framework of fat fractals and can reveal structural properties of materials characterized by a regular law of changing of the fractal dimensions. It can describe successions of power-law decays, with arbitrary decreasing values of the scattering exponents, and interleaved by regions of constant intensity.

  7. ABC of multi-fractal spacetimes and fractional sea turtles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2016-04-01

    We clarify what it means to have a spacetime fractal geometry in quantum gravity and show that its properties differ from those of usual fractals. A weak and a strong definition of multi-scale and multi-fractal spacetimes are given together with a sketch of the landscape of multi-scale theories of gravitation. Then, in the context of the fractional theory with q-derivatives, we explore the consequences of living in a multi-fractal spacetime. To illustrate the behavior of a non-relativistic body, we take the entertaining example of a sea turtle. We show that, when only the time direction is fractal, sea turtles swim at a faster speed than in an ordinary world, while they swim at a slower speed if only the spatial directions are fractal. The latter type of geometry is the one most commonly found in quantum gravity. For time-like fractals, relativistic objects can exceed the speed of light, but strongly so only if their size is smaller than the range of particle-physics interactions. We also find new results about log-oscillating measures, the measure presentation and their role in physical observations and in future extensions to nowhere-differentiable stochastic spacetimes.

  8. Fractal dimensions of rampart impact craters on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ching, Delwyn; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Mouginis-Mark, Peter; Bruno, Barbara C.

    1993-01-01

    Ejecta blanket morphologies of Martian rampart craters may yield important clues to the atmospheric densities during impact, and the nature of target materials (e.g., hard rock, fine-grained sediments, presence of volatiles). In general, the morphologies of such craters suggest emplacement by a fluidized, ground hugging flow instead of ballistic emplacement by dry ejecta. We have quantitatively characterized the shape of the margins of the ejecta blankets of 15 rampart craters using fractal geometry. Our preliminary results suggest that the craters are fractals and are self-similar over scales of approximately 0.1 km to 30 km. Fractal dimensions (a measure of the extent to which a line fills a plane) range from 1.06 to 1.31. No correlations of fractal dimension with target type, elevation, or crater size were observed, though the data base is small. The range in fractal dimension and lack of correlation may be due to a complex interplay of target properties (grain size, volatile content), atmospheric pressure, and crater size. The mere fact that the ejecta margins are fractals, however, indicates that viscosity and yield strength of the ejecta were at least as low as those of basalts, because silicic lava flows are not generally fractals.

  9. Fractal branching pattern in the pial vasculature in the cat.

    PubMed

    Hermán, P; Kocsis, L; Eke, A

    2001-06-01

    Arborization pattern was studied in pial vascular networks by treating them as fractals. Rather than applying elaborate taxonomy assembled from measures from individual vessel segments and bifurcations arranged in their branching order, the authors' approach captured the structural details at once in high-resolution digital images processed for the skeleton of the networks. The pial networks appear random and at the same time having structural elements similar to each other when viewed at different scales--a property known as self-similarity revealed by the geometry of fractals. Fractal (capacity) dimension, Dcap, was calculated to evaluate the network's spatial complexity by the box counting method (BCM) and its variant, the extended counting method (XCM). Box counting method and XCM were subject to numerical testing on ideal fractals of known D. The authors found that precision of these fractal methods depends on the fractal character (branching, nonbranching) of the structure they evaluate. Dcaps (group mean +/- SD) for the arterial and venous pial networks in the cat (n = 6) are 1.37 +/- 0.04, 1.37 +/- 0.02 by XCM, and 1.30 +/- 0.04, 1.31 +/- 0.03 by BCM, respectively. The arterial and venous systems thus appear to be developed according to the same fractal generation rule in the cat.

  10. Process for applying control variables having fractal structures

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, IV, Jonathan S.; Lawson, Roger L.

    1996-01-01

    A process and apparatus for the application of a control variable having a fractal structure to a body or process. The process of the present invention comprises the steps of generating a control variable having a fractal structure and applying the control variable to a body or process reacting in accordance with the control variable. The process is applicable to electroforming where first, second and successive pulsed-currents are applied to cause the deposition of material onto a substrate, such that the first pulsed-current, the second pulsed-current, and successive pulsed currents form a fractal pulsed-current waveform.

  11. Emergence of fractals in aggregation with stochastic self-replication.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Md Kamrul; Hassan, Md Zahedul; Islam, Nabila

    2013-10-01

    We propose and investigate a simple model which describes the kinetics of aggregation of Brownian particles with stochastic self-replication. An exact solution and the scaling theory are presented alongside numerical simulation which fully support all theoretical findings. In particular, we show analytically that the particle size distribution function exhibits dynamic scaling and we verify it numerically using the idea of data collapse. Furthermore, the conditions under which the resulting system emerges as a fractal are found, the fractal dimension of the system is given, and the relationship between this fractal dimension and a conserved quantity is pointed out.

  12. Fractal Globules: A New Approach to Artificial Molecular Machines

    PubMed Central

    Avetisov, Vladik A.; Ivanov, Viktor A.; Meshkov, Dmitry A.; Nechaev, Sergei K.

    2014-01-01

    The over-damped relaxation of elastic networks constructed by contact maps of hierarchically folded fractal (crumpled) polymer globules was investigated in detail. It was found that the relaxation dynamics of an anisotropic fractal globule is very similar to the behavior of biological molecular machines like motor proteins. When it is perturbed, the system quickly relaxes to a low-dimensional manifold, M, with a large basin of attraction and then slowly approaches equilibrium, not escaping M. Taking these properties into account, it is suggested that fractal globules, even those made by synthetic polymers, are artificial molecular machines that can transform perturbations into directed quasimechanical motion along a defined path. PMID:25418305

  13. Process for applying control variables having fractal structures

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, J.S. IV; Lawson, R.L.

    1996-01-23

    A process and apparatus are disclosed for the application of a control variable having a fractal structure to a body or process. The process of the present invention comprises the steps of generating a control variable having a fractal structure and applying the control variable to a body or process reacting in accordance with the control variable. The process is applicable to electroforming where first, second and successive pulsed-currents are applied to cause the deposition of material onto a substrate, such that the first pulsed-current, the second pulsed-current, and successive pulsed currents form a fractal pulsed-current waveform. 3 figs.

  14. Gravitation theory in a fractal space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Agop, M.; Gottlieb, I.

    2006-05-15

    Assimilating the physical space-time with a fractal, a general theory is built. For a fractal dimension D=2, the virtual geodesics of this space-time implies a generalized Schroedinger type equation. Subsequently, a geometric formulation of the gravitation theory on a fractal space-time is given. Then, a connection is introduced on a tangent bundle, the connection coefficients, the Riemann curvature tensor and the Einstein field equation are calculated. It results, by means of a dilation operator, the equivalence of this model with quantum Einstein gravity.

  15. Fractal pharmacokinetics of the drug mibefradil in the liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuite, J.; Marsh, R.; Tuszyński, J.

    2002-08-01

    We explore the ramifications of the fractal geometry of the key organ for drug elimination, the liver, on pharmacokinetic data analysis. A formalism is developed for the use of a combination of well-stirred Euclidean and fractal compartments in the body. Perturbation analysis is carried out to obtain analytical solutions for the drug concentration time evolution. These results are then fitted to experimental data collected from clinically instrumented dogs [see, A. Skerjanec et al., J. Pharm. Sci. 85, 189 (1995)] using the drug mibefradil. The thus obtained spectral fractal dimension has a range of values that is consistent with the value found in independently performed ultrasound experiments on the liver.

  16. Multi-Scale Fractal Analysis of Image Texture and Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerson, Charles W.

    1998-01-01

    Fractals embody important ideas of self-similarity, in which the spatial behavior or appearance of a system is largely independent of scale. Self-similarity is defined as a property of curves or surfaces where each part is indistinguishable from the whole, or where the form of the curve or surface is invariant with respect to scale. An ideal fractal (or monofractal) curve or surface has a constant dimension over all scales, although it may not be an integer value. This is in contrast to Euclidean or topological dimensions, where discrete one, two, and three dimensions describe curves, planes, and volumes. Theoretically, if the digital numbers of a remotely sensed image resemble an ideal fractal surface, then due to the self-similarity property, the fractal dimension of the image will not vary with scale and resolution. However, most geographical phenomena are not strictly self-similar at all scales, but they can often be modeled by a stochastic fractal in which the scaling and self-similarity properties of the fractal have inexact patterns that can be described by statistics. Stochastic fractal sets relax the monofractal self-similarity assumption and measure many scales and resolutions in order to represent the varying form of a phenomenon as a function of local variables across space. In image interpretation, pattern is defined as the overall spatial form of related features, and the repetition of certain forms is a characteristic pattern found in many cultural objects and some natural features. Texture is the visual impression of coarseness or smoothness caused by the variability or uniformity of image tone or color. A potential use of fractals concerns the analysis of image texture. In these situations it is commonly observed that the degree of roughness or inexactness in an image or surface is a function of scale and not of experimental technique. The fractal dimension of remote sensing data could yield quantitative insight on the spatial complexity and

  17. Power dissipation in fractal Feynman-Sierpinski AC circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso Ruiz, Patricia

    2017-07-01

    This paper studies the concept of power dissipation in infinite graphs and fractals associated with passive linear networks consisting of non-dissipative elements. In particular, we analyze the so-called Feynman-Sierpinski ladder, a fractal AC circuit motivated by Feynman's infinite ladder, that exhibits power dissipation and wave propagation for some frequencies. Power dissipation in this circuit is obtained as a limit of quadratic forms, and the corresponding power dissipation measure associated with harmonic potentials is constructed. The latter measure is proved to be continuous and singular with respect to an appropriate Hausdorff measure defined on the fractal dust of nodes of the network.

  18. Fractal aspects and convergence of Newton`s method

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, M.

    1996-12-31

    Newton`s Method is a widely established iterative algorithm for solving non-linear systems. Its appeal lies in its great simplicity, easy generalization to multiple dimensions and a quadratic local convergence rate. Despite these features, little is known about its global behavior. In this paper, we will explain a seemingly random global convergence pattern using fractal concepts and show that the behavior of the residual is entirely explicable. We will also establish quantitative results for the convergence rates. Knowing the mechanism of fractal generation, we present a stabilization to the orthodox Newton method that remedies the fractal behavior and improves convergence.

  19. Fractal-geometry simulation of a lightning discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkhanov, V. K.; Bashkuev, Yu. B.

    2012-12-01

    It is suggested that a wideband lightning discharge be approximated by a damped periodic oscillation. With such an approach, the oscillation frequency and relaxation time are introduced and it is found that lightning radiates over a distance of several tens of kilometers. This length is much greater than the lightning bolt's apparent length (several kilometers). The difference between the lengths is explained using fractal geometry. In terms of fractal geometry, the lightning discharge is so tortuous that an actually very long lightning bolt is accommodated by a short straight line. An attempt is made to determine the fractal dimension of tortuous and intermittent lightning bolts.

  20. Fractal atomic-level percolation in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, David Z; Shi, Crystal Y; An, Qi; Zeng, Qiaoshi; Mao, Wendy L; Goddard, William A; Greer, Julia R

    2015-09-18

    Metallic glasses are metallic alloys that exhibit exotic material properties. They may have fractal structures at the atomic level, but a physical mechanism for their organization without ordering has not been identified. We demonstrated a crossover between fractal short-range (<2 atomic diameters) and homogeneous long-range structures using in situ x-ray diffraction, tomography, and molecular dynamics simulations. A specific class of fractal, the percolation cluster, explains the structural details for several metallic-glass compositions. We postulate that atoms percolate in the liquid phase and that the percolating cluster becomes rigid at the glass transition temperature.

  1. Spatial behavior analysis at the global level using fractal geometry.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Roger C

    2008-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that an estimate of fractal dimension can provide a useful metric for quantifying settlement patterns. This study uses fractal methods to investigate settlement patterns at a global scale showing that the scaling behavior of the pattern of the world's largest cities corresponds to that typically observed for coastlines and rivers. This serves to validate the use of fractal dimension as a scale-independent measure of settlement patterns which can be correlated with other physical features. Such a measure may be a useful validation criterion for models of human settlement and spatial behavior.

  2. Fractal patterns applied to implant surface: definitions and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dohan Ehrenfest, David M

    2011-10-01

    Fractal patterns are frequently found in nature, but they are difficult to reproduce in artificial objects such as implantable materials. In this article, a definition of the concept of fractals for osseointegrated surfaces is suggested, based on the search for quasi-self-similarity on at least 3 scales of investigation: microscale, nanoscale, and atomic/crystal scale. Following this definition, the fractal dimension of some surfaces may be defined (illustrated here with the Intra-Lock Ossean surface). However the biological effects of this architecture are still unknown and should be examined carefully in the future.

  3. Anisotropic linear elastic properties of fractal-like composites.

    PubMed

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Cornetti, Pietro; Pugno, Nicola; Sapora, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    In this work, the anisotropic linear elastic properties of two-phase composite materials, made up of square inclusions embedded in a matrix, are investigated. The inclusions present a fractal hierarchical distribution and are supposed to have the same Poisson's ratio as the matrix but a different Young's modulus. The effective elastic moduli of the medium are computed at each fractal iteration by coupling a position-space renormalization-group technique with a finite element analysis. The study allows to obtain and generalize some fundamental properties of fractal composite materials.

  4. Anisotropic linear elastic properties of fractal-like composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Cornetti, Pietro; Pugno, Nicola; Sapora, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    In this work, the anisotropic linear elastic properties of two-phase composite materials, made up of square inclusions embedded in a matrix, are investigated. The inclusions present a fractal hierarchical distribution and are supposed to have the same Poisson’s ratio as the matrix but a different Young’s modulus. The effective elastic moduli of the medium are computed at each fractal iteration by coupling a position-space renormalization-group technique with a finite element analysis. The study allows to obtain and generalize some fundamental properties of fractal composite materials.

  5. Fractal dimension of cerebral surfaces using magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Prasad, R.R.

    1988-11-01

    The calculation of the fractal dimension of the surface bounded by the grey matter in the normal human brain using axial, sagittal, and coronal cross-sectional magnetic resonance (MR) images is presented. The fractal dimension in this case is a measure of the convolutedness of this cerebral surface. It is proposed that the fractal dimension, a feature that may be extracted from MR images, may potentially be used for image analysis, quantitative tissue characterization, and as a feature to monitor and identify cerebral abnormalities and developmental changes.

  6. Not just fractal surfaces, but surface fractal aggregates: Derivation of the expression for the structure factor and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besselink, R.; Stawski, T. M.; Van Driessche, A. E. S.; Benning, L. G.

    2016-12-01

    Densely packed surface fractal aggregates form in systems with high local volume fractions of particles with very short diffusion lengths, which effectively means that particles have little space to move. However, there are no prior mathematical models, which would describe scattering from such surface fractal aggregates and which would allow the subdivision between inter- and intraparticle interferences of such aggregates. Here, we show that by including a form factor function of the primary particles building the aggregate, a finite size of the surface fractal interfacial sub-surfaces can be derived from a structure factor term. This formalism allows us to define both a finite specific surface area for fractal aggregates and the fraction of particle interfacial sub-surfaces at the perimeter of an aggregate. The derived surface fractal model is validated by comparing it with an ab initio approach that involves the generation of a "brick-in-a-wall" von Koch type contour fractals. Moreover, we show that this approach explains observed scattering intensities from in situ experiments that followed gypsum (CaSO4 ṡ 2H2O) precipitation from highly supersaturated solutions. Our model of densely packed "brick-in-a-wall" surface fractal aggregates may well be the key precursor step in the formation of several types of mosaic- and meso-crystals.

  7. A fractal model of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, Ioan

    The book represents a revisioned, extended, completed and translated version of the book "Superposed Universes. A scientific novel and a SF story" (1995). The book contains a hypothesis by the author concerning the complexity of the Nature. An introduction to the theories of numbers, manyfolds and topology is given. The possible connection with the theory of evolution of the Universe is discussed. The book contains also in the last chapter a SF story based on the hypothesis presented. A connection with fractals theory is given. A part of his earlier studies (1955-1956) were subsequently published without citation by Ali Kyrala (Phys. Rev. vol.117, No.5, march 1, 1960). The book contains as an important appendix the early papers (some of which are published in the coauthoprship with his scientific advisors): 1) T.T. Vescan, A. Weiszmann and I.Gottlieb, Contributii la studiul problemelor geometrice ale teoriei relativitatii restranse. Academia R.P.R. Baza Timisoara. Lucrarile consfatuirii de geometrie diferentiala din 9-12 iunie 1955. In this paper the authors show a new method of the calculation of the metrics. 2) Jean Gottlieb, L'hyphotese d'un modele de la structure de la matiere, Revista Matematica y Fisica Teorica, Serie A, Volumen XY, No.1, y.2, 1964 3) I. Gottlieb, Some hypotheses on space, time and gravitation, Studies in Gravitation Theory, CIP Press, Bucharest, 1988, pp.227-234 as well as some recent papers (published in the coauthorship with his disciples): 4)M. Agop, Gottlieb speace-time. A fractal axiomatic model of the Universe. in Particles and Fields, Editors: M.Agop and P.D. Ioannou, Athens University Press, 2005, pp. 59-141 5) I. Gottlieb, M.Agop and V.Enache, Games with Cantor's dust. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals, vol.40 (2009) pp. 940-945 6) I. Gottlieb, My picture over the World, Bull. of the Polytechnic Institute of Iasi. Tom LVI)LX, Fasc. 1, 2010, pp. 1-18. The book contains also a dedication to father Vasile Gottlieb and wife Cleopatra

  8. Experimental assessment of fractal scale similarity in turbulent flows. Part 2. Higher-dimensional intersections and non-fractal inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederiksen, Richard D.; Dahm, Werner J. A.; Dowling, David R.

    1997-05-01

    Results from an earlier experimental assessment of fractal scale similarity in one-dimensional spatial and temporal intersections in turbulent flows are here extended to two- and three-dimensional spatial intersections. Over 25000 two-dimensional (2562) intersections and nearly 40 three-dimensional (2563) intersections, collectively representing more than 2.3 billion data points, were analysed using objective statistical methods to determine which intersections were as fractal as stochastically scale-similar fractal gauge sets having the same record length. Results for the geometry of Sc [dbl greater-than sign]1 scalar isosurfaces and the scalar dissipation support span the range of lengthscales between the scalar and viscous diffusion scales [lambda]D and [lambda][nu]. The present study finds clear evidence for stochastic fractal scale similarity in the dissipation support. With increasing intersection dimension n, the data show a decrease in the fraction of intersections satisfying the criteria for fractal scale similarity, consistent with the presence of localized non-fractal inclusions. Local scale similarity analyses on three-dimensional (643) intersections directly show such intermittent non-fractal inclusions with characteristic lengthscale comparable to [lambda][nu]. These inclusions lead to failure of the relation among codimensions Dn[identical with]D[minus sign](3[minus sign]n) when applied to simple average dimensions, which has formed the basis for most previous assessments of fractal scale-similarity. Unlike the dissipation support geometry, scalar isosurface geometries from the same data were found not to be as fractal as fractional Brownian motion gauge sets over the range of scales examined.

  9. Modelling Applicability of Fractal Analysis to Efficiency of Soil Exploration by Roots

    PubMed Central

    WALK, THOMAS C.; VAN ERP, ERIK; LYNCH, JONATHAN P.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Fractal analysis allows calculation of fractal dimension, fractal abundance and lacunarity. Fractal analysis of plant roots has revealed correlations of fractal dimension with age, topology or genotypic variation, while fractal abundance has been associated with root length. Lacunarity is associated with heterogeneity of distribution, and has yet to be utilized in analysis of roots. In this study, fractal analysis was applied to the study of root architecture and acquisition of diffusion‐limited nutrients. The hypothesis that soil depletion and root competition are more closely correlated with a combination of fractal parameters than by any one alone was tested. • Model The geometric simulation model SimRoot was used to dynamically model roots of various architectures growing for up to 16 d in three soil types with contrasting nutrient mobility. Fractal parameters were calculated for whole roots, projections of roots and vertical slices of roots taken at 0, 2·5 and 5 cm from the root origin. Nutrient depletion volumes, competition volumes, and relative competition were regressed against fractal parameters and root length. • Key Results Root length was correlated with depletion volume, competition volume and relative competition at all times. In analysis of three‐dimensional, projected roots and 0 cm slices, log(fractal abundance) was highly correlated with log(depletion volume) when times were pooled. Other than this, multiple regression yielded better correlations than regression with single fractal parameters. Correlations decreased with age of roots and distance of vertical slices from the root origin. Field data were also examined to see if fractal dimension, fractal abundance and lacunarity can be used to distinguish common bean genotypes in field situations. There were significant differences in fractal dimension and fractal abundance, but not in lacunarity. • Conclusions These results suggest that applying fractal

  10. Modelling applicability of fractal analysis to efficiency of soil exploration by roots.

    PubMed

    Walk, Thomas C; Van Erp, Erik; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2004-07-01

    Fractal analysis allows calculation of fractal dimension, fractal abundance and lacunarity. Fractal analysis of plant roots has revealed correlations of fractal dimension with age, topology or genotypic variation, while fractal abundance has been associated with root length. Lacunarity is associated with heterogeneity of distribution, and has yet to be utilized in analysis of roots. In this study, fractal analysis was applied to the study of root architecture and acquisition of diffusion-limited nutrients. The hypothesis that soil depletion and root competition are more closely correlated with a combination of fractal parameters than by any one alone was tested. The geometric simulation model SimRoot was used to dynamically model roots of various architectures growing for up to 16 d in three soil types with contrasting nutrient mobility. Fractal parameters were calculated for whole roots, projections of roots and vertical slices of roots taken at 0, 2.5 and 5 cm from the root origin. Nutrient depletion volumes, competition volumes, and relative competition were regressed against fractal parameters and root length. Root length was correlated with depletion volume, competition volume and relative competition at all times. In analysis of three-dimensional, projected roots and 0 cm slices, log(fractal abundance) was highly correlated with log(depletion volume) when times were pooled. Other than this, multiple regression yielded better correlations than regression with single fractal parameters. Correlations decreased with age of roots and distance of vertical slices from the root origin. Field data were also examined to see if fractal dimension, fractal abundance and lacunarity can be used to distinguish common bean genotypes in field situations. There were significant differences in fractal dimension and fractal abundance, but not in lacunarity. These results suggest that applying fractal analysis to research of soil exploration by root systems should include fractal

  11. Fractal fluctuations in cardiac time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, B. J.; Zhang, R.; Sanders, A. W.; Miniyar, S.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Human heart rate, controlled by complex feedback mechanisms, is a vital index of systematic circulation. However, it has been shown that beat-to-beat values of heart rate fluctuate continually over a wide range of time scales. Herein we use the relative dispersion, the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean, to show, by systematically aggregating the data, that the correlation in the beat-to-beat cardiac time series is a modulated inverse power law. This scaling property indicates the existence of long-time memory in the underlying cardiac control process and supports the conclusion that heart rate variability is a temporal fractal. We argue that the cardiac control system has allometric properties that enable it to respond to a dynamical environment through scaling.

  12. Fractal Analysis of Drainage Basins on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Marinova, M. M.; McGovern, P. J.; Clifford, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    We used statistical properties of drainage networks on Mars as a measure of martian landscape morphology and an indicator of landscape evolution processes. We utilize the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data to construct digital elevation maps (DEMs) of several, mostly ancient, martian terrains. Drainage basins and channel networks are computationally extracted from DEMs and their structures are analyzed and compared to drainage networks extracted from terrestrial and lunar DEMs. We show that martian networks are self-affine statistical fractals with planar properties similar to terrestrial networks, but vertical properties similar to lunar networks. The uniformity of martian drainage density is between those for terrestrial and lunar landscapes. Our results are consistent with the roughening of ancient martian terrains by combination of rainfall-fed erosion and impacts, although roughening by other fluvial processes cannot be excluded. The notion of sustained rainfall in recent Mars history is inconsistent with our findings.

  13. Capillary Condensation in a Fractal Porous Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Broseta, Daniel; Barre, Loic; Vizika, Olga; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Guilbaud, Jean-Pierre; Lyonnard, Sandrine

    2001-06-04

    Small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering are used to characterize the surface roughness and porosity of a natural rock which are described over three decades in length scales and over nine decades in scattered intensities by a surface fractal dimension D=2.68{+-}0.03 . When this porous medium is exposed to a vapor of a contrast-matched water, neutron scattering reveals that surface roughness disappears at small scales, where a Porod behavior typical of smooth interfaces is observed instead. Water-sorption measurements confirm that such interface smoothing is due predominantly to the water condensing in the most strongly curved asperities rather than covering the surface with a wetting film of uniform thickness.

  14. Stochastic and fractal analysis of fracture trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessendorf, Michael H.

    1987-01-01

    Analyses of fracture trajectories are used to investigate structures that fall between 'micro' and 'macro' scales. It was shown that fracture trajectories belong to the class of nonstationary processes. It was also found that correlation distance, which may be related to a characteristic size of a fracture process, increases with crack length. An assemblage of crack trajectory processes may be considered as a diffusive process. Chudnovsky (1981-1985) introduced a 'crack diffusion coefficient' d which reflects the ability of the material to deviate the crack trajectory from the most energetically efficient path and thus links the material toughness to its structure. For the set of fracture trajectories in AISI 304 steel, d was found to be equal to 1.04 microns. The fractal dimension D for the same set of trajectories was found to be 1.133.

  15. A ``fractal'' modification of Torricelli's formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maramathas, Athanasios J.; Boudouvis, Andreas G.

    2010-03-01

    A modification is proposed of Torricelli’s (1608-1647) formula for the velocity of water discharging from a small hole at the bottom of a large tank filled with fractal solid material. The new formula takes proper account of the mechanical energy losses due to flow in the solid matrix, thus expanding the area of validity of the classical Torricelli’s formula. Moreover, it offers a convenient alternative to Darcy’s law for estimating the discharge rate from an aquifer. The new formula was derived from laboratory experiments, with a low-Reynolds number discharge flow (Darcian flow). It was tested in a natural karst aquifer where the flow is non-Darcian, at Almiros spring on the island of Crete (Greece). In both cases, the predictive capability of the modified formula is established.

  16. Fractal power law in literary English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, L. L.; Gonçalves, L. B.

    2006-02-01

    We present in this paper a numerical investigation of literary texts by various well-known English writers, covering the first half of the twentieth century, based upon the results obtained through corpus analysis of the texts. A fractal power law is obtained for the lexical wealth defined as the ratio between the number of different words and the total number of words of a given text. By considering as a signature of each author the exponent and the amplitude of the power law, and the standard deviation of the lexical wealth, it is possible to discriminate works of different genres and writers and show that each writer has a very distinct signature, either considered among other literary writers or compared with writers of non-literary texts. It is also shown that, for a given author, the signature is able to discriminate between short stories and novels.

  17. Fractal Analysis of Drainage Basins on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Marinova, M. M.; McGovern, P. J.; Clifford, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    We used statistical properties of drainage networks on Mars as a measure of martian landscape morphology and an indicator of landscape evolution processes. We utilize the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data to construct digital elevation maps (DEMs) of several, mostly ancient, martian terrains. Drainage basins and channel networks are computationally extracted from DEMs and their structures are analyzed and compared to drainage networks extracted from terrestrial and lunar DEMs. We show that martian networks are self-affine statistical fractals with planar properties similar to terrestrial networks, but vertical properties similar to lunar networks. The uniformity of martian drainage density is between those for terrestrial and lunar landscapes. Our results are consistent with the roughening of ancient martian terrains by combination of rainfall-fed erosion and impacts, although roughening by other fluvial processes cannot be excluded. The notion of sustained rainfall in recent Mars history is inconsistent with our findings.

  18. Fractal THz slow light metamaterial devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Shoichi

    Scope and Method of Study: The goal of this study is to investigate the time delay of the fractal H metamaterials in the terahertz regime. This metamaterial contains resonators with two different sizes of H structures which mimic Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and create a transmission window and the corresponding phase dispersion, thus producing slow light. The Al structures were fabricated on silicon wafer and Mylar by using microelectronic lithography and thermal evaporation technique. By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the phase change caused by the slow light system and the actual time delay were obtained. Numerical simulations were carried out to systematize the effect of permittivity and structure dimensions on the optical properties. Findings and Conclusions: We experimentally demonstrated the numerical time delay of the fractal H metamaterial as a slow light device. When permittivity of the substrates increases, the peak position of the transmission window shifts to lower frequency and the bandwidth becomes broader. As a result, silicon performed larger time delay than that of Mylar. By changing the length of the resonator, the bandwidth and the peak position of the transmission window is controllable. At the edges of the transmission window, the negative time delays (fast light) were also observed. Mylar acts as a quaci-free standing structure and allows higher spectral measurement. Moreover, metamaterials fabricated on multiple Mylar films can potentially act as a more effective slow light device. As applications, slow light metamaterials are expected to be used for high-capacity terahertz communication networks, all-optical information processing and sensing devices.

  19. From Fractal Trees to Deltaic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazanacli, D.; Wolinsky, M. A.; Sylvester, Z.; Cantelli, A.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    Geometric networks that capture many aspects of natural deltas can be constructed from simple concepts from graph theory and normal probability distributions. Fractal trees with symmetrical geometries are the result of replicating two simple geometric elements, line segments whose lengths decrease and bifurcation angles that are commonly held constant. Branches could also have a thickness, which in the case of natural distributary systems is the equivalent of channel width. In river- or wave-dominated natural deltas, the channel width is a function of discharge. When normal variations around the mean values for length, bifurcating angles, and discharge are applied, along with either pruning of 'clashing' branches or merging (equivalent to channel confluence), fractal trees start resembling natural deltaic networks, except that the resulting channels are unnaturally straight. Introducing a bifurcation probability fewer, naturally curved channels are obtained. If there is no bifurcation, the direction of each new segment depends on the direction the previous segment upstream (correlated random walk) and, to a lesser extent, on a general direction of growth (directional bias). When bifurcation occurs, the resulting two directions also depend on the bifurcation angle and the discharge split proportions, with the dominant branch following the direction of the upstream parent channel closely. The bifurcation probability controls the channel density and, in conjunction with the variability of the directional angles, the overall curvature of the channels. The growth of the network in effect is associated with net delta progradation. The overall shape and shape evolution of the delta depend mainly on the bifurcation angle average size and angle variability coupled with the degree of dominant direction dependency (bias). The proposed algorithm demonstrates how, based on only a few simple rules, a wide variety of channel networks resembling natural deltas, can be replicated

  20. Iterons, fractals and computations of automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwak, Paweł

    1999-03-01

    Processing of strings by some automata, when viewed on space-time (ST) diagrams, reveals characteristic soliton-like coherent periodic objects. They are inherently associated with iterations of automata mappings thus we call them the iterons. In the paper we present two classes of one-dimensional iterons: particles and filtrons. The particles are typical for parallel (cellular) processing, while filtrons, introduced in (32) are specific for serial processing of strings. In general, the images of iterated automata mappings exhibit not only coherent entities but also the fractals, and quasi-periodic and chaotic dynamics. We show typical images of such computations: fractals, multiplication by a number, and addition of binary numbers defined by a Turing machine. Then, the particles are presented as iterons generated by cellular automata in three computations: B/U code conversion (13, 29), majority classification (9), and in discrete version of the FPU (Fermi-Pasta-Ulam) dynamics (7, 23). We disclose particles by a technique of combinational recoding of ST diagrams (as opposed to sequential recoding). Subsequently, we recall the recursive filters based on FCA (filter cellular automata) window operators, and considered by Park (26), Ablowitz (1), Fokas (11), Fuchssteiner (12), Bruschi (5) and Jiang (20). We present the automata equivalents to these filters (33). Some of them belong to the class of filter automata introduced in (30). We also define and illustrate some properties of filtrons. Contrary to particles, the filtrons interact nonlocally in the sense that distant symbols may influence one another. Thus their interactions are very unusual. Some examples have been given in (32). Here we show new examples of filtron phenomena: multifiltron solitonic collisions, attracting and repelling filtrons, trapped bouncing filtrons (which behave like a resonance cavity) and quasi filtrons.

  1. Fractals and Forecasting in Earthquakes and Finance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    It is now recognized that Benoit Mandelbrot's fractals play a critical role in describing a vast range of physical and social phenomena. Here we focus on two systems, earthquakes and finance. Since 1942, earthquakes have been characterized by the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude-frequency relation, which in more recent times is often written as a moment-frequency power law. A similar relation can be shown to hold for financial markets. Moreover, a recent New York Times article, titled "A Richter Scale for the Markets" [1] summarized the emerging viewpoint that stock market crashes can be described with similar ideas as large and great earthquakes. The idea that stock market crashes can be related in any way to earthquake phenomena has its roots in Mandelbrot's 1963 work on speculative prices in commodities markets such as cotton [2]. He pointed out that Gaussian statistics did not account for the excessive number of booms and busts that characterize such markets. Here we show that both earthquakes and financial crashes can both be described by a common Landau-Ginzburg-type free energy model, involving the presence of a classical limit of stability, or spinodal. These metastable systems are characterized by fractal statistics near the spinodal. For earthquakes, the independent ("order") parameter is the slip deficit along a fault, whereas for the financial markets, it is financial leverage in place. For financial markets, asset values play the role of a free energy. In both systems, a common set of techniques can be used to compute the probabilities of future earthquakes or crashes. In the case of financial models, the probabilities are closely related to implied volatility, an important component of Black-Scholes models for stock valuations. [2] B. Mandelbrot, The variation of certain speculative prices, J. Business, 36, 294 (1963)

  2. Fractal analysis of circulating platelets in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, G; Tanganelli, I

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of computerized fractal analysis for objective characterization by means of transmission electron microscopy of the complexity of circulating platelets collected from healthy individuals and from type 2 diabetic patients, a pathologic condition in which platelet hyperreactivity has been described. Platelet boundaries were extracted by means of automatically image analysis. Local fractal dimension by box counting (measure of geometric complexity) was automatically calculated. The results showed that the platelet boundary observed by electron microscopy is fractal and that the shape of the circulating platelets is significantly more complex in the diabetic patients in comparison to healthy subjects (p <  0.01), with 100% correct classification. In vitro activated platelets from healthy subjects show an analogous increase of geometric complexity. Computerized fractal analysis of platelet shape by transmission electron microscopy can provide accurate, quantitative, data to study platelet activation in diabetes mellitus.

  3. Derivation of Archie's' law based on a fractal pore volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongtao; Liu, Tangyan

    2017-03-01

    The geometrical mechanism behind Archie's law has been extensively investigated for many years, but is as yet inadequately understood. In this research, we present a straight-forward theoretical derivation revealing that the geometrical mechanism behind Archie's law is well represented in terms of a fractal pore volume. This representation is verified by the results of numerical simulations of the electrical conductivity obtained from deterministic fractal models. The derivation naturally suggests some new physical interpretations for Archie's parameters. It is revealed that the fractal building process determines the values of the cementation exponent and the prefactor. In addition, the prefactor is also determined by the initial states of the porosity and formation factor, which together define the initial state of the fractal building process.

  4. The Classification of HEp-2 Cell Patterns Using Fractal Descriptor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rudan; Sun, Yuanyuan; Yang, Zhihao; Song, Bo; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2015-07-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) with HEp-2 cells is considered as a powerful, sensitive and comprehensive technique for analyzing antinuclear autoantibodies (ANAs). The automatic classification of the HEp-2 cell images from IIF has played an important role in diagnosis. Fractal dimension can be used on the analysis of image representing and also on the property quantification like texture complexity and spatial occupation. In this study, we apply the fractal theory in the application of HEp-2 cell staining pattern classification, utilizing fractal descriptor firstly in the HEp-2 cell pattern classification with the help of morphological descriptor and pixel difference descriptor. The method is applied to the data set of MIVIA and uses the support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Experimental results show that the fractal descriptor combining with morphological descriptor and pixel difference descriptor makes the precisions of six patterns more stable, all above 50%, achieving 67.17% overall accuracy at best with relatively simple feature vectors.

  5. Fern leaves and cauliflower curds are not fractals

    PubMed Central

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2012-01-01

    The popular demonstration of drawing a mature fern leaf as expressed by Barnsley's fractal method is mathematically and visually very attractive but anatomically and developmentally misleading, and thus has limited, if any, biological significance. The same is true for the fractal demonstration of the external features of cauliflower curds. Actual fern leaves and cauliflower curds have a very small number of anatomically variable and non-iterating bifurcations, which superficially look self-similar, but do not allow for scaling down of their structure as real fractals do. Moreover, fern leaves and cauliflower curds develop from the inside out through a process totally different from fractal drawing procedures. The above cases demonstrate a general problem of using mathematical tools to investigate or illustrate biological phenomena in an irrelevant manner. A realistic set of mathematical equations to describe fern leaf or cauliflower curd development is needed. PMID:22516819

  6. Improved Fourier-based characterization of intracellular fractal features

    PubMed Central

    Xylas, Joanna; Quinn, Kyle P.; Hunter, Martin; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2012-01-01

    A novel Fourier-based image analysis method for measuring fractal features is presented which can significantly reduce artifacts due to non-fractal edge effects. The technique is broadly applicable to the quantitative characterization of internal morphology (texture) of image features with well-defined borders. In this study, we explore the capacity of this method for quantitative assessment of intracellular fractal morphology of mitochondrial networks in images of normal and diseased (precancerous) epithelial tissues. Using a combination of simulated fractal images and endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy, our method is shown to more accurately characterize the exponent of the high-frequency power spectral density (PSD) of these images in the presence of artifacts that arise due to cellular and nuclear borders. PMID:23188308

  7. Fern leaves and cauliflower curds are not fractals.

    PubMed

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2012-05-01

    The popular demonstration of drawing a mature fern leaf as expressed by Barnsley's fractal method is mathematically and visually very attractive but anatomically and developmentally misleading, and thus has limited, if any, biological significance. The same is true for the fractal demonstration of the external features of cauliflower curds. Actual fern leaves and cauliflower curds have a very small number of anatomically variable and non-iterating bifurcations, which superficially look self-similar, but do not allow for scaling down of their structure as real fractals do. Moreover, fern leaves and cauliflower curds develop from the inside out through a process totally different from fractal drawing procedures. The above cases demonstrate a general problem of using mathematical tools to investigate or illustrate biological phenomena in an irrelevant manner. A realistic set of mathematical equations to describe fern leaf or cauliflower curd development is needed.

  8. Fractal Particles: Titan's Thermal Structure and IR Opacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, C. P.; Rannou, P.; Guez, L.; Young, E. F.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Titan's haze particles are the principle opacity at solar wavelengths. Most past work in modeling these particles has assumed spherical particles. However, observational evidence strongly favors fractal shapes for the haze particles. We consider the implications of fractal particles for the thermal structure and near infrared opacity of Titan's atmosphere. We find that assuming fractal particles with the optical properties based on laboratory tholin material and with a production rate that allows for a match to the geometric albedo results in warmer troposphere and surface temperatures compared to spherical particles. In the near infrared (1-3 microns) the predicted opacity of the fractal particles is up to a factor of two less than for spherical particles. This has implications for the ability of Cassini to image Titan's surface at 1 micron.

  9. Hands-On Fractals and the Unexpected in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluchoff, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a hands-on project in which unusual fractal images are produced using only a photocopy machine and office supplies. The resulting images are an example of the contraction mapping principle.

  10. The fractal heart — embracing mathematics in the cardiology clinic

    PubMed Central

    Captur, Gabriella; Karperien, Audrey L.; Hughes, Alun D.; Francis, Darrel P.; Moon, James C.

    2017-01-01

    For clinicians grappling with quantifying the complex spatial and temporal patterns of cardiac structure and function (such as myocardial trabeculae, coronary microvascular anatomy, tissue perfusion, myocyte histology, electrical conduction, heart rate, and blood-pressure variability), fractal analysis is a powerful, but still underused, mathematical tool. In this Perspectives article, we explain some fundamental principles of fractal geometry and place it in a familiar medical setting. We summarize studies in the cardiovascular sciences in which fractal methods have successfully been used to investigate disease mechanisms, and suggest potential future clinical roles in cardiac imaging and time series measurements. We believe that clinical researchers can deploy innovative fractal solutions to common cardiac problems that might ultimately translate into advancements for patient care. PMID:27708281

  11. Monitoring the Depth of Anaesthesia Using Fractal Complexity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klonowski, W.; Olejarczyk, E.; Stepien, R.; Jalowiecki, P.; Rudner, R.

    We propose a simple and effective method of characterizing complexity of EEG-signals for monitoring the depth of anaesthesia using Higuchi's fractal dimension method. We demonstrate that the proposed method may compete with the widely used BIS monitoring method.

  12. Fractal characterization and wettability of ion treated silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. P.; Kumar, Tanuj; Baranwal, V.; Vandana, Kumar, Manvendra; Priya, P. K.; Pandey, S. N.; Mittal, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Fractal characterization of surface morphology can be useful as a tool for tailoring the wetting properties of solid surfaces. In this work, rippled surfaces of Si (100) are grown using 200 keV Ar+ ion beam irradiation at different ion doses. Relationship between fractal and wetting properties of these surfaces are explored. The height-height correlation function extracted from atomic force microscopic images, demonstrates an increase in roughness exponent with an increase in ion doses. A steep variation in contact angle values is found for low fractal dimensions. Roughness exponent and fractal dimensions are found correlated with the static water contact angle measurement. It is observed that after a crossover of the roughness exponent, the surface morphology has a rippled structure. Larger values of interface width indicate the larger ripples on the surface. The contact angle of water drops on such surfaces is observed to be lowest. Autocorrelation function is used for the measurement of ripple wavelength.

  13. Vortex-ring-fractal Structure of Atom and Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Osmera, Pavel

    2010-06-17

    This chapter is an attempt to attain a new and profound model of the nature's structure using a vortex-ring-fractal theory (VRFT). Scientists have been trying to explain some phenomena in Nature that have not been explained so far. The aim of this paper is the vortex-ring-fractal modeling of elements in the Mendeleev's periodic table, which is not in contradiction to the known laws of nature. We would like to find some acceptable structure model of the hydrogen as a vortex-fractal-coil structure of the proton and a vortex-fractal-ring structure of the electron. It is known that planetary model of the hydrogen atom is not right, the classical quantum model is too abstract. Our imagination is that the hydrogen is a levitation system of the proton and the electron. Structures of helium, oxygen, and carbon atoms and a hydrogen molecule are presented too.

  14. Fractal dynamics of body motion in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Masaki; Akay, Metin; Tamura, Toshiyo; Higashi, Yuji; Fujimoto, Toshiro

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we assess the complexity (fractal measure) of body motion during walking in patients with Parkinson's disease. The body motion of 11 patients with Parkinson's disease and 10 healthy elderly subjects was recorded using a triaxial accelerometry technique. A triaxial accelerometer was attached to the lumbar region. An assessment of the complexity of body motion was made using a maximum-likelihood-estimator-based fractal analysis method. Our data suggest that the fractal measures of the body motion of patients with Parkinson's disease are higher than those of healthy elderly subjects. These results were statistically different in the X (anteroposterior), Y (lateral) and Z (vertical) directions of body motion between patients with Parkinson's disease and the healthy elderly subjects (p < 0.01 in X and Z directions and p < 0.05 in Y direction). The complexity (fractal measure) of body motion can be useful to assess and monitor the output from the motor system during walking in clinical practice.

  15. FRACTAL DIMENSION RESULTS FOR CONTINUOUS TIME RANDOM WALKS

    PubMed Central

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Nane, Erkan; Xiao, Yimin

    2013-01-01

    Continuous time random walks impose random waiting times between particle jumps. This paper computes the fractal dimensions of their process limits, which represent particle traces in anomalous diffusion. PMID:23482421

  16. Evaluation of Two Fractal Methods for Magnetogram Image Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, B.; Adams, M.; Hathaway, D. H.; Hagyard, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Fractal and multifractal techniques have been applied to various types of solar data to study the fractal properties of sunspots as well as the distribution of photospheric magnetic fields and the role of random motions on the solar surface in this distribution. Other research includes the investigation of changes in the fractal dimension as an indicator for solar flares. Here we evaluate the efficacy of two methods for determining the fractal dimension of an image data set: the Differential Box Counting scheme and a new method, the Jaenisch scheme. To determine the sensitivity of the techniques to changes in image complexity, various types of constructed images are analyzed. In addition, we apply this method to solar magnetogram data from Marshall Space Flight Centers vector magnetograph.

  17. Wetting characteristics of 3-dimensional nanostructured fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Ethan; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Lijia; Lu, Yongfeng; Ndao, Sidy

    2017-01-01

    This article reports the fabrication and wetting characteristics of 3-dimensional nanostructured fractal surfaces (3DNFS). Three distinct 3DNFS surfaces, namely cubic, Romanesco broccoli, and sphereflake were fabricated using two-photon direct laser writing. Contact angle measurements were performed on the multiscale fractal surfaces to characterize their wetting properties. Average contact angles ranged from 66.8° for the smooth control surface to 0° for one of the fractal surfaces. The change in wetting behavior was attributed to modification of the interfacial surface properties due to the inclusion of 3-dimensional hierarchical fractal nanostructures. However, this behavior does not exactly obey existing surface wetting models in the literature. Potential applications for these types of surfaces in physical and biological sciences are also discussed.

  18. Facilitated diffusion of proteins through crumpled fractal DNA globules.

    PubMed

    Smrek, Jan; Grosberg, Alexander Y

    2015-07-01

    We explore how the specific fractal globule conformation, found for the chromatin fiber of higher eukaryotes and topologically constrained dense polymers, affects the facilitated diffusion of proteins in this environment. Using scaling arguments and supporting Monte Carlo simulations, we relate DNA looping probability distribution, fractal dimension, and protein nonspecific affinity for the DNA to the effective diffusion parameters of the proteins. We explicitly consider correlations between subsequent readsorption events of the proteins, and we find that facilitated diffusion is faster for the crumpled globule conformation with high intersegmental surface dimension than in the case of dense fractal conformations with smooth surfaces. As a byproduct, we obtain an expression for the macroscopic conductivity of a hypothetic material consisting of conducting fractal nanowires immersed in a weakly conducting medium.

  19. Fractal based curves in musical creativity: A critical annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgaki, Anastasia; Tsolakis, Christos

    In this article we examine fractal curves and synthesis algorithms in musical composition and research. First we trace the evolution of different approaches for the use of fractals in music since the 80's by a literature review. Furthermore, we review representative fractal algorithms and platforms that implement them. Properties such as self-similarity (pink noise), correlation, memory (related to the notion of Brownian motion) or non correlation at multiple levels (white noise), can be used to develop hierarchy of criteria for analyzing different layers of musical structure. L-systems can be applied in the modelling of melody in different musical cultures as well as in the investigation of musical perception principles. Finally, we propose a critical investigation approach for the use of artificial or natural fractal curves in systematic musicology.

  20. Hands-On Fractals and the Unexpected in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluchoff, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a hands-on project in which unusual fractal images are produced using only a photocopy machine and office supplies. The resulting images are an example of the contraction mapping principle.

  1. Recognition of spatial weak targets based on fractal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mengyu; Yang, Yuliang; Li, Dongxia

    2005-11-01

    Recognition of the interesting targets is the key techniques of precise guided weapon systems. Because fractal dimension is an interesting textual feature of an image, it has been used in many pattern recognition applications including classification and segmentation. According to the fractal feature of man-made objects in infrared images, a new algorithm is presented to detect the airplanes in this paper. And then we can partition and identify the potential targets using this fractal algorithm. Simulations illustrate that the airplane is successfully identified with the algorithm. The algorithm only requires moderate operations, so it is easy to be implemented for automatic target detection in real-time systems. The results of the experiments show that the fractal dimension can efficiently reflect the object surface complexity or irregularity in images. The algorithm is a powerful tool in identifying airplanes from infrared images.

  2. Applications of fractal geometry to dynamical evolution of sunspots

    SciTech Connect

    Milovanov, A.V.; Zelenyi, L.M. )

    1993-07-01

    A fractal model for sunspot dynamics is presented. Formation of a sunspot in the solar photosphere is considered from the viewpoint of aggregation of magnetic flux tubes on a fractal geometry. Fine structure of the magnetic flux tubes is analyzed for a broad class of non-Maxwellian plasma distribution functions. The sunspot fractal dimension is proved to depend on the parameters of the plasma distribution function, enabling one to investigate intrinsic properties of the solar plasma by means of powerful geometrical methods. Magnetic field dissipation in the tubes is shown to result in effective sunspot decay. Sunspot formation and decay times as well as the diffusion constant [ital K] deduced by using the fractal model, are in a good agreement with observational data. Disappearance of umbras in decaying sunspots is interpreted as a second-order phase transition reminiscent of the transition through the Curie point in ferromagnetics.

  3. Is fractal geometry useful in medicine and biomedical sciences?

    PubMed

    Heymans, O; Fissette, J; Vico, P; Blacher, S; Masset, D; Brouers, F

    2000-03-01

    Fractal geometry has become very useful in the understanding of many phenomena in various fields such as astrophysics, economy or agriculture and recently in medicine. After a brief intuitive introduction to the basis of fractal geometry, the clue is made about the correlation between Df and the complexity or the irregularity of a structure. However, fractal analysis must be applied with certain caution in natural objects such as bio-medical ones. The cardio-vascular system remains one of the most important fields of application of these kinds of approach. Spectral analysis of the R-R interval, morphology of the distal coronary arteries constitute two examples. Other very interesting applications are founded in bacteriology, medical imaging or ophthalmology. In our institution, we apply fractal analysis in order to quantitate angiogenesis and other vascular processes.

  4. Fractal properties of aggregates of metal nanoclusters on solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, V. M.; Kuznetsova, Yu. V.; D'yakova, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    AFM images are used to determine and analyze fractal characteristics (cluster fraction dimension and lacunarity) of aggregates of Au and Ag nanoclusters on metal films of the same metal produced with the aid of thermal vacuum deposition on mica surface. A fractal dimension of 1.6 that corresponds to typical samples with relatively uniform distribution of nanoclusters on the film surface is in agreement with the mean value calculated from experimental data of Belko et al., who studied the fractal dimension of Au nanoclusters on a different dielectric (quartz) surface. When a compact single aggregate of Au nanoclusters is formed on a certain active center or defect, the fractal cluster dimension decreases to 1.4. The experimental data are compared with the results of existing theoretical models of association of nanoclusters in 2D systems.

  5. Fractality in nonequilibrium steady states of quasiperiodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Vipin Kerala; de Mulatier, Clélia; Žnidarič, Marko

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium response of quasiperiodic systems to boundary driving. In particular, we focus on the Aubry-André-Harper model at its metal-insulator transition and the diagonal Fibonacci model. We find that opening the system at the boundaries provides a viable experimental technique to probe its underlying fractality, which is reflected in the fractal spatial dependence of simple observables (such as magnetization) in the nonequilibrium steady state. We also find that the dynamics in the nonequilibrium steady state depends on the length of the chain chosen: generic length chains harbour qualitatively slower transport (different scaling exponent) than Fibonacci length chains, which is in turn slower than in the closed system. We conjecture that such fractal nonequilibrium steady states should arise in generic driven critical systems that have fractal properties.

  6. Evaluation of Two Fractal Methods for Magnetogram Image Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, B.; Adams, M.; Hathaway, D. H.; Hagyard, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Fractal and multifractal techniques have been applied to various types of solar data to study the fractal properties of sunspots as well as the distribution of photospheric magnetic fields and the role of random motions on the solar surface in this distribution. Other research includes the investigation of changes in the fractal dimension as an indicator for solar flares. Here we evaluate the efficacy of two methods for determining the fractal dimension of an image data set: the Differential Box Counting scheme and a new method, the Jaenisch scheme. To determine the sensitivity of the techniques to changes in image complexity, various types of constructed images are analyzed. In addition, we apply this method to solar magnetogram data from Marshall Space Flight Centers vector magnetograph.

  7. Origins of fractality in the growth of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chaoming; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A.

    2006-04-01

    Complex networks from such different fields as biology, technology or sociology share similar organization principles. The possibility of a unique growth mechanism promises to uncover universal origins of collective behaviour. In particular, the emergence of self-similarity in complex networks raises the fundamental question of the growth process according to which these structures evolve. Here we investigate the concept of renormalization as a mechanism for the growth of fractal and non-fractal modular networks. We show that the key principle that gives rise to the fractal architecture of networks is a strong effective `repulsion' (or, disassortativity) between the most connected nodes (that is, the hubs) on all length scales, rendering them very dispersed. More importantly, we show that a robust network comprising functional modules, such as a cellular network, necessitates a fractal topology, suggestive of an evolutionary drive for their existence.

  8. Accuracy of the box-counting algorithm for noisy fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górski, A. Z.; Stróż, M.; Oświȩcimka, P.; Skrzat, J.

    2016-04-01

    The box-counting (BC) algorithm is applied to calculate fractal dimensions of four fractal sets. The sets are contaminated with an additive noise with amplitude γ=10-5-10-1. The accuracy of calculated numerical values of the fractal dimensions is analyzed as a function of γ for different sizes of the data sample. In particular, it has been found that even in case of pure fractals (γ=0) as well as for tiny noise (γ≈10-5) one has considerable error for the calculated exponents of order 0.01. For larger noise the error is growing up to 0.1 and more, with natural saturation limited by the embedding dimension. This prohibits the power-like scaling of the error. Moreover, the noise effect cannot be cured by taking larger data samples.

  9. [Dimensional fractal of post-paddy wheat root architecture].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin-xin; Ding, Qi-shuo; Li, Yi-nian; Xue, Jin-lin; Lu, Ming-zhou; Qiu, Wei

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate whether crop rooting system was directionally dependent, a field digitizer was used to measure post-paddy wheat root architectures. The acquired data was transferred to Pro-E, in which virtual root architecture was reconstructed and projected to a series of planes each separated in 10° apart. Fractal dimension and fractal abundance of root projections in all the 18 planes were calculated, revealing a distinctive architectural distribution of wheat root in each direction. This strongly proved that post-paddy wheat root architecture was directionally dependent. From seedling to turning green stage, fractal dimension of the 18 projections fluctuated significantly, illustrating a dynamical root developing process in the period. At the jointing stage, however, fractal indices of wheat root architecture resumed its regularity in each dimension. This wheat root architecture recovered its dimensional distinctness. The proposed method was applicable for precision modeling field state root distribution in soil.

  10. Facilitated diffusion of proteins through crumpled fractal DNA globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrek, Jan; Grosberg, Alexander Y.

    2015-07-01

    We explore how the specific fractal globule conformation, found for the chromatin fiber of higher eukaryotes and topologically constrained dense polymers, affects the facilitated diffusion of proteins in this environment. Using scaling arguments and supporting Monte Carlo simulations, we relate DNA looping probability distribution, fractal dimension, and protein nonspecific affinity for the DNA to the effective diffusion parameters of the proteins. We explicitly consider correlations between subsequent readsorption events of the proteins, and we find that facilitated diffusion is faster for the crumpled globule conformation with high intersegmental surface dimension than in the case of dense fractal conformations with smooth surfaces. As a byproduct, we obtain an expression for the macroscopic conductivity of a hypothetic material consisting of conducting fractal nanowires immersed in a weakly conducting medium.

  11. Hyper-Fractal Analysis: A visual tool for estimating the fractal dimension of 4D objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossu, I. V.; Grossu, I.; Felea, D.; Besliu, C.; Jipa, Al.; Esanu, T.; Bordeianu, C. C.; Stan, E.

    2013-04-01

    This work presents a new version of a Visual Basic 6.0 application for estimating the fractal dimension of images and 3D objects (Grossu et al. (2010) [1]). The program was extended for working with four-dimensional objects stored in comma separated values files. This might be of interest in biomedicine, for analyzing the evolution in time of three-dimensional images. New version program summaryProgram title: Hyper-Fractal Analysis (Fractal Analysis v03) Catalogue identifier: AEEG_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEG_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 745761 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12544491 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MS Visual Basic 6.0 Computer: PC Operating system: MS Windows 98 or later RAM: 100M Classification: 14 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEG_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 831-832 Does the new version supersede the previous version? Yes Nature of problem: Estimating the fractal dimension of 4D images. Solution method: Optimized implementation of the 4D box-counting algorithm. Reasons for new version: Inspired by existing applications of 3D fractals in biomedicine [3], we extended the optimized version of the box-counting algorithm [1, 2] to the four-dimensional case. This might be of interest in analyzing the evolution in time of 3D images. The box-counting algorithm was extended in order to support 4D objects, stored in comma separated values files. A new form was added for generating 2D, 3D, and 4D test data. The application was tested on 4D objects with known dimension, e.g. the Sierpinski hypertetrahedron gasket, Df=ln(5)/ln(2) (Fig. 1). The algorithm could be extended, with minimum effort, to

  12. New 5-adic Cantor sets and fractal string.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Rani, Mamta; Chugh, Renu

    2013-01-01

    In the year (1879-1884), George Cantor coined few problems and consequences in the field of set theory. One of them was the Cantor ternary set as a classical example of fractals. In this paper, 5-adic Cantor one-fifth set as an example of fractal string have been introduced. Moreover, the applications of 5-adic Cantor one-fifth set in string theory have also been studied.

  13. Discrimination of walking patterns using wavelet-based fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Masaki; Tamura, Toshiyo; Akay, Metin; Fujimoto, Toshiro; Togawa, Tatsuo; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2002-09-01

    In this paper, we attempted to classify the acceleration signals for walking along a corridor and on stairs by using the wavelet-based fractal analysis method. In addition, the wavelet-based fractal analysis method was used to evaluate the gait of elderly subjects and patients with Parkinson's disease. The triaxial acceleration signals were measured close to the center of gravity of the body while the subject walked along a corridor and up and down stairs continuously. Signal measurements were recorded from 10 healthy young subjects and 11 elderly subjects. For comparison, two patients with Parkinson's disease participated in the level walking. The acceleration signal in each direction was decomposed to seven detailed signals at different wavelet scales by using the discrete wavelet transform. The variances of detailed signals at scales 7 to 1 were calculated. The fractal dimension of the acceleration signal was then estimated from the slope of the variance progression. The fractal dimensions were significantly different among the three types of walking for individual subjects (p < 0.01) and showed a high reproducibility. Our results suggest that the fractal dimensions are effective for classifying the walking types. Moreover, the fractal dimensions were significantly higher for the elderly subjects than for the young subjects (p < 0.01). For the patients with Parkinson's disease, the fractal dimensions tended to be higher than those of healthy subjects. These results suggest that the acceleration signals change into a more complex pattern with aging and with Parkinson's disease, and the fractal dimension can be used to evaluate the gait of elderly subjects and patients with Parkinson's disease.

  14. Tissue as a self-organizing system with fractal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, P; Konarski, J

    2001-01-01

    Cell is a supramolecular dynamic network. Screening of tissue-specific cDNA library and results of Relative RT-PCR indicate that the relationship between genotype, (i.e., dynamic network of genes and their protein regulatory elements) and phenotype is non-bijective, and mendelian inheritance is a special case only. This implies non-linearity, complexity, and quasi-determinism, (i.e., co-existence of deterministic and non-deterministic events) of dynamic cellular network; prerequisite conditions for the existence of fractal structure. Indeed, the box counting method reveals that morphological patterns of the higher order, such as gland-like structures or populations of differentiating cancer cells possess fractal dimension and self-similarity. Since fractal space is not filled out randomly, a variety of morphological patterns of functional states arises. The expansion coefficient characterizes evolution of fractal dynamics. The coefficient indicates what kind of interactions occurs between cells, and how far from the limiting integer dimension of the Euclidean space the expanding population of cells is. We conclude that cellular phenomena occur in the fractal space; aggregation of cells is a supracollective phenomenon (expansion coefficient > 0), and differentiation is a collective one (expansion coefficient < 0). Fractal dimension or self-similarity are lost during tumor progression. The existence of fractal structure in a complex tissue system denotes that dynamic cellular phenomena generate an attractor with the appropriate organization of space-time. And vice versa, this attractor sets up physical limits for cellular phenomena during their interactions with various fields. This relationship can help to understand the emergence of extraterrestial forms of life. Although those forms can be composed of non-carbon molecules, fractal structure appears to be the common feature of all interactive biosystems.

  15. Fractal geometry of some Martian lava flow margins: Alba Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauhanen, K.

    1993-01-01

    Fractal dimension for a few lava flow margins on the gently sloping flanks of Alba Patera were measured using the structured walk method. Fractal behavior was observed at scales ranging from 20 to 100 pixels. The upper limit of the linear part of log(margin length) vs. log(scale) profile correlated well to the margin length. The lower limit depended on resolution and flow properties.

  16. Fractal characterization of a fractured chalk reservoir - The Laegerdorf case

    SciTech Connect

    Stoelum, H.H.; Koestler, A.G.; Feder, J.; Joessang, T.; Aharony, A.

    1991-03-01

    What is the matrix block size distribution of a fractured reservoir In order to answer this question and assess the potential of fractal geometry as a method of characterization of fracture networks, a pilot study has been done of the fractured chalk quarry in Laegerdorf. The fractures seen on the quarry walls were traced in the field for a total area of {approximately}200 {times} 45 m. The digitized pictures have been analyzed by a standard box-counting method. This analysis gave a fractal dimension of similarity varying from 1.33 for fractured areas between faults, to 1.43 for the fault zone, and 1.53 for the highly deformed fault gouge. The amplitude showed a similar trend. The fractal dimension for the whole system of fractures is {approximately}1.55. In other words, fracture networks in chalk have a nonlinear, fractal geometry, and so matrix block size is a scaling property of chalk reservoirs. In terms of rock mechanics, the authors interpret the variation of the fractal dimension as follows: A small fractal dimension and amplitude are associated with brittle deformation in the elastic regime, while a large fractal dimension and amplitude are associated with predominantly ductile, strain softening deformation in the plastic regime. The interaction between the two regimes of deformation in the rock body is a key element of successful characterization and may be approached by seeing the rock as a non-Newtonian viscoelastic medium. The fractal dimension for the whole is close to a material independent limit that constrains the development of fractures.

  17. Fractal dimension of mesospheric radar backscatter at 2. 75 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C.; Armstrong, R.J.; La Hoz, C. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors identified the fractal dimension of radar returns from the mesopause region at 2.75 MHz. The input dataset was a time series of echo amplitude at a discrete height obtained from a partial reflection radar operating at Ramfjordmoen in northern Norway. Two different algorithms both of which yield approximations to the fractal dimension have been employed and give almost identical results. The radar echo dataset in question exhibits a dimension of between 7 and 8.

  18. Time evolution of the fractal dimension of a mixing front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Gonzalez-Nieto, P.; Grau, J.

    2009-04-01

    We present a description of an experimental study of an array of turbulent plumes (from one to nine plumes), investigating the time evolution of the fractal dimension of the plumes and also the spatial evolution of the fractal dimension from one plume to other. We also investigate the effects of bouyancy (different Atwood numbers), the number of plumes and the height of the bouyancy source on the fractal dimension. The plumes are formed by injecting a dense fluid from a small source (from one to nine orifices) into a stationary body of lighter brime (saline solution) contained in a tank. The source fluid was dyed with fluorescein and we use the LIF technique. The plumes were fully turbulent and we have both momentum and bouyancy regimes. The fractal dimensions of contours of concentration were measured. The fractal analysis of the turbulent convective plumes was performed with the box counting algorithm for different intensities of evolving plume images using the special software Ima_Calc. Fractal dimensions between 1.3 and 1.35 are obtained from box counting methods for free convection and neutral boundary layers. Other results have been published which use the box counting method to analyze images of jet sections -produced from LIF techniques. The regions where most of the mixing takes place are also compared with Reactive flow experiments using phenolphthalein and acid-base interfaces performed by Redondo(1994) IMA 43. Eds M. Farge, JC Hunt and C. Vassilicos.

  19. Experimental control of scaling behavior: what is not fractal?

    PubMed

    Likens, Aaron D; Fine, Justin M; Amazeen, Eric L; Amazeen, Polemnia G

    2015-10-01

    The list of psychological processes thought to exhibit fractal behavior is growing. Although some might argue that the seeming ubiquity of fractal patterns illustrates their significance, unchecked growth of that list jeopardizes their relevance. It is important to identify when a single behavior is and is not fractal in order to make meaningful conclusions about the processes underlying those patterns. The hypothesis tested in the present experiment is that fractal patterns reflect the enactment of control. Participants performed two steering tasks: steering on a straight track and steering on a circular track. Although each task could be accomplished by holding the steering wheel at a constant angle, steering around a curve may require more constant control, at least from a psychological standpoint. Results showed that evidence for fractal behavior was strongest for the circular track; straight tracks showed evidence of two scaling regions. We argue from those results that, going forward, the goal of the fractal literature should be to bring scaling behavior under experimental control.

  20. Intrinsic half-metallicity in fractal carbon nitride honeycomb lattices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aizhu; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-09-14

    Fractals are natural phenomena that exhibit a repeating pattern "exactly the same at every scale or nearly the same at different scales". Defect-free molecular fractals were assembled successfully in a recent work [Shang et al., Nature Chem., 2015, 7, 389-393]. Here, we adopted the feature of a repeating pattern in searching two-dimensional (2D) materials with intrinsic half-metallicity and high stability that are desirable for spintronics applications. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that the electronic properties of fractal frameworks of carbon nitrides have stable ferromagnetism accompanied by half-metallicity, which are highly dependent on the fractal structure. The ferromagnetism increases gradually with the increase of fractal order. The Curie temperature of these metal-free systems estimated from Monte Carlo simulations is considerably higher than room temperature. The stable ferromagnetism, intrinsic half-metallicity, and fractal characteristics of spin distribution in the carbon nitride frameworks open an avenue for the design of metal-free magnetic materials with exotic properties.