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Sample records for fractal structure filaments

  1. Fractal structures and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bassingthwaighte, J.B.; Beard, D.A.; Percival, D.B.; Raymond, G.M.

    1996-06-01

    Fractals and chaos are closely related. Many chaotic systems have fractal features. Fractals are self-similar or self-affine structures, which means that they look much of the same when magnified or reduced in scale over a reasonably large range of scales, at least two orders of magnitude and preferably more (Mandelbrot, 1983). The methods for estimating their fractal dimensions or their Hurst coefficients, which summarize the scaling relationships and their correlation structures, are going through a rapid evolutionary phase. Fractal measures can be regarded as providing a useful statistical measure of correlated random processes. They also provide a basis for analyzing recursive processes in biology such as the growth of arborizing networks in the circulatory system, airways, or glandular ducts. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Fractal structure of asphaltene aggregates.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Nazmul H G; Dabros, Tadeusz; Masliyah, Jacob H

    2005-05-15

    A photographic technique coupled with image analysis was used to measure the size and fractal dimension of asphaltene aggregates formed in toluene-heptane solvent mixtures. First, asphaltene aggregates were examined in a Couette device and the fractal-like aggregate structures were quantified using boundary fractal dimension. The evolution of the floc structure with time was monitored. The relative rates of shear-induced aggregation and fragmentation/restructuring determine the steady-state floc structure. The average floc structure became more compact or more organized as the floc size distribution attained steady state. Moreover, the higher the shear rate is, the more compact the floc structure is at steady state. Second, the fractal dimensions of asphaltene aggregates were also determined in a free-settling test. The experimentally determined terminal settling velocities and characteristic lengths of the aggregates were utilized to estimate the 2D and 3D fractal dimensions. The size-density fractal dimension (D(3)) of the asphaltene aggregates was estimated to be in the range from 1.06 to 1.41. This relatively low fractal dimension suggests that the asphaltene aggregates are highly porous and very tenuous. The aggregates have a structure with extremely low space-filling capacity.

  3. Backbone fractal dimension and fractal hybrid orbital of protein structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xin; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2013-12-01

    Fractal geometry analysis provides a useful and desirable tool to characterize the configuration and structure of proteins. In this paper we examined the fractal properties of 750 folded proteins from four different structural classes, namely (1) the α-class (dominated by α-helices), (2) the β-class (dominated by β-pleated sheets), (3) the (α/β)-class (α-helices and β-sheets alternately mixed) and (4) the (α + β)-class (α-helices and β-sheets largely segregated) by using two fractal dimension methods, i.e. "the local fractal dimension" and "the backbone fractal dimension" (a new and useful quantitative parameter). The results showed that the protein molecules exhibit a fractal behavior in the range of 1 ⩽ N ⩽ 15 (N is the number of the interval between two adjacent amino acid residues), and the value of backbone fractal dimension is distinctly greater than that of local fractal dimension for the same protein. The average value of two fractal dimensions decreased in order of α > α/β > α + β > β. Moreover, the mathematical formula for the hybrid orbital model of protein based on the concept of backbone fractal dimension is in good coincidence with that of the similarity dimension. So it is a very accurate and simple method to analyze the hybrid orbital model of protein by using the backbone fractal dimension.

  4. Filament wound structure and method

    DOEpatents

    Dritt, William S.; Gerth, Howard L.; Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Pardue, Robert M.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention relates to a filament wound spherical structure comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness.

  5. Fragmentation of Fractal Random Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elçi, Eren Metin; Weigel, Martin; Fytas, Nikolaos G.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the fragmentation behavior of random clusters on the lattice under a process where bonds between neighboring sites are successively broken. Modeling such structures by configurations of a generalized Potts or random-cluster model allows us to discuss a wide range of systems with fractal properties including trees as well as dense clusters. We present exact results for the densities of fragmenting edges and the distribution of fragment sizes for critical clusters in two dimensions. Dynamical fragmentation with a size cutoff leads to broad distributions of fragment sizes. The resulting power laws are shown to encode characteristic fingerprints of the fragmented objects.

  6. Segmentation of histological structures for fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Vanessa; Kouznetsov, Alexei; Tambasco, Mauro

    2009-02-01

    Pathologists examine histology sections to make diagnostic and prognostic assessments regarding cancer based on deviations in cellular and/or glandular structures. However, these assessments are subjective and exhibit some degree of observer variability. Recent studies have shown that fractal dimension (a quantitative measure of structural complexity) has proven useful for characterizing structural deviations and exhibits great potential for automated cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Computing fractal dimension relies on accurate image segmentation to capture the architectural complexity of the histology specimen. For this purpose, previous studies have used techniques such as intensity histogram analysis and edge detection algorithms. However, care must be taken when segmenting pathologically relevant structures since improper edge detection can result in an inaccurate estimation of fractal dimension. In this study, we established a reliable method for segmenting edges from grayscale images. We used a Koch snowflake, an object of known fractal dimension, to investigate the accuracy of various edge detection algorithms and selected the most appropriate algorithm to extract the outline structures. Next, we created validation objects ranging in fractal dimension from 1.3 to 1.9 imitating the size, structural complexity, and spatial pixel intensity distribution of stained histology section images. We applied increasing intensity thresholds to the validation objects to extract the outline structures and observe the effects on the corresponding segmentation and fractal dimension. The intensity threshold yielding the maximum fractal dimension provided the most accurate fractal dimension and segmentation, indicating that this quantitative method could be used in an automated classification system for histology specimens.

  7. Fractal structures in nonlinear plasma physics.

    PubMed

    Viana, R L; da Silva, E C; Kroetz, T; Caldas, I L; Roberto, M; Sanjuán, M A F

    2011-01-28

    Fractal structures appear in many situations related to the dynamics of conservative as well as dissipative dynamical systems, being a manifestation of chaotic behaviour. In open area-preserving discrete dynamical systems we can find fractal structures in the form of fractal boundaries, associated to escape basins, and even possessing the more general property of Wada. Such systems appear in certain applications in plasma physics, like the magnetic field line behaviour in tokamaks with ergodic limiters. The main purpose of this paper is to show how such fractal structures have observable consequences in terms of the transport properties in the plasma edge of tokamaks, some of which have been experimentally verified. We emphasize the role of the fractal structures in the understanding of mesoscale phenomena in plasmas, such as electromagnetic turbulence.

  8. Recurrence Quantification of Fractal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    By definition, fractal structures possess recurrent patterns. At different levels repeating patterns can be visualized at higher magnifications. The purpose of this chapter is threefold. First, general characteristics of dynamical systems are addressed from a theoretical mathematical perspective. Second, qualitative and quantitative recurrence analyses are reviewed in brief, but the reader is directed to other sources for explicit details. Third, example mathematical systems that generate strange attractors are explicitly defined, giving the reader the ability to reproduce the rich dynamics of continuous chaotic flows or discrete chaotic iterations. The challenge is then posited for the reader to study for themselves the recurrent structuring of these different dynamics. With a firm appreciation of the power of recurrence analysis, the reader will be prepared to turn their sights on real-world systems (physiological, psychological, mechanical, etc.). PMID:23060808

  9. Fractal structures and fractal functions as disease indicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Escos, J.M; Alados, C.L.; Emlen, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental instability is an early indicator of stress, and has been used to monitor the impacts of human disturbance on natural ecosystems. Here we investigate the use of different measures of developmental instability on two species, green peppers (Capsicum annuum), a plant, and Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica), an animal. For green peppers we compared the variance in allometric relationship between control plants, and a treatment group infected with the tomato spotted wilt virus. The results show that infected plants have a greater variance about the allometric regression line than the control plants. We also observed a reduction in complexity of branch structure in green pepper with a viral infection. Box-counting fractal dimension of branch architecture declined under stress infection. We also tested the reduction in complexity of behavioral patterns under stress situations in Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica). Fractal dimension of head-lift frequency distribution measures predator detection efficiency. This dimension decreased under stressful conditions, such as advanced pregnancy and parasitic infection. Feeding distribution activities reflect food searching efficiency. Power spectral analysis proves to be the most powerful tool for character- izing fractal behavior, revealing a reduction in complexity of time distribution activity under parasitic infection.

  10. Filament Winding Of Carbon/Carbon Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacoy, Paul J.; Schmitigal, Wesley P.; Phillips, Wayne M.

    1991-01-01

    Improved method of winding carbon filaments for carbon/carbon composite structures less costly and labor-intensive, also produces more consistent results. Involves use of roller squeegee to ensure filaments continuously wet with resin during winding. Also involves control of spacing and resin contents of plies to obtain strong bonds between carbon filaments and carbon matrices. Lends itself to full automation and involves use of filaments and matrix-precursor resins in their simplest forms, thereby reducing costs.

  11. Intermediate Filaments: Structure and Assembly.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Harald; Aebi, Ueli

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the intermediate filament (IF) supergene family are ubiquitous structural components that comprise, in a cell type-specific manner, the cytoskeleton proper in animal tissues. All IF proteins show a distinctly organized, extended α-helical conformation prone to form two-stranded coiled coils, which are the basic building blocks of these highly flexible, stress-resistant cytoskeletal filaments. IF proteins are highly charged, thus representing versatile polyampholytes with multiple functions. Taking vimentin, keratins, and the nuclear lamins as our prime examples, we present an overview of their molecular and structural parameters. These, in turn, document the ability of IF proteins to form distinct, highly diverse supramolecular assemblies and biomaterials found, for example, at the inner nuclear membrane, throughout the cytoplasm, and in highly complex extracellular appendages, such as hair and nails, of vertebrate organisms. Ultimately, our aim is to set the stage for a more rational understanding of the immediate effects that missense mutations in IF genes have on cellular functions and for their far-reaching impact on the development of the numerous IF diseases caused by them.

  12. Dynamic structure factor of vibrating fractals.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Klafter, Joseph; Granek, Rony

    2012-02-10

    Motivated by novel experimental work and the lack of an adequate theory, we study the dynamic structure factor S(k,t) of large vibrating fractal networks at large wave numbers k. We show that the decay of S(k,t) is dominated by the spatially averaged mean square displacement of a network node, which evolves subdiffusively in time, ((u[over →](i)(t)-u[over →](i)(0))(2))∼t(ν), where ν depends on the spectral dimension d(s) and fractal dimension d(f). As a result, S(k,t) decays as a stretched exponential S(k,t)≈S(k)e(-(Γ(k)t)(ν)) with Γ(k)∼k(2/ν). Applications to a variety of fractal-like systems are elucidated.

  13. The fractal structure of the mitochondrial genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oiwa, Nestor N.; Glazier, James A.

    2002-08-01

    The mitochondrial DNA genome has a definite multifractal structure. We show that loops, hairpins and inverted palindromes are responsible for this self-similarity. We can thus establish a definite relation between the function of subsequences and their fractal dimension. Intriguingly, protein coding DNAs also exhibit palindromic structures, although they do not appear in the sequence of amino acids. These structures may reflect the stabilization and transcriptional control of DNA or the control of posttranscriptional editing of mRNA.

  14. Myosin filament structure in vertebrate smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The in vivo structure of the myosin filaments in vertebrate smooth muscle is unknown. Evidence from purified smooth muscle myosin and from some studies of intact smooth muscle suggests that they may have a nonhelical, side-polar arrangement of crossbridges. However, the bipolar, helical structure characteristic of myosin filaments in striated muscle has not been disproved for smooth muscle. We have used EM to investigate this question in a functionally diverse group of smooth muscles (from the vascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive, and visual systems) from mammalian, amphibian, and avian species. Intact muscle under physiological conditions, rapidly frozen and then freeze substituted, shows many myosin filaments with a square backbone in transverse profile. Transverse sections of fixed, chemically skinned muscles also show square backbones and, in addition, reveal projections (crossbridges) on only two opposite sides of the square. Filaments gently isolated from skinned smooth muscles and observed by negative staining show crossbridges with a 14.5-nm repeat projecting in opposite directions on opposite sides of the filament. Such filaments subjected to low ionic strength conditions show bare filament ends and an antiparallel arrangement of myosin tails along the length of the filament. All of these observations are consistent with a side-polar structure and argue against a bipolar, helical crossbridge arrangement. We conclude that myosin filaments in all smooth muscles, regardless of function, are likely to be side-polar. Such a structure could be an important factor in the ability of smooth muscles to contract by large amounts. PMID:8698822

  15. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  16. Evaluation of 3D Printer Accuracy in Producing Fractal Structure.

    PubMed

    Kikegawa, Kana; Takamatsu, Kyuuichirou; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2017-01-01

    Hierarchical structures, also known as fractal structures, exhibit advantageous material properties, such as water- and oil-repellency as well as other useful optical characteristics, owing to its self-similarity. Various methods have been developed for producing hierarchical geometrical structures. Recently, fractal structures have been manufactured using a 3D printing technique that involves computer-aided design data. In this study, we confirmed the accuracy of geometrical structures when Koch curve-like fractal structures with zero to three generations were printed using a 3D printer. The fractal dimension was analyzed using a box-counting method. This analysis indicated that the fractal dimension of the third generation hierarchical structure was approximately the same as that of the ideal Koch curve. These findings demonstrate that the design and production of fractal structures can be controlled using a 3D printer. Although the interior angle deviated from the ideal value, the side length could be precisely controlled.

  17. SANS spectra of the fractal supernucleosomal chromatin structure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilatovskiy, Andrey V.; Lebedev, Dmitry V.; Filatov, Michael V.; Petukhov, Michael G.; Isaev-Ivanov, Vladimir V.

    2012-03-01

    The eukaryotic genome consists of chromatin—a nucleoprotein complex with hierarchical architecture based on nucleosomes, the organization of higher-order chromatin structures still remains unknown. Available experimental data, including SANS spectra we had obtained for whole nuclei, suggested fractal nature of chromatin. Previously we had built random-walk supernucleosomal models (up to 106 nucleosomes) to interpret our SANS spectra. Here we report a new method to build fractal supernucleosomal structure of a given fractal dimension or two different dimensions. Agreement between calculated and experimental SANS spectra was significantly improved, especially for model with two fractal dimensions—3 and 2.

  18. Paradigms of Complexity: Fractals and Structures in the Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Miroslav M.

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * The Origin of Complexity (invited talk) * On the Existence of Spatially Uniform Scaling Laws in the Climate System * Multispectral Backscattering: A Fractal-Structure Probe * Small-Angle Multiple Scattering on a Fractal System of Point Scatterers * Symmetric Fractals Generated by Cellular Automata * Bispectra and Phase Correlations for Chaotic Dynamical Systems * Self-Organized Criticality Models of Neural Development * Altered Fractal and Irregular Heart Rate Behavior in Sick Fetuses * Extract Multiple Scaling in Long-Term Heart Rate Variability * A Semi-Continous Box Counting Method for Fractal Dimension Measurement of Short Single Dimension Temporal Signals - Preliminary Study * A Fractional Brownian Motion Model of Cracking * Self-Affine Scaling Studies on Fractography * Coarsening of Fractal Interfaces * A Fractal Model of Ocean Surface Superdiffusion * Stochastic Subsurface Flow and Transport in Fractal Fractal Conductivity Fields * Rendering Through Iterated Function Systems * The σ-Hull - The Hull Where Fractals Live - Calculating a Hull Bounded by Log Spirals to Solve the Inverse IFS-Problem by the Detected Orbits * On the Multifractal Properties of Passively Convected Scalar Fields * New Statistical Textural Transforms for Non-Stationary Signals: Application to Generalized Mutlifractal Analysis * Laplacian Growth of Parallel Needles: Their Mullins-Sekerka Instability * Entropy Dynamics Associated with Self-Organization * Fractal Properties in Economics (invited talk) * Fractal Approach to the Regional Seismic Event Discrimination Problem * Fractal and Topological Complexity of Radioactive Contamination * Pattern Selection: Nonsingular Saffman-Taylor Finger and Its Dynamic Evolution with Zero Surface Tension * A Family of Complex Wavelets for the Characterization of Singularities * Stabilization of Chaotic Amplitude Fluctuations in Multimode, Intracavity-Doubled Solid-State Lasers * Chaotic

  19. Structure of Flexible Filamentous Plant Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah C.; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C.; Havens, Wendy M.; Ghabrial, Said A.; Wall, Joseph S.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2008-10-23

    Flexible filamentous viruses make up a large fraction of the known plant viruses, but in comparison with those of other viruses, very little is known about their structures. We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to determine the symmetry of a potyvirus, soybean mosaic virus; to confirm the symmetry of a potexvirus, potato virus X; and to determine the low-resolution structures of both viruses. We conclude that these viruses and, by implication, most or all flexible filamentous plant viruses share a common coat protein fold and helical symmetry, with slightly less than 9 subunits per helical turn.

  20. Structure of flexible filamentous plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah C; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C; Havens, Wendy M; Ghabrial, Said A; Wall, Joseph S; Stubbs, Gerald

    2008-10-01

    Flexible filamentous viruses make up a large fraction of the known plant viruses, but in comparison with those of other viruses, very little is known about their structures. We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to determine the symmetry of a potyvirus, soybean mosaic virus; to confirm the symmetry of a potexvirus, potato virus X; and to determine the low-resolution structures of both viruses. We conclude that these viruses and, by implication, most or all flexible filamentous plant viruses share a common coat protein fold and helical symmetry, with slightly less than 9 subunits per helical turn.

  1. Vortex-ring-fractal Structure of Atom and Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Osmera, Pavel

    2010-06-17

    This chapter is an attempt to attain a new and profound model of the nature's structure using a vortex-ring-fractal theory (VRFT). Scientists have been trying to explain some phenomena in Nature that have not been explained so far. The aim of this paper is the vortex-ring-fractal modeling of elements in the Mendeleev's periodic table, which is not in contradiction to the known laws of nature. We would like to find some acceptable structure model of the hydrogen as a vortex-fractal-coil structure of the proton and a vortex-fractal-ring structure of the electron. It is known that planetary model of the hydrogen atom is not right, the classical quantum model is too abstract. Our imagination is that the hydrogen is a levitation system of the proton and the electron. Structures of helium, oxygen, and carbon atoms and a hydrogen molecule are presented too.

  2. Process for applying control variables having fractal structures

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, J.S. IV; Lawson, R.L.

    1996-01-23

    A process and apparatus are disclosed for the application of a control variable having a fractal structure to a body or process. The process of the present invention comprises the steps of generating a control variable having a fractal structure and applying the control variable to a body or process reacting in accordance with the control variable. The process is applicable to electroforming where first, second and successive pulsed-currents are applied to cause the deposition of material onto a substrate, such that the first pulsed-current, the second pulsed-current, and successive pulsed currents form a fractal pulsed-current waveform. 3 figs.

  3. Process for applying control variables having fractal structures

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, IV, Jonathan S.; Lawson, Roger L.

    1996-01-01

    A process and apparatus for the application of a control variable having a fractal structure to a body or process. The process of the present invention comprises the steps of generating a control variable having a fractal structure and applying the control variable to a body or process reacting in accordance with the control variable. The process is applicable to electroforming where first, second and successive pulsed-currents are applied to cause the deposition of material onto a substrate, such that the first pulsed-current, the second pulsed-current, and successive pulsed currents form a fractal pulsed-current waveform.

  4. Fractal Bread.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbenshade, Donald H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Develops the idea of fractals through a laboratory activity that calculates the fractal dimension of ordinary white bread. Extends use of the fractal dimension to compare other complex structures as other breads and sponges. (MDH)

  5. Modeling of Aperiodic Fractal Waveguide Structures for Multifrequency Light Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Marianne; Dal Negro, Luca; Feng, Ning-Ning; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Michel, Jurgen

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present the design of a novel waveguide structure capable of multifrequency transmission bands with strongly enhanced electric field states. The concept of the structure is based on aperiodic and quasi-periodic fractal ordering of scattering subunits combined within a traditional channel-waveguide scheme. The resulting 3-D fractal waveguides are characterized by complex transmission spectra and sustain quasi-localized field modes with strong enhancement effects due to the lack of translational symmetry. In this paper, we will describe how it is possible to accurately model these complex waveguide structures within a simple 1-D model. We will explore the formation of photonic band gaps and the character of the quasi-localized states in fractal waveguide structures generated according to different deterministic rules, such as Fibonacci, Thue Morse, and Rudin Shapiro sequences. Furthermore, we will qualitatively compare the characteristics of the optical gaps and field states in periodic, fractal, and aperiodic waveguides. The results of our comparative study will show that fractal waveguides based on aperiodic order exhibit the richest transmission spectra with field-enhancement effects occurring at multiple frequencies. The proposed fractal waveguide design can provide an attractive route toward the fabrication of optically active devices for multiwavelength operation.

  6. Fractal structure of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Under some conditions, time series of the interplanetary magnetic field strength and components have the properties of fractal curves. Magnetic field measurements made near 8.5 AU by Voyager 2 from June 5 to August 24, 1981 were self-similar over time scales from approximately 20 sec to approximately 3 x 100,000 sec, and the fractal dimension of the time series of the strength and components of the magnetic field was D = 5/3, corresponding to a power spectrum P(f) approximately f sup -5/3. Since the Kolmogorov spectrum for homogeneous, isotropic, stationary turbulence is also f sup -5/3, the Voyager 2 measurements are consistent with the observation of an inertial range of turbulence extending over approximately four decades in frequency. Interaction regions probably contributed most of the power in this interval. As an example, one interaction region is discussed in which the magnetic field had a fractal dimension D = 5/3.

  7. Fractal Particles: Titan's Thermal Structure and IR Opacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, C. P.; Rannou, P.; Guez, L.; Young, E. F.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Titan's haze particles are the principle opacity at solar wavelengths. Most past work in modeling these particles has assumed spherical particles. However, observational evidence strongly favors fractal shapes for the haze particles. We consider the implications of fractal particles for the thermal structure and near infrared opacity of Titan's atmosphere. We find that assuming fractal particles with the optical properties based on laboratory tholin material and with a production rate that allows for a match to the geometric albedo results in warmer troposphere and surface temperatures compared to spherical particles. In the near infrared (1-3 microns) the predicted opacity of the fractal particles is up to a factor of two less than for spherical particles. This has implications for the ability of Cassini to image Titan's surface at 1 micron.

  8. Filamentous structures in skeletal muscle: anchors for the subsarcolemmal space.

    PubMed

    Khairani, Astrid Feinisa; Tajika, Yuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Ueno, Hitoshi; Murakami, Tohru; Soenggono, Arifin; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    In skeletal muscle fibers, intermediate filaments and actin filaments provide structural support to the myofibrils and the sarcolemma. For many years, it was poorly understood from ultrastructural observations that how these filamentous structures were kept anchored. The present study was conducted to determine the architecture of filamentous anchoring structures in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils. The diaphragms (Dp) of adult wild type and mdx mice (mdx is a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy) were subjected to tension applied perpendicular to the long axis of the muscle fibers, with or without treatment with 1% Triton X-100 or 0.03% saponin. These experiments were conducted to confirm the presence and integrity of the filamentous anchoring structures. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that these structures provide firm transverse connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. Most of the filamentous structures appeared to be inserted into subsarcolemmal densities, forming anchoring connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. In some cases, actin filaments were found to run longitudinally in the subsarcolemmal space to connect to the sarcolemma or in some cases to connect to the intermyofibrils as elongated thin filaments. These filamentous anchoring structures were less common in the mdx Dp. Our data suggest that the transverse and longitudinal filamentous structures form an anchoring system in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils.

  9. The analysis of the influence of fractal structure of stimuli on fractal dynamics in fixational eye movements and EEG signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.; Akrami, Amin

    2016-05-01

    One of the major challenges in vision research is to analyze the effect of visual stimuli on human vision. However, no relationship has been yet discovered between the structure of the visual stimulus, and the structure of fixational eye movements. This study reveals the plasticity of human fixational eye movements in relation to the ‘complex’ visual stimulus. We demonstrated that the fractal temporal structure of visual dynamics shifts towards the fractal dynamics of the visual stimulus (image). The results showed that images with higher complexity (higher fractality) cause fixational eye movements with lower fractality. Considering the brain, as the main part of nervous system that is engaged in eye movements, we analyzed the governed Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal during fixation. We have found out that there is a coupling between fractality of image, EEG and fixational eye movements. The capability observed in this research can be further investigated and applied for treatment of different vision disorders.

  10. The analysis of the influence of fractal structure of stimuli on fractal dynamics in fixational eye movements and EEG signal

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.; Akrami, Amin

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in vision research is to analyze the effect of visual stimuli on human vision. However, no relationship has been yet discovered between the structure of the visual stimulus, and the structure of fixational eye movements. This study reveals the plasticity of human fixational eye movements in relation to the ‘complex’ visual stimulus. We demonstrated that the fractal temporal structure of visual dynamics shifts towards the fractal dynamics of the visual stimulus (image). The results showed that images with higher complexity (higher fractality) cause fixational eye movements with lower fractality. Considering the brain, as the main part of nervous system that is engaged in eye movements, we analyzed the governed Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal during fixation. We have found out that there is a coupling between fractality of image, EEG and fixational eye movements. The capability observed in this research can be further investigated and applied for treatment of different vision disorders. PMID:27217194

  11. Chaotic transients and fractal structures governing coupled swing dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Y.; Enomoto, T. ); Stewart, H.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Numerical simulations are used to study coupled swing equations modeling the dynamics of two electric generators connected to an infinite bus by a simple transmission network. In particular, the effect of varying parameters corresponding to the input power supplied to each generator is studied. In addition to stable steady operating conditions, which should correspond to synchronized, normal operation, the coupled swing model has other stable states of large amplitude oscillations which, if realized, would represent non-synchronized motions: the phase space boundary separating their basins of attraction is fractal, corresponding to chaotic transient motions. These fractal structures in phase space and the associated fractal structures in parameter space will be of primary concern to engineers in predicting system behavior.

  12. The structures, mass motions and footpoints of solar filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramanasastry, Aparna

    This thesis focuses on identifying the mechanism by which solar filaments acquire mass. Some of the speculations for how a filament gets its mass are 1) injection of mass from the chromosphere into the filament structure, and 2) condensation of mass from the corona into the region of the filament channel. Mass motion at the footpoints of the filaments is studied to detect mass entering and leaving the filament body. The magnetic properties of the footpoints of the filaments are also studied. Recommendations are drawn by comparing observational properties obtained in this study with the features used in some of the previously developed models. The datasets used for this study are high-resolution image sets of centerline and Doppler wings of Halpha, obtained using the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT). The data were obtained on Oct 30, 2010. The data set contains three filaments in an active region in the northern hemisphere of the Sun. The images in each wavelength are aligned and made into movies to find the footpoints of the filaments through which the mass goes into and comes out of the filaments from and to the chromosphere, respectively. The magnetic properties of the footpoints are studied by overlaying the magnetogram images with the DOT images by using full-disk Halpha images for matching the features in the two. Of the three filaments, one of the filaments is observed to be stable throughout the duration of the observations; another filament erupts after about two hours of the beginning of observations; and the third filament is in its early stages of formation. The ends of the stable filament are clearly observed whereas the ends of the erupting filament and the forming filament are observed clearly intermittently during the duration of the observations. The animations of the region near the ends of filament 1 reveal definite injection and draining of mass via the footpoints into and out of the filament. The mass motion into and out of the filaments are observed

  13. Fractal structure of the liver: effect on drug elimination.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Liver modeling in pharmacokinetics has been based on outflow curves of extracellular tracers obtained in single-pass perfused rat livers. These reference curves represent the hepatic transit time densities (TTD) of tracers. Since the fractal structure of the sinusoidal network implies a TTD with power-law tail, the question is whether the use of conventional empirical TTDs with exponential tail may lead to biased estimates of hepatic clearance. A simulation study using a novel TTD model that accounts for fractal heterogeneity of hepatic flow shows that the bias is less than about 5%. Using this approach to determine the influence of hepatic flow dispersion on drug extraction, only a minor effect was found. The results demonstrate that there is no need for specific fractal models of hepatic drug elimination.

  14. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Haniam, P.; Kunsombat, C.; Chiangga, S.; Songsasen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  15. Kinetic signature of fractal-like filament networks formed by orientational linear epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Wonmuk; Eryilmaz, Esma

    2014-07-11

    We study a broad class of epitaxial assembly of filament networks on lattice surfaces. Over time, a scale-free behavior emerges with a 2.5-3 power-law exponent in filament length distribution. Partitioning between the power-law and exponential behaviors in a network can be used to find the stage and kinetic parameters of the assembly process. To analyze real-world networks, we develop a computer program that measures the network architecture in experimental images. Application to triaxial networks of collagen fibrils shows quantitative agreement with our model. Our unifying approach can be used for characterizing and controlling the network formation that is observed across biological and nonbiological systems.

  16. Kinetic Signature of Fractal-like Filament Networks Formed by Orientational Linear Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wonmuk; Eryilmaz, Esma

    2014-07-01

    We study a broad class of epitaxial assembly of filament networks on lattice surfaces. Over time, a scale-free behavior emerges with a 2.5-3 power-law exponent in filament length distribution. Partitioning between the power-law and exponential behaviors in a network can be used to find the stage and kinetic parameters of the assembly process. To analyze real-world networks, we develop a computer program that measures the network architecture in experimental images. Application to triaxial networks of collagen fibrils shows quantitative agreement with our model. Our unifying approach can be used for characterizing and controlling the network formation that is observed across biological and nonbiological systems.

  17. Ubiquitination and filamentous structure of cytidine triphosphate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Li-Mei; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chakraborty, Archan; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Lin, Yu-Hung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Living organisms respond to nutrient availability by regulating the activity of metabolic enzymes. Therefore, the reversible post-translational modification of an enzyme is a common regulatory mechanism for energy conservation. Recently, cytidine-5′-triphosphate (CTP) synthase was discovered to form a filamentous structure that is evolutionarily conserved from flies to humans. Interestingly, induction of the formation of CTP synthase filament is responsive to starvation or glutamine depletion. However, the biological roles of this structure remain elusive. We have recently shown that ubiquitination regulates CTP synthase activity by promoting filament formation in Drosophila ovaries during endocycles. Intriguingly, although the ubiquitination process was required for filament formation induced by glutamine depletion, CTP synthase ubiquitination was found to be inversely correlated with filament formation in Drosophila and human cell lines. In this article, we discuss the putative dual roles of ubiquitination, as well as its physiological implications, in the regulation of CTP synthase structure. PMID:27116391

  18. Not just fractal surfaces, but surface fractal aggregates: Derivation of the expression for the structure factor and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besselink, R.; Stawski, T. M.; Van Driessche, A. E. S.; Benning, L. G.

    2016-12-01

    Densely packed surface fractal aggregates form in systems with high local volume fractions of particles with very short diffusion lengths, which effectively means that particles have little space to move. However, there are no prior mathematical models, which would describe scattering from such surface fractal aggregates and which would allow the subdivision between inter- and intraparticle interferences of such aggregates. Here, we show that by including a form factor function of the primary particles building the aggregate, a finite size of the surface fractal interfacial sub-surfaces can be derived from a structure factor term. This formalism allows us to define both a finite specific surface area for fractal aggregates and the fraction of particle interfacial sub-surfaces at the perimeter of an aggregate. The derived surface fractal model is validated by comparing it with an ab initio approach that involves the generation of a "brick-in-a-wall" von Koch type contour fractals. Moreover, we show that this approach explains observed scattering intensities from in situ experiments that followed gypsum (CaSO4 ṡ 2H2O) precipitation from highly supersaturated solutions. Our model of densely packed "brick-in-a-wall" surface fractal aggregates may well be the key precursor step in the formation of several types of mosaic- and meso-crystals.

  19. Filament shape versus coronal potential magnetic field structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B.

    2016-01-01

    Solar filament shape in projection on disc depends on the structure of the coronal magnetic field. We calculate the position of polarity inversion lines (PILs) of coronal potential magnetic field at different heights above the photosphere, which compose the magnetic neutral surface, and compare with them the distribution of the filament material in Hα chromospheric images. We found that the most of the filament material is enclosed between two PILs, one at a lower height close to the chromosphere and one at a higher level, which can be considered as a height of the filament spine. Observations of the same filament on the limb by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft confirm that the height of the spine is really very close to the value obtained from the PIL and filament border matching. Such matching can be used for filament height estimations in on-disc observations. Filament barbs are housed within protruding sections of the low-level PIL. On the base of simple model, we show that the similarity of the neutral surfaces in potential and non-potential fields with the same sub-photospheric sources is the reason for the found tendency for the filament material to gather near the potential-field neutral surface.

  20. Myosin filament 3D structure in mammalian cardiac muscle☆

    PubMed Central

    AL-Khayat, Hind A.; Morris, Edward P.; Kensler, Robert W.; Squire, John M.

    2008-01-01

    A number of cardiac myopathies (e.g. familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy) are linked to mutations in cardiac muscle myosin filament proteins, including myosin and myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C). To understand the myopathies it is necessary to know the normal 3D structure of these filaments. We have carried out 3D single particle analysis of electron micrograph images of negatively stained isolated myosin filaments from rabbit cardiac muscle. Single filament images were aligned and divided into segments about 2 × 430 Å long, each of which was treated as an independent ‘particle’. The resulting 40 Å resolution 3D reconstruction showed both axial and azimuthal (no radial) myosin head perturbations within the 430 Å repeat, with successive crown rotations of approximately 60°, 60° and 0°, rather than the regular 40° for an unperturbed helix. However, it is shown that the projecting density peaks appear to start at low radius from origins closer to those expected for an unperturbed helical filament, and that the azimuthal perturbation especially increases with radius. The head arrangements in rabbit cardiac myosin filaments are very similar to those in fish skeletal muscle myosin filaments, suggesting a possible general structural theme for myosin filaments in all vertebrate striated muscles (skeletal and cardiac). PMID:18472277

  1. Fractal analysis of the hierarchic structure of fossil coal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A.D.; Vasilenko, T.A.; Kirillov, A.K.

    2008-05-15

    The fractal analysis is described as method of studying images of surface of fossil coal, one of the natural sorbent, with the aim of determining its structural surface heterogeneity. The deformation effect as a reduction in the dimensions of heterogeneity boundaries is considered. It is shown that the theory of nonequilibrium dynamic systems permits to assess a formation level of heterogeneities involved into a sorbent composition by means of the Hurst factor.

  2. Structural design criteria for filament-wound composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Jensen, D. W.; Claus, S. J.; Pai, S. P.; Hipp, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced composite cylinders, manufactured by filament winding, provide a cost effective solution to many present structural applications; however, the compressive performance of filament-wound cylinders is lower than comparable shells fabricated from unidirectional tape. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of this reduction in thin filament-wound cylinders by relating the manufacturing procedures to the quality of the cylinder and to its compressive performance. The experiments on cylinder buckling were complemented by eigenvalue buckling analysis using a detailed geometric model in a finite element analysis. The applicability of classical buckling analyses was also investigated as a design tool.

  3. Fractal analysis illuminates the form of connectionist structural gradualness.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Whitney; Cho, Pyeong Whan; Szkudlarek, Emily

    2013-07-01

    We examine two connectionist networks-a fractal learning neural network (FLNN) and a Simple Recurrent Network (SRN)-that are trained to process center-embedded symbol sequences. Previous work provides evidence that connectionist networks trained on infinite-state languages tend to form fractal encodings. Most such work focuses on simple counting recursion cases (e.g., anbn), which are not comparable to the complex recursive patterns seen in natural language syntax. Here, we consider exponential state growth cases (including mirror recursion), describe a new training scheme that seems to facilitate learning, and note that the connectionist learning of these cases has a continuous metamorphosis property that looks very different from what is achievable with symbolic encodings. We identify a property-ragged progressive generalization-which helps make this difference clearer. We suggest two conclusions. First, the fractal analysis of these more complex learning cases reveals the possibility of comparing connectionist networks and symbolic models of grammatical structure in a principled way-this helps remove the black box character of connectionist networks and indicates how the theory they support is different from symbolic approaches. Second, the findings indicate the value of future, linked mathematical and empirical work on these models-something that is more possible now than it was 10 years ago.

  4. Observation of two different fractal structures in nanoparticle, protein and surfactant complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Mehan, Sumit Kumar, Sugam Aswal, V. K.

    2014-04-24

    Small angle neutron scattering has been carried out from a complex of nanoparticle, protein and surfactant. Although all the components are similarly (anionic) charged, we have observed strong interactions in their complex formation. It is characterized by the coexistence of two different mass fractal structures. The first fractal structure is originated from the protein and surfactant interaction and second from the depletion effect of first fractal structure leading the nanoparticle aggregation. The fractal structure of protein-surfactant complex represents to bead necklace structure of micelle-like clusters of surfactant formed along the unfolded protein chain. Its fractal dimension depends on the surfactant to protein ratio (r) and decreases with the increase in r. However, fractal dimension of nanoparticle aggregates in nanoparticle-protein complex is found to be independent of protein concentration and governed by the diffusion limited aggregation like morphology.

  5. Structural changes accompanying phosphorylation of tarantula muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to study the structural changes that occur in the myosin filaments of tarantula striated muscle when they are phosphorylated. Myosin filaments in muscle homogenates maintained in relaxing conditions (ATP, EGTA) are found to have nonphosphorylated regulatory light chains as shown by urea/glycerol gel electrophoresis and [32P]phosphate autoradiography. Negative staining reveals an ordered, helical arrangement of crossbridges in these filaments, in which the heads from axially neighboring myosin molecules appear to interact with each other. When the free Ca2+ concentration in a homogenate is raised to 10(-4) M, or when a Ca2+-insensitive myosin light chain kinase is added at low Ca2+ (10(-8) M), the regulatory light chains of myosin become rapidly phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is accompanied by potentiation of the actin activation of the myosin Mg- ATPase activity and by loss of order of the helical crossbridge arrangement characteristic of the relaxed filament. We suggest that in the relaxed state, when the regulatory light chains are not phosphorylated, the myosin heads are held down on the filament backbone by head-head interactions or by interactions of the heads with the filament backbone. Phosphorylation of the light chains may alter these interactions so that the crossbridges become more loosely associated with the filament backbone giving rise to the observed changes and facilitating crossbridge interaction with actin. PMID:2958483

  6. Fractal parameterization analysis of ferroelectric domain structure evolution induced by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslovskaya, A. G.; Barabash, T. K.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents some results of fractal analysis of ferroelectric domain structure images visualized with scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The fractal and multifractal characteristics were estimated to demonstrate self-similar organization of ferroelectric domain structure registered with static and dynamic contrast modes of SEM. Fractal methods as sensitive analytical tools were used to indicate degree of domain structure and domain boundary imperfections. The electron irradiation-induced erosion effect of ferroelectric domain boundaries in electron beam-stimulated polarization current mode of SEM is characterized by considerable raising of fractal dimension. For dynamic contrast mode of SEM there was revealed that complication of domain structure during its dynamics is specified by increase in fractal dimension of images and slight raising of boundary fractal dimension.

  7. Method for preparing metallated filament-wound structures

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, George R.

    1979-01-01

    Metallated graphite filament-wound structures are prepared by coating a continuous multi-filament carbon yarn with a metal carbide, impregnating the carbide coated yarn with a polymerizable carbon precursor, winding the resulting filament about a mandrel, partially curing the impregnation in air, subjecting the wound composite to heat and pressure to cure the carbon precursor, and thereafter heating the composite in a sizing die at a pressure loading of at least 1000 psi for graphitizing the carbonaceous material in the composite. The carbide in the composite coalesces into rod-like shapes which are disposed in an end-to-end relationship parallel with the filaments to provide resistance to erosion in abrasive laden atmospheres.

  8. Fractal structure of films deposited in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Budaev, V. P.; Khimchenko, L. N.

    2007-04-15

    The surface of amorphous films deposited in the T-10 tokamak was studied in a scanning tunnel microscope. The surface relief on a scale from 10 nm to 100 {mu}m showed a stochastic surface topography and revealed a hierarchy of grains. The observed variety of irregular structures of the films was studied within the framework of the concept of scale invariance using the methods of fractal geometry and statistical physics. The experimental probability density distribution functions of the surface height variations are close in shape to the Cauchy distribution. The stochastic surface topography of the films is characterized by a Hurst parameter of H = 0.68-0.85, which is evidence of a nontrivial self-similarity of the film structure. The fractal character and porous structure of deposited irregular films must be considered as an important issue related to the accumulation of tritium in the ITER project. The process of film growth on the surface of tokamak components exposed to plasma has been treated within the framework of the general concept of inhomogeneous surface growth. A strong turbulence of the edge plasma in tokamaks can give rise to fluctuations in the incident flux of particles, which leads to the growth of fractal films with grain dimensions ranging from nano-to micrometer scale. The shape of the surface of some films found in the T-10 tokamak has been interpreted using a model of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). The growth of films according to the discrete DLA model was simulated using statistics of fluctuations observed in a turbulent edge plasma of the T-10 tokamak. The modified DLA model reproduces well the main features of the surface of some films deposited in tokamaks.

  9. Chaotic dynamics and fractal structures in experiments with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daza, Alvar; Georgeot, Bertrand; Guéry-Odelin, David; Wagemakers, Alexandre; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2017-01-01

    We use tools from nonlinear dynamics for the detailed analysis of cold-atom experiments. A powerful example is provided by the recent concept of basin entropy, which allows us to quantify the final-state unpredictability that results from the complexity of the phase-space geometry. We show here that this enables one to reliably infer the presence of fractal structures in phase space from direct measurements. We illustrate the method with numerical simulations in an experimental configuration made of two crossing laser guides that can be used as a matter-wave splitter.

  10. [Power-law species richness accumulation as manifestation of the fractal community structure].

    PubMed

    Gelashvili, D B; Iudin, D I; Rozenberg, G S; Iakimov, N V

    2007-01-01

    Applications of the fractal to describing the species structure of communities are discussed. Fundamental notions of fractal geometry are explained in the first part. The problem of applying the concept of fractal to describe the spatial allocation of particular species and of community as a whole is reviewed in the second part. In the final part, the usage of the selfsimirity principle for analyzing community organization is substantiated, and evidence of the fractal structure of biocenoses is presented according to Whittaker's concept of alpha diversity. It is shown that community is characterized, as a fractal object, by scale invariance, by power function relationship between the number of structural elements of the community (individuals, populations, species) and the scale (sampling effort), and, finally, by fractional value of the power (fractal dimension). Power function is the formula the takes into account the share of rare species, or species represented by a single individual. providing for no saturation of the function f(x). This formula also does not contradict the A.P. Levich's "rule of ecological non-additivity" and, lastly, allows the application of fractal formalism to characterize the species structure of a community. It is concluded that the mathematical image of species richness is a monofractal, i.e., a set characterised by only one parameter, fractal dimension. Thus, the species structure of a community (as well as the pattern of its spatial allocation) displays self-similarity and is a fractal.

  11. Structural Dynamics of Filament-Wound Booster Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F. M.

    1987-01-01

    Report summarizes program of measurements and calculations of vibrations in filament-wound composite models of Space Shuttle solid-rocket boosters. Vibrational behavior predicted by finite-element computer model of structural dynamics correlates well with data from tests on full- and quarter-scale models. Computer model developed with NASTRAN general-purpose structural-analysis computer code.

  12. TRANSIENT CHAOS AND FRACTAL STRUCTURES IN PLANETARY FEEDING ZONES

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, T.; Regály, Zs.

    2015-01-01

    The circular restricted three-body problem is investigated in the context of accretion and scattering processes. In our model, a large number of identical non-interacting mass-less planetesimals are considered in the planar case orbiting a star-planet system. This description allows us to investigate the gravitational scattering and possible capture of the particles by the forming planetary embryo in a dynamical systems approach. Although the problem serves a large variety of complex motions, the results can be easily interpreted because of the low dimensionality of the phase space. We show that initial conditions define isolated regions of the disk, where planetesimals accrete or escape, which have, in fact, a fractal structure. The fractal geometry of these ''basins'' implies that the dynamics is very complex. Based on the calculated escape rates and escape times, it is also demonstrated that the planetary accretion rate is exponential for short times and follows a power law for longer integration. A new numerical calculation of the maximum mass that a planet can reach (described by the expression of the isolation mass) is also derived.

  13. Fractal analysis of bone structure with applications to osteoporosis and microgravity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, R.S.; Swarnarkar, V.; Krishnamurthy, R.; Hausman, E.; LeBlanc, A.; Lin, C.; Shackelford, L.

    1995-12-31

    The authors characterize the trabecular structure with the aid of fractal dimension. The authors use Alternating Sequential filters to generate a nonlinear pyramid for fractal dimension computations. The authors do not make any assumptions of the statistical distributions of the underlying fractal bone structure. The only assumption of the scheme is the rudimentary definition of self similarity. This allows them the freedom of not being constrained by statistical estimation schemes. With mathematical simulations, the authors have shown that the ASF methods outperform other existing methods for fractal dimension estimation. They have shown that the fractal dimension remains the same when computed with both the X-Ray images and the MRI images of the patella. They have shown that the fractal dimension of osteoporotic subjects is lower than that of the normal subjects. In animal models, the authors have shown that the fractal dimension of osteoporotic rats was lower than that of the normal rats. In a 17 week bedrest study, they have shown that the subject`s prebedrest fractal dimension is higher than that of the postbedrest fractal dimension.

  14. Particle accelerations and current structures of Weibel and Filamentation instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, C. M.; Huynh, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Particle accelerations of the Wibel instability (WI) and the Filamentation instability(FI) are studied by using PIC simuations, comparing them side-by-side. Although two instabilities are almost identical in the linear growth phase, significant differences are found in the nonlinear phase in their particle accelerations and current structures. The FI shows enhanced electron acceleration, whereas particle acceleration is almost absent in the WI. The different particle accelerations between the FI and the WI seem to be associated with their different current structures; a hollow electron current structure for the FI and a center filled current structure for that of the WI. Different electron distributions seem to bring in different current filament structures, eventually leading to different magnetic characteristics.

  15. On filament structure and propagation within a commercial plasma globe

    SciTech Connect

    Burin, M. J.; Simmons, G. G.; Ceja, H. G.; Zweben, S. J.; Nagy, A.; Brunkhorst, C.

    2015-05-15

    The filamentary discharge seen within commercial plasma globes is commonly enjoyed yet not well understood. Here, we investigate the discharge properties of a plasma globe using a variable high voltage amplifier. We find that increasing voltage magnitude increases the number of filaments while leaving their individual structure basically unchanged, a result typical of dielectric barrier discharges. The frequency of the voltage also affects filament population but more significantly changes filament structure, with more diffuse filaments seen at lower frequencies. Voltage polarity is observed to be important, especially at lower frequencies, where for negative-gradient voltages the discharge is more diffuse, not filamentary. At late stages of the discharge circular structures appear and expand on the glass boundaries. We find no trend of discharge speed with respect to voltage variables, though this may be due to manufacturer sample-to-sample variation. Each voltage cycle the discharge expands outward at ∼10–15 km/s, a speed significantly higher than the estimated electron drift yet considerably lower than that observed for most streamers. We discuss the physics of these observations and their relation to similar discharges that can be found within nature and industry.

  16. Multi-fractal structure in Arctic sea ice satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, W.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Since 21th century, Arctic sea ice has shown significant decrease especially during summer season. These decline has been considered by climate scientists as a critical sign of the effect of global warming. Especially, IPCC global climate models confirmed the recent decline of Arctic sea ice and predict the more decline in the near future. Even with rather significant amount of inter-model variability in climate models, satellite data during around 30 years support the results of climate models. However, the decline of Arctic sea ice is confirmed based on monthly averaged data and linear regression after erasing seasonal cycle. Even with strong conjecture of the real decline of Arctic sea ice, we cannot exclude one part of natural oscillations affecting Arctic sea ice physics due to strong non-stationarity. It is also possible not to make any conclusive statements using the monthly averaged data due to a lack of data or multi-fractal structure of data excluded in the data. Here, we will use MF-DFA (Multi-Fractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis) to determine the multi-scale structure of Arctic sea ice area and albedo using AVHRR Polar Pathfinder Twice-Daily 5km EASE-grid composites, which is expected to decide whether the decline shown in the linear regression of the monthly averaged data can be considered as the real decline caused by global warming or not. Also, the multi-scale structure information drawn from this analysis is expected to give us the guideline for selecting significant physics for low-order Arctic sea ice

  17. An improvement of the fractal theory and its application in pore structure evaluation and permeability estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xinmin; Fan, Yiren; Deng, Shaogui; Han, Yujiao; Liu, Jiaxiong

    2016-09-01

    We present an improved fractal model for pore structure evaluation and permeability estimation based on the high pressure mercury porosimetry data. An accumulative fractal equation is introduced to characterize the piecewise nature of the capillary pressure and the mercury saturation. The iterative truncated singular value decomposition algorithm is developed to solve the accumulative fractal equation and obtain the fractal dimension distributions. Furthermore, the fractal dimension distributions and relevant parameters are used to characterize the pore structure and permeability. The results demonstrate that the proposed model provides better characterization of the mercury injection capillary pressure than conventional monofractal theory. In addition, there is a direct relationship between the pore structure types and the fractal dimension spectrums. What is more, the permeability is strongly correlated with the geometric and the arithmetic mean values of fractal dimensions, and the permeability estimated using these new fractal dimension parameters achieve excellent result. The improved model and solution give a fresh perspective of the conventional monofractal theory, which may be applied in many geological and geophysical fields.

  18. Fractal astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, M.

    1989-02-01

    The author discusses some of the more recent research on fractal astronomy and results presented in several astronomical studies. First, the large-scale structure of the universe is considered, while in another section one drops in scale to examine some of the smallest bodies in our solar system; the comets and meteoroids. The final section presents some thoughts on what influence the fractal ideology might have on astronomy, focusing particularly on the question recently raised by Kadanoff, "Fractals: where's the physics?"

  19. Application of fractal dimensions to study the structure of flocs formed in lime softening process.

    PubMed

    Vahedi, Arman; Gorczyca, Beata

    2011-01-01

    The use of fractal dimensions to study the internal structure and settling of flocs formed in lime softening process was investigated. Fractal dimensions of flocs were measured directly on floc images and indirectly from their settling velocity. An optical microscope with a motorized stage was used to measure the fractal dimensions of lime softening flocs directly on their images in 2 and 3D space. The directly determined fractal dimensions of the lime softening flocs were 1.11-1.25 for floc boundary, 1.82-1.99 for cross-sectional area and 2.6-2.99 for floc volume. The fractal dimension determined indirectly from the flocs settling rates was 1.87 that was different from the 3D fractal dimension determined directly on floc images. This discrepancy is due to the following incorrect assumptions used for fractal dimensions determined from floc settling rates: linear relationship between square settling velocity and floc size (Stokes' Law), Euclidean relationship between floc size and volume, constant fractal dimensions and one primary particle size describing entire population of flocs. Floc settling model incorporating variable floc fractal dimensions as well as variable primary particle size was found to describe the settling velocity of large (>50 μm) lime softening flocs better than Stokes' Law. Settling velocities of smaller flocs (<50 μm) could still be quite well predicted by Stokes' Law. The variation of fractal dimensions with lime floc size in this study indicated that two mechanisms are involved in the formation of these flocs: cluster-cluster aggregation for small flocs (<50 μm) and diffusion-limited aggregation for large flocs (>50 μm). Therefore, the relationship between the floc fractal dimension and floc size appears to be determined by floc formation mechanisms.

  20. The intermediate-sized filaments in rat kangaroo PtK2 cells. II. Structure and composition of isolated filaments.

    PubMed

    Franke, W W; Schmid, E; Osborn, M; Weber, K

    1978-08-01

    When cultured cells of the rat kangaroo cell line PtK2 grown on plastic or glass surfaces are lysed and extracted with combinations of low and high salt buffers and the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 cytoskeletal preparations are obtained that show an enrichment of 6 to 11 nm thick filaments. The arrays of these filaments have been examined by various light and electron microscopic techniques, including ultrathin sectioning, whole mount transmission electron microscopy, negative staining, and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, 6 to 11 nm filaments isolated from these cells with similar extraction procedures and with centrifugation techniques have been examined by electron microscopy. The arrays of these isolated intermediate-sized filaments, their ultrastructure and their specific decoration by certain antibodies present in normal rabbit sera as well as by guinea pig antibodies against purified bovine prekeratin is demonstrated. When preparations enriched in these intermediate-sized filaments are examined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis a corresponding enrichment of three polypeptide bands with apparent molecular weights of about 45 000, 52 000 and 58 000 (the latter component sometimes appears split into two bands) is observed, besides some residual actin and a few high molecular weight bands. The morphology of the isolated filaments, their immunological reaction with antibodies decorating prekeratin-containing structures, and the sizes of their constitutive polypeptides suggest that these filaments are closely related to prekeratin-containing filaments observed in a variety of epithelial cells.

  1. Flexible filamentous virus structure from fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, Gerald; Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah; McCullough, Ian; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Ghabrial, Said

    2008-10-24

    Fiber diffraction data have been obtained from Narcissus mosaic virus, a potexvirus from the family Flexiviridae, and soybean mosaic virus (SMV), a potyvirus from the family Potyviridae. Analysis of the data in conjunction with cryo-electron microscopy data allowed us to determine the symmetry of the viruses and to make reconstructions of SMV at 19 {angstrom} resolution and of another potexvirus, papaya mosaic virus, at 18 {angstrom} resolution. These data include the first well-ordered data ever obtained for the potyviruses and the best-ordered data from the potexviruses, and offer the promise of eventual high resolution structure determinations.

  2. Structure and mechanical properties of liquid crystalline filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, Alexey; Nemes, Alexandru; Stannarius, Ralf; Schulz, Mario; Nadasi, Hajnalka; Weissflog, Wolfgang

    2005-03-01

    The formation of stable freely suspended filaments is an interesting peculiarity of some liquid crystal phases. So far, little is known about their structure and stability. Similarly to free-standing smectic films, an internal molecular structure of the mesophase stabilizes these macroscopically well-ordered objects with length to diameter ratios of 10{sup 3} and above. In this paper, we report observations of smectic liquid crystal fibers formed by bent-shaped molecules in different mesophases. Our study, employing several experimental techniques, focuses on mechanical and structural aspects of fiber formation such as internal structure, stability, and mechanical and optical properties.

  3. An Early Cretaceous heterodontosaurid dinosaur with filamentous integumentary structures.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Ting; You, Hai-Lu; Xu, Xing; Dong, Zhi-Ming

    2009-03-19

    Ornithischia is one of the two major groups of dinosaurs, with heterodontosauridae as one of its major clades. Heterodontosauridae is characterized by small, gracile bodies and a problematic phylogenetic position. Recent phylogenetic work indicates that it represents the most basal group of all well-known ornithischians. Previous heterodontosaurid records are mainly from the Early Jurassic period (205-190 million years ago) of Africa. Here we report a new heterodontosaurid, Tianyulong confuciusi gen. et sp. nov., from the Early Cretaceous period (144-99 million years ago) of western Liaoning Province, China. Tianyulong extends the geographical distribution of heterodontosaurids to Asia and confirms the clade's previously questionable temporal range extension into the Early Cretaceous period. More surprisingly, Tianyulong bears long, singular and unbranched filamentous integumentary (outer skin) structures. This represents the first confirmed report, to our knowledge, of filamentous integumentary structures in an ornithischian dinosaur.

  4. Fractal Dimension Analysis of Subcortical Gray Matter Structures in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sehatpour, Pejman; Long, Jun; Gui, Weihua; Qiao, Jianping; Javitt, Daniel C.; Wang, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    A failure of adaptive inference—misinterpreting available sensory information for appropriate perception and action—is at the heart of clinical manifestations of schizophrenia, implicating key subcortical structures in the brain including the hippocampus. We used high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) fractal geometry analysis to study subtle and potentially biologically relevant structural alterations (in the geometry of protrusions, gyri and indentations, sulci) in subcortical gray matter (GM) in patients with schizophrenia relative to healthy individuals. In particular, we focus on utilizing Fractal Dimension (FD), a compact shape descriptor that can be computed using inputs with irregular (i.e., not necessarily smooth) surfaces in order to quantify complexity (of geometrical properties and configurations of structures across spatial scales) of subcortical GM in this disorder. Probabilistic (entropy-based) information FD was computed based on the box-counting approach for each of the seven subcortical structures, bilaterally, as well as the brainstem from high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images in chronic patients with schizophrenia (n = 19) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 19) (age ranges: patients, 22.7–54.3 and healthy controls, 24.9–51.6 years old). We found a significant reduction of FD in the left hippocampus (median: 2.1460, range: 2.07–2.18 vs. median: 2.1730, range: 2.15–2.23, p<0.001; Cohen’s effect size, U3 = 0.8158 (95% Confidence Intervals, CIs: 0.6316, 1.0)), the right hippocampus (median: 2.1430, range: 2.05–2.19 vs. median: 2.1760, range: 2.12–2.21, p = 0.004; U3 = 0.8421 (CIs: 0.5263, 1)), as well as left thalamus (median: 2.4230, range: 2.40–2.44, p = 0.005; U3 = 0.7895 (CIs: 0.5789, 0.9473)) in schizophrenia patients, relative to healthy individuals. Our findings provide in-vivo quantitative evidence for reduced surface complexity of hippocampus, with reduced FD indicating a less complex, less regular GM

  5. Fractal analysis of radiographs: assessment of trabecular bone structure and prediction of elastic modulus and strength.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, S; Lin, J; Link, T; Millard, J; Augat, P; Ouyang, X; Newitt, D; Gould, R; Kothari, M; Genant, H

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether fractal dimension of radiographs provide measures of trabecular bone structure which correlate with bone mineral density (BMD) and bone biomechanics, and whether these relationships depend on the technique used to calculate the fractal dimension. Eighty seven cubic specimen of human trabecular bone were obtained from the vertebrae and femur. The cubes were radiographed along all three orientations--superior-inferior (SI), medial-lateral (ML), and anterior-posterior (AP), digitized, corrected for background variations, and fractal based techniques were applied to quantify trabecular structure. Three different techniques namely, semivariance, surface area, and power spectral methods were used. The specimens were tested in compression along three orientations and the Young's modulus (YM) was determined. Compressive strength was measured along the SI direction. Quantitative computed tomography was used to measure trabecular BMD. High-resolution magnetic-resonance images were used to obtain three-dimensional measures of trabecular architecture such as the apparent bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, spacing, and number. The measures of trabecular structure computed in the different directions showed significant differences (p<0.05). The correlation between BMD, YM, strength, and the fractal dimension were direction and technique dependent. The trends of variation of the fractal dimension with BMD and biomechanical properties also depended on the technique and the range of resolutions over which the data was analyzed. The fractal dimension showed varying trends with bone mineral density changes, and these trends also depended on the range of frequencies over which the fractal dimension was measured. For example, using the power spectral method the fractal dimension increased with BMD when computed over a lower range of spatial frequencies and decreased for higher ranges. However, for the surface area technique

  6. Novel actin-like filament structure from Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Popp, David; Narita, Akihiro; Lee, Lin Jie; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Xue, Bo; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Robinson, Robert C

    2012-06-15

    Eukaryotic F-actin is constructed from two protofilaments that gently wind around each other to form a helical polymer. Several bacterial actin-like proteins (Alps) are also known to form F-actin-like helical arrangements from two protofilaments, yet with varied helical geometries. Here, we report a unique filament architecture of Alp12 from Clostridium tetani that is constructed from four protofilaments. Through fitting of an Alp12 monomer homology model into the electron microscopy data, the filament was determined to be constructed from two antiparallel strands, each composed of two parallel protofilaments. These four protofilaments form an open helical cylinder separated by a wide cleft. The molecular interactions within single protofilaments are similar to F-actin, yet interactions between protofilaments differ from those in F-actin. The filament structure and assembly and disassembly kinetics suggest Alp12 to be a dynamically unstable force-generating motor involved in segregating the pE88 plasmid, which encodes the lethal tetanus toxin, and thus a potential target for drug design. Alp12 can be repeatedly cycled between states of polymerization and dissociation, making it a novel candidate for incorporation into fuel-propelled nanobiopolymer machines.

  7. Fractal structures and their computer simulation in rapidly quenched Ai-Mn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Hong, Chunyong; Dai, Hong; Yang, Pinsheng; Tan, Yuxi

    1999-02-01

    The microstructure of rapidly quenched A1-Mn alloys were studied by TEM and SEM. The icosahedral phase in AI-Mn alloys was observed to show various types of fractal morphologies, which may be classified into four kinds: 1) dendritic shape, 2) flower-like shape, 3) granular shape and 4) grain-oscillation shape. After being digitized by a computer, the fractal dimensions (D) of these morphologies were calculated. Based on the traditional diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model computer simulations were made with two-seeded and many-seeded clusters, which reflect the growing mechanism of some fractal structures in A1-Mn alloys. It is suggested that these fractal structures are formed by many icosahedral particles about 20 nm in size aggregating during the rapid quenching process.

  8. Evaporation-induced formation of fractal-like structures from nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2012-01-28

    After the nanofluids are fully dried, the self-assembled nanoparticles can form various structures on the substrate. The fractal-like patterns are among them. The two-dimensional Kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed to predict the drying patterns of the nanofluids in an open domain, where the dewetting front shrinks from the edge toward the center. The simulation reveals that the initially dispersed particles can be deposited into an isotropic branched structure which remains frozen after full evaporation of the base fluid. The well-developed fractal-like particle aggregates are different from the fractal cavities obtained in the previous closed domain simulation. The present prediction of the fractal particle aggregation is verified by the experiments with the water-based nanofluids. The images taken using a scanning electron microscope prove that the evaporation-induced branched microstructures are formed by the nanoparticles as the water is totally dried.

  9. Fractal structure of sequential behaviour patterns: an indicator of stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alados, C.L.; Escos, J.M; Emlen, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The detection of stress arising from parasitic infection bySarcoptes scabieisand from pregnancy is explored, using a fractal analysis of head lifting behaviour and feeding–non-feeding activity sequences in female Spanish ibex,Capra pyrenaica, under natural conditions. Because organisms under stress increase their metabolic rate and, in consequence, energy consumption, it follows that stress will, generally, lead to a reduction in complexity (fractal dimension) of exploratory behaviour. In the present study the fractal dimension of the three measures of complexity used declined with stress, both from pregnancy and from parasitic infection. This observation provides a new and effective way to assess the general state of animals’ health in the field, without the need for capture and handling.

  10. Robustness of the fractal regime for the multiple-scattering structure factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, Nisha; Botet, Robert; Puri, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    In the single-scattering theory of electromagnetic radiation, the fractal regime is a definite range in the photon momentum-transfer q, which is characterized by the scaling-law behavior of the structure factor: S(q) ∝ 1 /q df. This allows a straightforward estimation of the fractal dimension df of aggregates in Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) experiments. However, this behavior is not commonly studied in optical scattering experiments because of the lack of information on its domain of validity. In the present work, we propose a definition of the multiple-scattering structure factor, which naturally generalizes the single-scattering function S(q). We show that the mean-field theory of electromagnetic scattering provides an explicit condition to interpret the significance of multiple scattering. In this paper, we investigate and discuss electromagnetic scattering by three classes of fractal aggregates. The results obtained from the TMatrix method show that the fractal scaling range is divided into two domains: (1) a genuine fractal regime, which is robust; (2) a possible anomalous scaling regime, S(q) ∝ 1 /qδ, with exponent δ independent of df, and related to the way the scattering mechanism uses the local morphology of the scatterer. The recognition, and an analysis, of the latter domain is of importance because it may result in significant reduction of the fractal regime, and brings into question the proper mechanism in the build-up of multiple-scattering.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamics of fractal media

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2006-05-15

    The fractal distribution of charged particles is considered. An example of this distribution is the charged particles that are distributed over the fractal. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. These integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Typical turbulent media could be of a fractal structure and the corresponding equations should be changed to include the fractal features of the media. The magnetohydrodynamics equations for fractal media are derived from the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equations and integral hydrodynamics (balance) equations. Possible equilibrium states for these equations are considered.

  12. Filamentary structures in dense plasma focus: Current filaments or vortex filaments?

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Leopoldo Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José; Castillo, Fermin; Veloso, Felipe; Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-07-15

    Recent observations of an azimuthally distributed array of sub-millimeter size sources of fusion protons and correlation between extreme ultraviolet (XUV) images of filaments with neutron yield in PF-1000 plasma focus have re-kindled interest in their significance. These filaments have been described variously in literature as current filaments and vortex filaments, with very little experimental evidence in support of either nomenclature. This paper provides, for the first time, experimental observations of filaments on a table-top plasma focus device using three techniques: framing photography of visible self-luminosity from the plasma, schlieren photography, and interferometry. Quantitative evaluation of density profile of filaments from interferometry reveals that their radius closely agrees with the collision-less ion skin depth. This is a signature of relaxed state of a Hall fluid, which has significant mass flow with equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energy, supporting the “vortex filament” description. This interpretation is consistent with empirical evidence of an efficient energy concentration mechanism inferred from nuclear reaction yields.

  13. Addition of electrophilic lipids to actin alters filament structure

    SciTech Connect

    Gayarre, Javier; Sanchez, David; Sanchez-Gomez, Francisco J.; Terron, Maria C.; Llorca, Oscar; Perez-Sala, Dolores . E-mail: dperezsala@cib.csic.es

    2006-11-03

    Pathophysiological processes associated with oxidative stress lead to the generation of reactive lipid species. Among them, lipids bearing unsaturated aldehyde or ketone moieties can form covalent adducts with cysteine residues and modulate protein function. Through proteomic techniques we have identified actin as a target for the addition of biotinylated analogs of the cyclopentenone prostaglandins 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-PGJ{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}) and PGA{sub 1} in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. This modification could take place in vitro and mapped to the protein C-terminal end. Other electrophilic lipids, like the isoprostane 8-iso-PGA{sub 1} and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, also bound to actin. The C-terminal region of actin is important for monomer-monomer interactions and polymerization. Electron microscopy showed that actin treated with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formed filaments which were less abundant and displayed shorter length and altered structure. Streptavidin-gold staining allowed mapping of biotinylated 15d-PGJ{sub 2} at sites of filament disruption. These results shed light on the structural implications of actin modification by lipid electrophiles.

  14. Negative Stains Containing Trehalose: Application to Tubular and Filamentous Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. Robin; Gerber, Max; Gebauer, Wolfgang; Wernicke, Wolfgang; Markl, Jürgen

    1996-02-01

    Several examples are presented that show the successful application of uranyl acetate and ammonium molybdate negative staining in the presence of trehalose for TEM studies of filamentous and tubular structures. The principal benefit to be gained from the inclusion of trehalose stems from the considerably reduced flattening of the large tubular structures and the greater orientational freedom of single molecules due to an increased depth of the negative stain in the presence of trehalose. Trehalose is likely to provide considerable protection to protein molecules and their assemblies during the drying of negatively stained specimens. Some reduction in the excessive density imparted by uranyl acetate around large assemblies is also achieved. Nevertheless, in the presence of 1% (w/v) trehalose, it is desirable to increase the concentration of negative stain to 5% (w/v) for ammonium molybdate and to 4% for uranyl acetate to produce satisfactory image contrast. In general, the ammonium molybdate-trehalose negative stain is more satisfactory than the uranyl acetate-trehalose combination, because of the greater electron beam sensitivity of the uranyl negative stain. Reassembled taxol-stabilized pig brain microtubules, together with collagen fibrils, sperm tails, helical filaments, and reassociated hemocyanin (KLH2), all from the giant keyhole limpet Megathura crenulata, have been studied by negative staining in the presence of trehalose. In all cases satisfactory TEM imaging conditions were readily obtained on the specimens, as long as regions of excessively deep stain were avoided.

  15. Addition of electrophilic lipids to actin alters filament structure.

    PubMed

    Gayarre, Javier; Sánchez, David; Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Terrón, María C; Llorca, Oscar; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2006-11-03

    Pathophysiological processes associated with oxidative stress lead to the generation of reactive lipid species. Among them, lipids bearing unsaturated aldehyde or ketone moieties can form covalent adducts with cysteine residues and modulate protein function. Through proteomic techniques we have identified actin as a target for the addition of biotinylated analogs of the cyclopentenone prostaglandins 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and PGA(1) in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. This modification could take place in vitro and mapped to the protein C-terminal end. Other electrophilic lipids, like the isoprostane 8-iso-PGA(1) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, also bound to actin. The C-terminal region of actin is important for monomer-monomer interactions and polymerization. Electron microscopy showed that actin treated with 15d-PGJ(2) or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formed filaments which were less abundant and displayed shorter length and altered structure. Streptavidin-gold staining allowed mapping of biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2) at sites of filament disruption. These results shed light on the structural implications of actin modification by lipid electrophiles.

  16. Quantification of structural changes in acute inflammation by fractal dimension, angular second moment and correlation.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Marija; Pantic, Igor; De Luka, Silvio R; Puskas, Nela; Zaletel, Ivan; Milutinovic-Smiljanic, Sanja; Pantic, Senka; Trbovich, Alexander M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine alteration and possible application of fractal dimension, angular second moment, and correlation for quantification of structural changes in acutely inflamed tissue. Acute inflammation was induced by injection of turpentine oil into the right and left hind limb muscles of mice, whereas control animals received intramuscular saline injection. After 12 h, animals were anesthetised and treated muscles collected. The tissue was stained by hematoxylin and eosin, digital micrographs produced, enabling determination of fractal dimension of the cells, angular second moment and correlation of studied tissue. Histopathological analysis showed presence of inflammatory infiltrate and tissue damage in inflammatory group, whereas tissue structure in control group was preserved, devoid of inflammatory infiltrate. Fractal dimension of the cells, angular second moment and correlation of treated tissue in inflammatory group decreased in comparison to the control group. In this study, we were first to observe and report that fractal dimension of the cells, angular second moment, and correlation were reduced in acutely inflamed tissue, indicating loss of overall complexity of the cells in the tissue, the tissue uniformity and structure regularity. Fractal dimension, angular second moment and correlation could be useful methods for quantification of structural changes in acute inflammation.

  17. Paramyosin structures in the thick filaments of the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Heumann, H G

    1980-10-01

    Freeze-substituted cells of the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis contain paramyosin filaments which exhibit a characteristic fine structure. Longitudinally sectioned filaments show a variety of band patterns, those occurring most frequently being cross, oblique or double oblique striations. The periodic spacings within one pattern are precise as can be demonstrated by Markham analysis and optical diffractometry. The patterns arise from structures in the interior of the filament since they persist in serially sectioned filaments and a layered structure is visible in cross-sectioned filaments. The different patterns are found to be convertible by rotating the grid around the filament axis. The observations led to the conclusion that the paramyosin core has some kind of helical arrangement. A model is proposed which consists of concentric layers of parallel paramyosin molecules which are displaced along the molecular axis in such a way that the characteristic Bear-Selby net structure results.

  18. Fractal flame structure due to the hydrodynamic Darrieus-Landau instability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rixin; Bai, Xue-Song; Bychkov, Vitaly

    2015-12-01

    By using large scale numerical simulations, we obtain fractal structure, which develops at originally planar flame fronts due to the hydrodynamic Darrieus-Landau (DL) instability bending the fronts. We clarify some important issues regarding the DL fractal flames, which have been debated for a long time. We demonstrate an increase of the flame propagation speed with the hypothetic channel width, which controls the length scale of the instability development. We show that this increase may be fitted by a power law indicating the mean fractal properties of the flame front structure. The power exponent in this law is found to be not a universal constant, rather it depends on the flame properties-on the density drop at the front. Using box counting on the simulated flame front shapes we show the fractal flame dimension at the intermediate scale is smaller than the one given by the power law, but it has a similar dependency on the density drop. We also obtain a formation of pockets at the DL fractal flame fronts, which previously has been associated only with turbulent burning.

  19. Critical behavior of the ferromagnetic q -state Potts model in fractal dimensions: Monte Carlo simulations on Sierpinski and Menger fractal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monceau, Pascal

    2006-09-01

    The extension of the phase diagram of the q -state Potts model to noninteger dimension is investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations on Sierpinski and Menger fractal structures. Both multicanonical and canonical simulations have been carried out with the help of the Wang-Landau and the Wolff cluster algorithms. Lower bounds are provided for the critical values qc of q where a first-order transition is expected in the cases of two structures whose fractal dimension is smaller than 2: The transitions associated with the seven-state and ten-state Potts models on Sierpinski carpets with fractal dimensions df≃1.8928 and df≃1.7925 , respectively, are shown to be second-order ones, the renormalization eigenvalue exponents yh are calculated, and bounds are provided for the renormalization eigenvalue exponents yt and the critical temperatures. Moreover, the results suggest that second-order transitions are expected to occur for very large values of q when the fractal dimension is lowered below 2—that is, in the case of hierarchically weakly connected systems with an infinite ramification order. At last, the transition associated with the four-state Potts model on a fractal structure with a dimension df≃2.631 is shown to be a weakly first-order one.

  20. Dynamics of fractal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbach, R.

    1986-02-01

    Random structures often exhibit fractal geometry, defined in terms of the mass scaling exponent, D, the fractal dimension. The vibrational dynamics of fractal networks are expressed in terms of the exponent d double bar, the fracton dimensionality. The eigenstates on a fractal network are spatially localized for d double bar less than or equal to 2. The implications of fractal geometry are discussed for thermal transport on fractal networks. The electron-fracton interaction is developed, with a brief outline given for the time dependence of the electronic relaxation on fractal networks. It is suggested that amorphous or glassy materials may exhibit fractal properties at short length scales or, equivalently, at high energies. The calculations of physical properties can be used to test the fractal character of the vibrational excitations in these materials.

  1. Structure and fractal dimension of protein-detergent complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Teixeira, José

    1986-11-01

    Small-angle neutron-scattering experiments were made on bovine serum albumin (BSA)-lithium dodecyl sulfate (LDS) complexes in buffer solutions. As increasing amounts of LDS are added, the scattering data indicate that BSA molecules are successively transformed into random coil conformations with LDS forming globular micelles randomly decorating the polypeptide backbones. A cross-section formula is developed which successfully fits small-angle neutron-scattering spectra over the entire Q range. The fractal dimension, the micellar size, and the extent of the denatured protein are simultaneously extracted.

  2. Development of epoxy matrices for filament-wound graphite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.J.; Walkup, C.M.; Kong, F.M.; Mones, E.T.

    1984-11-27

    This paper reviews our program to develop epoxy matrix systems for filament-wound graphite structures. The criteria for this matrix development program requires that the epoxide and amine components are processible and non-toxic; and the corresponding matrix itself is tough, possesses a Tg > 120/sup 0/C and does not lose its mechanical-thermal properties upon exposure to service environment conditions. We report our data on processible, hindered amine cured-epoxide matrices such as menthane or 2,5 dimethyl 2,5 hexane diamine cured bis-phenol-A-diglycidyl ether (DGEBA) epoxide systems in the presence of viscosity-lowering diluents. To produce tough, processible matrices that do not deteriorate upon exposure to service environment conditions requires a knowledge of the network structure formed and how such structure may deteriorate under molecular flow associated with the shear-band toughening mechanisms. For amine-cured DGEBA matrices we report deterioration in the mechanical response and Tg after plastic flow has occurred in such glasses. Permanent chemical changes that occur during this flow induced degradation process were monitored by stress-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The ability to eliminate the aging of tough, cross-linked composite matrices upon molecular flow is discussed in terms of networks with segments of equal extensibility. 15 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Significant performance enhancement in continuous wave terahertz photomixers based on fractal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, H.; Heidarzadeh, H.; Rostami, A.; Rostami, G.; Dolatyari, M.

    2017-01-01

    A photoconductive fractal antenna significantly improves the performance of photomixing-based continuous wave (CW) terahertz (THz) systems. An analysis has been carried out for the generation of CW-THz radiation by photomixer photoconductive antenna technique. To increase the active area for generation and hence the THz radiation power we used interdigitated electrodes that are coupled with a fractal tree antenna. In this paper, both semiconductor and electromagnetic problems are considered. Here, photomixer devices with Thue-Morse fractal tree antennas in two configurations (narrow and wide) are discussed. This new approach gives better performance, especially in the increasing of THz output power of photomixer devices, when compared with the conventional structures. In addition, applying the interdigitated electrodes improved THz photocurrent, considerably. It produces THz radiation power several times higher than the photomixers with simple gap.

  4. Fractal structures for the Jacobi Hamiltonian of restricted three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollin, G.; Lages, J.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    We study the dynamical chaos and integrable motion in the planar circular restricted three-body problem and determine the fractal dimension of the spiral strange repeller set of non-escaping orbits at different values of mass ratio of binary bodies and of Jacobi integral of motion. We find that the spiral fractal structure of the Poincaré section leads to a spiral density distribution of particles remaining in the system. We also show that the initial exponential drop of survival probability with time is followed by the algebraic decay related to the universal algebraic statistics of Poincaré recurrences in generic symplectic maps.

  5. Investigation of changes in fractal dimension from layered retinal structures of healthy and diabetic eyes with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Zakharov, Valery P.; Myakinin, Oleg O.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Artemyev, Dmitry N.; Kornilin, Dmitry V.

    2015-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is usually employed for the measurement of retinal thickness characterizing the structural changes of tissue. However, fractal dimension (FD) could also character the structural changes of tissue. Therefore, fractal dimension changes may provide further information regarding cellular layers and early damage in ocular diseases. We investigated the possibility of OCT in detecting changes in fractal dimension from layered retinal structures. OCT images were obtained from diabetic patients without retinopathy (DM, n = 38 eyes) or mild diabetic retinopathy (MDR, n = 43 eyes) and normal healthy subjects (Controls, n = 74 eyes). Fractal dimension was calculated using the differentiate box counting methodology. We evaluated the usefulness of quantifying fractal dimension of layered structures in the detection of retinal damage. Generalized estimating equations considering within-subject intereye relations were used to test for differences between the groups. A modified p value of <0.001 was considered statistically significant. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to describe the ability of fractal dimension to discriminate between the eyes of DM, MDR and healthy eyes. Significant decreases of fractal dimension were observed in all layers in the MDR eyes compared with controls except in the inner nuclear layer (INL). Significant decreases of fractal dimension were also observed in all layers in the MDR eyes compared with DM eyes. The highest area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) values estimated for fractal dimension were observed for the outer plexiform layer (OPL) and outer segment photoreceptors (OS) when comparing MDR eyes with controls. The highest AUROC value estimated for fractal dimension were also observed for the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and OS when comparing MDR eyes with DM eyes. Our results suggest that fractal dimension of the intraretinal layers may provide useful

  6. Structural complexity of filaments formed from the actin and tubulin folds

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shimin; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Narita, Akihiro; Popp, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT From yeast to man, an evolutionary distance of 1.3 billion years, the F-actin filament structure has been conserved largely in line with the 94% sequence identity. The situation is entirely different in bacteria. In comparison to eukaryotic actins, the bacterial actin-like proteins (ALPs) show medium to low levels of sequence identity. This is extreme in the case of the ParM family of proteins, which often display less than 20% identity. ParMs are plasmid segregation proteins that form the polymerizing motors that propel pairs of plasmids to the extremities of a cell prior to cell division, ensuring faithful inheritance of the plasmid. Recently, exotic ParM filament structures have been elucidated that show ParM filament geometries are not limited to the standard polar pair of strands typified by actin. Four-stranded non-polar ParM filaments existing as open or closed nanotubules are found in Clostridium tetani and Bacillus thuringiensis, respectively. These diverse architectures indicate that the actin fold is capable of forming a large variety of filament morphologies, and that the conception of the “actin” filament has been heavily influenced by its conservation in eukaryotes. Here, we review the history of the structure determination of the eukaryotic actin filament to give a sense of context for the discovery of the new ParM filament structures. We describe the novel ParM geometries and predict that even more complex actin-like filaments may exist in bacteria. Finally, we compare the architectures of filaments arising from the actin and tubulin folds and conclude that the basic units possess similar properties that can each form a range of structures. Thus, the use of the actin fold in microfilaments and the tubulin fold for microtubules likely arose from a wider range of filament possibilities, but became entrenched as those architectures in early eukaryotes. PMID:28042378

  7. Flow around new wind fence with multi-scale fractal structure in an atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Sarah; Lee, Sang-Joon; Zhang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Understanding and controlling atmospheric boundary-layer flows with engineered structures, such as porous wind fences or windbreaks, has been of great interest to the fluid mechanics and wind engineering community. Previous studies found that the regular mono-scale grid fence of 50% porosity and a bottom gap of 10% of the fence height are considered to be optimal over a flat surface. Significant differences in turbulent flow structure have recently been noted behind multi-scale fractal wind fences, even with the same porosity. In this study, wind-tunnel tests on the turbulent flow and the turbulence kinetic energy transport of 1D and 2D multi-scale fractal fences under atmospheric boundary-layer were conducted. Velocity fields around the fractal fences were systematically measured using Particle Image Velocimetry to uncover effects of key parameters on turbulent flows around the fences at a Reynolds number of approximately 3.6x104 based on the free-stream speed and fence height. The turbulent flow structures induced by specific 1D/2D multi-scale fractal wind fences were compared to those of a conventional grid fence. The present results would contribute to the design of new-generation wind fences to reduce snow/sand deposition on critical infrastructure such as roads and bridges.

  8. Ultrasonic analysis of Kevlar-epoxy filament wound structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosey, W. D.

    1985-07-01

    Composite structures are often desirable for their strength and weight characteristics. Since composites are not as well characterized mechanically as metallic or ceramic structures, much work has been performed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to obtain that characterization and to develop methods of determining the mechanical properties of a composite nondestructively. Most of the work to date has been performed on nonenclosed structures. One notable exception has been the holographic evaluation of spherical Kevlar-epoxy composite pressure vessels. Several promising nondestructive evaluation techniques have been used to locate flaws and predict the integrity of the composite. Several of these include thermography, Moire interferometry, ultrasonic stress wave factor, ultrasonic C-scan image enhancement, radiography, and nuclear magnetic resonance. As a first step in this transfer and development of NDE techniques, known defects were placed within spherical Kevlar-epoxy, filament-wound test specimens to determine the extent to which they could be detected. These defects included Teflon shim-simulated delaminations, macrosphere-simulated voids, dry-band sets, variable tension, Kevlar 29 fiber instead of the higher strength Kevlar 40 fiber, and an alternate high-void-content winding pattern. Ultrasonic waveform analysis was performed in both the time and frequency domains to determine the detectability and locatability of structural flaws within the composite. Preparation has been made at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and at the University of Delaware, to examine the specimens using various NDE techniques. This work is a compilation of interim project reports in partial fulfillment of the contracts between Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, the University of Delaware, and Y-12 Plant.

  9. Ultrasonic analysis of Kevlar-epoxy filament wound structures

    SciTech Connect

    Brosey, W.D.

    1985-07-16

    Composite structures are often desirable for their strength and weight characteristics. Since composites are not as well characterized mechanically as metallic or ceramic structures, much work has been performed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to obtain that characterization and to develop methods of determining the mechanical properties of a composite nondestructively. Most of the work to date has been performed on nonenclosed structures. One notable exception has been the holographic evaluation of spherical Kevlar-epoxy composite pressure vessels. Several promising nondestructive evaluation techniques have been used to locate flaws and predict the integrity of the composite. Several of these include thermography, Moire interferometry, ultrasonic stress wave factor, ultrasonic C-scan image enhancement, radiography, and nuclear magnetic resonance. As a first step in this transfer and development of NDE techniques, known defects were placed within spherical Kevlar-epoxy, filament-wound test specimens to determine the extent to which they could be detected. These defects included Teflon shim-simulated delaminations, macrosphere-simulated voids, dry-band sets, variable tension, Kevlar 29 fiber instead of the higher strength Kevlar 40 fiber, and an alternate high-void-content winding pattern. Ultrasonic waveform analysis was performed in both the time and frequency domains to determine the detectability and locatability of structural flaws within the composite. Preparation has been made at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and at the University of Delaware, to examine the specimens using various NDE techniques. This work is a compilation of interim project reports in partial fulfillment of the contracts between Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, the University of Delaware, and Y-12 Plant.

  10. Structural analysis of vimentin and keratin intermediate filaments by cryo-electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Norlen, Lars . E-mail: lars.norlen@ki.se; Masich, Sergej; Goldie, Kenneth N.; Hoenger, Andreas

    2007-06-10

    Intermediate filaments are a large and structurally diverse group of cellular filaments that are classified into five different groups. They are referred to as intermediate filaments (IFs) because they are intermediate in diameter between the two other cytoskeletal filament systems that is filamentous actin and microtubules. The basic building block of IFs is a predominantly {alpha}-helical rod with variable length globular N- and C-terminal domains. On the ultra-structural level there are two major differences between IFs and microtubules or actin filaments: IFs are non-polar, and they do not exhibit large globular domains. IF molecules associate via a coiled-coil interaction into dimers and higher oligomers. Structural investigations into the molecular building plan of IFs have been performed with a variety of biophysical and imaging methods such as negative staining and metal-shadowing electron microscopy (EM), mass determination by scanning transmission EM, X-ray crystallography on fragments of the IF stalk and low-angle X-ray scattering. The actual packing of IF dimers into a long filament varies between the different families. Typically the dimers form so called protofibrils that further assemble into a filament. Here we introduce new cryo-imaging methods for structural investigations of IFs in vitro and in vivo, i.e., cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, as well as associated techniques such as the preparation and handling of vitrified sections of cellular specimens.

  11. Structures of actin-like ParM filaments show architecture of plasmid-segregating spindles.

    PubMed

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Murshudov, Garib N; Sachse, Carsten; Löwe, Jan

    2015-07-02

    Active segregation of Escherichia coli low-copy-number plasmid R1 involves formation of a bipolar spindle made of left-handed double-helical actin-like ParM filaments. ParR links the filaments with centromeric parC plasmid DNA, while facilitating the addition of subunits to ParM filaments. Growing ParMRC spindles push sister plasmids to the cell poles. Here, using modern electron cryomicroscopy methods, we investigate the structures and arrangements of ParM filaments in vitro and in cells, revealing at near-atomic resolution how subunits and filaments come together to produce the simplest known mitotic machinery. To understand the mechanism of dynamic instability, we determine structures of ParM filaments in different nucleotide states. The structure of filaments bound to the ATP analogue AMPPNP is determined at 4.3 Å resolution and refined. The ParM filament structure shows strong longitudinal interfaces and weaker lateral interactions. Also using electron cryomicroscopy, we reconstruct ParM doublets forming antiparallel spindles. Finally, with whole-cell electron cryotomography, we show that doublets are abundant in bacterial cells containing low-copy-number plasmids with the ParMRC locus, leading to an asynchronous model of R1 plasmid segregation.

  12. Fabrication of Multscale Fractal-Like Structures by Controlling Fluid Interface Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Tanveer Ul; Gandhi, Prasanna S.

    2016-11-01

    Nature, in quest for the best designs has shaped its vital systems into fractal geometries. Effectual way of spontaneous fabrication of scalable, ordered fractal-like structures by controlling Saffman-Taylor instability in a lifted Hele-Shaw cell is deployed here. In lifted Hele-Shaw cell uncontrolled penetration of low-viscosity fluid into its high-viscosity counterpart is known to develop irregular, non-repeatable, normally short-lived, branched patterns. We propose and characterize experimentally anisotropies in a form of spatially distributed pits on the cell plates to control initiation and further penetration of non-splitting fingers. The proposed control over shielding mechanism yields recipes for fabrication of families of ordered fractal-like patterns of multiple generations. As an example, we demonstrate and characterize fabrication of a Cayley tree fractal-like pattern. The patterns, in addition, are retained permanently by employing UV/thermally curable fluids. The proposed technique thus establishes solid foundation for bio-mimicking natural structures spanning multiple-scales for scientific and engineering use.

  13. Fabrication of Multscale Fractal-Like Structures by Controlling Fluid Interface Instability

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Tanveer ul; Gandhi, Prasanna S.

    2016-01-01

    Nature, in quest for the best designs has shaped its vital systems into fractal geometries. Effectual way of spontaneous fabrication of scalable, ordered fractal-like structures by controlling Saffman-Taylor instability in a lifted Hele-Shaw cell is deployed here. In lifted Hele-Shaw cell uncontrolled penetration of low-viscosity fluid into its high-viscosity counterpart is known to develop irregular, non-repeatable, normally short-lived, branched patterns. We propose and characterize experimentally anisotropies in a form of spatially distributed pits on the cell plates to control initiation and further penetration of non-splitting fingers. The proposed control over shielding mechanism yields recipes for fabrication of families of ordered fractal-like patterns of multiple generations. As an example, we demonstrate and characterize fabrication of a Cayley tree fractal-like pattern. The patterns, in addition, are retained permanently by employing UV/thermally curable fluids. The proposed technique thus establishes solid foundation for bio-mimicking natural structures spanning multiple-scales for scientific and engineering use. PMID:27849003

  14. Structural transition of actin filament in a cell-sized water droplet with a phospholipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, M.; Yoshikawa, K.

    2006-03-01

    Actin filament, F-actin, is a semiflexible polymer with a negative charge, and is one of the main constituents of cell membranes. To clarify the effect of cross talk between a phospholipid membrane and actin filaments in cells, we conducted microscopic observations on the structural changes in actin filaments in a cell-sized (several tens of micrometers in diameter) water droplet coated with a phospholipid membrane such as phosphatidylserine (PS; negatively charged head group) or phosphatidylethanolamine (PE; neutral head group) as a simple model of a living cell membrane. With PS, actin filaments are distributed uniformly in the water phase without adsorption onto the membrane surface between 2 and 6mM Mg2+, while between 6 and 12mM Mg2+, actin filaments are adsorbed onto the inner membrane surface. With PE, the actin filaments are uniformly adsorbed onto the inner membrane surface between 2 and 12mM Mg2+. With both PS and PE membranes, at Mg2+ concentrations higher than 12mM, thick bundles are formed in the bulk water droplet accompanied by the dissolution of actin filaments from the membrane surface. The attraction between actin filaments and membrane is attributable to an increase in the translational entropy of counterions accompanied by the adsorption of actin filaments onto the membrane surface. These results suggest that a microscopic water droplet coated with phospholipid can serve as an easy-to-handle model of cell membranes.

  15. Exhaled Aerosol Pattern Discloses Lung Structural Abnormality: A Sensitivity Study Using Computational Modeling and Fractal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Si, Xiuhua A.; Kim, JongWon; Mckee, Edward; Lin, En-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Background Exhaled aerosol patterns, also called aerosol fingerprints, provide clues to the health of the lung and can be used to detect disease-modified airway structures. The key is how to decode the exhaled aerosol fingerprints and retrieve the lung structural information for a non-invasive identification of respiratory diseases. Objective and Methods In this study, a CFD-fractal analysis method was developed to quantify exhaled aerosol fingerprints and applied it to one benign and three malign conditions: a tracheal carina tumor, a bronchial tumor, and asthma. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 30 L/min were simulated, with exhaled distributions recorded at the mouth. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to simulate respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Aerosol morphometric measures such as concentration disparity, spatial distributions, and fractal analysis were applied to distinguish various exhaled aerosol patterns. Findings Utilizing physiology-based modeling, we demonstrated substantial differences in exhaled aerosol distributions among normal and pathological airways, which were suggestive of the disease location and extent. With fractal analysis, we also demonstrated that exhaled aerosol patterns exhibited fractal behavior in both the entire image and selected regions of interest. Each exhaled aerosol fingerprint exhibited distinct pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, lacunarity, and multifractal spectrum. Furthermore, a correlation of the diseased location and exhaled aerosol spatial distribution was established for asthma. Conclusion Aerosol-fingerprint-based breath tests disclose clues about the site and severity of lung diseases and appear to be sensitive enough to be a practical tool for diagnosis and prognosis of respiratory diseases with structural abnormalities. PMID:25105680

  16. Fractal nematic colloids

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, S. M.; Jagodič, U.; Mozaffari, M. R.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Muševič, I.; Ravnik, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter. PMID:28117325

  17. Fractal nematic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. M.; Jagodič, U.; Mozaffari, M. R.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Muševič, I.; Ravnik, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter.

  18. Fractal nematic colloids.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, S M; Jagodič, U; Mozaffari, M R; Ejtehadi, M R; Muševič, I; Ravnik, M

    2017-01-24

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter.

  19. Large-scale coherent structures in fractal-generated, axisymmetric wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedic, Jovan; Supponen, Outi; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Vassilicos, John Christos

    2013-11-01

    The coherence and energy of large-scale structures in turbulent axisymmetric wakes are known to play a role on the drag coefficient of the body. Specifically, there is an expectation that drag can be reduced by reducing the energy of the vortex shedding. We use fractal plates which have been shown to have higher drag coefficients than square plates and disks with the same frontal area (Nedic, Ganapathisubramani & Vassilicos FDR 2013), yet show that the energy of the large-scale vortices shed from these plates is reduced by 15% to 60% compared to non-fractal plates. Fractal plates can reduce wake size and alter dissipation scalings [see DFD13-2013-000126] and the relation CD =CVCɛ between the drag coefficient and coefficients of wake volume and average turbulent dissipation rate can be used to explore consequences on drag. Furthermore, the azimuthal mode associated with the vortex shedding (m = 1) is still found to be dominant for all plates, however its coherence is slightly altered by the fractals, whilst mode m = 2 has been dramatically altered.

  20. Fractal images induce fractal pupil dilations and constrictions.

    PubMed

    Moon, P; Muday, J; Raynor, S; Schirillo, J; Boydston, C; Fairbanks, M S; Taylor, R P

    2014-09-01

    Fractals are self-similar structures or patterns that repeat at increasingly fine magnifications. Research has revealed fractal patterns in many natural and physiological processes. This article investigates pupillary size over time to determine if their oscillations demonstrate a fractal pattern. We predict that pupil size over time will fluctuate in a fractal manner and this may be due to either the fractal neuronal structure or fractal properties of the image viewed. We present evidence that low complexity fractal patterns underlie pupillary oscillations as subjects view spatial fractal patterns. We also present evidence implicating the autonomic nervous system's importance in these patterns. Using the variational method of the box-counting procedure we demonstrate that low complexity fractal patterns are found in changes within pupil size over time in millimeters (mm) and our data suggest that these pupillary oscillation patterns do not depend on the fractal properties of the image viewed.

  1. Fractal antenna and fractal resonator primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Self-similarity and fractals have opened new and important avenues for antenna and electronic solutions over the last 25 years. This primer provides an introduction to the benefits provided by fractal geometry in antennas, resonators, and related structures. Such benefits include, among many, wider bandwidths, smaller sizes, part-less electronic components, and better performance. Fractals also provide a new generation of optimized design tools, first used successfully in antennas but applicable in a general fashion.

  2. Growing gold fractal nano-structures and studying changes in their morphology as a function of film growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Amit; Banerjee, S. S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the formation of fractal like nano-structures on free standing gold films grown via surfactant mediated thin film growth process. We determine these structures to be confined within the first few monolayers of the thin film. Their chemical composition is identical to that of the Au film, although their density is different from the surrounding film. We observe changes in the morphology of these fractal structures by controlling the film growth rate, which spans across three orders of magnitude. From our study, we quantify the morphological changes in the fractal structure via a roundness parameter and we suggest an empirical relation between the roundness parameter and the growth rate. The study shows an inverse relationship between the roundness parameter and the growth rate and also that the fractal to compact morphological transition is continuous.

  3. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Assembles into Structured Filamentous Virion Particles Independently of Host Cytoskeleton and Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Fyza Y.; Utley, Thomas J.; Craven, Ryan E.; Rogers, Meredith C.; Lapierre, Lynne A.; Goldenring, James R.; Crowe, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that assembles into viral filaments at the cell surface. Virus assembly often depends on the ability of a virus to use host proteins to accomplish viral tasks. Since the fusion protein cytoplasmic tail (FCT) is critical for viral filamentous assembly, we hypothesized that host proteins important for viral assembly may be recruited by the FCT. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that filamin A interacted with FCT, and mammalian cell experiments showed it localized to viral filaments but did not affect viral replication. Furthermore, we found that a number of actin-associated proteins also were excluded from viral filaments. Actin or tubulin cytoskeletal rearrangement was not necessary for F trafficking to the cell surface or for viral assembly into filaments, but was necessary for optimal viral replication and may be important for anchoring viral filaments. These findings suggest that RSV assembly into filaments occurs independently of actin polymerization and that viral proteins are the principal drivers for the mechanical tasks involved with formation of complex, structured RSV filaments at the host cell plasma membrane. PMID:22808269

  4. Changes in fractal structure of heart rate variability during a nap in one case.

    PubMed

    Shono, H; Shono, M; Takasaki, M; Iwasaka, T; Sugimori, H

    2001-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze fractal structures of adult heart rate (HR) variability during a nap. Fractal analysis was carried out in one case over consecutive 10-min time series of HR, which were simultaneously recorded with electroencephalogram. Scaling relationships showed cross-over patterns characterized by alphas and alphal (i.e. slopes above and below a cross-over point). The alphas and alphal were black and white noise at Stage 4 of NREM sleep, and black and 1/f noise in REM sleep. Cross-over points changed from the first to second sleep cycle. We demonstrate the multifractal structures of HR variability during a nap in the present case.

  5. Critical behavior of the quantum Ising model on a fractal structure.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hangmo

    2013-07-01

    We study the critical behavior of the transverse-field quantum Ising model on a fractal structure, namely the Sierpinski carpet. When a magnetic field Δ is applied perpendicular to the Ising spin direction, quantum fluctuations affect the transition between the ferromagnetic and the paramagnetic phases. Employing the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo simulation method and the finite-size scaling analysis, we investigate the interplay between the quantum fluctuations and the exotic dimensionality of the fractal structure and its effect on the critical behavior. As the transverse magnetic field increases, the critical temperature monotonically decreases until it apparently vanishes at a critical field Δ(c), beyond which the system becomes paramagnetic at all temperatures. However, the critical exponents are independent of Δ and remain the same as in the purely classical(Δ=0) case.

  6. Estimation of the adequacy of the fractal model of the atomic structure of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Golodenko, A. B.

    2010-01-15

    A method of constructing a fractal model of noncrystalline solid substance is considered using the example of amorphous silicon. In systems of iteration functions, the physical meaning of dihedral and valence angles of the elementary crystallographic cell is assigned to arguments. The model adequacy is estimated by the radial distribution function, the atomic structure density, the distribution of valence and dihedral angles, and the density of dangling interatomic bonds.

  7. THE FORMATION AND MAGNETIC STRUCTURES OF ACTIVE-REGION FILAMENTS OBSERVED BY NVST, SDO, AND HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Wang, J. C.; Xiang, Y. Y.; Kong, D. F.; Yang, L. H.; Pan, G. M.

    2015-08-15

    To better understand the properties of solar active-region filaments, we present a detailed study on the formation and magnetic structures of two active-region filaments in active region NOAA 11884 during a period of four days. It is found that the shearing motion of the opposite magnetic polarities and the rotation of the small sunspots with negative polarity play an important role in the formation of two active-region filaments. During the formation of these two active-region filaments, one foot of the filaments was rooted in a small sunspot with negative polarity. The small sunspot rotated not only around another small sunspot with negative polarity, but also around the center of its umbra. By analyzing the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation using the vector magnetic fields in the photosphere, twisted structures were found in the two active-region filaments prior to their eruptions. These results imply that the magnetic fields were dragged by the shearing motion between opposite magnetic polarities and became more horizontal. The sunspot rotation twisted the horizontal magnetic fields and finally formed the twisted active-region filaments.

  8. Fractal analysis of the structural complexity of the connective tissue in human carotid bodies

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Diego; Porzionato, Andrea; Tortorella, Cinzia; Macchi, Veronica; De Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) may undergo different structural changes during perinatal development, aging, or in response to environmental stimuli. In the previous literature, morphometric approaches to evaluate these changes have considered quantitative first order parameters, such as volumes or densities, while changes in spatial disposition and/or complexity of structural components have not yet been considered. In the present study, different strategies for addressing morphological complexity of CB, apart from the overall amount of each tissue component, were evaluated and compared. In particular, we considered the spatial distribution of connective tissue in the carotid bodies of young control subjects, young opiate-related deaths and aged subjects, through analysis of dispersion (Morisita's index), gray level co-occurrence matrix (entropy, angular second moment, variance, correlation), and fractal analysis (fractal dimension, lacunarity). Opiate-related deaths and aged subjects showed a comparable increase in connective tissue with respect to young controls. However, the Morisita's index (p < 0.05), angular second moment (p < 0.05), fractal dimension (p < 0.01), and lacunarity (p < 0.01) permitted to identify significant differences in the disposition of the connective tissue between these two series. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was also calculated to evaluate the efficiency of each parameter. The fractal dimension and lacunarity, with areas under the ROC curve of 0.9651 (excellent accuracy) and 0.8835 (good accuracy), respectively, showed the highest discriminatory power. They evidenced higher level of structural complexity in the carotid bodies of opiate-related deaths than old controls, due to more complex branching of intralobular connective tissue. Further analyses will have to consider the suitability of these approaches to address other morphological features of the CB, such as different cell populations, vascularization, and innervation

  9. [Quantitative structure characteristics and fractal dimension of Chinese medicine granules measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray computed micro tomography].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-long; Zheng, Qin; Yin, Xian-zhen; Xiao, Guang-qing; Liao, Zu-hua; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ji-wen

    2015-06-01

    The shape and structure of granules are controlled by the granulation process, which is one of the main factors to determine the nature of the solid dosage forms. In this article, three kinds of granules of a traditional Chinese medicine for improving appetite and promoting digestion, namely, Jianwei Granules, were prepared using granulation technologies as pendular granulation, high speed stirring granulation, and fluidized bed granulation and the powder properties of them were investigated. Meanwhile, synchrotron radiation X-ray computed micro tomography (SR-µCT) was applied to quantitatively determine the irregular internal structures of the granules. The three-dimensional (3D) structure models were obtained by 3D reconstruction, which were more accurately to characterize the three-dimensional structures of the particles through the quantitative data. The models were also used to quantitatively compare the structural differences of granules prepared by different granulation processes with the same formula, so as to characterize how the production process plays a role in the pharmaceutical behaviors of the granules. To focus on the irregularity of the particle structure, the box counting method was used to calculate the fractal dimensions of the granules. The results showed that the fractal dimension is more sensitive to reflect the minor differences in the structure features than the conventional parameters, and capable to specifically distinct granules in structure. It is proved that the fractal dimension could quantitatively characterize the structural information of irregular granules. It is the first time suggested by our research that the fractal dimension difference (Df,c) between two fractal dimension parameters, namely, the volume matrix fractal dimension and the surface matrix fractal dimension, is a new index to characterize granules with irregular structures and evaluate the effects of production processes on the structures of granules as a new

  10. Structural five-fold symmetry in the fractal morphology of diffusion-limited aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.; Muzy, J. F.; Tabard, M.

    1992-09-01

    The statistical self-similarity of the geometry of diffusion-limited aggregates and the multifractal nature of the growth probability distribution on the surface of the growing clusters are investigated using the wavelet transform. This study reveals the existence of a predominant structural five-fold symmetry in the internal frozen region as well as in the active outer region of the interface. This observation is corroborated by a statistical analysis of the screening effects that govern diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) growth in linear and sector-shaped cells. The existence of this symmetry is likely to be a clue to a hierarchichal fractal ordering. We report on the discovery of Fibonacci sequences in the inner extinct region of large mass off-lattice DLA clusters, with a branching ratio which converges asymptotically to the golden mean. We suggest an interpretation of the DLA morphology as a “quasifractal” counterpart of the well-ordered snowflake fractal architecture.

  11. Microelectronics and nanotechnology, and the fractal-like structure of information, knowledge, and science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutu, Catalin Silviu; Axinte, Tiberiu

    2016-12-01

    The article is centralizing and is concentrating the information from a considerable amount of papers related to the field of microelectronics and nanotechnology and also provides an approach to science and to the future evolution of science, based on the theory of the fractals. The new science of microelectronics and nanotechnology is one of the best examples of how the science of future will look like, namely at the confluence of increasingly more other sciences, where increasingly more sciences are to be added in the structure of the new science and the role of the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary is becoming more and more important. Although not giving explicit details (e.g. specific formulas) the theory of fractals is used in the paper to explain the way of generation of new science for the specific case of microelectronics and nanotechnology, but is also used in the paper to outline a different way to approach new science and eventually to approach new sciences to come. There are mainly two motivations for the present article, namely: on the one hand, the position of the microelectronics and nanotechnologies in the fractal-like structure of science, and, on the other hand, that much of the communication, information, knowledge and science transfer, dissemination and advancement in sciences are taking place using the new technologies related to microelectronics and nanotechnologies.

  12. Characterization of microgravity effects on bone structure and strength using fractal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acharya, Raj S.; Shackelford, Linda

    1995-01-01

    The effect of micro-gravity on the musculoskeletal system has been well studied. Significant changes in bone and muscle have been shown after long term space flight. Similar changes have been demonstrated due to bed rest. Bone demineralization is particularly profound in weight bearing bones. Much of the current techniques to monitor bone condition use bone mass measurements. However, bone mass measurements are not reliable to distinguish Osteoporotic and Normal subjects. It has been shown that the overlap between normals and osteoporosis is found for all of the bone mass measurement technologies: single and dual photon absorptiometry, quantitative computed tomography and direct measurement of bone area/volume on biopsy as well as radiogrammetry. A similar discordance is noted in the fact that it has not been regularly possible to find the expected correlation between severity of osteoporosis and degree of bone loss. Structural parameters such as trabecular connectivity have been proposed as features for assessing bone conditions. In this report, we use fractal analysis to characterize bone structure. We show that the fractal dimension computed with MRI images and X-Ray images of the patella are the same. Preliminary experimental results show that the fractal dimension computed from MRI images of vertebrae of human subjects before bedrest is higher than during bedrest.

  13. Structural architecture of the CARMA1/Bcl10/MALT1 signalosome: nucleation-induced filamentous assembly.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Qi; Yang, Chenghua; Zheng, Chao; Fontán, Lorena; David, Liron; Yu, Xiong; Bracken, Clay; Rosen, Monica; Melnick, Ari; Egelman, Edward H; Wu, Hao

    2013-09-26

    The CARMA1/Bcl10/MALT1 (CBM) signalosome mediates antigen receptor-induced NF-κB signaling to regulate multiple lymphocyte functions. While CARMA1 and Bcl10 contain caspase recruitment domains (CARDs), MALT1 is a paracaspase with structural similarity to caspases. Here we show that the reconstituted CBM signalosome is a helical filamentous assembly in which substoichiometric CARMA1 nucleates Bcl10 filaments. Bcl10 filament formation is a highly cooperative process whose threshold is sensitized by oligomerized CARMA1 upon receptor activation. In cells, both cotransfected CARMA1/Bcl10 complex and the endogenous CBM signalosome are filamentous morphologically. Combining crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron microscopy, we reveal the structure of the Bcl10 CARD filament and the mode of interaction between CARMA1 and Bcl10. Structure-guided mutagenesis confirmed the observed interfaces in Bcl10 filament assembly and MALT1 activation in vitro and NF-κB activation in cells. These data support a paradigm of nucleation-induced signal transduction with threshold response due to cooperativity and signal amplification by polymerization.

  14. Bridging Three Orders of Magnitude: Multiple Scattered Waves Sense Fractal Microscopic Structures via Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Simon A.; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Nordsletten, David; Michler, Christian; Juge, Lauriane; Serfaty, Jean-Michel; Bilston, Lynne; Guzina, Bojan; Holm, Sverre; Sinkus, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    Wave scattering provides profound insight into the structure of matter. Typically, the ability to sense microstructure is determined by the ratio of scatterer size to probing wavelength. Here, we address the question of whether macroscopic waves can report back the presence and distribution of microscopic scatterers despite several orders of magnitude difference in scale between wavelength and scatterer size. In our analysis, monosized hard scatterers 5 μ m in radius are immersed in lossless gelatin phantoms to investigate the effect of multiple reflections on the propagation of shear waves with millimeter wavelength. Steady-state monochromatic waves are imaged in situ via magnetic resonance imaging, enabling quantification of the phase velocity at a voxel size big enough to contain thousands of individual scatterers, but small enough to resolve the wavelength. We show in theory, experiments, and simulations that the resulting coherent superposition of multiple reflections gives rise to power-law dispersion at the macroscopic scale if the scatterer distribution exhibits apparent fractality over an effective length scale that is comparable to the probing wavelength. Since apparent fractality is naturally present in any random medium, microstructure can thereby leave its fingerprint on the macroscopically quantifiable power-law exponent. Our results are generic to wave phenomena and carry great potential for sensing microstructure that exhibits intrinsic fractality, such as, for instance, vasculature.

  15. Fractal structures in two-metal electrodeposition systems I: Pb and Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakouzi, Elias; Sultan, Rabih

    2011-12-01

    Pattern formation in two-metal electrochemical deposition has been scarcely explored in the chemical literature. In this paper, we report new experiments on zinc-lead fractal co-deposition. Electrodeposits are grown in special cells at a fixed large value of the zinc ion concentration, while that of the lead ion is increased gradually. A very wide diversity of morphologies are obtained and classified. Most of the deposited domains are almost exclusively Pb or Zn. But certain regions originating at the base cathode, ranging from a short grass alley to dense, grown-up bushes or shrubs, manifest a combined Pb-Zn composition. Composition is determined using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x ray measurements as well atomic absorption spectroscopy. Pb domains are characterized by shiny leaf-like and dense deposits as well as flowers with round, balloon-like corollas. The Zn zones display a greater variety of morphologies such as thick trunks and thin and fine branching, in addition to minute "cigar flower" structures. The various morphologies are analyzed and classified from the viewpoint of fractal nature, characterized by the box-count fractal dimension. Finally, macroscopic spatial alternation between two different characteristic morphologies is observed under certain conditions.

  16. Bridging Three Orders of Magnitude: Multiple Scattered Waves Sense Fractal Microscopic Structures via Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Simon A; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Nordsletten, David; Michler, Christian; Juge, Lauriane; Serfaty, Jean-Michel; Bilston, Lynne; Guzina, Bojan; Holm, Sverre; Sinkus, Ralph

    2015-08-28

    Wave scattering provides profound insight into the structure of matter. Typically, the ability to sense microstructure is determined by the ratio of scatterer size to probing wavelength. Here, we address the question of whether macroscopic waves can report back the presence and distribution of microscopic scatterers despite several orders of magnitude difference in scale between wavelength and scatterer size. In our analysis, monosized hard scatterers 5  μm in radius are immersed in lossless gelatin phantoms to investigate the effect of multiple reflections on the propagation of shear waves with millimeter wavelength. Steady-state monochromatic waves are imaged in situ via magnetic resonance imaging, enabling quantification of the phase velocity at a voxel size big enough to contain thousands of individual scatterers, but small enough to resolve the wavelength. We show in theory, experiments, and simulations that the resulting coherent superposition of multiple reflections gives rise to power-law dispersion at the macroscopic scale if the scatterer distribution exhibits apparent fractality over an effective length scale that is comparable to the probing wavelength. Since apparent fractality is naturally present in any random medium, microstructure can thereby leave its fingerprint on the macroscopically quantifiable power-law exponent. Our results are generic to wave phenomena and carry great potential for sensing microstructure that exhibits intrinsic fractality, such as, for instance, vasculature.

  17. Fractal structures in two-metal electrodeposition systems I: Pb and Zn

    SciTech Connect

    Nakouzi, Elias; Sultan, Rabih

    2011-12-15

    Pattern formation in two-metal electrochemical deposition has been scarcely explored in the chemical literature. In this paper, we report new experiments on zinc-lead fractal co-deposition. Electrodeposits are grown in special cells at a fixed large value of the zinc ion concentration, while that of the lead ion is increased gradually. A very wide diversity of morphologies are obtained and classified. Most of the deposited domains are almost exclusively Pb or Zn. But certain regions originating at the base cathode, ranging from a short grass alley to dense, grown-up bushes or shrubs, manifest a combined Pb-Zn composition. Composition is determined using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x ray measurements as well atomic absorption spectroscopy. Pb domains are characterized by shiny leaf-like and dense deposits as well as flowers with round, balloon-like corollas. The Zn zones display a greater variety of morphologies such as thick trunks and thin and fine branching, in addition to minute ''cigar flower'' structures. The various morphologies are analyzed and classified from the viewpoint of fractal nature, characterized by the box-count fractal dimension. Finally, macroscopic spatial alternation between two different characteristic morphologies is observed under certain conditions.

  18. Long-Range Order and Fractality in the Structure and Organization of Eukaryotic Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polychronopoulos, Dimitris; Tsiagkas, Giannis; Athanasopoulou, Labrini; Sellis, Diamantis; Almirantis, Yannis

    2014-12-01

    The late Professor J.S. Nicolis always emphasized, both in his writings and in presentations and discussions with students and friends, the relevance of a dynamical systems approach to biology. In particular, viewing the genome as a "biological text" captures the dynamical character of both the evolution and function of the organisms in the form of correlations indicating the presence of a long-range order. This genomic structure can be expressed in forms reminiscent of natural languages and several temporal and spatial traces l by the functioning of dynamical systems: Zipf laws, self-similarity and fractality. Here we review several works of our group and recent unpublished results, focusing on the chromosomal distribution of biologically active genomic components: Genes and protein-coding segments, CpG islands, transposable elements belonging to all major classes and several types of conserved non-coding genomic elements. We report the systematic appearance of power-laws in the size distribution of the distances between elements belonging to each of these types of functional genomic elements. Moreover, fractality is also found in several cases, using box-counting and entropic scaling.We present here, for the first time in a unified way, an aggregative model of the genomic dynamics which can explain the observed patterns on the grounds of known phenomena accompanying genome evolution. Our results comply with recent findings about a "fractal globule" geometry of chromatin in the eukaryotic nucleus.

  19. Multiple crystal structures of actin dimers and their implications for interactions in the actin filament

    PubMed Central

    Sawaya, Michael R.; Kudryashov, D. S.; Pashkov, Inna; Adisetiyo, Helty; Reisler, Emil; Yeates, Todd O.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of actin in its monomeric form is known at high resolution, while the structure of filamentous F-actin is only understood at considerably lower resolution. Knowing pre­cisely how the monomers of actin fit together would lead to a deeper understanding of the dynamic behavior of the actin filament. Here, a series of crystal structures of actin dimers are reported which were prepared by cross-linking in either the longitudinal or the lateral direction in the filament state. Laterally cross-linked dimers, comprised of monomers belonging to different protofilaments, are found to adopt configurations in crystals that are not related to the native structure of filamentous actin. In contrast, multiple structures of longitudinal dimers consistently reveal the same interface between monomers within a single protofilament. The re­appearance of the same longitudinal interface in multiple crystal structures adds weight to arguments that the interface visualized is similar to that in actin filaments. Highly conserved atomic interactions involving residues 199–205 and 287–291 are highlighted. PMID:18391412

  20. X-ray structures associated with disappearing H-alpha filaments in active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the relationship between active region disappearing H-alpha filaments and the associated coronal X-ray structures observed both before the disappearance event and afterwards. The events chosen for the study were selected from a list of active region X-ray transients observed in the images from the X-ray telescope on Skylab and from a list compiled by Webb (1976) of sudden disappearances of filaments during the Skylab period. Results indicate no distinction between the disappearing and the remaining active region filaments in terms of their pre-event associated X-ray emission features. However, X-ray brightenings were associated in a nearly one-to-one correspondence with disappearing portions of the filaments.

  1. Consequences of the fractal architecture of trees on their structural measures.

    PubMed

    Pluciński, Mateusz; Pluciński, Szymon; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2008-03-07

    While the mechanics of trees are well known, a systematic and comprehensive study of the mechanical consequences of a tree's fractal structure has been lacking. Here, we analyze the structure of botanical trees using computer modeling and show that many relevant measures of support throughout all the branches of a tree follow specific patterns which can be described by characteristic probability distributions and well-defined spatial relationships. Most notably, moments, forces, and axial and shear stresses throughout the different branches all exhibit power-law distributions. These results suggest a new approach to the study of the mechanics of trees, one accounting for the implications of the above results.

  2. Sarcomere-length dependence of myosin filament structure in skeletal muscle fibres of the frog.

    PubMed

    Reconditi, Massimo; Brunello, Elisabetta; Fusi, Luca; Linari, Marco; Martinez, Manuel Fernandez; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Irving, Malcolm; Piazzesi, Gabriella

    2014-03-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns were recorded at beamline ID02 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility from small bundles of skeletal muscle fibres from Rana esculenta at sarcomere lengths between 2.1 and 3.5 μm at 4°C. The intensities of the X-ray reflections from resting fibres associated with the quasi-helical order of the myosin heads and myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C) decreased in the sarcomere length range 2.6-3.0 μm but were constant outside it, suggesting that an OFF conformation of the thick filament is maintained by an interaction between MyBP-C and the thin filaments. During active isometric contraction the intensity of the M3 reflection from the regular repeat of the myosin heads along the filaments decreased in proportion to the overlap between thick and thin filaments, with no change in its interference fine structure. Thus, myosin heads in the regions of the thick filaments that do not overlap with thin filaments are highly disordered during isometric contraction, in contrast to their quasi-helical order at rest. Heads in the overlap region that belong to two-headed myosin molecules that are fully detached from actin are also highly disordered, in contrast to the detached partners of actin-attached heads. These results provide strong support for the concept of a regulatory structural transition in the thick filament involving changes in both the organisation of the myosin heads on its surface and the axial periodicity of the myosin tails in its backbone, mediated by an interaction between MyBP-C and the thin filaments.

  3. Fractal structures in the chaotic motion of charged particles in a magnetized plasma under the influence of drift waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, A. C.; Viana, R. L.; Kroetz, T.; Caldas, I. L.

    2017-03-01

    Chaotic dynamics in open Hamiltonian dynamical systems typically presents a number of fractal structures in phase space derived from the interwoven structure of invariant manifolds and the corresponding chaotic saddle. These structures are thought to play an important role in the transport properties related to the chaotic motion. Such properties can explain some aspects of the non-uniform nature of the anomalous transport observed in magnetically confined plasmas. Accordingly we consider a theoretical model for the interaction of charged test particles with drift waves. We describe the exit basin structure of the corresponding chaotic orbit in phase space and interpret it in terms of the invariant manifold structure underlying chaotic dynamics. As a result, the exit basin boundary is shown to be a fractal curve, by direct calculation of its box-counting dimension. Moreover, when there are more than two basins, we verify the existence of the Wada property, an extreme form of fractality.

  4. Robust estimation of fractal measures for characterizing the structural complexity of the human brain: optimization and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Joaquín; Sporns, Olaf; Cheng, Hu; Aznárez-Sanado, Maite; Wang, Yang; Josa, Santiago; Arrondo, Gonzalo; Mathews, Vincent P; Hummer, Tom A; Kronenberger, William G; Avena-Koenigsberger, Andrea; Saykin, Andrew J; Pastor, María A

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution isotropic three-dimensional reconstructions of human brain gray and white matter structures can be characterized to quantify aspects of their shape, volume and topological complexity. In particular, methods based on fractal analysis have been applied in neuroimaging studies to quantify the structural complexity of the brain in both healthy and impaired conditions. The usefulness of such measures for characterizing individual differences in brain structure critically depends on their within-subject reproducibility in order to allow the robust detection of between-subject differences. This study analyzes key analytic parameters of three fractal-based methods that rely on the box-counting algorithm with the aim to maximize within-subject reproducibility of the fractal characterizations of different brain objects, including the pial surface, the cortical ribbon volume, the white matter volume and the gray matter/white matter boundary. Two separate datasets originating from different imaging centers were analyzed, comprising 50 subjects with three and 24 subjects with four successive scanning sessions per subject, respectively. The reproducibility of fractal measures was statistically assessed by computing their intra-class correlations. Results reveal differences between different fractal estimators and allow the identification of several parameters that are critical for high reproducibility. Highest reproducibility with intra-class correlations in the range of 0.9-0.95 is achieved with the correlation dimension. Further analyses of the fractal dimensions of parcellated cortical and subcortical gray matter regions suggest robustly estimated and region-specific patterns of individual variability. These results are valuable for defining appropriate parameter configurations when studying changes in fractal descriptors of human brain structure, for instance in studies of neurological diseases that do not allow repeated measurements or for disease

  5. Robust estimation of fractal measures for characterizing the structural complexity of the human brain: optimization and reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Goñi, Joaquín; Sporns, Olaf; Cheng, Hu; Aznárez-Sanado, Maite; Wang, Yang; Josa, Santiago; Arrondo, Gonzalo; Mathews, Vincent P; Hummer, Tom A; Kronenberger, William G; Avena-Koenigsberger, Andrea; Saykin, Andrew J.; Pastor, María A.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution isotropic three-dimensional reconstructions of human brain gray and white matter structures can be characterized to quantify aspects of their shape, volume and topological complexity. In particular, methods based on fractal analysis have been applied in neuroimaging studies to quantify the structural complexity of the brain in both healthy and impaired conditions. The usefulness of such measures for characterizing individual differences in brain structure critically depends on their within-subject reproducibility in order to allow the robust detection of between-subject differences. This study analyzes key analytic parameters of three fractal-based methods that rely on the box-counting algorithm with the aim to maximize within-subject reproducibility of the fractal characterizations of different brain objects, including the pial surface, the cortical ribbon volume, the white matter volume and the grey matter/white matter boundary. Two separate datasets originating from different imaging centers were analyzed, comprising, 50 subjects with three and 24 subjects with four successive scanning sessions per subject, respectively. The reproducibility of fractal measures was statistically assessed by computing their intra-class correlations. Results reveal differences between different fractal estimators and allow the identification of several parameters that are critical for high reproducibility. Highest reproducibility with intra-class correlations in the range of 0.9–0.95 is achieved with the correlation dimension. Further analyses of the fractal dimensions of parcellated cortical and subcortical gray matter regions suggest robustly estimated and region-specific patterns of individual variability. These results are valuable for defining appropriate parameter configurations when studying changes in fractal descriptors of human brain structure, for instance in studies of neurological diseases that do not allow repeated measurements or for disease

  6. Engineering the shape and structure of materials by fractal cut

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yigil; Shin, Joong-Ho; Costa, Avelino; Kim, Tae Ann; Kunin, Valentin; Li, Ju; Lee, Su Yeon; Yang, Shu; Han, Heung Nam; Choi, In-Suk; Srolovitz, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the transformation of a sheet of material into a wide range of desired shapes and patterns by introducing a set of simple cuts in a multilevel hierarchy with different motifs. Each choice of hierarchical cut motif and cut level allows the material to expand into a unique structure with a unique set of properties. We can reverse-engineer the desired expanded geometries to find the requisite cut pattern to produce it without changing the physical properties of the initial material. The concept was experimentally realized and applied to create an electrode that expands to >800% the original area with only very minor stretching of the underlying material. The generality of our approach greatly expands the design space for materials so that they can be tuned for diverse applications. PMID:25422433

  7. DARK RIBBONS PROPAGATING AND SWEEPING ACROSS EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET STRUCTURES AFTER FILAMENT ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Junmin; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn

    2015-05-20

    With observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we first report that dark ribbons (DRs) moved apart from the filament channel and swept across EUV structures after filament eruptions on 2013 June 23 and 2012 February 10 and 24, respectively. In the first event, the DR with a length of 168 Mm appeared at 100 Mm to the northwest of the filament channel, where the filament erupted 15 hr previously. The DR moved toward the northwest with the different sections having different velocities, ranging from 0.3 to 1.6 km s{sup −1}. When the DR’s middle part swept across a strong EUV structure, the motion of this part was blocked, appearing to deflect the DR. With the DR propagation, the connection of the surrounding EUV structures gradually changed. After one day passed, the DR eventually disappeared. In the other two events, the dynamic evolution of the DRs was similar to that in the first event. Based on the observations, we speculate that the reconnection during the filament eruption changes the configuration of the surrounding magnetic fields systematically. During the reconnection process, magnetic fields are deflecting and the former arbitrarily distributed magnetic fields are rearranged along specific directions. The deflection of magnetic fields results in an instantaneous void region where the magnetic strength is smaller and the plasma density is lower. Consequently, the void region is observed as a DR and propagates outward with the reconnection developing.

  8. Dark Ribbons Propagating and Sweeping Across Extreme Ultraviolet Structures After Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Junmin; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong

    2015-05-01

    With observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we first report that dark ribbons (DRs) moved apart from the filament channel and swept across EUV structures after filament eruptions on 2013 June 23 and 2012 February 10 and 24, respectively. In the first event, the DR with a length of 168 Mm appeared at 100 Mm to the northwest of the filament channel, where the filament erupted 15 hr previously. The DR moved toward the northwest with the different sections having different velocities, ranging from 0.3 to 1.6 km s-1. When the DR’s middle part swept across a strong EUV structure, the motion of this part was blocked, appearing to deflect the DR. With the DR propagation, the connection of the surrounding EUV structures gradually changed. After one day passed, the DR eventually disappeared. In the other two events, the dynamic evolution of the DRs was similar to that in the first event. Based on the observations, we speculate that the reconnection during the filament eruption changes the configuration of the surrounding magnetic fields systematically. During the reconnection process, magnetic fields are deflecting and the former arbitrarily distributed magnetic fields are rearranged along specific directions. The deflection of magnetic fields results in an instantaneous void region where the magnetic strength is smaller and the plasma density is lower. Consequently, the void region is observed as a DR and propagates outward with the reconnection developing.

  9. Fractal image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnsley, Michael F.; Sloan, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    Fractals are geometric or data structures which do not simplify under magnification. Fractal Image Compression is a technique which associates a fractal to an image. On the one hand, the fractal can be described in terms of a few succinct rules, while on the other, the fractal contains much or all of the image information. Since the rules are described with less bits of data than the image, compression results. Data compression with fractals is an approach to reach high compression ratios for large data streams related to images. The high compression ratios are attained at a cost of large amounts of computation. Both lossless and lossy modes are supported by the technique. The technique is stable in that small errors in codes lead to small errors in image data. Applications to the NASA mission are discussed.

  10. Assembly and exchange of intermediate filament proteins of neurons: neurofilaments are dynamic structures

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have explored the dynamics of intermediate filament assembly and subunit exchange using fluorescently labeled neurofilament proteins and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. Neurofilaments (NFs) are assembled from three highly phosphorylated proteins with molecular masses of 180 (NF-H), 130 (NF-M), and 66 kD (NF-L) of which NF-L forms the structural core. The core component, NF-L, was stoichiometrically labeled at cysteine 321 with fluorescein, coumarin, or biotin-maleimide to produce assembly-competent fluorescent or biotinylated derivatives, respectively. Using coumarin-labeled NF-L as fluorescence donor and fluorescein-labeled NF-L as the fluorescence acceptor, assembly of NF filaments was induced by rapidly raising the NaCl concentration to 170 mM, and the kinetics was followed by the decrease in the donor fluorescence. Assembly of NF-L subunits into filaments does not require nucleotide binding or hydrolysis but is strongly dependent on ionic strength, pH, and temperature. The critical concentration of NF-L, that concentration that remains unassembled at equilibrium with fully formed filaments, is 38 micrograms/ml or 0.6 microM. Under physiological salt conditions NF-L filaments also undergo extensive subunit exchange. Kinetic analysis and evaluation of several possible mechanisms indicate that subunit exchange is preceded by dissociation of subunits from the filament and generation of a kinetically active pool of soluble subunits. Given the concentration of NF-L found in nerve cells and the possibility of regulating this pool, these results provide the first information that intermediate filaments are dynamic structures and that NF-L within the NF complex is in dynamic equilibrium with a small but kinetically active pool of unassembled NF-L units. PMID:2925792

  11. Structure of a Longitudinal Actin Dimer Assembled by Tandem W Domains: Implications for Actin Filament Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C.; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-11-20

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  12. Structure of a longitudinal actin dimer assembled by tandem w domains: implications for actin filament nucleation.

    PubMed

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2010-10-15

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin β4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin β4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  13. Effects of humic acid on recoverability and fractal structure of alum-kaolin flocs.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Runsheng; Zhang, Xihui; Xiao, Feng; Li, Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    Particle surface characteristics, floc recoverability and fractal structure of alum-kaolin flocs were investigated using in situ particle image velocimetry (PIV) and microbalance with or without humic acid. Experimental results indicated that the zeta potential of kaolin particle surface after adsorption of humic acid was related with humic acid concentration and its acid-base buffering capacity. Adsorption of humic acid resulted in more negative electrophoresis on the particle surface. Coagulant dosages for particles to form flocs would increase with increasing humic concentration. PIV was used to evaluate floc structural fragmentation, floc surface erosion as well as recoverability after high shear. It was found that the floc size during the steady phase of growth was small, while the regrowing capability decreased in the presence of humic acid. The recoverability was closely related with floc breakage modes including floc structural fragmentation and floc surface erosion. The fractal dimensions of alum-kaolin flocs by mass-size method based on microbalance would decrease with increasing humic concentration. This study proved that humic acid had adverse influences on the performance of coagulation process.

  14. Defect modes properties in self-similar fractal multilayer structures containing lossless single negative metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, H.; Rezaei, M.

    2013-08-01

    Transfer matrix method is used to investigate the electromagnetic transmission spectra of a one-dimensional photonic fractal multilayer structure composed of single-negative metamaterial when common positive dielectric defect layers of are introduced. It is found that the frequency of the resonance defect modes can be tuned independently by varying the defect layer thicknesses. It is also found that by increasing the value of refractive index of defect layers and the number of periods, the full width half maximum of defect modes will be narrowed and shifted to lower frequencies. Also, our investigations show that for both TE and TM polarizations moving away from normal incidence to oblique incidence shows that the defect modes shift to upper frequencies. In other words, the defect modes inside the band gap depend on the incident angle and polarization. More interesting, for angles of incidence greater than 55° the defect modes for TE polarization (unlike to TM polarization) are eliminated. Moreover, the electromagnetic fields in the defect layers are strongly localized, and they can be excite independently. We believe that the proposed fractal structures can be useful in designing tunable independently high-Q filters with specific channels by adjusting their structural parameters.

  15. Invertebrate muscles: thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Scott L; Hobbs, Kevin H; Thuma, Jeffrey B

    2008-10-01

    This is the second in a series of canonical reviews on invertebrate muscle. We cover here thin and thick filament structure, the molecular basis of force generation and its regulation, and two special properties of some invertebrate muscle, catch and asynchronous muscle. Invertebrate thin filaments resemble vertebrate thin filaments, although helix structure and tropomyosin arrangement show small differences. Invertebrate thick filaments, alternatively, are very different from vertebrate striated thick filaments and show great variation within invertebrates. Part of this diversity stems from variation in paramyosin content, which is greatly increased in very large diameter invertebrate thick filaments. Other of it arises from relatively small changes in filament backbone structure, which results in filaments with grossly similar myosin head placements (rotating crowns of heads every 14.5 nm) but large changes in detail (distances between heads in azimuthal registration varying from three to thousands of crowns). The lever arm basis of force generation is common to both vertebrates and invertebrates, and in some invertebrates this process is understood on the near atomic level. Invertebrate actomyosin is both thin (tropomyosin:troponin) and thick (primarily via direct Ca(++) binding to myosin) filament regulated, and most invertebrate muscles are dually regulated. These mechanisms are well understood on the molecular level, but the behavioral utility of dual regulation is less so. The phosphorylation state of the thick filament associated giant protein, twitchin, has been recently shown to be the molecular basis of catch. The molecular basis of the stretch activation underlying asynchronous muscle activity, however, remains unresolved.

  16. Invertebrate muscles: thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Scott L.; Hobbs, Kevin H.; Thuma, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the second in a series of canonical reviews on invertebrate muscle. We cover here thin and thick filament structure, the molecular basis of force generation and its regulation, and two special properties of some invertebrate muscle, catch and asynchronous muscle. Invertebrate thin filaments resemble vertebrate thin filaments, although helix structure and tropomyosin arrangement show small differences. Invertebrate thick filaments, alternatively, are very different from vertebrate striated thick filaments and show great variation within invertebrates. Part of this diversity stems from variation in paramyosin content, which is greatly increased in very large diameter invertebrate thick filaments. Other of it arises from relatively small changes in filament backbone structure, which results in filaments with grossly similar myosin head placements (rotating crowns of heads every 14.5 nm) but large changes in detail (distances between heads in azimuthal registration varying from three to thousands of crowns). The lever arm basis of force generation is common to both vetebrates and invertebrates, and in some invertebrates this process is understood on the near atomic level. Invertebrate actomyosin is both thin (tropomyosin:troponin) and thick (primarily via direct Ca++ binding to myosin) filament regulated, and most invertebrate muscles are dually regulated. These mechanisms are well understood on the molecular level, but the behavioral utility of dual regulation is less so. The phosphorylation state of the thick filament associated giant protein, twitchin, has been recently shown to be the molecular basis of catch. The molecular basis of the stretch activation underlying asynchronous muscle activity, however, remains unresolved. PMID:18616971

  17. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: A Model for Fractal Dimension of Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Hua; Yu, Bo-Ming; Zou, Ming-Qing

    2009-11-01

    We report a model for the fractal dimension Ds of rough surfaces based on the fractal distribution of roughness elements on surfaces and the fractal character of surface profiles. The proposed model for the fractal dimension Ds is expressed as a function of the fractal dimensions D for conic roughness diameter/height and Dp for surface profile, maximum roughness base diameter λmax, the ratio β of conic roughness height to its base radius as well as the ratio λminλmax of the minimum to the maximal base diameter.

  18. Auditory-motor synchronization with temporally fluctuating sequences is dependent on fractal structure but not musical expertise

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Summer K.; Limb, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Fractal structure is a ubiquitous property found in nature and biology, and has been observed in processes at different levels of organization, including rhythmic behavior and musical structure. A temporal process is characterized as fractal when serial long-term correlations and statistical self-similarity (scaling) are present. Previous studies of sensorimotor synchronization using isochronous (non-fractal) stimuli show that participants' errors exhibit persistent structure (positive long-term correlations), while their inter-tap intervals (ITIs) exhibit anti-persistent structure (negative long-term correlations). Auditory-motor synchronization has not been investigated with anti-persistent stimuli. In the current study, we systematically investigated whether the fractal structure of auditory rhythms was reflected in the responses of participants who were asked to coordinate their taps with each event. We asked musicians and non-musicians to tap with 12 different rhythms that ranged from anti-persistent to persistent. The scaling exponents of the ITIs were strongly correlated with the scaling exponents of the stimuli, showing that the long-term structure of the participants' taps scaled with the long-term structure of the stimuli. Surprisingly, the performance of the musicians was not significantly better than that of the non-musicians. Our results imply that humans are able to readily adapt (rather than simply react) to the overall statistical structure of temporally fluctuating stimuli, regardless of musical skill. PMID:25232347

  19. The Global Relationship between Chromatin Physical Topology, Fractal Structure, and Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Almassalha, L M; Tiwari, A; Ruhoff, P T; Stypula-Cyrus, Y; Cherkezyan, L; Matsuda, H; Dela Cruz, M A; Chandler, J E; White, C; Maneval, C; Subramanian, H; Szleifer, I; Roy, H K; Backman, V

    2017-01-24

    Most of what we know about gene transcription comes from the view of cells as molecular machines: focusing on the role of molecular modifications to the proteins carrying out transcriptional reactions at a loci-by-loci basis. This view ignores a critical reality: biological reactions do not happen in an empty space, but in a highly complex, interrelated, and dense nanoenvironment that profoundly influences chemical interactions. We explored the relationship between the physical nanoenvironment of chromatin and gene transcription in vitro. We analytically show that changes in the fractal dimension, D, of chromatin correspond to simultaneous increases in chromatin accessibility and compaction heterogeneity. Using these predictions, we demonstrate experimentally that nanoscopic changes to chromatin D within thirty minutes correlate with concomitant enhancement and suppression of transcription. Further, we show that the increased heterogeneity of physical structure of chromatin due to increase in fractal dimension correlates with increased heterogeneity of gene networks. These findings indicate that the higher order folding of chromatin topology may act as a molecular-pathway independent code regulating global patterns of gene expression. Since physical organization of chromatin is frequently altered in oncogenesis, this work provides evidence pairing molecular function to physical structure for processes frequently altered during tumorigenesis.

  20. The Global Relationship between Chromatin Physical Topology, Fractal Structure, and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Almassalha, L. M.; Tiwari, A.; Ruhoff, P. T.; Stypula-Cyrus, Y.; Cherkezyan, L.; Matsuda, H.; Dela Cruz, M. A.; Chandler, J. E.; White, C.; Maneval, C.; Subramanian, H.; Szleifer, I.; Roy, H. K.; Backman, V.

    2017-01-01

    Most of what we know about gene transcription comes from the view of cells as molecular machines: focusing on the role of molecular modifications to the proteins carrying out transcriptional reactions at a loci-by-loci basis. This view ignores a critical reality: biological reactions do not happen in an empty space, but in a highly complex, interrelated, and dense nanoenvironment that profoundly influences chemical interactions. We explored the relationship between the physical nanoenvironment of chromatin and gene transcription in vitro. We analytically show that changes in the fractal dimension, D, of chromatin correspond to simultaneous increases in chromatin accessibility and compaction heterogeneity. Using these predictions, we demonstrate experimentally that nanoscopic changes to chromatin D within thirty minutes correlate with concomitant enhancement and suppression of transcription. Further, we show that the increased heterogeneity of physical structure of chromatin due to increase in fractal dimension correlates with increased heterogeneity of gene networks. These findings indicate that the higher order folding of chromatin topology may act as a molecular-pathway independent code regulating global patterns of gene expression. Since physical organization of chromatin is frequently altered in oncogenesis, this work provides evidence pairing molecular function to physical structure for processes frequently altered during tumorigenesis. PMID:28117353

  1. Contribution of stratified extracellular polymeric substances to the gel-like and fractal structures of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Yuan, D Q; Wang, Y L; Feng, J

    2014-06-01

    The gel-like and fractal structures of activated sludge (AS) before and after extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extraction as well as different EPS fractions were investigated. The contributions of individual components in different EPS fractions to the gel-like behavior of sludge samples by enzyme treatment were examined as well. The centrifugation and ultrasound method was employed to stratify the EPS into slime, loosely and tightly bound EPS (LB- and TB-EPS). It was observed that all samples behaved as weak gels with weak-link. TB-EPS and AS after LB-EPS extraction showed the strongest elasticity in higher concentrations and highest mass fractal dimension, which may indicate the key role of TB-EPS in the gel-like and fractal structures of the sludge. Effects of protease or amylase on the gel-like property of sludge samples differed in the presence of different EPS fractions.

  2. Fractal radar scattering from soil.

    PubMed

    Oleschko, Klaudia; Korvin, Gabor; Figueroa, Benjamin; Vuelvas, Marco Antonio; Balankin, Alexander S; Flores, Lourdes; Carreón, Dora

    2003-04-01

    A general technique is developed to retrieve the fractal dimension of self-similar soils through microwave (radar) scattering. The technique is based on a mathematical model relating the fractal dimensions of the georadargram to that of the scattering structure. Clear and different fractal signatures have been observed over four geosystems (soils and sediments) compared in this work.

  3. Fractal Geometry of Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Wolfgang E.

    In Fractals smaller parts and the whole are linked together. Fractals are self-similar, as those parts are, at least approximately, scaled-down copies of the rough whole. In architecture, such a concept has also been known for a long time. Not only architects of the twentieth century called for an overall idea that is mirrored in every single detail, but also Gothic cathedrals and Indian temples offer self-similarity. This study mainly focuses upon the question whether this concept of self-similarity makes architecture with fractal properties more diverse and interesting than Euclidean Modern architecture. The first part gives an introduction and explains Fractal properties in various natural and architectural objects, presenting the underlying structure by computer programmed renderings. In this connection, differences between the fractal, architectural concept and true, mathematical Fractals are worked out to become aware of limits. This is the basis for dealing with the problem whether fractal-like architecture, particularly facades, can be measured so that different designs can be compared with each other under the aspect of fractal properties. Finally the usability of the Box-Counting Method, an easy-to-use measurement method of Fractal Dimension is analyzed with regard to architecture.

  4. Demonstration of mechanical connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nucleoplasm that stabilize nuclear structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maniotis, A. J.; Chen, C. S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    We report here that living cells and nuclei are hard-wired such that a mechanical tug on cell surface receptors can immediately change the organization of molecular assemblies in the cytoplasm and nucleus. When integrins were pulled by micromanipulating bound microbeads or micropipettes, cytoskeletal filaments reoriented, nuclei distorted, and nucleoli redistributed along the axis of the applied tension field. These effects were specific for integrins, independent of cortical membrane distortion, and were mediated by direct linkages between the cytoskeleton and nucleus. Actin microfilaments mediated force transfer to the nucleus at low strain; however, tearing of the actin gel resulted with greater distortion. In contrast, intermediate filaments effectively mediated force transfer to the nucleus under both conditions. These filament systems also acted as molecular guy wires to mechanically stiffen the nucleus and anchor it in place, whereas microtubules acted to hold open the intermediate filament lattice and to stabilize the nucleus against lateral compression. Molecular connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nuclear scaffolds may therefore provide a discrete path for mechanical signal transfer through cells as well as a mechanism for producing integrated changes in cell and nuclear structure in response to changes in extracellular matrix adhesivity or mechanics.

  5. CORTICAL CYTOPLASMIC FILAMENTS OF CLEAVING EGGS: A STRUCTURAL ELEMENT CORRESPONDING TO THE CONTRACTILE RING

    PubMed Central

    Szollosi, Daniel

    1970-01-01

    A sheath consisting of filaments 50–70 A in diameter has been demonstrated in association with the expanded, leading margins of the cleavage furrow in unilaterally and symmetrically cleaving eggs of a jellyfish and a polychaete worm, respectively. The observations suggest that the filament system might provide a structural basis for the existence of the contractile gel that, according to a hypothesis by Marsland and Landau, accomplishes cleavage. The filamentous sheath is present only in the furrow region and is arranged in an arcuate manner in unilaterally cleaving eggs and circumferentially in symmetrical cleavage. The filaments appear to be of finite length, and a number of them must overlap to span the length of the furrow. Contraction may be accomplished if the filaments slide relative to each other. However, contraction per se was experimentally not demonstrated in the studied systems. The disappearance of microvilli and the merocrine type secretion of mucoid droplets at the interdigitating or "spinning" membrane region of unilateral cleavage suggest that the unfolding of a pleated membrane and the insertion of intracytoplasmic membranes might contribute, at least in part, to the necessary extra cell membrane. PMID:4390970

  6. Structural basis for the prion-like MAVS filaments in antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; He, Xiaojing; Zheng, Hui; Huang, Lily J; Hou, Fajian; Yu, Zhiheng; de la Cruz, Michael Jason; Borkowski, Brian; Zhang, Xuewu; Chen, Zhijian J; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein is required for innate immune responses against RNA viruses. In virus-infected cells MAVS forms prion-like aggregates to activate antiviral signaling cascades, but the underlying structural mechanism is unknown. Here we report cryo-electron microscopic structures of the helical filaments formed by both the N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) of MAVS and a truncated MAVS lacking part of the proline-rich region and the C-terminal transmembrane domain. Both structures are left-handed three-stranded helical filaments, revealing specific interfaces between individual CARD subunits that are dictated by electrostatic interactions between neighboring strands and hydrophobic interactions within each strand. Point mutations at multiple locations of these two interfaces impaired filament formation and antiviral signaling. Super-resolution imaging of virus-infected cells revealed rod-shaped MAVS clusters on mitochondria. These results elucidate the structural mechanism of MAVS polymerization, and explain how an α-helical domain uses distinct chemical interactions to form self-perpetuating filaments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01489.001 PMID:24569476

  7. Structural basis for the prion-like MAVS filaments in antiviral innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; He, Xiaojing; Zheng, Hui; Huang, Lily J; Hou, Fajian; Yu, Zhiheng; de la Cruz, Michael Jason; Borkowski, Brian; Zhang, Xuewu; Chen, Zhijian J; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein is required for innate immune responses against RNA viruses. In virus-infected cells MAVS forms prion-like aggregates to activate antiviral signaling cascades, but the underlying structural mechanism is unknown. Here we report cryo-electron microscopic structures of the helical filaments formed by both the N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) of MAVS and a truncated MAVS lacking part of the proline-rich region and the C-terminal transmembrane domain. Both structures are left-handed three-stranded helical filaments, revealing specific interfaces between individual CARD subunits that are dictated by electrostatic interactions between neighboring strands and hydrophobic interactions within each strand. Point mutations at multiple locations of these two interfaces impaired filament formation and antiviral signaling. Super-resolution imaging of virus-infected cells revealed rod-shaped MAVS clusters on mitochondria. These results elucidate the structural mechanism of MAVS polymerization, and explain how an α-helical domain uses distinct chemical interactions to form self-perpetuating filaments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01489.001.

  8. Structure, sarcomeric organization, and thin filament binding of cardiac myosin-binding protein-C.

    PubMed

    Craig, Roger; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Mun, Ji Young; Torre, Iratxe; Luther, Pradeep K

    2014-03-01

    Myosin-binding protein-C (MyBP-C) is an accessory protein of the myosin filaments of vertebrate striated muscle. In the heart, it plays a key role in modulating contractility in response to β-adrenergic stimulation. Mutations in the cardiac isoform (cMyBP-C) are a leading cause of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Understanding cMyBP-C function and its role in disease requires knowledge of the structure of the molecule, its organization in the sarcomere, and its interactions with other sarcomeric proteins. Here we review the main structural features of this modular, elongated molecule and the properties of some of its key domains. We describe observations suggesting that the bulk of the molecule extends perpendicular to the thick filament, enabling it to reach neighboring thin filaments in the sarcomere. We review structural and functional evidence for interaction of its N-terminal domains with actin and how this may modulate thin filament activation. We also discuss the effects that phosphorylation of cMyBP-C has on some of these structural features and how this might relate to cMyBP-C function in the beating heart.

  9. Structural and Mechanical Properties of Intermediate Filaments under Extreme Conditions and Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhao

    Intermediate filaments are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. It was discovered during the recent decades that intermediate filament proteins play key roles to reinforce cells subjected to large-deformation as well as participate in signal transduction. However, it is still poorly understood how the nanoscopic structure, as well as the biochemical properties of these protein molecules contribute to their biomechanical functions. In this research we investigate the material function of intermediate filaments under various extreme mechanical conditions as well as disease states. We use a full atomistic model and study its response to mechanical stresses. Learning from the mechanical response obtained from atomistic simulations, we build mesoscopic models following the finer-trains-coarser principles. By using this multiple-scale model, we present a detailed analysis of the mechanical properties and associated deformation mechanisms of intermediate filament network. We reveal the mechanism of a transition from alpha-helices to beta-sheets with subsequent intermolecular sliding under mechanical force, which has been inferred previously from experimental results. This nanoscale mechanism results in a characteristic nonlinear force-extension curve, which leads to a delocalization of mechanical energy and prevents catastrophic fracture. This explains how intermediate filament can withstand extreme mechanical deformation of > 1 00% strain despite the presence of structural defects. We combine computational and experimental techniques to investigate the molecular mechanism of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, a premature aging disease. We find that the mutated lamin tail .domain is more compact and stable than the normal one. This altered structure and stability may enhance the association of intermediate filaments with the nuclear membrane, providing a molecular mechanism of the disease. We study the nuclear membrane association

  10. Characterization of Microgravity Effects on Bone Structure and Strength Using Fractal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acharya, Raj S.; Shackelford, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Protecting humans against extreme environmental conditions requires a thorough understanding of the pathophysiological changes resulting from the exposure to those extreme conditions. Knowledge of the degree of medical risk associated with the exposure is of paramount importance in the design of effective prophylactic and therapeutic measures for space exploration. Major health hazards due o musculoskeletal systems include the signs and symptoms of hypercalciuria, lengthy recovery of lost bone tissue after flight, the possibility of irreversible trabecular bone loss, the possible effect of calcification in the soft tissues, and the possible increase in fracture potential. In this research, we characterize the trabecular structure with the aid of fractal analysis. Our research to relate local trabecular structural information to microgravity conditions is an important initial step in understanding the effect of microgravity and countermeasures on bone condition and strength. The proposed research is also closely linked with Osteoporosis and will benefit the general population.

  11. Non-Debye dielectric relaxation in biological structures arises from their fractal nature.

    PubMed

    Raicu, V; Sato, T; Raicu, G

    2001-08-01

    What differentiates biological tissues from one another, thereby allowing their accomplishment of a physiological function, is their organization at supracellular and cellular levels. We developed general dielectric models for Cantorian (or treelike) fractal networks of transmission lines that mimic supracellular organization in numerous biological tissues and tissue surfaces, and which are compatible with both in vitro and in vivo measuring techniques. By varying a set of adjustable physical and geometrical parameters pertaining to the structure, we could numerically reproduce a variety of dielectric dispersion curves-most of them of a composite type-that suitably described experimental data from relatively organized biological tissues. We therefore conclude that the well-documented non-Debye dielectric behavior of biological structures reflects their self-similar architecture.

  12. Nanoscopic structural rearrangements of the Cu-filament in conductive-bridge memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celano, U.; Giammaria, G.; Goux, L.; Belmonte, A.; Jurczak, M.; Vandervorst, W.

    2016-07-01

    The electrochemical reactions triggering resistive switching in conductive-bridge resistive random access memory (CBRAM) are spatially confined in few tens of nm3. The formation and dissolution of nanoscopic Cu-filaments rely on the displacement of ions in such confined volume, and it is driven by the electric field induced ion migration and nanoscaled redox reactions. The stochastic nature of these fundamental processes leads to a large variability of the device performance. In this work, a combination of two- and three-dimensional scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques are used to study the conductive filament (CF) formation, rupture and its nanoscopic structural rearrangements. The high spatial confinement of our approach enables to locally induce RS in a confined area and image it in 3D. A conical shape of the CF is consistently observed, indicating that the ion migration is the rate limiting step in the filament formation when using high quality dielectrics as switching layers. The sub-10 nm electrical contact size of the AFM tip is used to study the filament's dissolution and detect the hopping conduction of Cu during the CF rupture. We consistently observe a tunnel gap formation associated with the tip-induced filament reset. Finally, aiming to match the fundamental understanding with the integrated device operations, we apply scalpel SPM to failed memory cells and directly observe the appearance of filament multiplicity as a major source of failures and variability in CBRAM.The electrochemical reactions triggering resistive switching in conductive-bridge resistive random access memory (CBRAM) are spatially confined in few tens of nm3. The formation and dissolution of nanoscopic Cu-filaments rely on the displacement of ions in such confined volume, and it is driven by the electric field induced ion migration and nanoscaled redox reactions. The stochastic nature of these fundamental processes leads to a large variability of the device performance. In this

  13. Fractal structure and the dynamics of aggregation of synthetic melanin in low pH aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.; Sung, J.; Eisner, M.; Moss, S.C.; Gallas, J.

    1989-01-01

    We have used static and dynamic light scattering to study the dynamics of aggregation of synthetic melanin, an amorphous biopolymeric substance, in low pH aqueous solution. We have found that, depending on the final pH value of the solutions, there existed two regimes of the aggregation kinetics, one corresponding to diffusion limited aggregation (DLA), and the other corresponding to reaction limited aggregation (RLA). The precipitates formed in these two regimes can be characterized by fractal structures. We have found fractal dimensions of d/sub f/ = 1.8 for the DLA clusters and d/sub f/ = 2.2 for the RLA clusters. These results agree well with the proposed limits of the fractal dimensions of the gold aggregates formed in aqueous solutions by Weitz et al.

  14. The fractal structure and the dynamics of aggregation of synthetic melanin in low pH aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. S.; Sung, J.; Eisner, M.; Moss, S. C.; Gallas, J.

    1989-01-01

    We have used static and dynamic light scattering to study the dynamics of aggregation of synthetic melanin, an amorphous biopolymeric substance, in low pH aqueous solution. We have found that, depending on the final pH value of the solutions, there existed two regimes of the aggregation kinetics, one corresponding to diffusion limited aggregation (DLA), and the other corresponding to reaction limited aggregation (RLA). The precipitates formed in these two regimes can be characterized by fractal structures. We have found fractal dimensions of df =1.8 for the DLA clusters and df =2.2 for the RLA clusters. These results agree well with the proposed limits of the fractal dimensions of the gold aggregates formed in aqueous solutions by Weitz et al.

  15. Multilamellar Structures and Filament Bundles Are Found on the Cell Surface during Bunyavirus Egress

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Sánchez, Laura; Risco, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Inside cells, viruses build specialized compartments for replication and morphogenesis. We observed that virus release associates with specific structures found on the surface of mammalian cells. Cultured adherent cells were infected with a bunyavirus and processed for oriented sectioning and transmission electron microscopy. Imaging of cell basal regions showed sophisticated multilamellar structures (MLS) and extracellular filament bundles with attached viruses. Correlative light and electron microscopy confirmed that both MLS and filaments proliferated during the maximum egress of new viruses. MLS dimensions and structure were reminiscent of those reported for the nanostructures on gecko fingertips, which are responsible for the extraordinary attachment capacity of these lizards. As infected cells with MLS were more resistant to detachment than control cells, we propose an adhesive function for these structures, which would compensate for the loss of adherence during release of new virus progeny. PMID:23799021

  16. Time scale defined by the fractal structure of the price fluctuations in foreign exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yoshiaki

    2010-04-01

    In this contribution, a new time scale named C-fluctuation time is defined by price fluctuations observed at a given resolution. The intraday fractal structures and the relations of the three time scales: real time (physical time), tick time and C-fluctuation time, in foreign exchange markets are analyzed. The data set used is trading prices of foreign exchange rates; US dollar (USD)/Japanese yen (JPY), USD/Euro (EUR), and EUR/JPY. The accuracy of the data is one minute and data within a minute are recorded in order of transaction. The series of instantaneous velocity of C-fluctuation time flowing are exponentially distributed for small C when they are measured by real time and for tiny C when they are measured by tick time. When the market is volatile, for larger C, the series of instantaneous velocity are exponentially distributed.

  17. STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF QUIESCENT FILAMENT CHANNELS OBSERVED BY HINODE/XRT AND STEREO/EUVI

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yingna; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan; Golub, Leon

    2010-09-20

    We present a study of the structure and dynamics of quiescent filament channels observed by Hinode/XRT and STEREO/EUVI at the solar minimum 23/24 from 2006 November to 2008 December. For 12 channels identified on the solar disk (Group I channels), we find that the morphology of the structure on the two sides of the channel is asymmetric in both X-rays and EUV: the eastern side has curved features while the western side has straight features. We interpret the results in terms of a magnetic flux rope model. The asymmetry in the morphology is due to the variation in axial flux of the flux rope along the channel, which causes the field lines from one polarity to turn into the flux rope (curved feature), while the field lines from the other polarity are connected to very distant sources (straight). For most of the 68 channels identified by cavities at the east and west limbs (Group II channels), the asymmetry cannot be clearly identified, which is likely due to the fact that the axial flux may be relatively constant along such channels. Corresponding cavities are identified only for 5 of the 12 Group I channels, while Group II channels are identified for all of the 68 cavity pairs. The studied filament channels are often observed as dark channels in X-rays and EUV. Sheared loops within Group I channels are often seen in X-rays, but are rarely seen in Group II channels as shown in the X-ray Telescope daily synoptic observations. A survey of the dynamics of studied filament channels shows that filament eruptions occur at an average rate of 1.4 filament eruptions per channel per solar rotation.

  18. Structural basis of thymosin-β4/profilin exchange leading to actin filament polymerization.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bo; Leyrat, Cedric; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2014-10-28

    Thymosin-β4 (Tβ4) and profilin are the two major sequestering proteins that maintain the pool of monomeric actin (G-actin) within cells of higher eukaryotes. Tβ4 prevents G-actin from joining a filament, whereas profilin:actin only supports barbed-end elongation. Here, we report two Tβ4:actin structures. The first structure shows that Tβ4 has two helices that bind at the barbed and pointed faces of G-actin, preventing the incorporation of the bound G-actin into a filament. The second structure displays a more open nucleotide binding cleft on G-actin, which is typical of profilin:actin structures, with a concomitant disruption of the Tβ4 C-terminal helix interaction. These structures, combined with biochemical assays and molecular dynamics simulations, show that the exchange of bound actin between Tβ4 and profilin involves both steric and allosteric components. The sensitivity of profilin to the conformational state of actin indicates a similar allosteric mechanism for the dissociation of profilin during filament elongation.

  19. Structural and fractal characterization of tungstophosphoric acid modified titanium dioxide photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, S.; Rožić, Lj; Vuković, Z.; Grbić, B.; Radić, N.; Stojadinović, S.; Vasilić, R.

    2017-04-01

    This article presents the comparison of structural and fractal properties of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) and TiO2 modified with tungstophosphoric acid (TiO2/HPW) and their impact on the photocatalytic degradation of hazardous water pollutants. TiO2 and TiO2/HPW samples were synthesized by a combined sol-gel and hydrothermal processing. The XRD analysis of pure TiO2 samples revealed that phase composition was mainly dependent on the calcination temperature, changing from amorphous TiO2 to crystalline anatase and rutile by increasing the temperature. On the other hand, the XRD of TiO2/HPW samples calcined at temperatures above 600 °C showed crystalline peaks associated to formation of WO3 and WO2.92 crystalline domains. The N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm and pore size distribution of TiO2/HPW samples detected the existence of mesoporous characteristic with very narrow bimodal pores in the mesoporous region. The structural heterogeneity of samples was analyzed by means of pore size distribution functions, while the variation in fractal dimension were determined from the nitrogen adsorption isotherms, using the modified Frenkel-Halsey-Hill method. The results demonstrate that the approach is capable of characterizing complex textures such as those present in the TiO2 and TiO2/HPW photocatalysts. Besides, the effect of calcinations condition on photocatalytic properties of the samples was also investigated. The highest efficiency with respect to methyl orange photodecomposition was observed for TiO2/HPW photocatalysts calcined at 700 °C.

  20. Fractal structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes in biologically relevant conditions: role of chirality vs. media conditions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Iftheker A; Aich, Nirupam; Afrooz, A R M Nabiul; Flora, Joseph R V; Schierz, P Ariette; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Saleh, Navid B

    2013-11-01

    Aggregate structure of covalently functionalized chiral specific semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was systematically studied employing static light scattering (SLS). Fractal dimensions (Df) of two specific chirality SWNTs-SG65 and SG76 with (6, 5) and (7, 6) chiral enrichments-were measured under four biological exposure media conditions, namely: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 medium, and 0.9% saline solution. The SWNTs exhibited chiral dependence on Df with SG65 showing more fractal or loosely bound aggregate structures, i.e., lower Df values (range of 2.24±0.03 to 2.64±0.05), compared to the SG76 sample (range of 2.58±0.13 to 2.90±0.08). All the Df values reported are highly reproducible, measured from multiple SLS runs and estimated with 'random block-effects' statistical analysis that yielded all p values to be <0.001. The key mechanism for such difference in Df between the SWNT samples was identified as the difference in van der Waals (VDW) interaction energies of these samples, where higher VDW of SG76 resulted in tighter packing density. Effect of medium type showed lower sensitivity; however, presence of di-valent cations (Ca(2+)) in DMEM and MEM media resulted in relatively loose or more fractal aggregates. Moreover, presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), used to mimic the in vitro cell culture condition, reduced the Df values, i.e., created more fractal structures. Steric hindrance to aggregation was identified as the key mechanism for creating the fractal structures. Also, increase in FBS concentration from 1% to 10% resulted in increasingly lower Df values.

  1. High-resolution structure of the presynaptic RAD51 filament on single-stranded DNA by electron cryo-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Short, Judith M.; Liu, Yang; Chen, Shaoxia; Soni, Neelesh; Madhusudhan, Mallur S.; Shivji, Mahmud K.K.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous DNA recombination (HR) by the RAD51 recombinase enables error-free DNA break repair. To execute HR, RAD51 first forms a presynaptic filament on single-stranded (ss) DNA, which catalyses pairing with homologous double-stranded (ds) DNA. Here, we report a structure for the presynaptic human RAD51 filament at 3.5–5.0Å resolution using electron cryo-microscopy. RAD51 encases ssDNA in a helical filament of 103Å pitch, comprising 6.4 protomers per turn, with a rise of 16.1Å and a twist of 56.2°. Inter-protomer distance correlates with rotation of an α-helical region in the core catalytic domain that is juxtaposed to ssDNA, suggesting how the RAD51–DNA interaction modulates protomer spacing and filament pitch. We map Fanconi anaemia-like disease-associated RAD51 mutations, clarifying potential phenotypes. We predict binding sites on the presynaptic filament for two modules present in each BRC repeat of the BRCA2 tumour suppressor, a critical HR mediator. Structural modelling suggests that changes in filament pitch mask or expose one binding site with filament-inhibitory potential, rationalizing the paradoxical ability of the BRC repeats to either stabilize or inhibit filament formation at different steps during HR. Collectively, our findings provide fresh insight into the structural mechanism of HR and its dysregulation in human disease. PMID:27596592

  2. Hybrid stent device of flow-diverting effect and stent-assisted coil embolization formed by fractal structure.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masahiro; Irie, Keiko; Masunaga, Kouhei; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Nakajima, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Masaru; Fukuda, Toshio; Arai, Fumihito; Negoro, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a novel hybrid medical stent device. This hybrid stent device formed by fractal mesh structures provides a flow-diverting effect and stent-assisted coil embolization. Flow-diverter stents decrease blood flow into an aneurysm to prevent its rupture. In general, the mesh size of a flow-diverter stent needs to be small enough to prevent blood flow into the aneurysm. Conventional flow-diverter stents are not available for stent-assisted coil embolization, which is an effective method for aneurysm occlusion, because the mesh size is too small to insert a micro-catheter for coil embolization. The proposed hybrid stent device is capable of stent-assisted coil embolization while simultaneously providing a flow-diverting effect. The fractal stent device is composed of mesh structures with fine and rough mesh areas. The rough mesh area can be used to insert a micro-catheter for stent-assisted coil embolization. Flow-diverting effects of two fractal stent designs were composed to three commercially available stent designs. Flow-diverting effects were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment. Based on the CFD and PIV results, the fractal stent devices reduce the flow velocity inside an aneurism just as much as the commercially available flow-diverting stents while allowing stent-assisted coil embolization.

  3. Sizes, graphitic structures and fractal geometry of light-duty diesel engine particulates.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. O.; Zhu, J.; Ciatti, S.; Choi, M. Y.; Energy Systems; Drexel Univ.

    2003-01-01

    The particulate matter of a light-duty diesel engine was characterized in its morphology, sizes, internal microstructures, and fractal geometry. A thermophoretic sampling system was employed to collect particulates directly from the exhaust manifold of a 1.7-liter turbocharged common-rail direct-injection diesel engine. The particulate samples collected at various engine-operating conditions were then analyzed by using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an image processing/data acquisition system. Results showed that mean primary particle diameters (dp), and radii of gyration (Rg), ranged from 19.4 nm to 32.5 nm and 77.4 nm to 134.1 nm, respectively, through the entire engine-operating conditions of 675 rpm (idling) to 4000 rpm and 0% to 100% loads. It was also revealed that the other important parameters sensitive to the particulate formation, such as exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) rate, equivalence ratio, and temperature, affected particle sizes significantly. Bigger primary particles were measured at higher EGR rates, higher equivalence ratios (fuel-rich), and lower exhaust temperatures. Fractal dimensions (D{sup f}) were measured at a range of 1.5 - 1.7, which are smaller than those measured for heavy-duty direct-injection diesel engine particulates in our previous study. This finding implies that the light-duty diesel engine used in this study produces more stretched chain-like shape particles, while the heavy-duty diesel engine emits more spherical particles. The microstructures of diesel particulates were observed at high TEM magnifications and further analyzed by a Raman spectroscope. Raman spectra revealed an atomic structure of the particulates produced at high engine loads, which is similar to that of typical graphite.

  4. Parameterizing liquid crystal variable retarder structural organization with a fractal-Born approximation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladish, James C.; Duncan, Donald D.

    2016-05-01

    Liquid crystal variable retarders (LCVRs) are computer-controlled birefringent devices that contain nanometer-sized birefringent liquid crystals (LCs). These devices impart retardance effects through a global, uniform orientation change of the LCs, which is based on a user-defined drive voltage input. In other words, the LC structural organization dictates the device functionality. The LC structural organization also produces a spectral scatter component which exhibits an inverse power law dependence. We investigate LC structural organization by measuring the voltage-dependent LC spectral scattering signature with an integrating sphere and then relate this observable to a fractal-Born model based on the Born approximation and a Von Kármán spectrum. We obtain LCVR light scattering spectra at various drive voltages (i.e., different LC orientations) and then parameterize LCVR structural organization with voltage-dependent correlation lengths. The results can aid in determining performance characteristics of systems using LCVRs and can provide insight into interpreting structural organization measurements.

  5. Structure of the Acidianus Filamentous Virus 3 and Comparative Genomics of Related Archaeal Lipothrixviruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Gisle; Aramayo, Ricardo; Basta, Tamara; Häring, Monika; Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Chen, Lanming; Rachel, Reinhard; Boisset, Nicolas; Garrett, Roger A.; Prangishvili, David

    2008-01-01

    Four novel filamentous viruses with double-stranded DNA genomes, namely, Acidianus filamentous virus 3 (AFV3), AFV6, AFV7, and AFV8, have been characterized from the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus, and they are assigned to the Betalipothrixvirus genus of the family Lipothrixviridae. The structures of the approximately 2-μm-long virions are similar, and one of them, AFV3, was studied in detail. It consists of a cylindrical envelope containing globular subunits arranged in a helical formation that is unique for any known double-stranded DNA virus. The envelope is 3.1 nm thick and encases an inner core with two parallel rows of protein subunits arranged like a zipper. Each end of the virion is tapered and carries three short filaments. Two major structural proteins were identified as being common to all betalipothrixviruses. The viral genomes were sequenced and analyzed, and they reveal a high level of conservation in both gene content and gene order over large regions, with this similarity extending partly to the earlier described betalipothrixvirus Sulfolobus islandicus filamentous virus. A few predicted gene products of each virus, in addition to the structural proteins, could be assigned specific functions, including a putative helicase involved in Holliday junction branch migration, a nuclease, a protein phosphatase, transcriptional regulators, and glycosyltransferases. The AFV7 genome appears to have undergone intergenomic recombination with a large section of an AFV2-like viral genome, apparently resulting in phenotypic changes, as revealed by the presence of AFV2-like termini in the AFV7 virions. Shared features of the genomes include (i) large inverted terminal repeats exhibiting conserved, regularly spaced direct repeats; (ii) a highly conserved operon encoding the two major structural proteins; (iii) multiple overlapping open reading frames, which may be indicative of gene recoding; (iv) putative 12-bp genetic elements; and (v) partial gene

  6. In vivo formation steps of the hard alpha-keratin intermediate filament along a hair follicle: evidence for structural polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Rafik, Mériem Er; Briki, Fatma; Burghammer, Manfred; Doucet, Jean

    2006-04-01

    Several aspects of the intermediate filaments' molecular architecture remain mysterious despite decades of study. The growth process and the final architecture may depend on the physical, chemical, and biochemical environment. Aiming at clarifying this issue, we have revisited the structure of the human hair follicle by means of X-ray microdiffraction. We conclude that the histology-based growth zones along the follicle are correlated to the fine architecture of the filaments deduced from X-ray microdiffraction. Our analysis reveals the existence of two major polymorph intermediate filament architectures. Just above the bulb, the filaments are characterized by a diameter of 100 Angstroms and a low-density core. The following zone upwards is characterized by the lateral aggregation of the filaments into a compact network of filaments, by a contraction of their diameter (to 75 Angstroms) and by the setting up of a long-range longitudinal ordering. In the upper zone, the small structural change associated with the tissue hardening likely concerns the terminal domains. The architecture of the intermediate filament in the upper zones could be specific to hard alpha-keratin whilst the other architecture found in the lower zone could be representative for intermediate filaments in a different environment.

  7. Self-Elongation with Sequential Folding of a Filament of Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Ryojiro; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Katori, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    Under hard-agar and nutrient-rich conditions, a cell of Bacillus subtilis grows as a single filament owing to the failure of cell separation after each growth and division cycle. The self-elongating filament of cells shows sequential folding processes, and multifold structures extend over an agar plate. We report that the growth process from the exponential phase to the stationary phase is well described by the time evolution of fractal dimensions of the filament configuration. We propose a method of characterizing filament configurations using a set of lengths of multifold parts of a filament. Systems of differential equations are introduced to describe the folding processes that create multifold structures in the early stage of the growth process. We show that the fitting of experimental data to the solutions of equations is excellent, and the parameters involved in our model systems are determined.

  8. Density filament and helical field line structures in three dimensional Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritaka, Toseo; Sakawa, Youichi; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Morita, Taichi; Yamaura, Yuta; Ishikawa, Taishi; Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Collisionless shocks mediated by Weibel instability are attracting attention for their relevance to experimental demonstrations of astrophysical shocks in high-intensity laser facilities. The three dimensional structure of Weibel-mediated shocks is investigated through a fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulation. The structures obtained are characterized by the following features: (i) helical magnetic field lines elongated in the direction upstream of the shock region, (ii) high and low density filaments inside the helical field lines. These structures originate from the interaction between counter-streaming plasma flow and magnetic vortexes caused by Weibel instability, and potentially affect the shock formation mechanism.

  9. Dynamic structure factor of vibrating fractals: proteins as a case study.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Klafter, Joseph; Granek, Rony

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamic structure factor S(k,t) of proteins at large wave numbers k, kR(g)≫1, where R(g) is the gyration radius. At this regime measurements are sensitive to internal dynamics, and we focus on vibrational dynamics of folded proteins. Exploiting the analogy between proteins and fractals, we perform a general analytic calculation of the displacement two-point correlation functions, <[u(−>)(i)(t)-u(−>)(j)(0)](2)>. We confront the derived expressions with numerical evaluations that are based on protein data bank (PDB) structures and the Gaussian network model (GNM) for a few proteins and for the Sierpinski gasket as a controlled check. We use these calculations to evaluate S(k,t) with arrested rotational and translational degrees of freedom, and show that the decay of S(k,t) is dominated by the spatially averaged mean-square displacement of an amino acid. The latter has been previously shown to evolve subdiffusively in time, <[u(−>)(i)(t)-u(−>)(i)(0)](2)> ~t(ν), where ν is the anomalous diffusion exponent that depends on the spectral dimension d(s) and fractal dimension d(f). As a result, for wave numbers obeying k(2))(2)>≳1, S(k,t) effectively decays as a stretched exponential S(k,t)≃S(k)e(-(Γ(k)t)(β)) with β≃ν, where the relaxation rate is Γ(k)~(k(B)T/mω(o)(2))(1/β)k(2/β), T is the temperature, and mω(o)(2) the GNM effective spring constant describing the interaction between neighboring amino acids. The static structure factor is dominated by the fractal character of the native fold, S(k)~k(-d(f)), with negligible to marginal influence of vibrations. The analytical expressions are first confronted with numerically based calculations on the Sierpinski gasket, and very good agreement is found between simulations and theory. We then perform PDB-GNM-based numerical calculations for a few proteins, and an effective stretched exponential decay of the dynamic structure factor is found, albeit their relatively small size

  10. Three-dimensional structure of actin filaments and of an actin gel made with actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Niederman, R; Amrein, P C; Hartwig, J

    1983-05-01

    Purified muscle actin and mixtures of actin and actin-binding protein were examined in the transmission electron microscope after fixation, critical point drying, and rotary shadowing. The three-dimensional structure of the protein assemblies was analyzed by a computer-assisted graphic analysis applicable to generalized filament networks. This analysis yielded information concerning the frequency of filament intersections, the filament length between these intersections, the angle at which filaments branch at these intersections, and the concentration of filaments within a defined volume. Purified actin at a concentration of 1 mg/ml assembled into a uniform mass of long filaments which overlap at random angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Actin in the presence of macrophage actin-binding protein assembled into short, straight filaments, organized in a perpendicular branching network. The distance between branch points was inversely related to the molar ratio of actin-binding protein to actin. This distance was what would be predicted if actin filaments grew at right angles off of nucleation sites on the two ends of actin-binding protein dimers, and then annealed. The results suggest that actin in combination with actin-binding protein self-assembles to form a three-dimensional network resembling the peripheral cytoskeleton of motile cells.

  11. Freely Suspended Smectic Filaments and the Structure of the B7 Phase of MHOBOW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, N.; Link, D. R.; Maclennan, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    Our recent discovery of the spontaneous formation of chiral domains in fluid smectic phases of achiral bow-shaped molecules opens up a wide variety of possibilities for new liquid crystal phases and phenomena. The basic, spontaneously chiral layer structure of the highest temperature fluid smectic phases, the B2 and B7, are shown. One of the most intriguing aspects of this structure is the plethora of possible phases coming from different stacking sequences of the polar ordering and tilt directions. The four possibilities of next-nearest neighbor alternation are shown. In the original material studied, NOBOW, the ground states found are antiferroelectric, either the racemic SmC(sub S)P(sub A) or the chiral SmC(sub A)P(sub A). We are currently studying MHOBOW, synthesized by D. Walba which, by virtue of its methyl hexyloxy tail has a tendency to form anticlinic layer interfaces, in the hope of finding a phase with a ferroelectric ground state, either SmC(sub A)P(sub S) or SmC(sub S)P(sub A), which can be obtained in NOBOW only by applying a field. Preliminary observations of MHO-BOW have made its study, from the point of view of understanding novel LC structures, extremely high priority. The following truly remarkable characteristics have been revealed: (i) The smectic phase grows out of the isotropic in the form of helical ribbons. The resulting planar aligned textures of focal conics with layers normal to glass plates exhibit bizarre modulations, including stripes and checker-boards. These have also been seen in other materials suggesting that this is a new phase (tentatively called B7), which is a fluid smectic with some kind of in-layer structure. (ii) It is virtually impossible to make freely suspended films of MHOBOW. Rather it makes the freely suspended filaments which preliminary x-ray scattering experiments reveal to have the nested cylinder layer structure indicated; (iii) The powder x-ray diffraction exhibits four resolution-limited smectic layering peaks

  12. Discriminatory ability of fractal and grey level co-occurrence matrix methods in structural analysis of hippocampus layers.

    PubMed

    Pantic, Igor; Dacic, Sanja; Brkic, Predrag; Lavrnja, Irena; Jovanovic, Tomislav; Pantic, Senka; Pekovic, Sanja

    2015-04-07

    Fractal and grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) analysis represent two mathematical computer-assisted algorithms that are today thought to be able to accurately detect and quantify changes in tissue architecture during various physiological and pathological processes. However, despite their numerous applications in histology and pathology, their sensitivity, specificity and validity regarding evaluation of brain tissue remain unclear. In this article we present the results indicating that certain parameters of fractal and GLCM analysis have high discriminatory ability in distinguishing two morphologically similar regions of rat hippocampus: stratum lacunosum-moleculare and stratum radiatum. Fractal and GLCM algorithms were performed on a total of 240 thionine-stained hippocampus micrographs of 12 male Wistar albino rats. 120 digital micrographs represented stratum lacunosum-moleculare, and another 120 stratum radiatum. For each image, 7 parameters were calculated: fractal dimension, lacunarity, GLCM angular second moment, GLCM contrast, inverse difference moment, GLCM correlation, and GLCM variance. GLCM variance (VAR) resulted in the largest area under the Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.96, demonstrating an outstanding discriminatory power in analysis of stratum lacunosum-moleculare (average VAR equaled 478.1 ± 179.8) and stratum radiatum (average VAR of 145.9 ± 59.2, p < 0.0001). For the criterion VAR ≤ 227.5, sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 86.7%, respectively. GLCM correlation as a parameter also produced large area under the ROC curve of 0.95. Our results are in accordance with the findings of our previous study regarding brain white mass fractal and textural analysis. GLCM algorithm as an image analysis method has potentially high applicability in structural analysis of brain tissue cytoarcitecture.

  13. A study of the fractal structure of the precipitate and the mechanism of its formation from the gallbladder bile of a patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Kong, X.; Xie, A.; Shen, Y.; Zhu, J.; Li, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2007-12-01

    The precipitation of three kinds of structures from gallbladder bile of a patient, fractal structure, regular crystal structure, and small disperse granules, was observed in the same sample using Field Emission Gun-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM). The results indicated that there was a transition from a linear equilibrium system to a nonlinear and nonequilibrium system, which was discussed using the theory of entropy. The chemical compositions of these three different kinds of precipitates were determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). This experimental result revealed that Na and Cl played important roles in the formation of the fractal and crystal structures. Besides, the Aggregation-Diffusion-Fractal (ADF) model was used to explain the growth mechanism of the fractal.

  14. High-birefringence photonic crystal fiber structures based on the binary morse-thue fractal sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Muraeb, Ahmed; Abdel-Aty-Zohdy, Hoda

    2016-09-01

    A novel index-guiding Silica glass-core hexagonal High-Birefringence Photonic Crystal Fiber (HB-PCF) is proposed, with five rings of standard cladding air circular holes arranged in four formations inspired by the Binary Morse-Thue fractal Sequence (BMTS). The form birefringence, confinement loss, chromatic dispersion, effective mode area, and effective normalized frequency are evaluated for the four PCFs operating within (1.8 - 2 μm) eye-safe wavelength range. Modeling and analysis of the four PCF formations are performed deploying full-vector analysis in Finite Element Method (FEM) using COMSOL Multiphysics. Respecting fabrication and in light of commercial availability in designing the proposed PCF structures, a high birefringence of up to (6.549 × 10-3 at 2 μm) is achieved with dispersionfree single-mode operation. Confinement loss as low as (3.2 × 10-5 - 6.5 × 10-4 dB/m for 1.8 - 2 μm range) is achieved as well. Comparison against previously reported PCF structures reveals the desirably higher birefringence of our BMTS HB-PCF. The proposed PCFs are of vital use in various optical systems (e.g.: multi-wavelength fiber ring laser systems, and tunable lasers), catering for applications such as: optical sensing, LIDAR systems, material processing, optical signal processing, and optical communication.

  15. Effect of calcium magnesium acetate on the forming property and fractal dimension of sludge pore structure during combustion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihui; Duan, Feng; Huang, Yaji; Chyang, Chiensong

    2015-12-01

    The changes in pore structure characteristics of sewage sludge particles under effect of calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) during combustion were investigated, the samples were characterized by N2 isothermal absorption method, and the data were used to analyze the fractal properties of the obtained samples. Results show that reaction time and the mole ratio of calcium to sulfur (Ca/S ratio) have notable impact on the pore structure and morphology of solid sample. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area (SBET) of sample increases with Ca/S ratio, while significant decreases with reaction time. The fractal dimension D has the similar trend with that of SBET, indicating that the surface roughness of sludge increases under the effect of CMA adding, resulting in improved the sludge combustion and the desulfurization process.

  16. Crystal structure of the coat protein of the flexible filamentous papaya mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaoqing; Wang, Tao; Bohon, Jen; Gagné, Marie-Ève Laliberté; Bolduc, Marilène; Leclerc, Denis; Li, Huilin

    2012-09-14

    Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) is a filamentous plant virus that belongs to the Alphaflexiviridae family. Flexible filamentous viruses have defied more than two decades of effort in fiber diffraction, and no high-resolution structure is available for any member of the Alphaflexiviridae family. Here, we report our structural characterization of PapMV by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction. We found that PapMV is 135Å in diameter with a helical symmetry of ~10 subunits per turn. Crystal structure of the C-terminal truncated PapMV coat protein (CP) reveals a novel all-helix fold with seven α-helices. Thus, the PapMVCP structure is different from the four-helix-bundle fold of tobacco mosaic virus in which helix bundling dominates the subunit interface in tobacco mosaic virus and conveys rigidity to the rod virus. PapMV CP was crystallized as an asymmetrical dimer in which one protein lassoes the other by the N-terminal peptide. Mutation of residues critical to the inter-subunit lasso interaction abolishes CP polymerization. The crystal structure suggests that PapMV may polymerize via the consecutive N-terminal loop lassoing mechanism. The structure of PapMV will be useful for rational design and engineering of the PapMV nanoparticles into innovative vaccines.

  17. Studying neutral hydrogen structures during the epoch of reionization using fractal dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Bidisha; Choudhury, T. Roy; Seshadri, T. R.

    2017-04-01

    Fractal dimensions can be used to characterize the clustering and lacunarities in density distributions. We use generalized fractal dimensions to study the neutral hydrogen distribution (H I) during the epoch of reionization. Using a semi-numeric model of ionized bubbles to generate the H I field, we calculate the fractal dimensions for length-scales ∼10 h-1cMpc. We find that the H I field displays significant multifractal behaviour and is not consistent with homogeneity at these scales when the mass-averaged neutral fraction bar{x}_{H I}^M ≳ 0.5. This multifractal nature is driven entirely by the shapes and distribution of the ionized regions. The sensitivity of the fractal dimension to the neutral fraction implies that it can be used for constraining reionization history. We find that the fractal dimension is relatively less sensitive to the value of the minimum mass of ionizing haloes when it is in the range ∼109-1010h-1M⊙. Interestingly, the fractal dimension is very different when the reionization proceeds inside-out compared to when it is outside-in. Thus, the multifractal nature of H I density field at high redshifts can be used to study the nature of reionization.

  18. Fractal dust grains in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.; Peng, R. D.; Liu, Y. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Ye, M. F.; Wang, L.

    2012-09-15

    Fractal dust grains of different shapes are observed in a radially confined magnetized radio frequency plasma. The fractal dimensions of the dust structures in two-dimensional (2D) horizontal dust layers are calculated, and their evolution in the dust growth process is investigated. It is found that as the dust grains grow the fractal dimension of the dust structure decreases. In addition, the fractal dimension of the center region is larger than that of the entire region in the 2D dust layer. In the initial growth stage, the small dust particulates at a high number density in a 2D layer tend to fill space as a normal surface with fractal dimension D = 2. The mechanism of the formation of fractal dust grains is discussed.

  19. On the Mass Fractal Character of Si-Based Structural Networks in Amorphous Polymer Derived Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Widgeon, Scarlett

    2015-01-01

    The intermediate-range packing of SiNxC4−x (0 ≤ x ≤ 4) tetrahedra in polysilycarbodiimide and polysilazane-derived amorphous SiCN ceramics is investigated using 29Si spin-lattice relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance (SLR NMR) spectroscopy. The SiCN network in the polysilylcarbodiimide-derived ceramic consists predominantly of SiN4 tetrahedra that are characterized by a 3-dimensional spatial distribution signifying compact packing of such units to form amorphous Si3N4 clusters. On the other hand, the SiCN network of the polysilazane-derived ceramic is characterized by mixed bonded SiNxC4−x tetrahedra that are inefficiently packed with a mass fractal dimension of Df ~2.5 that is significantly lower than the embedding Euclidean dimension (D = 3). This result unequivocally confirms the hypothesis that the presence of dissimilar atoms, namely, 4-coordinated C and 3-coordinated N, in the nearest neighbor environment of Si along with some exclusion in connectivity between SiCxN4−x tetrahedra with widely different N:C ratios and the absence of bonding between C and N result in steric hindrance to an efficient packing of these structural units. It is noted that similar inefficiencies in packing are observed in polymer-derived amorphous SiOC ceramics as well as in proteins and binary hard sphere systems.

  20. Skip residues modulate the structural properties of the myosin rod and guide thick filament assembly

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Keenan C.; Buvoli, Massimo; Korkmaz, Elif Nihal; Buvoli, Ada; Zheng, Yuqing; Heinze, Nathan T.; Cui, Qiang; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Rayment, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The rod of sarcomeric myosins directs thick filament assembly and is characterized by the insertion of four skip residues that introduce discontinuities in the coiled-coil heptad repeats. We report here that the regions surrounding the first three skip residues share high structural similarity despite their low sequence homology. Near each of these skip residues, the coiled-coil transitions to a nonclose-packed structure inducing local relaxation of the superhelical pitch. Moreover, molecular dynamics suggest that these distorted regions can assume different conformationally stable states. In contrast, the last skip residue region constitutes a true molecular hinge, providing C-terminal rod flexibility. Assembly of myosin with mutated skip residues in cardiomyocytes shows that the functional importance of each skip residue is associated with rod position and reveals the unique role of the molecular hinge in promoting myosin antiparallel packing. By defining the biophysical properties of the rod, the structures and molecular dynamic calculations presented here provide insight into thick filament formation, and highlight the structural differences occurring between the coiled-coils of myosin and the stereotypical tropomyosin. In addition to extending our knowledge into the conformational and biological properties of coiled-coil discontinuities, the molecular characterization of the four myosin skip residues also provides a guide to modeling the effects of rod mutations causing cardiac and skeletal myopathies. PMID:26150528

  1. Skip residues modulate the structural properties of the myosin rod and guide thick filament assembly

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Keenan C.; Buvoli, Massimo; Korkmaz, Elif Nihal; ...

    2015-07-06

    The rod of sarcomeric myosins directs thick filament assembly and is characterized by the insertion of four skip residues that introduce discontinuities in the coiled-coil heptad repeats. We report in this paper that the regions surrounding the first three skip residues share high structural similarity despite their low sequence homology. Near each of these skip residues, the coiled-coil transitions to a nonclose-packed structure inducing local relaxation of the superhelical pitch. Moreover, molecular dynamics suggest that these distorted regions can assume different conformationally stable states. In contrast, the last skip residue region constitutes a true molecular hinge, providing C-terminal rod flexibility.more » Assembly of myosin with mutated skip residues in cardiomyocytes shows that the functional importance of each skip residue is associated with rod position and reveals the unique role of the molecular hinge in promoting myosin antiparallel packing. By defining the biophysical properties of the rod, the structures and molecular dynamic calculations presented here provide insight into thick filament formation, and highlight the structural differences occurring between the coiled-coils of myosin and the stereotypical tropomyosin. Finally, in addition to extending our knowledge into the conformational and biological properties of coiled-coil discontinuities, the molecular characterization of the four myosin skip residues also provides a guide to modeling the effects of rod mutations causing cardiac and skeletal myopathies.« less

  2. Turbulent wakes of fractal objects.

    PubMed

    Staicu, Adrian; Mazzi, Biagio; Vassilicos, J C; van de Water, Willem

    2003-06-01

    Turbulence of a windtunnel flow is stirred using objects that have a fractal structure. The strong turbulent wakes resulting from three such objects which have different fractal dimensions are probed using multiprobe hot-wire anemometry in various configurations. Statistical turbulent quantities are studied within inertial and dissipative range scales in an attempt to relate changes in their self-similar behavior to the scaling of the fractal objects.

  3. Fractal Movies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Because fractal images are by nature very complex, it can be inspiring and instructive to create the code in the classroom and watch the fractal image evolve as the user slowly changes some important parameter or zooms in and out of the image. Uses programming language that permits the user to store and retrieve a graphics image as a disk file.…

  4. Measuring fractality.

    PubMed

    Stadnitski, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    WHEN INVESTIGATING FRACTAL PHENOMENA, THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS ARE FUNDAMENTAL FOR THE APPLIED RESEARCHER: (1) What are essential statistical properties of 1/f noise? (2) Which estimators are available for measuring fractality? (3) Which measurement instruments are appropriate and how are they applied? The purpose of this article is to give clear and comprehensible answers to these questions. First, theoretical characteristics of a fractal pattern (self-similarity, long memory, power law) and the related fractal parameters (the Hurst coefficient, the scaling exponent α, the fractional differencing parameter d of the autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average methodology, the power exponent β of the spectral analysis) are discussed. Then, estimators of fractal parameters from different software packages commonly used by applied researchers (R, SAS, SPSS) are introduced and evaluated. Advantages, disadvantages, and constrains of the popular estimators ([Formula: see text] power spectral density, detrended fluctuation analysis, signal summation conversion) are illustrated by elaborate examples. Finally, crucial steps of fractal analysis (plotting time series data, autocorrelation, and spectral functions; performing stationarity tests; choosing an adequate estimator; estimating fractal parameters; distinguishing fractal processes from short-memory patterns) are demonstrated with empirical time series.

  5. Measuring Fractality

    PubMed Central

    Stadnitski, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    When investigating fractal phenomena, the following questions are fundamental for the applied researcher: (1) What are essential statistical properties of 1/f noise? (2) Which estimators are available for measuring fractality? (3) Which measurement instruments are appropriate and how are they applied? The purpose of this article is to give clear and comprehensible answers to these questions. First, theoretical characteristics of a fractal pattern (self-similarity, long memory, power law) and the related fractal parameters (the Hurst coefficient, the scaling exponent α, the fractional differencing parameter d of the autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average methodology, the power exponent β of the spectral analysis) are discussed. Then, estimators of fractal parameters from different software packages commonly used by applied researchers (R, SAS, SPSS) are introduced and evaluated. Advantages, disadvantages, and constrains of the popular estimators (d^ML, power spectral density, detrended fluctuation analysis, signal summation conversion) are illustrated by elaborate examples. Finally, crucial steps of fractal analysis (plotting time series data, autocorrelation, and spectral functions; performing stationarity tests; choosing an adequate estimator; estimating fractal parameters; distinguishing fractal processes from short-memory patterns) are demonstrated with empirical time series. PMID:22586408

  6. Fractal Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Shirley B.

    1992-01-01

    This article traces the historical development of fractal geometry from early in the twentieth century and offers an explanation of the mathematics behind the recursion formulas and their representations within computer graphics. Also included are the fundamentals behind programing for fractal graphics in the C Language with appropriate…

  7. Exploring Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewdney, A. K.

    1991-01-01

    Explores the subject of fractal geometry focusing on the occurrence of fractal-like shapes in the natural world. Topics include iterated functions, chaos theory, the Lorenz attractor, logistic maps, the Mandelbrot set, and mini-Mandelbrot sets. Provides appropriate computer algorithms, as well as further sources of information. (JJK)

  8. Stochastic dislocation kinetics and fractal structures in deforming metals probed by acoustic emission and surface topography measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradov, A.; Yasnikov, I. S.; Estrin, Y.

    2014-06-21

    We demonstrate that the fractal dimension (FD) of the dislocation population in a deforming material is an important quantitative characteristic of the evolution of the dislocation structure. Thus, we show that peaking of FD signifies a nearing loss of uniformity of plastic flow and the onset of strain localization. Two techniques were employed to determine FD: (i) inspection of surface morphology of the deforming crystal by white light interferometry and (ii) monitoring of acoustic emission (AE) during uniaxial tensile deformation. A connection between the AE characteristics and the fractal dimension determined from surface topography measurements was established. As a common platform for the two methods, the dislocation density evolution in the bulk was used. The relations found made it possible to identify the occurrence of a peak in the median frequency of AE as a harbinger of plastic instability leading to necking. It is suggested that access to the fractal dimension provided by AE measurements and by surface topography analysis makes these techniques important tools for monitoring the evolution of the dislocation structure during plastic deformation—both as stand-alone methods and especially when used in tandem.

  9. Collaborative protein filaments.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Debnath; Löwe, Jan

    2015-09-14

    It is now well established that prokaryotic cells assemble diverse proteins into dynamic cytoskeletal filaments that perform essential cellular functions. Although most of the filaments assemble on their own to form higher order structures, growing evidence suggests that there are a number of prokaryotic proteins that polymerise only in the presence of a matrix such as DNA, lipid membrane or even another filament. Matrix-assisted filament systems are frequently nucleotide dependent and cytomotive but rarely considered as part of the bacterial cytoskeleton. Here, we categorise this family of filament-forming systems as collaborative filaments and introduce a simple nomenclature. Collaborative filaments are frequent in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes and are involved in vital cellular processes including chromosome segregation, DNA repair and maintenance, gene silencing and cytokinesis to mention a few. In this review, we highlight common principles underlying collaborative filaments and correlate these with known functions.

  10. Filament wound composite thermal isolator structures for cryogenic dewars and instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    Studies showing high tensile strength, low thermal conductivity, and adequate fatigue strength capabiliies in conjunction with low resin outgassing properties of S-90 fiber glass with SCI REZ 080 and 081 epoxy resins has resulted in use of filament wound tension straps, struts, and conical shells as thermal isolators in several high-performance cryogenic applications. These thermal isolator structures and their use in the following cryogenic systems are discussed in this paper: hydrogen and oxygen dewars for space shuttle, helium tank for the infra-red astronomy satellite, spacecraft refrigerators, and infrared telescope. Mechanical and thermo-physical properties of the composite laminates are presented.

  11. Searching for filaments and large-scale structure around DAFT/FADA clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Márquez, I.; Acebrón, A.; Adami, C.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Capelato, H.; Martinet, N.; Sarron, F.; Ulmer, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Clusters of galaxies are located at the intersection of cosmic filaments and are still accreting galaxies and groups along these preferential directions. However, because of their relatively low contrast on the sky, filaments are difficult to detect (unless a large amount of spectroscopic data are available), and unambiguous detections have been limited until now to relatively low redshifts (z< ~ 0.3). Aims: This project is aimed at searching for extensions and filaments around clusters, traced by galaxies selected to be at the cluster redshift based on the red sequence. In the 0.4 filaments. Methods: We have searched for extensions and filaments around the thirty clusters of the DAFT/FADA survey for which we had deep wide field photometric data. For each cluster, based on a colour-magnitude diagram, we selected galaxies that were likely to belong to the red sequence, and hence to be at the cluster redshift, and built density maps. By computing the background for each of these maps and drawing 3σ contours, we estimated the elongations of the structures detected in this way. Whenever possible, we identified the other structures detected on the density maps with clusters listed in NED. Results: We find clear elongations in twelve clusters out of thirty, with sizes that can reach up to 7.6 Mpc. Eleven other clusters have neighbouring structures, but the zones linking them are not detected in the density maps at a 3σ level. Three clusters show no extended structure and no neighbours, and four clusters are of too low contrast to be clearly visible on our density maps. Conclusions: The simple method we have applied appears to work well to show the existence of filaments and/or extensions around a number of clusters in the redshift range 0.4

  12. Fractals in physiology and medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; West, Bruce J.

    1987-01-01

    The paper demonstrates how the nonlinear concepts of fractals, as applied in physiology and medicine, can provide an insight into the organization of such complex structures as the tracheobronchial tree and heart, as well as into the dynamics of healthy physiological variability. Particular attention is given to the characteristics of computer-generated fractal lungs and heart and to fractal pathologies in these organs. It is shown that alterations in fractal scaling may underlie a number of pathophysiological disturbances, including sudden cardiac death syndromes.

  13. Structural data suggest that the active and inactive forms of the RecA filament are not simply interconvertible.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Egelman, E H

    1992-09-05

    We have used electron microscopy to examine the two major conformational states of the helical filament formed by the RecA protein of Escherichia coli. The compressed filament, formed in the absence of a nucleotide cofactor either as a self-polymer or on a single-stranded DNA molecule, is characterized in solution by about 6.1 subunits per turn of a 76 A pitch helix, and appears to be inactive with respect to all RecA activity. The active state of the filament, formed with ATP or an ATP analog on either a single or double-stranded DNA substrate, has about 6.2 subunits per turn of a 94 A pitch helix. Measurements of the contour length of RecA-covered single-stranded DNA circles in ice, formed in the absence of nucleotide cofactor, indicate that each RecA subunit binds five bases, in contrast to the three bases or base-pairs per subunit in the active state. The different stoichiometries of DNA binding suggests that the two polymeric forms are not interconvertible, as has been suggested on biochemical grounds. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the inactive state shows the same general features as the 83 A pitch filament present in the RecA crystal. This structural similarity and the fact that the crystal does not contain ATP or DNA suggests that the crystal structure is more similar to the compressed filament than the active, extended filament.

  14. Fabrication of transparent antifouling thin films with fractal structure by atmospheric pressure cold plasma deposition.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Hayato; Yamauchi, Koji; Kim, Yoon-Kee; Ogawa, Kazufumi; Yamaguchi, Kenzo; Suzaki, Yoshifumi

    2012-12-21

    Antifouling surface with both superhydrophobicity and oil-repellency has been fabricated on glass substrate by forming fractal microstructure(s). The fractal microstructure was constituted by transparent silica particles of 100 nm diameter and transparent zinc-oxide columns grown on silica particles by atmospheric pressure cold plasma deposition. The sample surface was coated with a chemically adsorbed monomolecular layer. We found that one sample has the superhydrophobic ability with a water droplet contact angle of more than 150°, while another sample has a high transmittance of more than 85% in a wavelength range from 400 to 800 nm.

  15. The primary structure of component 8c-1, a subunit protein of intermediate filaments in wool keratin. Relationships with proteins from other intermediate filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, L M; Crewther, W G; Inglis, A S

    1986-01-01

    Component 8c-1, one of four highly homologous component-8 subunit proteins present in the microfibrils of wool, was isolated as its S-carboxymethyl derivative and its amino acid sequence was determined. Large peptides were isolated after cleaving the protein chemically or enzymically and the sequence of each was determined with an automatic Sequenator. The peptides were ordered by sequence overlaps and, in some instances, by homology with known sequences from other component-8 subunits. The C-terminal residues were identified by three procedures. Full details of the various procedures used have been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50133 (4 pp.) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1986) 233, 5. The result showed that the protein comprises 412 residues and has an Mr, including the N-terminal acetyl group, of 48,300. The sequence of residues 98-200 of component 8c-1 was found to correspond to the partial or complete sequences of four homologous type I helical segments previously isolated from helical fragments recovered from chymotryptic digests of microfibrillar proteins of wool [Crewther & Dowling (1971) Appl. Polym. Symp. 18, 1-20; Crewther, Gough, Inglis & McKern (1978) Text. Res. J. 48, 160-162; Gough, Inglis & Crewther (1978) Biochem. J. 173, 385]. Considered in relation to amino acid sequences of other intermediate-filament proteins, the sequence is in accord with the view that keratin filament proteins are of two types [Hanukoglu & Fuchs (1983) Cell (Cambridge, Mass.) 33, 915-924]. Filament proteins from non-keratinous tissues, such as desmin, vimentin, neurofilament proteins and the glial fibrillary acidic protein, which form monocomponent filaments, constitute a third type. It is suggested that as a whole the proteins from intermediate filaments be classed as filamentins, the three types at present identified forming

  16. Fractal processes in soil water retention

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, S.W.; Wheatcraft, S.W. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors propose a physical conceptual model for soil texture and pore structure that is based on the concept of fractal geometry. The motivation for a fractal model of soil texture is that some particle size distributions in granular soils have already been shown to display self-similar scaling that is typical of fractal objects. Hence it is reasonable to expect that pore size distributions may also display fractal scaling properties. The paradigm that they used for the soil pore size distribution is the Sierpinski carpet, which is a fractal that contains self similar holes (or pores) over a wide range of scales. The authors evaluate the water retention properties of regular and random Sierpinski carpets and relate these properties directly to the Brooks and Corey (or Campbell) empirical water retention model. They relate the water retention curves directly to the fractal dimension of the Sierpinski carpet and show that the fractal dimension strongly controls the water retention properties of the Sierpinski carpet soil. Higher fractal dimensions are shown to mimic clay-type soils, with very slow dewatering characteristics and relatively low fractal dimensions are shown to mimic a sandy soil with relatively rapid dewatering characteristics. Their fractal model of soil water retention removes the empirical fitting parameters from the soil water retention models and provides paramters which are intrinsic to the nature of the fractal porous structure. The relative permeability functions of Burdine and Mualem are also shown to be fractal directly from fractal water retention results.

  17. Purification and structural characterization of a filamentous, mucin-like proteophosphoglycan secreted by Leishmania parasites.

    PubMed

    Ilg, T; Stierhof, Y D; Craik, D; Simpson, R; Handman, E; Bacic, A

    1996-08-30

    Parasitic protozoa of the genus Leishmania secrete a filamentous macromolecule that forms networks and appears to be associated with cell aggregation. We report here the purification of this parasite antigen from Leishmania major culture supernatant and its compositional (75.6% carbohydrate, 20% phosphate, 4.4% amino acids, w/w), structural, and ultrastructural characterization as a highly unusual proteophosphoglycan (PPG). Mild acid hydrolysis, which cleaves preferentially hexose 1-phosphate bonds, releases the PPG glycans. Their structures are Galbeta1-4Man, Manalpha1-2Man, Galbeta1-3Galbeta1-4Man, PO4-6(Galbeta1-3)0-2Galbeta1-4Man, and PO4-6(Arabeta1-2Galbeta1-3)Galbeta1-4Man. These glycans are also components of the parasite glycolipid lipophosphoglycan, but their relative abundance and structural organization in PPG are different. Some of them represent novel forms of protein glycosylation. 31P NMR on native PPG demonstrates that phosphate is exclusively in phosphodiester bonds and that the basic structure R-Manalpha1-PO4-6-Gal-R connects the glycans. A phosphodiester linkage to phosphoserine (most likely R-Manalpha1-PO4-Ser) anchors the PPG oligosaccharides to the polypeptide. PPG has a unique amino acid composition; glycosylated phosphoserine (>43 mol %), serine, alanine, and proline account for more than 87 mol % and appear to be clustered in large proteinase-resistant domains. Electron microscopy of purified PPG reveals cable-like, flexible, long (to 6 microm), and unbranched filaments. The overall structure of PPG shows many similarities to mammalian mucins. Potential functions of this novel mucin-like molecule for the parasites are discussed.

  18. Book review of "Biophysical Chemistry of Fractal Structures and Processes in Environmental Systems"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The editors are N. Senesi and K.J. Wilkinson, and the book is published in 2008 by John Wiley and Sons, with 323 pages. This book is part of the IUPAC series on “Analytical and physical chemistry of environmental systems.” Nineteen generally well-known fractal scientists have contributed to this vol...

  19. Structural basis for activation, assembly and membrane binding of ESCRT-III Snf7 filaments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaogeng; Henne, W Mike; Borbat, Peter P; Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Freed, Jack H; Mao, Yuxin; Fromme, J Christopher; Emr, Scott D

    2015-12-15

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) constitute hetero-oligomeric machines that catalyze multiple topologically similar membrane-remodeling processes. Although ESCRT-III subunits polymerize into spirals, how individual ESCRT-III subunits are activated and assembled together into a membrane-deforming filament remains unknown. Here, we determine X-ray crystal structures of the most abundant ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 in its active conformation. Using pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS), we show that Snf7 activation requires a prominent conformational rearrangement to expose protein-membrane and protein-protein interfaces. This promotes the assembly of Snf7 arrays with ~30 Å periodicity into a membrane-sculpting filament. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that mutations on these protein interfaces halt Snf7 assembly and block ESCRT function. The architecture of the activated and membrane-bound Snf7 polymer provides crucial insights into the spatially unique ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling.

  20. Structural basis for activation, assembly and membrane binding of ESCRT-III Snf7 filaments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaogeng; Henne, W Mike; Borbat, Peter P; Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Freed, Jack H; Mao, Yuxin; Fromme, J Christopher; Emr, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) constitute hetero-oligomeric machines that catalyze multiple topologically similar membrane-remodeling processes. Although ESCRT-III subunits polymerize into spirals, how individual ESCRT-III subunits are activated and assembled together into a membrane-deforming filament remains unknown. Here, we determine X-ray crystal structures of the most abundant ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 in its active conformation. Using pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS), we show that Snf7 activation requires a prominent conformational rearrangement to expose protein-membrane and protein-protein interfaces. This promotes the assembly of Snf7 arrays with ~30 Å periodicity into a membrane-sculpting filament. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that mutations on these protein interfaces halt Snf7 assembly and block ESCRT function. The architecture of the activated and membrane-bound Snf7 polymer provides crucial insights into the spatially unique ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12548.001 PMID:26670543

  1. Plasticity in PYD assembly revealed by cryo-EM structure of the PYD filament of AIM2.

    PubMed

    Lu, Alvin; Li, Yang; Yin, Qian; Ruan, Jianbin; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward; Wu, Hao

    Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an essential cytosolic double-stranded DNA receptor that assembles with the adaptor, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), and caspase-1 to form the AIM2 inflammasome, which leads to proteolytic maturation of cytokines and pyroptotic cell death. AIM2 contains an N-terminal Pyrin domain (PYD) that interacts with ASC through PYD/PYD interactions and nucleates ASC(PYD) filament formation. To elucidate the molecular basis of AIM2-induced ASC(PYD) polymerization, we generated AIM2(PYD) filaments fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and determined its cryo-electron microscopic (cryo-EM) structure. The map showed distinct definition of helices, allowing fitting of the crystal structure. Surprisingly, the GFP-AIM2(PYD) filament is a 1-start helix with helical parameters distinct from those of the 3-start ASC(PYD) filament. However, despite the apparent symmetry difference, helical net and detailed interface analyses reveal minimal changes in subunit packing. GFP-AIM2(PYD) nucleated ASC(PYD) filament formation in comparable efficiency as untagged AIM2(PYD), suggesting assembly plasticity in both AIM2(PYD) and ASC(PYD). The DNA-binding domain of AIM2 is able to form AIM2/DNA filaments, within which the AIM2(PYD) is brought into proximity to template ASC(PYD) filament assembly. Because ASC is able to interact with many PYD-containing receptors for the formation of inflammasomes, the observed structural plasticity may be critically important for this versatility in the PYD/PYD interactions.

  2. Plasticity in PYD assembly revealed by cryo-EM structure of the PYD filament of AIM2

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Alvin; Li, Yang; Yin, Qian; Ruan, Jianbin; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an essential cytosolic double-stranded DNA receptor that assembles with the adaptor, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), and caspase-1 to form the AIM2 inflammasome, which leads to proteolytic maturation of cytokines and pyroptotic cell death. AIM2 contains an N-terminal Pyrin domain (PYD) that interacts with ASC through PYD/PYD interactions and nucleates ASCPYD filament formation. To elucidate the molecular basis of AIM2-induced ASCPYD polymerization, we generated AIM2PYD filaments fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and determined its cryo-electron microscopic (cryo-EM) structure. The map showed distinct definition of helices, allowing fitting of the crystal structure. Surprisingly, the GFP-AIM2PYD filament is a 1-start helix with helical parameters distinct from those of the 3-start ASCPYD filament. However, despite the apparent symmetry difference, helical net and detailed interface analyses reveal minimal changes in subunit packing. GFP-AIM2PYD nucleated ASCPYD filament formation in comparable efficiency as untagged AIM2PYD, suggesting assembly plasticity in both AIM2PYD and ASCPYD. The DNA-binding domain of AIM2 is able to form AIM2/DNA filaments, within which the AIM2PYD is brought into proximity to template ASCPYD filament assembly. Because ASC is able to interact with many PYD-containing receptors for the formation of inflammasomes, the observed structural plasticity may be critically important for this versatility in the PYD/PYD interactions. PMID:26583071

  3. The Language of Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurgens, Hartmut; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The production and application of images based on fractal geometry are described. Discussed are fractal language groups, fractal image coding, and fractal dialects. Implications for these applications of geometry to mathematics education are suggested. (CW)

  4. Fractal dynamics of earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, P.; Chen, K.

    1995-05-01

    Many objects in nature, from mountain landscapes to electrical breakdown and turbulence, have a self-similar fractal spatial structure. It seems obvious that to understand the origin of self-similar structures, one must understand the nature of the dynamical processes that created them: temporal and spatial properties must necessarily be completely interwoven. This is particularly true for earthquakes, which have a variety of fractal aspects. The distribution of energy released during earthquakes is given by the Gutenberg-Richter power law. The distribution of epicenters appears to be fractal with dimension D {approx} 1--1.3. The number of after shocks decay as a function of time according to the Omori power law. There have been several attempts to explain the Gutenberg-Richter law by starting from a fractal distribution of faults or stresses. But this is a hen-and-egg approach: to explain the Gutenberg-Richter law, one assumes the existence of another power-law--the fractal distribution. The authors present results of a simple stick slip model of earthquakes, which evolves to a self-organized critical state. Emphasis is on demonstrating that empirical power laws for earthquakes indicate that the Earth`s crust is at the critical state, with no typical time, space, or energy scale. Of course the model is tremendously oversimplified; however in analogy with equilibrium phenomena they do not expect criticality to depend on details of the model (universality).

  5. The topological insulator in a fractal space

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Yan-Yang; Li, Shu-Shen

    2014-06-09

    We investigate the band structures and transport properties of a two-dimensional model of topological insulator, with a fractal edge or a fractal bulk. A fractal edge does not affect the robust transport even when the fractal pattern has reached the resolution of the atomic-scale, because the bulk is still well insulating against backscattering. On the other hand, a fractal bulk can support the robust transport only when the fractal resolution is much larger than a critical size. Smaller resolution of bulk fractal pattern will lead to remarkable backscattering and localization, due to strong couplings of opposite edge states on narrow sub-edges which appear almost everywhere in the fractal bulk.

  6. Analysis of fractals with combined partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedovich, T. G.; Tokarev, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    The space—time properties in the general theory of relativity, as well as the discreteness and non-Archimedean property of space in the quantum theory of gravitation, are discussed. It is emphasized that the properties of bodies in non-Archimedean spaces coincide with the properties of the field of P-adic numbers and fractals. It is suggested that parton showers, used for describing interactions between particles and nuclei at high energies, have a fractal structure. A mechanism of fractal formation with combined partition is considered. The modified SePaC method is offered for the analysis of such fractals. The BC, PaC, and SePaC methods for determining a fractal dimension and other fractal characteristics (numbers of levels and values of a base of forming a fractal) are considered. It is found that the SePaC method has advantages for the analysis of fractals with combined partition.

  7. Synchrosqueezed wavelet transform-fractality model for locating, detecting, and quantifying damage in smart highrise building structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amezquita-Sanchez, Juan P.; Adeli, Hojjat

    2015-06-01

    A new methodology is presented for (a) detecting, (b) locating, and (c) quantifying the damage severity in a smart highrise building structure. The methodology consists of three steps: In step 1, the synchrosqueezed wavelet transform is used to eliminate the noise in the signals. In step 2, a nonlinear dynamics measure based on the chaos theory, fractality dimension (FD), is employed to detect features to be used for damage detection. In step 3, a new structural damage index, based on the estimated FD values, is proposed as a measure of the condition of the structure. Further, the damage location is obtained using the changes of the estimated FD values. Three different FD algorithms for computing the fractality of time series signals are investigated. They are Katz’s FD, Higuchi’s FD, and box dimension. The usefulness and effectiveness of the proposed methodology are validated using the sensed data obtained experimentally for the 1:20 scaled model of a 38-storey concrete building structure.

  8. Quantitative multi-scale analysis of mineral distributions and fractal pore structures for a heterogeneous Junger Basin shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. D.; Liu, K. Y.; Yang, Y. S.; Ren, Y. Q.; Hu, T.; Deng, B.; Xiao, T. Q.

    2016-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) characterization of shales has recently attracted wide attentions in relation to the growing importance of shale oil and gas. Obtaining a complete 3D compositional distribution of shale has proven to be challenging due to its multi-scale characteristics. A combined multi-energy X-ray micro-CT technique and data-constrained modelling (DCM) approach has been used to quantitatively investigate the multi-scale mineral and porosity distributions of a heterogeneous shale from the Junger Basin, northwestern China by sub-sampling. The 3D sub-resolution structures of minerals and pores in the samples are quantitatively obtained as the partial volume fraction distributions, with colours representing compositions. The shale sub-samples from two areas have different physical structures for minerals and pores, with the dominant minerals being feldspar and dolomite, respectively. Significant heterogeneities have been observed in the analysis. The sub-voxel sized pores form large interconnected clusters with fractal structures. The fractal dimensions of the largest clusters for both sub-samples were quantitatively calculated and found to be 2.34 and 2.86, respectively. The results are relevant in quantitative modelling of gas transport in shale reservoirs.

  9. Hypothesis testing on the fractal structure of behavioral sequences: the Bayesian assessment of scaling methodology.

    PubMed

    Moscoso del Prado Martín, Fermín

    2013-12-01

    I introduce the Bayesian assessment of scaling (BAS), a simple but powerful Bayesian hypothesis contrast methodology that can be used to test hypotheses on the scaling regime exhibited by a sequence of behavioral data. Rather than comparing parametric models, as typically done in previous approaches, the BAS offers a direct, nonparametric way to test whether a time series exhibits fractal scaling. The BAS provides a simpler and faster test than do previous methods, and the code for making the required computations is provided. The method also enables testing of finely specified hypotheses on the scaling indices, something that was not possible with the previously available methods. I then present 4 simulation studies showing that the BAS methodology outperforms the other methods used in the psychological literature. I conclude with a discussion of methodological issues on fractal analyses in experimental psychology.

  10. Fractal Nature of the Electronic Structure of a Penrose Tiling Lattice in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Tetsuo; Kamimura, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    The one-electron energy spectrum of a Penrose tiling lattice in a magnetic field is studied with a tight-binding Hamiltonian. We show the following remarkable results characteristic of a Penrose lattice. (1) The density of states in a magnetic field has a central peak with zero width at zero energy. It is shown that the zero-energy states correspond to the ring states in which wavefunction has nonvanishing amplitudes only at the sites circling the origin. (2) The magnetic field dependence of the energy spectrum shows a butterfly shape caused by Landau quantization. (3) The magnetic field dependence of the energy spectrum also shows a fractal nature. In particular it is characterized by two periods whose ratio is equal to the golden mean (1+\\sqrt{5})/2, and two periods comprising a Fibonacci sequence. We have clarified the origin of this fractal behavior of the energy spectrum analytically.

  11. The structure and poloidal dynamics of blob filaments in TJ-K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, S.; Fuchert, G.; Ramisch, M.; Hirth, T.

    2016-04-01

    Relatively dense, field-aligned, filament-like structures (blobs) have been observed to propagate radially and poloidally through the scrape-off layer (SOL) in magnetically confined fusion plasmas, and contribute significantly to SOL transport. A detailed understanding of blob structure and dynamics, and their dependence on magnetic field geometry, is important in magnetic confinement physics for the prediction of heat loads on reactor wall facing components, as well as for understanding plasma confinement and neutral particle recycling. Experimentally deduced centre of mass poloidal blob velocity components, obtained using the conditional averaging technique, have been compared to an analytical blob model which has been simplified to express blob velocity in terms of the magnetic field curvature vector. Background flows are not incorporated into the analytical model, and must be added in to obtain good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the 3D structure of blobs in TJ-K has been investigated using the conditional average of density fluctuations in two toroidally separated poloidal planes. Blobs are observed to be aligned to a flux tube near to the last closed flux surface, in the blob birth region. However at positions further along the blob trajectory, the structures do not deform according to the magnetic shear, rather they remain rigid, and retain their original form.

  12. Terahertz spectroscopy of plasmonic fractals.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, A; Matsui, T; Zhu, W; Nahata, A; Vardeny, Z V

    2009-03-20

    We use terahertz time-domain spectroscopy to study the transmission properties of metallic films perforated with aperture arrays having deterministic or stochastic fractal morphologies ("plasmonic fractals"), and compare them with random aperture arrays. All of the measured plasmonic fractals show transmission resonances and antiresonances at frequencies that correspond to prominent features in their structure factors in k space. However, in sharp contrast to periodic aperture arrays, the resonant transmission enhancement decreases with increasing array size. This property is explained using a density-density correlation function, and is utilized for determining the underlying fractal dimensionality, D(<2). Furthermore, a sum rule for the transmission resonances and antiresonances in plasmonic fractals relative to the transmission of the corresponding random aperture arrays is obtained, and is shown to be universal.

  13. Regulation of structure and function of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used as a valuable system to study structure and function of striated muscle. The body wall muscle of C. elegans is obliquely striated muscle with highly organized sarcomeric assembly of actin, myosin, and other accessary proteins. Genetic and molecular biological studies in C. elegans have identified a number of genes encoding structural and regulatory components for the muscle contractile apparatuses, and many of them have counterparts in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscles or striated muscles in other invertebrates. Applicability of genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry has made C. elegans an excellent system to study mechanisms of muscle contractility and assembly and maintenance of myofibrils. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms of structure and function of actin filaments in the C. elegans body wall muscle. Sarcomeric actin filaments in C. elegans muscle are associated with the troponin-tropomyosin system that regulates the actin-myosin interaction. Proteins that bind to the side and ends of actin filaments support ordered assembly of thin filaments. Furthermore, regulators of actin dynamics play important roles in initial assembly, growth, and maintenance of sarcomeres. The knowledge acquired in C. elegans can serve as bases to understand the basic mechanisms of muscle structure and function. PMID:25125169

  14. Designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengchao; Wang, Shutao

    2014-06-06

    Fractal structures in nature offer a unique "fractal contact mode" that guarantees the efficient working of an organism with an optimized style. Fractal nanostructured biointerfaces have shown great potential for the ultrasensitive detection of disease-relevant biomarkers from small biomolecules on the nanoscale to cancer cells on the microscale. This review will present the advantages of fractal nanostructures, the basic concept of designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces, and their biomedical applications for the ultrasensitive detection of various disease-relevant biomarkers, such microRNA, cancer antigen 125, and breast cancer cells, from unpurified cell lysates and the blood of patients.

  15. Astrophysical fractals - An overview and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdang, J.

    1990-01-01

    Different astrophysical circumstances under which fractal structures have been identified so far, or are likely to be identified in the future, are reviewed. The observed fractals can be classified into 2 main groups: (1) fractal configurations in space-time, materializing as fractals defined over the time axis at a given position in space, or over the physical configuration space at a fixed instant in time; and (2) fractals in parameter spaces. The theoretical interpretation of the origin of the spatial fractal geometry of the most conspicuous 'irregular' astronomical bodies is still wanting in the context of standard continuum models. In contrast, the less conventional discrete models (cellular automata) naturally produce such spatially fractal structures.

  16. Emergence of fractal scaling in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-09-01

    Some real-world networks are shown to be fractal or self-similar. It is widespread that such a phenomenon originates from the repulsion between hubs or disassortativity. Here we show that this common belief fails to capture the causality. Our key insight to address it is to pinpoint links critical to fractality. Those links with small edge betweenness centrality (BC) constitute a special architecture called fractal reference system, which gives birth to the fractal structure of those reported networks. In contrast, a small amount of links with high BC enable small-world effects, hiding the intrinsic fractality. With enough of such links removed, fractal scaling spontaneously arises from nonfractal networks. Our results provide a multiple-scale view on the structure and dynamics and place fractality as a generic organizing principle of complex networks on a firmer ground.

  17. Emergence of fractal scaling in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-09-01

    Some real-world networks are shown to be fractal or self-similar. It is widespread that such a phenomenon originates from the repulsion between hubs or disassortativity. Here we show that this common belief fails to capture the causality. Our key insight to address it is to pinpoint links critical to fractality. Those links with small edge betweenness centrality (BC) constitute a special architecture called fractal reference system, which gives birth to the fractal structure of those reported networks. In contrast, a small amount of links with high BC enable small-world effects, hiding the intrinsic fractality. With enough of such links removed, fractal scaling spontaneously arises from nonfractal networks. Our results provide a multiple-scale view on the structure and dynamics and place fractality as a generic organizing principle of complex networks on a firmer ground.

  18. On the Structure and Evolution of a Polar Crown Prominence/Filament System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Schmit, D. J.; Tiwari, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    Polar crown prominences, that partially circle the Sun's poles between 60° and 70° latitude, are made of chromospheric plasma. We aim to diagnose the 3D dynamics of a polar crown prominence using high-cadence EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA at 304, 171, and 193 Å and the Ahead spacecraft of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO-A)/EUVI at 195 Å. Using time series across specific structures, we compare flows across the disk in 195 Å with the prominence dynamics seen on the limb. The densest prominence material forms vertical columns that are separated by many tens of Mm and connected by dynamic bridges of plasma that are clearly visible in 304/171 Å two-colour images. We also observe intermittent but repetitious flows with velocity 15 km s-1 in the prominence that appear to be associated with EUV bright points on the solar disk. The boundary between the prominence and the overlying cavity appears as a sharp edge. We discuss the structure of the coronal cavity seen both above and around the prominence. SDO/HMI and GONG magnetograms are used to infer the underlying magnetic topology. The evolution and structure of the prominence with respect to the magnetic field seems to agree with the filament-linkage model.

  19. Using Data Mining and Computational Approaches to Study Intermediate Filament Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Parry, David A D

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research aimed at determining the structure and function of the family of intermediate filament proteins has made significant advances over the past 20 years. Much of this has either contributed to or relied on the amino acid sequence databases that are now available online, and the data mining approaches that have been developed to analyze these sequences. As the quality of sequence data is generally high, it follows that it is the design of the computational and graphical methodologies that are of especial importance to researchers who aspire to gain a greater understanding of those sequence features that specify both function and structural hierarchy. However, these techniques are necessarily subject to limitations and it is important that these be recognized. In addition, no single method is likely to be successful in solving a particular problem, and a coordinated approach using a suite of methods is generally required. A final step in the process involves the interpretation of the results obtained and the construction of a working model or hypothesis that suggests further experimentation. While such methods allow meaningful progress to be made it is still important that the data are interpreted correctly and conservatively. New data mining methods are continually being developed, and it can be expected that even greater understanding of the relationship between structure and function will be gleaned from sequence data in the coming years.

  20. Structural properties of highly conductive ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films grown by hot-filament CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, M.; Lin, I.-N.; Manoharan, D.; Moeinian, A.; Brühne, K.; Fecht, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we show the correlation of the electrical conductivity of ultra-nanocrystalline (UNCD) diamond films grown by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) with their structural properties. The substrate temperature, the methane to hydrogen ratio and the pressure are the main factor influencing the growth of conductive UNCD films, which extends from electrical resistive diamond films (<10-4 S/cm) to highly conductive diamond films with a specific conductivity of 300 S/cm. High-resolution-transmission-electron-microscopy (HRTEM) and electron-energy-loss-spectroscopy (EELS) have been done on the highly conductive diamond films, to show the origin of the high electrical conductivity. The HRTEM results show random oriented diamond grains and a large amount of nano-graphite between the diamond crystals. EELS investigations are confirming these results. Raman measurements are correlated with the specific conductivity, which shows structural changes of sp2 carbons bonds as function of conductivity. Hall experiments complete the results, which lead to a model of an electron mobility based conductivity, which is influenced by the structural properties of the grain boundary regions in the ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films.

  1. The structure of the coronal soft X-ray source associated with the dark filament disappearance of 1991 September 28 using the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, Alan; Uchida, Yutaka; Tsuneta, Saku; Strong, Keith T.; Acton, Loren W.; Hiei, Eijiro; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Watanabe, Takashi; Shibata, Kazunari

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the coronal soft X-ray source associated with the dark filament disappearance on September 28, 1991, observed with the Soft X-ray Telescope, is examined as a possible example of the 'eruption-reconnection' model of filament disappearance. The results suggest, however, that this model may not fit. There is a strong possibility that much of the dark filament mass remains in the heated unwinding axial field.

  2. Effect of filament twist on the structure and properties of Ag-sheathed Bi2223 tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Kurihara, C.; Machida, T.; Inada, R.; Oota, A.

    2009-10-01

    Ag-sheathed Bi2223 tapes show good performances and are ready for many prototype applications. However, drastic reduction of AC loss is strongly required for practical AC power applications. To reduce the AC loss under AC external magnetic field, the introduction of filament twisting with high resistive barrier is effective, but the filament twisting tends to decrease the Jc value. This decrease in Jc is a problem to balance low AC loss with high Ic value. In this study, the effect of filament twisting on the microstructure and Jc property was investigated to overcome the Jc reduction. The Bi2223 tapes sheathed with Ag-Cu alloy were fabricated with a standard PIT method. Although the formation of Bi2223 phase was not affected by filament twisting from the XRD analysis and SEM observation, the Jc values of the twisted tapes decreased about 30% compared to that of non-twisted tape. In the case of the same twist pitch, the sample rolled under large pass reduction ratio showed relatively high Jc value. This high Jc would be caused by the high aspect ratio of the filament of those tapes, in which the grain alignment along the filament interface would be well. On the other hand, a reason for the Jc reduction of twist tapes is proposed to be the misorientation at grain boundaries of Bi2223 grains in the transference region near the edges of the tape, where the filaments move up and down in the thickness direction.

  3. Structure and assembly of P-pili: A protruding hinge region used for assembly of a bacterial adhesion filament

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiang-Qi; Bullitt, Esther

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution structures of macromolecular complexes offer unparalleled insight into the workings of biological systems and hence the interplay of these systems in health and disease. We have adopted a multifaceted approach to understanding the pathogenically important structure of P-pili, the class I adhesion pili from pyelonephritic Escherichia coli. Our approach combines electron cryomicroscopy, site-directed mutagenesis, homology modeling, and energy calculations, resulting in a high-resolution model of PapA, the major structural element of these pili. Fitting of the modeled PapA subunit into the electron cryomicroscopy data provides a detailed view of these pilins within the supramolecular architecture of the pilus filament. A structural hinge in the N-terminal region of the subunit is located at the site of a newly resolved electron density that protrudes from the P-pilus surface. The structural flexibility provided by this hinge is necessary for assembly of P-pili, illustrating one solution to construction of large macromolecular complexes from small repeating units. These data support our hypothesis that domain-swapped pilin subunits transit the outer cell membrane vertically and rotate about the hinge for final positioning into the pilus filament. Our data confirm and supply a structural basis for much previous genetic, biochemical, and structural data. This model of the P-pilus filament provides an insight into the mechanism of assembly of a macromolecular complex essential for initiation of kidney infection by these bacteria. PMID:16782819

  4. Featuring dark coronal structures: physical signatures of filaments and coronal holes for automated recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, Judith; Cid, Consuelo; Saiz, Elena; Cerrato, Yolanda; Guerrero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Filaments may be mistaken for coronal holes when observed in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images; however, a closer and more careful look reveals that their photometric properties are different. The combination of EUV images with photospheric magnetograms shows some characteristic differences between filaments and coronal holes. We have performed analyses with 7 different SDO/AIA wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 211, 193, 304, 335 Å) and SDO/HMI magnetograms obtained in September 2011 and March 2012 to study coronal holes and filaments from the photometric, magnetic, and also geometric point of view, since projection effects play an important role on the aforementioned traits.

  5. The structural basis for the intrinsic disorder of the actin filament: the "lateral slipping" model

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) helical reconstructions computed from electron micrographs of negatively stained dispersed F-actin filaments invariably revealed two uninterrupted columns of mass forming the "backbone" of the double-helical filament. The contact between neighboring subunits along the thus defined two long-pitch helical strands was spatially conserved and of high mass density, while the intersubunit contact between them was of lower mass density and varied among reconstructions. In contrast, phalloidinstabilized F-actin filaments displayed higher and spatially more conserved mass density between the two long-pitch helical strands, suggesting that this bicyclic hepta-peptide toxin strengthens the intersubunit contact between the two strands. Consistent with this distinct intersubunit bonding pattern, the two long-pitch helical strands of unstabilized filaments were sometimes observed separated from each other over a distance of two to six subunits, suggesting that the intrastrand intersubunit contact is also physically stronger than the interstrand contact. The resolution of the filament reconstructions, extending to 2.5 nm axially and radially, enabled us to reproducibly "cut out" the F- actin subunit which measured 5.5 nm axially by 6.0 nm tangentially by 3.2 nm radially. The subunit is distinctly polar with a massive "base" pointing towards the "barbed" end of the filament, and a slender "tip" defining its "pointed" end (i.e., relative to the "arrowhead" pattern revealed after stoichiometric decoration of the filaments with myosin subfragment 1). Concavities running approximately parallel to the filament axis both on the inner and outer face of the subunit define a distinct cleft separating the subunit into two domains of similar size: an inner domain confined to radii less than or equal to 2.5-nm forms the uninterrupted backbone of the two long-pitch helical strands, and an outer domain placed at radii of 2-5-nm protrudes radially and thus predominantly

  6. Structural and fractal properties of particles emitted from spark ignition engines.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K; Moosmüller, Hans; Arnott, W Patrick; Garro, Mark A; Walker, John

    2006-11-01

    Size, morphology, and microstructure of particles emitted from one light-duty passenger vehicle (Buick Century; model year 1990; PM (particulate matter) mass emission rate 3.1 mg/km) and two light-duty trucks (Chevrolet C2; model year 1973; PM mass emission rate 282 mg/km, and Chevrolet El Camino; model year 1976; PM mass emission rate 31 mg/km), running California's unified driving cycles (UDC) on a chassis dynamometer, were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM images yielded particle properties including three-dimensional density fractal dimensions, monomer and agglomerate number size distributions, and three different shape descriptors, namely aspect ratio, root form factor, and roundness. The density fractal dimension of the particles was between 1.7 and 1.78, while the number size distribution of the particles placed the majority of the particles in the accumulation mode (0.1-0.3 microm). The shape descriptors were found to decrease with increasing particle size. Partial melting of particles, a rare and previously unreported phenomenon, was observed upon exposure of particles emitted during phase 2 of the UDC to the low accelerating voltage electron beam of the SEM. The rate of melting was quantified for individual particles, establishing a near linear relationship between the melting rate and the organic carbon 1 to elemental carbon ratio.

  7. A Brief Historical Introduction to Fractals and Fractal Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with a brief historical introduction to fractals, fractal dimension and fractal geometry. Many fractals including the Cantor fractal, the Koch fractal, the Minkowski fractal, the Mandelbrot and Given fractal are described to illustrate self-similar geometrical figures. This is followed by the discovery of dynamical systems and…

  8. Fractal features of seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caserta, A.; Consolini, G.; Michelis, P. De

    2003-04-01

    We present experimental observations and data analysis concerning the fractal features of seismic noise in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 40 Hz. In detail, we investigate the 3D average squared soil displacement and the distribution function of its fluctuations for different near-surface geological structures. We found that the seismic noise is consistent with a persistent fractal brownian motion characterized by a Hurst exponent grather than 1/2. Moreover, a clear dependence of the fractal nature of the seismic noise on the near-surface local geology has been found.

  9. Thermal collapse of snowflake fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, T.; Jurjiu, A.; Biscarini, F.; Volta, A.; Zerbetto, F.

    2012-08-01

    Snowflakes are thermodynamically unstable structures that would ultimately become ice balls. To investigate their dynamics, we mapped atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of small ice crystals - built as filled von Koch fractals - onto a discrete-time random walk model. Then the walkers explored the thermal evolution of high fractal generations. The in silico experiments showed that the evolution is not entirely random. The flakes step down one fractal generation before forfeiting their architecture. The effect may be used to trace the thermal history of snow.

  10. Primary edge localized mode filament structure in the National Spherical Torus Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqueda, R. J.; Maingi, R.; NSTX Team

    2009-05-01

    Edge localized modes (ELMs) are routinely seen in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. These unstable modes give rise to plasma filaments that burst radially outward during the nonlinear phase of the instability, moving across flux surfaces into the scrape-off layer. Fast-frame visible imaging is used in NSTX to study the evolution and characteristics of the post-ELM filaments. These edge filaments, which are well aligned with the local magnetic field, are seen to evolve from a perturbation of the edge that within 40-50 μs develops into the relatively high density/temperature primary filaments. The distribution of primary filaments in toroidal angle is seen to agree with a random model with moderate average toroidal mode numbers. At the same time, gas puff imaging shows that the perturbation of the edge leading to the burst of the ELM into the scrape-off layer is characterized by a broadband increase in fluctuations at much smaller poloidal wavelengths (λpol˜2-12 cm). These two measurements suggest that early development of turbulence may play a role in the development of primary ELM filamentation.

  11. Structure of the filamentous phage pIV multimer by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Opalka, Natacha; Beckmann, Roland; Boisset, Nicolas; Simon, Martha N; Russel, Marjorie; Darst, Seth A

    2003-01-17

    The homo-multimeric pIV protein constitutes a channel required for the assembly and export of filamentous phage across the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. We present a 22 A-resolution three-dimensional reconstruction of detergent-solubilized pIV by cryo-electron microscopy associated with image analysis. The structure reveals a barrel-like complex, 13.5 nm in diameter and 24 nm in length, with D14 point-group symmetry, consisting of a dimer of unit multimers. Side views of each unit multimer exhibit three cylindrical domains named the N-ring, the M-ring and the C-ring. Gold labeling of pIV engineered to contain a single cysteine residue near the N or C terminus unambiguously identified the N-terminal region as the N-ring, and the C-terminal region was inferred to make up the C-ring. A large pore, ranging in inner diameter from 6.0 nm to 8.8 nm, runs through the middle of the multimer, but a central domain, the pore gate, blocks it. Moreover, the pore diameter at the N-ring is smaller than the phage particle. We therefore propose that the pIV multimer undergoes a large conformational change during phage transport, with reorganization of the central domain to open the pore, and widening at the N-ring in order to accommodate the 6.5 nm diameter phage particle.

  12. The fractal geometry of life.

    PubMed

    Losa, Gabriele A

    2009-01-01

    The extension of the concepts of Fractal Geometry (Mandelbrot [1983]) toward the life sciences has led to significant progress in understanding complex functional properties and architectural / morphological / structural features characterising cells and tissues during ontogenesis and both normal and pathological development processes. It has even been argued that fractal geometry could provide a coherent description of the design principles underlying living organisms (Weibel [1991]). Fractals fulfil a certain number of theoretical and methodological criteria including a high level of organization, shape irregularity, functional and morphological self-similarity, scale invariance, iterative pathways and a peculiar non-integer fractal dimension [FD]. Whereas mathematical objects are deterministic invariant or self-similar over an unlimited range of scales, biological components are statistically self-similar only within a fractal domain defined by upper and lower limits, called scaling window, in which the relationship between the scale of observation and the measured size or length of the object can be established (Losa and Nonnenmacher [1996]). Selected examples will contribute to depict complex biological shapes and structures as fractal entities, and also to show why the application of the fractal principle is valuable for measuring dimensional, geometrical and functional parameters of cells, tissues and organs occurring within the vegetal and animal realms. If the criteria for a strict description of natural fractals are met, then it follows that a Fractal Geometry of Life may be envisaged and all natural objects and biological systems exhibiting self-similar patterns and scaling properties may be considered as belonging to the new subdiscipline of "fractalomics".

  13. THE RAPID FORMATION OF A FILAMENT CAUSED BY MAGNETIC RECONNECTION BETWEEN TWO SETS OF DARK THREADLIKE STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Yu, Shunping; Xu, Zhe E-mail: yjy@ynao.ac.cn

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of the high spatiotemporal resolution observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present rare observations of the rapid formation of a filament caused by magnetic reconnection between two sets of dark threadlike structures. The two sets of dark threadlike structures belong to distinct flux systems with their adjacent ends anchored in an opposite-polarity magnetic field region, where the calculated photospheric velocity field shows that converging flows dominate there. Due to the converging flows, opposite-polarity magnetic flux converged and then canceled, leading to the formation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) brightening that spread in opposite directions along the spine of the dark threadlike structures. Meanwhile, very weak remote brightening in the other terminals of the dark threadlike structures, as well as EUV loops, which rooted in the opposite-polarity magnetic field region, appeared. In addition, all of the AIA Fe line observations reveal that a flux rope was formed and underwent a rolling motion during the fadeaway of the EUV brightening. Soon after, as the EUV brightening disappeared, a filament that is very likely composed of two sets of intertwined dark threadlike structures was formed. Via differential emission measure (EM) analysis, it is found that both the EM and temperature of the plasma around the flux-canceling site increased during the brightening, implying that there, magnetic reconnection may occur to heat the plasma. These observations provide evidence that the filament is formed by magnetic reconnection associated with flux convergence and cancellation, and the magnetic structure of the filament is most likely a flux rope.

  14. Isolation and characterization of Candida albicans morphological mutants derepressed for the formation of filamentous hypha-type structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, C.; Pomes, R.; Nombela, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Several Candida albicans morphological mutants were obtained by a procedure based on a combined treatment with nitrous acid plus UV irradiation and a double-enrichment step to increase the proportion of mutants growing as long filamentous structures. Altered cell morphogenesis in these mutants correlated with an altered colonial phenotype. Two of these mutants, C. albicans NEL102 and NEL103, were selected and characterized. Mutant blastoconidia initiated budding but eventually gave rise to filamentous hypha-type formations. These filaments were long and septate, and they branched very regularly at positions near septa. Calcofluor white (which is known to bind chitin-rich areas) stained septa, branching zones, and filament tips very intensely, as observed under the fluorescence microscope. Wild-type hybrids were obtained by fusing protoplasts of strain NEL102 with B14, another morphological mutant previously described as being permanently pseudomycelial, indicating that genetic determinants responsible for the two altered phenotypes are different. The mutants characterized in this work seemed to sequentially express the morphogenic characteristics of C. albicans, from blastoconidia to hyphae, in the absence of any inducer. Further characterization of these strains could be relevant to gain understanding of the genetic control of dimorphism in this species.

  15. The ALP-Enigma protein ALP-1 functions in actin filament organization to promote muscle structural integrity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Han, Hsiao-Fen; Beckerle, Mary C

    2009-05-01

    Mutations that affect the Z-disk-associated ALP-Enigma proteins have been linked to human muscular and cardiac diseases. Despite their clear physiological significance for human health, the mechanism of action of ALP-Enigma proteins is largely unknown. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the ALP-Enigma protein family is encoded by a single gene, alp-1; thus C. elegans provides an excellent model to study ALP-Enigma function. Here we present a molecular and genetic analysis of ALP-Enigma function in C. elegans. We show that ALP-1 and alpha-actinin colocalize at dense bodies where actin filaments are anchored and that the proper localization of ALP-1 at dense bodies is dependent on alpha-actinin. Our analysis of alp-1 mutants demonstrates that ALP-1 functions to maintain actin filament organization and participates in muscle stabilization during contraction. Reducing alpha-actinin activity enhances the actin filament phenotype of the alp-1 mutants, suggesting that ALP-1 and alpha-actinin function in the same cellular process. Like alpha-actinin, alp-1 also interacts genetically with a connectin/titin family member, ketn-1, to provide mechanical stability for supporting body wall muscle contraction. Taken together, our data demonstrate that ALP-1 and alpha-actinin function together to stabilize actin filaments and promote muscle structural integrity.

  16. Music and fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuorinen, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Any of the arts may produce exemplars that have fractal characteristics. There may be fractal painting, fractal poetry, and the like. But these will always be specific instances, not necessarily displaying intrinsic properties of the art-medium itself. Only music, I believe, of all the arts possesses an intrinsically fractal character, so that its very nature is fractally determined. Thus, it is reasonable to assert that any instance of music is fractal...

  17. Fractal analysis of deformation-induced dislocation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Zaiser, M. ); Bay, K. . Inst. fuer Theoretische und Angewandte Physik); Haehner, P. . Joint Research Centre TU Braunschweig . Inst. fuer Metallphysik und Nukleare Festkoerperphysik)

    1999-06-22

    The paper reports extensive analyses of the fractal geometry of cellular dislocation structures observed in Cu deformed in multiple-slip orientation. Several methods presented for the determination of fractal dimensions are shown to give consistent results. Criteria are formulated which allow the distinguishing of fractal from non-fractal patterns, and implications of fractal dislocation patterning for quantitative metallography are discussed in detail. For an interpretation of the findings a theoretical model is outlined according to which dislocation cell formation is associated to a noise-induced structural transition far from equilibrium. This allows relating the observed fractal dimensions to the stochastic properties of deformation by collective dislocation glide.

  18. Self-Oligomerizing Structure of the Flagellar Cap Protein FliD and Its Implication in Filament Assembly.

    PubMed

    Song, Wan Seok; Cho, So Yeon; Hong, Ho Jeong; Park, Sun Cheol; Yoon, Sung-Il

    2017-03-24

    FliD is a self-oligomerizing structural protein that caps the growing end of the bacterial flagellar filament. FliD also plays a key role in the flagellar system by continuously adding a new flagellin protein to the tip of the filament. To structurally characterize FliD oligomerization and to provide a FliD-mediated flagellin polymerization mechanism, we have determined the crystal structures of FliD proteins from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ecFliD and stFliD, respectively). ecFliD consists of three domains (D1, D2, and D3) and forms a hexamer plate of the D2 and D3 domains that resembles a six-pointed star with legs consisting of the D1 domain. In contrast, the D2 and D3 domains of stFliD assemble into a pentamer as a five-pointed star plate. Despite their distinct oligomeric states, ecFliD and stFliD engage a common molecular surface for oligomerization. FliD also features interdomain and intersubunit flexibility, suggesting that FliD reorganizes its domains and adjacent subunits depending on the FliD binding partner. The similarity of the FliD shape to flagellin and the structural dynamics of FliD led us to propose a FliD-catalyzed filament elongation mechanism. In this model, FliD occupies a position in place of a nascent flagellin until the flagellin reaches the growing end of the filament, and then, FliD moves aside to repeat the positional replacement.

  19. Construction of fractal nanostructures based on Kepler-Shubnikov nets

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V. V. Talanov, V. M.

    2013-05-15

    A system of information codes for deterministic fractal lattices and sets of multifractal curves is proposed. An iterative modular design was used to obtain a series of deterministic fractal lattices with generators in the form of fragments of 2D structures and a series of multifractal curves (based on some Kepler-Shubnikov nets) having Cantor set properties. The main characteristics of fractal structures and their lacunar spectra are determined. A hierarchical principle is formulated for modules of regular fractal structures.

  20. Cryo-electron microscopy structure of human peroxiredoxin-3 filament reveals the assembly of a putative chaperone.

    PubMed

    Radjainia, Mazdak; Venugopal, Hariprasad; Desfosses, Ambroise; Phillips, Amy J; Yewdall, N Amy; Hampton, Mark B; Gerrard, Juliet A; Mitra, Alok K

    2015-05-05

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a ubiquitous class of thiol-dependent peroxidases that play an important role in the protection and response of cells to oxidative stress. The catalytic unit of typical 2-Cys Prxs are homodimers, which can self-associate to form complex assemblies that are hypothesized to have signaling and chaperone activity. Mitochondrial Prx3 forms dodecameric toroids, which can further stack to form filaments, the so-called high-molecular-weight (HMW) form that has putative holdase activity. We used single-particle analysis and helical processing of electron cryomicroscopy images of human Prx3 filaments induced by low pH to generate a ∼7-Å resolution 3D structure of the HMW form, the first such structure for a 2-Cys Prx. The pseudo-atomic model reveals interactions that promote the stacking of the toroids and shows that unlike previously reported data, the structure can accommodate a partially folded C terminus. The HMW filament lumen displays hydrophobic patches, which we hypothesize bestow holdase activity.

  1. The pore structure and fractal characteristics of shales with low thermal maturity from the Yuqia Coalfield, northern Qaidam Basin, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Haihai; Shao, Longyi; Li, Yonghong; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Wenlong; Wen, Huaijun

    2016-12-01

    The continental shales from the Middle Jurassic Shimengou Formation of the northern Qaidam Basin, northwestern China, have been investigated in recent years because of their shale gas potential. In this study, a total of twenty-two shale samples were collected from the YQ-1 borehole in the Yuqia Coalfield, northern Qaidam Basin. The total organic carbon (TOC) contents, pore structure parameters, and fractal characteristics of the samples were investigated using TOC analysis, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption experiments, and fractal analysis. The results show that the average pore size of the Shimengou shales varied from 8.149 nm to 20.635 nm with a mean value of 10.74 nm, which is considered mesopore-sized. The pores of the shales are mainly inkbottle- and slit-shaped. The sedimentary environment plays an essential role in controlling the TOC contents of the low maturity shales, with the TOC values of shales from deep to semi-deep lake facies (mean: 5.23%) being notably higher than those of the shore-shallow lake facies (mean: 0.65%). The fractal dimensions range from 2.4639 to 2.6857 with a mean of 2.6122, higher than those of marine shales, which indicates that the pore surface was rougher and the pore structure more complex in these continental shales. The fractal dimensions increase with increasing total pore volume and total specific surface area, and with decreasing average pore size. With increasing TOC contents in shales, the fractal dimensions increase first and then decrease, with the highest value occurring at 2% of TOC content, which is in accordance with the trends between the TOC and both total specific surface area and total pore volume. The pore structure complexity and pore surface roughness of these low-maturity shales would be controlled by the combined effects of both sedimentary environments and the TOC contents.

  2. USING CORONAL CELLS TO INFER THE MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE AND CHIRALITY OF FILAMENT CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P.; Martin, S. F.; Panasenco, O.

    2013-08-01

    Coronal cells are visible at temperatures of {approx}1.2 MK in Fe XII coronal images obtained from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft. We show that near a filament channel, the plumelike tails of these cells bend horizontally in opposite directions on the two sides of the channel like fibrils in the chromosphere. Because the cells are rooted in magnetic flux concentrations of majority polarity, these observations can be used with photospheric magnetograms to infer the direction of the horizontal field in filament channels and the chirality of the associated magnetic field. This method is similar to the procedure for inferring the direction of the magnetic field and the chirality of the fibril pattern in filament channels from H{alpha} observations. However, the coronal cell observations are easier to use and provide clear inferences of the horizontal field direction for heights up to {approx}50 Mm into the corona.

  3. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURE OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT AS EXTRAPOLATED FROM PHOTOSPHERIC AND CHROMOSPHERIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yelles Chaouche, L.; Kuckein, C.; Martinez Pillet, V.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2012-03-20

    The three-dimensional structure of an active region filament is studied using nonlinear force-free field extrapolations based on simultaneous observations at a photospheric and a chromospheric height. To that end, we used the Si I 10827 A line and the He I 10830 A triplet obtained with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (Tenerife). The two extrapolations have been carried out independently from each other and their respective spatial domains overlap in a considerable height range. This opens up new possibilities for diagnostics in addition to the usual ones obtained through a single extrapolation from, typically, a photospheric layer. Among those possibilities, this method allows the determination of an average formation height of the He I 10830 A signal of Almost-Equal-To 2 Mm above the surface of the Sun. It allows, as well, a cross-check of the obtained three-dimensional magnetic structures to verify a possible deviation from the force-free condition, especially at the photosphere. The extrapolations yield a filament formed by a twisted flux rope whose axis is located at about 1.4 Mm above the solar surface. The twisted field lines make slightly more than one turn along the filament within our field of view, which results in 0.055 turns Mm{sup -1}. The convex part of the field lines (as seen from the solar surface) constitutes dips where the plasma can naturally be supported. The obtained three-dimensional magnetic structure of the filament depends on the choice of the observed horizontal magnetic field as determined from the 180 Degree-Sign solution of the azimuth. We derive a method to check for the correctness of the selected 180 Degree-Sign ambiguity solution.

  4. Fractal analysis of Mesoamerican pyramids.

    PubMed

    Burkle-Elizondo, Gerardo; Valdez-Cepeda, Ricardo David

    2006-01-01

    A myth of ancient cultural roots was integrated into Mesoamerican cult, and the reference to architecture denoted a depth religious symbolism. The pyramids form a functional part of this cosmovision that is centered on sacralization. The space architecture works was an expression of the ideological necessities into their conception of harmony. The symbolism of the temple structures seems to reflect the mathematical order of the Universe. We contemplate two models of fractal analysis. The first one includes 16 pyramids. We studied a data set that was treated as a fractal profile to estimate the Df through variography (Dv). The estimated Fractal Dimension Dv = 1.383 +/- 0.211. In the second one we studied a data set to estimate the Dv of 19 pyramids and the estimated Fractal Dimension Dv = 1.229 +/- 0.165.

  5. Order-fractal transitions in abstract paintings

    SciTech Connect

    Calleja, E.M. de la; Cervantes, F.; Calleja, J. de la

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we determined the degree of order for 22 Jackson Pollock paintings using the Hausdorff–Besicovitch fractal dimension. Based on the maximum value of each multi-fractal spectrum, the artworks were classified according to the year in which they were painted. It has been reported that Pollock’s paintings are fractal and that this feature was more evident in his later works. However, our results show that the fractal dimension of these paintings ranges among values close to two. We characterize this behavior as a fractal-order transition. Based on the study of disorder-order transition in physical systems, we interpreted the fractal-order transition via the dark paint strokes in Pollock’s paintings as structured lines that follow a power law measured by the fractal dimension. We determined self-similarity in specific paintings, thereby demonstrating an important dependence on the scale of observations. We also characterized the fractal spectrum for the painting entitled Teri’s Find. We obtained similar spectra for Teri’s Find and Number 5, thereby suggesting that the fractal dimension cannot be rejected completely as a quantitative parameter for authenticating these artworks. -- Highlights: •We determined the degree of order in Jackson Pollock paintings using the Hausdorff–Besicovitch dimension. •We detected a fractal-order transition from Pollock’s paintings between 1947 and 1951. •We suggest that Jackson Pollock could have painted Teri’s Find.

  6. Fractal scattering of microwaves from soils.

    PubMed

    Oleschko, K; Korvin, G; Balankin, A S; Khachaturov, R V; Flores, L; Figueroa, B; Urrutia, J; Brambila, F

    2002-10-28

    Using a combination of laboratory experiments and computer simulation we show that microwaves reflected from and transmitted through soil have a fractal dimension correlated to that of the soil's hierarchic permittivity network. The mathematical model relating the ground-penetrating radar record to the mass fractal dimension of soil structure is also developed. The fractal signature of the scattered microwaves correlates well with some physical and mechanical properties of soils.

  7. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics on Fractals Subset of Real-Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmankhaneh, Alireza Khalili; Golmankhaneh, Ali Khalili; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2013-11-01

    A discontinuous media can be described by fractal dimensions. Fractal objects has special geometric properties, which are discrete and discontinuous structure. A fractal-time diffusion equation is a model for subdiffusive. In this work, we have generalized the Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics on fractal using the fractional local derivative, so one can use as a new mathematical model for the motion in the fractal media. More, Poisson bracket on fractal subset of real line is suggested.

  8. Chaos recognition and fractal analysis in the term structure of Shanghai Interbank Offered Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Rongbao; Chen, Xi; Li, Xinjie

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the Shanghai Interbank Offered Rate (SHIBOR) employing the chaos recognition and fractal analysis. We find that all interest rates of SHIBOR are chaotic systems with multifractal nature. The volatilities of the short-term interest rates are larger than the medium- and long-term interest rates and the magnitudes of these fluctuations decrease with the term increases. The smaller fluctuations of all interest rates have long-term memory property. The larger fluctuations of medium- or long-term interest rates have also long-term memory property but not for those of short-term rates. Moreover, there is long-term memory property between the two interest rates of SHIBOR with one medium- or long-term, but not for both short-term interest rates. Especially, there is also long-term memory between SHIBOR and USD LIBOR. These findings are beneficial not only to understand well the SHIBOR's running but also to price accurately financial products.

  9. Structural hierarchy of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei based on small-angle neutron scattering: Fractal nature of the large-scale chromatin organization

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, D. V. Filatov, M. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Islamov, A. Kh.; Stellbrink, J.; Pantina, R. A.; Denisov, Yu. Yu.; Toperverg, B. P.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2008-01-15

    The chromatin organization in chicken erythrocyte nuclei was studied by small-angle neutron scattering in the scattering-vector range from 1.5 x 10{sup -1} to 10{sup -4} A{sup -1} with the use of the contrast-variation technique. This scattering-vector range corresponds to linear dimensions from 4 nm to 6 {mu}m and covers the whole hierarchy of chromatin structures, from the nucleosomal structure to the entire nucleus. The results of the present study allowed the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) both the chromatin-protein structure and the structure of the nucleic acid component in chicken erythrocyte nuclei have mass-fractal properties, (2) the structure of the protein component of chromatin exhibits a fractal behavior on scales extending over two orders of magnitude, from the nucleosomal size to the size of an entire nucleus, and (3) the structure of the nucleic acid component of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei is likewise of a fractal nature and has two levels of organization or two phases with the crossover point at about 300-400 nm.

  10. RUI: Structure and Behavior of RF-Driven Plasma Filaments in High-Pressure Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Burin, Michael J.

    2014-11-18

    The filamentary discharge seen within commercial plasma globes is commonly enjoyed, yet not well understood. We investigate filament properties in a plasma globe using a variable high voltage amplifier. Results from the 3-year grant period and their physics are discussed.

  11. Photosynthesis irradiance parameters and community structure associated with coastal filaments and adjacent waters in the northern Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, Rory K.; Lohrenz, Steven E.; Rathbun, Catherine E.; Michelle Wood, A.; Arnone, Robert A.; Jones, Burton H.; Kindle, John C.; Weidemann, Alan D.

    Comparisons were made among size-fractionated photosynthesis-irradiance ( P- E) parameters, chlorophyll a size distributions, and accessory pigment composition of natural phytoplankton assemblages in filaments, coastal upwelling waters, and an oligotrophic region of the northern Arabian Sea during the Fall Intermonsoon in 1995. Differences between P- E parameters, PBmax and αB, were observed between filaments and adjacent waters and were associated with differences in phytoplankton community structure. In a southern filament and coastal upwelled waters, the majority of the estimated biomass (chlorophyll a) was present in the larger (2-20 and 20-200 μm) size fractions; dominant accessory pigments were 19'-butanoyloxyfucoxanthin and peridinin. In higher salinity waters, high percentages of chlorophyll a and lutein/zeaxanthin were observed in the smallest size-fraction (<2 μm). Whole water values of PBmax ranged from 1.77 to 2.31 (g C g chl a-1 h -1) when the majority of the biomass was in the largest fractions. Higher values (more than 4.48 g C g chl a-1 h -1) were determined in whole water samples for communities comprised primarily of small cells. A size dependence was also observed in the value of αB, 0.017 or greater (g C g chl a-1 h -1)/(μmol quanta m -2 s -1) for whole water samples at stations dominated by small cells and 0.013 when derived from stations dominated by large cells. The observed pattern of larger phytoplankton associated with upwelling and filament waters was consistent with previous investigations and was, for the most part, comparable to findings in the California Current system. Our results show that differences in taxonomic composition and photosynthetic characteristics were indeed present between filament waters and other distinct regions; these results suggest that taxonomic variations may be associated with size-related variations in P- E parameters. Our findings provide a unique data set describing filament biology in the northern

  12. Atomic structure of the vimentin central α-helical domain and its implications for intermediate filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Chernyatina, Anastasia A; Nicolet, Stefan; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald; Strelkov, Sergei V

    2012-08-21

    Together with actin filaments and microtubules, intermediate filaments (IFs) are the basic cytoskeletal components of metazoan cells. Over 80 human diseases have been linked to mutations in various IF proteins to date. However, the filament structure is far from being resolved at the atomic level, which hampers rational understanding of IF pathologies. The elementary building block of all IF proteins is a dimer consisting of an α-helical coiled-coil (CC) "rod" domain flanked by the flexible head and tail domains. Here we present three crystal structures of overlapping human vimentin fragments that comprise the first half of its rod domain. Given the previously solved fragments, a nearly complete atomic structure of the vimentin rod has become available. It consists of three α-helical segments (coils 1A, 1B, and 2) interconnected by linkers (L1 and L12). Most of the CC structure has a left-handed twist with heptad repeats, but both coil 1B and coil 2 also exhibit untwisted, parallel stretches with hendecad repeats. In the crystal structure, linker L1 was found to be α-helical without being involved in the CC formation. The available data allow us to construct an atomic model of the antiparallel tetramer representing the second level of vimentin assembly. Although the presence of the nonhelical head domains is essential for proper tetramer stabilization, the precise alignment of the dimers forming the tetramer appears to depend on the complementarity of their surface charge distribution patterns, while the structural plasticity of linker L1 and coil 1A plays a role in the subsequent IF assembly process.

  13. Designing Phoxonic Metamaterials with Fractal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Sisi; Koh, Cheong Yang; Kooi, Steve; Thomas, Edwin

    2012-02-01

    Recently, the concepts of fractal geometry have been introduced into electromagnetic and plasmonic metamaterials. With their self-similarity, structures based on fractal geometry should exhibit multi-band character with high Q factors due to the scaling law. However, there exist few studies of phononic metamaterials based on fractal geometry. We use COMSOL to investigate the wave propagation in two dimensional systems possessing fractal geometries. The simulations of these systems, guided by our recently developed general design framework, help to understand the role of design in determining the phononic properties of the structures. Proposed structures are being fabricated via standard lithographic or 3D printing techniques. The wave behavior of the structures can be characterized using Brillouin Light Scattering, Scanning Acoustic Microscope and Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy. Due to their sparse spatial distribution, fractal phononic structures show potential fir ``smart skin'', where multifunctional components can be fabricated on the same platform.

  14. Specific Glucoside Transporters Influence Septal Structure and Function in the Filamentous, Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Morión, Mercedes; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; López-Igual, Rocío; Frías, José E; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Wolk, C Peter; Flores, Enrique

    2017-04-01

    When deprived of combined nitrogen, some filamentous cyanobacteria contain two cell types: vegetative cells that fix CO2 through oxygenic photosynthesis and heterocysts that are specialized in N2 fixation. In the diazotrophic filament, the vegetative cells provide the heterocysts with reduced carbon (mainly in the form of sucrose) and heterocysts provide the vegetative cells with combined nitrogen. Septal junctions traverse peptidoglycan through structures known as nanopores and appear to mediate intercellular molecular transfer that can be traced with fluorescent markers, including the sucrose analog esculin (a coumarin glucoside) that is incorporated into the cells. Uptake of esculin by the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was inhibited by the α-glucosides sucrose and maltose. Analysis of Anabaena mutants identified components of three glucoside transporters that move esculin into the cells: GlsC (Alr4781) and GlsP (All0261) are an ATP-binding subunit and a permease subunit of two different ABC transporters, respectively, and HepP (All1711) is a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) protein that was shown previously to be involved in formation of the heterocyst envelope. Transfer of fluorescent markers (especially calcein) between vegetative cells of Anabaena was impaired by mutation of glucoside transporter genes. GlsP and HepP interact in bacterial two-hybrid assays with the septal junction-related protein SepJ, and GlsC was found to be necessary for the formation of a normal number of septal peptidoglycan nanopores and for normal subcellular localization of SepJ. Therefore, beyond their possible role in nutrient uptake in Anabaena, glucoside transporters influence the structure and function of septal junctions.IMPORTANCE Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria have the ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and to assimilate atmospheric CO2 and N2 These organisms grow as filaments that fix these gases specifically in vegetative

  15. Fractal analysis of complex microstructure in castings

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.Z.; Lipp, D.C.; Hellawell, A.

    1995-12-31

    Complex microstructures in castings are usually characterized descriptively which often raises ambiguity and makes it difficult to relate the microstructure to the growth kinetics or mechanical properties in processing modeling. Combining the principle of fractal geometry and computer image processing techniques, it is feasible to characterize the complex microstructures numerically by the parameters of fractal dimension, D, and shape factor, a, without ambiguity. Procedures of fractal measurement and analysis are described, and a test case of its application to cast irons is provided. The results show that the irregular cast structures may all be characterized numerically by fractal analysis.

  16. Structure of myosin filaments from relaxed Lethocerus flight muscle by cryo-EM at 6 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhongjun; Taylor, Dianne W.; Reedy, Michael K.; Edwards, Robert J.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a cryo–electron microscopy three-dimensional image reconstruction of relaxed myosin II–containing thick filaments from the flight muscle of the giant water bug Lethocerus indicus. The relaxed thick filament structure is a key element of muscle physiology because it facilitates the reextension process following contraction. Conversely, the myosin heads must disrupt their relaxed arrangement to drive contraction. Previous models predicted that Lethocerus myosin was unique in having an intermolecular head-head interaction, as opposed to the intramolecular head-head interaction observed in all other species. In contrast to the predicted model, we find an intramolecular head-head interaction, which is similar to that of other thick filaments but oriented in a distinctly different way. The arrangement of myosin’s long α-helical coiled-coil rod domain has been hypothesized as either curved layers or helical subfilaments. Our reconstruction is the first report having sufficient resolution to track the rod α helices in their native environment at resolutions ~5.5 Å, and it shows that the layer arrangement is correct for Lethocerus. Threading separate paths through the forest of myosin coiled coils are four nonmyosin peptides. We suggest that the unusual position of the heads and the rod arrangement separated by nonmyosin peptides are adaptations for mechanical signal transduction whereby applied tension disrupts the myosin heads as a component of stretch activation. PMID:27704041

  17. Use of a fusion protein between GFP and an actin-binding domain to visualize transient filamentous-actin structures.

    PubMed

    Pang, K M; Lee, E; Knecht, D A

    1998-03-26

    Many important processes in eukaryotic cells involve changes in the quantity, location and the organization of actin filaments [1] [2] [3]. We have been able to visualize these changes in live cells using a fusion protein (GFP-ABD) comprising the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria and the 25 kDa highly conserved actin-binding domain (ABD) from the amino terminus of the actin cross-linking protein ABP-120 [4]. In live cells of the soil amoeba Dictyostelium that were expressing GFP-ABD, the three-dimensional architecture of the actin cortex was clearly visualized. The pattern of GFP-ABD fluorescence in these cells coincided with that of rhodamine-phalloidin, indicating that GFP-ABD specifically binds filamentous (F) actin. On the ventral surface of non-polarized vegetative cells, a broad ring of F actin periodically assembled and contracted, whereas in polarized cells there were transient punctate F-actin structures; cells cycled between the polarized and non-polarized morphologies. During the formation of pseudopods, an increase in fluorescence intensity coincided with the initial outward deformation of the membrane. This is consistent with the models of pseudopod extension that predict an increase in the local density of actin filaments. In conclusion, GFP-ABD specifically binds F actin and allows the visualization of F-actin dynamics and cellular behavior simultaneously.

  18. Modeling fractal structure of city-size distributions using correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanguang

    2011-01-01

    Zipf's law is one the most conspicuous empirical facts for cities, however, there is no convincing explanation for the scaling relation between rank and size and its scaling exponent. Using the idea from general fractals and scaling, I propose a dual competition hypothesis of city development to explain the value intervals and the special value, 1, of the power exponent. Zipf's law and Pareto's law can be mathematically transformed into one another, but represent different processes of urban evolution, respectively. Based on the Pareto distribution, a frequency correlation function can be constructed. By scaling analysis and multifractals spectrum, the parameter interval of Pareto exponent is derived as (0.5, 1]; Based on the Zipf distribution, a size correlation function can be built, and it is opposite to the first one. By the second correlation function and multifractals notion, the Pareto exponent interval is derived as [1, 2). Thus the process of urban evolution falls into two effects: one is the Pareto effect indicating city number increase (external complexity), and the other the Zipf effect indicating city size growth (internal complexity). Because of struggle of the two effects, the scaling exponent varies from 0.5 to 2; but if the two effects reach equilibrium with each other, the scaling exponent approaches 1. A series of mathematical experiments on hierarchical correlation are employed to verify the models and a conclusion can be drawn that if cities in a given region follow Zipf's law, the frequency and size correlations will follow the scaling law. This theory can be generalized to interpret the inverse power-law distributions in various fields of physical and social sciences.

  19. Comparison of two fractal interpolation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yang; Zheng, Zeyu; Xiao, Rui; Shi, Haibo

    2017-03-01

    As a tool for studying complex shapes and structures in nature, fractal theory plays a critical role in revealing the organizational structure of the complex phenomenon. Numerous fractal interpolation methods have been proposed over the past few decades, but they differ substantially in the form features and statistical properties. In this study, we simulated one- and two-dimensional fractal surfaces by using the midpoint displacement method and the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot fractal function method, and observed great differences between the two methods in the statistical characteristics and autocorrelation features. From the aspect of form features, the simulations of the midpoint displacement method showed a relatively flat surface which appears to have peaks with different height as the fractal dimension increases. While the simulations of the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot fractal function method showed a rough surface which appears to have dense and highly similar peaks as the fractal dimension increases. From the aspect of statistical properties, the peak heights from the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot simulations are greater than those of the middle point displacement method with the same fractal dimension, and the variances are approximately two times larger. When the fractal dimension equals to 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, and 1.8, the skewness is positive with the midpoint displacement method and the peaks are all convex, but for the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot fractal function method the skewness is both positive and negative with values fluctuating in the vicinity of zero. The kurtosis is less than one with the midpoint displacement method, and generally less than that of the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot fractal function method. The autocorrelation analysis indicated that the simulation of the midpoint displacement method is not periodic with prominent randomness, which is suitable for simulating aperiodic surface. While the simulation of the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot fractal function method has

  20. Is the applicability of fractal statistics to sedimentary structures the result of scale-invariant stochastic processes or deterministic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Turcotte, D.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Fractal statistics are the only statistics that are scale invariant. Examples in tectonics include distributions of faults, displacements on faults, distributions and permeabilities of fractures, and distributions of folds. Many aspects of sedimentology are also fractal including distributions of sedimentary sequences, variations in permeability, and shapes of boundaries. Since the underlying processes are likely to be scale invariant, it is reasonable to conclude that the number-size statistics of oil fields will be fractal. Log-normal statistics are often applied; they are not scale invariant. Two explanations for fractal statistics can be given. They may be the result of scale-invariant stochastic processes. Random walk (Brownian noise) is one example. Topography generally resembles Brownian noise, a power-law spectrum with fractal dimension D = 1.5. Alternatively fractal statistics can be the result of deterministic chaos. Turbulent flows are examples of deterministic chaos, the governing equations are deterministic but the resulting flows are statistical. Tectonic displacements can be shown to be the result of deterministic chaos; it is likely that erosion is another example.

  1. Structural CNT Composites. Part I; Developing a Carbon Nanotube Filament Winder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauti, Godfrey; Kim, Jae-Woo; Wincheski, Russell A.; Antczak, Andrew; Campero, Jamie C.; Luong, Hoa H.; Shanahan, Michelle H.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based materials promise advances in the production of high strength and multifunctional components for aerospace and other applications. Specifically, in tension dominated applications, the latest CNT based filaments are yielding composite properties comparable to or exceeding composites from more established fibers such as Kevlar and carbon fiber. However, for the properties of these materials to be fully realized at the component level, suitable manufacturing processes have to be developed. These materials handle differently from conventional fibers, with different wetting characteristics and behavior under load. The limited availability of bulk forms also requires that the equipment be scaled down accordingly to tailor the process development approach to material availability. Here, the development of hardware and software for filament winding of carbon nanotube based tapes and yarns is described. This hardware features precision guidance of the CNT material and control of the winding tension over a wide range in an open architecture that allows for effective process control and troubleshooting during winding. Use of the filament winder to develop CNT based Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) shall also be discussed.

  2. Solid friction between soft filaments.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes's drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  3. Insights into the mechanism of Rad51 recombinase from the structure and properties of a filament interface mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jianhong; Villanueva, Nicolas; Rould, Mark A.; Morrical, Scott W.

    2010-09-03

    Rad51 protein promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes. Recombination activities are activated by Rad51 filament assembly on ssDNA. Previous studies of yeast Rad51 showed that His352 occupies an important position at the filament interface, where it could relay signals between subunits and active sites. To investigate, we characterized yeast Rad51 H352A and H352Y mutants, and solved the structure of H352Y. H352A forms catalytically competent but salt-labile complexes on ssDNA. In contrast, H352Y forms salt-resistant complexes on ssDNA, but is defective in nucleotide exchange, RPA displacement and strand exchange with full-length DNA substrates. The 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of H352Y reveals a right-handed helical filament in a high-pitch (130 {angstrom}) conformation with P61 symmetry. The catalytic core and dimer interface regions of H352Y closely resemble those of DNA-bound Escherichia coli RecA protein. The H352Y mutation stabilizes Phe187 from the adjacent subunit in a position that interferes with the {gamma}-phosphate-binding site of the Walker A motif/P-loop, potentially explaining the limited catalysis observed. Comparison of Rad51 H352Y, RecA-DNA and related structures reveals that the presence of bound DNA correlates with the isomerization of a conserved cis peptide near Walker B to the trans configuration, which appears to prime the catalytic glutamate residue for ATP hydrolysis.

  4. Structure and Mutational Analyses of Escherichia coli ZapD Reveal Charged Residues Involved in FtsZ Filament Bundling

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Elyse J.; Wroblewski, Charles; Seidel, Laura; Berezuk, Alison M.; Brewer, Dyanne; Kimber, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial cell division is an essential and highly coordinated process. It requires the polymerization of the tubulin homologue FtsZ to form a dynamic ring (Z-ring) at midcell. Z-ring formation relies on a group of FtsZ-associated proteins (Zap) for stability throughout the process of division. In Escherichia coli, there are currently five Zap proteins (ZapA through ZapE), of which four (ZapA, ZapB, ZapC, and ZapD) are small soluble proteins that act to bind and bundle FtsZ filaments. In particular, ZapD forms a functional dimer and interacts with the C-terminal tail of FtsZ, but little is known about its structure and mechanism of action. Here, we present the crystal structure of Escherichia coli ZapD and show it forms a symmetrical dimer with centrally located α-helices flanked by β-sheet domains. Based on the structure of ZapD and its chemical cross-linking to FtsZ, we targeted nine charged ZapD residues for modification by site-directed mutagenesis. Using in vitro FtsZ sedimentation assays, we show that residues R56, R221, and R225 are important for bundling FtsZ filaments, while transmission electron microscopy revealed that altering these residues results in different FtsZ bundle morphology compared to those of filaments bundled with wild-type ZapD. ZapD residue R116 also showed altered FtsZ bundle morphology but levels of FtsZ bundling similar to that of wild-type ZapD. Together, these results reveal that ZapD residues R116, R221, and R225 likely participate in forming a positively charged binding pocket that is critical for bundling FtsZ filaments. IMPORTANCE Z-ring assembly underpins the formation of the essential cell division complex known as the divisome and is required for recruitment of downstream cell division proteins. ZapD is one of several proteins in E. coli that associates with the Z-ring to promote FtsZ bundling and aids in the overall fitness of the division process. In the present study, we describe the dimeric structure of E. coli

  5. The complexity and fractal structures of CSI300 before and after the introduction of CSI300IF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongwu; Du, Ziping

    2014-11-01

    This paper employs multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) approach to analyze the complexity and fractal structures of China Securities Index 300 (CSI300), which covers the period from April 5, 2006 to May 9, 2014. Through comparing the statistic properties before and after the introduction of CSI300 index futures (CSI300IF), we find that: (1) the price return series exhibits multifractal properties for the two periods; (2) by comparing the efficient measure based on the general Hurst exponent, we find the market becomes more efficient after the introduction of CSI300IF; (3) the width of multifractal spectrum becomes narrower, which means the complexity of the market is decreased. Therefore, the introduction of CSI300IF is beneficial to reduce the risk and increase the efficiency of Chinese securities market. Furthermore, the main sources of multifractality of these time series are examined through the shuffle method, and the results show that before CSI300IF the multifractality is mainly due to the long-range correlation properties between small and large fluctuations, while after CSI300IF it is more due to fat-tailed probability distributions.

  6. The Sun-Earth connect 2: Modelling patterns of a fractal Sun in time and space using the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert G. V.

    2017-02-01

    Self-similar matrices of the fine structure constant of solar electromagnetic force and its inverse, multiplied by the Carrington synodic rotation, have been previously shown to account for at least 98% of the top one hundred significant frequencies and periodicities observed in the ACRIM composite irradiance satellite measurement and the terrestrial 10.7cm Penticton Adjusted Daily Flux data sets. This self-similarity allows for the development of a time-space differential equation (DE) where the solutions define a solar model for transmissions through the core, radiative, tachocline, convective and coronal zones with some encouraging empirical and theoretical results. The DE assumes a fundamental complex oscillation in the solar core and that time at the tachocline is smeared with real and imaginary constructs. The resulting solutions simulate for tachocline transmission, the solar cycle where time-line trajectories either 'loop' as Hermite polynomials for an active Sun or 'tail' as complementary error functions for a passive Sun. Further, a mechanism that allows for the stable energy transmission through the tachocline is explored and the model predicts the initial exponential coronal heating from nanoflare supercharging. The twisting of the field at the tachocline is then described as a quaternion within which neutrinos can oscillate. The resulting fractal bubbles are simulated as a Julia Set which can then aggregate from nanoflares into solar flares and prominences. Empirical examples demonstrate that time and space fractals are important constructs in understanding the behaviour of the Sun, from the impact on climate and biological histories on Earth, to the fractal influence on the spatial distributions of the solar system. The research suggests that there is a fractal clock underpinning solar frequencies in packages defined by the fine structure constant, where magnetic flipping and irradiance fluctuations at phase changes, have periodically impacted on the

  7. Spatial structure of scrape-off-layer filaments near the midplane and X-point regions of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J L; Zweben, S J; Umansky, M V; Cziegler, I; Grulke, O; LaBombard, B; Stotler, D P

    2008-05-22

    Movies of edge turbulence at both the outboard midplane and the region outboard of the typical lower X-point location in C-Mod have been obtained using Gas-Puff-Imaging together with fast-framing cameras. Intermittent turbulent structures, typically referred to as blobs or filaments, are observed in both locations. Near the midplane the filaments are roughly circular in cross-section, while in the X-point region they are highly elongated. Filament velocities in this region are {approx}3x faster than the radial velocities at the midplane, in a direction roughly normal to the local flux surfaces. The observations are consistent with the picture that the filaments arise in outboard region and, as a consequence of the rapid parallel diffusion of the potential perturbations, map along field lines. A simulation using the 3D BOUT turbulence code has been made, with the result that reproduces many of the spatial features observed in the experiment.

  8. Structural Analysis of Human Cofilin 2/Filamentous Actin Assemblies: Atomic-Resolution Insights from Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yehl, Jenna; Kudryashova, Elena; Reisler, Emil; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Polenova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Cellular actin dynamics is an essential element of numerous cellular processes, such as cell motility, cell division and endocytosis. Actin’s involvement in these processes is mediated by many actin-binding proteins, among which the cofilin family plays unique and essential role in accelerating actin treadmilling in filamentous actin (F-actin) in a nucleotide-state dependent manner. Cofilin preferentially interacts with older filaments by recognizing time-dependent changes in F-actin structure associated with the hydrolysis of ATP and release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the nucleotide cleft of actin. The structure of cofilin on F-actin and the details of the intermolecular interface remain poorly understood at atomic resolution. Here we report atomic-level characterization by magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of the muscle isoform of human cofilin 2 (CFL2) bound to F-actin. We demonstrate that resonance assignments for the majority of atoms are readily accomplished and we derive the intermolecular interface between CFL2 and F-actin. The MAS NMR approach reported here establishes the foundation for atomic-resolution characterization of a broad range of actin-associated proteins bound to F-actin. PMID:28303963

  9. Analysis on the Filament Structure Evolution in Reset Transition of Cu/HfO2/Pt RRAM Device.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing; Li, Yang; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Miranda, Enrique; Suñé, Jordi; Liu, Ming

    2016-12-01

    The resistive switching (RS) process of resistive random access memory (RRAM) is dynamically correlated with the evolution process of conductive path or conductive filament (CF) during its breakdown (rupture) and recovery (reformation). In this study, a statistical evaluation method is developed to analyze the filament structure evolution process in the reset operation of Cu/HfO2/Pt RRAM device. This method is based on a specific functional relationship between the Weibull slopes of reset parameters' distributions and the CF resistance (R on). The CF of the Cu/HfO2/Pt device is demonstrated to be ruptured abruptly, and the CF structure of the device has completely degraded in the reset point. Since no intermediate states are generated in the abrupt reset process, it is quite favorable for the reliable and stable one-bit operation in RRAM device. Finally, on the basis of the cell-based analytical thermal dissolution model, a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is implemented to further verify the experimental results. This work provides inspiration for RRAM reliability and performance design to put RRAM into practical application.

  10. Fractal nanoparticle plasmonics: the Cayley tree.

    PubMed

    Gottheim, Samuel; Zhang, Hui; Govorov, Alexander O; Halas, Naomi J

    2015-03-24

    There has been strong, ongoing interest over the past decade in developing strategies to design and engineer materials with tailored optical properties. Fractal-like nanoparticles and films have long been known to possess a remarkably broad-band optical response and are potential nanoscale components for realizing spectrum-spanning optical effects. Here we examine the role of self-similarity in a fractal geometry for the design of plasmon line shapes. By computing and fabricating simple Cayley tree nanostructures of increasing fractal order N, we are able to identify the principle behind how the multimodal plasmon spectrum of this system develops as the fractal order is increased. With increasing N, the fractal structure acquires an increasing number of modes with certain degeneracies: these modes correspond to plasmon oscillations on the different length scales inside a fractal. As a result, fractals with large N exhibit broad, multipeaked spectra from plasmons with large degeneracy numbers. The Cayley tree serves as an example of a more general, fractal-based route for the design of structures and media with highly complex optical line shapes.

  11. Investigation of the Near Wake Flow Structure of a Fractal Square Turbulence Grid using Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzol, Oguz; Hazaveh, Hooman Amiri

    2016-11-01

    The 3D flow structure within the near wake of a four-iteration fractal square turbulence grid is obtained by combining data from closely-spaced horizontal and vertical two-dimensional PIV measurement planes. For this purpose, the grid is placed inside the entrance of the test section of a suction type wind tunnel. The experiments are conducted at a freestream velocity of 8 m/s, corresponding to a Reynolds number of 9000 based on effective mesh size. The freestream turbulence intensity is about 0.5%. The measurement volume extends about 7 effective mesh sizes downstream of the grid. Within the measurement volume, 1000 vector maps are obtained on each one of the 220 horizontal and 220 vertical 2D PIV planes that are separated from each other by 500 microns, which is close to the in-plane vector spacing of 600 microns. This dataset allowed us to calculate all components of mean velocity, velocity gradient tensor, and vorticity as well as the Reynolds stress tensor except for (v'w') component. Using the analyzed three-dimensional mean flow field data, we are able to observe the three dimensional structure of the wakes of the largest bars that dominate the flow field and the corresponding turbulence generation characteristics. We focus on how the wake geometry, decay characteristics and stress-strain relations get impacted by the presence of smaller wakes surrounding the largest wake regions. We also investigate how 3D mean flow non-uniformities get generated downstream of the grid such as lateral contraction and bulging of mean wake shapes.

  12. Formation of dense structures induced by filament collisions. Correlation of density, kinematics, and magnetic field in the Pipe nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Alves, F. O.; Franco, G. A. P.; Onishi, T.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.

    2015-02-01

    Context. The Pipe nebula is a molecular cloud that lacks star formation feedback and has a relatively simple morphology and velocity structure. This makes it an ideal target for testing cloud evolution through collisions. Aims: We aim at drawing a comprehensive picture of this relatively simple cloud to better understand the formation and evolution of molecular clouds on large scales. Methods: We use archival data to compare the optical polarization properties, the visual extinction, and the 13CO velocities and linewidths of the entire cloud in order to identify trends among the observables. Results: The Pipe nebula can be roughly divided into two filaments with different orientations and gas velocity ranges: E-W at 2-4 km s-1 and N-S at 6-7 km s-1. The two filaments overlap at the bowl, where the gas shows a velocity gradient spanning from 2 to 7 km s-1. Compared to the rest of the Pipe nebula, the bowl gas appears to be denser and exhibits larger linewidths. In addition, the polarization data at the bowl shows lower angular dispersion and higher polarization degree. Cores in the bowl tend to cluster in space and to follow the 13CO velocity gradient. In the stem, cores tend to cluster in regions with properties similar to those of the bowl. Conclusions: The velocity pattern points to a collision between the filaments in the bowl region. The magnetic field seems to be compressed and strengthened in the shocked region. The proportional increase in density and magnetic field strength by a factor similar to the Alfvénic Mach number suggests a continuous shock at low Alfvénic Mach number under the flux-freezing condition. Shocked regions seem to enhance the formation and clustering of dense cores. A movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  13. The fractal aggregation of asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Hoepfner, Michael P; Fávero, Cláudio Vilas Bôas; Haji-Akbari, Nasim; Fogler, H Scott

    2013-07-16

    This paper discusses time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering results that were used to investigate asphaltene structure and stability with and without a precipitant added in both crude oil and model oil. A novel approach was used to isolate the scattering from asphaltenes that are insoluble and in the process of aggregating from those that are soluble. It was found that both soluble and insoluble asphaltenes form fractal clusters in crude oil and the fractal dimension of the insoluble asphaltene clusters is higher than that of the soluble clusters. Adding heptane also increases the size of soluble asphaltene clusters without modifying the fractal dimension. Understanding the process of insoluble asphaltenes forming fractals with higher fractal dimensions will potentially reveal the microscopic asphaltene destabilization mechanism (i.e., how a precipitant modifies asphaltene-asphaltene interactions). It was concluded that because of the polydisperse nature of asphaltenes, no well-defined asphaltene phase stability envelope exists and small amounts of asphaltenes precipitated even at dilute precipitant concentrations. Asphaltenes that are stable in a crude oil-precipitant mixture are dispersed on the nanometer length scale. An asphaltene precipitation mechanism is proposed that is consistent with the experimental findings. Additionally, it was found that the heptane-insoluble asphaltene fraction is the dominant source of small-angle scattering in crude oil and the previously unobtainable asphaltene solubility at low heptane concentrations was measured.

  14. Chaos and Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Ray

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an educational game called "The Chaos Game" which produces complicated fractal images. Two basic computer programs are included. The production of fractal images by the Sierpinski gasket and the Chaos Game programs is discussed. (CW)

  15. Chaos, Fractals, and Polynomials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tylee, J. Louis; Tylee, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses chaos theory; linear algebraic equations and the numerical solution of polynomials, including the use of the Newton-Raphson technique to find polynomial roots; fractals; search region and coordinate systems; convergence; and generating color fractals on a computer. (LRW)

  16. Fractals for physicians.

    PubMed

    Thamrin, Cindy; Stern, Georgette; Frey, Urs

    2010-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the study of fractals in medicine. In this review, we provide an overview of fractals, of techniques available to describe fractals in physiological data, and we propose some reasons why a physician might benefit from an understanding of fractals and fractal analysis, with an emphasis on paediatric respiratory medicine where possible. Among these reasons are the ubiquity of fractal organisation in nature and in the body, and how changes in this organisation over the lifespan provide insight into development and senescence. Fractal properties have also been shown to be altered in disease and even to predict the risk of worsening of disease. Finally, implications of a fractal organisation include robustness to errors during development, ability to adapt to surroundings, and the restoration of such organisation as targets for intervention and treatment.

  17. Structure of Importin-α from a Filamentous Fungus in Complex with a Classical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Natalia E; Takeda, Agnes A S; Dreyer, Thiago R; Freitas, Fernanda Z; Bertolini, Maria Célia; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2015-01-01

    Neurospora crassa is a filamentous fungus that has been extensively studied as a model organism for eukaryotic biology, providing fundamental insights into cellular processes such as cell signaling, growth and differentiation. To advance in the study of this multicellular organism, an understanding of the specific mechanisms for protein transport into the cell nucleus is essential. Importin-α (Imp-α) is the receptor for cargo proteins that contain specific nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that play a key role in the classical nuclear import pathway. Structures of Imp-α from different organisms (yeast, rice, mouse, and human) have been determined, revealing that this receptor possesses a conserved structural scaffold. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the Impα mechanism of action may vary significantly for different organisms or for different isoforms from the same organism. Therefore, structural, functional, and biophysical characterization of different Impα proteins is necessary to understand the selectivity of nuclear transport. Here, we determined the first crystal structure of an Impα from a filamentous fungus which is also the highest resolution Impα structure already solved to date (1.75 Å). In addition, we performed calorimetric analysis to determine the affinity and thermodynamic parameters of the interaction between Imp-α and the classical SV40 NLS peptide. The comparison of these data with previous studies on Impα proteins led us to demonstrate that N. crassa Imp-α possess specific features that are distinct from mammalian Imp-α but exhibit important similarities to rice Imp-α, particularly at the minor NLS binding site.

  18. Characterization of HI Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubar, Emily; Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2017-01-01

    We characterized the properties of dramatic interstellar HI filaments to learn more about the dynamics and structure of such features. Using Gauss fitting software, we searched the Effelsburg-Bonn HI Survey data for indications of a simple twisting (toroidal) motion across these filaments. Instead, we found that the structure was more complicated than expected. Apparent angular widths of several filaments were measured using the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array HI (GALFA-HI), Bonn, and Leident/Argentine/Bonn (LAB) surveys. Based on filament widths and other parameters, we conclude that magnetism is the dominant force opposing internal motion and maintaining the structure of these filaments. The apparent width as a function of beam width closely follows a relationship reported in 1993 for HI features in general. They tend to subtend an angle two times the beam width, suggesting that the features remain unresolved.The Arecibo Observatory is operated by SRI International under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (AST-1100968), and in alliance with Ana G. Méndez-Universidad Metropolitana, and the Universities Space Research Association. The Arecibo Observatory REU is funded under grant AST-1559849 to Universidad Metropolitana.

  19. Reorganization of actin filaments by ADF/cofilin is involved in formation of microtubule structures during Xenopus oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Abe, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We examined the reorganization of actin filaments and microtubules during Xenopus oocyte maturation. Surrounding the germinal vesicle (GV) in immature oocytes, the cytoplasmic actin filaments reorganized to accumulate beneath the vegetal side of the GV, where the microtubule-organizing center and transient microtubule array (MTOC-TMA) assembled, just before GV breakdown (GVBD). Immediately after GVBD, both Xenopus ADF/cofilin (XAC) and its phosphatase Slingshot (XSSH) accumulated into the nuclei and intranuclear actin filaments disassembled from the vegetal side with the shrinkage of the GV. As the MTOC-TMA developed well, cytoplasmic actin filaments were retained at the MTOC-TMA base region. Suppression of XAC dephosphorylation by anti-XSSH antibody injection inhibited both actin filament reorganization and proper formation and localization of both the MTOC-TMA and meiotic spindles. Stabilization of actin filaments by phalloidin also inhibited formation of the MTOC-TMA and disassembly of intranuclear actin filaments without affecting nuclear shrinkage. Nocodazole also caused the MTOC-TMA and the cytoplasmic actin filaments at its base region to disappear, which further impeded disassembly of intranuclear actin filaments from the vegetal side. XAC appears to reorganize cytoplasmic actin filaments required for precise assembly of the MTOC and, together with the MTOC-TMA, regulate the intranuclear actin filament disassembly essential for meiotic spindle formation. PMID:26424802

  20. Fractal aggregates in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabane, M.; Rannou, P.; Chassefiere, E.; Israel, G.

    1993-04-01

    The cluster structure of Titan's atmosphere was modeled by using an Eulerian microphysical model with the specific formulation of microphysical laws applying to fractal particles. The growth of aggregates in the settling phase was treated by introducing the fractal dimension as a parameter of the model. The model was used to obtain a vertical distribution of size and number density of the aggregates for different production altitudes. Results confirm previous estimates of the formation altitude of photochemical aerosols. The vertical profile of the effective radius of aggregates was calculated as a function of the visible optical depth.

  1. Structural Analysis of Helios Filament-Wound Tanks Subjected to Internal Pressure and Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L

    2005-01-01

    A finite-element stress analysis is performed on Helios filament-wound hydrogen tanks to examine the stress field and effect of end dome geometry on the stress field. Each tank is composed of a central circular cylindrical section with either geodesic or hemispherical end domes, which have metallic polar bosses. The tanks are subjected to combined and separate internal pressure and temperature loading conditions, and the stress contributions of each loading component are examined. The tank-wall-polar-boss interfacial meridional tensile stress in the hemispherical dome is found to be approximately 27 percent lower than that in the geodesic dome. The effects of both material anisotropy and the aluminum lining on the intensities of tensile meridional stress at the tank-wall-polar-boss bonding interface are examined.

  2. Nonvolatile conductive filaments resistive switching behaviors in Ag/GaO x /Nb:SrTiO3/Ag structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P. G.; Zhi, Y. S.; Wang, P. C.; Sun, Z. B.; Li, L. H.; An, Y. H.; Guo, D. Y.; Tang, W. H.; Xiao, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    Ag/GaO x /NSTO/Ag structures were fabricated, and the electrical properties measurement results show that the device behaviors a unipolar resistance switching characteristic with bi-stable resistance ratio of three orders. In the positive voltage region, the dominant conducting mechanism of high resistance state obeys Poole-Frenkel emission rules, while in the negative region, that obeys space-charge-limited current mechanism. Both the I- V curves of ON and OFF states and temperature-dependent variation resistances indicate that the unipolar resistance switching behavior can be explained by the formation/rupture of conductive filaments, which composed of oxygen vacancies. The stable switching results demonstrated that the structure can be applied in resistance random access memory devices.

  3. Fractals in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraboni, Michael; Moller, Trisha

    2008-01-01

    Fractal geometry offers teachers great flexibility: It can be adapted to the level of the audience or to time constraints. Although easily explained, fractal geometry leads to rich and interesting mathematical complexities. In this article, the authors describe fractal geometry, explain the process of iteration, and provide a sample exercise.…

  4. Fractal interpretation of intermittency

    SciTech Connect

    Hwa, R.C.

    1991-12-01

    Implication of intermittency in high-energy collisions is first discussed. Then follows a description of the fractal interpretation of intermittency. A basic quantity with asymptotic fractal behavior is introduced. It is then shown how the factorial moments and the G moments can be expressed in terms of it. The relationship between the intermittency indices and the fractal indices is made explicit.

  5. Fresnel diffraction of fractal grating and self-imaging effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhong; Zhang, Wei; Cui, Yuwei; Teng, Shuyun

    2014-04-01

    Based on the self-similarity property of fractal, two types of fractal gratings are produced according to the production and addition operations of multiple periodic gratings. Fresnel diffractions of fractal grating are analyzed theoretically, and the general mathematic expressions of the diffraction intensity distributions of fractal grating are deduced. The gray-scale patterns of the 2D diffraction distributions of fractal grating are provided through numerical calculations. The diffraction patterns take on the periodicity along the longitude and transverse directions. The 1D diffraction distribution at some certain distances shows the same structure as the fractal grating. This indicates that the self-image of fractal grating is really formed in the Fresnel diffraction region. The experimental measurement of the diffraction intensity distribution of fractal grating with different fractal dimensions and different fractal levels is performed, and the self-images of fractal grating are obtained successfully in experiments. The conclusions of this paper are helpful for the development of the application of fractal grating.

  6. Localization and fractal spectra of optical phonon modes in quasiperiodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmo, D. H. A. L.; Dantas, A. L.; Medeiros, S. K.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Freire, V. N.

    2005-04-01

    The dispersion relation and localization profile of confined optical phonon modes in quasiperiodic structures, made up of nitride semiconductor materials, are analyzed through a transfer-matrix approach. The quasiperiodic structures are characterized by the nature of their Fourier spectrum, which can be dense pure point (Fibonacci sequences) or singular continuous (Thue-Morse and Double-period sequences). These substitutional sequences are described in terms of a series of generations that obey peculiar recursion relations and/or inflation rules. We present a quantitative analysis of the localization and magnitude of the allowed band widths in the optical phonons spectra of these quasiperiodic structures, as well as how they scale as a function of the number of generations of the sequences.

  7. Experimental evidence of how the fractal structure controls the hydrodynamic resistance on granular aggregates moving through water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Federico

    2015-09-01

    A comprehensive set of experiments was carried out to investigate the effect of the fractal architecture of granular aggregates on the free-fall acceleration through a still water column. Test aggregates were first generated numerically with a method that allowed to control the fractal dimension d and, next, three stochastic replicates were lithographically fabricated for each of six values of d ranging between 1.9 and 2.7. The recorded position, velocity and acceleration served to analyze their dynamics in the Reynolds and Galilei number space, and to calculate the momentum rate of change and the intensity of drag (viscous and impact) and inertial forces (added mass and Basset-Bousinnesq). Analysis of these forces highlighted a strong dependence on d; additionally, integration of these forces in the particle momentum equation allowed to identify an additional resistance Rx that showed a strong correlation with d. A correlation analysis of Rx with various scaling laws combining velocity and acceleration suggested that Rx could be described by a nonlinear drag force and a force intermediate between drag and inertia. It was therefore concluded that irregular granular fractal aggregates accelerating in water are subject to highly complex and nonlinear hydrodynamic effects caused by surface roughness and volume porosity, and that these effects have tight connection with the internal and external fractal characteristics of the aggregates.

  8. Structural changes of the regulatory proteins bound to the thin filaments in skeletal muscle contraction by X-ray fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Yasunobu Takezawa, Yasunori; Matsuo, Tatsuhito; Ueno, Yutaka; Minakata, Shiho; Tanaka, Hidehiro; Wakabayashi, Katsuzo

    2008-04-25

    In order to clarify the structural changes related to the regulation mechanism in skeletal muscle contraction, the intensity changes of thin filament-based reflections were investigated by X-ray fiber diffraction. The time course and extent of intensity changes of the first to third order troponin (TN)-associated meridional reflections with a basic repeat of 38.4 nm were different for each of these reflections. The intensity of the first and second thin filament layer lines changed in a reciprocal manner both during initial activation and during the force generation process. The axial spacings of the TN-meridional reflections decreased by {approx}0.1% upon activation relative to the relaxing state and increased by {approx}0.24% in the force generation state, in line with that of the 2.7-nm reflection. Ca{sup 2+}-binding to TN triggered the shortening and a change in the helical symmetry of the thin filaments. Modeling of the structural changes using the intensities of the thin filament-based reflections suggested that the conformation of the globular core domain of TN altered upon activation, undergoing additional conformational changes at the tension plateau. The tail domain of TN moved together with tropomyosin during contraction. The results indicate that the structural changes of regulatory proteins bound to the actin filaments occur in two steps, the first in response to the Ca{sup 2+}-binding and the second induced by actomyosin interaction.

  9. [Chaos and fractals and their applications in electrocardial signal research].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qing; Guo, Yongxin; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2009-06-01

    Chaos and fractals are ubiquitous phenomena of nature. A system with fractal structure usually behaves chaos. As a complicated nonlinear dynamics system, heart has fractals structure and behaves as chaos. The deeper inherent mechanism of heart can be opened out when the chaos and fractals theory is utilized in the research of the electrical activity of heart. Generally a time series of a system was used for describing the status of the strange attractor of the system. The indices include Poincare plot, fractals dimension, Lyapunov exponent, entropy, scaling exponent, Hurst index and so on. In this article, the basic concepts and the methods of chaos and fractals were introduced firstly. Then the applications of chaos and fractals theories in the study of electrocardial signal were expounded with example of how they are used for ventricular fibrillation.

  10. Spectral scalability and optical spectra of fractal multilayer structures: FDTD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simsek, Sevket; Palaz, Selami; Mamedov, Amirullah M.; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2017-01-01

    An investigation of the optical properties and band structures for the conventional and Fibonacci photonic crystals (PCs) based on SrTiO3 and Sb2Te3 is made in the present research. Here, we use one-dimensional SrTiO3- and Sb2Te3-based layers. We have theoretically calculated the photonic band structure and transmission spectra of SrTiO3- and Sb2Te3-based PC superlattices. The position of minima in the transmission spectrum correlates with the gaps obtained in the calculation. The intensity of the transmission depths is more intense in the case of higher refractive index contrast between the layers.

  11. Extracellular matrix of adipogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells reveals a network of collagen filaments, mostly interwoven by hexagonal structural units.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mujib; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is the non-cellular component of tissues, which not only provides biological shelter but also takes part in the cellular decisions for diverse functions. Every tissue has an ECM with unique composition and topology that governs the process of determination, differentiation, proliferation, migration and regeneration of cells. Little is known about the structural organization of matrix especially of MSC-derived adipogenic ECM. Here, we particularly focus on the composition and architecture of the fat ECM to understand the cellular behavior on functional bases. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were adipogenically differentiated, then, were transferred to adipogenic propagation medium, whereas they started the release of lipid droplets leaving bare network of ECM. Microarray analysis was performed, to indentify the molecular machinery of matrix. Adipogenesis was verified by Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets and by qPCR of adipogenic marker genes PPARG and FABP4. Antibody staining demonstrated the presence of collagen type I, II and IV filaments, while alkaline phosphatase activity verified the ossified nature of these filaments. In the adipogenic matrix, the hexagonal structures were abundant followed by octagonal structures, whereas they interwoven in a crisscross manner. Regarding molecular machinery of adipogenic ECM, the bioinformatics analysis revealed the upregulated expression of COL4A1, ITGA7, ITGA7, SDC2, ICAM3, ADAMTS9, TIMP4, GPC1, GPC4 and downregulated expression of COL14A1, ADAMTS5, TIMP2, TIMP3, BGN, LAMA3, ITGA2, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB8, CLDN11. Moreover, genes associated with integrins, glycoproteins, laminins, fibronectins, cadherins, selectins and linked signaling pathways were found. Knowledge of the interactive-language between cells and matrix could be beneficial for the artificial designing of biomaterials and bioscaffolds.

  12. Kiloparsec-Scale Simulations of Star Formation in Disk Galaxies III. Structure and Dynamics of Filaments and Clumps in Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Michael J.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Van Loo, Sven

    2015-05-01

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of self-gravitating dense gas in a galactic disk, exploring scales ranging from 1 kpc down to ˜0.1 pc. Our primary goal is to understand how dense filaments form in giant molecular clouds (GMCs). These structures, often observed as infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) in the Galactic plane, are thought to be the precursors to massive stars and star clusters, so their formation may be the rate-limiting step controlling global star formation rates in galactic systems as described by the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. Our study follows on from Van Loo et al., which carried out simulations to 0.5 pc resolution and examined global aspects of the formation of dense gas clumps and the resulting star formation rate. Here, using our higher resolution, we examine the detailed structural, kinematic, and dynamical properties of dense filaments and clumps, including mass surface density (Σ) probability distribution functions, filament mass per unit length and its dispersion, lateral Σ profiles, filament fragmentation, filament velocity gradients and infall, and degree of filament and clump virialization. Where possible, these properties are compared to observations of IRDCs. By many metrics, especially too large mass fractions of high {Σ }\\gt 1 g c{{m}-2} material, too high mass per unit length dispersion due to dense clump formation, too high velocity gradients, and too high velocity dispersion for a given mass per unit length, the simulated filaments differ from observed IRDCs. We thus conclude that IRDCs do not form from global fast collapse of GMCs. Rather, we expect that IRDC formation and collapse are slowed significantly by the influence of dynamically important magnetic fields, which may thus play a crucial role in regulating galactic star formation rates.

  13. Complex Flare Dynamics Initiated by a Filament-Filament Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chunming; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; Sun, Xudong; McAteer, James

    2015-04-01

    We report on a filament eruption that led to a relatively rare filament-filament interaction event. The filaments were located at different heights above the same segment of a circular polarity inversion line (PIL) around a condensed leading sunspot. The onset of the eruption of the lower of the two filaments was accompanied by a simultaneous descent of the upper filament resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction led to the subsequent merger of the filaments into a single magnetically complex structure that erupted to create a large solar flare and an array of complex dynamical activity. A hard X-ray coronal source and an associated enhancement of hot plasma are observed at the interface between the two interacting filaments. These phenomena are related to the production of a small C flare and the subsequent development of a much stronger M flare. Magnetic loop shrinkage and descending dark voids were observed at different locations as part of the large flare energy release giving us a unique insight into these dynamic flare phenomena.

  14. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model.

    PubMed

    Nicolás-Carlock, J R; Carrillo-Estrada, J L; Dossetti, V

    2016-01-19

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters' fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension.

  15. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás-Carlock, J. R.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Dossetti, V.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters’ fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension. PMID:26781204

  16. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolás-Carlock, J. R.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Dossetti, V.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters’ fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension.

  17. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Sprout Branching of Tumour Capillary Network Growth: Fractal Dimension and Multifractal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Jian-Long; Lu, Hang-Jun; Wu, Feng-Min; Xu, You-Sheng

    2008-05-01

    A tumour vascular network, characterized as an irregularly stochastic growth, is different from the normal vascular network. We systematically analyse the dependence of the branching. It is found that anastomosis of tumour on time is according to a number of tumour images, and both the fractal dimensions and multifractal spectra of the tumours are obtained. In the cases studied, the fractal dimensions of the tumour vascular network increase with time and the multifractal spectrum not only rises entirely but also shifts right. In addition, the best drug delivery stage is discussed according to the difference of the singularity exponent δα(δα = αmax — αmin), which shows some change in the growth process of the tumour vascular network. A common underlying principle is obtained from our analysis along with previous results.

  18. Statistics of the fractal structure and phase singularity of a plane light wave propagation in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ruizhong

    2008-01-10

    Numerical experiments are carried out for a plane wave propagating in the atmospheric turbulence for a weak to strong fluctuation condition, i.e., the Rytov index being in a large range of 2x10(-3) to 20. Mainly two categories of propagation events are explored for the same range of Rytov index. In one category the propagation distance and also the Fresnel length are kept fixed with the turbulence strength changing. In the other the turbulence strength is kept fixed with the distance changing. The statistical characteristics of the scintillation index, the maximum and minimum of the intensity, the fractal dimension of the intensity image, and the number density of the phase singularity are analyzed. The behaviors of the fractal dimension and the density of the phase singularity present obvious differences for the two categories of propagation. The fractal dimension depends both on the Rytov index and the Fresnel length. In both weak and strong fluctuation conditions the dimension generally increases with the Rytov index, but is at minimum at the onset region. The phase singularity density is coincident with the theoretical results under a weak fluctuation condition, and has a slowly increasing manner with the Rytov index in the strong fluctuation condition. The dependence on the Fresnel size is confident and there is no saturation for the phase singularity.

  19. Predicting Solar Filament Eruptions with HEK Filament Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, A.; Reeves, K.; Schanche, N.

    2015-12-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013) has shown a positive correlation (80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME's). If certain filament properties, such as length, chirality, and tilt, indicate a tendency towards filament eruptions, one may be able to further predict an oncoming CME. Towards this end, we present a novel algorithm based on spatiotemporal analysis that systematically correlates filament eruptions documented in the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) with HEK filaments that have been grouped together using a tracking algorithm developed at Georgia State University (e.g. Kempton et al. 2014). We also find filament tracks that are not correlated with eruptions to form a null data set in a similar fashion. Finally, we compare the metadata from erupting and non-erupting filament tracks to discover which filament properties may present signs of an eruption onset. Through statistical methods such as the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and Random Forest Classifier, we find that a filament that is increasing in length or changing in tilt with respect to the equator may be a useful gauge to predict a filament eruption. However, the average values of length and tilt for both datasets follow similar distributions, leading us to conclude that these parameters do not indicate an eruption event. This work is supported by the NSF-REU solar physics program at SAO, grant number AGS-1263241, and NSF DIBBS grant number ACI-1443061.

  20. Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Structures and Evolution analysis by Combination of Fractal Dimension of 3 Wavelength Lidar Signal and Range Correct Signal of 1064nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, L.; McCormick, M. P.; Su, J.

    2015-12-01

    Detection of the PBL heights and the PBL structure is very important for understanding the dynamic of the PBL since heat, water vapor and pollutions which come from the surface must transport through the PBL before they can affect the upper atmosphere. Fractal dimension (FD) retrieved from the three wavelengths lidar signals and the range- corrected signal (RCS) of 1064nm were used to analyses the PBL height and structure in Hampton University (HU, 37.02° N, 76.33° W). And the result shows that the new method has the potential to determine the top of different layer at same time. Combination of the FD and RCS signal also can be used to derive the structure of the PBL. Also the PBL evolution and the long time variety of the PBL in Hampton were analyzed. Wavelet covariance transform (WCT) was used to objectively determine the top and structure of the PBL from the FD signal and RCS signal.

  1. Exploring Fractals in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Describes an activity involving six investigations. Introduces students to fractals, allows them to study the properties of some famous fractals, and encourages them to create their own fractal artwork. Contains 14 references. (ASK)

  2. ZnS:Cr Nanostructures Building Fractals and Their Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoi, D. P.; Das, U.; Mohanta, D.; Ahmed, G. A.; Choudhury, A.

    2010-10-04

    Cr doped ZnS nanostructures have been fabricated through colloidal solution route by using Polyvinyl alcohol (-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub n} and Polyvinyl pyrrolidone k30 (C{sub 6}H{sub 9}NO){sub x} as dielectric hosts. Growth of fractal structures have been observed through Transmission Electron Microscopy. Higher magnification TEM study reveals that these fractals actually a organize structure of ZnS:Cr nanostructures. The structural study of these nanostructures in the fractals is done by X-Ray Diffraction, UV-Visible spectroscopy, Photoluminescence spectroscopy AFM and MFM. These investigations allow us to form a comprehensive explanation of fractal as well as nanostructure growth. We have done dimensional study of these fractals and the reason behind the formation of these fractals.

  3. Fractals: To Know, to Do, to Simulate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente; Irazoque, Glinda

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the development of fractal theory and suggests fractal aggregates as an attractive alternative for introducing fractal concepts. Describes methods for producing metallic fractals and a computer simulation for drawing fractals. (MVL)

  4. Multifractal parametrization for the volume of space forms on surfaces of Zn x Cd1- x Te-Si(111) heterocompositions and estimating the energy of a surface with fractal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, P. P.; Krizhanovskii, V. B.; Rashkovetskii, L. V.; Vuichik, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    Multifractal (MF) analysis is used to describe the volume of space forms on the surfaces of structures in the solid solution of a Zn x Cd1- x Te-Si(111) substrate. AFM images of film surfaces have been are used for MF analysis. The parameters of MF spectra are determined for the distribution of volume of surface nanoforms. Based on the formal approach and data on the parameters of the fractal state for the volume and surfaces of nanoforms, an equation is proposed that considers the contribution from the fractal structure of the surface to its surface energy. The behavior of the system's surface energy, depending on fractal parameters that describe states of the volume and surfaces of nanoforms is discussed.

  5. Fractals in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Paul; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2003-10-01

    In examples of fractals such as moon craters, rivers,2 cauliflower,3 and bread,4 the actual growth process of the fractal object is missed. In the simple experiment described here, one can observe and record the growth of calcium carbonate crystals — a ubiquitous material found in marble and seashells — in real time. The video frames can be digitized and analyzed to determine the fractal dimension.

  6. Solid friction between soft filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A. W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  7. Solid friction between soft filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A. W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-03-02

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  8. Surface manipulation of protein filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreplak, Laurent; Staple, Douglas; Loparic, Marko; Kreuzer, Hans-Juergen

    2009-03-01

    Within mammalian tissues, cells move by actively remodeling a dense network of collagen fibrils. In order to study this situation, we analyze the force response of two types of filamentous protein structures, desmin intermediate filaments 12 nm in diameter and collagen fibrils 80 nm in diameter. Both types of filaments were adsorbed at a solid-liquid interface and locally moved with an AFM tip at constant velocity against surface friction in the interfacial plane. In the case of collagen fibrils, that have an extensibility below 30% extension, we observed that microns long fibrils could be moved by the tip and deformed into shapes that could not be explain by the linear elastic theory for a stiff rod. In the case of desmin filaments that can be stretched up to 3.5 times there length, we observed local stretching of the filaments and discreet steps in the torsional force measured with the cantilever. In order to describe both types of filaments' behaviors, we described the protein filaments as a chain of beads of mass m linked together by a mass-less polymer linker. By solving the Newtonian equations of motions for the coupled beads in the presence of a point load and a viscous drag due to the surface-filament interactions we were able to reproduced our experimental data and extract information on friction.

  9. Analyzing the photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with fractal Sierpinski gasket structure based on the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional plasma-dielectric photonic crystals (2D PPCs) under a transverse-magnetic (TM) wave are theoretically investigated by a modified plane wave expansion (PWE) method where Monte Carlo method is introduced. The proposed PWE method can be used to calculate the band structures of 2D PPCs which possess arbitrary-shaped filler and any lattice. The efficiency and convergence of the present method are discussed by a numerical example. The configuration of 2D PPCs is the square lattices with fractal Sierpinski gasket structure whose constituents are homogeneous and isotropic. The type-1 PPCs is filled with the dielectric cylinders in the plasma background, while its complementary structure is called type-2 PPCs, in which plasma cylinders behave as the fillers in the dielectric background. The calculated results reveal that the enough accuracy and good convergence can be obtained, if the number of random sampling points of Monte Carlo method is large enough. The band structures of two types of PPCs with different fractal orders of Sierpinski gasket structure also are theoretically computed for a comparison. It is demonstrate that the PBGs in higher frequency region are more easily produced in the type-1 PPCs rather than in the type-2 PPCs. Sierpinski gasket structure introduced in the 2D PPCs leads to a larger cutoff frequency, enhances and induces more PBGs in high frequency region. The effects of configurational parameters of two types of PPCs on the PBGs are also investigated in detail. The results show that the PBGs of the PPCs can be easily manipulated by tuning those parameters. The present type-1 PPCs are more suitable to design the tunable compacted devices.

  10. RESOLVED SHOCK STRUCTURE OF THE BALMER-DOMINATED FILAMENTS IN TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT: COSMIC-RAY PRECURSOR?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Joon; Park, Sangwook; Raymond, John C.; Korreck, Kelly; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Winkler, P. F.

    2010-06-01

    We report on the results from H{alpha} imaging observations of the eastern limb of Tycho's supernova remnant (SN1572) using the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. We resolve the detailed structure of the fast, collisionless shock wave into a delicate structure of nearly edge-on filaments. We find a gradual increase of H{alpha} intensity just ahead of the shock front, which we interpret as emission from the thin ({approx}1'') shock precursor. We find that a significant amount of the H{alpha} emission comes from the precursor and that this could affect the amount of temperature equilibration derived from the observed flux ratio of the broad and narrow H{alpha} components. The observed H{alpha} emission profiles are fit using simple precursor models, and we discuss the relevant parameters. We suggest that the precursor is likely due to cosmic rays and discuss the efficiency of cosmic-ray acceleration at this position.

  11. THE FORMATION AND ERUPTION OF A SMALL CIRCULAR FILAMENT DRIVEN BY ROTATING MAGNETIC STRUCTURES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Hong, Junchao; Xu, Zhe E-mail: yjy@ynao.ac.cn

    2015-04-20

    We present the first observation of the formation and eruption of a small circular filament driven by a rotating network magnetic field (RNF) in the quiet Sun. In the negative footpoint region of an inverse J-shaped dextral filament, the RNF was formed by the convergence to supergranular junctions of several magnetic flux patches of the same polarity, and it then rotated counterclockwise (CCW) for approximately 11 hr and showed up as a CCW rotating EUV cyclone, during which time the filament gradually evolved into a circular filament that surrounded the cyclone. When the calculated convergence and vortex flows appeared around the RNF during its formation and rotation phases, the injected magnetic helicity calculation also showed negative helicity accumulation during the RNF rotation that was consistent with the dextral chirality of the filament. Finally, the RNF rotation stopped and the cyclone disappeared, and, probably due to an emerging bipole and its forced cancellation with the RNF, the closure filament underwent an eruption along its axis in the (clockwise) direction opposite to the rotation directions of the RNF and cyclone. These observations suggest that the RNFs might play an important role in the formation of nearby small-scale circular filaments as they transport and inject magnetic energy and helicity, and the formation of the EUV cyclones may be a further manifestation of the helicity injected into the corona by the rotation of the RNFs in the photosphere. In addition, the new emerging bipole observed before the filament eruption might be responsible for destabilizing the system and triggering the magnetic reconnection which proves useful for the filament eruption.

  12. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta, Azzurra; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway. PMID:27120621

  13. In-depth characterization and computational 3D reconstruction of flagellar filament protein layer structure based on in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Peter; Kozma, Daniel; Nemeth, Andrea; Jankovics, Hajnalka; Kurunczi, Sandor; Horvath, Robert; Vonderviszt, Ferenc; Fried, Miklos; Petrik, Peter

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we have reconstructed the statistical 3D structure of hundreds of nanometers thick surface immobilized flagellar filament protein layers in their native environment, in buffer solution. The protein deposition onto the surface activated Ta 2O 5 film was performed in a flow cell, and the immobilization process was followed by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. A multilayer optical model was developed, in that the protein layer was described by five effective medium sublayers. Applying this method, an in-depth analysis of the protein layer formation was performed. Based on the kinetics in the distribution of the surface mass density, the statistical properties of the filamentous film could be determined computationally as a function of the measurement time. It was also demonstrated that the 3D structure of the protein layer can be reconstructed based on the calculated in-depth mass density profile. The computational investigation revealed that the filaments can be classified into two individual groups in approximately equal ratio according to their orientation. In the first group the filaments are close to laying position, whereas in the second group they are in a standing position, resulting in a significantly denser sublayer close to the substrate than at a larger distance.

  14. Fractal geometry is heritable in trees.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Joseph K; Bangert, Randy K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Trotter, R Talbot; Shuster, Stephen M; Whitham, Thomas G

    2004-09-01

    Understanding the genetic basis to landscape vegetation structure is an important step that will allow us to examine ecological and evolutionary processes at multiple spatial scales. Here for the first time we show that the fractal architecture of a dominant plant on the landscape exhibits high broad-sense heritability and thus has a genetic basis. The fractal architecture of trees is known to influence ecological communities associated with them. In a unidirectional cottonwood-hybridizing complex (Populus angustifolia x P. fremontii) pure and hybrid cottonwoods differed significantly in their fractal architecture, with phenotypic variance among backcross hybrids exceeding that of F1 hybrids and of pure narrowleaf cottonwoods by two-fold. This result provides a crucial link between genes and fractal scaling theory, and places the study of landscape ecology within an evolutionary framework.

  15. Link between truncated fractals and coupled oscillators in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Paar, V; Pavin, N; Rosandić, M

    2001-09-07

    This article aims at providing a new theoretical insight into the fundamental question of the origin of truncated fractals in biological systems. It is well known that fractal geometry is one of the characteristics of living organisms. However, contrary to mathematical fractals which are self-similar at all scales, the biological fractals are truncated, i.e. their self-similarity extends at most over a few orders of magnitude of separation. We show that nonlinear coupled oscillators, modeling one of the basic features of biological systems, may generate truncated fractals: a truncated fractal pattern for basin boundaries appears in a simple mathematical model of two coupled nonlinear oscillators with weak dissipation. This fractal pattern can be considered as a particular hidden fractal property. At the level of sufficiently fine precision technique the truncated fractality acts as a simple structure, leading to predictability, but at a lower level of precision it is effectively fractal, limiting the predictability of the long-term behavior of biological systems. We point out to the generic nature of our result.

  16. Fractal energy carpets in non-Hermitian Hofstadter quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, Maxim N.; Ouvry, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    We study the non-Hermitian Hofstadter dynamics of a quantum particle with biased motion on a square lattice in the background of a magnetic field. We show that in quasimomentum space, the energy spectrum is an overlap of infinitely many inequivalent fractals. The energy levels in each fractal are space-filling curves with Hausdorff dimension 2. The band structure of the spectrum is similar to a fractal spider web in contrast to the Hofstadter butterfly for unbiased motion.

  17. Pulse regime in formation of fractal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-11-01

    The pulse regime of vaporization of a bulk metal located in a buffer gas is analyzed as a method of generation of metal atoms under the action of a plasma torch or a laser beam. Subsequently these atoms are transformed into solid nanoclusters, fractal aggregates and then into fractal fibers if the growth process proceeds in an external electric field. We are guided by metals in which transitions between s and d-electrons of their atoms are possible, since these metals are used as catalysts and filters in interaction with gas flows. The resistance of metal fractal structures to a gas flow is evaluated that allows one to find optimal parameters of a fractal structure for gas flow propagation through it. The thermal regime of interaction between a plasma pulse or a laser beam and a metal surface is analyzed. It is shown that the basic energy from an external source is consumed on a bulk metal heating, and the efficiency of atom evaporation from the metal surface, that is the ratio of energy fluxes for vaporization and heating, is 10-3-10-4 for transient metals under consideration. A typical energy flux ( 106 W/cm2), a typical surface temperature ( 3000 K), and a typical pulse duration ( 1 μs) provide a sufficient amount of evaporated atoms to generate fractal fibers such that each molecule of a gas flow collides with the skeleton of fractal fibers many times.

  18. Line graphs for fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warchalowski, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Malgorzata J.

    2017-03-01

    We found the Lindenmayer systems for line graphs built on selected fractals. We show that the fractal dimension of such obtained graphs in all analysed cases is the same as for their original graphs. Both for the original graphs and for their line graphs we identified classes of nodes which reflect symmetry of the graph.

  19. Application of Fractal Dimension on Palsar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dharmendra; Pant, Triloki

    viz. HH (Horizontal-Horizontal Polarization), VV (Vertical-Vertical Polarization) and HV (Horizontal-Vertical Polarization) are considered individually. First of all each polarized image is classified in an unsupervised way and various clusters, i.e., four clusters are identified with the help of reference data as Water, Urban and Agricultural Area. For each cluster, the fractal dimension is obtained from the fractal map. Based on the study the ranges of fractal dimension for three classes are Water: 2.0-2.17, Agricultural Area: 2.24-2.72, Urban Area: 2.63-2.92 for HH polarized image; Water: 2.0-2.21, Agricultural Area: 2.20-2.64, Urban; 2.58-2.94 for VV polarized image and Water: 2.0-2.14, Agricultural Area: 2.18-2.58, Urban: 2.46-2.94 for HV polarized image. Since the class Others represents a mixture of various classes, an explicit range of D for this class can not be determined. A closer look at the ranges of fractal dimension indicates that there is an overlapping of the values for different classes, despite of which the classes can be distinguished. Also, the class Water having low value of fractal dimension can be treated as smooth and Urban Area having higher values of fractal dimension can be considered rough in structure while the class Agricultural Area shows an intermediate roughness.

  20. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein – Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Carolina W.; Saab, Sérgio C.; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. Our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament. PMID:27447485

  1. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein – Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, Wellington C.; Galvão, Carolina W.; Saab, Sérgio C.; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.; Spies, Maria

    2016-07-22

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. In conclusion, our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament.

  2. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  3. Chemical and biological structure and transport of a cool filament associated with a jet-eddy system of northern California in July 1986 (OPTOMA21)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Burton H.; Mooers, Christopher N. K.; Rienecker, Michele M.; Stanton, Tim; Washburn, Libe

    1991-01-01

    The distributions of nutrient, pigment, bio-optical, and physical variables were mapped in a jet-eddy system off Point Reyes and Point Arena, California, from July 7 to 19, 1986, in order to describe the 3D variability of the filament and its relation to the nutrient and phytoplankton distributions offshore, to examine the interaction between the filament and coastal water, and to estimate the transport of nutrients and phytoplankton by the jet system. Several cool filaments were distinguishable at distances of more than 35-50 km from the coast in satellite imagery during this period. The juxtaposition of these features as well as the presence of an offshore anticyclone and a cyclone south of the filament anchored to the coast at Point Arena led to complex patterns in all variables, aided by the apparent alongshore variability in the source of upwelled water. This structure has implications for the fluxes of organic material in the region and is probably significant in organizing the interactions among different trophic levels within the system.

  4. Fractal Metrology for biogeosystems analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Argüelles, V.; Oleschko, K.; Tarquis, A. M.; Korvin, G.; Gaona, C.; Parrot, J.-F.; Ventura-Ramos, E.

    2010-11-01

    The solid-pore distribution pattern plays an important role in soil functioning being related with the main physical, chemical and biological multiscale and multitemporal processes of this complex system. In the present research, we studied the aggregation process as self-organizing and operating near a critical point. The structural pattern is extracted from the digital images of three soils (Chernozem, Solonetz and "Chocolate" Clay) and compared in terms of roughness of the gray-intensity distribution quantified by several measurement techniques. Special attention was paid to the uncertainty of each of them measured in terms of standard deviation. Some of the applied methods are known as classical in the fractal context (box-counting, rescaling-range and wavelets analyses, etc.) while the others have been recently developed by our Group. The combination of these techniques, coming from Fractal Geometry, Metrology, Informatics, Probability Theory and Statistics is termed in this paper Fractal Metrology (FM). We show the usefulness of FM for complex systems analysis through a case study of the soil's physical and chemical degradation applying the selected toolbox to describe and compare the structural attributes of three porous media with contrasting structure but similar clay mineralogy dominated by montmorillonites.

  5. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, J. H.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  6. Immobilization of functional light antenna structures derived from the filamentous green bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Arati; Muthuswamy, Jit; Labelle, Jeffrey T; Pizziconi, Vincent B

    2008-08-05

    The integration of highly efficient, natural photosynthetic light antenna structures into engineered systems while their biophotonic capabilities are maintained has been an elusive goal in the design of biohybrid photonic devices. In this study, we report a novel technique to covalently immobilize nanoscaled bacterial light antenna structures known as chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus on both conductive and nonconductive glass while their energy transducing functionality was maintained. Chlorosomes without their reaction centers (RCs) were covalently immobilized on 3-aminoproyltriethoxysilane (APTES) treated surfaces using a glutaraldehyde linker. AFM techniques verified that the chlorosomes maintained their native ellipsoidal ultrastructure upon immobilization. Results from absorbance and fluorescence spectral analysis (where the Stokes shift to 808/810 nm was observed upon 470 nm blue light excitation) in conjunction with confocal microscopy confirm that the functional integrity of immobilized chlorosomes was also preserved. In addition, experiments with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) suggested that the presence of chlorosomes in the electrical double layer of the electrode enhanced the electron transfer capacity of the electrochemical cell. Further, chronoamperometric studies suggested that the reduced form of the Bchl- c pigments found within the chlorosome modulate the conduction properties of the electrochemical cell, where the oxidized form of Bchl- c pigments impeded any current transduction at a bias of 0.4 V within the electrochemical cell. The results therefore demonstrate that the intact chlorosomes can be successfully immobilized while their biophotonic transduction capabilities are preserved through the immobilization process. These findings indicate that it is feasible to design biophotonic devices incorporating fully functional light antenna structures, which may offer significant performance enhancements to current silicon

  7. Fractal dimension analysis of complexity in Ligeti piano pieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Rolf

    2005-04-01

    Fractal correlation dimensional analysis has been performed with whole solo piano pieces by Gyrgy Ligeti at every 50ms interval of the pieces. The resulting curves of development of complexity represented by the fractal dimension showed up a very reasonable correlation with the perceptional density of events during these pieces. The seventh piece of Ligeti's ``Musica ricercata'' was used as a test case. Here, each new part of the piece was followed by an increase of the fractal dimension because of the increase of information at the part changes. The second piece ``Galamb borong,'' number seven of the piano Etudes was used, because Ligeti wrote these Etudes after studying fractal geometry. Although the piece is not fractal in the strict mathematical sense, the overall structure of the psychoacoustic event-density as well as the detailed event development is represented by the fractal dimension plot.

  8. Radiative transfer theory for the fractal structure and power-law decay characteristics of short-period seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Haruo; Fukushima, Rintaro

    2013-12-01

    For short period S-wave seismograms of an earthquake, the maximum amplitude decreases according to a power of traveltime, and the coda amplitude also decreases according to a power of lapse time measured from the earthquake origin time. The radiative transfer theory has been often used for the envelope synthesis of complex seismograms composed of scattered waves due to random heterogeneities in the Earth medium; however, the conventional theory, which supposes uniform distributions of scatterers (heterogeneities) and intrinsic absorbers, predicts that both the ballistic term amplitude and the coda wave amplitude exponentially decrease with time increasing in addition to the geometrical decay. In order to explain their power-law characteristics, this paper proposes the radiative transfer theory for a fractally random and homogeneous distribution of isotropic scatterers and intrinsic absorbers with fractal dimension D ≤ 3 in the 3-D space: the number density of scatterers/absorbers in a sphere of radius r is proportional to rD - 3 for distance r ≫ rc but constant for r ≪ rc, where the corner distance rc is introduced to avoid divergence at a small r. The case of D = 3 corresponds to the conventional uniform distribution. For the case of D = 2, the theory well predicts that the mean square (MS) amplitude of the ballistic-wave decreases according to a power of traveltime and the MS amplitude of coda waves decreases according to a power of lapse time measured from the origin time, where each power is controlled by the scattering coefficient, intrinsic absorption coefficient and corner distance. For the case of D = 1, the ballistic-wave MS amplitude decay is the inverse square of time and the coda decay is much faster. As a preliminary work, fixing D = 2 as a priori choice, we analyse S-seismogram envelopes of a local earthquake in Japan. The case study shows that the radiative transfer theory for a fractal scattering medium is useful for the study of the

  9. Fractal dimension and architecture of trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Fazzalari, N L; Parkinson, I H

    1996-01-01

    The fractal dimension of trabecular bone was determined for biopsies from the proximal femur of 25 subjects undergoing hip arthroplasty. The average age was 67.7 years. A binary profile of the trabecular bone in the biopsy was obtained from a digitized image. A program written for the Quantimet 520 performed the fractal analysis. The fractal dimension was calculated for each specimen, using boxes whose sides ranged from 65 to 1000 microns in length. The mean fractal dimension for the 25 subjects was 1.195 +/- 0.064 and shows that in Euclidean terms the surface extent of trabecular bone is indeterminate. The Quantimet 520 was also used to perform bone histomorphometric measurements. These were bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) (per cent) = 11.05 +/- 4.38, bone surface/total volume (BS/TV) (mm2/mm3) = 1.90 +/- 0.51, trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) (mm) = 0.12 +/- 0.03, trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp) (mm) = 1.03 +/- 0.36, and trabecular number (Tb.N) (number/mm) = 0.95 +/- 0.25. Pearsons' correlation coefficients showed a statistically significant relationship between the fractal dimension and all the histomorphometric parameters, with BV/TV (r = 0.85, P < 0.0001), BS/TV (r = 0.74, P < 0.0001), Tb.Th (r = 0.50, P < 0.02), Tb.Sp (r = -0.81, P < 0.0001), and Tb.N (r = 0.76, P < 0.0001). This method for calculating fractal dimension shows that trabecular bone exhibits fractal properties over a defined box size, which is within the dimensions of a structural unit for trabecular bone. Therefore, the fractal dimension of trabecular bone provides a measure which does not rely on Euclidean descriptors in order to describe a complex geometry.

  10. Surface fractals in liposome aggregation.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the aggregation of charged liposomes induced by magnesium is investigated. Static and dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and cryotransmission electron microscopy are used as experimental techniques. In particular, multiple intracluster scattering is reduced to a negligible amount using a cross-correlation light scattering scheme. The analysis of the cluster structure, probed by means of static light scattering, reveals an evolution from surface fractals to mass fractals with increasing magnesium concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy micrographs of the aggregates are consistent with this interpretation. In addition, a comparative analysis of these results with those previously reported in the presence of calcium suggests that the different hydration energy between lipid vesicles when these divalent cations are present plays a fundamental role in the cluster morphology. This suggestion is also supported by infrared spectroscopy data. The kinetics of the aggregation processes is also analyzed through the time evolution of the mean diffusion coefficient of the aggregates.

  11. Fractal metrology for biogeosystems analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Argüelles, V.; Oleschko, K.; Tarquis, A. M.; Korvin, G.; Gaona, C.; Parrot, J.-F.; Ventura-Ramos, E.

    2010-06-01

    The solid-pore distribution pattern plays an important role in soil functioning being related with the main physical, chemical and biological multiscale and multitemporal processes. In the present research, this pattern is extracted from the digital images of three soils (Chernozem, Solonetz and "Chocolate'' Clay) and compared in terms of roughness of the gray-intensity distribution (the measurand) quantified by several measurement techniques. Special attention was paid to the uncertainty of each of them and to the measurement function which best fits to the experimental results. Some of the applied techniques are known as classical in the fractal context (box-counting, rescaling-range and wavelets analyses, etc.) while the others have been recently developed by our Group. The combination of all these techniques, coming from Fractal Geometry, Metrology, Informatics, Probability Theory and Statistics is termed in this paper Fractal Metrology (FM). We show the usefulness of FM through a case study of soil physical and chemical degradation applying the selected toolbox to describe and compare the main structural attributes of three porous media with contrasting structure but similar clay mineralogy dominated by montmorillonites.

  12. Fractal analysis of scatter imaging signatures to distinguish breast pathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguizabal, Alma; Laughney, Ashley M.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Wells, Wendy A.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2013-02-01

    Fractal analysis combined with a label-free scattering technique is proposed for describing the pathological architecture of tumors. Clinicians and pathologists are conventionally trained to classify abnormal features such as structural irregularities or high indices of mitosis. The potential of fractal analysis lies in the fact of being a morphometric measure of the irregular structures providing a measure of the object's complexity and self-similarity. As cancer is characterized by disorder and irregularity in tissues, this measure could be related to tumor growth. Fractal analysis has been probed in the understanding of the tumor vasculature network. This work addresses the feasibility of applying fractal analysis to the scattering power map (as a physical modeling) and principal components (as a statistical modeling) provided by a localized reflectance spectroscopic system. Disorder, irregularity and cell size variation in tissue samples is translated into the scattering power and principal components magnitude and its fractal dimension is correlated with the pathologist assessment of the samples. The fractal dimension is computed applying the box-counting technique. Results show that fractal analysis of ex-vivo fresh tissue samples exhibits separated ranges of fractal dimension that could help classifier combining the fractal results with other morphological features. This contrast trend would help in the discrimination of tissues in the intraoperative context and may serve as a useful adjunct to surgeons.

  13. Simulation of extreme ground water flow in the fractal crack structure of Earth's crust - impact on catastrophic floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukharov, Dmitriy; Aleksey, Kucherik; Tatyana, Trifonova

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the contribution of groundwater in catastrophic floods is the question under discussion [1,2]. The principal problem in such an approach - to analyze the transportation ways for groundwater in dynamics, and especially - the reasons of exit it on land surface. The crackness, being a characteristic property for all rocks, should be associated with the process in respect of unified dynamic system as a river water basin is, taking into account fundamental phenomena of the 3D-crack network development/modification (up to faults) as a transport groundwater system [3]. 2. In the system of fractal cracks (connected with the main channel for groundwater) the formation of extreme flow is possible, i.e. a devastating case occurs by instantaneous flash mechanism. The development of such a process is related to two factors. First, within the main channel of propagation of the groundwater when a motion is turbulent. In accordance with the theory of Kolmogorov [4], we assume that such a turbulence is isotropic. The fact means that both velocity and pressure fields in the water flow have pulsations related to the non-linear energy transfer between the vortices. This approach allows us to determine both that a maximum possible size of the vortices defined by characteristic dimensions of the underground channel and another - a minimum size of their due to process of dissipation. Energy transfer in the eddies formed near a border, is a complex nonlinear process, which we described by using a modernized Prandtl semi-empirical model [5]. Second, the mechanism of groundwater propagation in the system of cracks extending from the main underground channel is described in the frames of the fractal geometry methods [6]. The approach allows to determine the degree of similarity in the crack system, i.e. the ratio of mean diameters and lengths of cracks/faults for each step of decomposition. The fact results in integrated quantitative characteristics of 3D-network in all, by fractal

  14. Cluster Monte Carlo dynamics for the Ising model on fractal structures in dimensions between one and two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monceau, P.; Hsiao, P.-Y.

    2003-02-01

    We study the cluster size distributions generated by the Wolff algorithm in the framework of the Ising model on Sierpinski fractals with Hausdorff dimension Df between 1 and 2. We show that these distributions exhibit a scaling property involving the magnetic exponent yh associated with one of the eigen-direction of the renormalization flows. We suggest that a single cluster tends to invade the whole lattice as Df tends towards the lower critical dimension of the Ising model, namely 1. The autocorrelation times associated with the Wolff and Swendsen-Wang algorithms enable us to calculate dynamical exponents; the cluster algorithms are shown to be more efficient in reducing the critical slowing down when Df is lowered.

  15. Influence of buoyancy on drainage of a fractal porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huinink, H. P.; Michels, M. A.

    2002-10-01

    The influence of stabilizing hydrostatic pressure gradients on the drainage of a fractal porous medium is studied. The invasion process is treated with invasion percolation (IP) in a gradient. Fractality is mimicked by randomly closing bonds of a network. Two length scales govern the problem: the characteristic length of the pore structure ξs and a length scale ξg above which buoyancy determines the structure of the cluster. When ξs<ξg the local structure of the invading cluster is governed by the interplay of capillarity and the fractal properties of the pore space. Only parts of the backbone of the pore structure can be invaded. Therefore, the obtained fractal dimension for small systems L<ξs is much lower (1.40) than the one for ordinary IP (1.82). On larger length scales, ξsfractality of the pore space is no longer important and the cluster grows as in ordinary IP. When L>ξg, gravity becomes important and ξg scales with the bond number B as ξg~B-0.57, as in ordinary IP, while the fractal dimension becomes equal to the Euclidean one. When ξg<ξs gravity is already important on length scales where the fractality of the medium has to be considered too. On small scales L<ξg, where only capillarity and fractality play a role the cluster structure is again characterized by the fractal dimension of 1.40. On larger length scales, ξgfractal dimension of 1.52 is found. The length scale ξg no longer follows ordinary IP scaling: ξg~B-0.69. When L>ξs the fractal dimension of the invading cluster equals the Euclidean one and ξg~B-0.69.

  16. Bacillus subtilis Bactofilins Are Essential for Flagellar Hook- and Filament Assembly and Dynamically Localize into Structures of Less than 100 nm Diameter underneath the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    El Andari, Jihad; Altegoer, Florian; Bange, Gert; Graumann, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a widely conserved protein family implicated in cell shape maintenance and in bacterial motility. We show that the bactofilins BacE and BacF from Bacillus subtilis are essential for motility. The proteins are required for the establishment of flagellar hook- and filament structures, but apparently not for the formation of basal bodies. Functional YFP fusions to BacE and to BacF localize as discrete assemblies at the B. subtilis cell membrane, and have a diameter of 60 to 70 nm. BacF assemblies are relatively static, and partially colocalize with flagellar basal bodies, while BacE assemblies are fewer per cell than those of BacF and are highly mobile. Tracking of BacE foci showed that the assemblies arrest at a single point for a few hundred milliseconds, showing that a putative interaction with flagellar structures would be transient and fast. When overexpressed or expressed in a heterologous cell system, bactofilins can form filamentous structures, and also form multimers as purified proteins. Our data reveal a propensity for bactofilins to form filaments, however, in B. subtilis cells, bactofilins assemble into defined size assemblies that show a dynamic localization pattern and play a role in flagellar assembly. PMID:26517549

  17. PARTIAL SLINGSHOT RECONNECTION BETWEEN TWO FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yunchun; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Zheng, Ruisheng; Yang, Bo; Li, Haidong; Yang, Dan

    2013-02-10

    We present a rare observation of an interaction between two filaments around AR 11358 and AR 11361 on 2011 December 3 that is strongly suggestive of the occurrence of slingshot reconnection. A small elbow-shaped active-region filament (F12) underwent a failed eruption that brought it into contact with a nearby larger, thicker filament (F34). Accompanied by the appearance of complicated internal structures below the erupting F12, its two legs separated away from each other and then connected into F34. This process led the filaments to change their connectivity to form two newly linked filaments, and one of them showed a clear inverse {gamma}-shape. However, the alteration in the filament connectivity was imperfect since F34 is discernible after the eruption. These observations can be interpreted as a partial slingshot reconnection between two filaments that had unequal axial magnetic flux.

  18. Preparation and characterization of fractal elastomer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Yoshimune; Seino, Eri; Abe, Saya; Mayama, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The elastomer materials with hierarchical structure and suitable wettability are useful as biological surface model. In the present study, urethane resin and silicone resin elastomers with hierarchical rough surfaces were prepared and referred to as "fractal elastomers". We found a hierarchy of small projections that existed over larger ones on these surfaces. These elastomers were synthesized by transferring a fractal surface structure of alkylketene dimer. The rough structure enhanced the hydrophobicity and weakened friction resistance of the elastomer surfaces. These materials can be useful for artificial skin with biomimetic surface properties.

  19. Structural Dynamics of the Vimentin Coiled-coil Contact Regions Involved in Filament Assembly as Revealed by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange.

    PubMed

    Premchandar, Aiswarya; Mücke, Norbert; Poznański, Jarosław; Wedig, Tatjana; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Herrmann, Harald; Dadlez, Michał

    2016-11-25

    Intermediate filaments (IF) are major constituents of the cytoskeleton of metazoan cells. They are not only responsible for the mechanical properties but also for various physiological activities in different cells and tissues. The building blocks of IFs are extended coiled-coil-forming proteins exhibiting a characteristic central α-helical domain ("rod"). The fundamental principles of the filament assembly mechanism and the network formation have been widely elucidated for the cytoplasmic IF protein vimentin. Also, a comprehensive structural model for the tetrameric complex of vimentin has been obtained by X-ray crystallography in combination with various biochemical and biophysical techniques. To extend these static data and to investigate the dynamic properties of the full-length proteins in solution during the various assembly steps, we analyzed the patterns of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in vimentin and in four variants carrying point mutations in the IF consensus motifs present at either end of the α-helical rod that cause an assembly arrest at the unit-length filament (ULF) stage. The results yielded unique insights into the structural properties of subdomains within the full-length vimentin, in particular in regions of contact in α-helical and linker segments that stabilize different oligomeric forms such as tetramers, ULFs, and mature filaments. Moreover, hydrogen-deuterium exchange analysis of the point-mutated variants directly demonstrated the active role of the IF consensus motifs in the oligomerization mechanism of tetramers during ULF formation. Ultimately, using molecular dynamics simulation procedures, we provide a structural model for the subdomain-mediated tetramer/tetramer interaction via "cross-coiling" as the first step of the assembly process.

  20. Characterization of branch complexity by fractal analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alados, C.L.; Escos, J.; Emlen, J.M.; Freeman, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    The comparison between complexity in the sense of space occupancy (box-counting fractal dimension D(c) and information dimension D1) and heterogeneity in the sense of space distribution (average evenness index f and evenness variation coefficient J(cv)) were investigated in mathematical fractal objects and natural branch structures. In general, increased fractal dimension was paired with low heterogeneity. Comparisons between branch architecture in Anthyllis cytisoides under different slope exposure and grazing impact revealed that branches were more complex and more homogeneously distributed for plants on northern exposures than southern, while grazing had no impact during a wet year. Developmental instability was also investigated by the statistical noise of the allometric relation between internode length and node order. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that fractal dimension of branch structure can be used to analyze the structural organization of plants, especially if we consider not only fractal dimension but also shoot distribution within the canopy (lacunarity). These indexes together with developmental instability analyses are good indicators of growth responses to the environment.

  1. Rheological and fractal hydrodynamics of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Tijani, H I; Abdullah, N; Yuzir, A; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-06-01

    The structural and hydrodynamic features for granules were characterized using settling experiments, predefined mathematical simulations and ImageJ-particle analyses. This study describes the rheological characterization of these biologically immobilized aggregates under non-Newtonian flows. The second order dimensional analysis defined as D2=1.795 for native clusters and D2=1.099 for dewatered clusters and a characteristic three-dimensional fractal dimension of 2.46 depicts that these relatively porous and differentially permeable fractals had a structural configuration in close proximity with that described for a compact sphere formed via cluster-cluster aggregation. The three-dimensional fractal dimension calculated via settling-fractal correlation, U∝l(D) to characterize immobilized granules validates the quantitative measurements used for describing its structural integrity and aggregate complexity. These results suggest that scaling relationships based on fractal geometry are vital for quantifying the effects of different laminar conditions on the aggregates' morphology and characteristics such as density, porosity, and projected surface area.

  2. Colocalization properties of elementary Ca(2+) release signals with structures specific to the contractile filaments and the tubular system of intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Tihomir; Zapiec, Bolek; Förderer, Moritz; Fink, Rainer H A; Vogel, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Ca(2+) regulates several important intracellular processes. We combined second harmonic generation (SHG) and two photon excited fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) to simultaneously record the SHG signal of the myosin filaments and localized elementary Ca(2+) release signals (LCSs). We found LCSs associated with Y-shaped structures of the myosin filament pattern (YMs), so called verniers, in intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers under hypertonic treatment. Ion channels crucial for the Ca(2+) regulation are located in the tubular system, a system that is important for Ca(2+) regulation and excitation-contraction coupling. We investigated the tubular system of intact, living mouse skeletal muscle fibers using 2PFM and the fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator Fluo-4 dissolved in the external solution or the membrane dye di-8-ANEPPS. We simultaneously measured the SHG signal from the myosin filaments of the skeletal muscle fibers. We found that at least a subset of the YMs observed in SHG images are closely juxtaposed with Y-shaped structures of the transverse tubules (YTs). The distances of corresponding YMs and YTs yield values between 1.3 μm and 4.1 μm including pixel uncertainty with a mean distance of 2.52±0.10 μm (S.E.M., n=41). Additionally, we observed that some of the linear-shaped areas in the tubular system are colocalized with linear-shaped areas in the SHG images.

  3. Laser light scattering as a probe of fractal colloid aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, David A.; Lin, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The extensive use of laser light scattering is reviewed, both static and dynamic, in the study of colloid aggregation. Static light scattering enables the study of the fractal structure of the aggregates, while dynamic light scattering enables the study of aggregation kinetics. In addition, both techniques can be combined to demonstrate the universality of the aggregation process. Colloidal aggregates are now well understood and therefore represent an excellent experimental system to use in the study of the physical properties of fractal objects. However, the ultimate size of fractal aggregates is fundamentally limited by gravitational acceleration which will destroy the fractal structure as the size of the aggregates increases. This represents a great opportunity for spaceborne experimentation, where the reduced g will enable the growth of fractal structures of sufficient size for many interesting studies of their physical properties.

  4. Splines on fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strichartz, Robert S.; Usher, Michael

    2000-09-01

    A general theory of piecewise multiharmonic splines is constructed for a class of fractals (post-critically finite) that includes the familiar Sierpinski gasket, based on Kigami's theory of Laplacians on these fractals. The spline spaces are the analogues of the spaces of piecewise Cj polynomials of degree 2j + 1 on an interval, with nodes at dyadic rational points. We give explicit algorithms for effectively computing multiharmonic functions (solutions of [Delta]j+1u = 0) and for constructing bases for the spline spaces (for general fractals we need to assume that j is odd), and also for computing inner products of these functions. This enables us to give a finite element method for the approximate solution of fractal differential equations. We give the analogue of Simpson's method for numerical integration on the Sierpinski gasket. We use splines to approximate functions vanishing on the boundary by functions vanishing in a neighbourhood of the boundary.

  5. Foolin' with Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Garry

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a mathematical investigation of fractals and highlights the thinking involved, problem solving strategies used, generalizing skills required, the role of technology, and the role of mathematics. (ASK)

  6. Fractals and Transformations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannon, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are several different transformations based on the generation of fractals including self-similar designs, the chaos game, the koch curve, and the Sierpinski Triangle. Three computer programs which illustrate these concepts are provided. (CW)

  7. Modeling Fractal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.

    The proper methodology for describing the dynamics of certain complex phenomena and fractal time series is the fractional calculus through the fractional Langevin equation discussed herein and applied in a biomedical context. We show that a fractional operator (derivative or integral) acting on a fractal function, yields another fractal function, allowing us to construct a fractional Langevin equation to describe the evolution of a fractal statistical process, for example, human gait and cerebral blood flow. The goal of this talk is to make clear how certain complex phenomena, such as those that are abundantly present in human physiology, can be faithfully described using dynamical models involving fractional differential stochastic equations. These models are tested against existing data sets and shown to describe time series from complex physiologic phenomena quite well.

  8. Fractal Geometry of Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Radlinski, A.P.; Radlinska, E.Z.; Agamalian, M.; Wignall, G.D.; Lindner, P.; Randl, O.G.

    1999-04-01

    The analysis of small- and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering data for sedimentary rocks shows that the pore-rock fabric interface is a surface fractal (D{sub s}=2.82) over 3 orders of magnitude of the length scale and 10 orders of magnitude in intensity. The fractal dimension and scatterer size obtained from scanning electron microscopy image processing are consistent with neutron scattering data. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Fractal Tectonics and Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    Tectonic processes build landforms that are subsequently destroyed by erosional processes. Landforms exhibit fractal statistics in a variety of ways; examples include (1) lengths of coast lines; (2) number-size statistics of lakes and islands; (3) spectral behavior of topography and bathymetry both globally and locally; and (4) branching statistics of drainage networks. Erosional processes are dominant in the development of many landforms on this planet, but similar fractal statistics are also applicable to the surface of Venus where minimal erosion has occurred. A number of dynamical systems models for landforms have been proposed, including (1) cellular automata; (2) diffusion limited aggregation; (3) self-avoiding percolation; and (4) advective-diffusion equations. The fractal statistics and validity of these models will be discussed. Earthquakes also exhibit fractal statistics. The frequency-magnitude statistics of earthquakes satisfy the fractal Gutenberg-Richter relation both globally and locally. Earthquakes are believed to be a classic example of self-organized criticality. One model for earthquakes utilizes interacting slider-blocks. These slider block models have been shown to behave chaotically and to exhibit self-organized criticality. The applicability of these models will be discussed and alternative approaches will be presented. Fragmentation has been demonstrated to produce fractal statistics in many cases. Comminution is one model for fragmentation that yields fractal statistics. It has been proposed that comminution is also responsible for much of the deformation in the earth's crust. The brittle disruption of the crust and the resulting earthquakes present an integrated problem with many fractal aspects.

  10. Fractals and cancer.

    PubMed

    Baish, J W; Jain, R K

    2000-07-15

    Recent studies have shown that fractal geometry, a vocabulary of irregular shapes, can be useful for describing the pathological architecture of tumors and, perhaps more surprisingly, for yielding insights into the mechanisms of tumor growth and angiogenesis that complement those obtained by modern molecular methods. This article outlines the basic methods of fractal geometry and discusses the value and limitations of applying this new tool to cancer research.

  11. Menger sponge-like fractal body created by a novel template method.

    PubMed

    Mayama, H; Tsujii, K

    2006-09-28

    We have established experimental strategies on how to create a Menger sponge-like fractal body and how to control its fractal dimension. The essence was to utilize alkylketene dimer (AKD), which spontaneously forms super-water-repellent fractal surface. We prepared "fractal AKD particles" with fractal surface structure as templates of pores in fractal body. The fractal body was synthesized by filling the remained space between the packed template particles with a tetramethyl orthosilicate solution, solidifying it by the sol-gel process, and removing the template by calcinations. We have succeeded in systematically creating fractal bodies of silica with different cross-sectional fractal dimensions D(cs)=1.87, 1.84, and 1.80 using "fractal template particles" compressed under the ratio=1.0, 2.0, and 3.0, respectively. We also discussed the possibilities of their fractal geometries in comparison with mathematical models. We concluded that the created fractal bodies were close to a Menger sponge and its modified one. Our experimental strategy allows us to design fractality of porous materials.

  12. Fractal lattice of gelatin nanoglobules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, D. V.; Krasovskii, A. N.

    2012-11-01

    The globular structure of polymer coatings on a glass, which were obtained from micellar solutions of gelatin in the isooctane-water-sodium (bis-2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate system, has been studied using electron microscopy. It has been shown that an increase in the average globule size is accompanied by the formation of a fractal lattice of nanoglobules and a periodic physical network of macromolecules in the coating. The stability of such system of the "liquid-in-a-solid" type is limited by the destruction of globules and the formation of a homogeneous network structure of the coating.

  13. Filamentous fungal diversity and community structure associated with the solid state fermentation of Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi; Wu, Qun; Xu, Yan

    2014-06-02

    Maotai-flavor liquor is produced by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process under solid state conditions, including Daqu (starter) making, stacking fermentation and alcohol fermentation stages. Filamentous fungi produce many enzymes to degrade the starch material into fermentable sugar during liquor fermentation. This study investigated the filamentous fungal community associated with liquor making process. Eight and seven different fungal species were identified by using culture-dependent and -independent method (PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DGGE) analyses, respectively. The traditional enumeration method showed that Daqu provided 7 fungal species for stacking fermentation. The total population of filamentous fungi increased from 3.4 × 10(3)cfu/g to 1.28 × 10(4)cfu/g in the first 3 days of stacking fermentation, and then decreased till the end. In alcohol fermentation in pits, the population continuously decreased and few fungal species survived (lower than 1 × 10(3)cfu/g) after 10 days. Therefore, stacking fermentation is an essential stage for the growth of filamentous fungi. Paecilomyces variotii, Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus terreus were detected by both methods, and P. variotii and A. oryzae were the predominant species. Meanwhile, P. variotii possessed the highest glucoamylase (3252 ± 526 U/g) and A. oryzae exhibited the highest α-amylase (1491 ± 324 U/g) activity among the cultivable fungal species. Furthermore, the variation of starch and reducing sugar content was consistent with the growth of P. variotii and A. oryzae in Zaopei (fermented grains) during stacking fermentation, which implied that the two filamentous fungi played an important role in producing amylase for hydrolyzing the starch.

  14. The Fractal Simulation Of Biological Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    1989-04-01

    This paper provides a light introduction to simple graphics techniques for visualizing a large class of biological shapes generated from recursive algorithms. In order to capture some of the structural richness inherent in organisms, the algorithms produce not only extreme variability but also a high level of organization. The material primarily comes from previous published works of the author. For a general background on fractal methods in mathematics and science, see Mandelbrot's famous book. For research on the fractal characterization of other biological structures, such as the lung's bronchial tree and the surfaces of protein molecules.

  15. On the Classification of Fractal Squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun Jason; Liu, Jing-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In the previous paper [K. S. Lau, J. J. Luo and H. Rao, Topological structure of fractal squares, Math. Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 155 (2013) 73-86], Lau, Luo and Rao completely classified the topological structure of so called fractal square F defined by F = (F + 𝒟)/n, where 𝒟 ⊊ {0, 1,…,n - 1}2,n ≥ 2. In this paper, we further provide simple criteria for the F to be totally disconnected, then we discuss the Lipschitz classification of F in the case n = 3, which is an attempt to consider non-totally disconnected sets.

  16. Fractal and multifractal analyses of bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jian; Yu, Zu-Guo; Xie, Xian-Hua

    2017-03-31

    Bipartite networks have attracted considerable interest in various fields. Fractality and multifractality of unipartite (classical) networks have been studied in recent years, but there is no work to study these properties of bipartite networks. In this paper, we try to unfold the self-similarity structure of bipartite networks by performing the fractal and multifractal analyses for a variety of real-world bipartite network data sets and models. First, we find the fractality in some bipartite networks, including the CiteULike, Netflix, MovieLens (ml-20m), Delicious data sets and (u, v)-flower model. Meanwhile, we observe the shifted power-law or exponential behavior in other several networks. We then focus on the multifractal properties of bipartite networks. Our results indicate that the multifractality exists in those bipartite networks possessing fractality. To capture the inherent attribute of bipartite network with two types different nodes, we give the different weights for the nodes of different classes, and show the existence of multifractality in these node-weighted bipartite networks. In addition, for the data sets with ratings, we modify the two existing algorithms for fractal and multifractal analyses of edge-weighted unipartite networks to study the self-similarity of the corresponding edge-weighted bipartite networks. The results show that our modified algorithms are feasible and can effectively uncover the self-similarity structure of these edge-weighted bipartite networks and their corresponding node-weighted versions.

  17. Fractal and multifractal analyses of bipartite networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jian; Yu, Zu-Guo; Xie, Xian-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Bipartite networks have attracted considerable interest in various fields. Fractality and multifractality of unipartite (classical) networks have been studied in recent years, but there is no work to study these properties of bipartite networks. In this paper, we try to unfold the self-similarity structure of bipartite networks by performing the fractal and multifractal analyses for a variety of real-world bipartite network data sets and models. First, we find the fractality in some bipartite networks, including the CiteULike, Netflix, MovieLens (ml-20m), Delicious data sets and (u, v)-flower model. Meanwhile, we observe the shifted power-law or exponential behavior in other several networks. We then focus on the multifractal properties of bipartite networks. Our results indicate that the multifractality exists in those bipartite networks possessing fractality. To capture the inherent attribute of bipartite network with two types different nodes, we give the different weights for the nodes of different classes, and show the existence of multifractality in these node-weighted bipartite networks. In addition, for the data sets with ratings, we modify the two existing algorithms for fractal and multifractal analyses of edge-weighted unipartite networks to study the self-similarity of the corresponding edge-weighted bipartite networks. The results show that our modified algorithms are feasible and can effectively uncover the self-similarity structure of these edge-weighted bipartite networks and their corresponding node-weighted versions. PMID:28361962

  18. Hierarchical socioeconomic fractality: The rich, the poor, and the middle-class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-05-01

    Since the seminal work of the Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, the study of wealth and income has been a topic of active scientific exploration engaging researches ranging from economics and political science to econophysics and complex systems. This paper investigates the intrinsic fractality of wealth and income. To that end we introduce and characterize three forms of socioeconomic scale-invariance-poor fractality, rich fractality, and middle-class fractality-and construct hierarchical fractal approximations of general wealth and income distributions, based on the stitching of these three forms of fractality. Intertwining the theoretical results with real-world empirical data we then establish that the three forms of socioeconomic fractality-amalgamated into a composite hierarchical structure-underlie the distributions of wealth and income in human societies. We further establish that the hierarchical socioeconomic fractality of wealth and income is also displayed by empirical rank distributions observed across the sciences.

  19. Determining Effective Thermal Conductivity of Fabrics by Using Fractal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fanglong; Li, Kejing

    2010-03-01

    In this article, a fractal effective thermal conductivity model for woven fabrics with multiple layers is developed. Structural models of yarn and plain woven fabric are derived based on the fractal characteristics of macro-pores (gap or channel) between the yarns and micro-pores inside the yarns. The fractal effective thermal conductivity model can be expressed as a function of the pore structure (fractal dimension) and architectural parameters of the woven fabric. Good agreement is found between the fractal model and the thermal conductivity measurements in the general porosity ranges. It is expected that the model will be helpful in the evaluation of thermal comfort for woven fabric in the whole range of porosity.

  20. Fractal branching pattern of the monopodial canine airway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping M; Kraman, Steve S

    2004-06-01

    Unlike the human lung, monopodial canine airway branching follows an irregular dichotomized pattern with fractal features. We studied three canine airway molds and found a self-similarity feature from macro- to microscopic scales, which formed a fractal set up to seven scales in the airways. At each fractal scale, lateral branches evenly lined up along an approximately straight main trunk to form three to four two-dimensional structures, and each lateral branch was the monopodial main trunk of the next fractal scale. We defined this pattern as the fractal main lateral-branching pattern, which exhibited similar structures from macro- to microscopic scales, including lobes, sublobes, sub-sublobes, etc. We speculate that it, rather than a mother-daughter pattern, could better describe the actual asymmetrical architecture of the monopodial canine airway.

  1. Self-Organization of Treadmilling Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubrovinski, K.; Kruse, K.

    2007-11-01

    The cytoskeleton is an active network of polar filaments. The activity can lead to the polymerization of filaments at one end and depolymerization at the other. This phenomenon is called treadmilling and is essential for many cellular processes, in particular, the crawling of cells on a substrate. We develop a microscopic theoretical framework for describing systems of treadmilling filaments. We show that such systems can self-organize into structures observed in cell fragments, in particular, asters and moving spots.

  2. Fractal atomic-level percolation in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, David Z; Shi, Crystal Y; An, Qi; Zeng, Qiaoshi; Mao, Wendy L; Goddard, William A; Greer, Julia R

    2015-09-18

    Metallic glasses are metallic alloys that exhibit exotic material properties. They may have fractal structures at the atomic level, but a physical mechanism for their organization without ordering has not been identified. We demonstrated a crossover between fractal short-range (<2 atomic diameters) and homogeneous long-range structures using in situ x-ray diffraction, tomography, and molecular dynamics simulations. A specific class of fractal, the percolation cluster, explains the structural details for several metallic-glass compositions. We postulate that atoms percolate in the liquid phase and that the percolating cluster becomes rigid at the glass transition temperature.

  3. Solubilization and fractionation of paired helical filaments.

    PubMed

    González, P J; Correas, I; Avila, J

    1992-09-01

    Paired helical filaments isolated from brains of two different patients with Alzheimer's disease were extensively treated with the ionic detergent, sodium dodecyl sulphate. Filaments were solubilized at different extents, depending on the brain examined, thus suggesting the existence of two types of paired helical filaments: sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble and insoluble filaments. In the first case, the number of structures resembling paired helical filaments greatly decreased after the detergent treatment, as observed by electron microscopy. Simultaneously, a decrease in the amount of sedimentable protein was also observed upon centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-treated paired helical filaments. A sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was isolated as a supernatant after low-speed centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulphate-treated paired helical filaments. The addition of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet-P40 to this fraction resulted in the formation of paired helical filament-like structures. When the sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was further fractionated by high-speed centrifugation, three subfractions were observed: a supernatant, a pellet and a thin layer between these two subfractions. No paired helical filaments were observed in any of these subfractions, even after addition of Nonidet P-40. However, when they were mixed back together, the treatment with Nonidet P-40 resulted in the visualization of paired helical filament-like structures. These results suggest that at least two different components are needed for the reconstitution of paired helical filaments as determined by electron microscopy. The method described here may allow the study of the components involved in the formation of paired helical filaments and the identification of possible factors capable of blocking this process.

  4. Fractal Patterns and Chaos Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaney, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Teachers incorporate the chaos game and the concept of a fractal into various areas of the algebra and geometry curriculum. The chaos game approach to fractals provides teachers with an opportunity to help students comprehend the geometry of affine transformations.

  5. Building Fractal Models with Manipulatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coes, Loring

    1993-01-01

    Uses manipulative materials to build and examine geometric models that simulate the self-similarity properties of fractals. Examples are discussed in two dimensions, three dimensions, and the fractal dimension. Discusses how models can be misleading. (Contains 10 references.) (MDH)

  6. Fractals for Geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleshko, Klaudia; de Jesús Correa López, María; Romero, Alejandro; Ramírez, Victor; Pérez, Olga

    2016-04-01

    The effectiveness of fractal toolbox to capture the scaling or fractal probability distribution, and simply fractal statistics of main hydrocarbon reservoir attributes, was highlighted by Mandelbrot (1995) and confirmed by several researchers (Zhao et al., 2015). Notwithstanding, after more than twenty years, it's still common the opinion that fractals are not useful for the petroleum engineers and especially for Geoengineering (Corbett, 2012). In spite of this negative background, we have successfully applied the fractal and multifractal techniques to our project entitled "Petroleum Reservoir as a Fractal Reactor" (2013 up to now). The distinguishable feature of Fractal Reservoir is the irregular shapes and rough pore/solid distributions (Siler, 2007), observed across a broad range of scales (from SEM to seismic). At the beginning, we have accomplished the detailed analysis of Nelson and Kibler (2003) Catalog of Porosity and Permeability, created for the core plugs of siliciclastic rocks (around ten thousand data were compared). We enriched this Catalog by more than two thousand data extracted from the last ten years publications on PoroPerm (Corbett, 2012) in carbonates deposits, as well as by our own data from one of the PEMEX, Mexico, oil fields. The strong power law scaling behavior was documented for the major part of these data from the geological deposits of contrasting genesis. Based on these results and taking into account the basic principles and models of the Physics of Fractals, introduced by Per Back and Kan Chen (1989), we have developed new software (Muukíl Kaab), useful to process the multiscale geological and geophysical information and to integrate the static geological and petrophysical reservoir models to dynamic ones. The new type of fractal numerical model with dynamical power law relations among the shapes and sizes of mesh' cells was designed and calibrated in the studied area. The statistically sound power law relations were established

  7. Fractal dimension of bioconvection patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Shallow cultures of the motile algal strain, Euglena gracilis, were concentrated to 2 x 10 to the 6th organisms per ml and placed in constant temperature water baths at 24 and 38 C. Bioconvective patterns formed an open two-dimensional structure with random branches, similar to clusters encountered in the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model. When averaged over several example cultures, the pattern was found to have no natural length scale, self-similar branching, and a fractal dimension (d about 1.7). These agree well with the two-dimensional DLA.

  8. Fractal Dimension of Bioconvection Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-10-01

    Shallow cultures of the motile algal strain, Euglena gracilis, were concentrated to 2× 106 organisms per ml and placed in constant temperature water baths at 24 and 38 C. Bioconvective patterns formed an open two-dimensional structure with random branches, similar to clusters encountered in the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model. When averaged over several example cultures, the pattern was found to have no natural length scale, self-similar branching and a fractal dimension (d˜1.7). These agree well with the two-dimensional DLA.

  9. Utilizing Fractal Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    Linear concepts of time plus the modern capacity to track history emerged out of circular conceptions characteristic of ancient and traditional cultures. A fractal concept of time lies implicitly within the analog clock, where each moment is treated as unique. With fractal geometry the best descriptor of nature, qualities of self-similarity and scale invariance easily model her endless variety and recursive patterning, both in time and across space. To better manage temporal aspects of our lives, a fractal concept of time is non-reductive, based more on the fullness of being than on fragments of doing. By using a fractal concept of time, each activity or dimension of life is multiply and vertically nested. Each nested cycle remains simultaneously present, operating according to intrinsic dynamics and time scales. By adding the vertical axis of simultaneity to the horizontal axis of length, time is already full and never needs to be filled. To attend to time's vertical dimension is to tap into the imaginary potential for infinite depth. To switch from linear to fractal time allows us to relax into each moment while keeping in mind the whole.

  10. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huai Liang; Chin, See Leang

    2011-01-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence spectra (fingerprints) from the excited fragments, which can be used for the identification of various substances including chemical and biological species. On the other hand, along with the femtosecond laser filamentation, white-light supercontinuum emission in the infrared to UV range is generated, which can be used as an ideal light source for absorption Lidar. In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress concerning remote sensing of the atmosphere using femtosecond laser filamentation. PMID:22346566

  11. Fractal design concepts for stretchable electronics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jonathan A; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Su, Yewang; Hattori, Yoshiaki; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sung-Young; Zhang, Yihui; Liu, Zhuangjian; Cheng, Huanyu; Falgout, Leo; Bajema, Mike; Coleman, Todd; Gregoire, Dan; Larsen, Ryan J; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-01-01

    Stretchable electronics provide a foundation for applications that exceed the scope of conventional wafer and circuit board technologies due to their unique capacity to integrate with soft materials and curvilinear surfaces. The range of possibilities is predicated on the development of device architectures that simultaneously offer advanced electronic function and compliant mechanics. Here we report that thin films of hard electronic materials patterned in deterministic fractal motifs and bonded to elastomers enable unusual mechanics with important implications in stretchable device design. In particular, we demonstrate the utility of Peano, Greek cross, Vicsek and other fractal constructs to yield space-filling structures of electronic materials, including monocrystalline silicon, for electrophysiological sensors, precision monitors and actuators, and radio frequency antennas. These devices support conformal mounting on the skin and have unique properties such as invisibility under magnetic resonance imaging. The results suggest that fractal-based layouts represent important strategies for hard-soft materials integration.

  12. Fractal design concepts for stretchable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jonathan A.; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Su, Yewang; Hattori, Yoshiaki; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sung-Young; Zhang, Yihui; Liu, Zhuangjian; Cheng, Huanyu; Falgout, Leo; Bajema, Mike; Coleman, Todd; Gregoire, Dan; Larsen, Ryan J.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-02-01

    Stretchable electronics provide a foundation for applications that exceed the scope of conventional wafer and circuit board technologies due to their unique capacity to integrate with soft materials and curvilinear surfaces. The range of possibilities is predicated on the development of device architectures that simultaneously offer advanced electronic function and compliant mechanics. Here we report that thin films of hard electronic materials patterned in deterministic fractal motifs and bonded to elastomers enable unusual mechanics with important implications in stretchable device design. In particular, we demonstrate the utility of Peano, Greek cross, Vicsek and other fractal constructs to yield space-filling structures of electronic materials, including monocrystalline silicon, for electrophysiological sensors, precision monitors and actuators, and radio frequency antennas. These devices support conformal mounting on the skin and have unique properties such as invisibility under magnetic resonance imaging. The results suggest that fractal-based layouts represent important strategies for hard-soft materials integration.

  13. Scrape-off Layer Current Model for Filament Structure Observed during Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hironori; Fredrickson, E. D.; Schaffer, M. J.

    2008-04-15

    The plasma in tokamaks often exhibits a relaxation oscillation called the edge localized mode (ELM), which is generally attributed to MHD instability driven by strong gradients at the plasma boundary. It is shown here that field-aligned currents flowing just outside the boundary may also play a role in the ELM process. The poloidal perturbation magnetic field during ELMs in the DIII–D tokamak calculated from measured currents can reproduce prominent observed features, including a narrow magnetic structure at the outboard midplane similar to filaments observed earlier in DIII–D and NSTX.

  14. Scrape-Off-Layer Current Model for Filament Structure Observed during Edge-Localized Modes in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hironori; Fredrickson, E. D.; Schaffer, M. J.

    2008-05-23

    The plasma in tokamaks often exhibits a relaxation oscillation called the edge-localized mode (ELM), which is generally attributed to MHD instability driven by strong gradients at the plasma boundary. It is shown here that field-aligned currents flowing just outside the boundary may also play a role in the ELM process. The poloidal perturbation magnetic field during ELMs in the DIII-D tokamak calculated from measured currents can reproduce prominent observed features, including a narrow magnetic structure at the outboard midplane similar to filaments observed earlier in DIII-D and NSTX.

  15. Filamentation in Laser Wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, Eva; Trines, Raoul; Silva, Luis; Bingham, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Laser filamentation instability is observed in plasma wakefields with sub-critical densities, and in high density inertial fusion plasmas. This leads to non-uniform acceleration or compression respectively. Here, we present simulation results on laser filamentation in plasma wakefields. The 2-D simulations are carried out using the particle-in-cell code Osiris. The filament intensity was found to increase exponentially before saturating. The maximum amplitude to which the highest intensity filament grew for a specific set of parameters was also recorded, and plotted against a corresponding parameter value. Clear, positively correlated linear trends were established between plasma density, transverse wavenumber k, laser pulse amplitude and maximum filament amplitude. Plasma density and maximum filament amplitude also showed a positive correlation, which saturated after a certain plasma density. Pulse duration and interaction length did not affect either filament intensity or transverse k value in a predictable manner. There was no discernible trend between pulse amplitude and filament width.

  16. The fractal nature of vacuum arc cathode spots

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-05-27

    Cathode spot phenomena show many features of fractals, for example self-similar patterns in the emitted light and arc erosion traces. Although there have been hints on the fractal nature of cathode spots in the literature, the fractal approach to spot interpretation is underutilized. In this work, a brief review of spot properties is given, touching the differences between spot type 1 (on cathodes surfaces with dielectric layers) and spot type 2 (on metallic, clean surfaces) as well as the known spot fragment or cell structure. The basic properties of self-similarity, power laws, random colored noise, and fractals are introduced. Several points of evidence for the fractal nature of spots are provided. Specifically power laws are identified as signature of fractal properties, such as spectral power of noisy arc parameters (ion current, arc voltage, etc) obtained by fast Fourier transform. It is shown that fractal properties can be observed down to the cutoff by measurement resolution or occurrence of elementary steps in physical processes. Random walk models of cathode spot motion are well established: they go asymptotically to Brownian motion for infinitesimal step width. The power spectrum of the arc voltage noise falls as 1/f {sup 2}, where f is frequency, supporting a fractal spot model associated with Brownian motion.

  17. a Fractal Network Model for Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Li, Cuihong; Qiu, Shuxia; Sasmito, Agus Pulung

    2016-04-01

    The transport properties and mechanisms of fractured porous media are very important for oil and gas reservoir engineering, hydraulics, environmental science, chemical engineering, etc. In this paper, a fractal dual-porosity model is developed to estimate the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media, where a fractal tree-like network model is used to characterize the fracture system according to its fractal scaling laws and topological structures. The analytical expressions for the effective permeability of fracture system and fractured porous media, tortuosity, fracture density and fraction are derived. The proposed fractal model has been validated by comparisons with available experimental data and numerical simulation. It has been shown that fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture have significant effect on the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media. The effective permeability of fracture system can be increased with the increase of fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture, while it can be remarkably lowered by introducing tortuosity at large branching angle. Also, a scaling law between the fracture density and fractal dimension for fracture length has been found, where the scaling exponent depends on the fracture number. The present fractal dual-porosity model may shed light on the transport physics of fractured porous media and provide theoretical basis for oil and gas exploitation, underground water, nuclear waste disposal and geothermal energy extraction as well as chemical engineering, etc.

  18. Deterministic fractals: extracting additional information from small-angle scattering data.

    PubMed

    Cherny, A Yu; Anitas, E M; Osipov, V A; Kuklin, A I

    2011-09-01

    The small-angle scattering curves of deterministic mass fractals are studied and analyzed in momentum space. In the fractal region, the curve I(q)q(D) is found to be log-periodic with good accuracy, and the period is equal to the scaling factor of the fractal. Here, D and I(q) are the fractal dimension and the scattering intensity, respectively. The number of periods of this curve coincides with the number of fractal iterations. We show that the log-periodicity of I(q)q(D) in the momentum space is related to the log-periodicity of the quantity g(r)r(3-D) in the real space, where g(r) is the pair distribution function. The minima and maxima positions of the scattering intensity are estimated explicitly by relating them to the pair distance distribution in real space. It is shown that the minima and maxima are damped with increasing polydispersity of the fractal sets; however, they remain quite pronounced even at sufficiently large values of polydispersity. A generalized self-similar Vicsek fractal with controllable fractal dimension is introduced, and its scattering properties are studied to illustrate the above findings. In contrast with the usual methods, the present analysis allows us to obtain not only the fractal dimension and the edges of the fractal region, but also the fractal iteration number, the scaling factor, and the number of structural units from which the fractal is composed.

  19. Filament Eruption Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    We have been investigating filament eruptions in recent years. Use filament eruptions as markers of the coronal field evolution. Data from SoHO, Yohkoh, TRACE, Hinode, and other sources. We and others have observed: (1)Filaments often show slow rise, followed by fast rise, (2) Brightenings, preflares, microflares during slow rise (3) Magnetic evolution in hours prior to eruption onset. We investigated What do Hinode and SDO show for filament eruptions?

  20. An Introduction to Flow and Transport in Fractal Models of Porous Media: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jianchao; San José Martínez, Fernando; Martín, Miguel Angel; Perfect, Edmund

    2014-09-01

    This special issue gathers together a number of recent papers on fractal geometry and its applications to the modeling of flow and transport in porous media. The aim is to provide a systematic approach for analyzing the statics and dynamics of fluids in fractal porous media by means of theory, modeling and experimentation. The topics covered include lacunarity analyses of multifractal and natural grayscale patterns, random packing's of self-similar pore/particle size distributions, Darcian and non-Darcian hydraulic flows, diffusion within fractals, models for the permeability and thermal conductivity of fractal porous media and hydrophobicity and surface erosion properties of fractal structures.

  1. The relationship between fractal dimension and other-race and inversion effects in recognising facial emotions.

    PubMed

    Takehara, Takuma; Ochiai, Fumio; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    There is currently substantial literature to suggest that facial emotion recognition is impaired when other-race or inverted faces are presented. This study examined circumplex structures for recognising facial emotions under these conditions, directly measured those structures using a fractal dimension, and examined the difference between fractal dimensions. Results established that emotion ratings for the emotion prototypes used were sufficiently accurate under all conditions. Fractal analyses showed that the fractal dimensions of the circumplexes were significantly higher for recognition of facial emotions in other races than in one's own when the faces were presented upright; the fractal dimensions of the circumplexes were also higher for recognition of emotions in inverted faces than in upright faces in the own-race condition. The results suggest that a lower level of facial emotion recognition is associated with higher fractal dimension and that an increase of fractal dimension may be characterised by lack of facial familiarity.

  2. [Recent progress of research and applications of fractal and its theories in medicine].

    PubMed

    Cai, Congbo; Wang, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Fractal, a mathematics concept, is used to describe an image of self-similarity and scale invariance. Some organisms have been discovered with the fractal characteristics, such as cerebral cortex surface, retinal vessel structure, cardiovascular network, and trabecular bone, etc. It has been preliminarily confirmed that the three-dimensional structure of cells cultured in vitro could be significantly enhanced by bionic fractal surface. Moreover, fractal theory in clinical research will help early diagnosis and treatment of diseases, reducing the patient's pain and suffering. The development process of diseases in the human body can be expressed by the fractal theories parameter. It is of considerable significance to retrospectively review the preparation and application of fractal surface and its diagnostic value in medicine. This paper gives an application of fractal and its theories in the medical science, based on the research achievements in our laboratory.

  3. Filamentation in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cardozo, N.J.; Barth, C.J.; Chu, C.C.; Lok, J.; Montvai, A.; Oomens, A.A.; Peters, M.; Pijper, F.J.; de Rover, M.; Schueller, F.C.; Steenbakkers, M.F.; RTP team

    1995-09-01

    The relevance of a nest of toroidal flux surfaces as a paradigm of the magnetic topology of a tokamak plasma is challenged. High resolution Thomson scattering measurements of electron temperature and density in RTP show several hot filaments in the plasma center and sharp gradients near the sawtooth inversion radius and structures outside the sawtooth region under central ECH. In ohmic plasmas, too, the pressure and temperature profiles show significant bumps. These measurements give evidence of a complex magnetic topology. Transport in a medium with spatially strongly varying diffusivity is considered. It is shown that macroscopic transport is determined by the microscopic structure: a transport theory must predict this structure and the diffusivity in the insulating regions, while the {open_quote}turbulent{close_quote} diffusivity is irrelevant. A numerical approach to equilibria with broken surfaces is presented. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Using cell structures to develop functional nanomaterials and nanostructures--case studies of actin filaments and microtubules.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kevin Chia-Wen; Yang, Chung-Yao; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2014-04-25

    This article is based on the continued development of biologically relevant elements (i.e., actin filaments and microtubules in living cells) as building blocks to create functional nanomaterials and nanostructures that can then be used to manufacture nature-inspired small-scale devices or systems. Here, we summarize current progress in the field and focus specifically on processes characterized by (1) robustness and ease of use, (2) inexpensiveness, and (3) potential expandability to mass production. This article, we believe, will provide scientists and engineers with a more comprehensive understanding of how to mine biological materials and natural design features to construct functional materials and devices.

  5. Solid friction between soft filaments

    DOE PAGES

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; ...

    2015-03-02

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag,more » can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.« less

  6. Solid friction between soft filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A.W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments1,2. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials. PMID:25730393

  7. Flames in fractal grid generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, K. H. H.; Geipel, P.; Hampp, F.; Lindstedt, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Twin premixed turbulent opposed jet flames were stabilized for lean mixtures of air with methane and propane in fractal grid generated turbulence. A density segregation method was applied alongside particle image velocimetry to obtain velocity and scalar statistics. It is shown that the current fractal grids increase the turbulence levels by around a factor of 2. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was applied to show that the fractal grids produce slightly larger turbulent structures that decay at a slower rate as compared to conventional perforated plates. Conditional POD (CPOD) was also implemented using the density segregation technique and the results show that CPOD is essential to segregate the relative structures and turbulent kinetic energy distributions in each stream. The Kolmogorov length scales were also estimated providing values ∼0.1 and ∼0.5 mm in the reactants and products, respectively. Resolved profiles of flame surface density indicate that a thin flame assumption leading to bimodal statistics is not perfectly valid under the current conditions and it is expected that the data obtained will be of significant value to the development of computational methods that can provide information on the conditional structure of turbulence. It is concluded that the increase in the turbulent Reynolds number is without any negative impact on other parameters and that fractal grids provide a route towards removing the classical problem of a relatively low ratio of turbulent to bulk strain associated with the opposed jet configuration.

  8. Structural changes in the myosin filament and cross-bridges during active force development in single intact frog muscle fibres: stiffness and X-ray diffraction measurements.

    PubMed

    Brunello, E; Bianco, P; Piazzesi, G; Linari, M; Reconditi, M; Panine, P; Narayanan, T; Helsby, W I; Irving, M; Lombardi, V

    2006-12-15

    Structural and mechanical changes occurring in the myosin filament and myosin head domains during the development of the isometric tetanus have been investigated in intact frog muscle fibres at 4 degrees C and 2.15 microm sarcomere length, using sarcomere level mechanics and X-ray diffraction at beamline ID2 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France). The time courses of changes in both the M3 and M6 myosin-based reflections were recorded with 5 ms frames using the gas-filled RAPID detector (MicroGap Technology). Following the end of the latent period (11 ms after the start of stimulation), force increases to the tetanus plateau value (T(0)) with a half-time of 40 ms, and the spacings of the M3 and M6 reflections (S(M3) and S(M6)) increase by 1.5% from their resting values, with time courses that lead that of force by approximately 10 and approximately 20 ms, respectively. These temporal relations are maintained when the increase of force is delayed by approximately 10 ms by imposing, from 5 ms after the first stimulus, 50 nm (half-sarcomere)(-1) shortening at the velocity (V(0)) that maintains zero force. Shortening at V(0) transiently reduces S(M3) following the latent period and delays the subsequent increase in S(M3), but only delays the S(M6) increase without a transient decrease. Shortening at V(0) imposed at the tetanus plateau causes an abrupt reduction of the intensity of the M3 reflection (I(M3)), whereas the intensity of the M6 reflection (I(M6)) is only slightly reduced. The changes in half-sarcomere stiffness indicate that the isometric force at each time point is proportional to the number of myosin heads bound to actin. The different sensitivities of the intensity and spacing of the M3 and M6 reflections to the mechanical responses support the view that the M3 reflection in active muscle originates mainly from the myosin heads attached to the actin filament and the M6 reflection originates mainly from a fixed structure in the

  9. FRACTAL DIMENSION OF GALAXY ISOPHOTES

    SciTech Connect

    Thanki, Sandip; Rhee, George; Lepp, Stephen E-mail: grhee@physics.unlv.edu

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we investigate the use of the fractal dimension of galaxy isophotes in galaxy classification. We have applied two different methods for determining fractal dimensions to the isophotes of elliptical and spiral galaxies derived from CCD images. We conclude that fractal dimension alone is not a reliable tool but that combined with other parameters in a neural net algorithm the fractal dimension could be of use. In particular, we have used three parameters to segregate the ellipticals and lenticulars from the spiral galaxies in our sample. These three parameters are the correlation fractal dimension D {sub corr}, the difference between the correlation fractal dimension and the capacity fractal dimension D {sub corr} - D {sub cap}, and, thirdly, the B - V color of the galaxy.

  10. Fractal analysis of high-resolution CT images as a tool for quantification of lung diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Uppaluri, R.; Mitsa, T.; Galvin, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Fractal geometry is increasingly being used to model complex naturally occurring phenomena. There are two types of fractals in nature-geometric fractals and stochastic fractals. The pulmonary branching structure is a geometric fractal and the intensity of its grey scale image is a stochastic fractal. In this paper, the authors attempt to quantify the texture of CT lung images using properties of both types of fractals. A simple algorithm for detecting of abnormality in human lungs, based on 2-D and 3-D fractal dimensions, is presented. This method involves calculating the local fractal dimensions, based on intensities, in the 2-D slice to air edge enhancement. Following this, grey level thresholding is performed and a global fractal dimension, based on structure, for the entire data is estimated in 2-D and 3-D. High Resolution CT images of normal and abnormal lungs were analyzed. Preliminary results showed that classification of normal and abnormal images could be obtained based on the differences between their global fractal dimensions.

  11. Special issue on filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruxin; Milchberg, Howard; Mysyrowicz, André

    2014-05-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on filamentation, to appear in the spring of 2015, and invites you to submit a paper. This special issue will attempt to give an overview of the present status of this field in order to create synergies and foster future developments. The issue is open to papers on the following issues: Theoretical advances on filamentation. Self-focusing and collapse. Filamentation in various media. Pulse self-compression and ultrafast processes in filaments. Molecular alignment and rotation. Filamentation tailoring. Interaction between filaments. Filament weather and pollution control. Filament induced condensation and precipitation. Terahertz science with filaments. Lasing in filaments. Filament induced molecular excitation and reaction. Electric discharge and plasma. Cross-disciplinary applications. Novel concepts related to these topics are particularly welcome. Please submit your article by 1 October 2014 (expected web publication: spring 2015) using our website http://mc04.manuscriptcentral.com/jphysb-iop. Submissions received after this date will be considered for the journal, but may not be included in the special issue. The issue will be edited by Ruxin Li, Howard Milchberg and André Mysyrowicz.

  12. Fractal geometry of music.

    PubMed Central

    Hsü, K J; Hsü, A J

    1990-01-01

    Music critics have compared Bach's music to the precision of mathematics. What "mathematics" and what "precision" are the questions for a curious scientist. The purpose of this short note is to suggest that the mathematics is, at least in part, Mandelbrot's fractal geometry and the precision is the deviation from a log-log linear plot. PMID:11607061

  13. A Fractal Excursion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Dane R.

    1991-01-01

    After introducing the two-dimensional Koch curve, which is generated by simple recursions on an equilateral triangle, the process is extended to three dimensions with simple recursions on a regular tetrahedron. Included, for both fractal sequences, are iterative formulae, illustrations of the first several iterations, and a sample PASCAL program.…

  14. Focus on Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Tim K.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a three-lesson unit that uses fractal geometry to measure the coastline of Massachusetts. Two lessons provide hands-on activities utilizing compass and grid methods to perform the measurements and the third lesson analyzes and explains the results of the activities. (MDH)

  15. Comprehensive fractal description of porosity of coal of different ranks.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiangang; Zhang, Guocheng; Song, Zhimin; Liu, Gaofeng; Li, Bing

    2014-01-01

    We selected, as the objects of our research, lignite from the Beizao Mine, gas coal from the Caiyuan Mine, coking coal from the Xiqu Mine, and anthracite from the Guhanshan Mine. We used the mercury intrusion method and the low-temperature liquid nitrogen adsorption method to analyze the structure and shape of the coal pores and calculated the fractal dimensions of different aperture segments in the coal. The experimental results show that the fractal dimension of the aperture segment of lignite, gas coal, and coking coal with an aperture of greater than or equal to 10 nm, as well as the fractal dimension of the aperture segment of anthracite with an aperture of greater than or equal to 100 nm, can be calculated using the mercury intrusion method; the fractal dimension of the coal pore, with an aperture range between 2.03 nm and 361.14 nm, can be calculated using the liquid nitrogen adsorption method, of which the fractal dimensions bounded by apertures of 10 nm and 100 nm are different. Based on these findings, we defined and calculated the comprehensive fractal dimensions of the coal pores and achieved the unity of fractal dimensions for full apertures of coal pores, thereby facilitating, overall characterization for the heterogeneity of the coal pore structure.

  16. How is kinematic structure connected to the core scale from filament scale?; Mopra mapping observations with multi-lines of dense cores in Lupus I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokane, Kazuhiro; Saito, Masao; Tachihara, Kengo; Saigo, Kazuya; van Kempen, Tim; Cortes, Paulo; Hill, Tracey; Knee, Lewis; Kurono, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Satoko; Aya, Higuchi; Nyman, Lars-Ake

    2014-06-01

    Recently, high sensitivity mappings of nearby molecular clouds in far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths with Hershel and AzTEC/ASTE show ubiquitous existence of the filamentary structures with 0.1-pc uniform width. It is important to investigate dense core formation from large scale structure via fragmentation. We have conducted MOPRA multi-line mapping observations covered on 0.02 - 0.2 pc scales of 8 dense cores in a filamentary cloud of nearby Lupus I at 140 pc. A class 0/I protostellar core IRAS 15398-3359 is included as a sample, which has an adjacent prestellar core with the separation of 0.13pc in the west. The maps of N2H+, HNC, HC3N show well associated with each core. The velocity field of C18O shows 1.4 km/s/pc from north to south over the region containing two dense cores, which is consistent with past observation of NANTEN. In contrast to C18O results, the velocity field of HC3N shows different structures, which suggest counter rotation of two dense cores; 1.2 km/s/pc from north-west to south-east around a protostellar core and 0.8 km/s/pc from east to west around a presteller core. The filament will be fragmentized and collapsed to dense cores when the line density is over 2Cs/G (where Cs is sound speed and G is gravitational constant). If that velocity gradient was caused by such situation, it should be red-blue-red-blue across two dense cores but the observed kinematics is not consistent with this scenario, which requires that the filament structure would be extremely curved with a skew angle. Although we cannot reject the collapsing interruption, those results suggest the spin-up rotating picture separated from large-scale structure.

  17. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  18. Fractal Physiology and the Fractional Calculus: A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    West, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a restricted overview of Fractal Physiology focusing on the complexity of the human body and the characterization of that complexity through fractal measures and their dynamics, with fractal dynamics being described by the fractional calculus. Not only are anatomical structures (Grizzi and Chiriva-Internati, 2005), such as the convoluted surface of the brain, the lining of the bowel, neural networks and placenta, fractal, but the output of dynamical physiologic networks are fractal as well (Bassingthwaighte et al., 1994). The time series for the inter-beat intervals of the heart, inter-breath intervals and inter-stride intervals have all been shown to be fractal and/or multifractal statistical phenomena. Consequently, the fractal dimension turns out to be a significantly better indicator of organismic functions in health and disease than the traditional average measures, such as heart rate, breathing rate, and stride rate. The observation that human physiology is primarily fractal was first made in the 1980s, based on the analysis of a limited number of datasets. We review some of these phenomena herein by applying an allometric aggregation approach to the processing of physiologic time series. This straight forward method establishes the scaling behavior of complex physiologic networks and some dynamic models capable of generating such scaling are reviewed. These models include simple and fractional random walks, which describe how the scaling of correlation functions and probability densities are related to time series data. Subsequently, it is suggested that a proper methodology for describing the dynamics of fractal time series may well be the fractional calculus, either through the fractional Langevin equation or the fractional diffusion equation. A fractional operator (derivative or integral) acting on a fractal function, yields another fractal function, allowing us to construct a fractional Langevin equation to describe the evolution of a

  19. Large-Scale Patterns of Filament Channels and Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Duncan

    2016-07-01

    In this review the properties and large-scale patterns of filament channels and filaments will be considered. Initially, the global formation locations of filament channels and filaments are discussed, along with their hemispheric pattern. Next, observations of the formation of filament channels and filaments are described where two opposing views are considered. Finally, the wide range of models that have been constructed to consider the formation of filament channels and filaments over long time-scales are described, along with the origin of the hemispheric pattern of filaments.

  20. Fractal frontiers in cardiovascular magnetic resonance: towards clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Captur, Gabriella; Karperien, Audrey L; Li, Chunming; Zemrak, Filip; Tobon-Gomez, Catalina; Gao, Xuexin; Bluemke, David A; Elliott, Perry M; Petersen, Steffen E; Moon, James C

    2015-09-07

    Many of the structures and parameters that are detected, measured and reported in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) have at least some properties that are fractal, meaning complex and self-similar at different scales. To date however, there has been little use of fractal geometry in CMR; by comparison, many more applications of fractal analysis have been published in MR imaging of the brain.This review explains the fundamental principles of fractal geometry, places the fractal dimension into a meaningful context within the realms of Euclidean and topological space, and defines its role in digital image processing. It summarises the basic mathematics, highlights strengths and potential limitations of its application to biomedical imaging, shows key current examples and suggests a simple route for its successful clinical implementation by the CMR community.By simplifying some of the more abstract concepts of deterministic fractals, this review invites CMR scientists (clinicians, technologists, physicists) to experiment with fractal analysis as a means of developing the next generation of intelligent quantitative cardiac imaging tools.

  1. Enigmatic reticulated filaments in subsurface granite.

    PubMed

    Miller, A Z; Hernández-Mariné, M; Jurado, V; Dionísio, A; Barquinha, P; Fortunato, E; Afonso, M J; Chaminé, H I; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    2012-12-01

    In the last few years, geomicrobiologists have focused their researches on the nature and origin of enigmatic reticulated filaments reported in modern and fossil samples from limestone caves and basalt lava tubes. Researchers have posed questions on these filaments concerning their nature, origin, chemistry, morphology, mode of formation and growth. A tentative microbial origin has been elusive since these filaments are found as hollow tubular sheaths and could not be affiliated to any known microorganism. We describe the presence of similar structures in a 16th century granite tunnel in Porto, Northwest Portugal. The reticulated filaments we identify exhibit fine geometry surface ornamentation formed by cross-linked Mn-rich nanofibres, surrounded by a large amount of extracellular polymeric substances. Within these Mn-rich filaments we report for the first time the occurrence of microbial cells.

  2. Pond fractals in a tidal flat.

    PubMed

    Cael, B B; Lambert, Bennett; Bisson, Kelsey

    2015-11-01

    Studies over the past decade have reported power-law distributions for the areas of terrestrial lakes and Arctic melt ponds, as well as fractal relationships between their areas and coastlines. Here we report similar fractal structure of ponds in a tidal flat, thereby extending the spatial and temporal scales on which such phenomena have been observed in geophysical systems. Images taken during low tide of a tidal flat in Damariscotta, Maine, reveal a well-resolved power-law distribution of pond sizes over three orders of magnitude with a consistent fractal area-perimeter relationship. The data are consistent with the predictions of percolation theory for unscreened perimeters and scale-free cluster size distributions and are robust to alterations of the image processing procedure. The small spatial and temporal scales of these data suggest this easily observable system may serve as a useful model for investigating the evolution of pond geometries, while emphasizing the generality of fractal behavior in geophysical surfaces.

  3. Fractals in geology and geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    The definition of a fractal distribution is that the number of objects N with a characteristic size greater than r scales with the relation N of about r exp -D. The frequency-size distributions for islands, earthquakes, fragments, ore deposits, and oil fields often satisfy this relation. This application illustrates a fundamental aspect of fractal distributions, scale invariance. The requirement of an object to define a scale in photograhs of many geological features is one indication of the wide applicability of scale invariance to geological problems; scale invariance can lead to fractal clustering. Geophysical spectra can also be related to fractals; these are self-affine fractals rather than self-similar fractals. Examples include the earth's topography and geoid.

  4. Multilayer adsorption on fractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Péter; Felinger, Attila

    2014-01-10

    Multilayer adsorption is often observed in liquid chromatography. The most frequently employed model for multilayer adsorption is the BET isotherm equation. In this study we introduce an interpretation of multilayer adsorption measured on liquid chromatographic stationary phases based on the fractal theory. The fractal BET isotherm model was successfully used to determine the apparent fractal dimension of the adsorbent surface. The nonlinear fitting of the fractal BET equation gives us the estimation of the adsorption equilibrium constants and the monolayer saturation capacity of the adsorbent as well. In our experiments, aniline and proline were used as test molecules on reversed phase and normal phase columns, respectively. Our results suggest an apparent fractal dimension 2.88-2.99 in the case of reversed phase adsorbents, in the contrast with a bare silica column with a fractal dimension of 2.54.

  5. Structure of the mitochondrial creatine kinase octamer: high-resolution shadowing and image averaging of single molecules and formation of linear filaments under specific staining conditions

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The combination of high-resolution tantalum/tungsten (Ta/W) shadowing at very low specimen temperature (-250 degrees C) under ultrahigh vacuum (less than 2 x 10(-9) mbar) with circular harmonic image averaging revealed details on the surface structure of mitochondrial creatine kinase (Mi-CK) molecules with a resolution less than 2.5 nm. Mi-CK octamers exhibit a cross-like surface depression dividing the square shaped projection of 10 x 10 nm into four equally sized subdomains, which correspond to the four dimers forming the octameric Mi-CK molecule. By a combination of positive staining (with uranyl acetate) and heavy metal shadowing, internal structures as well as the surface relief of Mi-CK were visualized at the same time at high resolution. Computational image analysis revealed only a single projection class of molecules, but the ability of Mi-CK to form linear filaments, as well as geometrical considerations concerning the formation of octamers by four equal, asymmetric dimers, suggest the existence of at least two distinct faces on the molecule. By image processing of Mi-CK filaments a side view of the octamer differing from the top-bottom projections of single molecules became evident showing a funnel-like access each form the top and bottom of the octamer connected by a central channel. The general structure of the Mi-CK octamer described here is relevant to the localization of the molecule at the inner-outer mitochondrial contact sites and to the function of Mi-CK as an "energy channeling" molecule. PMID:1702444

  6. Radial Infall onto a Massive Molecular Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Cara; Myers, Philip C.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Keto, Eric; Kirk, Helen

    The newly discovered Massive Molecular Filament (MMF) G32.02+0.05 (~ 70 pc long, 105 M⊙) has been shaped and compressed by older generations of massive stars. The similarity of this filament in physical structure (density profile, temperature) to much smaller star-forming filaments, suggests that the mechanism to form such filaments may be a universal process. The densest portion of the filament, apparent as an Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) shows a range of massive star formation signatures throughout. We investigate the kinematics in this filament and find widespread inverse P cygni asymmetric line profiles. These line asymmetries are interpreted as a signature of large-scale radial collapse. Using line asymmetries observed with optically thick HCO+ (1-0) and optically thin H13CO+ (1-0) across a range of massive star forming regions in the filament, we estimate the global radial infall rate of the filament to range from a few 100 to a few 1000 M⊙ Myr-1 pc-1. At its current infall rate the densest portions of the cloud will more than double their current mass within a Myr.

  7. Fractal rigidity in migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Latka, Dariusz; West, Bruce J.

    2004-04-01

    We study the middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAfv) in humans using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). Scaling properties of time series of the axial flow velocity averaged over a cardiac beat interval may be characterized by two exponents. The short time scaling exponent (STSE) determines the statistical properties of fluctuations of blood flow velocities in short-time intervals while the Hurst exponent describes the long-term fractal properties. In many migraineurs the value of the STSE is significantly reduced and may approach that of the Hurst exponent. This change in dynamical properties reflects the significant loss of short-term adaptability and the overall hyperexcitability of the underlying cerebral blood flow control system. We call this effect fractal rigidity.

  8. Fractal polyzirconosiloxane cluster coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1992-08-01

    Fractal polyzirconosiloxane (PZS) cluster films were prepared through the hydrolysis-polycondensation-pyrolysis synthesis of two-step HCl acid-NaOH base catalyzed sol precursors consisting of N-[3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl]-4,5-dihydroimidazole, Zr(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4}, methanol, and water. When amorphous PZSs were applied to aluminum as protective coatings against NaCl-induced corrosion, the effective film was that derived from the sol having a pH near the isoelectric point in the positive zeta potential region. The following four factors played an important role in assembling the protective PZS coating films: (1) a proper rate of condensation, (2) a moderate ratio of Si-O-Si to Si-O-Zr linkages formed in the PZS network, (3) hydrophobic characteristics, and (4) a specific microstructural geometry, in which large fractal clusters were linked together.

  9. Fractal polyzirconosiloxane cluster coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1992-01-01

    Fractal polyzirconosiloxane (PZS) cluster films were prepared through the hydrolysis-polycondensation-pyrolysis synthesis of two-step HCl acid-NaOH base catalyzed sol precursors consisting of N-(3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazole, Zr(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4}, methanol, and water. When amorphous PZSs were applied to aluminum as protective coatings against NaCl-induced corrosion, the effective film was that derived from the sol having a pH near the isoelectric point in the positive zeta potential region. The following four factors played an important role in assembling the protective PZS coating films: (1) a proper rate of condensation, (2) a moderate ratio of Si-O-Si to Si-O-Zr linkages formed in the PZS network, (3) hydrophobic characteristics, and (4) a specific microstructural geometry, in which large fractal clusters were linked together.

  10. Fractal surface finish

    SciTech Connect

    Church, E.L.

    1988-04-15

    Surface finish measurements are usually fitted to models of the finish correlation function which are parametrized in terms of root-mean-square roughnesses, sigma, and correlation lengths, l. Highly finished optical surfaces, however, are frequently better described by fractal models, which involve inverse power-law spectra and are parametrized by spectral strengths, K/sub n/, and spectral indices, n. Analyzing measurements of fractal surfaces in terms of sigma and l gives results which are not intrinsic surface parameters but which depend on the bandwidth parameters of the measurement process used. This paper derives expressions for these pseudoparameters and discusses the errors involved in using them for the characterization and specification of surface finish.

  11. Fractal surface finish

    SciTech Connect

    Church, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    Surface finish measurements are usually fitted to models of the finish correlation function which are parameterized in terms of root-mean-square roughness, sigma, and correlation lengths, l. Highly-finished optical surfaces, however, are frequently better described by fractal models, which involve inverse-power-law spectra and are parameterized by spectral strengths, K/sub n/, and spectral indices, n. Analyzing measurements of fractal surfaces in terms of sigma and l gives results which are not intrinsic surface parameters but which depend on the bandwidth parameters of the measurement process used. This paper derives expressions for these pseudo parameters and discusses the errors involved in using them for the characterization and specification of surface finish. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Langevin Equation on Fractal Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satin, Seema; Gangal, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze random motion of a particle on a fractal curve, using Langevin approach. This involves defining a new velocity in terms of mass of the fractal curve, as defined in recent work. The geometry of the fractal curve, plays an important role in this analysis. A Langevin equation with a particular model of noise is proposed and solved using techniques of the Fα-Calculus.

  13. Fractal multifiber microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Lee M.; Feller, W. B.; Kenter, Almus T.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and performance of microchannel plates (MCPs) made using fractal tiling mehtods are reviewed. MCPs with 40 mm active areas having near-perfect channel ordering were produced. These plates demonstrated electrical performance characteristics equivalent to conventionally constructed MCPs. These apparently are the first MCPs which have a sufficiently high degree of order to permit single channel addressability. Potential applications for these devices and the prospects for further development are discussed.

  14. Fractals and humor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Demetri

    2015-03-01

    Demetri Maritn prepared this palindromic poem as his project for Michael Frame's fractal geometry class at Yale. Notice the first, fourth, and seventh words in the second and next-to-second lines are palindromes, the first two and last two lines are palindromes, the middle line, "Be still if I fill its ebb" minus its last letter is a palindrome, and the entire poem is a palindrome...

  15. Fractal Properties in Economics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    field of science, econophysics , was established recently in 1997 [2, 3]. This is a study of economic phenomena based on the methods and approaches of...physics. Among 244 many topics in econophysics there are three topics that are closely related to the study of fractals. They are price changes in open...prices, J. of Bussiness (Chicago) 36 (1963) pp.3 9 4 -4 19 . 2. J. Kertesz and 1. Kondor (Eds.), Econophysics : an emerging science (Kluwer Academic

  16. Fractal geometry of some Martian lava flow margins: Alba Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauhanen, K.

    1993-01-01

    Fractal dimension for a few lava flow margins on the gently sloping flanks of Alba Patera were measured using the structured walk method. Fractal behavior was observed at scales ranging from 20 to 100 pixels. The upper limit of the linear part of log(margin length) vs. log(scale) profile correlated well to the margin length. The lower limit depended on resolution and flow properties.

  17. Tissue as a self-organizing system with fractal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, P; Konarski, J

    2001-01-01

    Cell is a supramolecular dynamic network. Screening of tissue-specific cDNA library and results of Relative RT-PCR indicate that the relationship between genotype, (i.e., dynamic network of genes and their protein regulatory elements) and phenotype is non-bijective, and mendelian inheritance is a special case only. This implies non-linearity, complexity, and quasi-determinism, (i.e., co-existence of deterministic and non-deterministic events) of dynamic cellular network; prerequisite conditions for the existence of fractal structure. Indeed, the box counting method reveals that morphological patterns of the higher order, such as gland-like structures or populations of differentiating cancer cells possess fractal dimension and self-similarity. Since fractal space is not filled out randomly, a variety of morphological patterns of functional states arises. The expansion coefficient characterizes evolution of fractal dynamics. The coefficient indicates what kind of interactions occurs between cells, and how far from the limiting integer dimension of the Euclidean space the expanding population of cells is. We conclude that cellular phenomena occur in the fractal space; aggregation of cells is a supracollective phenomenon (expansion coefficient > 0), and differentiation is a collective one (expansion coefficient < 0). Fractal dimension or self-similarity are lost during tumor progression. The existence of fractal structure in a complex tissue system denotes that dynamic cellular phenomena generate an attractor with the appropriate organization of space-time. And vice versa, this attractor sets up physical limits for cellular phenomena during their interactions with various fields. This relationship can help to understand the emergence of extraterrestial forms of life. Although those forms can be composed of non-carbon molecules, fractal structure appears to be the common feature of all interactive biosystems.

  18. Darwinian Evolution and Fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Paul H.

    2009-05-01

    Did nature's beauty emerge by chance or was it intelligently designed? Richard Dawkins asserts that evolution is blind aimless chance. Michael Behe believes, on the contrary, that the first cell was intelligently designed. The scientific evidence is that nature's creativity arises from the interplay between chance AND design (laws). Darwin's ``Origin of the Species,'' published 150 years ago in 1859, characterized evolution as the interplay between variations (symbolized by dice) and the natural selection law (design). This is evident in recent discoveries in DNA, Madelbrot's Fractal Geometry of Nature, and the success of the genetic design algorithm. Algorithms for generating fractals have the same interplay between randomness and law as evolution. Fractal statistics, which are not completely random, characterize such phenomena such as fluctuations in the stock market, the Nile River, rainfall, and tree rings. As chaos theorist Joseph Ford put it: God plays dice, but the dice are loaded. Thus Darwin, in discovering the evolutionary interplay between variations and natural selection, was throwing God's dice!

  19. Dimension of fractal basin boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Park, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    In many dynamical systems, multiple attractors coexist for certain parameter ranges. The set of initial conditions that asymptotically approach each attractor is its basin of attraction. These basins can be intertwined on arbitrary small scales. Basin boundary can be either smooth or fractal. Dynamical systems that have fractal basin boundary show final state sensitivity of the initial conditions. A measure of this sensitivity (uncertainty exponent {alpha}) is related to the dimension of the basin boundary d = D - {alpha}, where D is the dimension of the phase space and d is the dimension of the basin boundary. At metamorphosis values of the parameter, there might happen a conversion from smooth to fractal basin boundary (smooth-fractal metamorphosis) or a conversion from fractal to another fractal basin boundary characteristically different from the previous fractal one (fractal-fractal metamorphosis). The dimension changes continuously with the parameter except at the metamorphosis values where the dimension of the basin boundary jumps discontinuously. We chose the Henon map and the forced damped pendulum to investigate this. Scaling of the basin volumes near the metamorphosis values of the parameter is also being studied for the Henon map. Observations are explained analytically by using low dimensional model map.

  20. Investigating Fractal Geometry Using LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses dimensionality in Euclidean geometry. Presents methods to produce fractals using LOGO. Uses the idea of self-similarity. Included are program listings and suggested extension activities. (MVL)

  1. Fractals in biology and medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havlin, S.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Mantegna, R. N.; Ossadnik, S. M.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    Our purpose is to describe some recent progress in applying fractal concepts to systems of relevance to biology and medicine. We review several biological systems characterized by fractal geometry, with a particular focus on the long-range power-law correlations found recently in DNA sequences containing noncoding material. Furthermore, we discuss the finding that the exponent alpha quantifying these long-range correlations ("fractal complexity") is smaller for coding than for noncoding sequences. We also discuss the application of fractal scaling analysis to the dynamics of heartbeat regulation, and report the recent finding that the normal heart is characterized by long-range "anticorrelations" which are absent in the diseased heart.

  2. The near-atomic cryoEM structure of a flexible filamentous plant virus shows homology of its coat protein with nucleoproteins of animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Méndez-López, Eduardo; Lasso, Gorka; Sánchez-Pina, M Amelia; Aranda, Miguel; Valle, Mikel

    2015-12-16

    Flexible filamentous viruses include economically important plant pathogens. Their viral particles contain several hundred copies of a helically arrayed coat protein (CP) protecting a (+)ssRNA. We describe here a structure at 3.9 Å resolution, from electron cryomicroscopy, of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), a representative of the genus Potexvirus (family Alphaflexiviridae). Our results allow modeling of the CP and its interactions with viral RNA. The overall fold of PepMV CP resembles that of nucleoproteins (NPs) from the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae), a group of enveloped (-)ssRNA viruses. The main difference between potexvirus CP and phlebovirus NP is in their C-terminal extensions, which appear to determine the characteristics of the distinct multimeric assemblies - a flexuous, helical rod or a loose ribonucleoprotein. The homology suggests gene transfer between eukaryotic (+) and (-)ssRNA viruses.

  3. The near-atomic cryoEM structure of a flexible filamentous plant virus shows homology of its coat protein with nucleoproteins of animal viruses

    PubMed Central

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Méndez-López, Eduardo; Lasso, Gorka; Sánchez-Pina, M Amelia; Aranda, Miguel; Valle, Mikel

    2015-01-01

    Flexible filamentous viruses include economically important plant pathogens. Their viral particles contain several hundred copies of a helically arrayed coat protein (CP) protecting a (+)ssRNA. We describe here a structure at 3.9 Å resolution, from electron cryomicroscopy, of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), a representative of the genus Potexvirus (family Alphaflexiviridae). Our results allow modeling of the CP and its interactions with viral RNA. The overall fold of PepMV CP resembles that of nucleoproteins (NPs) from the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae), a group of enveloped (-)ssRNA viruses. The main difference between potexvirus CP and phlebovirus NP is in their C-terminal extensions, which appear to determine the characteristics of the distinct multimeric assemblies – a flexuous, helical rod or a loose ribonucleoprotein. The homology suggests gene transfer between eukaryotic (+) and (-)ssRNA viruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11795.001 PMID:26673077

  4. Titin strain contributes to the Frank–Starling law of the heart by structural rearrangements of both thin- and thick-filament proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Mou, Younss; Hsu, Karen; Farman, Gerrie P.; Kumar, Mohit; Greaser, Marion L.; Irving, Thomas C.; de Tombe, Pieter P.

    2016-01-01

    The Frank–Starling mechanism of the heart is due, in part, to modulation of myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by sarcomere length (SL) [length-dependent activation (LDA)]. The molecular mechanism(s) that underlie LDA are unknown. Recent evidence has implicated the giant protein titin in this cellular process, possibly by positioning the myosin head closer to actin. To clarify the role of titin strain in LDA, we isolated myocardium from either WT or homozygous mutant (HM) rats that express a giant splice isoform of titin, and subjected the muscles to stretch from 2.0 to 2.4 μm of SL. Upon stretch, HM compared with WT muscles displayed reduced passive force, twitch force, and myofilament LDA. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray diffraction measurements of WT twitching muscles during diastole revealed stretch-induced increases in the intensity of myosin (M2 and M6) and troponin (Tn3) reflections, as well as a reduction in cross-bridge radial spacing. Independent fluorescent probe analyses in relaxed permeabilized myocytes corroborated these findings. X-ray electron density reconstruction revealed increased mass/ordering in both thick and thin filaments. The SL-dependent changes in structure observed in WT myocardium were absent in HM myocardium. Overall, our results reveal a correlation between titin strain and the Frank–Starling mechanism. The molecular basis underlying this phenomenon appears not to involve interfilament spacing or movement of myosin toward actin but, rather, sarcomere stretch-induced simultaneous structural rearrangements within both thin and thick filaments that correlate with titin strain and myofilament LDA. PMID:26858417

  5. Titin strain contributes to the Frank-Starling law of the heart by structural rearrangements of both thin- and thick-filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Ait-Mou, Younss; Hsu, Karen; Farman, Gerrie P; Kumar, Mohit; Greaser, Marion L; Irving, Thomas C; de Tombe, Pieter P

    2016-02-23

    The Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart is due, in part, to modulation of myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity by sarcomere length (SL) [length-dependent activation (LDA)]. The molecular mechanism(s) that underlie LDA are unknown. Recent evidence has implicated the giant protein titin in this cellular process, possibly by positioning the myosin head closer to actin. To clarify the role of titin strain in LDA, we isolated myocardium from either WT or homozygous mutant (HM) rats that express a giant splice isoform of titin, and subjected the muscles to stretch from 2.0 to 2.4 μm of SL. Upon stretch, HM compared with WT muscles displayed reduced passive force, twitch force, and myofilament LDA. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray diffraction measurements of WT twitching muscles during diastole revealed stretch-induced increases in the intensity of myosin (M2 and M6) and troponin (Tn3) reflections, as well as a reduction in cross-bridge radial spacing. Independent fluorescent probe analyses in relaxed permeabilized myocytes corroborated these findings. X-ray electron density reconstruction revealed increased mass/ordering in both thick and thin filaments. The SL-dependent changes in structure observed in WT myocardium were absent in HM myocardium. Overall, our results reveal a correlation between titin strain and the Frank-Starling mechanism. The molecular basis underlying this phenomenon appears not to involve interfilament spacing or movement of myosin toward actin but, rather, sarcomere stretch-induced simultaneous structural rearrangements within both thin and thick filaments that correlate with titin strain and myofilament LDA.

  6. Titin strain contributes to the Frank–Starling law of the heart by structural rearrangements of both thin- and thick-filament proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ait-Mou, Younss; Hsu, Karen; Farman, Gerrie P.; Kumar, Mohit; Greaser, Marion L.; Irving, Thomas C.; de Tombe, Pieter P.

    2016-02-08

    The Frank–Starling mechanism of the heart is due, in part, to modulation of myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by sarcomere length (SL) [length-dependent activation (LDA)]. The molecular mechanism(s) that underlie LDA are unknown. Recent evidence has implicated the giant protein titin in this cellular process, possibly by positioning the myosin head closer to actin. To clarify the role of titin strain in LDA, we isolated myocardium from either WT or homozygous mutant (HM) rats that express a giant splice isoform of titin, and subjected the muscles to stretch from 2.0 to 2.4 μm of SL. Upon stretch, HM compared with WT muscles displayed reduced passive force, twitch force, and myofilament LDA. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray diffraction measurements of WT twitching muscles during diastole revealed stretch-induced increases in the intensity of myosin (M2 and M6) and troponin (Tn3) reflections, as well as a reduction in cross-bridge radial spacing. Independent fluorescent probe analyses in relaxed permeabilized myocytes corroborated these findings. X-ray electron density reconstruction revealed increased mass/ordering in both thick and thin filaments. The SL-dependent changes in structure observed in WT myocardium were absent in HM myocardium. Overall, our results reveal a correlation between titin strain and the Frank–Starling mechanism. The molecular basis underlying this phenomenon appears not to involve interfilament spacing or movement of myosin toward actin but, rather, sarcomere stretch-induced simultaneous structural rearrangements within both thin and thick filaments that correlate with titin strain and myofilament LDA.

  7. Titin strain contributes to the Frank–Starling law of the heart by structural rearrangements of both thin- and thick-filament proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Ait-Mou, Younss; Hsu, Karen; Farman, Gerrie P.; ...

    2016-02-08

    The Frank–Starling mechanism of the heart is due, in part, to modulation of myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by sarcomere length (SL) [length-dependent activation (LDA)]. The molecular mechanism(s) that underlie LDA are unknown. Recent evidence has implicated the giant protein titin in this cellular process, possibly by positioning the myosin head closer to actin. To clarify the role of titin strain in LDA, we isolated myocardium from either WT or homozygous mutant (HM) rats that express a giant splice isoform of titin, and subjected the muscles to stretch from 2.0 to 2.4 μm of SL. Upon stretch, HM compared with WT musclesmore » displayed reduced passive force, twitch force, and myofilament LDA. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray diffraction measurements of WT twitching muscles during diastole revealed stretch-induced increases in the intensity of myosin (M2 and M6) and troponin (Tn3) reflections, as well as a reduction in cross-bridge radial spacing. Independent fluorescent probe analyses in relaxed permeabilized myocytes corroborated these findings. X-ray electron density reconstruction revealed increased mass/ordering in both thick and thin filaments. The SL-dependent changes in structure observed in WT myocardium were absent in HM myocardium. Overall, our results reveal a correlation between titin strain and the Frank–Starling mechanism. The molecular basis underlying this phenomenon appears not to involve interfilament spacing or movement of myosin toward actin but, rather, sarcomere stretch-induced simultaneous structural rearrangements within both thin and thick filaments that correlate with titin strain and myofilament LDA.« less

  8. Titin strain contributes to the Frank-Starling law of the heart by structural rearrangements of both thin- and thick-filament proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ait-Mou, Younss; Hsu, Karen; Farman, Gerrie P.; Kumar, Mohit; Greaser, Marion L.; Irving, Thomas C.; de Tombe, Pieter P.

    2016-04-29

    We determined that the Frank–Starling mechanism of the heart is due, in part, to modulation of myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by sarcomere length (SL) [length-dependent activation (LDA)]. The molecular mechanism(s) that underlie LDA are unknown. Recent evidence has implicated the giant protein titin in this cellular process, possibly by positioning the myosin head closer to actin. To clarify the role of titin strain in LDA, we isolated myocardium from either WT or homozygous mutant (HM) rats that express a giant splice isoform of titin, and subjected the muscles to stretch from 2.0 to 2.4 μm of SL. Upon stretch, HM compared with WT muscles displayed reduced passive force, twitch force, and myofilament LDA. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray diffraction measurements of WT twitching muscles during diastole revealed stretch-induced increases in the intensity of myosin (M2 and M6) and troponin (Tn3) reflections, as well as a reduction in cross-bridge radial spacing. Independent fluorescent probe analyses in relaxed permeabilized myocytes corroborated these findings. X-ray electron density reconstruction revealed increased mass/ordering in both thick and thin filaments. The SL-dependent changes in structure observed in WT myocardium were absent in HM myocardium. Our results reveal a correlation between titin strain and the Frank–Starling mechanism. The molecular basis underlying this phenomenon appears not to involve interfilament spacing or movement of myosin toward actin but, rather, sarcomere stretch-induced simultaneous structural rearrangements within both thin and thick filaments that correlate with titin strain and myofilament LDA.

  9. Physical properties of cytoplasmic intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Block, Johanna; Schroeder, Viktor; Pawelzyk, Paul; Willenbacher, Norbert; Köster, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a sophisticated filament system in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes. They form bundles and networks with adapted viscoelastic properties and are strongly interconnected with the other filament types, microfilaments and microtubules. IFs are cell type specific and apart from biochemical functions, they act as mechanical entities to provide stability and resilience to cells and tissues. We review the physical properties of these abundant structural proteins including both in vitro studies and cell experiments. IFs are hierarchical structures and their physical properties seem to a large part be encoded in the very specific architecture of the biopolymers. Thus, we begin our review by presenting the assembly mechanism, followed by the mechanical properties of individual filaments, network and structure formation due to electrostatic interactions, and eventually the mechanics of in vitro and cellular networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  10. Nanoflow over a fractal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, Michail; Frank, Michael; Drikakis, Dimitris

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of surface roughness on nanoflows using molecular dynamics simulations. A fractal model is employed to model wall roughness, and simulations are performed for liquid argon confined by two solid walls. It is shown that the surface roughness reduces the velocity in the proximity of the walls with the reduction being accentuated when increasing the roughness depth and wettability of the solid wall. It also makes the flow three-dimensional and anisotropic. In flows over idealized smooth surfaces, the liquid forms parallel, well-spaced layers, with a significant gap between the first layer and the solid wall. Rough walls distort the orderly distribution of fluid layers resulting in an incoherent formation of irregularly shaped fluid structures around and within the wall cavities.

  11. Temporal fractals in seabird foraging behaviour: diving through the scales of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, Andrew J. J.; Pelletier, Laure; Chiaradia, Andre; Kato, Akiko; Ropert-Coudert, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Animal behaviour exhibits fractal structure in space and time. Fractal properties in animal space-use have been explored extensively under the Lévy flight foraging hypothesis, but studies of behaviour change itself through time are rarer, have typically used shorter sequences generated in the laboratory, and generally lack critical assessment of their results. We thus performed an in-depth analysis of fractal time in binary dive sequences collected via bio-logging from free-ranging little penguins (Eudyptula minor) across full-day foraging trips (216 data points; 4 orders of temporal magnitude). Results from 4 fractal methods show that dive sequences are long-range dependent and persistent across ca. 2 orders of magnitude. This fractal structure correlated with trip length and time spent underwater, but individual traits had little effect. Fractal time is a fundamental characteristic of penguin foraging behaviour, and its investigation is thus a promising avenue for research on interactions between animals and their environments.

  12. Spatial log-periodic oscillations of first-passage observables in fractals.

    PubMed

    Akkermans, Eric; Benichou, Olivier; Dunne, Gerald V; Teplyaev, Alexander; Voituriez, Raphael

    2012-12-01

    For transport processes in geometrically restricted domains, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) admits a general scaling dependence on space parameters for diffusion, anomalous diffusion, and diffusion in disordered or fractal media. For transport in self-similar fractal structures, we obtain an expression for the source-target distance dependence of the MFPT that exhibits both the leading power-law behavior, depending on the Hausdorff and spectral dimension of the fractal, as well as small log-periodic oscillations that are a clear and definitive signal of the underlying fractal structure. We also present refined numerical results for the Sierpinski gasket that confirm this oscillatory behavior.

  13. Tungsten Filament Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  14. Tungsten filament fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-05-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent light bulb is being replaced by compact fluorescent and LED lamps.

  15. The Hydrodynamic Stability of Gaseous Cosmic Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnboim, Yuval; Padnos, Dan; Zinger, Elad

    2016-11-01

    Virial shocks at the edges of cosmic-web structures are a clear prediction of standard structure formation theories. We derive a criterion for the stability of the post-shock gas and of the virial shock itself in spherical, filamentary, and planar infall geometries. When gas cooling is important, we find that shocks become unstable, and gas flows uninterrupted toward the center of the respective halo, filament, or sheet. For filaments, we impose this criterion on self-similar infall solutions. We find that instability is expected for filament masses between 1011 and 1013 {M}⊙ Mpc-1. Using a simplified toy model, we then show that these filaments will likely feed halos with 1010 M ⊙ ≲ M halo ≲ 1013 M ⊙ at redshift z = 3, as well as 1012 M ⊙ ≲ M halo ≲ 1015 M ⊙ at z = 0. The instability will affect the survivability of the filaments as they penetrate gaseous halos in a non-trivial way. Additionally, smaller halos accreting onto non-stable filaments will not be subject to ram pressure inside the filaments. The instreaming gas will continue toward the center and stop either once its angular momentum balances the gravitational attraction, or when its density becomes so high that it becomes self-shielded to radiation.

  16. Applications of fractal geometry to dynamical evolution of sunspots

    SciTech Connect

    Milovanov, A.V.; Zelenyi, L.M. )

    1993-07-01

    A fractal model for sunspot dynamics is presented. Formation of a sunspot in the solar photosphere is considered from the viewpoint of aggregation of magnetic flux tubes on a fractal geometry. Fine structure of the magnetic flux tubes is analyzed for a broad class of non-Maxwellian plasma distribution functions. The sunspot fractal dimension is proved to depend on the parameters of the plasma distribution function, enabling one to investigate intrinsic properties of the solar plasma by means of powerful geometrical methods. Magnetic field dissipation in the tubes is shown to result in effective sunspot decay. Sunspot formation and decay times as well as the diffusion constant [ital K] deduced by using the fractal model, are in a good agreement with observational data. Disappearance of umbras in decaying sunspots is interpreted as a second-order phase transition reminiscent of the transition through the Curie point in ferromagnetics.

  17. Is fractal geometry useful in medicine and biomedical sciences?

    PubMed

    Heymans, O; Fissette, J; Vico, P; Blacher, S; Masset, D; Brouers, F

    2000-03-01

    Fractal geometry has become very useful in the understanding of many phenomena in various fields such as astrophysics, economy or agriculture and recently in medicine. After a brief intuitive introduction to the basis of fractal geometry, the clue is made about the correlation between Df and the complexity or the irregularity of a structure. However, fractal analysis must be applied with certain caution in natural objects such as bio-medical ones. The cardio-vascular system remains one of the most important fields of application of these kinds of approach. Spectral analysis of the R-R interval, morphology of the distal coronary arteries constitute two examples. Other very interesting applications are founded in bacteriology, medical imaging or ophthalmology. In our institution, we apply fractal analysis in order to quantitate angiogenesis and other vascular processes.

  18. Fractal characterization and wettability of ion treated silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. P.; Kumar, Tanuj; Baranwal, V.; Vandana, Kumar, Manvendra; Priya, P. K.; Pandey, S. N.; Mittal, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Fractal characterization of surface morphology can be useful as a tool for tailoring the wetting properties of solid surfaces. In this work, rippled surfaces of Si (100) are grown using 200 keV Ar+ ion beam irradiation at different ion doses. Relationship between fractal and wetting properties of these surfaces are explored. The height-height correlation function extracted from atomic force microscopic images, demonstrates an increase in roughness exponent with an increase in ion doses. A steep variation in contact angle values is found for low fractal dimensions. Roughness exponent and fractal dimensions are found correlated with the static water contact angle measurement. It is observed that after a crossover of the roughness exponent, the surface morphology has a rippled structure. Larger values of interface width indicate the larger ripples on the surface. The contact angle of water drops on such surfaces is observed to be lowest. Autocorrelation function is used for the measurement of ripple wavelength.

  19. Fern leaves and cauliflower curds are not fractals.

    PubMed

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2012-05-01

    The popular demonstration of drawing a mature fern leaf as expressed by Barnsley's fractal method is mathematically and visually very attractive but anatomically and developmentally misleading, and thus has limited, if any, biological significance. The same is true for the fractal demonstration of the external features of cauliflower curds. Actual fern leaves and cauliflower curds have a very small number of anatomically variable and non-iterating bifurcations, which superficially look self-similar, but do not allow for scaling down of their structure as real fractals do. Moreover, fern leaves and cauliflower curds develop from the inside out through a process totally different from fractal drawing procedures. The above cases demonstrate a general problem of using mathematical tools to investigate or illustrate biological phenomena in an irrelevant manner. A realistic set of mathematical equations to describe fern leaf or cauliflower curd development is needed.

  20. Fractal based curves in musical creativity: A critical annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgaki, Anastasia; Tsolakis, Christos

    In this article we examine fractal curves and synthesis algorithms in musical composition and research. First we trace the evolution of different approaches for the use of fractals in music since the 80's by a literature review. Furthermore, we review representative fractal algorithms and platforms that implement them. Properties such as self-similarity (pink noise), correlation, memory (related to the notion of Brownian motion) or non correlation at multiple levels (white noise), can be used to develop hierarchy of criteria for analyzing different layers of musical structure. L-systems can be applied in the modelling of melody in different musical cultures as well as in the investigation of musical perception principles. Finally, we propose a critical investigation approach for the use of artificial or natural fractal curves in systematic musicology.

  1. Fractal analysis: methodologies for biomedical researchers.

    PubMed

    Ristanović, Dusan; Milosević, Nebojsa T

    2012-01-01

    Fractal analysis has become a popular method in all branches of scientific investigations including biology and medicine. Although there is a growing interest in the application of fractal analysis in biological sciences, questions about the methodology of fractal analysis have partly restricted its wider and comprehensible application. It is a notable fact that fractal analysis is derived from fractal geometry, but there are some unresolved issues that need to be addressed. In this respect, we discuss several related underlying principles for fractal analysis and establish the meaningful relationship between fractal analysis and fractal geometry. Since some concepts in fractal analysis are determined descriptively and/or qualitatively, this paper provides their exact mathematical definitions or explanations. Another aim of this study is to show that nowadays fractal analysis is an independent mathematical and experimental method based on Mandelbrot's fractal geometry, Euclidean traditiontal geometry and Richardson's coastline method.

  2. COMPLEX FLARE DYNAMICS INITIATED BY A FILAMENT–FILAMENT INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Chunming; McAteer, R. T. James; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; Sun, Xudong

    2015-11-01

    We report on an eruption involving a relatively rare filament–filament interaction on 2013 June 21, observed by SDO and STEREO-B. The two filaments were separated in height with a “double-decker” configuration. The eruption of the lower filament began simultaneously with a descent of the upper filament, resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction was accompanied by the heating of surrounding plasma and an apparent crossing of a loop-like structure through the upper filament. The subsequent coalescence of the filaments drove a bright front ahead of the erupting structures. The whole process was associated with a C3.0 flare followed immediately by an M2.9 flare. Shrinking loops and descending dark voids were observed during the M2.9 flare at different locations above a C-shaped flare arcade as part of the energy release, giving us unique insight into the flare dynamics.

  3. Comparison analysis of fractal characteristics for tight sandstones using different calculation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyang; Wu, Caifang; Li, Teng

    2017-02-01

    The micropore structure of a tight sandstone is the decisive factor in determining its reserve and seepage characteristics. An accurate description of the pore structures and a complete characterization of the gas-water permeability are critical when exploring for tight sandstone gas. One simple and effective way to quantitatively characterize the heterogeneity and complexity of the pore structures in a low permeability reservoir is the fractal dimension. In this study, three different methods, each utilizing mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) data, were adopted to analyze the fractal dimensions and the fractal curves of sandstones from the no. 8 layer of the Xiashihezi Formation (He 8 member) in the Linxing block, dated from the Middle Permian. The morphological features of the fractal curves, the characteristics of the fractal dimensions and the theoretical differences between these three methods were also discussed. The results show that the fractal dimensions obtained by method I reflect the characteristics of the remaining pores that are not intruded by mercury, and they show that the involved pore scales are more comprehensive. While in methods II and III, both obtain the fractal dimensions of the pores intruded by mercury, the difference between them is in the selection of a simplified pore shape model, which results in the fractal dimensions differing by a value of 1 between them. No matter which method is adopted, the pore structures of tight sandstone reservoirs in the Linxing block exhibit fractal characteristics. However, the fractal dimensions obtained by method I are more suitable for describing the complexity and petrophysical properties of the tight sandstone pores in the He 8 member of the Linxing block. The fractal curves obtained by different methods are consistent to a certain extent in terms of morphological changes. Small pores (fractal characteristics, while large pores (>r max-point) are the critical

  4. Mechanics of vimentin intermediate filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ning; Stamenovic, Dimitrijie

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly evident that the cytoskeleton of living cells plays important roles in mechanical and biological functions of the cells. Here we focus on the contribution of intermediate filaments (IFs) to the mechanical behaviors of living cells. Vimentin, a major structural component of IFs in many cell types, is shown to play an important role in vital mechanical and biological functions such as cell contractility, migration, stiffness, stiffening, and proliferation.

  5. A Double-Minded Fractal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a fun activity of generating a double-minded fractal image for a linear algebra class once the idea of rotation and scaling matrices are introduced. In particular the fractal flip-flops between two words, depending on the level at which the image is viewed. (Contains 5 figures.)

  6. Fractal titanium oxide under inverse 10-ns laser deposition in air and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Aifei; Wang, Wenjun; Mei, Xuesong; Lin, Qijing; Cui, Jianlei; Wang, Kedian; Zhai, Zhaoyang

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents the preparation of different kinds of titanium oxide fractal structures on the surface of titanium by inverse pulsed laser deposition (IPLD) in air and water. In air, two-dimensional fractal structures are obtained with a low pulse energy. However, their branches units are aggregated and nanoscale branches disappear due to the high substrate temperature, causing the low fractal dimension of structure. When a higher laser energy is applied, the preformed deposited material forms a porous film, which reduces heat transfer from substrate. Therefore, three-dimensional and one-dimensional fractal structures with nanoscale branches on the topside of the film can be obtained. Then the desired two-dimensional fractal structures with nano-branches are obtained in water due to the water-induced rapid cooling of substrate temperature and plasma shock wave-induced particle's expansion along the surface of substrate. Meanwhile, the asymmetry of fractal structure units analyzed by diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model is caused by the difference of the distance between the initial deposited particles. In addition, when the pulse energy goes up to 111 mJ, the branches of two-dimensional fractal structure units are also aggregated and form isolated particles. The idea about modification of substrate temperature and water can guide the preparation of the desired titanium oxide fractal structures in pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is also applicable to other materials.

  7. Fractals analysis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohammed

    2005-09-06

    Heart rhythms are generated by complex self-regulating systems governed by the laws of chaos. Consequently, heart rhythms have fractal organization, characterized by self-similar dynamics with long-range order operating over multiple time scales. This allows for the self-organization and adaptability of heart rhythms under stress. Breakdown of this fractal organization into excessive order or uncorrelated randomness leads to a less-adaptable system, characteristic of aging and disease. With the tools of nonlinear dynamics, this fractal breakdown can be quantified with potential applications to diagnostic and prognostic clinical assessment. In this paper, I review the methodologies for fractal analysis of cardiac rhythms and the current literature on their applications in the clinical context. A brief overview of the basic mathematics of fractals is also included. Furthermore, I illustrate the usefulness of these powerful tools to clinical medicine by describing a novel noninvasive technique to monitor drug therapy in atrial fibrillation.

  8. The Three-Point Sinuosity Method for Calculating the Fractal Dimension of Machined Surface Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuankai; Li, Yan; Zhu, Hua; Zuo, Xue; Yang, Jianhua

    2015-04-01

    The three-point sinuosity (TPS) method is proposed to calculate the fractal dimension of surface profile accurately. In this method, a new measure, TPS is defined to present the structural complexity of fractal curves, and has been proved to follow the power law. Thus, the fractal dimension can be calculated through the slope of the fitted line in the log-log plot. The Weierstrass-Mandelbrot (W-M) fractal curves, as well as the real surface profiles obtained by grinding, sand blasting and turning, are used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The calculation values are compared to those obtained from root-mean-square (RMS) method, box-counting (BC) method and variation method. The results show that the TPS method has the widest scaling region, the least fit error and the highest accuracy among the methods examined, which demonstrates that the fractal characteristics of the fractal curves can be well revealed by the proposed method.

  9. Analysis of Fractional Flow for Transient Two-Phase Flow in Fractal Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ting; Duan, Yonggang; Fang, Quantang; Dai, Xiaolu; Wu, Jinsui

    2016-03-01

    Prediction of fractional flow in fractal porous medium is important for reservoir engineering and chemical engineering as well as hydrology. A physical conceptual fractional flow model of transient two-phase flow is developed in fractal porous medium based on the fractal characteristics of pore-size distribution and on the approximation that porous medium consist of a bundle of tortuous capillaries. The analytical expression for fractional flow for wetting phase is presented, and the proposed expression is the function of structural parameters (such as tortuosity fractal dimension, pore fractal dimension, maximum and minimum diameters of capillaries) and fluid properties (such as contact angle, viscosity and interfacial tension) in fractal porous medium. The sensitive parameters that influence fractional flow and its derivative are formulated, and their impacts on fractional flow are discussed.

  10. Production, characterization, and modeling of mineral filled polypropylene filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Brian Robert

    1999-11-01

    filaments increased with the increase in concentration of filler. The tensile tenacity, strain, and modulus were modeled with current composite models for particulate filled composites. The tenacity and strain models did not accurately predict the properties of the filaments, while the modulus models were more accurate, perhaps because the agglomerations of filler did not affect the modulus as much as it affected the tenacity and strain of the filaments. Production, characterization, and modeling of these filaments indicates that there are many areas for improvements, such as improved mixing of the filler and polypropylene, increased adhesion between matrix and filler, and decreased agglomerations of filler. Mechanically, these filaments can not match the properties of bone. However, they do have many structural similarities at the micro-mechanical level, so with some improvements in properties these filaments may be suitable models for modeling bone behavior.

  11. Fractal Risk Assessment of ISS Propulsion Module in Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mog, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    A unique and innovative risk assessment of the International Space Station (ISS) Propulsion Module is conducted using fractal modeling of the Module's response to the meteoroid and orbital debris environments. Both the environment models and structural failure modes due to the resultant hypervelocity impact phenomenology, as well as Module geometry, are investigated for fractal applicability. The fractal risk assessment methodology could produce a greatly simplified alternative to current methodologies, such as BUMPER analyses, while maintaining or increasing the number of complex scenarios that can be assessed. As a minimum, this innovative fractal approach will provide an independent assessment of existing methodologies in a unique way.

  12. Intrinsic half-metallicity in fractal carbon nitride honeycomb lattices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aizhu; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-09-14

    Fractals are natural phenomena that exhibit a repeating pattern "exactly the same at every scale or nearly the same at different scales". Defect-free molecular fractals were assembled successfully in a recent work [Shang et al., Nature Chem., 2015, 7, 389-393]. Here, we adopted the feature of a repeating pattern in searching two-dimensional (2D) materials with intrinsic half-metallicity and high stability that are desirable for spintronics applications. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that the electronic properties of fractal frameworks of carbon nitrides have stable ferromagnetism accompanied by half-metallicity, which are highly dependent on the fractal structure. The ferromagnetism increases gradually with the increase of fractal order. The Curie temperature of these metal-free systems estimated from Monte Carlo simulations is considerably higher than room temperature. The stable ferromagnetism, intrinsic half-metallicity, and fractal characteristics of spin distribution in the carbon nitride frameworks open an avenue for the design of metal-free magnetic materials with exotic properties.

  13. Fractal analysis of lumbar vertebral cancellous bone architecture.

    PubMed

    Feltrin, G P; Macchi, V; Saccavini, C; Tosi, E; Dus, C; Fassina, A; Parenti, A; De Caro, R

    2001-11-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by bone mineral density (BMD) decreasing and spongy bone rearrangement with consequent loss of elasticity and increased bone fragility. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) quantifies bone mineral content but does not describe spongy architecture. Analysis of trabecular pattern may provide additional information to evaluate osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether the fractal analysis of the microradiography of lumbar vertebrae provides a reliable assessment of bone texture, which correlates with the BMD. The lumbar segment of the spine was removed from 22 cadavers with no history of back pain and examined with standard x-ray, traditional tomography, and quantitative computed tomography to measure BMD. The fractal dimension, which quantifies the image fractal complexity, was calculated on microradiographs of axial sections of the fourth lumbar vertebra to determine its characteristic spongy network. The relationship between the values of the BMD and those of the fractal dimension was evaluated by linear regression and a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.96) was found. These findings suggest that the application of fractal analysis to radiological analyses can provide valuable information on the trabecular pattern of vertebrae. Thus, fractal dimensions of trabecular bone structure should be considered as a supplement to BMD evaluation in the assessment of osteoporosis.

  14. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  15. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A. H.; Flores-Johnson, E. A.; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  16. Fractal Tempo Fluctuation and Pulse Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Summer K.; Large, Edward W.; Fink, Philip W.

    2010-01-01

    WE INVESTIGATED PEOPLES’ ABILITY TO ADAPT TO THE fluctuating tempi of music performance. In Experiment 1, four pieces from different musical styles were chosen, and performances were recorded from a skilled pianist who was instructed to play with natural expression. Spectral and rescaled range analyses on interbeat interval time-series revealed long-range (1/f type) serial correlations and fractal scaling in each piece. Stimuli for Experiment 2 included two of the performances from Experiment 1, with mechanical versions serving as controls. Participants tapped the beat at ¼- and ⅛-note metrical levels, successfully adapting to large tempo fluctuations in both performances. Participants predicted the structured tempo fluctuations, with superior performance at the ¼-note level. Thus, listeners may exploit long-range correlations and fractal scaling to predict tempo changes in music. PMID:25190901

  17. Bone fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Feltrin, Gian Pietro; Stramare, Roberto; Miotto, Diego; Giacomini, Dario; Saccavini, Claudio

    2004-06-01

    Fractal analysis is a quantitative method used to evaluate complex anatomic findings in their elementary component. Its application to biologic images, particularly to cancellous bones, has been well practiced within the past few years. The aims of these applications are to assess changes in bone and the loss of spongious architecture, indicate bone fragility, and to show the increased risk for fracture in primary or secondary osteoporosis. The applications are very promising to help complete the studies that can define bone density (bone mineral density by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry or quantitative computed tomography), and also have the capacity to distinguish the patients with a high or low risk for fracture. Their extension to the clinical fields, to define a test for fracture risk, is still limited by difficult application to the medical quantitative imaging of bones, between correct application at superficial bones and unreliable application to deep bones. The future evolution and validity do not depend upon fractal methods but upon well-detailed imaging of the bones in clinical conditions.

  18. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework

    PubMed Central

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a ‘cartoon’ part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the ‘cartoon’ image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts

  19. In situ ellipsometric study of surface immobilization of flagellar filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurunczi, S.; Németh, A.; Hülber, T.; Kozma, P.; Petrik, P.; Jankovics, H.; Sebestyén, A.; Vonderviszt, F.; Fried, M.; Bársony, I.

    2010-10-01

    Protein filaments composed of thousands of subunits are promising candidates as sensing elements in biosensors. In this work in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry is applied to monitor the surface immobilization of flagellar filaments. This study is the first step towards the development of layers of filamentous receptors for sensor applications. Surface activation is performed using silanization and a subsequent glutaraldehyde crosslinking. Structure of the flagellar filament layers immobilized on activated and non-activated Si wafer substrates is determined using a two-layer effective medium model that accounted for the vertical density distribution of flagellar filaments with lengths of 300-1500 nm bound to the surface. The formation of the first interface layer can be explained by the multipoint covalent attachment of the filaments, while the second layer is mainly composed of tail pinned filaments floating upwards with the free parts. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy, covalent immobilization resulted in an increased surface density compared to absorption.

  20. The Dark Matter filament between Abell 222/223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Jörg P.; Werner, Norbert; Clowe, Douglas; Finoguenov, Alexis; Kitching, Tom; Miller, Lance; Simionescu, Aurora

    2016-10-01

    Weak lensing detections and measurements of filaments have been elusive for a long time. The reason is that the low density contrast of filaments generally pushes the weak lensing signal to unobservably low scales. To nevertheless map the dark matter in filaments exquisite data and unusual systems are necessary. SuprimeCam observations of the supercluster system Abell 222/223 provided the required combination of excellent seeing images and a fortuitous alignment of the filament with the line-of-sight. This boosted the lensing signal to a detectable level and led to the first weak lensing mass measurement of a large-scale structure filament. The filament connecting Abell 222 and Abell 223 is now the only one traced by the galaxy distribution, dark matter, and X-ray emission from the hottest phase of the warm-hot intergalactic medium. The combination of these data allows us to put the first constraints on the hot gas fraction in filaments.

  1. Snake Filament Eruption

    NASA Video Gallery

    A very long solar filament that had been snaking around the Sun erupted on Dec. 6, 2010 with a flourish. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) caught the action in dramatic detail in extreme ultr...

  2. Target Detection Using Fractal Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, J. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The concepts and theory of fractal geometry were applied to the problem of segmenting a 256 x 256 pixel image so that manmade objects could be extracted from natural backgrounds. The two most important measurements necessary to extract these manmade objects were fractal dimension and lacunarity. Provision was made to pass the manmade portion to a lookup table for subsequent identification. A computer program was written to construct cloud backgrounds of fractal dimensions which were allowed to vary between 2.2 and 2.8. Images of three model space targets were combined with these backgrounds to provide a data set for testing the validity of the approach. Once the data set was constructed, computer programs were written to extract estimates of the fractal dimension and lacunarity on 4 x 4 pixel subsets of the image. It was shown that for clouds of fractal dimension 2.7 or less, appropriate thresholding on fractal dimension and lacunarity yielded a 64 x 64 edge-detected image with all or most of the cloud background removed. These images were enhanced by an erosion and dilation to provide the final image passed to the lookup table. While the ultimate goal was to pass the final image to a neural network for identification, this work shows the applicability of fractal geometry to the problems of image segmentation, edge detection and separating a target of interest from a natural background.

  3. Fractal markets: Liquidity and investors on different time horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da-Ye; Nishimura, Yusaku; Men, Ming

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new agent-based model to study the source of liquidity and the “emergent” phenomenon in financial market with fractal structure. The model rests on fractal market hypothesis and agents with different time horizons of investments. What is interesting is that though the agent-based model reveals that the interaction between these heterogeneous agents affects the stability and liquidity of the financial market the real world market lacks detailed data to bring it to light since it is difficult to identify and distinguish the investors with different time horizons in the empirical approach. results show that in a relatively short period of time fractal market provides liquidity from investors with different horizons and the market gains stability when the market structure changes from uniformity to diversification. In the real world the fractal structure with the finite of horizons can only stabilize the market within limits. With the finite maximum horizons, the greater diversity of the investors and the fractal structure will not necessarily bring more stability to the market which might come with greater fluctuation in large time scale.

  4. Reinforcement of rubber by fractal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, T. A.; Rubinstein, M.; Colby, R. H.

    1993-03-01

    Rubber is commonly reinforced with colloidal aggregates of carbon or silica, whose structure has the scale invariance of a fractal object. Reinforced rubbers support large stresses, which often grow faster than linearly with the strain. We argue that under strong elongation the stress arises through lateral compression of the aggregates, driven by the large bulk modulus of the rubber. We derive a power-law relationship between stress and elongation λ when λgg 1. The predicted power p depends on the fractal dimension D and a second structural scaling exponent C. For diffusion-controlled aggregates this power p should lie beween 0.9 and 1.1 ; for reaction-controlled aggregates p should lie between 1.8 and 2.4. For uniaxial compression the analogous powers lie near 4. Practical rubbers filled with fractal aggregates should approach the conditions of validity for these scaling laws. On renforce souvent le caoutchouc avec des agrégats de carbone ou de silice dont la structure a l'invariance par dilatation d'un objet fractal. Les caoutchoucs ainsi renforcés supportent de grandes contraintes qui croissent souvent plus vite que l'élongation. Nous prétendons que, sous élongation forte, cette contrainte apparaît à cause d'une compression latérale des agrégats induite par le module volumique important du caoutchouc. Nous établissons une loi de puissance reliant la contrainte et l'élongation λ quand λgg 1. Cet exposant p dépend de la dimension fractale D et d'un deuxième exposant structural C. Pour des agrégats dont la cinétique de formation est limitée par diffusion, p vaut entre 0,9 et 1,1. Si la cinétique est limitée par le soudage local des particules, p vaut entre 1,8 et 2,4. Sous compression uniaxiale, les puissances homologues valent environ 4. Des caoutchoucs pratiques chargés de tels agrégats devraient approcher des conditions où ces lois d'échelle sont valables.

  5. Exterior dimension of fat fractals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebogi, C.; Mcdonald, S. W.; Ott, E.; Yorke, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Geometric scaling properties of fat fractal sets (fractals with finite volume) are discussed and characterized via the introduction of a new dimension-like quantity which is called the exterior dimension. In addition, it is shown that the exterior dimension is related to the 'uncertainty exponent' previously used in studies of fractal basin boundaries, and it is shown how this connection can be exploited to determine the exterior dimension. Three illustrative applications are described, two in nonlinear dynamics and one dealing with blood flow in the body. Possible relevance to porous materials and ballistic driven aggregation is also noted.

  6. The transience of virtual fractals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R P

    2012-01-01

    Artists have a long and fruitful tradition of exploiting electronic media to convert static images into dynamic images that evolve with time. Fractal patterns serve as an example: computers allow the observer to zoom in on virtual images and so experience the endless repetition of patterns in a matter that cannot be matched using static images. This year's featured cover artist, Susan Lowedermilk, instead plans to employ persistence of human vision to bring virtual fractals to life. This will be done by incorporating her prints of fractal patterns into zoetropes and phenakistoscopes.

  7. Joint unloading implant modifies subchondral bone trabecular structure in medial knee osteoarthritis: 2-year outcomes of a pilot study using fractal signature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Sode, Miki; Fuerst, Thomas; Block, Jon E

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is largely attributable to chronic excessive and aberrant joint loading. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify radiographic changes in subchondral bone after treatment with a minimally invasive joint unloading implant (KineSpring® Knee Implant System). Methods Nine patients with unilateral medial knee OA resistant to nonsurgical therapy were treated with the KineSpring System and followed for 2 years. Main outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, function, and stiffness subscores and independent core laboratory determinations of joint space width and fractal signature of the tibial cortex. Results WOMAC scores, on average, improved by 92% for pain, 91% for function, and 79% for stiffness over the 2-year follow-up period. Joint space width in the medial compartment of the treated knee significantly increased from 0.9 mm at baseline to 3.1 mm at 2 years; joint space width in the medial compartment of the untreated knee was unchanged. Fractal signatures of the vertically oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment decreased by 2.8% in the treated knee and increased by 2.1% in the untreated knee over 2 years. No statistically significant fractal signature changes were observed in the horizontally oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment or in the horizontal or vertical trabeculae of the lateral compartment in the treated knee. Conclusion Preliminary evidence suggests that the KineSpring System may modify knee OA disease progression by increasing joint space width and improving subchondral bone trabecular integrity, thereby reducing pain and improving joint function. PMID:25670891

  8. Lighting the universe with filaments.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Theuns, Tom

    2007-09-14

    The first stars in the universe form when chemically pristine gas heats as it falls into dark-matter potential wells, cools radiatively because of the formation of molecular hydrogen, and becomes self-gravitating. Using supercomputer simulations, we demonstrated that the stars' properties depend critically on the currently unknown nature of the dark matter. If the dark-matter particles have intrinsic velocities that wipe out small-scale structure, then the first stars form in filaments with lengths on the order of the free-streaming scale, which can be approximately 10(20) meters (approximately 3 kiloparsecs, corresponding to a baryonic mass of approximately 10(7) solar masses) for realistic "warm dark matter" candidates. Fragmentation of the filaments forms stars with a range of masses, which may explain the observed peculiar element abundance pattern of extremely metal-poor stars, whereas coalescence of fragments and stars during the filament's ultimate collapse may seed the supermassive black holes that lurk in the centers of most massive galaxies.

  9. Fractal analysis of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, A. L. D.; Lorite, G. S.; Rodrigues, C. M.; Souza, A. A.; Cotta, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated the growth process of Xylella fastidiosa biofilms inoculated on a glass. The size and the distance between biofilms were analyzed by optical images; a fractal analysis was carried out using scaling concepts and atomic force microscopy images. We observed that different biofilms show similar fractal characteristics, although morphological variations can be identified for different biofilm stages. Two types of structural patterns are suggested from the observed fractal dimensions Df. In the initial and final stages of biofilm formation, Df is 2.73±0.06 and 2.68±0.06, respectively, while in the maturation stage, Df=2.57±0.08. These values suggest that the biofilm growth can be understood as an Eden model in the former case, while diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) seems to dominate the maturation stage. Changes in the correlation length parallel to the surface were also observed; these results were correlated with the biofilm matrix formation, which can hinder nutrient diffusion and thus create conditions to drive DLA growth.

  10. Large broadband visible to infrared plasmonic absorption from Ag nanoparticles with a fractal structure embedded in a Teflon AFxAE matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, A.; Eilers, H.; Hidden, F.; Aktas, O. C.; Kiran, C. V. S.

    2006-01-01

    An unusual almost flat broadband plasmonic absorption, ranging from 400nm to well beyond 2500nm, was observed in a 150nm thin film of Ag nanoparticles embedded in a Teflon AF® matrix. The nanocomposites were synthesized by a simple single-step vapor-phase codeposition method. The Ag nanoparticles of various sizes and shapes, and thus various resonance frequencies, form a fractal percolating network. The broadband absorption, attributed to plasmon excitations within the nanoparticles, could be useful for multicolor applications in the visible and infrared wavelengths region.

  11. The albedo of fractal stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Ridgway, William; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Bell, Thomas L.; Snider, Jack B.

    1994-01-01

    An increase in the planetary albedo of the earth-atmosphere system by only 10% can decrease the equilibrium surface temperature to that of the last ice age. Nevertheless, albedo biases of 10% or greater would be introduced into large regions of current climate models if clouds were given their observed liquid water amounts, because of the treatment of clouds as plane parallel. The focus on marine stratocumulus clouds is due to their important role in cloud radiative forcing and also that, of the wide variety of earth's cloud types, they are most nearly plane parallel, so that they have the least albedo bias. The fractal model employed here reproduces both the probability distribution and the wavenumber spectrum of the stratocumulus liquid water path, as observed during the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE). A single new fractal parameter 0 less than or equal to f less than or equal to 1, is introduced and determined empirically by the variance of the logarithm of the vertically integrated liquid water. The reduced reflectivity of fractal stratocumulus clouds is approximately given by the plane-parallel reflectivity evaluated at a reduced 'effective optical thickness,' which when f = 0.5 is tau(sub eff) approximately equal to 10. Study of the diurnal cycle of stratocumulus liquid water during FIRE leads to a key unexpected result: the plane-parallel albedo bias is largest when the cloud fraction reaches 100%, that is, when any bias associated with the cloud fraction vanishes. This is primarily due to the variability increase with cloud fraction. Thus, the within-cloud fractal structure of stratocumulus has a more significant impact on estimates of its mesoscale-average albedo than does the cloud fraction.

  12. Fractal interrelationship in field and seismic data. Fifth quarterly technical report, March 21--June 21, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.H.; Dominic, J.; Halverson, J.

    1996-12-31

    The primary goal of this study is to evaluate the possibility that the fractal characteristics of reservoir fracture systems might be inferred from the fractal characteristics of the reservoir reflector. Results discussed in the summary below provide support for such a view. The matter will, however, remain unresolved until fracture data acquired from core or FMS logs can be compared to reflection seismic data from the core areas. A series of cross sections along the Middle Mountain syncline and Elkhorn Mountain anticline were evaluated. Near-surface deformation in the Middle Mountain and Elkhorn mountain area of the Valley and Ridge province is significant. In this area the fractal dimension of topography is linearly related to the fractal dimension of underlying structure. Comparison of the fractal variability of Valley and Ridge structures with those observed in seismic data from the Plateau indicate that the increased fractal dimension of reflection events implies greater relative abundance of higher order or smaller wavelength structures. Results from the seismic evaluation suggest that fractal analysis might provide a useful exploration tool in cases where one is interested in locating subtle detached structures or identifying fractured reservoirs. Results from the Valley and a Ridge area suggest that, in active tectonic areas, fractal analysis may provide a means to assess the relative frequency of earthquake activity over time periods that extend beyond the historical record.

  13. Fractal Analyses of Steady Infiltration and Terrain on an Undulating Agricultural Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fractal scaling behaviors have been observed in systems where interacting factors cause nested spatial structures. Surface water infiltration affects spatial patterns of soil water, nutrients, and plant development and crop yield. Here, we explored simple fractal scaling of quasi-steady infiltrati...

  14. Fractal characterization of seepage-pores of coals from China: An investigation on permeability of coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yanbin; Liu, Dameng; Tang, Dazhen; Tang, Shuheng; Huang, Wenhui; Liu, Zhihua; Che, Yao

    2009-06-01

    To better understand the characteristics of seepage-pores (pore radius larger than 100 nanometers) and their influence on the permeability of coals, we have conducted fractal analyses for 34 fresh coal samples (mean maximum vitrinite reflectance Ro,max from 0.43% to 4.21%) from North, Northwest and Northeast China. Mercury porosimetry data indicate that the coals are fractal, with pore radius ranging from 0.1 to 50 μm. Calculated fractal dimensions of these coals range from 2.61 to 2.98, higher than those from other kinds of rocks such as sandstone, shale, and carbonate. The data suggest that the coals have more complicated and inhomogeneous pore structures than other rocks. The fractal dimension has a negative correlation with the petrologic permeability of coals, particularly for higher rank coals (with 1.47-4.21% Ro,max), from which a strong negative linear correlation ( R2=0.85) between fractal dimension and permeability is observed. A 'U-shaped' trend between fractal dimensions and coal ranks is observed, with the minimum fractal dimensions occurring at 1.1-1.3% Ro,max. The sub-bituminous, high volatile bituminous, semi-anthracite, and anthracite have higher fractal dimensions. The effects of coal rank upon fractal dimensions are mainly due to the variety of micropore contents and aromaticity of coals with coalification.

  15. Plasma Brightenings in a Failed Solar Filament Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D.

    2017-03-01

    Failed filament eruptions are solar eruptions that are not associated with coronal mass ejections. In a failed filament eruption, the filament materials usually show some ascending and falling motions as well as generating bright EUV emissions. Here we report a failed filament eruption (SOL2016-07-22) that occurred in a quiet-Sun region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In this event, the filament spreads out but gets confined by the surrounding magnetic field. When interacting with the ambient magnetic field, the filament material brightens up and flows along the magnetic field lines through the corona to the chromosphere. We find that some materials slide down along the lifting magnetic structure containing the filament and impact the chromosphere, and through kinetic energy dissipation, cause two ribbon-like brightenings in a wide temperature range. There is evidence suggesting that magnetic reconnection occurs between the filament magnetic structure and the surrounding magnetic fields where filament plasma is heated to coronal temperatures. In addition, thread-like brightenings show up on top of the erupting magnetic fields at low temperatures, which might be produced by an energy imbalance from a fast drop of radiative cooling due to plasma rarefaction. Thus, this single event of a failed filament eruption shows the existence of a variety of plasma brightenings that may be caused by completely different heating mechanisms.

  16. Thermodynamics of Photons on Fractals

    SciTech Connect

    Akkermans, Eric; Dunne, Gerald V.; Teplyaev, Alexander

    2010-12-03

    A thermodynamical treatment of a massless scalar field (a photon) confined to a fractal spatial manifold leads to an equation of state relating pressure to internal energy, PV{sub s}=U/d{sub s}, where d{sub s} is the spectral dimension and V{sub s} defines the 'spectral volume'. For regular manifolds, V{sub s} coincides with the usual geometric spatial volume, but on a fractal this is not necessarily the case. This is further evidence that on a fractal, momentum space can have a different dimension than position space. Our analysis also provides a natural definition of the vacuum (Casimir) energy of a fractal. We suggest ways that these unusual properties might be probed experimentally.

  17. STARBURST-DRIVEN GALACTIC WINDS: FILAMENT FORMATION AND EMISSION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jackie L.; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2009-09-20

    We have performed a series of three-dimensional simulations of the interaction of a supersonic wind with a nonspherical radiative cloud. These simulations are motivated by our recent three-dimensional model of a starburst-driven galactic wind interacting with an inhomogeneous disk, which shows that an optically emitting filament can be formed by the breakup and acceleration of a cloud into a supersonic wind. In this study, we consider the evolution of a cloud with two different geometries (fractal and spherical) and investigate the importance of radiative cooling on the cloud's survival. We have also undertaken a comprehensive resolution study in order to ascertain the effect of the assumed numerical resolution on the results. We find that the ability of the cloud to radiate heat is crucial for its survival, with a radiative cloud experiencing a lower degree of acceleration and having a higher relative Mach number to the flow than in the adiabatic case. This diminishes the destructive effect of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the cloud. While an adiabatic cloud is destroyed over a short period of time, a radiative cloud is broken up via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability into numerous small, dense cloudlets, which are drawn into the flow to form a filamentary structure. The degree of fragmentation is highly dependent on the resolution of the simulation, with the number of cloudlets formed increasing as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is better resolved. Nevertheless, there is a clear qualitative trend, with the filamentary structure still persistent at high resolution. The geometry of the cloud affects the speed at which the cloud fragments; a wind more rapidly breaks up the cloud in regions of least density. A cloud with a more inhomogeneous density distribution fragments faster than a cloud with a more uniform structure (e.g., a sphere). We confirm the mechanism behind the formation of the Halpha emitting filaments found in our global simulations of a

  18. Steady laminar flow of fractal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Mena, Baltasar; Susarrey, Orlando; Samayoa, Didier

    2017-02-01

    We study laminar flow of a fractal fluid in a cylindrical tube. A flow of the fractal fluid is mapped into a homogeneous flow in a fractional dimensional space with metric induced by the fractal topology. The equations of motion for an incompressible Stokes flow of the Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. It is found that the radial distribution for the velocity in a steady Poiseuille flow of a fractal fluid is governed by the fractal metric of the flow, whereas the pressure distribution along the flow direction depends on the fractal topology of flow, as well as on the fractal metric. The radial distribution of the fractal fluid velocity in a steady Couette flow between two concentric cylinders is also derived.

  19. Applications of fractals in ecology.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, G; M May, R

    1990-03-01

    Fractal models describe the geometry of a wide variety of natural objects such as coastlines, island chains, coral reefs, satellite ocean-color images and patches of vegetation. Cast in the form of modified diffusion models, they can mimic natural and artificial landscapes having different types of complexity of shape. This article provides a brief introduction to fractals and reports on how they can be used by ecologists to answer a variety of basic questions, about scale, measurement and hierarchy in, ecological systems.

  20. Fractal symmetry of protein interior: what have we learned?

    PubMed

    Banerji, Anirban; Ghosh, Indira

    2011-08-01

    The application of fractal dimension-based constructs to probe the protein interior dates back to the development of the concept of fractal dimension itself. Numerous approaches have been tried and tested over a course of (almost) 30 years with the aim of elucidating the various facets of symmetry of self-similarity prevalent in the protein interior. In the last 5 years especially, there has been a startling upsurge of research that innovatively stretches the limits of fractal-based studies to present an array of unexpected results on the biophysical properties of protein interior. In this article, we introduce readers to the fundamentals of fractals, reviewing the commonality (and the lack of it) between these approaches before exploring the patterns in the results that they produced. Clustering the approaches in major schools of protein self-similarity studies, we describe the evolution of fractal dimension-based methodologies. The genealogy of approaches (and results) presented here portrays a clear picture of the contemporary state of fractal-based studies in the context of the protein interior. To underline the utility of fractal dimension-based measures further, we have performed a correlation dimension analysis on all of the available non-redundant protein structures, both at the level of an individual protein and at the level of structural domains. In this investigation, we were able to separately quantify the self-similar symmetries in spatial correlation patterns amongst peptide-dipole units, charged amino acids, residues with the π-electron cloud and hydrophobic amino acids. The results revealed that electrostatic environments in the interiors of proteins belonging to 'α/α toroid' (all-α class) and 'PLP-dependent transferase-like' domains (α/β class) are highly conducive. In contrast, the interiors of 'zinc finger design' ('designed proteins') and 'knottins' ('small proteins') were identified as folds with the least conducive electrostatic

  1. An improved direct-forcing immersed boundary method for fluid-structure interaction of a flexible filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Zhu, Xiaojue

    2012-11-01

    We present an improved immersed boundary method for the simulation of fluid structure interaction (FSI) of a slender body. Our numerical method is based on the one proposed by Wang and Zhang (J. Comput. Phys. 30:3479-3499, 2011). Although an accurate prediction of total force can be achieved by using this method, unphysical spatial oscillation is observed in the force distribution. This oscillation is detrimental to the prediction of structure response in FSI. In this work, several modifications are made to improve this method. Firstly, the implicit forcing is replaced by an explicit forcing. Secondly, a more consistent way of computing each component of the forcing on a staggered mesh is proposed. Thirdly, for a slender body of zero thickness, the discrete delta-function with a ``negative-tail'' is adopted for the interpolation at the endpoints. Numerical simulations are performed to test the efficacy of the modifications. It is found that the measures taken successfully reduce the oscillation and the results obtained agree well with those from the literatures. This work was supported by NSFC 10872201.

  2. Community structure of free-floating filamentous cyanobacterial mats from the Wonder Lake geothermal springs in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Lacap, Donnabella C; Smith, Gavin J D; Warren-Rhodes, Kimberley; Pointing, Stephen B

    2005-07-01

    Cyanobacterial mats were characterized from pools of 45-60 degrees C in near-neutral pH, low-sulphide geothermal springs in the Philippines. Mat structure did not vary with temperature. All mats possessed highly ordered layers of airspaces at both the macroscopic and microscopic level, and these appear to be an adaptation to a free-floating growth habit. Upper mat layers supported biomass with elevated carotenoid:chlorophyll a ratios and an as yet uncharacterized waxy layer on the dorsal surface. Microscopic examination revealed mats comprised a single Fischerella morphotype, with abundant heterocysts throughout mats at all temperatures. Molecular analysis of mat community structure only partly matched morphological identification. All samples supported greater 16S rDNA-defined diversity than morphology suggested, with a progressive loss in the number of genotypes with increasing temperature. Fischerella-like sequences were recovered from mats occurring at all temperatures, but some mats also yielded Oscillatoria-like sequences, although corresponding phenotypes were not observed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Fischerella-like sequences were most closely affiliated with Fischerella major and the Oscillatoria-like sequences with Oscillatoria amphigranulata.

  3. Fractal Variation with Changing Line Length: A Potential Problem for Planetary Lava Flow Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Richard K.; Anderson, Steven W.; McColley, Shawn; Fink, Jonathan H.

    2004-01-01

    Fractals are objects that are generally self similar at all scales. Coastlines, mountains, river systems, planetary orbits and some mathematical objects are all examples of fractals. Bruno et al. used the structured walk model of Richardson to establish that lava flows are fractals and that lava flow morphology could be determined by looking at the fractal dimension of flow margins. They determined that Hawaiian a.a flows have fractal dimensions that range from 1.05 to 1.09 and that the pahoehoe lava flows have a fractal dimension from 1.13 to 1.23. We have analyzed a number of natural and simulated lava flow margins and find that the fractal dimension varies according to the number and length of rod lengths used in the structured walk method. The potential variation we find in our analyses is sufficiently large so that unambiguous determination of lava flow morphology is problematic for some flows. We suggest that the structured walk method can provide meaningful fractal dimensions if rod lengths employed in the analysis provide a best-fit residual of greater than 0.98, as opposed to the 0.95 cutoff used in previous studies. We also find that the use of more than 4 rod lengths per analysis also reduces ambiguity in the results.

  4. Extended Vicsek fractals: Laplacian spectra and their applications.

    PubMed

    Dolgushev, Maxim; Liu, Hongxiao; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2016-11-01

    Extended Vicsek fractals (EVF) are the structures constructed by introducing linear spacers into traditional Vicsek fractals. Here we study the Laplacian spectra of the EVF. In particularly, the recurrence relations for the Laplacian spectra allow us to obtain an analytic expression for the sum of all inverse nonvanishing Laplacian eigenvalues. This quantity characterizes the large-scale properties, such as the gyration radius of the polymeric structures, or the global mean-first passage time for the random walk processes. Introduction of the linear spacers leads to local heterogeneities, which reveal themselves, for example, in the dynamics of EVF under external forces.

  5. Homogenization of spatially dispersive 1D fractal metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeini, Samaneh

    2016-04-01

    A layered uniaxial dielectric structure is considered. The layers in the structure are distributed according to a one-dimensional fractal set. The resulting fractal metamaterial is homogenized with an original source-driven homogenization approach which is suitable for both numerical and analytical calculations. Due to the fact that the considered metamaterial is nonmagnetic, the only effective parameter which needs to be calculated is the effective permittivity dyadic e(ω, k). The effective permittivity is obtained analytically (by using a transfer matrix approach) and numerically (by using a Finite-Difference Time-Domain solver).

  6. Role of Active Contraction and Tropomodulins in Regulating Actin Filament Length and Sarcomere Structure in Developing Zebrafish Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mazelet, Lise; Parker, Matthew O.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Ashworth, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Whilst it is recognized that contraction plays an important part in maintaining the structure and function of mature skeletal muscle, its role during development remains undefined. In this study the role of movement in skeletal muscle maturation was investigated in intact zebrafish embryos using a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches. An immotile mutant line (cacnb1ts25) which lacks functional voltage-gated calcium channels (dihydropyridine receptors) in the muscle and pharmacological immobilization of embryos with a reversible anesthetic (Tricaine), allowed the study of paralysis (in mutants and anesthetized fish) and recovery of movement (reversal of anesthetic treatment). The effect of paralysis in early embryos (aged between 17 and 24 hours post-fertilization, hpf) on skeletal muscle structure at both myofibrillar and myofilament level was determined using both immunostaining with confocal microscopy and small angle X-ray diffraction. The consequences of paralysis and subsequent recovery on the localization of the actin capping proteins Tropomodulin 1 & 4 (Tmod) in fish aged from 17 hpf until 42 hpf was also assessed. The functional consequences of early paralysis were investigated by examining the mechanical properties of the larval muscle. The length-force relationship, active and passive tension, was measured in immotile, recovered and control skeletal muscle at 5 and 7 day post-fertilization (dpf). Recovery of muscle function was also assessed by examining swimming patterns in recovered and control fish. Inhibition of the initial embryonic movements (up to 24 hpf) resulted in an increase in myofibril length and a decrease in width followed by almost complete recovery in both moving and paralyzed fish by 42 hpf. In conclusion, myofibril organization is regulated by a dual mechanism involving movement-dependent and movement-independent processes. The initial contractile event itself drives the localization of Tmod1 to its sarcomeric position

  7. Controlling Molecular Growth between Fractals and Crystals on Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Li, Na; Gu, Gao-Chen; Wang, Hao; Nieckarz, Damian; Szabelski, Paweł; He, Yang; Wang, Yu; Xie, Chao; Shen, Zi-Yong; Lü, Jing-Tao; Tang, Hao; Peng, Lian-Mao; Hou, Shi-Min; Wu, Kai; Wang, Yong-Feng

    2015-12-22

    Recent studies demonstrate that simple functional molecules, which usually form two-dimensional (2D) crystal structures when adsorbed on solid substrates, are also able to self-assemble into ordered openwork fractal aggregates. To direct and control the growth of such fractal supramolecules, it is necessary to explore the conditions under which both fractal and crystalline patterns develop and coexist. In this contribution, we study the coexistence of Sierpiński triangle (ST) fractals and 2D molecular crystals that were formed by 4,4″-dihydroxy-1,1':3',1″-terphenyl molecules on Au(111) in ultrahigh vacuum. Growth competition between the STs and 2D crystals was realized by tuning substrate and molecular surface coverage and changing the functional groups of the molecular building block. Density functional theory calculations and Monte Carlo simulations are used to characterize the process. Both experimental and theoretical results demonstrate the possibility of steering the surface self-assembly to generate fractal and nonfractal structures made up of the same molecular building block.

  8. Fractal approach to the description of the auroral region

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshov, A. A. Mogilevsky, M. M.; Kozelov, B. V.

    2013-07-15

    The plasma of the auroral region, where energetic particles precipitate from the magnetosphere into the ionosphere, is highly inhomogeneous and nonstationary. In this case, traditional methods of classical plasma physics turn out to be inapplicable. In order to correctly describe the dynamic regimes, transition processes, fluctuations, and self-similar scalings in this region, nonlinear dynamics methods based of the concepts of fractal geometry and percolation theory can be used. In this work, the fractal geometry and percolation theory are used to describe the spatial structure of the ionospheric conductivity. The topological properties, fractal dimensions, and connective indices characterizing the structure of the Pedersen and Hall conductivities on the nightside auroral zone are investigated theoretically. The restrictions imposed on the fractal estimates by the condition of ionospheric current percolation are analyzed. It is shown that the fluctuation scalings of the electric fields and auroral glow observed in the auroral zone fit well the restrictions imposed by the critical condition on the percolation of the Pedersen current. Thus, it is demonstrated that the fractal approach is a promising and convenient method for studying the properties of the ionosphere.

  9. Fractal geometry in an expanding, one-dimensional, Newtonian universe.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bruce N; Rouet, Jean-Louis; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel

    2007-09-01

    Observations of galaxies over large distances reveal the possibility of a fractal distribution of their positions. The source of fractal behavior is the lack of a length scale in the two body gravitational interaction. However, even with new, larger, sample sizes from recent surveys, it is difficult to extract information concerning fractal properties with confidence. Similarly, three-dimensional N-body simulations with a billion particles only provide a thousand particles per dimension, far too small for accurate conclusions. With one-dimensional models these limitations can be overcome by carrying out simulations with on the order of a quarter of a million particles without compromising the computation of the gravitational force. Here the multifractal properties of two of these models that incorporate different features of the dynamical equations governing the evolution of a matter dominated universe are compared. For each model at least two scaling regions are identified. By employing criteria from dynamical systems theory it is shown that only one of them can be geometrically significant. The results share important similarities with galaxy observations, such as hierarchical clustering and apparent bifractal geometry. They also provide insights concerning possible constraints on length and time scales for fractal structure. They clearly demonstrate that fractal geometry evolves in the mu (position, velocity) space. The observed patterns are simply a shadow (projection) of higher-dimensional structure.

  10. Fractal dynamics in the ionization of helium Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiulan; Zhang, Yanhui; Cai, Xiangji; Zhao, Guopeng; Kang, Lisha

    2016-11-01

    We study the ionization of helium Rydberg atoms in an electric field above the classical ionization threshold within the semiclassical theory. By introducing a fractal approach to describe the chaotic dynamical behavior of the ionization, we identify the fractal self-similarity structure of the escape time versus the distribution of the initial launch angles of electrons, and find that the self-similarity region shifts toward larger initial launch angles with a decrease in the scaled energy. We connect the fractal structure of the escape time plot to the escape dynamics of ionized electrons. Of particular note is that the fractal dimensions are sensitively controlled by the scaled energy and magnetic field, and exhibit excellent agreement with the chaotic extent of the ionization systems for both helium and hydrogen Rydberg atoms. It is shown that, besides the electric and magnetic fields, core scattering is a primary factor in the fractal dynamics. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2014AM030).

  11. Filamentous Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Badham, Matthew D.; Rossman, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a pathogen of global medical importance causing significant health and socio-economic costs every year. Influenza virus is an unusual pathogen in that it is pleomorphic, capable of forming virions ranging in shape from spherical to filamentous. Despite decades of research on the influenza virus, much remains unknown about the formation of filamentous influenza viruses and their role in the viral replication cycle. Here, we discuss what is known about influenza virus assembly and budding, focusing on the viral and host factors that are involved in the determination of viral morphology. Whilst the biological function of the filamentous morphology remains unknown, recent results suggest a role in facilitating viral spread in vivo. We discuss these results and speculate on the consequences of viral morphology during influenza virus infection of the human respiratory tract. PMID:28042529

  12. Persistent Fluctuations in Stride Intervals under Fractal Auditory Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Marmelat, Vivien; Torre, Kjerstin; Beek, Peter J.; Daffertshofer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Stride sequences of healthy gait are characterized by persistent long-range correlations, which become anti-persistent in the presence of an isochronous metronome. The latter phenomenon is of particular interest because auditory cueing is generally considered to reduce stride variability and may hence be beneficial for stabilizing gait. Complex systems tend to match their correlation structure when synchronizing. In gait training, can one capitalize on this tendency by using a fractal metronome rather than an isochronous one? We examined whether auditory cues with fractal variations in inter-beat intervals yield similar fractal inter-stride interval variability as isochronous auditory cueing in two complementary experiments. In Experiment 1, participants walked on a treadmill while being paced by either an isochronous or a fractal metronome with different variation strengths between beats in order to test whether participants managed to synchronize with a fractal metronome and to determine the necessary amount of variability for participants to switch from anti-persistent to persistent inter-stride intervals. Participants did synchronize with the metronome despite its fractal randomness. The corresponding coefficient of variation of inter-beat intervals was fixed in Experiment 2, in which participants walked on a treadmill while being paced by non-isochronous metronomes with different scaling exponents. As expected, inter-stride intervals showed persistent correlations similar to self-paced walking only when cueing contained persistent correlations. Our results open up a new window to optimize rhythmic auditory cueing for gait stabilization by integrating fractal fluctuations in the inter-beat intervals. PMID:24651455

  13. Persistent fluctuations in stride intervals under fractal auditory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Marmelat, Vivien; Torre, Kjerstin; Beek, Peter J; Daffertshofer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Stride sequences of healthy gait are characterized by persistent long-range correlations, which become anti-persistent in the presence of an isochronous metronome. The latter phenomenon is of particular interest because auditory cueing is generally considered to reduce stride variability and may hence be beneficial for stabilizing gait. Complex systems tend to match their correlation structure when synchronizing. In gait training, can one capitalize on this tendency by using a fractal metronome rather than an isochronous one? We examined whether auditory cues with fractal variations in inter-beat intervals yield similar fractal inter-stride interval variability as isochronous auditory cueing in two complementary experiments. In Experiment 1, participants walked on a treadmill while being paced by either an isochronous or a fractal metronome with different variation strengths between beats in order to test whether participants managed to synchronize with a fractal metronome and to determine the necessary amount of variability for participants to switch from anti-persistent to persistent inter-stride intervals. Participants did synchronize with the metronome despite its fractal randomness. The corresponding coefficient of variation of inter-beat intervals was fixed in Experiment 2, in which participants walked on a treadmill while being paced by non-isochronous metronomes with different scaling exponents. As expected, inter-stride intervals showed persistent correlations similar to self-paced walking only when cueing contained persistent correlations. Our results open up a new window to optimize rhythmic auditory cueing for gait stabilization by integrating fractal fluctuations in the inter-beat intervals.

  14. Develop and demonstrate manufacturing processes for fabricating graphite filament reinforced polymide (Gr/PI) composite structural elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, V. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the merits of using graphite/polyimide, NR-150B2 resin, for structural applications on advanced space launch vehicles. The program was divided into two phases: (1) Fabrication Process Development; and (2) Demonstration Components. The first phase of the program involved the selection of a graphite fiber, quality assurance of the NR-150B2 polyimide resin, and the quality assurance of the graphite/polyimide prepreg. In the second phase of the program, a limited number of components were fabricated before the NR-150B2 resin system was removed from the market by the supplier, Du Pont. The advancement of the NR-150B2 polyimide resin binder was found to vary significantly based on previous time and temperature history during the prepregging operation. Strength retention at 316C (600F) was found to be 50% that of room temperature strength. However, the composite would retain its initial strength after 200 hours exposure at 316C (600F). Basic chemistry studies are required for determining NR-150B2 resin binder quality assurance parameters. Graphite fibers are available that can withstand high temperature cure and postcure cycles.

  15. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  16. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-10-20

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components.

  17. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition.

  18. Disruption of the keratin filament network during epithelial cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, E B; Goodman, S L; Trejdosiewicz, L K

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of keratin filaments during cell division was examined in a wide range of epithelial lines from several species. Almost half of them show keratin disruption as described previously: by immunofluorescence, filaments are replaced during mitosis by a 'speckled' pattern of discrete cytoplasmic dots. In the electron microscope these ' speckles ' are seen as granules around the cell periphery, just below the actin cortical mesh, with no detectable 10 nm filament structure inside them and no keratin filament bundles in the rest of the cytoplasm. A time course of the filament reorganization was constructed from double immunofluorescence data; filaments are disrupted in prophase, and the filament network is intact again by cytokinesis. The phenomenon is restricted to cells rich in keratin filaments, such as keratinocytes; it is unrelated to the co-existence of vimentin in many of these cells, and vimentin is generally maintained as filaments while the keratin is restructured. Some resistance to the effect may be conferred by an extended cycle time. Filament reorganization takes place within minutes, so that a reversible mechanism seems more likely than one involving de novo protein synthesis, at this metabolically quiet stage of the cell cycle. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6202508

  19. A Fractal Nature for Polymerized Laminin

    PubMed Central

    Hochman-Mendez, Camila; Cantini, Marco; Moratal, David; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel; Coelho-Sampaio, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Polylaminin (polyLM) is a non-covalent acid-induced nano- and micro-structured polymer of the protein laminin displaying distinguished biological properties. Polylaminin stimulates neuritogenesis beyond the levels achieved by ordinary laminin and has been shown to promote axonal regeneration in animal models of spinal cord injury. Here we used confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize its three-dimensional structure. Renderization of confocal optical slices of immunostained polyLM revealed the aspect of a loose flocculated meshwork, which was homogeneously stained by the antibody. On the other hand, an ordinary matrix obtained upon adsorption of laminin in neutral pH (LM) was constituted of bulky protein aggregates whose interior was not accessible to the same anti-laminin antibody. SEM and AFM analyses revealed that the seed unit of polyLM was a flat polygon formed in solution whereas the seed structure of LM was highly heterogeneous, intercalating rod-like, spherical and thin spread lamellar deposits. As polyLM was visualized at progressively increasing magnifications, we observed that the morphology of the polymer was alike independently of the magnification used for the observation. A search for the Hausdorff dimension in images of the two matrices showed that polyLM, but not LM, presented fractal dimensions of 1.55, 1.62 and 1.70 after 1, 8 and 12 hours of adsorption, respectively. Data in the present work suggest that the intrinsic fractal nature of polymerized laminin can be the structural basis for the fractal-like organization of basement membranes in the neurogenic niches of the central nervous system. PMID:25296244

  20. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Tillotson, T.M.; Johnson, C.V. III

    1995-05-16

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces. 6 Figs.