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Sample records for fractional scaling analysis

  1. Polysome fractionation and analysis of mammalian translatomes on a genome-wide scale.

    PubMed

    Gandin, Valentina; Sikström, Kristina; Alain, Tommy; Morita, Masahiro; McLaughlan, Shannon; Larsson, Ola; Topisirovic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    mRNA translation plays a central role in the regulation of gene expression and represents the most energy consuming process in mammalian cells. Accordingly, dysregulation of mRNA translation is considered to play a major role in a variety of pathological states including cancer. Ribosomes also host chaperones, which facilitate folding of nascent polypeptides, thereby modulating function and stability of newly synthesized polypeptides. In addition, emerging data indicate that ribosomes serve as a platform for a repertoire of signaling molecules, which are implicated in a variety of post-translational modifications of newly synthesized polypeptides as they emerge from the ribosome, and/or components of translational machinery. Herein, a well-established method of ribosome fractionation using sucrose density gradient centrifugation is described. In conjunction with the in-house developed "anota" algorithm this method allows direct determination of differential translation of individual mRNAs on a genome-wide scale. Moreover, this versatile protocol can be used for a variety of biochemical studies aiming to dissect the function of ribosome-associated protein complexes, including those that play a central role in folding and degradation of newly synthesized polypeptides.

  2. Gram-scale fractionation of nanodiamonds by density gradient ultracentrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wei; Mahfouz, Remi; Pan, Jun; Hou, Yuanfang; Beaujuge, Pierre M.; Bakr, Osman M.

    2013-05-01

    distributions remains one of the main challenges to their utilization. At this time, the number of practical approaches to optimize the size distribution of nanoparticles in many interesting materials systems, including diamond nanocrystals, remains limited. Diamond nanocrystals synthesized by detonation protocols - so-called detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) - are promising systems for drug delivery, photonics, and composites. DNDs are composed of primary particles with diameters mainly <10 nm and their aggregates (ca. 10-500 nm). Here, we introduce a large-scale approach to rate-zonal density gradient ultracentrifugation to obtain monodispersed fractions of nanoparticles in high yields. We use this method to fractionate a highly concentrated and stable aqueous solution of DNDs and to investigate the size distribution of various fractions by dynamic light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. This fractionation method enabled us to separate gram-scale amounts of DNDs into several size ranges within a relatively short period of time. In addition, the high product yields obtained for each fraction allowed us to apply the fractionation method iteratively to a particular size range of particles and to collect various fractions of highly monodispersed primary particles. Our method paves the way for in-depth studies of the physical and optical properties, growth, and aggregation mechanism of DNDs. Applications requiring DNDs with specific particle or aggregate sizes are now within reach. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Discussion of the influence of sample solution concentrations on DLS measurements, comparisons of the size distributions of our raw milled particles and NanoAmando particles, a detailed description of the RZDGU procedure, discussion of the influences of the gradients and centrifugation times on fractionation, TEM images, zeta potentials, AUC analysis and determination of mp

  3. The Use of Fractionation Scales for Communication Audits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, George A.; And Others

    A study investigated a new method of measuring organizational communication other than the audit methods currently in use. The method, which employs fractionation procedures, was used with workers from five different business groups within a large multinational corporation. The results showed that: (1) workers could use the scales reliably, (2)…

  4. Experimental considerations and scaling property of the fractional Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Adolf W.; Zalevsky, Zeev; Dorsch, Rainer G.; Mendlovic, David

    1998-01-01

    The fractional Fourier transform (FRT) is a mathematical operation which is useful in several branches of physics and signal processing. The FRT can be performed by a simple optical experiment. The FRT reacts in a somewhat complicated manner to a shift or to a scale change of the input. Likewise, a scaling change of the experimental parameters (wavelength, focal lengths) means a non-trivial change of the associated FRT. We study the scaling behavior of the FRT mainly from the experimentalists point of view. Some computer simulations illustrate our conclusions. A theoretical comment: The FRT is a two-parameter family of transformations.

  5. Modes of planetary-scale Fe isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenberg, Ronny; Blanckenburg, Friedhelm von

    2006-12-01

    A comprehensive set of high-precision Fe isotope data for the principle meteorite types and silicate reservoirs of the Earth is used to investigate iron isotope fractionation at inter- and intra-planetary scales. 14 chondrite analyses yield a homogeneous Fe isotope composition with an average δ56Fe/ 54Fe value of - 0.015 ± 0.020‰ (2 SE) relative to the international iron standard IRMM-014. Eight non-cumulate and polymict eucrite meteorites that sample the silicate portion of the HED (howardite-eucrite-diogenite) parent body yield an average δ56Fe/ 54Fe value of - 0.001 ± 0.017‰, indistinguishable to the chondritic Fe isotope composition. Fe isotope ratios that are indistinguishable to the chondritic value have also been published for SNC meteorites. This inner-solar system homogeneity in Fe isotopes suggests that planetary accretion itself did not significantly fractionate iron. Nine mantle xenoliths yield a 2 σ envelope of - 0.13‰ to + 0.09‰ in δ56Fe/ 54Fe. Using this range as proxy for the bulk silicate Earth in a mass balance model places the Fe isotope composition of the outer liquid core that contains ca. 83% of Earth's total iron to within ± 0.020‰ of the chondritic δ56Fe/ 54Fe value. These calculations allow to interprete magmatic iron meteorites ( δ56Fe/ 54Fe = + 0.047 ± 0.016‰; N = 8) to be representative for the Earth's inner metallic core. Eight terrestrial basalt samples yield a homogeneous Fe isotope composition with an average δ56Fe/ 54Fe value of + 0.072 ± 0.016‰. The observation that terrestrial basalts appear to be slightly heavier than mantle xenoliths and that thus partial mantle melting preferentially transfers heavy iron into the melt [S. Weyer, A.D. Anbar, G.P. Brey, C. Munker, K. Mezger and A.B. Woodland, Iron isotope fractionation during planetary differentiation, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 240(2), 251-264, 2005.] is intriguing, but also raises some important questions: first it is questionable whether the

  6. SCALING AND MODELING STUDIES OF HIGH-BOOTSTRAP FRACTION TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    PERKINS,FW; CASPER,TA; POLITZER,PA

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 SCALING AND MODELING STUDIES OF HIGH-BOOTSTRAP FRACTION TOKAMAKS. A theoretical framework is developed to generate tokamak equilibrium configurations for which, on one hand, the current results entirely from the bootstrap current source driven by the pressure gradient while, on the other hand, the pressure gradient is determined from the thermal conduction equation with a thermal diffusivity constructed to have properties observed in confinement experiments: gyroBohm confinement, gradients only with respect to the poloidal flux, global confinement depending only on plasma current and independent of toroidal field, a critical temperature gradient, and an overall confinement improvement with negative shear. The nondimensional method used yields eigenvalues composed of a collection of physics quantities, resulting in scaling relations among physics variables. It is found that the plasma temperature scales as T {proportional_to} P{sup 2/3}{var_epsilon}{sup -1/3}, while I{sub p} {proportional_to} n{sup 1/2}P{sup 1/3} a {var_epsilon}{sup 1/12}. The system has a solvability criterion which does not permit solutions when the confinement improves rapidly with increasing negative shear. A simplified 1-D model captures the essential physics of the coupling between bootstrap current generation and thermal conduction.

  7. Scaling and non-Abelian signature in fractional quantum Hall quasiparticle tunneling amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zi-Xiang; Lee, Ki H.; Rezayi, Edward H.; Wan, Xin; Yang, Kun

    2011-03-01

    We study the scaling behavior in the tunneling amplitude when quasiparticles tunnel along a straight path between the two edges of a fractional quantum Hall annulus. Such scaling behavior originates from the propagation and tunneling of charged quasielectrons and quasiholes in an effective field analysis. In the limit when the annulus deforms continuously into a quasi-one-dimensional (1D) ring, we conjecture the exact functional form of the tunneling amplitude for several cases, which reproduces the numerical results in finite systems exactly. The results for Abelian quasiparticle tunneling is consistent with the scaling analysis; this allows for the extraction of the conformal dimensions of the quasiparticles. We analyze the scaling behavior of both Abelian and non-Abelian quasiparticles in the Read-Rezayi { Z}_k -parafermion states. Interestingly, the non-Abelian quasiparticle tunneling amplitudes exhibit non-trivial k-dependent corrections to the scaling exponent.

  8. Scaling in sensitivity analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Doherty, P.F.

    2002-01-01

    Population matrix models allow sets of demographic parameters to be summarized by a single value 8, the finite rate of population increase. The consequences of change in individual demographic parameters are naturally measured by the corresponding changes in 8; sensitivity analyses compare demographic parameters on the basis of these changes. These comparisons are complicated by issues of scale. Elasticity analysis attempts to deal with issues of scale by comparing the effects of proportional changes in demographic parameters, but leads to inconsistencies in evaluating demographic rates. We discuss this and other problems of scaling in sensitivity analysis, and suggest a simple criterion for choosing appropriate scales. We apply our suggestions to data for the killer whale, Orcinus orca.

  9. Online Nanoflow Multidimensional Fractionation for High Efficiency Phosphopeptide Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Ficarro, Scott B.; Zhang, Yi; Carrasco-Alfonso, Marlene J.; Garg, Brijesh; Adelmant, Guillaume; Webber, James T.; Luckey, C. John; Marto, Jarrod A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite intense, continued interest in global analyses of signaling cascades through mass spectrometry-based studies, the large-scale, systematic production of phosphoproteomics data has been hampered in-part by inefficient fractionation strategies subsequent to phosphopeptide enrichment. Here we explore two novel multidimensional fractionation strategies for analysis of phosphopeptides. In the first technique we utilize aliphatic ion pairing agents to improve retention of phosphopeptides at high pH in the first dimension of a two-dimensional RP-RP. The second approach is based on the addition of strong anion exchange as the second dimension in a three-dimensional reversed phase (RP)-strong anion exchange (SAX)-RP configuration. Both techniques provide for automated, online data acquisition, with the 3-D platform providing the highest performance both in terms of separation peak capacity and the number of unique phosphopeptide sequences identified per μg of cell lysate consumed. Our integrated RP-SAX-RP platform provides several analytical figures of merit, including: (1) orthogonal separation mechanisms in each dimension; (2) high separation peak capacity (3) efficient retention of singly- and multiply-phosphorylated peptides; (4) compatibility with automated, online LC-MS analysis. We demonstrate the reproducibility of RP-SAX-RP and apply it to the analysis of phosphopeptides derived from multiple biological contexts, including an in vitro model of acute myeloid leukemia in addition to primary polyclonal CD8+ T-cells activated in vivo through bacterial infection and then purified from a single mouse. PMID:21788404

  10. Calcium isotope fractionation in groundwater: Molecular scale processes influencing field scale behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druhan, Jennifer L.; Steefel, Carl I.; Williams, Kenneth H.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2013-10-01

    It is the purpose of this study to demonstrate that the molecular scale reaction mechanisms describing calcite precipitation and calcium isotope fractionations under highly controlled laboratory conditions also reproduce field scale measurements of δ44Ca in groundwater systems. We present data collected from an aquifer during active carbonate mineral precipitation and develop a reactive transport model capturing the observed chemical and isotopic variations. Carbonate mineral precipitation and associated fluid δ44Ca data were measured in multiple clogged well bores during organic carbon amended biogenic reduction of a uranium contaminated aquifer in western Colorado, USA. Secondary mineral formation induced by carbonate alkalinity generated during the biostimulation process lead to substantial permeability reduction in multiple electron-donor injection wells at the field site. These conditions resulted in removal of aqueous calcium from a background concentration of 6 mM to <1 mM while δ44Ca enrichment ranged from 1‰ to greater than 2.5‰. The relationship between aqueous calcium removal and isotopic enrichment did not conform to Rayleigh model behavior. Explicit treatment of the individual isotopes of calcium within the CrunchFlow reactive transport code demonstrates that the system did not achieve isotopic reequilibration over the time scale of sample collection. Measured fluid δ44Ca values are accurately reproduced by a linear rate law when the Ca2+:CO32- activity ratio remains substantially greater than unity. Variation in the measured δ44Ca between wells is shown to originate from a difference in carbonate alkalinity generated in each well bore. The influence of fluid Ca2+:CO32- ratio on the precipitation rate and δ44Ca is modeled by coupling the CrunchFlow reactive transport code to an ion by ion growth model. This study presents the first coupled ion-by-ion and reactive transport model for isotopic enrichment and demonstrates that reproducing field-scale

  11. Chem-Prep PZT 95/5 for Neutron Generator Applications: Powder Fractionation Study of Production-Scale Powders

    SciTech Connect

    MOORE, DIANA L.; VOIGT, JAMES A.; WATSON, CHAD S.; MCKENZIE, BONNIE B.; MOORE, ROGER H.; HUTCHINSON, MICHAEL A.; LOCKWOOD, STEVEN J.; RODMAN-GONZALES, EMILY D.

    2003-06-01

    The Materials Chemistry Department 1846 has developed a lab-scale chem-prep process for the synthesis of PNZT 95/5, referred to as the ''SP'' process (Sandia Process). This process (TSP) has been successfully transferred to and scaled-up by Department 14192 (Ceramics and Glass Department), producing the larger quantities of PZT powder required to meet the future supply needs of Sandia for neutron generator production. The particle size distributions of TSP powders routinely have been found to contain a large particle size fraction that was absent in development (SP) powders. This SAND report documents experimental studies focused on characterizing these particles and assessing their potential impact on material performance. To characterize these larger particles, fractionation of several TSP powders was performed. The ''large particle size fractions'' obtained were characterized by particle size analysis, SEM, and ICP analysis and incorporated into compacts and sintered. Large particles were found to be very similar in structure and composition as the bulk of the powder. Studies showed that the large-size fractions of the powders behave similarly to the non-fractionated powder with respect to the types of microstructural features once sintered. Powders were also compared that were prepared using different post-synthesis processing (i.e. differences in precipitate drying). Results showed that these powders contained different amounts and sizes of porous inclusions when sintered. How this affects the functional performance of the PZT 95/5 material is the subject of future investigations.

  12. Bifurcation Analysis of Fractional Order Single Cell with Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, Vedat

    This paper presents the bifurcation analysis of fractional order model of delayed single cell which is proposed for delayed cellular neural networks with respect to the time delay τ. The bifurcation points, time delay τc, are determined by modified Mikhailov stability criterion for a range of fractional delayed cell order 0.3 ≤ q < 1. Numerical results obtained from Adams-Bashforth-Moulton method demonstrate that the supercritical Hopf bifurcation occurs in the system.

  13. Multifractal analysis for grading complex fractionated electrograms in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Duque, A; Novak, D; Kremen, V; Bustamante, J

    2015-11-01

    Complex fractionated atrial electrograms provide an important tool for identifying arrhythmogenic substrates that can be used to guide catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). However, fractionation is a phenomenon that remains unclear. This paper aims to evaluate the multifractal properties of electrograms in AF in order to propose a method based on multifractal analysis able to discriminate between different levels of fractionation. We introduce a new method, the h-fluctuation index (hFI), where h is the generalised Hurst exponent, to extract information from the shape of the multifractal spectrum. Two multifractal frameworks are evaluated: multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis and wavelet transform modulus maxima. hFI is exemplified through its application in synthetic signals, and it is evaluated in a database of electrograms labeled on the basis of four degrees of fractionation. We compare the performance of hFI with other indexes, and find that hFI outperforms them. The results of the study provide evidence that multifractal analysis is useful for studying fractionation phenomena in AF electrograms, and indicate that hFI can be proposed as a tool for grade fractionation associated with the detection of target sites for ablation in AF.

  14. Leaf area index retrieval using gap fractions obtained from high resolution satellite data: Comparisons of approaches, scales and atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsamo, Alemu

    2010-08-01

    This study is aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of the large scale LAI inversion algorithms using red and near infrared reflectance obtained from high resolution satellite imagery. Radiances in digital counts were obtained in 10 m resolution acquired on cloud free day of August 23, 2007, by the SPOT 5 high resolution geometric (HRG) instrument on mostly temperate hardwood forest located in the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence forest in Southern Quebec. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), scaled difference vegetation index (SDVI) and modified soil-adjusted vegetation index (MSAVI) were applied to calculate gap fractions. LAI was inverted from the gap fraction using the common Beer-Lambert's law of light extinction under forest canopy. The robustness of the algorithm was evaluated using the ground-based LAI measurements and by applying the methods for the independently simulated reflectance data using PROSPECT + SAIL coupled radiative transfer models. Furthermore, the high resolution LAI was compared with MODIS LAI product. The effects of atmospheric corrections and scales were investigated for all of the LAI retrieval methods. NDVI was found to be not suitable index for large scale LAI inversion due to the sensitivity to scale and atmospheric effects. SDVI was virtually scale and atmospheric correction invariant. MSAVI was also scale invariant. Considering all sensitivity analysis, MSAVI performed best followed by SDVI for robust LAI inversion from high resolution imagery.

  15. Network meta-analysis of survival data with fractional polynomials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pairwise meta-analysis, indirect treatment comparisons and network meta-analysis for aggregate level survival data are often based on the reported hazard ratio, which relies on the proportional hazards assumption. This assumption is implausible when hazard functions intersect, and can have a huge impact on decisions based on comparisons of expected survival, such as cost-effectiveness analysis. Methods As an alternative to network meta-analysis of survival data in which the treatment effect is represented by the constant hazard ratio, a multi-dimensional treatment effect approach is presented. With fractional polynomials the hazard functions of interventions compared in a randomized controlled trial are modeled, and the difference between the parameters of these fractional polynomials within a trial are synthesized (and indirectly compared) across studies. Results The proposed models are illustrated with an analysis of survival data in non-small-cell lung cancer. Fixed and random effects first and second order fractional polynomials were evaluated. Conclusion (Network) meta-analysis of survival data with models where the treatment effect is represented with several parameters using fractional polynomials can be more closely fitted to the available data than meta-analysis based on the constant hazard ratio. PMID:21548941

  16. Contrast Analysis for Scale Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olejnik, Stephen F.; And Others

    Research on tests for scale equality have focused exclusively on an overall test statistic and have not examined procedures for identifying specific differences in multiple group designs. The present study compares four contrast analysis procedures for scale differences in the single factor four-group design: (1) Tukey HSD; (2) Kramer-Tukey; (3)…

  17. Spiritual Competency Scale: Further Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Stephanie F.; Robertson, Linda A.; Gill, Carman S.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a follow-up analysis of the Spiritual Competency Scale, which initially validated ASERVIC's (Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling) spiritual competencies. The study examined whether the factor structure of the Spiritual Competency Scale would be supported by participants (i.e., ASERVIC…

  18. Interaction chromatography for characterization and large-scale fractionation of chemically heterogeneous copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Junwon

    The remarkable development of polymer synthesis techniques to make complex polymers with controlled chain architectures has inevitably demanded the advancement of polymer characterization tools to analyze the molecular dispersity in polymeric materials beyond size exclusion chromatography (SEC). In particular, man-made synthetic copolymers that consist of more than one monomer type are disperse mixtures of polymer chains that have distributions in terms of both chemical heterogeneity and chain length (molar mass). While the molecular weight distribution has been quite reliably estimated by the SEC, it is still challenging to properly characterize the chemical composition distribution in the copolymers. Here, I have developed and applied adsorption-based interaction chromatography (IC) techniques as a promising tool to characterize and fractionate polystyrene-based block, random and branched copolymers in terms of their chemical heterogeneity. The first part of this thesis is focused on the adsorption-desorption based purification of PS-b-PMMA diblock copolymers using nanoporous silica. The liquid chromatography analysis and large scale purification are discussed for the PS-b-PMMA block copolymers that have been synthesized by sequential anionic polymerization. SEC and IC are compared to critically analyze the contents of PS homopolymers in the as-synthesized block copolymers. In addition, I have developed an IC technique to provide faster and more reliable information on the chemical heterogeneity in the as-synthesized block copolymers. Finally, a large scale (multi-gram) separation technique is developed to obtain "homopolymer-free" block copolymers via a simple chromatographic filtration technique. By taking advantage of the large specific surface area of nanoporous silica (≈300m 2/g), large scale purification of neat PS-b-PMMA has successfully been achieved by controlling adsorption and desorption of the block copolymers on the silica gel surface using a

  19. A global analysis of parenchyma tissue fractions in secondary xylem of seed plants.

    PubMed

    Morris, Hugh; Plavcová, Lenka; Cvecko, Patrick; Fichtler, Esther; Gillingham, Mark A F; Martínez-Cabrera, Hugo I; McGlinn, Daniel J; Wheeler, Elisabeth; Zheng, Jingming; Ziemińska, Kasia; Jansen, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Parenchyma is an important tissue in secondary xylem of seed plants, with functions ranging from storage to defence and with effects on the physical and mechanical properties of wood. Currently, we lack a large-scale quantitative analysis of ray parenchyma (RP) and axial parenchyma (AP) tissue fractions. Here, we use data from the literature on AP and RP fractions to investigate the potential relationships of climate and growth form with total ray and axial parenchyma fractions (RAP). We found a 29-fold variation in RAP fraction, which was more strongly related to temperature than with precipitation. Stem succulents had the highest RAP values (mean ± SD: 70.2 ± 22.0%), followed by lianas (50.1 ± 16.3%), angiosperm trees and shrubs (26.3 ± 12.4%), and conifers (7.6 ± 2.6%). Differences in RAP fraction between temperate and tropical angiosperm trees (21.1 ± 7.9% vs 36.2 ± 13.4%, respectively) are due to differences in the AP fraction, which is typically three times higher in tropical than in temperate trees, but not in RP fraction. Our results illustrate that both temperature and growth form are important drivers of RAP fractions. These findings should help pave the way to better understand the various functions of RAP in plants.

  20. Decimal Fraction Arithmetic: Logical Error Analysis and Its Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standiford, Sally N.; And Others

    This report illustrates procedures of item construction for addition and subtraction examples involving decimal fractions. Using a procedural network of skills required to solve such examples, an item characteristic matrix of skills analysis was developed to describe the characteristics of the content domain by projected student difficulties. Then…

  1. Analysis of fractionation in corn-to-ethanol plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Camille

    As the dry grind ethanol industry has grown, the research and technology surrounding ethanol production and co-product value has increased. Including use of back-end oil extraction and front-end fractionation. Front-end fractionation is pre-fermentation separation of the corn kernel into 3 fractions: endosperm, bran, and germ. The endosperm fraction enters the existing ethanol plant, and a high protein DDGS product remains after fermentation. High value oil is extracted out of the germ fraction. This leaves corn germ meal and bran as co-products from the other two streams. These 3 co-products have a very different composition than traditional corn DDGS. Installing this technology allows ethanol plants to increase profitability by tapping into more diverse markets, and ultimately could allow for an increase in profitability. An ethanol plant model was developed to evaluate both back-end oil extraction and front-end fractionation technology and predict the change in co-products based on technology installed. The model runs in Microsoft Excel and requires inputs of whole corn composition (proximate analysis), amino acid content, and weight to predict the co-product quantity and quality. User inputs include saccharification and fermentation efficiencies, plant capacity, and plant process specifications including front-end fractionation and backend oil extraction, if applicable. This model provides plants a way to assess and monitor variability in co-product composition due to the variation in whole corn composition. Additionally the co-products predicted in this model are entered into the US Pork Center of Excellence, National Swine Nutrition Guide feed formulation software. This allows the plant user and animal nutritionists to evaluate the value of new co-products in existing animal diets.

  2. Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Fractional-Wet Systems: A Pore-Scale Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Ryan T.; Wildenschild, Dorthe

    2012-10-24

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a technology that could potentially increase the tertiary recovery of oil from mature oil formations. However, the efficacy of this technology in fractional-wet systems is unknown, and the mechanisms involved in oil mobilization therefore need further investigation. Our MEOR strategy consists of the injection of ex situ produced metabolic byproducts produced by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 (which lower interfacial tension (IFT) via biosurfactant production) into fractional-wet cores containing residual oil. Two different MEOR flooding solutions were tested; one solution contained both microbes and metabolic byproducts while the other contained only the metabolic byproducts. The columns were imaged with X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) after water flooding, and after MEOR, which allowed for the evaluation of the pore-scale processes taking place during MEOR. Results indicate that the larger residual oil blobs and residual oil held under relatively low capillary pressures were the main fractions recovered during MEOR. Residual oil saturation, interfacial curvatures, and oil blob sizes were measured from the CMT images and used to develop a conceptual model for MEOR in fractional-wet systems. Overall, results indicate that MEOR was effective at recovering oil from fractional-wet systems with reported additional oil recovered (AOR) values between 44 and 80%; the highest AOR values were observed in the most oil-wet system.

  3. Multiple satellite estimates of urban fractions and climate effects at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, G.; Xu, R.; He, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Regional climate is controlled by large scale forcing at lateral boundary and physical processes within the region. Landuse in East Asia has been changed substantially in the last three decades, featured with expansion of urban built-up at unprecedented scale and speed. The fast expansion of urban areas could contribute to local even regional climate change. However, current spatial datasets of urban fractions do not well represent extend and expansion of urban areas in the regions, and the best available satellite data and remote sensing techniques have not been well applied to serve regional modeling of urbanization impacts on near surface temperature and other climate variables. Better estimates of localized urban fractions and urban climate effects are badly needed. Here we use high and mid resolution satellite data to estimate urban fractions and to assess effects of urban heat islands at local and regional scales. With our fractional cover, data fusion, and differentiated threshold approaches, estimated urban extent was greater than previously reported in many global datasets. Many city clusters were merging into each other, with gradual blurring boundaries and disappearing of gaps among member cities. Cities and towns were more connected with roads and commercial corridors, while wildland and urban greens became more isolated as patches among built-up areas. Those new estimates are expected to effectively improve climate simulation at local and regional scales in East Asia. There were significant positive relations between urban fraction and urban heat island effects as demonstrated by VNIR and TIR data from multiple satellites. Stronger warming was detected at the meteorological stations that experienced greater urbanization, i.e., those with a higher urbanization rate. While the total urban area affects the absolute temperature values, the change of the urban area (urbanization rate) likely affects the temperature trend. Increases of approximately 10% in

  4. Analysis of the Phosphoinositide Composition of Subcellular Membrane Fractions.

    PubMed

    Sarkes, Deborah A; Rameh, Lucia E

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides play critical roles in the transduction of extracellular signals through the plasma membrane and also in endomembrane events important for vesicle trafficking and organelle function (Di Paolo and De Camilli, Nature 443(7112):651-657, 2006). The response triggered by these lipids is heavily dependent on the microenvironment in which they are found. HPLC analysis of labeled phosphoinositides allows quantification of the levels of each phosphoinositide species relative to their precursor, phosphatidylinositol. When combined with subcellular fractionation techniques, this strategy allows measurement of the relative phosphoinositide composition of each membrane fraction or organelle and determination of the microenvironment in which each species is enriched. Here, we describe the steps to separate and quantify total or localized phosphoinositides from cultured cells. PMID:26552687

  5. Aspect Ratio Scaling of Ideal No-wall Stability Limits in High Bootstrap Fraction Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. Menard; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; D.A. Gates; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; S.A. Sabbagh; V. Soukhanovskii; D. Stutman; the NSTX National Research Team

    2003-11-25

    Recent experiments in the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] have achieved normalized beta values twice the conventional tokamak limit at low internal inductance and with significant bootstrap current. These experimental results have motivated a computational re-examination of the plasma aspect ratio dependence of ideal no-wall magnetohydrodynamic stability limits. These calculations find that the profile-optimized no-wall stability limit in high bootstrap fraction regimes is well described by a nearly aspect ratio invariant normalized beta parameter utilizing the total magnetic field energy density inside the plasma. However, the scaling of normalized beta with internal inductance is found to be strongly aspect ratio dependent at sufficiently low aspect ratio. These calculations and detailed stability analyses of experimental equilibria indicate that the nonrotating plasma no-wall stability limit has been exceeded by as much as 30% in NSTX in a high bootstrap fraction regime.

  6. Different techniques of multispectral data analysis for vegetation fraction retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kancheva, Rumiana; Georgiev, Georgi

    2012-07-01

    Vegetation monitoring is one of the most important applications of remote sensing technologies. In respect to farmlands, the assessment of crop condition constitutes the basis of growth, development, and yield processes monitoring. Plant condition is defined by a set of biometric variables, such as density, height, biomass amount, leaf area index, and etc. The canopy cover fraction is closely related to these variables, and is state-indicative of the growth process. At the same time it is a defining factor of the soil-vegetation system spectral signatures. That is why spectral mixtures decomposition is a primary objective in remotely sensed data processing and interpretation, specifically in agricultural applications. The actual usefulness of the applied methods depends on their prediction reliability. The goal of this paper is to present and compare different techniques for quantitative endmember extraction from soil-crop patterns reflectance. These techniques include: linear spectral unmixing, two-dimensional spectra analysis, spectral ratio analysis (vegetation indices), spectral derivative analysis (red edge position), colorimetric analysis (tristimulus values sum, chromaticity coordinates and dominant wavelength). The objective is to reveal their potential, accuracy and robustness for plant fraction estimation from multispectral data. Regression relationships have been established between crop canopy cover and various spectral estimators.

  7. Viewable Gap Fraction in Forests at the Landscape and Stand Scale near Fraser, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melloh, R. A.; Woodcock, C. E.; Liu, J. C.; Hardy, J. P.; Koenig, G. G.; Davis, R. E.

    2002-12-01

    The 3-dimensional organization of canopy elements impacts the retrieval of snow and soil properties from remote sensing platforms, and influences the optical and infrared radiative environment within the forest. The number and size of gaps within and between tree crowns determines the type and amount of information that can be obtained remotely. One of the objectives of the NASA-Cold Land Process Experiment is to advance techniques for large-scale observation of hydrologic properties, including water storage and freeze-thaw state. Particular focus is placed on passive and active microwave sensors. The purpose of this paper is to: 1) describe gap fraction distributions and within-stand spatial variation of solar radiation in continuous and discontinuous tree stands in the Fraser Local Observation Site (LSOS), and 2) describe the information content that will be available in landscape scale viewable gap fraction maps (30-m resolution) for intensive study sites (ISA's) near Fraser, Colorado, USA. Hemispherical photographs were taken with a Nikkor 8mm/f2 lens at 20-m grid spacing in the Fraser-LSOS, an area of predominantly Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta), and were analyzed with Gap Light Analyzer software. Gap fraction probability distributions were determined for 10 degree zenith angle increments. Maximum mid-day radiation transmittance typically occurs at zenith angles between 51 and 61 degrees during mid to late February and 35 to 50 degrees for late March. The zenith angle ranges of maximum transmittance correspond to gap fraction probability distributions that peak at 0.4 in February, and 0.47 in March. The difference between transmittance into the north-edge and south-edge of clearings is more pronounced in February when mid-day sun angles are lower. Canopy openness at the site ranged from 22 to 60%. Direct transmittance ranged from 9 to 83%, and diffuse transmittance 24 to 81%. Viewable gap fraction is the proportion of the forest floor that can be viewed from

  8. Modeling subgrid scale mixture fraction variance in LES of evaporating spray

    SciTech Connect

    Pera, Cecile; Reveillon, Julien; Vervisch, Luc; Domingo, Pascale

    2006-09-15

    Simulations of a dilute spray evaporating in spatially decaying homogeneous turbulence are performed. An Eulerian description of the flow is adopted, while the behavior of the discrete liquid phase is captured using Lagrangian modeling. Time and length scales of the continuous carrier phase are fully simulated; and by varying the properties of the modeled spray, a database of spray carrier phase direct numerical simulation (CP-DNS) is obtained. The CP-DNS is then filtered on a coarse grid to conduct a priori tests of subgrid scale (SGS) closures. The objective is to provide methods for approximating the level of SGS mixture fraction variance in large eddy simulation (LES) of fuel spray turbulent combustion. Direct estimation of the variance from the scales resolved in LES is first discussed. Then, the solving of a balance equation to get the variance is addressed, with closures for the scalar dissipation rate and the correlation between vapor source and mixture fraction. From the results, a procedure to couple spray evaporation with SGS turbulent combustion modeling emerges. (author)

  9. Fractional-order elastic models of cartilage: A multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Royston, Thomas J.

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this research is to develop new quantitative methods to describe the elastic properties (e.g., shear modulus, viscosity) of biological tissues such as cartilage. Cartilage is a connective tissue that provides the lining for most of the joints in the body. Tissue histology of cartilage reveals a multi-scale architecture that spans a wide range from individual collagen and proteoglycan molecules to families of twisted macromolecular fibers and fibrils, and finally to a network of cells and extracellular matrix that form layers in the connective tissue. The principal cells in cartilage are chondrocytes that function at the microscopic scale by creating nano-scale networks of proteins whose biomechanical properties are ultimately expressed at the macroscopic scale in the tissue's viscoelasticity. The challenge for the bioengineer is to develop multi-scale modeling tools that predict the three-dimensional macro-scale mechanical performance of cartilage from micro-scale models. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR elastography (MRE) provide a basis for developing such models based on the nondestructive biomechanical assessment of cartilage in vitro and in vivo. This approach, for example, uses MRI to visualize developing proto-cartilage structure, MRE to characterize the shear modulus of such structures, and fractional calculus to describe the dynamic behavior. Such models can be extended using hysteresis modeling to account for the non-linear nature of the tissue. These techniques extend the existing computational methods to predict stiffness and strength, to assess short versus long term load response, and to measure static versus dynamic response to mechanical loads over a wide range of frequencies (50-1500 Hz). In the future, such methods can perhaps be used to help identify early changes in regenerative connective tissue at the microscopic scale and to enable more effective diagnostic monitoring of the onset of disease.

  10. Stability Analysis of Distributed Order Fractional Chen System

    PubMed Central

    Aminikhah, H.; Refahi Sheikhani, A.; Rezazadeh, H.

    2013-01-01

    We first investigate sufficient and necessary conditions of stability of nonlinear distributed order fractional system and then we generalize the integer-order Chen system into the distributed order fractional domain. Based on the asymptotic stability theory of nonlinear distributed order fractional systems, the stability of distributed order fractional Chen system is discussed. In addition, we have found that chaos exists in the double fractional order Chen system. Numerical solutions are used to verify the analytical results. PMID:24489508

  11. Scaling analysis of stock markets.

    PubMed

    Bu, Luping; Shang, Pengjian

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we apply the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), local scaling detrended fluctuation analysis (LSDFA), and detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) to investigate correlations of several stock markets. DFA method is for the detection of long-range correlations used in time series. LSDFA method is to show more local properties by using local scale exponents. DCCA method is a developed method to quantify the cross-correlation of two non-stationary time series. We report the results of auto-correlation and cross-correlation behaviors in three western countries and three Chinese stock markets in periods 2004-2006 (before the global financial crisis), 2007-2009 (during the global financial crisis), and 2010-2012 (after the global financial crisis) by using DFA, LSDFA, and DCCA method. The findings are that correlations of stocks are influenced by the economic systems of different countries and the financial crisis. The results indicate that there are stronger auto-correlations in Chinese stocks than western stocks in any period and stronger auto-correlations after the global financial crisis for every stock except Shen Cheng; The LSDFA shows more comprehensive and detailed features than traditional DFA method and the integration of China and the world in economy after the global financial crisis; When it turns to cross-correlations, it shows different properties for six stock markets, while for three Chinese stocks, it reaches the weakest cross-correlations during the global financial crisis.

  12. Scaling analysis of stock markets.

    PubMed

    Bu, Luping; Shang, Pengjian

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we apply the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), local scaling detrended fluctuation analysis (LSDFA), and detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) to investigate correlations of several stock markets. DFA method is for the detection of long-range correlations used in time series. LSDFA method is to show more local properties by using local scale exponents. DCCA method is a developed method to quantify the cross-correlation of two non-stationary time series. We report the results of auto-correlation and cross-correlation behaviors in three western countries and three Chinese stock markets in periods 2004-2006 (before the global financial crisis), 2007-2009 (during the global financial crisis), and 2010-2012 (after the global financial crisis) by using DFA, LSDFA, and DCCA method. The findings are that correlations of stocks are influenced by the economic systems of different countries and the financial crisis. The results indicate that there are stronger auto-correlations in Chinese stocks than western stocks in any period and stronger auto-correlations after the global financial crisis for every stock except Shen Cheng; The LSDFA shows more comprehensive and detailed features than traditional DFA method and the integration of China and the world in economy after the global financial crisis; When it turns to cross-correlations, it shows different properties for six stock markets, while for three Chinese stocks, it reaches the weakest cross-correlations during the global financial crisis. PMID:24985421

  13. Scaling analysis of stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Luping; Shang, Pengjian

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we apply the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), local scaling detrended fluctuation analysis (LSDFA), and detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) to investigate correlations of several stock markets. DFA method is for the detection of long-range correlations used in time series. LSDFA method is to show more local properties by using local scale exponents. DCCA method is a developed method to quantify the cross-correlation of two non-stationary time series. We report the results of auto-correlation and cross-correlation behaviors in three western countries and three Chinese stock markets in periods 2004-2006 (before the global financial crisis), 2007-2009 (during the global financial crisis), and 2010-2012 (after the global financial crisis) by using DFA, LSDFA, and DCCA method. The findings are that correlations of stocks are influenced by the economic systems of different countries and the financial crisis. The results indicate that there are stronger auto-correlations in Chinese stocks than western stocks in any period and stronger auto-correlations after the global financial crisis for every stock except Shen Cheng; The LSDFA shows more comprehensive and detailed features than traditional DFA method and the integration of China and the world in economy after the global financial crisis; When it turns to cross-correlations, it shows different properties for six stock markets, while for three Chinese stocks, it reaches the weakest cross-correlations during the global financial crisis.

  14. Hydrocarbon group analysis of Arabian crude oils TBP-fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, S.A.; Mahmud, F.; AlHarbi, D.K. )

    1990-02-01

    The authors present experimental studies carried out on hydrocarbon group analysis of commercial Arabian crude oil fractions corresponding to the true boiling point ranges of 200-400{sup 0}F, 400-500{sup 0}F, 500-650{sup 0}F, 650-850{sup 0}F and 850{sup 0}F+. The crude oils included Arab heavy (API{sup 0} = 28.0), Arab medium (API{sup 0} = 30.0), Arab light (API{sup 0} = 33.3), and Arab Berry extra light (API{sup 0} = 36.9). Waters Hydrocarbon Group Analyzer (HGA) system interfaced with model 730 Data Module has been used to obtain the compositional analysis in terms of saturates, neutral aromatics, polar aromatics and asphaltenes.

  15. Analysis of organic micropollutants in the lipid fraction of foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Liem, A K; Baumann, R A; de Jong, A P; van der Velde, E G; van Zoonen, P

    1992-10-30

    An overview is given of current techniques for the analysis of organic micropollutants that accumulate in the fatty fraction of foodstuffs, such as pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans. Isolation and clean-up are considered to be of great importance in the field of residue analysis. In general, problems are related to the low levels of the individual compounds at which they usually occur and the complexity of extraction and clean-up procedures for isolating and separating analytes from matrix components and other contaminants. Therefore, special attention is focused on sample pretreatment and on coupled chromatographic techniques, showing developments towards multi-residue methods, miniaturization and automation of analytical procedures. Coupling of chromatographic techniques with spectroscopic techniques is also considered as an important tool for identification and confirmation purposes.

  16. Simulation of Field-Scale Non-Fickian Plumes With Spatiotemporal Fractional Advection- Dispersion Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, D. A.; Zhang, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Conservative solute transport through natural media is typically "anomalous" or non-Fickian. The anomalous transport may be characterized by faster than linear growth of the centered second moment, or non-Gaussian leading or trailing edges of a plume emanating from a point source. These characteristics develop because of non-local dependence on either past (time) or far upstream (space) concentrations. Non-local equations developed to describe anomalous dispersion usually focus on constant transport parameters and/or independence of the transport on space dimension. These simplifications have been useful for fitting simple transport processes, such as laboratory column tests or 1-D projections of field data. However, they may be insufficient for real field settings, where direction-dependent depositional processes and nonstationary heterogeneity can occur. We develop a generalized, multi-dimensional, spatiotemporal fractional advection- dispersion equation (fADE) with variable parameters to characterize regional-scale anomalous dispersion processes including trapping in immobile zones and/or super-Fickian rapid transport. A Lagrangian numerical model of the space-time fractional transport equation is developed in which solute particles can disperse in both space and time, depending on the medium heterogeneity properties, such as the connectivity and statistical distributions of high versus low-permeability deposits. In the generalized fADE, the range of the order of fractional time derivative is (0 2], representing a wide range of possible trapping behavior. The extension of the order to the range (1 2] is novel to transport theory. We apply the numerical model in 1-D and 2-D to the MADE site tritium plumes, and results indicate that this method can capture the main behaviors of realistic plumes, including local variations of spreading, direction-dependent scaling rates, and arbitrary rapid transport along preferential flow paths. Since the governing equation

  17. Fractionation and Analysis of Polypeptides of Euglena gracilis Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, A C; Mendiola-Morgenthaler, L R; Floyd, G L; Salisbury, J L

    1976-07-01

    Intact Euglena gracilis chloroplasts, purified on gradients of silica sol, were lysed osmotically and fractionated by centrifugation on discontinuous gradients of sucrose into their soluble, envelope membrane, and thylakoid membrane components. The proteins of the different subchloroplast fractions, as well as those of whole chloroplasts, were analyzed by electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. The polypeptide profile of each fraction was distinctive and was in general similar to the profile obtained for analogous fractions of the chloroplasts of higher plants.The envelope membranes were separated into two fractions in the gradients according to their banding densities. Electron micrographs showed that the light envelope fraction consisted mostly of single-membrane vesicles, whereas the heavy envelope fraction consisted of multiple layers of folded membranes. Both envelope fractions were ultrastructurally distinct from the thylakoid membranes. PMID:16659627

  18. Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous

    SciTech Connect

    Dick Wingerson

    2004-12-15

    PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

  19. Mokken Scale Analysis Using Hierarchical Clustering Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Abswoude, Alexandra A. H.; Vermunt, Jeroen K.; Hemker, Bas T.; van der Ark, L. Andries

    2004-01-01

    Mokken scale analysis (MSA) can be used to assess and build unidimensional scales from an item pool that is sensitive to multiple dimensions. These scales satisfy a set of scaling conditions, one of which follows from the model of monotone homogeneity. An important drawback of the MSA program is that the sequential item selection and scale…

  20. Mapping canopy gap fraction and leaf area index at continent-scale from satellite lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, C.; Hopkinson, C.; Held, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Information on canopy cover is essential for understanding spatial and temporal variability in vegetation biomass, local meteorological processes and hydrological transfers within vegetated environments. Gap fraction (GF), an index of canopy cover, is often derived over large areas (100's km2) via airborne laser scanning (ALS), estimates of which are reasonably well understood. However, obtaining country-wide estimates is challenging due to the lack of spatially distributed point cloud data. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) removes spatial limitations, however, its large footprint nature and continuous waveform data measurements make derivations of GF challenging. ALS data from 3 Australian sites are used as a basis to scale-up GF estimates to GLAS footprint data by the use of a physically-based Weibull function. Spaceborne estimates of GF are employed in conjunction with supplementary predictor variables in the predictive Random Forest algorithm to yield country-wide estimates at a 250 m spatial resolution; country-wide estimates are accompanied with uncertainties at the pixel level. Preliminary estimates of effective Leaf Area Index (eLAI) are also presented by converting GF via the Beer-Lambert law, where an extinction coefficient of 0.5 is employed; deemed acceptable at such spatial scales. The need for such wide-scale quantification of GF and eLAI are key in the assessment and modification of current forest management strategies across Australia. Such work also assists Australia's Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN), a key asset to policy makers with regards to the management of the national ecosystem, in fulfilling their government issued mandates.

  1. A Quantitative Analysis of Children's Splitting Operations and Fraction Schemes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Anderson; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    2009-01-01

    Teaching experiments with pairs of children have generated several hypotheses about students' construction of fractions. For example, Steffe (2004) hypothesized that robust conceptions of improper fractions depends on the development of a splitting operation. Results from teaching experiments that rely on scheme theory and Steffe's hierarchy of…

  2. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-16

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

  3. Fractionating soils so that others do not have to: radiocarbon informs choice of method for scale, ecosystem, or process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    stock in the top 0-15 cm of mineral soil by 26%; however, sequential density separation into 7 fractions revealed 50-69% increases in C within low density fractions with MRT of less than 5 yr but over 300% losses of soil C within dense fraction with MRT of over 1275 yr. In these Andisols, the sequential density fractionation method was highly sensitive to land use change and the range of densities are hypothesized to be associated with different mechanisms for soil C stabilization acting over different time scales, which was confirmed by the radiocarbon-based MRT estimates. Although soil fractionation methods are powerful, other results from similar Andisols suggest that over geologic time scales MRT estimates for bulk soil profiles can be more informative than soil fractions. Careful consideration of the scientific question, study system, and scale is important when choosing a method for fractionating soil. Radiocarbon measurements can provide confirmation that the actual nature of the recovered fractions matches the theoretical one.

  4. Lie group analysis and similarity solution for fractional Blasius flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Mingyang; Zheng, Liancun; Liu, Fawang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation for boundary layer flow of viscoelastic fluids past a flat plate. Fractional-order Blasius equation with spatial fractional Riemann-Liouville derivative is derived firstly by using Lie group transformation. The solution is obtained numerically by the generalized shooting method, employing the shifted Grünwald formula and classical fourth order Runge-Kutta method as the iterative scheme. The effects of the order of fractional derivative and the generalized Reynolds number on the velocity profiles are analyzed and discussed. Numerical results show that the smaller the value of the fractional order derivative leads to the faster velocity of viscoelastic fluids near the plate but not to hold near the outer flow. As the Reynolds number increases, the fluid is moving faster in the whole boundary layer consistently.

  5. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.; Frisby, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) parameterization of the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) model to demonstrate validation of profile pattern hypotheses derived from multidimensional scaling (MDS). Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is an exploratory method for identifying major…

  6. Phosphorus, copper and zinc in solid and liquid fractions from full-scale and laboratory-separated pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Olga; Hjorth, Maibritt; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2012-09-01

    Pig slurry separation is a slurry treatment technique that can reduce excess loads of P, Cu and Zn to the arable land. This study investigated the effects of different commercial and laboratory separation treatments for pig slurry on P, Cu and Zn distribution into solid and liquid fractions. Solid and liquid separation fractions were collected from two commercial separators installed on the farm. Five different separation treatments were performed (polymer flocculation and drainage; coagulation with iron sulphate addition and polymer flocculation and drainage; ozonation and centrifugation; centrifugation only; and natural sedimentation) on sow and suckling piglet raw slurry. Particle size fractionation was performed on raw slurry and all separation fractions by sequential wet sieving and P, Cu and Zn concentrations were then measured in the particle size classes. Dry matter and total P, Cu and Zn were separated with higher efficiency when chemical pretreatments with flocculants and coagulants were introduced before mechanical separation at both commercial and laboratory scale. When solid fractions are utilized as crop fertilizer (primarily as P fertilizer), the loads of Cu and Zn to the soils are not markedly different than the loads applied with raw slurry. When liquid fractions are used as crop fertilizer (primarily as N fertilizer), the loads of Cu and Zn are markedly lower than those supplied with raw slurry. The loads of Cu and Zn introduced to the soil were lowest on application of the liquid fraction produced by optimized separation treatments that included flocculation and coagulation. PMID:23240207

  7. Phosphorus, copper and zinc in solid and liquid fractions from full-scale and laboratory-separated pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Olga; Hjorth, Maibritt; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2012-09-01

    Pig slurry separation is a slurry treatment technique that can reduce excess loads of P, Cu and Zn to the arable land. This study investigated the effects of different commercial and laboratory separation treatments for pig slurry on P, Cu and Zn distribution into solid and liquid fractions. Solid and liquid separation fractions were collected from two commercial separators installed on the farm. Five different separation treatments were performed (polymer flocculation and drainage; coagulation with iron sulphate addition and polymer flocculation and drainage; ozonation and centrifugation; centrifugation only; and natural sedimentation) on sow and suckling piglet raw slurry. Particle size fractionation was performed on raw slurry and all separation fractions by sequential wet sieving and P, Cu and Zn concentrations were then measured in the particle size classes. Dry matter and total P, Cu and Zn were separated with higher efficiency when chemical pretreatments with flocculants and coagulants were introduced before mechanical separation at both commercial and laboratory scale. When solid fractions are utilized as crop fertilizer (primarily as P fertilizer), the loads of Cu and Zn to the soils are not markedly different than the loads applied with raw slurry. When liquid fractions are used as crop fertilizer (primarily as N fertilizer), the loads of Cu and Zn are markedly lower than those supplied with raw slurry. The loads of Cu and Zn introduced to the soil were lowest on application of the liquid fraction produced by optimized separation treatments that included flocculation and coagulation.

  8. Uncertainty analysis of fission fraction for reactor antineutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X. B.; Lu, F.; Wang, L. Z.; Chen, Y. X.; Zhong, W. L.; An, F. P.

    2016-06-01

    Reactor simulation is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. Therefore, how to evaluate the antineutrino flux uncertainty results from reactor simulation is an important question. In this study, a method of the antineutrino flux uncertainty result from reactor simulation was proposed by considering the correlation coefficient. In order to use this method in the Daya Bay antineutrino experiment, the open source code DRAGON was improved and used for obtaining the fission fraction and correlation coefficient. The average fission fraction between DRAGON and SCIENCE code was compared and the difference was less than 5% for all the four isotopes. The uncertainty of fission fraction was evaluated by comparing simulation atomic density of four main isotopes with Takahama-3 experiment measurement. After that, the uncertainty of the antineutrino flux results from reactor simulation was evaluated as 0.6% per core for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment.

  9. Multielement analysis of metal-binding proteins in cytosol fractions.

    PubMed

    Bray, J T; Webb, L A; Reilly, F J

    1983-06-01

    The distribution of 24 elements among the cytosol protein fractions was determined for specimens of the bivalve mollusc Macoma balthica obtained from three estuarine locations subject to varying levels of metal pollution and on specimens of Rangia cuneata from three areas subject to varying degrees of thermal pollution. Of the 24 elements examined 15 occurred at levels above detection limits and in association with one or more of four distinct protein fractions. Levels of Ag and Cu associated with high molecular weight proteins and with "metallothionein-like" proteins permitted identification of those Macoma balthica specimens exposed to the greatest degree of metal stress.

  10. Stability analysis of impulsive functional systems of fractional order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamova, Ivanka; Stamov, Gani

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a class of impulsive fractional functional differential systems is investigated. Sufficient conditions for stability of the zero solution are proved, extending the corresponding theory of impulsive functional differential equations. The investigations are carried out by using the comparison principle, coupled with the Lyapunov function method. We apply our results to an impulsive single species model of Lotka-Volterra type.

  11. The ALHAMBRA survey: Accurate photometric merger fractions from PDF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sanjuan, C.; Cenarro, A. J..; Varela, J.; Viironen, K.; ALHAMBRA Team

    2015-05-01

    The estimation of the merger fraction in photometric surveys is limited by the large uncertainty in the photometric redshift compared with the velocity difference in kinematical close pairs (less than 500 km s^{-1}). Several efforts have conducted to deal with this limitation and we present the latest improvements. Our new method (i) provides a robust estimation of the merger fraction by using full probability distribution functions (PDFs) instead of Gaussian distributions, as in previous work; (ii) takes into account the dependence of the luminosity on redshift in both the selection of the samples and the definition of major/minor mergers; and (iii) deals with partial PDFs to define ``red" (E/S0 templates) and ``blue" (spiral/starburst templates) samples without apply any colour selection. We highlight our new method with the estimation of the merger fraction at z < 1 in the ALHAMBRA photometric survey. We find that our merger fractions and rates nicely agree with those from previous spectroscopic work. This new method will be capital for current and future large photometric surveys such as DES, SHARDS, J-PAS, or LSST.

  12. Isolation and Analysis of Detergent-Resistant Membrane Fractions.

    PubMed

    Aureli, Massimo; Grassi, Sara; Sonnino, Sandro; Prinetti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that the Golgi apparatus is capable of sorting proteins and sending them to the plasma membrane through "lipid rafts," membrane lipid domains highly enriched in glycosphingolipids, sphingomyelin, ceramide, and cholesterol, was formulated by van Meer and Simons in 1988 and came to a turning point when it was suggested that lipid rafts could be isolated thanks to their resistance to solubilization by some detergents, namely Triton X-100. An incredible number of papers have described the composition and properties of detergent-resistant membrane fractions. However, the use of this method has also raised the fiercest criticisms. In this chapter, we would like to discuss the most relevant methodological aspects related to the preparation of detergent-resistant membrane fractions, and to discuss the importance of discriminating between what is present on a cell membrane and what we can prepare from cell membranes in a laboratory tube.

  13. Analysis of methylsterol fractions from twenty vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Jeong, T M; Itoh, T; Tamura, T; Matsumoto, T

    1975-10-01

    The 4-monomethylsterol and 4,4-dimethylsterol fractions were separated from the unsaponifiables of 20 vegetable oils by preparative thin layer chromatography, and their compositions were determined by gas liquid chromatography. Tentative identification of the individual components of these fractions was carried out by gas liquid chromatography and combined gas liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Among 4-monomethylsterols, obtusifoliol, gramisterol, and citrostadienol occur abundantly in most of the oils. Cycloeucalenol also occurs in some of the oils as a major component of 4-monomethylsterols. Other 4-monomethylsterols tentatively identified are: lophenol, 31-norlanosterol, 31-norcycloartenol, and 31-norlanostenol and/or 4alpha-methylzymostenol. Among 4,4-dimethylsterols, cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartanol followed by beta-amyrin and cycloartanol are common to most of the oils. Butyrospermol, alpha-amyrin, lupeol, and cyclobranol together with a 4,4-dimethylsterol, presumably lanostenol, occur in some of the oils. Cyclolaudenol is present in poppy seed oil. Besides these compounds, each of the oils contains some unidentified members of 4-monomethylsterols and 4,4-dimethylsterols. The methylsterol fraction of capsicum seed oil as compared with that of the other oils is characterized by its very high content of lophenol and cycloartanol together with three other members, presumably 31-norlanostenol, 4alpha-methylzymostenol, and lanostenol.

  14. Analysis of football player's motion in view of fractional calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couceiro, Micael; Clemente, Filipe; Martins, Fernando

    2013-06-01

    Accurately retrieving the position of football players over time may lay the foundations for a whole series of possible new performance metrics for coaches and assistants. Despite the recent developments of automatic tracking systems, the misclassification problem (i.e., misleading a given player by another) still exists and requires human operators as final evaluators. This paper proposes an adaptive fractional calculus (FC) approach to improve the accuracy of tracking methods by estimating the position of players based on their trajectory so far. One half-time of an official football match was used to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed approach under different sampling periods of 250, 500 and 1000 ms. Moreover, the performance of the FC approach was compared with position-based and velocity-based methods. The experimental evaluation shows that the FC method presents a high classification accuracy for small sampling periods. Such results suggest that fractional dynamics may fit the trajectory of football players, thus being useful to increase the autonomy of tracking systems.

  15. Analysis of football player's motion in view of fractional calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couceiro, Micael S.; Clemente, Filipe M.; Martins, Fernando M. L.

    2013-06-01

    Accurately retrieving the position of football players over time may lay the foundations for a whole series of possible new performance metrics for coaches and assistants. Despite the recent developments of automatic tracking systems, the misclassification problem ( i.e., misleading a given player by another) still exists and requires human operators as final evaluators. This paper proposes an adaptive fractional calculus (FC) approach to improve the accuracy of tracking methods by estimating the position of players based on their trajectory so far. One half-time of an official football match was used to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed approach under different sampling periods of 250, 500 and 1000 ms. Moreover, the performance of the FC approach was compared with position-based and velocity-based methods. The experimental evaluation shows that the FC method presents a high classification accuracy for small sampling periods. Such results suggest that fractional dynamics may fit the trajectory of football players, thus being useful to increase the autonomy of tracking systems.

  16. Scaling analysis for the investigation of slip mechanisms in nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effect of slip mechanisms in nanofluids through scaling analysis. The role of nanoparticle slip mechanisms in both water- and ethylene glycol-based nanofluids is analyzed by considering shape, size, concentration, and temperature of the nanoparticles. From the scaling analysis, it is found that all of the slip mechanisms are dominant in particles of cylindrical shape as compared to that of spherical and sheet particles. The magnitudes of slip mechanisms are found to be higher for particles of size between 10 and 80 nm. The Brownian force is found to dominate in smaller particles below 10 nm and also at smaller volume fraction. However, the drag force is found to dominate in smaller particles below 10 nm and at higher volume fraction. The effect of thermophoresis and Magnus forces is found to increase with the particle size and concentration. In terms of time scales, the Brownian and gravity forces act considerably over a longer duration than the other forces. For copper-water-based nanofluid, the effective contribution of slip mechanisms leads to a heat transfer augmentation which is approximately 36% over that of the base fluid. The drag and gravity forces tend to reduce the Nusselt number of the nanofluid while the other forces tend to enhance it. PMID:21791036

  17. Scaling analysis for the investigation of slip mechanisms in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savithiri, S.; Pattamatta, Arvind; Das, Sarit K.

    2011-07-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effect of slip mechanisms in nanofluids through scaling analysis. The role of nanoparticle slip mechanisms in both water- and ethylene glycol-based nanofluids is analyzed by considering shape, size, concentration, and temperature of the nanoparticles. From the scaling analysis, it is found that all of the slip mechanisms are dominant in particles of cylindrical shape as compared to that of spherical and sheet particles. The magnitudes of slip mechanisms are found to be higher for particles of size between 10 and 80 nm. The Brownian force is found to dominate in smaller particles below 10 nm and also at smaller volume fraction. However, the drag force is found to dominate in smaller particles below 10 nm and at higher volume fraction. The effect of thermophoresis and Magnus forces is found to increase with the particle size and concentration. In terms of time scales, the Brownian and gravity forces act considerably over a longer duration than the other forces. For copper-water-based nanofluid, the effective contribution of slip mechanisms leads to a heat transfer augmentation which is approximately 36% over that of the base fluid. The drag and gravity forces tend to reduce the Nusselt number of the nanofluid while the other forces tend to enhance it.

  18. Instantaneous signal attenuation method for analysis of PFG fractional diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoxing

    2016-08-01

    An instantaneous signal attenuation (ISA) method for analyzing pulsed field gradient (PFG) fractional diffusion (FD) has been developed, which is modified from the propagator approach developed in 2001 by Lin et al. for analyzing PFG normal diffusion. Both, the current ISA method and the propagator method have the same fundamental basis that the total signal attenuation (SA) is the accumulation of all the ISA, and the ISA is the average SA of the whole diffusion system at each moment. However, the manner of calculating ISA is different. Unlike the use of the instantaneous propagator in the propagator method, the current method directly calculates ISA as A(K(t‧), t‧ + dt‧)/A(K(t‧), t‧), where A(K(t‧), t‧ + dt‧) and A(K(t‧), t‧) are the SA. This modification makes the current method applicable to PFG FD as the instantaneous propagator may not be obtainable in FD. The ISA method was applied to study PFG SA including the effect of finite gradient pulse widths (FGPW) for free FD, restricted FD and the FD affected by a non-homogeneous gradient field. The SA expressions were successfully obtained for all three types of free FDs while other current methods still have difficulty in obtaining all of them. The results from this method agree with reported results such as that obtained by the effective phase shift diffusion equation (EPSDE) method. The M-Wright phase distribution approximation was also used to derive an SA expression for time FD as a comparison, which agrees with ISA method. Additionally, the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) simulation was performed to simulate the SA of PFG FD, and the simulation results agree with the analytical results. Particularly, the CTRW simulation results give good support to the analytical results including FGPW effect for free FD and restricted time FD based on a fractional derivative model where there have been no corresponding theoretical reports to date. The theoretical SA expressions including FGPW obtained

  19. Instantaneous signal attenuation method for analysis of PFG fractional diffusions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guoxing

    2016-08-01

    An instantaneous signal attenuation (ISA) method for analyzing pulsed field gradient (PFG) fractional diffusion (FD) has been developed, which is modified from the propagator approach developed in 2001 by Lin et al. for analyzing PFG normal diffusion. Both, the current ISA method and the propagator method have the same fundamental basis that the total signal attenuation (SA) is the accumulation of all the ISA, and the ISA is the average SA of the whole diffusion system at each moment. However, the manner of calculating ISA is different. Unlike the use of the instantaneous propagator in the propagator method, the current method directly calculates ISA as A(K(t'),t'+dt')/A(K(t'),t'), where A(K(t'),t'+dt') and A(K(t'),t') are the SA. This modification makes the current method applicable to PFG FD as the instantaneous propagator may not be obtainable in FD. The ISA method was applied to study PFG SA including the effect of finite gradient pulse widths (FGPW) for free FD, restricted FD and the FD affected by a non-homogeneous gradient field. The SA expressions were successfully obtained for all three types of free FDs while other current methods still have difficulty in obtaining all of them. The results from this method agree with reported results such as that obtained by the effective phase shift diffusion equation (EPSDE) method. The M-Wright phase distribution approximation was also used to derive an SA expression for time FD as a comparison, which agrees with ISA method. Additionally, the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) simulation was performed to simulate the SA of PFG FD, and the simulation results agree with the analytical results. Particularly, the CTRW simulation results give good support to the analytical results including FGPW effect for free FD and restricted time FD based on a fractional derivative model where there have been no corresponding theoretical reports to date. The theoretical SA expressions including FGPW obtained here such as [Formula: see

  20. Stability analysis and limit cycle in fractional system with Brusselator nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafiychuk, V.; Datsko, B.

    2008-07-01

    The investigation of limit cycles in the fractional dynamical systems with Brusselator nonlinearities is considered. We present analysis of the stability domains as well as possible solutions realizing at different system parameters.

  1. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DESPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *S...

  2. Preparation of Mitochondrial Enriched Fractions for Metabolic Analysis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Cuesta, Eugenia; Rand, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Since mitochondria play roles in amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and fatty acid oxidation, defects in mitochondrial function often compromise the lives of those who suffer from these complex diseases. Detecting mitochondrial metabolic changes is vital to the understanding of mitochondrial disorders and mitochondrial responses to pharmacological agents. Although mitochondrial metabolism is at the core of metabolic regulation, the detection of subtle changes in mitochondrial metabolism may be hindered by the overrepresentation of other cytosolic metabolites obtained using whole organism or whole tissue extractions. Here we describe an isolation method that detected pronounced mitochondrial metabolic changes in Drosophila that were distinct between whole-fly and mitochondrial enriched preparations. To illustrate the sensitivity of this method, we used a set of Drosophila harboring genetically diverse mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNA) and exposed them to the drug rapamycin. Using this method we showed that rapamycin modifies mitochondrial metabolism in a mitochondrial-genotype-dependent manner. However, these changes are much more distinct in metabolomics studies when metabolites were extracted from mitochondrial enriched fractions. In contrast, whole tissue extracts only detected metabolic changes mediated by the drug rapamycin independently of mtDNAs. PMID:26485391

  3. Analysis of insecticidal Azadirachta indica A. Juss. fractions.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Bina Shaheen; Rasheed, Munawwer; Ilyas, Firdous; Gulzar, Tahsin; Tariq, Rajput Mohammad; Naqvi, Syed Naim-ul-Hassan

    2004-01-01

    As a result of chemical investigation on the ethanolic extract of fresh fruit coatings of Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (neem), twenty-seven compounds were identified in non-polar to less polar fractions which showed pesticidal activity determined by WHO method against Anopheles stephensi Liston. These identifications were basically made through GC-EIMS and were further supported by other spectroscopic techniques, including 13C NMR, UV and FTIR as well as retention indices. Thus sixteen n-alkanes, 1-16; three aromatics 2,6-bis-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methyl phenol (17), 2-(phenylmethylene)-octanal (20), 1,2,4-trimethoxy-5-(1Z-propenyl)-benzene (27); three benzopyranoids 3,4-dihydro-4,4,5,8-tetramethylcoumarin (18), 3,4-dihydro-4,4,7,8-tetramethylcoumarin-6-ol (19), 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethyl-cyclopenta[g]-2-benzopyran (22); one sesquiterpene methyl-3,7,11-trimethyl-2E,6E,10-dodecatrienoate (21); three esters of fatty acids methyl 14-methyl-pentadecanoate (23), ethyl hexadecanoate (24), ethyl 9Z-octadecenoate (25) and one monoterpene 3,7-dimethyl-1-octen-7-ol (26) were identified. Except 6, 8, 24 and 25 all these compounds were identified for the first time from the pericarp and fifteen of these, 1-3, 7, 9, 10, 17-23, 26, 27, are hitherto unreported previously from any part of the tree. Although this tree is a rich source of various natural products, it is the first report of identification of mono- and sesquiterpenes 26 and 21 and a potent antioxidant, 17. PMID:15018062

  4. Numerical analysis of scalar dissipation length-scales and their scaling properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishnavi, Pankaj; Kronenburg, Andreas

    2006-11-01

    Scalar dissipation rate, χ, is fundamental to the description of scalar-mixing in turbulent non-premixed combustion. Most contributions to the statistics for χ come from the finest turbulent mixing-scales and thus its adequate characterisation requires good resolution. Reliable χ-measurement is complicated by the trade-off between higher resolution and greater signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, the present numerical study utilises the error-free mixture fraction, Z, and fluid mechanical data from the turbulent reacting jet DNS of Pantano (2004). The aim is to quantify the resolution requirements for χ-measurement in terms of easily measurable properties of the flow like the integral-scale Reynolds number, Reδ, using spectral and spatial-filtering [cf. Barlow and Karpetis (2005)] analyses. Analysis of the 1-D cross-stream dissipation spectra enables the estimation of the dissipation length scales. It is shown that these spectrally-computed scales follow the expected Kolmogorov scaling with Reδ-0.75 . The work also involves local smoothening of the instantaneous χ-field over a non-overlapping spatial-interval (filter-width, wf), to study the smoothened χ-value as a function of wf, as wf is extrapolated to the smallest scale of interest. The dissipation length-scales thus captured show a stringent Reδ-1 scaling, compared to the usual Kolmogorov-type. This concurs with the criterion of 'resolution adequacy' of the DNS, as set out by Sreenivasan (2004) using the theory of multi-fractals.

  5. Emissions from small-scale energy production using co-combustion of biofuel and the dry fraction of household waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hedman, Bjoern . E-mail: bjorn.hedman@chem.umu.se; Burvall, Jan; Nilsson, Calle; Marklund, Stellan

    2005-07-01

    In sparsely populated rural areas, recycling of household waste might not always be the most environmentally advantageous solution due to the total amount of transport involved. In this study, an alternative approach to recycling has been tested using efficient small-scale biofuel boilers for co-combustion of biofuel and high-energy waste. The dry combustible fraction of source-sorted household waste was mixed with the energy crop reed canary-grass (Phalaris Arundinacea L.), and combusted in both a 5-kW pilot scale reactor and a biofuel boiler with 140-180 kW output capacity, in the form of pellets and briquettes, respectively. The chlorine content of the waste fraction was 0.2%, most of which originated from plastics. The HCl emissions exceeded levels stipulated in new EU-directives, but levels of equal magnitude were also generated from combustion of the pure biofuel. Addition of waste to the biofuel did not give any apparent increase in emissions of organic compounds. Dioxin levels were close to stipulated limits. With further refinement of combustion equipment, small-scale co-combustion systems have the potential to comply with emission regulations.

  6. EFFECTS OF OXYGEN AND AIR MIXING ON VOID FRACTIONS IN A LARGE SCALE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R; Hector Guerrero, H; Michael Restivo, M

    2008-09-11

    Oxygen and air mixing with spargers was performed in a 30 foot tall by 30 inch diameter column, to investigate mass transfer as air sparged up through the column and removed saturated oxygen from solution. The mixing techniques required to support this research are the focus of this paper. The fluids tested included water, water with an antifoam agent (AFA), and a high, solids content, Bingham plastic, nuclear waste simulant with AFA, referred to as AZ01 simulant, which is non-radioactive. Mixing of fluids in the column was performed using a recirculation system and an air sparger. The re-circulation system consisted of the column, a re-circulating pump, and associated piping. The air sparger was fabricated from a two inch diameter pipe concentrically installed in the column and open near the bottom of the column. The column contents were slowly re-circulated while fluids were mixed with the air sparger. Samples were rheologically tested to ensure effective mixing, as required. Once the fluids were adequately mixed, oxygen was homogeneously added through the re-circulation loop using a sintered metal oxygen sparger followed by a static mixer. Then the air sparger was re-actuated to remove oxygen from solution as air bubbled up through solution. To monitor mixing effectiveness several variables were monitored, which included flow rates, oxygen concentration, differential pressures along the column height, fluid levels, and void fractions, which are defined as the percent of dissolved gas divided by the total volume of gas and liquid. Research showed that mixing was uniform for water and water with AFA, but mixing for the AZ101 fluid was far more complex. Although mixing of AZ101 was uniform throughout most of the column, gas entrapment and settling of solids significantly affected test results. The detailed test results presented here provide some insight into the complexities of mixing and void fractions for different fluids and how the mixing process itself

  7. Plasma Fractionation Enriches Post-Myocardial Infarction Samples Prior to Proteomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Brás, Lisandra E.; DeLeon, Kristine Y.; Ma, Yonggang; Dai, Qiuxia; Hakala, Kevin; Weintraub, Susan T.; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2012-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels increase, and MMP-9 deletion improves post-MI remodeling of the left ventricle (LV). We provide here a technical report on plasma-analysis from wild type (WT) and MMP-9 null mice using fractionation and mass-spectrometry-based proteomics. MI was induced by coronary artery ligation in male WT and MMP-9 null mice (4–8 months old; n = 3/genotype). Plasma was collected on days 0 (pre-) and 1 post-MI. Plasma proteins were fractionated and proteins in the lowest (fraction 1) and highest (fraction 12) molecular weight fractions were separated by 1-D SDS-PAGE, digested in-gel with trypsin and analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS on an Orbitrap Velos. We tried five different fractionation protocols, before reaching an optimized protocol that allowed us to identify over 100 proteins. Serum amyloid A substantially increased post-MI in both genotypes, while alpha-2 macroglobulin increased only in the null samples. In fraction 12, extracellular matrix proteins were observed only post-MI. Interestingly, fibronectin-1, a substrate of MMP-9, was identified at both day 0 and day 1 post-MI in the MMP-9 null mice but was only identified post-MI in the WT mice. In conclusion, plasma fractionation offers an improved depletion-free method to evaluate plasma changes following MI. PMID:22778955

  8. Fractional calculus ties the microscopic and macroscopic scales of complex network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, B. J.; Turalska, M.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    A two-state, master equation-based decision-making model has been shown to generate phase transitions, to be topologically complex, and to manifest temporal complexity through an inverse power-law probability distribution function in the switching times between the two critical states of consensus. These properties are entailed by the fundamental assumption that the network elements in the decision-making model imperfectly imitate one another. The process of subordination establishes that a single network element can be described by a fractional master equation whose analytic solution yields the observed inverse power-law probability distribution obtained by numerical integration of the two-state master equation to a high degree of accuracy.

  9. Dark matter fraction of low-mass cluster members probed by galaxy-scale strong lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, W. G.; Grillo, C.; Mercurio, A.; Balestra, I.; Rosati, P.; Christensen, L.; Lombardi, M.; Caminha, G. B.; Nonino, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Umetsu, K.

    2016-05-01

    We present a strong lensing system, composed of four multiple images of a source at z = 2.387, created by two lens galaxies, G1 and G2, belonging to the galaxy cluster MACS J1115.9+0129 at z = 0.353. We use observations taken as part of the Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble, and its spectroscopic follow-up programme at the Very Large Telescope, to estimate the total mass distributions of the two galaxies and the cluster through strong gravitational lensing models. We find that the total projected mass values within the half-light radii, Re, of the two lens galaxies are MT,G1(fractions within Re of 0.11 ± 0.03, for G1, and 0.73 ± 0.32, for G2. The fact that the less massive galaxy, G1, is dark matter-dominated in its inner regions raises the question of whether the dark matter fraction in the core of early-type galaxies depends on their mass. Further investigating strong lensing systems will help us understand the influence that dark matter has on the structure and evolution of the inner regions of galaxies.

  10. Sensitivity analysis for large-scale problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Whitworth, Sandra L.

    1987-01-01

    The development of efficient techniques for calculating sensitivity derivatives is studied. The objective is to present a computational procedure for calculating sensitivity derivatives as part of performing structural reanalysis for large-scale problems. The scope is limited to framed type structures. Both linear static analysis and free-vibration eigenvalue problems are considered.

  11. Scale Free Reduced Rank Image Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horst, Paul

    In the traditional Guttman-Harris type image analysis, a transformation is applied to the data matrix such that each column of the transformed data matrix is the best least squares estimate of the corresponding column of the data matrix from the remaining columns. The model is scale free. However, it assumes (1) that the correlation matrix is…

  12. Subcellular fractionation of human neutrophils and analysis of subcellular markers.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Stine Novrup; Udby, Lene; Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The neutrophil has long been recognized for its impressive number of cytoplasmic granules that harbor proteins indispensable for innate immunity. Analysis of isolated granules has provided important information on how the neutrophil grades its response to match the challenges it meets on its passage from blood to tissues. Nitrogen cavitation was developed as a method for disruption of cells on the assumption that sudden reduction of the partial pressure of nitrogen would lead to aeration of nitrogen dissolved in the lipid bilayer of plasma membranes. We find that cells are broken by the shear stress that is associated with passage through the outlet valve under high pressure and that this results in disruption of the neutrophil cell membrane while granules remain intact. The unique properties of Percoll as a sedimentable density medium with no inherent tonicity or viscosity are used for creation of continuous density gradients with shoulders in the density profile created to optimize the physical separation of granule subsets and light membranes. Immunological methods (sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) are used for quantitation of proteins that are characteristic constituents of the granule subsets of neutrophils. PMID:24504946

  13. In-depth analysis of low abundant proteins in bovine colostrum using different fractionation techniques.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Asger; Bendixen, Emøke; Ingvartsen, Klaus Lønne; Røntved, Christine Maria

    2012-09-01

    Bovine colostrum is well known for its large content of bioactive components and its importance for neonatal survival. Unfortunately, the colostrum proteome is complicated by a wide dynamic range, because of a few dominating proteins that hamper sensitivity and proteome coverage achieved on low abundant proteins. Moreover, the composition of colostrum is complex and the proteins are located within different physical fractions that make up the colostrum. To gain a more exhaustive picture of the bovine colostrum proteome and gather information on protein location, we performed an extensive pre-analysis fractionation of colostrum prior to 2D-LC-MS/MS analysis. Physical and chemical properties of the proteins and colostrum were used alone or in combination for the separation of proteins. ELISA was used to quantify and verify the presence of proteins in colostrum. In total, 403 proteins were identified in the nonfractionated colostrum (NF) and seven fractions (F1-F7) using six different fractionation techniques. Fractionation contributed with 69 additional proteins in the fluid phase compared with NF. Different fractionation techniques each resulted in detection of unique subsets of proteins. Whey production by high-speed centrifugation contributed most to detection of low abundant proteins. Hence, prefractionation of colostrum prior to 2D-LC-MS/MS analysis expanded our knowledge on the presence and location of low abundant proteins in bovine colostrum. PMID:22848049

  14. Resolution or Analysis Scale: What Matters Most?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bradley

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the scale at which different covariates best explain the variation of soil properties reflects the geographic strategy of using map generalization (relative size of map delineations) to identify the scale at which phenomena occur. The size of map delineations corresponds to resolution in raster data models. Although not always considered in digital soil mapping studies, resolution is widely recognized as an important factor in identifying covariates in digital spatial analysis. However, many variables that are useful as predictors in digital soil mapping are dependent upon spatial context. For example, the slope gradient at a specific location can only be calculated by considering the surrounding area. In these cases, an analysis neighborhood is used when calculating such variables using a raster data model. The context or area considered is then dependent upon both the resolution and the number of cells (window size) used to define the neighborhood. This presentation explores the difference between resolution and analysis scale, then tests which concept is most important for identifying optimal scales of correlation for digital soil informatics.

  15. Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Activities and Phytochemical Analysis of Euphorbia wallichii Root Extract and its Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Ihsan; Ullah, Nazif; Bibi, Gulnaz; Kanwal, Simab; Sheeraz Ahmad, Muhammad; Mirza, Bushra

    2012-01-01

    Euphorbia wallichii a perennial herb growing mainly in Himalayas has been widely used in folk medicines for its medicinal properties. In the present study, the crude methanolic root extract (CME) and its fractions; n-Hexane Fraction (NHF), n-Butanol Fraction (NBF), Chloroform Fraction (CHF), Ethyl acetate Fraction (EAF) and Aqueous Fraction (AQF) of this plant specie were investigated for antioxidant and cytotoxic activities and phytochemical analysis. Antioxidant activity was determined by using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) and DNA protection assay performed on pBR322 plasmid DNA. In both these assays, promising results were obtained for CME as well as other fractions. The IC50 values for DPPH assay were in a range of 7.89 to 63.35 μg/ml in which EAF showed the best anti-oxidant potential and almost all the tested samples showed certain level of DNA protection. The cytotoxic activity was assessed by using Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay on human cell lines; H157 (Lung Carcinoma) and HT144 (Malignant Melanoma). The IC50 values of the tested samples ranged from 0.18 to 1.4 mg/mL against H157 cell line whereas against HT144 cell line the IC50 values ranged from 0.46 to 17.88 mg/mL with NBF fraction showing maximum potential for both. Furthermore, the phytochemical analysis of CME and its fractions showed the presences of flavonoids, saponins, tannins, terpenoides and cardiac glycosides with varying concentrations. PMID:24250446

  16. Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Chanakya, H.N. Sharma, Isha; Ramachandra, T.V.

    2009-04-15

    The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30 d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks.

  17. Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Chanakya, H N; Sharma, Isha; Ramachandra, T V

    2009-04-01

    The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks. PMID:19081239

  18. HPTLC Analysis of Bioactivity Guided Anticancer Enriched Fraction of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Picrorhiza kurroa

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Md. Nasar; Singh, Mhaveer; Parveen, Rabea; Khan, Washim; Ahmad, Sayeed; Zeeshan Najm, Mohammad; Husain, Syed Akhtar

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Hydroalcoholic extract of Picrorhiza kurroa and its fractions were subjected to in vitro screening for cytotoxicity; further best active fraction (BAF) obtained was tested against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) model in Balb/c mice after its quality control analysis. Methods. Cytotoxicities of all the fractions and mother extract of P. kurroa were determined, using MTT assay on breast cancer (MCF-7, MDA-MB 231) and cervical cancer (HeLa, SiHa) cell lines. Metabolic fingerprinting was developed using HPTLC with quantification of biomarkers (cucurbitacins B and E; betulinic acid; picrosides 1 and 2; and apocynin) in BAF. The EAC tumor-bearing mice were used for in vivo anticancer activity after oral administration (50 mg Kg−1) for 10 days. Results. Cytotoxicity assay of mother extract and its fractions over breast cancer and cervix cancer cell lines showed that dichloromethane (DCM) fraction was most cytotoxic (IC50 36.0–51.0 µg mL−1 at 72 h). Oral administration of DCM fraction showed significant reduction in tumor regression parameters, viable tumor cell count and restoration of hematological parameters may be due to presence of cucurbitacins B and E; betulinic acid; picrosides 1 and 2; and apocynin, as compared to the untreated mice of the control group. Conclusion. The DCM fraction of P. kurroa displayed potent anticancer activity and can be further explored for the development of a potential candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:26557675

  19. Analysis of Nuclear RNA Interference (RNAi) in Human Cells by Subcellular Fractionation and Argonaute Loading

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Li, Liande; Janowski, Bethany A.; Corey, David R.

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is well known for its ability to regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. In mammalian cell nuclei, however, the impact of RNAi has remained more controversial. A key technical hurdle has been a lack of optimized protocols for the isolation and analysis of cell nuclei. Here we describe a simplified protocol for nuclei isolation from cultured cells that incorporates a method for obtaining nucleoplasmic and chromatin fractions and removing cytoplasmic contamination. Cell fractions can then be used to detect the presence and activity of RNAi factors in the nucleus. We present a protocol for investigating an early step in RNAi, Argonaute protein loading with small RNAs, which is enabled by our improved extract preparations. These protocols facilitate characterization of nuclear RNAi and can be applied to the analysis of other nuclear proteins and pathways. From cellular fractionation to analysis of Argonaute loading results, this protocol takes 4–6 d to complete. PMID:25079428

  20. Dynamical analysis of strongly nonlinear fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shao-Fang; Shen, Yong-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Na; Yang, Shao-Pu; Xing, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the computation schemes for periodic solutions of the forced fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation are derived based on incremental harmonic balance (IHB) method. The general forms of periodic solutions are founded by the IHB method, which could be useful to obtain the periodic solutions with higher precision. The comparisons of the approximate analytical solutions by the IHB method and numerical integration are fulfilled, and the results certify the correctness and higher precision of the solutions by the IHB method. The dynamical analysis of strongly nonlinear fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation is investigated by the IHB method. Then, the effects of the excitation frequency, fractional order, fractional coefficient, and nonlinear stiffness coefficient on the complex dynamical behaviors are analyzed. At last, the detailed results are summarized and the conclusions are made, which present some useful information to analyze and/or control the dynamical response of this kind of system. PMID:27586626

  1. Dynamical analysis of strongly nonlinear fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Shao-Fang; Shen, Yong-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Na; Yang, Shao-Pu; Xing, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the computation schemes for periodic solutions of the forced fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation are derived based on incremental harmonic balance (IHB) method. The general forms of periodic solutions are founded by the IHB method, which could be useful to obtain the periodic solutions with higher precision. The comparisons of the approximate analytical solutions by the IHB method and numerical integration are fulfilled, and the results certify the correctness and higher precision of the solutions by the IHB method. The dynamical analysis of strongly nonlinear fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation is investigated by the IHB method. Then, the effects of the excitation frequency, fractional order, fractional coefficient, and nonlinear stiffness coefficient on the complex dynamical behaviors are analyzed. At last, the detailed results are summarized and the conclusions are made, which present some useful information to analyze and/or control the dynamical response of this kind of system.

  2. Global Identification and Differential Distribution Analysis of Glycans in Subcellular Fractions of Bladder Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ganglong; Huang, Luyu; Zhang, Jiaxu; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular components and their associated biological processes is crucial for cellular function. Protein glycosylation provides a basis for diversity of protein functions. Diversity of glycan composition in animal cells remains poorly understood. We used differential centrifugation techniques to isolate four subcellular protein fractions from homogenate of metastatic bladder YTS1 cells, low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells and normal bladder epithelia HCV29 cells: microsomal (Mic), mitochondrial (Mito), nuclear (Nuc), and cytosolic (Cyto). An integrated strategy combining lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis was then applied to evaluate protein glycosylation of the four fractions. Lectin microarray analysis revealed significant differences among the four fractions in terms of glycan binding to the lectins LCA, AAL, MPL, WGA and PWM in YTS1 cell, STL, Jacalin, VVA, LCA and WGA in KK47, and ConA, GNA, VVA and ACA in HCV29 cell. Among a total of 40, 32 and 15 N-glycans in four fractions of three cells detected by MS analysis, high-mannose and fucosylated structures were predominant, 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 5 N-glycans in KK47 and 7 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in all four fractions; and 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 16 N-glycans in KK47, and 3 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in only one fraction. Glycans in the latter category are considered potential markers for the corresponding organelles. The integrated strategy described here allows detailed examination of glycomes subcellular fraction with high resolution and sensitivity, and will be useful for elucidation of the functional roles of glycans and corresponding glycosylated proteins in distinct organelles. PMID:27313494

  3. Microbial activity balance in size fractionated suspended growth biomass from full-scale sidestream combined nitritation-anammox reactors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yijing; Wells, George; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance, distribution and activity of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox in size fractionated aggregates from full-scale suspended growth combined nitritation-anammox sidestream reactors. Plants with or without a cyclone device were also studied to assess a purported enrichment of anammox granules. Specific aerobic ammonium oxidation rates (p=0.01) and specific oxygen uptake rates (p=0.02) were significantly greater in flocs than in granules. AOB abundance measured using quantitative FISH was significantly higher in flocs than in granules (p=0.01). Conversely, anammox abundance was significantly greater in granules (p=0.03). The average ratio of anammox/AOB in systems employing hydrocyclone separation devices was 2.4, significantly higher (p=0.02) than the average ratio (0.5) in a system without a hydrocyclone. Our results demonstrate substantial functional and population-level segregation between floccular and granular fractions, and provide a key corroboration that cyclone separation devices can increase anammox levels in such systems.

  4. Different hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid formation in higher plants: Implications for paleohydrology reconstruction at a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhao; Liu, Weiguo; An, Zhisheng; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Leaf wax δDn-alkane values have shown to differ significantly among plant life forms (e.g., among grasses, shrubs, and trees) in higher plants. However, the underlying causes for the differences in leaf wax δDn-alkane values among different plant life forms remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed that leaf wax δDn-alkane values between major high plant lineages (eudicots versus monocots) differed significantly under the same environmental conditions. Such a difference primarily inherited from different hydrogen biosynthetic fractionations (εwax-lw). Based upon a reanalysis of the available leaf wax δDn-alkane dataset from modern plants in the Northern Hemisphere, we discovered that the apparent hydrogen fractionation factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax δDn-alkane values of major angiosperm lineages and precipitation δD values exhibited distinguishable distribution patterns at a global scale, with an average of ‑140‰ for monocotyledonous species, ‑107‰ for dicotyledonous species. Additionally, variations of leaf wax δDn-alkane values and the εwax-p values in gymnosperms are similar to those of dicotyledonous species. Therefore, the data let us believe that biological factors inherited from plant taxonomies have a significant effect on controlling leaf wax δDn-alkane values in higher plants.

  5. Different hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid formation in higher plants: Implications for paleohydrology reconstruction at a global scale

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinzhao; Liu, Weiguo; An, Zhisheng; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Leaf wax δDn-alkane values have shown to differ significantly among plant life forms (e.g., among grasses, shrubs, and trees) in higher plants. However, the underlying causes for the differences in leaf wax δDn-alkane values among different plant life forms remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed that leaf wax δDn-alkane values between major high plant lineages (eudicots versus monocots) differed significantly under the same environmental conditions. Such a difference primarily inherited from different hydrogen biosynthetic fractionations (εwax-lw). Based upon a reanalysis of the available leaf wax δDn-alkane dataset from modern plants in the Northern Hemisphere, we discovered that the apparent hydrogen fractionation factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax δDn-alkane values of major angiosperm lineages and precipitation δD values exhibited distinguishable distribution patterns at a global scale, with an average of −140‰ for monocotyledonous species, −107‰ for dicotyledonous species. Additionally, variations of leaf wax δDn-alkane values and the εwax-p values in gymnosperms are similar to those of dicotyledonous species. Therefore, the data let us believe that biological factors inherited from plant taxonomies have a significant effect on controlling leaf wax δDn-alkane values in higher plants. PMID:26806719

  6. Microbial activity balance in size fractionated suspended growth biomass from full-scale sidestream combined nitritation-anammox reactors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yijing; Wells, George; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance, distribution and activity of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox in size fractionated aggregates from full-scale suspended growth combined nitritation-anammox sidestream reactors. Plants with or without a cyclone device were also studied to assess a purported enrichment of anammox granules. Specific aerobic ammonium oxidation rates (p=0.01) and specific oxygen uptake rates (p=0.02) were significantly greater in flocs than in granules. AOB abundance measured using quantitative FISH was significantly higher in flocs than in granules (p=0.01). Conversely, anammox abundance was significantly greater in granules (p=0.03). The average ratio of anammox/AOB in systems employing hydrocyclone separation devices was 2.4, significantly higher (p=0.02) than the average ratio (0.5) in a system without a hydrocyclone. Our results demonstrate substantial functional and population-level segregation between floccular and granular fractions, and provide a key corroboration that cyclone separation devices can increase anammox levels in such systems. PMID:27347796

  7. Stability analysis of memristor-based fractional-order neural networks with different memductance functions.

    PubMed

    Rakkiyappan, R; Velmurugan, G; Cao, Jinde

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the problem of the existence, uniqueness and uniform stability of memristor-based fractional-order neural networks (MFNNs) with two different types of memductance functions is extensively investigated. Moreover, we formulate the complex-valued memristor-based fractional-order neural networks (CVMFNNs) with two different types of memductance functions and analyze the existence, uniqueness and uniform stability of such networks. By using Banach contraction principle and analysis technique, some sufficient conditions are obtained to ensure the existence, uniqueness and uniform stability of the considered MFNNs and CVMFNNs with two different types of memductance functions. The analysis results establish from the theory of fractional-order differential equations with discontinuous right-hand sides. Finally, four numerical examples are presented to show the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  8. Scaling the fractional advective-dispersive equation for numerical evaluation of microbial dynamics in confined geometries with sticky boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, R.; Cushman, J.H.

    2008-06-20

    Microbial motility is often characterized by 'run and tumble' behavior which consists of bacteria making sequences of runs followed by tumbles (random changes in direction). As a superset of Brownian motion, Levy motion seems to describe such a motility pattern. The Eulerian (Fokker-Planck) equation describing these motions is similar to the classical advection-diffusion equation except that the order of highest derivative is fractional, {alpha} element of (0, 2]. The Lagrangian equation, driven by a Levy measure with drift, is stochastic and employed to numerically explore the dynamics of microbes in a flow cell with sticky boundaries. The Eulerian equation is used to non-dimensionalize parameters. The amount of sorbed time on the boundaries is modeled as a random variable that can vary over a wide range of values. Salient features of first passage time are studied with respect to scaled parameters.

  9. Optimizing threshold for extreme scale analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Robert; Moreland, Kenneth; Atyachit, Utkarsh; Geveci, Berk; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2013-01-01

    As the HPC community starts focusing its efforts towards exascale, it becomes clear that we are looking at machines with a billion way concurrency. Although parallel computing has been at the core of the performance gains achieved until now, scaling over 1,000 times the current concurrency can be challenging. As discussed in this paper, even the smallest memory access and synchronization overheads can cause major bottlenecks at this scale. As we develop new software and adapt existing algorithms for exascale, we need to be cognizant of such pitfalls. In this paper, we document our experience with optimizing a fairly common and parallelizable visualization algorithm, threshold of cells based on scalar values, for such highly concurrent architectures. Our experiments help us identify design patterns that can be generalized for other visualization algorithms as well. We discuss our implementation within the Dax toolkit, which is a framework for data analysis and visualization at extreme scale. The Dax toolkit employs the patterns discussed here within the framework's scaffolding to make it easier for algorithm developers to write algorithms without having to worry about such scaling issues.

  10. Determining organic carbon distributions in soil particle size fractions as a precondition of lateral carbon transport modeling at large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Seher, Wiebke; Pfeffer, Eduard; Schultze, Nico; Amorim, Ricardo S. S.; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The erosional transport of organic carbon has an effect on the global carbon budget, however, it is uncertain, whether erosion is a sink or a source for carbon in the atmosphere. Continuous erosion leads to a massive loss of top soils including the loss of organic carbon historically accumulated in the soil humus fraction. The colluvial organic carbon could be protected from further degradation depending on the depth of the colluvial cover and local decomposing conditions. Another part of eroded soils and organic carbon will enter surface water bodies and might be transported over long distances. The selective nature of soil erosion results in a preferential transport of fine particles while less carbonic larger particles remain on site. Consequently organic carbon is enriched in the eroded sediment compared to the origin soil. As a precondition of process based lateral carbon flux modeling, carbon distribution on soil particle size fractions has to be known. In this regard the present study refers to the determination of organic carbon contents on soil particle size separates by a combined sieve-sedimentation method for different tropical and temperate soils Our results suggest high influences of parent material and climatic conditions on carbon distribution on soil particle separates. By applying these results in erosion modeling a test slope was simulated with the EROSION 2D simulation software covering certain land use and soil management scenarios referring to different rainfall events. These simulations allow first insights on carbon loss and depletion on sediment delivery areas as well as carbon gains and enrichments on deposition areas on the landscape scale and could be used as a step forward in landscape scaled carbon redistribution modeling.

  11. Molecular-level analysis of organic matter structure and composition from different soil mineral fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, J. S.; Gregorich, E. G.; Simpson, A. J.; Simpson, M. J.

    2009-04-01

    The formation and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) depends on the inherent chemical characteristics of biomolecular inputs (lignin, proteins, carbohydrates, macromolecular lipids, etc.) as well as the interactions between biomolecules and soil mineral fractions. The objective of this study is to characterize organic matter associated with the light, sand, silt and clay fractions of a Canadian agricultural soil. And, because lignin is believed to be a major contributor in SOM formation and preservation, the oxidation state of lignin in the different mineral fractions was measured using mild alkaline copper oxidation and gas chromatography - mass spectrometery which releases lignin phenols that are indicative of lignin sources and stage of degradation. For example, an increase in the acid/aldehyde (Ad/Al) ratio of lignin phenols has been observed with increased lignin degradation (and oxidation). In this study, lignin phenols from organic matter associated with the clay fraction had higher Ad/Al ratios for both syringyl and vanillyl lignin monomers when compared to that associated with silt, sand and the whole soil. These results suggest that either lignin degradation is enhanced by SOM association with clay surfaces or that oxidized lignin is preserved on clay mineral surfaces via sorption after partial degradation has occurred. The structural characteristics of organic matter from the soil fractions will also be examined by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Organic matter associated with each mineral fraction will be extracted with NaOH for high resolution solution-state NMR spectroscopy. Results from NMR analysis will determine the relative abundance of functional groups (alkane, aromatic, carbonyl, alkoxy) in each of the soil fractions. Relative intensities of the functional groups are indicative of relative contributions of biomolecular classes such as lipids, lignin, fatty acids, and sugars to the organic matter associated with

  12. Molecular-Level Analysis of Organic Matter Structure and Composition from Different Soil Mineral Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, J. S.; Gregorich, E. G.; Simpson, A. J.; Simpson, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    The formation and turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) depends on the inherent chemical characteristics of biomolecular inputs (lignin, proteins, carbohydrates, macromolecular lipids, etc.) as well as the interactions between biomolecules and soil mineral fractions. The objective of this study is to characterize organic matter associated with the light, sand, silt and clay fractions of a Canadian agricultural soil. And, because lignin is believed to be a major contributor in SOM formation and preservation, the oxidation state of lignin in the different mineral fractions was measured using mild alkaline copper oxidation and gas chromatography - mass spectrometery which releases lignin phenols that are indicative of lignin sources and stage of degradation. For example, an increase in the acid/aldehyde (Ad/Al) ratio of lignin phenols has been observed with increased lignin degradation (and oxidation). In this study, lignin phenols from organic matter associated with the clay fraction had higher Ad/Al ratios for both syringyl and vanillyl lignin monomers when compared to that associated with silt, sand and the whole soil. These results suggest that either lignin degradation is enhanced by SOM association with clay surfaces or that oxidized lignin is preserved on clay mineral surfaces via sorption after partial degradation has occurred. The structural characteristics of organic matter from the soil fractions will also be examined by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Organic matter associated with each mineral fraction will be extracted with NaOH for high resolution solution-state NMR spectroscopy. Results from NMR analysis will determine the relative abundance of functional groups (alkane, aromatic, carbonyl, alkoxy) in each of the soil fractions. Relative intensities of the functional groups are indicative of relative contributions of biomolecular classes such as lipids, lignin, fatty acids, and sugars to the organic matter associated with

  13. A comparative analysis of British and Taiwanese students' conceptual and procedural knowledge of fraction addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-Chuan

    2014-10-01

    This study examines students' procedural and conceptual achievement in fraction addition in England and Taiwan. A total of 1209 participants (561 British students and 648 Taiwanese students) at ages 12 and 13 were recruited from England and Taiwan to take part in the study. A quantitative design by means of a self-designed written test is adopted as central to the methodological considerations. The test has two major parts: the concept part and the skill part. The former is concerned with students' conceptual knowledge of fraction addition and the latter is interested in students' procedural competence when adding fractions. There were statistically significant differences both in concept and skill parts between the British and Taiwanese groups with the latter having a higher score. The analysis of the students' responses to the skill section indicates that the superiority of Taiwanese students' procedural achievements over those of their British peers is because most of the former are able to apply algorithms to adding fractions far more successfully than the latter. Earlier, Hart [1] reported that around 30% of the British students in their study used an erroneous strategy (adding tops and bottoms, for example, 2/3 + 1/7 = 3/10) while adding fractions. This study also finds that nearly the same percentage of the British group remained using this erroneous strategy to add fractions as Hart found in 1981. The study also provides evidence to show that students' understanding of fractions is confused and incomplete, even those who are successfully able to perform operations. More research is needed to be done to help students make sense of the operations and eventually attain computational competence with meaningful grounding in the domain of fractions.

  14. Large-Scale Visual Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Modern high performance computers have speeds measured in petaflops and handle data set sizes measured in terabytes and petabytes. Although these machines offer enormous potential for solving very large-scale realistic computational problems, their effectiveness will hinge upon the ability of human experts to interact with their simulation results and extract useful information. One of the greatest scientific challenges of the 21st century is to effectively understand and make use of the vast amount of information being produced. Visual data analysis will be among our most most important tools in helping to understand such large-scale information. Our research at the Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute at the University of Utah has focused on innovative, scalable techniques for large-scale 3D visual data analysis. In this talk, I will present state- of-the-art visualization techniques, including scalable visualization algorithms and software, cluster-based visualization methods and innovate visualization techniques applied to problems in computational science, engineering, and medicine. I will conclude with an outline for a future high performance visualization research challenges and opportunities.

  15. Multi-Scale Assimilation of AMSR-E Snow Water Equivalent and MODIS Snow Cover Fraction in Northern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lannoy, G. J.; Reichle, R. H.; Arsenault, K. R.; Houser, P. R.; Kumar, S.; Verhoest, N.; Pauwels, V. R.

    2011-12-01

    Eight years (2002-2010) of remotely sensed AMSR-E snow water equivalent (SWE) retrievals and MODIS snow cover fraction (SCF) observations are assimilated separately or jointly into the Noah land surface model. A multiscale ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is used, supplemented with a rule-based update. The satellite data are either left unscaled or are scaled for anomaly assimilation. The SWE assimilation estimates (or their anomalies) are validated against in situ observations at 14 high-elevation SNOTEL sites and 4 lower-elevation COOP sites over a domain in Northern Colorado. Both downscaling of coarse-scale AMSR-E SWE and assimilation of MODIS SCF data result in realistic spatial SWE patterns. At COOP sites with shallow snowpacks, both AMSR-E SWE and MODIS SCF data assimilation are beneficial, and joint SWE and SCF assimilation shows a significantly improved result for both scaled and unscaled data assimilation. However, in deep snowpack areas, AMSR-E retrievals are typically biased low, causing the assimilation without a priori scaling to deteriorate the seasonal SWE variability for the SNOTEL sites. Furthermore, anomaly SWE assimilation could not improve the interannual SWE variations in the assimilation results, because the AMSR-E retrievals lack a realistic interannual variability. SCF assimilation has only a marginal impact on the deep snowpack SNOTEL locations, because these sites experience extended periods of near-complete snow cover. Across all sites, SCF assimilation improves the timing of the onset of the snow season, but without a net improvement of SWE amounts.

  16. An Error Analysis in Division Problems in Fractions Posed by Pre-Service Elementary Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isik, Cemalettin; Kar, Tugrul

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to make an error analysis in the problems posed by pre-service elementary mathematics teachers about fractional division operation. It was carried out with 64 pre-service teachers studying in their final year in the Department of Mathematics Teaching in an eastern university during the spring semester of academic year…

  17. Large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations for phase coarsening at ultrahigh volume fraction on high-performance architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hui; Wang, K. G.; Jones, Jim E.

    2016-06-01

    A parallel algorithm for large-scale three-dimensional phase-field simulations of phase coarsening is developed and implemented on high-performance architectures. From the large-scale simulations, a new kinetics in phase coarsening in the region of ultrahigh volume fraction is found. The parallel implementation is capable of harnessing the greater computer power available from high-performance architectures. The parallelized code enables increase in three-dimensional simulation system size up to a 5123 grid cube. Through the parallelized code, practical runtime can be achieved for three-dimensional large-scale simulations, and the statistical significance of the results from these high resolution parallel simulations are greatly improved over those obtainable from serial simulations. A detailed performance analysis on speed-up and scalability is presented, showing good scalability which improves with increasing problem size. In addition, a model for prediction of runtime is developed, which shows a good agreement with actual run time from numerical tests.

  18. Homotopy analysis transform algorithm to solve time-fractional foam drainage equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mukesh; Naseem, Mohd; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Sunil

    2016-09-01

    This paper emphasizes on finding the solution for a foam drainageequation using the technique of modified homotopy analysis transform method (MHATM). MHATM is a new amalgamation of the homotopy analysis method and Laplace transform method with homotopy polynomial. Comparisons are made between the results of the proposed method for different values of fractional derivative α and exact solutions. Then, we analyze the results by numerical simulations, which demonstrate the simplicity and effectiveness of the present method.

  19. Implications of scaled δ15N fractionation for community predator-prey body mass ratio estimates in size-structured food webs.

    PubMed

    Reum, Jonathan C P; Jennings, Simon; Hunsicker, Mary E

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ(15) N) may be used to estimate community-level relationships between trophic level (TL) and body size in size-structured food webs and hence the mean predator to prey body mass ratio (PPMR). In turn, PPMR is used to estimate mean food chain length, trophic transfer efficiency and rates of change in abundance with body mass (usually reported as slopes of size spectra) and to calibrate and validate food web models. When estimating TL, researchers had assumed that fractionation of δ(15) N (Δδ(15) N) did not change with TL. However, a recent meta-analysis indicated that this assumption was not as well supported by data as the assumption that Δδ(15) N scales negatively with the δ(15) N of prey. We collated existing fish community δ(15) N-body size data for the Northeast Atlantic and tropical Western Arabian Sea with new data from the Northeast Pacific. These data were used to estimate TL-body mass relationships and PPMR under constant and scaled Δδ(15) N assumptions, and to assess how the scaled Δδ(15) N assumption affects our understanding of the structure of these food webs. Adoption of the scaled Δδ(15) N approach markedly reduces the previously reported differences in TL at body mass among fish communities from different regions. With scaled Δδ(15) N, TL-body mass relationships became more positive and PPMR fell. Results implied that realized prey size in these size-structured fish communities are less variable than previously assumed and food chains potentially longer. The adoption of generic PPMR estimates for calibration and validation of size-based fish community models is better supported than hitherto assumed, but predicted slopes of community size spectra are more sensitive to a given change or error in realized PPMR when PPMR is small. PMID:26046788

  20. Implications of scaled δ15N fractionation for community predator-prey body mass ratio estimates in size-structured food webs.

    PubMed

    Reum, Jonathan C P; Jennings, Simon; Hunsicker, Mary E

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ(15) N) may be used to estimate community-level relationships between trophic level (TL) and body size in size-structured food webs and hence the mean predator to prey body mass ratio (PPMR). In turn, PPMR is used to estimate mean food chain length, trophic transfer efficiency and rates of change in abundance with body mass (usually reported as slopes of size spectra) and to calibrate and validate food web models. When estimating TL, researchers had assumed that fractionation of δ(15) N (Δδ(15) N) did not change with TL. However, a recent meta-analysis indicated that this assumption was not as well supported by data as the assumption that Δδ(15) N scales negatively with the δ(15) N of prey. We collated existing fish community δ(15) N-body size data for the Northeast Atlantic and tropical Western Arabian Sea with new data from the Northeast Pacific. These data were used to estimate TL-body mass relationships and PPMR under constant and scaled Δδ(15) N assumptions, and to assess how the scaled Δδ(15) N assumption affects our understanding of the structure of these food webs. Adoption of the scaled Δδ(15) N approach markedly reduces the previously reported differences in TL at body mass among fish communities from different regions. With scaled Δδ(15) N, TL-body mass relationships became more positive and PPMR fell. Results implied that realized prey size in these size-structured fish communities are less variable than previously assumed and food chains potentially longer. The adoption of generic PPMR estimates for calibration and validation of size-based fish community models is better supported than hitherto assumed, but predicted slopes of community size spectra are more sensitive to a given change or error in realized PPMR when PPMR is small.

  1. Polarization measurement analysis. I. Impact of the full covariance matrix on polarization fraction and angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, L.; Plaszczynski, S.; Levrier, F.; Tristram, M.; Alina, D.; Ristorcelli, I.; Bernard, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    With the forthcoming release of high precision polarization measurements, such as from the Planck satellite, the metrology of polarization needs to be improved. In particular, it is important to have full knowledge of the noise properties when estimating polarization fraction and polarization angle, which suffer from well-known biases. While strong simplifying assumptions have usually been made in polarization analysis, we present a method for including the full covariance matrix of the Stokes parameters in estimates of the distributions of the polarization fraction and angle. We thereby quantified the impact of the noise properties on the biases in the observational quantities and derived analytical expressions for the probability density functions of these quantities that take the full complexity of the covariance matrix into account, including the Stokes I intensity components. We performed Monte Carlo simulations to explore the impact of the noise properties on the statistical variance and bias of the polarization fraction and angle. We show that for low variations (< 10%) of the effective ellipticity between the Q and U components around the symmetrical case the covariance matrix may be simplified as is usually done, with a negligible impact on the bias. For S/Ns with intensity lower than 10, the uncertainty on the total intensity is shown to drastically increase the uncertainty of the polarization fraction but not the relative bias of the polarization fraction, while a 10% correlation between the intensity and the polarized components does not significantly affect the bias of the polarization fraction. We compare estimates of the uncertainties that affect polarization measurements, addressing limitations of the estimates of the S/N, and we show how to build conservative confidence intervals for polarization fraction and angle simultaneously. This study, which is the first in a set of papers dedicated to analysing polarization measurements, focuses on the

  2. Large-scale isolation, fractionation, and purification of soluble starch-synthesizing enzymes: starch synthase and branching enzyme from potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Mukerjea, Rupendra; Falconer, Daniel J; Yoon, Seung-Heon; Robyt, John F

    2010-07-19

    Soluble starch-synthesizing enzymes, starch synthase (SSS) and starch-branching enzyme (SBE), were isolated, fractionated, and purified from white potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) on a large scale. Five steps were used: potato tuber extract from 2 kg of peeled potatoes, two acetone precipitations, and two fractionations on a large ultrafiltration polysulfone hollow fiber 100 kDa cartridge. Three kinds of fractions were obtained: (1) mixtures of SSS and SBE; (2) SSS, free of SBE; and (3) SBE, free of SSS. Contaminating enzymes (amylase, phosphorylase, and disproportionating enzyme) and carbohydrates were absent from the 2nd acetone precipitate and from the column fractions, as judged by the Molisch test and starch triiodide test. Activity yields of 122% (300,000-400,000 units) of SSS fractions and 187% (40,000-50,000 units) of SBE fractions were routinely obtained from the cartridge. Addition of 0.04% (w/v) polyvinyl alcohol 50K and 1 mM dithiothreitol to the glycine buffer (pH 8.4) gave long-term stability and higher yields of SSS and SBE, due to activation of inactive enzymes. Several SSS and SBE fractions from the two fractionations had very high specific activities, indicating high degrees of purification. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of selected SSS and SBE fractions gave two to five SSS and/or SBE activity bands, corresponding to the one to five protein bands present in the 2nd acetone precipitate.

  3. Cu isotope fractionation during bornite dissolution: An in situ X-ray diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Andrew J.; Mathur, Ryan; Post, Jeffrey E.; Heaney, Peter J.

    2012-10-24

    Low-temperature ore deposits exhibit a large variation in {delta}{sup 65}Cu ({approx}12{per_thousand}), and this range has been attributed, in part, to isotope fractionation during weathering reactions of primary minerals such as chalcocite and chalcopyrite. Here, we examine the fractionation of Cu isotopes during dissolution of another important Cu ore mineral, bornite, using a novel approach that combines time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) and isotope analysis of reaction products. During the initial stages of bornite oxidative dissolution by ferric sulfate (< 5 mol% of total Cu leached), dissolved Cu was enriched in isotopically heavy Cu ({sup 65}Cu) relative to the solid, with an average apparent isotope fractionation ({Delta}{sub aq - min} = {delta}{sup 65}Cu{sub aq} - {delta}{sup 65}Cu{sub min}{sup 0}) of 2.20 {+-} 0.25{per_thousand}. When > 20 mol% Cu was leached from the solid, the difference between the Cu isotope composition of the aqueous and mineral phases approached zero, with {Delta}{sub aq - min}{sup 0} values ranging from - 0.21 {+-} 0.61{per_thousand} to 0.92 {+-} 0.25{per_thousand}. XRD analysis allowed us to correlate changes in the atomic structure of bornite with the apparent isotope fractionation as the dissolution reaction progressed. These data revealed that the greatest degree of apparent fractionation is accompanied by a steep contraction in the unit-cell volume, which we identified as a transition from stoichiometric to non-stoichiometric bornite. We propose that the initially high {Delta}{sub aq - min} values result from isotopically heavy Cu ({sup 65}Cu) concentrating within Cu{sup 2+} during dissolution. The decrease in the apparent isotope fractionation as the reaction progresses occurs from the distillation of isotopically heavy Cu ({sup 65}Cu) during dissolution or kinetic isotope effects associated with the depletion of Cu from the surfaces of bornite particles.

  4. Subcellular Fractionation Analysis of the Extraction of Ubiquitinated Polytopic Membrane Substrate during ER-Associated Degradation.

    PubMed

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Kamura, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    During ER-associated degradation (ERAD), misfolded polytopic membrane proteins are ubiquitinated and retrotranslocated to the cytosol for proteasomal degradation. However, our understanding as to how polytopic membrane proteins are extracted from the ER to the cytosol remains largely unclear. To better define the localization and physical properties of ubiquitinated polytopic membrane substrates in vivo, we performed subcellular fractionation analysis of Ste6*, a twelve transmembrane protein that is ubiquitinated primarily by Doa10 E3 ligase in yeast. Consistent with previous in vitro studies, ubiquitinated Ste6* was extracted from P20 (20,000 g pellet) fraction to S20 (20,000 g supernatant) fraction in a Cdc48/p97-dependent manner. Similarly, Ubx2p, which recruits Cdc48/p97 to the ER, facilitated the extraction of Ste6*. By contrast, lipid droplet formation, which was suggested to be dispensable for the degradation of Hrd1-substrates in yeast, was not required for the degradation of Ste6*. Intriguingly, we found that ubiquitinated Ste6* in the S20 fraction could be enriched by further centrifugation at 100,000 g. Although it is currently uncertain whether ubiquitinated Ste6* in P100 fraction is completely free from any lipids, membrane flotation analysis suggested the existence of two distinct populations of ubiquitinated Ste6* with different states of membrane association. Together, these results imply that ubiquitinated Ste6* may be sequestered into a putative quality control sub-structure by Cdc48/p97. Fractionation assays developed in the present study provide a means to further dissect the ill-defined post-ubiquitination step during ERAD of polytopic membrane substrates.

  5. Analysis of Oxygenated Compounds in Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil Distillate Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Earl D.; Chupka, Gina; Luecke, Jon; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Alleman, Teresa L.; Iisa, Kristiina; Franz, James A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; McCormick, Robert L.

    2011-10-06

    potential for blending into finished fuels. Fractions from the lowest oxygen content oil exhibited some phenolic acidity, but generally contained very low levels of oxygen functional groups. These materials would likely be suitable as refinery feedstocks and potentially as fuel blend components. PIONA analysis of the Light and Naphtha fractions shows benzene content of 0.5 and 0.4 vol%, and predicted (RON + MON)/2 of 63 and 70, respectively.

  6. Fractional order Buck-Boost converter in CCM: modelling, analysis and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Faqiang; Ma, Xikui

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the modelling, analysis and the power electronics simulator (PSIM) simulations of the fractional order Buck-Boost converter operating in continuous conduction mode (CCM) operation are investigated. Based on the three-terminal switch device method, the average circuit model of the fractional order Buck-Boost converter is established, and the corresponding DC equivalent circuit model and AC small signal equivalent circuit model are presented. And then, the equilibrium point and the transfer functions are derived. It is found that the equilibrium point is not influenced by the inductor's or the capacitor's order, but both these orders are included in the derived transfer functions. Finally, the comparisons between the theoretical analysis and the PSIM simulations are given for confirmation.

  7. Structural analysis of gluten-free doughs by fractional rheological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orczykowska, Magdalena; Dziubiński, Marek; Owczarz, Piotr

    2015-02-01

    This study examines the effects of various components of tested gluten-free doughs, such as corn starch, amaranth flour, pea protein isolate, and cellulose in the form of plantain fibers on rheological properties of such doughs. The rheological properties of gluten-free doughs were assessed by using the rheological fractional standard linear solid model (FSLSM). Parameter analysis of the Maxwell-Wiechert fractional derivative rheological model allows to state that gluten-free doughs present a typical behavior of viscoelastic quasi-solid bodies. We obtained the contribution dependence of each component used in preparations of gluten-free doughs (either hard-gel or soft-gel structure). The complicate analysis of the mechanical structure of gluten-free dough was done by applying the FSLSM to explain quite precisely the effects of individual ingredients of the dough on its rheological properties.

  8. Vector wave analysis of an electromagnetic high-order Bessel vortex beam of fractional type α.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2011-03-01

    The scalar wave theory of nondiffracting electromagnetic (EM) high-order Bessel vortex beams of fractional type α has been recently explored, and their novel features and promising applications have been revealed. However, complete characterization of the properties for this new type of beam requires a vector analysis to determine the fields' components in space because scalar wave theory is inadequate to describe such beams, especially when the central spot is comparable to the wavelength (k(r)/k≈1, where k(r) is the radial component of the wavenumber k). Stemming from Maxwell's vector equations and the Lorenz gauge condition, a full vector wave analysis for the electric and magnetic fields is presented. The results are of particular importance in the study of EM wave scattering of a high-order Bessel vortex beam of fractional type α by particles.

  9. A two scale analysis of tight sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Davy, C. A.; Song, Y.; Troadec, D.; Hauss, G.; Skoczylas, F.

    2015-12-01

    Tight sandstones have a low porosity and a very small permeability K. Available models for K do not compare well with measurements. These sandstones are made of SiO_2 grains, with a typical size of several hundreds of micron. These grains are separated by a network of micro-cracks, with sizes ranging between microns down to tens of nm. Therefore, the structure can be schematized by Voronoi polyhedra separated by plane and permeable polygonal micro-cracks. Our goal is to estimate K based on a two scale analysis and to compare the results to measurements. For a particular sample [2], local measurements on several scales include FIB/SEM [3], CMT and 2D SEM. FIB/SEM is selected because the peak pore size given by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry is of 350nm. FIB/SEM imaging (with 50 nm voxel size) identifies an individual crack of 180nm average opening, whereas CMT provides a connected porosity (individual crack) for 60 nm voxel size, of 4 micron average opening. Numerical modelling is performed by combining the micro-crack network scale (given by 2D SEM) and the 3D micro-crack scale (given by either FIB/SEM or CMT). Estimates of the micro-crack density are derived from 2D SEM trace maps by counting the intersections with scanlines, the surface density of traces, and the number of fracture intersections. K is deduced by using a semi empirical formula valid for identical, isotropic and uniformly distributed fractures [1]. This value is proportional to the micro-crack transmissivity sigma. Sigma is determined by solving the Stokes equation in the micro-cracks measured by FIB/SEM or CMT. K is obtained by combining the two previous results. Good correlation with measured values on centimetric plugs is found when using sigma from CMT data. The results are discussed and further research is proposed. [1] Adler et al, Fractured porous media, Oxford Univ. Press, 2012. [2] Duan et al, Int. J. Rock Mech. Mining Sci., 65, p75, 2014. [3] Song et al, Marine and Petroleum Eng., 65, p63

  10. Long-term analysis of carbon dioxide and methane column-averaged mole fractions retrieved from SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneising, Oliver; Buchwitz, Michael; Reuter, Maximilian; Heymann, Jens; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Burrows, John P.

    2010-05-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases contributing to climate change. Despite their importance our knowledge about their variable natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks has significant gaps. Satellite observations can add important global scale information on greenhouse gas sources and sinks provided the data are accurate and precise enough and are sensitive to the lowest atmospheric layers where the variability is largest. High sensitivity to near-surface greenhouse gas concentration changes can be achieved using reflected solar radiation in the near-infrared/shortwave-infrared (NIR/SWIR) spectral region. SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT (launch 2002) was the first and is now besides TANSO onboard GOSAT (launch 2009) the only satellite instrument currently in space covering important absorption bands of both gases in this spectral range. Global SCIAMACHY nadir observations from the time period 2003-2009 have been used to retrieve carbon dioxide and methane column-averaged mole fractions (which are the quantities needed for inverse modelling to get information on the sources and sinks) constituting seven years of greenhouse gas information derived from European EO data and offering temporal overlap with GOSAT. These new improved WFM-DOAS multi-year global data sets extending afore existing retrievals will be presented and discussed including an analysis of the long-term characteristics and comparison of the retrieved mole fractions with independent data, e.g., a first analysis of how the SCIAMACHY results compare with GOSAT retrievals for the overlapping time period.

  11. Combination of Methods for the Fractionation, Investigation, and Analysis of Micro/Nano Particles in Volcanic Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeriy, Shkinev; Michail, Ermolin; Peter, Fedotov; Aleksander, Rudnev; Nikolay, Bulychev; Vitaliy, Linnik; Gerardo, Moreno

    2013-04-01

    resulted in the formation of sulfuric acid under atmospheric conditions. A combination of methods were used for the fractionation (dry sieving, membrane filtration, sedimentation field-flow fractionation in a rotating coiled column), investigation (capillary electrophoresis, scanning electron microscopy), and analysis (ICP MS, ICP-AES) of volcanic ash samples. The combination of fractionation techniques were chosen taking into account that (1) the efficiency of separation of particles for the subsequent technique should be higher than for the preceding one; (2) the separation principles of methods should be different (separation according size, density, charge etc.); (3) the initial separation should be carried out according to size, that makes possible to create an even scale for various samples. It has been shown experimentally that the combination of fractionation methods give a possibility to separate and analyze the fractions from 10 nm to 100 μm and to obtain an information about the distribution of elements. In particular, it is founded that nearly 20% of Be, K, Bi, Th, Fe, As, Tl, Ti, W, Hf, and Zr are removed from the ash into the s

  12. Lipidomic analysis of plasma lipoprotein fractions in myocardial infarction-prone rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroaki; Koike, Tomonari; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Takayuki; Yoshida, Masaru; Shiomi, Masashi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    Lipids play important roles in the body and are transported to various tissues via lipoproteins. It is commonly assumed that alteration of lipid levels in lipoproteins leads to dyslipidemia and serious diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD). However, lipid compositions in each lipoprotein fraction induced by lipoprotein metabolism are poorly understood. Lipidomics, which involves the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of lipids, is expected to provide valuable information regarding the pathogenic mechanism of CAD. Here, we performed a lipidomic analysis of plasma and its lipoprotein fractions in myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHLMI) rabbits. In total, 172 lipids in plasma obtained from normal and WHHLMI rabbits were quantified with high throughput and accuracy using supercritical fluid chromatography hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (SFC/Q-Orbitrap-MS). Plasma levels of each lipid class (i.e., phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, lysophosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, ceramide, triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and cholesterol ester, except for free fatty acids) in 21-month-old WHHLMI rabbits were significantly higher than those in normal rabbits. High levels of functional lipids, such as alkyl-phosphatidylcholines, phospholipids including ω-6 fatty acids, and plasmalogens, were also observed in WHHLMI rabbit plasma. In addition, high-resolution lipidomic analysis using very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) provided information on the specific molecular species of lipids in each lipoprotein fraction. In particular, higher levels of phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogens were detected in LDL than in VLDL. Our lipidomics approach for plasma lipoprotein fractions will be useful for in-depth studies on the pathogenesis of CAD. PMID:26162515

  13. Iron Cycling in Marine Sediments - New Insights from Isotope Analysis on Sequentially Extracted Fe Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, S.; Kasten, S.; Poulton, S.; Hartmann, J.; Staubwasser, M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive Fe (oxyhydr)oxides preferentially undergo early diagenetic cycling and may cause a diffusive flux of dissolved Fe2+ from sediments towards the sediment-water interface. The partitioning of Fe in sediments has traditionally been studied by applying sequential extractions based on reductive dissolution of Fe minerals. We complemented the sequential leaching method by Poulton and Canfield [1] in order to be able to gain δ56Fe data for specific Fe fractions, as such data are potentially useful to study Fe cycling in marine environments. The specific mineral fractions are Fe-carbonates, ferrihydrite + lepidocrocite, goethite + hematite, and magnetite. Leaching was performed with acetic acid, hydroxylamine-HCl, Na-dithionite and oxalic acid. The processing of leachates for δ56Fe analysis involved boiling the samples in HCl/HNO3/H2O2, Fe precipitation and anion exchange column chromatography. The new method was applied to short sediment cores from the North Sea and a bay of King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica). Downcore mineral-specific variations in δ56Fe revealed differing contributions of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides to redox cycling. A slight decrease in easily reducible Fe oxides correlating with a slight increase in δ56Fe for this fraction with depth, which is in line with progessive dissimilatory iron reduction [2,3], is visible in the top 10 cm of the North Sea core, but not in the antarctic sediments. Less reactive (dithionite and oxalate leachable) fractions did not reveal isotopic trends. The acetic acid-soluble fraction displayed pronounced δ56Fe trends at both sites that cannot be explained by acid volatile sulfides that are also extracted by acetic acid [1]. We suggest that low δ56Fe values in this fraction relative to the pool of easily reducible Fe oxides result from adsorbed Fe(II) that was open to isotopic exchange with oxide surfaces, affirming the experimental results of Crosby el al. [2]. Hence, δ56Fe analyses on marine

  14. The Isotropic Fractionator as a Tool for Quantitative Analysis in Central Nervous System Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Repetto, Ivan E.; Monti, Riccardo; Tropiano, Marta; Tomasi, Simone; Arbini, Alessia; Andrade-Moraes, Carlos-Humberto; Lent, Roberto; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    One major aim in quantitative and translational neuroscience is to achieve a precise and fast neuronal counting method to work on high throughput scale to obtain reliable results. Here, we tested the isotropic fractionator (IF) method for evaluating neuronal and non-neuronal cell loss in different models of central nervous system (CNS) pathologies. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent: (i) ischemic brain damage; (ii) intraperitoneal injection with kainic acid (KA) to induce epileptic seizures; and (iii) monolateral striatal injection with quinolinic acid (QA) mimicking human Huntington’s disease. All specimens were processed for IF method and cell loss assessed. Hippocampus from KA-treated rats and striatum from QA-treated rats were carefully dissected using a dissection microscope and a rat brain matrix. Ischemic rat brains slices were first processed for TTC staining and then for IF. In the ischemic group the cell loss corresponded to the neuronal loss suggesting that hypoxia primarily affects neurons. Combining IF with TTC staining we could correlate the volume of lesion to the neuronal loss; by IF, we could assess that neuronal loss also occurs contralaterally to the ischemic side. In the epileptic group we observed a reduction of neuronal cells in treated rats, but also evaluated the changes in the number of non-neuronal cells in response to the hippocampal damage. In the QA model, there was a robust reduction of neuronal cells on ipsilateral striatum. This neuronal cell loss was not related to a drastic change in the total number of cells, being overcome by the increase in non-neuronal cells, thus suggesting that excitotoxic damage in the striatum strongly activates inflammation and glial proliferation. We concluded that the IF method could represent a simple and reliable quantitative technique to evaluate the effects of experimental lesions mimicking human diseases, and to consider the neuroprotective/anti-inflammatory effects of different treatments in the whole

  15. The Isotropic Fractionator as a Tool for Quantitative Analysis in Central Nervous System Diseases.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Ivan E; Monti, Riccardo; Tropiano, Marta; Tomasi, Simone; Arbini, Alessia; Andrade-Moraes, Carlos-Humberto; Lent, Roberto; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    One major aim in quantitative and translational neuroscience is to achieve a precise and fast neuronal counting method to work on high throughput scale to obtain reliable results. Here, we tested the isotropic fractionator (IF) method for evaluating neuronal and non-neuronal cell loss in different models of central nervous system (CNS) pathologies. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent: (i) ischemic brain damage; (ii) intraperitoneal injection with kainic acid (KA) to induce epileptic seizures; and (iii) monolateral striatal injection with quinolinic acid (QA) mimicking human Huntington's disease. All specimens were processed for IF method and cell loss assessed. Hippocampus from KA-treated rats and striatum from QA-treated rats were carefully dissected using a dissection microscope and a rat brain matrix. Ischemic rat brains slices were first processed for TTC staining and then for IF. In the ischemic group the cell loss corresponded to the neuronal loss suggesting that hypoxia primarily affects neurons. Combining IF with TTC staining we could correlate the volume of lesion to the neuronal loss; by IF, we could assess that neuronal loss also occurs contralaterally to the ischemic side. In the epileptic group we observed a reduction of neuronal cells in treated rats, but also evaluated the changes in the number of non-neuronal cells in response to the hippocampal damage. In the QA model, there was a robust reduction of neuronal cells on ipsilateral striatum. This neuronal cell loss was not related to a drastic change in the total number of cells, being overcome by the increase in non-neuronal cells, thus suggesting that excitotoxic damage in the striatum strongly activates inflammation and glial proliferation. We concluded that the IF method could represent a simple and reliable quantitative technique to evaluate the effects of experimental lesions mimicking human diseases, and to consider the neuroprotective/anti-inflammatory effects of different treatments in the whole

  16. Comprehensive triblock copolymer analysis by coupled thermal field-flow fractionation-NMR.

    PubMed

    van Aswegen, Werner; Hiller, Wolf; Hehn, Mathias; Pasch, Harald

    2013-07-12

    Thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF) is used as a novel fractionation technique to investigate the molecular heterogeneity of PB-b-PVP-b-PtBMA triblock copolymers. Such copolymers cause major problems in liquid chromatography due to very strong polar interactions with the stationary phase. ThFFF separates the copolymers with regard to size and/or chemical composition based on the normal and thermal diffusion coefficients. The separation mechanism in ThFFF and the chemical composition of the separated species is elucidated by online (1) H NMR. Based on the compositional analysis and a calibration of the system with the respective homopolymers, the samples are quantified regarding their molar masses, chemical compositions, and microstructures providing comprehensive information on the complex structure of these block copolymers. PMID:23722993

  17. Radiological and instrumental neutron activation analysis determined characteristics of size-fractionated fly ash.

    PubMed

    Peppas, T K; Karfopoulos, K L; Karangelos, D J; Rouni, P K; Anagnostakis, M J; Simopoulos, S E

    2010-09-15

    The concentration of trace elements and radionuclides in fly ash particles of different size can exhibit significant variation, due to the various processes taking place during combustion inside a coal-fired power plant. An investigation of this effect has been performed by analyzing samples of fly ash originating in two different coal-fired power plants, after separation into size fractions by sieving. The samples were analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry, including low-energy techniques, radon exhalation measurement and instrumental neutron activation analysis for the determination of Al, As, Ga, K, La, Na, Mn, Mg, Sr, Sc, and V. Variations are observed in the results of various samples analyzed, while the activity balances calculated from the results of individual size fractions are consistent with those of the raw ash samples. Correlations among the radionuclides examined are also observed, while individual nuclide behavior varies between the two types of fly ash examined. PMID:20605322

  18. Obstacles and Challenges in Preservice Teachers' Explorations with Fractions: A View from a Small-Scale Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osana, Helena P.; Royea, Diana A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we implemented one-on-one fractions instruction to eight preservice teachers. The intervention, which was based on the principle of Progressive Formalization (Freudenthal, 1983), was centered on problem solving and on progressively formalizing the participants' intuitive knowledge of fractions. The objectives of the study were to…

  19. Relating feedstock composition to product slate and composition in catalytic cracking: 1. Bench scale experiments with liquid chromatographic fractions from Wilmington, CA, >650{degree}F resid

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.B.; Zagula, E.J.; Reynolds, J.W.; Wandke, H.H.; Young, L.L.; Chew, H.

    1993-09-01

    The catalytic cracking behavior of compound types in the >650{degree}F resid from a Wilmington, CA, 14.2{degree} API crude was investigated. Liquid Chromatography (LC) was used to separate the resid into eight fractions. These fractions were used as feedstocks for a bench scale fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) unit. Gasoline was produced almost exclusively from neutral (65 % of whole resid) components. Acidic and basic types were partially converted to coke plus small amounts of C{sub l} and C{sub 2} gases, with the balance primarily carrying over as heavy liquid products. Gasoline composition depended on the type and quantity of polar compounds present in the feed because both acidic and basic compounds inhibited cracking reactions ({beta}-scission, hydrogen transfer, etc.) to varying degrees. In accordance with prior work, basic nitrogen compounds exhibited the largest inhibitory effect on cracking. Their effect is dependent on concentrations up to a limiting value which may correspond to saturation of susceptible catalyst sites. On an equal weight basis, the effect of high boiling (high molecular weight) bases was less than those occurring in the 650--1000{degree}F distillate range. Partitioning of nitrogen present in acidic (e.g. carbazole) forms in the feed into liquid products was greater than for basic nitrogen. Thiophenic forms of sulfur partitioned more into liquid and less into gaseous (H{sub 2}S) products than sulfide-type sulfur. Coke yield was approximately proportional to microcarbon residue test results for all feeds. Ongoing work with additional feedstocks has indicated behavior similar to that of Wilmington. Selected Wilmington liquid products are undergoing detailed analysis in order to determine relationships between feed versus product composition, particularly with respect to acidic and basic types.

  20. Financial analysis of technology acquisition using fractionated lasers as a model.

    PubMed

    Jutkowitz, Eric; Carniol, Paul J; Carniol, Alan R

    2010-08-01

    Ablative fractional lasers are among the most advanced and costly devices on the market. Yet, there is a dearth of published literature on the cost and potential return on investment (ROI) of such devices. The objective of this study was to provide a methodological framework for physicians to evaluate ROI. To facilitate this analysis, we conducted a case study on the potential ROI of eight ablative fractional lasers. In the base case analysis, a 5-year lease and a 3-year lease were assumed as the purchase option with a $0 down payment and 3-month payment deferral. In addition to lease payments, service contracts, labor cost, and disposables were included in the total cost estimate. Revenue was estimated as price per procedure multiplied by total number of procedures in a year. Sensitivity analyses were performed to account for variability in model assumptions. Based on the assumptions of the model, all lasers had higher ROI under the 5-year lease agreement compared with that for the 3-year lease agreement. When comparing results between lasers, those with lower operating and purchase cost delivered a higher ROI. Sensitivity analysis indicates the model is most sensitive to purchase method. If physicians opt to purchase the device rather than lease, they can significantly enhance ROI. ROI analysis is an important tool for physicians who are considering making an expensive device acquisition. However, physicians should not rely solely on ROI and must also consider the clinical benefits of a laser.

  1. Global scale precipitation from monthly to centennial scales: empirical space-time scaling analysis, anthropogenic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, Isabel; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of precipitation scaling regimes represents a key contribution to the improved understanding of space-time precipitation variability, which is the focus here. We conduct space-time scaling analyses of spectra and Haar fluctuations in precipitation, using three global scale precipitation products (one instrument based, one reanalysis based, one satellite and gauge based), from monthly to centennial scales and planetary down to several hundred kilometers in spatial scale. Results show the presence - similarly to other atmospheric fields - of an intermediate "macroweather" regime between the familiar weather and climate regimes: we characterize systematically the macroweather precipitation temporal and spatial, and joint space-time statistics and variability, and the outer scale limit of temporal scaling. These regimes qualitatively and quantitatively alternate in the way fluctuations vary with scale. In the macroweather regime, the fluctuations diminish with time scale (this is important for seasonal, annual, and decadal forecasts) while anthropogenic effects increase with time scale. Our approach determines the time scale at which the anthropogenic signal can be detected above the natural variability noise: the critical scale is about 20 - 40 yrs (depending on the product, on the spatial scale). This explains for example why studies that use data covering only a few decades do not easily give evidence of anthropogenic changes in precipitation, as a consequence of warming: the period is too short. Overall, while showing that precipitation can be modeled with space-time scaling processes, our results clarify the different precipitation scaling regimes and further allow us to quantify the agreement (and lack of agreement) of the precipitation products as a function of space and time scales. Moreover, this work contributes to clarify a basic problem in hydro-climatology, which is to measure precipitation trends at decadal and longer scales and to

  2. Fractional order analysis of Sephadex gel structures: NMR measurements reflecting anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Akpa, Belinda S.; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-( bD) α], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4000 s mm -2). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  3. A systematic analysis of eluted fraction of plasma post immunoaffinity depletion: implications in biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Amit Kumar; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Basak, Trayambak; Kumar, Dhirendra; Ahmad, Shadab; Priyadarshini, Ruby; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Dash, Debasis; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2011-01-01

    Plasma is the most easily accessible source for biomarker discovery in clinical proteomics. However, identifying potential biomarkers from plasma is a challenge given the large dynamic range of proteins. The potential biomarkers in plasma are generally present at very low abundance levels and hence identification of these low abundance proteins necessitates the depletion of highly abundant proteins. Sample pre-fractionation using immuno-depletion of high abundance proteins using multi-affinity removal system (MARS) has been a popular method to deplete multiple high abundance proteins. However, depletion of these abundant proteins can result in concomitant removal of low abundant proteins. Although there are some reports suggesting the removal of non-targeted proteins, the predominant view is that number of such proteins is small. In this study, we identified proteins that are removed along with the targeted high abundant proteins. Three plasma samples were depleted using each of the three MARS (Hu-6, Hu-14 and Proteoprep 20) cartridges. The affinity bound fractions were subjected to gelC-MS using an LTQ-Orbitrap instrument. Using four database search algorithms including MassWiz (developed in house), we selected the peptides identified at <1% FDR. Peptides identified by at least two algorithms were selected for protein identification. After this rigorous bioinformatics analysis, we identified 101 proteins with high confidence. Thus, we believe that for biomarker discovery and proper quantitation of proteins, it might be better to study both bound and depleted fractions from any MARS depleted plasma sample.

  4. Lie Symmetry Analysis and Explicit Solutions of the Time Fractional Fifth-Order KdV Equation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang wei; Xu, Tian zhou; Feng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, using the Lie group analysis method, we study the invariance properties of the time fractional fifth-order KdV equation. A systematic research to derive Lie point symmetries to time fractional fifth-order KdV equation is performed. In the sense of point symmetry, all of the vector fields and the symmetry reductions of the fractional fifth-order KdV equation are obtained. At last, by virtue of the sub-equation method, some exact solutions to the fractional fifth-order KdV equation are provided. PMID:24523885

  5. Lie symmetry analysis and explicit solutions of the time fractional fifth-order KdV equation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang Wei; Xu, Tian Zhou; Feng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, using the Lie group analysis method, we study the invariance properties of the time fractional fifth-order KdV equation. A systematic research to derive Lie point symmetries to time fractional fifth-order KdV equation is performed. In the sense of point symmetry, all of the vector fields and the symmetry reductions of the fractional fifth-order KdV equation are obtained. At last, by virtue of the sub-equation method, some exact solutions to the fractional fifth-order KdV equation are provided. PMID:24523885

  6. Fractionation and removal of dissolved organic carbon in a full-scale granular activated carbon filter used for drinking water production.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Oriol; Lefèvre, Benoît; Fernández, Marc; Bernat, Xavier; Paraira, Miquel; Pons, Marc

    2013-05-15

    The removal of natural organic matter (NOM) and, more particularly, its individual fractions by two different GACs was investigated in full-scale filters in a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). Fractionation of NOM was performed by high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) into biopolymers, humic substances, building blocks and low molecular weight organics. The sorption capacity of GAC in terms of iodine number (IN) and apparent surface area (SBET), as well as the filling of narrow- and super-microporosity were monitored over the 1-year operation of the filters. Both GACs demonstrated to be effective at removing NOM over a wide range of fractions, especially the low and intermediate molecular weight fractions. TOC removal initially occurred via adsorption, and smaller (lighter) fractions were more removed as they could enter and diffuse more easily through the pores of the adsorbent. As time progressed, biodegradation also played a role in the TOC removal, and lighter fractions continued to be preferentially removed due to their higher biodegradability. The gained knowledge would assist drinking water utilities in selecting a proper GAC for the removal of NOM from water and, therefore, complying more successfully the latest water regulations.

  7. Study of the free volume fraction in polylactic acid (PLA) by thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, A.; Benrekaa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The poly (lactic acid) or polylactide (PLA) is a biodegradable polymer with high modulus, strength and thermoplastic properties. In this work, the evolution of various properties of PLA is studied, such as glass transition temperature, mechanical modules and elongation percentage with the aim of investigating the free volume fraction. To do so, two thermal techniques have been used: the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dilatometry. The results obtained by these techniques are combined to go back to the structural properties of the studied material.

  8. Two-dimensional Raman mole-fraction and temperature measurements for hydrogen-nitrogen mixture analysis.

    PubMed

    Braeuer, Andreas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2009-02-01

    A two-dimensional laser Raman technique was developed and applied to directly probe the population number of selected rotational and vibrational energy levels of hydrogen and nitrogen. Using three cameras simultaneously, temperature and mole fraction images could be detected. Three different combinations of rotational and vibrational Raman signals of hydrogen and nitrogen were analyzed to identify the combination that is most suitable for future mixture analysis in hydrogen internal combustion engines. Here the experiments were conducted in an injection chamber where hot hydrogen was injected into room temperature nitrogen at 1.1 MPa. PMID:19183582

  9. Variability of a Stellar Corona on a Time Scale of Days: Evidence for Abundance Fractionation in an Emerging Coronal Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordon, R.; Behar, E.; Drake, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Elemental abundance effects in active coronae have eluded our understanding for almost three decades, since the discovery of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect on the sun. The goal of this paper is to monitor the same coronal structures over a time interval of six days and resolve active regions on a stellar corona through rotational modulation. We report on four iso-phase X-ray spectroscopic observations of the RS CVn binary EI Eri with XMM-Newton, carried out approximately every two days, to match the rotation period of EI Eri. We present an analysis of the thermal and chemical structure of the EI Eri corona as it evolves over the six days. Although the corona is rather steady in its temperature distribution, the emission measure and FIP bias both vary and seem to be correlated. An active region, predating the beginning of the campaign, repeatedly enters into our view at the same phase as it rotates from beyond the stellar limb. As a result, the abundances tend slightly, but consistently, to increase for high FIP elements (an inverse FIP effect) with phase. We estimate the abundance increase of high FIP elements in the active region to be of about 75% over the coronal mean. This observed fractionation of elements in an active region on time scales of days provides circumstantial clues regarding the element enrichment mechanism of non-flaring stellar coronae.

  10. Production of nitrate-rich compost from the solid fraction of dairy manure by a lab-scale composting system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhao-Yong; Zhang, Jing; Zhong, Xiao-Zhong; Tan, Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we developed an efficient composting process for the solid fraction of dairy manure (SFDM) using lab-scale systems. We first evaluated the factors affecting the SFDM composting process using different thermophilic phase durations (TPD, 6 or 3days) and aeration rates (AR, 0.4 or 0.2 lmin(-1)kg(-1)-total solid (TS)). Results indicated that a similar volatile total solid (VTS) degradation efficiency (approximately 60%) was achieved with a TPD of 6 or 3days and an AR of 0.4 l min(-1) kg(-1)-TS (hereafter called higher AR), and a TPD of 3days resulted in less N loss caused by ammonia stripping. N loss was least when AR was decreased to 0.2 l min(-1) kg(-1)-TS (hereafter called lower AR) during the SFDM composting process. However, moisture content (MC) in the composting pile increased at the lower AR because of water production by VTS degradation and less water volatilization. Reduced oxygen availability caused by excess water led to lower VTS degradation efficiency and inhibition of nitrification. Adding sawdust to adjust the C/N ratio and decrease the MC improved nitrification during the composing processes; however, the addition of increasing amounts of sawdust decreased NO3(-) concentration in matured compost. When an improved composting reactor with a condensate removal and collection system was used for the SFDM composting process, the MC of the composting pile was significantly reduced, and nitrification was detected 10-14days earlier. This was attributed to the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Highly matured compost could be generated within 40-50days. The VTS degradation efficiency reached 62.0% and the final N content, NO3(-) concentration, and germination index (GI) at the end of the composting process were 3.3%, 15.5×10(3)mg kg(-1)-TS, and 112.1%, respectively. PMID:26965212

  11. Dynamical scaling analysis of plant callus growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, J.; Buceta, J.; Juarez, K.; Pumariño, B.; de la Torre, J.; Iriondo, J. M.

    2003-07-01

    We present experimental results for the dynamical scaling properties of the development of plant calli. We have assayed two different species of plant calli, Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa, under different growth conditions, and show that their dynamical scalings share a universality class. From a theoretical point of view, we introduce a scaling hypothesis for systems whose size evolves in time. We expect our work to be relevant for the understanding and characterization of other systems that undergo growth due to cell division and differentiation, such as, for example, tumor development.

  12. Failure Analysis of a Pilot Scale Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K J

    2001-09-14

    Failure of the pilot-scale test melter resulted from severe overheating of the Inconel 690 jacketed molybdenum electrode. Extreme temperatures were required to melt the glass during this campaign because the feed material contained a very high waste loading.

  13. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Cancer Locus of Control Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jessica W.; Donatelle, Rebecca J.; Acock, Alan C.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a confirmatory factor analysis of the Cancer Locus of Control scale (M. Watson and others, 1990), administered to 543 women with a history of breast cancer. Results support a three-factor model of the scale and support use of the scale to assess control dimensions. (SLD)

  14. Minimum Sample Size Requirements for Mokken Scale Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straat, J. Hendrik; van der Ark, L. Andries; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    An automated item selection procedure in Mokken scale analysis partitions a set of items into one or more Mokken scales, if the data allow. Two algorithms are available that pursue the same goal of selecting Mokken scales of maximum length: Mokken's original automated item selection procedure (AISP) and a genetic algorithm (GA). Minimum…

  15. A Scale Analysis of the Effects of US Federal Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Jessica Zacher

    2012-01-01

    In this essay I argue that the effects of federal policy can be examined through a scale analysis that helps deconstruct the effect of the current widespread accountability movement in the US educational system. I first discuss the concept of scale, including its thus-far limited use in educational research. I define scales not only as…

  16. Detection of crossover time scales in multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Erjia; Leung, Yee

    2013-04-01

    Fractal is employed in this paper as a scale-based method for the identification of the scaling behavior of time series. Many spatial and temporal processes exhibiting complex multi(mono)-scaling behaviors are fractals. One of the important concepts in fractals is crossover time scale(s) that separates distinct regimes having different fractal scaling behaviors. A common method is multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). The detection of crossover time scale(s) is, however, relatively subjective since it has been made without rigorous statistical procedures and has generally been determined by eye balling or subjective observation. Crossover time scales such determined may be spurious and problematic. It may not reflect the genuine underlying scaling behavior of a time series. The purpose of this paper is to propose a statistical procedure to model complex fractal scaling behaviors and reliably identify the crossover time scales under MF-DFA. The scaling-identification regression model, grounded on a solid statistical foundation, is first proposed to describe multi-scaling behaviors of fractals. Through the regression analysis and statistical inference, we can (1) identify the crossover time scales that cannot be detected by eye-balling observation, (2) determine the number and locations of the genuine crossover time scales, (3) give confidence intervals for the crossover time scales, and (4) establish the statistically significant regression model depicting the underlying scaling behavior of a time series. To substantive our argument, the regression model is applied to analyze the multi-scaling behaviors of avian-influenza outbreaks, water consumption, daily mean temperature, and rainfall of Hong Kong. Through the proposed model, we can have a deeper understanding of fractals in general and a statistical approach to identify multi-scaling behavior under MF-DFA in particular.

  17. Convective scale weather analysis and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, J. F. W.

    1984-01-01

    How satellite data can be used to improve insight into the mesoscale behavior of the atmosphere is demonstrated with emphasis on the GOES-VAS sounding and image data. This geostationary satellite has the unique ability to observe frequently the atmosphere (sounders) and its cloud cover (visible and infrared) from the synoptic scale down to the cloud scale. These uniformly calibrated data sets can be combined with conventional data to reveal many of the features important in mesoscale weather development and evolution.

  18. Numerical analysis of an H1-Galerkin mixed finite element method for time fractional telegraph equation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Min; Liu, Yang; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    We discuss and analyze an H(1)-Galerkin mixed finite element (H(1)-GMFE) method to look for the numerical solution of time fractional telegraph equation. We introduce an auxiliary variable to reduce the original equation into lower-order coupled equations and then formulate an H(1)-GMFE scheme with two important variables. We discretize the Caputo time fractional derivatives using the finite difference methods and approximate the spatial direction by applying the H(1)-GMFE method. Based on the discussion on the theoretical error analysis in L(2)-norm for the scalar unknown and its gradient in one dimensional case, we obtain the optimal order of convergence in space-time direction. Further, we also derive the optimal error results for the scalar unknown in H(1)-norm. Moreover, we derive and analyze the stability of H(1)-GMFE scheme and give the results of a priori error estimates in two- or three-dimensional cases. In order to verify our theoretical analysis, we give some results of numerical calculation by using the Matlab procedure.

  19. Proteomic Analysis of a Fraction with Intact Eyespots of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Assignment of Protein Methylation.

    PubMed

    Eitzinger, Nicole; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Geimer, Stefan; Boness, David; Kreimer, Georg; Mittag, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate green algae possess a visual system, the eyespot. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it is situated at the edge of the chloroplast and consists of two carotenoid rich lipid globule layers subtended by thylakoid membranes (TM) that are attached to both chloroplast envelope membranes and a specialized area of the plasma membrane (PM). A former analysis of an eyespot fraction identified 203 proteins. To increase the understanding of eyespot related processes, knowledge of the protein composition of the membranes in its close vicinity is desirable. Here, we present a purification procedure that allows isolation of intact eyespots. This gain in intactness goes, however, hand in hand with an increase of contaminants from other organelles. Proteomic analysis identified 742 proteins. Novel candidates include proteins for eyespot development, retina-related proteins, ion pumps, and membrane-associated proteins, calcium sensing proteins as well as kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins. Methylation of proteins at Arg or Lys is known as an important posttranslational modification involved in, e.g., signal transduction. Here, we identify several proteins from eyespot fractions that are methylated at Arg and/or Lys. Among them is the eyespot specific SOUL3 protein that influences the size and position of the eyespot and EYE2, a protein important for its development. PMID:26697039

  20. Proteomic Analysis of a Fraction with Intact Eyespots of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Assignment of Protein Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Eitzinger, Nicole; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Geimer, Stefan; Boness, David; Kreimer, Georg; Mittag, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate green algae possess a visual system, the eyespot. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it is situated at the edge of the chloroplast and consists of two carotenoid rich lipid globule layers subtended by thylakoid membranes (TM) that are attached to both chloroplast envelope membranes and a specialized area of the plasma membrane (PM). A former analysis of an eyespot fraction identified 203 proteins. To increase the understanding of eyespot related processes, knowledge of the protein composition of the membranes in its close vicinity is desirable. Here, we present a purification procedure that allows isolation of intact eyespots. This gain in intactness goes, however, hand in hand with an increase of contaminants from other organelles. Proteomic analysis identified 742 proteins. Novel candidates include proteins for eyespot development, retina-related proteins, ion pumps, and membrane-associated proteins, calcium sensing proteins as well as kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins. Methylation of proteins at Arg or Lys is known as an important posttranslational modification involved in, e.g., signal transduction. Here, we identify several proteins from eyespot fractions that are methylated at Arg and/or Lys. Among them is the eyespot specific SOUL3 protein that influences the size and position of the eyespot and EYE2, a protein important for its development. PMID:26697039

  1. Analysis of plant ribosomes with asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Leena; Tuomainen, Päivi; Eskelin, Katri

    2014-02-01

    Ribosome profiling is a technique used to separate ribosomal subunits, 80S ribosomes (monosomes), and polyribosomes (polysomes) from other RNA-protein complexes. It is traditionally performed in sucrose gradients. In this study, we used asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) to characterize ribosome profiles of Nicotiana benthamiana plants. With the optimized running conditions, we were able to separate free molecules from ribosomal subunits and intact ribosomes. We used various chemical and enzymatic treatments to validate the positions of subunits, monosomes, and polysomes in the AsFlFFF fractograms. We also characterized the protein and RNA content of AsFlFFF fractions by gel electrophoresis and western blotting. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that ribosomes remained bound to messenger RNAs (mRNAs) during the analysis. Therefore, we conclude that AsFlFFF can be used for ribosome profiling to study the mRNAs that are being translated. It can also be used to study the protein composition of ribosomes that are active in translation at that particular moment.

  2. Numerical analysis of an H1-Galerkin mixed finite element method for time fractional telegraph equation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Min; Liu, Yang; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    We discuss and analyze an H(1)-Galerkin mixed finite element (H(1)-GMFE) method to look for the numerical solution of time fractional telegraph equation. We introduce an auxiliary variable to reduce the original equation into lower-order coupled equations and then formulate an H(1)-GMFE scheme with two important variables. We discretize the Caputo time fractional derivatives using the finite difference methods and approximate the spatial direction by applying the H(1)-GMFE method. Based on the discussion on the theoretical error analysis in L(2)-norm for the scalar unknown and its gradient in one dimensional case, we obtain the optimal order of convergence in space-time direction. Further, we also derive the optimal error results for the scalar unknown in H(1)-norm. Moreover, we derive and analyze the stability of H(1)-GMFE scheme and give the results of a priori error estimates in two- or three-dimensional cases. In order to verify our theoretical analysis, we give some results of numerical calculation by using the Matlab procedure. PMID:25184148

  3. The Bootstrap Fraction in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, G. T.

    1997-04-15

    The TRANSP plasma analysis code is used to calculate the bootstrap current generated during neutral-beam injection and ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating for a wide variety of TFTR discharges. An empirical scaling relation is given for the bootstrap current fraction using the ratio of the peakedness of the thermal pressure and the total current density.

  4. Long-term analysis of carbon dioxide and methane column-averaged mole fractions retrieved from SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneising, Oliver; Buchwitz, Michael; Reuter, Maximilian; Heymann, Jens; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Burrows, John P.

    Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and methane (CH4 ) are the two most important anthropogenic green-house gases contributing to climate change. Despite their importance our knowledge about their variable natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks has significant gaps. Satellite observa-tions can add important global scale information on greenhouse gas sources and sinks provided the data are accurate and precise enough and are sensitive to the lowest atmospheric layers where the variability is largest. High sensitivity to near-surface greenhouse gas concentration changes can be achieved using reflected solar radiation in the near-infrared/shortwave-infrared (NIR/SWIR) spectral region. SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT (launch 2002) was the first and is now besides TANSO onboard GOSAT (launch 2009) the only satellite instrument currently in space covering important absorption bands of both gases in this spectral range. Global SCIAMACHY nadir observations from the time period 2003-2009 have been used to retrieve carbon dioxide and methane column-averaged mole fractions (which are the quantities needed for inverse modelling to get information on the sources and sinks) constituting seven years of greenhouse gas information derived from European EO data and offering temporal overlap with GOSAT. These new improved WFM-DOAS multi-year global data sets extending afore existing retrievals will be presented and discussed including an analysis of the long-term characteristics and comparison of the retrieved mole fractions with independent data, e.g., a first analysis of how the SCIAMACHY results compare with GOSAT retrievals for the overlapping time period.

  5. Chemical Analysis of Fractionated Halogens in Atmospheric Aerosols Collected in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuhako, A.; Miyagi, Y.; Somada, Y.; Azechi, S.; Handa, D.; Oshiro, Y.; Murayama, H.; Arakaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Halogens (Cl, Br and I) play important roles in the atmosphere, e.g. ozone depletion by Br during spring in Polar Regions. Sources of halogens in atmospheric aerosols are mainly from ocean. But, for example, when we analyzed Br- with ion chromatography, its concentrations were almost always below the detection limit, which is also much lower than the estimated concentrations from sodium ion concentrations. We hypothesized that portions of halogens are escaped to the atmosphere, similar to chlorine loss, changed their chemical forms to such as BrO3- and IO3-, and/or even formed precipitates. There was few reported data so far about fractionated halogen concentrations in atmospheric aerosols. Thus, purpose of this study was to determine halogen concentrations in different fractions; free ion, water-soluble chemically transformed ions and precipitates using the authentic aerosols. Moreover, we analyzed seasonal variation for each fraction. Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) of Okinawa, Japan during January 2010 and August 2013. A high volume air sampler was used for collecting total particulate matters on quartz filters on a weekly basis. Ultrapure water was used to extract water-soluble factions of halogens. The extracted solutions were filtered with the membrane filter and used for chemical analysis with ion chromatography and ICP-MS. Moreover, the total halogens in aerosols were obtained after digesting aerosols with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) using the microwave and analysis with ICP-MS. For Cl, water-soluble Cl- accounted for about 70% of the estimates with Na content. No other forms of water-soluble Cl were found. About 30% of Cl was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For Br, water-soluble Br accounted for about 43% of the estimates with Na content, and within the 43%, about 10% of Br was not in the form of Br-. About 46% of Br was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For I

  6. SCALING ANALYSIS OF REPOSITORY HEAT LOAD FOR REDUCED DIMENSIONALITY MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL T. ITAMUA AND CLIFFORD K. HO

    1998-06-04

    The thermal energy released from the waste packages emplaced in the potential Yucca Mountain repository is expected to result in changes in the repository temperature, relative humidity, air mass fraction, gas flow rates, and other parameters that are important input into the models used to calculate the performance of the engineered system components. In particular, the waste package degradation models require input from thermal-hydrologic models that have higher resolution than those currently used to simulate the T/H responses at the mountain-scale. Therefore, a combination of mountain- and drift-scale T/H models is being used to generate the drift thermal-hydrologic environment.

  7. Scaling analysis on Indian foreign exchange market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, A.; Barat, P.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the scaling behavior of the average daily exchange rate returns of the Indian Rupee against four foreign currencies: namely, US Dollar, Euro, Great Britain Pound and Japanese Yen. The average daily exchange rate return of the Indian Rupee against US Dollar is found to exhibit a persistent scaling behavior and follow Levy stable distribution. On the contrary, the average daily exchange rate returns of the other three foreign currencies do not show persistency or antipersistency and follow Gaussian distribution.

  8. Top-down and bottom-up lipidomic analysis of rabbit lipoproteins under different metabolic conditions using flow field-flow fractionation, nanoflow liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Ju Yong; Chung, Bong Chul; Seo, Hong Seog; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-07-31

    This study demonstrated the performances of top-down and bottom-up approaches in lipidomic analysis of lipoproteins from rabbits raised under different metabolic conditions: healthy controls, carrageenan-induced inflammation, dehydration, high cholesterol (HC) diet, and highest cholesterol diet with inflammation (HCI). In the bottom-up approach, the high density lipoproteins (HDL) and the low density lipoproteins (LDL) were size-sorted and collected on a semi-preparative scale using a multiplexed hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation (MxHF5), followed by nanoflow liquid chromatography-ESI-MS/MS (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis of the lipids extracted from each lipoprotein fraction. In the top-down method, size-fractionated lipoproteins were directly infused to MS for quantitative analysis of targeted lipids using chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (cAF4-ESI-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The comprehensive bottom-up analysis yielded 122 and 104 lipids from HDL and LDL, respectively. Rabbits within the HC and HCI groups had lipid patterns that contrasted most substantially from those of controls, suggesting that HC diet significantly alters the lipid composition of lipoproteins. Among the identified lipids, 20 lipid species that exhibited large differences (>10-fold) were selected as targets for the top-down quantitative analysis in order to compare the results with those from the bottom-up method. Statistical comparison of the results from the two methods revealed that the results were not significantly different for most of the selected species, except for those species with only small differences in concentration between groups. The current study demonstrated that top-down lipid analysis using cAF4-ESI-MS/MS is a powerful high-speed analytical platform for targeted lipidomic analysis that does not require the extraction of lipids from blood samples.

  9. Longitudinal Network Analysis Using Multidimensional Scaling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, George A.; Palmer, Mark T.

    The Galileo System, a variant of metric multidimensional scaling, is used in this paper to analyze over-time changes in social networks. The paper first discusses the theoretical necessity for the use of this procedure and the methodological problems associated with its use. It then examines the air traffic network among 31 major cities in the…

  10. Analysis of 953 Human Proteins from a Mitochondrial HEK293 Fraction by Complexome Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, Hans J. C. T.; Vogel, Rutger O.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; van den Heuvel, Lambert P.; van Gool, Alain J.; Gloerich, Jolein; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; Nijtmans, Leo G.

    2013-01-01

    Complexome profiling is a novel technique which uses shotgun proteomics to establish protein migration profiles from fractionated blue native electrophoresis gels. Here we present a dataset of blue native electrophoresis migration profiles for 953 proteins by complexome profiling. By analysis of mitochondrial ribosomal complexes we demonstrate its potential to verify putative protein-protein interactions identified by affinity purification – mass spectrometry studies. Protein complexes were extracted in their native state from a HEK293 mitochondrial fraction and separated by blue native gel electrophoresis. Gel lanes were cut into gel slices of even size and analyzed by shotgun proteomics. Subsequently, the acquired protein migration profiles were analyzed for co-migration via hierarchical cluster analysis. This dataset holds great promise as a comprehensive resource for de novo identification of protein-protein interactions or to underpin and prioritize candidate protein interactions from other studies. To demonstrate the potential use of our dataset we focussed on the mitochondrial translation machinery. Our results show that mitoribosomal complexes can be analyzed by blue native gel electrophoresis, as at least four distinct complexes. Analysis of these complexes confirmed that 24 proteins that had previously been reported to co-purify with mitoribosomes indeed co-migrated with subunits of the mitochondrial ribosome. Co-migration of several proteins involved in biogenesis of inner mitochondrial membrane complexes together with mitoribosomal complexes suggested the possibility of co-translational assembly in human cells. Our data also highlighted a putative ribonucleotide complex that potentially contains MRPL10, MRPL12 and MRPL53 together with LRPPRC and SLIRP. PMID:23935861

  11. Response analysis of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongge; Xu, Wei; Yang, Guidong; Jia, Wantao

    2016-08-01

    The Poisson white noise, as a typical non-Gaussian excitation, has attracted much attention recently. However, little work was referred to the study of stochastic systems with fractional derivative under Poisson white noise excitation. This paper investigates the stationary response of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise. The equivalent stochastic system of the original stochastic system is obtained. Then, approximate stationary solutions are obtained with the help of the perturbation method. Finally, two typical examples are discussed in detail to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The analysis also shows that the fractional order and the fractional coefficient significantly affect the responses of the stochastic systems with fractional derivative. PMID:27586619

  12. Differential branching fraction and angular analysis of Λ {/b 0} → Λμ + μ - decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-06-01

    The differential branching fraction of the rare decay Λ {/b 0} → Λμ + μ - is measured as a function of q 2, the square of the dimuon invariant mass. The analysis is performed using proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 .0 fb-1, collected by the LHCb experiment. Evidence of signal is observed in the q 2 region below the square of the J/ψ mass. Integrating over 15 < q 2 < 20 GeV2 /c 4 the differential branching fraction is measured as where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic and due to the normalisation mode, Λ {/b 0} → J/ ψΛ, respectively. In the q 2 intervals where the signal is observed, angular distributions are studied and the forward-backward asymmetries in the dimuon ( A {FB/ ℓ }) and hadron ( A {FB/ h }) systems are measured for the first time. In the range 15 < q 2 < 20 GeV2 /c 4 they are found to be [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Estimating and modeling the cure fraction in population-based cancer survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Paul C; Thompson, John R; Weston, Claire L; Dickman, Paul W

    2007-07-01

    In population-based cancer studies, cure is said to occur when the mortality (hazard) rate in the diseased group of individuals returns to the same level as that expected in the general population. The cure fraction (the proportion of patients cured of disease) is of interest to patients and is a useful measure to monitor trends in survival of curable disease. There are 2 main types of cure fraction model, the mixture cure fraction model and the non-mixture cure fraction model, with most previous work concentrating on the mixture cure fraction model. In this paper, we extend the parametric non-mixture cure fraction model to incorporate background mortality, thus providing estimates of the cure fraction in population-based cancer studies. We compare the estimates of relative survival and the cure fraction between the 2 types of model and also investigate the importance of modeling the ancillary parameters in the selected parametric distribution for both types of model.

  14. Rapid immunochemical analysis of the sulfonamide-sugar conjugated fraction of antibiotic contaminated honey samples.

    PubMed

    Muriano, A; Chabottaux, V; Diserens, J-M; Granier, B; Sanchez-Baeza, F; Marco, M-P

    2015-07-01

    A rapid high-throughput immunochemical screening (HtiS) procedure for the analysis of the sulfonamide (SA)-sugar conjugated fraction of antibiotic contaminated honey samples has been developed. Studies performed with this matrix have indicated that sulfonamide antibiotics are conjugated to sugars rapidly and quantitatively, providing samples with very low SA immunoreactivity. Therefore, sulfonamides must be first released before the analysis, and for this purpose, a simple and fast sample preparation procedure has been established consisting of hydrolyzing the sample for 5 min, adjusting the pH and buffering the sample prior to the immunochemical analysis. Under these conditions, honey samples could be directly analyzed without any additional sample treatment, other than dilution. Recovery values of the whole analytical procedure were greater than 85%. The analysis of the same samples without the hydrolysis provided recovery values below 5%. Selectivity studies performed in hydrolyzed honey samples revealed that nine relevant sulfonamide antibiotics can be detected with limit of detection (LOD) values below the action limits established by some EU countries (Belgium, 20 μg kg(-1), United Kingdom or Switzerland, 50 μg kg(-1)).

  15. Rapid immunochemical analysis of the sulfonamide-sugar conjugated fraction of antibiotic contaminated honey samples.

    PubMed

    Muriano, A; Chabottaux, V; Diserens, J-M; Granier, B; Sanchez-Baeza, F; Marco, M-P

    2015-07-01

    A rapid high-throughput immunochemical screening (HtiS) procedure for the analysis of the sulfonamide (SA)-sugar conjugated fraction of antibiotic contaminated honey samples has been developed. Studies performed with this matrix have indicated that sulfonamide antibiotics are conjugated to sugars rapidly and quantitatively, providing samples with very low SA immunoreactivity. Therefore, sulfonamides must be first released before the analysis, and for this purpose, a simple and fast sample preparation procedure has been established consisting of hydrolyzing the sample for 5 min, adjusting the pH and buffering the sample prior to the immunochemical analysis. Under these conditions, honey samples could be directly analyzed without any additional sample treatment, other than dilution. Recovery values of the whole analytical procedure were greater than 85%. The analysis of the same samples without the hydrolysis provided recovery values below 5%. Selectivity studies performed in hydrolyzed honey samples revealed that nine relevant sulfonamide antibiotics can be detected with limit of detection (LOD) values below the action limits established by some EU countries (Belgium, 20 μg kg(-1), United Kingdom or Switzerland, 50 μg kg(-1)). PMID:25704696

  16. Computational methods for criticality safety analysis within the scale system

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Bucholz, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The criticality safety analysis capabilities within the SCALE system are centered around the Monte Carlo codes KENO IV and KENO V.a, which are both included in SCALE as functional modules. The XSDRNPM-S module is also an important tool within SCALE for obtaining multiplication factors for one-dimensional system models. This paper reviews the features and modeling capabilities of these codes along with their implementation within the Criticality Safety Analysis Sequences (CSAS) of SCALE. The CSAS modules provide automated cross-section processing and user-friendly input that allow criticality safety analyses to be done in an efficient and accurate manner. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Lie Symmetry Analysis and Conservation Laws of a Generalized Time Fractional Foam Drainage Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Tian, Shou-Fu; Zhao, Zhen-Tao; Song, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a generalized time fractional nonlinear foam drainage equation is investigated by means of the Lie group analysis method. Based on the Riemann—Liouville derivative, the Lie point symmetries and symmetry reductions of the equation are derived, respectively. Furthermore, conservation laws with two kinds of independent variables of the equation are performed by making use of the nonlinear self-adjointness method. Supported by the National Training Programs of Innovation and Entrepreneurship for Undergraduates under Grant No. 201410290039, the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grant Nos. 2015QNA53 and 2015XKQY14, the Fundamental Research Funds for Postdoctoral at the Key Laboratory of Gas and Fire Control for Coal Mines, the General Financial Grant from the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2015M570498, and Natural Sciences Foundation of China under Grant No. 11301527

  18. Tracking the behavior of different size fractions of dissolved organic matter in a full-scale advanced drinking water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Quang, Viet Ly; Choi, Ilhwan; Hur, Jin

    2015-11-01

    In this study, five different dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions, defined based on a size exclusion chromatography with simultaneous detection of organic carbon (OCD) and ultraviolet (UVD), were quantitatively tracked with a treatment train of coagulation/flocculation-sand filtration-ozonation-granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration in a full-scale advanced drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). Five DOM samples including raw water were taken after each treatment process in the DWTP every month over the period of three years. A higher abundance of biopolymer (BP) fraction was found in the raw water during spring and winter than in the other seasons, suggesting an influence of algal bloom and/or meltwater on DOM composition. The greater extent of removal was observed upon the coagulation/flocculation for high-molecular-weight fractions including BP and humic substances (HS) and aromatic moieties, while lower sized fractions were preferentially removed by the GAC filtration. Ozone treatment produced the fraction of low-molecular-weight neutrals probably resulting from the breakdown of double-bonded carbon structures by ozone oxidation. Coagulation/flocculation was the only process that revealed significant effects of influent DOM composition on the treatment efficiency, as revealed by a high correlation between the DOM removal rate and the relative abundance of HS for the raw water. Our study demonstrated that SEC-OCD-UVD was successful in monitoring size-based DOM composition for the advanced DWTP, providing an insight into optimizing the treatment options and the operational conditions for the removal of particular fractions within the bulk DOM.

  19. Modeling and performance analysis of the fractional order quadratic Boost converter in discontinuous conduction mode-discontinuous conduction mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Cheng; Liang, Zhi-Shan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, based on the fact that the inductors and capacitors are of fractional order in nature, the four-order mathematical model of the fractional order quadratic Boost converter in type I and type II discontinuous conduction mode (DCM) — DCM is established by using fractional calculus theory. Direct current (DC) analysis is conducted by using the DC equivalent model and the transfer functions are derived from the corresponding alternating current (AC) equivalent model. The DCM-DCM regions of type I and type II are obtained and the relations between the regions and the orders are found. The influence of the orders on the performance of the quadratic Boost converter in DCM-DCM is verified by numerical and circuit simulations. Simulation results demonstrate the correctness of the fractional order model and the efficiency of the proposed theoretical analysis.

  20. Analysis of size-fractionated coal combustion aerosols by PIXE and other analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, W.; Røyset, O.; Vadset, M.; Kauppinen, E. I.; Lind, T. M.

    1993-04-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to study the chemical composition of size-fractionated in-stack fly-ash particles emitted during coal combustion. The samples were collected before the electrostatic precipitator at a gas temperature of 120°C during the combustion of Venezuelan coal in a 81 MW capacity circulating fluidized bed boiler. The sampling device consisted of a Berner low pressure impactor, which was operated with a cyclone precutter. The Nuclepore polycarbonate foils, which were used as collection surfaces in the low pressure impactor, were analyzed by the three techniques and the results of common elements were critically compared. The PIXE results were systematically lower than the INAA data and the percentage difference appeared to be stage-dependent, but virtually independent upon the element. The discrepancies are most likely due to bounce-off effects, particle reentrainment and other sampling artifacts, which may make that a fraction of the aerosol particles is deposited on the impaction foils outside the section analyzed by PIXE. However, by resorting to a "mixed internal standard" approach, accurate PIXE data are obtained. Also in the comparison between the ICP-MS and the INAA data significant discrepancies were observed. These are most likely due to incomplete dissolution of the particulate material and in particular of the alumino-silicate fly-ash matrix, during the acid digestion sample preparation step for ICP-MS. It is suggested that a comparison between ICP-MS data of acid digested samples and INAA can advantageously be used to provide speciation information on the various elements. Selected examples of size distributions are presented and briefly discussed.

  1. Nanometer to Centimeter Scale Analysis and Modeling of Pore Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesolowski, D. J.; Anovitz, L.; Vlcek, L.; Rother, G.; Cole, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The microstructure and evolution of pore space in rocks is a critically important factor controlling fluid flow. The size, distribution and connectivity of these confined geometries dictate how fluids including H2O and CO2, migrate into and through these micro- and nano-environments, wet and react with the solid. (Ultra)small-angle neutron scattering and autocorrelations derived from BSE imaging provide a method of quantifying pore structures in a statistically significant manner from the nanometer to the centimeter scale. Multifractal analysis provides additional constraints. These methods were used to characterize the pore features of a variety of potential CO2 geological storage formations and geothermal systems such as the shallow buried quartz arenites from the St. Peter Sandstone and the deeper Mt. Simon quartz arenite in Ohio as well as the Eau Claire shale and mudrocks from the Cranfield MS CO2 injection test and the normal temperature and high-temperature vapor-dominated parts of the Geysers geothermal system in California. For example, analyses of samples of St. Peter sandstone show total porosity correlates with changes in pores structure including pore size ratios, surface fractal dimensions, and lacunarity. These samples contain significant large-scale porosity, modified by quartz overgrowths, and neutron scattering results show significant sub-micron porosity, which may make up fifty percent or more of the total pore volume. While previous scattering data from sandstones suggest scattering is dominated by surface fractal behavior, our data are both fractal and pseudo-fractal. The scattering curves are composed of steps, modeled as polydispersed assemblages of pores with log-normal distributions. In some samples a surface-fractal overprint is present. There are also significant changes in the mono and multifractal dimensions of the pore structure as the pore fraction decreases. There are strong positive correlations between D(0) and image and total

  2. Local variance for multi-scale analysis in geomorphometry

    PubMed Central

    Drăguţ, Lucian; Eisank, Clemens; Strasser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Increasing availability of high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) is leading to a paradigm shift regarding scale issues in geomorphometry, prompting new solutions to cope with multi-scale analysis and detection of characteristic scales. We tested the suitability of the local variance (LV) method, originally developed for image analysis, for multi-scale analysis in geomorphometry. The method consists of: 1) up-scaling land-surface parameters derived from a DEM; 2) calculating LV as the average standard deviation (SD) within a 3 × 3 moving window for each scale level; 3) calculating the rate of change of LV (ROC-LV) from one level to another, and 4) plotting values so obtained against scale levels. We interpreted peaks in the ROC-LV graphs as markers of scale levels where cells or segments match types of pattern elements characterized by (relatively) equal degrees of homogeneity. The proposed method has been applied to LiDAR DEMs in two test areas different in terms of roughness: low relief and mountainous, respectively. For each test area, scale levels for slope gradient, plan, and profile curvatures were produced at constant increments with either resampling (cell-based) or image segmentation (object-based). Visual assessment revealed homogeneous areas that convincingly associate into patterns of land-surface parameters well differentiated across scales. We found that the LV method performed better on scale levels generated through segmentation as compared to up-scaling through resampling. The results indicate that coupling multi-scale pattern analysis with delineation of morphometric primitives is possible. This approach could be further used for developing hierarchical classifications of landform elements. PMID:21779138

  3. Local variance for multi-scale analysis in geomorphometry.

    PubMed

    Drăguţ, Lucian; Eisank, Clemens; Strasser, Thomas

    2011-07-15

    Increasing availability of high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) is leading to a paradigm shift regarding scale issues in geomorphometry, prompting new solutions to cope with multi-scale analysis and detection of characteristic scales. We tested the suitability of the local variance (LV) method, originally developed for image analysis, for multi-scale analysis in geomorphometry. The method consists of: 1) up-scaling land-surface parameters derived from a DEM; 2) calculating LV as the average standard deviation (SD) within a 3 × 3 moving window for each scale level; 3) calculating the rate of change of LV (ROC-LV) from one level to another, and 4) plotting values so obtained against scale levels. We interpreted peaks in the ROC-LV graphs as markers of scale levels where cells or segments match types of pattern elements characterized by (relatively) equal degrees of homogeneity. The proposed method has been applied to LiDAR DEMs in two test areas different in terms of roughness: low relief and mountainous, respectively. For each test area, scale levels for slope gradient, plan, and profile curvatures were produced at constant increments with either resampling (cell-based) or image segmentation (object-based). Visual assessment revealed homogeneous areas that convincingly associate into patterns of land-surface parameters well differentiated across scales. We found that the LV method performed better on scale levels generated through segmentation as compared to up-scaling through resampling. The results indicate that coupling multi-scale pattern analysis with delineation of morphometric primitives is possible. This approach could be further used for developing hierarchical classifications of landform elements. PMID:21779138

  4. Scaling and long-range dependence in option pricing III: A fractional version of the Merton model with transaction costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Tian; Yan, Hai-Gang; Tang, Ming-Ming; Zhu, En-Hui

    2010-02-01

    A model for option pricing of fractional version of the Merton model with ‘Hurst exponent’ H being in [1/2,1) is established with transaction costs. In particular, for H∈(1/2,1) the minimal price Cmin(t,St) of an option under transaction costs is obtained, which displays that the timestep δt and the ‘Hurst exponent’ H play an important role in option pricing with transaction costs.

  5. Development of a short version of the Aging Males' Symptoms scale: Mokken scaling analysis and Rasch analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chin-Pang; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Kun-Hao; Chu, Chun-Lin; Chiu, Yu-Wen; Chen, Jiun-Liang; Chen, Ching-Yen

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a psychometrically sound short version of the 17-item Aging Males' Symptoms (AMS) scale using Mokken scale analysis (MSA) and Rasch analysis. We recruited a convenient sample of 1787 men (age: mean (SD) = 43.8 (11.5) years) who visited a men's health polyclinic in Taiwan and completed the AMS scale. The scale was first assessed using MSA. The remaining items were assessed using Rasch analysis. We used a stepwise approach to remove items with χ(2) item statistics and mean square values while monitoring unidimensionality. The item reduction process resulted in a 6-item version of the AMS scale (AMS-6). The AMS-6 scale included a 5-item psychosomatic subscale (original items 1, 4, 5, 8, and 9) and a 1-item sexual subscale (original item 16). Analyses confirmed that the 5-item psychosomatic subscale was a Rasch scale. The AMS-6 correlated well with the AMS scales: the 5-item psychosomatic subscale correlated with the AMS scale (r between 0.50 and 0.92); the 1-item sexual subscale correlated with the sexual subscale of the AMS scale (r = 0.81). A 6-item short form of the AMS scale had satisfactory measurement properties. This version may be useful for estimating psychosomatic and sexual symptoms as well as health-related quality of life with a minimal burden on respondents.

  6. Development of a short version of the Aging Males' Symptoms scale: Mokken scaling analysis and Rasch analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chin-Pang; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Kun-Hao; Chu, Chun-Lin; Chiu, Yu-Wen; Chen, Jiun-Liang; Chen, Ching-Yen

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a psychometrically sound short version of the 17-item Aging Males' Symptoms (AMS) scale using Mokken scale analysis (MSA) and Rasch analysis. We recruited a convenient sample of 1787 men (age: mean (SD) = 43.8 (11.5) years) who visited a men's health polyclinic in Taiwan and completed the AMS scale. The scale was first assessed using MSA. The remaining items were assessed using Rasch analysis. We used a stepwise approach to remove items with χ(2) item statistics and mean square values while monitoring unidimensionality. The item reduction process resulted in a 6-item version of the AMS scale (AMS-6). The AMS-6 scale included a 5-item psychosomatic subscale (original items 1, 4, 5, 8, and 9) and a 1-item sexual subscale (original item 16). Analyses confirmed that the 5-item psychosomatic subscale was a Rasch scale. The AMS-6 correlated well with the AMS scales: the 5-item psychosomatic subscale correlated with the AMS scale (r between 0.50 and 0.92); the 1-item sexual subscale correlated with the sexual subscale of the AMS scale (r = 0.81). A 6-item short form of the AMS scale had satisfactory measurement properties. This version may be useful for estimating psychosomatic and sexual symptoms as well as health-related quality of life with a minimal burden on respondents. PMID:26984738

  7. Fundulus heteroclitus gonadotropins.5: Small scale chromatographic fractionation of pituitary extracts into components with different steroidogenic activities using homologous bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Wai Peter; Petrino, Teresa R; Wallace, Robin A

    2004-01-01

    Fractionation and characterization of gonadotropins (GtH) from Fundulus heteroclitus pituitary extracts were carried out using a biocompatible liquid chromatographic procedure (Pharmacia FPLC system). Chromatographic fractions were monitored for gonadotropic activities (induction of oocyte maturation and steroid production) using homologous follicle bioassays in vitro. Size-exclusion chromatography eluted gonadotropic activity in one major protein peak (Mr ~ 30,000). Anion-exchange and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography (HIC) yielded two distinct peaks of 17beta-estradiol (E2)- and 17alpha-hydroxy,20beta-dihydroprogesterone (DHP)-promoting activity with associated oocyte maturation. Two-dimensional chromatography (chromatofocusing followed by HIC) resolved pituitary extracts into two active fractions; both induced E2 synthesis, but one was relatively poor in eliciting DHP and testosterone production. Thus, using homologous bioassays, at least two quantitatively different gonadotropic (steroidogenic) activities: an E2-promoting gonadotropin (GtH I-like) and a DHP-promoting gonadotropin (GtH II-like), which has a lower isoelectric point but greater hydrophobicity than the former, can be distinguished from F. heteroclitus pituitaries by a variety of chromatographic procedures. This study complements previous biochemical and molecular data in F. heteroclitus and substantiates the duality of GtH function in a multiple-spawning teleost. PMID:15040801

  8. Determining the significance of scale values from multidimensional scaling profile analysis using a resampling method.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cody S

    2005-02-01

    Although multidimensional scaling (MDS) profile analysis is widely used to study individual differences, there is no objective way to evaluate the statistical significance of the estimated scale values. In the present study, a resampling technique (bootstrapping) was used to construct confidence limits for scale values estimated from MDS profile analysis. These bootstrap confidence limits were used, in turn, to evaluate the significance of marker variables of the profiles. The results from analyses of both simulation data and real data suggest that the bootstrap method may be valid and may be used to evaluate hypotheses about the statistical significance of marker variables of MDS profiles. PMID:16097342

  9. Spatial sensitivity analysis of remote sensing snow cover fraction data in a distributed hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezowski, Tomasz; Chormański, Jarosław; Nossent, Jiri; Batelaan, Okke

    2014-05-01

    Distributed hydrological models enhance the analysis and explanation of environmental processes. As more spatial input data and time series become available, more analysis is required of the sensitivity of the data on the simulations. Most research so far focussed on the sensitivity of precipitation data in distributed hydrological models. However, these results can not be compared until a universal approach to quantify the sensitivity of a model to spatial data is available. The frequently tested and used remote sensing data for distributed models is snow cover. Snow cover fraction (SCF) remote sensing products are easily available from the internet, e.g. MODIS snow cover product MOD10A1 (daily snow cover fraction at 500m spatial resolution). In this work a spatial sensitivity analysis (SA) of remotely sensed SCF from MOD10A1 was conducted with the distributed WetSpa model. The aim is to investigate if the WetSpa model is differently subjected to SCF uncertainty in different areas of the model domain. The analysis was extended to look not only at SA quantities but also to relate them to the physical parameters and processes in the study area. The study area is the Biebrza River catchment, Poland, which is considered semi natural catchment and subject to a spring snow melt regime. Hydrological simulations are performed with the distributed WetSpa model, with a simulation period of 2 hydrological years. For the SA the Latin-Hypercube One-factor-At-a-Time (LH-OAT) algorithm is used, with a set of different response functions in regular 4 x 4 km grid. The results show that the spatial patterns of sensitivity can be easily interpreted by co-occurrence of different landscape features. Moreover, the spatial patterns of the SA results are related to the WetSpa spatial parameters and to different physical processes. Based on the study results, it is clear that spatial approach of SA can be performed with the proposed algorithm and the MOD10A1 SCF is spatially sensitive in

  10. An effective phase shift diffusion equation method for analysis of PFG normal and fractional diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoxing

    2015-10-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion measurement has a lot of applications in NMR and MRI. Its analysis relies on the ability to obtain the signal attenuation expressions, which can be obtained by averaging over the accumulating phase shift distribution (APSD). However, current theoretical models are not robust or require approximations to get the APSD. Here, a new formalism, an effective phase shift diffusion (EPSD) equation method is presented to calculate the APSD directly. This is based on the idea that the gradient pulse effect on the change of the APSD can be viewed as a diffusion process in the virtual phase space (VPS). The EPSD has a diffusion coefficient, Kβ(t)D radβ/sα, where α is time derivative order and β is a space derivative order, respectively. The EPSD equations of VPS are built based on the diffusion equations of real space by replacing the diffusion coefficients and the coordinate system (from real space coordinate to virtual phase coordinate). Two different models, the fractal derivative model and the fractional derivative model from the literature were used to build the EPSD fractional diffusion equations. The APSD obtained from solving these EPSD equations were used to calculate the PFG signal attenuation. From the fractal derivative model the attenuation is exp(-γβgβδβDf1 tα), a stretched exponential function (SEF) attenuation, while from the fractional derivative model the attenuation is Eα,1(-γβgβδβDf2 tα), a Mittag-Leffler function (MLF) attenuation. The MLF attenuation can be reduced to SEF attenuation when α = 1, and can be approximated as a SEF attenuation when the attenuation is small. Additionally, the effect of finite gradient pulse widths (FGPW) is calculated. From the fractal derivative model, the signal attenuation including FGPW effect is exp[ -Df1 ∫0τ Kβ (t)dtα ] . The results obtained in this study are in good agreement with the results in literature. Several expressions that describe signal

  11. Rasch Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale--Short Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Karl S.; Green, Kathy E.; Cox, Enid O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine scale dimensionality, reliability, invariance, targeting, continuity, cutoff scores, and diagnostic use of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF) over time with a sample of 177 English-speaking U.S. elders. Design and Methods: An item response theory, Rasch analysis, was conducted with…

  12. Component Cost Analysis of Large Scale Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelton, R. E.; Yousuff, A.

    1982-01-01

    The ideas of cost decomposition is summarized to aid in the determination of the relative cost (or 'price') of each component of a linear dynamic system using quadratic performance criteria. In addition to the insights into system behavior that are afforded by such a component cost analysis CCA, these CCA ideas naturally lead to a theory for cost-equivalent realizations.

  13. Lysozyme fractionation from egg white at pilot scale by means of tangential flow membrane adsorbers: Investigation of the flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Janina; Voigt, Katharina; Zochowski, Bianca; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2016-03-18

    The application of membrane adsorbers instead of classical packed bed columns for protein fractionation is still a growing field. In the case of egg white protein fractionation, the application of classical chromatography is additionally limited due to its high viscosity that impairs filtration. By using tangential flow membrane adsorbers as stationary phase this limiting factor can be left out, as they can be loaded with particle containing substrates. The flow conditions existing in tangential flow membrane adsorbers are not fully understood yet. Thus, the aim of the present study was to gain a deeper understanding of the transport mechanisms in tangential flow membrane adsorbers. It was found that loading in recirculation mode instead of single pass mode increased the binding capacity (0.39 vs. 0.52 mg cm(-2)). Further, it was shown that either higher flow rates (0.39 mg cm(-2) vs. 0.57 mg cm(-2) at 1 CV min(-1) or 20 CV min(-1), respectively) or higher amounts of the target protein in the feed (0.24 mg cm(-2) vs. 0.85 mg cm(-2) for 2.5 or 39.0 g lysozyme, respectively) led to more protein binding. These results show that, in contrast to radial flow or flat sheet membrane adsorbers, the transport in tangential flow membrane adsorbers is not purely based on convection, but on a mix of convection and diffusion. Additionally, investigations concerning the influence of fouling formation were performed that can lead to transport limitations. It was found that this impact is neglectable. It can be concluded that the usage of tangential flow membrane adsorbers is very recommendable for egg white protein fractionations, although the transport is partly diffusion-limited. PMID:26898148

  14. Fractional order ultra low-speed position servo: improved performance via describing function analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ying; Chen, Yangquan; Pi, Youguo

    2011-01-01

    In a reference of the previous work, a new systematic design method for fractional order proportional and derivative (FOPD) controller is proposed for a class of typical second-order plants. Simulation and experimental results in the reference show that, the dynamic performance and robustness with the designed FOPD controller outperforms that with the optimized traditional integer order proportional integral (IOPI) controller at normal speed. Furthermore, it is found that, for the ultra low-speed position tracking with a significant friction effect, the tracking performance using the designed FOPD controller is much better than that using the optimized IOPI controller. However, the reason of this advantage is unclear. In this paper, using the describing function method and Bode plots analysis, the observed advantage of the designed FOPD controller over the optimized IOPI controller, for the nonlinear low-speed position tracking system with friction effect, is explained with the theoretical analysis. This explanation for the priority of the designed FOPD controller is consistently demonstrated by the extended experimental results in this paper.

  15. SCALE ANALYSIS OF CONVECTIVE MELTING WITH INTERNAL HEAT GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau

    2011-03-01

    Using a scale analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate internal heat for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  16. Bioassay-guided fractionation of antifouling compounds using computer-assisted motion analysis of brown algal spore swimming.

    PubMed

    Greer, Stephen P; Iken, Katrin; McClintock, James B; Amsler, Charles D

    2006-01-01

    Antifouling extracts from the sea stars Astropecten articulatus and Luidia clathrata and from the brittle star Astrocyclus caecilia were fractionated by solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography. Bioactive fractions were identified with the use of computer-assisted motion analysis-based bioassays utilising previously described Hincksia irregularis spore swimming behaviour parameters. Quantified parameters of spore movement were rate of change of direction (RCD) and speed (SPEE). The methods used initially required only 10 microg equivalent amounts of total crude extract and each resultant resolving step (normalised to 1 mg ml(-1) of crude, unfractionated extract) required far less material. Statistical analyses of RCD and ratios of RCD:SPEE values in experiments comparing swimming in the presence of extract fractions to controls revealed that both parameters were useful individually and in combination for efficiently following compound bioactivity throughout the fractionation procedure. This technique was also able to detect synergistic or additive interactions between compounds.

  17. Solubility, inhibition of crystallization and microscopic analysis of calcium oxalate crystals in the presence of fractions from Humulus lupulus L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frąckowiak, Anna; Koźlecki, Tomasz; Skibiński, PrzemysŁaw; GaweŁ, WiesŁaw; Zaczyńska, Ewa; Czarny, Anna; Piekarska, Katarzyna; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-11-01

    Procedures for obtaining noncytotoxic and nonmutagenic extracts from Humulus lupulus L. of high potency for inhibition and dissolving of model (calcium oxalate crystals) and real kidney stones, obtained from patients after surgery, are presented. Multistep extraction procedures were performed in order to obtain the preparations with the highest calcium complexing properties. The composition of obtained active fractions was analyzed by GC/MS and NMR methods. The influence of preparations on inhibition of formation and dissolution of model and real kidney stones were evaluated based on conductrometric titration, flame photometry and microscopic analysis. The "fraction soluble in methanol" obtained from water-alkaline extracts contains sugar alcohols and organic acids, and is effective in dissolving the kidney stones. The "fraction insoluble in methanol" contains only sugar derivatives and it changes the morphology of the crystals, making them "jelly-like". Both fractions are potentially effective in kidney stone therapy.

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy and principal component analysis of soy protein hydrolysate fractions and the potential to assess their antioxidant capacity characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ranamukhaarachchi, Sahan A; Peiris, Ramila H; Moresoli, Christine

    2017-02-15

    The potential of intrinsic fluorescence and principal component analysis (PCA) to characterize the antioxidant capacity of soy protein hydrolysates (SPH) during sequential ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF) was evaluated. SPH was obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of soy protein isolate. Antioxidant capacity was measured by Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) and Folin Ciocalteau Reagent (FCR) assays together with fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM). PCA of the fluorescence EEMs revealed two principal components (PC1-tryptophan, PC2-tyrosine) that captured significant variance in the fluorescence spectra. Regression models between antioxidant capacity and PC1 and PC2 displayed strong linear correlations for NF fractions and a weak linear correlation for UF fractions. Clustering of UF and NF fractions according to ORACFPCA and FCRFPCA was observed. The ability of this method to extract information on contributions by tryptophan and tyrosine amino acid residues to the antioxidant capacity of SPH fractions was demonstrated. PMID:27664660

  19. Acoustic analysis of musical intervals in modern Byzantine Chant scales.

    PubMed

    Delviniotis, Dimitrios; Kouroupetroglou, Georgios; Theodoridis, Sergios

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate experimentally the music intervals in modern Byzantine Chant performance and to compare the obtained results with the equal temperament scales introduced by the Patriarchal Music Committee (PMC). Current measurements resulted from pressure and electroglottographic recordings of 13 famous chanters singing scales of all the music genera. The scales' microintervals were derived after pitch detection based on autocorrelation, cepstrum, and harmonic product spectrum analysis. The microintervallic differences between the experimental values and the PMC's ones were statistically analyzed indicating large deviation of the mean values and the standard deviations. Significant interaction effects were identified among some genera and between ascending and descending scale directions.

  20. External beam radiotherapy for palliation of painful bone metastases: pooled data bioeffect dose response analysis of dose fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveen, T.; Supe, Sanjay S.; Ganesh, K. M.; Samuel, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Bone metastases develop in up to 70% of newly diagnosed cancer patients and result in immobility, anxiety, and depression, severely diminishing the patients quality of life. Radiotherapy is a frequently used modality for bone metastasis and has been shown to be effective in reducing metastatic bone pain and in some instances, causing tumor shrinkage or growth inhibition. There is controversy surrounding the optimal fractionation schedule and total dose of external beam radiotherapy, despite many randomized trials and overviews addressing the issue. This study was undertaken to apply BED to clinical fractionation data of radiotherapeutic management of bone metastases in order to arrive at optimum BED values for acceptable level of response rate. A computerised literature search was conducted to identify all prospective clinical studies that addressed the issue of fractionation for the treatment of bone metastasis. The results of these studies were pooled together to form the database for the analysis. A total of 4111 number of patients received radiation dose ranging from 4 to 40.5 Gy in 1 to 15 fractions with dose per fraction ranging from 2 to 10 Gy. Single fraction treatments were delivered in 2013 patients and the dose varied from 4 to 10 Gy. Multifraction treatments were delivered in 2098 patients and the dose varied from 15 to 40.5 Gy. The biological effective dose (BED) was evaluated for each fractionation schedule using the linear quadratic model and an α/β value of 10 Gy. Response rate increased significantly beyond a BED value of 14.4 Gy (p < 0.01). Based on our analysis and indications from the literature about higher retreatment and fracture rate of single fraction treatments, minimum BED value of 14.4 Gy is recommended.

  1. Water and waste load allocation in rivers with emphasis on agricultural return flows: application of fractional factorial analysis.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Ali; Kerachian, Reza; Nikoo, Mohammad Reza; Soltani, Maryam; Estalaki, Siamak Malakpour

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a new methodology is developed to handle parameter and input uncertainties in water and waste load allocation (WWLA) in rivers by using factorial interval optimization and the Soil, Water, Atmosphere, and Plant (SWAP) simulation model. A fractional factorial analysis is utilized to provide detailed effects of uncertain parameters and their interaction on the optimization model outputs. The number of required optimizations in a fractional factorial analysis can be much less than a complete sensitivity analysis. The most important uncertain inputs and parameters can be also selected using a fractional factorial analysis. The uncertainty of the selected inputs and parameters should be incorporated real time water and waste load allocation. The proposed methodology utilizes the SWAP simulation model to estimate the quantity and quality of each agricultural return flow based on the allocated water quantity and quality. In order to control the pollution loads of agricultural dischargers, it is assumed that a part of their return flows can be diverted to evaporation ponds. Results of applying the methodology to the Dez River system in the southwestern part of Iran show its effectiveness and applicability for simultaneous water and waste load allocation in rivers. It is shown that in our case study, the number of required optimizations in the fractional factorial analysis can be reduced from 64 to 16. Analysis of the interactive effects of uncertainties indicates that in a low flow condition, the upstream water quality would have a significant effect on the total benefit of the system. PMID:24880723

  2. A comparison of two methods for fractionating complex mixtures in preparation for toxicity analysis.

    PubMed

    Cizmas, Leslie; Barhoumi, Rola; Burghardt, Robert C; Reeves, William R; He, Lingyu; McDonald, Thomas J; Donnelly, Kirby C

    2003-07-25

    Chemical fractionation is a widely used tool for the chemical and toxicological characterization of complex mixtures. The objective of this research was to compare two frequently employed methods for fractionating a wood preserving waste (WPW) containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pentachlorophenol (PCP). The first method involved fractionation of the WPW into acid, base, and neutral fractions using a liquid-liquid acid/base/neutral (A/B/N) technique. The second method utilized alumina column chromatography to produce two fractions, A1 and A2. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry were used to quantify the chemical components in all fractions. The alumina method recovered 473,338 mg of total PAHs (tPAHs) per kilogram crude, while the A/B/N method yielded only 193,379 mg tPAHs/kg crude. In contrast, the A/B/N method recovered 13.7 mg PCP/kg crude while the alumina method yielded only 0.5 mg PCP/kg crude. Three bioassays were used to determine the toxicity of the crude extract and fractions. The neutral and A1 fractions contained the highest levels of tPAHs and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) but failed to induce a positive response in the Salmonella/microsome assay with concentrations containing as much as 1800 and 2500 ng BaP/plate, respectively. In the Escherichia coli prophage induction assay, the acid fraction, which contained 472 mg PCP/kg fraction, induced a positive response, as did the base fraction, which did not contain detectable PCP. Significant reduction of gap junctional intercellular communication in hepatic cells occurred with the crude extract and acid, base, and neutral fractions. Overall, the results of these bioassays suggest that PCP genotoxicity was expressed in the acid fraction, whereas the cumulative genotoxicity of genotoxic PAHs appeared to be masked in the isolates from either fractionation method. The optimal fractionation method for a mixture of chlorophenols and PAHs may involve a refined hybrid method.

  3. Multiple time scale complexity analysis of resting state FMRI.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert X; Yan, Lirong; Wang, Danny J J

    2014-06-01

    The present study explored multi-scale entropy (MSE) analysis to investigate the entropy of resting state fMRI signals across multiple time scales. MSE analysis was developed to distinguish random noise from complex signals since the entropy of the former decreases with longer time scales while the latter signal maintains its entropy due to a "self-resemblance" across time scales. A long resting state BOLD fMRI (rs-fMRI) scan with 1000 data points was performed on five healthy young volunteers to investigate the spatial and temporal characteristics of entropy across multiple time scales. A shorter rs-fMRI scan with 240 data points was performed on a cohort of subjects consisting of healthy young (age 23 ± 2 years, n = 8) and aged volunteers (age 66 ± 3 years, n = 8) to investigate the effect of healthy aging on the entropy of rs-fMRI. The results showed that MSE of gray matter, rather than white matter, resembles closely that of f (-1) noise over multiple time scales. By filtering out high frequency random fluctuations, MSE analysis is able to reveal enhanced contrast in entropy between gray and white matter, as well as between age groups at longer time scales. Our data support the use of MSE analysis as a validation metric for quantifying the complexity of rs-fMRI signals.

  4. Scaling Limit Analysis of Borromean Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, L. A.; Bellotti, F. F.; Frederico, T.; Yamashita, M. T.; Tomio, Lauro

    2016-05-01

    The analysis of the core recoil momentum distribution of neutron-rich isotopes of light exotic nuclei is performed within a model of halo nuclei described by a core and two neutrons dominated by the s-wave channel. We adopt the renormalized three-body model with a zero-range force, which accounts for the Efimov physics. This model is applicable to nuclei with large two-neutron halos compared to the core size, and a neutron-core scattering length larger than the interaction range. The halo wave function in momentum space is obtained by using as inputs the two-neutron separation energy and the energies of the singlet neutron-neutron and neutron-core virtual states. Within our model, we obtain the momentum probability densities for the Borromean exotic nuclei Lithium-11 (^{11}Li), Berylium-14 (^{14}Be) and Carbon-22 (^{22}C). A fair reproduction of the experimental data was obtained in the case of the core recoil momentum distribution of ^{11}Li and ^{14}Be, without free parameters. By extending the model to ^{22}C, the combined analysis of the core momentum distribution and matter radius suggest (i) a ^{21}C virtual state well below 1 MeV; (ii) an overestimation of the extracted matter ^{22}C radius; and (iii) a two-neutron separation energy between 100 and 400 keV.

  5. Pilot-scale investigation of drinking water ultrafiltration membrane fouling rates using advanced data analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Peldszus, Sigrid; Peiris, Ramila H; Ruhl, Aki S; Mehrez, Renata; Jekel, Martin; Legge, Raymond L; Huck, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    A pilot-scale investigation of the performance of biofiltration as a pre-treatment to ultrafiltration for drinking water treatment was conducted between 2008 and 2010. The objective of this study was to further understand the fouling behaviour of ultrafiltration at pilot scale and assess the utility of different foulant monitoring tools. Various fractions of natural organic matter (NOM) and colloidal/particulate matter of raw water, biofilter effluents, and membrane permeate were characterized by employing two advanced NOM characterization techniques: liquid chromatography - organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (FEEM) combined with principal component analysis (PCA). A framework of fouling rate quantification and classification was also developed and utilized in this study. In cases such as the present one where raw water quality and therefore fouling potential vary substantially, such classification can be considered essential for proper data interpretation. The individual and combined contributions of various NOM fractions and colloidal/particulate matter to hydraulically reversible and irreversible fouling were investigated using various multivariate statistical analysis techniques. Protein-like substances and biopolymers were identified as major contributors to both reversible and irreversible fouling, whereas colloidal/particulate matter can alleviate the extent of irreversible fouling. Humic-like substances contributed little to either reversible or irreversible fouling at low level fouling rates. The complementary nature of FEEM-PCA and LC-OCD for assessing the fouling potential of complex water matrices was also illustrated by this pilot-scale study.

  6. Scaling effects on area-averaged fraction of vegetation cover derived using a linear mixture model with two-band spectral vegetation index constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Kenta; Huete, Alfredo R.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanisms underlying the scaling effects that apply to a fraction of vegetation cover (FVC) estimates derived using two-band spectral vegetation index (VI) isoline-based linear mixture models (VI isoline-based LMM). The VIs included the normalized difference vegetation index, a soil-adjusted vegetation index, and a two-band enhanced vegetation index (EVI2). This study focused in part on the monotonicity of an area-averaged FVC estimate as a function of spatial resolution. The proof of monotonicity yielded measures of the intrinsic area-averaged FVC uncertainties due to scaling effects. The derived results demonstrate that a factor ξ, which was defined as a function of "true" and "estimated" endmember spectra of the vegetated and nonvegetated surfaces, was responsible for conveying monotonicity or nonmonotonicity. The monotonic FVC values displayed a uniform increasing or decreasing trend that was independent of the choice of the two-band VI. Conditions under which scaling effects were eliminated from the FVC were identified. Numerical simulations verifying the monotonicity and the practical utility of the scaling theory were evaluated using numerical experiments applied to Landsat7-Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data. The findings contribute to developing scale-invariant FVC estimation algorithms for multisensor and data continuity.

  7. Model Evaluation and Multiple Strategies in Cognitive Diagnosis: An Analysis of Fraction Subtraction Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Jimmy; Douglas, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies three models for cognitive diagnosis, each illustrated with an application to fraction subtraction data. The objective of each of these models is to classify examinees according to their mastery of skills assumed to be required for fraction subtraction. We consider the DINA model, the NIDA model, and a new model that extends the…

  8. Analysis, pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of different fractions of Scots pine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Forestry residues consisting of softwood are a major lignocellulosic resource for production of liquid biofuels. Scots pine, a commercially important forest tree, was fractionated into seven fractions of chips: juvenile heartwood, mature heartwood, juvenile sapwood, mature sapwood, bark, top parts, and knotwood. The different fractions were characterized analytically with regard to chemical composition and susceptibility to dilute-acid pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. Results All fractions were characterized by a high glucan content (38-43%) and a high content of other carbohydrates (11-14% mannan, 2-4% galactan) that generate easily convertible hexose sugars, and by a low content of inorganic material (0.2-0.9% ash). The lignin content was relatively uniform (27-32%) and the syringyl-guaiacyl ratio of the different fractions were within the range 0.021-0.025. The knotwood had a high content of extractives (9%) compared to the other fractions. The effects of pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification were relatively similar, but without pretreatment the bark fraction was considerably more susceptible to enzymatic saccharification. Conclusions Since sawn timber is a main product from softwood species such as Scots pine, it is an important issue whether different parts of the tree are equally suitable for bioconversion processes. The investigation shows that bioconversion of Scots pine is facilitated by that most of the different fractions exhibit relatively similar properties with regard to chemical composition and susceptibility to techniques used for bioconversion of woody biomass. PMID:24641769

  9. An Analysis of Elementary School Children's Fractional Knowledge Depicted with Circle, Rectangle, and Number Line Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunç-Pekkan, Zelha

    2015-01-01

    It is now well known that fractions are difficult concepts to learn as well as to teach. Teachers usually use circular pies, rectangular shapes and number lines on the paper as teaching tools for fraction instruction. This article contributes to the field by investigating how the widely used three external graphical representations (i.e., circle,…

  10. Analysis of the Two-Fraction Method for Generating Primitive Pythagoras Triples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babajee, Diyashvir Kreetee Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Finding methods for generating Pythagorean triples have been of great interest to Mathematicians since the Babylonians (from 1900 to 1600 BC). One of these methods is the less known two-fraction method which works for any two fractions whose product is 2. In this work, we analyse the method and show that it can be obtained from the fact that the…

  11. Chemical composition of the graphitic black carbon fraction in riverine and marine sediments at sub-micron scales using carbon X-ray spectromicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberstroh, Paul R.; Brandes, Jay A.; Gélinas, Yves; Dickens, Angela F.; Wirick, Sue; Cody, George

    2006-03-01

    The chemical composition of the graphitic black carbon (GBC) fraction of marine organic matter was explored in several marine and freshwater sedimentary environments along the west coast of North America and the Pacific Ocean. Analysis by carbon X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy shows the GBC fraction of Stillaguamish River surface sediments to be dominated by more highly ordered and impure forms of graphite, together forming about 80% of the GBC, with a smaller percent of an aliphatic carbon component. Eel River Margin surface sediments had very little highly ordered graphite, and were instead dominated by amorphous carbon and to a lesser extent, impure graphite. However, the GBC of surface sediments from the Washington State Slope and the Mexico Margin was composed almost solely of amorphous carbon. Pre-anthropogenic, highly oxidized deep-sea sediments from the open Equatorial Pacific Ocean contained over half their GBC in different forms of graphite as well as highly aliphatic carbon, low aromatic/highly acidic aliphatic carbon, low aromatic/highly aliphatic carbon, and amorphous forms of carbon. Our results clearly show the impact of graphite and amorphous C phases in the BC fraction in modern riverine sediments and nearby marine shelf deposits. The pre-anthropogenic Equatorial Pacific GBC fraction is remarkable in the existence of highly ordered graphite.

  12. Chemical Composition of the Graphitic Black Carbon Fraction in Riverine and Marine Sediments at Submicron Scales using Carbon X-ray Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haberstroh,P.; Brandes, J.; Gelinas, Y.; Dickens, A.; Wirick, S.; Cody, G.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of the graphitic black carbon (GBC) fraction of marine organic matter was explored in several marine and freshwater sedimentary environments along the west coast of North America and the Pacific Ocean. Analysis by carbon x-ray absorption near edge structure (C-XANES) spectroscopy and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) show the GBC-fraction of Stillaguamish River surface sediments to be dominated by more highly-ordered and impure forms of graphite, together forming about 80% of the GBC, with a smaller percent of an aliphatic carbon component. Eel River Margin surface sediments had very little highly-ordered graphite, and were instead dominated by amorphous carbon and to a lesser extent, impure graphite. However, the GBC of surface sediments from the Washington State Slope and the Mexico Margin were composed almost solely of amorphous carbon. Pre-anthropogenic, highly-oxidized deep-sea sediments from the open Equatorial Pacific Ocean contained over half their GBC in different forms of graphite as well as highly-aliphatic carbon, low aromatic/highly-acidic aliphatic carbon, low aromatic/highly aliphatic carbon, and amorphous forms of carbon. Our results clearly show the impact of graphite and amorphous C phases in the BC fraction in modern riverine sediments and nearby marine shelf deposits. The pre-anthropogenic Equatorial Pacific GBC fraction is remarkable in the existence of highly-ordered graphite.

  13. Multi-scale Analysis of High Resolution Topography: Feature Extraction and Identification of Landscape Characteristic Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passalacqua, P.; Sangireddy, H.; Stark, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of digital terrain data, detailed information on terrain characteristics and on scale and location of geomorphic features is available over extended areas. Our ability to observe landscapes and quantify topographic patterns has greatly improved, including the estimation of fluxes of mass and energy across landscapes. Challenges still remain in the analysis of high resolution topography data; the presence of features such as roads, for example, challenges classic methods for feature extraction and large data volumes require computationally efficient extraction and analysis methods. Moreover, opportunities exist to define new robust metrics of landscape characterization for landscape comparison and model validation. In this presentation we cover recent research in multi-scale and objective analysis of high resolution topography data. We show how the analysis of the probability density function of topographic attributes such as slope, curvature, and topographic index contains useful information for feature localization and extraction. The analysis of how the distributions change across scales, quantified by the behavior of modal values and interquartile range, allows the identification of landscape characteristic scales, such as terrain roughness. The methods are introduced on synthetic signals in one and two dimensions and then applied to a variety of landscapes of different characteristics. Validation of the methods includes the analysis of modeled landscapes where the noise distribution is known and features of interest easily measured.

  14. [In vitro transdermal delivery of the active fraction of xiangfusiwu decoction based on principal component analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Hao; Liu, Pei; Qian, Da-Wei; Li, Wei; Shang, Er-Xin; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to establish a method based on principal component analysis (PCA) for the study of transdermal delivery of multiple components in Chinese medicine, and to choose the best penetration enhancers for the active fraction of Xiangfusiwu decoction (BW) with this method. Improved Franz diffusion cells with isolated rat abdomen skins were carried out to experiment on the transdermal delivery of six active components, including ferulic acid, paeoniflorin, albiflorin, protopine, tetrahydropalmatine and tetrahydrocolumbamine. The concentrations of these components were determined by LC-MS/MS, then the total factor scores of the concentrations at different times were calculated using PCA and were employed instead of the concentrations to compute the cumulative amounts and steady fluxes, the latter of which were considered as the indexes for optimizing penetration enhancers. The results showed that compared to the control group, the steady fluxes of the other groups increased significantly and furthermore, 4% azone with 1% propylene glycol manifested the best effect. The six components could penetrate through skin well under the action of penetration enhancers. The method established in this study has been proved to be suitable for the study of transdermal delivery of multiple components, and it provided a scientific basis for preparation research of Xiangfusiwu decoction and moreover, it could be a reference for Chinese medicine research. PMID:23984531

  15. Fractionation of Eremurus spectabilis fructans by ethanol: Box-Behnken design and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Pourfarzad, Amir; Habibi Najafi, Mohammad B; Haddad Khodaparast, Mohammad H; Hassanzadeh Khayyat, Mohammad; Malekpour, Akbar

    2014-06-15

    The fructans, inulin and oligofructose, are known to exert many food and pharmaceutical applications and are widely used in functional foods throughout the world for their nutritional and techno-functional properties. In the present study, the Box-Behnken design was used to determine the optimal conditions for fructan precipitation from Eremurus spectabilis root powder (Serish) by adding ethanol that gave the maximum yield. Ethanol-to-syrup (E/S) ratio (2:1-15:1), precipitation temperature (30-60°C) and syrup concentration (10-40°B) were considered variables of fructan precipitation. The most compatible model among mean, linear and quadratic expressions was fitted to each response and the regression coefficients were determined using least square method. There was a good agreement between the experimental data and their predicted counterparts. The optimum conditions for fractionating fructan composition of Serish by ethanol were estimated to be E/S ratio of 8.56, temperature of 23.51°C and initial syrup concentration of 40°B. Precipitation under these optimized conditions achieved the best yield (85.81%), average chain length (12.92) and purity (80.18%). In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) allowed discriminating among precipitated fructan specialties.

  16. Three-dimensional distribution of the ISM in the Milky Way Galaxy. IV. 3D molecular fraction and Galactic-scale H I-to-H2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the volume-density molecular fraction, defined by f_mol^ρ =ρ _H_2/(ρ _{H I}+ρ _H_2), is studied in the Milky Way Galaxy. The molecular front appears at galacto-centric distance of R ˜ 8 kpc, where the galactic-scale phase transition from atomic to molecular hydrogen occurs with f_mol^ρ dropping from ˜0.8 to 0.2 within a radial interval as narrow as ˜0.5 kpc. The f_mol^ρ front is much sharper than that of the surface density molecular fraction. The f_mol^ρ front also appears in the direction vertical to the galactic plane with a full width of the high-f_mol^ρ disk to be ˜100 pc. The radial and vertical f_mol^ρ profiles, particularly the front behavior, are fitted by theoretical curves calculated using the observed density profile and assumed radiation field and metallicity with exponential gradients. The molecular fraction was found to be enhanced along spiral arms at radii R ˜ 6 to 10 kpc, such as the Perseus arm. This implies that the molecular clouds are produced from H I in the arms and are dissociated in the interarm regions in the transition region around the molecular front. We also show that there is a threshold value of mean H I density, over which H I is transformed into molecular gas.

  17. Heat transfer analysis in a second grade fluid over and oscillating vertical plate using fractional Caputo-Fabrizio derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Nehad Ali; Khan, Ilyas

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a Caputo-Fabrizio fractional derivatives approach to the thermal analysis of a second grade fluid over an infinite oscillating vertical flat plate. Together with an oscillating boundary motion, the heat transfer is caused by the buoyancy force induced by temperature differences between the plate and the fluid. Closed form solutions of the fluid velocity and temperature are obtained by means of the Laplace transform. The solutions of ordinary second grade and Newtonian fluids corresponding to time derivatives of integer and fractional orders are obtained as particular cases of the present solutions. Numerical computations and graphical illustrations are used in order to study the effects of the Caputo-Fabrizio time-fractional parameter α, the material parameter α _2 , and the Prandtl and Grashof numbers on the velocity field. A comparison for time derivative of integer order versus fractional order is shown graphically for both Newtonian and second grade fluids. It is found that fractional fluids (second grade and Newtonian) have highest velocities. This shows that the fractional parameter enhances the fluid flow.

  18. Module-scale analysis of pressure retarded osmosis: performance limitations and implications for full-scale operation.

    PubMed

    Straub, Anthony P; Lin, Shihong; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-10-21

    We investigate the performance of pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) at the module scale, accounting for the detrimental effects of reverse salt flux, internal concentration polarization, and external concentration polarization. Our analysis offers insights on optimization of three critical operation and design parameters--applied hydraulic pressure, initial feed flow rate fraction, and membrane area--to maximize the specific energy and power density extractable in the system. For co- and counter-current flow modules, we determine that appropriate selection of the membrane area is critical to obtain a high specific energy. Furthermore, we find that the optimal operating conditions in a realistic module can be reasonably approximated using established optima for an ideal system (i.e., an applied hydraulic pressure equal to approximately half the osmotic pressure difference and an initial feed flow rate fraction that provides equal amounts of feed and draw solutions). For a system in counter-current operation with a river water (0.015 M NaCl) and seawater (0.6 M NaCl) solution pairing, the maximum specific energy obtainable using performance properties of commercially available membranes was determined to be 0.147 kWh per m(3) of total mixed solution, which is 57% of the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Operating to obtain a high specific energy, however, results in very low power densities (less than 2 W/m(2)), indicating that the trade-off between power density and specific energy is an inherent challenge to full-scale PRO systems. Finally, we quantify additional losses and energetic costs in the PRO system, which further reduce the net specific energy and indicate serious challenges in extracting net energy in PRO with river water and seawater solution pairings.

  19. Module-scale analysis of pressure retarded osmosis: performance limitations and implications for full-scale operation.

    PubMed

    Straub, Anthony P; Lin, Shihong; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-10-21

    We investigate the performance of pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) at the module scale, accounting for the detrimental effects of reverse salt flux, internal concentration polarization, and external concentration polarization. Our analysis offers insights on optimization of three critical operation and design parameters--applied hydraulic pressure, initial feed flow rate fraction, and membrane area--to maximize the specific energy and power density extractable in the system. For co- and counter-current flow modules, we determine that appropriate selection of the membrane area is critical to obtain a high specific energy. Furthermore, we find that the optimal operating conditions in a realistic module can be reasonably approximated using established optima for an ideal system (i.e., an applied hydraulic pressure equal to approximately half the osmotic pressure difference and an initial feed flow rate fraction that provides equal amounts of feed and draw solutions). For a system in counter-current operation with a river water (0.015 M NaCl) and seawater (0.6 M NaCl) solution pairing, the maximum specific energy obtainable using performance properties of commercially available membranes was determined to be 0.147 kWh per m(3) of total mixed solution, which is 57% of the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Operating to obtain a high specific energy, however, results in very low power densities (less than 2 W/m(2)), indicating that the trade-off between power density and specific energy is an inherent challenge to full-scale PRO systems. Finally, we quantify additional losses and energetic costs in the PRO system, which further reduce the net specific energy and indicate serious challenges in extracting net energy in PRO with river water and seawater solution pairings. PMID:25222561

  20. An Analysis of Model Scale Data Transformation to Full Scale Flight Using Chevron Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford; Bridges, James

    2003-01-01

    Ground-based model scale aeroacoustic data is frequently used to predict the results of flight tests while saving time and money. The value of a model scale test is therefore dependent on how well the data can be transformed to the full scale conditions. In the spring of 2000, a model scale test was conducted to prove the value of chevron nozzles as a noise reduction device for turbojet applications. The chevron nozzle reduced noise by 2 EPNdB at an engine pressure ratio of 2.3 compared to that of the standard conic nozzle. This result led to a full scale flyover test in the spring of 2001 to verify these results. The flyover test confirmed the 2 EPNdB reduction predicted by the model scale test one year earlier. However, further analysis of the data revealed that the spectra and directivity, both on an OASPL and PNL basis, do not agree in either shape or absolute level. This paper explores these differences in an effort to improve the data transformation from model scale to full scale.

  1. Psychometric Analysis of Role Conflict and Ambiguity Scales in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Anwar; Yusoff, Rosman Bin Md.; Khan, Muhammad Muddassar; Yasir, Muhammad; Khan, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive Psychometric Analysis of Rizzo et al.'s (1970) Role Conflict & Ambiguity (RCA) scales were performed after its distribution among 600 academic staff working in six universities of Pakistan. The reliability analysis includes calculation of Cronbach Alpha Coefficients and Inter-Items statistics, whereas validity was determined by…

  2. Scaling range of power laws that originate from fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grech, Dariusz; Mazur, Zygmunt

    2013-05-01

    We extend our previous study of scaling range properties performed for detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) [Physica A0378-437110.1016/j.physa.2013.01.049 392, 2384 (2013)] to other techniques of fluctuation analysis (FA). The new technique, called modified detrended moving average analysis (MDMA), is introduced, and its scaling range properties are examined and compared with those of detrended moving average analysis (DMA) and DFA. It is shown that contrary to DFA, DMA and MDMA techniques exhibit power law dependence of the scaling range with respect to the length of the searched signal and with respect to the accuracy R2 of the fit to the considered scaling law imposed by DMA or MDMA methods. This power law dependence is satisfied for both uncorrelated and autocorrelated data. We find also a simple generalization of this power law relation for series with a different level of autocorrelations measured in terms of the Hurst exponent. Basic relations between scaling ranges for different techniques are also discussed. Our findings should be particularly useful for local FA in, e.g., econophysics, finances, or physiology, where the huge number of short time series has to be examined at once and wherever the preliminary check of the scaling range regime for each of the series separately is neither effective nor possible.

  3. Extreme fractionation and micro-scale variation of sulphur isotopes during bacterial sulphate reduction in deep groundwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Henrik; Tullborg, Eva-Lena; Whitehouse, Martin; Sandberg, Bertil; Blomfeldt, Thomas; Åström, Mats E.

    2015-07-01

    This study conducted at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, SE Sweden, determines the extent and mechanisms of sulphur-isotope fractionation in permanently reducing groundwater in fractured crystalline rock. Two boreholes >400 m below the ground surface were investigated. In the 17-year-old boreholes, the Al instrumentation pipes had corroded locally (i.e., Al-[oxy]hydroxides had formed) and minerals (i.e., pyrite, iron monosulphide, and calcite) had precipitated on various parts on the equipment. By chemically and isotopically comparing the precipitates on the withdrawn instrumentation and the borehole waters, we gained new insight into the dynamics of sulphate reduction, sulphide precipitation, and sulphur-isotope fractionation in deep-seated crystalline-rock settings. An astonishing feature of the pyrite is its huge variability in δ34S, which can exceed 100‰ in total (i.e., -47.2 to +53.3‰) and 60‰ over 50 μm of growth in a single crystal. The values at the low end of the range are up to 71‰ lower than measured in the dissolved sulphate in the water (20-30‰), which is larger than the maximum difference reported between sulphate and sulphide in pure-culture experiments (66‰) but within the range reported from natural sedimentary settings. Although single-step reduction seems likely, further studies are needed to rule out the effects of possible S disproportionation. The values at the high end of the range (i.e., high δ34Spy) are much higher than could be produced from the measured sulphate under any biogeochemical conditions. This strongly suggests the development of closed-system conditions near the growing pyrite, i.e., the rate of sulphate reduction exceeds the rate of sulphate diffusion in the local fluid near the pyrite, causing the local aqueous phase (and thus the forming pyrite) to become successively enriched in heavy S (34S). Consequently, the δ34S values of the forming pyrite become exceptionally high and strongly decoupled from the δ34S

  4. Metagenomic analysis of size-fractionated picoplankton in a marine oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Sangita; Parris, Darren J; DeLong, Edward F; Stewart, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) support diverse microbial communities with roles in major elemental cycles. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition and metabolism of OMZ microorganisms vary between particle-associated and free-living size fractions. We used amplicon (16S rRNA gene) and shotgun metagenome sequencing to compare microbial communities from large (>1.6 μm) and small (0.2-1.6 μm) filter size fractions along a depth gradient in the OMZ off Chile. Despite steep vertical redox gradients, size fraction was a significantly stronger predictor of community composition compared to depth. Phylogenetic diversity showed contrasting patterns, decreasing towards the anoxic OMZ core in the small size fraction, but exhibiting maximal values at these depths within the larger size fraction. Fraction-specific distributions were evident for key OMZ taxa, including anammox planctomycetes, whose coding sequences were enriched up to threefold in the 0.2-1.6 μm community. Functional gene composition also differed between fractions, with the >1.6 μm community significantly enriched in genes mediating social interactions, including motility, adhesion, cell-to-cell transfer, antibiotic resistance and mobile element activity. Prokaryotic transposase genes were three to six fold more abundant in this fraction, comprising up to 2% of protein-coding sequences, suggesting that particle surfaces may act as hotbeds for transposition-based genome changes in marine microbes. Genes for nitric and nitrous oxide reduction were also more abundant (three to seven fold) in the larger size fraction, suggesting microniche partitioning of key denitrification steps. These results highlight an important role for surface attachment in shaping community metabolic potential and genome content in OMZ microorganisms.

  5. Stability analysis of fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with time delays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Yu, Yongguang; Wen, Guoguang

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the stability for fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with time delays. Firstly, the fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with hub structure and time delays are studied. Some sufficient conditions for stability of the systems are obtained. Next, two fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with different ring structures and time delays are developed. By studying the developed neural networks, the corresponding sufficient conditions for stability of the systems are also derived. It is shown that the stability conditions are independent of time delays. Finally, numerical simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results obtained in this paper.

  6. Multiple-length-scale deformation analysis in a thermoplastic polyurethane

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Tan; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Prisacariu, Cristina; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers enjoy an exceptionally wide range of applications due to their remarkable versatility. These block co-polymers are used here as an example of a structurally inhomogeneous composite containing nano-scale gradients, whose internal strain differs depending on the length scale of consideration. Here we present a combined experimental and modelling approach to the hierarchical characterization of block co-polymer deformation. Synchrotron-based small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering and radiography are used for strain evaluation across the scales. Transmission electron microscopy image-based finite element modelling and fast Fourier transform analysis are used to develop a multi-phase numerical model that achieves agreement with the combined experimental data using a minimal number of adjustable structural parameters. The results highlight the importance of fuzzy interfaces, that is, regions of nanometre-scale structure and property gradients, in determining the mechanical properties of hierarchical composites across the scales. PMID:25758945

  7. Multiple-length-scale deformation analysis in a thermoplastic polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Sui, Tan; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P; Prisacariu, Cristina; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers enjoy an exceptionally wide range of applications due to their remarkable versatility. These block co-polymers are used here as an example of a structurally inhomogeneous composite containing nano-scale gradients, whose internal strain differs depending on the length scale of consideration. Here we present a combined experimental and modelling approach to the hierarchical characterization of block co-polymer deformation. Synchrotron-based small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering and radiography are used for strain evaluation across the scales. Transmission electron microscopy image-based finite element modelling and fast Fourier transform analysis are used to develop a multi-phase numerical model that achieves agreement with the combined experimental data using a minimal number of adjustable structural parameters. The results highlight the importance of fuzzy interfaces, that is, regions of nanometre-scale structure and property gradients, in determining the mechanical properties of hierarchical composites across the scales. PMID:25758945

  8. Static Aeroelastic Scaling and Analysis of a Sub-Scale Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a scaled wind tunnel model for static aeroelastic similarity with a full-scale wing model. The full-scale aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with flexible wing structures referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The baseline stiffness of the ESAC wing represents a conventionally stiff wing model. Static aeroelastic scaling is conducted on the stiff wing configuration to develop the wind tunnel model, but additional tailoring is also conducted such that the wind tunnel model achieves a 10% wing tip deflection at the wind tunnel test condition. An aeroelastic scaling procedure and analysis is conducted, and a sub-scale flexible wind tunnel model based on the full-scale's undeformed jig-shape is developed. Optimization of the flexible wind tunnel model's undeflected twist along the span, or pre-twist or wash-out, is then conducted for the design test condition. The resulting wind tunnel model is an aeroelastic model designed for the wind tunnel test condition.

  9. Analysis, scale modeling, and full-scale testing of shipping containers for radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Huerta, M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews numerical analysis and scale modeling techniques used to analyze the response of spent-nuclear-fuel shipping containers in severe impact environments. Illustrations of how these techniques have been utilized to analyze two extremely severe hypothetical accident environments are presented. The accident environments include the headon impact of a tractor trailer system and cask into a rigid barrier at 129 km/h (80 mph) and the broadside impact of a cask by a locomotive traveling at 129 km/h (80 mph). The results of the analysis techniques are discussed and compared to results of full-scale tests of the accident scenarios conducted subsequent to the analyses. It is shown that the analyses successfully predicted the response of the full-scale hardware.

  10. Bully-Victimization Scale: Using Rasch Modeling in the Analysis of a Qualitative Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehto, Marybeth

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether the data from the qualitative study fit Rasch model requirements for the definition of a measure, as well as to address concern in the extant literature regarding the appropriate number of items needed in analysis to assure unidimensionality. The self-report victimization scale was…

  11. Size analysis of automobile soot particles using field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Kim, W S; Kim, S H; Lee, D W; Lee, S; Lim, C S; Ryu, J H

    2001-03-15

    Soot particles emitted from various automobile engines are analyzed for size distributions using field-flow fractionation (FFF). Soot samples are prepared for FFF analysis using a three-step procedure, where a layer of soot particles is focused between the layers of n-hexane and water, followed by dispersing of particles in water containing 0.05% Triton X-100. The mean diameters determined by FFF show similar trends with those obtained from dynamic light scattering (DLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data from FFF are also compared with those from an on-line scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). SMPS size distributions extend further to larger size than those of FFF distributions, which indicates the three-step sample preparation procedure effectively disaggregates the agglomerated particles. Although the amount of particulate matter (PM) emitted from a heavy-duty diesel engine is much higher than that from a light-duty diesel engine, the size distributions of soot particles show no significant difference between heavy- and light-duty diesel engines. The engine-operating mode (engine speed and load rate) does not seem to affect significantly the size distribution of soot particles. It was found that the PM from a turbocharged diesel engine contains a higher percentage of particles smaller than 100 nm than an engine with a naturally aspirated (NA) air-inhalation system. As for gasoline engines, the PM collected after the catalytic converter has a narrower size distribution than those collected before and has a higher percentage of particles smaller than 100 nm. PMID:11347907

  12. Size analysis of automobile soot particles using field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Kim, W S; Kim, S H; Lee, D W; Lee, S; Lim, C S; Ryu, J H

    2001-03-15

    Soot particles emitted from various automobile engines are analyzed for size distributions using field-flow fractionation (FFF). Soot samples are prepared for FFF analysis using a three-step procedure, where a layer of soot particles is focused between the layers of n-hexane and water, followed by dispersing of particles in water containing 0.05% Triton X-100. The mean diameters determined by FFF show similar trends with those obtained from dynamic light scattering (DLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data from FFF are also compared with those from an on-line scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). SMPS size distributions extend further to larger size than those of FFF distributions, which indicates the three-step sample preparation procedure effectively disaggregates the agglomerated particles. Although the amount of particulate matter (PM) emitted from a heavy-duty diesel engine is much higher than that from a light-duty diesel engine, the size distributions of soot particles show no significant difference between heavy- and light-duty diesel engines. The engine-operating mode (engine speed and load rate) does not seem to affect significantly the size distribution of soot particles. It was found that the PM from a turbocharged diesel engine contains a higher percentage of particles smaller than 100 nm than an engine with a naturally aspirated (NA) air-inhalation system. As for gasoline engines, the PM collected after the catalytic converter has a narrower size distribution than those collected before and has a higher percentage of particles smaller than 100 nm.

  13. Time-series analysis of mortality effects from airborne particulate matter size fractions in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei; Xin, Jinyuan; Wang, Yuesi; Wang, Shigong; Shang, Kezheng; Liu, Zirui; Li, Guoxing; Pan, Xiaochuan; Wei, Linbo; Wang, Mingzhen

    2013-12-01

    Evidence concerning the health risk of fine and coarse particles is limited in developing Asian countries. The modifying effect between particles and temperature and season also remains unclear. Our study is one of the first to investigate the acute effect of particles size fractions, modifying effects and interannual variations of relative risk in a developing megacity where particulate levels are extraordinarily high compared to other Asian cities. After controlling for potential confounding, the results of a time-series analysis during the period 2005-2009 show that a 10 μg m-3 increase in PM2.5 levels is associated with a 0.65% (95% CI: 0.29-0.80%), 0.63% (95% CI: 0.25-0.83%), and 1.38% (95% CI: 0.51-1.71%) increase in non-accidental mortality, respiratory mortality, and circulatory mortality, respectively, while a 10 μg m-3 increase in PM10 is similarly associated with increases of 0.15% (95% CI: 0.04-0.22%), 0.08% (95% CI: 0.01-0.18%), and 0.44% (95% CI: 0.12-0.63%). We did not find a significant effect of PM2.5-10 on daily mortality outcomes. Our analyses conclude that temperature and particulates, exposures to both of which are expected to increase with climate change, might act together to worsen human health in Beijing, especially in the cool seasons. The level of the estimated percentage increase assume an escalating tendency during the study period, in addition to having a low value in 2008, and after the Olympic Games, the values increased significantly as the temporary atmospheric pollution control measures were terminated mostly.

  14. Three-dimensional modeling and numerical analysis of fractional flow reserve in human coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Neng; Lv, Hui-Jie; Xiang, Ya-Fei; Fan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) computed from CT (FFRCT) is a novel method for determining the physiologic significance of coronary artery disease (CAD). Several clinical trials have been conducted, but its diagnostic performance varied among different trials. Aim To determine the cut-off value of FFRCT and its correlation with the gold standard used to diagnose CAD in clinical practice. Material and methods Forty patients with single vessel disease were included in our study. Computed tomography scan and coronary angiography with FFR were conducted for these patients. Three-dimensional geometric reconstruction and numerical analysis based on the computed tomographic angiogram (CTA) of coronary arteries were applied to obtain the values of FFRCT. The correlation between FFRCT and the gold standard used in clinical practice was tested. Results For FFRCT, the best cut-off value was 0.76, with the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values of 84.6%, 92.9%, 88% and 73.3%, respectively. The area under the receiver-operator characteristics curve was 0.945 (p < 0.0001). There was a good correlation of FFRCT values with FFR values (r = 0.94, p < 0.0001), with a slight overestimation of FFRCT as compared with measured FFR (mean difference 0.01 ±0.11, p < 0.05). For inter-observer agreement, the mean κ value was 0.69 (0.61 to 0.78) and for intra-observer agreement the mean κ value was 0.61 (0.50 to 0.72). Conclusions FFRCT derived from CT of the coronary artery is a reliable non-invasive way providing reliable functional information of coronary artery stenosis. PMID:26966446

  15. Analysis of Fraction Skill Score properties for a displaced rainy grid point in a rectangular domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skok, Gregor

    2016-03-01

    The Fraction Skill Score (FSS) is a recently developed and popular metric used for precipitation verification. A compact analytical expression for FSS is derived for a case with a single displaced rainy grid point in a rectangular domain. The existence of an analytical solution is used to determine some properties of FSS, which might also be applicable in other cases since the rain areas of any shape will asymptote towards this solution if the displacement is sufficiently large. The use of the simple square shape of the neighborhood causes the FSS value to be dependent on the direction of the displacements (not only on the displacement size). The effect is limited in scope but can increase or decrease the FSS value by 0.1. Moving a nearby border closer to the rainy points can either increase or decrease the FSS value, depending on the location of the border. The FSS value near a border can be at most 33% larger than the FSS value in the infinite domain, assuming the same neighborhood size and displacement. The effect of the nearby corner is similar to the effect of the nearby border but is stronger. The useful forecast criteria (FSSuseful) is defined as a value of FSS for a precipitation feature with a displacement half the neighborhood size. FSSuseful for a displaced rainy grid point depends on the orientation of the displacement being the largest for displacements that are parallel to the borders and the smallest for a diagonal displacement for which the value can be as low as 0.42. An analysis of a real dataset was also performed, which showed that the border effect is usually small, but in some cases the effect becomes large (an increase of FSS value up to 70% was identified). The likelihood of a strong border effect in real datasets increases significantly if the neighborhood size at FSS = 0.5 is comparable or larger than the domain size.

  16. Multi-Scale Distributed Sensitivity Analysis of Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelam, M.; Mohanty, B.

    2015-12-01

    Amidst nature's great variability and complexity and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission aims to provide high resolution soil moisture products for earth sciences applications. One of the biggest challenges still faced by the remote sensing community are the uncertainties, heterogeneities and scaling exhibited by soil, land cover, topography, precipitation etc. At each spatial scale, there are different levels of uncertainties and heterogeneities. Also, each land surface variable derived from various satellite mission comes with their own error margins. As such, soil moisture retrieval accuracy is affected as radiative model sensitivity changes with space, time, and scale. In this paper, we explore the distributed sensitivity analysis of radiative model under different hydro-climates and spatial scales, 1.5 km, 3 km, 9km and 39km. This analysis is conducted in three different regions Iowa, U.S.A (SMEX02), Arizona, USA (SMEX04) and Winnipeg, Canada (SMAPVEX12). Distributed variables such as soil moisture, soil texture, vegetation and temperature are assumed to be uncertain and are conditionally simulated to obtain uncertain maps, whereas roughness data which is spatially limited are assumed a probability distribution. The relative contribution of the uncertain model inputs to the aggregated model output is also studied, using various aggregation techniques. We use global sensitivity analysis (GSA) to conduct this analysis across spatio-temporal scales. Keywords: Soil moisture, radiative transfer, remote sensing, sensitivity, SMEX02, SMAPVEX12.

  17. Geographical Scale Effects on the Analysis of Leptospirosis Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Gracie, Renata; Barcellos, Christovam; Magalhães, Mônica; Souza-Santos, Reinaldo; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens Guimarães

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis displays a great diversity of routes of exposure, reservoirs, etiologic agents, and clinical symptoms. It occurs almost worldwide but its pattern of transmission varies depending where it happens. Climate change may increase the number of cases, especially in developing countries, like Brazil. Spatial analysis studies of leptospirosis have highlighted the importance of socioeconomic and environmental context. Hence, the choice of the geographical scale and unit of analysis used in the studies is pivotal, because it restricts the indicators available for the analysis and may bias the results. In this study, we evaluated which environmental and socioeconomic factors, typically used to characterize the risks of leptospirosis transmission, are more relevant at different geographical scales (i.e., regional, municipal, and local). Geographic Information Systems were used for data analysis. Correlations between leptospirosis incidence and several socioeconomic and environmental indicators were calculated at different geographical scales. At the regional scale, the strongest correlations were observed between leptospirosis incidence and the amount of people living in slums, or the percent of the area densely urbanized. At the municipal scale, there were no significant correlations. At the local level, the percent of the area prone to flooding best correlated with leptospirosis incidence. PMID:25310536

  18. Geographical scale effects on the analysis of leptospirosis determinants.

    PubMed

    Gracie, Renata; Barcellos, Christovam; Magalhães, Mônica; Souza-Santos, Reinaldo; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens Guimarães

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis displays a great diversity of routes of exposure, reservoirs, etiologic agents, and clinical symptoms. It occurs almost worldwide but its pattern of transmission varies depending where it happens. Climate change may increase the number of cases, especially in developing countries, like Brazil. Spatial analysis studies of leptospirosis have highlighted the importance of socioeconomic and environmental context. Hence, the choice of the geographical scale and unit of analysis used in the studies is pivotal, because it restricts the indicators available for the analysis and may bias the results. In this study, we evaluated which environmental and socioeconomic factors, typically used to characterize the risks of leptospirosis transmission, are more relevant at different geographical scales (i.e., regional, municipal, and local). Geographic Information Systems were used for data analysis. Correlations between leptospirosis incidence and several socioeconomic and environmental indicators were calculated at different geographical scales. At the regional scale, the strongest correlations were observed between leptospirosis incidence and the amount of people living in slums, or the percent of the area densely urbanized. At the municipal scale, there were no significant correlations. At the local level, the percent of the area prone to flooding best correlated with leptospirosis incidence. PMID:25310536

  19. Shielding analysis methods available in the scale computational system

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Tang, J.S.; Hermann, O.W.; Bucholz, J.A.; Emmett, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Computational tools have been included in the SCALE system to allow shielding analysis to be performed using both discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques. One-dimensional discrete ordinates analyses are performed with the XSDRNPM-S module, and point dose rates outside the shield are calculated with the XSDOSE module. Multidimensional analyses are performed with the MORSE-SGC/S Monte Carlo module. This paper will review the above modules and the four Shielding Analysis Sequences (SAS) developed for the SCALE system. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Full-scale system impact analysis: Digital document storage project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Digital Document Storage Full Scale System can provide cost effective electronic document storage, retrieval, hard copy reproduction, and remote access for users of NASA Technical Reports. The desired functionality of the DDS system is highly dependent on the assumed requirements for remote access used in this Impact Analysis. It is highly recommended that NASA proceed with a phased, communications requirement analysis to ensure that adequate communications service can be supplied at a reasonable cost in order to validate recent working assumptions upon which the success of the DDS Full Scale System is dependent.

  1. Multi-scale analysis for environmental dispersion in wetland flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zi; Li, Z.; Chen, G. Q.

    2011-08-01

    Presented in this work is a multi-scale analysis for longitudinal evolution of contaminant concentration in a fully developed flow through a shallow wetland channel. An environmental dispersion model for the mean concentration is devised as an extension of Taylor's classical formulation by a multi-scale analysis. Corresponding environmental dispersivity is found identical to that determined by the method of concentration moments. For typical contaminant constituents of chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, total phosphorus, total nitrogen and heavy metal, the evolution of contaminant cloud is illustrated with the critical length and duration of the contaminant cloud with constituent concentration beyond some given environmental standard level.

  2. Preparation of postsynaptic density fraction from hippocampal slices and proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dosemeci, Ayse . E-mail: dosemeca@mail.nih.gov; Tao-Cheng, J.-H.; Vinade, Lucia; Jaffe, Howard

    2006-01-13

    Hippocampal slices offer an excellent experimental system for the study of activity-induced changes in the postsynaptic density (PSD). While studies have documented electrophysiological and structural changes at synapses in response to precise manipulations of hippocampal slices, parallel biochemical and proteomic analyses were hampered by the lack of subcellular fractionation techniques applicable to starting tissue about three orders of magnitude smaller than that used in conventional protocols. Here, we describe a simple and convenient method for the preparation of PSD fractions from hippocampal slices and the identification of its components by proteomic techniques. The 'micro PSD fraction' obtained following two consecutive extractions of a synaptosomal fraction with Triton X-100 shows a significant enrichment in the marker protein PSD-95. Thin section electron microscopy shows PSDs similar to those observed in situ. However, other particulate material, especially myelin, and membrane vesicles are also present. The composition of the PSD fraction from hippocampal slices was analyzed by 2D LC/MS/MS. The proteomic approach which utilizes as little as 10 {mu}g total protein allowed the identification of >100 proteins. Many of the proteins detected in the fraction are the same as those identified in conventional PSD preparations including specialized PSD-scaffolding proteins, signaling molecules, cytoskeletal elements as well as certain contaminants. The results show the feasibility of the preparation of a PSD fraction from hippocampal slices of reasonable purity and of sufficient yield for proteomic analyses. In addition, we show that further purification of PSDs is possible using magnetic beads coated with a PSD-95 antibody.

  3. An Analysis of the Deuterium Fractionation of Star-forming Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, R. K.; Kirk, H. M.; Shirley, Y. L.

    2013-03-01

    We have performed a pointed survey of N2D+ 2-1 and N2D+ 3-2 emission toward 64 N2H+-bright starless and protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope and Kitt Peak 12 m telescope. We find a mean deuterium fractionation in N2H+, RD = N(N2D+)/N(N2H+), of 0.08, with a maximum RD = 0.2. In detected sources, we find no significant difference in the deuterium fractionation between starless and protostellar cores, nor between cores in clustered or isolated environments. We compare the deuterium fraction in N2H+ with parameters linked to advanced core evolution. We only find significant correlations between the deuterium fraction and increased H2 column density, as well as with increased central core density, for all cores. Toward protostellar sources, we additionally find a significant anticorrelation between RD and bolometric temperature. We show that the Perseus cores are characterized by low CO depletion values relative to previous studies of star-forming cores, similar to recent results in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. We suggest that the low average CO depletion is the dominant mechanism that constrains the average deuterium fractionation in the Perseus cores to small values. While current equilibrium and dynamic chemical models are able to reproduce the range of deuterium fractionation values we find in Perseus, reproducing the scatter across the cores requires variation in parameters such as the ionization fraction or the ortho-to-para-H2 ratio across the cloud, or a range in core evolution timescales.

  4. Tools for Large-Scale Mobile Malware Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bierma, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing mobile applications for malicious behavior is an important area of re- search, and is made di cult, in part, by the increasingly large number of appli- cations available for the major operating systems. There are currently over 1.2 million apps available in both the Google Play and Apple App stores (the respec- tive o cial marketplaces for the Android and iOS operating systems)[1, 2]. Our research provides two large-scale analysis tools to aid in the detection and analysis of mobile malware. The rst tool we present, Andlantis, is a scalable dynamic analysis system capa- ble of processing over 3000 Android applications per hour. Traditionally, Android dynamic analysis techniques have been relatively limited in scale due to the compu- tational resources required to emulate the full Android system to achieve accurate execution. Andlantis is the most scalable Android dynamic analysis framework to date, and is able to collect valuable forensic data, which helps reverse-engineers and malware researchers identify and understand anomalous application behavior. We discuss the results of running 1261 malware samples through the system, and provide examples of malware analysis performed with the resulting data. While techniques exist to perform static analysis on a large number of appli- cations, large-scale analysis of iOS applications has been relatively small scale due to the closed nature of the iOS ecosystem, and the di culty of acquiring appli- cations for analysis. The second tool we present, iClone, addresses the challenges associated with iOS research in order to detect application clones within a dataset of over 20,000 iOS applications.

  5. Specimen Preparation for Metal Matrix Composites with a High Volume Fraction of Reinforcing Particles for EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. S.; Belozerov, G. A.; Smirnova, E. O.; Konovalov, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.; Muizemnek, O. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with a procedure of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis of a metal matrix composite (MMC) with a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. Unlike standard procedures of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis, the proposed procedure is iterative with consecutive application of mechanical and electrochemical polishing. This procedure significantly improves the results of an indexed MMC matrix in comparison with the standard procedure of specimen preparation. The procedure was verified on a MMC with pure aluminum (99.8% Al) as the matrix, SiC particles being used as reinforcing elements. The average size of the SiC particles is 14 μm, and their volume fraction amounts to 50% of the total volume of the composite. It has been experimentally found that, for making the EBSD analysis of a material matrix near reinforcing particles, the difference in height between the particles and the matrix should not exceed 2 µm.

  6. Fractionation of polyphenols in hawthorn into polymeric procyanidins, phenolic acids and flavonoids prior to high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Svedström, Ulla; Vuorela, Heikki; Kostiainen, Risto; Laakso, Into; Hiltunen, Raimo

    2006-04-21

    Polymeric procyanidins, phenolic carboxylic acids and flavonoids of hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata) were fractionated prior to HPLC analysis using column chromatography and solid-phase extraction (SPE). The flavonoid fraction also contained (-)-epicatechin. The three groups of phenolics, each with clearly different UV spectra, were examined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) analysis. The average repeatability of the method (RSD) was in the range of 8-13% for chlorogenic acid, (-)-epicatechin and hyperoside. The polymeric procyanidins of hawthorn flowers consisted mainly of (-)-epicatechin subunits, and their mean degree of polymerization (DP) was 22.2. The HPLC methods developed can be used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of different phenolic compounds in hawthorn plant material and their extracts.

  7. Review and statistical analysis of the ultrasonic velocity method for estimating the porosity fraction in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Swickard, S. M.; Stang, D. B.; Deguire, M. R.

    1990-01-01

    A review and statistical analysis of the ultrasonic velocity method for estimating the porosity fraction in polycrystalline materials is presented. Initially, a semi-empirical model is developed showing the origin of the linear relationship between ultrasonic velocity and porosity fraction. Then, from a compilation of data produced by many researchers, scatter plots of velocity versus percent porosity data are shown for Al2O3, MgO, porcelain-based ceramics, PZT, SiC, Si3N4, steel, tungsten, UO2,(U0.30Pu0.70)C, and YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Linear regression analysis produced predicted slope, intercept, correlation coefficient, level of significance, and confidence interval statistics for the data. Velocity values predicted from regression analysis for fully-dense materials are in good agreement with those calculated from elastic properties.

  8. Review and statistical analysis of the use of ultrasonic velocity for estimating the porosity fraction in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Swickard, S. M.; Stang, D. B.; Deguire, M. R.

    1991-01-01

    A review and statistical analysis of the ultrasonic velocity method for estimating the porosity fraction in polycrystalline materials is presented. Initially, a semiempirical model is developed showing the origin of the linear relationship between ultrasonic velocity and porosity fraction. Then, from a compilation of data produced by many researchers, scatter plots of velocity versus percent porosity data are shown for Al2O3, MgO, porcelain-based ceramics, PZT, SiC, Si3N4, steel, tungsten, UO2,(U0.30Pu0.70)C, and YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Linear regression analysis produces predicted slope, intercept, correlation coefficient, level of significance, and confidence interval statistics for the data. Velocity values predicted from regression analysis of fully-dense materials are in good agreement with those calculated from elastic properties.

  9. Analysis of tristable energy harvesting system having fractional order viscoelastic material.

    PubMed

    Oumbé Tékam, G T; Kwuimy, C A Kitio; Woafo, P

    2015-01-01

    A particular attention is devoted to analyze the dynamics of a strongly nonlinear energy harvester having fractional order viscoelastic flexible material. The strong nonlinearity is obtained from the magnetic interaction between the end free of the flexible material and three equally spaced magnets. Periodic responses are computed using the KrylovBogoliubov averaging method, and the effects of fractional order damping on the output electric energy are analyzed. It is obtained that the harvested energy is enhanced for small order of the fractional derivative. Considering the order and strength of the fractional viscoelastic property as control parameter, the complexity of the system response is investigated through the Melnikov criteria for horseshoes chaos, which allows us to derive the mathematical expression of the boundary between intra-well motion and bifurcations appearance domain. We observe that the order and strength of the fractional viscoelastic property can be effectively used to control chaos in the system. The results are confirmed by the smooth and fractal shape of the basin of attraction as the order of derivative decreases. The bifurcation diagrams and the corresponding Lyapunov exponents are plotted to get insight into the nonlinear response of the system.

  10. Analysis of tristable energy harvesting system having fractional order viscoelastic material

    SciTech Connect

    Oumbé Tékam, G. T.; Woafo, P.; Kitio Kwuimy, C. A.

    2015-01-15

    A particular attention is devoted to analyze the dynamics of a strongly nonlinear energy harvester having fractional order viscoelastic flexible material. The strong nonlinearity is obtained from the magnetic interaction between the end free of the flexible material and three equally spaced magnets. Periodic responses are computed using the KrylovBogoliubov averaging method, and the effects of fractional order damping on the output electric energy are analyzed. It is obtained that the harvested energy is enhanced for small order of the fractional derivative. Considering the order and strength of the fractional viscoelastic property as control parameter, the complexity of the system response is investigated through the Melnikov criteria for horseshoes chaos, which allows us to derive the mathematical expression of the boundary between intra-well motion and bifurcations appearance domain. We observe that the order and strength of the fractional viscoelastic property can be effectively used to control chaos in the system. The results are confirmed by the smooth and fractal shape of the basin of attraction as the order of derivative decreases. The bifurcation diagrams and the corresponding Lyapunov exponents are plotted to get insight into the nonlinear response of the system.

  11. Analysis of tristable energy harvesting system having fractional order viscoelastic material.

    PubMed

    Oumbé Tékam, G T; Kwuimy, C A Kitio; Woafo, P

    2015-01-01

    A particular attention is devoted to analyze the dynamics of a strongly nonlinear energy harvester having fractional order viscoelastic flexible material. The strong nonlinearity is obtained from the magnetic interaction between the end free of the flexible material and three equally spaced magnets. Periodic responses are computed using the KrylovBogoliubov averaging method, and the effects of fractional order damping on the output electric energy are analyzed. It is obtained that the harvested energy is enhanced for small order of the fractional derivative. Considering the order and strength of the fractional viscoelastic property as control parameter, the complexity of the system response is investigated through the Melnikov criteria for horseshoes chaos, which allows us to derive the mathematical expression of the boundary between intra-well motion and bifurcations appearance domain. We observe that the order and strength of the fractional viscoelastic property can be effectively used to control chaos in the system. The results are confirmed by the smooth and fractal shape of the basin of attraction as the order of derivative decreases. The bifurcation diagrams and the corresponding Lyapunov exponents are plotted to get insight into the nonlinear response of the system. PMID:25637923

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Fractionated Toxoplasma Oocysts Reveals Clues to Their Environmental Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bogyo, Matthew; Conrad, Patricia A.; Boothroyd, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is unique in its ability to infect a broad range of birds and mammals, including humans, leading to an extremely high worldwide prevalence and distribution. This work focuses on the environmentally resistant oocyst, which is the product of sexual replication in felids and an important source of human infection. Due to the difficulty in producing and working with oocysts, relatively little is known about how this stage is able to resist extreme environmental stresses and how they initiate a new infection, once ingested. To fill this gap, the proteome of the wall and sporocyst/sporozoite fractions of mature, sporulated oocysts were characterized using one-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by LC-MS/MS on trypsin-digested peptides. A combined total of 1021 non-redundant T. gondii proteins were identified in the sporocyst/sporozoite fraction and 226 were identified in the oocyst wall fraction. Significantly, 172 of the identified proteins have not previously been identified in Toxoplasma proteomic studies. Among these are several of interest for their likely role in conferring environmental resistance including a family of small, tyrosine-rich proteins present in the oocyst wall fractions and late embryogenesis abundant domain-containing (LEA) proteins in the cytosolic fractions. The latter are known from other systems to be key to enabling survival against desiccation. PMID:22279555

  13. Dynamic analysis of a fractional order delayed predator-prey system with harvesting.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Zhao, Hongyong; Zhang, Xuebing

    2016-06-01

    In the study, we consider a fractional order delayed predator-prey system with harvesting terms. Our discussion is divided into two cases. Without harvesting, we investigate the stability of the model, as well as deriving some criteria by analyzing the associated characteristic equation. With harvesting, we investigate the dynamics of the system from the aspect of local stability and analyze the influence of harvesting to prey and predator. Finally, numerical simulations are presented to verify our theoretical results. In addition, using numerical simulations, we investigate the effects of fractional order and harvesting terms on dynamic behavior. Our numerical results show that fractional order can affect not only the stability of the system without harvesting terms, but also the switching times from stability to instability and to stability. The harvesting can convert the equilibrium point, the stability and the stability switching times.

  14. Dynamic analysis of a fractional order delayed predator-prey system with harvesting.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Zhao, Hongyong; Zhang, Xuebing

    2016-06-01

    In the study, we consider a fractional order delayed predator-prey system with harvesting terms. Our discussion is divided into two cases. Without harvesting, we investigate the stability of the model, as well as deriving some criteria by analyzing the associated characteristic equation. With harvesting, we investigate the dynamics of the system from the aspect of local stability and analyze the influence of harvesting to prey and predator. Finally, numerical simulations are presented to verify our theoretical results. In addition, using numerical simulations, we investigate the effects of fractional order and harvesting terms on dynamic behavior. Our numerical results show that fractional order can affect not only the stability of the system without harvesting terms, but also the switching times from stability to instability and to stability. The harvesting can convert the equilibrium point, the stability and the stability switching times. PMID:27026265

  15. Complexity of carbon market from multi-scale entropy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xinghua; Li, Shasha; Tian, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Complexity of carbon market is the consequence of economic dynamics and extreme social political events in global carbon markets. The multi-scale entropy can measure the long-term structures in the daily price return time series. By using multi-scale entropy analysis, we explore the complexity of carbon market and mean reversion trend of daily price return. The logarithmic difference of data Dec16 from August 6, 2010 to May 22, 2015 is selected as the sample. The entropy is higher in small time scale, while lower in large. The dependence of the entropy on the time scale reveals the mean reversion of carbon prices return in the long run. A relatively great fluctuation over some short time period indicates that the complexity of carbon market evolves consistently with economic development track and the events of international climate conferences.

  16. Single-Fraction Versus 5-Fraction Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression in Patients With Limited Survival Prognoses: Results of a Matched-Pair Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Šegedin, Barbara; Perpar, Ana; Conde, Antonio J.; Garcia, Raquel; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Cacicedo, Jon; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: This study compared single-fraction to multi-fraction short-course radiation therapy (RT) for symptomatic metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) in patients with limited survival prognosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 121 patients who received 8 Gy × 1 fraction were matched (1:1) to 121 patients treated with 4 Gy × 5 fractions for 10 factors including age, sex, performance status, primary tumor type, number of involved vertebrae, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval between tumor diagnosis and MESCC, pre-RT ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits prior to RT. Endpoints included in-field repeated RT (reRT) for MESCC, overall survival (OS), and impact of RT on motor function. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test for in-field reRT for MESCC and OS and with the ordered-logit model for effect of RT on motor function. Results: Doses of 8 Gy × 1 fraction and 4 Gy × 5 fractions were not significantly different with respect to the need for in-field reRT for MESCC (P=.11) at 6 months (18% vs 9%, respectively) and 12 months (30% vs 22%, respectively). The RT regimen also had no significant impact on OS (P=.65) and post-RT motor function (P=.21). OS rates at 6 and 12 months were 24% and 9%, respectively, after 8 Gy × 1 fraction versus 25% and 13%, respectively, after 4 Gy × 5 fractions. Improvement of motor function was observed in 17% of patients after 8 Gy × 1 fraction and 23% after 4 Gy × 5 fractions, respectively. Conclusions: There were no significant differences with respect to need for in-field reRT for MESCC, OS, and motor function by dose fractionation regimen. Thus, 8 Gy × 1 fraction may be a reasonable option for patients with survival prognosis of a few months.

  17. The scaling of time series size towards detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaolei; Ren, Liwei; Shang, Pengjian; Feng, Guochen

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modification of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), called multivariate DFA (MNDFA) method, based on the scaling of time series size N. In traditional DFA method, we obtained the influence of the sequence segmentation interval s, and it inspires us to propose a new model MNDFA to discuss the scaling of time series size towards DFA. The effectiveness of the procedure is verified by numerical experiments with both artificial and stock returns series. Results show that the proposed MNDFA method contains more significant information of series compared to traditional DFA method. The scaling of time series size has an influence on the auto-correlation (AC) in time series. For certain series, we obtain an exponential relationship, and also calculate the slope through the fitting function. Our analysis and finite-size effect test demonstrate that an appropriate choice of the time series size can avoid unnecessary influences, and also make the testing results more accurate.

  18. A Factor Analysis of the Discipline Efficacy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Rebecca McMahon; Kazelskis, Richard; Reeves-Kazelskis, Carolyn

    The Discipline Efficacy Scale (DES) was designed to measure personal and general teacher efficacy beliefs about student discipline. A confirmatory factor analysis of the proposed two-factor model was carried out using a sample of 206 junior- and senior-level preservice teacher education students. Goodness of fit measures did not suggest a good fit…

  19. Large-scale data analysis using the Wigner function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earnshaw, R. A.; Lei, C.; Li, J.; Mugassabi, S.; Vourdas, A.

    2012-04-01

    Large-scale data are analysed using the Wigner function. It is shown that the 'frequency variable' provides important information, which is lost with other techniques. The method is applied to 'sentiment analysis' in data from social networks and also to financial data.

  20. Exploratory Factor Analysis of African Self-Consciousness Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhagwat, Ranjit; Kelly, Shalonda; Lambert, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    This study replicates and extends prior studies of the dimensionality, convergent, and external validity of African Self-Consciousness Scale scores with appropriate exploratory factor analysis methods and a large gender balanced sample (N = 348). Viable one- and two-factor solutions were cross-validated. Both first factors overlapped significantly…

  1. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Professional Opinion Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greeno, Elizabeth J.; Hughes, Anne K.; Hayward, R. Anna; Parker, Karen L.

    2007-01-01

    The Professional Opinion Scale (POS) was developed to measure social work values orientation. Objective: A confirmatory factor analysis was performed on the POS. Method: This cross-sectional study used a mailed survey design with a national random (simple) sample of members of the National Association of Social Workers. Results: The study…

  2. Quantitative analysis in field-flow fractionation using ultraviolet-visible detectors: an experimental design for absolute measurements

    PubMed

    Zattoni; Melucci; Torsi; Reschiglian

    2000-03-01

    In previous works, it has been shown that a standard ultraviolet-visible detection system can be used for quantitative analysis of heterogeneous systems (dispersed supermicron particles) in field-flow fractionation (FFF) by single peak area measurements. Such an analysis method was shown to require either experimental measurements (standardless analysis) or an accurate model (absolute analysis) to determine the extinction efficiency of the particulate samples. In this work, an experimental design to assess absolute analysis in FFF through prediction of particles' optical extinction is presented. Prediction derives from the semiempirical approach by van de Hulst and Walstra. Special emphasis is given to the restriction of the experimental domain of instrumental conditions within which absolute analysis is allowed. Validation by statistical analysis and a practical application to real sample recovery studies are also given.

  3. Thermodynamic analysis of the energy recovery from the aerobic bioconversion of solid urban waste organic fraction.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, Francesco; Benavoli, Manuel; Zoppitelli, Mirco

    2008-01-01

    Waste management is of the utmost importance for many countries and especially for highly developed ones due to its implications on society. In particular, proper treatment before disposal of the solid urban waste organic fraction is one of the main issues that is addressed in waste management. In fact, the organic fraction is particularly reactive and if disposed in sanitary landfills without previous adequate treatment, a large amount of dangerous and polluting gaseous, liquid and solid substances can be produced. Some waste treatment processes can also present an opportunity to produce other by-products like energy, recycled materials and other products with both economic and environmental benefits. In this paper, the aerobic treatment of the organic fraction of solid urban waste, performed in a biocell plant with the possibility of recovering heat for civil or industrial needs, was examined from the thermodynamic point of view. A theoretical model was proposed both for the biological process of the organic fraction, as well as for the heat recovery system. The most significant results are represented and discussed. PMID:17512716

  4. Strategies for Teaching Fractions: Using Error Analysis for Intervention and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Many students struggle with fractions and must understand them before learning higher-level math. Veteran educator David B. Spangler provides research-based tools that are aligned with NCTM and Common Core State Standards. He outlines powerful diagnostic methods for analyzing student work and providing timely, specific, and meaningful…

  5. Quantitative analysis of scale of aeromagnetic data raises questions about geologic-map scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nykanen, V.; Raines, G.L.

    2006-01-01

    A recently published study has shown that small-scale geologic map data can reproduce mineral assessments made with considerably larger scale data. This result contradicts conventional wisdom about the importance of scale in mineral exploration, at least for regional studies. In order to formally investigate aspects of scale, a weights-of-evidence analysis using known gold occurrences and deposits in the Central Lapland Greenstone Belt of Finland as training sites provided a test of the predictive power of the aeromagnetic data. These orogenic-mesothermal-type gold occurrences and deposits have strong lithologic and structural controls associated with long (up to several kilometers), narrow (up to hundreds of meters) hydrothermal alteration zones with associated magnetic lows. The aeromagnetic data were processed using conventional geophysical methods of successive upward continuation simulating terrane clearance or 'flight height' from the original 30 m to an artificial 2000 m. The analyses show, as expected, that the predictive power of aeromagnetic data, as measured by the weights-of-evidence contrast, decreases with increasing flight height. Interestingly, the Moran autocorrelation of aeromagnetic data representing differing flight height, that is spatial scales, decreases with decreasing resolution of source data. The Moran autocorrelation coefficient scems to be another measure of the quality of the aeromagnetic data for predicting exploration targets. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

  6. Large-scale liquid immiscibility and fractional crystallization in the 1780 Ma Taihang dyke swarm: Implications for genesis of the bimodal Xiong'er volcanic province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Wang, Xinping; Lai, Yong; Wang, Chong; Windley, Brian F.

    2015-11-01

    Immiscibility is a potential mechanism for the formation of high-Fe-Ti-P rocks; however, whether large-scale segregation and eruption of high-Si lavas can occur in nature has yet to be proven. In this study, we investigate the possibility of immiscibility between the cogenetic 1780 Ma high-Fe-Ti-P-bearing Taihang dykes and the 'bimodal' Xiong'er volcanics in North China. The compositions of silicate melt inclusions in plagioclase megacrysts of the dykes provide a new approach to obtain the primary liquid. Mineral and bulk-rock compositions reveal that large compositional variations in the dykes are the result of plagioclase- and clinopyroxene-dominated fractional crystallization and of density-driven mineral sorting, which together caused the liquids to be poor in Ca-Al but rich in Fe-Ti-P-K, and thus chemically immiscible. Conjugate interstitial granophyric and ilmenite-rich intergrowths and reactive microstructures especially olivine coronas in the dykes, and Si-/Fe-Ti-rich globules in the volcanics, provide petrographic evidence for the presence of two coeval, coexisting liquids in equilibrium separated by a miscibility gap, and thus for immiscibility and segregation/migration. The fractional crystallization and subsequent segregation were responsible for the compositional diversity of the Taihang dykes and also of the 'bimodal' Xiong'er volcanics. Accordingly, the dacite and rhyolite lavas are potentially the high-Si counterparts of the high-Ti dykes, and the basalt and andesite lavas are the erupted equivalents of the relatively low-Ti dykes. It is likely that the sustained plagioclase- and clinopyroxene-dominated fractional crystallization, and the enhanced fO2 were responsible for the immiscibility. The segregation probably took place during the ascent of the liquid in the pumping system (feeder dykes). This likely represents one natural example of crust-scale immiscibility from which many high-Ti dykes and silicic lavas (~ 1/3 volume of the Xiong

  7. Angular analysis and differential branching fraction of the decay B {/s 0} → ϕμ + μ -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthieu, K.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Diaz, M. Vieites; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2015-09-01

    An angular analysis and a measurement of the differential branching fraction of the decay B s 0 → ϕμ + μ - are presented, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 .0 fb-1 of pp collisions recorded by the LHCb experiment at √{s}=7 and 8 TeV. Measurements are reported as a function of q 2, the square of the dimuon invariant mass and results of the angular analysis are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. In the range 1 < q 2 < 6 GeV2 /c 4, where precise theoretical calculations are available, the differential branching fraction is found to be more than 3 σ below the Standard Model predictions. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Exploratory Data analysis ENvironment eXtreme scale (EDENx)

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad Allen

    2015-07-01

    EDENx is a multivariate data visualization tool that allows interactive user driven analysis of large-scale data sets with high dimensionality. EDENx builds on our earlier system, called EDEN to enable analysis of more dimensions and larger scale data sets. EDENx provides an initial overview of summary statistics for each variable in the data set under investigation. EDENx allows the user to interact with graphical summary plots of the data to investigate subsets and their statistical associations. These plots include histograms, binned scatterplots, binned parallel coordinate plots, timeline plots, and graphical correlation indicators. From the EDENx interface, a user can select a subsample of interest and launch a more detailed data visualization via the EDEN system. EDENx is best suited for high-level, aggregate analysis tasks while EDEN is more appropriate for detail data investigations.

  9. Exploratory Data analysis ENvironment eXtreme scale (EDENx)

    2015-07-01

    EDENx is a multivariate data visualization tool that allows interactive user driven analysis of large-scale data sets with high dimensionality. EDENx builds on our earlier system, called EDEN to enable analysis of more dimensions and larger scale data sets. EDENx provides an initial overview of summary statistics for each variable in the data set under investigation. EDENx allows the user to interact with graphical summary plots of the data to investigate subsets and their statisticalmore » associations. These plots include histograms, binned scatterplots, binned parallel coordinate plots, timeline plots, and graphical correlation indicators. From the EDENx interface, a user can select a subsample of interest and launch a more detailed data visualization via the EDEN system. EDENx is best suited for high-level, aggregate analysis tasks while EDEN is more appropriate for detail data investigations.« less

  10. SINEX: SCALE shielding analysis GUI for X-Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Browman, S.M.; Barnett, D.L.

    1997-12-01

    SINEX (SCALE Interface Environment for X-windows) is an X-Windows graphical user interface (GUI), that is being developed for performing SCALE radiation shielding analyses. SINEX enables the user to generate input for the SAS4/MORSE and QADS/QAD-CGGP shielding analysis sequences in SCALE. The code features will facilitate the use of both analytical sequences with a minimum of additional user input. Included in SINEX is the capability to check the geometry model by generating two-dimensional (2-D) color plots of the geometry model using a new version of the SCALE module, PICTURE. The most sophisticated feature, however, is the 2-D visualization display that provides a graphical representation on screen as the user builds a geometry model. This capability to interactively build a model will significantly increase user productivity and reduce user errors. SINEX will perform extensive error checking and will allow users to execute SCALE directly from the GUI. The interface will also provide direct on-line access to the SCALE manual.

  11. Handbook of Scaling Methods in Aquatic Ecology: Measurement, Analysis, Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrasé, Celia

    2004-03-01

    Researchers in aquatic sciences have long been interested in describing temporal and biological heterogeneities at different observation scales. During the 1970s, scaling studies received a boost from the application of spectral analysis to ecological sciences. Since then, new insights have evolved in parallel with advances in observation technologies and computing power. In particular, during the last 2 decades, novel theoretical achievements were facilitated by the use of microstructure profilers, the application of mathematical tools derived from fractal and wavelet analyses, and the increase in computing power that allowed more complex simulations. The idea of publishing the Handbook of Scaling Methods in Aquatic Ecology arose out of a special session of the 2001 Aquatic Science Meeting of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography. The edition of the book is timely, because it compiles a good amount of the work done in these last 2 decades. The book is comprised of three sections: measurements, analysis, and simulation. Each contains some review chapters and a number of more specialized contributions. The contents are multidisciplinary and focus on biological and physical processes and their interactions over a broad range of scales, from micro-layers to ocean basins. The handbook topics include high-resolution observation methodologies, as well as applications of different mathematical tools for analysis and simulation of spatial structures, time variability of physical and biological processes, and individual organism behavior. The scientific background of the authors is highly diverse, ensuring broad interest for the scientific community.

  12. SCALE system cross-section validation for criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hathout, A M; Westfall, R M; Dodds, Jr, H L

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test selected data from three cross-section libraries for use in the criticality safety analysis of UO/sub 2/ fuel rod lattices. The libraries, which are distributed with the SCALE system, are used to analyze potential criticality problems which could arise in the industrial fuel cycle for PWR and BWR reactors. Fuel lattice criticality problems could occur in pool storage, dry storage with accidental moderation, shearing and dissolution of irradiated elements, and in fuel transport and storage due to inadequate packing and shipping cask design. The data were tested by using the SCALE system to analyze 25 recently performed critical experiments.

  13. Multi-scale statistical analysis of coronal solar activity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gamborino, Diana; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Martinell, Julio J.

    2016-07-08

    Multi-filter images from the solar corona are used to obtain temperature maps that are analyzed using techniques based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in order to extract dynamical and structural information at various scales. Exploring active regions before and after a solar flare and comparing them with quiet regions, we show that the multi-scale behavior presents distinct statistical properties for each case that can be used to characterize the level of activity in a region. Information about the nature of heat transport is also to be extracted from the analysis.

  14. A comparative analysis of radiobiological models for cell surviving fractions at high doses.

    PubMed

    Andisheh, B; Edgren, M; Belkić, Dž; Mavroidis, P; Brahme, A; Lind, B K

    2013-04-01

    For many years the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been widely used to describe the effects of total dose and dose per fraction at low-to-intermediate doses in conventional fractionated radiotherapy. Recent advances in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) have increased the interest in finding a reliable cell survival model, which will be accurate at high doses, as well. Different models have been proposed for improving descriptions of high dose survival responses, such as the Universal Survival Curve (USC), the Kavanagh-Newman (KN) and several generalizations of the LQ model, e.g. the Linear-Quadratic-Linear (LQL) model and the Pade Linear Quadratic (PLQ) model. The purpose of the present study is to compare a number of models in order to find the best option(s) which could successfully be used as a fractionation correction method in SRT. In this work, six independent experimental data sets were used: CHOAA8 (Chinese hamster fibroblast), H460 (non-small cell lung cancer, NSLC), NCI-H841 (small cell lung cancer, SCLC), CP3 and DU145 (human prostate carcinoma cell lines) and U1690 (SCLC). By detailed comparisons with these measurements, the performance of nine different radiobiological models was examined for the entire dose range, including high doses beyond the shoulder of the survival curves. Using the computed and measured cell surviving fractions, comparison of the goodness-of-fit for all the models was performed by means of the reduced χ (2)-test with a 95% confidence interval. The obtained results indicate that models with dose-independent final slopes and extrapolation numbers generally represent better choices for SRT. This is especially important at high doses where the final slope and extrapolation numbers are presently found to play a major role. The PLQ, USC and LQL models have the least number of shortcomings at all doses. The extrapolation numbers and final slopes of these models do not depend on dose. Their asymptotes

  15. [Analysis of microbial community structure at full-scale wastewater treatment plants by oxidation ditch].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yun; Yang, Dian-hai; Lu, Wen-jian

    2012-08-01

    The microbial populations of the oxidation ditch process at the full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in a city in north China were analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Fractions structure varieties and distribution characteristics of Accumulibacter as potential phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs), and Competibacter as potential glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) were quantified. The results indicated that Accumulibacter comprised around 2.0% +/- 0.6%, 3.4% +/- 0.6% and 3.5% +/- 1.2% of the total biomass in the anaerobic tank, anoxic zone and zone, respectively, while the corresponding values for Competibacter were 25.3% +/- 8.7%, 30.3% +/- 7.1% and 24.4% +/- 6.1%. Lower Accumulibacter fractions were found compared with previous full-scale reports (7%-22%), indicating low phosphorus removal efficiency in the oxidation ditch system. Statistical analysis indicated that the amount of PAOs was significantly higher in the anoxic zone and the aerobic zone compared with that in the anaerobic tank, while GAOs remained at the same level. PMID:23213894

  16. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  17. Consecutive anaerobic-aerobic treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and lignocellulosic materials in laboratory-scale landfill-bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Pellera, Frantseska-Maria; Pasparakis, Emmanouil; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2016-10-01

    The scope of this study is to evaluate the use of laboratory-scale landfill-bioreactors, operated consecutively under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, for the combined treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with two different co-substrates of lignocellulosic nature, namely green waste (GW) and dried olive pomace (DOP). According to the results such a system would represent a promising option for eventual larger scale applications. Similar variation patterns among bioreactors indicate a relatively defined sequence of processes. Initially operating the systems under anaerobic conditions would allow energetic exploitation of the substrates, while the implementation of a leachate treatment system ultimately aiming at nutrient recovery, especially during the anaerobic phase, could be a profitable option for the whole system, due to the high organic load that characterizes this effluent. In order to improve the overall effectiveness of such a system, measures towards enhancing methane contents of produced biogas, such as substrate pretreatment, should be investigated. Moreover, the subsequent aerobic phase should have the goal of stabilizing the residual materials and finally obtain an end material eventually suitable for other purposes. PMID:27497587

  18. Consecutive anaerobic-aerobic treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and lignocellulosic materials in laboratory-scale landfill-bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Pellera, Frantseska-Maria; Pasparakis, Emmanouil; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2016-10-01

    The scope of this study is to evaluate the use of laboratory-scale landfill-bioreactors, operated consecutively under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, for the combined treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with two different co-substrates of lignocellulosic nature, namely green waste (GW) and dried olive pomace (DOP). According to the results such a system would represent a promising option for eventual larger scale applications. Similar variation patterns among bioreactors indicate a relatively defined sequence of processes. Initially operating the systems under anaerobic conditions would allow energetic exploitation of the substrates, while the implementation of a leachate treatment system ultimately aiming at nutrient recovery, especially during the anaerobic phase, could be a profitable option for the whole system, due to the high organic load that characterizes this effluent. In order to improve the overall effectiveness of such a system, measures towards enhancing methane contents of produced biogas, such as substrate pretreatment, should be investigated. Moreover, the subsequent aerobic phase should have the goal of stabilizing the residual materials and finally obtain an end material eventually suitable for other purposes.

  19. Usability of multiangular imaging spectroscopy data for analysis of vegetation canopy shadow fraction in boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiet, Vincent; Perheentupa, Viljami; Mõttus, Matti; Hernández-Clemente, Rocío

    2016-04-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is a remote sensing technology which records continuous spectral data at a very high (better than 10 nm) resolution. Such spectral images can be used to monitor, for example, the photosynthetic activity of vegetation. Photosynthetic activity is dependent on varying light conditions and varies within the canopy. To measure this variation we need very high spatial resolution data with resolution better than the dominating canopy element size (e.g., tree crown in a forest canopy). This is useful, e.g., for detecting photosynthetic downregulation and thus plant stress. Canopy illumination conditions are often quantified using the shadow fraction: the fraction of visible foliage which is not sunlit. Shadow fraction is known to depend on view angle (e.g., hot spot images have very low shadow fraction). Hence, multiple observation angles potentially increase the range of shadow fraction in the imagery in high spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy data. To investigate the potential of multi-angle imaging spectroscopy in investigating canopy processes which vary with shadow fraction, we obtained a unique multiangular airborne imaging spectroscopy data for the Hyytiälä forest research station located in Finland (61° 50'N, 24° 17'E) in July 2015. The main tree species are Norway spruce (Picea abies L. karst), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh., Betula pendula Roth). We used an airborne hyperspectral sensor AISA Eagle II (Specim - Spectral Imaging Ltd., Finland) mounted on a tilting platform. The tilting platform allowed us to measure at nadir and approximately 35 degrees off-nadir. The hyperspectral sensor has a 37.5 degrees field of view (FOV), 0.6m pixel size, 128 spectral bands with an average spectral bandwidth of 4.6nm and is sensitive in the 400-1000 nm spectral region. The airborne data was radiometrically, atmospherically and geometrically processed using the Parge and Atcor software (Re Se applications Schl

  20. [Chromatographic analysis of low molecular weight fraction of cerebrospinal fluid in children with acute neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, L A; Shatik, S V; Sorokina, M N; Karasev, V V

    2002-05-01

    Low molecular-weight (oligopeptide) fraction of the cerebrospinal fluid was analyzed by high-performance reversed phase liquid chromatography in 30 children with bacterial and viral neuroinfections. The incidence and height of chromathoraphic peaks in bacterial meningitis depended on the disease etiology, stage, and severity. Qualitative and quantitative composition of low molecular-weight fraction of the liquor varied in patients with viral neuroinfections, depending on the severity of the cerebral parenchyma involvement. Differences in chromatographic profiles in complicated and uneventful course of neuroinfections indicate a possible damaging, protective, or regulatory effect of the liquor peptides. These data focus the attention on the role of oligopeptides in the genesis of neuroinfectious process, significance of search for peptide markers, their further isolation, identification, and development of test systems available for clinical application. PMID:12085699

  1. Dataset from proteomic analysis of rat, mouse, and human liver microsomes and S9 fractions.

    PubMed

    Golizeh, Makan; Schneider, Christina; Ohlund, Leanne B; Sleno, Lekha

    2015-06-01

    Rat, mouse and human liver microsomes and S9 fractions were analyzed using an optimized method combining ion exchange fractionation of digested peptides, and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HR-MS/MS). The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository (Vizcaíno et al., 2013 [1]) with the dataset identifiers PXD000717, PXD000720, PXD000721, PXD000731, PXD000733 and PXD000734. Data related to the peptides (trypsin digests only) were also uploaded to Peptide Atlas (Farrah et al., 2013 [2]) and are available with the dataset identifiers PASS00407, PASS00409, PASS00411, PASS00412, PASS00413 and PASS00414. The present dataset is associated with a research article published in EuPA Open Proteomics [3].

  2. [Chromatographic analysis of low molecular weight fraction of cerebrospinal fluid in children with acute neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, L A; Shatik, S V; Sorokina, M N; Karasev, V V

    2002-05-01

    Low molecular-weight (oligopeptide) fraction of the cerebrospinal fluid was analyzed by high-performance reversed phase liquid chromatography in 30 children with bacterial and viral neuroinfections. The incidence and height of chromathoraphic peaks in bacterial meningitis depended on the disease etiology, stage, and severity. Qualitative and quantitative composition of low molecular-weight fraction of the liquor varied in patients with viral neuroinfections, depending on the severity of the cerebral parenchyma involvement. Differences in chromatographic profiles in complicated and uneventful course of neuroinfections indicate a possible damaging, protective, or regulatory effect of the liquor peptides. These data focus the attention on the role of oligopeptides in the genesis of neuroinfectious process, significance of search for peptide markers, their further isolation, identification, and development of test systems available for clinical application.

  3. Preparation of envelope membrane fractions from Arabidopsis chloroplasts for proteomic analysis and other studies.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Daniel; Moyet, Lucas; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Ferro, Myriam; Joyard, Jacques; Rolland, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Plastids are semiautonomous organelles restricted to plants and protists. These plastids are surrounded by a double membrane system, or envelope. These envelope membranes contain machineries to import nuclear-encoded proteins, and transporters for ions or metabolites, but are also essential for a range of plastid-specific metabolisms. Targeted semiquantitative proteomic investigations have revealed specific cross-contaminations by other cell or plastid compartments that may occur during chloroplast envelope purification. This article describes procedures developed to recover highly purified envelope fractions starting from Percoll-purified Arabidopsis chloroplasts, gives an overview of possible cross-contaminations, provides some tricks to limit these cross-contaminations, and lists immunological markers and methods that can be used to assess the purity of the envelope fractions.

  4. Dynamical analysis of memristor-based fractional-order neural networks with time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xueli; Yu, Yongguang; Wang, Hu; Hu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the memristor-based fractional-order neural networks with time delay are analyzed. Based on the theories of set-value maps, differential inclusions and Filippov’s solution, some sufficient conditions for asymptotic stability of this neural network model are obtained when the external inputs are constants. Besides, uniform stability condition is derived when the external inputs are time-varying, and its attractive interval is estimated. Finally, numerical examples are given to verify our results.

  5. New Criticality Safety Analysis Capabilities in SCALE 5.1

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Stephen M; DeHart, Mark D; Dunn, Michael E; Goluoglu, Sedat; Horwedel, James E; Petrie Jr, Lester M; Rearden, Bradley T; Williams, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    Version 5.1 of the SCALE computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, released in 2006, contains several significant enhancements for nuclear criticality safety analysis. This paper highlights new capabilities in SCALE 5.1, including improved resonance self-shielding capabilities; ENDF/B-VI.7 cross-section and covariance data libraries; HTML output for KENO V.a; analytical calculations of KENO-VI volumes with GeeWiz/KENO3D; new CENTRMST/PMCST modules for processing ENDF/B-VI data in TSUNAMI; SCALE Generalized Geometry Package in NEWT; KENO Monte Carlo depletion in TRITON; and plotting of cross-section and covariance data in Javapeno.

  6. Bridgman crystal growth in low gravity - A scaling analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. I. D.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1990-01-01

    The results of an order-of-magnitude or scaling analysis are compared with those of numerical simulations of the effects of steady low gravity on compositional nonuniformity in crystals grown by the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. In particular, the results are examined of numerical simulations of the effect of steady residual acceleration on the transport of solute in a gallium-doped germanium melt during directional solidification under low-gravity conditions. The results are interpreted in terms of the relevant dimensionless groups associated with the process, and scaling techniques are evaluated by comparing their predictions with the numerical results. It is demonstrated that, when convective transport is comparable with diffusive transport, some specific knowledge of the behavior of the system is required before scaling arguments can be used to make reasonable predictions.

  7. Moderated regression analysis and Likert scales: too coarse for comfort.

    PubMed

    Russell, C J; Bobko, P

    1992-06-01

    One of the most commonly accepted models of relationships among three variables in applied industrial and organizational psychology is the simple moderator effect. However, many authors have expressed concern over the general lack of empirical support for interaction effects reported in the literature. We demonstrate in the current sample that use of a continuous, dependent-response scale instead of a discrete, Likert-type scale, causes moderated regression analysis effect sizes to increase an average of 93%. We suggest that use of relatively coarse Likert scales to measure fine dependent responses causes information loss that, although varying widely across subjects, greatly reduces the probability of detecting true interaction effects. Specific recommendations for alternate research strategies are made. PMID:1601825

  8. Differential branching fraction and angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0 μ+ μ-.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Silva Coutinho, R; Shires, A; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-05-01

    The angular distributions and the partial branching fraction of the decay B0 → K*0 μ+ μ- are studied by using an integrated luminosity of 0.37  fb(-1) of data collected with the LHCb detector. The forward-backward asymmetry of the muons, A(FB), the fraction of longitudinal polarization, F(L), and the partial branching fraction dB/dq2 are determined as a function of the dimuon invariant mass. The measurements are in good agreement with the standard model predictions and are the most precise to date. In the dimuon invariant mass squared range 1.00-6.00  GeV2/c4, the results are A(FB)=-0.06(-0.14)(+0.13)±0.04, F(L)=0.55±0.10±0.03, and dB/dq2=(0.42±0.06±0.03)×10(-7)  c4/GeV2. In each case, the first error is statistical and the second systematic. PMID:22681061

  9. Analysis of two colliding fractionally damped spherical shells in modelling blunt human head impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossikhin, Yury A.; Shitikova, Marina V.

    2013-06-01

    The collision of two elastic or viscoelastic spherical shells is investigated as a model for the dynamic response of a human head impacted by another head or by some spherical object. Determination of the impact force that is actually being transmitted to bone will require the model for the shock interaction of the impactor and human head. This model is indended to be used in simulating crash scenarios in frontal impacts, and provide an effective tool to estimate the severity of effect on the human head and to estimate brain injury risks. The model developed here suggests that after the moment of impact quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse shock waves are generated, which then propagate along the spherical shells. The solution behind the wave fronts is constructed with the help of the theory of discontinuities. It is assumed that the viscoelastic features of the shells are exhibited only in the contact domain, while the remaining parts retain their elastic properties. In this case, the contact spot is assumed to be a plane disk with constant radius, and the viscoelastic features of the shells are described by the fractional derivative standard linear solid model. In the case under consideration, the governing differential equations are solved analytically by the Laplace transform technique. It is shown that the fractional parameter of the fractional derivative model plays very important role, since its variation allows one to take into account the age-related changes in the mechanical properties of bone.

  10. Differential branching fraction and angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0 μ+ μ-.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Silva Coutinho, R; Shires, A; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-05-01

    The angular distributions and the partial branching fraction of the decay B0 → K*0 μ+ μ- are studied by using an integrated luminosity of 0.37  fb(-1) of data collected with the LHCb detector. The forward-backward asymmetry of the muons, A(FB), the fraction of longitudinal polarization, F(L), and the partial branching fraction dB/dq2 are determined as a function of the dimuon invariant mass. The measurements are in good agreement with the standard model predictions and are the most precise to date. In the dimuon invariant mass squared range 1.00-6.00  GeV2/c4, the results are A(FB)=-0.06(-0.14)(+0.13)±0.04, F(L)=0.55±0.10±0.03, and dB/dq2=(0.42±0.06±0.03)×10(-7)  c4/GeV2. In each case, the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  11. Deformation analysis of polymers composites: rheological model involving time-based fractional derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H. W.; Yi, H. Y.; Mishnaevsky, L.; Wang, R.; Duan, Z. Q.; Chen, Q.

    2016-08-01

    A modeling approach to time-dependent property of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymers (GFRP) composites is of special interest for quantitative description of long-term behavior. An electronic creep machine is employed to investigate the time-dependent deformation of four specimens of dog-bond-shaped GFRP composites at various stress level. A negative exponent function based on structural changes is introduced to describe the damage evolution of material properties in the process of creep test. Accordingly, a new creep constitutive equation, referred to fractional derivative Maxwell model, is suggested to characterize the time-dependent behavior of GFRP composites by replacing Newtonian dashpot with the Abel dashpot in the classical Maxwell model. The analytic solution for the fractional derivative Maxwell model is given and the relative parameters are determined. The results estimated by the fractional derivative Maxwell model proposed in the paper are in a good agreement with the experimental data. It is shown that the new creep constitutive model proposed in the paper needs few parameters to represent various time-dependent behaviors.

  12. Microbial community analysis of a full-scale DEMON bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Muñoz-Palazon, Barbara; Garcia-Ruiz, Maria-Jesus; Osorio, Francisco; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus

    2015-03-01

    Full-scale applications of autotrophic nitrogen removal technologies for the treatment of digested sludge liquor have proliferated during the last decade. Among these technologies, the aerobic/anoxic deammonification process (DEMON) is one of the major applied processes. This technology achieves nitrogen removal from wastewater through anammox metabolism inside a single bioreactor due to alternating cycles of aeration. To date, microbial community composition of full-scale DEMON bioreactors have never been reported. In this study, bacterial community structure of a full-scale DEMON bioreactor located at the Apeldoorn wastewater treatment plant was analyzed using pyrosequencing. This technique provided a higher-resolution study of the bacterial assemblage of the system compared to other techniques used in lab-scale DEMON bioreactors. Results showed that the DEMON bioreactor was a complex ecosystem where ammonium oxidizing bacteria, anammox bacteria and many other bacterial phylotypes coexist. The potential ecological role of all phylotypes found was discussed. Thus, metagenomic analysis through pyrosequencing offered new perspectives over the functioning of the DEMON bioreactor by exhaustive identification of microorganisms, which play a key role in the performance of bioreactors. In this way, pyrosequencing has been proven as a helpful tool for the in-depth investigation of the functioning of bioreactors at microbiological scale.

  13. Scaling Laws in Canopy Flows: A Wind-Tunnel Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalini, Antonio; Fransson, Jens H. M.; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2013-08-01

    An analysis of velocity statistics and spectra measured above a wind-tunnel forest model is reported. Several measurement stations downstream of the forest edge have been investigated and it is observed that, while the mean velocity profile adjusts quickly to the new canopy boundary condition, the turbulence lags behind and shows a continuous penetration towards the free stream along the canopy model. The statistical profiles illustrate this growth and do not collapse when plotted as a function of the vertical coordinate. However, when the statistics are plotted as function of the local mean velocity (normalized with a characteristic velocity scale), they do collapse, independently of the streamwise position and freestream velocity. A new scaling for the spectra of all three velocity components is proposed based on the velocity variance and integral time scale. This normalization improves the collapse of the spectra compared to existing scalings adopted in atmospheric measurements, and allows the determination of a universal function that provides the velocity spectrum. Furthermore, a comparison of the proposed scaling laws for two different canopy densities is shown, demonstrating that the vertical velocity variance is the most sensible statistical quantity to the characteristics of the canopy roughness.

  14. Apache Drill: Interactive Ad-Hoc Analysis at Scale.

    PubMed

    Hausenblas, Michael; Nadeau, Jacques

    2013-06-01

    Apache Drill is a distributed system for interactive ad-hoc analysis of large-scale datasets. Designed to handle up to petabytes of data spread across thousands of servers, the goal of Drill is to respond to ad-hoc queries in a low-latency manner. In this article, we introduce Drill's architecture, discuss its extensibility points, and put it into the context of the emerging offerings in the interactive analytics realm.

  15. Computerized left ventricular regional ejection fraction analysis for detection of ischemic coronary artery disease with multidetector CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Irfan; Li, Dong; Nasir, Khurram; Gupta, Mohit; Kadakia, Jigar; Gao, Yanlin; Ma, Eva; Mao, Song Shou; Budoff, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    Regional ejection fraction (REF) provides important functional information of the left ventricular regional myocardium. We aimed to test the diagnostic accuracy of computerized REF analysis for detecting the ischemia and significant stenosis with multidetector CT angiography (MDCT). This is a retrospective study including 155 patients who underwent MDCT scans for evaluation of coronary artery disease. Among them, 83 patients also underwent SPECT imaging and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Two groups of patients were defined: Control group with 0 coronary artery calcium and normal global and regional ventricular function, and comparison group. REF measurement was performed on all patients using computerized software. Control group REF measurements will be used as reference standard (mean-2SD REF/mean global ejection fraction) to define abnormal REF. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of REF in detecting perfusion defects (fixed and reversible) was 73, 80, 75 and 79 % respectively, in a patient based analysis of comparison group. The diagnostic accuracy of REF in predicting significant stenosis (>50 %) on ICA compared with SPECT was 72 versus 61 % and 85 versus 79 % in patient and vessel based analysis of comparison group, respectively. ROC curve analysis showed REF to be a better predictor of perfusion defects on SPECT compared with significant stenosis (>50 %) alone or stenosis combined with REF (P < 0.05). The computerized assessment of REF analysis is comparable to SPECT in predicting ischemia and a better predictor of significant stenosis than SPECT. This study also provides reference standard to define abnormal values.

  16. Empirical analysis of scaling and fractal characteristics of outpatients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Jiang; Liu, Zi-Xian; Guo, Jin-Li

    2014-01-01

    The paper uses power-law frequency distribution, power spectrum analysis, detrended fluctuation analysis, and surrogate data testing to evaluate outpatient registration data of two hospitals in China and to investigate the human dynamics of systems that use the “first come, first served” protocols. The research results reveal that outpatient behavior follow scaling laws. The results also suggest that the time series of inter-arrival time exhibit 1/f noise and have positive long-range correlation. Our research may contribute to operational optimization and resource allocation in hospital based on FCFS admission protocols.

  17. Bicoherence analysis of model-scale jet noise.

    PubMed

    Gee, Kent L; Atchley, Anthony A; Falco, Lauren E; Shepherd, Micah R; Ukeiley, Lawrence S; Jansen, Bernard J; Seiner, John M

    2010-11-01

    Bicoherence analysis has been used to characterize nonlinear effects in the propagation of noise from a model-scale, Mach-2.0, unheated jet. Nonlinear propagation effects are predominantly limited to regions near the peak directivity angle for this jet source and propagation range. The analysis also examines the practice of identifying nonlinear propagation by comparing spectra measured at two different distances and assuming far-field, linear propagation between them. This spectral comparison method can lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the role of nonlinearity when the observations are made in the geometric near field of an extended, directional radiator, such as a jet. PMID:21110528

  18. Scaling detection in time series: diffusion entropy analysis.

    PubMed

    Scafetta, Nicola; Grigolini, Paolo

    2002-09-01

    The methods currently used to determine the scaling exponent of a complex dynamic process described by a time series are based on the numerical evaluation of variance. This means that all of them can be safely applied only to the case where ordinary statistical properties hold true even if strange kinetics are involved. We illustrate a method of statistical analysis based on the Shannon entropy of the diffusion process generated by the time series, called diffusion entropy analysis (DEA). We adopt artificial Gauss and Lévy time series, as prototypes of ordinary and anomalous statistics, respectively, and we analyze them with the DEA and four ordinary methods of analysis, some of which are very popular. We show that the DEA determines the correct scaling exponent even when the statistical properties, as well as the dynamic properties, are anomalous. The other four methods produce correct results in the Gauss case but fail to detect the correct scaling in the case of Lévy statistics. PMID:12366207

  19. Bioactivity-guided fractionation and analysis of compounds with anti-influenza virus activity from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Quanjun; Wu, Bin; Shi, Yujing; Du, Xiaowei; Fan, Mingsong; Sun, Zhaolin; Cui, Xiaolan; Huang, Chenggang

    2012-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of extracts from Fructus Gardeniae led to analysis of its bioactive natural products. After infection by influenza virus strain A/FM/1/47-MA in vivo, antiviral activity of the extracts were investigated. The target fraction was orally administered to rats and blood was collected. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photo diode array detector and electrospray ion trap multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry was applied to screen the compounds absorbed into the blood. A structural characterization based on the retention time, ultraviolet spectra, parent ions and fragmentation ions was performed. Thirteen compounds were confirmed or tentatively identified. This provides an accurate profile of the composition of bioactive compounds responsible for the anti-influenza properties. PMID:22297738

  20. Fractional Calculus Models for the Anomalous Diffusion Processes and Their Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchko, Yu.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, the anomalous diffusion processes are modeled with partial differential equations of the fractional order that are then discussed in details. The anomalous diffusion can be characterized by the property that it no longer follows the Gaussian statistics and in particular one observes a deviation from the linear time dependence of the mean squared displacement. This is the case for many different phenomena including, e.g., the translocation dynamics of a polymer chain through a nanopore, charge carrier transport in amorphous semiconductors, laser cooling in quantum optical systems to mention only few of them. In this paper, we consider the case of the anomalous diffusion that shows a power-low growth of the mean squared displacement in time. Our starting point is a stochastic formulation of the model in terms of the random walk processes. Following this line, a continuous time random walk model in form of a system of the integral equations of convolution type for the corresponding probability density functions is introduced. These so called master equations can be explicitly solved in the Fourier-Laplace domain. The time-fractional differential equation is then derived asymptotically from the master equations for the special classes of the probability density functions with the infinite first moment. For the obtained model equation and its generalizations the initial-boundary-value problems in the bounded domains are discussed. A special focus is on the initial-boundary-value problems for the generalized time-fractional diffusion equation. For this equation, the maximum principle well known for the elliptic and parabolic type PDEs is presented and applied both for the a priori estimates of the solution and for the proof of its uniqueness. Finally, first the existence of the generalized solution and then the existence of the solution under some restrictions are shown.

  1. Horizontal Variability of Water and Its Relationship to Cloud Fraction near the Tropical Tropopause: Using Aircraft Observations of Water Vapor to Improve the Representation of Grid-scale Cloud Formation in GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Molod, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale models such as GEOS-5 typically calculate grid-scale fractional cloudiness through a PDF parameterization of the sub-gridscale distribution of specific humidity. The GEOS-5 moisture routine uses a simple rectangular PDF varying in height that follows a tanh profile. While below 10 km this profile is informed by moisture information from the AIRS instrument, there is relatively little empirical basis for the profile above that level. ATTREX provides an opportunity to refine the profile using estimates of the horizontal variability of measurements of water vapor, total water and ice particles from the Global Hawk aircraft at or near the tropopause. These measurements will be compared with estimates of large-scale cloud fraction from CALIPSO and lidar retrievals from the CPL on the aircraft. We will use the variability measurements to perform studies of the sensitivity of the GEOS-5 cloud-fraction to various modifications to the PDF shape and to its vertical profile.

  2. The ALHAMBRA survey: accurate merger fractions derived by PDF analysis of photometrically close pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sanjuan, C.; Cenarro, A. J.; Varela, J.; Viironen, K.; Molino, A.; Benítez, N.; Arnalte-Mur, P.; Ascaso, B.; Díaz-García, L. A.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Moles, M.; Pović, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Cerviño, M.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Del Olmo, A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husillos, C.; Infante, L.; Martínez, V. J.; Perea, J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: Our goal is to develop and test a novel methodology to compute accurate close-pair fractions with photometric redshifts. Methods: We improved the currently used methodologies to estimate the merger fraction fm from photometric redshifts by (i) using the full probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the sources in redshift space; (ii) including the variation in the luminosity of the sources with z in both the sample selection and the luminosity ratio constrain; and (iii) splitting individual PDFs into red and blue spectral templates to reliably work with colour selections. We tested the performance of our new methodology with the PDFs provided by the ALHAMBRA photometric survey. Results: The merger fractions and rates from the ALHAMBRA survey agree excellently well with those from spectroscopic work for both the general population and red and blue galaxies. With the merger rate of bright (MB ≤ -20-1.1z) galaxies evolving as (1 + z)n, the power-law index n is higher for blue galaxies (n = 2.7 ± 0.5) than for red galaxies (n = 1.3 ± 0.4), confirming previous results. Integrating the merger rate over cosmic time, we find that the average number of mergers per galaxy since z = 1 is Nmred = 0.57 ± 0.05 for red galaxies and Nmblue = 0.26 ± 0.02 for blue galaxies. Conclusions: Our new methodology statistically exploits all the available information provided by photometric redshift codes and yields accurate measurements of the merger fraction by close pairs from using photometric redshifts alone. Current and future photometric surveys will benefit from this new methodology. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, jointly operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) at Heidelberg and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).The catalogues, probabilities, and figures of the ALHAMBRA close pairs detected in Sect. 5.1 are available at http://https://cloud.iaa.csic.es/alhambra/catalogues/ClosePairs

  3. Scale-space analysis of time series in circulatory research.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Kim Erlend; Godtliebsen, Fred; Revhaug, Arthur

    2006-12-01

    Statistical analysis of time series is still inadequate within circulation research. With the advent of increasing computational power and real-time recordings from hemodynamic studies, one is increasingly dealing with vast amounts of data in time series. This paper aims to illustrate how statistical analysis using the significant nonstationarities (SiNoS) method may complement traditional repeated-measures ANOVA and linear mixed models. We applied these methods on a dataset of local hepatic and systemic circulatory changes induced by aortoportal shunting and graded liver resection. We found SiNoS analysis more comprehensive when compared with traditional statistical analysis in the following four ways: 1) the method allows better signal-to-noise detection; 2) including all data points from real time recordings in a statistical analysis permits better detection of significant features in the data; 3) analysis with multiple scales of resolution facilitates a more differentiated observation of the material; and 4) the method affords excellent visual presentation by combining group differences, time trends, and multiscale statistical analysis allowing the observer to quickly view and evaluate the material. It is our opinion that SiNoS analysis of time series is a very powerful statistical tool that may be used to complement conventional statistical methods.

  4. Multi-scale model analysis and hindcast of the 2013 Colorado Flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochis, David; Yu, Wei; Sampson, Kevin; Dugger, Aubrey; McCreight, James; Zhang, Yongxin; Ikeda, Kyoko

    2015-04-01

    While the generation of most flood and flash flood events is fundamentally linked to the occurrence of heavy rainfall, the physical mechanisms responsible for translating rainfall into floods are complex and manifold. These runoff generation processes evolve over many spatial and temporal scales during the course of flooding events. As such robust flood and flash flood prediction systems need to account for multitude of terrestrial processes occurring over a wide range of space and time scales. One such extreme multiscale flood event was the 2013 Colorado Flood in which over 400 mm of rainfall fell along the Rock Mountain mountain front region over the course of a few days. The flooding impacts from this heavy rainfall event included not only high, fast flows in steep mountain streams but also included large areas of inundation on the adjacent plains and numerous soil saturation excess impacts such as hillslope failures and groundwater intrusions into domestic structures. A multi-scale and multi-process evaluation of this flood event is performed using the community WRF-Hydro modeling system. We incorporate several operational quantitative precipitation estimate and quantitative precipitation forecast products in the analysis and document the skill of multiple configurations of WRF-Hydro physics options across a range of contributing area length scales. Emphasis is placed on assessing how well the different model configurations capture the multi-scale streamflow response from small headwater catchments out to the entire South Platte River basin whose total contributing area exceeds 25,000 sq km. In addition to streamflow we also present evaluations of event simulations and hindcasts of soil saturation fraction, groundwater levels and inundated areas as a means of assessing different runoff generation mechanisms. Finally, results from a U.S. national-scale, fully-coupled hydrometeorological hindcast of the 2013 Colorado flood event using the combined WRF atmospheric

  5. A fractional Fourier transform analysis of a bubble excited by an ultrasonic chirp.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Euan; Mulholland, Anthony J

    2011-11-01

    The fractional Fourier transform is proposed here as a model based, signal processing technique for determining the size of a bubble in a fluid. The bubble is insonified with an ultrasonic chirp and the radiated pressure field is recorded. This experimental bubble response is then compared with a series of theoretical model responses to identify the most accurate match between experiment and theory which allows the correct bubble size to be identified. The fractional Fourier transform is used to produce a more detailed description of each response, and two-dimensional cross correlation is then employed to identify the similarities between the experimental response and each theoretical response. In this paper the experimental bubble response is simulated by adding various levels of noise to the theoretical model output. The method is compared to the standard technique of using time-domain cross correlation. The proposed method is shown to be far more robust at correctly sizing the bubble and can cope with much lower signal to noise ratios.

  6. Electrophoretically driven SDS removal and protein fractionation in the shotgun analysis of membrane proteomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Lin, Yong; Yan, Yizhong; Li, Jianjun; He, Quanze; Chen, Ping; Wang, Xianchun; Liang, Songping

    2012-01-01

    SDS is mostly used to enhance the solubilization and extraction of membrane proteins due to its strong detergency and low cost. Nevertheless, SDS interferes with the subsequent procedures and needs to be removed from the samples. In this work, a special gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE) system was developed to remove SDS from the SDS-solubilized protein samples. As a proof-of-principle experiment, the GGE system was designed to be composed of an agarose loading layer, six polyacrylamide fractionation layers with different concentrations and a high-concentration polyacrylamide sealing layer. The advantages of the GGE system are that it not only can electrophoretically remove SDS efficiently so that the protein loss resulted from the repeated gel washing after electrophoresis was avoided, but also can reduce the complexity of the sample, prevent the precipitation of proteins after loading and avoid the loss of proteins with low molecular weight during the electrophoresis. Using GGE system, about 85% of SDS in the sample and gel was electrophoretically removed and the proteins were fractionated. Compared with the two representative gel-based sample cleanup methods reported in literature, GGE-based strategy significantly improved the identification efficiency of proteins in terms of the number and coverage of the identified proteins. PMID:22222976

  7. The Sun-Earth connect 1: A fractional d-matrix of solar emissions compared to spectral analysis evidence of solar measurements and climate proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert G. V.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility that there is a constant ratio underpinning published solar cycles provides an opportunity to explore the harmonics within emission processes. This idea is initially developed by a phenomenological matrix where the elements or emission phases are underpinned by a cyclic fractional dimension d (0.39807) which is shown here to include the fine structure constant (1/137.0356). The Sun's Carrington synodic rotation (27.275d) multiplied by the inverse of the fine structure constant creates elements of this d-matrix which yields possible sequences of self-similar phase periods between harmonic elements of solar emissions. The periodicities of the Carrington rotation is defined by row 1 (R1) and subsequent rows R2,R3,R4 are the potential phase periods of possible twisting permutations of the tachocline. For solar measurements, the first four rows of the matrix predict at least 98% of the top hundred significant periodicities determined from multi-taper spectral analysis of solar data sets (the satellite ACRIM composite irradiance; the terrestrial 10.7cm Penticton Adjusted Daily Radio Flux, Series D; and the historical mean monthly International Sunspot Number). At centennial and millennial time scales, the same matrix predicts 'average' significant periodicities (greater than 95%) reported in 23 published climate data sets. This discovery suggests there is strong empirical evidence for a d-cyclic fractional 'solar clock', where the corresponding spectrum of cycles and switching events are embedded into the historical, climatic and geological records of the Earth.

  8. Chromatographic methods of fractionation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, A D

    1987-01-01

    Chromatography's functional versatility, separation efficiency, gentle non-denaturing separating process and ease of automation and scale-up make it attractive for industrial scale protein purification. The Winnipeg Rh Institute's new Plasma Fractionation facility is an example of the use of chromatography for the large scale purification of plasma protein fractions. The fractionation facility has a capacity to process 800 litres of plasma per batch into blood clotting factor VIII and IX, albumin and intravenous immune serum globulin (i.v. ISG). Albumin and i.v. ISG are purified using ion exchange columns of DEAE-Sepharose (230 litre size), DEAE-Biogel (150 litre size) and CM-Sepharose (150 litre size). The chromatographic process is automated using a Modicon 584 Programmable Logic Controller to regulate valves, pumps and sensors which control plasma flow during fractionation. The stainless steel tanks and piping are automatically cleaned-in-place. The high degree of automation and cleaning provides efficient operation and sanitary processing. Chromatographic methods (DEAE-Sepharose and metal chelation) are also being used at the pilot scale to purify the human blood products superoxide dismutase and hemoglobin from outdated red blood cells. Characterization of the protein fractions produced by chromatography has shown them to be of equal or higher quality than fractions produced by other techniques.

  9. An analysis of rainfall-runoff conversion in dry Mediterranean environments considering scale and connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual-Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Rubio, José Luis; Andreu, Vicente

    2010-05-01

    Rainfall-runoff conversion in western dry Mediterranean environments is a process needed of better understanding. It is commonly assumed that overland flow generation occurs whenever high intensity events are present, although a small fraction of the precipitation is transformed in runoff. Recent studies suggest that for a better understanding of runoff generation, aspects such as scale and water paths and connectivity should be approached. In this work, the rainfall-runoff conversion is analysed taking in consideration the contributing area and hydrological connectivity. Within the same basin, the Barranc del Carraixet, in eastern Spain, near the city of Valencia, it has been selected three scales of work: four experimental plots (8 x 40 m), micro-basin (17.01 ha) and small drainage basin (127.9 km2). Data used consists in rainfall and runoff values recorded during twelve months (from 1 April 2008 to 31 march, 2009). For the analysis of runoff generation at the different scales rainfall thresholds and runoff rates and thresholds were used. For hydrological connectivity, at plot level, coefficients of determination were analysed. Results show the importance of scale in flow generation with increasing rainfall thresholds as the draining area becomes larger. In addition, the number of runoff and flow records diminished with scale. In the studied period it has been registered 26 rainfall events, 15 of which (66%) produced runoff at plot scale, only three registered flow at micro-basin scale, and none was recorded at watershed level. Inverse relationship is given between the volume of runoff and recurrence, with increasing scale. Connectivity, at plot level, is variable, increasing the R2 according the simplification of processes, when the interference of vegetation decreases, establishing better linearity between rain and surface flow. In the three cases, studied scale and connectivity seems to be factors that affect the form in which rainfall is converted in runoff

  10. Analysis of panthers full-scale heat transfer tests with RELAP5

    SciTech Connect

    Parlatan, Y.; Boyer, B.D.; Jo, J.; Rohatgi, S.

    1996-01-01

    The RELAP5 code is being assessed on the full-scale Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) in the Performance ANalysis and Testing of HEat Removal Systems (PANTHERS) facility at Societa Informazioni Termoidrauliche (SIET) in Italy. PANTHERS is a test facility with fall-size prototype beat exchangers for the PCCS in support of the General Electric`s (GE) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) program. PANTHERS tests with a low noncondensable gas concentration and with a high noncondensable gas concentration were analyzed with RELAP5. The results showed that beat transfer rate decreases significantly along the PCCS tubes. In the test case with a higher inlet noncondensable gas fraction, the PCCS removed 35% less heat than in the test case with the lower noncondensable gas fraction. The dominant resistance to the overall heat transfer is the condensation beat transfer resistance inside the tubes. This resistance increased by about 5-fold between the inlet and exit of the tube due to the build up of noncondensable gases along the tube. The RELAP5 calculations also predicted that 4% to 5% of the heat removed to the PCCS pool occurs in the inlet steam piping and PCCS upper and lower headers. These piping needs to be modeled for other tests systems. The full-scale PANTHERS predictions are also compared against 1/400 scale GIRAFFE tests. GIRAFFE has 33% larger heat surface area, but its efficiency is only 15% and 23% higher than PANTHERS for the two cases analyzed This was explained by the high heat transfer resistance inside the tubes near the exit.

  11. Perceptual security of encrypted images based on wavelet scaling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Olmos, C.; Murguía, J. S.; Ramírez-Torres, M. T.; Mejía Carlos, M.; Rosu, H. C.; González-Aguilar, H.

    2016-08-01

    The scaling behavior of the pixel fluctuations of encrypted images is evaluated by using the detrended fluctuation analysis based on wavelets, a modern technique that has been successfully used recently for a wide range of natural phenomena and technological processes. As encryption algorithms, we use the Advanced Encryption System (AES) in RBT mode and two versions of a cryptosystem based on cellular automata, with the encryption process applied both fully and partially by selecting different bitplanes. In all cases, the results show that the encrypted images in which no understandable information can be visually appreciated and whose pixels look totally random present a persistent scaling behavior with the scaling exponent α close to 0.5, implying no correlation between pixels when the DFA with wavelets is applied. This suggests that the scaling exponents of the encrypted images can be used as a perceptual security criterion in the sense that when their values are close to 0.5 (the white noise value) the encrypted images are more secure also from the perceptual point of view.

  12. Efficient rotation- and scale-invariant texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Kam-Keung; Lam, Kin-Man

    2010-10-01

    Texture analysis plays an important role in content-based image retrieval and other areas of image processing. It is often desirable for the texture classifier to be rotation and scale invariant. Furthermore, to enable real-time usage, it is desirable to perform the classification efficiently. Toward these goals, we propose several enhancements to the multiresolution Gabor analysis. The first is a new set of kernels called Slit, which can replace Gabor wavelets in applications where high computational speed is desired. Compared to Gabor, feature extraction using Slit requires only 11 to 17% of the numeric operations. The second is to make the features more rotation invariant. We propose a circular sum of the feature elements from the same scale of the feature vector. This has the effect of averaging the feature vector from all orientations. The third is a slide-matching scheme for the final stage of the classifier, which can be applied to different types of distance measures. Distances are calculated at slightly different scales, and the smallest value is used as the actual distance measures. Experimental results using different image databases and distance measures show distinct improvements over existing schemes.

  13. Multi-Scale Fractal Analysis of Image Texture and Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerson, Charles W.

    1998-01-01

    Fractals embody important ideas of self-similarity, in which the spatial behavior or appearance of a system is largely independent of scale. Self-similarity is defined as a property of curves or surfaces where each part is indistinguishable from the whole, or where the form of the curve or surface is invariant with respect to scale. An ideal fractal (or monofractal) curve or surface has a constant dimension over all scales, although it may not be an integer value. This is in contrast to Euclidean or topological dimensions, where discrete one, two, and three dimensions describe curves, planes, and volumes. Theoretically, if the digital numbers of a remotely sensed image resemble an ideal fractal surface, then due to the self-similarity property, the fractal dimension of the image will not vary with scale and resolution. However, most geographical phenomena are not strictly self-similar at all scales, but they can often be modeled by a stochastic fractal in which the scaling and self-similarity properties of the fractal have inexact patterns that can be described by statistics. Stochastic fractal sets relax the monofractal self-similarity assumption and measure many scales and resolutions in order to represent the varying form of a phenomenon as a function of local variables across space. In image interpretation, pattern is defined as the overall spatial form of related features, and the repetition of certain forms is a characteristic pattern found in many cultural objects and some natural features. Texture is the visual impression of coarseness or smoothness caused by the variability or uniformity of image tone or color. A potential use of fractals concerns the analysis of image texture. In these situations it is commonly observed that the degree of roughness or inexactness in an image or surface is a function of scale and not of experimental technique. The fractal dimension of remote sensing data could yield quantitative insight on the spatial complexity and

  14. Detection of venous needle dislodgement during haemodialysis using fractional order shape index ratio and fuzzy colour relation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Chen, Wei-Ling; Kan, Chung-Dann; Wu, Ming-Jui; Mai, Yi-Chen

    2015-12-01

    Venous needle dislodgement (VND) is a life-threatening complication during haemodialysis (HD) treatment. When VND occurs, it only takes a few minutes for blood loss in an adult patient. According to the ANNA (American Nephrology Nurses' Association) VND survey reports, VND is a concerning issue for the nephrology nurses/staff and patients. To ensure HD care and an effective treatment environment, this Letter proposes a combination of fractional order shape index ratio (SIR) and fuzzy colour relation analysis (CRA) to detect VND. If the venous needle drops out, clinical examinations show that both heart pulses and pressure wave variations have a low correlation at the venous anatomic site. Therefore, fractional order SIR is used to quantify the differences in transverse vibration pressures (TVPs) between the normal condition and meter reading. Linear regression shows that the fractional order SIR has a high correlation with the TVP variation. Fuzzy CRA is designed in a simple and visual message manner to identify the risk levels. A worst-case study demonstrated that the proposed model can be used for VND detection in clinical applications.

  15. Detection of venous needle dislodgement during haemodialysis using fractional order shape index ratio and fuzzy colour relation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Chen, Wei-Ling; Kan, Chung-Dann; Wu, Ming-Jui; Mai, Yi-Chen

    2015-12-01

    Venous needle dislodgement (VND) is a life-threatening complication during haemodialysis (HD) treatment. When VND occurs, it only takes a few minutes for blood loss in an adult patient. According to the ANNA (American Nephrology Nurses' Association) VND survey reports, VND is a concerning issue for the nephrology nurses/staff and patients. To ensure HD care and an effective treatment environment, this Letter proposes a combination of fractional order shape index ratio (SIR) and fuzzy colour relation analysis (CRA) to detect VND. If the venous needle drops out, clinical examinations show that both heart pulses and pressure wave variations have a low correlation at the venous anatomic site. Therefore, fractional order SIR is used to quantify the differences in transverse vibration pressures (TVPs) between the normal condition and meter reading. Linear regression shows that the fractional order SIR has a high correlation with the TVP variation. Fuzzy CRA is designed in a simple and visual message manner to identify the risk levels. A worst-case study demonstrated that the proposed model can be used for VND detection in clinical applications. PMID:26713159

  16. Scaling laws of nanoporous gold under uniaxial compression: Effects of structural disorder on the solid fraction, elastic Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus and yield strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roschning, B.; Huber, N.

    2016-07-01

    In this work the relationship between the structural disorder and the macroscopic mechanical behavior of nanoporous gold under uniaxial compression was investigated, using the finite element method. A recently proposed model based on a microstructure consisting of four-coordinated spherical nodes interconnected by cylindrical struts, whose node positions are randomly displaced from the lattice points of a diamond cubic lattice, was extended. This was done by including the increased density as result of the introduced structural disorder. Scaling equations for the elastic Poisson's ratio, the Young's modulus and the yield strength were determined as functions of the structural disorder and the solid fraction. The extended model was applied to identify the elastic-plastic behavior of the solid phase of nanoporous gold. It was found, that the elastic Poisson's ratio provides a robust basis for the calibration of the structural disorder. Based on this approach, a systematic study of the size effect on the yield strength was performed and the results were compared to experimental data provided in literature. An excellent agreement with recently published results for polymer infiltrated samples of nanoporous gold with varying ligament size was found.

  17. REGIONAL-SCALE WIND FIELD CLASSIFICATION EMPLOYING CLUSTER ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, L G; Glaser, R E; Chin, H S; Loosmore, G A

    2004-06-17

    The classification of time-varying multivariate regional-scale wind fields at a specific location can assist event planning as well as consequence and risk analysis. Further, wind field classification involves data transformation and inference techniques that effectively characterize stochastic wind field variation. Such a classification scheme is potentially useful for addressing overall atmospheric transport uncertainty and meteorological parameter sensitivity issues. Different methods to classify wind fields over a location include the principal component analysis of wind data (e.g., Hardy and Walton, 1978) and the use of cluster analysis for wind data (e.g., Green et al., 1992; Kaufmann and Weber, 1996). The goal of this study is to use a clustering method to classify the winds of a gridded data set, i.e, from meteorological simulations generated by a forecast model.

  18. Producing fractional rangeland component predictions in a sagebrush ecosystem, a Wyoming sensitivity analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, George; Homer, Collin G.; Granneman, Brian; Meyer, Debra K.

    2012-01-01

    high-resolution remote sensing data (Homer and others, 2012). This method has proven its utility; however, to develop these products across even larger areas will require additional cost efficiencies to ensure that an adequate product can be developed for the lowest cost possible. Given the vast geographic extent of shrubland ecosystems in the western United States, identifying cost efficiencies with optimal training data development and subsequent application to medium resolution satellite imagery provide the most likely areas for methodological efficiency gains. The primary objective of this research was to conduct a series of sensitivity tests to evaluate the most optimal and practical way to develop Landsat scale information for estimating the extent and distribution of sagebrush ecosystem components over large areas in the conterminous United States. An existing dataset of sagebrush components developed from extensive field measurements, high-resolution satellite imagery, and medium resolution Landsat imagery in Wyoming was used as the reference database (Homer and others, 2012). Statistical analysis was performed to analyze the relation between the accuracy of sagebrush components and the amount and distribution of training data on Landsat scenes needed to obtain accurate predictions.

  19. Dynamical analysis of a fractional SIR model with birth and death on heterogeneous complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Jingjing; Zhao, Hongyong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a fractional SIR model with birth and death rates on heterogeneous complex networks is proposed. Firstly, we obtain a threshold value R0 based on the existence of endemic equilibrium point E∗, which completely determines the dynamics of the model. Secondly, by using Lyapunov function and Kirchhoff's matrix tree theorem, the globally asymptotical stability of the disease-free equilibrium point E0 and the endemic equilibrium point E∗ of the model are investigated. That is, when R0 < 1, the disease-free equilibrium point E0 is globally asymptotically stable and the disease always dies out; when R0 > 1, the disease-free equilibrium point E0 becomes unstable and in the meantime there exists a unique endemic equilibrium point E∗, which is globally asymptotically stable and the disease is uniformly persistent. Finally, the effects of various immunization schemes are studied and compared. Numerical simulations are given to demonstrate the main results.

  20. Third brain ventricle deformation analysis using fractional differentiation and evolution strategy in brain cine-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakib, Amir; Aiboud, Fazia; Hodel, Jerome; Siarry, Patrick; Decq, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present an original method to evaluate the deformations in the third cerebral ventricle on a brain cine- MR imaging. First, a segmentation process, based on a fractional differentiation method, is directly applied on a 2D+t dataset to detect the contours of the region of interest (i.e. lamina terminalis). Then, the successive segmented contours are matched using a procedure of global alignment, followed by a morphing process, based on the Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMAES). Finally, local measurements of deformations are derived from the previously determined matched contours. The validation step is realized by comparing our results with the measurements achieved on the same patients by an expert.

  1. Reactor Physics Methods and Analysis Capabilities in SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. DeHart; Stephen M. Bowman

    2011-05-01

    The TRITON sequence of the SCALE code system provides a powerful, robust, and rigorous approach for performing reactor physics analysis. This paper presents a detailed description of TRITON in terms of its key components used in reactor calculations. The ability to accurately predict the nuclide composition of depleted reactor fuel is important in a wide variety of applications. These applications include, but are not limited to, the design, licensing, and operation of commercial/research reactors and spent-fuel transport/storage systems. New complex design projects such as next-generation power reactors and space reactors require new high-fidelity physics methods, such as those available in SCALE/TRITON, that accurately represent the physics associated with both evolutionary and revolutionary reactor concepts as they depart from traditional and well-understood light water reactor designs.

  2. Reactor Physics Methods and Analysis Capabilities in SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, Mark D; Bowman, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    The TRITON sequence of the SCALE code system provides a powerful, robust, and rigorous approach for performing reactor physics analysis. This paper presents a detailed description of TRITON in terms of its key components used in reactor calculations. The ability to accurately predict the nuclide composition of depleted reactor fuel is important in a wide variety of applications. These applications include, but are not limited to, the design, licensing, and operation of commercial/research reactors and spent-fuel transport/storage systems. New complex design projects such as next-generation power reactors and space reactors require new high-fidelity physics methods, such as those available in SCALE/TRITON, that accurately represent the physics associated with both evolutionary and revolutionary reactor concepts as they depart from traditional and well-understood light water reactor designs.

  3. Nonlinear analysis of anesthesia dynamics by Fractal Scaling Exponent.

    PubMed

    Gifani, P; Rabiee, H R; Hashemi, M R; Taslimi, P; Ghanbari, M

    2006-01-01

    The depth of anesthesia estimation has been one of the most research interests in the field of EEG signal processing in recent decades. In this paper we present a new methodology to quantify the depth of anesthesia by quantifying the dynamic fluctuation of the EEG signal. Extraction of useful information about the nonlinear dynamic of the brain during anesthesia has been proposed with the optimum Fractal Scaling Exponent. This optimum solution is based on the best box sizes in the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) algorithm which have meaningful changes at different depth of anesthesia. The Fractal Scaling Exponent (FSE) Index as a new criterion has been proposed. The experimental results confirm that our new Index can clearly discriminate between aware to moderate and deep anesthesia levels. Moreover, it significantly reduces the computational complexity and results in a faster reaction to the transients in patients' consciousness levels in relations with the other algorithms.

  4. AUTORADIOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS ON AGAR PLATES OF ANTIGENS FROM SUB CELLULAR FRACTIONS OF RAT LIVER SLICES

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, W. S.; Perlmann, P.; Hultin, T.

    1961-01-01

    Slices of rat livers were incubated with 14C amino acids, homogenized, and subjected to differential centrifugation. The microsomes were further extracted with the non-ionic detergent Lubrol W and with EDTA. These extracts and the microsome free "cell sap," freed from the pH 5 precipitable fraction, were subsequently reacted with antisera using agar diffusion techniques. The antisera employed were obtained from rabbits injected with different subcellular fractions of rat liver or with rat serum proteins. When the agar diffusion plates were autoradiographed it was found that some of the precipitates were radioactive while others were not. Control experiments indicated that this labeling was due to the specific incorporation of 14C amino acids into various rat liver antigens during incubation of the slices rather than to a non-specific adsorption of radioactive material to the immunological precipitates. When the slices were incubated with the isotope for up to 30 minutes, the serum proteins which could be extracted from the microsomes with the detergent were strongly labeled, as were a number of additional microsomal antigens of unknown significance. In contrast, the serum proteins present in the cell sap were only weakly labeled. Most of the typical cell sap proteins, both those precipitable and those soluble at pH 5, seemed to remain unlabeled. No consistently reproducible results were obtained with the EDTA extracts of the ribosomal residues remaining after extraction of the microsomes with the detergent. Incubation of the liver slices for longer periods (up to 120 minutes) led to a strong labeling of the serum proteins in the cell sap as well as to the appearance of labeling in additional cell sap proteins. The results are discussed with regard to the subcellular site of synthesis and the metabolism of the different antigens. PMID:13772607

  5. Pyrolysis temperature affects phosphorus transformation in biochar: Chemical fractionation and (31)P NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Zhang, You; Shao, Hongbo; Sun, Junna

    2016-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling or reuse by pyrolyzing crop residue has recently elicited increased research interest. However, the effects of feedstock and pyrolysis conditions on P species have not been fully understood. Such knowledge is important in identifying the agronomic and environmental uses of biochar. Residues of three main Chinese agricultural crops and the biochars (produced at 300°C-600°C) derived from these crops were used to determine P transformations during pyrolysis. Hedley sequential fractionation and (31)P NMR analyses were used in the investigation. Our results showed that P transformation in biochar was significantly affected by pyrolysis temperature regardless of feedstock (Wheat straw, maize straw and peanut husk). Pyrolysis treatment transformed water soluble P into a labile (NaHCO3-Pi) or semi-labile pool (NaOH-Pi) and into a stable pool (Dil. HCl P and residual-P). At the same time, organic P was transformed into inorganic P fractions which was identified by the rapid decomposition of organic P detected with solution (31)P NMR. The P transformation during pyrolysis process suggested more stable P was formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. This result was also evidenced by the presence of less soluble or stable P species, such as such as poly-P, crandallite (CaAl3(OH)5(PO4)2) and Wavellite (Al3(OH)3(PO4)2·5H2O), as detected by solid-state (31)P NMR in biochars formed at a higher pyrolysis temperature. Furthermore, a significant proportion of less soluble pyrophosphate was identified by solution (2%-35%) and solid-state (8%-53%) (31)P NMR, which was also responsible for the stable P forms at higher pyrolysis temperature although their solubility or stability requires further investigation. Results suggested that a relatively lower pyrolysis temperature retains P availability regardless of feedstock during pyrolysis process.

  6. Failure analysis of fuel cell electrodes using three-dimensional multi-length scale X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, A.; El Hannach, M.; Orfino, F. P.; Dutta, M.; Kjeang, E.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT), a non-destructive technique, is proposed for three-dimensional, multi-length scale characterization of complex failure modes in fuel cell electrodes. Comparative tomography data sets are acquired for a conditioned beginning of life (BOL) and a degraded end of life (EOL) membrane electrode assembly subjected to cathode degradation by voltage cycling. Micro length scale analysis shows a five-fold increase in crack size and 57% thickness reduction in the EOL cathode catalyst layer, indicating widespread action of carbon corrosion. Complementary nano length scale analysis shows a significant reduction in porosity, increased pore size, and dramatically reduced effective diffusivity within the remaining porous structure of the catalyst layer at EOL. Collapsing of the structure is evident from the combination of thinning and reduced porosity, as uniquely determined by the multi-length scale approach. Additionally, a novel image processing based technique developed for nano scale segregation of pore, ionomer, and Pt/C dominated voxels shows an increase in ionomer volume fraction, Pt/C agglomerates, and severe carbon corrosion at the catalyst layer/membrane interface at EOL. In summary, XCT based multi-length scale analysis enables detailed information needed for comprehensive understanding of the complex failure modes observed in fuel cell electrodes.

  7. Scaling and dimensional analysis of acoustic streaming jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moudjed, B.; Botton, V.; Henry, D.; Ben Hadid, H.

    2014-09-15

    This paper focuses on acoustic streaming free jets. This is to say that progressive acoustic waves are used to generate a steady flow far from any wall. The derivation of the governing equations under the form of a nonlinear hydrodynamics problem coupled with an acoustic propagation problem is made on the basis of a time scale discrimination approach. This approach is preferred to the usually invoked amplitude perturbations expansion since it is consistent with experimental observations of acoustic streaming flows featuring hydrodynamic nonlinearities and turbulence. Experimental results obtained with a plane transducer in water are also presented together with a review of the former experimental investigations using similar configurations. A comparison of the shape of the acoustic field with the shape of the velocity field shows that diffraction is a key ingredient in the problem though it is rarely accounted for in the literature. A scaling analysis is made and leads to two scaling laws for the typical velocity level in acoustic streaming free jets; these are both observed in our setup and in former studies by other teams. We also perform a dimensional analysis of this problem: a set of seven dimensionless groups is required to describe a typical acoustic experiment. We find that a full similarity is usually not possible between two acoustic streaming experiments featuring different fluids. We then choose to relax the similarity with respect to sound attenuation and to focus on the case of a scaled water experiment representing an acoustic streaming application in liquid metals, in particular, in liquid silicon and in liquid sodium. We show that small acoustic powers can yield relatively high Reynolds numbers and velocity levels; this could be a virtue for heat and mass transfer applications, but a drawback for ultrasonic velocimetry.

  8. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  9. Dehazing method through polarimetric imaging and multi-scale analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lei; Shao, Xiaopeng; Liu, Fei; Wang, Lin

    2015-05-01

    An approach for haze removal utilizing polarimetric imaging and multi-scale analysis has been developed to solve one problem that haze weather weakens the interpretation of remote sensing because of the poor visibility and short detection distance of haze images. On the one hand, the polarization effects of the airlight and the object radiance in the imaging procedure has been considered. On the other hand, one fact that objects and haze possess different frequency distribution properties has been emphasized. So multi-scale analysis through wavelet transform has been employed to make it possible for low frequency components that haze presents and high frequency coefficients that image details or edges occupy are processed separately. According to the measure of the polarization feather by Stokes parameters, three linear polarized images (0°, 45°, and 90°) have been taken on haze weather, then the best polarized image min I and the worst one max I can be synthesized. Afterwards, those two polarized images contaminated by haze have been decomposed into different spatial layers with wavelet analysis, and the low frequency images have been processed via a polarization dehazing algorithm while high frequency components manipulated with a nonlinear transform. Then the ultimate haze-free image can be reconstructed by inverse wavelet reconstruction. Experimental results verify that the dehazing method proposed in this study can strongly promote image visibility and increase detection distance through haze for imaging warning and remote sensing systems.

  10. Fractional watt Vuillemier cryogenic refrigerator program engineering notebook. Volume 2: Stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. S.

    1974-01-01

    A structural analysis performed on the 1/4-watt cryogenic refrigerator. The analysis covered the complete assembly except for the cooling jacket and mounting brackets. Maximum stresses, margin of safety, and natural frequencies were calculated for structurally loaded refrigerator components shown in assembly drawings. The stress analysis indicates that the design is satisfactory for the specified vibration environment, and the proof, burst, and normal operating loads.

  11. Remote visualization and scale analysis of large turbulence datatsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livescu, D.; Pulido, J.; Burns, R.; Canada, C.; Ahrens, J.; Hamann, B.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate simulations of turbulent flows require solving all the dynamically relevant scales of motions. This technique, called Direct Numerical Simulation, has been successfully applied to a variety of simple flows; however, the large-scale flows encountered in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFD) would require meshes outside the range of the most powerful supercomputers for the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, the current generation of petascale computers has enabled unprecedented simulations of many types of turbulent flows which focus on various GFD aspects, from the idealized configurations extensively studied in the past to more complex flows closer to the practical applications. The pace at which such simulations are performed only continues to increase; however, the simulations themselves are restricted to a small number of groups with access to large computational platforms. Yet the petabytes of turbulence data offer almost limitless information on many different aspects of the flow, from the hierarchy of turbulence moments, spectra and correlations, to structure-functions, geometrical properties, etc. The ability to share such datasets with other groups can significantly reduce the time to analyze the data, help the creative process and increase the pace of discovery. Using the largest DOE supercomputing platforms, we have performed some of the biggest turbulence simulations to date, in various configurations, addressing specific aspects of turbulence production and mixing mechanisms. Until recently, the visualization and analysis of such datasets was restricted by access to large supercomputers. The public Johns Hopkins Turbulence database simplifies the access to multi-Terabyte turbulence datasets and facilitates turbulence analysis through the use of commodity hardware. First, one of our datasets, which is part of the database, will be described and then a framework that adds high-speed visualization and wavelet support for multi-resolution analysis of

  12. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of an alkaloid fraction from Piper longum L. using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuiyong; Fan, Yunpeng; Wang, Hui; Fu, Qing; Jin, Yu; Liang, Xinmiao

    2015-05-10

    In a previous research, an alkaloid fraction and 18 alkaloid compounds were prepared from Piper longum L. by series of purification process. In this paper, a qualitative and quantitative analysis method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-DAD-MS) was developed to evaluate the alkaloid fraction. Qualitative analysis of the alkaloid fraction was firstly completed by UHPLC-DAD method and 18 amide alkaloid compounds were identified. A further qualitative analysis of the alkaloid fraction was accomplished by UHPLC-MS/MS method. Another 25 amide alkaloids were identified according to their characteristic ions and neutral losses. At last, a quantitative method for the alkaloid fraction was established using four marker compounds including piperine, pipernonatine, guineensine and N-isobutyl-2E,4E-octadecadienamide. After the validation of this method, the contents of above four marker compounds in the alkaloid fraction were 57.5mg/g, 65.6mg/g, 17.7mg/g and 23.9mg/g, respectively. Moreover, the relative response factors of other three compounds to piperine were calculated. A comparative study between external standard quantification and relative response factor quantification proved no remarkable difference. UHPLC-DAD-MS method was demonstrated to be a powerful tool for the characterization of the alkaloid fraction from P. longum L. and the result proved that the quality of alkaloid fraction was efficiently improved after appropriate purification.

  13. Analytic scaling analysis of high harmonic generation conversion efficiency.

    PubMed

    Falcão-Filho, E L; Gkortsas, M; Gordon, Ariel; Kärtner, Franz X

    2009-06-22

    Closed form expressions for the high harmonic generation (HHG) conversion efficiency are obtained for the plateau and cutoff regions. The presented formulas eliminate most of the computational complexity related to HHG simulations, and enable a detailed scaling analysis of HHG efficiency as a function of drive laser parameters and material properties. Moreover, in the total absence of any fitting procedure, the results show excellent agreement with experimental data reported in the literature. Thus, this paper opens new pathways for the global optimization problem of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources based on HHG.

  14. Bi-Component T2* Analysis of Bound and Pore Bone Water Fractions Fails at High Field Strengths

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Alan C.; Wehrli, Suzanne L.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis involves degradation of bone’s trabecular architecture, cortical thinning, and enlargement of cortical pores. Increased cortical porosity is a major cause of the decreased strength of osteoporotic bone. The majority of cortical pores, however, are below the resolution limit of MRI. Recent work has shown that porosity can be evaluated by MRI-based quantification of bone water. Bi-exponential T2* fitting and adiabatic inversion preparation are the two most common methods purported to distinguish bound and pore water in order to quantify matrix density and porosity. To assess the viability of T2* bi-component analysis as a method for quantifying bound and pore water fractions, we have applied this method to human cortical bone at 1.5T, 3T, 7T, and 9.4T, and validated the resulting pool fractions against μCT-derived porosity and gravimetrically-determined bone densities. We also investigated alternative methods: 2D T1–T2* bi-component fitting by incorporating saturation-recovery, 1D and 2D fitting of CPMG echo amplitudes, and deuterium inversion recovery. Short-T2* pool fraction was moderately correlated with porosity (R2 = 0.70) and matrix density (R2 = 0.63) at 1.5T, but the strengths of these associations were found to diminish rapidly as field strength increases, falling below R2 = 0.5 at 3T. Addition of the T1 dimension to bi-component analysis only slightly improved the strengths of these correlations. T2*-based bi-component analysis should therefore be used with caution. Performance of deuterium inversion-recovery at 9.4T was also poor (R2 = 0.50 versus porosity and R2 = 0.46 versus matrix density). CPMG-derived short-T2 fraction at 9.4T, however, is highly correlated with porosity (R2 = 0.87) and matrix density (R2 = 0.88), confirming the utility of this method for independent validation of bone water pools. PMID:25981785

  15. Scale-bridging analysis on deformation behavior of high-nitrogen austenitic steels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Ha, Heon-Young; Hwang, Byoungchul; Kim, Sung-Joon; Shin, Eunjoo; Lee, Jong Wook

    2013-08-01

    Scale-bridging analysis on deformation behavior of high-nitrogen austenitic Fe-18Cr-10Mn-(0.39 and 0.69)N steels was performed by neutron diffraction, electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two important modes of deformation were identified depending on the nitrogen content: deformation twinning in the 0.69 N alloy and strain-induced martensitic transformation in the 0.39 N alloy. The phase fraction and deformation faulting probabilities were evaluated based on analyses of peak shift and asymmetry of neutron diffraction profiles. Semi in situ EBSD measurement was performed to investigate the orientation dependence of deformation microstructure and it showed that the variants of ε martensite as well as twin showed strong orientation dependence with respect to tensile axis. TEM observation showed that deformation twin with a {111} mathematical left angle bracket 112 mathematical right angle bracket crystallographic component was predominant in the 0.69 N alloy whereas two types of strain-induced martensites (ε and α' martensites) were observed in the 0.39 N alloy. It can be concluded that scale-bridging analysis using neutron diffraction, EBSD, and TEM can yield a comprehensive understanding of the deformation mechanism of nitrogen-alloyed austenitic steels.

  16. [Determination of the ejection fraction of the left ventricle by videodensitometric analysis of digital angiography. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Angel, C Y; Vuthien, H; Letienne, G; Pernes, J M; Brenot, P; Parola, J L; Raynaud, A; Gaux, J C

    1985-08-01

    Digitalisation enables angiocardiography to be performed by a peripheral intravenous injection. Computer-assisted analysis of the date widens the possibilities of quantification. The authors have developed a videodensitometric method of studying the left ventricular ejection fraction. The research was performed on an experimental model and the technique validated in a series of 10 patients. The experimental model consisted of a series of balloons which, when inflated with contrast medium assumed an allipsoid shape resembling a left ventricle. The balloons were blown up in two stages with an automatic injector to simulate systole and diastole. The images were recorded in the same way as during ventriculography. Videodensitometric measurements showed 3 to 5% variations from the true values. The method was then applied to the calculation of the left ventricular ejection fraction in 10 patients: left ventricular function was also quantified by geometrical methods (Dodge) from the same angiogrammes and the 2 sets of results were then compared. The correlation coefficient between the two methods was 0.97, so validating the new technique. Videodensitometry opens up new perspectives in the study of left ventricular function. On the other hand it can be used to monitor the ejection fraction in severely ill or recently operated patients, and, on the other hand the principle of videodensitometry eliminates the geometrical approximations inherent in the classical methods of angiographic analysis and would therefore seem to be more suitable for the study of pathological left ventricules (aneurysm...). Finally, the technique of videodensitometry represents a new step towards the measurement of true volumes and flow rates. PMID:3935074

  17. Analysis of Organic Anionic Surfactants in Fine and Coarse Fractions of Freshly Emitted Sea Spray Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Richard E; Laskina, Olga; Jayarathne, Thilina; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Lin, Peng; Sultana, Camille; Lee, Christopher; Moore, Kathryn A; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H; Prather, Kimberly A; Grassian, Vicki H; Stone, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-01

    The inclusion of organic compounds in freshly emitted sea spray aerosol (SSA) has been shown to be size-dependent, with an increasing organic fraction in smaller particles. Here we have used electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry in negative ion mode to identify organic compounds in nascent sea spray collected throughout a 25 day mesocosm experiment. Over 280 organic compounds from ten major homologous series were tentatively identified, including saturated (C8-C24) and unsaturated (C12-C22) fatty acids, fatty acid derivatives (including saturated oxo-fatty acids (C5-C18) and saturated hydroxy-fatty acids (C5-C18), organosulfates (C2-C7, C12-C17) and sulfonates (C16-C22). During the mesocosm, the distributions of molecules within some homologous series responded to variations among the levels of phytoplankton and bacteria in the seawater. The average molecular weight and carbon preference index of saturated fatty acids significantly decreased within fine SSA during the progression of the mesocosm, which was not observed in coarse SSA, sea-surface microlayer or in fresh seawater. This study helps to define the molecular composition of nascent SSA and biological processes in the ocean relate to SSA composition. PMID:26828238

  18. In vitro determination of the indigestible fraction in foods: an alternative to dietary fiber analysis.

    PubMed

    Saura-Calixto, F; García-Alonso, A; Goñi, I; Bravo, L

    2000-08-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) intakes in Western countries only accounts for about one-third of the substrates required for colonic bacterial cell turnover. There is a general trend among nutritionists to extend the DF concept to include all food constituents reaching the colon. In this line, a method to quantify the major nondigestible components in plant foods, namely, the indigestible fraction (IF), is presented. Analytical conditions for IF determination are close to physiological. Samples, analyzed as eaten, were successively incubated with pepsin and alpha-amylase; after centrifugation and dialysis, insoluble and soluble IFs were obtained. IF values include DF, resistant starch, resistant protein, and other associated compounds. IF contents determined in common foods (cereals, legumes, vegetables, and fruits) were higher than DF contents. Calculated IF intakes were close to the estimated amount of substrates reaching the colon. IF data could be more useful than DF data from a nutritional point of view; therefore, IF is proposed as an alternative to DF for food labeling and food composition tables. PMID:10956113

  19. Sorptive tape extraction in the analysis of the volatile fraction emitted from biological solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Bicchi, C; Cordero, C; Liberto, E; Rubiolo, P; Sgorbini, B; Sandra, P

    2007-05-01

    Sorptive tape extraction (STE) is a recent sorption-based sampling technique in which a flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tape is used to recover analytes at the surface of a solid matrix by direct contact as well as from the headspace in equilibrium with it. Solutes thus enriched on the inert PDMS material can be recovered either by solvent desorption or by thermo-desorption. The concentration capability of both direct contact and headspace STE was evaluated by sampling (a) aromatic plants to study the reaction of a vegetable matrix submitted to stress, and (b) fruits at the surface of the pulp or inside the pulp; the composition of the volatile fraction released from the skin when a perfume is sprayed on the back of the hand was also studied. The concentration capability of direct contact and headspace STE was compared to that of HSSE with a 20 microL PDMS twister and HS-SPME with a PDMS 100 microm fibre, by determining the relative abundances (RA) of the characterizing components of the aromatic plants under investigation. Repeatability and influence of tape surface on STE recovery were also evaluated.

  20. Model-based analysis of a dielectrophoretic microfluidic device for field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bobby; Alazzam, Anas; Abutayeh, Mohammad; Stiharu, Ion

    2016-08-01

    We present the development of a dynamic model for predicting the trajectory of microparticles in microfluidic devices, employing dielectrophoresis, for Hyperlayer field-flow fractionation. The electrode configuration is such that multiple finite-sized electrodes are located on the top and bottom walls of the microchannel; the electrodes on the walls are aligned with each other. The electric potential inside the microchannel is described using the Laplace equation while the microparticles' trajectory is described using equations based on Newton's second law. All equations are solved using finite difference method. The equations of motion account for forces including inertia, buoyancy, drag, gravity, virtual mass, and dielectrophoresis. The model is used for parametric study; the geometric parameters analyzed include microparticle radius, microchannel depth, and electrode/spacing lengths while volumetric flow rate and actuation voltage are the two operating parameters considered in the study. The trajectory of microparticles is composed of transient and steady state phases; the trajectory is influenced by all parameters. Microparticle radius and volumetric flow rate, above the threshold, do not influence the steady state levitation height; microparticle levitation is not possible below the threshold of the volumetric flow rate. Microchannel depth, electrode/spacing lengths, and actuation voltage influence the steady-state levitation height.

  1. Model-based analysis of a dielectrophoretic microfluidic device for field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bobby; Alazzam, Anas; Abutayeh, Mohammad; Stiharu, Ion

    2016-08-01

    We present the development of a dynamic model for predicting the trajectory of microparticles in microfluidic devices, employing dielectrophoresis, for Hyperlayer field-flow fractionation. The electrode configuration is such that multiple finite-sized electrodes are located on the top and bottom walls of the microchannel; the electrodes on the walls are aligned with each other. The electric potential inside the microchannel is described using the Laplace equation while the microparticles' trajectory is described using equations based on Newton's second law. All equations are solved using finite difference method. The equations of motion account for forces including inertia, buoyancy, drag, gravity, virtual mass, and dielectrophoresis. The model is used for parametric study; the geometric parameters analyzed include microparticle radius, microchannel depth, and electrode/spacing lengths while volumetric flow rate and actuation voltage are the two operating parameters considered in the study. The trajectory of microparticles is composed of transient and steady state phases; the trajectory is influenced by all parameters. Microparticle radius and volumetric flow rate, above the threshold, do not influence the steady state levitation height; microparticle levitation is not possible below the threshold of the volumetric flow rate. Microchannel depth, electrode/spacing lengths, and actuation voltage influence the steady-state levitation height. PMID:27322871

  2. A fractional Fourier transform analysis of the scattering of ultrasonic waves

    PubMed Central

    Tant, Katherine M.M.; Mulholland, Anthony J.; Langer, Matthias; Gachagan, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Many safety critical structures, such as those found in nuclear plants, oil pipelines and in the aerospace industry, rely on key components that are constructed from heterogeneous materials. Ultrasonic non-destructive testing (NDT) uses high-frequency mechanical waves to inspect these parts, ensuring they operate reliably without compromising their integrity. It is possible to employ mathematical models to develop a deeper understanding of the acquired ultrasonic data and enhance defect imaging algorithms. In this paper, a model for the scattering of ultrasonic waves by a crack is derived in the time–frequency domain. The fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) is applied to an inhomogeneous wave equation where the forcing function is prescribed as a linear chirp, modulated by a Gaussian envelope. The homogeneous solution is found via the Born approximation which encapsulates information regarding the flaw geometry. The inhomogeneous solution is obtained via the inverse Fourier transform of a Gaussian-windowed linear chirp excitation. It is observed that, although the scattering profile of the flaw does not change, it is amplified. Thus, the theory demonstrates the enhanced signal-to-noise ratio permitted by the use of coded excitation, as well as establishing a time–frequency domain framework to assist in flaw identification and classification. PMID:25792967

  3. Advanced analysis of polymer emulsions: Particle size and particle size distribution by field-flow fractionation and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Makan, Ashwell C; Spallek, Markus J; du Toit, Madeleine; Klein, Thorsten; Pasch, Harald

    2016-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) is an advanced fractionation technique for the analyses of very sensitive particles. In this study, different FFF techniques were used for the fractionation and analysis of polymer emulsions/latexes. As model systems, a pure acrylic emulsion and emulsions containing titanium dioxide were prepared and analyzed. An acrylic emulsion polymerization was conducted, continuously sampled from the reactor and subsequently analyzed to determine the particle size, radius of gyration in specific, of the latex particles throughout the polymerization reaction. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), coupled to a multidetector system, multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI), respectively, were used to investigate the evolution of particle sizes and particle size distributions (PSDs) as the polymerization progressed. The obtained particle sizes were compared against batch-mode dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results indicated differences between AF4 and DLS results due to DLS taking hydration layers into account, whereas both AF4 and SdFFF were coupled to MALLS detection, hence not taking the hydration layer into account for size determination. SdFFF has additional separation capabilities with a much higher resolution compared to AF4. The calculated radii values were 5 nm larger for SdFFF measurements for each analyzed sample against the corresponding AF4 values. Additionally a low particle size shoulder was observed for SdFFF indicating bimodality in the reactor very early during the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, different emulsions were mixed with inorganic species used as additives in cosmetics and coatings such as TiO2. These complex mixtures of species were analyzed to investigate the retention and particle interaction behavior under different AF4 experimental conditions, such as the mobile phase. The AF4 system was coupled online

  4. The Effect of Essential Oils and Bioactive Fractions on Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans Biofilms: A Confocal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Freires, Irlan Almeida; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Duarte, Marta Cristina Teixeira; Sartoratto, Adilson; Figueira, Glyn Mara; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2015-01-01

    The essential oils (EO) and bioactive fractions (BF) from Aloysia gratissima, Baccharis dracunculifolia, Coriandrum sativum, Cyperus articulatus, and Lippia sidoides were proven to have strong antimicrobial activity on planktonic microorganisms; however, little is known about their effects on the morphology or viability of oral biofilms. Previously, we determined the EO/fractions with the best antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Candida spp. In this report, we used a confocal analysis to investigate the effect of these EO and BF on the morphology of S. mutans biofilms (thickness, biovolume, and architecture) and on the metabolic viability of C. albicans biofilms. The analysis of intact treated S. mutans biofilms showed no statistical difference for thickness in all groups compared to the control. However, a significant reduction in the biovolume of extracellular polysaccharides and bacteria was observed for A. gratissima and L. sidoides groups, indicating that these BF disrupt biofilm integrity and may have created porosity in the biofilm. This phenomenon could potentially result in a weakened structure and affect biofilm dynamics. Finally, C. sativum EO drastically affected C. albicans viability when compared to the control. These results highlight the promising antimicrobial activity of these plant species and support future translational research on the treatment of dental caries and oral candidiasis. PMID:25821503

  5. The Effect of Essential Oils and Bioactive Fractions on Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans Biofilms: A Confocal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Freires, Irlan Almeida; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Duarte, Marta Cristina Teixeira; Sartoratto, Adilson; Figueira, Glyn Mara; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2015-01-01

    The essential oils (EO) and bioactive fractions (BF) from Aloysia gratissima, Baccharis dracunculifolia, Coriandrum sativum, Cyperus articulatus, and Lippia sidoides were proven to have strong antimicrobial activity on planktonic microorganisms; however, little is known about their effects on the morphology or viability of oral biofilms. Previously, we determined the EO/fractions with the best antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Candida spp. In this report, we used a confocal analysis to investigate the effect of these EO and BF on the morphology of S. mutans biofilms (thickness, biovolume, and architecture) and on the metabolic viability of C. albicans biofilms. The analysis of intact treated S. mutans biofilms showed no statistical difference for thickness in all groups compared to the control. However, a significant reduction in the biovolume of extracellular polysaccharides and bacteria was observed for A. gratissima and L. sidoides groups, indicating that these BF disrupt biofilm integrity and may have created porosity in the biofilm. This phenomenon could potentially result in a weakened structure and affect biofilm dynamics. Finally, C. sativum EO drastically affected C. albicans viability when compared to the control. These results highlight the promising antimicrobial activity of these plant species and support future translational research on the treatment of dental caries and oral candidiasis. PMID:25821503

  6. Dysfunction Screening in Experimental Arteriovenous Grafts for Hemodialysis Using Fractional-Order Extractor and Color Relation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Jui; Chen, Wei-Ling; Kan, Chung-Dann; Yu, Fan-Ming; Wang, Su-Chin; Lin, Hsiu-Hui; Lin, Chia-Hung

    2015-12-01

    In physical examinations, hemodialysis access stenosis leading to dysfunction occurs at the venous anastomosis site or the outflow vein. Information from the inflow stenosis, such as blood pressure, pressure drop, and flow resistance increases, allows dysfunction screening from the stage of early clots and thrombosis to the progression of outflow stenosis. Therefore, this study proposes dysfunction screening model in experimental arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) using the fractional-order extractor (FOE) and the color relation analysis (CRA). A Sprott system was designed using an FOE to quantify the differences in transverse vibration pressures between the inflow and outflow sites of an AVG. Experimental analysis revealed that the degree of stenosis (DOS) correlated with an increase in fractional-order dynamic errors (FODEs). Exponential regression was used to fit a non-linear curve and can be used to quantify the relationship between the FODEs and DOS (R (2) = 0.8064). The specific ranges were used to evaluate the stenosis degree, such as DOS: <50, 50-80, and >80%. A CRA-based screening method was derived from the hue angle-saturation-value color model, which describes perceptual color relationships for the DOS. It has a flexibility inference manner with color visualization to represent the different stenosis degrees, which has average accuracy >90% superior to the traditional methods. This in vitro experimental study demonstrated that the proposed model can be used for dysfunction screening in stenotic AVGs.

  7. A Multi-scale Approach to Urban Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluch, Renne; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2005-01-01

    An environmental consequence of urbanization is the urban heat island effect, a situation where urban areas are warmer than surrounding rural areas. The urban heat island phenomenon results from the replacement of natural landscapes with impervious surfaces such as concrete and asphalt and is linked to adverse economic and environmental impacts. In order to better understand the urban microclimate, a greater understanding of the urban thermal pattern (UTP), including an analysis of the thermal properties of individual land covers, is needed. This study examines the UTP by means of thermal land cover response for the Salt Lake City, Utah, study area at two scales: 1) the community level, and 2) the regional or valleywide level. Airborne ATLAS (Advanced Thermal Land Applications Sensor) data, a high spatial resolution (10-meter) dataset appropriate for an environment containing a concentration of diverse land covers, are used for both land cover and thermal analysis at the community level. The ATLAS data consist of 15 channels covering the visible, near-IR, mid-IR and thermal-IR wavelengths. At the regional level Landsat TM data are used for land cover analysis while the ATLAS channel 13 data are used for the thermal analysis. Results show that a heat island is evident at both the community and the valleywide level where there is an abundance of impervious surfaces. ATLAS data perform well in community level studies in terms of land cover and thermal exchanges, but other, more coarse-resolution data sets are more appropriate for large-area thermal studies. Thermal response per land cover is consistent at both levels, which suggests potential for urban climate modeling at multiple scales.

  8. Problems of allometric scaling analysis: examples from mammalian reproductive biology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert D; Genoud, Michel; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K

    2005-05-01

    Biological scaling analyses employing the widely used bivariate allometric model are beset by at least four interacting problems: (1) choice of an appropriate best-fit line with due attention to the influence of outliers; (2) objective recognition of divergent subsets in the data (allometric grades); (3) potential restrictions on statistical independence resulting from phylogenetic inertia; and (4) the need for extreme caution in inferring causation from correlation. A new non-parametric line-fitting technique has been developed that eliminates requirements for normality of distribution, greatly reduces the influence of outliers and permits objective recognition of grade shifts in substantial datasets. This technique is applied in scaling analyses of mammalian gestation periods and of neonatal body mass in primates. These analyses feed into a re-examination, conducted with partial correlation analysis, of the maternal energy hypothesis relating to mammalian brain evolution, which suggests links between body size and brain size in neonates and adults, gestation period and basal metabolic rate. Much has been made of the potential problem of phylogenetic inertia as a confounding factor in scaling analyses. However, this problem may be less severe than suspected earlier because nested analyses of variance conducted on residual variation (rather than on raw values) reveals that there is considerable variance at low taxonomic levels. In fact, limited divergence in body size between closely related species is one of the prime examples of phylogenetic inertia. One common approach to eliminating perceived problems of phylogenetic inertia in allometric analyses has been calculation of 'independent contrast values'. It is demonstrated that the reasoning behind this approach is flawed in several ways. Calculation of contrast values for closely related species of similar body size is, in fact, highly questionable, particularly when there are major deviations from the best

  9. Flux Coupling Analysis of Genome-Scale Metabolic Network Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Burgard, Anthony P.; Nikolaev, Evgeni V.; Schilling, Christophe H.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Flux Coupling Finder (FCF) framework for elucidating the topological and flux connectivity features of genome-scale metabolic networks. The framework is demonstrated on genome-scale metabolic reconstructions of Helicobacter pylori, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The analysis allows one to determine whether any two metabolic fluxes, v1 and v2, are (1) directionally coupled, if a non-zero flux for v1 implies a non-zero flux for v2 but not necessarily the reverse; (2) partially coupled, if a non-zero flux for v1 implies a non-zero, though variable, flux for v2 and vice versa; or (3) fully coupled, if a non-zero flux for v1 implies not only a non-zero but also a fixed flux for v2 and vice versa. Flux coupling analysis also enables the global identification of blocked reactions, which are all reactions incapable of carrying flux under a certain condition; equivalent knockouts, defined as the set of all possible reactions whose deletion forces the flux through a particular reaction to zero; and sets of affected reactions denoting all reactions whose fluxes are forced to zero if a particular reaction is deleted. The FCF approach thus provides a novel and versatile tool for aiding metabolic reconstructions and guiding genetic manipulations. PMID:14718379

  10. Statistical analysis of large-scale neuronal recording data

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Jamie L.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2010-01-01

    Relating stimulus properties to the response properties of individual neurons and neuronal networks is a major goal of sensory research. Many investigators implant electrode arrays in multiple brain areas and record from chronically implanted electrodes over time to answer a variety of questions. Technical challenges related to analyzing large-scale neuronal recording data are not trivial. Several analysis methods traditionally used by neurophysiologists do not account for dependencies in the data that are inherent in multi-electrode recordings. In addition, when neurophysiological data are not best modeled by the normal distribution and when the variables of interest may not be linearly related, extensions of the linear modeling techniques are recommended. A variety of methods exist to analyze correlated data, even when data are not normally distributed and the relationships are nonlinear. Here we review expansions of the Generalized Linear Model designed to address these data properties. Such methods are used in other research fields, and the application to large-scale neuronal recording data will enable investigators to determine the variable properties that convincingly contribute to the variances in the observed neuronal measures. Standard measures of neuron properties such as response magnitudes can be analyzed using these methods, and measures of neuronal network activity such as spike timing correlations can be analyzed as well. We have done just that in recordings from 100-electrode arrays implanted in the primary somatosensory cortex of owl monkeys. Here we illustrate how one example method, Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, is a useful method to apply to large-scale neuronal recordings. PMID:20472395

  11. Micro-scaled high-throughput digestion of plant tissue samples for multi-elemental analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Thomas H; Laursen, Kristian H; Persson, Daniel P; Pedas, Pai; Husted, Søren; Schjoerring, Jan K

    2009-01-01

    Background Quantitative multi-elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry depends on a complete digestion of solid samples. However, fast and thorough sample digestion is a challenging analytical task which constitutes a bottleneck in modern multi-elemental analysis. Additional obstacles may be that sample quantities are limited and elemental concentrations low. In such cases, digestion in small volumes with minimum dilution and contamination is required in order to obtain high accuracy data. Results We have developed a micro-scaled microwave digestion procedure and optimized it for accurate elemental profiling of plant materials (1-20 mg dry weight). A commercially available 64-position rotor with 5 ml disposable glass vials, originally designed for microwave-based parallel organic synthesis, was used as a platform for the digestion. The novel micro-scaled method was successfully validated by the use of various certified reference materials (CRM) with matrices rich in starch, lipid or protein. When the micro-scaled digestion procedure was applied on single rice grains or small batches of Arabidopsis seeds (1 mg, corresponding to approximately 50 seeds), the obtained elemental profiles closely matched those obtained by conventional analysis using digestion in large volume vessels. Accumulated elemental contents derived from separate analyses of rice grain fractions (aleurone, embryo and endosperm) closely matched the total content obtained by analysis of the whole rice grain. Conclusion A high-throughput micro-scaled method has been developed which enables digestion of small quantities of plant samples for subsequent elemental profiling by ICP-spectrometry. The method constitutes a valuable tool for screening of mutants and transformants. In addition, the method facilitates studies of the distribution of essential trace elements between and within plant organs which is relevant for, e.g., breeding programmes aiming at improvement of the

  12. Analysis and fractionation of silicone and fluorosilicone oils for intraocular use.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Refojo, M F; Crabtree, D V; Leong, F L

    1990-10-01

    Silicone oil (SiO) and fluorosilicone oil (FSiO) are useful in difficult cases of retinal detachment surgery. Unidentified low-molecular-weight components (LMWC) and residual catalysts in SiO and FSiO have been implicated in the adverse reactions of the oils in the eye. The authors analyzed LMWC of SiO and FSiO using a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a 6-ft x 2-mm column packed with 3% SP-2250 and a flame-ionization detector. By commercially available standards and a homologous series plot, MD3M to MD23M (linear LMWC) and D4 to D30 (cyclic LMWC) were positively identified in commercial-grade 1000-centistokes (cs) SiO. Commercial-grade 12,500-cs SiO contained GC-detectable LMWC (up to MD28M and D30) at higher concentrations than commercial-grade 1000 cs SiO, although the weight percent of acetone-extractable LMWC (including those larger than MD28M and D30) was less in the former than in the latter. The GC-detectable LMWC in most medical-grade SiO were less than those in commercial-grade SiO. Tetramethylammonium siloxanolate (a residual catalyst) and tributylphosphine oxide (a heat-decomposition product of a polymerization catalyst) were tentatively identified in commercial- and medical-grade 12,500-cs SiO, respectively. Commercial-grade 1000- and 10,000-cs FSiO also contained LMWC, including F3 and/or F4 (cyclic LMWC). To eliminate LMWC from the oils, the authors developed a solvent fractionation method using acetone for SiO and hexane for FSiO. After continuous solvent extraction of SiO for 2 weeks and FSiO for 3 weeks, all measurable LMWC were eliminated from the oils.

  13. Experimental studies and model analysis of noble gas fractionation in porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ding, Xin; Kennedy, B. Mack.; Evans, William C.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The noble gases, which are chemically inert under normal terrestrial conditions but vary systematically across a wide range of atomic mass and diffusivity, offer a multicomponent approach to investigating gas dynamics in unsaturated soil horizons, including transfer of gas between saturated zones, unsaturated zones, and the atmosphere. To evaluate the degree to which fractionation of noble gases in the presence of an advective–diffusive flux agrees with existing theory, a simple laboratory sand column experiment was conducted. Pure CO2 was injected at the base of the column, providing a series of constant CO2 fluxes through the column. At five fixed sampling depths within the system, samples were collected for CO2 and noble gas analyses, and ambient pressures were measured. Both the advection–diffusion and dusty gas models were used to simulate the behavior of CO2 and noble gases under the experimental conditions, and the simulations were compared with the measured depth-dependent concentration profiles of the gases. Given the relatively high permeability of the sand column (5 ´ 10−11 m2), Knudsen diffusion terms were small, and both the dusty gas model and the advection–diffusion model accurately predicted the concentration profiles of the CO2 and atmospheric noble gases across a range of CO2 flux from ?700 to 10,000 g m−2 d−1. The agreement between predicted and measured gas concentrations demonstrated that, when applied to natural systems, the multi-component capability provided by the noble gases can be exploited to constrain component and total gas fluxes of non-conserved (CO2) and conserved (noble gas) species or attributes of the soil column relevant to gas transport, such as porosity, tortuosity, and gas saturation.

  14. Mucus: A new tissue fraction for rapid determination of fish diet switching using stable isotope analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotope analysis of diet switching by fishes often is hampered by slow turnover rates of the tissues analyzed (usually muscle or fins). We examined epidermal mucus as a potentially faster turnover “tissue” that might provide a more rapid assessment of diet switching. In a ...

  15. Mucus: a new tissue fraction for rapid determination of fish diet switching using stable isotope analysis.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable isotope analysis of diet switching by fishes is often hampered by slow turnover rates of the tissues analyzed (usually muscle or fins). We examined epidermal mucus as a potentially faster turnover “tissue” that might provide a more rapid assessment of diet switching. In a controlled hatchery...

  16. Size-dependent geometrically nonlinear free vibration analysis of fractional viscoelastic nanobeams based on the nonlocal elasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Faraji Oskouie, M.; Gholami, R.

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, mathematical modeling and engineering applications of fractional-order calculus have been extensively utilized to provide efficient simulation tools in the field of solid mechanics. In this paper, a nonlinear fractional nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model is established using the concept of fractional derivative and nonlocal elasticity theory to investigate the size-dependent geometrically nonlinear free vibration of fractional viscoelastic nanobeams. The non-classical fractional integro-differential Euler-Bernoulli beam model contains the nonlocal parameter, viscoelasticity coefficient and order of the fractional derivative to interpret the size effect, viscoelastic material and fractional behavior in the nanoscale fractional viscoelastic structures, respectively. In the solution procedure, the Galerkin method is employed to reduce the fractional integro-partial differential governing equation to a fractional ordinary differential equation in the time domain. Afterwards, the predictor-corrector method is used to solve the nonlinear fractional time-dependent equation. Finally, the influences of nonlocal parameter, order of fractional derivative and viscoelasticity coefficient on the nonlinear time response of fractional viscoelastic nanobeams are discussed in detail. Moreover, comparisons are made between the time responses of linear and nonlinear models.

  17. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of mass fractions of toxic metals in plastic.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwangwon; Kang, Namgoo

    2007-10-15

    It is very challenging to decompose a plastic product for the purpose of analysis of hazardous elements contained. To circumvent such technical problem, it is imperative that an analyst employ a nondestructive analytical method free of any pretreatments. The analytical results of the concentrations of toxic metals such as Cd and Cr in polypropylene for seven samples at two different levels were obtained using the instrumental neutron activation analysis. This work was intended ultimately to establish certified reference materials (CRMs) of these metals in the polypropylene, traceable to the SI. The uncertainties associated with the analytical procedures were estimated in accordance with the ISO guideline. The results were subsequently validated by a comparison with those for CRM-680 and -681 of the Bureau Communautaire de Reference (BCR), which demonstrated acceptable agreement within their uncertainty ranges.

  18. Segmentation-based method incorporating fractional volume analysis for quantification of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deming; Doddrell, David M.

    2001-07-01

    Partial volume effect is a major problem in brain tissue segmentation on digital images such as magnetic resonance (MR) images. In this paper, special attention has been paid to partial volume effect when developing a method for quantifying brain atrophy. Specifically, partial volume effect is minimized in the process of parameter estimation prior to segmentation by identifying and excluding those voxels with possible partial volume effect. A quantitative measure for partial volume effect was also introduced through developing a model that calculates fractional volumes for voxels with mixtures of two different tissues. For quantifying cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes, fractional volumes are calculated for two classes of mixture involving gray matter and CSF, and white matter and CSF. Tissue segmentation is carried out using 1D and 2D thresholding techniques after images are intensity- corrected. Threshold values are estimated using the minimum error method. Morphological processing and region identification analysis are used extensively in the algorithm. As an application, the method was employed for evaluating rates of brain atrophy based on serially acquired structural brain MR images. Consistent and accurate rates of brain atrophy have been obtained for patients with Alzheimer's disease as well as for elderly subjects due to normal aging process.

  19. The Multi-index Mittag-Leffler Functions and Their Applications for Solving Fractional Order Problems in Applied Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryakova, V. S.; Luchko, Yu. F.

    2010-11-01

    During the last few decades, differential equations and systems of fractional order (that is arbitrary one, not necessarily integer) begun to play an important role in modeling of various phenomena of physical, engineering, automatization, biological and biomedical, chemical, earth, economics, social relations, etc. nature. The so-called Special Functions of Fractional Calculus (SF of FC) provide an important tool of Fractional Calculus (FC) and Applied Analysis (AA). In particular, they are often used to represent the solutions of fractional differential equations in explicit form. Among the most popular representatives of the SF of FC are: the Mittag-Leffler (ML) function, the Wright generalized hypergeometric function pΨq, the more general Fox H-function, and the Inayat-HussainH-function. The classical Special Functions (called also SF of Mathematical Physics), including the orthogonal polynomials, and the pFq-hypergeometric functions fall in this scheme as examples of the simpler Meijer G-function. In this survey talk, we overview the properties and some applications of an important class of SF of FC, introduced for the first time in our works. For integer m>1 and arbitrary real (or complex, under suitable restrictions) indices ρ1,…,ρm>0 and μ1,…,μm, we define the multi-index (vector-index) Mittag-Leffler functions by: E(1/ρi),(μi)(z) = E)1/ρi),(μi)(m)(z) = ∑ K=0∞zk/Γ(μ1+kρ1)…Γ(μm+k/ρm) = 1Ψm[(1,1)(μ1,1/ρi)1m;z] = H1,m+11,1[-z‖(0,1)(0,1),(1-μi,1/ρi)1m]. We propose also a list of examples of SF of FC that are E(1/ρi),(μi)-functions and play important role in pure mathematics and in solving problems from natural, applied and social sciences, and state

  20. Numerical analysis of field-scale transport of bromacil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, David; Tauber-Yasur, Inbar; Laufer, Asher; Yaron, Bruno

    Field-scale transport of bromacil (5-bromo-3- sec-butyl-6-methyluracil) was analyzed using two different model processes for local description of the transport. The first was the classical, one-region convection dispersion equation (CDE) model while the second was the two-region, mobile-immobile (MIM) model. The analyses were performed by means of detailed three-dimensional, numerical simulations of the flow and the transport [Russo, D., Zaidel, J. and Laufer, A., Numerical analysis of flow and transport in a three-dimensional partially saturated heterogeneous soil. Water Resour. Res., 1998, in press], employing local soil hydraulic properties parameters from field measurements and local adsorption/desorption coefficients and the first-order degradation rate coefficient from laboratory measurements. Results of the analyses suggest that for a given flow regime, mass exchange between the mobile and the immobile regions retards the bromacil degradation, considerably affects the distribution of the bromacil resident concentration, c, at relatively large travel times, slightly affects the spatial moments of the distribution of c, and increases the skewing of the bromacil breakthrough and the uncertainty in its prediction, compared with the case in which the soil contained only a single (mobile) region. Mean and standard deviation of the simulated concentration profiles at various elapsed times were compared with measurements from a field-scale transport experiment [Tauber-Yasur, I., Hadas, A., Russo, D. and Yaron, B., Leaching of terbuthylazine and bromacil through field soils. Water, Air Soil Poln., 1998, in press] conducted at the Bet Dagan site. Given the limitations of the present study (e.g. the lack of detailed field data on the spatial variability of the soil chemical properties) the main conclusion of the present study is that the field-scale transport of bromacil at the Bet Dagan site is better quantified with the MIM model than the CDE model.

  1. Reliability analysis of a utility-scale solar power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, G. J.

    1992-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a reliability analysis for a solar central receiver power plant that employs a salt-in-tube receiver. Because reliability data for a number of critical plant components have only recently been collected, this is the first time a credible analysis can be performed. This type of power plant will be built by a consortium of western US utilities led by the Southern California Edison Company. The 10 MW plant is known as Solar Two and is scheduled to be on-line in 1994. It is a prototype which should lead to the construction of 100 MW commercial-scale plants by the year 2000. The availability calculation was performed with the UNIRAM computer code. The analysis predicted a forced outage rate of 5.4 percent and an overall plant availability, including scheduled outages, of 91 percent. The code also identified the most important contributors to plant unavailability. Control system failures were identified as the most important cause of forced outages. Receiver problems were rated second with turbine outages third. The overall plant availability of 91 percent exceeds the goal identified by the US utility study. This paper discuses the availability calculation and presents evidence why the 91 percent availability is a credible estimate.

  2. Fractionation and analysis of lipopolysaccharide-derived oligosaccharides by zwitterionic-type hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Man-Kupisinska, Aleksandra; Bobko, Ewelina; Gozdziewicz, Tomasz K; Maciejewska, Anna; Jachymek, Wojciech; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Lukasiewicz, Jolanta

    2016-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) is a main surface antigen and virulence factor of Gram-negative bacteria. Regardless of the source of LPS, this molecule, isolated from the smooth forms of bacteria, is characterised by a general structural layout encompassing three regions: (i) an O-specific polysaccharide (O-PS) - a polymer of repeating oligosaccharide units, (ii) core oligosaccharide (OS), and (iii) the lipid A anchoring LPS in the outer membrane of the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. Structural analysis usually requires degradation of LPS and further efficient separation of various poly- and oligosaccharide glycoforms. The hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was shown as an efficient technique for separation of labelled or native neutral and acidic glycans, glycopeptides, sialylated glycans, glycosylated and nonglycosylated peptides. Herein we adopted ZIC(®) (zwitterionic stationary phase covalently attached to porous silica)-HILIC technology in combination with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry to separate different LPS-derived oligosaccharides. As a result three effective procedures have been developed: (i) to separate different core oligosaccharides of Escherichia coli R1 LOS, (ii) to separate RU-[Hep]-Kdo oligosaccharides from core OS glycoforms of Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 LPS, and (iii) to separate Hep and Kdo-containing mono, di-, tri- and tetrasaccharides of H. alvei PCM 1200 LPS. Moreover, some of developed analytical procedures were scaled to semi-preparative protocols and used to obtain highly-purified fractions of the interest in larger quantities required for future evaluation, analysis, and biological applications. PMID:27085741

  3. In-situ sampling of a large-scale particle simulation for interactive visualization and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, Jonathan L; Ahrens, James P; Heitmann, Katrin

    2010-12-09

    We propose storing a random sampling of data from large scale particle simulations, such as the Roadrunner Universe MC{sup 3} cosmological simulation, to be used for interactive post-analysis and visualization. Simulation data generation rates will continue to be far greater than storage bandwidth rates and other limiting technologies by many orders of magnitude. This implies that only a very small fraction of data generated by the simulation can ever be stored and subsequently post-analyzed. The limiting technology in this situation is analogous to the problem in many population surveys: there aren't enough human resources to query a large population. To cope with the lack of resources, statistical sampling techniques are used to create a representative data set of a large population. Mirroring that situation, we propose to store a simulation-time random sampling of the particle data to cope with the bOlllenecks and support interactive, exploratory post-analysis. The particle samples are immediately stored in a level-ol-detail format for post-visualization and analysis, which amortizes the cost of post-processing for interactive visualization. Additionally, we incorporate a system for recording and visualizing sample approximation error information for confidence and importance highlighting.

  4. 13C metabolic flux analysis at a genome-scale.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Saratram; Maranas, Costas D

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic models used in 13C metabolic flux analysis generally include a limited number of reactions primarily from central metabolism. They typically omit degradation pathways, complete cofactor balances, and atom transition contributions for reactions outside central metabolism. This study addresses the impact on prediction fidelity of scaling-up mapping models to a genome-scale. The core mapping model employed in this study accounts for (75 reactions and 65 metabolites) primarily from central metabolism. The genome-scale metabolic mapping model (GSMM) (697 reaction and 595 metabolites) is constructed using as a basis the iAF1260 model upon eliminating reactions guaranteed not to carry flux based on growth and fermentation data for a minimal glucose growth medium. Labeling data for 17 amino acid fragments obtained from cells fed with glucose labeled at the second carbon was used to obtain fluxes and ranges. Metabolic fluxes and confidence intervals are estimated, for both core and genome-scale mapping models, by minimizing the sum of square of differences between predicted and experimentally measured labeling patterns using the EMU decomposition algorithm. Overall, we find that both topology and estimated values of the metabolic fluxes remain largely consistent between core and GSM model. Stepping up to a genome-scale mapping model leads to wider flux inference ranges for 20 key reactions present in the core model. The glycolysis flux range doubles due to the possibility of active gluconeogenesis, the TCA flux range expanded by 80% due to the availability of a bypass through arginine consistent with labeling data, and the transhydrogenase reaction flux was essentially unresolved due to the presence of as many as five routes for the inter-conversion of NADPH to NADH afforded by the genome-scale model. By globally accounting for ATP demands in the GSMM model the unused ATP decreased drastically with the lower bound matching the maintenance ATP requirement. A non

  5. Anomaly Detection in Multiple Scale for Insider Threat Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoohwan; Sheldon, Frederick T; Hively, Lee M

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method to quantify malicious insider activity with statistical and graph-based analysis aided with semantic scoring rules. Different types of personal activities or interactions are monitored to form a set of directed weighted graphs. The semantic scoring rules assign higher scores for the events more significant and suspicious. Then we build personal activity profiles in the form of score tables. Profiles are created in multiple scales where the low level profiles are aggregated toward more stable higherlevel profiles within the subject or object hierarchy. Further, the profiles are created in different time scales such as day, week, or month. During operation, the insider s current activity profile is compared to the historical profiles to produce an anomaly score. For each subject with a high anomaly score, a subgraph of connected subjects is extracted to look for any related score movement. Finally the subjects are ranked by their anomaly scores to help the analysts focus on high-scored subjects. The threat-ranking component supports the interaction between the User Dashboard and the Insider Threat Knowledge Base portal. The portal includes a repository for historical results, i.e., adjudicated cases containing all of the information first presented to the user and including any additional insights to help the analysts. In this paper we show the framework of the proposed system and the operational algorithms.

  6. Parallel Index and Query for Large Scale Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Jerry; Wu, Kesheng; Ruebel, Oliver; Howison, Mark; Qiang, Ji; Prabhat,; Austin, Brian; Bethel, E. Wes; Ryne, Rob D.; Shoshani, Arie

    2011-07-18

    Modern scientific datasets present numerous data management and analysis challenges. State-of-the-art index and query technologies are critical for facilitating interactive exploration of large datasets, but numerous challenges remain in terms of designing a system for process- ing general scientific datasets. The system needs to be able to run on distributed multi-core platforms, efficiently utilize underlying I/O infrastructure, and scale to massive datasets. We present FastQuery, a novel software framework that address these challenges. FastQuery utilizes a state-of-the-art index and query technology (FastBit) and is designed to process mas- sive datasets on modern supercomputing platforms. We apply FastQuery to processing of a massive 50TB dataset generated by a large scale accelerator modeling code. We demonstrate the scalability of the tool to 11,520 cores. Motivated by the scientific need to search for inter- esting particles in this dataset, we use our framework to reduce search time from hours to tens of seconds.

  7. Two-field analysis of no-scale supergravity inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; García, Marcos A.G.; Olive, Keith A.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V. E-mail: garciagarcia@physics.umn.edu E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu

    2015-01-01

    Since the building-blocks of supersymmetric models include chiral superfields containing pairs of effective scalar fields, a two-field approach is particularly appropriate for models of inflation based on supergravity. In this paper, we generalize the two-field analysis of the inflationary power spectrum to supergravity models with arbitrary Kähler potential. We show how two-field effects in the context of no-scale supergravity can alter the model predictions for the scalar spectral index n{sub s} and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r, yielding results that interpolate between the Planck-friendly Starobinsky model and BICEP2-friendly predictions. In particular, we show that two-field effects in a chaotic no-scale inflation model with a quadratic potential are capable of reducing r to very small values || 0.1. We also calculate the non-Gaussianity measure f{sub NL}, finding that is well below the current experimental sensitivity.

  8. Multidimensional scaling analysis of the dynamics of a country economy.

    PubMed

    Tenreiro Machado, J A; Mata, Maria Eugénia

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the Portuguese short-run business cycles over the last 150 years and presents the multidimensional scaling (MDS) for visualizing the results. The analytical and numerical assessment of this long-run perspective reveals periods with close connections between the macroeconomic variables related to government accounts equilibrium, balance of payments equilibrium, and economic growth. The MDS method is adopted for a quantitative statistical analysis. In this way, similarity clusters of several historical periods emerge in the MDS maps, namely, in identifying similarities and dissimilarities that identify periods of prosperity and crises, growth, and stagnation. Such features are major aspects of collective national achievement, to which can be associated the impact of international problems such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, or the current global financial crisis, as well as national events in the context of broad political blueprints for the Portuguese society in the rising globalization process. PMID:24294132

  9. Cluster coarsening during polymer collapse: Finite-size scaling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Suman; Janke, Wolfhard

    2015-06-01

    We study the kinetics of the collapse of a single flexible polymer when it is quenched from a good solvent to a poor solvent. Results obtained from Monte Carlo simulations show that the collapse occurs through a sequence of events with the formation, growth and subsequent coalescence of clusters of monomers to a single compact globule. Particular emphasis is given in this work to the cluster growth during the collapse, analyzed via the application of finite-size scaling techniques. The growth exponent obtained in our analysis is suggestive of the universal Lifshitz-Slyozov mechanism of cluster growth. The methods used in this work could be of more general validity and applicable to other phenomena such as protein folding.

  10. Large scale rigidity-based flexibility analysis of biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Streinu, Ileana

    2016-01-01

    KINematics And RIgidity (KINARI) is an on-going project for in silico flexibility analysis of proteins. The new version of the software, Kinari-2, extends the functionality of our free web server KinariWeb, incorporates advanced web technologies, emphasizes the reproducibility of its experiments, and makes substantially improved tools available to the user. It is designed specifically for large scale experiments, in particular, for (a) very large molecules, including bioassemblies with high degree of symmetry such as viruses and crystals, (b) large collections of related biomolecules, such as those obtained through simulated dilutions, mutations, or conformational changes from various types of dynamics simulations, and (c) is intended to work as seemlessly as possible on the large, idiosyncratic, publicly available repository of biomolecules, the Protein Data Bank. We describe the system design, along with the main data processing, computational, mathematical, and validation challenges underlying this phase of the KINARI project. PMID:26958583

  11. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Sport Organizational Effectiveness Scale.

    PubMed

    Karteroliotis, Konstantinos; Papadimitriou, Dimitra

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factorial validity of the 5-factor model of sport organizational effectiveness developed by Papadimitriou and Taylor. This questionnaire has 33 items which assess five composite effectiveness dimensions pertinent to the operation of sport organizations: calibre of the board and external liaisons, interest in athletes, internal procedures, long term planning, and sport science support. The multiple constituency approach was used as a theoretical framework for developing this scale. Data were obtained from respondents affiliated with 20 Greek national sport organizations with a questionnaire. Analysis indicated that the 5-factor model of effectiveness is workable in assessing the organizational performance of nonprofit sport organizations. The application of the multiple constituency approach in studying sport organizational effectiveness was also suggested.

  12. Factor analysis of the Iowa family interaction rating scales.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Hannah C; Bradbury, Thomas N; Trail, Thomas E; Karney, Benjamin R

    2011-12-01

    Observational coding systems are uniquely suited for investigating interactional processes in couples and families, but their validity in diverse populations is unknown. We addressed this issue by applying factor analysis to interactional data collected from couples in low-income neighborhoods and coded with the widely used Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales (IFIRS). Our sample of 414 low-income, ethnically diverse newlywed couples each provided 24-min samples of problem-solving and social support behavior. Interrater reliabilities were strong, and the resultant factors--reflecting positive, negative, and effective communication--were very similar to those obtained with White middle-class samples. Additionally, couples were more negative, less positive, and less effective in problem-solving conversations than in socially supportive conversations, further supporting the validity of the IFIRS in this population. We conclude by discussing the strengths and shortcomings of the IFIRS when used in a low-income, ethnically diverse population.

  13. Multidimensional scaling analysis of the dynamics of a country economy.

    PubMed

    Tenreiro Machado, J A; Mata, Maria Eugénia

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the Portuguese short-run business cycles over the last 150 years and presents the multidimensional scaling (MDS) for visualizing the results. The analytical and numerical assessment of this long-run perspective reveals periods with close connections between the macroeconomic variables related to government accounts equilibrium, balance of payments equilibrium, and economic growth. The MDS method is adopted for a quantitative statistical analysis. In this way, similarity clusters of several historical periods emerge in the MDS maps, namely, in identifying similarities and dissimilarities that identify periods of prosperity and crises, growth, and stagnation. Such features are major aspects of collective national achievement, to which can be associated the impact of international problems such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, or the current global financial crisis, as well as national events in the context of broad political blueprints for the Portuguese society in the rising globalization process.

  14. Multidimensional Scaling Analysis of the Dynamics of a Country Economy

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Maria Eugénia

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the Portuguese short-run business cycles over the last 150 years and presents the multidimensional scaling (MDS) for visualizing the results. The analytical and numerical assessment of this long-run perspective reveals periods with close connections between the macroeconomic variables related to government accounts equilibrium, balance of payments equilibrium, and economic growth. The MDS method is adopted for a quantitative statistical analysis. In this way, similarity clusters of several historical periods emerge in the MDS maps, namely, in identifying similarities and dissimilarities that identify periods of prosperity and crises, growth, and stagnation. Such features are major aspects of collective national achievement, to which can be associated the impact of international problems such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, or the current global financial crisis, as well as national events in the context of broad political blueprints for the Portuguese society in the rising globalization process. PMID:24294132

  15. Large-Scale Quantitative Analysis of Painting Arts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daniel; Son, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Hawoong

    2014-12-01

    Scientists have made efforts to understand the beauty of painting art in their own languages. As digital image acquisition of painting arts has made rapid progress, researchers have come to a point where it is possible to perform statistical analysis of a large-scale database of artistic paints to make a bridge between art and science. Using digital image processing techniques, we investigate three quantitative measures of images - the usage of individual colors, the variety of colors, and the roughness of the brightness. We found a difference in color usage between classical paintings and photographs, and a significantly low color variety of the medieval period. Interestingly, moreover, the increment of roughness exponent as painting techniques such as chiaroscuro and sfumato have advanced is consistent with historical circumstances.

  16. Large-Scale Quantitative Analysis of Painting Arts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel; Son, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Hawoong

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have made efforts to understand the beauty of painting art in their own languages. As digital image acquisition of painting arts has made rapid progress, researchers have come to a point where it is possible to perform statistical analysis of a large-scale database of artistic paints to make a bridge between art and science. Using digital image processing techniques, we investigate three quantitative measures of images – the usage of individual colors, the variety of colors, and the roughness of the brightness. We found a difference in color usage between classical paintings and photographs, and a significantly low color variety of the medieval period. Interestingly, moreover, the increment of roughness exponent as painting techniques such as chiaroscuro and sfumato have advanced is consistent with historical circumstances. PMID:25501877

  17. Relative Spectral Mixture Analysis for monitoring natural hazards that impact vegetation cover: the importance of the nonphotosynthetic fraction in understanding landscape response to drought, fire, and hurricane damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okin, G. S.

    2007-12-01

    Remote sensing provides a unique ability to monitor natural hazards that impact vegetation hydrologically. Here, the use of a new multitemporal remote sensing technique that employs free, coarse multispectral remote sensing data is demonstrated in monitoring short- and long-term drought, fire occurrence and recovery, and damage to hurricane-related mangrove ecosystems and subsequent recovery of these systems. The new technique, relative spectral mixture analysis (RSMA), provides information about the nonphotosynthetic fraction (nonphotosynthetic vegetation plus litter) of ground cover in addition to the green vegetation fraction. In some cases, RSMA even provides an improved ability to monitor changes in the green fraction compared to traditional vegetation indices or standard remote sensing products. In arid and semiarid regions, the nonphotosynthetic fraction can vary on an annual basis significantly more than the green fraction and is thus perfectly suited for monitoring drought in these regions. Mortality of evergreen trees due to long-term drought also shows up strongly in the nonphotosynthetic fraction as green vegetation is replaced by dry needles and bare trunks. The response of the nonphotosynthetic fraction to fire is significantly different from that of drought because of the combustion of nonphotosynthetic material. Finally, damage to mangrove ecosystems from hurricane damage, and their subsequent recovery, is readily observable in both the green and nonphotosynthetic fractions as estimated by RSMA.

  18. Subproteomic analysis of basic proteins in aged skeletal muscle following offgel pre-fractionation.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Joan; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2012-04-01

    The progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass is a serious pathophysiological problem in the elderly, which warrants detailed biochemical studies into the underlying mechanism of age-related fiber degeneration. Over the last few years, mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has identified a considerable number of new biomarkers of muscle aging in humans and animal models of sarcopenia. However, interpretation of the proteomic findings is often complicated by technical and biological limitations. Although gel electrophoresis-based approaches represent a highly sensitive analytical way for the large-scale and high-throughput survey of global changes in skeletal muscle proteins during aging, often the presence of components with an isoelectric point in the basic range is underestimated. We, therefore, carried out a comparative subproteomic study of young versus aged rat muscle focusing on potential changes in muscle proteins with an alkaline isoelectric point, using a combination of offgel electrophoresis and two-dimensional (2D) slab gel electrophoresis. Offgel electrophoresis was successfully applied as a prefractionation step to enrich basic protein species from crude tissue extracts representing young adult versus senescent muscle specimens. Proteomics has demonstrated alterations in a small cohort of basic proteins during muscle aging. The mass spectrometric identification of altered proteins and immunoblotting revealed a decrease in the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and a concomitant increase in mitochondrial creatine kinase (CK) and ubiquinol cytochrome‑c reductase. This agrees with the idea of a glycolytic-to-oxidative shift during muscle aging, which is indicative of an overall fast-to-slow transition process in senescent rat muscle. Thus, alterations in the abundance of metabolic enzymes appear to play a central role in the molecular pathogenesis of age‑dependent muscle wasting. PMID:22267262

  19. Solid/solution Cu fractionations/speciation of a Cu contaminated soil after pilot-scale electrokinetic remediation and their relationships with soil microbial and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan-Ying; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Cang, Long; Li, Lian-Zhen; Wang, Peng

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed metal speciation/fractionations of a Cu contaminated soil before and after electrokinetic remediation as well as their relationships with the soil microbial and enzyme activities. Significant changes in the exchangeable and adsorbed-Cu fractionations occurred after electrokinetic treatment, while labile soil Cu in the solution had a tendency to decrease from the anode to the cathode, and the soil free Cu(2+) ions were mainly accumulated in the sections close to the cathode. The results of regression analyses revealed that both the soil Cu speciation in solution phase and the Cu fractionations in solid phase could play important roles in the changes of the soil microbial and enzyme activities. Our findings suggest that the bioavailability of soil heavy metals and their ecotoxicological effects on the soil biota before and after electroremediation can be better understood in terms of their chemical speciation and fractionations. PMID:19427727

  20. Bilateral photoplethysmography analysis for arteriovenous fistula dysfunction screening with fractional-order feature and cooperative game-based embedded detector

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-Xing; Wu, Ming-Jui; Li, Chien-Ming; Lim, Bee-Yen; Du, Yi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The bilateral photoplethysmography (PPG) analysis for arteriovenous fistula (AVF) dysfunction screening with a fractional-order feature and a cooperative game (CG)-based embedded detector is proposed. The proposed detector uses a feature extraction method and a CG to evaluate the risk level for AVF dysfunction for patients undergoing haemodialysis treatment. A Sprott system is used to design a self-synchronisation error formulation to quantify the differences in the changes of blood volume for the sinister and dexter thumbs’ PPG signals. Bilateral PPGs exhibit a significant difference in rise time and amplitude, which is proportional to the degree of stenosis. A less parameterised CG model is then used to evaluate the risk level. The proposed detector is also studied using an embedded system and bilateral optical measurements. The experimental results show that the risk of AVF stenosis during haemodialysis treatment is detected earlier. PMID:26609407

  1. (30)Si mole fraction of a silicon material highly enriched in (28)Si determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Giancarlo; Di Luzio, Marco; Mana, Giovanni; Oddone, Massimo; Pramann, Axel; Prata, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The latest determination of the Avogadro constant, carried out by counting the atoms in a pure silicon crystal highly enriched in (28)Si, reached the target 2 × 10(-8) relative uncertainty required for the redefinition of the kilogram based on the Planck constant. The knowledge of the isotopic composition of the enriched silicon material is central; it is measured by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. In this work, an independent estimate of the (30)Si mole fraction was obtained by applying a relative measurement protocol based on Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The amount of (30)Si isotope was determined by counting the 1266.1 keV γ-photons emitted during the radioactive decay of the radioisotope (31)Si produced via the neutron capture reaction (30)Si(n,γ)(31)Si. The x((30)Si) = 1.043(19) × 10(-6) mol mol(-1) is consistent with the value currently adopted by the International Avogadro Coordination.

  2. Bilateral photoplethysmography analysis for arteriovenous fistula dysfunction screening with fractional-order feature and cooperative game-based embedded detector.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Xing; Lin, Chia-Hung; Wu, Ming-Jui; Li, Chien-Ming; Lim, Bee-Yen; Du, Yi-Chun

    2015-06-01

    The bilateral photoplethysmography (PPG) analysis for arteriovenous fistula (AVF) dysfunction screening with a fractional-order feature and a cooperative game (CG)-based embedded detector is proposed. The proposed detector uses a feature extraction method and a CG to evaluate the risk level for AVF dysfunction for patients undergoing haemodialysis treatment. A Sprott system is used to design a self-synchronisation error formulation to quantify the differences in the changes of blood volume for the sinister and dexter thumbs' PPG signals. Bilateral PPGs exhibit a significant difference in rise time and amplitude, which is proportional to the degree of stenosis. A less parameterised CG model is then used to evaluate the risk level. The proposed detector is also studied using an embedded system and bilateral optical measurements. The experimental results show that the risk of AVF stenosis during haemodialysis treatment is detected earlier. PMID:26609407

  3. The nonlinear relationship between albedo and cloud fraction on near-global, monthly mean scale in observations and in the CMIP5 model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engström, A.; Bender, F. A.-M.; Charlson, R. J.; Wood, R.

    2015-11-01

    We study the relation between monthly mean albedo and cloud fraction over ocean, 60°S-60°N. Satellite observations indicate that these clouds all fall on the same near-exponential curve, with a monotonic distribution over the ranges of cloud fractions and albedo. Using these observational data as a reference, we examine the degree to which 26 climate models capture this feature of the near-global marine cloud population. Models show a general increase in albedo with increasing cloud fraction, but none of them display a relation that is as well defined as that characterizing the observations. Models typically display larger albedo variability at a given cloud fraction, larger sensitivity in albedo to changes in cloud fraction, and lower cloud fractions. Several models also show branched distributions, contrasting with the smooth observational relation. In the models the present-day cloud scenes are more reflective than the preindustrial, demonstrating the simulated impact of anthropogenic aerosols on planetary albedo.

  4. Thermophilic two-phase anaerobic digestion of source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste for bio-hythane production: effect of recirculation sludge on process stability and microbiology over a long-term pilot-scale experience.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, A; Zanetti, L; Micolucci, F; Cavinato, C

    2014-01-01

    A two-stage thermophilic anaerobic digestion process for the concurrent production of hydrogen and methane through the treatment of the source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste was carried out over a long-term pilot scale experience. Two continuously stirred tank reactors were operated for about 1 year. The results showed that stable production of bio-hythane without inoculum treatment could be obtained. The pH of the dark fermentation reactor was maintained in the optimal range for hydrogen-producing bacteria activity through sludge recirculation from a methanogenic reactor. An average specific bio-hythane production of 0.65 m(3) per kg of volatile solids fed was achieved when the recirculation flow was controlled through an evaporation unit in order to avoid inhibition problems for both microbial communities. Microbial analysis indicated that dominant bacterial species in the dark fermentation reactor are related to the Lactobacillus family, while the population of the methanogenic reactor was mainly composed of Defluviitoga tunisiensis. The archaeal community of the methanogenic reactor shifted, moving from Methanothermobacter-like to Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales, the latter found also in the dark fermentation reactor when a considerable methane production was detected.

  5. High pH reversed-phase chromatography with fraction concatenation for 2D proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Shen, Yufeng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-04-01

    Orthogonal high-resolution separations are critical for attaining improved analytical dynamic ranges of proteome measurements. Concatenated high pH reversed phase liquid chromatography affords better separations than the strong cation exchange conventionally applied for two-dimensional shotgun proteomic analysis. For example, concatenated high pH reversed phase liquid chromatography increased identification coverage for peptides (e.g., by 1.8-fold) and proteins (e.g., by 1.6-fold) in shotgun proteomics analyses of a digested human protein sample. Additional advantages of concatenated high pH RPLC include improved protein sequence coverage, simplified sample processing, and reduced sample losses, making this an attractive first dimension separation strategy for two-dimensional proteomics analyses.

  6. The theory of maximally and minimally even sets, the one- dimensional antiferromagnetic Ising model, and the continued fraction compromise of musical scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douthett, Elwood (Jack) Moser, Jr.

    1999-10-01

    Cyclic configurations of white and black sites, together with convex (concave) functions used to weight path length, are investigated. The weights of the white set and black set are the sums of the weights of the paths connecting the white sites and black sites, respectively, and the weight between sets is the sum of the weights of the paths that connect sites opposite in color. It is shown that when the weights of all configurations of a fixed number of white and a fixed number of black sites are compared, minimum (maximum) weight of a white set, minimum (maximum) weight of the a black set, and maximum (minimum) weight between sets occur simultaneously. Such configurations are called maximally even configurations. Similarly, the configurations whose weights are the opposite extremes occur simultaneously and are called minimally even configurations. Algorithms that generate these configurations are constructed and applied to the one- dimensional antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 Ising model. Next the goodness of continued fractions as applied to musical intervals (frequency ratios and their base 2 logarithms) is explored. It is shown that, for the intermediate convergents between two consecutive principal convergents of an irrational number, the first half of the intermediate convergents are poorer approximations than the preceding principal convergent while the second half are better approximations; the goodness of a middle intermediate convergent can only be determined by calculation. These convergents are used to determine what equal-tempered systems have intervals that most closely approximate the musical fifth (pn/ qn = log2(3/2)). The goodness of exponentiated convergents ( 2pn/qn~3/2 ) is also investigated. It is shown that, with the exception of a middle convergent, the goodness of the exponential form agrees with that of its logarithmic Counterpart As in the case of the logarithmic form, the goodness of a middle intermediate convergent in the exponential form can

  7. Spatial data analysis for exploration of regional scale geothermal resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Majid Kiavarz; Noorollahi, Younes; Samadzadegan, Farhad; Sharifi, Mohammad Ali; Itoi, Ryuichi

    2013-10-01

    Defining a comprehensive conceptual model of the resources sought is one of the most important steps in geothermal potential mapping. In this study, Fry analysis as a spatial distribution method and 5% well existence, distance distribution, weights of evidence (WofE), and evidential belief function (EBFs) methods as spatial association methods were applied comparatively to known geothermal occurrences, and to publicly-available regional-scale geoscience data in Akita and Iwate provinces within the Tohoku volcanic arc, in northern Japan. Fry analysis and rose diagrams revealed similar directional patterns of geothermal wells and volcanoes, NNW-, NNE-, NE-trending faults, hotsprings and fumaroles. Among the spatial association methods, WofE defined a conceptual model correspondent with the real world situations, approved with the aid of expert opinion. The results of the spatial association analyses quantitatively indicated that the known geothermal occurrences are strongly spatially-associated with geological features such as volcanoes, craters, NNW-, NNE-, NE-direction faults and geochemical features such as hotsprings, hydrothermal alteration zones and fumaroles. Geophysical data contains temperature gradients over 100 °C/km and heat flow over 100 mW/m2. In general, geochemical and geophysical data were better evidence layers than geological data for exploring geothermal resources. The spatial analyses of the case study area suggested that quantitative knowledge from hydrothermal geothermal resources was significantly useful for further exploration and for geothermal potential mapping in the case study region. The results can also be extended to the regions with nearly similar characteristics.

  8. A Unifying Review of Bioassay-Guided Fractionation, Effect-Directed Analysis and Related Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    The success of modern methods in analytical chemistry sometimes obscures the problem that the ever increasing amount of analytical data does not necessarily give more insight of practical relevance. As alternative approaches, toxicity- and bioactivity-based assays can deliver valuable information about biological effects of complex materials in humans, other species or even ecosystems. However, the observed effects often cannot be clearly assigned to specific chemical compounds. In these cases, the establishment of an unambiguous cause-effect relationship is not possible. Effect-directed analysis tries to interconnect instrumental analytical techniques with a biological/biochemical entity, which identifies or isolates substances of biological relevance. Successful application has been demonstrated in many fields, either as proof-of-principle studies or even for complex samples. This review discusses the different approaches, advantages and limitations and finally shows some practical examples. The broad emergence of effect-directed analytical concepts might lead to a true paradigm shift in analytical chemistry, away from ever growing lists of chemical compounds. The connection of biological effects with the identification and quantification of molecular entities leads to relevant answers to many real life questions. PMID:23012539

  9. Comparative Analysis of the Volatile Fraction of Fruit Juice from Different Citrus Species

    PubMed Central

    Alamar, M. Carmen; Gutiérrez, Abelardo; Granell, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The volatile composition of fruit from four Citrus varieties (Powell Navel orange, Clemenules mandarine, and Fortune mandarine and Chandler pummelo) covering four different species has been studied. Over one hundred compounds were profiled after HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis, including 27 esters, 23 aldehydes, 21 alcohols, 13 monoterpene hydrocarbons, 10 ketones, 5 sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, 4 monoterpene cyclic ethers, 4 furans, and 2 aromatic hydrocarbons, which were all confirmed with standards. The differences in the volatile profile among juices of these varieties were essentially quantitative and only a few compounds were found exclusively in a single variety, mainly in Chandler. The volatile profile however was able to differentiate all four varieties and revealed complex interactions between them including the participation in the same biosynthetic pathway. Some compounds (6 esters, 2 ketones, 1 furan and 2 aromatic hydrocarbons) had never been reported earlier in Citrus juices. This volatile profiling platform for Citrus juice by HS-SPME-GC-MS and the interrelationship detected among the volatiles can be used as a roadmap for future breeding or biotechnological applications. PMID:21818287

  10. Mapping wildfire susceptibility in Southern California using live and dead fractions of vegetation derived from Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis of MODIS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P.; Roberts, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Wildfire is a significant natural disturbance mechanism in Southern California. Assessing spatial patterns of wildfire susceptibility requires estimates of the live and dead fractions of vegetation. The Fire Potential Index (FPI), which is currently the only operationally computed fire susceptibility index incorporating remote sensing data, estimates such fractions using a relative greenness measure based on time series of vegetation index images. This contribution assesses the potential of Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) for deriving such fractions from single MODIS images without the need for a long remote sensing time series, and investigates the applicability of such MESMA-derived fractions for mapping dynamic fire susceptibility in Southern California. Endmembers for MESMA were selected from a library of reference endmembers using Constrained Reference Endmember Selection (CRES), which uses field estimates of fractions to guide the selection process. Fraction images of green vegetation, non-photosynthetic vegetation, soil, and shade were then computed for all available 16-day MODIS composites between 2000 and 2006 using MESMA. Initial results indicate that MESMA of MODIS imagery is capable of providing reliable estimates of live and dead vegetation fraction. Validation against in situ observations in the Santa Ynez Mountains near Santa Barbara, California, shows that the average fraction error for two tested species was around 10%. Further validation of MODIS-derived fractions was performed against fractions from high-resolution hyperspectral data. It was shown that the fractions derived from data of both sensors correlate with R2 values greater than 0.95. MESMA-derived live and dead vegetation fractions were subsequently tested as a substitute to relative greenness in the FPI algorithm. FPI was computed for every day between 2000 and 2006 using the derived fractions. Model performance was then tested by extracting FPI values for

  11. Age Differences on Alcoholic MMPI Scales: A Discriminant Analysis Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulstich, Michael E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory to 91 male alcoholics after detoxification. Results indicated that the Psychopathic Deviant and Paranoia scales declined with age, while the Responsibility scale increased with age. (JAC)

  12. In situ vitrification large-scale operational acceptance test analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Buelt, J.L.; Carter, J.G.

    1986-05-01

    A thermal treatment process is currently under study to provide possible enhancement of in-place stabilization of transuranic and chemically contaminated soil sites. The process is known as in situ vitrification (ISV). In situ vitrification is a remedial action process that destroys solid and liquid organic contaminants and incorporates radionuclides into a glass-like material that renders contaminants substantially less mobile and less likely to impact the environment. A large-scale operational acceptance test (LSOAT) was recently completed in which more than 180 t of vitrified soil were produced in each of three adjacent settings. The LSOAT demonstrated that the process conforms to the functional design criteria necessary for the large-scale radioactive test (LSRT) to be conducted following verification of the performance capabilities of the process. The energy requirements and vitrified block size, shape, and mass are sufficiently equivalent to those predicted by the ISV mathematical model to confirm its usefulness as a predictive tool. The LSOAT demonstrated an electrode replacement technique, which can be used if an electrode fails, and techniques have been identified to minimize air oxidation, thereby extending electrode life. A statistical analysis was employed during the LSOAT to identify graphite collars and an insulative surface as successful cold cap subsidence techniques. The LSOAT also showed that even under worst-case conditions, the off-gas system exceeds the flow requirements necessary to maintain a negative pressure on the hood covering the area being vitrified. The retention of simulated radionuclides and chemicals in the soil and off-gas system exceeds requirements so that projected emissions are one to two orders of magnitude below the maximum permissible concentrations of contaminants at the stack.

  13. Secondary Analysis of Large-Scale Assessment Data: An Alternative to Variable-Centred Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Kui Foon; Kennedy, Kerry John

    2014-01-01

    International large-scale assessments are now part of the educational landscape in many countries and often feed into major policy decisions. Yet, such assessments also provide data sets for secondary analysis that can address key issues of concern to educators and policymakers alike. Traditionally, such secondary analyses have been based on a…

  14. Large-scale dimension densities for heart rate variability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Corinna; Wessel, Niels; Schirdewan, Alexander; Kurths, Jürgen

    2006-04-01

    In this work, we reanalyze the heart rate variability (HRV) data from the 2002 Computers in Cardiology (CiC) Challenge using the concept of large-scale dimension densities and additionally apply this technique to data of healthy persons and of patients with cardiac diseases. The large-scale dimension density (LASDID) is estimated from the time series using a normalized Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm, which leads to a suitable correction of systematic errors produced by boundary effects in the rather large scales of a system. This way, it is possible to analyze rather short, nonstationary, and unfiltered data, such as HRV. Moreover, this method allows us to analyze short parts of the data and to look for differences between day and night. The circadian changes in the dimension density enable us to distinguish almost completely between real data and computer-generated data from the CiC 2002 challenge using only one parameter. In the second part we analyzed the data of 15 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), 15 patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), 15 elderly healthy subjects (EH), as well as 18 young and healthy persons (YH). With our method we are able to separate completely the AF (ρlsμ=0.97±0.02) group from the others and, especially during daytime, the CHF patients show significant differences from the young and elderly healthy volunteers (CHF, 0.65±0.13 ; EH, 0.54±0.05 ; YH, 0.57±0.05 ; p<0.05 for both comparisons). Moreover, for the CHF patients we find no circadian changes in ρlsμ (day, 0.65±0.13 ; night, 0.66±0.12 ; n.s.) in contrast to healthy controls (day, 0.54±0.05 ; night, 0.61±0.05 ; p=0.002 ). Correlation analysis showed no statistical significant relation between standard HRV and circadian LASDID, demonstrating a possibly independent application of our method for clinical risk stratification.

  15. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Educators' Attitudes toward Educational Research Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Mehmet Ali

    2011-01-01

    This article reports results of a confirmatory factor analysis performed to cross-validate the factor structure of the Educators' Attitudes Toward Educational Research Scale. The original scale had been developed by the author and revised based on the results of an exploratory factor analysis. In the present study, the revised scale was given to…

  16. Measuring Mathematics Anxiety: Psychometric Analysis of a Bidimensional Affective Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Haiyan; Wang, LihShing; Pan, Wei; Frey, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a theoretically and methodologically sound bidimensional affective scale measuring mathematics anxiety with high psychometric quality. The psychometric properties of a 14-item Mathematics Anxiety Scale-Revised (MAS-R) adapted from Betz's (1978) 10-item Mathematics Anxiety Scale were empirically analyzed on a…

  17. Revision and Factor Analysis of a Death Anxiety Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, James A.; Powell, F. C.

    Earlier research on death anxiety using the 34-item scale developed by Nehrke-Templer-Boyar (NTB) indicated that females and younger persons have significantly higher death anxiety. To simplify a death anxiety scale for use with different age groups, and to determine the conceptual factors actually measured by the scale, a revised 25-item…

  18. Comparative analysis of prolamin and glutelin fractions from wheat, rye, and barley with five sandwich ELISA test kits.

    PubMed

    Lexhaller, Barbara; Tompos, Christine; Scherf, Katharina Anne

    2016-09-01

    The safety of gluten-free foods is essential for celiac disease (CD) patients to prevent serious complications. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) are recommended for gluten analysis to monitor the compliance of gluten-free products to the Codex threshold of 20 mg gluten/kg. However, due to the specific features of each gluten ELISA test kit, the results often deviate systematically and largely depend on the characteristics of the antibody. This comprehensive study assessed the specificities and sensitivities of three monoclonal (R5, G12, and Skerritt) and two polyclonal antibodies to the alcohol-soluble prolamin and alcohol-insoluble glutelin fractions of gluten from wheat, rye, and barley, all of which harbor CD-active epitopes. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography served as independent reference method to quantify gluten protein concentrations and allow comparisons of different gluten fractions within one kit and between kits. Wheat prolamins were detected quite accurately by all antibodies, but high variability between antibody specificities and sensitivities was observed for rye and barley prolamins and rye glutelins, and the largest discrepancies were found for wheat and barley glutelins. The gluten content (sum of prolamins and glutelins) was either overestimated up to six times (rye) or underestimated up to seven times (barley). Overestimation of gluten contents may unnecessarily limit the availability of gluten-free products, but underestimation represents a serious health risk for CD patients. It is important to consider these differences between antibodies used in kits and consider what each kit is capable of measuring, especially with samples where the source of gluten is unknown.

  19. Comparative analysis of prolamin and glutelin fractions from wheat, rye, and barley with five sandwich ELISA test kits.

    PubMed

    Lexhaller, Barbara; Tompos, Christine; Scherf, Katharina Anne

    2016-09-01

    The safety of gluten-free foods is essential for celiac disease (CD) patients to prevent serious complications. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) are recommended for gluten analysis to monitor the compliance of gluten-free products to the Codex threshold of 20 mg gluten/kg. However, due to the specific features of each gluten ELISA test kit, the results often deviate systematically and largely depend on the characteristics of the antibody. This comprehensive study assessed the specificities and sensitivities of three monoclonal (R5, G12, and Skerritt) and two polyclonal antibodies to the alcohol-soluble prolamin and alcohol-insoluble glutelin fractions of gluten from wheat, rye, and barley, all of which harbor CD-active epitopes. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography served as independent reference method to quantify gluten protein concentrations and allow comparisons of different gluten fractions within one kit and between kits. Wheat prolamins were detected quite accurately by all antibodies, but high variability between antibody specificities and sensitivities was observed for rye and barley prolamins and rye glutelins, and the largest discrepancies were found for wheat and barley glutelins. The gluten content (sum of prolamins and glutelins) was either overestimated up to six times (rye) or underestimated up to seven times (barley). Overestimation of gluten contents may unnecessarily limit the availability of gluten-free products, but underestimation represents a serious health risk for CD patients. It is important to consider these differences between antibodies used in kits and consider what each kit is capable of measuring, especially with samples where the source of gluten is unknown. PMID:27342795

  20. α-Glucosidase inhibition and antioxidant activity of an oenological commercial tannin. Extraction, fractionation and analysis by HPLC/ESI-MS/MS and (1)H NMR.

    PubMed

    Muccilli, Vera; Cardullo, Nunzio; Spatafora, Carmela; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Tringali, Corrado

    2017-01-15

    Two batches of the oenological tannin Tan'Activ R, (toasted oak wood - Quercus robur), were extracted with ethanol. A fractionation on XAD-16 afforded four fractions for each extract. Extracts and fractions were evaluated for antioxidant activity (DPPH), polyphenol content (GAE) and yeast α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Comparable results were obtained for both columns, fractions X1B and X2B showing the highest antioxidant activity. Fractions X1C and X2C notably inhibited α-glucosidase, with IC50=9.89 and 8.05μg/mL, respectively. Fractions were subjected to HPLC/ESI-MS/MS and (1)H NMR analysis. The main phenolic constituents of both X1B and X2B were a monogalloylglucose isomer (1), a HHDP-glucose isomer (2), castalin (3) gallic acid (4), vescalagin (5), and grandinin (or its isomer roburin E, 6). X1C and X2C showed a complex composition, including non-phenolic constituents. Fractionation of X2C gave a subfraction, with enhanced α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50=6.15μg/mL), with castalagin (7) as the main constituent. PMID:27542449

  1. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  2. Positive fractional linear electrical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczorek, Tadeusz

    2013-10-01

    The positive fractional linear systems and electrical circuits are addressed. New classes of fractional asymptotically stable and unstable electrical circuits are introduced. The Caputo and Riemann-Liouville definitions of fractional derivatives are used to analysis of the positive electrical circuits composed of resistors, capacitors, coils and voltage (current) sources. The positive fractional electrical and specially unstable different types electrical circuits are analyzed. Some open problems are formulated.

  3. Dynamic analysis with a fractional-order chaotic system for estimation of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chien-Ming; Du, Yi-Chun; Wu, Jian-Xing; Lin, Chia-Hung; Ho, Yueh-Ren; Chen, Tainsong

    2013-08-01

    Lower-extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by narrowing or occlusion of vessels in patients like type 2 diabetes mellitus, the elderly and smokers. Patients with PAD are mostly asymptomatic; typical early symptoms of this limb-threatening disorder are intermittent claudication and leg pain, suggesting the necessity for accurate diagnosis by invasive angiography and ankle-brachial pressure index. This index acts as a gold standard reference for PAD diagnosis and categorizes its severity into normal, low-grade and high-grade, with respective cut-off points of ≥0.9, 0.9-0.5 and <0.5. PAD can be assessed using photoplethysmography as a diagnostic screening tool, displaying changes in pulse transit time and shape, and dissimilarities of these changes between lower limbs. The present report proposed photoplethysmogram with fractional-order chaotic system to assess PAD in 14 diabetics and 11 healthy adults, with analysis of dynamic errors based on various butterfly motion patterns, and color relational analysis as classifier for pattern recognition. The results show that the classification of PAD severity among these testees was achieved with high accuracy and efficiency. This noninvasive methodology potentially provides timing and accessible feedback to patients with asymptomatic PAD and their physicians for further invasive diagnosis or strict management of risk factors to intervene in the disease progression.

  4. Source analysis of heavy metals and arsenic in organic fractions of municipal solid waste in a mega-city (Shanghai).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2008-03-01

    Heavy metals and arsenic contamination in municipal solid waste (MSW) and its treatment products has garnered increasing attention. This study investigated the heavy metals and arsenic flows in organic fractions of MSW (OFMSW) in Shanghai, China, through a one-year monitoring program. The OFMSW separated directly from the source (source-separated, pure organic waste), obtained from the treatment facilities were sampled and compared with pure foodstuffs. The heavy metals and arsenic contents in the source-separated OFMSW resembled those in foodstuffs, whereas the OFMSW from the treatment facilities was significantly contaminated with heavy metals and arsenic and failed to meet the government standards for land use. Using flow analysis, > 80% of heavy metals and arsenic were from extrinsic inorganic waste with high ash content that was combined with OFMSW during MSW collection, transfer, transportation, and storage stages. Based on source analysis of heavy metals and arsenic, suggestions for reducing heavy metals and arsenic contents in the current MSW management system in Shanghai are presented.

  5. Differentiation of roasted and soluble coffees through physical fractionation of selected essential and nonessential metals in their brews and exploratory data analysis.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Pawel; Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna; Stelmach, Ewelina; Welna, Maja

    2016-11-01

    An analytical scheme for physical fractionation of Al, Ba, Ca, Co, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Sr and Zn in ground roasted and soluble coffees brews was proposed. It was based on ultrafiltration through five ultrafiltration membranes having molecular weight cut-offs of 5, 10, 30, 50 and 100kDa. The highest ">100kDa" and the lowest "<5kDa" molecular weight fractions were established to differentiate the studied coffees brews the most. Al, Cu, Fe and Ni were mostly associated with the ">100kDa" fraction, while Co, K, Mg and Na - with the "<5kDa" fraction. For Ba, Ca, Mn, Sr and Zn, ">100kDa" and "<5kDa" fractions contributions were equally accounted. The physical fractionation pattern of selected metals was convenient for discovering important features of brews of both coffee types and differences between them by principal component analysis and then classifying them by linear discriminant analysis. PMID:27591664

  6. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  7. The Effect of Data Scaling on Dual Prices and Sensitivity Analysis in Linear Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlakha, V. G.; Vemuganti, R. R.

    2007-01-01

    In many practical situations scaling the data is necessary to solve linear programs. This note explores the relationships in translating the sensitivity analysis between the original and the scaled problems.

  8. Large-Scale Candidate Gene Analysis of HDL Particle Features

    PubMed Central

    Kaess, Bernhard M.; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Braund, Peter S.; Stark, Klaus; Rafelt, Suzanne; Fischer, Marcus; Hardwick, Robert; Nelson, Christopher P.; Debiec, Radoslaw; Huber, Fritz; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert; Rose, Lynda M.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Hopewell, Jemma; Clarke, Robert; Burton, Paul R.; Tobin, Martin D.

    2011-01-01

    Background HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) is an established marker of cardiovascular risk with significant genetic determination. However, HDL particles are not homogenous, and refined HDL phenotyping may improve insight into regulation of HDL metabolism. We therefore assessed HDL particles by NMR spectroscopy and conducted a large-scale candidate gene association analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured plasma HDL-C and determined mean HDL particle size and particle number by NMR spectroscopy in 2024 individuals from 512 British Caucasian families. Genotypes were 49,094 SNPs in >2,100 cardiometabolic candidate genes/loci as represented on the HumanCVD BeadChip version 2. False discovery rates (FDR) were calculated to account for multiple testing. Analyses on classical HDL-C revealed significant associations (FDR<0.05) only for CETP (cholesteryl ester transfer protein; lead SNP rs3764261: p = 5.6*10−15) and SGCD (sarcoglycan delta; rs6877118: p = 8.6*10−6). In contrast, analysis with HDL mean particle size yielded additional associations in LIPC (hepatic lipase; rs261332: p = 6.1*10−9), PLTP (phospholipid transfer protein, rs4810479: p = 1.7*10−8) and FBLN5 (fibulin-5; rs2246416: p = 6.2*10−6). The associations of SGCD and Fibulin-5 with HDL particle size could not be replicated in PROCARDIS (n = 3,078) and/or the Women's Genome Health Study (n = 23,170). Conclusions We show that refined HDL phenotyping by NMR spectroscopy can detect known genes of HDL metabolism better than analyses on HDL-C. PMID:21283740

  9. Scale up of a viscous fungal fermentation: application of scale-up criteria with regime analysis and operating boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Pollard, D J; Kirschner, T F; Hunt, G R; Tong, I-T; Stieber, R; Salmon, P M

    2007-02-01

    The scale up of the novel, pharmaceutically important pneumocandin (B(0)), from the filamentous fungus Glarea lozoyensis was successfully completed from pilot scale (0.07, 0.8, and 19 m(3)) to production scale (57 m(3)). This was accomplished, despite dissimilar reactor geometry, employing a combination of scale-up criteria, process sensitivity studies, and regime analysis using characteristic time constants for both oxygen mass transfer and bulk mixing. Dissolved oxygen tension, separated from the influence of agitation by gas blending at the 0.07 m(3)-scale, had a marked influence on the concentrations of pneumocandin analogs with different levels of hydroxylation, and these concentrations were used as an indicator of bulk mixing upon scale up. The profound impact of dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) (low and high levels) on analog formation dictated the use of constant DOT, at 80% air saturation, as a scale-up criterion. As a result k(L)a, Oxygen uptake rate (OUR) and hence the OTR were held constant, which were effectively conserved across the scales, while the use of other criterion such as P(g)/V(L), or mixing time were less effective. Production scale (57 m(3)) mixing times were found to be faster than those at 19 m(3) due to a difference in liquid height/tank diameter ratio (H(L)/D(T)). Regime analysis at 19 and 57 m(3) for bulk mixing (t(c)) and oxygen transfer (1/k(L)a) showed that oxygen transfer was the rate-limiting step for this highly shear thinning fermentation, providing additional support for the choice of scale-up criterion.

  10. MicroScale Thermophoresis: Interaction analysis and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; André, Timon; Wanner, Randy; Roth, Heide Marie; Duhr, Stefan; Baaske, Philipp; Breitsprecher, Dennis

    2014-12-01

    MicroScale Thermophoresis (MST) is a powerful technique to quantify biomolecular interactions. It is based on thermophoresis, the directed movement of molecules in a temperature gradient, which strongly depends on a variety of molecular properties such as size, charge, hydration shell or conformation. Thus, this technique is highly sensitive to virtually any change in molecular properties, allowing for a precise quantification of molecular events independent of the size or nature of the investigated specimen. During a MST experiment, a temperature gradient is induced by an infrared laser. The directed movement of molecules through the temperature gradient is detected and quantified using either covalently attached or intrinsic fluorophores. By combining the precision of fluorescence detection with the variability and sensitivity of thermophoresis, MST provides a flexible, robust and fast way to dissect molecular interactions. In this review, we present recent progress and developments in MST technology and focus on MST applications beyond standard biomolecular interaction studies. By using different model systems, we introduce alternative MST applications - such as determination of binding stoichiometries and binding modes, analysis of protein unfolding, thermodynamics and enzyme kinetics. In addition, wedemonstrate the capability of MST to quantify high-affinity interactions with dissociation constants (Kds) in the low picomolar (pM) range as well as protein-protein interactions in pure mammalian cell lysates.

  11. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine.

  12. MIXREGLS: A Program for Mixed-Effects Location Scale Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hedeker, Donald; Nordgren, Rachel

    2013-03-01

    MIXREGLS is a program which provides estimates for a mixed-effects location scale model assuming a (conditionally) normally-distributed dependent variable. This model can be used for analysis of data in which subjects may be measured at many observations and interest is in modeling the mean and variance structure. In terms of the variance structure, covariates can by specified to have effects on both the between-subject and within-subject variances. Another use is for clustered data in which subjects are nested within clusters (e.g., clinics, hospitals, schools, etc.) and interest is in modeling the between-cluster and within-cluster variances in terms of covariates. MIXREGLS was written in Fortran and uses maximum likelihood estimation, utilizing both the EM algorithm and a Newton-Raphson solution. Estimation of the random effects is accomplished using empirical Bayes methods. Examples illustrating stand-alone usage and features of MIXREGLS are provided, as well as use via the SAS and R software packages. PMID:23761062

  13. MIXREGLS: A Program for Mixed-Effects Location Scale Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hedeker, Donald; Nordgren, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    MIXREGLS is a program which provides estimates for a mixed-effects location scale model assuming a (conditionally) normally-distributed dependent variable. This model can be used for analysis of data in which subjects may be measured at many observations and interest is in modeling the mean and variance structure. In terms of the variance structure, covariates can by specified to have effects on both the between-subject and within-subject variances. Another use is for clustered data in which subjects are nested within clusters (e.g., clinics, hospitals, schools, etc.) and interest is in modeling the between-cluster and within-cluster variances in terms of covariates. MIXREGLS was written in Fortran and uses maximum likelihood estimation, utilizing both the EM algorithm and a Newton-Raphson solution. Estimation of the random effects is accomplished using empirical Bayes methods. Examples illustrating stand-alone usage and features of MIXREGLS are provided, as well as use via the SAS and R software packages. PMID:23761062

  14. Numerical Simulation and Scaling Analysis of Cell Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Rui; He, Ping

    2011-11-01

    Cell printing, i.e., printing three dimensional (3D) structures of cells held in a tissue matrix, is gaining significant attention in the biomedical community. The key idea is to use inkjet printer or similar devices to print cells into 3D patterns with a resolution comparable to the size of mammalian cells. Achieving such a resolution in vitro can lead to breakthroughs in areas such as organ transplantation. Although the feasibility of cell printing has been demonstrated recently, the printing resolution and cell viability remain to be improved. Here we investigate a unit operation in cell printing, namely, the impact of a cell-laden droplet into a pool of highly viscous liquids. The droplet and cell dynamics are quantified using both direct numerical simulation and scaling analysis. These studies indicate that although cell experienced significant stress during droplet impact, the duration of such stress is very short, which helps explain why many cells can survive the cell printing process. These studies also revealed that cell membrane can be temporarily ruptured during cell printing, which is supported by indirect experimental evidence.

  15. Quantitative analysis and reduction of the eco-toxicity risk of heavy metals for the fine fraction of automobile shredder residue (ASR) using H2O2.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jiwan; Yang, Jae-Kyu; Chang, Yoon-Young

    2016-02-01

    Automobile shredder residue (ASR) fraction (size <0.25mm) can be considered as hazardous due to presence of high concentrations of heavy metals. Hydrogen peroxide combined with nitric acid has been used for the recovery of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Ni, Pb, Cd and Cr) from the fine fraction of ASR. A sequential extraction procedure has also been used to determine the heavy metal speciation in the fine fraction of ASR before and after treatment. A risk analysis of the fine fraction of ASR before and after treatment was conducted to assess the bioavailability and eco-toxicity of heavy metals. These results showed that the recovery of heavy metals from ASR increased with an increase in the hydrogen peroxide concentration. A high concentration of heavy metals was found to be present in Cbio fractions (the sum of the exchangeable and carbonate fractions) in the fine fraction of ASR, indicating high toxicity risk. The Cbio rate of all selected heavy metals was found to range from 8.6% to 33.4% of the total metal content in the fine fraction of ASR. After treatment, Cbio was reduced to 0.3-3.3% of total metal upon a treatment with 2.0% hydrogen peroxide. On the basis of the risk assessment code (RAC), the environmental risk values for heavy metals in the fine fraction of ASR reflect high risk/medium risk. However, after treatment, the heavy metals would be categorized as low risk/no risk. The present study concludes that hydrogen peroxide combined with nitric acid is a promising treatment for the recovery and reduction of the eco-toxicity risk of heavy metals in ASR.

  16. Scaling Analysis of Ocean Surface Turbulent Heterogeneities from Satellite Remote Sensing: Use of 2D Structure Functions.

    PubMed

    Renosh, P R; Schmitt, Francois G; Loisel, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing observations allow the ocean surface to be sampled synoptically over large spatio-temporal scales. The images provided from visible and thermal infrared satellite observations are widely used in physical, biological, and ecological oceanography. The present work proposes a method to understand the multi-scaling properties of satellite products such as the Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and the Sea Surface Temperature (SST), rarely studied. The specific objectives of this study are to show how the small scale heterogeneities of satellite images can be characterised using tools borrowed from the fields of turbulence. For that purpose, we show how the structure function, which is classically used in the frame of scaling time series analysis, can be used also in 2D. The main advantage of this method is that it can be applied to process images which have missing data. Based on both simulated and real images, we demonstrate that coarse-graining (CG) of a gradient modulus transform of the original image does not provide correct scaling exponents. We show, using a fractional Brownian simulation in 2D, that the structure function (SF) can be used with randomly sampled couple of points, and verify that 1 million of couple of points provides enough statistics.

  17. Scaling Analysis of Ocean Surface Turbulent Heterogeneities from Satellite Remote Sensing: Use of 2D Structure Functions

    PubMed Central

    Renosh, P. R.; Schmitt, Francois G.; Loisel, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing observations allow the ocean surface to be sampled synoptically over large spatio-temporal scales. The images provided from visible and thermal infrared satellite observations are widely used in physical, biological, and ecological oceanography. The present work proposes a method to understand the multi-scaling properties of satellite products such as the Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and the Sea Surface Temperature (SST), rarely studied. The specific objectives of this study are to show how the small scale heterogeneities of satellite images can be characterised using tools borrowed from the fields of turbulence. For that purpose, we show how the structure function, which is classically used in the frame of scaling time series analysis, can be used also in 2D. The main advantage of this method is that it can be applied to process images which have missing data. Based on both simulated and real images, we demonstrate that coarse-graining (CG) of a gradient modulus transform of the original image does not provide correct scaling exponents. We show, using a fractional Brownian simulation in 2D, that the structure function (SF) can be used with randomly sampled couple of points, and verify that 1 million of couple of points provides enough statistics. PMID:26017551

  18. Conventional and enantioselective gas chromatography with microfabricated planar columns for analysis of real-world samples of plant volatile fraction.

    PubMed

    Cagliero, C; Galli, S; Galli, M; Elmi, I; Belluce, M; Zampolli, S; Sgorbini, B; Rubiolo, P; Bicchi, C

    2016-01-15

    Within a project exploring the application of lab-on-chip GC to in-field analysis of the plant volatile fraction, this study evaluated the performance of a set of planar columns (also known as microchannels, MEMS columns, or microfabricated columns) of different dimensions installed in a conventional GC unit. Circular double-spiral-shaped-channel planar columns with different square/rectangular sections up to 2m long were applied to the analysis of both essential oils and headspace samples of a group of medicinal and aromatic plants (chamomile, peppermint, sage, rosemary, lavender and bergamot) and of standard mixtures of related compounds; the results were compared to those obtained with reference narrow-bore columns (l:5m, dc:0.1mm, df:0.1 μm). The above essential oils and headspaces were first analyzed quali-and quantitatively with planar columns statically coated with conventional stationary phases (5%-phenyl-polymethylsiloxane and auto-bondable nitroterephthalic-acid-modified polyethylene glycol), and then submitted to chiral recognition of their diagnostic markers, by enantioselective GC with a planar columns coated with a cyclodextrin derivative (30% 6(I-VII)-O-TBDMS-3(I-VII)-O-ethyl-2(I-VII)-O-ethyl-β-cyclodextrin in PS-086). Column characteristics and analysis conditions were first optimized to obtain suitable retention and efficiency for the samples investigated. The planar columns tested showed performances close to the reference conventional narrow-bore columns, with theoretical plate numbers per meter (N/m) ranging from 6100 to 7200 for those coated with the conventional stationary phases, and above 5600 for those with the chiral selector. PMID:26733393

  19. Spectral transfer function analysis of respiratory hemodynamic fluctuations predicts end-diastolic stiffness in preserved ejection fraction heart failure.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Mahmoud; Leite, Sara; Alaa, Mohamed; Oliveira-Pinto, José; Tavares-Silva, Marta; Fontoura, Dulce; Falcão-Pires, Inês; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Lourenço, André P

    2016-01-01

    Preserved ejection fraction heart failure (HFpEF) diagnosis remains controversial, and invasive left ventricular (LV) hemodynamic evaluation and/or exercise testing is advocated by many. The stiffer HFpEF myocardium may show impaired stroke volume (SV) variation induced by fluctuating LV filling pressure during ventilation. Our aim was to investigate spectral transfer function (STF) gain from end-diastolic pressure (EDP) to indexed SV (SVi) in experimental HFpEF. Eighteen-week-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and ZSF1 lean (ZSF1 Ln) and obese rats (ZSF1 Ob) randomly underwent LV open-chest (OC, n = 8 each group) or closed-chest hemodynamic evaluation (CC, n = 6 each group) under halogenate anesthesia and positive-pressure ventilation at constant inspiratory pressure. Beat-to-beat fluctuations in hemodynamic parameters during ventilation were assessed by STF. End-diastolic stiffness (βi) and end-systolic elastance (Eesi) for indexed volumes were obtained by inferior vena cava occlusion in OC (multibeat) or single-beat method estimates in CC. ZSF1 Ob showed higher EDP spectrum (P < 0.001), higher STF gain between end-diastolic volume and EDP, and impaired STF gain between EDP and SVi compared with both hypertensive ZSF1 Ln and normotensive WKY controls (P < 0.001). Likewise βi was only higher in ZSF1 Ob while Eesi was raised in both ZSF1 groups. On multivariate analysis βi and not Eesi correlated with impaired STF gain from EDP to SVi (P < 0.001), and receiver-operating characteristics analysis showed an area under curve of 0.89 for higher βi prediction (P < 0.001). Results support further clinical testing of STF analysis from right heart catheterization-derived EDP surrogates to noninvasively determined SV as screening/diagnostic tool to assess myocardial stiffness in HFpEF.

  20. Scale invariance analysis for genetic networks applying homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Bernuau, Emmanuel; Efimov, Denis; Perruquetti, Wilfrid

    2016-05-01

    Scalability is a property describing the change of the trajectory of a dynamical system under a scaling of the input stimulus and of the initial conditions. Particular cases of scalability include the scale invariance and fold change detection (when the scaling of the input does not influence the system output). In the present paper it is shown that homogeneous systems have this scalability property while locally homogeneous systems approximately possess this property. These facts are used for detecting scale invariance or approximate scalability (far from a steady state) in several biological systems. The results are illustrated by various regulatory networks. PMID:26304616

  1. Analysis, scale modeling, and full-scale test of a railcar and spent-nuclear-fuel shipping cask in a high-velocity impact against a rigid barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, M.

    1981-06-01

    This report describes the mathematical analysis, the physical scale modeling, and a full-scale crash test of a railcar spent-nuclear-fuel shipping system. The mathematical analysis utilized a lumped-parameter model to predict the structural response of the railcar and the shipping cask. The physical scale modeling analysis consisted of two crash tests that used 1/8-scale models to assess railcar and shipping cask damage. The full-scale crash test, conducted with retired railcar equipment, was carefully monitored with onboard instrumentation and high-speed photography. Results of the mathematical and scale modeling analyses are compared with the full-scale test. 29 figures.

  2. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  3. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  4. Fractional telegrapher's equation from fractional persistent random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoliver, Jaume

    2016-05-01

    We generalize the telegrapher's equation to allow for anomalous transport. We derive the space-time fractional telegrapher's equation using the formalism of the persistent random walk in continuous time. We also obtain the characteristic function of the space-time fractional process and study some particular cases and asymptotic approximations. Similarly to the ordinary telegrapher's equation, the time-fractional equation also presents distinct behaviors for different time scales. Specifically, transitions between different subdiffusive regimes or from superdiffusion to subdiffusion are shown by the fractional equation as time progresses.

  5. Fractional telegrapher's equation from fractional persistent random walks.

    PubMed

    Masoliver, Jaume

    2016-05-01

    We generalize the telegrapher's equation to allow for anomalous transport. We derive the space-time fractional telegrapher's equation using the formalism of the persistent random walk in continuous time. We also obtain the characteristic function of the space-time fractional process and study some particular cases and asymptotic approximations. Similarly to the ordinary telegrapher's equation, the time-fractional equation also presents distinct behaviors for different time scales. Specifically, transitions between different subdiffusive regimes or from superdiffusion to subdiffusion are shown by the fractional equation as time progresses. PMID:27300830

  6. Reliability and Validity Analysis of the Multiple Intelligence Perception Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yesil, Rustu; Korkmaz, Ozgen

    2010-01-01

    This study mainly aims to develop a scale to determine individual intelligence profiles based on self-perceptions. The study group consists of 925 students studying in various departments of the Faculty of Education at Ahi Evran University. A logical and statistical approach was adopted in scale development. Expert opinion was obtained for the…

  7. Analysis of Hydrogen Depletion Using a Scaled Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, T.K.; Malliakos, A.

    1998-10-28

    Hydrogen depletion tests of a scaled passive autocatalytic recombine (pAR) were performed in the Surtsey test vessel at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The experiments were used to determine the hydrogen depletion rate of a PAR in the presence of steam and also to evaluate the effect of scale (number of cartridges) on the PAR performance at both low and high hydrogen concentrations.

  8. A Comparative Review of Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis of Large-Scale Systems - II: Statistical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Cacuci, Dan G.; Ionescu-Bujor, Mihaela

    2004-07-15

    Part II of this review paper highlights the salient features of the most popular statistical methods currently used for local and global sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of both large-scale computational models and indirect experimental measurements. These statistical procedures represent sampling-based methods (random sampling, stratified importance sampling, and Latin Hypercube sampling), first- and second-order reliability algorithms (FORM and SORM, respectively), variance-based methods (correlation ratio-based methods, the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test, and the Sobol Method), and screening design methods (classical one-at-a-time experiments, global one-at-a-time design methods, systematic fractional replicate designs, and sequential bifurcation designs). It is emphasized that all statistical uncertainty and sensitivity analysis procedures first commence with the 'uncertainty analysis' stage and only subsequently proceed to the 'sensitivity analysis' stage; this path is the exact reverse of the conceptual path underlying the methods of deterministic sensitivity and uncertainty analysis where the sensitivities are determined prior to using them for uncertainty analysis. By comparison to deterministic methods, statistical methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are relatively easier to develop and use but cannot yield exact values of the local sensitivities. Furthermore, current statistical methods have two major inherent drawbacks as follows: 1. Since many thousands of simulations are needed to obtain reliable results, statistical methods are at best expensive (for small systems) or, at worst, impracticable (e.g., for large time-dependent systems).2. Since the response sensitivities and parameter uncertainties are inherently and inseparably amalgamated in the results produced by these methods, improvements in parameter uncertainties cannot be directly propagated to improve response uncertainties; rather, the entire set of simulations and

  9. Impact and fracture analysis of fish scales from Arapaima gigas.

    PubMed

    Torres, F G; Malásquez, M; Troncoso, O P

    2015-06-01

    Fish scales from the Amazonian fish Arapaima gigas have been characterised to study their impact and fracture behaviour at three different environmental conditions. Scales were cut in two different directions to analyse the influence of the orientation of collagen layers. The energy absorbed during impact tests was measured for each sample and SEM images were taken after each test in order to analyse the failure mechanisms. The results showed that scales tested at cryogenic temperatures display fragile behaviour, while scales tested at room temperature did not fracture. Different failure mechanisms have been identified, analysed and compared with the failure modes that occur in bone. The impact energy obtained for fish scales was two to three times higher than the values reported for bone in the literature. PMID:25842120

  10. Impact and fracture analysis of fish scales from Arapaima gigas.

    PubMed

    Torres, F G; Malásquez, M; Troncoso, O P

    2015-06-01

    Fish scales from the Amazonian fish Arapaima gigas have been characterised to study their impact and fracture behaviour at three different environmental conditions. Scales were cut in two different directions to analyse the influence of the orientation of collagen layers. The energy absorbed during impact tests was measured for each sample and SEM images were taken after each test in order to analyse the failure mechanisms. The results showed that scales tested at cryogenic temperatures display fragile behaviour, while scales tested at room temperature did not fracture. Different failure mechanisms have been identified, analysed and compared with the failure modes that occur in bone. The impact energy obtained for fish scales was two to three times higher than the values reported for bone in the literature.

  11. GAS MIXING ANALYSIS IN A LARGE-SCALED SALTSTONE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S

    2008-05-28

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to estimate the flow patterns mainly driven by temperature gradients inside vapor space in a large-scaled Saltstone vault facility at Savannah River site (SRS). The purpose of this work is to examine the gas motions inside the vapor space under the current vault configurations by taking a three-dimensional transient momentum-energy coupled approach for the vapor space domain of the vault. The modeling calculations were based on prototypic vault geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Solidification Engineering. The modeling analysis was focused on the air flow patterns near the ventilated corner zones of the vapor space inside the Saltstone vault. The turbulence behavior and natural convection mechanism used in the present model were benchmarked against the literature information and theoretical results. The verified model was applied to the Saltstone vault geometry for the transient assessment of the air flow patterns inside the vapor space of the vault region using the potential operating conditions. The baseline model considered two cases for the estimations of the flow patterns within the vapor space. One is the reference nominal case. The other is for the negative temperature gradient between the roof inner and top grout surface temperatures intended for the potential bounding condition. The flow patterns of the vapor space calculated by the CFD model demonstrate that the ambient air comes into the vapor space of the vault through the lower-end ventilation hole, and it gets heated up by the Benard-cell type circulation before leaving the vault via the higher-end ventilation hole. The calculated results are consistent with the literature information. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  12. Lie Symmetry Analysis, Conservation Laws and Exact Power Series Solutions for Time-Fractional Fordy–Gibbons Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lian-Li; Tian, Shou-Fu; Wang, Xiu-Bin; Zhang, Tian-Tian

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the time fractional Fordy–Gibbons equation is investigated with Riemann–Liouville derivative. The equation can be reduced to the Caudrey–Dodd–Gibbon equation, Savada–Kotera equation and the Kaup–Kupershmidt equation, etc. By means of the Lie group analysis method, the invariance properties and symmetry reductions of the equation are derived. Furthermore, by means of the power series theory, its exact power series solutions of the equation are also constructed. Finally, two kinds of conservation laws of the equation are well obtained with aid of the self-adjoint method. Supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for Key Discipline Construction under Grant No. XZD201602, the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grant Nos. 2015QNA53 and 2015XKQY14, the Fundamental Research Funds for Postdoctoral at the Key Laboratory of Gas and Fire Control for Coal Mines, the General Financial Grant from the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2015M570498, and Natural Sciences Foundation of China under Grant No. 11301527

  13. Lie Symmetry Analysis, Conservation Laws and Exact Power Series Solutions for Time-Fractional Fordy-Gibbons Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lian-Li; Tian, Shou-Fu; Wang, Xiu-Bin; Zhang, Tian-Tian

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the time fractional Fordy-Gibbons equation is investigated with Riemann-Liouville derivative. The equation can be reduced to the Caudrey-Dodd-Gibbon equation, Savada-Kotera equation and the Kaup-Kupershmidt equation, etc. By means of the Lie group analysis method, the invariance properties and symmetry reductions of the equation are derived. Furthermore, by means of the power series theory, its exact power series solutions of the equation are also constructed. Finally, two kinds of conservation laws of the equation are well obtained with aid of the self-adjoint method. Supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for Key Discipline Construction under Grant No. XZD201602, the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grant Nos. 2015QNA53 and 2015XKQY14, the Fundamental Research Funds for Postdoctoral at the Key Laboratory of Gas and Fire Control for Coal Mines, the General Financial Grant from the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2015M570498, and Natural Sciences Foundation of China under Grant No. 11301527

  14. Analysis of small scale turbulent structures and the effect of spatial scales on gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnieders, Jana; Garbe, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The exchange of gases through the air-sea interface strongly depends on environmental conditions such as wind stress and waves which in turn generate near surface turbulence. Near surface turbulence is a main driver of surface divergence which has been shown to cause highly variable transfer rates on relatively small spatial scales. Due to the cool skin of the ocean, heat can be used as a tracer to detect areas of surface convergence and thus gather information about size and intensity of a turbulent process. We use infrared imagery to visualize near surface aqueous turbulence and determine the impact of turbulent scales on exchange rates. Through the high temporal and spatial resolution of these types of measurements spatial scales as well as surface dynamics can be captured. The surface heat pattern is formed by distinct structures on two scales - small-scale short lived structures termed fish scales and larger scale cold streaks that are consistent with the footprints of Langmuir Circulations. There are two key characteristics of the observed surface heat patterns: 1. The surface heat patterns show characteristic features of scales. 2. The structure of these patterns change with increasing wind stress and surface conditions. In [2] turbulent cell sizes have been shown to systematically decrease with increasing wind speed until a saturation at u* = 0.7 cm/s is reached. Results suggest a saturation in the tangential stress. Similar behaviour has been observed by [1] for gas transfer measurements at higher wind speeds. In this contribution a new model to estimate the heat flux is applied which is based on the measured turbulent cell size und surface velocities. This approach allows the direct comparison of the net effect on heat flux of eddies of different sizes and a comparison to gas transfer measurements. Linking transport models with thermographic measurements, transfer velocities can be computed. In this contribution, we will quantify the effect of small scale

  15. Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Analysis of Whole Saliva Reveals a Distinct Phosphorylation Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Matthew D.; Chen, Xiaobing; McGowan, Thomas; Bandhakavi, Sricharan; Cheng, Bin; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Griffin, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth knowledge of bodily fluid phosphoproteomes, such as whole saliva, is limited. To better understand the whole saliva phosphoproteome, we generated a large-scale catalog of phosphorylated proteins. To circumvent the wide dynamic range of phosphoprotein abundance in whole saliva, we combined dynamic range compression using hexapeptide beads, strong cation exchange HPLC peptide fractionation, and immobilized metal affinity chromatography prior to mass spectrometry. In total, 217 unique phosphopeptides sites were identified representing 85 distinct phosphoproteins at 2.3% global FDR. From these peptides, 129 distinct phosphorylation sites were identified of which 57 were previously known, but only 11 of which had been previously identified in whole saliva. Cellular localization analysis revealed salivary phosphoproteins had a distribution similar to all known salivary proteins, but with less relative representation in “extracellular” and “plasma membrane” categories compared to salivary glycoproteins. Sequence alignment showed that phosphorylation occurred at acidic-directed kinase, proline-directed, and basophilic motifs. This differs from plasma phosphoproteins, which predominantly occur at Golgi casein kinase recognized sequences. Collectively, these results suggest diverse functions for salivary phosphoproteins and multiple kinases involved in their processing and secretion. In all, this study should lay groundwork for future elucidation of the functions of salivary protein phosphorylation. PMID:21299198

  16. Schinus terebinthifolius scale-up countercurrent chromatography (Part I): High performance countercurrent chromatography fractionation of triterpene acids with off-line detection using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Mariana Neves; Costa, Fernanda das Neves; Leitão, Gilda Guimarães; Garrard, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana; Winterhalter, Peter; Jerz, Gerold

    2015-04-10

    'Countercurrent chromatography' (CCC) is an ideal technique for the recovery, purification and isolation of bioactive natural products, due to the liquid nature of the stationary phase, process predictability and the possibility of scale-up from analytical to preparative scale. In this work, a method developed for the fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi berries dichloromethane extract was thoroughly optimized to achieve maximal throughput with minimal solvent and time consumption per gram of processed crude extract, using analytical, semi-preparative and preparative 'high performance countercurrent chromatography' (HPCCC) instruments. The method using the biphasic solvent system composed of n-heptane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was volumetrically scaled up to increase sample throughput up to 120 times, while maintaining separation efficiency and time. As a fast and specific detection alternative, the fractions collected from the CCC-separations were injected to an 'atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometer' (APCI-MS/MS) and reconstituted molecular weight MS-chromatograms of the APCI-ionizable compounds from S. terebinthifolius were obtained. This procedure led to the direct isolation of tirucallane type triterpenes such as masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids. Also oleanonic and moronic acids have been identified for the first time in the species. In summary, this approach can be used for other CCC scale-up processes, enabling MS-target-guided isolation procedures.

  17. Schinus terebinthifolius scale-up countercurrent chromatography (Part I): High performance countercurrent chromatography fractionation of triterpene acids with off-line detection using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Mariana Neves; Costa, Fernanda das Neves; Leitão, Gilda Guimarães; Garrard, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana; Winterhalter, Peter; Jerz, Gerold

    2015-04-10

    'Countercurrent chromatography' (CCC) is an ideal technique for the recovery, purification and isolation of bioactive natural products, due to the liquid nature of the stationary phase, process predictability and the possibility of scale-up from analytical to preparative scale. In this work, a method developed for the fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi berries dichloromethane extract was thoroughly optimized to achieve maximal throughput with minimal solvent and time consumption per gram of processed crude extract, using analytical, semi-preparative and preparative 'high performance countercurrent chromatography' (HPCCC) instruments. The method using the biphasic solvent system composed of n-heptane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was volumetrically scaled up to increase sample throughput up to 120 times, while maintaining separation efficiency and time. As a fast and specific detection alternative, the fractions collected from the CCC-separations were injected to an 'atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometer' (APCI-MS/MS) and reconstituted molecular weight MS-chromatograms of the APCI-ionizable compounds from S. terebinthifolius were obtained. This procedure led to the direct isolation of tirucallane type triterpenes such as masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids. Also oleanonic and moronic acids have been identified for the first time in the species. In summary, this approach can be used for other CCC scale-up processes, enabling MS-target-guided isolation procedures. PMID:25757818

  18. Scaling parameters for PFBC cyclone separator system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, A.; Romeo, L.M.; Cortes, C.

    1999-07-01

    Laboratory-scale cold flow models have been used extensively to study the behavior of many installations. In particular, fluidized bed cold flow models have allowed developing the knowledge of fluidized bed hydrodynamics. In order for the results of the research to be relevant to commercial power plants, cold flow models must be properly scaled. Many efforts have been made to understand the performance of fluidized beds, but up to now no attention has been paid in developing the knowledge of cyclone separator systems. CIRCE has worked on the development of scaling parameters to enable laboratory-scale equipment operating at room temperature to simulate the performance of cyclone separator systems. This paper presents the simplified scaling parameters and experimental comparison of a cyclone separator system and a cold flow model constructed and based on those parameters. The cold flow model has been used to establish the validity of the scaling laws for cyclone separator systems and permits detailed room temperature studies (determining the filtration effects of varying operating parameters and cyclone design) to be performed in a rapid and cost effective manner. This valuable and reliable design tool will contribute to a more rapid and concise understanding of hot gas filtration systems based on cyclones. The study of the behavior of the cold flow model, including observation and measurements of flow patterns in cyclones and diplegs will allow characterizing the performance of the full-scale ash removal system, establishing safe limits of operation and testing design improvements.

  19. A Critical Analysis of the Concept of Scale Dependent Macrodispersivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, A.; Attinger, S.; Cvetkovic, V.; Dagan, G.; Dietrich, P.; Fiori, A.; Rubin, Y.; Teutsch, G.

    2014-12-01

    Transport by groundwater occurs over the different scales encountered by moving solute plumes. Spreading of plumes is often quantified by the longitudinal macrodispersivity αL (half the rate of change of the second spatial moment divided by the mean velocity). It was found that generally αL is scale dependent, increasing with the travel distance L of the plume centroid, stabilizing eventually at a constant value (Fickian regime).It was surmised in the literature that αL(L) scales up with travel distance following a universal scaling law. Attempts to define the scaling law were pursued by several authors (Arya et al, 1988, Neuman, 1990, Xu and Eckstein, 1995, Schulze-Makuch, 2005), by fitting a regression line in the log-log representation of results from an ensemble of field experiment, primarily those experiments included by the compendium of experiments summarized by Gelhar et al, 1992.Despite concerns raised about universality of scaling laws (e.g., Gelhar, 1992, Anderson, 1991), such relationships are being employed by practitioners for modeling multiscale transport (e.g., Fetter, 1999), because they, presumably, offer a convenient prediction tool, with no need for detailed site characterization. Several attempts were made to provide theoretical justifications for the existence of a universal scaling law (e.g. Neuman, 1990 and 2010, Hunt et al, 2011).Our study revisited the concept of universal scaling through detailed analyses of field data (including the most recent tracer tests reported in the literature), coupled with a thorough re-evaluation of the reliability of the reported αL values. Our investigation concludes that transport, and particularly αL(L), is formation-specific, and that modeling of transport cannot be relegated to a universal scaling law. Instead, transport requires characterization of aquifer properties, e.g. spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity, and the use of adequate models.

  20. A Critical Analysis of the Concept of Scale Dependent Macrodispersivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Alraune; Attinger, Sabine; Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Dagan, Gedeon; Dietrich, Peter; Fiori, Aldo; Rubin, Yoram; Teutsch, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Transport by groundwater occurs over the different scales encountered by moving solute plumes. Spreading of plumes is often quantified by the longitudinal macrodispersivity αL (half the rate of change of the second spatial moment divided by the mean velocity). It was found that generally αL is scale dependent, increasing with the travel distance L of the plume centroid, stabilizing eventually at a constant value (Fickian regime). It was surmised in the literature that αL scales up with travel distance L following a universal scaling law. Attempts to define the scaling law were sursued by several authors (Arya et al, 1988, Neuman, 1990, Xu and Eckstein, 1995, Schulze-Makuch, 2005), by fitting a regression line in the log-log representation of results from an ensemble of field experiment, primarily those experiments included by the compendium of experiments summarized by Gelhar et al, 1992. Despite concerns raised about universality of scaling laws (e.g., Gelhar, 1992, Anderson, 1991), such relationships are being employed by practitioners for modeling multiscale transport (e.g., Fetter, 1999), because they, presumably, offer a convenient prediction tool, with no need for detailed site characterization. Several attempts were made to provide theoretical justifications for the existence of a universal scaling law (e.g. Neuman, 1990 and 2010, Hunt et al, 2011). Our study revisited the concept of universal scaling through detailed analyses of field data (including the most recent tracer tests reported in the literature), coupled with a thorough re-evaluation of the reliability of the reported αL values. Our investigation concludes that transport, and particularly αL, is formation-specific, and that modeling of transport cannot be relegated to a universal scaling law. Instead, transport requires characterization of aquifer properties, e.g. spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity, and the use of adequate models.

  1. Fractional Galilean symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseiny, Ali; Rouhani, Shahin

    2016-09-01

    We generalize the differential representation of the operators of the Galilean algebras to include fractional derivatives. As a result a whole new class of scale invariant Galilean algebras are obtained. The first member of this class has dynamical index z = 2 similar to the Schrödinger algebra. The second member of the class has dynamical index z = 3 / 2, which happens to be the dynamical index Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation.

  2. Rating Scale Analysis and Psychometric Properties of the Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipriani, Daniel J.; Hensen, Francine E.; McPeck, Danielle L.; Kubec, Gina L. D.; Thomas, Julie J.

    2012-01-01

    Parents and caregivers faced with the challenges of transferring children with disability are at risk of musculoskeletal injuries and/or emotional stress. The Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers (CSEST) is a 14-item questionnaire that measures self-efficacy for transferring under common conditions. The CSEST yields reliable data and valid…

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Scales for Diagnosing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (SCALES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryser, Gail R.; Campbell, Hilary L.; Miller, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have evolved over time with current versions of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual", (4th edition), text revision, ("DSM-IV-TR") suggesting that two constellations of symptoms may be present alone or in combination. The SCALES instrument for diagnosing attention deficit…

  4. Refining a self-assessment of informatics competency scale using Mokken scaling analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sunmoo; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Bakken, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare environments are increasingly implementing health information technology (HIT) and those from various professions must be competent to use HIT in meaningful ways. In addition, HIT has been shown to enable interprofessional approaches to health care. The purpose of this article is to describe the refinement of the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale (SANICS) using analytic techniques based upon item response theory (IRT) and discuss its relevance to interprofessional education and practice. In a sample of 604 nursing students, the 93-item version of SANICS was examined using non-parametric IRT. The iterative modeling procedure included 31 steps comprising: (1) assessing scalability, (2) assessing monotonicity, (3) assessing invariant item ordering, and (4) expert input. SANICS was reduced to an 18-item hierarchical scale with excellent reliability. Fundamental skills for team functioning and shared decision making among team members (e.g. "using monitoring systems appropriately," "describing general systems to support clinical care") had the highest level of difficulty, and "demonstrating basic technology skills" had the lowest difficulty level. Most items reflect informatics competencies relevant to all health professionals. Further, the approaches can be applied to construct a new hierarchical scale or refine an existing scale related to informatics attitudes or competencies for various health professions.

  5. Refining a self-assessment of informatics competency scale using Mokken scaling analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sunmoo; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Bakken, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare environments are increasingly implementing health information technology (HIT) and those from various professions must be competent to use HIT in meaningful ways. In addition, HIT has been shown to enable interprofessional approaches to health care. The purpose of this article is to describe the refinement of the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale (SANICS) using analytic techniques based upon item response theory (IRT) and discuss its relevance to interprofessional education and practice. In a sample of 604 nursing students, the 93-item version of SANICS was examined using non-parametric IRT. The iterative modeling procedure included 31 steps comprising: (1) assessing scalability, (2) assessing monotonicity, (3) assessing invariant item ordering, and (4) expert input. SANICS was reduced to an 18-item hierarchical scale with excellent reliability. Fundamental skills for team functioning and shared decision making among team members (e.g. "using monitoring systems appropriately," "describing general systems to support clinical care") had the highest level of difficulty, and "demonstrating basic technology skills" had the lowest difficulty level. Most items reflect informatics competencies relevant to all health professionals. Further, the approaches can be applied to construct a new hierarchical scale or refine an existing scale related to informatics attitudes or competencies for various health professions. PMID:26652630

  6. A Factor Analysis of the Laurelton Self-Concept Scale. Volume 1, Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Robert H.; Budoff, Milton

    Items from the Laurelton Self Concept Scale (LSCS) and the Locus of Control Scale for Children were administered to 172 male and female educable mental retardates to examine the LSCS by R factor analysis. It was found that the Self Concept Scale is factor analyzable when appropriately administered to educables. The small factors grouped into…

  7. Three-dimensional analysis of scale morphology in bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Dylan K; Lauder, George V

    2016-06-01

    Fish scales are morphologically diverse among species, within species, and on individuals. Scales of bony fishes are often categorized into three main types: cycloid scales have smooth edges; spinoid scales have spines protruding from the body of the scale; ctenoid scales have interdigitating spines protruding from the posterior margin of the scale. For this study, we used two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) visualization techniques to investigate scale morphology of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) on different regions of the body. Micro-CT scanning was used to visualize individual scales taken from different regions, and a new technique called GelSight was used to rapidly measure the 3D surface structure and elevation profiles of in situ scale patches from different regions. We used these data to compare the surface morphology of scales from different regions, using morphological measurements and surface metrology metrics to develop a set of shape variables. We performed a discriminant function analysis to show that bluegill scales differ across the body - scales are cycloid on the opercle but ctenoid on the rest of the body, and the proportion of ctenii coverage increases ventrally on the fish. Scales on the opercle and just below the anterior spinous dorsal fin were smaller in height, length, and thickness than scales elsewhere on the body. Surface roughness did not appear to differ over the body of the fish, although scales at the start of the caudal peduncle had higher skew values than other scales, indicating they have a surface that contains more peaks than valleys. Scale shape also differs along the body, with scales near the base of the tail having a more elongated shape. This study adds to our knowledge of scale structure and diversity in fishes, and the 3D measurement of scale surface structure provides the basis for future testing of functional hypotheses relating scale morphology to locomotor performance. PMID:27062451

  8. TMFA: A FORTRAN Program for Three-Mode Factor Analysis and Individual Differences Multidimensional Scaling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfield, Joel

    1978-01-01

    TMFA, a FORTRAN program for three-mode factor analysis and individual-differences multidimensional scaling, is described. Program features include a variety of input options, extensive preprocessing of input data, and several alternative methods of analysis. (Author)

  9. Fractionation analysis of manganese in Turkish hazelnuts (Corylus avellana L.) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Umran Seven; Gucer, Seref

    2014-11-01

    In this study, an analytical fractionation scheme based on water, diethyl ether, n-hexane, and methanol extractions has been developed to identify manganese-bound fractions. Additionally, in vitro simulated gastric and intestinal digestion, n-octanol extraction, and activated carbon adsorption were used to interpret the manganese-bound structures in hazelnuts in terms of bioaccessibility. The total content of manganese in the samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion, and additional validation was performed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Water fractions were further evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the identification of water-soluble manganese fractions in hazelnut samples. The limits of detection and quantification were 3.6 and 12.0 μg L(-1), respectively, based on peak height.

  10. Sensory and mass spectrometric analysis of the peptidic fraction lower than one thousand daltons in Manchego cheese.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ruiz, J A; Taborda, G; Amigo, L; Ramos, M; Molina, E

    2007-11-01

    A total of 107 different peptides, all derived from alphaS1-, alphaS2-, and beta-casein, were identified in different fractions of artisan or industrial Manchego cheese at 4 and 8 mo of ripening, and their sequences were examined. Most of these peptides are described for the first time in Manchego cheese. Taste characteristics (umami and bitter) were assigned based on their AA sequence and the position of these AA within the sequence. The umami taste was predominant in all fractions analyzed by the panelists, and the peptides EQEEL, QEEL, and EINEL, containing a high number of glutamic residues, were found within the fractions. However, in several fractions described as having umami characteristics, no peptides responsible for this taste were detected. Therefore, compounds other than peptides seem to be involved in the umami properties of water-soluble extracts lower than 1,000 Da of Manchego cheese. PMID:17954735

  11. Antioxidant activity measured in different solvent fractions obtained from Mentha spicata Linn.: an analysis by ABTS*+ decolorization assay.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Ponnan; Ramamurthy, Perumal; Santhiya, Sathiyavedu Thyagarajan; Ramesh, Arabandi

    2006-01-01

    Antioxidant compounds are abundantly available in plants and play an important role in scavenging free radicals, thus providing protection to humans against oxidative DNA damage. Mentha spicata Linn., commonly called spearmint, belongs to the family lamiaceae. It was selected in the present study because Mentha extracts have antioxidant properties due to the presence of eugenol, caffeic acid, rosmarinic acid and alpha-tocopherol. Four solvent fractions (hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and water) of ethanolic extract of dried leaves powder of M. spicata were analyzed for total antioxidant activity (TAA) and relative antioxidant activity (RAA) and compared with standard antioxidants such as Quercetin, beta-carotene, L-ascorbic acid and glutathione using ABTS*+ decolorization assay (ABTS/Potassium persulphate). The antioxidant activity was assumed to be from the total phenolic content of the ethanolic extract. Total phenolics are found to be highest in ethyl acetate fraction (54 mg/g) and least in hexane fraction (13 mg/g) and more or less similar in water and chloroform fractions (30-32 mg/g). TAA is found to be less in hexane and chloroform fractions (<53% at 50 microg/ml) and highest in ethyl acetate (95% at 20 microg/ml) and water (84% at 30 microg/ml) fractions. The RAA of ethyl acetate fraction is 1.1 compared to quercetin (at 5 microM/ml), but greater when compared to beta-carotene (15 microM/ml), L-ascorbic acid (15 microM/ml) and glutathione (15 microM/ml). The RAAs with these antioxidants are in the range of 1.31 -1.6. The values of RAAs for water fraction also show similar trend and are in the range of 1.0-1.4. The antioxidant activities of the solvent factions are closely related to the content of total phenolics present in them.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Single Fraction of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Single Fraction of External Beam Radiation Therapy for Palliation of Vertebral Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hayeon; Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful; Smith, Kenneth J.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been proposed for the palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases because higher radiation doses may result in superior and more durable pain control. A phase III clinical trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631) comparing single fraction SBRT with single fraction external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in palliative treatment of painful vertebral bone metastases is now ongoing. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to compare these strategies. Methods and Materials: A Markov model, using a 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon, was developed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT (16 or 18 Gy in 1 fraction) with that of 8 Gy in 1 fraction of EBRT. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and EBRT were captured in the model. Costs were based on Medicare reimbursement in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for uncertainty, 1-way, 2-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: Base case pain relief after the treatment was assumed as 20% higher in SBRT. Base case treatment costs for SBRT and EBRT were $9000 and $1087, respectively. In the base case analysis, SBRT resulted in an ICER of $124,552 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of the utility of unrelieved pain; the utility of relieved pain after initial treatment and median survival were also sensitive to variation. If median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT cost <$100,000 per QALY gained. Conclusion: SBRT for palliation of vertebral bone metastases is not cost-effective compared with EBRT at a $100,000 per QALY gained WTP threshold. However, if median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT costs ≤$100

  13. Visualization of viral candidate cDNAs in infectious brain fractions from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by representational difference analysis.

    PubMed

    Dron, M; Manuelidis, L

    1996-08-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), a neurodegenerative and dementing disease of later life, is caused by a viruslike entity that is incompletely characterized. As in scrapie, all more purified infectious brain preparations contain nucleic acids. However, it has not been possible to visualize unique bands that may derive from a viral genome. We here used a subtractive strategy known as representational difference analysis (RDA) to uncover such sequences. To reduce the complexity of starting target nucleic acids, sucrose gradients were first used to select nuclease resistant particles with a defined 120S size. In CJD this single 120S gradient peak is highly enriched for infectivity, and contains reduced amounts of PrP (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 92, 5124-8, 1995). Parallel 120S fractions from uninfected brain were made to generate subtractor sequences. 120S particles were lysed in GdnSCN, and ng amounts of released RNA were purified for random-primed cDNA synthesis. To capture representative fragments of 100-500 bp, cDNAs were cleaved with Mbo I for adaptor ligation and amplification. In the first experiment with moderate RDA selection, it was possible to visualize clones from CJD cDNA that did not hybridize to control cDNA. In the second experiment, more exhaustive subtractions yielded a discrete set of CJD derived gel bands. Competitive hybridization showed a subset of these bands were not present in either the control 120S cDNA or in the hamster genome. This represents the first demonstration of apparently CJD-specific nucleic acid bands in more purified infectious preparations. Although exhaustive cloning, sequencing and correlative titration studies need to be done, it is encouraging that most of the viral candidates selected thus far have no significant homology with any previously described sequence in the database.

  14. Assessment of heavy metals contamination in sediments from three adjacent regions of the Yellow River using metal chemical fractions and multivariate analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoling; Zuo, Hang; Tian, Mengjing; Zhang, Liyang; Meng, Jia; Zhou, Xuening; Min, Na; Chang, Xinyuan; Liu, Ying

    2016-02-01

    Metal chemical fractions obtained by optimized BCR three-stage extraction procedure and multivariate analysis techniques were exploited for assessing 7 heavy metals (Cr, Pb, Cd, Co, Cu, Zn and Ni) in sediments from Gansu province, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Regions of the Yellow River in Northern China. The results indicated that higher susceptibility and bioavailability of Cr and Cd with a strong anthropogenic source were due to their higher availability in the exchangeable fraction. A portion of Pb, Cd, Co, Zn, and Ni in reducible fraction may be due to the fact that they can form stable complexes with Fe and Mn oxides. Substantial amount of Pb, Co, Ni and Cu was observed as oxidizable fraction because of their strong affinity to the organic matters so that they can complex with humic substances in sediments. The high geo-accumulation indexes (I(geo)) for Cr and Cd showed their higher environmental risk to the aquatic biota. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that high toxic Cr and Cd in polluted sites (Cd in S10, S11 and Cr in S13) may be contributed to anthropogenic sources, it was consistent with the results of dual hierarchical clustering analysis (DHCA), which could give more details about contributing sources.

  15. Bile Salt Micelles and Phospholipid Vesicles Present in Simulated and Human Intestinal Fluids: Structural Analysis by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation/Multiangle Laser Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Elvang, Philipp A; Hinna, Askell H; Brouwers, Joachim; Hens, Bart; Augustijns, Patrick; Brandl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge about colloidal assemblies present in human intestinal fluids (HIFs), such as bile salt micelles and phospholipid vesicles, is regarded of importance for a better understanding of the in vivo dissolution and absorption behavior of poorly soluble drugs (Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II/IV drugs) because of their drug-solubilizing ability. The characterization of these potential drug-solubilizing compartments is a prerequisite for further studies of the mechanistic interplays between drug molecules and colloidal structures within HIFs. The aim of the present study was to apply asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) in combination with multiangle laser light scattering in an attempt to reveal coexistence of colloidal particles in both artificial and aspirated HIFs and to determine their sizes. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation/multiangle laser light scattering analysis of the colloidal phase of intestinal fluids allowed for a detailed insight into the whole spectrum of submicron- to micrometer-sized particles. With respect to the simulated intestinal fluids mimicking fasted and fed state (FaSSIF-V1 and FeSSIF-V1, respectively), FaSSIF contained one distinct size fraction of colloidal assemblies, whereas FeSSIF contained 2 fractions of colloidal species with significantly different sizes. These size fractions likely represent (1) mixed taurocholate-phospholipid-micelles, as indicated by a size range up to 70 nm (in diameter) and a strong UV absorption and (2) small phospholipid vesicles of 90-210 nm diameter. In contrast, within the colloidal phase of the fasted state aspirate of a human volunteer, 4 different size fractions were separated from each other in a consistent and reproducible manner. The 2 fractions containing large particles showed mean sizes of approximately 50 and 200 nm, respectively (intensity-weighted mean diameter, Dz), likely representing mixed cholate/phospholipid micelles and phospholipid vesicles

  16. Scale analysis of equatorial plasma irregularities derived from Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chao; Stolle, Claudia; Lühr, Hermann; Park, Jaeheung; Fejer, Bela G.; Kervalishvili, Guram N.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the scale sizes of equatorial plasma irregularities (EPIs) using measurements from the Swarm satellites during its early mission and final constellation phases. We found that with longitudinal separation between Swarm satellites larger than 0.4°, no significant correlation was found any more. This result suggests that EPI structures include plasma density scale sizes less than 44 km in the zonal direction. During the Swarm earlier mission phase, clearly better EPI correlations are obtained in the northern hemisphere, implying more fragmented irregularities in the southern hemisphere where the ambient magnetic field is low. The previously reported inverted-C shell structure of EPIs is generally confirmed by the Swarm observations in the northern hemisphere, but with various tilt angles. From the Swarm spacecrafts with zonal separations of about 150 km, we conclude that larger zonal scale sizes of irregularities exist during the early evening hours (around 1900 LT).

  17. 'Scaling' analysis of the ice accretion process on aircraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, E. G.; Tabrizi, A. H.; Missimer, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive set of scaling parameters is developed for the ice accretion process by analyzing the energy equations of the dynamic freezing zone and the already frozen ice layer, the continuity equation associated with supercooled liquid droplets entering into and impacting within the dynamic freezing zone, and energy equation of the ice layer. No initial arbitrary judgments are made regarding the relative magnitudes of each of the terms. The method of intrinsic reference variables in employed in order to develop the appropriate scaling parameters and their relative significance in rime icing conditions in an orderly process, rather than utilizing empiricism. The significance of these parameters is examined and the parameters are combined with scaling criteria related to droplet trajectory similitude.

  18. Modeling of biomass fractionation in a lab-scale biorefinery: Solubilization of hemicellulose and cellulose from holm oak wood using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, A; Piqueras, C M; Sobrón, F; García-Serna, J

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulose fractionation is a key biorefinery process that need to be understood. In this work, a comprehensive study on hydrothermal-fractionation of holm oak in a semi-continuous system was conducted. The aim was to develop a physicochemical model in order to reproduce the role of temperature and water flow over the products composition. The experiments involved two sets: at constant flow (6mL/min) and two different ranges of temperature (140-180 and 240-280°C) and at a constant temperature range (180-260°C) and different flows: 11.0, 15.0 and 27.9mL/min. From the results, temperature has main influence and flow effect was observed only if soluble compounds were produced. The kinetic model was validated against experimental data, reproducing the total organic carbon profile (e.g. deviation of 33%) and the physicochemical phenomena observed in the process. In the model, it was also considered the variations of molecular weight of each biopolymer, successfully reproducing the biomass cleaving.

  19. Modeling of biomass fractionation in a lab-scale biorefinery: Solubilization of hemicellulose and cellulose from holm oak wood using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, A; Piqueras, C M; Sobrón, F; García-Serna, J

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulose fractionation is a key biorefinery process that need to be understood. In this work, a comprehensive study on hydrothermal-fractionation of holm oak in a semi-continuous system was conducted. The aim was to develop a physicochemical model in order to reproduce the role of temperature and water flow over the products composition. The experiments involved two sets: at constant flow (6mL/min) and two different ranges of temperature (140-180 and 240-280°C) and at a constant temperature range (180-260°C) and different flows: 11.0, 15.0 and 27.9mL/min. From the results, temperature has main influence and flow effect was observed only if soluble compounds were produced. The kinetic model was validated against experimental data, reproducing the total organic carbon profile (e.g. deviation of 33%) and the physicochemical phenomena observed in the process. In the model, it was also considered the variations of molecular weight of each biopolymer, successfully reproducing the biomass cleaving. PMID:26476169

  20. Technical Note: A measure of watershed nonlinearity II: re-introducing an IFP inverse fractional power transform for streamflow recession analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    This note illustrates, in the context of Brutsaert-Nieber (1977) model: -dQ/dt = aQb, the utility of a newly rediscovered inverse fractional power (IFP) transform of the flow rates. This method of streamflow recession analysis dates back a half-century. The IFP transform Δb on an operand Q is defined as Δb Q = 1/Qb-1. Brutsaert-Nieber model by IFP transform thus becomes: ΔbQ(t) = ΔbQ(0) + (b-1) at, if b ≠ 1. The IFP transformed recession curve appears as a straight line on a semi-IFP plot. The method has both the advantage of being independent of the size of computational time step, and the disadvantage of being depending on the parameter b value. This is used to calibrate the Brutsaert-Nieber recession flow model in which b is a slope (or shape) parameter, and a is an intercept (or a scale parameter). It is applied to four observed events on the Spoon River in Illinois (4237 km2). The results show that the IFP transform method gives a narrower range of parameter b values than the regression method in a recession plot. Theoretically, an IFP transformed recession curve for large watersheds falls between those performed by the reciprocal of the cubic root (RoCR) transform and the reciprocal of the square root (RoSR) one. In general, the forgotten IFP transform method merits a fresh look, especially for hillslopes and zero-order catchments, the building blocks of a watershed system. In particular, because of its origin in hillslope hydrology, the 1-parameter RoSR transform need be falsified or verified for application to headwater catchments.

  1. Proteomic analysis of the soluble and the lysosomal+mitochondrial fractions from rat pancreas: Implications for cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, Violeta; Sánchez-Bernal, Carmen; Sarmiento, Nancy; Viana, Raúl A; Ferreira, Laura; Pérez, Nieves; Calvo, José J; Sánchez-Yagüe, Jesús

    2012-09-01

    Alterations in protein expression within the initiation phase of acute pancreatitis (AP) might play an important role in the development of this disease, lysosomes being involved in its pathophysiology. The use of pancreatic subcellular fractions in proteomic analysis, simplifies protein maps and helps in the identification of new protein changes and biomarkers characterizing tissue damage. The present study aims to determine the differentially expressed acidic proteins in the pancreatic soluble and lysosomal+mitochondrial (L+M) fractions from rats during the early phase of the experimental model of cerulein (Cer)-induced AP. Subcellular pancreatic extracts from diseased and control rats were analyzed by 2-DE (3-5.6 pH range) and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Comparative analysis afforded the conclusive identification of 13 (soluble fraction) and 7 (L+M fraction) proteins or protein fragments occuring in different amounts between diseased and control pancreas, some of them being newly described in AP. In the soluble fraction, we detected changes related to inflammation and apoptosis (α1-inhibitor-3, α-1 antitrypsin, α-1 macroglobulin, haptoglobin, STRAP), oxidative stress and stress response (peroxiredoxin-2, thioredoxin-like 1, GRP94/TRA1, heat shock cognate 71kDa protein), digestive proteases (elastase 3B), serine protease inhibition (serpins B6 and A3L) and translation processes (EF 1-δ). In the L+M fraction, we detected changes mainly related to energy generation or cellular metabolism (ATP synthase β subunit, chymotrypsinogen B, triacylglycerol lipase), cell redox homeostasis (iodothyronine 5´monodeiodinase) and digestive proteases (carboxypeptidase B1). The data should provide valuable information for unraveling the early pathophysiologic mechanisms of Cer-induced AP. PMID:22713802

  2. Fractional-calculus diffusion equation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequel to the work on the quantization of nonconservative systems using fractional calculus and quantization of a system with Brownian motion, which aims to consider the dissipation effects in quantum-mechanical description of microscale systems. Results The canonical quantization of a system represented classically by one-dimensional Fick's law, and the diffusion equation is carried out according to the Dirac method. A suitable Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian, describing the diffusive system, are constructed and the Hamiltonian is transformed to Schrodinger's equation which is solved. An application regarding implementation of the developed mathematical method to the analysis of diffusion, osmosis, which is a biological application of the diffusion process, is carried out. Schrödinger's equation is solved. Conclusions The plot of the probability function represents clearly the dissipative and drift forces and hence the osmosis, which agrees totally with the macro-scale view, or the classical-version osmosis. PMID:20492677

  3. A Multidimensional Scaling Analysis of Students' Attitudes about Science Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masnick, Amy M.; Valenti, S. Stavros; Cox, Brian D.; Osman, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    To encourage students to seek careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields, it is important to gauge students' implicit and explicit attitudes towards scientific professions. We asked high school and college students to rate the similarity of pairs of occupations, and then used multidimensional scaling (MDS) to create…

  4. THE USEFULNESS OF SCALE ANALYSIS: EXAMPLES FROM EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many water system managers and operators are curious about the value of analyzing the scales of drinking water pipes. Approximately 20 sections of lead service lines were removed in 2002 from various locations throughout the greater Boston distribution system, and were sent to ...

  5. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Work Locus of Control Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Joseph E.; Jose, Paul E.; Brough, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Original formulations of the Work Locus of Control Scale (WLCS) proposed a unidimensional structure of this measure; however, more recently, evidence for a two-dimensional structure has been reported, with separate subscales for internal and external loci of control. The current study evaluates the one- and two-factor models with confirmatory…

  6. Acquiescent Responding in Balanced Multidimensional Scales and Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2006-01-01

    Personality tests often consist of a set of dichotomous or Likert items. These response formats are known to be susceptible to an agreeing-response bias called acquiescence. The common assumption in balanced scales is that the sum of appropriately reversed responses should be reasonably free of acquiescence. However, inter-item correlation (or…

  7. Analysis of linear trade models and relation to scale economies.

    PubMed

    Gomory, R E; Baumol, W J

    1997-09-01

    We discuss linear Ricardo models with a range of parameters. We show that the exact boundary of the region of equilibria of these models is obtained by solving a simple integer programming problem. We show that there is also an exact correspondence between many of the equilibria resulting from families of linear models and the multiple equilibria of economies of scale models.

  8. Analysis of stock market indices through multidimensional scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro; Duarte, Fernando B.; Duarte, Gonçalo Monteiro

    2011-12-01

    We propose a graphical method to visualize possible time-varying correlations between fifteen stock market values. The method is useful for observing stable or emerging clusters of stock markets with similar behaviour. The graphs, originated from applying multidimensional scaling techniques (MDS), may also guide the construction of multivariate econometric models.

  9. A Rasch Analysis of the Teachers Music Confidence Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Abd-El-Fattah, Sabry; Lee, Lai Wan Maria

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a new measure of teachers' confidence to conduct musical activities with young children; Teachers Music Confidence Scale (TMCS). The TMCS was developed using a sample of 284 in-service and pre-service early childhood teachers in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). The TMCS consisted of 10 musical activities.…

  10. A Factor Analysis of the Research Self-Efficacy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieschke, Kathleen J.; And Others

    Counseling professionals' and counseling psychology students' interest in performing research seems to be waning. Identifying the impediments to graduate students' interest and participation in research is important if systematic efforts to engage them in research are to succeed. The Research Self-Efficacy Scale (RSES) was designed to measure…

  11. Simulation and Analysis of Large-Scale Compton Imaging Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Manini, H A; Lange, D J; Wright, D M

    2006-12-27

    We perform simulations of two types of large-scale Compton imaging detectors. The first type uses silicon and germanium detector crystals, and the second type uses silicon and CdZnTe (CZT) detector crystals. The simulations use realistic detector geometry and parameters. We analyze the performance of each type of detector, and we present results using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves.

  12. The Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale: An Independent Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkey, Frank H.

    1982-01-01

    Examined the factor structure and subscale reliabilities of an eight-dimensional measure of fear of death (the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale) using a New Zealand sample. Comparison with the results of a United States study showed that both the subscale reliabilities and the factor structure were almost perfectly reproduced. (Author)

  13. High-resolution droplet-based fractionation of nano-LC separations onto microarrays for MALDI-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Küster, Simon K; Pabst, Martin; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zenobi, Renato; Dittrich, Petra S

    2014-05-20

    We present a robust droplet-based device, which enables the fractionation of ultralow flow rate nanoflow liquid chromatography (nano-LC) eluate streams at high frequencies and high peak resolution. This is achieved by directly interfacing the separation column to a micro T-junction, where the eluate stream is compartmentalized into picoliter droplets. This immediate compartmentalization prevents peak dispersion during eluate transport and conserves the chromatographic performance. Subsequently, nanoliter eluate fractions are collected at a rate of one fraction per second on a high-density microarray to retain the separation with high temporal resolution. Chromatographic separations of up to 45 min runtime can thus be archived on a single microarray possessing 2700 sample spots. The performance of this device is demonstrated by fractionating the separation of a tryptic digest of a known protein mixture onto the microarray chip and subsequently analyzing the sample archive using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Resulting peak widths are found to be significantly reduced compared to standard continuous flow spotting technologies as well as in comparison to a conventional nano-LC-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry interface. Moreover, we demonstrate the advantage of our high-definition nanofractionation device by applying two different MALDI matrices to all collected fractions in an alternating fashion. Since the information that is obtained from a MALDI-MS measurement depends on the choice of MALDI matrix, we can extract complementary information from neighboring spots containing almost identical composition but different matrices. PMID:24725135

  14. Analysis of liposomes using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation: separation conditions and drug/lipid recovery.

    PubMed

    Kuntsche, Judith; Decker, Christiane; Fahr, Alfred

    2012-08-01

    Liposomes composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol were analyzed by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with multi-angle laser light scattering. In addition to evaluation of fractionation conditions (flow conditions, sample mass, carrier liquid), radiolabeled drug-loaded liposomes were used to determine the liposome recovery and a potential loss of incorporated drug during fractionation. Neither sample concentration nor the cross-flow gradient distinctly affected the size results but at very low sample concentration (injected mass 5 μg) the fraction of larger vesicles was underestimated. Imbalance in the osmolality between the inner and outer aqueous phase resulted in liposome swelling after dilution in hypoosmotic carrier liquids. In contrast, liposome shrinking under hyperosmotic conditions was barely visible. The liposomes themselves eluted completely (lipid recoveries were close to 100%) but there was a loss of incorporated drugs during separation with a strong dependence on the octanol-water partition coefficient of the drug. Whereas corticosterone (partition coefficient ~2) was washed out more or less completely (recovery about 2%), loss of temoporfin (partition coefficient ~9) was only minor (recovery about 80%). All fractionations were well repeatable under the experimental conditions applied in the present study.

  15. Insights into soil carbon dynamics across climatic and geologic gradients from time-series and fraction-specific radiocarbon analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, Tessa Sophia; Hagedorn, Frank; Zell, Claudia; McIntyre, Cameron; Eglinton, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the interaction between soil organic matter (SOM) and climatic, geologic and ecological factors is essential for the understanding of potential susceptibility and vulnerability to climate and land use change. Radiocarbon constitutes a powerful tool for unraveling SOM dynamics and is increasingly used in studies of carbon turnover. The complex and inherently heterogeneous nature of SOM renders it challenging to assess the processes that govern SOM stability by solely looking at the bulk signature on a plot-scale level. This project combines bulk radiocarbon measurements on a regional-scale spanning wide climatic and geologic gradients with a more in-depth approach for a subset of locations. For this subset, time-series and carbon pool-specific radiocarbon data has been acquired for both topsoil and deeper soils. These well-studied sites are part of the Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research (LWF) program of the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape research (WSL). Statistical analysis was performed to examine relationships of radiocarbon signatures with variables such as temperature, precipitation and elevation. Bomb-curve modeling was applied determine carbon turnover using time-series data. Results indicate that (1) there is no significant correlation between Δ14C signature and environmental conditions except a weak positive correlation with mean annual temperature, (2) vertical gradients in Δ14C signatures in surface and deeper soils are highly similar despite covering disparate soil-types and climatic systems, and (3) radiocarbon signatures vary significantly between time-series samples and carbon pools. Overall, this study provides a uniquely comprehensive dataset that allows for a better understanding of links between carbon dynamics and environmental settings, as well as for pool-specific and long-term trends in carbon (de)stabilization.

  16. Scaling and long-range dependence in option pricing II: Pricing European option with transaction costs under the mixed Brownian-fractional Brownian model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Tian; Zhu, En-Hui; Tang, Ming-Ming; Yan, Hai-Gang

    2010-02-01

    This paper deals with the problem of discrete-time option pricing by the mixed Brownian-fractional Brownian model with transaction costs. By a mean-self-financing delta hedging argument in a discrete-time setting, a European call option pricing formula is obtained. In particular, the minimal pricing cmin(t,st) of an option under transaction costs is obtained, which shows that timestep δt and Hurst exponent H play an important role in option pricing with transaction costs. In addition, we also show that there exists fundamental difference between the continuous-time trade and discrete-time trade and that continuous-time trade assumption will result in underestimating the value of a European call option.

  17. Development of a scale down cell culture model using multivariate analysis as a qualification tool.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Valerie Liu; Wang, Angela X; Yusuf-Makagiansar, Helena; Ryll, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In characterizing a cell culture process to support regulatory activities such as process validation and Quality by Design, developing a representative scale down model for design space definition is of great importance. The manufacturing bioreactor should ideally reproduce bench scale performance with respect to all measurable parameters. However, due to intrinsic geometric differences between scales, process performance at manufacturing scale often varies from bench scale performance, typically exhibiting differences in parameters such as cell growth, protein productivity, and/or dissolved carbon dioxide concentration. Here, we describe a case study in which a bench scale cell culture process model is developed to mimic historical manufacturing scale performance for a late stage CHO-based monoclonal antibody program. Using multivariate analysis (MVA) as primary data analysis tool in addition to traditional univariate analysis techniques to identify gaps between scales, process adjustments were implemented at bench scale resulting in an improved scale down cell culture process model. Finally we propose an approach for small scale model qualification including three main aspects: MVA, comparison of key physiological rates, and comparison of product quality attributes.

  18. Scale Issues in Remote Sensing: A Review on Analysis, Processing and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hua; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2009-01-01

    With the development of quantitative remote sensing, scale issues have attracted more and more the attention of scientists. Research is now suffering from a severe scale discrepancy between data sources and the models used. Consequently, both data interpretation and model application become difficult due to these scale issues. Therefore, effectively scaling remotely sensed information at different scales has already become one of the most important research focuses of remote sensing. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate scale issues from the points of view of analysis, processing and modeling and to provide technical assistance when facing scale issues in remote sensing. The definition of scale and relevant terminologies are given in the first part of this paper. Then, the main causes of scale effects and the scaling effects on measurements, retrieval models and products are reviewed and discussed. Ways to describe the scale threshold and scale domain are briefly discussed. Finally, the general scaling methods, in particular up-scaling methods, are compared and summarized in detail. PMID:22573986

  19. Screening of antioxidant phenolic compounds in Chinese rhubarb combining fast counter-current chromatography fractionation and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruilin; Lu, Yanbin; Dai, Xiaojing; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, an effective method combing fast elution-extrusion counter-current chromatography (CCC) and LC/MS for rapid screening of antioxidative phenolic compounds in Chinese Rhubarb is presented. An integrated three-coil CCC column (40 mL each coil) was used to accomplish the optimization of biphasic liquid system. In a single run (approximately 40 min), the solvent system composed of n-hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water (1:1:1:1, v/v) was selected as optimum CCC liquid system for fast fractionation of the crude ethanol extract. With a 140 mL-capacity CCC instrument, 100 mg Chinese Rhubarb extract was separated under the optimized conditions, producing six fractions in only 100 min. The quantities of each fraction were approximately 15 mg. In addition, each fraction was subjected to antioxidant activity assay and characterized by LC/MS analysis. Fifty compounds, including phenolic acids, phenolic glucosides and hydroxyanthraquinones, were detected by LC/MS/MS analysis. As a result, gallic acid together with Fr I showed excellent antioxidant activity, which was well consistent with previous studies and exhibited great potential for natural drug discovery program of the present method.

  20. Crater ejecta scaling laws - Fundamental forms based on dimensional analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, K. R.; Schmidt, R. M.; Holsapple, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    Self-consistent scaling laws are developed for meteoroid impact crater ejecta. Attention is given to the ejection velocity of material as a function of the impact point, the volume of ejecta with a threshold velocity, and the thickness of ejecta deposit in terms of the distance from the impact. Use is made of recently developed equations for energy and momentum coupling in cratering events. Consideration is given to scaling of laboratory trials up to real-world events and formulations are developed for calculating the ejection velocities and ejecta blanket profiles in the gravity and strength regimes of crater formation. It is concluded that, in the gravity regime, the thickness of an ejecta blanket is the same in all directions if the thickness and range are expressed in terms of the crater radius. In the strength regime, however, the ejecta velocities are independent of crater size, thereby allowing for asymmetric ejecta blankets. Controlled experiments are recommended for the gravity/strength transition.

  1. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents results of experiments conducted to measure release fractions during certain tank retrieval processes. The tests were performed in a 1/4 scale model of a waste storage tank. The retrieval processes simulated were: (1) Discharging liquid or slurry from the mouth of a vertically oriented two-in. Schedule 40 pipe. The discharging material was in free-fall from the mouth of the pipe near the top of the tank into a liquid or slurry pool at the bottom of the tank. (2) The jet from a 9/16-in.-diameter nozzle transferring liquid or slurry waste from one side of the tank to the other. The discharging liquid was aimed at the opposite side of the tank from the nozzle and either impacted the tank wall or fell into a liquid or slurry pool in the bottom of the tank. (3) A high pressure fan jet of liquid striking a steel plate or simulated waste from a stand-off distance of a few inches. For each process, a water-soluble fluorescent dye was added to the liquid fraction as a tracer. Kaolin clay was used to represent the solids. The tank was covered and there was no forced ventilation in the tank during the tests. Six air samples were collected during each test. The air samples were collected at fixed positions in the tank. The air sample filters were dried and weighed to determine the solids collection. The fluorescent dye was then leached from each filter and quantified with a fluorometer to determine the collection of liquid. Samples of the slurry and liquid simulants were also collected to determine the quantities of simulant used in each test. To calculate the release fraction, the quantity collected on each air sample was adjusted for the fraction of the tank volume sampled and divided by the quantity of material exposed in the simulation. The method was not as sensitive for the solids content as it was for the liquid content, but in those instances where a solids release fraction was determined, it was in relatively good agreement with that of the

  2. Analysis plan for 1985 large-scale tests. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McMullan, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this effort is to assist DNA in planning for large-scale (upwards of 5000 tons) detonations of conventional explosives in the 1985 and beyond time frame. Primary research objectives were to investigate potential means to increase blast duration and peak pressures. This report identifies and analyzes several candidate explosives. It examines several charge designs and identifies advantages and disadvantages of each. Other factors including terrain and multiburst techniques are addressed as are test site considerations.

  3. Wavelet multiscale analysis for Hedge Funds: Scaling and strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlon, T.; Crane, M.; Ruskin, H. J.

    2008-09-01

    The wide acceptance of Hedge Funds by Institutional Investors and Pension Funds has led to an explosive growth in assets under management. These investors are drawn to Hedge Funds due to the seemingly low correlation with traditional investments and the attractive returns. The correlations and market risk (the Beta in the Capital Asset Pricing Model) of Hedge Funds are generally calculated using monthly returns data, which may produce misleading results as Hedge Funds often hold illiquid exchange-traded securities or difficult to price over-the-counter securities. In this paper, the Maximum Overlap Discrete Wavelet Transform (MODWT) is applied to measure the scaling properties of Hedge Fund correlation and market risk with respect to the S&P 500. It is found that the level of correlation and market risk varies greatly according to the strategy studied and the time scale examined. Finally, the effects of scaling properties on the risk profile of a portfolio made up of Hedge Funds is studied using correlation matrices calculated over different time horizons.

  4. A quality assessment of 3D video analysis for full scale rockfall experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkwein, A.; Glover, J.; Bourrier, F.; Gerber, W.

    2012-04-01

    Main goal of full scale rockfall experiments is to retrieve a 3D trajectory of a boulder along the slope. Such trajectories then can be used to calibrate rockfall simulation models. This contribution presents the application of video analysis techniques capturing rock fall velocity of some free fall full scale rockfall experiments along a rock face with an inclination of about 50 degrees. Different scaling methodologies have been evaluated. They mainly differ in the way the scaling factors between the movie frames and the reality and are determined. For this purpose some scale bars and targets with known dimensions have been distributed in advance along the slope. The single scaling approaches are briefly described as follows: (i) Image raster is scaled to the distant fixed scale bar then recalibrated to the plane of the passing rock boulder by taking the measured position of the nearest impact as the distance to the camera. The distance between the camera, scale bar, and passing boulder are surveyed. (ii) The image raster was scaled using the four nearest targets (identified using frontal video) from the trajectory to be analyzed. The average of the scaling factors was finally taken as scaling factor. (iii) The image raster was scaled using the four nearest targets from the trajectory to be analyzed. The scaling factor for one trajectory was calculated by balancing the mean scaling factors associated with the two nearest and the two farthest targets in relation to their mean distance to the analyzed trajectory. (iv) Same as previous method but with varying scaling factors during along the trajectory. It has shown that a direct measure of the scaling target and nearest impact zone is the most accurate. If constant plane is assumed it doesn't account for the lateral deviations of the rock boulder from the fall line consequently adding error into the analysis. Thus a combination of scaling methods (i) and (iv) are considered to give the best results. For best results

  5. Dimensionality of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in Cardiac Patients: Comparison of Mokken Scale Analysis and Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emons, Wilco H. M.; Sijtsma, Klaas; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2012-01-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) measures anxiety and depressive symptoms and is widely used in clinical and nonclinical populations. However, there is some debate about the number of dimensions represented by the HADS. In a sample of 534 Dutch cardiac patients, this study examined (a) the dimensionality of the HADS using Mokken…

  6. Analysis of Small-Scale Convective Dynamics in a Crown Fire Using Infrared Video Camera Imagery.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Terry L.; Radke, Larry; Coen, Janice; Middleton, Don

    1999-10-01

    A good physical understanding of the initiation, propagation, and spread of crown fires remains an elusive goal for fire researchers. Although some data exist that describe the fire spread rate and some qualitative aspects of wildfire behavior, none have revealed the very small timescales and spatial scales in the convective processes that may play a key role in determining both the details and the rate of fire spread. Here such a dataset is derived using data from a prescribed burn during the International Crown Fire Modelling Experiment. A gradient-based image flow analysis scheme is presented and applied to a sequence of high-frequency (0.03 s), high-resolution (0.05-0.16 m) radiant temperature images obtained by an Inframetrics ThermaCAM instrument during an intense crown fire to derive wind fields and sensible heat flux. It was found that the motions during the crown fire had energy-containing scales on the order of meters with timescales of fractions of a second. Estimates of maximum vertical heat fluxes ranged between 0.6 and 3 MW m2 over the 4.5-min burn, with early time periods showing surprisingly large fluxes of 3 MW m2. Statistically determined velocity extremes, using five standard deviations from the mean, suggest that updrafts between 10 and 30 m s1, downdrafts between 10 and 20 m s1, and horizontal motions between 5 and 15 m s1 frequently occurred throughout the fire.The image flow analyses indicated a number of physical mechanisms that contribute to the fire spread rate, such as the enhanced tilting of horizontal vortices leading to counterrotating convective towers with estimated vertical vorticities of 4 to 10 s1 rotating such that air between the towers blew in the direction of fire spread at canopy height and below. The IR imagery and flow analysis also repeatedly showed regions of thermal saturation (infrared temperature > 750°C), rising through the convection. These regions represent turbulent bursts or hairpin vortices resulting again from

  7. FT-IR and C-13 NMR analysis of soil humic fractions from a long term cropping systems study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased knowledge of humic fractions is important due to its involvement in many soil ecosystem processes. Soil humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) from a nine-year agroecosystem study with different tillage, cropping system, and N source treatments were characterized using FT-IR andsolid-state ...

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Lonicera japonica Thunb. Immature Flower Buds Using Combinatorial Peptide Ligand Libraries and Polyethylene Glycol Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Xiaobao; Tian, Jingkui; Zhang, Lin; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-01-01

    Lonicera japonica Thunb. flower is a well-known medicinal plant that has been widely used for the treatment of human disease. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological activities of L. japonica immature flower buds, a gel-free/label-free proteomic technique was used in combination with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation for the enrichment of low-abundance proteins and removal of high-abundance proteins, respectively. A total of 177, 614, and 529 proteins were identified in crude protein extraction, CPLL fractions, and PEG fractions, respectively. Among the identified proteins, 283 and 239 proteins were specifically identified by the CPLL and PEG methods, respectively. In particular, proteins related to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, signaling, hormone metabolism, and transport were highly enriched by CPLL and PEG fractionation compared to crude protein extraction. A total of 28 secondary metabolism-related proteins and 25 metabolites were identified in L. japonica immature flower buds. To determine the specificity of the identified proteins and metabolites for L. japonica immature flower buds, Cerasus flower buds were used, which resulted in the abundance of hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase in L. japonica immature flower buds being 10-fold higher than that in Cerasus flower buds. These results suggest that proteins related to secondary metabolism might be responsible for the biological activities of L. japonica immature flower buds.

  9. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering for analysis of gelatin nanoparticle drug carrier systems.

    PubMed

    Fraunhofer, Wolfgang; Winter, Gerhard; Coester, Conrad

    2004-04-01

    The physicochemical properties of nanosized colloidal drug carrier systems are of great influence on drug efficacy. Consequently, a broad spectrum of analytical techniques is applied for comprehensive drug carrier characterization. It is the primary objective of this paper to present asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4), coupled online with multiangle light scattering detection, for the characterization of gelatin nanoparticles. Size and size distribution of drug-loaded and unloaded nanoparticles were determined, and data were correlated with results of state-of-the-art methods, such as scanning electron microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. Moreover, the AF4 fractionation of gelatin nanoparticulate carriers from a protein model drug is demonstrated for the first time, proposing a feasible way to assess the amount of loaded drug in situ without sample preparation. This hypothesis was set into practice by monitoring the drug loading of nanoparticles with oligonucleotide payloads. In this realm, various fractions of gelatin bulk material were analyzed via AF4 and size-exclusion high-pressure liquid chromatography. Mass distributions and high-molecular-weight fraction ratios of the gelatin samples varied, depending on the separation method applied. In general, the AF4 method demonstrated the ability to comprehensively characterize polymeric gelatin bulk material as well as drug-loaded and unloaded nanoparticles in terms of size, size distribution, molecular weight, and loading efficiency.

  10. A Comparative Analysis of British and Taiwanese Students' Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge of Fraction Addition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hui-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    This study examines students' procedural and conceptual achievement in fraction addition in England and Taiwan. A total of 1209 participants (561 British students and 648 Taiwanese students) at ages 12 and 13 were recruited from England and Taiwan to take part in the study. A quantitative design by means of a self-designed written test is…

  11. Analysis of Free Fractions for Chiral Drugs Using Ultrafast Extraction and Multi-Dimensional High-Performance Affinity Chromatography†

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Yoo, Michelle J.; Hage, David S.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-dimensional chromatographic approach was developed to measure the free fractions of drug enantiomers in samples that also contained a binding protein or serum. This method, which combined ultrafast affinity extraction with a chiral stationary phase, was demonstrated using the drug warfarin and the protein human serum albumin. PMID:23979112

  12. Teaching a New Method of Partial Fraction Decomposition to Senior Secondary Students: Results and Analysis from a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Man, Yiu-Kwong; Leung, Allen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach to compute the partial fraction decompositions of rational functions and describe the results of its trials at three secondary schools in Hong Kong. The data were collected via quizzes, questionnaire and interviews. In general, according to the responses from the teachers and students concerned, this new…

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Lonicera japonica Thunb. Immature Flower Buds Using Combinatorial Peptide Ligand Libraries and Polyethylene Glycol Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Xiaobao; Tian, Jingkui; Zhang, Lin; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-01-01

    Lonicera japonica Thunb. flower is a well-known medicinal plant that has been widely used for the treatment of human disease. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological activities of L. japonica immature flower buds, a gel-free/label-free proteomic technique was used in combination with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation for the enrichment of low-abundance proteins and removal of high-abundance proteins, respectively. A total of 177, 614, and 529 proteins were identified in crude protein extraction, CPLL fractions, and PEG fractions, respectively. Among the identified proteins, 283 and 239 proteins were specifically identified by the CPLL and PEG methods, respectively. In particular, proteins related to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, signaling, hormone metabolism, and transport were highly enriched by CPLL and PEG fractionation compared to crude protein extraction. A total of 28 secondary metabolism-related proteins and 25 metabolites were identified in L. japonica immature flower buds. To determine the specificity of the identified proteins and metabolites for L. japonica immature flower buds, Cerasus flower buds were used, which resulted in the abundance of hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase in L. japonica immature flower buds being 10-fold higher than that in Cerasus flower buds. These results suggest that proteins related to secondary metabolism might be responsible for the biological activities of L. japonica immature flower buds. PMID:26573373

  14. Heterogeneity and scaling in soil-vegetation atmosphere systems: implications for pattern analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.

    2009-12-01

    Advances in sensor physics and technology create opportunities for explicit consideration of patterns in soil-vegetation-atmosphere systems (SVAS). The purpose of this talk is to provoke discussion on the current status of pattern analysis and interpretation in SVAS. The explicit consideration of patterns requires observations and analysis at scales that are both coarser and finer than the scale of interest. Within-scale scaling relationships are often observed in SVAS components. However, direct scaling relationships have not been discovered between scales, possibly because the different scales provide different types of information about the SVAS, use different variables to characterize SVAS, and exhibit different variability of the system. To transcend the scales, models are needed that explicitly treat the fine-scale heterogeneity and rare occurrences that control processes at the coarser scale. As patterns are generated from simulations and or/or observations, methods are needed for pattern characterization and comparison. One promising direction here is the symbolic representation of patterns which leads to the exploitation of methods developed in the bioinformatics community. Examples drawn from soil hydrology and micrometeorology will be used in illustrations to make the argument that observation and analysis of patterns is the important part of understanding and quantifying relationships between structure, functioning and self-organization in SVAS and their components.

  15. Analysis of free drug fractions in human serum by ultrafast affinity extraction and two-dimensional affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiwei; Podariu, Maria; Matsuda, Ryan; Hage, David S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast affinity extraction and a two-dimensional high performance affinity chromatographic system were used to measure the free fractions for various drugs in serum and at typical therapeutic concentrations. Pooled samples of normal serum or serum from diabetic patients were utilized in this work. Several drug models (i.e., quinidine, diazepam, gliclazide, tolbutamide, and acetohexamide) were examined that represented a relatively wide range of therapeutic concentrations and affinities for human serum albumin (HSA). The two-dimensional system consisted of an HSA microcolumn for the extraction of a free drug fraction, followed by a larger HSA analytical column for the further separation and measurement of this fraction. Factors that were optimized in this method included the flow rates, column sizes, and column switching times that were employed. The final extraction times used for isolating the free drug fractions were 333-665 ms or less. The dissociation rate constants for several of the drugs with soluble HSA were measured during system optimization, giving results that agreed with reference values. In the final system, free drug fractions in the range of 0.7-9.5% were measured and gave good agreement with values that were determined by ultrafiltration. Association equilibrium constants or global affinities were also estimated by this approach for the drugs with soluble HSA. The results for the two-dimensional system were obtained in 5-10 min or less and required only 1-5 μL of serum per injection. The same approach could be adapted for work with other drugs and proteins in clinical samples or for biomedical research. PMID:26462924

  16. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA content and Ki-67-positive fractions in the diagnosis of salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Horii, A; Yoshida, J; Sakai, M; Okamoto, S; Kubo, T

    1998-01-01

    To explore the utility of flow cytometry (FCM) for the diagnosis of histopathology of salivary gland tumors, fresh materials taken at surgery from 23 Warthin's tumors, 57 pleomorphic adenomas, and 14 malignant tumors were analyzed for DNA ploidy and proliferative cell activities, including S-phase fraction (SPF), G2- plus M-phase fraction (G2M), and Ki-67-positive fraction. To facilitate this study, glands were taken from all major salivary sites and minor glands in the head and neck. DNA aneuploidy was not detected in the benign tumors. Nine of 14 malignant tumors showed DNA aneuploidy. The percentage of SPF or G2M of the malignant tumors was significantly higher than those of the benign tumors. The percentage of Ki-67-positive fraction of pleomorphic adenomas was comparable to that of malignant tumors and was significantly higher than that of Warthin's tumors. Ki-67 of 20% as a cut-off had a sensitivity of 88%, specificity of 100%, and accuracy of 91% for differentiating pleomorphic adenomas from Warthin's tumors. In analyzing DNA content and proliferative activities by FCM, we could distinguish among the three major histopathologies of salivary gland tumors. Warthin's tumors showed low SPF + G2M with low Ki-67, pleomorphic adenomas had low SPF + G2M with high Ki-67, and malignant tumor showed high SPF + G2M with high Ki-67. The high percentage of the Ki-67-positive fraction seen in pleomorphic adenomas may reflect their potential biological aggressiveness manifested as tumor recurrence or malignant transformation.

  17. Stochastic analysis of a field-scale unsaturated transport experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, G.; Comegna, A.; Coppola, A.; Sommella, A.; Santini, A.

    2010-10-01

    Modelling of field-scale transport of chemicals is of deep interest to public as well as private sectors, and it represents an area of active theoretical research in many environmentally-based disciplines. However, the experimental data needed to validate field-scale transport models are very limited due to the numerous logistic difficulties that one faces out. In the present paper, the migration of a tracer (Cl -) was monitored during its movement in the unsaturated zone beneath the surface of 8 m × 50 m sandy soil. Under flux-controlled, steady-state water flow ( Jw = 10 mm/day) was achieved by bidaily sprinkler irrigation. A pulse of 105 g/m 2 KCl was applied uniformly to the surface, and subsequently leached downward by the same (chloride-free) flux Jw over the successive two months. Chloride concentration monitoring was carried out in seven measurement campaigns (each one corresponding to a given time) along seven (parallel) transects. The mass recovery was near 100%, therefore underlining the very good-quality of the concentration data-set. The chloride concentrations are used to test two field-scale models of unsaturated transport: (i) the Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE), which models transport far from the zone of solute entry, and (ii) the Stochastic- Convective Log- normal (CLT) transfer function model, which instead accounts for transport near the release zone. Both the models provided an excellent representation of the solute spreading at z > 0.45 m (being z = 0.45 m the calibration depth). As a consequence, by the depth z ≈ 50 cm one can regard transport as Fickian. The ADE model dramatically underestimates solute spreading at shallow depths. This is due to the boundary effects which are not captured by the ADE. The CLT model appears to be a more robust tool to mimic transport at every depth.

  18. Wavelet analysis and scaling properties of time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manimaran, P.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.; Parikh, Jitendra C.

    2005-10-01

    We propose a wavelet based method for the characterization of the scaling behavior of nonstationary time series. It makes use of the built-in ability of the wavelets for capturing the trends in a data set, in variable window sizes. Discrete wavelets from the Daubechies family are used to illustrate the efficacy of this procedure. After studying binomial multifractal time series with the present and earlier approaches of detrending for comparison, we analyze the time series of averaged spin density in the 2D Ising model at the critical temperature, along with several experimental data sets possessing multifractal behavior.

  19. Analysis of world economic variables using multidimensional scaling.

    PubMed

    Machado, J A Tenreiro; Mata, Maria Eugénia

    2015-01-01

    Waves of globalization reflect the historical technical progress and modern economic growth. The dynamics of this process are here approached using the multidimensional scaling (MDS) methodology to analyze the evolution of GDP per capita, international trade openness, life expectancy, and education tertiary enrollment in 14 countries. MDS provides the appropriate theoretical concepts and the exact mathematical tools to describe the joint evolution of these indicators of economic growth, globalization, welfare and human development of the world economy from 1977 up to 2012. The polarization dance of countries enlightens the convergence paths, potential warfare and present-day rivalries in the global geopolitical scene.

  20. Analysis of world economic variables using multidimensional scaling.

    PubMed

    Machado, J A Tenreiro; Mata, Maria Eugénia

    2015-01-01

    Waves of globalization reflect the historical technical progress and modern economic growth. The dynamics of this process are here approached using the multidimensional scaling (MDS) methodology to analyze the evolution of GDP per capita, international trade openness, life expectancy, and education tertiary enrollment in 14 countries. MDS provides the appropriate theoretical concepts and the exact mathematical tools to describe the joint evolution of these indicators of economic growth, globalization, welfare and human development of the world economy from 1977 up to 2012. The polarization dance of countries enlightens the convergence paths, potential warfare and present-day rivalries in the global geopolitical scene. PMID:25811177

  1. A tree swaying in a turbulent wind: a scaling analysis.

    PubMed

    Odijk, Theo

    2015-01-01

    A tentative scaling theory is presented of a tree swaying in a turbulent wind. It is argued that the turbulence of the air within the crown is in the inertial regime. An eddy causes a dynamic bending response of the branches according to a time criterion. The resulting expression for the penetration depth of the wind yields an exponent which appears to be consistent with that pertaining to the morphology of the tree branches. An energy criterion shows that the dynamics of the branches is basically passive. The possibility of hydrodynamic screening by the leaves is discussed.

  2. Enabling Large-Scale Biomedical Analysis in the Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Chih; Yu, Chin-Sheng; Lin, Yen-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in high-throughput instrumentations has led to an astonishing growth in both volume and complexity of biomedical data collected from various sources. The planet-size data brings serious challenges to the storage and computing technologies. Cloud computing is an alternative to crack the nut because it gives concurrent consideration to enable storage and high-performance computing on large-scale data. This work briefly introduces the data intensive computing system and summarizes existing cloud-based resources in bioinformatics. These developments and applications would facilitate biomedical research to make the vast amount of diversification data meaningful and usable. PMID:24288665

  3. Scaling analysis of 2D fractal cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schliecker, Gudrun

    2001-01-01

    The correlations between topological and metric properties of fractal tessellations are analysed. To this end, Sierpinski cellular structures are constructed for different geometries related to Sierpinski gaskets and to the Apollonian packing of discs. For these geometries, the properties of the distribution of the cells' areas and topologies can be derived analytically. In all cases, an algebraic increase of the cell's average area with its number of neighbours is obtained. This property, unknown from natural cellular structures, confirms previous observations in numerical studies of Voronoi tessellations generated by fractal point sets. In addition, a simple rigorous scaling resp. multiscaling properties relating the shapes and the sizes of the cells are found.

  4. Analysis of World Economic Variables Using Multidimensional Scaling

    PubMed Central

    Machado, J.A. Tenreiro; Mata, Maria Eugénia

    2015-01-01

    Waves of globalization reflect the historical technical progress and modern economic growth. The dynamics of this process are here approached using the multidimensional scaling (MDS) methodology to analyze the evolution of GDP per capita, international trade openness, life expectancy, and education tertiary enrollment in 14 countries. MDS provides the appropriate theoretical concepts and the exact mathematical tools to describe the joint evolution of these indicators of economic growth, globalization, welfare and human development of the world economy from 1977 up to 2012. The polarization dance of countries enlightens the convergence paths, potential warfare and present-day rivalries in the global geopolitical scene. PMID:25811177

  5. Dual Scaling Analysis of Chinese Students' Conceptions of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, John; Chan, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Using a descriptive quantitative methodology for categorical data analysis, investigates whether Chinese students' conceptions of learning included memorization. Explains that the University of Hong Kong students (n=25) ranked six conceptions of learning. Includes references. (CMK)

  6. Economic analysis of small-scale fuel alcohol plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, J.J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    To plan Department of Energy support programs, it is essential to understand the fundamental economics of both the large industrial size plants and the small on-farm size alcohol plants. EG and G Idaho, Inc., has designed a 25 gallon per hour anhydrous ethanol plant for the Department of Energy's Alcohol Fuels Office. This is a state-of-the-art reference plant, which will demonstrate the cost and performance of currently available equipment. The objective of this report is to examine the economics of the EG and G small-scale alcohol plant design and to determine the conditions under which a farm plant is a financially sound investment. The reference EG and G Small-Scale Plant is estimated to cost $400,000. Given the baseline conditions defined in this report, it is calculated that this plant will provide an annual after-tax of return on equity of 15%, with alcohol selling at $1.62 per gallon. It is concluded that this plant is an excellent investment in today's market, where 200 proof ethanol sells for between $1.80 and $2.00 per gallon. The baseline conditions which have a significant effect on the economics include plant design parameters, cost estimates, financial assumptions and economic forecasts. Uncertainty associated with operational variables will be eliminated when EG and G's reference plant begins operation in the fall of 1980. Plant operation will verify alcohol yield per bushel of corn, labor costs, maintenance costs, plant availability and by-product value.

  7. Small-Scale Smart Grid Construction and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surface, Nicholas James

    The smart grid (SG) is a commonly used catch-phrase in the energy industry yet there is no universally accepted definition. The objectives and most useful concepts have been investigated extensively in economic, environmental and engineering research by applying statistical knowledge and established theories to develop simulations without constructing physical models. In this study, a small-scale version (SSSG) is constructed to physically represent these ideas so they can be evaluated. Results of construction show data acquisition three times more expensive than the grid itself although mainly due to the incapability to downsize 70% of data acquisition costs to small-scale. Experimentation on the fully assembled grid exposes the limitations of low cost modified sine wave power, significant enough to recommend pure sine wave investment in future SSSG iterations. Findings can be projected to full-size SG at a ratio of 1:10, based on the appliance representing average US household peak daily load. However this exposes disproportionalities in the SSSG compared with previous SG investigations and recommended changes for future iterations are established to remedy this issue. Also discussed are other ideas investigated in the literature and their suitability for SSSG incorporation. It is highly recommended to develop a user-friendly bidirectional charger to more accurately represent vehicle-to-grid (V2G) infrastructure. Smart homes, BEV swap stations and pumped hydroelectric storage can also be researched on future iterations of the SSSG.

  8. Bench-scale Analysis of Surrogates for Anaerobic Digestion Processes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Zachary S; Long, Sharon C

    2016-05-01

    Frequent monitoring of anaerobic digestion processes for pathogen destruction is both cost and time prohibitive. The use of surrogates to supplement regulatory monitoring may be one solution. To evaluate surrogates, a semi-batch bench-scale anaerobic digester design was tested. Bench-scale reactors were operated under mesophilic (36 °C) and thermophilic (53-55 °C) conditions, with a 15 day solids retention time. Biosolids from different facilities and during different seasons were examined. USEPA regulated pathogens and surrogate organisms were enumerated at different times throughout each experiment. The surrogate organisms included fecal coliforms, E. coli, enterococci, male-specific and somatic coliphages, Clostridium perfringens, and bacterial spores. Male-specific coliphages tested well as a potential surrogate organism for virus inactivation. None of the tested surrogate organisms correlated well with helminth inactivation under the conditions studied. There were statistically significant differences in the inactivation rates between the facilities in this study, but not between seasons. PMID:27131309

  9. Combining Flux Balance and Energy Balance Analysis for Large-Scale Metabolic Network: Biochemical Circuit Theory for Analysis of Large-Scale Metabolic Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, Daniel A.; Liang, Shou-Dan; Qian, Hong; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Predicting behavior of large-scale biochemical metabolic networks represents one of the greatest challenges of bioinformatics and computational biology. Approaches, such as flux balance analysis (FBA), that account for the known stoichiometry of the reaction network while avoiding implementation of detailed reaction kinetics are perhaps the most promising tools for the analysis of large complex networks. As a step towards building a complete theory of biochemical circuit analysis, we introduce energy balance analysis (EBA), which compliments the FBA approach by introducing fundamental constraints based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Fluxes obtained with EBA are thermodynamically feasible and provide valuable insight into the activation and suppression of biochemical pathways.

  10. Manufacturing Cost Analysis for YSZ-Based FlexCells at Pilot and Full Scale Production Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Robin Kimbrell; Kellie Chenault

    2011-05-01

    Significant reductions in cell costs must be achieved in order to realize the full commercial potential of megawatt-scale SOFC power systems. The FlexCell designed by NexTech Materials is a scalable SOFC technology that offers particular advantages over competitive technologies. In this updated topical report, NexTech analyzes its FlexCell design and fabrication process to establish manufacturing costs at both pilot scale (10 MW/year) and full-scale (250 MW/year) production levels and benchmarks this against estimated anode supported cell costs at the 250 MW scale. This analysis will show that even with conservative assumptions for yield, materials usage, and cell power density, a cost of $35 per kilowatt can be achieved at high volume. Through advancements in cell size and membrane thickness, NexTech has identified paths for achieving cell manufacturing costs as low as $27 per kilowatt for its FlexCell technology. Also in this report, NexTech analyzes the impact of raw material costs on cell cost, showing the significant increases that result if target raw material costs cannot be achieved at this volume.

  11. Scaling Analysis of Ocean Surface Turbulent Heterogeneities from Satellite Remote Sensing: Use of 2D Structure Functions, methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, F. G.; Pannimpullath Remanan, R.; Loisel, H.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing observations allow the ocean surface to be sampled over large spatio-temporal scales. The images provided from visible and thermal infrared satellite observations are widely used in physical, biological, and ecological oceanography. The present work proposes a method to understand the multi-scaling properties of satellite products such as the Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and the Sea Surface Temperature (SST). The specific objectives of this study are to show how the small scale heterogeneities of satellite images can be characterised using tools borrowed from the fields of turbulence. We show how the structure function, which is classically used in the frame of scaling time series analysis, can be used also in 2D. The main advantage of this method is that it can be applied to process images which have missing data. Based on both simulated and real images, we demonstrate that coarse-graining (CG) of a gradient modulus transform of the original image does not provide correct scaling exponents. We show, using a fractional Brownian simulation in 2D, that the structure function (SF) can be used with randomly sampled couple of points, and verify that 1 million of couple of points provides enough statistics. After this methodological study, some applications are presented: the nonlinear moment function ζ(q) is fitted using the lognormal model with 2 parameters, the Hurst index H and the intermittency μ. The values of H and μ are discussed for 4 different parameters (Chl-a, SST, Rrs-443 and Rrs-555) and for different locations, chosen among different contrasted regions of the ocean, characterized by high spatial heterogeneity in Chl-a and SST.

  12. Analysis and Management of Large-Scale Activities Based on Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shaofan; Ji, Jingwei; Lu, Ligang; Wang, Zhiyi

    Based on the concepts of system safety engineering, life-cycle and interface that comes from American system safety standard MIL-STD-882E, and apply them to the process of risk analysis and management of large-scale activities. Identify the involved personnel, departments, funds and other contents throughout the life cycle of large-scale activities. Recognize and classify the ultimate risk sources of people, objects and environment of large-scale activities from the perspective of interface. Put forward the accident cause analysis model according to the previous large-scale activities' accidents and combine with the analysis of the risk source interface. Analyze the risks of each interface and summary various types of risks the large-scale activities faced. Come up with the risk management consciousness, policies and regulations, risk control and supervision departments improvement ideas.

  13. A two-scale finite element formulation for the dynamic analysis of heterogeneous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ionita, Axinte

    2008-01-01

    In the analysis of heterogeneous materials using a two-scale Finite Element Method (FEM) the usual assumption is that the Representative Volume Element (RVE) of the micro-scale is much smaller than the finite element discretization of the macro-scale. However there are situations in which the RVE becomes comparable with, or even bigger than the finite element. These situations are considered in this article from the perspective of a two-scale FEM dynamic analysis. Using the principle of virtual power, new equations for the fluctuating fields are developed in terms of velocities rather than displacements. To allow more flexibility in the analysis, a scaling deformation tensor is introduced together with a procedure for its determination. Numerical examples using the new approach are presented.

  14. Large-scale temporal analysis of computer and information science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soos, Sandor; Kampis, George; Gulyás, László

    2013-09-01

    The main aim of the project reported in this paper was twofold. One of the primary goals was to produce an extensive source of network data for bibliometric analyses of field dynamics in the case of Computer and Information Science. To this end, we rendered the raw material of the DBLP computer and infoscience bibliography into a comprehensive collection of dynamic network data, promptly available for further statistical analysis. The other goal was to demonstrate the value of our data source via its use in mapping Computer and Information Science (CIS). An analysis of the evolution of CIS was performed in terms of collaboration (co-authorship) network dynamics. Dynamic network analysis covered three quarters of the XX. century (76 years, from 1936 to date). Network evolution was described both at the macro- and the mezo level (in terms of community characteristics). Results show that the development of CIS followed what appears to be a universal pattern of growing into a "mature" discipline.

  15. Data mining: data analysis on a grand scale?

    PubMed

    Smyth, P

    2000-08-01

    Modern data mining has evolved largely as a result of efforts by computer scientists to address the needs of 'data owners' in extracting useful information from massive observational data sets. Because of this historical context, data mining to date has largely focused on computational and algorithmic issues rather than the more traditional statistical aspects of data analysis. This paper provides a brief review of the origins of data mining as well as discussing some of the primary themes in current research in data mining, including scalable algorithms for massive data sets, discovering novel patterns in data, and analysis of text, web, and related multimedia data sets.

  16. Computational solutions to large-scale data management and analysis.

    PubMed

    Schadt, Eric E; Linderman, Michael D; Sorenson, Jon; Lee, Lawrence; Nolan, Garry P

    2010-09-01

    Today we can generate hundreds of gigabases of DNA and RNA sequencing data in a week for less than US$5,000. The astonishing rate of data generation by these low-cost, high-throughput technologies in genomics is being matched by that of other technologies, such as real-time imaging and mass spectrometry-based flow cytometry. Success in the life sciences will depend on our ability to properly interpret the large-scale, high-dimensional data sets that are generated by these technologies, which in turn requires us to adopt advances in informatics. Here we discuss how we can master the different types of computational environments that exist - such as cloud and heterogeneous computing - to successfully tackle our big data problems.

  17. Fine scale thermal blooming instability: a linear stability analysis.

    PubMed

    Barnard, J J

    1989-02-01

    The fine-scale thermal blooming instability of a high power trans-atmospheric laser beam is shown to be affected by the laser pulse length. In this study, we calculate the asymptotic gain of a sinusoidal perturbation as a function of pulse length and perturbation wavenumber. We include the effects of viscosity, diffusion, and wind shear, and we heuristically estimate the effect of turbulence. We find that for short laser pulses, the small wavenumber perturbations are reduced due to acoustic effects. However, large wavenumber perturbations remain large and extend to a higher cutoff in wavenumber than in the long laser pulse limit. At wavenumbers higher than this cutoff, thermal diffusion causes exponential decay of the perturbations. For long laser pulse length wind shear and turbulence limit perturbation growth.

  18. A Multidimensional Scaling Analysis of Students' Attitudes about Science Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnick, Amy M.; Stavros Valenti, S.; Cox, Brian D.; Osman, Christopher J.

    2010-03-01

    To encourage students to seek careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields, it is important to gauge students' implicit and explicit attitudes towards scientific professions. We asked high school and college students to rate the similarity of pairs of occupations, and then used multidimensional scaling (MDS) to create a spatial representation of occupational similarity. Other students confirmed the emergent MDS map by rating each of the occupations along several dimensions. We found that participants across age and sex considered scientific professions to be less creative and less people-oriented than other popular career choices. We conclude that students may be led away from STEM careers by common misperceptions that science is a difficult, uncreative, and socially isolating pursuit.

  19. Computational solutions to large-scale data management and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schadt, Eric E.; Linderman, Michael D.; Sorenson, Jon; Lee, Lawrence; Nolan, Garry P.

    2011-01-01

    Today we can generate hundreds of gigabases of DNA and RNA sequencing data in a week for less than US$5,000. The astonishing rate of data generation by these low-cost, high-throughput technologies in genomics is being matched by that of other technologies, such as real-time imaging and mass spectrometry-based flow cytometry. Success in the life sciences will depend on our ability to properly interpret the large-scale, high-dimensional data sets that are generated by these technologies, which in turn requires us to adopt advances in informatics. Here we discuss how we can master the different types of computational environments that exist — such as cloud and heterogeneous computing — to successfully tackle our big data problems. PMID:20717155

  20. Reducing Waste in Extreme Scale Systems through Introspective Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bautista-Gomez, Leonardo; Gainaru, Ana; Perarnau, Swann; Engelmann, Christian; Cappello, Franck; Snir, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Resilience is an important challenge for extreme- scale supercomputers. Today, failures in supercomputers are assumed to be uniformly distributed in time. However, recent studies show that failures in high-performance computing systems are partially correlated in time, generating periods of higher failure density. Our study of the failure logs of multiple supercomputers show that periods of higher failure density occur with up to three times more than the average. We design a monitoring system that listens to hardware events and forwards important events to the runtime to detect those regime changes. We implement a runtime capable of receiving notifications and adapt dynamically. In addition, we build an analytical model to predict the gains that such dynamic approach could achieve. We demonstrate that in some systems, our approach can reduce the wasted time by over 30%.