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Sample records for fractured slab techniques

  1. May eclogite dehydration cause slab fracturation ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loury, Chloé; Lanari, Pierre; Rolland, Yann; Guillot, Stéphane; Ganino, Clément

    2015-04-01

    prograde path, leading to a complete dehydration at the pressure peak conditions, (25 kbar and 510°C). The amount of water released during this stage is about 20 g/dm3. In this example, no hydration event is recorded during the exhumation, explaining the good preservation of the anhydrous eclogite. This study shows that garnet thermobarometry in eclogite may be used as a proxy for progressive oceanic crust dehydration as suggested by the models of Baxter & Caddick (2014). In contrast to such models, the estimations proposed in the present study are based on the measured composition of local domains in rock-samples and not on average bulk rock compositions. Complete dehydration of eclogites around 75 km corresponds to the maximum depth of most exhumed oceanic eclogites except for a few special cases. Moreover the distribution of seismicity along the slab shows that only few earthquakes do occur in the crust beyond this limit as compared to the seismicity above it. Consequently this example from a natural sample strongly suggests that the eclogite dehydration at this depth can cause slab fracturation and consequently enhance eclogite exhumation. Baxter, E.F. & Caddick, M.J. 2013. Garnet growth as a proxy for progressive subduction zone dehydration. Geology, 41, 643-646 Lanari, P., Vidal, O., De Andrade, V., Dubacq, B., Lewin, E., Grosch, E.G. & Schwartz, S. 2014. XMapTools: A MATLAB©-based program for electron microprobe X-ray image processing and geothermobarometry. Computers & Geosciences, 62, 227-240 Loury, C., Rolland, Y., Guillot, S., Mikolaichuk, A., Lanari, P., Bruguier, O. & Bosch, D. in press. Crustal-scale structure of South Tien Shan : implications for subduction polarity and Cenozoic reactivation. Geological Society of London, special publications

  2. Size effect law and fracture mechanics of the triggering of dry snow slab avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bažant, ZdeněK. P.; Zi, Goangseup; McClung, David

    2003-02-01

    A size effect law for fracture triggering in dry snow slabs of high enough length-to-thickness ratio is formulated, based on simplified one-dimensional analysis by equivalent linear elastic fracture mechanics. Viscoelastic effects during fracture are neglected. The derived law, which is analogous to Bažant's energetic size effect law developed for concrete and later for sea ice, fiber composites, rocks, and ceramics, is shown to agree with two-dimensional finite element analysis of mode II cohesive crack model with a finite residual shear stress. Fitting the proposed size effect law to fracture data for various slab thicknesses permits identifying the material fracture parameters. The value of preexisting shear stress in a thin weak zone of finite length is shown to have significant effect. There exists a certain critical snow depth, depending on the preexisting stress value, below which the size effect disappears. Practical applications require considering that the material properties (particularly the mode II fracture toughness or fracture energy) at the snow slab base are not constant but depend strongly on the slab thickness. This means that one must distinguish the material size effect from the structural size effect, and the combined size effect law must be obtained by introducing into the structural size effect law dependence of its parameters on snow thickness. The thickness dependence of these parameters can be obtained by matching the combined law to avalanche observations. Matching Perla's field data on 116 avalanches suggests that the mode II fracture toughness is approximately proportional to 1.8 power of snow thickness.

  3. Slab fractures of the third tarsal bone: Minimally invasive repair using a single 3.5 mm cortex screw placed in lag fashion in 17 Thoroughbred racehorses.

    PubMed

    Barker, W H J; Wright, I M

    2017-03-01

    A technique for minimally invasive repair of slab fractures of the third tarsal bone has not previously been reported. Results of third tarsal bone slab fracture repair in Thoroughbred racehorses are lacking. To report the outcomes of repair of uniplanar frontal slab factures of the third tarsal bone using a single 3.5 mm cortex screw in lag fashion. Retrospective case series. Case records of horses that had undergone this procedure were reviewed. Seventeen horses underwent surgery. Eighteen percent of cases had wedge shaped third tarsal bones. A point midway between the long and lateral digital extensor tendons and centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints created a suitable entry site for implants. The fracture location, configuration and curvature of the third tarsal bone and associated joints requires a dorsolateral proximal-plantaromedial distal trajectory for the screw, which was determined by preplaced needles. There were no complications and fractures healed in all cases at 4-6 months post surgery. Seventy-nine percent of horses returned to racing and, at the time of reporting, 3 are in post operative rehabilitation programmes. The technique reported provides a safe, appropriate and repeatable means of repairing slab fractures of the third tarsal bone. Surgical repair is a viable alternative to conservative management. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  4. Subduction of fracture zones controls mantle melting and geochemical signature above slabs.

    PubMed

    Manea, Vlad C; Leeman, William P; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi

    2014-10-24

    For some volcanic arcs, the geochemistry of volcanic rocks erupting above subducted oceanic fracture zones is consistent with higher than normal fluid inputs to arc magma sources. Here we use enrichment of boron (B/Zr) in volcanic arc lavas as a proxy to evaluate relative along-strike inputs of slab-derived fluids in the Aleutian, Andean, Cascades and Trans-Mexican arcs. Significant B/Zr spikes coincide with subduction of prominent fracture zones in the relatively cool Aleutian and Andean subduction zones where fracture zone subduction locally enhances fluid introduction beneath volcanic arcs. Geodynamic models of subduction have not previously considered how fracture zones may influence the melt and fluid distribution above slabs. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of subduction, we show that enhanced production of slab-derived fluids and mantle wedge melts concentrate in areas where fracture zones are subducted, resulting in significant along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes.

  5. Offshore hydraulic fracturing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Meese, C.A. ); Mullen, M.E. ); Barree, R.D. )

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes the frac-and-pack completion technique currently being used in the Gulf of Mexico, and elsewhere, for stimulation and sand control. The paper describes process applications and concerns that arise during implementation of the technique and discusses the completion procedure, treatment design, and execution.

  6. Surgical techniques of olecranon fractures.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, James A; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2014-08-01

    Olecranon fractures are common upper extremity injuries. The vast majority are treated with operative fixation. Many treatment techniques have been described including tension band and plating. This review covers the most commonly used fixation techniques in detail, including pearls and pitfalls with case examples of both successful treatments and potential complications. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fracture problem of a nonhomogeneous high temperature superconductor slab based on real fundamental solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Zheng, Zhiye; Li, Xueyi

    2015-12-01

    To analyze the fracture problem of the nonhomogeneous high temperature superconductor (HTS) slab under electromagnetic force, we derive the real fundamental solutions based on eigenvalue and eigenvector analyses. The superconductor E-J constitutive law is characterized by the Bean model where the critical current density is independent of the flux density. Fracture analysis is performed by the methods of singular integral equations which are solved numerically by Lobatto-Chybeshev collocation method. Numerical results of the stress intensity factor (SIF) are obtained. Moreover, the crack opening displacement (COD) can be obtained by numerical integration dislocation density functions. The effects of the thickness ratio, HTS material nonhomogeneous parameters, applied magnetic field and critical current density on SIF and COD are discussed. The present work could theoretically provide quantitative predictions of the fracture mechanism of the nonhomogeneous HTS.

  8. Minimally invasive osteosynthesis technique for articular fractures.

    PubMed

    Beale, Brian S; Cole, Grayson

    2012-09-01

    Articular fractures require accurate reduction and rigid stabilization to decrease the chance of osteoarthritis and joint dysfunction. Articular fractures have been traditionally repaired by arthrotomy and internal fixation. Recently, minimally invasive techniques have been introduced to treat articular fractures, reducing patient morbidity and improving the accuracy of reduction. A variety of techniques, including distraction, radiographic imaging, and arthroscopy, are used with the minimally invasive osteosynthesis technique of articular fractures to achieve a successful repair and outcome.

  9. Subduction of Fracture Zones control mantle melting and geochemical signature above slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Leeman, William; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi

    2014-05-01

    The geochemistry of arc volcanics proximal to oceanic fracture zones (FZs) is consistent with higher than normal fluid inputs to arc magma sources. Here, enrichment of boron (B/Zr) in volcanic arc lavas is used to evaluate relative along-strike inputs of slab-derived fluids in the Aleutian, Andean, Cascades, and Trans-Mexican arcs. Significant B/Zr spikes coincide with subduction of prominent FZs in the relatively cool Aleutian and Andean subduction zones, but not in the relatively warm Cascadia and Mexican subduction zones, suggesting that FZ subduction locally enhances fluid introduction beneath volcanic arcs, and retention of fluids to sub-arc depths diminishes with subduction zone thermal gradient. Geodynamic treatments of lateral inhomogeneities in subducting plates have not previously considered how FZs may influence the melt and fluid distribution above the slab. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, concentrate in areas where fracture zones are subducted, resulting in along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes.

  10. A biomechanical comparison of headless tapered variable pitch and AO cortical bone screws for fixation of a simulated slab fracture in equine third carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Aloisio C D; Galuppo, Larry D; Taylor, Kenneth T; Jensen, David G; Stover, Susan M

    2003-01-01

    specimens (1.64 +/- 0.73 kN/mm; P =.005). All other shear mechanical testing variables were not statistically different among screw types. The 4/5 Acutrak insertion technique was accurate and safe, and the AT screw effectively stabilized simulated equine C3 frontal plane slab fractures. When tested in shear, this screw type was mechanically comparable to the 4.5-mm AO screw; however, AT constructs had greater initial shear stiffness. Initial shear stiffness was likely an indirect measure of interfragmentary compression, and thus may indicate that the AT screw provides a more rigid fixation for frontal plane C3 slab fractures in horses. Considering the comparable mechanical behavior, greater initial shear stiffness for AT screw stabilized C3 slab fracture fragments, the ability to accurately insert the screw with the aid of a guide pin, and the potential for less persistent soft tissue irritation with the headless screw design, the 4/5 tapered AT screw is an attractive alternative for repair of C3 slab fractures in horses. Copyright 2003 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons

  11. Plating of patella fractures: techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Benjamin C; Mehta, Sanjay; Castaneda, Joaquin; French, Bruce G; Blanchard, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Operative treatment of displaced patella fractures with tension band fixation remains the gold standard, but is associated with a significant rate of complications and symptomatic implants. Despite the evolution of tension band fixation to include cannulated screws, surprisingly little other development has been made to improve overall patient outcomes. In this article, we present the techniques and outcomes of patella plating for displaced patella fractures and patella nonunions.

  12. Physical and Clinical Evaluation of Hip Spica Cast applied with Three-slab Technique using Fibreglass Material

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, KM; Ferdhany, ME; Saw, A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hip spica casting is an important component of treatment for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and popular treatment method for femur fractures in children. Breakage at the hip region is a relatively common problem of this cast. We have developed a three-slab technique of hip spica application using fibreglass as the cast material. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the physical durability of the spica cast and skin complications with its use. Methodology: A retrospective review of children with various conditions requiring hip spica immobilisation which was applied using our method. Study duration was from 1st of January 2014 until 31st December 2015. Our main outcomes were cast breakage and skin complications. For children with hip instability, the first cast would be changed after one month, and the second cast about two months later. Results: Twenty-one children were included, with an average age of 2.2 years. The most common indication for spica immobilisation was developmental dysplasia of the hip. One child had skin irritation after spica application. No spica breakage was noted. Conclusion: This study showed that the three-slab method of hip spica cast application using fibreglass material was durable and safe with low risk of skin complications. PMID:28553442

  13. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis fracture reduction techniques in small animals.

    PubMed

    Peirone, Bruno; Rovesti, Gian Luca; Baroncelli, Alessandro Boero; Piras, Lisa

    2012-09-01

    Indirect fracture reduction is used to align diaphyseal fractures in small animals when using minimally-invasive fracture repair. Indirect reduction achieves functional fracture reduction without opening the fracture site. The limb is restored to length and spatial alignment is achieved to ensure proper angular and rotational alignment. Fracture reduction can be accomplished using a variety of techniques and devices, including hanging the limb, manual traction, distraction table, external fixators, and a fracture distractor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ray-tracing technique and imaging properties by a PC slab with neff=-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Chen, Jiabi; Qian, W.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, negative refractive media as the representation of new electromagnetic medium has become the front and the very popular researching field, and the production of the flat lens is one of its major applications. In our study, the imaging behaviors by two-dimensional photonic crystal slabs have been investigated systematically. We suggest a ray-tracing technique to discuss the action of photonic crystal slab with negative refraction. The propagation of electromagnetic waves in two-dimensional hexagonal lattice photonic crystal slab is investigated through dispersion characteristics analysis and numerical simulation of field patterns. Imaging and focusing with effective negative refractive index of -1 have been observed in these systems for both polarized waves, that is TE- and TM-polarized point source be considered simultaneously. Based on the exact finite-difference time-domain method to perform numerical simulation and physical analysis, we have demonstrated that the two-dimensional photonic crystal we designed can realize nearly perfect imaging with TM-polarized point source in the near field and far field, and the results are consistent with the ray-tracing technique quite well, while to TE-polarized point source the imaging is not perfect although it have neff=-1 in the same direction.

  15. Imaging the slab beneath central Chile using the Spectral Elements Method and adjoint techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercerat, E. D.; Nolet, G.; Marot, M.; Deshayes, P.; Monfret, T.

    2010-12-01

    This work focuses on imaging the subducting slab beneath Central Chile using novel inversion techniques based on the adjoint method and accurate wave propagation simulations using the Spectral Elements Method. The study area comprises the flat slab portion of the Nazca plate between 29 S and 34 S subducting beneath South America. We will use a database of regional seismicity consisting of both crustal and deep slab earthquakes with magnitude 3 < Mw < 6 recorded by different temporary and permanent seismological networks. Our main goal is to determine both the kinematics and the geometry of the subducting slab in order to help the geodynamical interpretation of such particular active margin. The Spectral Elements Method (SPECFEM3D code) is used to generate the synthetic seismograms and it will be applied for the iterative minimization based on adjoint techniques. The numerical mesh is 600 km x 600 km in horizontal coordinates and 220 km depth. As a first step, we are faced to well-known issues concerning mesh generation (resolution, quality, absorbing boundary conditions). In particular, we must evaluate the influence of free surface topography, as well as the MOHO and other geological interfaces in the synthetic seismograms. The initial velocity model from a previous travel-time tomography study, is linearly interpolated to the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grid. The comparison between the first forward simulations (up to 4 seconds minimum period) validate the initial velocity model of the study area, although many features not reproduced by the initial model have already been identified. Next step will concentrate in the comparison between finite-frequency kernels calculated by travel-time methods with ones based on adjoint methods, in order to highlight advantages and disadvantages in terms of resolution, accuracy, but also computational cost.

  16. Techniques for increasing boron fiber fracture strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Improvement in the strain-to-failure of CVD boron fibers is shown possible by contracting the tungsten boride core region and its inherent flaws. The results of three methods are presented in which etching and thermal processing techniques were employed to achieve core flaw contraction by internal stresses available in the boron sheath. After commercially and treatment induced surface flaws were removed from 203 micrometers (8 mil) fibers, the core flaw was observed to be essentially the only source of fiber fracture. Thus, fiber strain-to-failure was found to improve by an amount equal to the treatment induced contraction on the core flaw. Commercial feasibility considerations suggest as the most cost effective technique that method in which as-produced fibers are given a rapid heat treatment above 700 C. Preliminary results concerning the contraction kinetics and fracture behavior observed are presented and discussed both for high vacuum and argon gas heat treatment environments.

  17. Techniques for increasing boron fiber fracture strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Improvement in the strain-to-failure of chemical-vapor-deposition boron fibers is shown possible by contracting the tungsten boride core region and its inherent flaws. Results of three methods are presented in which etching and thermal-processing techniques were employed to achieve core flaw contraction by internal stresses available in the boron sheath. After commercially and treatment-induced surface flaws were removed from 203-micron (8-mil) fibers, the core flaw was observed to be essentially the only source of fiber fracture. Thus, fiber strain-to-failure was found to improve by an amount equal to the treatment-induced contraction on the core flaw. To date, average fracture strains and stresses greater than 1.4% and 5.5 GN/sq m (800 ksi), respectively, have been achieved. Commercial feasibility considerations suggest as the most cost-effective technique that method in which as-produced fibers are given a rapid heat treatment above 700 C. Preliminary results concerning the contraction kinetics and fracture behavior observed with this technique are presented and discussed for both high-vacuum and argon-gas heat-treatment environments.

  18. Snow fracture in relation to slab avalanche release: critical state for the onset of crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaume, Johan; van Herwijnen, Alec; Chambon, Guillaume; Wever, Nander; Schweizer, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    The failure of a weak snow layer buried below cohesive slab layers is a necessary, but insufficient, condition for the release of a dry-snow slab avalanche. The size of the crack in the weak layer must also exceed a critical length to propagate across a slope. In contrast to pioneering shear-based approaches, recent developments account for weak layer collapse and allow for better explaining typical observations of remote triggering from low-angle terrain. However, these new models predict a critical length for crack propagation that is almost independent of slope angle, a rather surprising and counterintuitive result. Based on discrete element simulations we propose a new analytical expression for the critical crack length. This new model reconciles past approaches by considering for the first time the complex interplay between slab elasticity and the mechanical behavior of the weak layer including its structural collapse. The crack begins to propagate when the stress induced by slab loading and deformation at the crack tip exceeds the limit given by the failure envelope of the weak layer. The model can reproduce crack propagation on low-angle terrain and the decrease in critical length with increasing slope angle as modeled in numerical experiments. The good agreement of our new model with extensive field data and the ease of implementation in the snow cover model SNOWPACK opens a promising prospect for improving avalanche forecasting.

  19. Fracture problems of a superconducting slab with a central kinked crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S. W.; Feng, W. J.; Liu, J. X.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the central kinked crack problem is investigated for a long rectangular superconducting slab under electromagnetic forces. The distributions of both the current density and the magnetic flux density in the slab are obtained analytically in the Kim critical state model for both the zero-field cooling and the field cooling magnetization processes. And based on the finite element method, the stress intensity factors at the crack tips for decreasing magnetic fields are numerically calculated. Numerical results obtained show that the zero-field cooling activation process generally has more significant influence on the stress intensity factors than the field cooling activation process, and that for every activation process, as the applied field decreases, the superconducting slab is most dangerous when the currents in the crack region are just be influenced. In general, both the maximal mode-I stress intensity factors (SIFs) and mode-II SIFs decrease with the increasing of either the introduced dimensionless parameter p in the Kim model or the crack length. However, the effects of kinked angles on the SIFs are complex. The present study should be helpful to the design and application of high-temperature superconductors.

  20. Fracture detection in crystalline rock using ultrasonic reflection techniques: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.P. )

    1982-11-01

    This research was initiated to investigate using ultrasonic seismic reflection techniques to detect fracture discontinuities in a granitic rock. Initial compressional (P) and shear (SH) wave experiments were performed on a 0.9 {times} 0.9 {times} 0.3 meter granite slab in an attempt to detect seismic energy reflected from the opposite face of the slab. It was found that processing techniques such as deconvolution and array synthesis could improve the standout of the reflection event. During the summers of 1979 and 1980 SH reflection experiments were performed at a granite quarry near Knowles, California. The purpose of this study was to use SH reflection methods to detect an in situ fracture located one to three meters behind the quarry face. These SH data were later analyzed using methods similar to those applied in the laboratory. Interpretation of the later-arriving events observed in the SH field data as reflections from a steeply-dipping fracture was inconclusive. 41 refs., 43 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Dynamics of slab detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, T.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Gerya, T. V.

    2012-04-01

    Our study investigates the dynamics of slab detachment and evaluates the amount of time necessary for slabs to detach. We combine both the results of two-dimensional numerical modeling with the prediction of a one-dimensional analytical solution for viscous necking under gravity. This tidy suggest that the dominant deformation mechanisms leading to slab detachment is viscous necking, independently of the depth of slab detachment. Localised simple shear may also occur when the slab dip is moderate, especially in the colder parts of the slab. Brittle fracturing, or breaking, plays a minor role during the slab detachment process. 2D thermo-mechanical simulations indicate that the duration of slab detachment is short (< 4 Ma) and can occur in less than 0.5 Ma. No simple correlation between the slab detachment depth and duration was found. Our results suggest that deep slab detachments (> 250 km) can also occur within a short time (< 1 Ma). On the other hand, slab detachments taking place between 35 and 250 km depth may last less than 2 Ma. This aspect has implications for geodynamic interpretations using slab detachment as explanation for processes such as melting, exhumation or surface uplift.

  2. [Case-control study on close reduction and plaster slab fixation combined with plaster external traction for the treatment of pediatric Gartland type III supracondylar humerus fractures].

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu-Xiang; Wei, Xiao-Chun; Li, Hai-Ming

    2014-07-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects between close reduction and plaster slab fixation combined with plaster external traction and operation for the treatment of pediatric closed Gartland type III supracondylar humerus fractures without neurovascular injury complications. From June 2009 to June 2012, 151 children with closed Gartland III supracondylar humerus fractures were retrospectively studied and divided into two groups, including 87 boys and 64 girls, ranging in age from 1 to 12 years old with an average of 5.3 years old. Among them, 76 children (conservative group) were treated with close reduction and plaster slab fixation combined with plaster external traction; 75 children (operation group) underwent surgical operation. The time of elbow joint function exercise, the healing time of fracture, the function recovery of elbow joint and carrying angle was recorded and analyzed. The therapeutic effects were evaluated by the Flynn criteria system. All patients were followed up from 6 to 36 months (18.3 months on average). The average time of fracture healing and elbow joint functional exercise of the conservative group was shorter than those of operation group (P < 0.001). Motion range of the elbows and carrying angle of two groups were no statistical difference (P > 0.05). According to Flynn criteria system, in conservative group, the result was excellent in 31 cases, good in 35, fair in 7, and poor in 3; in operation group, 27 in excellent, 30 in good, 17 in fair and 1 in poor; there was no significant difference between two groups in therapeutic effects (P > 0.05). Close reduction and plaster slab fixation combined with plaster external traction in treatment of pediatric closed Gartland type III supracondylar humerus fractures without neurovascular injury complications,which has similar effect to surgical treatment, and the time of fracture healing and elbow joint function exercise are significantly shorter.

  3. Rock porosity and fracture parameter estimation by image technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Wang, Ch. Z.; Hu, Y. Z.

    2009-06-01

    To estimate rock porosity in 2D and 3D, we used image technique to analyze rock fractures. We set up some models to characterize the rock fractures, based on the models, we used Best fit Ferret method to auto-determine fracture zone, then, analyze rock fracture porosities in 2-D and 3-D. In this study, rock sample is cut off into a number of slices of a certain thickness (18mm), then the fracture images are taken slice by slice both by using ultraviolet and visible lights, subsequently the fracture images are auto-thresholded into binary images, and fracture zones are determined by minimum circumscribed rectangles, finally the porosities are calculated in 2-D dimensional, and 3-D porosities are estimated based on 2-D porosity information.

  4. New technique for fixing rib fracture with bioabsorbable plate.

    PubMed

    Oyamatsu, Hironori; Ohata, Norihisa; Narita, Kunio

    2016-09-01

    Fixation of a bone fracture with a bioabsorbable plate made of poly-L-lactide and hydroxyapatite has received attention. We adopted this technique for a rib fracture by bending the plate into a U-shape and fixing it with suture through the holes in the mesh of the plate and holes that are drilled in the edge of the fractured rib. The suture is also wound around the plate. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Calcaneal Fracture Management: Extensile Lateral Approach Versus Small Incision Technique.

    PubMed

    Kiewiet, Nathan J; Sangeorzan, Bruce J

    2017-03-01

    Calcaneal fracture management has historically been a controversial topic and represents an area of sustained interest over the past several decades. The authors review current methods for calcaneal fracture fixation with an extensile lateral approach and small incision techniques. Early reports of small incision techniques have reported promising outcomes and reduced risks for complications. These techniques may be beneficial to reduce the risk of soft tissue complications and improve the rate of recovery.

  6. Safe surgical technique for associated acetabular fractures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Associated acetabular fractures are challenging injuries to manage. The complex surgical approaches and the technical difficulty in achieving anatomical reduction imply that the learning curve to achieve high-quality care of patients with such challenging injuries is extremely steep. This first article in the Journal’s “Safe Surgical Technique” section presents the standard surgical care, in conjunction with intraoperative tips and tricks, for the safe management of all subgroups of associated acetabular fractures. PMID:23414782

  7. Operative Fixation of Rib Fractures Indications, Techniques, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Galos, David; Taylor, Benjamin; McLaurin, Toni

    2017-01-01

    Rib fractures are extremely common injuries and vary in there severity from single nondisplaced fractures to multiple segmental fractures resulting in flail chest and respiratory compromise. Historically, rib fractures have been treated conservatively with pain control and respiratory therapy. However this method may not be the best treatment modality in all situations. Operative fixation of select rib fractures has been increasing in popularity especially in patients with flail chest and respiratory compromise. Newer techniques use muscle sparing approaches and precontoured locking plate technology to obtain stable fixation and allow improved respiration. Current reports shows that rib fracture fixation offers the benefits of improved respiratory mechanics and improved pain control in the severe chest wall injury with resultant improvement in patient outcomes by decreasing time on the ventilator, time in the intensive care unit, and overall hospital length of stay.

  8. Diagnosis of hip fracture by the auscultatory percussion technique.

    PubMed

    File, P; Wood, J P; Kreplick, L W

    1998-03-01

    Traumatic hip pain is a commonly encountered complaint in the emergency department. Occasionally, initial radiographs fail to show a fracture. A delayed diagnosis can result in significant patient morbidity. Diagnostic algorithms have been formulated to evaluate the patient with hip pain and negative initial radiographs. The auscultatory percussion technique can alert the physician of the presence or absence of an occult hip fracture. Consequently, the physician may order a more sophisticated imaging technique.

  9. Techniques for intramedullary nailing of proximal tibia fractures.

    PubMed

    Stinner, Daniel J; Mir, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Despite poor early results with intramedullary nailing of extra-articular proximal tibia fractures, improvements in surgical technique and implant design modifications have resulted in more acceptable outcomes. However, prevention of the commonly encountered apex anterior and/or valgus deformities remains a challenge when treating these injuries. It is necessary for the surgeon to recognize this and know how to neutralize these forces. Surgeons should be comfortable using a variety of the reduction techniques presented to minimize fracture malalignment.

  10. Improving clinical examination in acute tibial fractures by enhancing visual cues: the case for always 'cutting back' a tibial back-slab and marking the dorsalis pedis pulse.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alasdair; Kimber, Cheryl; Bramwell, Donald; Jaarsma, Ruurd

    2016-08-01

    Look, feel, move is a simple and widely taught sequence to be followed when undertaking a clinical examination in orthopaedics (Maher et al., 1994; McRae, 1999; Solomon et al., 2010). The splinting of an acute tibial fracture with a posterior back-slab is also common practice; with the most commonly taught design involving covering the dorsum of the foot with bandaging (Charnley, 1950; Maher et al., 1994; McRae, 1989). We investigated the effect of the visual cues provided by exposing the dorsum of the foot and marking the dorsalis pedis pulse. We used a clinical simulation in which we compared the quality of the recorded clinical examination undertaken by 30 nurses. The nurses were randomly assigned to assess a patient with either a traditional back-slab or one in which the dorsal bandaging had been cut back and the dorsalis pedis pulse marked. We found that the quality of the recorded clinical examination was significantly better in the cut-back group. Previous studies have shown that the cut-back would not alter the effectiveness of the back-slab as a splint (Zagorski et al., 1993). We conclude that all tibial back-slabs should have the bandaging on the dorsum of the foot cut back and the location of the dorsalis pedis pulse marked. This simple adaptation will improve the subsequent clinical examinations undertaken and recorded without reducing the back-slab's effectiveness as a splint. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of Discrete Fracture Modeling and Upscaling Techniques to Complex Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi-Fard, M.; Lapene, A.; Pauget, L.

    2012-12-01

    During the last decade, an important effort has been made to improve data acquisition (seismic and borehole imaging) and workflow for reservoir characterization which has greatly benefited the description of fractured reservoirs. However, the geological models resulting from the interpretations need to be validated or calibrated against dynamic data. Flow modeling in fractured reservoirs remains a challenge due to the difficulty of representing mass transfers at different heterogeneity scales. The majority of the existing approaches are based on dual continuum representation where the fracture network and the matrix are represented separately and their interactions are modeled using transfer functions. These models are usually based on idealized representation of the fracture distribution which makes the integration of real data difficult. In recent years, due to increases in computer power, discrete fracture modeling techniques (DFM) are becoming popular. In these techniques the fractures are represented explicitly allowing the direct use of data. In this work we consider the DFM technique developed by Karimi-Fard et al. [1] which is based on an unstructured finite-volume discretization. The mass flux between two adjacent control-volumes is evaluated using an optimized two-point flux approximation. The result of the discretization is a list of control-volumes with the associated pore-volumes and positions, and a list of connections with the associated transmissibilities. Fracture intersections are simplified using a connectivity transformation which contributes considerably to the efficiency of the methodology. In addition, the method is designed for general purpose simulators and any connectivity based simulator can be used for flow simulations. The DFM technique is either used standalone or as part of an upscaling technique. The upscaling techniques are required for large reservoirs where the explicit representation of all fractures and faults is not possible

  12. A Novel Technique in Restoring Fractured Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    K, Rajavardhan; Sankar, A.J. Sai; Shaik, Tanveer Ahmed; V, Naveen Kumar; K, Raj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Trauma to the anterior teeth is a common phenomenon in young children and in adolescents. Uncomplicated crown fracture to the permanent teeth has an intense effect not only on the patient’s appearance, but also on function and speech. This case report describes a novel technique in restoring an uncomplicated fractured maxillary anterior tooth in a young patient with direct composite, which is economical and requires less chair side time. PMID:24701546

  13. Arthroscopic treatment for greater tuberosity fractures: rationale and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Taverna, Ettore; Sansone, Valerio; Battistella, Ferdinando

    2004-07-01

    A description of a new technique for arthroscopic treatment of minimally displaced greater tuberosity fractures of the humerus and associated soft tissue lesions is presented. This kind of fracture is usually treated nonsurgically. However, recent evidence suggests that even a small amount of superior displacement may produce shoulder dysfunction and require a perfect surgical reduction and fixation. Moreover, any displaced fracture of the greater tuberosity presents a high rate of associated and largely undetected soft tissue lesions. To avoid underestimating accompanying soft tissue pathology, arthroscopic assessment before open treatment of greater tuberosity fractures has been suggested. In 2 earlier case reports, we described the use of an arthroscope not only to diagnose and treat a rotator cuff tear and a Bankart lesion associated with a minimally displaced greater tuberosity fracture but also to arthroscopically reduce and treat the fracture. With advancements in arthroscopy and equipment, we refined and systematized the original arthroscopic technique that we have routinely used since 1997. This article presents the new technique.

  14. Metacarpal Neck Fractures: A Review of Surgical Indications and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Padegimas, Eric M.; Warrender, William J.; Jones, Christopher M.; Ilyas, Asif M.

    2016-01-01

    Context Hand injuries are a common emergency department presentation. Metacarpal fractures account for 40% of all hand fractures and can be seen in the setting of low or high energy trauma. The most common injury pattern is a metacarpal neck fracture. In this study, the authors aim to review the surgical indications for metacarpal neck fractures, the fixation options available along with the risk and benefits of each. Evidence Acquisition Literature review of the different treatment modalities for metacarpal neck fractures. Review focuses on surgical indications and the risks and benefits of different operative techniques. Results The indications for surgery are based on the amount of dorsal angulation of the distal fragment. The ulnar digits can tolerate greater angulation as the radial digits more easily lose grip strength. The most widely utilized fixation techniques are pinning with k-wires, dorsal plating, or intramedullary fixation. There is currently no consensus on an optimal fixation technique as surgical management has been found to have a complication rate up to 36%. Plate and screw fixation demonstrated especially high complication rates. Conclusions Metacarpal neck fractures are a common injury in young and active patients that results in substantial missed time from work. While the surgical indications are well-described, there is no consensus on the optimal treatment modality because of high complication rates. Dorsal plating has higher complication rates than closed reduction and percutaneous pinning, but is necessary in comminuted fractures. The lack of an ideal fixation construct suggests that further study of the commonly utilized techniques as well as novel techniques is necessary. PMID:27800460

  15. The handshake technique: proposal of a closed manual reduction technique for Colles' wrist fracture.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Andrea Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Colles' fracture is a distal radius injury, with dorsal tilt of the distal radial fracture fragment. Its typical treatment involves reduction and plaster cast immobilization to restore its anatomical position. Sometimes, reduction maneuver may be difficult with poor outcomes, requiring repeated reduction maneuvers or eventual surgical treatment. The author proposes a simple, easy, and reliable manual reduction technique.

  16. A Novel Approach in Security Using Gyration Slab with Watermarking Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupa, Ch.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a novel security approach is proposed to improve the security and robustness of the data. It uses three levels of security to protect the sensitive data. In the first level, the data is to be protected by Gyration slab encryption algorithm. Result of the first level has to be embedded into an image as original using our earlier paper concept PLSB into a second level of security. The resultant image from the second level is considered as watermark Image. In the third level, the watermark image is embedded into the original image. Here watermark image and original image are similar. The final output of the proposed security approach is a watermarked image which holds the stego image. This method provides more security and robustness than the existing approaches. The main properties of the proposed approach are Gyration slab operations and watermark image and original image are similar. These can reduce the Brute-force attack and improve the confusion and diffusion principles. The main strengths of this paper are cryptanalysis, steganalysis, watermark analysis with reports.

  17. Recognition of skeletal fractures in infants: an autopsy technique.

    PubMed

    Love, Jennifer C; Sanchez, Luis A

    2009-11-01

    Complete recognition and documentation of injury pattern is crucial in the diagnosis of child abuse. Skeletal fractures regarded as highly specific to nonaccidental injury in infants include posterior rib, scapular, metaphyseal, and spinous process fractures. These injuries are often occult, especially when acute, to standard radiologic and autopsy procedures. The presented autopsy technique requires incising and reflecting skeletal muscles to expose the bones and costal osseous joints in situ, increasing the opportunity to recognize skeletal injury. Fractured or atypical appearing bones are removed and processed for complete evaluation. The bones are processed by macerating the soft tissue in a water soap bath at an elevated temperature. To aid in reconstruction of the decedent, long bones are replaced with wooden dowels and the chest cavity is packed with the organ bag. The technique is invasive and recommended for cases in which the pathologist has reasonable suspicion of acute or remote trauma.

  18. Safe surgical technique: intramedullary nail fixation of tibial shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Zelle, Boris A; Boni, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Statically locked, reamed intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Establishing an appropriate starting point is a crucial part of the surgical procedure. Recently, suprapatellar nailing in the semi-extended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique. Numerous reduction techiques are available to achieve an anatomic fracture alignment and the treating surgeon should be familiar with these maneuvers. Open reduction techniques should be considered if anatomic fracture alignment cannot be achieved by closed means. Favorable union rates above 90 % can be achieved by both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing. Despite favorable union rates, patients continue to have functional long-term impairments. In particular, anterior knee pain remains a common complaint following intramedullary tibial nailing. Malrotation remains a commonly reported complication after tibial nailing. The effect of postoperative tibial malalignment on the clinical and radiographic outcome requires further investigation.

  19. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Frauk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2001-08-15

    Research continues on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. Work has progressed on developing techniques for estimating fracture properties from seismic and well log data, developing naturally fractured wellbore models, and developing a model to characterize the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the fracture system for use in the naturally fractured reservoir simulator.

  20. Fracture resistance of premolar teeth restored with different filling techniques.

    PubMed

    França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Worschech, Claudia Cia; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Lovadino, José Roberto

    2005-08-15

    The aim of this study is to verify the fracture resistance of premolars with large mesiocclusodistal (MOD) preparations with composite resin using different incremental techniques when subjected to an occlusal load. Forty maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Class II MOD cavities were prepared in all specimens with parallel walls and no approximal boxes. The resulting isthmus width was 1/3 the distance between the cusp tips and (3/4) the height of the crown. Teeth in group I, the control group, were not restored. Specimens in group II were restored in three incremental vertical layers. Group III specimens were restored in three horizontal layers, and finally, specimens in group IV were restored in oblique layers. With exception of the placement technique, specimens in groups II, III and IV were restored using the Single Bond adhesive system and P60 composite resin following manufacturer's recommendations. A 4 mm diameter steel sphere contacted the buccal and lingual cusps of the tested teeth at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. The values obtained in this study were subjected to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and a Tukey-Kramer test. Only group I (non-restored) obtained a minor means of fracture resistance. No significant differences among groups II, III, and IV were found. This study shows on large MOD cavities the incremental filling techniques do not influence the fracture resistance of premolar teeth restored with composite resin.

  1. Total hip replacement for hip fracture: Surgical techniques and concepts.

    PubMed

    Coomber, Ross; Porteous, Matthew; Hubble, Matthew J W; Parker, Martyn J

    2016-10-01

    When treating a hip fracture with a total hip replacement (THR) the surgical technique may differ in a number of aspects in comparison to elective arthroplasty. The hip fracture patient is more likely to have poor bone stock secondary to osteoporosis, be older, have a greater number of co-morbidities, and have had limited peri-operative work-up. These factors lead to a higher risk of complications, morbidity and perioperative mortality. Consideration should be made to performing the THR in a laminar flow theatre, by a surgeon experienced in total hip arthroplasty, using an anterolateral approach, cementing the implant in place, using a large head size and with repair of the joint capsule. Combined Ortho-geriatric care is recommended with similar post-operative rehabilitation to elective THR patients but with less expectation of short length of stay and consideration for fracture prevention measures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Suprapatellar nailing of tibial fractures-Indications and technique.

    PubMed

    Franke, J; Hohendorff, B; Alt, V; Thormann, U; Schnettler, R

    2016-02-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the standard procedure for surgical treatment of closed and Gustilo-Anderson Grade I-II° open fractures of the tibial shaft. The use of intramedullary nailing for the treatment of proximal metaphyseal tibia fractures is frequently followed by postoperative malalignment, whereas plate osteosynthesis is associated with higher rates of postoperative infection. Intramedullary nailing of tibial fractures is generally performed through an infrapatellar approach. The injured extremity must be positioned at a minimum of 90° of flexion in the knee joint to achieve optimal exposure of the correct entry point. The tension of the quadriceps tendon causes a typical apex anterior angulation of the proximal fragment. The suprapatellar approach improves reduction of the fracture and reduces the occurrence of malalignment during intramedullary nailing of extra-articular proximal tibial fractures. The knee is positioned in 20° of flexion to neutralise traction forces secondary to the quadriceps muscle, thus preventing an apex anterior angulation of the proximal fragment. An additional advantage of the technique is that it allows the surgeon to avoid or minimise further soft tissue damage because of the distance between the optimal incision point and the usual area of soft tissue damage.

  3. Midshaft Clavicular Fractures - Osteosynthesis with Minimally Invasive Technique

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sadek, Tabet A.; Niklev, Desislav; Al-Sadek, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fractures of the clavicle are one of the most common fractures in modern orthopaedics and traumatology practice. Knowing the mechanism of trauma, and it’s pathophysiological elements, it’s clear distinction and it’s individual features are essential to the development of more new and effective methods for their treatment, and the minimising of postoperative complications. AIM: The aim of this paper was to present the results of our patients treated with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between January 2011 and March 2013, 12 patients were treated with MIPO technique. The mean age was 47.5 years (range, 16-79 years). Outcomes and complications of clinical treatment were reviewed. RESULTS: All fractures healed within a mean period of 4.9 months (range, 2-10 months). Regarding complications, there was no occurrence of implant failure or deep infection. There were no nonunions, but one 79-year-old man had a delayed union. Almost of all the cases didn’t need bending of the plate. Seven plates were removed by their hopes. And there weren’t any cases that required new incisions. CONCLUSIONS: A pre-contoured plate anatomically configured to fit the clavicle was easier to apply. MIPO technique for midshaft clavicle fractures may be a good option. PMID:28028406

  4. Detection of delamination in concrete slabs combining infrared thermography and impact echo techniques: a comparative experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Fuad; Bartoli, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Inspection of bridge decks is of primary importance in the field of bridges maintenance since, unless other structural components, they are more subjected to degradation and traffic-induced deterioration phenomena. Among the various deterioration mechanisms, delaminations are generally difficult to detect because no visible effects are usually observed on the deck surface. Since the entity of the damage progressively increase during time, methodologies able to effectively detect delaminations are needed in order to design appropriate solutions and reduce maintenance costs. In this work, the results obtained using two different nondestructive techniques, namely the impact echo (IE) method and the infrared thermography (IR), are compared. Experimental tests have been performed on a 20cm thick concrete slab containing delaminations of various extensions and on a small 60cm×60cm×20cm concrete specimen. Impact echo tests have been performed, with ultrasonic waveforms collected on an orthogonal grid of points spaced 30cm apart. Spacing was reduced to 5 cm for IE data collection in the small block. Leveraging different features extracted from IE, delaminations have been located. The results obtained using the impact echo test have been compared with those extracted using the infrared thermography. The main concept behind the use of the IR is that embedded horizontal interfaces behave as heat traps, resulting in different temperature areas on the slab surface. A discussion on the pro and cons of the two methodologies is provided and the paper ends with a preliminary attempt to perform data fusion, combining the results from the 2 different nondestructive techniques.

  5. Use of orthogonal or parallel plating techniques to treat distal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua M; Dantuluri, Phani K

    2010-08-01

    Distal humerus fractures continue to be a complex fracture to treat. This article describes two surgical techniques that can be used to tackle these difficult fractures: Parallel plating and orthogonal plating. Both techniques have yielded excellent outcomes after open reduction and internal fixation; yet each has its own set of unique considerations. However, the key to successful treatment of these difficult fractures regardless of technique remains obtaining anatomic reduction with stable fixation and the implementation of early motion.

  6. In-vitro Evaluation of Fracture Strength Recovery of Reattached Anterior Fractured Tooth Fragment Using Different Re-Attachment Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkhayum, Abdulmujeeb; Munjal, Sumit; Babaji, Prashant; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap; Munjal, Seema; Lau, Himani; Olekar, Santosh T; Lau, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic injuries caused to anterior teeth are most common. Emergency management of fractured fragments is necessary, for preserving their vitalities and for retaining aesthetics in an economical way. Various methods are available for restoring fractured, uncomplicated teeth, such as reattachment of fractured fragments, composite restoration. But only limited data is available on evaluation of the strength of reattached fractured fragments. Hence, the present study was designed. Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the fracture strength recovery of re-attached anterior fractured tooth fragment by using different re-attachment techniques. Methodology: Forty human upper central incisions were used in this study. The roots of the teeth were confined in a special device (holder) and adapted in a Universal Testing Machine. Load was applied to each tooth in bucco-lingual direction, by using a small stainless steel ball. The force which was required to fracture the tooth was recorded. Both the fragment and remaining fractured tooth was restored by using four reattachment techniques - simple reattachment, external chamfer, over contour and internal dentinal groove. Specimens were loaded in same pre-determined area which was used in procedure to obtain fragments. The force required to detach each fragment was recorded and it was correlated with the fracture strength of an intact tooth and that which was obtained after doing restorative procedures for all groups i.e. fracture strength recovery. Results: Technique I (simple reattachment) and Technique 2 (external chamfer) showed fracture strength recoveries of 44.3% and 60.6% respectively. However, these values were lower than those which were obtained by usingTechnique 3 (Over contour) -86.8% and Technique 4 (internal dentinal groove) -89.5%. Conclusion: Over contour and internal dentinal groove reattachment is a preferred technique as compared to the other reattachment techniques which were

  7. Influence of restorative technique on the biomechanical behavior of endodontically treated maxillary premolars. Part I: fracture resistance and fracture mode.

    PubMed

    Soares, Paulo Vinicius; Santos-Filho, Paulo Cesar Freitas; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Soares, Carlos Jose

    2008-01-01

    Unresolved controversy exists concerning the preferred cavity design and restorative technique used to restore endodontically treated maxillary premolars to improve their resistance to fracture under occlusal load. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance, stress distribution, and cusp deformation of endodontically treated human maxillary premolars restored with different materials. The study is divided into 2 parts. In Part I, fracture resistance and fracture mode were determined. Seventy noncarious human maxillary premolars were selected and divided into 7 groups (n=10). The control group, ST, consisted of sound unprepared teeth. Teeth in the other 6 groups were endodontically treated and each received 1 of 2 cavity preparation designs: MODd, direct mesio-occlusal-distal preparation; MODi, indirect mesio-occlusal-distal preparation. Teeth were restored with 4 types of material: AM, MODd restored with amalgam; CR, MODd restored with composite resin; LPR, MODi restored with laboratory-processed composite resin; and LGC, MODi restored with leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The fracture resistance (N) was assessed under compressive load in a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (alpha =.05). Fracture modes were recorded based on the degree of tooth structure involvement and restoration damage. Statistical analysis showed that the ST group presented the highest fracture resistance values. The restored groups showed significantly higher fracture resistance values compared to the nonrestored groups. The groups restored with adhesive techniques (LPR, CR, and LGC) presented significantly higher fracture resistance values than the group restored with the nonadhesive technique (AM) (P<.001). The catastrophic fractures were prevalent in MODd, MODi, AM, and LPR groups, and less severe fractures were found in ST and LGC groups. For the CR group, there was no prevalent fracture mode. Teeth with the

  8. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Tan, Ting; Liu, Ken C

    2014-01-01

    Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of great interest regarding reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks, however, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen, in addition to the inherited specimen size effect. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, a torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  9. Current techniques for management of transverse displaced olecranon fractures

    PubMed Central

    den Hamer, Anniek; Heusinkveld, Maarten; Traa, Willeke; Oomen, Pim; Oliva, Francesco; Del Buono, Angelo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background displaced transverse fractures of the olecranon are the most common fractures occurring in the elbow in adults that requires operative intervention. Methods a literature search was performed on PubMed, Web of Science, Science Direct/Scopus, Google Scholar and Google using the keywords ‘olecranon’, ‘fracture’, ‘internal fixation’ and ‘tension band wiring’, with no limit for time or restrictions to language. Results thirty-one clinical articles were selected: 20 retrospective studies, 9 prospective cohort studies, and 2 randomized control trials. The CMS ranged from 18 to 66 (mean 41.68): overall, the quality of the studies was poor, and no moderate or good quality studies were found. The mean follow-up was 46.7 months (range 1 to 350 months). Several complications occurred after surgery: prominent hardware, skin breakdown, wire migration and infections occurred frequently. Removal of the hardware was required in 472 patients, usually after complaints, but also removal was routinely undertaken. Conclusions tension band wiring is still the most widely applied method to operatively manage olecranon fractures, with the transcortical method of using K-wires the most satisfactory. Plate fixation is a good alternative as complications are minimal. Other techniques using absorbable sutures are less investigated, but are promising, especially in children. PMID:26261793

  10. Fast iterative, coupled-integral-equation technique for inhomogeneous profiled and periodic slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magath, Thore; Serebryannikov, Andriyâ E.

    2005-11-01

    A fast coupled-integral-equation (CIE) technique is developed to compute the plane-TE-wave scattering by a wide class of periodic 2D inhomogeneous structures with curvilinear boundaries, which includes finite-thickness relief and rod gratings made of homogeneous material as special cases. The CIEs in the spectral domain are derived from the standard volume electric field integral equation. The kernel of the CIEs is of Picard type and offers therefore the possibility of deriving recursions, which allow the computation of the convolution integrals occurring in the CIEs with linear amounts of arithmetic complexity and memory. To utilize this advantage, the CIEs are solved iteratively. We apply the biconjugate gradient stabilized method. To make the iterative solution process faster, an efficient preconditioning operator (PO) is proposed that is based on a formal analytical inversion of the CIEs. The application of the PO also takes only linear complexity and memory. Numerical studies are carried out to demonstrate the potential and flexibility of the CIE technique proposed. Though the best efficiency and accuracy are observed at either low permittivity contrast or high conductivity, the technique can be used in a wide range of variation of material parameters of the structures including when they contain components made of both dielectrics with high permittivity and typical metals.

  11. A new technique in the surgical treatment of Hangman's fractures: Neurospinal Academy (NSA) technique

    PubMed Central

    Dalbayrak, Sedat; Yaman, Onur; Yılmaz, Mesut

    2013-01-01

    Context: Treatment of Hangman's fractures is still controversial. Hangman's fractures Type II and IIA are usually treated with surgical procedures. Aim: This study aims at describing the Neurospinal Academy (NSA) technique as an attempt to achieve an approximation of the fracture line to the axis body, which may be used for Type II and IIA patients with severe displacement and angulation. Settings and Design: NSA technique both pars or pedicle screws are placed bicortically to ensure that anterior surface of C2 vertebral body will be crossed 1-2 mm. A rod is prepared in suitable length and curve to connect the two screws. For placing the rod, sufficient amount of bone is resected from the C2 spinous process. C2 vertebral body is pulled back by means of the screws that crossed the anterior surface of C2 vertebral body. Materials and Methods: Hangman II and IIA patient are treated with NSA technique. Result: Angulated and tilted C2 vertebral body was pulled back and approximated to posterior elements. Conclusions: In Hangman's fractures Type II and IIA with severe vertebral body and pedicle displacement, NSA technique is an effective and reliable treatment alternative for the approximation of posterior elements to the C2 vertebral body, which is tilted, angulated, and dislocated. PMID:24744563

  12. A new technique in the surgical treatment of Hangman's fractures: Neurospinal Academy (NSA) technique.

    PubMed

    Dalbayrak, Sedat; Yaman, Onur; Yılmaz, Mesut

    2013-07-01

    Treatment of Hangman's fractures is still controversial. Hangman's fractures Type II and IIA are usually treated with surgical procedures. This study aims at describing the Neurospinal Academy (NSA) technique as an attempt to achieve an approximation of the fracture line to the axis body, which may be used for Type II and IIA patients with severe displacement and angulation. NSA technique both pars or pedicle screws are placed bicortically to ensure that anterior surface of C2 vertebral body will be crossed 1-2 mm. A rod is prepared in suitable length and curve to connect the two screws. For placing the rod, sufficient amount of bone is resected from the C2 spinous process. C2 vertebral body is pulled back by means of the screws that crossed the anterior surface of C2 vertebral body. Hangman II and IIA patient are treated with NSA technique. Angulated and tilted C2 vertebral body was pulled back and approximated to posterior elements. In Hangman's fractures Type II and IIA with severe vertebral body and pedicle displacement, NSA technique is an effective and reliable treatment alternative for the approximation of posterior elements to the C2 vertebral body, which is tilted, angulated, and dislocated.

  13. [Case-control study on small splint fixation with trapezoid pad and plaster slab fixation for the treatment of comminuted Colles fracture].

    PubMed

    Li, Teng-Hui; Chen, Min; Liu, Xiang-Qian; Gao, Yan-Ping; Wang, Huan; Li, Jia; Huang, Guang-Ping

    2013-09-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy of trapezoid pad coordinate with small splint fixation treatment with plaster slab fixation treatment for comminuted Colles fracture. From October 2010 to March 2012,80 outpatients with comminuted Colles fracture were divided into two groups. There were 40 patients in trapezoid pad splint fixation treatment group and 40 patients in pipe type plaster control group. There were 13 males and 27 females in trapezoid pad splint fixation treatment group,with an average age of (62.1 +/- 19.2) years old. And there were 15 males and 25 females in pipe type plaster control group,with an average age of (60.2 +/- 19.5) years old. After treated with manipulative reduction,the fractures were fixed with pipe plaster in the control group, and were fixed with trapezoid pad joint by small splint in the treatment group. The patients in both groups were regularly taken X-ray recheck and changed dressings to obtain the clinical healing. Patients were guided to do functional exercise after splints were taken off. The therapeutic effects were evaluated according to Gartland-Werlley wrist score when splints taken off and after 2 months. According to wrist score, the average scores in the treatment group were (8.1 +/- 2.8) when splints taken off and (5.3 +/- 4.5) after 2 months. And the average scores in the control group were (10.3 +/- 2.6) when splints taken off and (8.4 +/- 5.8) after 2 months. The score in the treatment group was higher than that of control group. The average shortened lengths of radius were (4.8 + 1.7) mm in the treatment group and (8.2 +/- 2.1) mm in the control group. The shortened length of control group was larger than that of treatment group. Trapezoid pad coordinated with small splint fixation is better than traditional pipe type plaster for treating comminuted Colles fracture.

  14. Density characterization of radiochromic film through source axis distance (SAD) technique in linac with slab phantom for radiotherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariani, Yousida; Haris, Bambang

    2017-05-01

    Characterization of radiochromic film density is accomplished through Source Axis Distance (SAD) technique in a slab phantom Linac with various depths and breadths of field. Type of the film used is gafchromic RTQA2. The dose of radiation exposure of the film may cause changes in the film density. This research aims to determine the relation between the density and the dose depth through the characteristic of curves to identify the depth of the dose and particular breadth of the field as a reference for the dose of radiotherapy patients. The result shows that the higher the dose is absorbed, the darker the film will be, yet the lower the density is obtained. The dose depth is determined by measuring the amount of dose received at various depths and breadths of field using film that is placed on the slab phantom with 6 MV linac radiation and dose of 300 cGy. The variation of the depth at 1.5 cm; 4 cm; 6 cm; 8 cm; 10 cm, the field size at 4 × 4 cm2, and the dose depth at 359.7 cGy; 315.3 cGy; 281.4 cGy; 241.2 cGy; 220.5 cGy were settled. The field size 6 × 6 cm2 takes the dose depth 354.6 cGy; 314.1 cGy; 282.6 cGy; 244.5 cGy; 224.7 cGy. The field size 8 × 8 cm2 takes the dose depth 351.6 cGy; 313 cGy; 283.8 cGy; 247.2 cGy; 228 cGy. The field size 10 × 10 cm2 takes the dose depth 348.9 cGy; 342.6 cGy; 248.4 cGy; 249.6 cGy; 231 cGy.

  15. Seismic anisotropy and mantle flow below subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpole, Jack; Wookey, James; Kendall, J.-Michael; Masters, T.-Guy

    2017-05-01

    Subduction is integral to mantle convection and plate tectonics, yet the role of the subslab mantle in this process is poorly understood. Some propose that decoupling from the slab permits widespread trench parallel flow in the subslab mantle, although the geodynamical feasibility of this has been questioned. Here, we use the source-side shear wave splitting technique to probe anisotropy beneath subducting slabs, enabling us to test petrofabric models and constrain the geometry of mantle fow. Our global dataset contains 6369 high quality measurements - spanning ∼ 40 , 000 km of subduction zone trenches - over the complete range of available source depths (4 to 687 km) - and a large range of angles in the slab reference frame. We find that anisotropy in the subslab mantle is well characterised by tilted transverse isotropy with a slow-symmetry-axis pointing normal to the plane of the slab. This appears incompatible with purely trench-parallel flow models. On the other hand it is compatible with the idea that the asthenosphere is tilted and entrained during subduction. Trench parallel measurements are most commonly associated with shallow events (source depth < 50 km) - suggesting a separate region of anisotropy in the lithospheric slab. This may correspond to the shape preferred orientation of cracks, fractures, and faults opened by slab bending. Meanwhile the deepest events probe the upper lower mantle where splitting is found to be consistent with deformed bridgmanite.

  16. Technique Using Isoelastic Tension Band for Treatment of Olecranon Fractures.

    PubMed

    Rajfer, Rebecca A; Danoff, Jonathan R; Yemul, Kiran S; Zouzias, Ioannis; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2015-12-01

    The isoelastic ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene tension band may be considered an alternative to stainless steel wire for tension band fixation of olecranon fractures. In this article, we present our technique using this isoelastic tension band and describe the outcomes of 7 patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation of closed, displaced olecranon fractures with minimal or no articular surface comminution. We reviewed medical records and performed physical examinations and functional assessments. Anatomical reduction was maintained in all elbows through union. Physical examination measurements indicated nominal side-to-side differences in motion and strength. Mean Broberg and Morrey elbow score was good (92/100), and mean (SD) Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score was 12.6 (17.2). One patient had a minor degree of hardware irritation at longest follow-up but did not request hardware removal. One patient underwent implant removal for a symptomatic implant 5 years after surgery. This easily reproducible technique yields excellent physical and functional outcomes.

  17. A novel technique for unstable Hangman's fracture: lag screw-rod (LSR) technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Wang, Qing; Yang, Han; Kang, Jianping; Wang, Gaoju; Song, Yueming

    2017-04-01

    The goal of the study was to describe the lag screw-rod (LSR) technique for the treatment of unstable Hangman's fracture as an attempt to pull C2 vertebral body back to posterior elements easily and immobilize C2 relative to C3 simultaneously. Twenty-one patients with unstable Hangman's fracture were treated with the LSR technique from January 2008 to October 2014. The clinical and radiological records were reviewed retrospectively. The angulation and displacement of C2 on C3 were evaluated. Complications, neck pain, neurological improvement, and fusion rate were assessed. The LSR technique was used for C2-C3 pedicle fixation and fusion in all the patients. The C2 vertebral body was pulled back to posterior elements successfully. The angulation and displacement of C2 on C3 were rectified obviously. No intra-operative or post-operative spinal cord or vertebral injury was observed. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for neck pain decreased gradually after operation. The patients with spinal cord injury were recovered at final following up. All patients achieved bony fusion without internal fixation failures. The LSR technique is an effective and reliable treatment for unstable Hangman's fractures. The technique has the advantages of pulling back the C2 vertebral body back to posterior elements easily and immobilizing C2 relative to C3 simultaneously.

  18. In situ contouring technique in the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Yann Philippe; Aoui, Mourad

    2009-01-01

    Burst fractures typically occur at T12 or L1 and create a sagittal deformity by a compression mechanism. This posttraumatic kyphosis is evaluated preoperatively by measuring the sagittal index of Farcy. Posterior instrumentation using in situ contouring is based on a bilateral insertion of rods which take the shape of the spine first. The rods are placed in a perpendicular position to monoaxial pedicular screws and then bent in situ, which makes the spine follow the movements of the rods. This principle makes it possible to correct the posttraumatic kyphosis at the level of the fractured vertebra and the overlying disk, which will open progressively using a ligamentotaxis mechanism. An additional anterior approach is indicated if the sagittal correction through the disk represents less than 50% compared to the total correction (in otherwords, if the correction of the traumatic deformity is obtained more in the disk than in the bone (>50%), an additional anterior approach is performed: more through the disk than the vertebral body (>50%)). This reliable technique meets the requirements of sagittal posttraumatic kyphosis correction, and provides a solid construct which avoids bracing. PMID:19669804

  19. Neck of femur fracture fixation in a bilateral amputee: an uncommon condition requiring an improvised fracture table positioning technique.

    PubMed

    Berg, Andrew James; Bhatia, Chandra

    2014-02-21

    While neck of femur fractures are common it is rare to see this injury in a bilateral leg amputee. Special consideration needs to be given to the management of these patients. We report the case of a 58-year-old man with bilateral leg amputation who presented to the emergency department with left hip pain following a fall. A fracture of the left neck of femur with extension into the femoral shaft was diagnosed. Internal fixation was planned with a dynamic hip screw. Standard fracture table setup, which allows for traction of the fractured limb and positioning of the contralateral limb such that anteroposterior and lateral X-rays can be obtained, was not possible in this case due to the amputations. We highlight considerations that need to be made in positioning a bilateral amputee for neck of femur fracture fixation and also highlight an improvised technique that can be utilised by other surgeons.

  20. Surgical management of metastatic long bone fractures: principles and techniques.

    PubMed

    Scolaro, John Alan; Lackman, Richard D

    2014-02-01

    Management of metastatic long bone fractures requires identification of the lesion and the use of sound fracture fixation principles to relieve pain and restore function. The treating surgeon must understand the principles of pathologic fracture fixation before initiating treatment. Because these fractures occur in the context of a progressive systemic disease, management typically involves a multidisciplinary approach. When considering surgical stabilization of these fractures, the abnormal (or absent) healing environment associated with diseased bone and the overall condition of the patient must be taken into account. The goal of surgery is to obtain a rigid mechanical construct, which allows for early mobility and weight bearing. This can be achieved using internal fixation with polymethyl methacrylate cement or segmental resection and joint reconstruction. Prosthetic joint arthroplasty is a more reliable means of fracture management when insufficient bone is present for fixation. Prophylactic stabilization of impending pathologic fractures can reduce the morbidity associated with metastatic lesions.

  1. Repair technique for fractured implant-supported metal-ceramic restorations: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Wady, Amanda Fucci; Paleari, André Gustavo; Queiroz, Thallita Pereira; Margonar, Rogerio

    2014-10-01

    The fracture of porcelain structures have been related in either natural dentition or implant-supported restorations. Techniques using a composite resin or indirect methods can be used. This article presents a porcelain fracture on implant-supported metal-ceramic restoration. IPS Empress e.max laminate veneer restoration was used to repair the fracture. With this technique, it was possible to restore aesthetics and function, combined with low cost and patient satisfaction.

  2. Using biomechanics to improve the surgical technique for internal fixation of intracapsular femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in science and technology, the success rate for the treatment of displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures in high-energy injuries remains disappointing. The blood supply system in the femoral head of humans does not favor recovery from these fractures. Once these fractures occur, osteonecrosis and nonunion rates may be as high as 30%, even if the newest technique is used. There are some surgical techniques used to supplement internal fixation to reestablish the blood supply in the femoral head, but none have been evidently successful. After analysis of related studies, the author concludes that immediate surgical treatment using improved techniques incorporating the principles of biomechanics can improve the success rate of treatment of these fractures. Using these principles, the fracture site can achieve sufficient stability. Consequently, the blood supply in the femoral head and neck can be reestablished earlier and loss of reduction of fragments during treatment can be minimized. Thus, the chance of full recovery from these complicated fractures can be maximized. In this study, the biomechanical characteristics of these fractures and the principles associated with the surgical techniques used for treating them are reviewed and clarified. Finally, a surgical technique which is ideal from the author's viewpoint is presented. The author believes that the recommended surgical technique may become the best method for treating these complicated fractures.

  3. Analysis of compressive fracture in rock using statistical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.

    1994-12-01

    Fracture of rock in compression is analyzed using a field-theory model, and the processes of crack coalescence and fracture formation and the effect of grain-scale heterogeneities on macroscopic behavior of rock are studied. The model is based on observations of fracture in laboratory compression tests, and incorporates assumptions developed using fracture mechanics analysis of rock fracture. The model represents grains as discrete sites, and uses superposition of continuum and crack-interaction stresses to create cracks at these sites. The sites are also used to introduce local heterogeneity. Clusters of cracked sites can be analyzed using percolation theory. Stress-strain curves for simulated uniaxial tests were analyzed by studying the location of cracked sites, and partitioning of strain energy for selected intervals. Results show that the model implicitly predicts both development of shear-type fracture surfaces and a strength-vs-size relation that are similar to those observed for real rocks. Results of a parameter-sensitivity analysis indicate that heterogeneity in the local stresses, attributed to the shape and loading of individual grains, has a first-order effect on strength, and that increasing local stress heterogeneity lowers compressive strength following an inverse power law. Peak strength decreased with increasing lattice size and decreasing mean site strength, and was independent of site-strength distribution. A model for rock fracture based on a nearest-neighbor algorithm for stress redistribution is also presented and used to simulate laboratory compression tests, with promising results.

  4. A technique for revealing scale-dependent patterns in fracture spacing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Ankur; Perfect, Edmund; Dunne, William M.; McKay, Larry D.

    2014-07-01

    Data on fracture spacing along scan lines have been widely analyzed for the purposes of characterization. Most of these studies, however, either consider the cumulative frequency of spacing data without regard to the actual sequence of the spacing values or compute an average spacing that may not work for clustered fractures. The coefficient of variation parameter is often used to differentiate between clustered, random, and anticlustered fractures in a scan line but does not address the issue of scale-dependent variations in spacing. Lacunarity is a parameter that has been previously used for delineating scale-dependent clustering in fracture networks with similar fractal dimensions. This technique has the further capability of identifying scales at which different patterns emerge within the same data set. Lacunarity can also delineate possible fractal behavior. This paper tests the ability of lacunarity to find patterns (fractal/uniform/random) within synthetic and natural fracture clusters. A set of four model scan lines (uniformly spaced fractures, periodically spaced fracture clusters, fractal fracture clusters, and random fractures) was considered. The first derivative of the lacunarity curves of these models was used to find the intercluster distance and organization of fractures within the clusters. The same technique was then applied to a set of two natural fracture scan line data, one with fracture clusters with fractal organization within and the other with randomly spaced fractures. It was found that the proposed technique could discriminate between the random and clustered patterns, find the intercluster distance, and identify the type of spatial organization within the clusters.

  5. Computational techniques for the assessment of fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Donald D; Thomas, Thaddeus P; Campos Marin, Ana; Elkins, Jacob M; Lack, William D; Lacroix, Damien

    2014-06-01

    The combination of high-resolution three-dimensional medical imaging, increased computing power, and modern computational methods provide unprecedented capabilities for assessing the repair and healing of fractured bone. Fracture healing is a natural process that restores the mechanical integrity of bone and is greatly influenced by the prevailing mechanical environment. Mechanobiological theories have been proposed to provide greater insight into the relationships between mechanics (stress and strain) and biology. Computational approaches for modelling these relationships have evolved from simple tools to analyze fracture healing at a single point in time to current models that capture complex biological events such as angiogenesis, stochasticity in cellular activities, and cell-phenotype specific activities. The predictive capacity of these models has been established using corroborating physical experiments. For clinical application, mechanobiological models accounting for patient-to-patient variability hold the potential to predict fracture healing and thereby help clinicians to customize treatment. Advanced imaging tools permit patient-specific geometries to be used in such models. Refining the models to study the strain fields within a fracture gap and adapting the models for case-specific simulation may provide more accurate examination of the relationship between strain and fracture healing in actual patients. Medical imaging systems have significantly advanced the capability for less invasive visualization of injured musculoskeletal tissues, but all too often the consideration of these rich datasets has stopped at the level of subjective observation. Computational image analysis methods have not yet been applied to study fracture healing, but two comparable challenges which have been addressed in this general area are the evaluation of fracture severity and of fracture-associated soft tissue injury. CT-based methodologies developed to assess and quantify

  6. Open reduction internal fixation for proximal humerus fractures indications, techniques, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Brandon S; Egol, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures account for approximately 5% of all fractures. It is estimated that due to our aging population, orthopaedic surgeons will see a three-fold increase in proximal humerus fractures over the next 30 years. Internal fixation with locked plating is the current mainstay of treatment for functionally active patients who desire minimal loss of function. A thorough understanding of the indications, techniques, and drawbacks of treatment with internal fixation is essential to achieve the highest quality of patient care.

  7. Minimally Invasive Surgical Approach to Distal Fibula Fractures: A Technique Tip

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tyler; Chien, Bonnie; Ghorbanhoseini, Mohammad; Kwon, John Y.

    2017-01-01

    Wound complications following ankle fracture surgery are a major concern. Through the use of minimally invasive surgical techniques some of these complications can be mitigated. Recent investigations have reported on percutaneous fixation of distal fibula fractures demonstrating similar radiographic and functional outcomes to traditional open approaches. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe in detail the minimally invasive surgical approach for distal fibula fractures. PMID:28271086

  8. Technique for gentle accurate reproducible closed reduction of intracapsular fracture of neck of femur.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ravindra H; Kumar, Sachin; Mishra, Bhanu

    2017-03-01

    Non-anatomic reduction with either inferior offset or varus angulation was the strongest predictor of re-displacement of the fracture and poor outcome after fixation of intracapsular fracture of neck of femur. There are many techniques for closed reduction and can be broadly divided into non-invasive and invasive techniques. We describe a minimally invasive technique, which we believe is easy, reproducible and successful in achieving good anatomical reduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1985-03-12

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  10. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; DeZubay, Egon A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Vidt, Edward J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  11. Slab reformer

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, F.R.; DeZubay, E.A.; Murray, A.P.; Vidt, E.J.

    1984-02-07

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations are disclosed particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant. 14 figs.

  12. Slab reformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Inventor); DeZubay, Egon A. (Inventor); Murray, Alexander P. (Inventor); Vidt, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot comubstion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  13. Slab reformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurrier, Francis R. (Inventor); DeZubay, Egon A. (Inventor); Murray, Alexander P. (Inventor); Vidt, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Slab-shaped high efficiency catalytic reformer configurations particularly useful for generation of fuels to be used in fuel cell based generation systems. A plurality of structures forming a generally rectangular peripheral envelope are spaced about one another to form annular regions, an interior annular region containing a catalytic bed and being regeneratively heated on one side by a hot combustion gas and on the other side by the gaseous products of the reformation. An integrally mounted combustor is cooled by impingement of incoming oxidant.

  14. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, John Jy-An; Ren, Fei; Tan, Tin; Liu, Ken

    2014-12-19

    Reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks is significantly influenced by the mechanical performance of the structural materials exposed in the hydrogen environment. Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of specific interest since they are relevant to many catastrophic failures. However, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, special testing apparatus were designed to facilitate in situ fracture testing in H2. A torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The design concepts will be discussed. Preliminary in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  15. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, John Jy-An; Ren, Fei; Tan, Tin; ...

    2014-12-19

    Reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks is significantly influenced by the mechanical performance of the structural materials exposed in the hydrogen environment. Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of specific interest since they are relevant to many catastrophic failures. However, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, special testing apparatus were designed to facilitate in situ fracture testing in H2. A torsional fixture was developed to utilizemore » an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The design concepts will be discussed. Preliminary in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.« less

  16. Femoral fracture repair using a locking plate technique in an adult captive polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Dawn M; Dew, Terry; Douglass, Michael; Perez, Edward

    2010-02-01

    To report successful femoral fracture repair in a polar bear. Case report. Female polar bear (Ursus maritimus) 5 years and approximately 250 kg. A closed, complete, comminuted fracture of the distal midshaft femur was successfully reduced and stabilized using a compression plating technique with 2 specialized human femur plates offering axial, rotational, and bending support, and allowing the bone to share loads with the implant. Postoperative radiographs were obtained at 11.5 weeks, 11 months, and 24 months. Bone healing characterized by marked periosteal reaction was evident at 11 months with extensive remodeling evident at 24 months. No complications were noted. Distal mid shaft femoral fracture was reduced, stabilized, and healed in an adult polar bear with a locking plate technique using 2 plates. Previously, femoral fractures in polar bears were considered irreparable. Use of 2 plates applied with a locking plate technique can result in successful fracture repair despite large body weight and inability to restrict postoperative activity.

  17. Effectiveness of MIS technique as a treatment modality for open intra-articular calcaneal fractures: A prospective evaluation with matched closed fractures treated by conventional technique.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Mandeep Singh; Gahlot, Nitesh; Satyaprakash, Sambit; Kanojia, Rajendra Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Twenty-five displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in 21 patients, aged 15-55 years were included in this study. Sanders' type I fractures, severe crushing or partial amputation, were excluded from the study. Patients were divided into group 1 (open fractures treated by MIS), and group 2 (closed fractures treated by ORIF). Group 1 had 16 and group 2 had 9 cases. Seven of 25 fractures (28%) developed wound related issues postoperatively. One patient (11.1%) in group 2 had wound margin necrosis, while 6 patients (37.5%) in group 1 developed pin tract and/or wound infection. At 1-year follow-up, the mean MFS for group 1 was 79 and mean MFS for group 2 was 84.4 (66.67% were good). The AOFAS score for group 1 was 77.37 and for group 2 was 86.1. The Bohlers' angle was restored in 81.16% cases in group 1 and 88.8% in group 2, while Gissane angle was restored in 68.75% of group 1 cases and 77.79% of group 2 cases. This study shows that acceptable fracture reduction can be obtained and maintained by MIS technique and it can be used as the primary definitive treatment option in open calcaneal fractures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impaction bone grafting and cemented stem revision in periprosthetic hip fractures: a novel surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Dearden, Paul M; Bobak, Peter P; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2014-01-01

    With an ageing population, and increasing longevity of hip arthroplasty prostheses, the incidence of periprosthetic femoral fractures is rising. We present a simple and easily reproducible technique for reduction of any periprosthetic fracture that requires bone graft augmentation. This method facilitates impaction bone grafting to reconstitute lost bone stock and revision using a cemented implant.

  19. Lower Extremity Fracture Reduction: Tips, Tricks, and Techniques So That You Leave the Operating Room Satisfied.

    PubMed

    Mir, Hassan R; Boulton, Christina L; Russell, George V; Archdeacon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    It can be challenging for surgeons to obtain proper alignment and to create stable constructs for the maintenance of many lower extremity fractures until union is achieved. Whether lower extremity fractures are treated with plates and screws or intramedullary nails, there are numerous pearls that may help surgeons deal with these difficult injuries. Various intraoperative techniques can be used for lower extremity fracture reduction and stabilization. The use of several reduction tools, tips, and tricks may facilitate the care of lower extremity fractures and, subsequently, improve patient outcomes.

  20. Computer assisted preoperative planning of bone fracture reduction: Simulation techniques and new trends.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Delgado, Juan J; Paulano-Godino, Félix; PulidoRam-Ramírez, Rubén; Jiménez-Pérez, J Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The development of support systems for surgery significantly increases the likelihood of obtaining satisfactory results. In the case of fracture reduction interventions these systems enable surgery planning, training, monitoring and assessment. They allow improvement of fracture stabilization, a minimizing of health risks and a reduction of surgery time. Planning a bone fracture reduction by means of a computer assisted simulation involves several semiautomatic or automatic steps. The simulation deals with the correct position of osseous fragments and fixation devices for a fracture reduction. Currently, to the best of our knowledge there is no computer assisted methods to plan an entire fracture reduction process. This paper presents an overall scheme of the computer based process for planning a bone fracture reduction, as described above, and details its main steps, the most common proposed techniques and their main shortcomings. In addition, challenges and new trends of this research field are depicted and analyzed.

  1. A novel technique for reduction and immobilization of tibial shaft fractures: the hammock.

    PubMed

    Konda, Sanjit R; Jordan, Charles J; Davidovitch, Roy I; Egol, Kenneth A

    2011-06-01

    Standard techniques for immobilization of a tibia shaft fracture in the emergency department in a long-leg splint can be cumbersome, technically difficult, and often requires the use of an assistant. We have developed a novel technique for the reduction and splinting of tibial shaft fractures, which uses a "hammock" constructed of stockinette, which allows a single consulting orthopaedic physician to rapidly reduce and place a long-leg plaster splint or cast on a patient. This technique was performed on 12 consecutive patients with a total of 12 tibial shaft fractures. Translation, angulation, and shortening of the fracture were documented in anteroposterior and lateral views of the injured tibia and these parameters were compared against values measured after the hammock technique was used to reduce and splint the fracture. Pre-"hammock" average values for fracture displacement in the anteroposterior plane for translation, angulation, and shortening were 10.5 mm (53.1%), 12.0°, and 9.4 mm, respectively. Post-"hammock" average values for fracture displacement in the anteroposterior plane for the same parameters were 8.7 mm (44.4%), 4.2°, and 7.9 mm, respectively. Pre-"hammock" average values for fracture displacement in the lateral plane for translation and angulation were 4.9 mm and 8.7°. Post-"hammock" average values for fracture displacement in the lateral plane for the same parameters were 4.9 mm and 2.0°, respectively. These results show that this technique is able to achieve the goals of fracture reduction and immobilization in a rapid fashion when help is not available.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for

  3. Treatment of physeal fractures of the distal radius by volar intrafocal Kapandji method: surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Guy; Orbach, Hagay; Chezar, Avi; Rozen, Nimrod

    2017-01-01

    Distal radial physeal fractures with volar displacement are rare. Several methods of operative treatment include volar plate without inserting distal screws, percutaneous technique using two anterior skin incisions and reversed Kapandji technique with pins introduced through a posterior approach and locked at the anterior cortex of the fracture. We report three cases along with a literature review of the surgical techniques described in the past and a novel surgical technique for this uncommon fracture termed "Volar Kapandji". All patients had anatomic reduction at the last follow-up radiography, and all patients had a full range of motion and VAS 0 at the last follow-up. No complications were recorded. This case study presents the minimally invasive option for treating rare cases of physeal distal radius fractures with volar displacement. V.

  4. Unilateral lag-screw technique for an isolated anterior 1/4 atlas fracture

    PubMed Central

    Keskil, Semih; Göksel, Murat; Yüksel, Ulaş

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Fractures of the atlas are classified based on the fracture location and associated ligamentous injury. Among patients with atlas fractures treated using external immobilization, nonunion of the fracture could be seen. Objective: Ideally, treatment strategy for an unstable atlas fracture would involve limited fixation to maintain the fracture fragments in a reduced position without restricting the range of motion (ROM) of the atlantoaxial and atlantooccipital joints. Summary of Background Data: Such a result can be established using either transoral limited internal fixation or limited posterior lateral mass fixation. However, due to high infection risk and technical difficulty, posterior approaches are preferred but none of these techniques can fully address anterior 1/4 atlas fractures such as in this case. Materials and Methods: A novel open and direct technique in which a unilateral lag screw was placed to reduce and stabilize a progressively widening isolated right-sided anterior 1/4 single fracture of C1 that was initially treated with a rigid cervical collar is described. Results: Radiological studies made after the surgery showed no implant failure, good cervical alignment, and good reduction with fusion of C1. Conclusions: It is suggested that isolated C1 fractures can be surgically reduced and immobilized using a lateral compression screw to allow union and maintain both C1-0 and C1-2 motions, and in our knowledge this is the first description of the use of a lag screw to achieve reduction of distracted anterior 1/4 fracture fragments of the C1 from a posterior approach. This technique has the potential to become a valuable adjunct to the surgeon's armamentarium, in our opinion, only for fractures with distracted or comminuted fragments whose alignment would not be expected to significantly change with classical lateral mass screw reduction. PMID:27041886

  5. [Periprosthetic humeral fractures: Strategies and techniques of revision arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Beirer, M; Brunner, U

    2016-04-01

    The primary aims when performing revision arthroplasty of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) are preservation of bone stock, achieving fracture healing and preserving a stable prosthesis with the focus on regaining the preoperative shoulder-arm function. The indications for revision arthroplasty are given in PHF in combination with loosening of the stem. In addition, further factors must be independently clarified in the case of an anatomical arthroplasty. In this context secondary glenoid erosion as well as rotator cuff insufficiency are potential factors for an extended revision procedure. For the performance of revision surgery modular revision sets including long stems, revision glenoid and metaglene components as well as plate and cerclage systems are obligatory besides the explantation instrumentation. Despite a loosened prosthesis, a transhumeral removal of the stem along with a subpectoral fenestration are often required. Length as well as bracing of revision stems need to bridge the fracture by at least twice the humeral diameter. Moreover, in many cases a combined procedure using an additional distal open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) plus cable cerclages as well as biological augmentation might be needed. Assuming an adequate preparation, the experienced surgeon is able to achieve a high fracture union rate along with an acceptable or even good shoulder function and to avoid further complications.

  6. Effect of Different Instrumentation Techniques on Vertical Root Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Tavanafar, Saeid; Karimpour, Azadeh; Karimpour, Hamideh; Mohammed Saleh, Abdulrahman; Hamed Saeed, Musab

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Vertical root fractures are catastrophic events that often result in tooth extraction. Many contributing factor are associated with increasing incidence of vertical root fracture. Root canal preparation is one of the predisposing factors which can increase the root susceptibility to vertical fracture. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the effects of three different instrumentation techniques on vertical root fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods In this study, 120 freshly extracted mandibular premolar teeth of similar dimensions were decoronated and randomly divided into control (n=30), nickel-titanium hand K-file (HF, n=30), BioRaCe rotary file (BR, n=30), and WaveOne reciprocating single-file (WO, n=30) groups. After cleaning and shaping the root canals, AH26 was used as canal sealer, and obturation was completed using the continuous wave technique. The root canals were embedded vertically in standardised autopolymerising acrylic resin blocks, and subjected to a vertical load to cause vertical root fracture. The forces required to induce fractures were measured using a universal testing machine. ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test were used to analyse the data. Results All experimental groups showed statistically significant reductions in fracture resistance as compared with the control group. There was a statistically significant difference between the HF and BR groups. The WO group did not differ significantly from the HF group or the BR group. Conclusion All three instrumentation techniques caused weakening of the structure of the roots, and rendered them susceptible to fracture under lesser load than unprepared roots. The fracture resistance of roots prepared with the single-file reciprocating technique was similar to that of those prepared with NiTi hand and rotary instrumentation techniques. PMID:26106635

  7. 3D Fast Spin Echo With Out-of-Slab Cancellation: A Technique for High-Resolution Structural Imaging of Trabecular Bone at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Magland, Jeremy F.; Rajapakse, Chamith S.; Wright, Alexander C.; Acciavatti, Raymond; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2016-01-01

    Spin-echo-based pulse sequences are desirable for the application of high-resolution imaging of trabecular bone but tend to involve high-power deposition. Increased availability of ultrahigh field scanners has opened new possibilities for imaging with increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency, but many pulse sequences that are standard at 1.5 and 3 T exceed specific absorption rate limits at 7 T. A modified, reduced specific absorption rate, three-dimensional, fast spin-echo pulse sequence optimized specifically for in vivo trabecular bone imaging at 7 T is introduced. The sequence involves a slab-selective excitation pulse, low-power nonselective refocusing pulses, and phase cycling to cancel undesired out-of-slab signal. In vivo images of the distal tibia were acquired using the technique at 1.5, 3, and 7 T field strengths, and SNR was found to increase at least linearly using receive coils of identical geometry. Signal dependence on the choice of refocusing flip angles in the echo train was analyzed experimentally and theoretically by combining the signal from hundreds of coherence pathways, and it is shown that a significant specific absorption rate reduction can be achieved with negligible SNR loss. PMID:20187181

  8. Percutaneous Cannulated Compression Screw Osteosynthesis in Phalanx Fractures: The Surgical Technique, the Indications, and the Results

    PubMed Central

    Kisch, Tobias; Wenzel, Eike; Mailänder, Peter; Stang, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Fractures of metacarpals and phalanges are very common fractures, and there are a lot of treatment modalities. The purpose of the study was to describe the technique of percutaneous fixation of phalangeal fractures using a cannulated compression screw fixation system and its results. Methods: We conducted a prospective clinical study on 43 patients with different types of phalangeal fractures undergoing a percutaneous cannulated compression screw osteosynthesis. Parameters such as average operation time and clinical outcome were evaluated postoperatively. Results: Forty-three patients were treated using a percutaneous cannulated compression screw fixation system for phalanx fractures of the proximal (n = 26), middle phalanx (n = 16), or distal phalanx (n = 1). All fractures healed after 6 to 8 weeks except in 1 patient with secondary loss of reduction occurring 2.5 weeks after surgery. No infections were observed. The mean total active motion values were 247.56° ±16.16° and 244.35° ± 11.61° for the intra-articular fracture and 251.25° ± 19.86° for the shaft fractures; the mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score 3 months after the surgery was 1.67 ± 2.74. Conclusions: The advantages of this technique are the avoidance of an open procedure requiring extensive soft-tissue dissection with the risks of tendon adhesions and the achievement of interfragmentary compression. Because of the interfragmentary compression, it is superior to simple K-wires. With regard to indications, our primary focus was on unicondylar proximal interphalangeal joint fractures, shaft fractures, and simple oblique 2-fragment fractures. PMID:28293333

  9. A novel technique to repair a transverse sacral fracture in a previously fused lumbosacral spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Thomas; Chedid, Mokbel K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transverse fractures of the sacrum are rare, and surgical treatment for these fractures ranges from conservative to challenging. Transverse stress fractures of the sacrum after placement of lumbar-to-sacral instrumentation have been previously described. We report a new technique to repair a transverse Type-2 Roy-Camille fracture with spondylolisthesis of S1 over S2 in a previously fused instrumented high-grade L4-L5, L5-S1 spondylolisthesis. Case Description: A 64-year-old female who previously had an L4-L5, L5-S1 fusion for spondylolisthesis presented with excruciating lower back pain and radiculopathy for over 6 months. She was found to have an S1-S2 transverse fracture caused by previous implantation of pedicle screws. She underwent repositioning of several failed right lumbar and sacral screws and then had bilateral S1-S2 screws placed directly across the fracture line. The patient had an unremarkable postoperative course. She discontinued most of her pain medications within 6 weeks postoperatively. In the months following surgery, she reported only minimal lower back pain and no radiculopathy with the last appointment 5 years postoperatively. Conclusions: We describe a novel technique to reduce an iatrogenic transverse type-2 Roy-Camille fracture at S1-S2 in a previously instrumented high-grade L4-L5, L5-S1 spondylolisthesis. The patient's fracture achieved adequate reduction and fusion with symptomatic relief. PMID:28028448

  10. Influence of restorative techniques on fracture load of endodontically treated premolars.

    PubMed

    Bianchi E Silva, Ana Amélia; Ghiggi, Paula Cristine; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study evaluated the influence of restorative techniques on the fracture load and fracture mode of endodontically treated premolars with MOD cavities. Sixty maxillary premolars were divided into groups: G1 - sound teeth; G2 - direct technique using Four Season; G3 - Adoro inlays; G4 - Adoro onlays; G5 - Empress inlays; G6 - Empress onlays. The specimens were submitted to compressive axial loading until failure. The fracture mode was analyzed. RESULTS. According to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05), the sound teeth (1370.61 N) showed the highest fracture load mean, which did not differ statistically from IPS Empress onlays (1304.21 N). Intermediate values were obtained for IPS Empress inlays (918.76 N), Adoro onlays (861.15 N), Adoro inlays (792.71 N) which did not differ statistically among them. The lowest fracture load was obtained for direct restorations with Four Seasons (696.08 N), which did not differ statistically from the Adoro inlays. CONCLUSIONS. The ceramic restorations provided higher fracture load and more incidences of catastrophic fractures. Cuspal coverage increased teeth fracture load. The results were similar for direct and indirect inlays with composite resin.

  11. Low Profile Mesh Plating for Patella Fractures: Video of a Novel Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Diederik O; Hickerson, Lindsay E; Warner, Stephen J; Helfet, David L; Lorich, Dean G

    2016-08-01

    Patella fractures can be challenging to treat particularly in the presence of inferior pole comminution. In this video we present a novel surgical technique for the treatment of patella fractures using a small fragment low profile mesh plate. Key points are the surgical exposure with direct visualization of the articular reduction, the preparation of the mesh plate to accommodate patellar anatomy and the augmentation of the construct using Krackow sutures to address inferior pole comminution. Low profile mesh plating allows for multiplanar fixation of patella fractures while avoiding implant and fixation problems related to tension band fixation. Our early experience with this technique is encouraging and it appears that this technique is useful for the treatment of the majority of patella fractures.

  12. Comparison techniques for VSB fractured vs. unfractured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, D.; Valadez, J.

    2013-06-01

    There are known VSB (Variable shape beam) mask writers in production today that require mask data with all angle edges to be approximated by staircases (stacked slits) in either a horizontal or vertical direction. The approximation uses 0, 45 or 90 degree edges, depending on the fracture setup and the angle of the edges in the original data. In order to gauge the effectiveness of the algorithm that fractures the original design to the VSB format, several methods can be employed to analyze the differences between the fractured data in the VSB format output and the original data before fracture. This is commonly referred to as skew error. This paper explores various methods and approaches that can be used, and examines each in detail. The goal is to highlight the differences and the effectiveness of each method in order to provide mask makers with the necessary information to make decisions best suited for their MDP-to-Lithography process flow. The first method explored is an XOR operation, followed by a double geometric biasing, aka Underover Sizing. The second method explored is an XOR operation, followed by a cut out of the differences starting from the unfractured polygon edges, aka Path Implode. The third method analyzed is an XOR operation, followed by measurement of the differences in the direction orthogonal to the unfractured edges, aka Difference Measurement. The fourth and last method analyzed is a mix of the last two, and employs an XOR operation, followed by measurement of the differences in the direction orthogonal to the unfractured edges, followed by a cut out of the measurement results, aka Measurement Implode.

  13. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with the bonded amalgam technique.

    PubMed

    Dias de Souza, G M; Pereira, G D; Dias, C T; Paulillo, L A

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars with MOD Class II cavity preparations restored with silver amalgam (G1), Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus and silver amalgam (G2) and Panavia F and silver amalgam (G3). After the restorations were made, the specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours at 100% humidity and submitted to the compression test. Statistical analysis of the data (ANOVA and Tukey Test) revealed no significant differences among the three groups that were studied.

  14. Locking plate fixation of distal femoral fractures is a challenging technique: a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Giampiero; Toro, Antonio; de Sire, Alessandro; Iolascon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Summary Distal femoral fractures have typically a bimodal occurrence: in young people due to a high-energy trauma and in older people related to a low-energy trauma. These fractures are associated to a very high morbidity and mortality in elderly. Distal femoral fractures might be treated with plates, intramedullary nails, external fixations, and prosthesis. However, difficulties in fracture healing and the rate of complications are important clinical issues. The purpose of this retrospective review was to present our experience in treatment of distal femoral fracture in a sample of older people in order to evaluate the technical pitfalls and strategies used to face up the fractures unsuccessfully treated with locking plates. We included people aged more than 65 years, with a diagnosis of distal femoral fracture, treated with locking plates. We considered ‘unsuccessfully treated’ the cases with healing problems or hardware failures. Of the 12 patients (9 females and 3 males; mean aged 68.75 ± 3.31 years) included, we observed 3 ‘unsuccessfully cases’, 2 due to nonunions and 1 due to an early hardware failure, all treated using a condylar blade plate with a bone graft. One patient obtained a complete fracture healing after 1 year and in the other cases there was a nonunion. We observed as most common technical pitfalls: inadequate plate lengthening, fracture bridging, and number of locking screws. The use of locking plates is an emerging technique to treat these fractures but it seems more challenging than expected. In literature there is a lack of evidences about the surgical management of distal femoral fractures that is still an important challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon that has to be able to use all the fixation devices available. PMID:27134634

  15. Two-Tension-Band Technique in Revision Surgery for Fixation Failure of Patellar Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zichao; Qin, Hui; Ding, Haoliang; Xu, Haitao; An, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    Background Failed patellar fracture fixation is rare, and is usually attributed to technical errors. There are no specific details available on how to address this problem. We present our two-tension-band technique for fixing patellar fractures. Material/Methods Between March 2010 and March 2013, 4 men and 2 women with failed fixation patellar fractures were treated in our department. Their average age was 34 years (range 23–49 years). The initial fracture type was C1 in 3, C2 in 1, and C3 in 2, according to the AO classification. The initial fracture patterns included 3 transverse and 3 comminuted fractures. There were no open fractures. All patients underwent internal fixation with a modified anterior tension band (MATB) supplemented with cerclage wiring. All failures were caused by tension bands sliding past the tip of the Kirschner wires. The mean time between the primary and revision operations was 16.2 months (range 2–63 months). We revised the fractures by two-separate-tension-band technique. Results The mean follow-up was 52 months (range 31–67 months). All patients healed radiographically without complications at an average of 14.7 weeks (range 8–20 weeks). The Bostman knee score was excellent in 3 and good in 3. All patients regained full extension and the mean range of flexion was 147.5° (135–155°). Conclusions Use of this two-tension-band technique can avoid technical errors and provide more secure fixation. We recommend it for both primary and revision surgery of patellar fractures. PMID:27485104

  16. [Periprosthetic humeral fractures: Strategies and techniques for osteosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Brunner, U; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) is currently low and accounts for 0.6-2.4%. Due to an increase in the rate of primary implantations a quantitative increase of PHF is to be expected in the near future. The majority of PHF occur intraoperatively during implantation with an increased risk for cementless stems and when performing total arthroplasty. Additional risk factors are in particular female gender and the severity of comorbidities. In contrast, postoperative PHF mostly due to low-energy falls, have a prevalence between 0.6% and 0.9% and are significantly less common. The prognosis and functional outcome following revision by open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) essentially depend on a thorough assessment of the indications for revision surgery, the operative treatment and the pretraumatic functional condition of the affected shoulder. In the armamentarium of periprosthetic ORIF of the humerus cerclage systems and locking implants as well as a combination of both play a central role. In comminuted fractures with extensive defect zones, severely thinned cortex or extensive osteolysis a biological augmentation of the ORIF should be considered. In this context when the indications are correctly interpreted, especially in the case of a stable anchored stem, various groups have reported that a high bony union rate can be achieved. As the treatment of PHF is complex it should be performed in dedicated centers in order to adequately address potential comorbidities, especially in the elderly population.

  17. NON-UNIONS AFTER FIXATION OF HUMERAL FRACTURES USING HACKETHAL'S BUNDLE NAILING TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    OBRUBA, PETR; RAMMELT, STEFAN; KOPP, LUBOMIR; EDELMANN, KAREL; AVENARIUS, JAKUB

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of the study was to identify factors contributing to the development of non-union after fixation of diaphyseal humeral fractures using Hackethal's intramedullary nailing technique. Methods: In the time period from 2001 to 2010 156 patients with diaphyseal humeral fractures were treated surgically using Hackethal's technique. Six of them (3.8%) developed non-union. This group included three women and two men aged 63-69 years and one woman aged 37 years. The following parameters of the patients were recorded: age, gender, comorbidities, substance abuse, mechanism of injury, fracture type and location according to the AO/ASIF classification, and the operative technique. Results: A non-union developed in six patients treated with Hackethal´s method (3.8%). Five of six non-unions (83%) were observed in patients in their sixties. In the subgroup of sexagenarians, non-union developed in 20.8% of surgically treated patients, as compared to 3.8 % in entire group. In the union group, fractures have been caused by high energy trauma in 52% of patients. In patients who developed non-union, high energy trauma caused 67% of fractures. With correct surgical technique the development of a non-union was observed in 0.7% of patients, with incorrect technique in 35.7% (p<0.001). Conclusion: Treatment of diaphyseal humeral fractures with Hackethal's intramedullary elastic bundle nailing resulted in an overall high union rate. Factors contributing to the development of non-union were extension of this method to AO type B3 and C fractures and technical imperfection during implantation. Level of Evidence III, Prospective, Case-Control Study. PMID:28149195

  18. Higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Gansch, Roman; Kalchmair, Stefan; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron M; Klang, Pavel; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2011-08-15

    We present a detailed investigation of higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs. In such structures the resonances exhibit a blue-shift compared to an ideal two-dimensional photonic crystal, which depends on the order of the slab mode and the polarization. By fabricating a series of photonic crystal slab photo detecting devices, with varying ratios of slab thickness to photonic crystal lattice constant, we are able to distinguish between 0th and 1st order slab modes as well as the polarization from the shift of resonances in the photocurrent spectra. This method complements the photonic band structure mapping technique for characterization of photonic crystal slabs. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  19. Comparison of 2 plating techniques for lateral clavicle fractures, using a new standardized biomechanical testing setup.

    PubMed

    Suter, Cyrill; Majewski, Martin; Nowakowski, Andrej M

    2017-09-08

    Conservative treatment of lateral clavicle fractures (Neer type II) often ends with unsatisfactory results for patients. Operative treatment is thus gaining acceptance. A retrospective study found success using a double plate technique for these injuries. For the current study, a standardized testing setup was developed to compare the mechanical properties of single versus double plate technique for lateral clavicle fractures. Six synthetic bones were tested for each technique. Neer type IIB fractures were created using computer-aided design (CAD). Fatigue testing was carried out with a cantilever bending test. Parameters measured were cycles undergone, failure load and stiffness at the point of failure. The standardized testing setup was able to provide reproducible failures. The double plate technique lasted about 16,000 more cycles and withstood an additional 22.4 N on average. The new modified standardized testing setup produced reproducible fixation failures for both clavicle fracture fixation techniques. The double plate technique seems to be mechanically superior to the single plate technique.

  20. New fracturing techniques reduce tight gas sand completion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, P.L.; Hunter, J.L. ); Kuhlman, R.D. ); Weinheimer, D.D. )

    1992-10-12

    This paper reports on new fracturing stimulation technology which contributed to solving problems in completing tight gas sands in the Carthage Cotton Valley field in Texas. These technologies included improved fluid systems, computer-controlled proppant placement, multiple isotope radioactive logs, mechanical properties logs, and innovative casing design. Drilling activity in the Carthage field commenced on a large scale in 1978 and 1979. At that time, the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 (NGPA) first allowed higher gas prices. In 1980, low-permeability sandstones officially were classified as tight gas sands by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). This classification qualified the sands for NGPA incentive gas prices. After the Texas Railroad Commission (RRC) changed the field rules to 320 acre spacing, another round of development drilling began. In 1981 and 1982, Pennzoil drilled and completed 22 infill development wells before the gas market crashed in 1982.

  1. Preseptal transconjunctival approach to the orbital floor fractures. Surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, S; Scolozzi, P

    2015-12-01

    Orbital floor fractures may be reached through 2 types of conjunctival approaches, the preseptal one and the retroseptal one. While the retroseptal approach offers a more direct and easier route to the orbital rim and floor, it is associated with a significantly higher rate of lower lid complications compared to the preseptal approach. We will focus on the preseptal transconjunctival approach. The conjunctival incision is performed with a guarded needle-tip electrocautery or with a long-handled scalpel (blade No. 15) from the inferior extremity of the semilunar fold to the lateral canthal region. The subconjunctival plane is divided with Stevens scissors medially and laterally. This plane, located between the preseptal cranial conjunctival flap covered by the orbital septum and the caudal conjunctival flap covered by the orbicular muscle's fascia, is opened with the scissors toward the inferior orbital rim. The periosteum over the inferior orbital rim is incised and reflected. The subperiosteal dissection is continued toward the orbital floor. The incarcerated periorbital tissues are repositioned to expose the stable bone margins of the fracture before orbital reconstruction. The closure of the periorbita is performed with uninterrupted 5-0 Vicryl sutures. The conjunctiva is closed with a running 6-0 Maxon suture. Although technically more demanding than the retroseptal approach, the preseptal approach enables a large and safe access to the entire orbital floor by passing through an anatomical bloodless plane. This approach can also be combined with a lateral canthotomy/cantholysis and with a medial caruncular transconjunctival incision, thus providing extended exposure of the entire orbit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Internal fixation of fractured ribs in neonatal foals with nylon cable tie using a modified technique.

    PubMed

    Williams, T Boullhesen; Williams, Jarred M; Rodgerson, Dwayne H

    2017-06-01

    Nylon cable tie has been shown to be an effective and economical method for fixing fractured ribs in the neonatal foal. This article describes a modification of the previously described technique. Under general anesthesia, the fractured ribs were exposed and a hole was drilled in the dorsal and ventral fragments. The fracture was not reduced, leaving the fragments overriding each other. The nylon cable tie was passed through the hole in the dorsal fragment from the external surface of the rib. The free end of the cable tie was then passed through the hole in the ventral fragment from the external surface of the rib and the tie was tightened. This technique was used in 4 neonatal foals with no complications. The modification of the original technique represents a method to minimize soft tissue trauma, implant failure, and complications.

  3. The use of surface geophysical techniques to detect fractures in bedrock; an annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Mark R.; Haeni, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    This annotated bibliography compiles references about the theory and application of surface geophysical techniques to locate fractures or fracture zones within bedrock units. Forty-three publications are referenced, including journal articles, theses, conference proceedings, abstracts, translations, and reports prepared by private contractors and U.S. Government agencies. Thirty-one of the publications are annotated. The remainder are untranslated foreign language articles, which are listed only as bibliographic references. Most annotations summarize the location, geologic setting, surface geophysical technique used, and results of a study. A few highly relevant theoretical studies are annotated also. Publications that discuss only the use of borehole geophysical techniques to locate fractures are excluded from this bibliography. Also excluded are highly theoretical works that may have little or no known practical application.

  4. Bicondylar tibial plateau fractures managed with the Sheffield Hybrid Fixator. Biomechanical study and operative technique.

    PubMed

    Ali, A M; Yang, L; Hashmi, M; Saleh, M

    2001-12-01

    The two main challenges in the management of bicondylar tibial plateau fractures are: Firstly, the compromised skin and soft tissue envelope which invite a high rate of complications following attempted open reduction and dual plating. Secondly, poor bone quality and comminuted fracture patterns, which create difficulty in achieving stable fixation. Although dual plating is considered to be the best mechanical method of stabilizing these complex fractures, there remains concern regarding the high rate of complications associated with extensive soft tissue dissection, required for the insertion of these plates in an already compromised knee. The Sheffield Hybrid fixator (SHF) technique offers a solution to the two main problems of these difficult fractures by minimizing soft tissue dissection, since bone fragments are reduced and fixed percutaneously, and providing superior cancellous bone purchase with beam loading stabilization for comminuted fractures. Our biomechanical testing showed the SHF with four tensioned wires to be as strong as dual plating and able to provide adequate mechanical stability in the fixation of bicondylar tibial plateau fractures. This was confirmed clinically by a prospective review of the use of the SHF at our centre, for managing complex and high-energy tibial plateau fractures with a good final outcome and no cases of deep infection or septic arthritis.

  5. Numerical simulation of dynamic fracture and failure in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-05-01

    Numerical simulation of dynamic fracture and failure processes in solid continua using Lagrangian finite element techniques is the subject of discussion in this investigation. The specific configurations in this study include penetration of steel projectiles into aluminum blocks and concrete slabs. The failure mode in the aluminum block is excessive deformation while the concrete slab fails by hole growth, spallation, and scabbing. The transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA2D was used for the numerical analysis. The erosion capability in LS-DYNA2D was exercised to carry out the fracture and failure simulations. Calculated results were compared to the experimental data. Good correlations were obtained.

  6. Closed-Loop Double Endobutton Technique for Repair of Unstable Distal Clavicle Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Struhl, Steven; Wolfson, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Displaced fractures of the distal clavicle are inherently unstable and lead to nonunion in a high percentage of cases. The optimal surgical management remains controversial. Hypothesis: Indirect osteosynthesis with a closed-loop double endobutton construct would result in reliable fracture union and obviate the need for additional surgery. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Eight patients with an acute unstable Neer type IIB distal clavicle fracture were treated with a closed-loop double endobutton implant. Mean follow-up averaged 3.4 years (range, 1-9 years). Two patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 6 patients underwent a detailed functional and radiologic evaluation. Results: Definitive fracture healing was achieved in all patients. There were no complications, and no patients required additional surgery related to the index procedure. The mean Constant score was 97 at final follow-up. Conclusion: The closed-loop double endobutton technique was reliable and effective in achieving fracture union in all patients with unstable Neer type IIB fractures of the distal clavicle. This technique obviates the need for late hardware removal that is often necessary when direct osteosynthesis is used and avoids potential complications associated with coracoclavicular cerclage constructs that require knot fixation. PMID:27504466

  7. The study of a naturally fractured gas reservoir using seismic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, C.R.; Lynn, H.B.; Simon, M.

    1999-09-01

    The upper Green River Formation at the Bluebell-Altamont field, Utah is a tight gas sand reservoir where economic production can be sustained only in regions of high natural fracturing. In 1994, a demonstration seismic project was conducted at the field to show how exploration for, and the characterization of, naturally fractured gas reservoirs can be more effective through the integrated use of seismic techniques. Study of field exposures, well logs, and regional stress indicators prior to the seismic survey indicated a high degree of preferential orientation to the dominant fracture trend at the field. The seismic survey consisted of two crossing, nine-component surface seismic lines and a nine-component vertical seismic profile. The compression, and shear-wave surface seismic both recorded anisotropies that were related to the presence and azimuth of the natural fracturing. The surface seismic results were supported by results from the nine-component vertical seismic profile. This program demonstrates the potential offered by the use of integrated seismic and geological techniques for the analysis of both land and marine naturally fractured reservoirs; furthermore, it demonstrates the possibilities of reviewing existing databases containing compression-wave surface seismic data for fracture information.

  8. Non-IMF mandibular fracture reduction techniques: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Batbayar, Enkh-Orchlon; van Minnen, Baucke; Bos, Ruud R M

    2017-08-01

    Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) techniques are commonly used in mandibular fracture treatment to reduce bone fragments and re-establish normal occlusion. However, non-IMF reduction techniques such as repositioning forceps may be preferable due to their quick yet adequate reduction. The purpose of this paper is to assess which non-IMF reduction techniques and reduction forceps are available for fracture reduction in the mandible. A systematic search was performed in the databases of Pubmed and EMBASE. The search was updated until February 2016 and no initial date and language preference was set. 14 articles were selected for this review, among them ten articles related to reduction forceps and four articles describing other techniques. Thus, modification and design of reduction forceps and other reduction techniques are qualitatively described. Few designs of repositioning forceps have been proposed in the literature. Quick and adequate reduction of fractures seems possible with non-IMF techniques resulting in anatomic repositioning and shorter operation time, especially in cases with good interfragmentary stability. Further development and clinical testing of reduction forceps is necessary to establish their future role in maxillofacial fracture treatment. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of different veneering techniques on the fracture strength of metal and zirconia frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Ayse Gozde; Ulusoy, Mubin; Yuce, Mert

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine whether the fracture strengths and failure types differed between metal and zirconia frameworks veneered with pressable or layering ceramics. MATERIALS AND METHODS A phantom molar tooth was prepared and duplicated in 40 cobalt-chromium abutments. Twenty metal (IPS d.SIGN 15, Ivoclar, Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) and 20 zirconia (IPS e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar) frameworks were fabricated on the abutments. Each framework group was randomly divided into 2 subgroups according to the veneering material: pressable and layering ceramics (n=10). Forty molar crowns were fabricated, cemented onto the corresponding abutments and then thermocycled (5-55℃, 10,000 cycles). A load was applied in a universal testing machine until a fracture occurred on the crowns. In addition, failure types were examined using a stereomicroscope. Fracture load data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests at a significance level of 0.05. RESULTS The highest strength value was seen in metal-pressable (MP) group, whereas zirconia-pressable (ZP) group exhibited the lowest one. Moreover, group MP showed significantly higher fracture loads than group ZP (P=.015) and zirconia-layering (ZL) (P=.038) group. No significant difference in fracture strength was detected between groups MP and ML, and groups ZP and ZL (P>.05). Predominant fracture types were cohesive for metal groups and adhesive for zirconia groups. CONCLUSION Fracture strength of a restoration with a metal or a zirconia framework was independent of the veneering techniques. However, the pressing technique over metal frameworks resisted significantly higher fracture loads than zirconia frameworks. PMID:26816575

  10. The mechanism of fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    In this book eighty-five papers look at fractures. Topics covered are fracture mechanics, fracture mechanisms, evaluating fracture resistance, fracture toughness, predicting crack growth, surface cracking, crack initiation and propagation, weld fractures, engineering applications of fracture mechanics, fracture and failure in nonmetallic materials, dynamic fractures, test techniques, radiation embrittlement, applications of fracture mechanics, design concepts, and creep.

  11. Results of the percutaneous pinning of proximal humerus fractures with a modified palm tree technique.

    PubMed

    El-Alfy, Barakat Sayed

    2011-09-01

    Many techniques are available for closed reduction and percutaneous fixation of proximal humeral fractures. The palm tree technique was described by Kapandji in 1989. In that technique three curved wires are inserted through one hole at the V-shaped insertion of the deltoid muscle. It is a good technique but it has some disadvantages. In this study we introduced some modifications for the technique, and we evaluated the clinical results of the modified technique in treatment of 18 cases. Eighteen patients with displaced proximal humeral fractures were treated by closed reduction and percutaneous fixation with the palm tree technique after minor modifications. The age of the patients ranged from 38 to 75 years with an average of 56 years. Eleven were females and seven were males. The fractures were two-part in 13 cases and three-part fractures in five cases. The average time of healing was seven weeks. The follow-up period ranged from 14 months to 39 months with an average of 22 months. The Constant score ranged from 45 to 88 with a mean of 73. The results were satisfactory in 77% and unsatisfactory in 23% of the cases. The complications included pin tract infection in two cases, intraarticular wire migration in one case, skin necrosis around the wires in three cases and malunion with varus deformity in one case. No cases were complicated by neurovascular injury, loss of fixation or avascular necrosis of the humeral head. The palm tree technique is a good method for fixation of proximal humeral fractures. It produces good grip in both of the proximal and distal fragments and allows for early joint movements. Our modifications allow for easy insertion of the wires, increase the stability of fixation and minimize the risk of complications.

  12. Current Strategies for the Management of Pediatric Supracondylar Humerus Fractures: Tips and Techniques for Successful Closed Treatment.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Brian; Abzug, Joshua M; Ho, Christine Ann; Ritzman, Todd F

    2016-02-15

    Pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures are the most commonly encountered type of elbow fractures in children that require surgical fixation. Many pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures can be treated with closed reduction and percutaneous skeletal fixation. In difficult fractures, adjunct pin techniques, such as joystick wires and leverage pins, can be used to help attain a satisfactory and stable reduction before an open approach is used. After the fracture is reduced, optimal pinning, with the use of either crossed or lateral-entry techniques, and fixation that achieves maximal spread at the fracture site as well as bicortical engagement in both fragments are essential to maintain reduction and avoid complications that are associated with malunion. A practical approach as well as several tips and techniques may help surgeons attain and maintain stable closed reduction of pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures.

  13. Current Strategies for the Management of Pediatric Supracondylar Humerus Fractures: Tips and Techniques for Successful Closed Treatment.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Brian; Abzug, Joshua; Ho, Christine Ann; Ritzman, Todd F

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures are the most commonly encountered type of elbow fractures in children that require surgical fixation. Many pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures can be treated with closed reduction and percutaneous skeletal fixation. In difficult fractures, adjunct pin techniques, such as joystick wires and leverage pins, can be used to help attain a satisfactory and stable reduction before an open approach is used. After the fracture is reduced, optimal pinning, with the use of either crossed or lateral-entry techniques, and fixation that achieves maximal spread at the fracture site as well as bicortical engagement in both fragments are essential to maintain reduction and avoid complications that are associated with malunion. A practical approach as well as several tips and techniques may help surgeons attain and maintain stable closed reduction of pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures.

  14. General shot refinement technique on fracturing of curvilinear shape for VSB mask writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Takuya; Takahashi, Nobuyasu; Hamaji, Masakazu; Park, Jisoong; Lee, Sukho; Park, Sunghoon

    2014-10-01

    The increasing complexity of RET solutions has increased the shot count for advanced photomasks. In particular, the introduction of the inverse lithography technique (ILT) brings a significant increase in mask complexity and conventional fracturing algorithms generate many more shots because they are not optimized for curvilinear shapes. Several methods have been proposed to reduce shot count for ILT photomasks. One of the stronger approaches is model-based fracturing, which utilizes precise dose control, shot overlaps and many other techniques. However, it requires much more computation resources and upgrades to the EB mask writer to support user-level dose modulation and shot overlaps. We proposed an efficient algorithm to fracture curvy shapes into VSB shots5 which was based on geometry processing. The algorithm achieved better EPE and reasonable process time compared with a conventional fracturing algorithm but its fracturing quality can be degraded for the pattern which has relatively rough contour though it is curvy ILT pattern. In this paper, we present a couple of general techniques to refine a set of VSB shots to reduce edge placement error (EPE) to an original curvy contour with their experimental results.

  15. Technique and Early Results of Percutaneous Reduction of Sagittally Unstable Intertrochateric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Young Soo; Oh, Hyunsup; Cho, Yoon Je

    2011-01-01

    Background This paper introduces a percutaneous reduction technique using one or two Steinman pin(s) to reduce sagittally unstable intertrochanteric fractures. Methods A fracture was defined as a sagittally unstable intertrochanteric fracture when posterior sagging of a distal fragment and flexion of the proximal fragment worsens after usual maneuvers for a closed reduction. Of 119 intertrochanteric fractures treated from June 2007 to December 2008, twenty-one hips showed sagittal instability. The sagittal displacement was reduced using a Steinmann pin as a joystick, and stabilized with a nail device. Nineteen hips were followed up for more than one year. The clinical and radiological results were reviewed in 19 hips and compared with those of the remaining cases. Results The demographics were similar in both groups. The mean anesthetic time did not differ. Although the pre-injury and final activity levels were significantly lower in the study group, the degree of recovery was the same. No clinical complications related to this technique were encountered. Radiologically, the reduction was good in all hips in both groups. Union was obtained in all cases without any time differences. Conclusions This less invasive reduction technique is simple and safe to use for this type of difficult fracture. PMID:21909469

  16. [Efficacy analysis of intermediate screws technique plus injectable calcium sulfate for thoracolumbar fracture in postmenopausal patients].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Zeng, Zhi-li; Li, Shan-zhu; Jia, Yong-wei; Jia, Long; Wang, Jian-jie; Wu, Zhou-rui; Hu, Xiao; Xu, Wei; Maharjan, Sujan; Cheng, Li-ming

    2013-12-03

    To explore the clinical efficacies of intermediate screws plus injectable calcium sulfate MIIGX3 for thoracolumbar fracture in postmenopausal patients. A total of 21 postmenopausal patients with vertebral compression fractures reconstructed with posterior internal fixation of intermediate screws technique and anterior vertebral augmentation of MIIGX3 technique in three dimension were retrospectively analyzed. The changes of fracture vertebral height and Cobb's angle were compared.Visual analogue scale (VAS) was performed to evaluate their symptoms. All patients were followed up. Intermediate screws surgical technique plus MIIGX3 was successfully performed. The average injection dose was 4.6 ml.Leakage occurred intraoperatively in two cases. The average follow-up period was 15 (6-36) months. The VAS system demonstrated that pain decreased significantly (preoperative:7.8, postoperative:2.2). The height and Cobb's angle of fractured vertebra improved greatly. The preoperative values were 45.0 ± 6.4% and 19.4 ± 4.5° and postoperative ones 15.4 ± 3.9% and 8.64 ± 3.18° respectively. There was no occurrence of severe complications related with treatment.Except for 2 patients with a loss of 15% of vertebral height, the average heights of fractured vertebra in other 19 patients recovered to 85% of normal ones. Thoracolumbar fracture in postmenopausal patients may be managed satisfactorily by intermediate screws and injectable calcium sulfate technique.Such a technique is both safe and effective. And its stable and durable reduction offers significant improvement.

  17. The incidence of secondary vertebral fracture of vertebral augmentation techniques versus conservative treatment for painful osteoporotic vertebral fractures: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Dawei; Meng, Bin; Gan, Minfeng; Niu, Junjie; Li, Shiyan; Chen, Hao; Yuan, Chenxi; Yang, Huilin

    2015-08-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) and balloon kyphoplasty (BKP) are minimally invasive and effective vertebral augmentation techniques for managing osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs). Recent meta-analyses have compared the incidence of secondary vertebral fractures between patients treated with vertebral augmentation techniques or conservative treatment; however, the inclusions were not thorough and rigorous enough, and the effects of each technique on the incidence of secondary vertebral fractures remain unclear. To perform an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of the studies with more rigorous inclusion criteria on the effects of vertebral augmentation techniques and conservative treatment for OVCF on the incidence of secondary vertebral fractures. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SpringerLink, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library database were searched for relevant original articles comparing the incidence of secondary vertebral fractures between vertebral augmentation techniques and conservative treatment for patients with OVCFs. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective non-randomized controlled trials (NRCTs) were identified. The methodological qualities of the studies were evaluated, relevant data were extracted and recorded, and an appropriate meta-analysis was conducted. A total of 13 articles were included. The pooled results from included studies showed no statistically significant differences in the incidence of secondary vertebral fractures between patients treated with vertebral augmentation techniques and conservative treatment. Subgroup analysis comparing different study designs, durations of symptoms, follow-up times, races of patients, and techniques were conducted, and no significant differences in the incidence of secondary fractures were identified (P > 0.05). No obvious publication bias was detected by either Begg's test (P = 0.360 > 0.05) or Egger's test (P = 0.373 > 0.05). Despite current thinking in the

  18. Pulse transient hot strip technique adapted for slab sample geometry to study anisotropic thermal transport properties of μm-thin crystalline films.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y; Gustavsson, J S; Haglund, A; Gustavsson, M; Gustafsson, S E

    2014-04-01

    A new method based on the adaptation of the Pulse Transient Hot Strip technique to slab sample geometry has been developed for studying thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of anisotropic thin film materials (<50 μm) with thermal conductivity in the 0.01-100 W/mK range, deposited on thin substrates (i.e., wafers). Strength of this technique is that it provides a well-controlled thermal probing depth, making it possible to probe a predetermined depth of the sample layer and thereby avoiding the influence from material(s) deeper down in the sample. To verify the technique a series of measurements were conducted on a y-cut single crystal quartz wafer. A Hot Strip sensor (32-μm wide, 3.2-mm long) was deposited along two orthogonal crystallographic (x- and z-) directions and two independent pulse transients were recorded. Thereafter, the data was fitted to our theoretical model, and the anisotropic thermal transport properties were determined. Using a thermal probing depth of only 30 μm, we obtained a thermal conductivity along the perpendicular (parallel) direction to the z-, i.e., optic axis of 6.48 (11.4) W/mK, and a thermal diffusivity of 3.62 (6.52) mm(2)/s. This yields a volumetric specific heat of 1.79 MJ/mK. These values agree well with tabulated data on bulk crystalline quartz supporting the accuracy of the technique, and the obtained standard deviation of less than 2.7% demonstrates the precision of this new measurement technique.

  19. [Application progress of minimally invasive technique in treatment of calcaneus fractures].

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Yunfeng; Yu, Guangrong

    2013-02-01

    To review the application progress of minimally invasive technique in the treatment of calcaneus fractures and to analyze the advantages and disadvantages of each method as well as to predict the trend of development in the field. Domestic and abroad literature concerning the minimally invasive technique applied in calcaneus fractures in recent years was reviewed extensively and analyzed thoroughly. There are both advantages and limitations of each minimally invasive technique including percutaneous reduction and fixation, limited incision, external fixator, arthroscopic assisted reduction, and balloon expansion reduction. But every technique is developing rapidly and becoming more and more effective. A variety of minimally invasive technique can not only be used independently but also can be applied jointly to complement one another. It needs further study how to improve the effectiveness and expand the indications. And the theoretical basis of evidence-based medicine needs to be provided more.

  20. Treatment of proximal humerus fractures in children with a modified palm tree technique.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ayman M; Fawzy, Sallam I; Moaty, Medhat; Abelaziz, Mohamed

    2017-03-21

    Although most pediatric proximal humeral fractures can be successfully treated conservatively with satisfactory results, many operative techniques have been described for the treatment of displaced proximal humeral fractures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous fixation using a modified palm tree technique for proximal humerus fractures in children. Between March 2011 and May 2013, the modified palm tree technique was used for the management of 30 children (20 boys and 10 girls) with displaced proximal humeral fractures. The average age of the patients was 11.5 years (age range from 8 to 15 years). They were evaluated clinically by the Constant-Murley score and by radiological analysis. The average follow-up duration was 18 months. The average time of fracture union was 6 weeks (range from 4 to 8 weeks). The average Constant score of the patients was 92 (range from 87 to 95), with excellent results in 27 (90%) cases, good results in three (10%) cases, and no fair or poor results (0%). The reported complications were superficial pin-tract infection in five cases, treated by daily dressing and local antibiotics, and malunion with a varus deformity in two cases (about 15°), with no recorded cases with deep infection. None of the cases required open reduction. No cases were complicated by avascular necrosis of the head humerus or loss of fixation. Kirschner wires were removed after an average period of 7 weeks. The modified palm tree technique represents an efficient method for the treatment of proximal humerus fractures in children. It produces a good grip in both the proximal and distal fragments. It allows for early joint movements.

  1. Novel Intramedullary-Fixation Technique for Long Bone Fragility Fractures Using Bioresorbable Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nishizuka, Takanobu; Kurahashi, Toshikazu; Hara, Tatsuya; Hirata, Hitoshi; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Almost all of the currently available fracture fixation devices for metaphyseal fragility fractures are made of hard metals, which carry a high risk of implant-related complications such as implant cutout in severely osteoporotic patients. We developed a novel fracture fixation technique (intramedullary-fixation with biodegradable materials; IM-BM) for severely weakened long bones using three different non-metallic biomaterials, a poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) woven tube, a nonwoven polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) fiber mat, and an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The purpose of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of IM-BM with mechanical testing as well as with an animal experiment. To perform mechanical testing, we fixed two longitudinal acrylic pipes with four different methods, and used them for a three-point bending test (N = 5). The three-point bending test revealed that the average fracture energy for the IM-BM group (PLLA + CPC + PHA) was 3 times greater than that of PLLA + CPC group, and 60 to 200 times greater than that of CPC + PHA group and CPC group. Using an osteoporotic rabbit distal femur incomplete fracture model, sixteen rabbits were randomly allocated into four experimental groups (IM-BM group, PLLA + CPC group, CPC group, Kirschner wire (K-wire) group). No rabbit in the IM-BM group suffered fracture displacement even under full weight bearing. In contrast, two rabbits in the PLLA + CPC group, three rabbits in the CPC group, and three rabbits in the K-wire group suffered fracture displacement within the first postoperative week. The present work demonstrated that IM-BM was strong enough to reinforce and stabilize incomplete fractures with both mechanical testing and an animal experiment even in the distal thigh, where bone is exposed to the highest bending and torsional stresses in the body. IM-BM can be one treatment option for those with severe osteoporosis. PMID:25111138

  2. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2003-12-01

    This project covers three distinct features of thin film fracture and deformation in which the current experimental technique of nanoindentation demonstrates limitations. The first feature is film fracture, which can be generated either by nanoindentation or bulge testing thin films. Examples of both tests will be shown, in particular oxide films on metallic or semiconductor substrates. Nanoindentations were made into oxide films on aluminum and titanium substrates for two cases; one where the metal was a bulk (effectively single crystal) material and the other where the metal was a 1 pm thick film grown on a silica or silicon substrate. In both cases indentation was used to produce discontinuous loading curves, which indicate film fracture after plastic deformation of the metal. The oxides on bulk metals fractures occurred at reproducible loads, and the tensile stress in the films at fracture were approximately 10 and 15 GPa for the aluminum and titanium oxides respectively. Similarly, bulge tests of piezoelectric oxide films have been carried out and demonstrate film fracture at stresses of only 100's of MPa, suggesting the importance of defects and film thickness in evaluating film strength. The second feature of concern is film adhesion. Several qualitative and quantitative tests exist today that measure the adhesion properties of thin films. A relatively new technique that uses stressed overlayers to measure adhesion has been proposed and extensively studied. Delamination of thin films manifests itself in the form of either telephone cord or straight buckles. The buckles are used to calculate the interfacial fracture toughness of the film-substrate system. Nanoindentation can be utilized if more energy is needed to initiate buckling of the film system. Finally, deformation in metallic systems can lead to non-linear deformation due to 'bursts' of dislocation activity during nanoindentation. An experimental study to examine the structure of dislocations around

  3. Damage, crack growth and fracture characteristics of nuclear grade graphite using the Double Torsion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. H.; Marrow, T. J.; Tait, R. B.

    2011-07-01

    The crack initiation and propagation characteristics of two medium grained polygranular graphites, nuclear block graphite (NBG10) and Gilsocarbon (GCMB grade) graphite, have been studied using the Double Torsion (DT) technique. The DT technique allows stable crack propagation and easy crack tip observation of such brittle materials. The linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) methodology of the DT technique was adapted for elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) in conjunction with a methodology for directly calculating the J-integral from in-plane displacement fields (JMAN) to account for the non-linearity of graphite deformation. The full field surface displacement measurement techniques of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) and digital image correlation (DIC) were used to observe and measure crack initiation and propagation. Significant micro-cracking in the fracture process zone (FPZ) was observed as well as crack bridging in the wake of the crack tip. The R-curve behaviour was measured to determine the critical J-integral for crack propagation in both materials. Micro-cracks tended to nucleate at pores, causing deflection of the crack path. Rising R-curve behaviour was observed, which is attributed to the formation of the FPZ, while crack bridging and distributed micro-cracks are responsible for the increase in fracture resistance. Each contributes around 50% of the irreversible energy dissipation in both graphites.

  4. Alternative electronic logging technique locates fractures in Austin chalk horizontal well

    SciTech Connect

    Stang, C.W. )

    1989-11-01

    This article describes the search for a technique to locate fractures in a horizontal well. The author focuses on the utilization of a formation microscanner (FMS). The FMS is described and the results and problems associated with its utilization are presented.

  5. An irreducible variant of intertrochanteric fractures: a technique for open reduction.

    PubMed

    Said, G Z; Farouk, O; Said, H G Z

    2005-07-01

    We report five cases of intertrochanteric fractures that needed open reduction after failed closed reduction techniques. In all cases the shaft fragment included the lesser trochanter, and there was a long spike on the head-neck fragment. This was evident clinically as the proximal shaft, pulled by the iliopsoas tendon, produced a swelling in front of the hip joint. Radiographically, the fracture was minimally comminuted. The anteroposterior view revealed upward riding of the shaft fragment, while lateral view showed the femoral shaft in front of the head and neck. We describe a three-step technique, which was applied for open reduction in these unusual cases. With the patient supine on a standard operating table, the fracture site was exposed. The limb was placed in full adduction and external rotation to slacken the iliopsoas tendon. A Hohmann retractor was then passed medial to the shaft and behind the fractured surface of the sunken femoral neck, levering it anteriorly. Traction in abduction and internal rotation was applied to complete the reduction. Additional iliopsoas tenotomy was performed in two patients. All cases were fixed with a dynamic hip screw and all fractures united uneventfully.

  6. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  7. The effect of different restoration techniques on the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated molars.

    PubMed

    Cobankara, Funda Kont; Unlu, Nimet; Cetin, Ali Riza; Ozkan, Hatice Buyukozer

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated mandibular molars with mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities restored using different restoration techniques. Sixty sound extracted mandibular molars were randomly assigned to six groups (n=10). Group 1 did not receive any preparation. The teeth in Groups 2-6 received root canal treatment and a MOD cavity preparation. The teeth in Group 2 were kept unrestored. Group 3 was restored conventionally with amalgam. Group 4 was restored with a dentin bonding system (DBS, Clearfil SE Bond) and resin composite (CR) (Clearfil Photoposterior). Group 5 was restored with indirect hybrid ceramic inlay material (Estenia). In Group 6, polyethylene ribbon fiber (Ribbond) was inserted into cavities in a buccal-to-lingual direction and the teeth were then restored with DBS and CR. After finishing and polishing, the specimens, except for Group 2, were loaded to failure by a chewing simulation device (60,000 cycles x 50 N load, 1.3 Hz frequency) in an artificial environment at 37 degrees C. Each tooth was subjected to compressive loading perpendicular to the occlusal surface at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The mean loads necessary to fracture were recorded in Newtons and the results were statistically analyzed. The mean fracture values were as follows: Group 1: 2485.3 +/- 193.98a, Group 2: 533.9 +/- 59.4a, Group 3: 1705.8 +/- 135.7a, Group 4: 2033.3 +/- 137.6cd, Group 5: 2121.3 +/- 156.5d, Group 6: 1908.9 +/- 132.2cd. There were statistically significant differences between the groups annotated with different letters. Thus, Group 1 (intact teeth) had the greatest fracture resistance and Group 2 (non-restored teeth) the poorest. No statistically significant differences were found between Groups 3 (amalgam), 4 (resin composite) and 6 (polyethylene ribbon fiber reinforced composite) (p > 0.05). Group 5 (indirect hybrid ceramic inlay) had greater fracture resistance than Group 3 (p < 0.05). Within the limitations of

  8. Phosphate laser glass for NIF: production status, slab selection, and recent technical advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratwala, Tayyab I.; Campbell, John H.; Miller, Philip E.; Thorsness, Charles B.; Riley, Michael O.; Ehrmann, Paul R.; Steele, Rusty A.

    2004-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized high-energy (1.8 megajoule) / high-peak power (500 terawatt) laser system, which will utilize over 3000 meter-size Nd-doped metaphosphate glasses as its gain media. The current production status, the selection criteria of individual slabs for specific beam line locations, and some recent technical advances are reviewed. The glass blanks are manufactured by a novel continuous glass melting process, and the finished slabs are then prepared by epoxy bonding a Cu-doped phosphate glass edge cladding and by advanced finishing techniques. To date, nearly 3400 slab equivalents have been melted, 2600 have been rough-cut to blanks, 1200 have been finished, and 144 have been installed in NIF. A set of selection rules, which are designed to optimize laser performance (e.g., maintain gain balance between beam lines and minimize beam walkoff) and to maximize glass lifetime with respect to Pt damage site growth, have been established for assigning individual slabs to specific beam line locations. Recent technical advances for amplifier slab production, which include: 1) minimizing surface pitting (hazing) after final finishing; 2) minimizing humidity-induced surface degradation (weathering) upon storage and use; and 3) preventing mounting-induced surface fractures upon installation, have contributed in improving the laser glass quality.

  9. Fracture Resistance of Premolars Restored by Various Types and Placement Techniques of Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Zeynali, Mahsa; Pour, Zahra Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    To verify the fracture resistance of premolars with mesioocclusodistal preparations restored by different resin composites and placement techniques. Sixty premolars were randomly divided into two groups based on type of composite resin: Filtek P60 or Nulite F, and then each group was separated into three subgroups: bulk, centripetal, and fiber insert according to the type of placement method (n = 10). Single-bond adhesive system was used as composite bonding according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens were restored in Groups 1, 2, and 3 with Filtek P60 and in Groups 4, 5, and 6 with Nulite F. After being stored 24 hours at 37°C, a 4 mm diameter steel sphere in a universal testing machine was applied on tooth buccal and lingual cusps at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min until fracture occurred. Groups 3 and 6 showed higher fracture resistance than Groups 1, 2, 4, and 5. Among the placement techniques, the fiber insert method had a significant effect, but the type of composite was ineffective. The insertion technique in contrast to the type of material had a significant influence on the fracture resistance of premolar teeth. PMID:22666255

  10. Application of a new multiple fracturing technique to enhance gas production in Devonian shale

    SciTech Connect

    Cuderman, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    A new multiple fracturing technology has been applied in stimulating a Devonian shale gas well. In this new technique, propellants are used to obtain controlled pressurization of the wellbore to produce multiple fractures. The pressurization is controlled by suitable choice of propellants having different burn rates. The pressure risetime is the most important parameter governing fracture behavior. Methods are presented for specifying both the risetime and propellants to achieve it for Devonian shales. The Devonian shale stimulation was conducted in a 1040 m deep well in Meigs Co., Ohio. The experimental installation and hardware used are described together with results which include an increase in production from 190 m/sup 3//day to 623 m/sup 3//day. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  11. A New and Easy Technique of Maxillomandibular Fixation in Treatment of Mandibular Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Virendra; Bhagol, Amrish

    2011-01-01

    The present work evaluated the success of maxillomandibular fixation (MMF) by a new and simplified technique in management of minimally displaced mandibular fractures. A total of 20 patients who sustained various types of mandibular fractures were treated at the Government Dental College, Rohtak, India by a new MMF technique. The patients were evaluated by preoperative and postoperative radiography, and clinical testing was performed to assess the degree of tooth mobility adjacent to the site of MMF. The time required for MMF was also noted. Patient recovery was uneventful in all 20 cases, and the period of MMF ranged from 2 to 4 weeks (mean 21 days). The outcome was good. The mean time for performing MMF was 12 minutes (range, 10 to 15 minutes). It is a simple, quick, economical, and minimally invasive technique. Its mechanical principle provides an advantage in preventing postoperative periodontal problems. PMID:22942948

  12. What is the best fixation technique for the treatment of supracondylar humerus fractures in children?

    PubMed

    Patriota, Gyoguevara Sol Queiroz Andrade; Assunção Filho, Carlos Alberto; Assunção, Carlos Alberto

    2017-01-01

    To define the best technique for the surgical treatment of supracondylar fracture of the humerus (SFH) in children, evaluating percutaneous pinning with side wires vs. cross-pinning. Randomized controlled trials using the Medline, CAPES, and BIREME. The criteria for inclusion of articles criteria were: (1) randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing percutaneous wire fixation techniques, (2) SFH Gartland II B, III, and IV, and (3) children aged 1-14 years. The following were used as main variables: incidence of iatrogenic injury to the ulnar nerve and loss reduction. Eight studies were selected (521 patients) comparing surgical treatment with pinning in supracondylar fracture of the humerus in children Gartland II type B, III or IV. Iatrogenic injury to the ulnar nerve was greater with the cross-pinning technique, with RR 0.28 and p = 0.03, while the mini-open technique presented RR 0.14 and p = 0.2. A statistically significant greater loss of reduction in the lateral pinning was observed in FSU Gartland III and IV(p = 0.04). Based upon this meta-analysis of prospective randomized clinical trials, the following is recommended: (1) percutaneous pinning with lateral wires in supracondylar fractures of the humerus in children classified as Gartland II type B; (2) use of crossed wires for Gartland type III or IV, using the mini-open technique for the medial wire.

  13. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture on the nanometer scale.

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2005-11-01

    This work covers three distinct aspects of deformation and fracture during indentations. In particular, we develop an approach to verification of nanoindentation induced film fracture in hard film/soft substrate systems; we examine the ability to perform these experiments in harsh environments; we investigate the methods by which the resulting deformation from indentation can be quantified and correlated to computational simulations, and we examine the onset of plasticity during indentation testing. First, nanoindentation was utilized to induce fracture of brittle thin oxide films on compliant substrates. During the indentation, a load is applied and the penetration depth is continuously measured. A sudden discontinuity, indicative of film fracture, was observed upon the loading portion of the load-depth curve. The mechanical properties of thermally grown oxide films on various substrates were calculated using two different numerical methods. The first method utilized a plate bending approach by modeling the thin film as an axisymmetric circular plate on a compliant foundation. The second method measured the applied energy for fracture. The crack extension force and applied stress intensity at fracture was then determined from the energy measurements. Secondly, slip steps form on the free surface around indentations in most crystalline materials when dislocations reach the free surface. Analysis of these slip steps provides information about the deformation taking place in the material. Techniques have now been developed to allow for accurate and consistent measurement of slip steps and the effects of crystal orientation and tip geometry are characterized. These techniques will be described and compared to results from dislocation dynamics simulations.

  14. Augmented osteosynthesis of OTA 44-B fractures in older patients: a technique allowing early weightbearing.

    PubMed

    Assal, Mathieu; Christofilopoulos, Panayiotis; Lübbeke, Anne; Stern, Richard

    2011-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of an augmented technique of osteosynthesis in allowing early weightbearing in older patients with OTA 44-B (Danis-Weber B) fractures. Case series. University Level I trauma center. Thirty-six patients, nonconsecutive, with OTA 44-B fractures. Augmented internal fixation using an intramedullary wire, lateral plate, and screw augmentation with polymethylmethacrylate. Healed fracture with no loss of reduction. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score; percentage of patients who returned to prefracture function. All patients began weightbearing as tolerated in a removable brace at a mean of 13.5 days postoperatively. Thirty patients were available for follow-up at a minimum of 12 months (range, 12-14 months). All fractures healed with no loss of reduction. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 84.9 (range, 74-100), and 90% of patients returned to prefracture function. There were two infections, one in a 74-year-old diabetic woman and the other in a 92-year-old woman with pre-existing arterial insufficiency and a small ulcer over the tip of the second toe. Augmented internal fixation consisting of intramedullary wire, lateral plate, and screw augmentation with polymethylmethacrylate may allow for very early weightbearing without risk of secondary loss of reduction or disruption of the ankle mortise in older patients with OTA 44-B (Danis-Weber B) malleolar fractures.

  15. A casting and imaging technique for determining void geometry and relative permeability behavior of a single fracture specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.L.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

    1990-01-01

    A casting technique has been developed for making translucent replicas of the void space of natural rock fractures. Attenuation of light shined through the cast combined with digital image analysis provides a pointwise definition of fracture apertures. The technique has been applied to a fracture specimen from Dixie Valley, Nevada, and the measured void space geometry has been used to develop theoretical predictions of two-phase relative permeability. A strong anisotropy in relative permeabilities has been found, which is caused by highly anisotropic spatial correlations among fracture apertures. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Osteotomy, compression and other modifications of surgical techniques for internal fixation of extracapsular hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Parker, Martyn J; Handoll, Helen H G

    2009-04-15

    Many different surgical techniques have been described for the internal fixation of extracapsular hip fractures. To compare different aspects of surgical technique used in operations for internal fixation of extracapsular hip fractures in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (January 2008), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Current Controlled Trials, orthopaedic journals, conference proceedings and reference lists of articles. Date of last search was January 2008. No language restriction was applied. All randomised and quasi-randomised trials investigating operative techniques used in operations for the treatment of extracapsular hip fractures in adults. Two review authors independently selected trials, assessed trial quality and extracted data. Wherever appropriate, data were pooled. Predominantly older people with trochanteric fractures were treated in the 11 included trials.One trial (65 participants undergoing fixation with a fixed nail-plate) found no statistically significant differences between osteotomy versus anatomical reduction. Four trials, involving 465 participants undergoing fixation with a sliding hip screw (SHS), compared osteotomy versus anatomical reduction. Osteotomy was associated with an increased operative blood loss and length of surgery. There were no statistically significant differences for mortality, morbidity or measures of anatomical deformity.Two trials (138 participants) compared SHS fixation of a trochanteric hip fracture augmented with cement against a standard fixation. There were no reoperations even for the four cases of fixation failure in the cement group. The cement group had significantly better quality of life scores at six months. One trial (200 participants) comparing compression versus no compression of a trochanteric fracture in conjunction with SHS fixation found no significant

  17. Evaluation of geophysical techniques for identifying fractures in program wells in Deaf Smith County, Texas: Revision 1, Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, R.P.; Siminitz, P.C.

    1987-08-01

    Quantitative information about the presence and orientation of fractures is essential for the understanding of the geomechanical and geohydrological behavior of rocks. This report evaluates various borehole geophysical techniques for characterizing fractures in three Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program test wells in the Palo Duro Basin in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Emphasis has been placed on the Schlumberger Fracture Identification Log (FIL) which detects vertical fractures and provides data for calculation of orientation. Depths of FIL anomalies were compared to available core. It was found that the application of FIL results to characterize fracture frequency or orientation is inappropriate at this time. The uncertainties associated with the FIL information render the information unreliable. No geophysical logging tool appears to unequivocally determine the location and orientation of fractures in a borehole. Geologic mapping of the exploratory shafts will ultimately provide the best data on fracture frequency and orientation at the proposed repository site. 22 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Percutaneous pinning of pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures with the semisterile technique: the Miami experience.

    PubMed

    Iobst, Christopher A; Spurdle, Craig; King, Wesley F; Lopez, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures are common injuries. The standard of care for management of displaced supracondylar fractures has become closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of the fracture in the operating room. We have been using a "semisterile" surgical technique, similar to what is used when placing a traction pin at the bedside. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our cases from 2000-2004 requiring closed reduction and percutaneous pinning to determine if this method had an infection rate comparable to what is reported in the literature. A total of 304 cases were identified. There were no superficial pin track infections or deep infections requiring treatment in any patient. A review of the literature regarding percutaneous pinning of supracondylar humerus fractures reveals an overall infection rate of 2.34% (45/1922) with a deep infection rate of 0.47% (9/1922). Consequently, the use of the semisterile technique is safe and an efficient way to handle these cases in saving time, cost, and materials. We also found that the administration of perioperative antibiotics may not be necessary as 68% of our patients did not receive any antibiotics during the perioperative or postoperative period. Finally, we found that 37% of our patients were discharged home the same day the surgery was performed, and there were no cases of compartment syndrome or Volkmann ischemic contracture. This indicates that observation overnight in the hospital may not be necessary for every patient.

  19. A High-Resolution, Reproducible Technique for Measuring Fracture Aperture in Centimeter-Scale Rock Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, P.; Detwiler, R. L.; Elkhoury, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Mechanical and chemical processes can alter fracture surfaces and their corresponding aperture. Understanding the relationship between physicochemical processes and the alteration of fracture apertures is fundamental to quantifying the evolution of transport properties in the subsurface. Therefore, relevant experiments that quantify these processes require the ability to measure fracture surfaces and reconstruct fracture aperture fields at high resolutions before and after experiments. Furthermore, to meaningfully compare measured aperture fields before and after experiments, it is critical that the measurements are reproducible to ensure that differences in fracture apertures are due to physical changes and not data acquisition or reconstruction errors. Energy transmission techniques can provide direct, non-destructive measurement of fracture apertures. However, while X-ray CT is capable of μm-scale resolution, at those resolutions, it is limited to millimeter-scale cores. Alternatively, light absorbance techniques are limited to transparent analogs or casts of real rocks. Modern surface-profilometry instruments provide the ability to measure surface topography at high resolution, but it is difficult to reconstruct fracture apertures from the measured surfaces. We present a rigorous approach for using high-resolution measurements of surface topography to reproducibly reconstruct fracture aperture fields. An optical profilometer (NANOVEA ST400) provides surface topography measurements averaged over a spot size of 8 μm with spatial accuracy of ±0.1 μm and elevation accuracy of ±0.9 μm. Numerically mating the measured surfaces requires accurate, reproducible alignment of the two fracture halves in three-dimensional space. To facilitate alignment and provide a means for checking the alignment of scanned surfaces, we fabricated a jig for securing the halves of the core to the profilometer stage. The jig consists of two mated blocks of precision-milled steel that

  20. Triangular Fixation Technique for Bicolumn Restoration in Treatment of Distal Humerus Intercondylar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seung-Hoon; Jeong, Min; Lim, Hae-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Background Distal humerus intercondylar fractures are intra-articular and comminuted fractures involving soft tissue injury. As distal humerus is triangle-shaped, parallel plating coupled with articular fixation would be suitable for bicolumn restoration in treatment of distal humerus intercondylar fracture. Methods This study included 38 patients (15 males and 23 females) who underwent olecranon osteotomy, open reduction and internal fixation with the triangle-shaped cannulated screw and parallel locking plates (triangular fixation technique). Functional results were assessed with the visual analog scale (VAS) scores, Mayo elbow performance (MEP) scores and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaires. Anteroposterior and lateral elbow radiographs were assessed for reduction, alignment, fracture union, posttraumatic arthrosis, and heterotopic ossification, and computed tomography (CT) scans were used to obtain more accurate measurements of articular discrepancy. Results All fractures healed primarily with no loss of reduction. The mean VAS, MEP, and DASH scores of the affected elbow were not significantly different from those of the unaffected elbow (p = 0.140, p = 0.090, and p = 0.262, respectively). The mean degree of flexion was significantly lower in the affected elbow than in the unaffected elbow, but was still considered as functional (p = 0.001, > 100° in 33 of 38 patients). Two cases of articular step-offs (> 2 mm) were seen on follow-up CT scans, but not significantly higher in the affected elbow than in the unaffected elbow (p = 0.657). Binary logistic regression analysis revealed that only Association for Osteosynthesis (AO) type C3 fractures correlated with good/excellent functional outcome (p = 0.012). Complications occurred in 12 of the 38 patients, and the overall reoperation rate for complications was 10.5% (4 of 38 patients). Conclusions Triangular fixation technique for bicolumn restoration was an effective and reliable

  1. Quantify fluid saturation in fractures by light transmission technique and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) migration in transparent and rough fractures with variable aperture was studied experimentally using a light transmission technique. The migration of trichloroethylene (TCE) in variable-aperture fractures (20 cm wide x 32.5 cm high) showed that a TCE blob moved downward with snap-off events in four packs with apertures from 100 μm to 1000 μm, and that the pattern presented a single and tortuous cluster with many fingers in a pack with two apertures of 100 μm and 500 μm. The variable apertures in the fractures were measured by light transmission. A light intensity-saturation (LIS) model based on light transmission was used to quantify DNAPL saturation in the fracture system. Known volumes of TCE, were added to the chamber and these amounts were compared to the results obtained by LIS model. Strong correlation existed between results obtained based on LIS model and the known volumes of T CE. Sensitivity analysis showed that the aperture was more sensitive than parameter C2 of LIS model. LIS model was also used to measure dyed TCE saturation in air sparging experiment. The results showed that the distribution and amount of TCE significantly influenced the efficient of air sparging. The method developed here give a way to quantify fluid saturation in two-phase system in fractured medium, and provide a non-destructive, non-intrusive tool to investigate changes in DNAPL architecture and flow characteristics in laboratory experiments. Keywords: light transmission, fluid saturation, fracture, variable aperture AcknowledgementsFunding for this research from NSFC Project No. 41472212.

  2. Elastic suture (shoelace technique) for fasciotomy closure after treatment of compartmental syndrome associated to tibial fracture.

    PubMed

    Branco, Paulo Sergio Martins Castelo; Cardoso Junior, Mauricio; Rotbande, Isaac; Ciraudo, José Antonio Fraga; Silva, Celso Ricardo Correa de Melo; Leal, Paulo Cesar Dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    This article reports the use of elastic suture as an adjuvant in surgical wound closure caused by decompressive fasciotomy after compartment syndrome associated with a compound fracture of the tibia. Widely used in other medico-surgical specialties, this technique is unusual in orthopedics surgery, but the simplicity of the procedure and the successful outcome observed in this case allows for its consideration as indicated for situations similar to that presented in this study.

  3. The use of dual C-arms during fixation of calcaneal fractures: a technique tip.

    PubMed

    Abousayed, Mostafa M; Toussaint, Rull James; Kwon, John Y

    2014-06-01

    We describe a simple technique using dual C-arms (large and mini C-arm together) for open reduction internal fixation of calcaneal fractures in the lateral decubitus position that (1) decreases the difficulty of obtaining proper intraoperative imaging; (2) limits C-arm movement, which decreases risk of contamination and operative time; and (3) minimizes the drawbacks of each imaging fluoroscopic modality. Level V, Technical tip, Expert opinion.

  4. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with horizontal fiberglass posts or indirect techniques.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Carolina Ritter; Alves, Caroline Beatriz; Stona, Deborah; Spohr, Ana Maria; Rodrigues-Junior, Sinval Adalberto; Melara, Rafael; Burnett, Luiz Henrique

    2016-12-01

    Because of the many possibilities for endodontically restoring the posterior teeth and the high prevalence of restoration failures, this topic continues to be of major concern. A composite resin (CR) restoration reinforced by a horizontal fiberglass post may improve the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. The authors investigated this possibility by comparing the fracture resistance of molars restored with direct techniques with that of molars restored with indirect techniques. The authors divided 50 extracted sound third molars into 5 groups: sound teeth, onlay (ON), inlay (IN), direct CR, and transfixed fiberglass post (TFP) plus direct CR. The authors performed standardized mesio-occlusodistal cavity preparations and endodontic treatments. The authors cemented indirect restorations of Lava Ultimate (3M ESPE) adhesively in the ON and IN groups. The authors restored CR group teeth directly with Filtek Z230 XT (3M ESPE). In the TFP group, the authors transfixed 2 fiberglass posts horizontally and restored the teeth directly with CR. Thereafter, the authors submitted the teeth to cyclic fatigue loading with 500,000 cycles at 200 newtons. The authors tested fracture resistance in newtons in a universal testing machine. The authors analyzed data with 1-way analysis of variance and a Tukey test (P < .05). Sound teeth had the highest fracture resistance. ON had the highest recovery of resistance, followed by TFP. CR had the lowest recovery, which was similar to that of IN. Endodontically treated molars restored with TFP plus CR had fracture resistance similar to those restored with ON, which was higher than that for IN or CR only. Horizontal TFPs placed inside a composite restoration had the same performance as did ON restorations. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty for proximal humeral fractures: update on indications, technique, and results.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Daniel C; Vanbeek, Corinne; Lazarus, Mark D; Williams, Gerald R; Abboud, Joseph A

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of the reverse shoulder arthroplasty has provided shoulder surgeons with more options for the treatment of complex proximal humeral fractures in the elderly. Early reported results suggest that the average functional outcome may be better than hemiarthroplasty in certain patients and specific clinical scenarios. In addition, these results seem to be reached more quickly with less dependence on rehabilitation. The reverse prosthesis may be particularly useful in patients aged older than 70 years, especially those with severely comminuted fractures in osteopenic bone. These factors likely have a negative impact on the results of hemiarthroplasty and internal fixation. Despite the potential benefits of reverse arthroplasty for fracture, there is a significant learning curve with the use of this prosthesis, and it has its own set of complications. The surgeon must show appropriate judgment when selecting a reverse arthroplasty in the setting of a proximal humeral fracture and, furthermore, be well acquainted with the surgical technique and prosthetic options at the time of surgery. Although the longevity of this prosthesis remains unknown, midterm outcomes are promising.

  6. Outcomes and treatments of mal fractures caused by the split-crest technique in the mandible.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Yasuyuki; Yabase, Akiko; Ishida, Suguru; Kobayashi, Masaki; Komori, Takahide

    2014-09-26

    In this study, we investigated cases of mal fracture occurring during the split-crest procedure. In all subjects (six patients), the free cortical bone segment caused by the mal fracture was carefully maintained in the lateral position without fixation using a titanium plate or screw. On pre- and postoperative multiplanar reconstruction CT, the average total alveolar increase was 5.0 mm in the lower portion 1 mm from the top of the alveolar ridge, and the average total alveolar increase in the lower portion 11 mm from the top of the alveolar ridge was 2.2 mm. A total of 11 dental implants were placed immediately at the same time as the split-crest procedure, while three dental implants were placed after a waiting period of 4-11 months from bone augmentation. During an average follow-up of 27.8 months, there were no complications or cases of failed implants. Consequently, among the patients who experienced mal fracture during the split-crest technique, a sufficient volume of alveolar bone was obtained without the need for rigid fixation of the free bone segment, and the dental implants placed within the area of the mal fracture showed a good prognosis.

  7. A Novel Technique for Attaining Maxillomandibular Fixation in the Edentulous Mandible Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Knotts, Christopher; Workman, Meredith; Sawan, Kamal; El Amm, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Edentulous mandible fractures present a unique and challenging surgical problem, particularly because of lack of occlusive dental surfaces to capitalize upon maxillomandibular fixation (MMF). We present a novel technique to achieve MMF using rigid plates spanning the oral cavity to fixate the maxilla to the mandible. The process is rapid and allows stability using the established principles of rigidity, external fixation, and osteosynthesis. This technique allows for a faster MMF than with a Gunning splint and allows for easier oral hygiene. An illustrative case and pre- and postoperative imaging are provided. PMID:23449752

  8. A novel technique for attaining maxillomandibular fixation in the edentulous mandible fracture.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Christopher; Workman, Meredith; Sawan, Kamal; El Amm, Christian

    2012-03-01

    Edentulous mandible fractures present a unique and challenging surgical problem, particularly because of lack of occlusive dental surfaces to capitalize upon maxillomandibular fixation (MMF). We present a novel technique to achieve MMF using rigid plates spanning the oral cavity to fixate the maxilla to the mandible. The process is rapid and allows stability using the established principles of rigidity, external fixation, and osteosynthesis. This technique allows for a faster MMF than with a Gunning splint and allows for easier oral hygiene. An illustrative case and pre- and postoperative imaging are provided.

  9. Mid-America Orthopaedic Association Physician in Training Award: Surgical technique: Pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures: a technique to aid closed reduction.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Mary A; Oliver, Shelley M; Ringler, James R; Jones, Clifford B; Sietsema, Debra L

    2013-05-01

    Anatomic reduction of some displaced pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures is not attainable via closed manipulation, thus necessitating open reduction. Open reduction has been associated with increased complications, including elbow stiffness, scarring, iatrogenic neurovascular injury, and longer hospital stays. Using a Schanz pin to aid in closed reduction may decrease the need for conversion to an open procedure, possibly reducing morbidity. A percutaneously placed 2.5-mm Schanz pin was drilled into the posterior humeral diaphysis and used as a joystick to reduce anterior and posterior, varus and valgus, and rotational deformity. The fracture then was stabilized with 0.62-mm K-wires placed under fluoroscopy and the Schanz pin then was removed. We retrospectively reviewed all displaced pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures treated by one surgeon from March 2002 through December 2010, with 143 fractures meeting criteria for inclusion. These fractures then were divided into two groups. Group 1 (90 fractures) included fractures treated before implantation of the Schanz pin. In this group, if successful reduction could not be achieved via closed manipulations, a formal open reduction was performed. In Group 2, (53 fractures) the Schanz pin technique was used to assist with reduction of fractures that were not reduced successfully by closed manipulations. All fractures were stabilized with the 0.62-mm K-wires after the reductions. To equalize group size, the 37 most remote fractures in Group 1 were removed, leaving a final 53 fractures in each group for analysis. Demographics, injury data, operative technique, complications, and radiographic reduction were analyzed. The minimum followup for both groups was 3.3 weeks (average, 13 weeks; range, 3.3-130 weeks). Fewer fractures in Group 2 (one of 53, 1.9%) compared with Group 1 (seven of 53, 13%) underwent open reduction. Ten fractures in Group 2 underwent the Schanz pin technique, and none of these had open

  10. Early Earth slab stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, R.; Van Hunen, J.

    2016-12-01

    At present day, the Earth's mantle exhibits a combination of stagnant and penetrating slabs within the transition zone, indicating a intermittent convection mode between layered and whole-mantle convection. Isoviscous thermal convection calculations show that in a hotter Earth, the natural mode of convection was dominated by double-layered convection, which may imply that slabs were more prone to stagnate in the transition zone. Today, slab penetration is to a large extent controlled by trench mobility for a plausible range of lower mantle viscosity and Clapeyron slope of the mantle phase transitions. Trench mobility is, in turn, governed by slab strength and density and upper plate forcing. In this study, we systematically investigate the slab-transition zone internation in the Early Earth, using 2D self-consistent numerical subduction models. Early Earth's higher mantle temperature facilitates decoupling between the plates and the underlying asthenosphere, and may result in slab sinking almost without trench retreat. Such behaviour together with a low resistance of a weak lower mantle may allow slabs to penetrate. The ability of slab to sink into the lower mantle throughout Earth's history may have important implications for Earth's evolution: it would provide efficient mass and heat flux through the transition zone therefore provide an efficient way to cool and mix the Earth's mantle.

  11. Study of fractures in Precambrian crystalline rocks using field technique in and around Balarampur, Purulia district, West Bengal, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Monalisa; Acharya, Tapas

    2015-12-01

    Location of recharge zone in Precambrian crystalline rock is still unclear. The present study attempts to perform a detailed analysis of the joints/fractures developed in a Precambrian metamorphic terrain in and around Balarampur in Purulia district of West Bengal, India using bedrock data. The analysis shows that the orientations of major fracture trends are variable along with varying lithological units and structural affinities. The application of lithology-based analysis technique identifies highly predominant fracture frequency and fracture aperture in mica schist and phyllite in the area. This property is not evident in the granite gneiss and epidiorite. The moderate to high fracture permeability value is also associated with the fractures occurring in the shear zone. Mica schist and phyllite associated with the shear zone may represent a permeable recharge zone in the region.

  12. Inverse measurement of stiffness by the normalization technique for J-integral fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric

    2012-06-07

    The single specimen normalization technique for J-integral fracture toughness has been successfully employed by several researchers to study the strongly non-linear fracture response of ductile semicrystalline polymers. As part of the normalization technique the load and the plastic component of displacement are normalized. The normalized data is then fit with a normalization function that approximates a power law for small displacements that are dominated by blunting and smoothly transitions to a linear relationship for large displacements that are dominated by stable crack extension. Particularly for very ductile polymers the compliance term used to determine the plastic displacement can dominate the solution and small errors in determining the elastic modulus can lead to large errors in the normalization or even make it ill-posed. This can be further complicated for polymers where the elastic modulus is strong strain rate dependent and simply using a 'quasistatic' modulus from a dogbone measurement may not equate to the dominant strain rate in the compact tension specimen. The current work proposes directly measuring the compliance of the compact tension specimen in the solution of J-integral fracture toughness and then solving for the elastic modulus. By comparison with a range of strain rate data the dominant strain rate can then be determined.

  13. Tension plate for treatment of olecranon fractures: new surgical technique and case series study.

    PubMed

    Lukšic, Bruno; Juric, Ivo; Boschi, Vladimir; Pogorelic, Zenon; Bekavac, Josip

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of a new surgical technique for olecranon fractures using a tension plate (TP) designed by the operating surgeon. We included patients with olecranon fractures treated between September 2010 and August 2013 in our study. Treatment involved a new implant and operative technique, which combined the most favourable characteristics of 2 frequently used methods, tension band wiring and plate osteosynthesis, while eliminating their shortcomings. The new method was based on the newly constructed implant. Twenty patients participated in our study. We obtained the following functional results with our TP: median flexion 147.5° (interquartile range [IQR] 130°- 155°), median extension 135°/deficit 10° (IQR 135°-145°), median pronation 90° (IQR 81.3°-90°), median supination 90° (IQR 80°-90°). Implant-related complications were noted in 1 patient, and implants were removed in 3 patients. The mean functional Mayo elbow performance score was 94.8 (range 65-100). The removal of the implant was considerably less frequent in patients operated using the new method and implant than in patients operated using conventional methods at our institution (p < 0.001). Mean duration of follow-up was 8 months. Our TP for the treatment of olecranon fractures is safe and effective. Functional results are very good, with significantly decreased postoperative inconveniences and need to remove the implant. Less osteosynthetic material was used for TP construction, but stability was preserved.

  14. Proximal screws placement in intertrochanteric fractures treated with external fixation: comparison of two different techniques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To compare two different techniques of proximal pin placement for the treatment of intertrochanteric fractures in elderly patients utilizing the Orthofix Pertrochanteric Fixator. Methods Seventy elderly high-risk patients with an average age of 81 years were treated surgically for intertrochanteric fracture, resulting from a low energy trauma. Patients were randomly divided in two groups regarding to the proximal pin placement technique. In Group A the proximal pins were inserted in a convergent way, while in Group B were inserted in parallel. Results All fractures healed uneventfully after a mean time of 98 days. The fixator was well accepted and no patient had significant difficulties while sitting or lying. The mean VAS score was 5.4 in group A and 5.7 in group B. At 12 months after surgery, in group A the average Harris Hip Score and the Palmer and Parker mobility score was 67 and 5.8, respectively. In group B, the average Harris Hip Score and the Palmer and Parker mobility score was 62 and 5.6, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found regarding the functional outcome. The mean radiographic exposure during pin insertion in Group A and Group B was 15 and 6 seconds, respectively. The difference between the two groups, regarding the radiographic exposure, was found to be significant. Conclusion Proximal screw placement in a parallel way is simple, with significant less radiation exposure and shorter intraoperative duration. In addition, fixation stability is equal compared to convergent pin placement. PMID:21939534

  15. A fracture-orientation comparison between core-based and borehole-imaging techniques: Paleomagnetic, electronic multishot, and FMI

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, W.D. ); Van Alstine, D.R.; Butterworth J.E. )

    1996-01-01

    Accurate orientation of fractures is crucial to enhanced productivity in low-permeability fractured reservoirs. This study presents results of a rare instance in which three widely different fracture-orientation techniques could be directly compared for orientation accuracy. In a fracture-orientation study of Pardonet/Baldonnel (Upper Triassic) carbonates from the Gwillim field, British Columbia, a 50[degrees] to 60[degrees] fracture-orientation discrepancy was observed in two consecutive core runs oriented by [open quotes]electronic multishot[close quotes] (an electronic version of the conventional [open quote]multishot[close quotes] core- orientation technique) versus Schlumberger's Fullbore Formation MicroImager (FMI). To resolve this discrepancy, the paleomagnetic core-orientation technique was employed as a third fracture-orientation method. The paleomagnetically-determined fracture orientations agreed within 5[degrees] with FMI, and confirmed a systematic error in the electronic multishot orientations of 46[degrees] in Core 1 and 60[degrees] in Core 2. Superimposed on the systematic error was a second-order, oscillatory [open quotes]torsion error[close quotes] of [+-]10[degrees], which probably reflects acquisition of electronic multishot data within a rotating drillstring (unlike conventional multishot where coring is stopped before each [open quotes]shot[close quotes]). The paleomagnetic and FMI data reveal that natural and induced fractures have different orientations at this well location in the Gwillim field. Natural fractures dip 72[degrees] toward N 45[degrees] E, nearly orthogonal to bedding which dips 15[degrees] toward S 45[degrees] W. In contrast, induced petal fractures strike N 10[degrees] E, at a 55[degrees] angle to the strike of natural fractures and bedding.

  16. A fracture-orientation comparison between core-based and borehole-imaging techniques: Paleomagnetic, electronic multishot, and FMI

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, W.D.; Van Alstine, D.R.; Butterworth J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Accurate orientation of fractures is crucial to enhanced productivity in low-permeability fractured reservoirs. This study presents results of a rare instance in which three widely different fracture-orientation techniques could be directly compared for orientation accuracy. In a fracture-orientation study of Pardonet/Baldonnel (Upper Triassic) carbonates from the Gwillim field, British Columbia, a 50{degrees} to 60{degrees} fracture-orientation discrepancy was observed in two consecutive core runs oriented by {open_quotes}electronic multishot{close_quotes} (an electronic version of the conventional {open_quote}multishot{close_quotes} core- orientation technique) versus Schlumberger`s Fullbore Formation MicroImager (FMI). To resolve this discrepancy, the paleomagnetic core-orientation technique was employed as a third fracture-orientation method. The paleomagnetically-determined fracture orientations agreed within 5{degrees} with FMI, and confirmed a systematic error in the electronic multishot orientations of 46{degrees} in Core 1 and 60{degrees} in Core 2. Superimposed on the systematic error was a second-order, oscillatory {open_quotes}torsion error{close_quotes} of {+-}10{degrees}, which probably reflects acquisition of electronic multishot data within a rotating drillstring (unlike conventional multishot where coring is stopped before each {open_quotes}shot{close_quotes}). The paleomagnetic and FMI data reveal that natural and induced fractures have different orientations at this well location in the Gwillim field. Natural fractures dip 72{degrees} toward N 45{degrees} E, nearly orthogonal to bedding which dips 15{degrees} toward S 45{degrees} W. In contrast, induced petal fractures strike N 10{degrees} E, at a 55{degrees} angle to the strike of natural fractures and bedding.

  17. A revisit to high-rate mode-II fracture characterization of composites with Kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo; Jin, Huiqing

    2010-03-01

    Nowadays composite materials have been extensively utilized in many military and industrial applications. For example, the newest Boeing 787 uses 50% composite (mostly carbon fiber reinforced plastic) in production. However, the weak delamination strength of fiber reinforced composites, when subjected to external impact such as ballistic impact, has been always potential serious threats to the safety of passengers. Dynamic fracture toughness is a critical indicator of the performance from delamination in such impact events. Quasi-static experimental techniques for fracture toughness have been well developed. For example, end notched flexure (ENF) technique, which is illustrated in Fig. 1, has become a typical method to determined mode-II fracture toughness for composites under quasi-static loading conditions. However, dynamic fracture characterization of composites has been challenging. This has resulted in conflictive and confusing conclusions in regard to strain rate effects on fracture toughness of composites.

  18. Fracture analysis of plastic-bonded explosive by digital image correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Zhang, J.; Xiong, Chun-Yang; Fang, J.; Hao, Y.; Wen, M. P.

    2002-05-01

    Plastic-bonded explosive is a kind of energy material used in military and civil engineering. It serves also as structures or components to sustain external loads. Safety and reliability of the material is of importance to prevent damage and fracture during both manufacturing and usage procedure. Digital image correlation technique was applied to analyze the deformation field of the material near crack tip. The specimen was loaded by uniaxial compression and a slot was preset at the specimen edge with 45 degrees orientation. The speckle images were captured during the load and the surface patterns were matched by correlation computation to obtain the displacement components. The stress intensity factors of the crack tip were evaluated by the deformation in the near region of the crack. By the comparison of the strain field and the surface profile, the damage form of the material can be analyzed that showed brittle behavior with axial splitting fracture.

  19. Surgical treatment of complex proximal humeral fractures with a technique of nail and osteosuture: "NOS".

    PubMed

    Garret, J; Houdré, H; Cievet-Bonfils, M; Godenèche, Arnaud; Duparc, Fabrice; Roussignol, Xavier

    2017-03-14

    Open reduction and internal fixation of complex proximal humeral fracture represents a surgical challenge. The main objective of this procedure is to anatomically reduce the tuberosities. We propose a standardized and reproducible technique that we apply to all complex displaced 3- and 4-part fractures of patients under 50 years. We use an antero-lateral trans-deltoid approach; the humeral head and the tuberosities are reduced under fluoroscopic control. The tuberosities are stabilized with an inter-tuberosity osteosuture, and we then introduce a thin and straight intra-medullary nail (Telegraph IV FH Orthopedics) at the hinge point of the humeral head. The osteosynthesis of the tuberosities is completed by 3- or 4-self-stable divergent screws in the nail. A dynamic distal locking stabilizes the humeral shaft in rotation and facilitates consolidation thanks to micro movements. The removal of the nail with an arthroscopic shoulder arthrolysis in case of stiffness is possible secondarily.

  20. A new technique for cement augmentation of the sliding hip screw in proximal femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Karl K; Leys, Toby; Damen, Nikki; Nicholls, Rochelle L; Kuster, Markus S

    2008-01-01

    Fractures of the osteoporotic proximal femur are a significant source of mortality and morbidity in today's ageing population. Even with modern fixation techniques such as the sliding hip screw, a certain percentage of fixations will fail due to cut-out of the screw. This study presents a new method for augmenting hip screws with cement to reinforce the fixation. Unstable pertrochanteric fractures were created in paired osteoporotic cadaver femora (n=10). The fractures were fixed using either standard fixation techniques (dynamic hip screw), or using a dynamic hip screw augmented with cement. Cement was introduced using a customised jig to guide cement into a region superior to the screw in the femoral head. Cut-out resistance was assessed using a biaxial material testing machine, with loading applied in compression until failure. The new cement augmentation technique significantly improved the cut-out strength of the fixation (mean 42%; P=0.032). The failure mechanism for both groups was the same, with failure occurring through compression of the cancellous bone superior to the screw. The mean increase in temperature at the femoral neck was 3.7 degrees C in augmented bones, which is much lower than values previously reported for polymethylmethacrylate cements. Several benefits with this technique have emerged. The method is technically straightforward. The risk of cement penetration into the joint is reduced, and cement is targetted to the areas of the femoral head where it is most needed. The exothermic reaction is minimised by reducing the volume of cement used. The first clinical results are promising.

  1. Acute pain management of patients with multiple fractured ribs: a focus on regional techniques.

    PubMed

    Ho, Anthony M-H; Karmakar, Manoj K; Critchley, Lester A H

    2011-08-01

    Thoracic trauma leading to multiple fractured ribs (MFR) remains very common. Good analgesia may help to improve a patient's respiratory mechanics and to avoid intubation of the trachea for ventilatory support and therefore may dramatically alter the course of recovery. We herein review the analgesia options for patients with MFR. For healthy patients with one to two fractured ribs, systemic analgesics may suffice. For more than three to four fractured ribs, studies and experience have reaffirmed the superior analgesia made possible with thoracic epidural, thoracic paravertebral, and intercostal blocks. From experience, interpleural block has significant drawbacks. Catheterization allows the continuation of analgesia for 2 or more days with just one block. Use of the landmark technique is usually satisfactory for accurate block placement but ultrasound and nerve stimulation are showing promise in further improving needle and catheter placement accuracy, especially in the presence of difficult anatomy. Thoracic epidural, thoracic paravertebral, and intercostal blocks are the top choices for patients with MFR and they are of equivalent efficacy. Each has unique advantages and disadvantages. Our preference tends to be the thoracic paravertebral approach.

  2. A simplified Galveston technique for the stabilisation of pathological fractures of the sacrum.

    PubMed

    McGee, A M; Bache, C E; Spilsbury, J; Marks, D S; Stirling, A J; Thompson, A G

    2000-10-01

    Mechanical stabilisation of pathological fractures of the sacrum is technically challenging. There is often inadequate purchase in the sacrum, and stabilisation has to be achieved between the lumbar vertebrae and ilium. We present a simplification of the Galveston technique. We treated a total of six patients with this technique, four for metastatic disease and two for primary tumours. Our technique consists of the formation of a proximal stable construct using ISOLA pedicle screws linked distally using a modular system of connectors to threaded iliac bolts with cross linkages. Neurological decompression and fusion was performed as appropriate. The benefits of this method are: ease of access to the ilium, a solid purchase to the ilium, less rod contouring and shorter operating time. We have had no operative complications from this procedure. All patients were discharged home mobile, with a reduced opiate requirement.

  3. Unreamed intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures: operative technique and early clinical experience with the standard locking option.

    PubMed

    Krettek, C; Rudolf, J; Schandelmaier, P; Guy, P; Könemann, B; Tscherne, H

    1996-05-01

    Nailing techniques have changed in recent years in ways which are not just limited to omitting the reaming process. These changes concern positioning patients, techniques of reduction and selecting implants. Techniques of approach and exposure have been modified to new, less-invasive procedures to fulfill technical, functional and cosmetic requirements. In addition, techniques have been developed to avoid fragment diastasis, rotational and sagittal malalignment, and leg-length discrepancy. Finally, simple algorithms have been elaborated for the management of specific fracture patterns (bilateral shaft fractures, ipsilateral tibial fractures or associated femoral neck fractures) and to determine the number and location of locking bolts. We developed these algorithms, techniques and procedures in a series of 133 femoral shafts, which were stabilized with the AO unreamed femoral nail (URFN) in a prospective study between 1991 and 1994. Of these, the first 57 cases with a mean follow-up of 17.9 months (range, 5-44) after injury were reviewed. Fractures were classified according to Müller's 1990 system: 12 type A, 29 type B and 16 type C. Closed soft-tissue injuries were classified by our classification of 1982: 17 type C 0/I, 42 type C II. Of 15 open fractures, six were OI, six OII, two OIIIA and one was OIIIB by Gustilo's classification of 1984. The major complications were two broken locking bolts, one nail breaking after 9 weeks, one case of osteitis and one of intra-operative lung embolism.

  4. Corrective osteotomy for malunited metacarpal fractures: long-term results of a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Karthik, K; Tahmassebi, R; Khakha, R S; Compson, J

    2015-10-01

    Symptomatic malunited metacarpal fractures can significantly affect hand function. We retrospectively reviewed the results of our technique of corrective osteotomy in 14 malunited metacarpal fractures (12 patients) with an average age of 30 years (range 18-49) from January 2005 to December 2011. The dominant hand was involved in nine patients and all except one were male. The malunited metacarpals demonstrated mean dorsal apex angulation of 43° (range 33°-72°) with apparent metacarpal shortening. All except three cases had rotational deformity. All patients underwent surgical correction of the deformity using our described technique of closing wedge osteotomy using temporary intramedullary K-wire and plate fixation. At a mean follow-up of 46 months (range 12-78), the DASH scores improved significantly (p < 0.001). All our patients scored 'excellent' according to the Büchler criteria and at final follow-up had returned to pre-injury work and sports activities. Our technique is safe, easily performed and can be adapted to correct a range of deformities. Level of evidence: Level IV.

  5. Speed-Bridge arthroscopic reinsertion of tibial eminence fracture (complementary to the adjustable button fixation technique).

    PubMed

    Hardy, A; Casabianca, L; Grimaud, O; Meyer, A

    2017-02-01

    In comminuted fractures of the intercondyloid eminence of the tibial spine, the quality of the reduction and the arthroscopic fixation, notably adjustable suture button fixation, is sometimes disappointing with reduction defects of the anterior bone block. In the Speed-Bridge technique, the two traction sutures of the adjustable button fixation are replaced with two braided sutures of different colors. After the button is placed above the eminence, reduction is obtained by tightening the loop of the button. The accessory communitive fragments are then packed in the depression around the main fragment. A second row provides bone suturing for these accessory fragments; traction sutures of the button are attached anteromedially and laterally with knotless anchors to obtain a Speed-Bridge-type inverted-V bone suture. The Speed-Bridge arthroscopic reinsertion technique of the tibial eminence effectively completes the adjustable button bone suture technique for communitive fractures to obtain better reduction and good stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composite by acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kida, Sotoaki; Suzuki, Megumu

    1995-11-01

    The fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composites are studied by acoustic emission technique for examining the effects of fiber contents. The loads P{sub b} and P{sub c} which the damage mechanisms change are obtained at the inflection points of the total AE energy curve the energy gradient method. The damages are generated by fiber breaking at the load point of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in B material, and by the fiber breaking and the debonding between resin and fiber at the load points of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in C material.

  7. Mason type 3 radial head fractures: proposal of a synthesis technique using bioabsorbable thread

    PubMed Central

    SALVI, ANDREA EMILIO

    2016-01-01

    Multifragmentary fractures of the radial head (Mason type 3) are challenging for the surgeon. They are usually treated by means of complete removal of the injured head and sometimes by implantation of a metal prosthesis. Indeed, the bone fragments are often too small to allow stabilization through screws or even wires. The Author proposes an alternative technique, tested on a sawbone model, in which bioabsorbable thread is used, introduced in a figure-of-eight fashion. A review of the literature is provided. PMID:27602353

  8. Miniarthrotomy assisted percutaneous screw fixation for displaced medial malleolus fractures – A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Pramod; Aggrawal, Abhinav; Meena, Sanjay; Trikha, Vivek; Mittal, Samarth

    2014-01-01

    Aim To describe here a technique of miniarthrotomy assisted percutaneous screw insertion for displaced Herscovici type B and C medial malleolar fractures. Method Incision was made centred over the superomedial angle of the ankle mortise, about half a cm medial to tibialis anterior. Arthrotomy was done and reduction obtained. Percuntaneously, two 4 mm cancellous cannulated screws were inserted through medial malleolus. Results and conclusion This approach allows direct visualization of reduction, removal of entrapped soft tissue and preservation of saphenous vein and nerve. PMID:25983507

  9. The "Hoop" Plate for Posterior Bicondylar Shear Tibial Plateau Fractures: Description of a New Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Vincenzo; Schatzker, Joseph; Kfuri, Mauricio

    2017-07-01

    High-energy fractures of the proximal tibia with extensive fragmentation of the posterior rim of the tibial plateau are challenging. This technique aims to describe a method on how to embrace the posterior rim of the tibial plateau by placing a horizontal precontoured one-third tubular plate wrapped around its corners. This method, which we named "hoop plating," is mainly indicated for cases of crushed juxta-articular rim fractures, aiming to restore cortical containment of the tibial plateau. Through a lateral approach with a fibular head osteotomy (Lobenhoffer approach), both anterolateral and posterolateral fragments are directly reduced and supported by a one-third tubular plate of adequate length. The plate is inserted from lateral to medial deep to all soft tissues, and its position is checked with fluoroscopy. The implant sits exactly on the posterior cortex of the tibial plateau and provides containment for the reduced juxta-articular posterior cortex and rim. We begin with immediate range of motion. Toe-touch weight-bearing with crutches is allowed with the operated knee in full extension. Weight-bearing is gradually increased only after 6 weeks as bone healing is taking place. Clinical follow-up is performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 weeks. If the radiological exam confirms that the fracture is healed, the patient is allowed to proceed to muscle strengthening and bear weight entirely. The "hoop plating" may be a good option for the management in cases of extensive posterior tibial plateau articular surface fracture and impaction with rim and posterior cortical wall fragmentation. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Evaluation of occlusal fracture resistance of three different core materials using the Nayyar core technique

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Satti Narayana; Harika, Kolli; Manjula, Shobha; Chandra, Pavani; Vengi, Lokesh; Koka, Krishna Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim and purpose of this study was to determine the occlusal fracture resistance of three core buildup materials using the Nayyar technique. Materials and Methods: Thirty human extracted maxillary premolars were used for the study. The test samples were decoronated till the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) and proper cleaning and shaping was done with protaper niti files till the F3. Corresponding f3 protaper(Dentysply)gutta pecha cones were selected and obturated. The gutta-percha was removed till the depth of 4 mm from the coronal orifice with Gates Glidden (GG) drills for all the samples; then the samples were randomly divided into three different groups. Group I was restored with universal composite Z350XT, group II was restored with light curable glass ionomer cement (GIC), and group III was restored with miracle mix. The coronal buildup was done using compound supported matrix. The fracture resistance strength of all the specimen groups was tested under a universal testing machine. Results: The data of the study were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni's comparison test. Results of the study showed that group I that was restored with the universal composite Z350XT showed much higher fracture resistance strength compared to the other two groups. Statistically significant difference was noted between group I and group II and also between group I and group III. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the core buildup done with composite offered better occlusal fracture resistance strength compared to light curable GIC and miracle mix. PMID:27011931

  11. Imaging Fracture Networks Using Angled Crosshole Seismic Logging and Change Detection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, H. A.; Grubelich, M. C.; Preston, L. A.; Knox, J. M.; King, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a SubTER funded series of cross borehole geophysical imaging efforts designed to characterize fracture zones generated with an alternative stimulation method, which is being developed for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). One important characteristic of this stimulation method is that each detonation will produce multiple fractures without damaging the wellbore. To date, we have collected six full data sets with ~30k source-receiver pairs each for the purposes of high-resolution cross borehole seismic tomographic imaging. The first set of data serves as the baseline measurement (i.e. un-stimulated), three sets evaluate material changes after fracture emplacement and/or enhancement, and two sets are used for evaluation of pick error and seismic velocity changes attributable to changing environmental factors (i.e. saturation due to rain/snowfall in the shallow subsurface). Each of the six datasets has been evaluated for data quality and first arrivals have been picked on nearly 200k waveforms in the target area. Each set of data is then inverted using a Vidale-Hole finite-difference 3-D eikonal solver in two ways: 1) allowing for iterative ray tracing and 2) with fixed ray paths determined from the test performed before the fracture stimulation of interest. Utilizing these two methods allows us to compare and contrast the results from two commonly used change detection techniques. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Deepest hypocentral distributions associated with stagnant slabs and penetrated slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukao, Y.; Obayashi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We constructed a new P-wave tomographic model of the mantle, GAP_P4, using more than ten millions of travel time data, including waveform-based differential travel times from ocean bottoms, to all of which the finite frequency kernels were applied in the inversion. Based on this model, we made a systematic survey for subducted slab images around the Circum Pacific. This survey revealed a progressive lateral variation of slab configuration along arc(s), where a subducted slab is in general in one or two of the following four stages: I. slab stagnant above the 660, II. slab penetrating the 660, III. slab trapped in the uppermost lower mantle (660 to ˜1000 km in depth), and IV. slab descending well into the deep lower mantle. The majority of the slab images are either at stage I or III. We interpret I to IV as the successive stages of slab subduction through the transition region with the 660 at the middle. There is a remarkable correlation of the slab configuration with the deepest shock hypocentral distribution. Subhorizontal distributions of deepest shocks are associated with stagnant slabs in the transition zone (slabs at stage I). Their focal depths are limited to shallower than ˜620 km. Steeply dipping deepest shock distributions are associated with penetrating slabs across the 660-km discontinuity or trapped slabs below it (slabs at stages II and III). Their focal depths extend well beyond ˜620 km. There are no cases of association of either a stagnant slab (at stage I) with subvertical distribution of deepest shocks or a trapped slab (at stage II or III) with their subhorizontal distribution. Only steeply dipping slabs appear to penetrate the 660 to be trapped in the uppermost lower mantle. The along-arc variations of stagnant-slab configuration and deepest shock distribution beneath the Bonin arc indicate a process of how the slab begins to penetrate the 660-km discontinuity after the slab stagnation. Those beneath the Java arc and Kermadec arc commonly

  13. KAPANDJI TECHNIQUE AS AMINIMALLY INVASIVE PROCEDURE FOR SELECTED PATIENTS WITH TWO- AND THREE-PART FRACTURES OF THE PROXIMAL HUMERUS.

    PubMed

    Chamseddine, Ali Hassan; Abdallah, Amer Camille; Zein, Hadi Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Current algorithms for decision making in proximal humerus fractures consider the fracture pattern along with the patient characteristics and surgeon’s experience. Minimally invasive techniques for reduction and internal fixation of many types of these fractures have recently been widely promoted, especially with the use of the newly developed locking plate systems. Intramedullary flexible nailing is one of the oldest techniques using minimally invasive reduction and fixation of proximal humerus fractures. Kapandji technique uses the “Deltoid V” landmark as entry point for intramedullary insertion of the flexible nails into the humeral head. The authors report their experience with this procedure in twenty-six, relatively young patients with good bone quality, presenting with displaced 2- or 3-part extra-articular fracture of the proximal humerus, treated with percutaneous reduction and intramedullary flexible nailing as described by Kapandji. Nineteen medical records were available for this retrospective review, with 9 to 12 months follow-up. There were 15 excellent and 1 good results when patients were assessed for pain, function and range of motion of the shoulder. The authors submit that Kapandji technique is a valuable procedure for management of extra-articular displaced 2- and 3- part proximal humerus fractures in young patients with good bone quality.

  14. Tension plate for treatment of olecranon fractures: new surgical technique and case series study

    PubMed Central

    Lukšic, Bruno; Juric, Ivo; Boschi, Vladimir; Pogorelic, Zenon; Bekavac, Josip

    2015-01-01

    Background Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of a new surgical technique for olecranon fractures using a tension plate (TP) designed by the operating surgeon. Methods We included patients with olecranon fractures treated between September 2010 and August 2013 in our study. Treatment involved a new implant and operative technique, which combined the most favourable characteristics of 2 frequently used methods, tension band wiring and plate osteosynthesis, while eliminating their shortcomings. The new method was based on the newly constructed implant. Results Twenty patients participated in our study. We obtained the following functional results with our TP: median flexion 147.5° (interquartile range [IQR] 130°–155°), median extension 135°/deficit 10° (IQR 135°–145°), median pronation 90° (IQR 81.3°–90°), median supination 90° (IQR 80°–90°). Implant-related complications were noted in 1 patient, and implants were removed in 3 patients. The mean functional Mayo elbow performance score was 94.8 (range 65–100). The removal of the implant was considerably less frequent in patients operated using the new method and implant than in patients operated using conventional methods at our institution (p < 0.001). Mean duration of follow-up was 8 months. Conclusion Our TP for the treatment of olecranon fractures is safe and effective. Functional results are very good, with significantly decreased postoperative inconveniences and need to remove the implant. Less osteosynthetic material was used for TP construction, but stability was preserved. PMID:25427338

  15. A simple technique for measuring the fracture energy of lithiated thin-film silicon electrodes at various lithium concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong Seok; Pharr, Matt; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Vlassak, Joost J.

    2015-10-01

    We have measured the fracture energy of lithiated silicon thin-film electrodes as a function of lithium concentration using a bending test. First, silicon thin-films on copper substrates were lithiated to various states of charge. Then, bending tests were performed by deforming the substrate to a pre-defined shape, producing a variation of the curvature along the length of the electrode. The bending tests allow determination of the critical strains at which cracks initiate in the lithiated silicon. Using the substrate curvature technique, we also measured the elastic moduli and the stresses that develop in the electrodes during electrochemical lithiation. From these measurements, the fracture energy was calculated as a function of lithium concentration using a finite element simulation of fracture of an elastic film on an elastic-plastic substrate. The fracture energy was determined to be Γ = 12.0 ± 3.0 J m-2 for amorphous silicon and Γ = 10.0 ± 3.6 J m-2 for Li3.28Si, with little variation in the fracture energy for intermediate Li concentrations. These results provide a guideline for the practical design of high-capacity lithium ion batteries to avoid fracture. The experimental technique described in this paper also provides a simple means of measuring the fracture energy of brittle thin-films.

  16. [Application of rafting K-wire technique for tibial plateau fractures].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing-zhou; Yu, Wei-zhong; Li, Yun-feng; Liu, Yan-hui

    2015-12-01

    To summarize application of rafting K-wires technique for tibial plateau fractures. From January 2013 to January 2015,45 patients with tibial plateau fractures were treated by locking plate with rafting K-wires, including 33 males and 12 females with an average of 44.2 years old ranging from 22 to 56 years old. According to Schatzker classification, 6 cases were type II, 8 were type Ill, 4 were type IV, 4 were type V, and 5 were type VI. Allogeneic bone graft were performed for bone defects. All patients were fixed with two to five K-wires. Part of weight loading were encouraged at 3 months after operation,and full weight-loading were done at 5 months after operation. Postoperative complications were observed,and Rasmussen clinical and radiological assessment were used to evaluate clinical results. All Patients were followed up from 10 to 23 months with average of 14 months. According to Rasmussen clinical and radiological assessment, clinical scores 23.58 ± 6.33, radiological scores were 14.00 ± 6.33; and excellent and good rates were 82.2% and 77.8% respectively. Four patients occurred severe osteoporosis and collapse of articular surface; 5 patients occurred traumatic arthritis. Rafting K-wires technique with anatomized armor plate could effective fix and support platform collapse and joint bone fragments, increase support surface area and reduce postoperative reduction loss rate.

  17. Risk of injury to vascular-nerve bundle after calcaneal fracture: comparison among three techniques

    PubMed Central

    Labronici, Pedro José; Reder, Vitor Rodrigues; de Araujo Marins Filho, Guilherme Ferreira; Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Fernandes, Hélio Jorge Alvachian; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik

    2016-01-01

    Objective To ascertain whether the number of screws or pins placed in the calcaneus might increase the risk of injury when three different techniques for treating calcaneal fractures. Method 126 radiographs of patients who suffered displaced calcaneal fractures were retrospectively analyzed. Three surgical techniques were analyzed on an interobserver basis: 31 radiographs of patients treated using plates that were not specific for the calcaneus, 48 using specific plates and 47 using an external fixator. The risk of injury to the anatomical structures in relation to each Kirschner wire or screw was determined using a graded system in accordance with the Licht classification. The total risk of injury to the anatomical structures through placement of more than one wire/screw was quantified using the additive law of probabilities for the product, for independent events. Results All of the models presented high explanatory power for the risk evaluated, since the coefficient of determination values (R2) were greater than 98.6 for all the models. Therefore, the set of variables studied explained more than 98.6% of the variations in the risks of injury to arteries, veins or nerves and can be classified as excellent models for prevention of injuries. Conclusion The risk of injury to arteries, veins or nerves is not defined by the total number of pins/screws. The region and the number of pins/screws in each region define and determine the best distribution of the risk. PMID:27069891

  18. Fracture Detection in Alluvial Fan Deposits Using Near-Surface Seismic Reflection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, R. A.; Miller, B.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we document the observation of probable extensive shallow vertical fracture systems in unprocessed 2-D source gathers from near-surface seismic reflection surveys conducted over unconsolidated materials in alluvial fans environments. Mapping of fracture and fault systems within the sedimentary sections at hydrocarbon exploration scales has become common practice. This is due to the advent of post-stack attribute analysis of 3-D seismic images worldwide. However, examples of fracture detection and imaging in the near-surface are currently lacking in the literature. In addition, examples of fracture detection and mapping in the pre-stack domain are also lacking. In this study, unprocessed seismic source gathers from very high-resolution reflection surveys over alluvial fan deposits in tectonically active areas appear to display distinct patterns of amplitude drop off, geometrically similar to patterns expected for vertical fracture systems. The patterns can also be extracted by attribute analysis using techniques such as envelope and coherency analyses. Simple standard processing steps such as trace editing, muting, and bandpass filtering enhance interpretability. The patterns appear to be consistent and spatially fixed in the subsurface from source location to source location. These are observed in areas of obvious recent local large-scale fault movement. Examples are given from two areas, eastern Queen Valley in California and eastern Fish Lake Valley in Nevada. The stratigraphic and sedimentation patterns are quite complicated in both areas, and sediment characteristics vary considerably between sites. The surface sediments in the Queen Valley case are, in general, much coarser with many more boulder-sized clasts in the shallow subsurface. The seismic source consisted of a 30-06 rifle fired downhole at a depth of 0.5m. While the boulders interfered with seismic source operations, the record quality was excellent. The alluvial materials, especially

  19. The Kapandji technique for fixation of distal radius fractures--a biomechanical comparison of primary stability.

    PubMed

    Mittelmeier, W; Braun, C; Schäfer, R

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare Kapandji-K-wiring and established K-wiring techniques of the distal radius fracture for primary stability in a biomechanical model: dorsal K-wiring according to Kapandji using different angles of the K-wire, parallel and diagonal alignment of the K-wires. A new testing system which uses a synthetic material enabled us to carry out the cantilever bending test. By application of a lower load, the Kapandji procedure shows a higher reactive torque and stiffness. A higher reaction force of the other techniques, especially of the parallel wiring, are only observable under high-grade bending stress. Application of the Kapandji procedure with K-wires at a smaller angle to the axis of the radius results in the highest primary stability of the procedures investigated in the essential range of initial deformation.

  20. A conforming to interface structured adaptive mesh refinement technique for modeling fracture problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghrati, Soheil; Xiao, Fei; Nagarajan, Anand

    2016-12-01

    A Conforming to Interface Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (CISAMR) technique is introduced for the automated transformation of a structured grid into a conforming mesh with appropriate element aspect ratios. The CISAMR algorithm is composed of three main phases: (i) Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (SAMR) of the background grid; (ii) r-adaptivity of the nodes of elements cut by the crack; (iii) sub-triangulation of the elements deformed during the r-adaptivity process and those with hanging nodes generated during the SAMR process. The required considerations for the treatment of crack tips and branching cracks are also discussed in this manuscript. Regardless of the complexity of the problem geometry and without using iterative smoothing or optimization techniques, CISAMR ensures that aspect ratios of conforming elements are lower than three. Multiple numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the application of CISAMR for modeling linear elastic fracture problems with intricate morphologies.

  1. A conforming to interface structured adaptive mesh refinement technique for modeling fracture problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghrati, Soheil; Xiao, Fei; Nagarajan, Anand

    2017-04-01

    A Conforming to Interface Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (CISAMR) technique is introduced for the automated transformation of a structured grid into a conforming mesh with appropriate element aspect ratios. The CISAMR algorithm is composed of three main phases: (i) Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (SAMR) of the background grid; (ii) r-adaptivity of the nodes of elements cut by the crack; (iii) sub-triangulation of the elements deformed during the r-adaptivity process and those with hanging nodes generated during the SAMR process. The required considerations for the treatment of crack tips and branching cracks are also discussed in this manuscript. Regardless of the complexity of the problem geometry and without using iterative smoothing or optimization techniques, CISAMR ensures that aspect ratios of conforming elements are lower than three. Multiple numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the application of CISAMR for modeling linear elastic fracture problems with intricate morphologies.

  2. Evaluation of an ultrasonic technique to remove fractured rotary nickel-titanium endodontic instruments from root canals: clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jeff R; Parashos, Peter; Messer, Harold H

    2003-11-01

    The removal of fractured rotary nickel-titanium instruments from small, curved root canals is one of the most complex operative procedures in endodontics. There have been many different devices and techniques developed to remove fractured instruments, but none are consistently successful and all show a high incidence of canal damage such as perforation. A technique using a staging platform and the use of modern ultrasonic tips with direct visualization through a dental operating microscope has recently been evaluated. The use of this technique in clinical practice is described in 24 cases and illustrated by 3 cases.

  3. The Métaizeau technique for pediatric radial neck fracture with elbow dislocation: intraoperative pitfalls and associated forearm compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Halanski, Matthew A; Noonan, Kenneth J

    2014-03-01

    Displaced radial neck fractures in the pediatric population can be treated with retrograde intramedullary nailing of the radius (the Métaizeau technique). This method allows early movement, which may improve functional outcome. Unfortunately, repeated intraoperative attempts with this treatment in challenging fractures can result in compartment syndrome. In this article, we report the cases of 2 patients who underwent the Métaizeau technique for displaced radial neck fractures. In each case, optimal fixation of the radius was impossible because of concurrent elbow instability. Multiple attempts to reduce and stabilize these fractures may cause development or exacerbation of forearm compartment syndrome. The Métaizeau technique has been shown to be an effective method of minimally invasive surgical management of pediatric radial neck fractures. Its success may hinge on the ability of the elbow joint to hold the radial head in position while the implant is driven into the proximal radius in a retrograde fashion. Care should be used when dealing with radial neck fractures associated with elbow dislocation, as they may be difficult to reduce and stabilize. The increased operative time and soft-tissue injury associated with repeated attempts with this method may lead to or worsen compartment syndrome.

  4. Pressing fixation of mallet finger fractures with the end of a K-wire (a new fixation technique for mallet fractures).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenlong; Zhang, Xu; Zhao, Gang; Gao, Shunhong; Yu, Zhiliang

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate a surgical technique for the treatment of mallet finger fractures using a K-wire stabilization of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint and another K-wire pressing the bone fragment. Between June 2007 and March 2014, 41 patients (28 men, 13 women) with isolated closed mallet finger fracture were treated using two K-wires. In the cohort, the mean joint surface involvement was 44.3% (range: 28-62%). With a mean period of 23.6 months, patient follow-up lasted 13-34 months. The fingers were evaluated for loss of extension and flexion of the (DIP) joints. The results were graded using Crawford's criteria. Union of all fractures took place at an average of 5.5 weeks after the surgical procedure. Average extension lag was 4°, and active flexion 71°. According to the Crawford rating scale, 35 fingers were excellent, four were good, one was fair, and one was poor. Pressing fixation of the bone fragment with the end of a K-wire was a useful technique in the treatment of mallet finger fractures. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Extensive traumatic anterior skull base fractures with cerebrospinal fluid leak: classification and repair techniques using combined vascularized tissue flaps.

    PubMed

    Archer, Jacob B; Sun, Hai; Bonney, Phillip A; Zhao, Yan Daniel; Hiebert, Jared C; Sanclement, Jose A; Little, Andrew S; Sughrue, Michael E; Theodore, Nicholas; James, Jeffrey; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam

    2016-03-01

    This article introduces a classification scheme for extensive traumatic anterior skull base fracture to help stratify surgical treatment options. The authors describe their multilayer repair technique for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak resulting from extensive anterior skull base fracture using a combination of laterally pediculated temporalis fascial-pericranial, nasoseptal-pericranial, and anterior pericranial flaps. Retrospective chart review identified patients treated surgically between January 2004 and May 2014 for anterior skull base fractures with CSF fistulas. All patients were treated with bifrontal craniotomy and received pedicled tissue flaps. Cases were classified according to the extent of fracture: Class I (frontal bone/sinus involvement only); Class II (extent of involvement to ethmoid cribriform plate); and Class III (extent of involvement to sphenoid bone/sinus). Surgical repair techniques were tailored to the types of fractures. Patients were assessed for CSF leak at follow-up. The Fisher exact test was applied to investigate whether the repair techniques were associated with persistent postoperative CSF leak. Forty-three patients were identified in this series. Thirty-seven (86%) were male. The patients' mean age was 33 years (range 11-79 years). The mean overall length of follow-up was 14 months (range 5-45 months). Six fractures were classified as Class I, 8 as Class II, and 29 as Class III. The anterior pericranial flap alone was used in 33 patients (77%). Multiple flaps were used in 10 patients (3 salvage) (28%)--1 with Class II and 9 with Class III fractures. Five (17%) of the 30 patients with Class II or III fractures who received only a single anterior pericranial flap had persistent CSF leak (p < 0.31). No CSF leak was found in patients who received multiple flaps. Although postoperative CSF leak occurred only in high-grade fractures with single anterior flap repair, this finding was not significant. Extensive anterior skull base

  6. Vertical shear fractures of the medial malleolus: a biomechanical study of five internal fixation techniques.

    PubMed

    Toolan, B C; Koval, K J; Kummer, F J; Sanders, R; Zuckerman, J D

    1994-09-01

    Fifty embalmed human tibias were osteotomized to create a simulated vertical shear (supination-adduction) fracture of the medial malleolus and were stabilized using one of five internal fixation techniques. In offset axial testing, which simulated supination-adduction loading, the fixation strength of tibias stabilized with either cortical or cancellous lag screws placed perpendicular to the osteotomy was over five times greater than the strength of those treated with an antiglide plate and nearly two and a half times greater than those treated with cancellous lag screws placed oblique to the osteotomy. The tibias stabilized with cancellous lag screws placed perpendicular to the osteotomy exhibited twice the fixation strength of the tibias stabilized with an antiglide plate and distal lag screw. The tibias stabilized with an antiglide plate and distal lag screw and perpendicularly placed cortical or cancellous lag screws demonstrated three times greater resistance to displacement to the applied supination-adduction load than those stabilized with an antiglide plate alone. In offset transverse testing, to simulate loading in external rotation, the mean failure load of the tibias stabilized with cancellous lag screws placed perpendicular to the osteotomy was over two and a half times greater than those stabilized with an antiglide plate and distal lag screw. No significant differences were observed in the resistance to displacement for these tests. These results support the use of lag screws placed perpendicular to the fracture surface for stabilization of vertical shear fractures of the medial malleolus and indicate that the use of an antiglide plate, with or without a distal lag screw, does not offer any advantage over lag screw fixation.

  7. Review of techniques for monitoring the healing fracture of bones for implementation in an internally fixated pelvis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lydia Chwang Yuh; Chiu, Wing Kong; Russ, Matthias; Liew, Susan

    2012-03-01

    Sacral fractures from high-impact trauma often cause instability in the pelvic ring structure. Treatment is by internal fixation which clamps the fractured edges together to promote healing. Healing could take up to 12 weeks whereby patients are bedridden to avoid hindrances to the fracture from movement or weight bearing activities. Immobility can lead to muscle degradation and longer periods of rehabilitation. The ability to determine the time at which the fracture is stable enough to allow partial weight-bearing is important to reduce hospitalisation time. This review looks into different techniques used for monitoring the fracture healing of bones which could lead to possible methods for in situ and non-invasive assessment of healing fracture in a fixated pelvis. Traditional techniques being used include radiology and CT scans but were found to be unreliable at times and very subjective in addition to being non in situ. Strain gauges have proven to be very effective for accurate assessment of fracture healing as well as stability for long bones with external fixators but may not be suitable for an internally fixated pelvis. Ultrasound provides in situ monitoring of stiffness recovery but only assesses local fracture sites close to the skin surface and has only been tested on long bones. Vibration analysis can detect non-uniform healing due to its assessment of the overall structure but may suffer from low signal-to-noise ratio due to damping. Impedance techniques have been used to assess properties of non-long bones but recent studies have only been conducted on non-biological materials and more research needs to be done before it can be applicable for monitoring healing in the fixated pelvis.

  8. Closed reduction and K-wiring with the Kapandji technique for completely displaced pediatric distal radial fractures.

    PubMed

    Satish, Bhava R J; Vinodkumar, Muniramaiah; Suresh, Masilamani; Seetharam, Prasad Y; Jaikumar, Krishnaraj

    2014-09-01

    In completely displaced pediatric distal radial fractures, achieving satisfactory reduction with closed manipulation and maintenance of reduction with casting is difficult. Although the Kapandji technique of K-wiring is widely practiced for distal radial fracture fixation in adults, it is rarely used in pediatric acute fractures. Forty-six completely displaced distal radial fractures in children 7 to 14 years old were treated with closed reduction and K-wire fixation. One or 2 intrafocal K-wires were used to lever out and reduce the distal fragment's posterior and radial translation. One or 2 extrafocal K-wires were used to augment intrafocal fixation. Postoperative immobilization was enforced for 3 to 6 weeks (with a short arm plaster of Paris cast for the first half of the time and a removable wrist splint for the second half), after which time the K-wires were removed. Patients were followed for a minimum of 4 months. Mean patient age was 9.5 years. Near-anatomical reduction was achieved easily with the intrafocal leverage technique in all fractures. Mean procedure time for K-wiring was 7 minutes. On follow-up, there was no loss of reduction; remanipulation was not performed in any case. There were no pin-related complications. All fractures healed, and full function of the wrist and forearm was achieved in every case. The Kapandji K-wire technique consistently achieves easy and near-anatomical closed reduction by a leverage reduction method in completely displaced pediatric distal radial fractures. Reduction is maintained throughout the fracture-healing period. The casting duration can be reduced without loss of reduction, and good functional results can be obtained. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Multiple rib fracture in a neonatal foal using a nylon strand suture repair technique.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Beth M; Richardson, Dean W; Sheridan, Georgiana; Wilkins, Pamela A

    2005-01-01

    To report rib fracture repair using the Securos Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair System (SCCLRS; Securos Veterinary Orthopedics, Charlton, MA) in a neonatal foal. Case report. A 1-day-old Standardbred foal with fracture of left ribs 2-9. Four days after admission the foal was anesthetized and rib fractures were repaired using open reduction and the SCCLRS. Rib fractures were successfully stabilized and the foal was discharged 7 days postoperatively without further complications. The SCCLRS provided a straightforward, effective method of rib fracture repair in neonatal foals. Effective rib fracture repair in neonatal foals can be achieved with the SCCLRS.

  10. Fracture toughness of the nickel-alumina laminates by digital image-correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekky, Waleed

    The purpose of this work is to implement the digital image correlation technique (DIC) in composite laminate fracture testing. The latter involves measuring the crack opening displacement (COD) during stable crack propagation and characterizing the strain development in a constrained nickel layer under applied loading. The major challenge to measure the COD of alternated metal/ceramic layers is the elastic-mismatch effect. This leads to oscillating COD measurement. Smoothing the result with built-in modules of commercial software leads to a loss of data accuracy. A least-squares fitting routine for the data output gave acceptable COD profiles. The behavior of a single Ni ligament sandwiched between two Al2O3 layers was determined for two Ni thicknesses (0.125 and 0.25mm). Modeling of the behavior via a modified Bridgman approach for rectangular cross section samples, proved limited as different mechanisms are operating. Nevertheless, the behavior is however captured to a point, but the model underestimates the results vis a vis experimental ones. The fracture-resistance curves for Nickel/Alumina laminates were developed experimentally and modeled via LEFM using the weight function approach and utilizing single-ligament-, and COD-, data. The crack-tip toughness was found to increase with Ni layer thickness due to crack-tip-shielding. The crack-initiation-toughness was estimated from the stress field and the crack-opening-displacement of the main crack.

  11. Cordilleran slab windows

    SciTech Connect

    Thorkelson, D.J.; Taylor, R.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The geometry and geologic implications of subducted spreading ridges are topics that have bedeviled earth scientists ever since the recognition of plate tectonics. As a consequence of subduction of the Kula-Farallon and East Pacific rises, slab windows formed and migrated beneath the North American Cordillera. The probable shape and extent of these windows, which represent the asthenosphere-filled gaps between two separating, subducting oceanic plates, are depicted from the Late Cretaceous to the present. Possible effects of the existence and migration of slab windows on the Cordillera at various times include cessation of arc volcanism and replacement by rift or plate-edge volcanism; lithospheric uplift, attenuation, and extension; and increased intensity of compressional tectonism. Eocene extensional tectonism and alkaline magmatism in southern British Columbia and the northwestern United States were facilitated by slab-window development.

  12. Callus Formation and Mineralization after Fracture with Different Fixation Techniques: Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis versus Open Reduction Internal Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Haoliang; Qin, Hui; An, Zhiquan

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis(MIPO) has been considered as an alternative for fracture treatment. Previous study has demonstrated that MIPO technique has the advantage of less soft tissue injury compared with open reduction internal fixation (ORIF). However, the comparison of callus formation and mineralization between two plate osteosynthesis methods remains unknown. In this experiment, ulna fracture model was established in 42 beagle dogs. The fractures underwent reduction and internal fixation with MIPO or ORIF. Sequential fluorescent labeling and radiographs were applied to determine new callus formation and mineralization in two groups after operation. At 4, 8 and 12 weeks postoperatively, the animals were selected to be sacrificed and the ulna specimens were analyzed by Micro-CT. The sections were also treated with Masson staining for histological evaluation. More callus formation was observed in MIPO group in early stage of fracture healing. The fracture union rate has no significant difference between two groups. The results indicate that excessive soft tissue stripping may impact early callus formation. As MIPO technique can effectively reduce soft tissue injury with little incision, it is considered to be a promising alternative for fracture fixation. PMID:26444295

  13. Cerclage wire-plate composite for fixation of quadrilateral plate fractures of the acetabulum: a checkrein and pulley technique.

    PubMed

    Farid, Yasser R

    2010-05-01

    Acetabular fractures with complete or incomplete quadrilateral plate separation frequently present with central displacement of the femoral head. Failure of stable fixation of medial wall fractures leaves residual subluxation despite reduction of other fracture components. Several fixation techniques may be either technically demanding or insufficient for stable fixation in conditions of comminution, osteoporosis, or neglected injuries. The proposed wire-plate composite uses a reconstruction spring plate over the pelvic brim for medial wall buttressing. One hole on its true pelvic limb provides a pulley to deviate a cerclage wire or cable passed through the greater sciatic notch into the true pelvis. This enhances buttressing against medial protrusion. Application through anterior approaches is simple and fixation is reliable in difficult fractures without the risk of joint penetration because all quadrilateral plate buttressing implants remain extraosseous.

  14. A novel technique for identification of fractured ceramic acetabular liner in total hip arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shafafy, Roozbeh; Foote, Julian; Hargrove, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In total hip arthroplasty ceramic bearings are liable to fracture. We present the case of an 82-year-old male with groin pain and an audible squeak 6 months post ceramic on ceramic hip arthroplasty. Initial plain radiography and examination under anaesthetic (EUA) were normal. Fluoroscopy with normal image exposure was also unremarkable. Over penetration of the image intensifier film demonstrated a fracture of the ceramic acetabular liner. The patient subsequently underwent a revision of both acetabular and femoral bearing surfaces.Displaced ceramic liner fractures are easy to identify with plain radiographs. We recommend the use of over penetration using image intensification as a technique to help identify subtle ceramic liner fractures. To our knowledge this has not been previously reported in the literature.

  15. Multiscale organization of joints and faults in a fractured reservoir revealed by geostatistical, multifractal and wavelet techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Castaing, C.; Genter, A.; Ouillon, G.

    1995-08-01

    Datasets of the geometry of fracture systems were analysed at various scales in the western Arabian sedimentary platform by means of geostatistical, multifractal, and anisotropic-wavelet techniques. The investigations covered a wide range of scales, from regional to outcrops in a well-exposed area, and were based on field mapping of fractures, and the interpretation and digitizing of fracture patterns on aerial photographs and satellite images. As a first step, fracture data sets were used to examine the direction, size, spacing and density systematics, and the variability in these quantities with space and scale. Secondly, a multifractal analysis was carried out, which consists in estimating the moments of the spatial distribution of fractures at different resolutions. This global multifractal method was complemented by a local wavelet analysis, using a new anisotropic technique tailored to linear structures. For a map with a given scale of detail, this procedure permits to define integrated fracture patterns and their associated directions at a more regional scale. The main result of this combined approach is that fracturing is not a self-similar process from the centimeter scale up to the one-million-kilometer scale. Spatial distribution of faults appears as being highly controlled by the thickness of the different rheological layers that constitute the crust. A proceeding for upscaling fracture systems in sedimentary reservoirs can be proposed, based on (i) a power law for joint-length distribution, (ii) characteristic joint spacing depending on the critical sedimentary units, and (iii) fractal fault geometry for faults larger than the whole thickness of the sedimentary basin.

  16. Suture anchor fixation of displaced olecranon fractures in the elderly: a case series and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Dexter K; Barlow, Jonathan D; VanBeek, Corinne; Abboud, Joseph A

    2015-07-01

    Olecranon fractures are common in elderly patients, causing significant morbidity and functional impairment. Traditional surgical treatments are often complicated by hardware failure and prominence, frequently requiring reoperation. To address these concerns, a suture anchor fixation technique was developed and clinically evaluated. A consecutive series of elderly patients treated with this technique from 2006 to 2013 at a single institution were studied. All cases were surgically repaired with nonmetallic fully threaded suture anchors in a double-row fashion. Clinical outcome measures including the shortened Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score, the Oxford Elbow Score, and the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey score were obtained. Eight female patients with Mayo IIA or IIB fractures were identified. The mean age of the patients at time of operation was 73.5 ± 10.7 years (range, 59.3-88.8 years). The average time from injury to operation was 5.7 ± 3.7 days. The average follow-up was 5.1 ± 2.5 years (range, 0.8-7.4 years). Six patients were available for long-term follow-up; 1 patient had died, and 1 patient was unable to be contacted despite multiple attempts. There were no intraoperative complications or reoperations. All 8 patients healed uneventfully in an acceptable position without displacement. Postoperatively, the average Oxford Elbow Score was 47.17 ± 2.04; the average shortened Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score was 6.43 ± 9.47; and the average 12-Item Short Form Health Survey scores were 49.02 ± 16.59 and 55.38 ± 4.05 for the physical and mental component scales, respectively. Suture anchor fixation of olecranon fractures in the elderly population provides excellent long-term radiographic and clinical outcomes without hardware complications associated with traditional fixation methods. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)-related posterior rib fractures in neonates and infants following recommended changes in CPR techniques.

    PubMed

    Franke, I; Pingen, A; Schiffmann, H; Vogel, M; Vlajnic, D; Ganschow, R; Born, M

    2014-07-01

    Posterior rib fractures are highly indicative of non-accidental trauma (NAT) in infants. Since 2000, the "two-thumbs" technique for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of newborns and infants has been recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA). This technique is similar to the grip on an infant's thorax while shaking. Is it possible that posterior rib fractures in newborns and infants could be caused by the "two-thumbs" technique? Using computerized databases from three German children's hospitals, we identified all infants less than 12 months old who underwent professional CPR within a 10-year period. We included all infants with anterior-posterior chest radiographs taken after CPR. Exclusion criteria were sternotomy, osteopenia, various other bone diseases and NAT. The radiographs were independently reviewed by the Chief of Pediatric Radiology (MB) and a Senior Pediatrician, Head of the local Child Protection Team (IF). Eighty infants with 546 chest radiographs were identified, and 50 of those infants underwent CPR immediately after birth. Data concerning the length of CPR was available for 41 infants. The mean length of CPR was 11min (range: 1-180min, median: 3min). On average, there were seven radiographs per infant. A total of 39 infants had a follow-up radiograph after at least 10 days. No rib fracture was visible on any chest X-ray. The results of this study suggest rib fracture after the use of the "two-thumbs" CPR technique is uncommon. Thus, there should be careful consideration of abuse when these fractures are identified, regardless of whether CPR was performed and what technique used. The discovery of rib fractures in an infant who has undergone CPR without underlying bone disease or major trauma warrants a full child protection investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fracture detection by grating moiré and in-plane ESPI techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Amalia; Rodríguez-Vera, Ramón; Rayas, J. A.; Puga, H. J.

    2003-06-01

    Optical interferometry techniques have been used for high-precision displacement measuring. Commonly, in-plane sensitive arrangements use two symmetrical collimated wavefronts for object surface illumination. However, this is a limitation when large object surface, has to be analyzed. In this case spherical illumination is needed. As a consequence of using non-collimated symmetrical dual-beams the sensitivity vector varies with the local position on the surface target. Then, this kind of illumination is also capable of detecting a lightly and systematic out-of-plane component of deformation. In this paper a theoretical analysis of the sensitivity vector components behavior is made. Each component of the sensitivity vector to minimize the required displacement component uncertainty is calculated. This study is important in the stage of planning any interferometric measurement experiment, particularly, for moiré grating interferometric technique, which has been used only in collimated illumination. By using a spherical dual-beam optical setup, the present work shows results of fracture measuring by using moiré and speckle interferometric methods. As a result, advantages and disadvantages of both techniques are discussed and an accuracy study is reported.

  19. Inside out rafting K-wire technique for tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yong-Cheol; Oh, Jong-Keon; Oh, Chang-Wug; Sahu, Dipit; Hwang, Jin-Ho; Cho, Jae-Woo

    2012-02-01

    With the introduction of 3.5 anatomically pre-shaped plates, the rafting screw technique is gaining popularity in recent years for the management of lateral tibial plateau fractures with articular depression. To gain access to the depressed articular fragments, the split fragment is hinged open laterally. We elevate the depressed articular fragments to the normal level. The defect below is filled with bone graft or its substitutes. We then close the split fragment and apply rafting screws either through the screw holes of the plate or separately above the plate rather in a blind fashion. We therefore cannot be sure that the rafting screws are supporting the specific elevated fragments. For this reason some surgeons place the rafting screws from within and then close the lateral fragment over the screws. This so-called embedded rafting screw technique carries the risk of difficulty in removal, especially in case of an infection. Here we describe the inside out rafting technique to tackle this problem.

  20. [Radial external fixator for closed treatment of type III and IV supracondylar humerus fractures in children. A new surgical technique].

    PubMed

    Slongo, T

    2014-02-01

    Closed, anatomical reduction and reliable fixation of type III and IV supracondylar fractures that are either difficult or impossible to treat with conventional methods. According the Pediatric Comprehensive AO Classification for long bones this technique is preferred for type III and IV supracondylar fractures that cannot be reduced using closed standard manipulative techniques, where stable fixation using standard percutaneous wire configurations cannot be achieved, when severe swelling, open fracture, primary neurological or vascular problems ("pulseless pink hand") or multiple injuries indicate that optimal management of the injured limb should be free from cast. In patients with comorbidities (e.g., seizures or spasticity) requiring more stable fixation. In principle there are no contraindications. Prior to reduction of the fracture, fluoroscopically controlled insertion of a single Schanz screw into the lateral (radial) aspect of the distal fragment, which is defined by bulls eyeing the capitellum in the perfect lateral radiographic projection of the epiphysis, parallel to the physis. For very distal fractures this screw may be intra-epiphyseal, although usual placement is in the metaphysis just distal to the fracture line. After obtaining perfect lateral radiographic projection of the distal humeral metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction, a second Schanz screw is inserted independently into the proximal fracture fragment at the proximal end of the lateral supracondylar ridge in the sagittal plane perpendicular to the long axis of the humeral diaphysis. By bringing the screws parallel to each other in the coronal and transverse planes direct manipulations of the fragments and anatomical reduction using the so-called joystick technique is achieved. Fracture reduction can then be adjusted anatomically under fluoroscopic control and through clinical assessment. Once reduction is achieved the fragments have to be secured with a so-called "anti-rotation" K-wire. This

  1. Slab Leaf Bowls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suitor, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    In science class, fourth graders investigate the structure of plants and leaves from trees and how the process of photosynthesis turns sunlight into sugar proteins. In this article, the author fuses art and science for a creative and successful clay slab project in her elementary art classroom. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  2. Slab Leaf Bowls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suitor, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    In science class, fourth graders investigate the structure of plants and leaves from trees and how the process of photosynthesis turns sunlight into sugar proteins. In this article, the author fuses art and science for a creative and successful clay slab project in her elementary art classroom. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  3. Wiring Techniques for the Fixation of Trochanteric Fragments during Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty for Femoral Intertrochanteric Fracture: Clinical Study and Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yongsuk; Kim, Junhyun; Kim, Dong-Won

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Femoral intertrochanteric fractures are common in the elderly. Appropriate surgical fixation of trochanteric fracture fragments can restore normal anatomical structure and ambulation, and can aid in the recovery of biomechanical function of the hip. We evaluated clinical outcomes of bipolar hemiarthroplasty using a wiring technique for trochanteric fracture fragment fixation. Materials and Methods From September 2006 to February 2015, a total of 260 cases underwent simultaneous bipolar hemiarthroplasty and wire fixation. A total of 65 patients (69 hips) with an average age of 78 years and more than one year of follow-up was included in the study. Using pre-, postoperative and follow-up radiograms, we evaluated wire fixation failure and also assessed changes in walking ability. Results Loosening or osteolysis around the stem was not observed; however, we did observe bone growth around the stem (54 cases), cortical hypertrophy (6 cases), a wide range of sclerotic lines but no stem subsidence (1 case), wire breakage (9 cases), and fracture fragment migration with no significant functional deficiency (2 cases). Conclusion Our study showed that additional wiring for trochanteric fracture fragment fixation following bipolar hemiarthroplasty can help restore normal anatomy. The added stability results in faster rehabilitation, and good clinical and radiographic outcomes. We recommend this procedure in this type of fracture. PMID:28316962

  4. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism

    PubMed Central

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N.; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H2O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones. PMID:21536910

  5. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism.

    PubMed

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-05-17

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H(2)O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones.

  6. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Start A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3-145 dpa at 380-503 °C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 °C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180-200 MPa √{m} at 350-450 °C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature ⩾430 °C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 °C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  7. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3–145 dpa at 380–503 degrees*C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm *3mm* 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 *degreesC, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180—200 MPa*m^.5 at 350–450 degrees*C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature >430 degrees*C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 *degreesC and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  8. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, S; Toloczko, M

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3 145 dpa at 380 503 C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm 3mm 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa ffiffiffiffiffi m p at 350 450 C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperatureP430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 C and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  9. Fracture resistance and gap formation of MOD restorations: influence of restorative technique, bevel preparation and water storage.

    PubMed

    Coelho-De-Souza, Fábio Herrmann; Camacho, Guilherme Brião; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Powers, John M

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of technique, use of a bevel and thermal cycling on the fracture resistance and gap formation of resin composite MOD restorations. Fracture resistance was measured on standard MOD cavities prepared in 100 upper premolars that were stored for 24 hours and 6 months with 1000 thermal cycles. Subgroups (n=10) were: beveled or non-beveled preparations and direct restorations (Adper Single Bond/Filtek Z250) and indirect restorations (prepolymerized Filtek Z250 cemented with Rely XARC). Ten sound teeth and 10 specimens with MOD preparations without restorations served as the positive and negative controls, respectively. The specimens were subjected to axial compression in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Failure patterns were analyzed by stereomicroscopy (40x). To evaluate gap presence or absence, proximal box cavities were prepared in 24 human third molars that were restored as described above. The specimens were evaluated under SEM examination after 24 hours and six months. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and multiple comparison tests at the 0.05 level of significance. After 24 hours, the beveled restorations exhibited higher fracture strength values than the non-beveled restorations, and all groups showed resistance similar or superior to sound teeth. After six months, the highest fracture resistance was obtained for beveled inlays and the lowest values were observed for direct restorations with butt joints. Thermal cycling decreased fracture resistance in the majority of the groups. The main fracture pattern observed was cohesive failure in the material, but adhesive failures increased over time, especially in the non-beveled restorations. Under SEM examination, no difference was observed among the groups after 24 hours. However, after six months, the beveled restorations exhibited no gap formation. It was concluded that storage with thermal cycling decreased fracture resistance

  10. An Effective and Feasible Method, “Hammering Technique,” for Percutaneous Fixation of Anterior Column Acetabular Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihai; Zhang, Wei; Li, Tongtong; Li, Jiantao; Chen, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and advantages of percutaneous fixation of anterior column acetabular fracture with “hammering technique.” Materials and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 16 patients with percutaneous fixation of anterior column acetabular fracture with “hammering technique.” There were 11 males and 5 females with an average age of 38.88 years (range: 24–54 years) in our study. Our study included 7 nondisplaced fractures, 6 mild displaced fractures (<2 mm), and 5 displaced fractures (>2 mm). The mean time from injury to surgery was 4.5 days (range: 2–7 days). Results. The average of operation time was 27.56 minutes (range: 15–45 minutes), and the mean blood loss was 55.28 mL (range: 15–100 mL). The mean fluoroscopic time was 54.78 seconds (range: 40–77 seconds). The first pass of the guide wire was acceptable without cortical perforation or intra-articular perforation in 88.89% (16/18) of the procedures, and the second attempt was in 11.11% (2/18). Conclusion. Our study suggested that percutaneous fixation of anterior column acetabular fracture with “hammering technique” acquired satisfying surgical and clinical outcomes. It may be an alternative satisfying treatment for percutaneous fixation of anterior column acetabular fracture by 2D fluoroscopy using a C-arm with less fluoroscopic time. PMID:27493962

  11. An innovative technique for damage by-pass in gravel packed completions using tip screen-out fracture prepacks

    SciTech Connect

    Montagna, J.N.; Saucier, R.J.; Kelly, P.

    1995-12-31

    An innovative completion technique is being used in wells that require sand control to help eliminate high skins and increase pay, or effective kh, and thus improve well productivity. The success of this technique lies in concentrating high conductivity proppants in the near-wellbore region. This is accomplished by creating and propping a properly designed, length limited, hydraulically-induced fracture in conjunction with an annular water gravel pack. The result is a highly conductive flow path from virgin formation, through the near-wellbore damaged zone, and into the wellbore that also controls formation sand. The limited fracture is designed with the intent of preserving the integrity of the near well gravel pack since this aspect is critical to realizing the full benefits of the fracture. Industry data indicates that optimum gravel packing is achieved with a brine proppant carrier. In some cases, the entire operation (limited fracture and gravel pack) may be completed with brine. However, in other cases, as discussed here, the high leak-off associated with brine is reduced by a product developed to overcome the excessive fluid leak-off. Brine following this material provides the carrier medium for proppant placement in the fracture and for the gravel pack. The process is described and examples of field applications and results will be presented.

  12. Novel management of distal tibial and fibular fractures with Acumed fibular nail and minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis technique

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tie-Jun; Ju, Wei-Na; Qi, Bao-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Anatomical characteristics, such as subcutaneous position and minimal muscle cover, contribute to the complexity of fractures of the distal third of the tibia and fibula. Severe damage to soft tissue and instability ensure high risk of delayed bone union and wound complications such as nonunion, infection, and necrosis. Patient concerns: This case report discusses management in a 54-year-old woman who sustained fractures of the distal third of the left tibia and fibula, with damage to overlying soft tissue (swelling and blisters). Plating is accepted as the first choice for this type of fracture as it ensures accurate reduction and rigid fixation, but it increases the risk of complications. Diagnosis: Closed fracture of the distal third of the left tibia and fibula (AO: 43-A3). Interventions: After the swelling was alleviated, the patient underwent closed reduction and fixation with an Acumed fibular nail and minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis (MIPO), ensuring a smaller incision and minimal soft-tissue dissection. Outcomes: At the 1-year follow-up, the patient had recovered well and had regained satisfactory function in the treated limb. The Kofoed score of the left ankle was 95. Lessons: Based on the experience from this case, the operation can be undertaken safely when the swelling has been alleviated. The minimal invasive technique represents the best approach. Considering the merits and good outcome in this case, we recommend the Acumed fibular nail and MIPO technique for treatment of distal tibial and fibular fractures. PMID:28328865

  13. A prospective study of a modified pin-in-plaster technique for treatment of fractures of the distal radius

    PubMed Central

    Mirghasemi, S. A.; Rashidinia, S.; Sadeghi, M. S.; Talebizadeh, M.; Rahimi, N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There are various pin-in-plaster methods for treating fractures of the distal radius. The purpose of this study is to introduce a modified technique of ‘pin in plaster’. Methods Fifty-four patients with fractures of the distal radius were followed for one year post-operatively. Patients were excluded if they had type B fractures according to AO classification, multiple injuries or pathological fractures, and were treated more than seven days after injury. Range of movement and functional results were evaluated at three and six months and one and two years post-operatively. Radiographic parameters including radial inclination, tilt, and height, were measured pre- and post-operatively. Results The average radial tilt was 10.6° of volar flexion and radial height was 10.2 mm at the sixth month post-operatively. Three cases of pin tract infection were recorded, all of which were treated successfully with oral antibiotics. There were no cases of pin loosening. A total of 73 patients underwent surgery, and three cases of radial nerve irritation were recorded at the time of cast removal. All radial nerve palsies resolved at the six-month follow-up. There were no cases of median nerve compression or carpal tunnel syndrome, and no cases of tendon injury. Conclusion Our modified technique is effective to restore anatomic congruity and maintain reduction in fractures of the distal radius. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:176–180 PMID:26541833

  14. A prospective study of a modified pin-in-plaster technique for treatment of fractures of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Mirghasemi, S A; Rashidinia, S; Sadeghi, M S; Talebizadeh, M; Rahimi, N

    2015-11-01

    There are various pin-in-plaster methods for treating fractures of the distal radius. The purpose of this study is to introduce a modified technique of 'pin in plaster'. Fifty-four patients with fractures of the distal radius were followed for one year post-operatively. Patients were excluded if they had type B fractures according to AO classification, multiple injuries or pathological fractures, and were treated more than seven days after injury. Range of movement and functional results were evaluated at three and six months and one and two years post-operatively. Radiographic parameters including radial inclination, tilt, and height, were measured pre- and post-operatively. The average radial tilt was 10.6° of volar flexion and radial height was 10.2 mm at the sixth month post-operatively. Three cases of pin tract infection were recorded, all of which were treated successfully with oral antibiotics. There were no cases of pin loosening. A total of 73 patients underwent surgery, and three cases of radial nerve irritation were recorded at the time of cast removal. All radial nerve palsies resolved at the six-month follow-up. There were no cases of median nerve compression or carpal tunnel syndrome, and no cases of tendon injury. Our modified technique is effective to restore anatomic congruity and maintain reduction in fractures of the distal radius. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:176-180. ©2015 Mirghasemi et al.

  15. A gas gun based technique for studying the role of temperature in dynamic fracture and fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. R.; Chapman, D. J.; Eakins, D. E.

    2013-11-01

    Presented in this work is a new experimental technique to facilitate studies of materials under uniform radial expansion at rates of strain typically seen in ballistic and impact studies (103 to 105 s-1) at temperatures around 100-1000 K. Previous work places a right-cylinder polymer insert in a sample cylinder, into which a matching polymer projectile is launched using a gas gun. The impact and resulting deformation of the polymers imparts radial momentum to the cylinder. This work replaces the polymer insert with a steel ogive. A polycarbonate projectile deforms around the insert and drives radial expansion. The uniform radial expansion created has a less complex interface than previous work as only one material is driving the cylinder wall. As deformation of the insert is no longer necessary, the opportunity to heat or cool the cylinder prior to expansion is now available for studies into the effect of temperature on fracture and fragmentation behavior. This paper describes the design of this new impact configuration alongside how strain rate and expansion profile can be controlled. Validation experiment results with 6061-T6 aluminum and Ti-6Al-4V cylinders using a variety of diagnostics are compared with numerical modelling, where the benefits of this technique in assisting development of material strength and failure models are discussed with methods to control the sample temperature.

  16. Fracture density in the deep subsurface: Techniques with application to Point Arguello oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Narr, W. )

    1991-08-01

    Because Monterey Formation reservoirs rely on fractures (joints) for permeability, quantitative information on fracture spacing is important to exploration strategies and for understanding reservoir behavior. Density of joints in cores of four wells from the Point Arguello reservoir has been determined with a new, probability-based method, and these subsurface joint densities are compared with joint densities is the fracture-spacing index, which is the slope of the trend of layer thickness to joint spacing. In core and at outcrop, the only lithologic control on joint density is between nonjointed mudstone and harder (more brittle), jointed rocks. Within each well, the fracture-spacing index is the same for all hard rocks (though it varies between wells). In the reservoir, joint density relates to structural position. At outcrops in various structural settings, the fracture-spacing index is the same (approximately 1.29) in chert, dolostone, and porcelanite and siliceous shale. These rocks may be saturated with joints, so that differences in brittle strain due to local structural variations have been overwhelmed as joints continued to form during unroofing of these strata. Chert looks more fractured than other lithologies because of thin bedding. Fracture-spacing index is used to compute such parameters as fracture porosity and volume of fractures that directly contact the well bore. These parameters may be important when trying to model the behavior of a petroleum reservoir, or when trying to assess the feasibility of strongly deviating wells to improve the performance of a fracture reservoir.

  17. Treatment of Orbital Medial Wall Fractures with Titanium Mesh Plates Using Retrocaruncular Approach: Outcomes with Different Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Gerbino, Giovanni; Zavattero, Emanuele; Viterbo, Stefano; Ramieri, Guglielmo

    2015-01-01

    Surgical management of medial wall orbital fractures should be considered to avoid diplopia and posttraumatic enophthalmos. Treatment of these fractures remains a challenge for the maxillofacial surgeon because of complex anatomy and limited vision. This article aims to retrospectively evaluate the outcomes in the repair of medial orbital wall fractures using a retrocaruncular approach and titanium meshes, comparing the placement of the titanium mesh with three different techniques: (1) conventional free hand under direct vision, (2) with the assistance of an endoscope, and (c) with the assistance of a navigation system. Eighteen patients who underwent surgery for orbital medial wall fracture were enrolled in the study. On the basis of the implant placement technique, three groups were identified: group 1 (CONV), conventional free hand under direct vision; group 2 (ENDO), endoscopically assisted; group 3 (NAVI), a navigational system assisted (BrainLab, Feldkirchen, Germany). The postoperative quality of orbital reconstruction was assessed as satisfactory in 12 cases, good in 4 cases, and unsatisfactory in 2 cases. Particularly in group 1 (CONV) in four patients out of eight, the posterior ledge of the fracture was not reached by the implant and in one patient the mesh hinged toward the ethmoid. In group 3 (NAVI), in one patient out of five, the posterior ledge of the fracture was not reached. In conclusion, titanium orbital mesh plates and retrocaruncular approach are a reliable method to obtain an accurate orbital medial wall reconstruction. The use of endoscopic assistance through the surgical incisions improves accuracy of treatment allowing better visualization of the surgical field. Navigation aided surgery is a feasible technique especially for complex orbital reconstruction to improve predictability and outcomes in orbital repair. PMID:26576238

  18. Influence of cementation technique on fracture strength and leakage of alumina all-ceramic crowns after cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Blatz, Markus B; Oppes, Steven; Chiche, Gerard; Holst, Stefan; Sadan, Avishai

    2008-01-01

    To compare in vitro the influence of 3 cementation techniques on leakage and fracture strength of alumina all-ceramic crowns after cyclic loading in an artificial chewing simulator. Forty-eight extracted molars were mounted in a way that simulates natural tooth mobility. Crowns (Procera Alumina, Nobel Biocare) were fabricated and inserted with either conventional cementation with zinc phosphate cement without pretreatment (group ZOP); cementation with a universal adhesive resin cement without pretreatment (group HYB); or adhesive bonding with composite resin after pretreatment of the tooth (dentin bonding agent) and the crown (airborne-particle abrasion and a special ceramic priming agent containing adhesive monomers that bond to metal-oxide ceramics) (group ADH). All specimens were stored in artificial saliva and subjected to 1.2 million load cycles in a dual-axis chewing simulator (Willytec). Eight specimens per group were subjected to compressive load until failure, while the remaining 8 specimens were stained and sectioned for measuring of dye penetration. One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD were used for statistical analyses (alpha = .05). Cementation techniques were significantly different (P = .009) in regard to mean load at failure. Fracture strength was significantly greater for ADH (mean load at fracture, 2,782 +/- 419 N) as compared to HYB (1,980 +/- 270 N) or ZOP (1,788 +/- 242 N). All groups differed significantly for leakage values (P < .001), with ADH showing the lowest mean leakage (0.04 +/- 0.07 mm), followed by HYB (0.96 +/- 0.16 mm) and ZOP (2.44 +/- 0.19 mm). Cementation technique affects fracture strength and leakage of all-ceramic molar crowns. Fracture strengths were well above natural chewing forces for all cementation methods. However, adhesive bonding significantly increased fracture strength and improved marginal seal of alumina crowns.

  19. Facial fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M. M.; Freiberg, A.; Martin, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Emergency room physicians frequently see facial fractures that can have serious consequences for patients if mismanaged. This article reviews the signs, symptoms, imaging techniques, and general modes of treatment of common facial fractures. It focuses on fractures of the mandible, zygomaticomaxillary region, orbital floor, and nose. Images p520-a p522-a PMID:8199509

  20. Treatment of Gartland type III pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures with the Kapandji technique in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hsuan-Kai; Yang, Wen-E; Li, Wei-Chun; Chang, Chia-Hsieh

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the efficacy of the Kapandji technique performed in the prone position for humeral supracondylar fractures in children. Retrospective. Level I trauma center. We retrospectively reviewed 34 children with Gartland type III supracondylar humerus fractures. There were 22 boys and 12 girls with a mean age of 5.2 years (range, 1-12.7 years). Closed reduction and the Kapandji technique were performed in the prone position for all patients. The mean follow-up was 17.4 months (range, 13.2-24.8 months). We assessed preoperative and postoperative radiographs to evaluate the quality of the reduction. The clinical outcome was assessed according to the criteria of Flynn. All operations were performed in a closed manner, no cases required open reduction. Loss of reduction after K-wire fixation was identified in 2 patients. There were no pin-related nerve injuries. The mean range of elbow motion was 139.6 degrees. The clinical outcome was excellent in 31 patients, good in 2 patients (97% excellent or good), and fair in 1 patient. This technique is an effective and safe option to treat type III supracondylar humerus fractures in children. In patients with severe soft tissue swelling, unstable fracture reduction, or unable to achieve acceptable reduction, this technique could facilitate fracture reduction and avoid unnecessary open reduction. The disadvantage of this technique is that the prone position is less desirable for airway management. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  1. EVALUATION OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF FRACTURES IN TWO OR THREE PARTS OF THE PROXIMAL HUMERUS WITH THE "PARACHUTE TECHNIQUE".

    PubMed

    Junior, Antonio Carlos Tenor; Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; Filho, Rômulo Brasil; Filho, Cantidio Salvador Filardi; da Costa, Guilherme Leme; Menniti, Eduardo Libório

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the surgical technique called the "parachute technique, as applied to adult patients who suffered displaced and unstable two or three-part fractures of the proximal humerus, through the clinical outcomes. Between January 1995 and June 2006, 59 adult patients with displaced and unstable two or three-part fractures underwent operations performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Orthopedics and Traumatology Service of Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo using the "parachute technique. This method consists of an intramedullary tension band and extramedullary fixation in a figure-of-eight to join the fragments of the fracture, using a 6.5-millimeter spongy screw with partial threading, a washer and two non-absorbable wires, thereby producing stable synthesis with minimal aggression to the surrounding soft tissue and not requiring any subsequent removal of material. The final shape of this synthesis is reminiscent of the shape of an open parachute. The patients had a minimum postoperative follow-up of six months. For the diagnosis, trauma series radiographic views of the shoulder were produced. The fractures were classified in accordance with the system proposed by Neer. We used the scale of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), to evaluate the results. The "parachute technique" produced good results in 47% and excellent results in 26% of the cases, according to the UCLA scores. The "parachute technique" is a safe and effective treatment for displaced and unstable two or three-part fractures of the proximal humerus.

  2. Tomosynthesis: A new radiologic technique for rapid diagnosis of scaphoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Compton, N; Murphy, L; Lyons, F; Jones, J; MacMahon, P; Cashman, J

    2016-12-21

    Scaphoid fractures constitute 71% of all carpal bone fractures.(1) Early diagnosis and treatment has significant bearing on fracture union rates and better clinical outcomes. While displaced fractures can be readily seen on plain radiograph, undisplaced fractures can require advanced imaging modalities to confirm that diagnosis. Advanced imaging such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computerised tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy are routinely used for the diagnosis of scaphoid fractures but require significant radiation exposure, increased cost and can be difficult to access.(2) Tomosynthesis is an emerging imaging modality which uses conventional x-ray systems to produce cross-sectional images. There has yet to be extensive research carried out investigating the diagnostic value of tomosynthesis in scaphoid fractures. The aim of this study is to optimise patient positioning for the diagnosis of scaphoid fractures in a cadaveric model and compare the diagnostic yield of tomography to conventional CT. Using four cadaveric specimens, three limb positions were examined in unfractured and fractured scaphoids to determine the optimal limb positions required for visualisation of the scaphoid. As a result of this study, the optimal position for visualisation of the scaphoid and diagnosis of scaphoid fractures has been determined. The results demonstrate that tomosynthesis is as effective as CT scanning in identifying scaphoid fractures in both sensitivity and specificity. By comparison to CT, tomosynthesis is cheaper, has lower radiation exposure, requires fewer hospital resources and can be performed quickly. Tomosynthesis is a valid diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of scaphoid fractures. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plate fixation of odontoid fractures without C1-C2 arthrodesis: practice of a novel surgical technique for stabilization of odontoid fractures, including the opportunity to extend the fixation to C3.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Patrick; Thalhammer, Gerhild; Krumboeck, Anna; Schuster, Rupert; Kutscha-Lissberg, Florian; Zehetgruber, Isabella; Braunsteiner, Thomas; Vécsei, Vilmos

    2009-04-01

    Surgical treatment of odontoid fractures that do not allow interfragmentary fracture compression involves either posterior atlantoaxial arthrodesis or additional anterior stabilization using a plate construct. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical and radiographic outcome after anterior plate fixation of odontoid fractures that were not suitable for anterior screw fixation. We reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of 9 patients with an average age of 54 years at the time of surgery who had undergone anterior plate fixation of an odontoid fracture. Indications for using a plate construct were odontoid fractures with anterior oblique fracture lines, fractures with comminution or major displacement, and pathological fractures. Eight patients returned to their preinjury activity level and were satisfied with their treatment. One patient reported chronic pain symptoms and a notable decrease in cervical spine motion. Using the Smiley-Webster Scale to quantify their clinical outcome, we achieved an overall outcome score of 1.6. Bony fusion was achieved in all patients. Reduction or fixation failed in 2 patients. Reoperation for technical failures was not necessary in any of the patients. We had promising results using anterior plate fixation for surgical treatment of odontoid fractures that did not allow interfragmentary fracture compression. Because this method avoids the rigid fixation of the atlantoaxial joint in contrast to techniques of posterior cervical arthrodesis, it seems to be a practical option for the management of fracture types that require additional stabilization of the odontoid.

  4. Application of Rapid Prototyping Technique and Intraoperative Navigation System for the Repair and Reconstruction of Orbital Wall Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jong Hyun; Lee, Yong Hae; Ruy, Wan Chul; Roe, Young; Moon, Myung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Restoring the orbital cavity in large blow out fractures is a challenge for surgeons due to the anatomical complexity. This study evaluated the clinical outcomes and orbital volume after orbital wall fracture repair using a rapid prototyping (RP) technique and intraoperative navigation system. Methods This prospective study was conducted on the medical records and radiology records of 12 patients who had undergone a unilateral blow out fracture reconstruction using a RP technique and an intraoperative navigation system from November 2014 to March 2015. The surgical results were assessed by an ophthalmic examination and a comparison of the preoperative and postoperative orbital volume ratio (OVR) values. Results All patients had a successful treatment outcome without complications. Volumetric analysis revealed a significant decrease in the mean OVR from 1.0952±0.0662 (ranging from 0.9917 to 1.2509) preoperatively to 0.9942±0.0427 (ranging from 0.9394 to 1.0680) postoperatively. Conclusion The application of a RP technique for the repair of orbital wall fractures is a useful tool that may help improve the clinical outcomes by understanding the individual anatomy, determining the operability, and restoring the orbital cavity volume through optimal implant positioning along with an intraoperative navigation system. PMID:28913272

  5. Application of Rapid Prototyping Technique and Intraoperative Navigation System for the Repair and Reconstruction of Orbital Wall Fractures.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jong Hyun; Lee, Yong Hae; Ruy, Wan Chul; Roe, Young; Moon, Myung Ho; Jung, Sung Gyun

    2016-09-01

    Restoring the orbital cavity in large blow out fractures is a challenge for surgeons due to the anatomical complexity. This study evaluated the clinical outcomes and orbital volume after orbital wall fracture repair using a rapid prototyping (RP) technique and intraoperative navigation system. This prospective study was conducted on the medical records and radiology records of 12 patients who had undergone a unilateral blow out fracture reconstruction using a RP technique and an intraoperative navigation system from November 2014 to March 2015. The surgical results were assessed by an ophthalmic examination and a comparison of the preoperative and postoperative orbital volume ratio (OVR) values. All patients had a successful treatment outcome without complications. Volumetric analysis revealed a significant decrease in the mean OVR from 1.0952±0.0662 (ranging from 0.9917 to 1.2509) preoperatively to 0.9942±0.0427 (ranging from 0.9394 to 1.0680) postoperatively. The application of a RP technique for the repair of orbital wall fractures is a useful tool that may help improve the clinical outcomes by understanding the individual anatomy, determining the operability, and restoring the orbital cavity volume through optimal implant positioning along with an intraoperative navigation system.

  6. Fracture mechanics of snow avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Timonen, J.

    2001-07-01

    Dense snow avalanches are analyzed by modeling the snow slab as an elastic and brittle plate, attached by static friction to the underlying ground. The grade of heterogeneity in the local fracture (slip) thresholds, and the ratio of the average substrate slip threshold to the average slab fracture threshold, are the decisive parameters for avalanche dynamics. For a strong pack of snow there appears a stable precursor of local slips when the frictional contacts are weakened (equivalent to rising temperature), which eventually trigger a catastrophic crack growth that suddenly releases the entire slab. In the opposite limit of very high slip thresholds, the slab simply melts when the temperature is increased. In the intermediate regime, and for a homogeneous slab, the model display features typical of real snow avalanches. The model also suggests an explanation to why avalanches are impossible to forecast reliably based on precursor observations. This explanation may as well be applicable to other catastrophic rupture phenomena such as earthquakes.

  7. Fracture mechanics of snow avalanches.

    PubMed

    Aström, J A; Timonen, J

    2001-07-01

    Dense snow avalanches are analyzed by modeling the snow slab as an elastic and brittle plate, attached by static friction to the underlying ground. The grade of heterogeneity in the local fracture (slip) thresholds, and the ratio of the average substrate slip threshold to the average slab fracture threshold, are the decisive parameters for avalanche dynamics. For a strong pack of snow there appears a stable precursor of local slips when the frictional contacts are weakened (equivalent to rising temperature), which eventually trigger a catastrophic crack growth that suddenly releases the entire slab. In the opposite limit of very high slip thresholds, the slab simply melts when the temperature is increased. In the intermediate regime, and for a homogeneous slab, the model display features typical of real snow avalanches. The model also suggests an explanation to why avalanches are impossible to forecast reliably based on precursor observations. This explanation may as well be applicable to other catastrophic rupture phenomena such as earthquakes.

  8. Light-assisted templated self assembly using photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Camilo A; Dutt, Avik; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2011-06-06

    We explore a technique which we term light-assisted templated self-assembly. We calculate the optical forces on colloidal particles over a photonic crystal slab. We show that exciting a guided resonance mode of the slab yields a resonantly-enhanced, attractive optical force. We calculate the lateral optical forces above the slab and predict that stably trapped periodic patterns of particles are dependent on wavelength and polarization. Tuning the wavelength or polarization of the light source may thus allow the formation and reconfiguration of patterns. We expect that this technique may be used to design all-optically reconfigurable photonic devices.

  9. Piled-Slab Searches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    tinuously as one moves away from the origin (Figure 1). Because such a search is both strategically optimal and locally random, we will refer to it as SOLR ...approximating the inverted cup with a solid composed of n piled slabs. The resulting detection proba- bility will, of course, be smaller than the SOLR ...total effort density in the annulus between Ri−1 and Ri (Figure 2). The total Figure 1. The inverted SOLR cup has the greatest search effort density at

  10. Carbon dioxide slab laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tulip, J.

    1988-01-12

    A gas slab laser is described comprising: first and second elongated electrodes each including a planar light reflecting surface disposed so as to form a light guide only in a plane perpendicular to the planar surface and to define a gas discharge gap therebetween; a laser gas disposed in the gap; and means for applying a radio frequency current between the first and second electrodes to establish a laser-exciting discharge in the laser gas.

  11. Fixation of posterior process fractures of the olecranon using a modified suture bridge technique: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Cha, Soo Min; Shin, Hyun Dae; Kim, Kyung Cheon; Noh, Chang Kyun

    2014-12-01

    We encountered 2 patients with posterior process fractures of the olecranon and fixed the fragment using a modified suture bridge method without a metallic implant. The suture anchor was inserted distally through the fracture plane, and the small tip of proximal olecranon was reduced to the ulna. Computed tomography revealed bony union 4 and 5 months later. At the 1-year postoperative follow-up examination, the clinical outcomes were satisfactory in both patients. This suture bridge technique was reliable for small fragment fixation in posterior process fracture of the olecranon based on the tension band theory with no problems induced by metallic hardware. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effectiveness of Serial Measurement of Differential Pressure in Closed Tibial Diaphyseal Fractures in Diagnosing Acute Compartment Syndrome using Whiteside's Technique.

    PubMed

    Ramprasath, D R; Thirunarayanan, V; David, J; Anbazhagan, S

    2016-03-01

    Acute Compartment Syndrome is a limb-threatening emergency and it occurs most commonly after fractures. The aim of our study is to find out the effectiveness of serial measurement of differential pressure in closed tibial diaphyseal fractures, in diagnosing acute compartment syndrome, using Whiteside's technique. A total of 52 cases in the age group of 15 to 55 years admitted with closed fractures were studied for serial compartment pressure as well as serial differential pressure. Eight patients had persistent compartment pressure > 40mmHg, out of which only two patients had persistent differential pressure < 30mmHg and these two patients underwent fasciotomy. Thus, by measuring the compartment pressure serially and calculating differential pressure serially, acute compartment syndrome can be diagnosed or ruled out with higher precision, so that unnecessary fasciotomies can be avoided.

  13. Application of a Shape-Memory Alloy Concentrator in Displaced Patella Fractures: Technique and Long-Term Results.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuntong; Wang, Panfeng; Xia, Yan; Zhou, Panyu; Xie, Yang; Xu, Shuogui; Zhang, Chuncai

    2017-02-01

    Operative treatment is usually recommended in displaced patella fractures. Several techniques have been advocated for internal fixation of patella fractures. Despite the relatively good clinical outcomes that have been demonstrated in many studies, postoperative morbidities such as fixation failure, nonunion, infection, and knee stiffness are not uncommon. We present a new alternative treatment technique for displaced patellar fractures. Between April 1995 and May 2005, we used the Nitinol Patella Concentrator (NTPC) to treat 156 consecutive patients with displaced patellar fractures. Injuries arose from vehicular accidents in 56 (35.9%) cases, direct falls onto the knee in 85 (54.5%) cases, and sports injuries in 15 (9.6%) cases. The mean patient age was 46.3 years (range, 25-77 years). Clinical assessments were made using the Böstman knee score and the MOS SF-36 questionnaire (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form health survey), which were both recorded at the final follow-up visit. The mean follow-up was 7.3 years (range, 6-17 years). At the final follow-up, the Böstman knee scores were excellent in 88 cases (28-30), good in 55 (20-27), and unsatisfactory in 13 (<20). According to the MOS SF-36 evaluation, the average score was 84.5 (range, 62-91). Treatment of patellar fracture with the NTPC not only may serve as an effective and rigid fixation method in multifragmented displaced and inferior pole fractures, but also may provide continuous concentrative compression during the osseous healing process. Thus, use of the NTPC may help restore the functional integrity of the extensor mechanism and permit early rehabilitation with a lower incidence of postoperative complications. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Thermoelastic stress analysis techniques for mixed mode fracture and stochastic fatigue of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bo-Siou

    This study develops new quantitative thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) techniques for fracture and fatigue damage analysis of composite materials. The first part deals with the thermo-mechanical derivation of two quantitative TSA techniques applied to orthotropic composites with and without a transversely-isotropic surface coating layer. The new TSA test procedures are derived in order to relate the thermal infrared (IR) images with the sum of in-plane strains multiplied by two newly defined material constants that can be experimentally pre-calibrated. Experiments are performed to verify the TSA methods with finite element (FE) numerical results along with available anisotropic elasticity solution. The second part of this study applies the quantitative TSA techniques together with the Lekhnitskii's general anisotropic elasticity solution to calculate mixed-mode stress intensity factors (SIFs) in cracked composite materials. The cracked composite coupons are subjected to off-axis loadings with respect to four different material angles in order to generate mixed-mode SIFs. A least-squares method is used to correlate the sum of in-plane strains from the elasticity solution with the measured TSA test results. The mode-I and mode-II SIFs are determined from eccentrically loaded single-edge-notch tension (ESE(T)) composite specimens. The FE models and virtual crack closure technique (VCCT) are utilized for comparisons. In the third part, a new stochastic model is proposed to generate S-N curves accounting for the variability of the fatigue process. This cumulative damage Markov chain model (MCM) requires a limited number of fatigue tests for calibrating the probability transition matrix (PTM) in the Markov chain model and mean fatigue cycles to failure from experiments. In order to construct the MCM stochastic S-N curve, an iterative procedure is required to predict the mean cycles to failure. Fatigue tests are conducted in this study to demonstrate the MCM method

  15. Management of Mallet Fracture by Closed Extension-Block Pinning – A case based review of a novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sharat; Akhtar, Mohammad Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Close reduction by extension-block K-wire fixation for acute mallet fracture is a relatively novel mode of treatment which is based on two sound orthopedic principles – stable arc splinting and early protected motion. Distal interphalangeal joint splinting is still the technique commonly used for mallet fractures with significant morbidity and only moderate functional outcome. We have demonstrated here Ishiguro’s technique in a partially treated 2 weeks old mallet fracture with the flexion deformity at distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint after proper preoperative assessment. Peroperatively, proper anatomical localization of mallet fragment was done under fluoroscopy. Reduction of the avulsion fracture was done by extension block K-wire and intra-articular K-wire was inserted subsequently to hold the reduction in place and DIP joint in extension. Later on K-wires were removed at the end of 6 weeks follow up. Patient was subjected to the physiotherapy during the course of the treatment. Excellent functional outcome was noted at the end of three months. PMID:26120399

  16. Comparison of two tension-band fixation materials and techniques in transverse patella fractures: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Rabalais, R David; Burger, Evalina; Lu, Yun; Mansour, Alfred; Baratta, Richard V

    2008-02-01

    This study compared the biomechanical properties of 2 tension-band techniques with stainless steel wire and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) cable in a patella fracture model. Transverse patella fractures were simulated in 8 cadaver knees and fixated with figure-of-8 and parallel wire configurations in combination with Kirschner wires. Identical configurations were tested with UHMWPE cable. Specimens were mounted to a testing apparatus and the quadriceps was used to extend the knees from 90 degrees to 0 degrees; 4 knees were tested under monotonic loading, and 4 knees were tested under cyclic loading. Under monotonic loading, average fracture gap was 0.50 and 0.57 mm for steel wire and UHMWPE cable, respectively, in the figure-of-8 construct compared with 0.16 and 0.04 mm, respectively, in the parallel wire construct. Under cyclic loading, average fracture gap was 1.45 and 1.66 mm for steel wire and UHMWPE cable, respectively, in the figure-of-8 construct compared with 0.45 and 0.60 mm, respectively, in the parallel wire construct. A statistically significant effect of technique was found, with the parallel wire construct performing better than the figure-of-8 construct in both loading models. There was no effect of material or interaction. In this biomechanical model, parallel wires performed better than the figure-of-8 configuration in both loading regimens, and UHMWPE cable performed similarly to 18-gauge steel wire.

  17. Management of Mallet Fracture by Closed Extension-Block Pinning - A case based review of a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sharat; Akhtar, Mohammad Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Close reduction by extension-block K-wire fixation for acute mallet fracture is a relatively novel mode of treatment which is based on two sound orthopedic principles - stable arc splinting and early protected motion. Distal interphalangeal joint splinting is still the technique commonly used for mallet fractures with significant morbidity and only moderate functional outcome. We have demonstrated here Ishiguro's technique in a partially treated 2 weeks old mallet fracture with the flexion deformity at distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint after proper preoperative assessment. Peroperatively, proper anatomical localization of mallet fragment was done under fluoroscopy. Reduction of the avulsion fracture was done by extension block K-wire and intra-articular K-wire was inserted subsequently to hold the reduction in place and DIP joint in extension. Later on K-wires were removed at the end of 6 weeks follow up. Patient was subjected to the physiotherapy during the course of the treatment. Excellent functional outcome was noted at the end of three months.

  18. [Treatment of mid-distal humeral shaft fractures associated with radial nerve palsysis by minimally invasive screwed nails osteosynthesis technique].

    PubMed

    Zang, Wei; Liu, Yun-feng; Wu, Quan-min

    2009-07-01

    To investigate the surgical treatment of mid-distal humeral shaft fractures associated with radial nerve palsysis with minimal invasive screwed nails osteosynthesis technique. Thirty-six patients treated mid-distal humeral shaft fractures associated with radial nerve palsysis from January 2004 to January 2008. There were 28 males and 8 females whose age ranged from 20- to 58-years-old with an average of 36.5-years-old. Injury reasons: mechanical injury 18 cases, traffic injury 8 cases, accidents injury 10 cases, all cases were closed fracture. According to AO/ASIF classification, type A1 5 cases, type A2 7 cases, type B1 8 cases, type B2 7 cases, type B3 5 cases, type C3 4 cases. The small lateral incision was performed located to the fracture. After exploration of the radial nerve, the fractures were reduced. By acromion small lateral incision, the deltoid was separated. In the posterior macronodular slotted antegrade reamed bored with medullary cavity drill and selected a suitable screwed nail screwed into the medullary cavity distal. Along the slot, the locking pieces were inserted to complete the fixation. The postoperative complication, fracture healing time, radial nerve function recovery time, the motion of shoulder and elbow were recorded. The incision of all cases healed with stage I . The patients were followed up for 9-36 weeks with an average of 18.5 weeks. The X-ray examination showed fractures healing in 12-16 weeks (average of 15.6 weeks). Radial nerve function recovered fully at 12-36 weeks after operation (average of 17.8 weeks). Shoulder abduction is 150 degrees-170 degrees with an average of 160 degrees; elbow motion of activities was 130 degrees-140 degrees with an average of 135 degrees. The ASES method was used to assess the shoulder joint function, 20 cases gained the excellent result, 12 good and 4 poor. And according to HSS method, 36 cases of elbow joint function gained the excellent result. The surgical treatment of mid-distal humeral

  19. Fracture line distribution of olecranon fractures.

    PubMed

    Lubberts, Bart; Mellema, Jos J; Janssen, Stein J; Ring, David

    2017-01-01

    The association between specific olecranon fracture characteristics (e.g., displacement, fragmentation, subluxation) and fracture line distribution might help surgeons predict intra-articular fracture location based on fracture characteristics that can be determined on radiographs. We hypothesized that fracture mapping techniques would reveal different fracture patterns for minimally displaced fractures, displaced fractures, and fracture-dislocations of the olecranon. A consecutive series of 78 patients with olecranon fractures were evaluated using initial radiographs and computed tomography scans and characterized according to the Mayo classification. Fracture lines were identified based on reduced three-dimensional computed tomography reconstructions and graphically superimposed onto a standard template to create two-dimensional fracture maps. The fracture maps were then converted into fracture heat maps. Based on fracture and heat maps, fracture line location and patterns were determined. Six (7.7%) patients had a non- or minimally displaced fracture, 22 (28%) a displaced fracture, and 50 (64%) a fracture-dislocation of the olecranon. There were 27 (54%) anterior and 23 (46%) posterior olecranon fracture-dislocations. Fracture lines of non- or minimally displaced fractures and posterior fracture-dislocations enter and exit the trochlear notch at the base of the coronoid, while fracture lines of displaced fractures and anterior fracture-dislocations were spread more broadly over the depths of the trochlear notch. Based on fracture characteristics depicted on radiographs, one can anticipate the amount of the olecranon involved (how close is the fracture line to the coronoid) and the orientation of the fracture line. Computer tomography could be reserved for when more specific knowledge of the fracture line might affect treatment. III.

  20. Cocos-Nazca slab window beneath Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Stephen T.; Thorkelson, Derek J.

    1997-02-01

    Integration of petrologic and tectonic data favours a model of slab window formation beneath Central America in the Pliocene-Pleistocene. Central America has been the site of voluminous Cenozoic arc volcanism. The Cocos and Nazca plates, which are subducting beneath Central America, are diverging along the east-trending Cocos-Nazca spreading ridge. Since 25 Ma the Americas have advanced about 1800 km west over the ridge-transform system. Since at least 8 Ma, plate integrity and the ridge-transform configuration have been preserved during convergence, resulting in subduction of the spreading ridge and development of a slab window. The Panama fracture zone, an active transform fault, is the part of the ridge-transform system currently being subducted. The ridge-transform system formerly adjoining the northern end of the Panama fracture zone is likely to have been left-stepping. We use present-day plate motions to design a slab window to fit known variations in igneous composition, hypocentre distribution, and mantle anisotropy. The modeling demonstrates that subduction of ridge segments and resultant slab window development began between 6 and 10 Ma. Cessation of ridge subduction occurred between 1 and 3 Ma, when subduction of the Panama fracture zone is considered to have begun. The slab window is continuing to expand and migrate northeastward below the Central American volcanic arc. The absence of a Wadati-Benioff zone from southeastern Costa Rica through Panama corresponds to the position of the slab window. Within this region, dacitic and rhyolitic volcanic rocks have "adakitic" compositions, and are thought to result from anatexis of the young, buoyant crust which forms the trailing edges of the slabs bounding the window. Basalts in this area were derived from an enriched ocean-island type mantle source, whereas basalts from the rest of the arc, in Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala, are mainly derived from slab-modified depleted mantle, characteristic of

  1. Wiring technique for lesser trochanter fixation in proximal IM nailing of unstable intertrochanteric fractures: A modified candy-package wiring technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyeong Min; Nam, Kwang Woo; Seo, Kyu-Bum; Lim, Chaemoon; Kim, Jiyun; Park, Yong-Geun

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a new surgical technique, that involves modified Candy-package wiring followed by IM nailing fixation and to determine the clinical and radiological results obtained in patients with unstable intertrochanteric fractures with a lesser trochanter fragment. This study included 22 patients who were undergone proximal IM nailing with lesser trochanter wiring between January 2014 to June 2015. All patients were treated with minimally invasive technique of candy-package wiring for lesser trochanter fragments. The mean age was 75.8 years (range, 53-88) and average follow-up period was 15.1 months (range, 12-24). Each patient was followed up for a minimum of 12 months and their clinical and radiological results were analyzed. The mean period required for fracture union was 16.6 weeks. (range, 8-25) and union was successfully completed in all cases. The WOMAC scores at the last F/U visit (average; 45.4, range; 21-75) were not significantly different to pre-trauma status (average; 36.5, range; 19-59) (p=0.087). In comparison of ambulatory capacity prior to trauma, ambulatory aggravation was noted in four cases (18.2%), and eighteen cases (81.8%) was sustained walking ability of prior of trauma. Wiring breakage was found in two cases and heterotrophic ossification in one case. There were no functional deficeit related to the radiologic finding in these patients. With regard to postoperative complications, were no cut-outs, breakage, or pullout of screws. When surgically repairing unstable intertrochanteric fractures with lesser trochanter comminution using proximal IM nailing method, the modified Candy-packaging wiring technique increases the fixation force at the fracture site. Thus, through this technique, both firm fixation of the lesser trochanter and more stable bony union were obtained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Geomechanical Facies Concept In Fractured Resevoirs and the Application of Hybrid Numerical and Analytical Techniques for the Description of Coupled Transport In Fractured Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, C. I.; Wenqing, W.; Kolditz, O.

    2009-04-01

    Exploiting and geo-engineering of fractured rocks in the context of reservoir storage and utilisation is important to applications such as hydrogeology, petroleum geology, geothermal energy, nuclear waste storage and CO2-sequestration. Understanding fluid, mass and energy transport in the three dimensional fracture network is critical to the evaluation planned operating efficiency. Hydraulic, thermal, mechanical and chemical coupled processes under the typical reservoir conditions operate at different scales. Depending on whether the process is continuum dominated (e.g. transfer of stress in the rock body) or discontinuity dominated (e.g. hydraulic transport processes) different methods of numerically investigating and quantifying the system can be applied. A geomechanical facies approach provides the basis for large scale numerical analysis of the coupled processes and prediction of system response. It also provides the basis for a three dimensional holistic understanding of the reservoir systems and the appropriate investigation techniques which could be used to evaluate the capacities of the reservoirs to be investigated as well as appropriate development techniques. Concentrating on the numerical modelling there is often a difficult balance between the numerical stability criteria of the different equation systems which need to be solved to describe the interaction of the dominant processes. The introduction of analytical solutions where possible, functional dependencies and multiple meshes provides on the framework of the geo-mechanical facies concept provides an efficient and stable method for the prediction of the effect of the in situ coupling.

  3. Management of Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures by primary fascio-septo-cutaneous local flap and primary fixation: The ‘fix and shift’ technique

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, P R

    2017-01-01

    Background: Open fractures of tibia have posed great difficulty in managing both the soft tissue and the skeletal components of the injured limb. Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures are more difficult to manage than I, II, and III A fractures. Stable skeletal fixation with immediate soft tissue cover has been the key to the successful outcome in treating open tibial fractures, in particular, Gustilo Anderson III B types. If the length of the open wound is larger and if the exposed surface of tibial fracture and tibial shaft is greater, then the management becomes still more difficult. Materials and Methods: Thirty six Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures managed between June 2002 and December 2013 with “fix and shift” technique were retrospectively reviewed. All the 36 patients managed by this technique had open wounds measuring >5 cm (post debridement). Under fix and shift technique, stable fixation involved primary external fixator application or primary intramedullary nailing of the tibial fracture and immediate soft tissue cover involved septocutaneous shift, i.e., shifting of fasciocutaneous segments based on septocutaneous perforators. Results: Primary fracture union rate was 50% and reoperation rate (bone stimulating procedures) was 50%. Overall fracture union rate was 100%. The rate of malunion was 14% and deep infection was 16%. Failure of septocutaneous shift was 2.7%. There was no incidence of amputation. Conclusion: Management of Gustilo Anderson III B open tibial fractures with “fix and shift” technique has resulted in better outcome in terms of skeletal factors (primary fracture union, overall union, and time for union and malunion) and soft tissue factors (wound healing, flap failure, access to secondary procedures, and esthetic appearance) when compared to standard methods adopted earlier. Hence, “fix and shift” could be recommended as one of the treatment modalities for open III B tibial fractures. PMID:28216752

  4. A comparative study of trochanteric and basicervical fractures of the femur treated with the Ender and McLaughlin techniques.

    PubMed

    Indemini, E; Clerico, P; Fenoglio, E; Mariotti, U

    1982-09-01

    Endomedullary nailing as proposed by Ender is an important alternative in the treatment of trochanteric and basicervical fractures of the femur (Amici et al., 1980; Carret et al., 1980; Ender, 1970; Kempf et al., 1979; Zinghi et al., 1979). Rush's concept (Eiffel Tower, for the distal epiphysis) is reproposed with some variations and transposed to the femoral neck. The aim of the operation differs from that of the nail and plate technique in that, instead of trying to achieve anatomical reconstruction, an immediate functional by-pass of the fractured part is attempted. After using this technique for three years, we compared the old method, which we had not abandoned, the McLaughlin nail and plate, with the new Ender nail.

  5. Biomechanical comparison of two intraoperative mobilization techniques for maxillary distraction osteogenesis: Down-fracture versus non-down-fracture

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lili; Suzuki, Eduardo Yugo; Suzuki, Boonsiva

    2014-01-01

    Purposes: The purpose of this study was to compare the distraction forces and the biomechanical effects between two different intraoperative surgical procedures (down-fracture [DF] and non-DF [NDF]) for maxillary distraction osteogenesis. Materials and Methods: Eight patients were assigned into two groups according to the surgical procedure: DF, n = 6 versus NDF, n = 2. Lateral cephalograms taken preoperatively (T1), immediately after removal of the distraction device (T2), and after at least a 6 months follow-up period (T3) were analyzed. Assessment of distraction forces was performed during the distraction period. The Mann–Whitney U-test was used to compare the difference in the amount of advancement, the maximum distraction force and the amount of relapse. Results: Although a significantly greater amount of maxillary movement was observed in the DF group (median 9.5 mm; minimum-maximum 7.9-14.1 mm) than in the NDF group (median 5.9 mm; minimum-maximum 4.4-7.6 mm), significantly lower maximum distraction forces were observed in the DF (median 16.4 N; minimum-maximum 15.1-24.6 N) than in the NDF (median 32.9 N; minimum-maximum 27.6-38.2 N) group. A significantly greater amount of dental anchorage loss was observed in the NDF group. Moreover, the amount of relapse observed in the NDF group was approximately 3.5 times greater than in the DF group. Conclusions: In this study, it seemed that, the use of the NDF procedure resulted in lower levels of maxillary mobility at the time of the maxillary distraction, consequently requiring greater amounts of force to advance the maxillary bone. Moreover, it also resulted in a reduced amount of maxillary movement, a greater amount of dental anchorage loss and poor treatment stability. PMID:25593865

  6. A modified technique to extract fractured femoral stem in revision total hip arthroplasty: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Akrawi, Hawar; Magra, Merzesh; Shetty, Ajit; Ng, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The removal of well-fixed broken femoral component and cement mantle can be extremely demanding, time consuming and potentially damaging to the host bone. Different methods have been described to extract broken femoral stem yet this remains one of the most challenging prospect to the revision hip surgeon. PRESENTATION OF CASE The authors present two cases underwent a modified sliding cortical window technique utilising a tungsten carbide drill, Charnley pin retractor and an orthopaedic mallet to aid extraction of a fractured cemented femoral stem in revision total hip arthroplasty. DISCUSSION The modified technique offers a simple and controlled method in extracting a well fixed fractured cemented femoral stem. It has the advantage of retaining the cement mantle with subsequent good seal of the femoral cortical window secured with cable ready system. Furthermore, tungsten carbide drill bit and Charnley pin retractor are relatively readily available to aid the extraction of the broken stem. Finally, it yields the option of implanting a standard femoral stem and obviates the need for bypassing the cortical window with long revision femoral component. CONCLUSION Fractured femoral stem is a rare yet a complex and very demanding prospect to both patients and hip surgeons. The sliding cortical window technique utilising tungsten carbide drill and Charnley pin retractor is technically easy and most importantly; preserves host bone stock with cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty. We believe this technique can be added to the armamentarium of revision hip surgeon when faced with the challenge of extracting a fractured cemented femoral stem. PMID:24858980

  7. Safe cross-pinning of pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures with a flexion-extension-external rotation technique.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Andrew G; Settecerri, Jeffrey J

    2014-09-01

    The issue of pin configuration for fixation of displaced supracondylar humerus fractures continues to be controversial. In this article, we report on a large single-surgeon 12-year series in which a flexion-extension-external rotation technique of cross-pinning was used. We retrospectively reviewed all pediatric extension-type supracondylar humerus fractures treated by a single surgeon. The cases of 214 children (mean age, 5.8 years) and 215 medial-entry pins were reviewed in the final analysis. Surgical technique involved a classic hyperflexion maneuver and placement of lateral-entry pins. Indications for medial-entry pins included instability to intraoperative torsional stress examination or medial column comminution. The elbow was then extended to no more than 60° of flexion. The glenohumeral joint was externally rotated to position the medial epicondyle directly en face to the radiographic beam before placement of a medial-entry Kirschner wire. All reviewed patients had medial-entry pin placement with a flexion-extension-external rotation technique. Mean follow-up was 13 weeks. No ulnar nerve neurapraxias were reported. Consistent protection of the ulnar nerve during percutaneous placement of a medial epicondylar pin for supracondylar humerus fracture can be accomplished with partial elbow extension and glenohumeral external rotation after placement of lateral-entry pins.

  8. Outcomes of lumbopelvic fixation in the treatment of complex sacral fractures using minimally invasive surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Jazini, Ehsan; Weir, Tristan; Nwodim, Emeka; Tannous, Oliver; Saifi, Comron; Caffes, Nicholas; Costales, Timothy; Koh, Eugene; Banagan, Kelley; Gelb, Daniel; Ludwig, Steven C

    2017-09-01

    Complex sacral fractures with vertical and anterior pelvic ring instability treated with traditional fixation methods are associated with high rates of failure and poor clinical outcomes. Supplemental lumbopelvic fixation (LPF) has been applied for additional stability to help with fracture union. The study aimed to determine whether minimally invasive LPF provides reliable fracture stability and acceptable complication rates in cases of complex sacral fractures. This is a retrospective cohort study at a single level I trauma center. The sample includes 24 patients who underwent minimally invasive LPF for complex sacral fracture with or without associated pelvic ring injury. Reoperation for all causes, loss of fixation, surgical time, transfusion requirements, length of hospital stay, postoperative day at mobilization, and mortality were evaluated. Patient charts from 2008 to 2014 were reviewed. Of the 32 patients who underwent minimally invasive LPF for complex sacral fractures, 24 (12 male, 12 female) met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. Outcome measures were assessed with a retrospective chart review and radiographic review. The authors did not receive external funding for this study. Acute reoperation was 12%, and elective reoperation was 29%. Two (8%) patients returned to the operating room for infection, one (4.2%) required revision for instrumentation malposition, and seven (29%) underwent elective removal of instrumentation. No patient experienced failure of instrumentation or loss of correction. Average surgical time was 3.6 hours, blood loss was 180 mL, transfusion requirement was 2.1 units of packed red blood cells, and postoperative mobilization was on postoperative day 5. No mortalities occurred as a result of the minimally invasive LPF procedure. Compared with historic reports of open LPF, our results demonstrate reliable maintenance of reduction and acceptable complication rates with minimally invasive LPF for complexsacral fractures. The

  9. EVALUATION OF PATIENTS UNDERGOING FIXATION OF DIAPHYSEAL HUMERAL FRACTURES USING THE MINIMALLY INVASIVE BRIDGE-PLATE TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    Superti, Mauro José; Martynetz, Fábio; Falavinha, Ricardo Sprenger; Fávaro, Rodrigo Caldonazzo; Boas, Luis Felipe Villas; Filho, Salim Mussi; Martynetz, Juliano; Ribas, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to describe the experience of our group in treating humeral shaft fractures using the bridge–plate technique via an anterior approach. Methods: Seventeen patients with acute diaphyseal humeral fractures with an indication for surgical treatment who were operated in 2006–2010 were evaluated. The AO and Gustilo & Anderson classifications were used. All the patients were operated using the anterior bridge-plate technique and completed a follow–up period of at least twelve months. Results: Sixteen men and one woman were treated. Their mean age was 31.8 years (18–52). Among the injury mechanisms found were: five motorcycle accidents, four car accidents, three fractures due to firearm projectiles, two falls to the ground and finally, with one case each, assault, crushing and being run over. Eight patients had open fractures: two grade I, one grade II, four grade IIIa and one grade IIIb, according to the Gustilo-Anderson classification. In relation to the AO classification, we found: one 12A1, three 12A2, four 12A3, one 12B1, four 12 B2, three 12B3 and one 12C2. The mean postoperative follow-up was 25 months (12–48). As complications, two patients had pain in the elbow and a ROM deficit and one had deep infection. The mean time taken to achieve consolidation was 17.5 weeks. There was no loss of reduction, pseudarthrosis or malunion in this series of patients. Conclusion: The authors believe that the technique described has low rates of complications and morbidity, with good initial results, although the series is limited by the small sample. PMID:27042639

  10. SUB-SLAB PROBE INSTALLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sub-slab sampling has become an integral part of vapor intrusion investigations. It is now recommended in guidance documents developed by EPA and most states. A method for sub-slab probe installation was devised in 2002, presented at conferences through 2005, and finally docume...

  11. Impact of tunnels and tenodesis screws on clavicle fracture: a biomechanical study of varying coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Guillaume D; Russell, Robert D; Knight, Justin R; Hotchkiss, William R; Pierce, William A; Wilson, Philip L; Robertson, William J

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the load to fracture of distal clavicles with no tunnels, one tunnel, or 2 tunnels and to evaluate the effect of inserting tenodesis screws in the tunnels on load to fracture of the distal clavicle. Fifty right sawbone clavicles were obtained and divided into 5 groups (n = 10): group 1, normal clavicle; group 2, one tunnel, no tenodesis screw; group 3, 2 tunnels, no tenodesis screws; group 4, one tunnel with tenodesis screw; and group 5, 2 tunnels with 2 tenodesis screws. Tunnels were created using a 5-mm-diameter reamer, and 5.5 × 10 mm polyethyl ethyl ketone tenodesis screws were used. A 4-point bending load was applied to the distal clavicles. Load to failure was noted for each specimen. Load to failure in clavicles without tunnels was significantly higher (1,157.18 ± 147.10 N) than in all other groups (P < .0005). No statistical differences were noted between groups 2, 3, 4, and 5. Load to failure was not statistically different in clavicles with one versus 2 tunnels. In addition, the use of tenodesis screws in the tunnels did not affect the load required to fracture. The use of tunnels in the clavicle for coracoclavicular (CC) ligament reconstruction significantly reduces the load required to fracture the distal clavicle. The addition of tenodesis screws does not appear to significantly increase the strength of the clavicle in this construct. CC ligament reconstruction techniques commonly use tunnels in the distal clavicle, which may render the clavicle more susceptible to fracture. This study helps quantify the effect of these tunnels on the strength of the distal clavicle. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom; Bingham, Philip R; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Carmichael, Justin R

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

  13. FIXATION OF FRACTURES OF THE DISTAL EXTREMITY OF THE RADIUS USING THE MODIFIED KAPANDJI TECHNIQUE: EVALUATION OF THE RADIOLOGICAL RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Antonio Piva; Lhamby, Fabio Colla

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate a simple and efficacious option for treating fractures of the distal extremity of the radius using Kirschner wires. Methods: Between September 2008 and April 2009, 48 patients with fractures of the distal extremity of the radius, classified as A3 according to the AO classification, were treated surgically using a modification of the Kapandji technique. Results: Out of the 48 wrists operated, 42 (87.5%) presented postoperative measurements within the acceptable limits. We used the parameters of McQuenn and Caspers who considered that the radial angulation should be wider than 19° and the volar angulation should be narrower than -12°. All the postoperative volar inclination measurements were narrower than -3°. The mean preoperative radial inclination was 13.14° and the mean postoperative value was 21.18°. The mean preoperative volar inclination was 28.75° and the mean postoperative value was 3.31°. The mean preoperative radial height was 5.25 mm and the mean postoperative value was 9.48 mm. Conclusion: The technique described here had excellent stability for treating fractures of the distal extremity of the radius classified as A3. It was easy to implement and minimally invasive, with minimal surgical complications, and it was inexpensive. PMID:27027023

  14. FIXATION OF FRACTURES OF THE DISTAL EXTREMITY OF THE RADIUS USING THE MODIFIED KAPANDJI TECHNIQUE: EVALUATION OF THE RADIOLOGICAL RESULTS.

    PubMed

    Neto, Antonio Piva; Lhamby, Fabio Colla

    2011-01-01

    To demonstrate a simple and efficacious option for treating fractures of the distal extremity of the radius using Kirschner wires. Between September 2008 and April 2009, 48 patients with fractures of the distal extremity of the radius, classified as A3 according to the AO classification, were treated surgically using a modification of the Kapandji technique. Out of the 48 wrists operated, 42 (87.5%) presented postoperative measurements within the acceptable limits. We used the parameters of McQuenn and Caspers who considered that the radial angulation should be wider than 19° and the volar angulation should be narrower than -12°. All the postoperative volar inclination measurements were narrower than -3°. The mean preoperative radial inclination was 13.14° and the mean postoperative value was 21.18°. The mean preoperative volar inclination was 28.75° and the mean postoperative value was 3.31°. The mean preoperative radial height was 5.25 mm and the mean postoperative value was 9.48 mm. The technique described here had excellent stability for treating fractures of the distal extremity of the radius classified as A3. It was easy to implement and minimally invasive, with minimal surgical complications, and it was inexpensive.

  15. Successful stabilisation of a type III paediatric tibial eminence fracture using a tensioned wire technique.

    PubMed

    Archer, Matthew; Parkin, Tom; Latimer, Mark David

    2016-09-19

    We report the case of an 11-year-old boy presenting with a type III tibial eminence fracture. The fracture fragment was reduced arthroscopically. Two 1.6 mm retrograde K-wires were inserted from the tibial metaphysis across the physis and into the fracture fragment using a standard anterior cruciate ligament tibial tunnel guide. Once the wires were clearly visible within the joint the tips were bent over by ∼120°. The wires were then tensioned around a single small fragment screw inserted into the tibial metaphysis. An exceptionally strong fixation was achieved. The boy was mobilised without a brace. The wires were removed at 12 weeks and he returned to full activity at 14 weeks.

  16. An alternative technique for the management of phalangeal enchondromas with pathologic fractures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Yen; Huang, Peng-Ju; Huang, Hsuan-Ti; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Cheng, Yuh-Min; Fu, Yin-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Enchondroma of the hand with a pathologic fracture is generally treated by tumor curettage and bone grafting after the fracture has healed. However, delayed surgery postpones definitive diagnosis and prolongs the period of disability. We have treated pathologic fractures in a single stage through a modified lateral surgical approach with curettage of the tumor and stabilization using injectable calcium sulfate cement. The aim of this study was to report the outcomes of treatment with this material and the modified approach. Between 2006 and 2010, we enrolled 8 patients with solitary hand enchondromas and pathologic fractures. The surgical procedure involved a lateral approach, an extended lateral cortical window, thorough tumor evacuation, and reconstruction of the bone defects using commercially available injectable calcium sulfate cement. We performed evaluations before surgery and in the postoperative follow-up series by radiographs and clinical assessments, including measurement of joint motion by goniometry and a visual analog pain scale. The average time of follow-up was 19 months (range, 12-36 mo). The pathologic fractures of all patients healed clinically and radiographically within 8 weeks after surgery, and the mean active motion arcs of the metacarpophalangeal joints and proximal interphalangeal joints of the involved digit were 90° and 94°, respectively at 3-month follow-up. All patients returned to ordinary daily activities without obvious pain by 3 months postoperatively. We found no major complications, such as unacceptable alignment, nonunion, infection, or tumor recurrence, during follow-up. This study demonstrated the outcomes of early management of phalangeal enchondromas with pathologic fractures using a lateral approach and injectable calcium sulfate cement for reconstruction. This combined approach avoided the need for supplemental internal fixation, allowed early mobilization, and resulted in minimal joint stiffness. Therapeutic IV

  17. Characterizing the composition of bone formed during fracture healing using scanning electron microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Perdikouri, Christina; Tägil, Magnus; Isaksson, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    About 5-10% of all bone fractures suffer from delayed healing, which may lead to non-union. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) can be used to induce differentiation of osteoblasts and enhance the formation of the bony callus, and bisphosphonates help to retain the newly formed callus. The aim of this study was to investigate if scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) can identify differences in the mineral composition of the newly formed bone compared to cortical bone from a non-fractured control. Moreover, we investigate whether the use of BMPs and bisphosphonates-alone or combined-may have an effect on bone mineralization and composition. Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats at 9 weeks of age were randomly divided into four groups and treated with (A) saline, (B) BMP-7, (C) bisphosphonates (Zoledronate), and (D) BMP-7 + Zoledronate. The rats were sacrificed after 6 weeks. All samples were imaged using SEM and chemically analyzed with EDS to quantify the amount of C, N, Ca, P, O, Na, and Mg. The Ca/P ratio was the primary outcome. In the fractured samples, two areas of interest were chosen for chemical analysis with EDS: the callus and the cortical bone. In the non-fractured samples, only the cortex was analyzed. Our results showed that the element composition varied to a small extent between the callus and the cortical bone in the fractured bones. However, the Ca/P ratio did not differ significantly, suggesting that the mineralization at all sites is similar 6 weeks post-fracture in this rat model.

  18. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  19. Particle Movements in Chloroplast Membranes: Quantitative Measurements of Membrane Fluidity by the Freeze-Fracture Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ojakian, George K.; Satir, Peter

    1974-01-01

    Stacked chloroplast membranes isolated from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have differentiated particle arrays when examined by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. When the membranes are isolated unstacked, these particle arrays are lost and the fracture faces have a homogeneous appearance. The changes in appearance are due to rearrangement of existing membrane components by lateral particle movements in the plane of the fluid chloroplast membranes, since quantitative measurements demonstrate almost complete conservation of numbers and sizes of membrane particles during experimentally controlled stacking and unstacking. Images PMID:4525315

  20. Topological susceptibility from slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; de Forcrand, Philippe; Gerber, Urs

    2015-12-01

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility χ t. In principle it seems straightforward to measure χ t by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure χ t even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of χ t, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear σ-models.

  1. A modified minimally invasive technique for intra-articular displaced calcaneal fractures fixed by transverse and axial screws.

    PubMed

    Kapil Mani, K C; Acharya, Parimal; Dirgha Raj, R C; Pangeni, Bandhu Ram; Sigdel, Arun; Marahatta, Suman Babu

    2017-05-13

    The management of displaced, intra-articular calcaneal fracture represents a surgical challenge to even an experienced orthopedic surgeon. Plate osteosynthesis using an extended lateral approach is complicated by soft tissue problems, while those treated by closed reduction and percutaneous pinning cannot address all the intra-articular fragments sufficiently. The objective of our study is to evaluate restoration of subtalar joint and long-term functional outcomes in intra-articular displaced calcaneal fractures treated with transverse subcondral screws through a small incision on lateral aspect of calcaneus and percutaneously placed axial screws through the calcaneal tuberosity. Forty-five intra-articular calcaneal fractures were managed with this minimally invasive technique. Calcaneal height, width, length, Bohler's angle, and Gissane angle were measured preoperatively and last follow-up visit. Functional outcomes were assessed on the basis of American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle/hind foot score. Preoperative calcaneal length, height, width, Bohler's angle, and Gissane angle were improved from 68.62 ± 2.64 to 72.44 ± 2.63 mm, 39.28 ± 2.72 to 32.37 ± 2.65 mm, 47.04 ± 2.56 to 49.55 ± 2.45 mm, 12.66° ± 2.86° to 26.93° ± 2.57°, 123.91° ± 3.13° to 96.06° ± 3.92°, respectively, after surgery with P value <0.001. There were 21 (46.7%) excellent, 17 (37.8%) good, 4 (8.8%) fair, and 3 (6.7%) poor outcomes based on AOFAS ankle/hindfoot scores. Time to unite the fracture was 11.06 ± 1.82 weeks (range 8-16 weeks), and all fractures were united without major complications. Minimally invasive technique through a small incision on lateral aspect of calcaneus gives a moderately good exposure for anatomical restoration of Sander's type II and III calcaneal fractures fixed with both transverse and axial screws under fluoroscopic guidance.

  2. [Treatment of mid-distal humeral shaft fractures associated with radial nerve palsy using minimally invasive plating osteosynthesis technique].

    PubMed

    An, Zhiquan; Zeng, Bingfang; He, Xiaojian; Huang, Peiyan

    2008-05-01

    To explore the possibility of treating mid-distal humeral shaft fractures associated with radial nerve palsies with minimal invasive plating osteosynthesis (MIPO) techniques. From April 2003 to October 2006, 10 patients with mid-distal humeral shaft fractures associated with radial nerve palsies were treated. All patients were male, aged 19-58 years. According to AO/ASIF classification, there were 4 cases of B1 type, 2 cases of B3 type, 1 case of A2 type, 1 case of B2 type, 1 case of C3 type and 1 case of A3 type. A straight 4.5 mm dynamic compression plate was placed on the anterior aspect of humerus through two small incisions located on the anterior side of proximal and distal part of the arm. The radial nerve exploration was performed through a lateral small incision made on the fracture site. The fractures were then reduced by manual manipulation and the plate was fixated to the main fragments with 3 screws in each end of the plate. The postoperative complications, the bone healing time, and the recovery time of the radial nerve functions were recorded. The functions of the affected shoulder and elbow were assessed with UCLA and Mayo elbow performance score system respectively. All incision healed by first intention. Ten patients were followed up 9-36 months with an average of 15.7 months. The X-ray films showed that the union of fractures was achieved 12-16 weeks (13.6 weeks on average). The function of the radial nerves recovered completely 12-36 weeks (17.8 weeks on average) in 9 patients. The abductions of the affected shoulder were 150-170 degrees (165 degrees on average). The ROM of the elbows were 130-140 degrees (135.5 degrees on average). According to the UCLA shoulder scoring system, 9 patients achieved the excellent result and 1 patient achieved the good result. All the patients had the excellent results according to Mayo elbow performance score system. The mid-distal humeral shaft fractures associated with radial nerve palsies can be treated with

  3. [Kirschner wire transfixation of unstable ankle fractures: indication, surgical technique and outcomes].

    PubMed

    Marvan, J; Džupa, V; Bartoška, R; Kachlík, D; Krbec, M; Báča, V

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The aim of the study was to assess treatment outcomes in patients undergoing K-wire transfixation of unstable ankle fractures and compare the results with those of patients in whom it was possible to perform primary one-stage osteosynthesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Between 2009 and 2012, a total of 358 patients (191 women and 167 men) had surgery for unstable ankle fracture. At 1-year follow-up, their subjective feelings, objective findings and ankle radiographs were evaluated. The fractures were categorised according to the Weber classification. A patient group treated by one-stage osteosynthesis, a group with definitive transfixation and a group of patients in whom temporary transfixation was converted to definitive osteosynthesis were assessed and compared. RESULTS The group treated by one-stage osteosynthesis included 278 patients with an average age of 47 years; the group of 20 patients with definitive transfixation had an average age of 67 years, and the group of 60 patients who had temporary transfixation with subsequent conversion to internal osteosynthesis were 55 years on average. In the group with one-stage osteosynthesis, 223 (80%) ankle fractures on post-injury radiographs were associated with minor joint dislocations and 55 (20%) with major dislocations. On the other hand, the radiographs of the patients treated by temporary transfixation and delayed open reduction with internal fixation showed major dislocations in 38 (63%) and minor dislocations in the rest of the patients (37%); the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p<0.001). Posterior malleolar fractures were most frequent in the group with temporary transfixation (60%) and least frequent in the group with primary osteosynthesis (44%); also this difference was statistically significant (p=0.032). At one-year follow-up, in the group with one-stage osteosynthesis, 220 patients (79%) had no radiographic signs of posttraumatic ankle osteoarthritis while

  4. Influence of immediate dentin sealing techniques on cuspal deflection and fracture resistance of teeth restored with composite resin inlays.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, L; Mota, E G; Borges, G A; Burnett, L H; Spohr, A M

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY This research evaluated the influence of immediate dentin sealing (IDS) techniques on cuspal deflection and fracture resistance of teeth restored with composite resin inlays. Forty-eight maxillary premolars were divided into four groups: G1, sound teeth (control); G2, without IDS; G3, IDS with Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); and G4, IDS with CSE and Protect Liner F. The teeth from groups 2, 3, and 4 received mesio-distal-occlusal preparations. The impressions were made with vinyl polysiloxane, followed by provisional restoration and storage in water for seven days. The impressions were poured using type IV die stone, and inlays with Filtek Z250 composite resin were built over each cast. The inlays were luted with Panavia F. After storage in water for 72 hours, a 200-N load was applied on the occlusal surface using a metal sphere connected to a universal testing machine, and the cuspal deflection was measured with a micrometer. The specimens were then submitted to an axial load until failure. The following mean cuspal deflection (μm) and mean fracture resistance (N) followed by the same lowercase letter represent no statistical difference by analysis of variance and Tukey (p<0.05): cuspal deflection: G1, 3.1 ± 1.5(a); G2, 10.3 ± 4.6(b); G3, 5.5 ± 1.8(ac); and G4, 7.7 ± 5.1(bc); fracture resistance: G1, 1974 ± 708(a); G2, 1162 ± 474(b); G3, 700 ± 280(b); and G4, 810 ± 343(b). IDS with CSE allowed cuspal deflection comparable with that associated with sound teeth. The application of Protect Liner F did not contribute to a decrease in cuspal deflection. The IDS techniques did not influence the fracture resistance of teeth.

  5. Calculation and comparison of thermal effect in laser diode pumped slab lasers with different pumping structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Feng; Jiang, Nan; Wang, Yuefeng; Dong, Wei; Niu, Yanxiong

    2008-03-01

    Laser diode (LD) pumped slab laser, as an important high average power solid-state laser, is a promising laser source in military and industrial fields. The different laser diode pumping structures lead to different thermal effect in the slab gain medium. The thermal and stress analysis of slab laser with different pumping structure are performed by finite element analysis (FEA) with the software program ANSYS. The calculation results show that the face pumped and cooled laser results in a near one-dimension temperature distribution and eliminates thermal stress induced depolarization. But the structure is low pump efficiency due to the small thickness of slabs and the requirement to cool and pump through the same faces. End-pumped slab laser is high pump efficiency and excellent mode match, but its pumping arrangement is fairly complicated. The edge-pumped face-cooling slab laser's pump efficiency is better than face-pumping, and its pumping structure is simpler than end-pumped laser, but the tensile stress on surfaces may initiate failure of the gain medium so it is important to design so that the stress is well below the stress fracture limit. The comparison of the thermal effects with different pumping structure shows that, the edge-pumped slab laser has engineering advantages in high power slab laser's application. Furthermore, the end-pumped slab laser tends to get the best beam quality, so it is fit for the application which has a special requirement on laser beam quality.

  6. Transtrapezial Approach for Fixation of Acute Scaphoid Fractures: Rationale, Surgical Techniques, and Results: AAOS Exhibit Selection.

    PubMed

    Verstreken, Frederik; Meermans, Geert

    2015-05-20

    The ideal position for a screw used for scaphoid fixation is central. The purpose of this study was to compare the current volar percutaneous approaches used for scaphoid fracture fixation, explore different options to improve central screw placement, and describe our experience with the transtrapezial approach.

  7. Treatment of olecranon fractures with 2.4- and 2.7-mm plating techniques.

    PubMed

    Wellman, David S; Lazaro, Lionel E; Cymerman, Rachel M; Axelrad, Thomas W; Leu, David; Helfet, David L; Lorich, Dean G

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of olecranon fractures treated with 2.4- and 2.7-mm plate constructs. Retrospective Case Series. One-level 1 trauma center and 1 tertiary care hospital. Thirty-five consecutive patients meeting inclusion criteria. A 2.7- or 2.4-mm reconstruction plate was placed on the dorsal ulnar cortex and contoured to allow passage of either a 2.7- or 3.5-mm intramedullary screw. In 9 patients, additional plates were required to control comminution. Available computed tomographic (CT) scans were evaluated for the presence of comminution. Average Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) and Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS). All fractures were united. Average extension deficit was 4.2 degrees, and average flexion angle was 137.4 degrees. Outcome scores were completed by 94% (33/35) of study patients. Average DASH score was 6.6, and average MEPS score was 94.5. Implants were removed in 18 patients. In the cohort of patients with CT scans, 6 of the 7 fractures thought to be simple on plain film analysis were found to have occult comminution on CT scan. Comminution should be considered in all olecranon fractures, even when plain films display simple patterns; although this did not affect treatment in this series of plated patients, it may be important if selecting tension band wiring. Fixation with 2.4- and 2.7-mm plates addresses comminution in olecranon fractures, avoiding the pitfalls of tension band wiring. In patients with completed outcome scores, 97% (32/33) reported their outcomes as good or excellent according to the MEPS. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  8. Evaluation of the Fracture Toughness of Nb-40Al-8Cr-1W-1Y-0.05B Intermetallic Material by Indentation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Salem, J. A.; Hebsur, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    The fracture toughness of an Nb-40Al-8Cr - 1W-1Y-0.05B intermetallic material was evaluated by indentation techniques at room temperature. Two widely used indentation methods, crack size measurement and indent strength, yielded excellent agreement with a conventional fracture toughness technique using straight-through precracked specimens, despite the occasional formation of poorly configured cracks. However, the modified indentation technique, using dummy indent flaws, resulted in a low fracture toughness compared to that evaluated by the other methods. The material did not exhibit rising R-curve behavior, as evaluated from the indentation strength data. These results indicate that indentation fracture principles are applicable to this brittle intermetallic material without modification of the residual contact stress term originally calibrated for ceramic materials.

  9. Burnei’s “double X" internal fixation technique for supracondylar humerus fractures in children: indications, technique, advantages and alternative interventions

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, I; Gavriliu, S; Pârvan, A; Martiniuc, A; Japie, E; Ghiță, R; Drăghici, I; Hamei, S; Ţiripa, I; El Nayef, T; Dan, D

    2013-01-01

    Background. The Study and Research Group in Pediatric Orthopedics-2012 initated this retrospective study due to the fact that in Romania and in other countries, the numerous procedures do not ensure the physicians a definite point of view related to the therapeutic criteria in the treatment of supracondylar fractures. That is why the number of complications and their severity brought into notice these existent deficiencies. In order to correct some of these complications, cubitus varus or valgus, Prof. Al. Pesamosca communicated a paper called "Personal procedure in the treatment of posttraumatic cubitus varus" at the County Conference from Bacău, in June 24, 1978. This procedure has next been made popular by Prof. Gh. Burnei and his coworkers by operating patients with cubitus varus or valgus due to supracondylar humeral fractures and by presenting papers related to the subject at the national and international congresses. The latest paper regarding this problem has been presented at the 29th Annual Meeting of the European Pediatric Orthopedic Society in Zagreb, Croatia, April 7-10, 2010, being titled “Distal humeral Z-osteotomy for posttraumatic cubitus varus or valgus", having as authors Gh. Burnei, Ileana Georgescu, Ştefan Gavriliu, Costel Vlad and Daniela Dan. As members of this group, based on the performed studies, we wish to make popular this type of osteosynthesis, which ensures a tight fixation, avoids complications and allows a rapid postoperative activity. Introduction. The acknowledged treatment for these types of fractures is the orthopedic one and it must be accomplished as soon as possible, in the first 6 hours, by reduction and cast immobilization or by closed or open reduction and fixation, using one of the several methods (Judet, Boehler, Kapandji, San Antonio, San Diego, Burnei’s double X technique). The exposed treatment is indicated in irreducible supracondylar humeral fractures, in reducible, but unstable type, in polytraumatized

  10. Burnei's "double X" internal fixation technique for supracondylar humerus fractures in children: indications, technique, advantages and alternative interventions : Study and Research Group in Pediatric Orthopaedics-2012.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, I; Gavriliu, S; Pârvan, A; Martiniuc, A; Japie, E; Ghiță, R; Drăghici, I; Hamei, Ş; Ţiripa, I; El Nayef, T; Dan, D

    2013-06-15

    The Study and Research Group in Pediatric Orthopedics-2012 initated this retrospective study due to the fact that in Romania and in other countries, the numerous procedures do not ensure the physicians a definite point of view related to the therapeutic criteria in the treatment of supracondylar fractures. That is why the number of complications and their severity brought into notice these existent deficiencies. In order to correct some of these complications, cubitus varus or valgus, Prof. Al. Pesamosca communicated a paper called "Personal procedure in the treatment of posttraumatic cubitus varus" at the County Conference from Bacău, in June 24, 1978. This procedure has next been made popular by Prof. Gh. Burnei and his coworkers by operating patients with cubitus varus or valgus due to supracondylar humeral fractures and by presenting papers related to the subject at the national and international congresses. The latest paper regarding this problem has been presented at the 29th Annual Meeting of the European Pediatric Orthopedic Society in Zagreb, Croatia, April 7-10, 2010, being titled "Distal humeral Z-osteotomy for posttraumatic cubitus varus or valgus", having as authors Gh. Burnei, Ileana Georgescu, Ştefan Gavriliu, Costel Vlad and Daniela Dan. As members of this group, based on the performed studies, we wish to make popular this type of osteosynthesis, which ensures a tight fixation, avoids complications and allows a rapid postoperative activity. The acknowledged treatment for these types of fractures is the orthopedic one and it must be accomplished as soon as possible, in the first 6 hours, by reduction and cast immobilization or by closed or open reduction and fixation, using one of the several methods (Judet, Boehler, Kapandji, San Antonio, San Diego, Burnei's double X technique). The exposed treatment is indicated in irreducible supracondylar humeral fractures, in reducible, but unstable type, in polytraumatized patients with supracondylar

  11. Semiextended approach for intramedullary nailing via a patellar eversion technique for tibial-shaft fractures: Evaluation of the patellofemoral joint.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Obara, Shu; Hayashi, Junji; Arai, Masayuki; Sato, Kaoru

    2017-03-25

    Intramedullary nail fixation is a common treatment for tibial-shaft fractures, and it offers a better functional prognosis than other conservative treatments. Currently, the primary approach employed during intramedullary nail insertion is the semiextended position is the suprapatellar approach, which involves a vertical incision of the quadriceps tendon Damage to the patellofemoral joint cartilage has been highlighted as a drawback associated with this approach. To avoid this issue, we perform surgery using the patellar eversion technique and a soft sleeve. This method allows the articular surface to be monitored during intramedullary nail insertion. We arthroscopically assessed the effect of this technique on patellofemoral joint cartilage. The patellar eversion technique allows a direct view and protection of the patellofemoral joint without affecting the patella. Thus, damage to the patellofemoral joint cartilage can be avoided.

  12. Intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures in the semi-extended position using a suprapatellar portal technique.

    PubMed

    Zelle, Boris A

    2017-03-30

    Intramedullary nail fixation remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Establishing an appropriate starting point remains a crucial step in the surgical procedure. Tibial nailing using an infrapatellar starting point with the knee flexed over a radiolucent triangle has been established as a widely-used standard technique. Tibial nail insertion with the knee in the semi-extended position was introduced with the goal to counteract post-operative procurvatum deformities that frequently have been reported as a common problem in proximal third tibial shaft fractures. Early reports on tibial nailing in the semi-extended position used a knee arthrotomy in order to establish the proximal tibial starting point. Recent technological advances have provided the surgical community with instrumentation systems that allow for tibial nailing in the semi-extended position using a suprapatellar portal with nail insertion through the patellofemoral joint. Preliminary clinical studies have suggested favorable outcomes that can be achieved with this technique. This article provides a description of the surgical technique and a review of the currently available evidence.

  13. Results of treatment of displaced supracondylar humeral fractures in children by percutaneous lateral cross-wiring technique

    PubMed Central

    El-Adl, Wael A.; El-Said, Mohammed A.; Ali, Al-Sayed M.

    2008-01-01

    Seventy children with displaced type II and III supracondylar fractures of the humerus were managed with percutaneous lateral cross-wiring technique from January 2006 to January 2007. There were 54 boys and 16 girls with a mean age of 6.1 ± 3.07 years. All patients were operated within 24 h after trauma using the Dorgans percutaneous lateral cross-wiring technique. Patients were followed up for a mean period of 6.1 ± 2.6 months and assessed both radiologically for union; and functionally and cosmetically according to Flynn’s criteria. All patients achieved solid union. Functionally, all patients achieved satisfactory results, while cosmetically, 91.4% of patients had satisfactory results and 8.6% had unsatisfactory results. The most frequently occurring complications were minor pin tract infection in six patients, deep infection in two patients, and 32 patients suffered excessive granulation tissue formation mostly around the proximal pin. There was no iatrogenic neurological injury either for the ulnar or for the radial nerves. The obtained results and minor complications reported signify this technique as a viable treatment method for displaced type II and III supracondylar fractures in children. PMID:18427917

  14. Management of displaced inferior patellar pole fractures with modified tension band technique combined with cable cerclage using Cable Grip System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu; Wu, Qinfen; Lai, Chin-Hui; Wang, Xin

    2017-07-13

    We present a modified tension band technique combined with cable cerclage using Cable Grip System for the treatment of displaced inferior patellar pole fractures and report the knee functional outcome. The patients who had had operative treatment of a displaced inferior patellar pole fracture (AO/OTA 34-A1) between December 2013 and December 2015 were studied retrospectively. Eleven consecutive patients had had open reduction and internal fixation with the modified technique using Cable Grip System, of whom, five males and six females with an average age of 60.9 years (range, 29-81 years). All fractures occurred from direct fall onto the knee. The average time from injury to surgery was 6.1days (range, 2-12days). The range of motion (ROM) was measured in degrees by goniometry at postoperative intervals of 1, 2, 4, 12, and 48 weeks; Knee function was evaluated using the Rasmussen scores at final follow-up. No patients had nonunion, loss of reduction, migration of wire, irritation from the implant and fixation breakage during the follow-up period. Recovery of ROM was achieved at 12 weeks, with the average ROM at 1 week was 72° (range, 65°-78°), 86.4° (range, 78°-92°) at 2 weeks, 115.5° (range, 103°-122°) at 4 weeks, 129.6° (range, 122°-133°) at 12 weeks, 134.5° (range, 129°-139°) at 48 weeks after the operation. Concerning the knee function outcome assessment, all patients showed excellent results at final follow-up. The average Rasmussen scores was 27.9 out of 30 (range, 27-29). The modified tension band technique combined with cable cerclage using Cable Grip System for displaced inferior patellar pole fractures can provide stable fixation with excellent results in knee function, allows for immediate mobilization and early weight-bearing, which is a simple and valuable technique in routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Novel Two-Step Technique for Retrieving Fractured Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Segments Migrating into the Heart or the Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Hao; Miao, Nan-Dong; Ren, Yong-Jun; Liu, Kang; Min, Xu-Li; Yang, Ke; Yang, Shi; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To report the experience of a percutaneous technique for retrieving fractured peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery. Method. From April 2013 to July 2015, we performed percutaneous retrieval of fractured PICC segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery in five cancer patients who had undergone chemotherapy via PICC. The fractures were diagnosed with chest plain radiography. The patients included three cases of breast cancer, one case of rectal cancer, and one case of lower limb Ewing's tumor. The fractures were retained in the vessels of the patients for 1 to 3 days. All the fractures were retrieved by using a novel two-step technique in the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) suite. This two-step technique involves inserting a pigtail catheter to the heart or the pulmonary artery to grasp the fractured catheter fragment and bring it to the lower segment of the inferior vena cava, followed by grasping and removing the catheter fragment with a retrieval loop system of the vena cava filter retrieval set. Result. The fractured PICC segments were removed successfully in all five patients via unilateral (four patients) or bilateral (one patient) femoral vein access. No complications occurred during the interventional procedure. Conclusion. Percutaneous retrieval can be a safe, convenient, and minimally invasive method for the removal of fractured PICC segments. The technique reported in this paper will be applicable for the retrieval of fractured PICC segments and other catheter fragments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery. PMID:27642604

  16. The hematoma block: a simple, effective technique for closed reduction of ankle fracture dislocations.

    PubMed

    Ross, Adrianne; Catanzariti, Alan R; Mendicino, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Management of a dislocated ankle fracture can be challenging because of instability of the ankle mortise, a compromised soft tissue envelope, and the potential neurovascular compromise. Every effort should be made to quickly and efficiently relocate the disrupted ankle joint. Within the emergency department setting, narcotics and benzodiazepines can be used to sedate the patient before attempting closed reduction. The combination of narcotics and benzodiazepines provides relief of pain and muscle guarding; however, it conveys a risk of seizure as well as respiratory arrest. An alternative to conscious sedation is the hematoma block, or an intra-articular local anesthetic injection in the ankle joint and the associated fracture hematoma. The hematoma block offers a comparable amount of analgesia to conscious sedation without the additional cardiovascular risk, hospital cost, and procedure time. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Arthroscopically assisted osteosynthesis of dorsally tilted intraarticular distal radius fractures--technique and results].

    PubMed

    Lutz, M; Wieland, T; Deml, C; Erhart, S; Rudisch, A; Klestil, T

    2014-10-01

    The present paper describes the indication and application of an arthroscopically assisted osteosynthesis for distal radius fractures. Visualisation of articular incongruency is emphasised with special regard to articular fracture fragment reduction. In addition to that, classification of soft tissue injuries and treatment options are discussed. The final clinical and radiological results of 17 patients are presented: DASH and PRWE averaged 4.9 and 6.0 respectively. Active range of motion measured 123° for flexion/extension, 51° for radial and ulnar deviation and 163° for pronosupination, which is 87%, 98% and 97%, respectively, compared with the opposite wrist. Radial inclination at final follow-up was 23°, palmar tilt measured 6° and ulnar variance averaged -1.2 mm. The scapholunate gap at follow-up was 1.6 mm, and the scapholunate angle measured 57°.

  18. Complicated Crown-Root Fracture Treated Using Reattachment Procedure: A Single Visit Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Akhil; Talwar, Sangeeta; Ataide, Ida; Verma, Mahesh; Wadhawan, Neeraj

    2011-01-01

    Complicated crown-root fracture of maxillary central and lateral incisors is common in case of severe trauma or sports-related injury. It happens because of their anterior positioning in oral cavity and protrusive eruptive pattern. On their first dental visit, these patients are in pain and need emergency care. Because of impaired function, esthetics, and phonetics, such patients are quite apprehensive during their emergency visit. Successful pain management with immediate restoration of function, esthetics and phonetics should be the prime objective while handling such cases. This paper describes immediate treatment of oblique crown root fracture of maxillary right lateral incisor with reattachment procedure using light transmitting fiber post. After two and half years, the reattached fragment still has satisfying esthetics and excellent function. PMID:22690345

  19. Subbrachial approach to humeral shaft fractures: new surgical technique and retrospective case series study

    PubMed Central

    Boschi, Vladimir; Pogorelic, Zenon; Gulan, Gordan; Vilovic, Katarina; Stalekar, Hrvoje; Bilan, Kanito; Grandic, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Background There are few surgical approaches for treating humeral shaft fractures. Here we present our results using a subbrachial approach. Methods We conducted a retrospective case series involving patients who had surgery for a humeral shaft fracture between January 1994 and January 2008. We divided patients into 4 groups based on the surgical approach (anterior, anterolateral, posterior, subbrachial). In all patients, an AO 4.5 mm dynamic compression plate was used. Results During our study period, 280 patients aged 30–36 years underwent surgery for a humeral shaft fracture. The average duration of surgery was shortest using the subbrachial approach (40 min). The average loss of muscle strength was 40% for the anterolateral, 48% for the posterior, 42% for the anterior and 20% for the subbrachial approaches. The average loss of tension in the brachialis muscle after 4 months was 61% for the anterolateral, 48% for the anterior and 11% for the subbrachial approaches. Sixteen patients in the anterolateral and anterior groups and 6 patients in the posterior group experienced intraoperative lesions of the radial nerve. No postoperative complications were observed in the subbrachial group. Conclusion The subbrachial approach is practical and effective. The average duration of the surgery is shortened by half, loss of the muscle strength is minimal, and patients can resume everyday activities within 4 months. No patients in the sub-brachial group experienced injuries to the radial or musculocutaneous nerves. PMID:23187037

  20. Posterior C1-C2 Fixation Using Absorbable Suture for Type II Odontoid Fracture in 2-Year-Old Child: Description of a New Technique and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Labbe, Jean L; Peres, Olivier; Leclair, Olivier; Goulon, Renaud; Scemama, Patrice; Jourdel, François; Bertrou, Véronique; Murgier, Jerome

    2016-12-01

    Odontoid synchondrosis fractures are rare in children, even though they are the more common cervical fracture in children less than 7 years old. Nonoperative treatment with external orthosis immobilization is the treatment of choice for stable undisplaced or minimally displaced injuries. In unstable fractures, when reduction cannot be achieved or maintained, surgical fixation is recommended. We report a 2-year-old boy with an unstable fracture of the odontoid treated surgically using an absorbable monofilament suture for C1-C2 interlaminar fixation without bone grafting. This suture was strong enough to provide the stability necessary to allow healing of the synchondrosis and the delayed resorption of the suture was followed by complete restoration of the mobility between C1 and C2. This case illustrates that surgical stabilization using an absorbable suture in young children with an unstable odontoid fracture is a safe and effective alternative to other surgical techniques.

  1. New Packaging for Amplifier Slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.; Thorsness, C.; Suratwala, T.; Steele, R.; Rogowski, G.

    2015-03-18

    The following memo provides a discussion and detailed procedure for a new finished amplifier slab shipping and storage container. The new package is designed to maintain an environment of <5% RH to minimize weathering.

  2. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  3. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  4. Surface waves on a grounded dielectric slab covered by a resistive sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, David

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines surface wave propagation in a grounded dielectric slab covered with a resistive sheet. Transcendental equations are derived for each polarization and are solved using iterative techniques. Attention and phase velocity are shown for a representative geometry. The results are applicable to both a grounded slab covered with a resistive sheet and an ungrounded slab covered on each side with a resistive sheet.

  5. Closed reduction using the percutaneous leverage technique and internal fixation with K-wires to treat angulated radial neck fractures in children-case report.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Yongtao; Dang, Youting; Qiu, Yusheng

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric radial neck fractures are uncommon. Severely displaced and angulated fractures usually require treatment. Our goals for treatment are to avoid incision, reduce the fracture adequately with no reduction loss, and achieve good postoperative function. We aimed to observe the clinical outcomes of closed reduction with the percutaneous leverage technique and internal fixation with Kirschner-wires (K-wires) to treat angulated radial neck fractures in children.From January 2011 to April 2013, we treated 16 cases of angulated radial neck fracture in 12 boys and 4 girls. Five fractures were type II and 11 fractures were type III using the O'Brien classification. One K-wire was percutaneously introduced into the fracture site using the leverage technique to attain good reduction. Two K-wires were introduced from the proximal to the distal areas of the fracture site. The elbow was immobilized by cast in 90° of flexion and the forearm in supination for 3 to 4 weeks. The K-wires were removed at 3 to 4 weeks postoperatively. All cases were followed up for a mean duration of 3 years 6 months.According to the Metaizeau reduction classification, 12 cases were excellent, and 4 cases were good. According to the Metaizeau clinical classification, 14 cases were excellent, and 2 cases were good. There was no necrosis of the radial head. There was no infection, radioulnar synostosis, and damage of the radial nerve deep branch. There was no limitation in the pronation and supination functions of the forearm.Closed reduction using the percutaneous leverage technique and internal fixation using K-wires is easy to perform. It is encouraged to use this approach as the clinical outcome is good. level IV-retrospective case, treatment study.

  6. Closed reduction using the percutaneous leverage technique and internal fixation with K-wires to treat angulated radial neck fractures in children-case report

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Yongtao; Dang, Youting; Qiu, Yusheng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pediatric radial neck fractures are uncommon. Severely displaced and angulated fractures usually require treatment. Our goals for treatment are to avoid incision, reduce the fracture adequately with no reduction loss, and achieve good postoperative function. We aimed to observe the clinical outcomes of closed reduction with the percutaneous leverage technique and internal fixation with Kirschner-wires (K-wires) to treat angulated radial neck fractures in children. From January 2011 to April 2013, we treated 16 cases of angulated radial neck fracture in 12 boys and 4 girls. Five fractures were type II and 11 fractures were type III using the O’Brien classification. One K-wire was percutaneously introduced into the fracture site using the leverage technique to attain good reduction. Two K-wires were introduced from the proximal to the distal areas of the fracture site. The elbow was immobilized by cast in 90° of flexion and the forearm in supination for 3 to 4 weeks. The K-wires were removed at 3 to 4 weeks postoperatively. All cases were followed up for a mean duration of 3 years 6 months. According to the Metaizeau reduction classification, 12 cases were excellent, and 4 cases were good. According to the Metaizeau clinical classification, 14 cases were excellent, and 2 cases were good. There was no necrosis of the radial head. There was no infection, radioulnar synostosis, and damage of the radial nerve deep branch. There was no limitation in the pronation and supination functions of the forearm. Closed reduction using the percutaneous leverage technique and internal fixation using K-wires is easy to perform. It is encouraged to use this approach as the clinical outcome is good. Level of evidence: level IV-retrospective case, treatment study. PMID:28072734

  7. Fracture stability of anterior zirconia crowns with different core designs and veneered using the layering or the press-over technique.

    PubMed

    Eisenburger, Michael; Mache, Tobias; Borchers, Lothar; Stiesch, Meike

    2011-06-01

    In the current in vitro study, the fracture stability of anterior crowns with zirconia cores of different designs was investigated after applying different veneering techniques. Four groups of zirconia cores (n = 10 in each group) were produced using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) process. Cores with a standard cervical design were veneered using the layering technique (CCL) or the press-over technique (CCP). Further cores were designed with a porcelain shoulder, where the cervical margin of the zirconia core was reduced by 1 mm. These cores were also veneered using the layering technique (PSL) or the press-over technique (PSP). All crowns were cemented onto metal teeth and loaded until fracture in a universal testing machine. Chipping or fracture of the core was found to occur for CCL at 919±265 N (mean ±SD), for CCP at 798±226 N, for PSL at 739±184 N, and for PSP at 734±209 N. anova did not show significant differences between the four groups. For CCL and CCP, fracture lines ran in a mesio-distal orientation. For PSL and PSP, fracture lines ran into the porcelain shoulder. In summary, the use of a porcelain shoulder can be recommended with zirconia crowns in combination with either the layering or the press-over veneering technique.

  8. Dynamics of Mantle Circulation Associated with Slab Window Formation: Insights from 3D Laboratory Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, B.; Funiciello, F.; Moroni, M.; Faccenna, C.; Martinod, J.

    2009-12-01

    Slab window can form either by the intersection of a spreading ridge with a subduction zone or because of internal deformation of the slab that leads to its disruption. The main consequences of this phenomenon are the modifications of the physical, chemical and thermal conditions in the backarc mantle that in turn affect the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the overriding plate. We performed laboratory models of a two-layer linear viscous slab (silicone putty)-upper mantle (glucose syrup) system to quantitatively investigate the pattern of mantle circulation within the slab window (using Feature Tracking image analysis technique) and its influence on the kinematics of the system. Two different geometries have been tested considering a window located (a) at slab edges or (b) within the slab. Kinematic consequences of slab window have been explored to understand the dynamics of the mantle-slab interaction. Configuration (a) implies a reduction of the slab width (W) during subduction and is characterized by toroidal fluxes around the slab edges. The abrupt opening of lateral slab windows produces an acceleration of the trench retreat and subduction velocity, such as 40% for a three-fold width reduction. We interpret this behavior as mostly due to the decrease in the toroidal flow inside subduction windows, scaling with W2. Configuration (b) has been designed to explore the pattern of mantle flow within the window in the case of a laterally constrained subduction system. Slab window, which had a width (Ww) fixed to 15 % of the slab width, opened in the trench-perpendicular direction. It produced the formation of two toroidal mantle cells, centered on the slab midpoint and laterally growing as the slab window enlarged. Particles extruded through the slab window did not mix with particles located in the mantle wedge, the boundary between both reaching distances from the trench up to 3×Ww in the trench-perpendicular direction, and up to 1.5×Ww from the window edge in

  9. Surgical Technique of Corrective Osteotomy for Malunited Distal Radius Fracture Using the Computer-Simulated Patient Matched Instrument.

    PubMed

    Murase, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    The conventional corrective osteotomy for malunited distal radius fracture that employs dorsal approach and insertion of a trapezoidal bone graft does not always lead to precise correction or result in a satisfactory surgical outcome. Corrective osteotomy using a volar locking plate has recently become an alternative technique. In addition, the use of patient-matched instrument (PMI) via computed tomography simulation has been developed and is expected to simplify surgical procedures and improve surgical precision. The use of PMI makes it possible to accurately position screw holes prior to the osteotomy and simultaneously perform the correction and place the volar locking plate once the osteotomy is completed. The bone graft does not necessarily require a precise block form, and the problem of the extensor tendon contacting the dorsal plate is avoided. Although PMI placement and soft tissue release technique require some degree of specialized skill, they comprise a very useful surgical procedure. On the other hand, because patients with osteoporosis are at risk of peri-implant fracture, tandem ulnar shortening surgery should be considered to avoid excessive lengthening of the radius.

  10. A testing technique allowing cyclic application of axial, bending, and torque loads to fracture plates to examine screw loosening.

    PubMed

    Szivek, J A; Yapp, R A

    1989-04-01

    Orthopaedic internal fracture fixation plates are subjected to combined axial, bending, and torsional loads in vivo which can cause screw loosening and implant failure. This paper outlines a relatively simple technique which allows controlled application of combined axial, bending, and torsional loading to examine the loosening rate of cortical screws used to attach these plates. Fiber reinforced polycarbonate rods with a tensile strength similar to that of cortical bone were cut at half their length to simulate fractured tibii. These were compression plated using a standardized technique and placed in a loading fixture. Joint loads at the knee determined from force plate analysis and statics were applied to a plated fixture during testing. The design of the fixture allowed adjustment of the proportion of bending and torsional loads applied to the test samples. It also allowed a reproducible means of applying a predetermined axial, bending, and torsional load. Screw loosening following cyclical loading was evaluated by measuring the amount of angular displacement required to retighten screws to a prescribed torque value. A torque wrench was modified to allow the measurement of these displacements.

  11. The Plate-Joystick technique to reduce proximal humeral fractures and nonunions with a varus deformity through the extended deltoid-splitting approach.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C Michael; Inman, Dominic; Phillips, Sally-Anne

    2011-10-01

    Fractures and nonunions in which there is a varus deformity of the humeral head producing posterinferior subluxation of the articular surface are increasingly recognized as an important subgroup of proximal humeral fractures. Operative open reduction and internal fixation of these injuries is often recommended when the varus deformity is severe. We describe a simple technique to assist in the open reduction and locking plate stabilization of this challenging and complex fracture subtype using tools and implants that are readily available in most modern orthopaedic trauma operating rooms.

  12. “Rapid administration technique of ketamine for pediatric forearm fracture reduction- a dose finding study”

    PubMed Central

    Chinta, Sri S; Schrock, Charles R; McAllister, John D; Jaffe, David M; Liu, Jingxia; Kennedy, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective To estimate the minimum dose and total sedation time of rapidly infused ketamine that achieves 3-5 minutes of effective sedation in children undergoing forearm fracture reduction in the emergency department. Methods We used the Up-Down method to estimate the median dose of intravenous ketamine infused over ≤ 5 sec that provided effective sedation in 50% (ED50) and 95% (ED95) of healthy children aged 2-5, 6-11 or 12-17 years undergoing forearm fracture reduction. Most were pretreated with opioids. Three investigators blinded to ketamine dose independently graded sedation effectiveness by viewing a video recording of the first 5 minutes of sedation. Recovery was assessed by Modified Aldrete score. Results We enrolled 20 children in each age group. The estimated ED50 was 0.7, 0.5 and 0.6 mg/kg and the estimated ED95 was 0.7, 0.7 and 0.8 mg/kg for the 2-5, 6-11 and 12-17 years age groups, respectively. For the 2-5 years age group, an empirically derived ED95 was 0.8 mg/kg. All who received the empirically derived ED95 in the 2-5 years group or the estimated ED95 in the 6-11 and 12-17 years group had effective sedation. The median total sedation time for the three age groups respectively, was 25, 22.5 and 25 minutes if one dose of ketamine was administered and 35, 25 and 45 minutes if additional doses were administered. No participant experienced serious adverse events. Conclusions We estimated ED50 and ED95 for rapidly infused ketamine for three age groups undergoing fracture reduction. Total sedation time was shorter than most previous studies. PMID:25595951

  13. A new joystick technique for unsuccessful closed reduction of supracondylar humeral fractures: minimum trauma.

    PubMed

    Basaran, Serdar Hakan; Ercin, Ersin; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Bayrak, Alkan; Cumen, Huseyin; Avkan, Mustafa Cevdet

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare operation duration, radiological and functional results of the open reduction with either posterior or lateral approach and closed reduction with joystick method in unsuccessful closed reduction of displaced (Gartland type III) supracondylar humeral fractures. Between February 2010 and August 2011, 37 patients who were not obtained satisfactory reduction with classic closed reduction attempts for three times in operating room were included in this study. Patients were treated with three different surgical methods. Group I have 13 patients who had joystick and lateral K-wire-assisted closed reduction, group II have 12 patients who had open reduction by lateral approach, and group III have 12 patients who had open reduction by posterior approach. In final follow-up, AP and lateral radiographs of both elbows were taken and bilateral Baumann angles, lateral humerocapitellar angles, carrying angles, and elbow range of motion were measured. These angles and operation times compared between the groups. The functional and cosmetic outcome of surgery was evaluated by criteria of Flynn et al. There was no statistical significance difference between Baumann angles, lateral humerocapitellar angles, and carrying angles of fractured and uninjured sides in between three groups (respectively, p = 0.761, p = 0.354, p = 0.750). In group I, operation duration is shorter than the other groups. Functional scoring showed that in group I and group II, all patients have satisfactory results; however, in group III, three patients (25%) had poor results. In the perspective of cosmetic results, all three groups have satisfactory results. When classical closed reduction fail, lateral joystick and K-wire-assisted reduction is a useful way to make and maintain the reduction. Functional and radiological results are as good as lateral and posterior open approaches. Short operation time is an advantage. This method reduces the risk of complications due to

  14. Strong Plate, Weak Slab Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, R. I.; Stegman, D. R.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Models of mantle convection on Earth produce styles of convection that are not observed on Earth.Moreover non-Earth-like modes, such as two-sided downwellings, are the de facto mode of convection in such models.To recreate Earth style subduction, i.e. one-sided asymmetric recycling of the lithosphere, proper treatment of the plates and plate interface are required. Previous work has identified several model features that promote subduction. A free surface or pseudo-free surface and a layer of material with a relatively low strength material (weak crust) allow downgoing plates to bend and slide past overriding without creating undue stress at the plate interface. (Crameri, et al. 2012, GRL)A low viscosity mantle wedge, possibly a result of slab dehydration, decouples the plates in the system. (Gerya et al. 2007, Geo)Plates must be composed of material which, in the case of the overriding plate, are is strong enough to resist bending stresses imposed by the subducting plate and yet, as in the case of the subducting plate, be weak enough to bend and subduct when pulled by the already subducted slab. (Petersen et al. 2015, PEPI) Though strong surface plates are required for subduction such plates may present a problem when they encounter the lower mantle.As the subducting slab approaches the higher viscosity, lower mantle stresses are imposed on the tip.Strong slabs transmit this stress to the surface.There the stress field at the plate interface is modified and potentially modifies the style of convection. In addition to modifying the stress at the plate interface, the strength of the slab affects the morphology of the slab at the base of the upper mantle. (Stegman, et al 2010, Tectonophysics)Slabs that maintain a sufficient portion of their strength after being bent require high stresses to unbend or otherwise change their shape.On the other hand slabs that are weakened though the bending process are more amenable to changes in morphology. We present the results of

  15. Active part of Charlie--Gibbs fracture zone: A study using sonar and other geophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, R.

    1981-01-10

    A short survey with Gloria side-scan sonar and other geophysical instruments has revealed new information about Charlie--Gibbs fracture zone between 29/sup 0/ and 36 /sup 0/W. The traces of two transform faults have been clearly delineated. They fit small circles about the pole of rotation with an rms error of only about 1 km, but they do not always follow the deepest parts of the transform valleys. The transforms are joined by a short spreading center at 31 /sup 0/45 'W. The median transverse ridge appears to have been produced by normal seafloor spreading at this center and bears identifiable Vine-Matthews magnetic anomalies. A transverse ridge along the eastern inactive part of the northern transform may be an intrusive feature. Considerable thickness of sediment appear to have been deposited in the northern transform valley from Norwegian Sea overflow water passing through the fracture zone, but transverse ridges have prevented the sediment reaching the southern valley.

  16. Topical report on subsurface fracture mapping from geothermal wellbores. Phase I. Pulsed radar techniques. Phase II. Conventional logging methods. Phase III. Magnetic borehole ranging

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenbaum, B.A.; Rawson, G.

    1980-09-01

    To advance the state-of-the-art in Hot Dry Rock technology, an evaluation is made of (i) the use of radar to map far-field fractures, (ii) the use of more than twenty different conventional well logging tools to map borehole-fracture intercepts, and (iii) the use of magnetic dipole ranging to determine the relative positions of the injection well and the production well within the fractured zone. It is found that according to calculations, VHF backscatter radar has the potential for mapping fractures within a distance of 50 +- 20 meters from the wellbore. A new technique for improving fracture identification is presented. Analyses of extant data indicate that when used synergistically the (1) caliper, (2) resistivity dipmeter, (3) televiewer, (4) television, (5) impression packer, and (6) acoustic transmission are useful for mapping borehole-fracture intercepts. Improvements in both data interpretation techniques and high temperature operation are required. The surveying of one borehole from another appears feasible at ranges of up to 200 to 500 meters by using a low frequency magnetic field generated by a moderately strong dipole source (a solenoid) located in one borehole, a sensitive B field detector that traverses part of the second borehole, narrow band filtering, and special data inversion techniques.

  17. Reality-augmented virtual fluoroscopy for computer-assisted diaphyseal long bone fracture osteosynthesis: a novel technique and feasibility study results.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G; Dong, X; Gruetzner, P A

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a novel technique to create a reality-augmented virtual fluoroscopy for computer-assisted diaphyseal long bone fracture osteosynthesis and feasibility study results are presented. With this novel technique, repositioning of bone fragments during closed fracture reduction and osteosynthesis can lead to image updates in the virtual imaging planes of all acquired images without any radiation. The technique is achieved with a two-stage method. After acquiring a few (normally two) calibrated fluoroscopic images and before fracture reduction, the first stage, data preparation, interactively identifies and segments the bone fragments from the background in each image. After that, the second stage, image updates, repositions the fragment projection on to each virtual imaging plane in real time during fracture reduction and osteosynthesis using an OpenGL-based texture warping. Combined with a photorealistic virtual implant model rendering technique, the present technique allows the control of a closed indirect fracture osteosynthesis in the real world through direct insight into the virtual world. The first clinical study results show the reduction in the X-ray radiation to the patient as well as to the surgical team, and the improved operative precision, guaranteeing more safety for the patient. Furthermore, based on the experiences gained from this clinical study, two technical enhancements are proposed. One focuses on eliminating the user interactions with automated identifications and segmentations of bone fragments. The other focuses on providing non-photorealistic implant visualization. Further experiments are performed to validate the effectiveness of the proposed enhancements.

  18. New quantitative ultrasound techniques for bone analysis at the distal radius in hip fracture cases: differences between femoral neck and trochanteric fractures.

    PubMed

    Horii, Motoyuki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Sakai, Ryo; Sawada, Koshiro; Mikami, Yasuo; Toyama, Syogo; Ozaki, Etsuko; Kuriyama, Nagato; Kurokawa, Masao; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2017-01-01

    Ample evidence on etiological and pathological differences between femoral neck and trochanteric fracture cases suggests the possibility of individualized treatment. There are many issues related to areal bone mineral density and other quantitative computed tomography parameters of the proximal femur. Although osteoporosis is a systemic problem, little has been reported regarding differences in bone structural parameters, including bone mineral density, between them in regions other than the proximal femur. Participants were consecutive female patients >50 years of age admitted to the Saiseikai Suita Hospital (Osaka prefecture, Japan) for their first hip fracture between January 2012 and September 2014. Cortical thickness (CoTh, mm), volumetric trabecular bone mineral density (TBD, mg/cm(3)), and elastic modulus of trabecular bone (EMTb, GPa) were obtained as the new QUS parameters using the LD-100 system (Oyo Electric, Kyoto, Japan). The mean values of these parameters were compared between femoral neck and trochanteric fracture cases. In addition, correlations between age and each QUS parameter were investigated for each fracture type. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to examine the degree of effect each parameter on the fracture types. The area under the curve (AUC) for each parameter was compared to the AUC for age. There were 63 cases of femoral neck fracture (mean age, 78.2 years) and 37 cases of trochanteric fracture (mean age, 85.9 years). Mean TBD and EMTb were significantly higher for femoral neck fractures. There were significant negative correlations between QUS parameters and age for femoral neck fractures (P < 0.005). The regression lines for femoral neck fractures were above those for trochanteric fractures for TBD and EMTb. AUCs were 0.72 for age, and 0.61, 0.65, and 0.65 for CoTh, TBD, and EMTb, respectively. The new QUS parameters indicated that TR fracture cases were more osteoporotic than were FN fracture

  19. [Modified percutaneous vertebroplasty assisted by preoperative CT-based digital design: a new technique for osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture].

    PubMed

    Fei, Q; Zhao, F; Meng, H; Su, N; Wang, B Q; Li, D; Li, J J; Yang, Y

    2016-03-08

    To report a new technique of modified percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) assisted by preoperative CT-based digital design for osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF), and to discuss its preliminary clinical results. Thoracolumbar spine segment data (Dicom format) were obtained from lamellar CT scanning of seven old female or male with single OVCF. A three-dimensional model of thoracolumbar spine and simulative PVP models (via double transpedicular approach) were built in the Mimics software. With the help of a preoperative transparent marker located at the back midline skin and preoperative digital design by Mimics software, the needle insert point and needle direction in every patient were established. The surgical time, the number of intraoperative radiation perspective, bone cement filling condition in fracture vertebra, intraoperative complications and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores before and after surgery were recorded to evaluate the preliminary clinical results after modified PVP. The puncture process during PVP was in high accordance with the preoperative digital design by Mimics software in seven cases of single OVCF with the average age of 78 years old. The operation time was only 16.57±2.07 minutes and the intraoperative radiation perspective numbers were less than ten (7.86±1.68) times. The bone cement filling in all fracture vertebras were good and no surgical complications such as spine cord injury and cement leakage were founded. The VAS scores before and after surgery were 8.57±0.53 points and 1.43±0.53 point (P=0.000), respectively. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) assisted by preoperative CT-based digital design has high accuracy, which is expected to reduce operation time, intraoperative radiation exposure and the surgical complications related to puncture failure.

  20. Analysis of surface wave propagation in a grounded dielectric slab covered by a resistive sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Both parallel and perpendicular polarized surface waves are known to propagate on lossless and lossy grounded dielectric slabs. Surface wave propagation on a grounded dielectric slab covered with a resistive sheet is considered. Both parallel and perpendicular polarizations are examined. Transcendental equations are derived for each polarization and are solved using iterative techniques. Attenuation and phase velocity are shown for representative geometries. The results are applicable to both a grounded slab with a resistive sheet and an ungrounded slab covered on each side with a resistive sheet.

  1. Segmentation of the Farallon slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Stegman, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Recent tomography images reveal a complex 3D mantle structure beneath western United States, with feature morphology varying rapidly with depth. By assimilating plate motion history, paleo-age of sea floor, and paleo-geography of plate boundaries in a 3-D numerical model, we simulate the Farallon-Juan de Fuca subduction during the past 40 Ma. We find that the highly segmented upper mantle structure of western U.S. is a direct result of the Farallon subduction. We show that the tilted 'horseshoe'-shaped fast seismic anomaly beneath Nevada and Utah at 300-600 km depth range is in fact a segment of curled slab subducted since 15 Ma, and the shallower linear slab beneath the Cascades is younger than 5 Ma. The distinct morphology between these two parts of the subduction system indicates the strong influence of the fast trench rollback since 20 Ma, the northward migrating JF-PA-NA triple-junction, and the toroidal flow around slab edges. The observed mantle structures are used to constrain the rheology of the upper mantle through matching the shape, depth, and location of modeled subducted slab segments. The inferred viscosity for the asthenosphere is 5×10^19 Pa s and that for the transition zone is 1.5×10^21 Pa s. The slab is found to be about 2 orders of magnitude stronger than the ambient mantle above 410 km depth, but of similar order of magnitude viscosity in the transition zone.

  2. Rheological evolution of subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, G.

    2016-12-01

    The mechanical behavior of subducting lithosphere depends on both the rheological evolution of the slab and how the slab is modified prior to subduction. Geophysical data demonstrate that the combination of thermal evolution and deformation lead to alteration of the slab at both mid-ocean ridges and the outer rise of subduction zones. In addition, the locations of earthquakes in these locations are generally consistent with both extrapolation of laboratory data that constrain the depth to the brittle-plastic transition, and deformation mechanisms inferred from microstructural analysis of mantle rocks recovered from the oceanic lithosphere. However, the frictional properties of both mantle aggregates and their alteration products suggest that linking the location of lithospheric earthquakes to regions that become hydrothermally altered is not straightforward. Furthermore, the inferred link between the location of intermediate-depth seismicity and the conditions of dehydration reactions is challenged by laboratory studies on dehydration embrittlement. In this presentation, I will introduce these apparent discrepancies; provide some possible resolutions for them based on scaling of laboratory data and discuss the implications for how an integrated understanding of slab rheology informs our understanding of the mechanical and geochemical evolution of the slab.

  3. Cavitation-based hydro-fracturing technique for geothermal reservoir stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Ren, Fei; Cox, Thomas S.

    2017-02-21

    A rotary shutter valve 500 is used for geothermal reservoir stimulation. The valve 500 includes a pressure chamber 520 for holding a working fluid (F) under pressure. A rotatable shutter 532 is turned with a powering device 544 to periodically align one or more windows 534 with one or more apertures 526 in a bulkhead 524. When aligned, the pressurized working fluid (F) flows through the bulkhead 524 and enters a pulse cavity 522, where it is discharged from the pulse cavity 522 as pressure waves 200. The pressure wave propagation 200 and eventual collapse of the bubbles 202 can be transmitted to a target rock surface 204 either in the form of a shock wave 206, or by micro jets 208, depending on the bubble-surface distance. Once cavitation at the rock face begins, fractures are initiated in the rock to create a network of micro-fissures for enhanced heat transfer.

  4. Subduction of fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi; Leeman, William

    2013-04-01

    Since Wilson proposed in 1965 the existence of a new class of faults on the ocean floor, namely transform faults, the geodynamic effects and importance of fracture zone subduction is still little studied. It is known that oceanic plates are characterized by numerous fracture zones, and some of them have the potential to transport into subduction zones large volumes of water-rich serpentinite, providing a fertile water source for magma generated in subduction-related arc volcanoes. In most previous geodynamic studies, subducting plates are considered to be homogeneous, and there is no clear indication how the subduction of a fracture zone influences the melting pattern in the mantle wedge and the slab-derived fluids distribution in the subarc mantle. Here we show that subduction of serpentinized fracture zones plays a significant role in distribution of melt and fluids in the mantle wedge above the slab. Using high-resolution tree-dimensional coupled petrological-termomechanical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, vary dramatically in the region where a serpentinized fracture zone enters into subduction. Our models show that substantial hydration and partial melting tend to concentrate where fracture zones are being subducted, creating favorable conditions for partially molten hydrous plumes to develop. These results are consistent with the along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes in several regions, as the Aleutian Arc, the Cascades, the Southern Mexican Volcanic Arc, and the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone.

  5. Electromagnetic and ultrasonic investigations on a roman marble slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capizzi, Patrizia; Cosentino, Pietro L.

    2010-05-01

    The archaeological Museum of Rome (Museo delle Terme di Diocleziano) asked our group about the physical consistency of a marble slab (II - III century AD) that has recently fallen down during the transportation for an exhibition. In fact, due to insurance conflict, it was necessary to control the new fractures due to the recent accident and distinguish them from the ancient ones. The sculptured slab (today's size is 1280 x 70 x 9 cm), cut at the ends for a re-use as an inscription in the rear face, was restored (assemblage of different broken parts and cleaning) in contemporary times. We used different methodologies to investigate the slab: namely a pacometer (Protovale Elcometer) to individuate internal coupling pins, GPR (2000 MHz) and Ultrasonic (55 kHz) tomographic high-density surveys to investigate the internal extension of all the visible fractures and to search for the unknown internal ones. For every methodology used the quality of the acquired data was relatively high. They have been processed and compared to give a set of information useful for the bureaucratic problems of the Museum. Later on, the data have been processed in depth, for studying how to improve the data processing and for extracting all the information contained in the whole set of experimental data. Finally, the results of such a study in depth are exposed in detail.

  6. MANUFACTURING PROCESS DEVELOPMENT FOR ROLLING CAST SLABS OF COLUMBIUM (CB-752) ALLOY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Slab castings of HAYNES alloy Nb-752 (Nb-10W-2.5Zr) were made by the centrifugal skull casting and the electron - beam melting and casting techniques...fabricability of slabs made either by the centrifugal skull casting process or by the electron - beam melting and casting process. The sheet produced in the

  7. Percutaneous reduction and fixation of an intra-articular calcaneal fracture using an inflatable bone tamp: description of a novel and safe technique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Calcaneal fractures are common injuries involving the hind foot and often a source of significant long-term morbidity. Treatment options have changed throughout the ages from periods of preferred nonoperative management to closed reduction with a mallet, and more recently, open reduction and anatomic internal fixation. The current treatment of choice; however, is often debated, as open management of these fractures carries many risks to include wound breakdown and infection. A less invasive form of surgical management through small incisions, while maintaining the ability to obtain joint congruency, anatomic alignment, and restore calcaneal height and width would be ideal. We propose a novel form of fracture reduction using an inflatable bone tamp and percutaneous fracture fixation. Preoperative planning and experienced fluoroscopy is crucial to successful management using this method. Although we achieved successful radiographic outcome in this case, long-term functional outcome of this technique are yet to be published. PMID:22420710

  8. Studies on the measurement of subsurface fractures and geostress using acoustic emission technique for deep coalbed development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Masahiro; Utagawa, Manabu; Katsuyama, Kunihisa; Kiyama, Tamotsu; Narita, Takashi; Kono, Makoto

    1993-06-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was applied to the estimation of fractures and geostress using three kinds of AE measuring systems. One is for measuring AE parameters, other one is for measuring AE waves, and another is for measuring AE parameters in combination with two dimensional source location. The results of the study on the following subjects are as follows: (1) AE measuring systems and experimental consideration on the AE behavior of coal under the compressive stress; (2) experimental considerations on the propagation of hydrofracture in the discontinuous rocks, the propagation of hydrofracture in the coal measure rock, the mechanism of the Kaiser effect of AE, and the effect of elapsed time on the Kaiser effect; and (3) the practical application of the new suggested method to the estimation of geostress using cored rocks. It was confirmed that the new method for estimating geostress using acoustic emission was applicable to the estimation of geostress from cored rocks.

  9. Tidally-driven Fractures on Europa: Historical Overview and New Modeling Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, A. R.; Hurford, T.; Huff, E. M.; Manga, M.

    2007-12-01

    Cycloids are made up of linked arcuate segments and were observed in both Voyager and Galileo imagery. It has been proposed that cycloids are fractures that propagate in response to the tidal stress field, which changes throughout each orbit due to Europa's eccentricity. Several studies have tested tidal models by generating cycloidal features and comparing them to actual cycloids, resulting in compelling evidence for non-synchronous rotation. Also, recent modeling of cycloids in equatorial regions has shown that the obliquity of Europa is large enough to affect the formation of surface features. In addition to constraining the orbital and rotational parameters that control Europa's tidal stress field, modeling of cycloidal fractures can provide constraints on the mechanical properties of the ice shell. Despite the successes of cycloid modeling, the methodology for generating cycloids and comparing them with actual data could be greatly improved and more widely applied. Only five cycloids have been modeled although dozens of global-scale features can be identified in the Galileo images. And although equatorial cycloids provide the best constraints on the amount of obliquity and direction of the spin pole, only one cycloid in this region has been successfully modeled, mostly due to the increased parameter space and lack of symmetry in the stress field. Searching for best fits by hand is no longer feasible, especially for the large number of cycloids needed to precisely constrain Europa's orbital and rotational parameters. In addition, past cycloid modeling has not relied on a quantitative measure of goodness of fit when matching hypothetical cycloids to the observed features. While this approach may have been satisfactory for early work, as fits improve, it becomes increasingly important to have a consistent and quantitative measure with which to evaluate modeled cycloids. Moreover, a quantitative measure of misfit can be translated into uncertainties for model

  10. The Dynamics of Double Slab Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, A. F.; Royden, L. H.; Becker, T. W.

    2017-01-01

    We use numerical models to investigate the dynamics of two interacting slabs with parallel trenches. Cases considered are: a single slab reference, outward dipping slabs (out-dip), inward dipping slabs (in-dip), and slabs dipping in the same direction (same-dip). Where trenches converge over time (same-dip and out-dip systems), large positive dynamic pressures in the asthenosphere are generated beneath the middle plate, and large trench-normal extensional forces are transmitted through the middle plate. This results in slabs that dip away from the middle plate at depth, independent of trench geometry. The single slab, the front slab in the same-dip case, and both out-dip slabs undergo trench retreat and exhibit stable subduction. However, slabs within the other double subduction systems tend to completely overturn at the base of the upper mantle, and exhibit either trench advance (rear slab in same-dip), or near-stationary trenches (in-dip). For all slabs, the net slab-normal dynamic pressure at 330 km depth is nearly equal to the slab normal force induced by slab buoyancy. For double subduction, the net outward force on the slabs due to dynamic pressure from the asthenosphere is effectively counterbalanced by the net extensional force transmitted through the middle plate. Thus, dynamic pressure at depth, inter-plate coupling, and lithospheric stresses are closely linked and their effects cannot be isolated. Our results provide insights into both the temporal evolution of double slab systems on Earth and, more generally, how the various components of subduction systems, from mantle flow/pressure to inter-plate coupling, are dynamically linked.

  11. The importance of inferomedial support in the hot air balloon technique for treatment of 3-part proximal humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Jung-Han; Lhee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seung Jun

    2012-09-01

    Inferomedial support may affect the results of the hot air balloon technique for the treatment of displaced, 3-part fractures of the proximal humerus. Forty-three patients with displaced, 3-part fractures of the proximal humerus treated with the hot air balloon technique between 1995 and 2007 were included in the study. All patients were classified into 4 subgroups based on the presence or absence of medial buttress restoration and inferomedial screw insertion (R+, restored with inferomedial screw; R-, restored without inferomedial screw; NR+, non-restored with inferomedial screw; and NR-, non-restored without inferomedial screw). Assessment of radiologic and clinical outcome among subgroups was based on evaluation of neck-shaft angle, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and Neer score. The mean follow-up duration was 65 ± 29.7 months. The change in the neck-shaft angle in the R+, R-, NR+, and NR- groups was 3°, 2°, 3°, and 11°, respectively. The mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores in the R+, R-, NR+, and NR- groups were 91 ± 4.8, 86 ± 5.4, 85 ± 1.9, and 77 ± 5.8, respectively. The mean Neer scores in the R+, R-, NR+, and NR- groups were 92 ± 4.3, 88 ± 4.0, 87 ± 2.1, and 76 ± 8.2, respectively. Medial buttress restoration and inferomedial screw insertion affect bone-nail construct stability and clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of Ti addition on fracture behaviour of HSLA steel using TIG melting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, M. H. A.; Maleque, M. A.; Ali, M. Y.

    2017-03-01

    The welding process is a critical stage in the production of structural parts and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints must be appropriate in order to guarantee the reliability and durability of the components. The fracture toughness behaviour, which accounts for the residual strength of the component in the presence of flaws or cracks, is one of the most important properties to be evaluated in terms of microstructure and mechanical properties. In this present study, the surface of high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel was surface modified with the preplacement of pure Titanium (Ti) powder using a tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc heat source, at 100 ampere current with a voltage 30 V and a constant traversing speed of 1.0 mm/s using Argon shielded gas. The effect of preplaced Ti powder on the strength and toughness properties of the modified HSLA steel surface was investigated. The results indicated that the tensile and yield strength of HSLA steel decreased by ∼12% and ∼14%, respectively. While the impact toughness increased by ∼33% and the ductility decreased by ∼50%. The fractography analysis results by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were also presented in this paper.

  13. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    A slab window is defined as an 'hole' in the subducting lithosphere. In the classical view, slab windows develop where a spreading ridge intersects a subduction zone. The main consequences of this phenomenon are the modifications of the physical, chemical and thermal conditions in the backarc mantle that in turn affect the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the overriding plate. In this work, we perform dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models, to evaluate how the opening of a window in the subducting panel influences the geometry and the kinematics of the slab, the mantle circulation pattern and, finally, the overriding plate dynamic topography. The adopted setup consists in a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the roll-back of a fixed subducting plate (simulated using silicone putty) into the upper mantle (simulated using glucose syrup). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We find that the geometry and the kinematics of the slab are only minorly affected by the opening of a slab window. On the contrary, slab induced mantle circulation, quantified using Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified and produces a peculiar non-isostatic topographic signal on the overriding plate. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compare them to the Patagonian subduction zone finding that anomalous backarc volcanism that developed since middle Miocene could result from the lateral flowage of subslab mantle, and that part of the Patagonian uplift could be dynamically supported.

  14. Use of advanced borehole geophysical techniques to delineate fractured-rock ground-water flow and fractures along water-tunnel facilities in northern Queens County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumm, Frederick; Chu, Anthony; Lange, Andrew D.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Williams, John H.; Lane, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced borehole geophysical methods were used to assess the geohydrology of crystalline bedrock along the course of a new water tunnel for New York City. The logging methods include natural gamma, spontaneous potential, single-point resistance, mechanical and acoustic caliper, focused electromagnetic induction, electromagnetic resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, borehole-fluid temperature and conductance, differential temperature, heat-pulse flowmeter, acoustic televiewer, borehole deviation, optical televiewer, and borehole radar. Integrated interpretation of the geophysical logs from an 825-foot borehole (1) provided information on the extent, orientation, and structure (foliation and fractures) within the entire borehole, including intensely fractured intervals from which core recovery may be poor; (2) delineated transmissive fracture zones intersected by the borehole and provided estimates of their transmissivity and hydraulic head; and (3) enabled mapping of the location and orientation of structures at distances as much as 100 ft from the borehole.Analyses of the borehole-wall image and the geophysical logs from the borehole on Crescent Street, in northern Queens County, are presented here to illustrate the application of the methods. The borehole penetrates gneiss and other crystalline bedrock that has predominantly southeastward dipping foliation and nearly horizontal and southeastward-dipping fractures. The heat-pulse flowmeter logs obtained under pumping and nonpumping conditions, together with the other geophysical logs, indicate five transmissive fracture zones. More than 90 percent of the open-hole transmissivity is associated with a fracture zone 272 feet BLS (below land surface). A transmissive zone at 787 feet BLS that consists of nearly parallel fractures lies within the projected tunnel path; here the hydraulic head is 12 to 15 feet lower than that of transmissive zones above the 315-foot depth. The 60-megahertz directional borehole radar logs

  15. Use of advanced borehole geophysical techniques to delineate fractured-rock ground-water flow and fractures along water-tunnel facilities in northern Queens County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumm, Frederick; Chu, Anthony; Lange, Andrew D.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Lane,, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced borehole geophysical methods were used to assess the geohydrology of crystalline bedrock along the course of a new water tunnel for New York City. The logging methods include natural gamma, spontaneous potential, single-point resistance, mechanical and acoustic caliper, focused electromagnetic induction, electromagnetic resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, borehole-fluid temperature and conductance, differential temperature, heat-pulse flowmeter, acoustic televiewer, borehole deviation, optical televiewer, and borehole radar. Integrated interpretation of the geophysical logs from an 825-foot borehole (1) provided information on the extent, orientation, and structure (foliation and fractures) within the entire borehole, including intensely fractured intervals from which core recovery may be poor; (2) delineated transmissive fracture zones intersected by the borehole and provided estimates of their transmissivity and hydraulic head; and (3) enabled mapping of the location and orientation of structures at distances as much as 100 ft from the borehole. Analyses of the borehole-wall image and the geophysical logs from the borehole on Crescent Street, in northern Queens County, are presented here to illustrate the application of the methods. The borehole penetrates gneiss and other crystalline bedrock that has predominantly southeastward dipping foliation and nearly horizontal and southeastward-dipping fractures. The heat-pulse flowmeter logs obtained under pumping and nonpumping conditions, together with the other geophysical logs, indicate five transmissive fracture zones. More than 90 percent of the open-hole transmissivity is associated with a fracture zone 272 feet BLS (below land surface). A transmissive zone at 787 feet BLS that consists of nearly parallel fractures lies within the projected tunnel path; here the hydraulic head is 12 to 15 feet lower than that of transmissive zones above the 315-foot depth. The 60-megahertz directional borehole radar

  16. How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2002-10-04

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle that exerts a shear traction on the base of the plate. From the geologic history of subduction, we estimated the relative importance of "pull" versus "suction" for the present-day plates. Observed plate motions are best predicted if slabs in the upper mantle are attached to plates and generate slab pull forces that account for about half of the total driving force on plates. Slabs in the lower mantle are supported by viscous mantle forces and drive plates through slab suction.

  17. Less invasive lumbopelvic fixation technique using a percutaneous pedicle screw system for unstable pelvic ring fracture in a patient with severe multiple traumas.

    PubMed

    Yano, Sei; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Nakajima, Takayuki; Takazawa, Makoto; Hirasawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Nakagawa, Koichi; Nakajima, Arata; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Suzuki, Takane; Ohtori, Seiji

    2017-02-01

    Pelvic ring fractures are defined as life-threatening injuries that can be treated surgically with external or internal fixation. The authors report on an 81-year-old woman with an unstable pelvic fracture accompanying multiple traumas that was successfully treated with a less invasive procedure. The patient was injured in a traffic accident and sustained a total of 20 fractures, including pelvic ring, bilateral rib, and lumbar transverse processes fractures, and multiple fractures of both upper and lower extremities. The pelvic ring fracture was unstable with fractures of the bilateral sacrum with right sacroiliac disruption, right superior and inferior pubic rami, left superior pubic ramus, and ischium. During emergency surgery, bilateral external fixation was applied to the iliac crest to stabilize the pelvic ring. Second and third surgeries were performed 11 and 18 days after the first emergency surgery, respectively, to treat the multiple fractures. At the third surgery, the pelvic ring fracture was stabilized surgically using a less invasive posterior fixation technique. In this technique, 2 iliac screws were inserted on each side following an 8-cm midline posterior incision from the S-1 to S-3 spinous process, with the subcutaneous tissue detached from the fascia of the paraspinal muscles. The S-2 spinous process was removed and 2 rods were connected to bilateral iliac screws to stabilize the bilateral ilium in a switchback fashion. A crosslink device was applied to connect the 2 rods at the base of the S-2 spinous process. Following pelvic fixation, percutaneous pedicle screws were inserted into L-4 and L-5 vertebral bodies on both sides, and connected to the cranial rod connecting the bilateral iliac screws, thus completing the lumbopelvic fixation. The postoperative course was favorable with no postoperative complications. At the 10-month follow-up, bone union had been achieved at the superior ramus of the pubis, the patient did not complain of pain, and

  18. Transient slab flattening beneath Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, L. S.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Ramírez-Hoyos, L. F.; Monsalve, G.; Cardona, A.; Becker, T. W.

    2017-07-01

    Subduction of the Nazca and Caribbean Plates beneath northwestern Colombia is seen in two distinct Wadati Benioff Zones, one associated with a flat slab to the north and one associated with normal subduction south of 5.5°N. The normal subduction region is characterized by an active arc, whereas the flat slab region has no known Holocene volcanism. We analyze volcanic patterns over the past 14 Ma to show that in the mid-Miocene a continuous arc extended up to 7°N, indicating normal subduction of the Nazca Plate all along Colombia's Pacific margin. However, by 6 Ma, we find a complete cessation of this arc north of 3°N, indicating the presence of a far more laterally extensive flat slab than at present. Volcanism did not resume between 3°N and 6°N until after 4 Ma, consistent with lateral tearing and resteepening of the southern portion of the Colombian flat slab at that time.

  19. Modified Boyd’s Dual Onlay Bone Graft Technique for 15 Years Old Neglected Nonunion Fracture both Bone Forearm with Severe Angular Deformity: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramprasath, Dhurvas Ramlal; Thirunarayanan, Vasudevan; Ezhilmaran, Duraisamy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Neglected case of nonunion of fracture both bones forearm with deformity is very difficult to manage. Treatment options are minimal. Identifying such a case in literature is also very rare. One such rare case is discussed here. Case Report: Here, we present a case of a 65-year-old male patient, who was operated 15 years back for fracture both bones forearm, with 3.5 mm dynamic compression plate. Fracture went into nonunion and plate was broken. The patient presented to us 15 years later in August 2013 with nonunion, broken, and loosened implants and varus deformity of 90°. Implants were removed, sequential correction of deformity was done, using external fixators. After deformity correction was achieved, nonunion was managed by modified Boyd’s dual onlay bone graft technique. Conclusion: Modified Boyd’s dual onlay bone graft technique is an effective method in achieving union and restoration of functions, even in patients with resistant nonunion. PMID:28164051

  20. Casimir force in presence of multi layer magnetodielectric slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Kheirandish, Fardin; Soltani, Morteza; Sarabadani, Jalal

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > The Casimir force has been obtained in the presence of some dielectrics. > The approach is based on a Lagrangian. > It can be generalized to include the rough surfaces. > Finite temperature correction can be easily obtained. - Abstract: By using the path-integral formalism, electromagnetic field in the presence of some linear, isotropic magnetodielectric slabs is quantized and related correlation functions are found. In the framework of path-integral techniques, Casimir force between two infinitely large, parallel and ideal conductors, with a different number of magnetodielectric slabs in between, is obtained by calculating the Green's function corresponding to each geometry.

  1. OSTEOSYNTHESIS OF PROXIMAL HUMERAL END FRACTURES WITH FIXED-ANGLE PLATE AND LOCKING SCREWS: TECHNIQUE AND RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Marcio; Amaral, Marcus Vinicius; Monteiro, Martim; Brandão, Bruno Lobo; Motta Filho, Geraldo Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Describe the results of proximal humeral fractures surgically treated with the Philos locking plate system. Method: Between March 2003 and October 2004 we prospectively reviewed 24 of 26 patients with proximal humerus fractures treated with a Philos plate. The mean follow-up time was 12 months and the mean age of patients was 57 years. Six patients had four-part proximal humerus fractures, 11 patients had three-part proximal humerus fractures, and nine patients had two-part proximal humerus fractures. Clinical evaluation was performed using the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) criteria. Results: The mean UCLA score was 30 points (17-34). All fractures showed union. Three patients showed fracture union at varus position. The mean UCLA score for these patients was 27 points. Conclusion: Osteosynthesis with Philos plate provides a stable fixation method with good functional outcome. PMID:26998460

  2. Search for deep slabs in the Northwest Pacific mantle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H W; Anderson, D L

    1989-11-01

    A residual sphere is formed by projecting seismic ray travel-time anomalies, relative to a reference Earth model, onto an imaginary sphere around an earthquake. Any dominant slab-like fast band can be determined with spherical harmonic expansion. The technique is useful in detecting trends associated with high-velocity slabs beneath deep earthquakes after deep-mantle and near-receiver effects are removed. Two types of corrections are used. The first uses a tomographic global mantle model; the second uses teleseismic station averages of residuals from many events over a large area centered on the events of interest. Under the Mariana, Izu-Bonin, and Japan trenches, the dominant fast bands are generally consistent with seismicity trends. The results are unstable and differ from the seismicity trend for Kurile events. The predominant fast band for most deep earthquakes under Japan is subhorizontal rather than near vertical. We find little support for the deep slab penetration hypothesis.

  3. Segmentation of the Farallon slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijun; Stegman, Dave R.

    2011-11-01

    Recent tomography images reveal a complex 3D mantle structure beneath western United States, with feature morphology varying rapidly with depth. By assimilating plate motion history, paleo-age of sea floor, and paleo-geography of plate boundaries in a 3-D numerical model, we simulate the Farallon-Juan de Fuca subduction during the past 40 Ma. We find that the highly segmented upper mantle structure of western U.S. is a direct result of the Farallon subduction. We show that the tilted 'horseshoe'-shaped fast seismic anomaly beneath Nevada and Utah at 300-600 km depth range is in fact a segment of curled slab subducted since 15 Ma, and the shallower linear slab beneath the Cascades is younger than 5 Ma. The distinct morphology between these two parts of the subduction system indicates the strong influence of the fast trench rollback since 20 Ma, the northward migrating JF-PA-NA triple-junction, and the toroidal flow around slab edges. The observed mantle structures are used to constrain the rheology of the upper mantle through matching the shape, depth, and location of modeled subducted slab segments. The inferred viscosity for the asthenosphere is 5 × 10 19 Pa s and those for the transition zone and lower mantle are 1.5 × 10 21 Pa s and 2 × 10 22 Pa s, respectively. The slab is found to be about 2 orders of magnitude stronger than the ambient mantle above 410 km depth, but of similar order of magnitude viscosity in the transition zone.

  4. Slab Geometry and Stress State of the Southwestern Colombia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying

    A high rate of intermediate-depth earthquakes is concentrates in the Cauca cluster (3.5°N-5.5°N) and isolated from nearby seismicity in the southwestern Colombia subduction zone. Previously-studied nests of intermediate-depth earthquakes show that a high seismicity rate is often associated with a slab tear, detachment, or contortion. The cause of the less-studied Cauca cluster is unknown. To investigate the cause, we image the slab geometry using precise relative locations of intermediate-depth earthquakes. We use the earthquake catalog produced and seismic waveforms recorded by the Colombian National Seismic Network from January 2010 to March 2014. We calculate the focal mechanisms to examine whether the earthquakes reactivate pre-existing faults or form new fractures. The focal mechanisms are inverted for the intraslab stress field to check the stress guide hypothesis and to evaluate the stress orientations with regard to the change in the slab geometry. The earthquake relocations indicate that the Cauca segment has a continuous 20 km thick seismic zone and increases in dip angle from north to south. Two 40-km-tall fingers of earthquakes extend out of the slab and into the mantle wedge. Different from the previously-studied nests, the Cauca cluster does not correspond to slab contortions or tearing. The cluster may be associated with a high amount of dehydrated fluid. The determined focal mechanisms of 69 earthquakes have various types and variably-oriented nodal planes, corresponding to the reactivation of pre-existing faults and the formation of new fractures. The results of stress inversion show that the extensional axis in the northern Cauca segment is in the plane of the slab and 25° from the downdip direction, and the southern part has along-strike extension. The compression is subnormal to the plane of the slab. The stress field supports the stress guide hypothesis and shows a consistent rotation with increase in slab dip angle.

  5. DESIGN AND TESTING OF SUB-SLAB DEPRESSURIZATION FOR RADON MITIGATION IN NORTH FLORIDA HOUSES - PART I. PERFORMANCE AND DURABILITY - VOLUME 2. DATA APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration/research project to evaluate sub-slab depressurization (SSD) techniques for radon mitigation in North Florida where the housing stock is primarily slab-on-grade and the sub-slab medium typically consists of native soil and sand. Objecti...

  6. DESIGN AND TESTING OF SUB-SLAB DEPRESSURIZATION FOR RADON MITIGATION IN NORTH FLORIDA HOUSES - PART I. PERFORMANCE AND DURABILITY - VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration/research project to evaluate sub-slab depressurization (SSD) techniques for radon mitigation in North Florida where the housing stock is primarily slab-on-grade and the sub-slab medium typically consists of native soil and sand. Objecti...

  7. DESIGN AND TESTING OF SUB-SLAB DEPRESSURIZATION FOR RADON MITIGATION IN NORTH FLORIDA HOUSES - PART I. PERFORMANCE AND DURABILITY - VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration/research project to evaluate sub-slab depressurization (SSD) techniques for radon mitigation in North Florida where the housing stock is primarily slab-on-grade and the sub-slab medium typically consists of native soil and sand. Objecti...

  8. DESIGN AND TESTING OF SUB-SLAB DEPRESSURIZATION FOR RADON MITIGATION IN NORTH FLORIDA HOUSES - PART I. PERFORMANCE AND DURABILITY - VOLUME 2. DATA APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration/research project to evaluate sub-slab depressurization (SSD) techniques for radon mitigation in North Florida where the housing stock is primarily slab-on-grade and the sub-slab medium typically consists of native soil and sand. Objecti...

  9. Biomechanical Evaluation of Interfragmentary Compression At Tibia Plateau Fractures In Vitro Using Different Fixation Techniques: A CONSORT-Compliant Article: Erratum.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    [In the article "Biomechanical Evaluation of Interfragmentary Compression At Tibia Plateau Fractures In Vitro Using Different Fixation Techniques: A CONSORT-compliant" article, which appeared in Volume 94, Issue 1 of Medicine, a line denoting dual authorship was omitted. K. Kojima and B. Gueorguiev contributed equally to the article.].

  10. Mechanical properties, shrinkage stress, cuspal strain and fracture resistance of molars restored with bulk-fill composites and incremental filling technique.

    PubMed

    Rosatto, C M P; Bicalho, A A; Veríssimo, C; Bragança, G F; Rodrigues, M P; Tantbirojn, D; Versluis, A; Soares, C J

    2015-12-01

    To compare bulk-fill with incremental filling techniques for restoring large mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) restorations. Seventy-five molars with MOD preparations were divided into five groups: Z350XT, incrementally filled with Filtek Z350XT and four bulk-fills-FBF/Z350XT, Filtek Bulk Fill/Filtek Z350XT; VBF/CHA, Venus Bulk Fill/Charisma Diamond; SDR/EST-X, SDR/Esthet-X HD; TEC, TetricEvoCeram Bulk Fill. Cuspal strains were measured using strain-gauges (n=10): CSt-Re, during restorative procedure; CSt-100N, during 100N occlusal loading; CSt-Fr, at fracture load. Before fracture load, teeth were load-cycled. Fracture resistance, fracture mode, and enamel cracks were recorded. The other five teeth were used for Elastic modulus (E) and Vickers hardness (VH). Post-gel shrinkage (Shr), diametral tensile strength (DTS) and compressive strength (CS) were determined (n=10). Shrinkage stresses were analyzed using finite element analysis. SDR had similar CS values as TEC, lower than all other composites. CHA had similar DTS values as Z350XT, higher than all other composites. Z350XT had the highest mean Shr and SDR the lowest Shr. New enamel cracks and propagation was observed after the restoration, regardless of filling technique. Z350XT had lower fracture resistance than bulk-fill composite techniques. No significant differences in failure modes were found. E and VH were constant through the depth for all techniques. Bulk-filling techniques had lower stresses compared to Z350XT. Flowable bulk-fill composites had lower mechanical properties than paste bulk-fill and conventional composites. All bulk-fill composites had lower post-gel shrinkage than conventional composite. Bulk-fill filling techniques resulted in lower cusp strain, shrinkage stress and higher fracture resistance. Using bulk-fill composites cause lower CSt wich indicates lower stress in restored tooth. Furthermore, bulk-fill composites have a higher fracture resistance. Therefore, clinicians may choose the bulk

  11. Delineation of faults, fractures, foliation, and ground-water-flow zones in fractured-rock, on the southern part of Manhattan, New York, through use of advanced borehole-geophysical techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumm, Frederick; Chu, Anthony; Monti, Jack

    2004-01-01

    Advanced borehole-geophysical techniques were used to assess the geohydrology of crystalline bedrock in 20 boreholes on the southern part of Manhattan Island, N.Y., in preparation for construction of a third water tunnel for New York City. The borehole-logging techniques included natural gamma, single-point resistance, short-normal resistivity, mechanical and acoustic caliper, magnetic susceptibility, borehole-fluid temperature and resistivity, borehole-fluid specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, pH, redox, heatpulse flowmeter (at selected boreholes), borehole deviation, acoustic and optical televiewer, and borehole radar (at selected boreholes). Hydraulic head and specific-capacity test data were collected from 29 boreholes. The boreholes penetrated gneiss, schist, and other crystalline bedrock that has an overall southwest to northwest-dipping foliation. Most of the fractures penetrated are nearly horizontal or have moderate- to high-angle northwest or eastward dip azimuths. Foliation dip within the potential tunnel-construction zone is northwestward and southeastward in the proposed North Water-Tunnel, northwestward to southwestward in the proposed Midtown Water-Tunnel, and northwestward to westward dipping in the proposed South Water-Tunnel. Fracture population dip azimuths are variable. Heat-pulse flowmeter logs obtained under pumping and nonpumping (ambient) conditions, together with other geophysical logs, indicate transmissive fracture zones in each borehole. The 60-megahertz directional borehole-radar logs delineated the location and orientation of several radar reflectors that did not intersect the projection of the borehole.Fracture indexes range from 0.12 to 0.93 fractures per foot of borehole. Analysis of specific-capacity tests from each borehole indicated that transmissivity ranges from 2 to 459 feet squared per day; the highest transmissivity is at the Midtown Water-Tunnel borehole (E35ST-D).

  12. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening: Insights from laboratory models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We present dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models that have been conducted to improve our understanding of the influence of slab window opening on subduction dynamics, mantle flow and associated dynamic topography over geological time scales. The adopted setup consists of a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the subduction of a fixed plate of silicone (lithosphere) under negative buoyancy in a viscous layer of glucose syrup (mantle). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We found that the opening of a slab window does not produce consistent changes of the geometry and the kinematics of the slab. On the contrary, slab-induced mantle circulation, quantified both in the vertical and horizontal sections using the Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified. In particular, rollback subduction and the opening of the slab window generate a complex mantle circulation pattern characterized by the presence of poloidal and toroidal components, with the importance of each evolving according to kinematic stages. Mantle coming from the oceanic domain floods through the slab window, indenting the supra-slab mantle zone and producing its deformation without any mixing between mantle portions. The opening of the slab window and the upwelling of sub-slab mantle produce a regional-scale non-isostatic topographic uplift of the overriding plate that would correspond to values ranging between ca. 1 and 5 km in nature. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compared them to the tectonics and volcanism of the Patagonian subduction zone. We found that the anomalous backarc volcanism that has been developing since the middle Miocene could result from the lateral flow of sub-slab

  13. COMBINING A NEW 3-D SEISMIC S-WAVE PROPAGATION ANALYSIS FOR REMOTE FRACTURE DETECTION WITH A ROBUST SUBSURFACE MICROFRACTURE-BASED VERIFICATION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Bob Hardage; M.M. Backus; M.V. DeAngelo; R.J. Graebner; S.E. Laubach; Paul Murray

    2004-02-01

    Fractures within the producing reservoirs at McElroy Field could not be studied with the industry-provided 3C3D seismic data used as a cost-sharing contribution in this study. The signal-to-noise character of the converted-SV data across the targeted reservoirs in these contributed data was not adequate for interpreting azimuth-dependent data effects. After illustrating the low signal quality of the converted-SV data at McElroy Field, the seismic portion of this report abandons the McElroy study site and defers to 3C3D seismic data acquired across a different fractured carbonate reservoir system to illustrate how 3C3D seismic data can provide useful information about fracture systems. Using these latter data, we illustrate how fast-S and slow-S data effects can be analyzed in the prestack domain to recognize fracture azimuth, and then demonstrate how fast-S and slow-S data volumes can be analyzed in the poststack domain to estimate fracture intensity. In the geologic portion of the report, we analyze published regional stress data near McElroy Field and numerous formation multi-imager (FMI) logs acquired across McElroy to develop possible fracture models for the McElroy system. Regional stress data imply a fracture orientation different from the orientations observed in most of the FMI logs. This report culminates Phase 2 of the study, ''Combining a New 3-D Seismic S-Wave Propagation Analysis for Remote Fracture Detection with a Robust Subsurface Microfracture-Based Verification Technique''. Phase 3 will not be initiated because wells were to be drilled in Phase 3 of the project to verify the validity of fracture-orientation maps and fracture-intensity maps produced in Phase 2. Such maps cannot be made across McElroy Field because of the limitations of the available 3C3D seismic data at the depth level of the reservoir target.

  14. Dermal Fenestration With Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: A Technique for Managing Soft Tissue Injuries Associated With High-Energy Complex Foot Fractures.

    PubMed

    Poon, Henrietta; Le Cocq, Heather; Mountain, Alistair J; Sargeant, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    Military casualties can sustain complex foot fractures from blast incidents. This frequently involves the calcaneum and is commonly associated with mid-foot fracture dislocations. The foot is at risk of both compartment syndrome and the development of fracture blisters after such injuries. The amount of energy transfer and the environment in which the injury was sustained also predispose patients to potential skin necrosis and deep infection. Decompression of the compartments is a part of accepted practice in civilian trauma to reduce the risk of complications associated with significant soft tissue swelling. The traditional methods of foot fasciotomy, however, are not without significant complications. We report a simple technique of dermal fenestration combined with the use of negative pressure wound therapy, which aims to preserve the skin integrity of the foot without resorting to formal fasciotomy. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Allgöwer-Donati Versus Vertical Mattress Suture Technique Impact on Perfusion in Ankle Fracture Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial Using Intraoperative Angiography.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Steven F; Houdek, Matthew T; Wyles, Cody C; Yuan, Brandon J; Cross, William W; Cass, Joseph R; Sems, Stephen A

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate which primary wound closure technique for ankle fractures affords the most robust perfusion as measured by laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography: Allgöwer-Donati or vertical mattress. Prospective, randomized. Level 1 Academic Trauma Center. Thirty patients undergoing open reduction internal fixation for ankle fractures were prospectively randomized to Allgöwer-Donati (n = 15) or vertical mattress (n = 15) closure. Demographics were similar for both cohorts with respect to age, sex, body mass index, surgical timing, and OTA/AO fracture classification. Skin perfusion (mean incision perfusion and mean perfusion impairment) was quantified in fluorescence units with laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography along the lateral incision as well as anterior and posterior to the incision at 30 separate locations. Minimum follow-up was 3 months with a mean follow-up 4.7 months. Allgöwer-Donati enabled superior perfusion compared with the vertical mattress suture technique. Mean incision perfusion for Allgöwer-Donati was 51 (SD = 13) and for vertical mattress was 28 (SD = 10, P < 0.0001). Mean perfusion impairment was less in the Allgöwer-Donati cohort (12.8, SD = 9) compared with that in the vertical mattress cohort (23.4, SD = 14; P = 0.03). One patient in each cohort experienced a wound complication. The Allgöwer-Donati suture technique offers improved incision perfusion compared with vertical mattress closure after open reduction internal fixation of ankle fractures. Theoretically, this may enhance soft tissue healing and decrease the risk of wound complications. Surgeons may take this into consideration when deciding closure techniques for ankle fractures. Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  16. Wet or dry bandages for plaster back-slabs?

    PubMed

    Baliga, Santosh; Finlayson, D

    2012-12-01

    Cotton crêpe and stretch bandages are commonly used in back-slabs and casts in orthopaedic practice. In theory they allow swelling to occur after injury while splinting the fracture. The application of a wet bandage prevents the Plaster-of-Paris (POP) setting too rapidly, giving time to apply a mould or attain correct limb position. However, we hypothesised that a wet bandage contracts upon drying and may cause constriction of the splint. This study aimed at determining whether there was any significant change in length of commonly used bandages when wet as well as any further change when left to dry again. Two types of bandage were evaluated. 250 mm strips of bandage were dipped into water, gently squeezed and laid flat on a bench. The bandage was then immediately measured in length. The strips were then left to dry and re-measured. This experimental study shows that both cotton crepe and cling significantly shrink by around 7% when wet. This phenomenon has the potential to significantly increase the pressure exerted on the limb by a back-slab. We speculate that the application of wet bandages is why some back-slabs may need released. It is therefore recommended that bandages should be applied only in the dry form. Copyright © 2011 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inclined crack problem in a rectangular slab of superconductor under an electromagnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Yong, Huadong; Xue, Cun; Zhou, Youhe

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, the critical state Bean model is employed to estimate the effect of the electromagnetic force on the fracture behavior of the superconductor slab. The superconductor slab with an inclined crack is subjected to an applied field. Based on the finite element method, the stress intensity factors are computed for two activation processes, zero field cooling and field cooling. Numerical results obtained show that the crack length and the inclined angle have significant effects on the fracture behavior. Generally, maximum of mode-I stress intensity factor is larger than that of mode-II stress intensity factor. The stress intensity factors analyzed in the paper are useful to learn fracture behavior and mechanical failure of superconductors.

  18. Preface: Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suetsugu, Daisuke; Bina, Craig R.; Inoue, Toru; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2010-11-01

    We are pleased to publish this special issue of the journal Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors entitled "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics". This issue is an outgrowth of the international symposium "Deep Slab and Mantle Dynamics", which was held on February 25-27, 2009, in Kyoto, Japan. This symposium was organized by the "Stagnant Slab Project" (SSP) research group to present the results of the 5-year project and to facilitate intensive discussion with well-known international researchers in related fields. The SSP and the symposium were supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (16075101) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of the Japanese Government. In the symposium, key issues discussed by participants included: transportation of water into the deep mantle and its role in slab-related dynamics; observational and experimental constraints on deep slab properties and the slab environment; modeling of slab stagnation to constrain its mechanisms in comparison with observational and experimental data; observational, experimental and modeling constraints on the fate of stagnant slabs; eventual accumulation of stagnant slabs on the core-mantle boundary and its geodynamic implications. This special issue is a collection of papers presented in the symposium and other papers related to the subject of the symposium. The collected papers provide an overview of the wide range of multidisciplinary studies of mantle dynamics, particularly in the context of subduction, stagnation, and the fate of deep slabs.

  19. What really causes flat slab subduction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, V. C.; Perez-Gussinye, M.; Manea, M.

    2014-12-01

    How flat slab geometries are generated has been long debated. It has been suggested thattrenchward motion of thick cratons in some areas of South America and Cenozoic NorthAmerica progressively closed the asthenospheric wedge and induced flat subduction. Here wedevelop time-dependent numerical experiments to explore how trenchward motion of thickcratons may result in flat subduction. We find that as the craton approaches the trench andthe wedge closes, two opposite phenomena control slab geometry: the suction between oceanand continent increases, favoring slab flattening, while the mantle confined within the closingwedge dynamically pushes the slab backward and steepens it. When the slab retreats, as inthe Peru and Chile flat slabs, the wedge closure rate and dynamic push are small and suctionforces generate, in some cases, flat subduction. We model the past 30 m.y. of subduction in theChilean flat slab area and demonstrate that trenchward motion of thick lithosphere, 200-300km, currently ~700-800 km away from the Peru-Chile Trench, reproduces a slab geometrythat fits the stress pattern, seismicity distribution, and temporal and spatial evolution ofdeformation and volcanism in the region. We also suggest that varying trench kinematics mayexplain some differing slab geometries along South America. When the trench is stationaryor advances, the mantle flow within the closing wedge strongly pushes the slab backward andsteepens it, possibly explaining the absence of flat subduction in the Bolivian orocline.

  20. Surgical fixation of sternal fractures: preoperative planning and a safe surgical technique using locked titanium plates and depth limited drilling.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Drost, Stefan; Oppel, Pascal; Grupp, Sina; Schmitt, Sonja; Carbon, Roman Th; Mauerer, Andreas; Hennig, Friedrich F; Buder, Thomas

    2015-01-05

    Different ways to stabilize a sternal fracture are described in literature. Respecting different mechanisms of trauma such as the direct impact to the anterior chest wall or the flexion-compression injury of the trunk, there is a need to retain each sternal fragment in the correct position while neutralizing shearing forces to the sternum. Anterior sternal plating provides the best stability and is therefore increasingly used in most cases. However, many surgeons are reluctant to perform sternal osteosynthesis due to possible complications such as difficulties in preoperative planning, severe injuries to mediastinal organs, or failure of the performed method. This manuscript describes one possible safe way to stabilize different types of sternal fractures in a step by step guidance for anterior sternal plating using low profile locking titanium plates. Before surgical treatment, a detailed survey of the patient and a three dimensional reconstructed computed tomography is taken out to get detailed information of the fracture's morphology. The surgical approach is usually a midline incision. Its position can be described by measuring the distance from upper sternal edge to the fracture and its length can be approximated by the summation of 60 mm for the basis incision, the thickness of presternal soft tissue and the greatest distance between the fragments in case of multiple fractures. Performing subperiosteal dissection along the sternum while reducing the fracture, using depth limited drilling, and fixing the plates prevents injuries to mediastinal organs and vessels. Transverse fractures and oblique fractures at the corpus sterni are plated longitudinally, whereas oblique fractures of manubrium, sternocostal separation and any longitudinally fracture needs to be stabilized by a transverse plate from rib to sternum to rib. Usually the high convenience of a patient is seen during follow up as well as a precise reconstruction of the sternal morphology.

  1. The effect of amount of lost tooth structure and restorative technique on fracture resistance of endodontically treated premolars

    PubMed Central

    Bassir, Mahshid Mohammadi; Labibzadeh, Akram; Mollaverdi, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Endodontic treatment generally reduces the fracture resistance of teeth. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance and the mode of fracture of endodontically treated human premolars with different amounts of remaining tooth structure. Materials and Methods: Seventy non-carious human premolars were randomly assigned into 7 groups. Group 1 (ST) did not receive any preparation. The teeth in groups 2-7 received root canal treatment and different preparations. Group 2 (MO-NF): Mesio-occlusal preparation without filling; Group 3 (MOD-NF): Mesio-occluso-distal preparation without filling; Group 4 (MO-F): Mesio-occlusal preparation with direct composite restoration (Z250); Group 5 (MOD-F): Mesio-occluso-distal preparation with direct composite restoration (Z250); Group 6 (CC-D): Mesio-occluso-distal preparation with cusp reduction and direct composite restoration (Z250); Group 7 (CC-InD): Mesio-occluso-distal preparation with cusp reduction and indirect composite restoration (Gradia GC). The fracture resistance (N) was assessed under compressive load in a universal testing machine (Zwick) perpendicular to the occlusal surface at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min, and the mode of fracture was assessed under stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis: Data was analyzed by Kruskal – Wallis and Mann – Whitney tests and the mode of fracture was analyzed by Chi-square test (P < 0.05). Results: Statistical analysis showed that MO and MOD cavity preparations significantly reduced the fracture resistance of sound teeth. Direct composite restorations can improve the fracture resistance, and Groups 7 and 6 presented the highest fracture resistance values. Conclusions: Teeth with adhesive restorations showed significantly higher fracture resistance values as compared with the non-restored ones. PMID:24082569

  2. Safety screw fixation technique in a case of coracoid base fracture with acromioclavicular dislocation and coracoid base cross-sectional size data from a computed axial tomography study.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Yoshiteru; Hirano, Tetsuya; Miyatake, Katsutoshi; Fujii, Koji; Takeda, Yoshitsugu

    2014-07-01

    Coracoid base fracture accompanied by acromioclavicular joint dislocation with intact coracoclavicular ligaments is a rare injury. Generally, an open reduction with screw fixation is the first treatment choice, as it protects the important structures around the coracoid process. This report presents a new technique of screw fixation for coracoid base fracture and provides anatomic information on cross-sectional size of the coracoid base obtained by computed tomography (CT). An axial image of the coracoid base was visualized over the neck of the scapula, and a guidewire was inserted into this circle under fluoroscopic guidance. The wire was inserted easily into the neck of scapula across the coracoid base fracture with imaging in only 1 plane. In addition, 25 measurements of the coracoid base were made in 25 subjects on axial CT images. Average length of the long and short axes at the thinnest part of the coracoid base was 13.9 ± 2.0 mm (range 10.6-17.0) and 10.5 ± 2.2 mm (6.6-15.1), respectively. This new screw fixation technique and measurement data on the coracoid base may be beneficial for safety screw fixation of coracoid base fracture.

  3. [Periprosthetic Acetabulum Fractures].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, A J; Stuby, F; de Zwart, P M; Ochs, B G

    2016-12-01

    In contrast to periprosthetic fractures of the femur, periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are rare complications - both primary fractures and fractures in revision surgery. This topic is largely under-reported in the literature; there are a few case reports and no long term results. Due to an increase in life expectancy, the level of patients' activity and the number of primary joint replacements, one has to expect a rise in periprosthetic complications in general and periprosthetic acetabular fractures in particular. This kind of fracture can be intra-, peri- or postoperative. Intraoperative fractures are especially associated with insertion of cementless press-fit acetabular components or revision surgery. Postoperative periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are usually related to osteolysis, for example, due to polyethylene wear. There are also traumatic fractures and fractures missed intraoperatively that lead to some kind of insufficiency fracture. Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are treated conservatively if the implant is stable and the fracture is not dislocated. If surgery is needed, there are many possible different surgical techniques and challenging approaches. That is why periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum should be treated by experts in pelvic surgery as well as revision arthroplasty and the features specific to the patient, fracture and prosthetic must always be considered. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Study on the Multi-phase Flow and Fluid Saturation in 2D Fractured Media by Light Transmission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Ye, S.; Wu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Immiscible two-phase flows in fractured media are encountered in many engineering processes such as recovery of oil and gas, exploitation of geothermal energy, and groundwater contamination by immiscible chemicals. A two-dimensional rough wall parallel plate fracture model was set up and light transmission method (LTM) was applied to study two-phase flow system in fractured media. The fracture model stood with up and bottom flow and no flow on other two sides. A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to monitor the migration of DNAPL and gas bubbles in the fracture model. To simulate two-phase system in fracture media, air was injected into the water saturated cell (C1) through the middle of the bottom and NAPL was injected into another water saturated cell (C2) through the middle of the top of the cell. The results show LTM was an effective way in monitoring the migration of DNAPL and gas bubbles in the fracture models. Gas moved upwards quickly to the top of C1 in the way of air bubbles generated at the injection position and formed a continuous distribution. The migration of TCE was controlled by its own weight and fracture aperture. TCE migrated to large aperture firstly when moving downwards, and intruded into smaller one with accumulation of TCE. Light Intensity-Saturation Models (LISMs) were developed to estimate the gas or NAPL saturation in two-phase system. The volume amount of infiltration of gas bubbles or NAPL could be estimated from light intensities by LISMs. There were strong correlations between the added and calculated amounts of gas or TCE. It is feasible to use the light transmission method to characterize the movement and spatial distribution of gas or NAPL in fractured media.

  5. Surgical Fixation of Sternal Fractures: Preoperative Planning and a Safe Surgical Technique Using Locked Titanium Plates and Depth Limited Drilling

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Drost, Stefan; Oppel, Pascal; Grupp, Sina; Schmitt, Sonja; Carbon, Roman Th.; Mauerer, Andreas; Hennig, Friedrich F.; Buder, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Different ways to stabilize a sternal fracture are described in literature. Respecting different mechanisms of trauma such as the direct impact to the anterior chest wall or the flexion-compression injury of the trunk, there is a need to retain each sternal fragment in the correct position while neutralizing shearing forces to the sternum. Anterior sternal plating provides the best stability and is therefore increasingly used in most cases. However, many surgeons are reluctant to perform sternal osteosynthesis due to possible complications such as difficulties in preoperative planning, severe injuries to mediastinal organs, or failure of the performed method. This manuscript describes one possible safe way to stabilize different types of sternal fractures in a step by step guidance for anterior sternal plating using low profile locking titanium plates. Before surgical treatment, a detailed survey of the patient and a three dimensional reconstructed computed tomography is taken out to get detailed information of the fracture’s morphology. The surgical approach is usually a midline incision. Its position can be described by measuring the distance from upper sternal edge to the fracture and its length can be approximated by the summation of 60 mm for the basis incision, the thickness of presternal soft tissue and the greatest distance between the fragments in case of multiple fractures. Performing subperiosteal dissection along the sternum while reducing the fracture, using depth limited drilling, and fixing the plates prevents injuries to mediastinal organs and vessels. Transverse fractures and oblique fractures at the corpus sterni are plated longitudinally, whereas oblique fractures of manubrium, sternocostal separation and any longitudinally fracture needs to be stabilized by a transverse plate from rib to sternum to rib. Usually the high convenience of a patient is seen during follow up as well as a precise reconstruction of the sternal morphology. PMID

  6. Skull fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have been drinking alcohol or is otherwise impaired. Alternative Names Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture Images Skull of an adult Skull fracture Skull fracture ...

  7. Evaluation of the thermal bridging effects on the thermal performance of slab-on-grade floor foundation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Anzi, A.A.; Krarti, M.

    1997-12-31

    A steady-state solution is developed to determine the thermal interaction between a slab-on-grade floor and above-grade walls. In particular, the thermal bridging effects at the slab/wall joints are evaluated for various insulation configurations. Using a finite-difference numerical technique (FDM), the temperature field within the building envelope and the soil, the heat flux profiles along the foundation surfaces, and the total slab and wall heat losses are determined and analyzed for both interior and exterior insulation configurations. It was found that a significant thermal interaction exists between the slab-on-grade floor and the above-grade walls. In particular, it was found that adding thermal insulation to the slab or to the walls affects the thermal performance of both the slab and the walls.

  8. Stabilization of Volar Ulnar Rim Fractures of the Distal Radius: Current Techniques and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    O'Shaughnessy, Maureen A.; Shin, Alexander Y.; Kakar, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Background Distal radius fractures involving the lunate facet can be challenging to manage. Reports have shown the volar carpal subluxation/dislocation that can occur if the facet is not appropriately stabilized. Literature Review Recent emphasis in the literature has underscored the difficulty in managing this fracture fragment, suggesting standard volar plates may not be able to adequately stabilize the fragment. This article reviews the current literature with a special emphasis on fixation with a specifically designed fragment-specific hook plate to secure the lunate facet. Case Description An extended flexor carpi radialis volar approach was made which allows access to the distal volar ulnar fracture fragment. Once provisionally stabilized with Kirschner wire fixation, a volar hook plate was applied to capture this fragment. Additional fracture stabilization was used as deemed necessary to stabilize the remaining distal radius fracture. Clinical Relevance The volar marginal rim fragment remains a challenge in distal radius fracture management. Use of a hook plate to address the volar ulnar corner allows for stable fixation without loss of reduction at intermediate-term follow-up. PMID:27104076

  9. The Coronal Tooth Fractures: Preliminary Evaluation of a Three-Year Follow-Up of the Anterior Teeth Direct Fragment Reattachment Technique Without Additional Preparation.

    PubMed

    Giudice G, Lo; A, Alibrandi; F, Lipari; A, Lizio; F, Lauritano; G, Cervino; M, Cicciù

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to describe and to analyse the long-term results and the clinical steps of direct fragment reattachment technique with no additional tooth preparation, used to treat crown fracture. This technique achieves the clinical success, combining satisfactory aesthetic and functional results with a minimally invasive approach. The 3 years follow-up included 9 patients (5 males, 4 females) with coronal fracture. In all the cases the fragment was available and intact. The authors illustrate the adhesive procedure used. Under local anaesthesia and after positioning the rubber dam, both the tooth and the fragment surface were etched, rinsed and applied by the adhesive system in order to obtain the retention of the fractured part to the tooth without additional tooth preparation or resin cement. The statistical analysis shows the good performances of direct fragment reattachment technique. After 36 months, in 22.2% of the cases, the detachment was observed of the bonded fragment and in 11.1% of patients, complications were recorded. Our clinical experience shows how the ultra-conservative procedure used is fast, easy and offers a long term predictability; it also allows good functional and aesthetic outcomes.

  10. The Coronal Tooth Fractures: Preliminary Evaluation of a Three-Year Follow-Up of the Anterior Teeth Direct Fragment Reattachment Technique Without Additional Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Giudice G, Lo; A., Alibrandi; F, Lipari; A, Lizio; F, Lauritano; G, Cervino; M, Cicciù

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this research is to describe and to analyse the long-term results and the clinical steps of direct fragment reattachment technique with no additional tooth preparation, used to treat crown fracture. This technique achieves the clinical success, combining satisfactory aesthetic and functional results with a minimally invasive approach. Methods: The 3 years follow-up included 9 patients (5 males, 4 females) with coronal fracture. In all the cases the fragment was available and intact. The authors illustrate the adhesive procedure used. Under local anaesthesia and after positioning the rubber dam, both the tooth and the fragment surface were etched, rinsed and applied by the adhesive system in order to obtain the retention of the fractured part to the tooth without additional tooth preparation or resin cement. Results: The statistical analysis shows the good performances of direct fragment reattachment technique. After 36 months, in 22.2% of the cases, the detachment was observed of the bonded fragment and in 11.1% of patients, complications were recorded. Conclusion: Our clinical experience shows how the ultra-conservative procedure used is fast, easy and offers a long term predictability; it also allows good functional and aesthetic outcomes. PMID:28839475

  11. Pediatric Phalanx Fractures.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua M; Dua, Karan; Bauer, Andrea Sesko; Cornwall, Roger; Wyrick, Theresa O

    2016-11-01

    Phalangeal fractures are the most common type of hand fracture that occurs in the pediatric population and account for the second highest number of emergency department visits for fractures in the United States. The incidence of phalangeal fractures is the highest in children aged 10 to 14 years, which coincides with the time that most children begin playing contact sports. Younger children are more likely to sustain a phalangeal fracture in the home setting as a result of crush and laceration injuries. Salter-Harris type II fractures of the proximal phalanx are the most common type of finger fracture. An unmineralized physis is biomechanically weaker compared with the surrounding ligamentous structures and mature bone, which makes fractures about the physis likely. A thorough physical examination is necessary to assess the digital cascade for signs of rotational deformity and/or coronal malalignment. Plain radiographs of the hand and digits are sufficient to confirm a diagnosis of a phalangeal fracture. The management of phalangeal fractures is based on the initial severity of the injury and depends on the success of closed reduction techniques. Nondisplaced phalanx fractures are managed with splint immobilization. Stable, reduced phalanx fractures are immobilized but require close monitoring to ensure maintenance of fracture reduction. Unstable, displaced phalanx fractures require surgical management, preferably via closed reduction and percutaneous pinning.

  12. Pediatric Phalanx Fractures.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua M; Dua, Karan; Sesko Bauer, Andrea; Cornwall, Roger; Wyrick, Theresa O

    2017-02-15

    Phalangeal fractures are the most common type of hand fracture that occurs in the pediatric population and account for the second highest number of emergency department visits in the United States for fractures. The incidence of phalangeal fractures is the highest in children aged 10 to 14 years, which coincides with the time that most children begin playing contact sports. Younger children are more likely to sustain a phalangeal fracture in the home setting as a result of crush and laceration injuries. Salter-Harris type II fractures of the proximal phalanx are the most common type of finger fracture. An unmineralized physis is biomechanically weaker compared with the surrounding ligamentous structures and mature bone, which make fractures about the physis likely. A thorough physical examination is necessary to assess the digital cascade for signs of rotational deformity and/or coronal malalignment. Plain radiographs of the hand and digits are sufficient to confirm a diagnosis of a phalangeal fracture. The management of phalangeal fractures is based on the initial severity of the injury and depends on the success of closed reduction techniques. Nondisplaced phalanx fractures are managed with splint immobilization. Stable, reduced phalanx fractures are immobilized but require close monitoring to ensure maintenance of fracture reduction. Unstable, displaced phalanx fractures require surgical management, preferably via closed reduction and percutaneous pinning.

  13. Discrete Fracture Network Characterization of Fractured Shale Reservoirs with Implications to Hydraulic Fracturing Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, G.

    2016-12-01

    Shales are important petroleum source rocks and reservoir seals. Recent developments in hydraulic fracturing technology have facilitated high gas production rates from shale and have had a strong impact on the U.S. gas supply and markets. Modeling of effective permeability for fractured shale reservoirs has been challenging because the presence of a fracture network significantly alters the reservoir hydrologic properties. Due to the frequent occurrence of fracture networks, it is of vital importance to characterize fracture networks and to investigate how these networks can be used to optimize the hydraulic fracturing. We have conducted basic research on 3-D fracture permeability characterization and compartmentization analyses for fractured shale formations, which takes the advantages of the discrete fracture networks (DFN). The DFN modeling is a stochastic modeling approach using the probabilistic density functions of fractures. Three common scenarios of DFN models have been studied for fracture permeability mapping using our previously proposed techniques. In DFN models with moderately to highly concentrated fractures, there exists a representative element volume (REV) for fracture permeability characterization, which indicates that the fractured reservoirs can be treated as anisotropic homogeneous media. Hydraulic fracturing will be most effective if the orientation of the hydraulic fracture is perpendicular to the mean direction of the fractures. A DFN model with randomized fracture orientations, on the other hand, lacks an REV for fracture characterization. Therefore, a fracture permeability tensor has to be computed from each element. Modeling of fracture interconnectivity indicates that there exists no preferred direction for hydraulic fracturing to be most effective oweing to the interconnected pathways of the fracture network. 3-D fracture permeability mapping has been applied to the Devonian Chattanooga Shale in Alabama and the results suggest that an

  14. Comparative Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Obturated with Resin Based Adhesive Sealers with Conventional Obturation Technique: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Langalia, Akshay K; Dave, Bela; Patel, Neeta; Thakkar, Viral; Sheth, Sona; Parekh, Vaishali

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth obturated with different resin-based adhesive sealers with a conventional obturation technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 Single canaled teeth were divided into five groups. The first group was taken as a negative control. The rest of the groups were shaped using ProFile rotary files (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland). The second group was obturated with gutta-percha and a ZOE-based sealer Endoflas FS (Sanlor Dental Products, USA). The third group was obturated with gutta-percha and an epoxy-based sealer AH Plus (Dentsply, DeTrey, Germany). The fourth group was obturated with Resilon (Pentron Clinical Technologies, Wallingford, CT) and RealSeal sealer (Pentron Clinical Technologies). The fifth group was obturated with EndoREZ points and EndoREZ sealer (both from Ultradent, South Jordan, UT). Roots were then embedded into acrylic blocks and were then fixed into a material testing system and loaded with a stainless steel pin with a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min until fracture. The load at which the specimen fractured was recorded in Newtons. Results: It was found that forces at fracture were statistically significant for the newer resin systems, Resilon, and EndoREZ. Conclusion: It was concluded that roots obturated with newer resin systems (Resilon and EndoREZ) enhanced the root strength almost up to the level of the intact roots. PMID:25859099

  15. Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, J J; Kim, Y S; Pederson, D R; Brown, T D

    1999-04-01

    Periprosthetic acetabular fractures during and after total hip replacement occur infrequently. Intraoperative fractures have risen with the use of press fit cementless fixation techniques and postoperative fractures are increasing because of the long-term problems associated with osteolysis. This article outlines the classification and management of these fractures.

  16. A slab expression in the Gibraltar arc?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijholt, Nicolai; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2017-04-01

    The present-day geodynamic setting of the Gibraltar arc region results from several Myrs of subduction rollback in the overall (oblique) convergence of Africa and Iberia. As for most rollback settings in a convergence zone, the interaction of these two components is complex and distinctly non-stationary. Gibraltar slab rollback is considered to have stalled, or at least diminished largely in magnitude, since the late Miocene/early Pliocene, suggesting that the effect of the slab on present-day surface motions is negligible. However, GPS measurements indicate that the Gibraltar arc region has an anomalous motion with respect to both Iberia and Africa, i.e., the Gibraltar arc region does not move as part of the rigid Iberian, or the rigid African plate. A key question is whether this surface motion is an expression of the Gibraltar slab. Seismic activity in the Gibraltar region is diffuse and considerable in magnitude, making it a region of high seismic risk. Unlike the North African margin to the east, where thrust earthquakes dominate the focal mechanism tables, a complex pattern is observed with thrust, normal and strike-slip earthquakes in a region stretching between the northern Moroccan Atlas across the Gibraltar arc and Alboran Sea (with the Trans-Alboran Shear Zone) to the Betics of southern Spain. Even though no large mega-thrust earthquakes have been observed in recent history, slab rollback may not have completely ceased. However, since no activity has been observed in the accretionary wedge, probably since the Pliocene, it is likely that the subduction interface is locked. In this study, we perform a series of numerical models in which we combine the relative plate convergence, variable magnitude of friction on fault segments, regional variations in gravitational potential energy and slab pull of the Gibraltar slab. We seek to reproduce the GPS velocities and slip sense on regional faults and thereby determine whether the Gibraltar slab has an effect on

  17. Subducting slabs: Jellyfishes in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiselet, Christelle; Braun, Jean; Husson, Laurent; Le Carlier de Veslud, Christian; Thieulot, Cedric; Yamato, Philippe; Grujic, Djordje

    2010-08-01

    The constantly improving resolution of geophysical data, seismic tomography and seismicity in particular, shows that the lithosphere does not subduct as a slab of uniform thickness but is rather thinned in the upper mantle and thickened around the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle. This observation has traditionally been interpreted as evidence for the buckling and piling of slabs at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle, where a strong contrast in viscosity may exist and cause resistance to the penetration of slabs into the lower mantle. The distribution and character of seismicity reveal, however, that slabs undergo vertical extension in the upper mantle and compression near the transition zone. In this paper, we demonstrate that during the subduction process, the shape of low viscosity slabs (1 to 100 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) evolves toward an inverted plume shape that we coin jellyfish. Results of a 3D numerical model show that the leading tip of slabs deform toward a rounded head skirted by lateral tentacles that emerge from the sides of the jellyfish head. The head is linked to the body of the subducting slab by a thin tail. A complete parametric study reveals that subducting slabs may achieve a variety of shapes, in good agreement with the diversity of natural slab shapes evidenced by seismic tomography. Our work also suggests that the slab to mantle viscosity ratio in the Earth is most likely to be lower than 100. However, the sensitivity of slab shapes to upper and lower mantle viscosities and densities, which remain poorly constrained by independent evidence, precludes any systematic deciphering of the observations.

  18. Subducting Slabs: Jellyfishes in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiselet, C.; Braun, J.; Husson, L.; Le Carlier de Veslud, C.; Thieulot, C.; Yamato, P.; Grujic, D.

    2010-12-01

    The constantly improving resolution of geophysical data, seismic tomography and seismicity in particular, shows that the lithosphere does not subduct as a slab of uniform thickness but is rather thinned in the upper mantle and thickened around the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle. This observation has traditionally been interpreted as evidence for the buckling and piling of slabs at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle, where a strong contrast in viscosity may exist and cause resistance to the penetration of slabs into the lower mantle. The distribution and character of seismicity reveal, however, that slabs undergo vertical extension in the upper mantle and compression near the transition zone. In this paper, we demonstrate that during the subduction process, the shape of low viscosity slabs (1 to 100 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) evolves toward an inverted plume shape that we coin jellyfish. Results of a 3D numerical model show that the leading tip of slabs deform toward a rounded head skirted by lateral tentacles that emerge from the sides of the jellyfish head. The head is linked to the body of the subducting slab by a thin tail. A complete parametric study reveals that subducting slabs may achieve a variety of shapes, in good agreement with the diversity of natural slab shapes evidenced by seismic tomography. Our work also suggests that the slab to mantle viscosity ratio in the Earth is most likely to be lower than 100. However, the sensitivity of slab shapes to upper and lower mantle viscosities and densities, which remain poorly constrained by independent evidence, precludes any systematic deciphering of the observations.

  19. Slab Stagnation: How, When, and Where?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. D.; Frost, D. J.; Rubie, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Many slabs appear to stagnate in the transition zone although some slabs appear to stagnate at a depth of 1000 km and others appear to descend into the lower mantle relatively unaltered or, perhaps buckling as they descend. Because tomographic images provide a modern day snapshot of a time-dependent process, it is unclear whether the diversity of subducted slab geometries are a manifestation of the same process captured at different times in the lifetime of the subducting system or whether different subduction zones are subject to different conditions that control their evolution. At one time, stagnation of the slab at the base of the transition zone was thought to be due to the transformation of ringwoodite to bridgmanite plus ferropericlase, although subsequent experimental work showed that this transformation does not produce sufficient buoyancy to stall slab descent. In addition to phase transformations in the olivine system, rheology (specifically a ``viscosity hill'' in the upper part of the lower mantle), trench migration, depth-dependent thermodynamic parameters, and composition have all been investigated as potential slab stagnation mechanisms. The transformation of pyroxene to majoritic garnet occurs by extremely slow diffusion and thus pyroxene unlikely to transform at equilibrium pressures. We have shown that the presence of metastable pyroxene in the cold cores of subducted slabs is sufficient to cause flat-slab subduction. Given the diversity of slab structures, it is quite likely that a combination of mechanisms control slab dynamics. We will investigate slabs stagnation using numerical experiments in 2D and 3D with dislocation/diffusion creep rheology, phase transformations, and plate reconstructions to control the evolution of the plate system.

  20. Open intramedullary nailing with tension band and locking sutures for proximal humeral fracture: hot air balloon technique.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; An, Jin-Woo; Oh, Jeong-Hwan

    2006-01-01

    To reduce complications and increase fixation after the internal fixation of proximal humeral fractures, interlocking intramedullary nailing and tension-band and locking sutures were used simultaneously, and their results are reviewed. Twenty-six consecutive patients who underwent open intramedullary nailing with tension-band and locking sutures for proximal humeral fractures were selected. The mean follow-up period was 39 months. With regard to the functional evaluation, the mean Neer score was 90 points and the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score was 85. When patients were divided into those aged less than 65 years and those aged 65 years or greater and into those with 2-part fractures and those with 3-part fractures, postoperative pain, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and the Neer score showed no difference between the 2 groups. Open intramedullary nailing accompanied by tension-band and locking sutures for proximal humeral fractures shows sufficient fixation in older patients, and therefore, good postoperative shoulder function can be expected.

  1. The effect of various backfilling techniques on the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth performed apical plug with Biodentine.

    PubMed

    Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Kesim, Bertan; Düzgün, Salih; Tuncay, Öznur; Demirbuga, Sezer; Topçuoğlu, Gamze

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth that had been backfilled using different materials after using Biodentine as the apical plug material. Seventy-five single-rooted teeth were divided into five groups (n = 15). The 15 teeth in group 1 served as a negative control group and received no treatment. The remaining 60 teeth were instrumented to a #6 Peeso reamer to obtain a standard internal diameter of 1.5 mm. The apical 4 mm of 60 teeth was filled with Biodentine. The backfilling was then performed on each group as follows: group 2--no backfilling (positive control), group 3--gutta-percha, group 4--fiber post, and group 5--Biodentine. Specimens were then subjected to fracture testing. The force required to fracture each specimen was recorded, and the data were statistically analyzed. The mean fracture values of groups 1 and 4 were significantly higher than groups 2, 3, and 5 (P < 0.05). The values of groups 3 and 5 were significantly higher than group 2 (P < 0.05). The backfilling with fiber post after an apical Biodentine plug provided the highest fracture resistance among all experimental groups. © 2014 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Fixation of diaphyseal fractures with a segmental defect: a biomechanical comparison of locked and conventional plating techniques.

    PubMed

    Fulkerson, Eric; Egol, Kenneth A; Kubiak, Erik N; Liporace, Frank; Kummer, Frederick J; Koval, Kenneth J

    2006-04-01

    Locking plates are an alternative to conventional compression plate fixation for diaphyseal fractures. The objective of this study was to compare the stability of various plating with locked screw constructs to conventional nonlocked screws for fixation of a comminuted diaphyseal fracture model using a uniform, synthetic ulna. Locked screw construct variables were the use of unicortical or bicortical screws, and increasing bone to plate distance. This biomechanical study compared various construct groups after cyclic axial loading and three-point bending. Results were analyzed via one-way analysis of variance. Displacements after cyclical axial loading and number of cycles to failure in cyclic bending were used to assess construct stability. The constructs fixed by plates with bicortical locked screws withstood significantly more cycles to failure than the other constructs (p < 0.001). Significantly less displacement occurred after axial loading with bicortical locked screws than with bicortical nonlocked screws. Increased distance of the plate from the bone surface, and use of unicortical locked screws led to early failure with cyclic loading for constructs with locked screws. These results support the use of plating with bicortical locked screws as an alternative to conventional plating for comminuted diaphyseal fractures in osteoporotic bone. Bicortical locked screws with minimal displacement from the bone surface provide the most stable construct in the tested synthetic comminuted diaphyseal fracture model. The results of this study suggest use of plates with unicortical screws for the described fracture is not recommended.

  3. The slab geometry laser. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, J. M.; Kane, T. J.; Kuhn, K.; Byer, R. L.; Unternahrer, J.

    1984-01-01

    Slab geometry solid-state lasers offer significant performance improvements over conventional rod-geometry lasers. A detailed theoretical description of the thermal, stress, and beam-propagation characteristics of a slab laser is presented. The analysis includes consideration of the effects of the zig-zag optical path, which eliminates thermal and stress focusing and reduces residual birefringence.

  4. Slab Houses: Reflections of the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappetta, Ann

    1990-01-01

    Describes how students, influenced by Victorian architecture, created ceramic slab houses. Students devised a solution to depict the reflective nature of Victorian bay windows. Project incorporates art history, handbuilding, and surface ornamentation. Outlines and illustrates steps involved in making slab houses that can be adapted for use by…

  5. The slab geometry laser. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, J. M.; Kane, T. J.; Kuhn, K.; Byer, R. L.; Unternahrer, J.

    1984-01-01

    Slab geometry solid-state lasers offer significant performance improvements over conventional rod-geometry lasers. A detailed theoretical description of the thermal, stress, and beam-propagation characteristics of a slab laser is presented. The analysis includes consideration of the effects of the zig-zag optical path, which eliminates thermal and stress focusing and reduces residual birefringence.

  6. Open reduction and internal fixation of OTA type C2-C4 fractures of the calcaneus with a triple-plate technique.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Alexander; Müller, Jochen; Regazzoni, Pietro; Babst, Reto

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a surgical technique of open reduction and internal fixation of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures with 3 AO mini-fragment plates and to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcome of a consecutive group of patients after a mean follow-up of 41.7 months. A series of 54 patients (16 women and 38 men) with 62 calcaneal fractures were treated over a period of 6.5 years. Forty-five patients with 50 calcaneal fractures were completely clinically and radiologically followed up. Clinical follow-up included assessment of range of motion, pain according to a visual analogue scale, the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score, and the short-form 36 health survey. Radiological follow-up included plain axial and lateral radiographs and measurement of the Böhler's angle and Gissane's angle. Independent Student's t test and paired Student's t test were used alongside the chi-square test to compare clinical and radiological data and score values between different groups of patients. Eleven patients showed breakage of the osteosynthesis material during the healing process and 2 patients sustained deep wound infection requiring revision surgery. At the final follow-up all fractures had healed. The average range of motion was supination 26.4° (range 0° to 50°; SD 11.6°), pronation 15.4° (range 0° to 30°; SD 6.4°), dorsal extension 14.3° (range -10° to 30°; SD 8.0°), and plantarflexion 39.6° (range 20° to 65°; SD 11.7°). Patients with OTA type C4 fractures achieved significantly lower supination (p < .01) and plantarflexion (p < .01) compared with other fracture types. The mean visual analog scale pain score was 3.6 (range 0 to 8; SD 2.3) points, average American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score was 70.8 (range 33 to 100; SD 17.1) points, and the mean short-form 36 score was 60.98 (range 22.9 to 93.0; SD 18.4) points. The mean postoperative Böhler's angle was 28.9° (range 8

  7. Needle-in-Needle Technique for Percutaneous Retrieval of a Fractured Biopsy Needle during CT-Guided Biopsy of the Thoracic Spine.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Hamza; Thawani, Jayesh; Pukenas, Bryan

    2014-10-31

    Common complications related to CT-guided percutaneous thoracic bone biopsy procedures include pneumothorax and muscular hematoma. Serious, but rare complications include paralysis, nerve injury, CSF leak, and aortic injury. Device failure has not been well documented in the literature. We discuss our experience with biopsy needle breakage during retrieval of a core specimen and the technique used to help retrieve an embedded needle using a CT fluoroscopic-guided, needle-in-needle approach. A 43 year-old man with Stage IIIa NSCLC was found to have a T11 vertebral body lesion as seen on PET, CT, and MR imaging. The patient underwent a CT-guided biopsy in the prone position. The T11 vertebral body was localized and cannulated using the percutaneous Bonopty(®) (Apriomed, Upsala, Sweden) needle device. After fine needle aspiration samples were obtained, a core needle biopsy was attempted with a 16-gauge device. The needle fractured 4 cm deep to the skin during removal of a sclerotic lesion, leaving a retained portion within the pedicle and vertebral body. Using CT-guided fluoroscopy, a large diameter Murphy M2 needle was advanced over the distal portion of the fractured Bonopty needle. The Murphy M2 needle was advanced distal to the tip of the Bonopty needle and removed, capturing the broken Bonopty penetration needle along with a core specimen. Larger-bore biopsy needle systems and/or a coaxial system should be used to perform core biopsies in sclerotic lesions to prevent device fracture. If there is device fracture, a larger-bore needle may be used to help capture the fractured needle and prevent open surgery.

  8. Diode-side-pumped Alexandrite slab lasers.

    PubMed

    Damzen, M J; Thomas, G M; Minassian, A

    2017-05-15

    We present the investigation of diode-side-pumping of Alexandrite slab lasers in a range of designs using linear cavity and grazing-incidence bounce cavity configurations. An Alexandrite slab laser cavity with double-pass side pumping produces 23.4 mJ free-running energy at 100 Hz rate with slope efficiency ~40% with respect to absorbed pump energy. In a slab laser with single-bounce geometry output power of 12.2 W is produced, and in a double-bounce configuration 6.5 W multimode and 4.5 W output in TEM00 mode is produced. These first results of slab laser and amplifier designs in this paper highlight some of the potential strategies for power and energy scaling of Alexandrite using diode-side-pumped Alexandrite slab architectures with future availability of higher power red diode pumping.

  9. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  10. The Vibro-Acoustic Modelling of Slab Track with Embedded Rails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VAN LIER, S.

    2000-03-01

    The application of concrete slab track in railways has certain advantages compared with conventional ballasted track, but conventional slab track structures generally produce more noise than ballasted track. For this reason a “silent slab track” has been developed in the Dutch ICES “Stiller Treinverkeer” project (silent railway traffic) by optimizing the track. In the design, the rails are embedded in a cork-filled elastomeric material. The paper discusses the vibro-acoustic modelling of this track using the simulation package “TWINS”, combined with finite element techniques. The model evaluates the one-third octave band sound power spectrum radiated by train wheels and track, and provides for a tool to optimize the track design. Three track types are compared using the vibro-acoustic model: an existing slab track with embedded UIC54 rails, a newly designed, acoustically optimized slab track with a less stiff rail embedded in a stiffer elastomere, and, as a reference, a ballasted track. The models of the existing tracks have been validated with measurements. Calculations indicate that the optimized slab track will emit between 4 and 6 dB(A) less noise than the ballasted track. The existing slab track produces between 1·5 and 3 dB(A) more noise than the ballasted track; this is caused by resonances in the elastomeric moulding material in the frequency range determining the dB(A)-level.

  11. Slab stagnation and detachment under northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Results of tomography models around the Japanese Islands show the existence of a gap between the horizontally lying (stagnant) slab extending under northeastern China and the fast seismic velocity anomaly in the lower mantle. A simple conversion from the fast velocity anomaly to the low-temperature anomaly shows a similar feature. This feature appears to be inconsistent with the results of numerical simulations on the interaction between the slab and phase transitions with temperature-dependent viscosity. Such numerical models predict a continuous slab throughout the mantle. I extend previous analyses of the tomography model and model calculations to infer the origins of the gap beneath northeastern China. Results of numerical simulations that take the geologic history of the subduction zone into account suggest two possible origins for the gap: (1) the opening of the Japan Sea led to a breaking off of the otherwise continuous subducting slab, or (2) the western edge of the stagnant slab is the previous subducted ridge, which was the plate boundary between the extinct Izanagi and the Pacific plates. Origin (2) suggesting the present horizontally lying slab has accumulated since the ridge subduction, is preferable for explaining the present length of the horizontally lying slab in the upper mantle. Numerical models of origin (1) predict a stagnant slab in the upper mantle that is too short, and a narrow or non-existent gap. Preferred models require rather stronger flow resistance of the 660-km phase change than expected from current estimates of the phase transition property. Future detailed estimates of the amount of the subducted Izanagi plate and the present stagnant slab would be useful to constrain models. A systematic along-arc variation of the slab morphology from the northeast Japan to Kurile arcs is also recognized, and its understanding may constrain the 3D mantle flow there.

  12. Influence of core design, production technique, and material selection on fracture behavior of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal fixed dental prostheses produced using different multilayer techniques: split-file, over-pressing, and manually built-up veneers.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Deyar Jallal Hadi; Linderoth, Ewa H; Wennerberg, Ann; Vult Von Steyern, Per

    2016-01-01

    To investigate and compare the fracture strength and fracture mode in eleven groups of currently, the most commonly used multilayer three-unit all-ceramic yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with respect to the choice of core material, veneering material area, manufacturing technique, design of connectors, and radii of curvature of FDP cores. A total of 110 three-unit Y-TZP FDP cores with one intermediate pontic were made. The FDP cores in groups 1-7 were made with a split-file design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain, computer-aided design-on veneers, and over-pressed veneers. Groups 8-11 consisted of FDPs with a state-of-the-art design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain. All the FDP cores were subjected to simulated aging and finally loaded to fracture. There was a significant difference (P<0.05) between the core designs, but not between the different types of Y-TZP materials. The split-file designs with VITABLOCS(®) (1,806±165 N) and e.max(®) ZirPress (1,854±115 N) and the state-of-the-art design with VITA VM(®) 9 (1,849±150 N) demonstrated the highest mean fracture values. The shape of a split-file designed all-ceramic reconstruction calls for a different dimension protocol, compared to traditionally shaped ones, as the split-file design leads to sharp approximal indentations acting as fractural impressions, thus decreasing the overall strength. The design of a framework is a crucial factor for the load bearing capacity of an all-ceramic FDP. The state-of-the-art design is preferable since the split-file designed cores call for a cross-sectional connector area at least 42% larger, to have the same load bearing capacity as the state-of-the-art designed cores. All veneering materials and techniques tested in the study, split-file, over-press, built-up porcelains, and glass-ceramics are, with a great safety margin, sufficient for clinical use both anteriorly and posteriorly. Analysis of

  13. Influence of core design, production technique, and material selection on fracture behavior of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal fixed dental prostheses produced using different multilayer techniques: split-file, over-pressing, and manually built-up veneers

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Deyar Jallal Hadi; Linderoth, Ewa H; Wennerberg, Ann; Vult Von Steyern, Per

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate and compare the fracture strength and fracture mode in eleven groups of currently, the most commonly used multilayer three-unit all-ceramic yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with respect to the choice of core material, veneering material area, manufacturing technique, design of connectors, and radii of curvature of FDP cores. Materials and methods A total of 110 three-unit Y-TZP FDP cores with one intermediate pontic were made. The FDP cores in groups 1–7 were made with a split-file design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain, computer-aided design-on veneers, and over-pressed veneers. Groups 8–11 consisted of FDPs with a state-of-the-art design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain. All the FDP cores were subjected to simulated aging and finally loaded to fracture. Results There was a significant difference (P<0.05) between the core designs, but not between the different types of Y-TZP materials. The split-file designs with VITABLOCS® (1,806±165 N) and e.max® ZirPress (1,854±115 N) and the state-of-the-art design with VITA VM® 9 (1,849±150 N) demonstrated the highest mean fracture values. Conclusion The shape of a split-file designed all-ceramic reconstruction calls for a different dimension protocol, compared to traditionally shaped ones, as the split-file design leads to sharp approximal indentations acting as fractural impressions, thus decreasing the overall strength. The design of a framework is a crucial factor for the load bearing capacity of an all-ceramic FDP. The state-of-the-art design is preferable since the split-file designed cores call for a cross-sectional connector area at least 42% larger, to have the same load bearing capacity as the state-of-the-art designed cores. All veneering materials and techniques tested in the study, split-file, over-press, built-up porcelains, and glass–ceramics are, with a great safety margin, sufficient for clinical use

  14. Magnetoelectric sensor excitations in hexaferrite slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Saba; Izadkhah, Hessam; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Vittoria, Carmine

    2015-06-01

    We developed techniques for H- and E-field sensors utilizing single phase magnetoelectric (ME) hexaferrite slabs in the frequency range of 100 Hz to 10 MHz. Novel circuit designs incorporating both spiral and solenoid coils and single and multi-capacitor banks were developed to probe the physics and properties of ME hexaferrites and explore ME effects for sensor detections. Fundamental measurements of the anisotropic tensor elements of the magneto-electric coupling parameter were performed using these novel techniques. In addition, for H-field sensing experiments we measured sensitivity of about 3000 Vm-1/G using solenoid coils and 8000 Vm-1/G using spiral coils. For E-field, sensing the sensitivity was 10-4 G/Vm-1 and using single capacitor detector. Sensitivity for multi-capacitor detectors was measured to be in the order of 10-3 G/Vm-1 and frequency dependent exhibiting a maximum value at ˜1 MHz. Tunability of 0.1%-90% was achieved for tunable inductor applications using both single and multi-capacitors excitation. We believe that significant (˜106) improvements in sensitivity and tunability are feasible with simple modifications of the fabrication process.

  15. Vertebroplasty with self-locking hexagonal metal implants shows comparable primary and secondary stiffness to PMMA cement augmentation techniques in a biomechanical vertebral compression fracture model

    PubMed Central

    Disch, A. C.; Huber, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    With the growing incidence of vertebral compression fractures in elderly patients having a fair overall health condition, minimal-invasive treatment techniques are getting in focus of surgical therapy. Cement augmentation is widely performed and its complications and mechanical limitations are well described. Implants avoiding the side effects of cement augmentation while reaching the same level of stability would be desirable. The primary and secondary stability of a new augmentation method with self-locking hexagonal metal implants were investigated and compared with the performance of established augmentation options. 18 fresh-frozen human spinal specimens (Th12–L2/L3–L5) were tested with pure moments of 7.5 Nm in a six-degree-of-freedom spine simulator to investigate primary and secondary stability of three augmentation techniques: (1) vertebroplasty, (2) PMMA filled cavity and (3) hexagonal metal implants. An increasing three-step cyclic loading model was included. Elastic displacement and height loss under loading did not show significant differences between the three test groups. Investigation of primary and secondary stability evenly demonstrated comparable results for all techniques indicating an insufficiency to stabilise the fracture with higher load cycles. The newly introduced method for augmentation with the metal implant Spine Pearls achieved comparable results to bone cement based techniques in a biomechanical in vitro study. Midterm and longterm reduction preservation and ingrowth of the implants have to be proven in further studies. PMID:20213299

  16. Cretaceous Arctic magmatism: Slab vs. plume? Or slab and plume?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, E. S.; Miller, E. L.; Andronikov, A. V.; Brumley, K.; Mayer, L. A.; Mukasa, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic models for the Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent landmasses propose that rifting in the Amerasia Basin (AB) began in Jura-Cretaceous time, accompanied by the development of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). During the same timespan, deformation and slab-related magmatism, followed by intra-arc rifting, took place along the Pacific side of what was to become the Arctic Ocean. A compilation and comparison of the ages, characteristics and space-time variation of circum-Arctic magmatism allows for a better understanding of the role of Pacific margin versus Arctic-Atlantic plate tectonics and the role of plume-related magmatism in the origin of the Arctic Ocean. In Jura-Cretaceous time, an arc built upon older terranes overthrust the Arctic continental margins of North America and Eurasia, shedding debris into foreland basins in the Brooks Range, Alaska, across Chukotka, Russia, to the Lena Delta and New Siberian Islands region of the Russian Arctic. These syn-tectonic sediments have some common sources (e.g., ~250-300 Ma magmatic rocks) as determined by U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. They are as young as Valanginian-Berriasian (~136 Ma, Gradstein et al., 2004) and place a lower limit on the age of formation of the AB. Subsequent intrusions of granitoid plutons, inferred to be ultimately slab-retreat related, form a belt along the far eastern Russian Arctic continental margin onto Seward Peninsula and have yielded a continuous succession of zircon U-Pb ages from ~137-95 Ma (n=28) and a younger suite ~91-82 Ma (n=16). All plutons dated were intruded in an extensional tectonic setting based on their relations to wall-rock deformation. Regional distribution of ages shows a southward migration of the locus of magmatism during Cretaceous time. Basaltic lavas as old as 130 Ma and as young as 80 Ma (40Ar/39Ar)) erupted across the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard and Franz Josef Land and are associated with

  17. Metastability of Subducted Slabs in the Mantle Transition Zone: A Collaborative Geodynamic, Petrologic, and Seismological Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, J. M.; Billen, M. I.; Duncan, M. S.; Roy, C.; Ibourichene, A. S.; Olugboji, T.; Celine, C.; Rodríguez-González, J.; Grand, S. P.; Madrigal, P.; Sandiford, D.; Valencia-Cardona, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Subducted slabs exhibit a range of geometries in the mantle transition zone. Studies of this phenomenon suggest that olivine and/or pyroxene metastability may profoundly alter the slab density profile, leading to slab flattening (e.g., King et al., 2015) and potentially yielding a resolvable seismological signature (e.g., Kawakatsu and Yoshioka, 2011; Yoshioka et al., 2015). Such metastability may also be critical for deep earthquake generation. Geodynamic modelling of this process is typically done with a simplified petrologic model of the downgoing slab, whereas petrologic studies of phase assemblages in subducted slabs typically impose an idealized geodynamic model with an unrealistic thermal structure. Connecting these two approaches should lead to a better understanding of the consequences of metastable assemblages on subducting slabs. Here, we present a new methodology that combines geodynamic, seismic and petrologic approaches to assess the impact of mineral metastability on dynamic subduction models, developed in a collaborative effort begun at the 2016 NSF CIDER summer program in Santa Barbara, CA. We use two parallel approaches to extrapolate equilibrium rock properties to metastable regions and impose these data on extracted time-slices from robust thermo-mechanical geodynamic models, allowing us to quantify the density and buoyancy changes in the slab that result from considering metastable phase assemblages. Our preliminary results suggest that metastable assemblages can yield a 10-30% density decrease over the subducted slab relative to an equilibrium reference model. We then generate a seismic velocity profile of the slab, and compute waveforms based on the 2D finite-difference method (e.g., Vidale & Helmberger, 1987) to determine whether metastable phases could reasonably be detected by different seismic approaches. Continuing analyses will be aimed at coupling the evolution of geodynamic models with phase metastability to model the feedback between

  18. Fracture resistance of cuspal coverage of endodontically treated maxillary premolars with combined composite-amalgam compared to other techniques.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, F; Memarpour, M; Karimi, F

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the fracture resistance of teeth restored with combined composite-amalgam for cuspal coverage compared to direct coverage with composite (with or without an amalgam base) and composite onlay. Seventy-two intact maxillary premolars were randomly divided into six groups (n=12). The two control groups were G1, intact teeth (negative control), and G2, mesio-occlusodistal preparation only (positive control). Each of the four experimental groups used a different type of restoration for the prepared teeth: G3, direct composite cusp coverage; G4, composite onlay; G5, direct composite coverage with an amalgam base; and G6, combined composite-amalgam cuspal coverage. After thermocycling, fracture strength was tested. The data were analyzed with analysis of variance and the least significant differences post hoc tests (α=0.05). Mean fracture resistance in the six groups (in N) were G1, 1101 ±1 86; G2, 228 ± 38; G2, 699 ± 161; G4, 953 ± 185; G5, 859 ± 146; and G6, 772 ± 154. There were significant differences between G1 and all the other groups except for G4 and between G2 and all the other groups. Fracture strength in G3 also differed significantly compared to G4 and G5. The difference between G4 and G6 was statistically significant (p<0.05), but the difference between G3 and G6 was not (p>0.05).

  19. Residual Strain and Fracture Response of Al2O3 Coatings Deposited via APS and HVOF Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, R.; Faisal, N. H.; Paradowska, A. M.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to nondestructively evaluate the residual stress profile in two commercially available alumina/substrate coating systems and relate residual stress changes with the fracture response. Neutron diffraction, due to its high penetration depth, was used to measure residual strain in conventional air plasma-sprayed (APS) and finer powder high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF (θ-gun))-sprayed Al2O3 coating/substrate systems. The purpose of this comparison was to ascertain if finer powder Al2O3 coatings deposited via θ-gun can provide improved residual stress and fracture response in comparison to conventional APS coatings. To obtain a through thickness residual strain profile with high resolution, a partially submerged beam was used for measurements near the coating surface, and a beam submerged in the coating and substrate materials near the coating-substrate interface. By using the fast vertical scanning method, with careful leveling of the specimen using theodolites, the coating surface and the coating/substrate interface were located with an accuracy of about 50 μm. The results show that the through thickness residual strain in the APS coating was mainly tensile, whereas the HVOF coating had both compressive and tensile residual strains. Further analysis interlinking Vickers indentation fracture behavior using acoustic emission (AE) was conducted. The microstructural differences along with the nature and magnitude of the residual strain fields had a direct effect on the fracture response of the two coatings during the indentation process.

  20. Quantification of surgical trauma: comparison of conventional and minimally invasive surgical techniques for pertrochanteric fracture surgery based on markers of inflammation (interleukins).

    PubMed

    del Prete, F; Nizegorodcew, T; Regazzoni, P

    2012-09-01

    Fixation of pertrochanteric fracture is undoubtedly an additional trauma after the fracture itself. In elderly patients, it might have an important impact on the whole organism. In the literature we find various techniques to perform this type of surgery. Up to now, there are no parameters validated for quantification of the invasiveness of a surgical procedure; it is therefore still not demonstrated that any method is less invasive than any other. In an effort to find a way to quantify the invasiveness of a surgical procedure, inflammatory markers were collected in patients undergoing fixation of trochanteric fracture with gliding hip screw [dynamic hip screw (DHS)] using either a conventional (DHS conv) or minimally invasive (DHS MIO) technique. Two groups of patients were investigated prospectively; 36 of them were treated with conventional DHS technique and 32 with minimally invasive technique. Mean age was 84.7 ± 7.20 and 82.78 ± 7.71 years, respectively. Fracture type was classified according to the AO classification. Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured 1 h before and 1 h after surgery. Student's t test, chi-square test, and multivariate logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Preoperative levels of interleukins showed no significant differences between the two groups. In contrast, the postoperative blood level of IL-6 in patients operated with DHS conv technique (78.41 ± 67.04 pg/ml) was on average higher than in patients operated by DHS MIO technique (39.02 ± 37.36 pg/ml), the mean difference being 39.39 pg/ml [95 % confidence interval (CI) 12.65-66.13 pg/ml; p = 0.0045]. Multivariate logistic regression (backward method with limit of significance 0.05) confirmed that patients operated by conventional technique were significantly more likely to have increased IL-6 after surgery than those operated by MIO technique. IL-8 was measured in only 36 patients (20 for DHS conv, 16 for DHS MIO). No

  1. Applying MHD technology to the continuous casting of steel slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eiichi

    1995-05-01

    The application of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the continuous casting process started with the electromagnetic stirring of the stand pool with a traveling magnetic field. It has now advanced to the electromagnetic stirring of molten steel in the mold and the control of molten steel flow by an in-mold direct current magnetic field brake. These applied MHD techniques are designed to further improve the continuous casting process capability. They improve the surface quality of cast steel by homogenizing the meniscus temperature, stabilizing initial solidification, and cleaning the surface layer. They also improve the internal quality of cast steel by preventing inclusions from penetrating deep into the pool and promoting the flotation of argon bubbles. Applied MHD technology is still advancing in scope and methods in addition to the improvement of conventional continuously cast slab qualities. The continuous casting of bimetallic slab by suppressing mixing in the pool is one example of this progress.

  2. Detecting slab structure beneath the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Meghan S.; Sun, Daoyuan; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    The presence of subducted slabs in the Mediterranean has been well documented with seismic tomography, however, these images, which are produced by smoothed, damped inversions, underestimate the sharpness of the structures. The position and extent of the slabs and the presence possible tears or gaps in the subducted lithosphere are still debated, yet the shape and location these structures are important for kinematic reconstructions and evolution of the entire subduction zone system. Extensive distribution of broadband seismic instrumentation in the Mediterranean (Italian National Seismic Network in Italy and the NSF-PICASSO project in Spain and Morocco) has allowed us to use alternative methodologies to detect the position of the slabs and slab tears beneath the Central and Western Mediterranean. Using S receiver functions we are able to identify S-to-p conversions from the bottom of the subducted slab and a lack of these signals where there are gaps or tears in the slab. We also analyze broadband waveforms for changes in P wave coda from deep (> 300 km depth) local earthquakes. The waveform records for stations in southern Italy and around the Betic-Rif show large amplitude, high frequency (f > 5 Hz) late arrivals with long coda after relatively low-frequency onset. High frequency arrivals are the strongest from events whose raypaths travel within the slab to the stations where they are recorded allowing for mapping of where the subducted material is located within the upper mantle. These two methods, along with inferring the slab position from fast P-wave velocity perturbations in tomography and intermediate depth seismicity, provide additional geophysical evidence to aid in interpretation of the complex, segmented slab structure beneath the Mediterranean.

  3. Andean flat subduction maintained by slab tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepers, Gerben; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Kosters, Martha; Boschman, Lydian; McQuarrie, Nadine; Spakman, Wim

    2016-04-01

    In two segments below the Andean mountain belt, the Nazca Plate is currently subducting sub-horizontally below South America over a distance of 200-300 km before the plate bends into the mantle. Such flat slab segments have pronounced effects on orogenesis and magmatism and are widely believed to be caused by the downgoing plate resisting subduction due to its local positive buoyancy. In contrast, here we show that flat slabs primarily result from a local resistance against rollback rather than against subduction. From a kinematic reconstruction of the Andean fold-thrust belt we determine up to ~390 km of shortening since ~50 Ma. During this time the South American Plate moved ~1400 km westward relative to the mantle, thus forcing ~1000 km of trench retreat. Importantly, since the 11-12 Ma onset of flat slab formation, ~1000 km of Nazca Plate subduction occurred, much more than the flat slab lengths, which leads to our main finding that the flat slabs, while being initiated by arrival of buoyant material at the trench, are primarily maintained by locally impeded rollback. We suggest that dynamic support of flat subduction comes from the formation of slab tunnels below segments with the most buoyant material. These tunnels trap mantle material until tearing of the tunnel wall provides an escape route. Fast subduction of this tear is followed by a continuous slab and the process can recur during ongoing rollback of the 7000 km wide Nazca slab at segments with the most buoyant subducting material, explaining the regional and transient character of flat slabs. Our study highlights the importance of studying subduction dynamics in absolute plate motion context.

  4. Non-contrast-enhanced pulmonary vein MRI with a spatially selective slab inversion preparation sequence.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Chuang, Michael L; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois A; Rofsky, Neil M; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2010-02-01

    We propose a non-contrast-enhanced, three-dimensional, free-breathing, electrocardiogram-gated, gradient recalled echo sequence with a slab-selective inversion for pulmonary vein (PV) MRI. A sagittal inversion slab was applied prior to data acquisition to suppress structures adjacent to the left atrium (LA) and PVs, thereby improving the conspicuity of the PV and LA. Compared with other MR angiography methods using an inversion pulse, the proposed method does not require signal subtraction and the inversion slab is not parallel to the imaging slab. The feasibility of the proposed method was demonstrated in healthy subjects. The inversion slab thickness and inversion time were optimized to be 60 mm and 500 ms, respectively. Compared to conventional gradient recalled echo imaging without inversion, the proposed technique significantly increased the contrast-to-noise ratios between the LA and the right atrium by 20-fold (P < 0.01), increased the contrast-to-noise ratios between the PVs and right atrium by 10-fold (P < 0.03), and increased the contrast-to-noise ratios between the PVs, LA and pulmonary artery by 4-fold (P < 0.01 for both). The signal-to-noise ratios of the PVs and the LA were similar with and without the inversion slab (P > 0.3). The proposed technique greatly enhances the conspicuity of the PVs and LA without significant loss of signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. Study of the hoop fracture behaviour of nuclear fuel cladding from ring compression tests by means of non-linear optimization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F. J.; Martin Rengel, M. A.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Puerta, M. A.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the hoop fracture toughness of ZIRLO® fuel cladding is calculated as a function of three parameters: hydrogen concentration, temperature and displacement rate. To this end, pre-hydrided samples with nominal hydrogen concentrations of 0 (as-received), 150, 250, 500, 1200 and 2000 ppm were prepared. Hydrogen was precipitated as zirconium hydrides in the shape of platelets oriented along the hoop direction. Ring Compression Tests (RCTs) were conducted at three temperatures (20, 135 and 300 °C) and two displacement rates (0.5 and 100 mm/min). A new method has been proposed in this paper which allows the determination of fracture toughness from ring compression tests. The proposed method combines the experimental results, the cohesive crack model, finite elements simulations, numerical calculations and non-linear optimization techniques. The parameters of the cohesive crack model were calculated by minimizing the difference between the experimental data and the numerical results. An almost perfect fitting of the experimental results is achieved by this method. In addition, an estimation of the error in the calculated fracture toughness is also provided.

  6. Subduction starts by stripping slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, Mathieu; Agard, Philippe; Dubacq, Benoît; Prigent, Cécile; Plunder, Alexis; Yamato, Philippe; Guillot, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Metamorphic soles correspond to tectonic slices welded beneath most large-scale ophiolites. These slivers of oceanic crust metamorphosed up to granulite facies conditions are interpreted as having formed during the first My of intra-oceanic subduction from heat transfer from the incipient mantle wedge towards the top of the subducting plate. Our study reappraises the formation of metamorphic sole through detailed field and petrological work on three classical key sections across the Semail ophiolite (Oman and United Arab Emirates). Geothermobarometry and thermodynamic modelling show that metamorphic soles do not record a continuous temperature gradient, as expected from simple heating by the upper plate or by shear heating and proposed by previous studies. The upper, high-temperature metamorphic sole is subdivided in at least two units, testifying to the stepwise formation, detachment and accretion of successive slices from the downgoing slab to the mylonitic base of the ophiolite. Estimated peak pressure-temperature conditions through the metamorphic sole are, from top to bottom, 850˚C - 1GPa, 725°C - 0.8 GPa and 530°C - 0.5 GPa. These estimates appear constant within each unit but separated by a gap of 100 to 200˚C and 0.2 GPa. Despite being separated by hundreds of kilometres below the Semail ophiolite and having contrasting locations with respect to the ophiolite ridge axis, metamorphic soles show no evidence for significant petrological variations along strike. These constraints allow to refine the tectonic-petrological model for the genesis of metamorphic soles, formed through the stepwise stacking of several homogeneous slivers of oceanic crust and its sedimentary cover. Metamorphic soles do not so much result from downward heat transfer (ironing effect) but rather from progressive metamorphism during strain localization and cooling of the plate interface. The successive thrusts are the result of rheological contrasts between the sole (initially at the

  7. TESTING OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES IN CENTRAL OHIO HOUSES: PHASE 2 (WINTER 1988-1989)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests of developmental indoor radon reduction techniques in nine slab-on-grade and four crawl-space houses near Dayton. Ohio. he slab-on-grade tests indicated that, when there is a good layer of aggregate under the slab, the sub-slab ventilation (SSV) ...

  8. TESTING OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES IN CENTRAL OHIO HOUSES: PHASE 2 (WINTER 1988-1989)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests of developmental indoor radon reduction techniques in nine slab-on-grade and four crawl-space houses near Dayton. Ohio. he slab-on-grade tests indicated that, when there is a good layer of aggregate under the slab, the sub-slab ventilation (SSV) ...

  9. Comparison of Surgical Outcomes Between Short-Segment Open and Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques for Thoracolumbar Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xi; Shi, Yaohua; Dong, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare the surgical outcomes between open pedicle screw fixation (OPSF) and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PPSF) for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures, which has received scant research attention to date. Material/Methods Eight-four patients with acute and subacute thoracolumbar fractures who were treated with SSPSF from January 2013 to June 2014 at the Changzhou Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Changzhou, China) were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into 4 groups: the OPSF with 4 basic screws (OPSF-4) group, the OPSF with 4 basic and 2 additional screws (OPSF-6) group, the PPSF with 4 basic screws (PPSF-4) group, and the PPSF with 4 basic and 2 additional screws (PPSF-6) group. The intraoperative, immediate postoperative, and over 1-year follow-up outcomes were evaluated and compared among these groups. Results Blood loss in the PPSF-4 group and the PPSF-6 group was significantly less than in the OPSF-4 group and the OPSF-6 group (P<0.05). The OPSF-6 group exhibited significantly higher immediate postoperative correction percentage of anterior column height of fractured vertebra than the other 3 groups (P<0.05), and higher correction of sagittal regional Cobb angle and kyphotic angle of injured vertebra than in the PPSF-4 and -6 groups (P<0.05). In addition, there was no significant difference in the correction loss of percentage of anterior column height, and loss of sagittal Cobb angle and kyphotic angle of fractured vertebrae at final follow-up among the 4 groups (P>0.05). Conclusions OPSF with 6 screws had an advantage in the correction of injured vertebral height and kyphosis, and PPSF reduced the intraoperative blood loss of patients. PMID:27602557

  10. Seismic monitoring of hydraulic fracturing: techniques for determining fluid flow paths and state of stress away from a wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.; House, L.; Kaieda, H.

    1986-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has gained in popularity in recent years as a way to determine the orientations and magnitudes of tectonic stresses. By augmenting conventional hydraulic fracturing measurements with detection and mapping of the microearthquakes induced by fracturing, we can supplement and idependently confirm information obtained from conventional analysis. Important information obtained from seismic monitoring includes: the state of stress of the rock, orientation and spacing of the major joint sets, and measurements of rock elastic parameters at locations distant from the wellbore. While conventional well logging operations can provide information about several of these parameters, the zone of interrogation is usually limited to the immediate proximity of the borehole. The seismic waveforms of the microearthquakes contain a wealth of information about the rock in regions that are otherwise inaccessible for study. By reliably locating the hypocenters of many microearthquakes, we have inferred the joint patterns in the rock. We observed that microearthquake locations do not define a simple, thin, planar distribution, that the fault plane solutions are consistent with shear slippage, and that spectral analysis indicates that the source dimensions and slip along the faults are small. Hence we believe that the microearthquakes result from slip along preexisting joints, and not from tensile extension at the tip of the fracture. Orientations of the principal stresses can be estimated by using fault plane solutions of the larger microearthquakes. By using a joint earthquake location scheme, and/or calibrations with downhole detonators, rock velocities and heterogeneities thereof can be investigated in rock volumes that are far enough from the borehole to be representative of intrincis rock properties.

  11. Gene Therapy for Fracture Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    technically more difficult in both the surgery and the post- fracture injections, we hypothesized that the intramedullary injection technique would provide... Surgery : The fracture surgery for exterior injections is as previously described in the rat femur fracture model (Bonnerans and Einhorn, 1984). A...after surgery by the three-point bending technique (Figure 2). Post-fracture injections are performed from the exterior lateral or medial aspects

  12. Temporal evolution of crack propagation propensity in snow in relation to slab and weak layer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Jürg; Reuter, Benjamin; van Herwijnen, Alec; Richter, Bettina; Gaume, Johan

    2016-11-01

    If a weak snow layer below a cohesive slab is present in the snow cover, unstable snow conditions can prevail for days or even weeks. We monitored the temporal evolution of a weak layer of faceted crystals as well as the overlaying slab layers at the location of an automatic weather station in the Steintälli field site above Davos (Eastern Swiss Alps). We focussed on the crack propagation propensity and performed propagation saw tests (PSTs) on 7 sampling days during a 2-month period from early January to early March 2015. Based on video images taken during the tests we determined the mechanical properties of the slab and the weak layer and compared them to the results derived from concurrently performed measurements of penetration resistance using the snow micro-penetrometer (SMP). The critical cut length, observed in PSTs, increased overall during the measurement period. The increase was not steady and the lowest values of critical cut length were observed around the middle of the measurement period. The relevant mechanical properties, the slab effective elastic modulus and the weak layer specific fracture, overall increased as well. However, the changes with time differed, suggesting that the critical cut length cannot be assessed by simply monitoring a single mechanical property such as slab load, slab modulus or weak layer specific fracture energy. Instead, crack propagation propensity is the result of a complex interplay between the mechanical properties of the slab and the weak layer. We then compared our field observations to newly developed metrics of snow instability related to either failure initiation or crack propagation propensity. The metrics were either derived from the SMP signal or calculated from simulated snow stratigraphy (SNOWPACK). They partially reproduced the observed temporal evolution of critical cut length and instability test scores. Whereas our unique dataset of quantitative measures of snow instability provides new insights into the

  13. Effect of novel restoration techniques on the fracture resistance of teeth treated endodontically: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Emin Kaval, Mehmet; Turkun, Murat; Micoogullari Kurt, Seniha

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effects of fiber-reinforced composite restorations and a bulk-fill resin composite on the fracture strength of mandibular premolars treated endodontically. Standard mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared in 48 mandibular premolars. Following root canal treatment, teeth were assigned to four groups: Group 1, nano-hybrid resin composite; Group 2, polyethylene woven fiber plus nano-hybrid resin composite; Group 3, short fiber-reinforced resin composite plus nano-hybrid resin composite; and Group 4, bulk-fill resin composite plus nano-hybrid resin composite. Then, the teeth were subjected to the fracture toughness test. The data were analyzed statistically using one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's post-hoc test. The fiber-reinforced groups had better results than the nano-hybrid and bulk-fill composites (p<0.05), while the bulk-fill and nano-hybrid composite restorations gave similar results (p>0.05). Fiber-reinforcement improved the fracture strength of teeth with large MOD cavities treated endodontically. Bulk-fill composites can be used reliably as well as nano-hybrid composites.

  14. Determination of fracture toughness of calcium phosphate coatings deposited onto Ti6Al4V substrate by using indentation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Ibrahim; Cetinel, Hakan; Pasinli, Ahmet

    2012-09-01

    In this study, fracture toughness values of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings deposited onto Ti6Al4V substrate were determined by using Vickers indentation method. In this new patent holding method, the activation processes were performed with NaOH and NaOH+H2O2 on the Ti6Al4V material surface. Thicknesses of CaP coatings were measured from cross-sections of the samples by using optical microscopy. Vickers indentation tests were performed by using microhardness tester. Young's modulus values of the coatings were determined by using ultra microhardness tester. As a result, fracture toughness (K1C) values of the CaP coatings produced by using two different activation processes, were calculated by using experimental study results. These were found to be 0.43 MPa m1/2 and 0.39 MPa m1/2, respectively. It was determined that the CaP coating on Ti6Al4V activated by NaOH+H2O2 had higher fracture toughness than the CaP coating on Ti6Al4V activated by NaOH.

  15. Strength calculation for fiber concrete slabs under high velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artem, Ustinov; Kopanica, Dmitry; Belov, Nikolay; Jugov, Nikolay; Jugov, Alexey; Koshko, Bogdan; Kopanitsa, Georgy

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents results of the research on strength of concrete slabs reinforced with steel fiber and tested under a high velocity impact. Mathematical models are proposed to describe the behavior of continua with a complex structure with consideration of porosity, non-elastic effects, phase transformations and dynamic destructions of friable and plastic materials under shock wave impact. The models that describe the behavior of structural materials were designed in the RANET-3 CAD software system. This allowed solving the tasks of hit and explosion in the full three-dimensional statement using finite elements method modified for dynamic problems. The research results demonstrate the validity of the proposed mathematical model to calculate stress-strain state and fracture of layered fiber concrete structures under high velocity impact caused by blast wave.

  16. Development of a Rolling Process Design Tool for Use in Improving Hot Roll Slab Recovery (Quarterly Report: Q3-FY03)

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Wang, P

    2003-07-31

    In this quarter, an FEM simulation has been performed to compare the shape of the deformed slab after the 8th reduction pass with the experimental metrology data provided by Alcoa Technical Center (ATC). Also, a bug in the thermal contact algorithm used in parallel processing have been identified and corrected for consistent thermal solutions between the rollers and the slab. The overall shape of the slab at the end of the 8th pass is shown in Figure 1. Comparison of the sectional views at the center plane along the length of the slab for both experiment and simulation, shows that the curvature at the slab mouth at the centerline is slightly higher than the experimental result as shown in Figure 2. We are currently focusing on tuning the parameter values used in the simulation and a more complete parametric study for validation is underway. Also, unexpected fracture occurred along the surface of the slab in the 9th pass as shown in Figure 3. We believe that the reason is due to previously noted inadequacies in the fracture model at low strain rates and high stress triaxiality. We are expecting to receive a modified fracture model based on additional experiment shortly from Alcoa.

  17. Radiation pressure of active dispersive chiral slabs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maoyan; Li, Hailong; Gao, Dongliang; Gao, Lei; Xu, Jun; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-06-29

    We report a mechanism to obtain optical pulling or pushing forces exerted on the active dispersive chiral media. Electromagnetic wave equations for the pure chiral media using constitutive relations containing dispersive Drude models are numerically solved by means of Auxiliary Differential Equation Finite Difference Time Domain (ADE-FDTD) method. This method allows us to access the time averaged Lorentz force densities exerted on the magnetoelectric coupling chiral slabs via the derivation of bound electric and magnetic charge densities, as well as bound electric and magnetic current densities. Due to the continuously coupled cross-polarized electromagnetic waves, we find that the pressure gradient force is engendered on the active chiral slabs under a plane wave incidence. By changing the material parameters of the slabs, the total radiation pressure exerted on a single slab can be directed either along the propagation direction or in the opposite direction. This finding provides a promising avenue for detecting the chirality of materials by optical forces.

  18. Mixing characterization in a slab tank

    SciTech Connect

    Stoots, C.M.; Gavlak, A.M.; Calabrese, R.V.; Kyser, E.A.; Tatterson, G.B.

    1989-01-01

    Due to safety requirements, slab tanks are often used to process radioactive materials. The configuration is that of a slit or a tank of rectangular cross section with very low aspect ratio. Due to its nonconventional geometry, very little is known about the slab tank mixing environment. To better understand it, experiments have been performed in a full scale standard configuration equipped with two stirrer shafts, each containing several axial impellers. To characterize the velocity field, mean and RMS turbulent velocities have been measured at several impeller speeds with a two-component Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA). The LDA data have been supplemented with flow visualization, circulation time, and mixing time studies. Since the slab tank is often used as a precipitator, solids suspension studies have also been performed. The results of the various experiments will be presented and will be interpreted to elucidate slab tank dynamics. The implication to mixing efficiency will also be discussed.

  19. A simple analytical solution for slab detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2011-04-01

    An analytical solution is presented for the nonlinear dynamics of high amplitude necking in a free layer of power-law fluid extended in layer-parallel direction due to buoyancy stress. The solution is one-dimensional (1-D) and contains three dimensionless parameters: the thinning factor (i.e. ratio of current to initial layer thickness), the power-law stress exponent, n, and the ratio of time to the characteristic deformation time of a viscous layer under buoyancy stress, t/ tc. tc is the ratio of the layer's effective viscosity to the applied buoyancy stress. The value of tc/ n specifies the time for detachment, i.e. the time it takes until the layer thickness has thinned to zero. The first-order accuracy of the 1-D solution is confirmed with 2-D finite element simulations of buoyancy-driven necking in a layer of power-law fluid embedded in a linear or power-law viscous medium. The analytical solution is accurate within a factor about 2 if the effective viscosity ratio between the layer and the medium is larger than about 100 and if the medium is a power-law fluid. The analytical solution is applied to slab detachment using dislocation creep laws for dry and wet olivine. Results show that one of the most important parameters controlling the dynamics of slab detachment is the strength of the slab which strongly depends on temperature and rheological parameters. The fundamental conclusions concerning slab detachment resulting from both the analytical solution and from earlier published thermo-mechanical numerical simulations agree well, indicating the usefulness of the highly simplified analytical solution for better understanding slab detachment. Slab detachment resulting from viscous necking is a combination of inhomogeneous thinning due to varying buoyancy stress within the slab and a necking instability due to the power-law viscous rheology ( n > 1). Application of the analytical solution to the Hindu Kush slab provides no "order-of-magnitude argument" against

  20. Photocatalytic, highly hydrophilic porcelain stoneware slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, M.; Guarini, G.; Zanelli, C.; Marani, F.; Fossa, L.; Dondi, M.

    2011-10-01

    Photocatalytic, highly hydrophilic industrial porcelain stoneware large slabs were realized by deposition of nanostructured TiO2 coatings. Different surface finishing and experimental conditions were considered in order to assess the industrial feasibility. Photocatalytic and wetting behaviour of functionalized slabs mainly depends on surface phase composition in terms of anatase/rutile ratio, this involving - as a key issue - the deposition of TiO2 on industrially sintered products with an additional annealing step to strengthen coatings' performances and durability.

  1. Behavior of Partially Restrained Reinforced Concrete Slabs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Experimental Deflections and Coupling Forces. ........ 72 3.4 Method of Approximating Support Rotations . . . 76 3.5 Free-Body Diagram Used in Computing...common types of structural elements. Slabs are found in practically every type of structural system, ’ whether steel or concrete, single -story or...Because of the nature of reinforced concrete slabs, accurate evaluations of stresses, strains, and deflections are difficult to make by elasticity

  2. Application Improvements of Slab-Coupled Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadderdon, Spencer Lee

    This dissertation explores techniques for improving slab-coupled optical fiber sensor (SCOS) technology for use in specific applications and sensing configurations. SCOS are advantageous for their small size and all-dielectric composition which permit non-intrusive measurement of electric fields within compact environments; however, their small size also limits their sensitivity. This work performs a thorough analysis of the factors contributing to the performance of SCOS and demonstrates methods which improve SCOS, while maintaining its small dimensions and high level of directional sensitivity. These improvements include increasing the sensitivity by 9x, improving the frequency response to include sub 300 kHz frequencies, and developing a method to tune the resonances. The analysis shows that the best material for the slab waveguide is an electro-optic polymer because of its low RF permittivity combined with high electro-optic coefficient. Additional improvements are based on changing the crystal orientation to a transverse configuration, which enhances the sensitivity due to a combined increase in the effective electro-optic coefficient and electric field penetration into the slab. The transverse SCOS configuration not only improves the overall sensitivity but increases the directional sensitivity of the SCOS. Lithium niobate and electro-optic polymer are both experimentally shown to exhibit minimal frequency dependent sensitivity making them suitable for broad frequency applications. Simultaneous interrogation of multiple SCOS with a single tunable laser is achieved by tuning the resonant wavelengths of KTP SCOS so their resonances overlap.

  3. Development of a Rolling Process Design Tool for Use in Improving Hot Roll Slab Recovery Quarterly Report: Q1 FY03

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Wang, P

    2003-02-03

    In this quarter, further analysis was done to investigate the difficulty in predicting fracture at the slab ends. The stress concentration created by the notch geometry at the slab ends can accelerate damage and promote fracture at the relatively low strain rates that exist when the notch region is not directly in the roll bite. However, the phenomenological fracture model provided by Alcoa Technical Center (ATC) was calibrated for strain rates characteristic of the rolling process zone and hydrostatic stress states less severe than the leading edge notch. Additional experiments are being performed at ATC to extend the model's range to include the low strain rate, high triaxiality condition. A bug in the parallel code that caused an inconsistent temperature distribution at the slab surface has been identified and Corrected. Currently, more simulations are being performed to validate the model.

  4. Is Arthroscopic Technique Superior to Open Reduction Internal Fixation in the Treatment of Isolated Displaced Greater Tuberosity Fractures?

    PubMed

    Liao, Weixiong; Zhang, Hao; Li, Zhongli; Li, Ji

    2016-05-01

    Arthroscopic double-row suture-anchor fixation and open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) are used to treat displaced greater tuberosity fractures, but there are few data that can help guide the surgeon in choosing between these approaches. We therefore asked: (1) Is there a difference in surgical time between arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation and ORIF for isolated displaced greater tuberosity fractures? (2) Are there differences in the postoperative ROM and functional scores between arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation and ORIF for isolated displaced greater tuberosity fractures? (3) Are there differences in complications resulting in additional operations between the two approaches? Between 2006 and 2012, we treated 79 patients surgically for displaced greater tuberosity fractures. Of those, 32 (41%) were considered eligible for our study based on inclusion criteria for isolated displaced greater tuberosity fractures with a displacement of at least 5 mm but less than 2 cm. During that time, we generally treated patients with displaced greater tuberosity fractures with a displacement greater than 1 cm or with a fragment size greater than 3×3 cm with open treatment, and patients with displaced greater tuberosity fractures with a displacement less than 1 cm or with a fragment size less than 3×3 cm with arthroscopic treatment. Fifty-three underwent open treatment based on those indications, and 26 underwent arthroscopic treatment, of whom 17 (32%) and 15 (58%) were available for followup at a mean of 34 months (range, 24-28 months). All patients with such fractures identified from our institutional database were treated by these two approaches and no other methods were used. Surgical time was defined as the time from initiation of the incision to the time when suture of the incision was finished, and was determined by an observer with a stopwatch. Patients were followed up in the outpatient department at 6, 12, and 24 weeks, and every 6

  5. Double semi-tubular plating of clavicle using a piggyback technique--an alternative way of treating clavicle mid-shaft fractures in young patients.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Faisal; Kadakia, Anish P; Forrester, Richard; Price, Rodney; Tuson, Colin

    2011-12-01

    The majority of clavicle fractures unite uneventfully. Indications for operative surgery are limited, with high rates of complications. We describe our results with an alternative cost effective method of treating these injuries in young patients. It is a retrospective series of 20 patients treated between January 2005 and January 2009 with a "piggy back" technique using double plating with two 3.5 mm drill hole semitubular plates. All patients were assessed with DASH (Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand) score at last review. Average time to union was 12.5 weeks. The average DASH score was 834 (0-34.2). There was one case each of non-union, implant removal and symptomatic numbness around the scar. The overall complication rate was 15% with 5% incidence of non-union. The results compare favourably with previously published series. We propose that this technique allows a cost effective way of treating these fractures in young patients, with a high patient satisfaction rate.

  6. Influence of various bonding techniques on the fracture strength of thin CAD/CAM-fabricated occlusal glass-ceramic veneers.

    PubMed

    Yazigi, Christine; Kern, Matthias; Chaar, Mohamed Sad

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of immediate dentin sealing and the effects of different bonding protocols on the fracture strength of CAD/CAM occlusal veneers bonded to exposed dentin. Ninety-six extracted maxillary premolars were initially divided into three main groups with 32 specimens each: without immediate dentin sealing, immediate dentin sealing/total etching and immediate dentin sealing/selective etching. Teeth were identically prepared in the dentin to receive occlusal veneers of 0.8mm thickness, milled from lithium disilicate ceramic blocks (IPS e.max CAD). Each main group was later subdivided, according to the pre-cementation surface etching protocol (total/selective), into two subgroups with 16 specimens each. All restorations were adhesively bonded using a resin cement (Variolink Esthetic). Half of the specimens of each subgroup were subjected to thermo-dynamic loading in a chewing simulator with 1,200,000 cycles at 10kg load. The other half and the surviving specimens were subjected to quasi-static loading until failure. Statistical analysis was performed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests. All specimens except one survived the artificial aging. A significantly higher fracture strength of restorations (p ≤ 0.001) was obtained when immediate dentin sealing was followed regardless of the etching method with values ranging from a minimum of 1122 ± 336N to a maximum of 1853 ± 333N. Neither the pre-cementation treatment nor the artificial aging had a statistical significant effect on the fracture strength. Immediate dentin sealing protocol is recommended whenever dentin is exposed during the preparation for thin glass-ceramic occlusal veneers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Epithelialization Over a Scaffold of Antibiotic-Impregnated PMMA Beads: A Salvage Technique for Open Tibial Fractures with Bone and Soft Tissue Loss When all Else Fails

    PubMed Central

    Masrouha, Karim Z.; El-Bitar, Youssef; Najjar, Marc; Saghieh, Said

    2016-01-01

    The management of soft tissue defects in tibial fractures is essential for limb preservation. Current techniques are not without complications and may lead to poor functional outcomes. A salvage method is described using three illustrative cases whereby a combination of flaps and antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate beads are employed to fill the bony defect, fight the infection, and provide a surface for epithelial regeneration and secondary wound closure. This was performed after the partial failure of all other options. All patients were fully ambulatory with no clinical, radiographic or laboratory sign of infection at their most recent follow-up. Although our findings are encouraging, this is the first report of epithelialization of the skin on a polymethylmethacrylate scaffold. Further studies investigating the use of this technique are warranted. PMID:27517073

  8. Was there a Laramide "flat slab"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Slab-continent interactions drive most non-collisional orogenies; this has led us to usually anticipate that temporal changes or spatial variations in orogenic style are related to changes in the slab, most especially in the slab's dip. This is most dramatically evident for orogenies in the foreland, well away from the trench, such as the Laramide orogeny. However, the physical means of connecting slab geometry to crustal deformation remain obscure. Dickinson and Snyder (1978) and Bird (1984) laid out a conceptually elegant means of creating foreland deformation from shear between a slab and overriding continental lithosphere, but such strong shear removed all of the continental lithosphere in the western U.S. when included in a numerical simulation of flat slab subduction (Bird, 1988), a removal in conflict with observations of volcanic rocks and xenoliths in many locations. Relying on an increase in edge normal stresses results, for the Laramide, in requiring the little-deformed Colorado Plateau to either be unusually strong or to have risen rapidly enough and high enough to balance edge stresses with body forces. Early deformation in the Plateau rules out unusual strength, and the accumulation and preservation of Late Cretaceous near-sea level sedimentary rocks makes profound uplift unlikely (though not impossible). Relying on comparisons with the Sierras Pampeanas is also fraught with problems: the Sierras are not separated from the Andean fold-and-thrust belt by several hundred kilometers of little-deformed crust, nor were they buried under kilometers of marine muds as were large parts of the Laramide foreland. We have instead suggested that some unusual interactions of an obliquely subducting plate with a thick Archean continental root might provide a better explanation than a truly flat slab (Jones et al., 2011). From this, and given that several flat-slab segments today are not associated with foreland orogenesis and noting that direct evidence for truly

  9. Marginal gap, internal fit, and fracture load of leucite-reinforced ceramic inlays fabricated by CEREC inLab and hot-pressed techniques.

    PubMed

    Keshvad, Alireza; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Asefzadeh, Farokh; Khalilinejad, Foroogh; Alihemmati, Mohammad; Van Noort, Richard

    2011-10-01

    This in vitro study was designed to evaluate and compare the marginal gap, internal fit, and fracture load of resin-bonded, leucite-reinforced glass ceramic mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) inlays fabricated by computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) or hot pressing. Fifty caries-free extracted human molars were prepared for standardized MOD inlays. Impressions of each specimen were made and poured using type IV dental stone. Dies were randomly divided into two equal groups. Twenty-five ceramic inlays were fabricated by the hot-pressed technique using IPS Empress leucite-reinforced glass ceramics, and the other 25 ceramic inlays were produced by CAD/CAM technology using ProCAD leucite-reinforced ceramic blocks and CEREC inLab facilities. Inlays were bonded to the teeth using a dual-cured resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and then thermocycled for 5000 cycles. The marginal gap measurements were taken with a stereomicroscope. Specimens in each group of inlay systems were randomly divided into two subgroups of 10 and 15 specimens each. Ten specimens in each subgroup were sectioned mesiodistally for evaluation of the internal fit. The fracture load of specimens in the second subgroup (n = 15) of the two inlay systems was determined under compressive load in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test at a significance level of p < 0.05. The mean marginal and internal gap size in both IPS Empress and ProCAD inlays were less than 100 μm; however, the marginal gap for the IPS Empress restorations was significantly higher than that of ProCAD restorations (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the mean internal fit or the fracture load between the two glass ceramic inlays (p > 0.05). The leucite-reinforced glass ceramic inlay restorations fabricated by CEREC inLab (CAD/CAM) and the hot-pressed technique provided clinically acceptable marginal and internal fit with comparable fracture

  10. The load separation technique in the elastic-plastic fracture analysis of two- and three-dimensional geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharobeam, Monir H.

    1994-01-01

    Load separation is the representation of the load in the test records of geometries containing cracks as a multiplication of two separate functions: a crack geometry function and a material deformation function. Load separation is demonstrated in the test records of several two-dimensional geometries such as compact tension geometry, single edge notched bend geometry, and center cracked tension geometry and three-dimensional geometries such as semi-elliptical surface crack. The role of load separation in the evaluation of the fracture parameter J-integral and the associated factor eta for two-dimensional geometries is discussed. The paper also discusses the theoretical basis and the procedure for using load separation as a simplified yet accurate approach for plastic J evaluation in semi-elliptical surface crack which is a three-dimensional geometry. The experimental evaluation of J, and particularly J(sub pl), for three-dimensional geometries is very challenging. A few approaches have been developed in this regard and they are either complex or very approximate. The paper also presents the load separation as a mean to identify the blunting and crack growth regions in the experimental test records of precracked specimens. Finally, load separation as a methodology in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics is presented.

  11. Cracking behavior of structural slab bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baah, Prince

    Bridge deck cracking is a common problem throughout the United States, and it affects the durability and service life of concrete bridges. Several departments of transportation (DOTs) in the United States prefer using continuous three-span solid structural slab bridges without stringers over typical four-lane highways. Recent inspections of such bridges in Ohio revealed cracks as wide as 0.125 in. These measured crack widths are more than ten times the maximum limit recommended in ACI 224R-01 for bridge decks exposed to de-icing salts. Measurements using digital image correlation revealed that the cracks widened under truck loading, and in some cases, the cracks did not fully close after unloading. This dissertation includes details of an experimental investigation of the cracking behavior of structural concrete. Prism tests revealed that the concrete with epoxy-coated bars (ECB) develops the first crack at smaller loads, and develops larger crack widths compared to the corresponding specimens with uncoated (black) bars. Slab tests revealed that the slabs with longitudinal ECB developed first crack at smaller loads, exhibited wider cracks and a larger number of cracks, and failed at smaller ultimate loads compared to the corresponding test slabs with black bars. To develop a preventive measure, slabs with basalt and polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete were also included in the test program. These test slabs exhibited higher cracking loads, smaller crack widths, and higher ultimate loads at failure compared to the corresponding slab specimens without fibers. Merely satisfying the reinforcement spacing requirements given in AASHTO or ACI 318-11 is not adequate to limit cracking below the ACI 224R-01 recommended maximum limit, even though all the relevant design requirements are otherwise met. Addition of fiber to concrete without changing any steel reinforcing details is expected to reduce the severity and extent of cracking in reinforced concrete bridge decks.

  12. 46. 84INCH STRIP MILL. SLABS ROLLED AT THE PLANT'S SLABBING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. 84-INCH STRIP MILL. SLABS ROLLED AT THE PLANT'S SLABBING MILL ARE REHEATED IN ONE OF TWO CONTINUOUS FURNACES, THEN PUSHED OUT ONTO A CONVEYOR THAT CARRIES THEM TO THE ROUGHING AND FINISHING STANDS. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  13. Effects of change in slab geometry on the mantle flow and slab fabric in Southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, Sanja; Wagner, Lara S.; Beck, Susan L.; Long, Maureen D.; Zandt, George; Tavera, Hernando

    2016-10-01

    The effects of complex slab geometries on the surrounding mantle flow field are still poorly understood. Here we combine shear wave velocity structure with Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy to examine these effects in southern Peru, where the slab changes its geometry from steep to flat. To the south, where the slab subducts steeply, we find trench-parallel anisotropy beneath the active volcanic arc that we attribute to the mantle wedge and/or upper portions of the subducting plate. Farther north, beneath the easternmost corner of the flat slab, we observe a pronounced low-velocity anomaly. This anomaly is caused either by the presence of volatiles and/or flux melting that could result from southward directed, volatile-rich subslab mantle flow or by increased temperature and/or decompression melting due to small-scale vertical flow. We also find evidence for mantle flow through the tear north of the subducting Nazca Ridge. Finally, we observe anisotropy patterns associated with the fast velocity anomalies that reveal along strike variations in the slab's internal deformation. The change in slab geometry from steep to flat contorts the subducting plate south of the Nazca Ridge causing an alteration of the slab petrofabric. In contrast, the torn slab to the north still preserves the primary (fossilized) petrofabric first established shortly after plate formation.

  14. Experimental Study of Slabbing and Rockburst Induced by True-Triaxial Unloading and Local Dynamic Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Kun; Tao, Ming; Li, Xi-bing; Zhou, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Slabbing/spalling and rockburst are unconventional types of failure of hard rocks under conditions of unloading and various dynamic loads in environments with high and complex initial stresses. In this study, the failure behaviors of different rock types (granite, red sandstone, and cement mortar) were investigated using a novel testing system coupled to true-triaxial static loads and local dynamic disturbances. An acoustic emission system and a high-speed camera were used to record the real-time fracturing processes. The true-triaxial unloading test results indicate that slabbing occurred in the granite and sandstone, whereas the cement mortar underwent shear failure. Under local dynamically disturbed loading, none of the specimens displayed obvious fracturing at low-amplitude local dynamic loading; however, the degree of rock failure increased as the local dynamic loading amplitude increased. The cement mortar displayed no failure during testing, showing a considerable load-carrying capacity after testing. The sandstone underwent a relatively stable fracturing process, whereas violent rockbursts occurred in the granite specimen. The fracturing process does not appear to depend on the direction of local dynamic loading, and the acoustic emission count rate during rock fragmentation shows that similar crack evolution occurred under the two test scenarios (true-triaxial unloading and local dynamically disturbed loading).

  15. Stress Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Stress fractures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by ... up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of a ...

  16. Greenstick Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Greenstick fractures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A greenstick fracture occurs when a bone bends and cracks, instead of breaking completely into separate pieces. The fracture looks similar to what happens when you try ...

  17. Accidents due to falls from roof slabs.

    PubMed

    Rudelli, Bruno Alves; Silva, Marcelo Valerio Alabarce da; Akkari, Miguel; Santili, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Falls from the roof slabs of houses are accidents of high potential severity that occur in large Brazilian cities and often affect children and adolescents. The aims of this study were to characterize the factors that predispose towards this type of fall involving children and adolescents, quantify the severity of associated lesions and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN AND SETTING Descriptive observational prospective longitudinal study in two hospitals in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. METHODS Data were collected from 29 cases of falls from roof slabs involving children and adolescents between October 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS Cases involving males were more prevalent, accounting for 84%. The predominant age group was schoolchildren (7 to 12 years old; 44%). Leisure activities were most frequently being practiced on the roof slab at the time of the fall (86%), and flying a kite was the most prevalent game (37.9%). In 72% of the cases, the children were unaccompanied by an adult responsible for them. Severe conditions such as multiple trauma and traumatic brain injuries resulted from 79% of the accidents. CONCLUSION Falls from roof slabs are accidents of high potential severity, and preventive measures aimed towards informing parents and guardians about the dangers and risk factors associated with this type of accident are needed, along with physical protective measures, such as low walls around the slab and gates with locks to restrict free access to these places.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in an Asymmetric Magnetic Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allcock, Matthew; Erdélyi, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Analytical models of solar atmospheric magnetic structures have been crucial for our understanding of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave behaviour and in the development of the field of solar magneto-seismology. Here, an analytical approach is used to derive the dispersion relation for MHD waves in a magnetic slab of homogeneous plasma enclosed on its two sides by non-magnetic, semi-infinite plasma with different densities and temperatures. This generalises the classic magnetic slab model, which is symmetric about the slab. The dispersion relation, unlike that governing a symmetric slab, cannot be decoupled into the well-known sausage and kink modes, i.e. the modes have mixed properties. The eigenmodes of an asymmetric magnetic slab are better labelled as quasi-sausage and quasi-kink modes. Given that the solar atmosphere is highly inhomogeneous, this has implications for MHD mode identification in a range of solar structures. A parametric analysis of how the mode properties (in particular the phase speed, eigenfrequencies, and amplitudes) vary in terms of the introduced asymmetry is conducted. In particular, avoided crossings occur between quasi-sausage and quasi-kink surface modes, allowing modes to adopt different properties for different parameters in the external region.

  19. Characterization of anisotropic acoustic metamaterial slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Hyeong; Lee, Hyung Jin; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-01-01

    In an anisotropic acoustic metamaterial, the off-diagonal components of its effective mass density tensor should be considered in order to describe the anisotropic behavior produced by arbitrarily shaped inclusions. However, few studies have been carried out to characterize anisotropic acoustic metamaterials. In this paper, we propose a method that uses the non-diagonal effective mass density tensor to determine the behavior of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials. Our method accurately evaluates the effective properties of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials by separately dealing with slabs made of single and multiple unit cells along the thickness direction. To determine the effective properties, the reflection and transmission coefficients of an acoustic metamaterial slab are calculated, and then the wave vectors inside of the slab are determined using these coefficients. The effective material properties are finally determined by utilizing the spatial dispersion relation of the anisotropic acoustic metamaterial. Since the dispersion relation of an anisotropic acoustic metamaterial is explicitly used, its effective properties can be easily determined by only using a limited number of normal and oblique plane wave incidences into a metamaterial slab, unlike existing approaches requiring a large number of wave incidences. The validity of the proposed method is verified by conducting wave simulations for anisotropic acoustic metamaterial slabs with Z-shaped elastic inclusions of tilted principal material axes.

  20. Research on Magnetoinductive NDE Techniques to Measure Tensile Strength and Fracture Toughness in Steels as They are Manufactured

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    exists between CVN, the yield strength σy, and stress intensity factor K1c, which is often taken as a measure of fracture toughness. The relationship...0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 0 50 100 150 200 250 Stress Intensity Factor (K1c) N LH M ag ni tu de (m V) 4340, 3rd 4340,5th 9-4-30, 3rd 9-4-30, 5th...50 100 150 200 250 Stress Intensity Factor (K1c) N LH M ag ni tu de (m V) 4340, 3rd 4340,5th 9-4-30, 3rd 9-4-30, 5th Figure 2. Third and fifth

  1. Detecting lower-mantle slabs beneath Asia and the Aleutians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, L.; Thomas, C.

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the descend of subducted slabs we search for and analyse seismic arrivals that reflected off the surface of the slab. In order to distinguish between such arrivals and other seismic phases, we search for waves that reach a seismic array with a backazimuth deviating from the theoretical backazimuth of the earthquake. Source-receiver combinations are chosen in a way that their great circle paths do not intersect the slab region, hence the direct arrivals can serve as reference. We focus on the North and Northwest Pacific region by using earthquakes from Japan, the Philippines and the Hindu Kush area recorded at North American networks (e.g. USArray, Alaska and Canada). Using seismic array techniques for analysing the data and record information on slowness, backazimuth and traveltime of the observed out-of-plane arrivals we use these measurements to trace the wave back through a 1-D velocity model to its scattering/reflection location. We find a number of out-of-plane reflections. Assuming only single scattering, most out-of-plane signals have to travel as P-to-P phases and only a few as S-to-P phases, due to the length of the seismograms we processed. The located reflection points present a view of the 3-D structures within the mantle. In the upper mantle and the transition zone they correlate well with the edges of fast velocity regions in tomographic images. We also find reflection points in the mid- and lower mantle and their locations generally agree with fast velocities mapped by seismic tomography models suggesting that in the subduction regions we map, slabs enter the lower mantle. To validate our approach, we calculate and process synthetic seismograms for 3-D wave field propagation through a model containing a slab-like heterogeneity. We show, that depending on the source-receiver geometry relative to the reflection plane, it is indeed possible to observe and back-trace out-of-plane signals.

  2. Slab tears and intermediate-depth seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meighan, Hallie E.; Ten Brink, Uri; Pulliam, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Active tectonic regions where plate boundaries transition from subduction to strike slip can take several forms, such as triple junctions, acute, and obtuse corners. Well-documented slab tears that are associated with high rates of intermediate-depth seismicity are considered here: Gibraltar arc, the southern and northern ends of the Lesser Antilles arc, and the northern end of Tonga trench. Seismicity at each of these locations occurs, at times, in the form of swarms or clusters, and various authors have proposed that each marks an active locus of tear propagation. The swarms and clusters start at the top of the slab below the asthenospheric wedge and extend 30–60 km vertically downward within the slab. We propose that these swarms and clusters are generated by fluid-related embrittlement of mantle rocks. Focal mechanisms of these swarms generally fit the shear motion that is thought to be associated with the tearing process.

  3. Seismological Features of the Subducting Slab Beneath the Kii Peninsula, Central Japan, Revealed by Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, K.; Park, J.

    2007-12-01

    We report seismological evidence that the subducting Philippine Sea slab (PHS) beneath the Kii Peninsula, central Japan, can be divided into three segments. Offshore the Kii Peninsula, the "Tonankai" and "Nankai" fault segments suffer mega-thrust earthquakes that repeat every 100 to 150 years. The structure of the young, thin, contorted PHS is important to the seismo-tectonics in this region. We apply the receiver function (RF) analysis to 26 Hi-net short-period and 4 F-net broad-band seismographic stations. In the case that dipping velocity discontinuities and/or anisotropic media exist beneath seismometer, both radial RFs and transverse RFs contain useful information to estimate underground structure. For isotropic media with a dipping-slab interface, back- azimuthal variation in RFs depends largely on three parameters, the downdip azimuth, dip angle and the depth of the interface. We stack both radial and transverse RFs with allowance a time-shift caused by the dipping interface, searching for optimal parameters based on the grid-search technique at each station. At some stations located near the eastern coastline of the Kii Peninsula, the dip angle of the interface inferred from RF stacking is much steeper than that estimated by the local seismicity. This discrepancy arises from the interference of two slab-converted phases, suggesting a layer atop the slab. In these cases we refine the stack to distinguish two slab phases and estimate three parameters of each dipping interface separately. Two interfaces with the same dip direction and low dip angle are estimated at these stations, with depth difference near 6 km. Thus, the shallower interface may be related to the layer within the oceanic crust and the deeper one is the slab Moho. These double-layered interfaces are detected only at stations located up-dip of a belt-like distribution of non- volcanic low-frequency tremor. Comparing the interface dips estimated in this study with the direction of slab motion

  4. Development of a Rolling Process Design Tool for Use in Improving Hot Roll Slab Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Wang, P

    2003-05-06

    In this quarter, our primary effort has been focused on model verification, emphasizing on consistency in result for parallel and serial simulation runs, Progress has been made in refining the parallel thermal algorithms and in diminishing discretization effects in the contact region between the rollers and slab. We have received the metrology data of the ingot profile at the end of the fifth pass from Alcoa. Detailed comparisons between the data and the initial simulation result are being performed. Forthcoming from Alcoa are modifications to the fracture model based on additional experiments at lower strain rates. The original fracture model, was implemented in the finite element code, but damage in the rolling simulation was not correct due to the modeling errors at lower strain rates and high stress triaxiality. Validation simulations for the fracture model will continue when the experimentally-based adjustments to the parameter values become available.

  5. Extensive decarbonation of continuously hydrated subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, F.; Burton, M. R.; La Spina, G.; Macpherson, C.

    2016-12-01

    CO2 release from subducting slabs is a key element of Earth's carbon cycle, consigning slab carbon either to mantle burial or recycling to the surface through arc volcanism, however, what controls subducted carbon's fate is poorly understood. Fluids mobilized by devolatilization of subducting slabs play a fundamental role in the melting of mantle wedges and in global geochemical cycles [1]. The effect of such fluids on decarbonation in subducting lithologies has been investigated recently [2-5] but mechanisms of carbon transfer from the slab to wedge are poorly understood [2-6]. Several thermodynamic models [2-3], and experimental studies [6] suggest that carbon-bearing phases are stable at sub-arc depths (80-140 km; 2.6-4.5 GPa), implying that this carbon can be subducted to mantle depths of >140 km. This is inconsistent with observations of voluminous CO2 release from arc volcanoes [7-10], located above slabs that are at 2.6-4.5 GPa pressure. Here, we show that continuous hydrated of sediment veneers on subducting slabs by H2O released from oceanic crust and serpentinised mantle lithosphere [11-13], produces extensive slab decarbonation over a narrow, sub-arc pressure range, even for low temperature subduction pathways. This explains the location of CO2-rich volcanism, quantitatively links the sedimentary composition of slab material to the degree of decarbonation and greatly increases estimates for the magnitude of carbon flux through the arc in subduction zones. [1] Hilton, D.R. et al. (2002) Rev. Mineral. Geochem. 47, 319-370. [2] Gorman, P.J. et al. (2006) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 7. [3] Kerrick, D.M. and Connolly, J.A.D. (2001) Nature 411, 293-296. [4] Cook-Kollars, J. et al. (2014) Chem. Geol. 386, 31-48. [5] Collins, N.C. et al. (2015) Chem. Geol. 412, 132-150. [6] Poli, S. et al. (2009) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 278, 350-360. [7] Sano, Y. and Williams, S.N. (1996) Geophys. Res. Lett. 23, 2749-2752. [8] Marty, B. and Tolstikhin, I.N. (1998) Chem. Geol

  6. Exact image theory for the slab problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindell, I. V.

    1988-01-01

    Exact image theory, recently introduced for the exact solution of problems involving homogeneous half spaces and microstrip-like geometries, is developed here for the problem of homogeneous slab of isotropic dielectric and/or magnetic material in free space. Expressions for image sources, creating the exact reflected and transmitted fields, are given and their numerical evaluation is demonstrated. Nonradiating modes, guided by the slab and responsible for the loss of convergence of the image functions, are considered and extracted. The theory can be applied, for example, in an analysis of finite ground planes in microstrip antenna structures.

  7. The slab geometry laser. II - Thermal effects in a finite slab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, T. J.; Byer, R. L.; Eggleston, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents two methods for calculating the thermally induced stress, focusing, and depolarization in a pumped zigzag-slab solid-state laser. A computer program capable of detailed calculations of thermal effects in the general case is described. An approximate analysis of slab thermal effects in many cases allows calculation of these effects without use of the computer model directly. The analysis predicts that slabs of square cross section can be designed to have low depolarization and thermal focusing compared to Nd:YAG laser rods.

  8. The thermal effect of fluid circulation in the subducting crust on slab melting in the Chile subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Glenn A.; Wada, Ikuko; He, Jiangheng; Perry, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Fluids released from subducting slabs affect geochemical recycling and melt generation in the mantle wedge. The distribution of slab dehydration and the potential for slab melting are controlled by the composition/hydration of the slab entering a subduction zone and the pressure-temperature path that the slab follows. We examine the potential for along-strike changes in temperatures, fluid release, and slab melting for the subduction zone beneath the southern portion of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) in south central Chile. Because the age of the Nazca Plate entering the subduction zone decreases from ∼14 Ma north of the Guafo Fracture Zone to ∼6 Ma to the south, a southward warming of the subduction zone has been hypothesized. However, both north and south of Guafo Fracture Zone the geochemical signatures of southern SVZ arc lavas are similar, indicating 3-5 wt.% sediment melt and little to no contribution from melt of subducted basalt or aqueous fluids from subducted crust. We model temperatures in the system, use results of the thermal models and the thermodynamic calculation code Perple_X to estimate the pattern of dehydration-derived fluid release, and examine the potential locations for the onset of melting of the subducting slab. Surface heat flux observations in the region are most consistent with fluid circulation in the high permeability upper oceanic crust redistributing heat. This hydrothermal circulation preferentially cools the hottest parts of the system (i.e. those with the youngest subducting lithosphere). Models including the thermal effects of fluid circulation in the oceanic crust predict melting of the subducting sediment but not the basalt, consistent with the geochemical observations. In contrast, models that do not account for fluid circulation predict melting of both subducting sediment and basalt below the volcanic arc south of Guafo Fracture Zone. In our simulations with the effects of fluid circulation, the onset of sediment

  9. A review on risk assessment techniques for hydraulic fracturing water and produced water management implemented in onshore unconventional oil and gas production.

    PubMed

    Torres, Luisa; Yadav, Om Prakash; Khan, Eakalak

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review different risk assessment techniques applicable to onshore unconventional oil and gas production to determine the risks to water quantity and quality associated with hydraulic fracturing and produced water management. Water resources could be at risk without proper management of water, chemicals, and produced water. Previous risk assessments in the oil and gas industry were performed from an engineering perspective leaving aside important social factors. Different risk assessment methods and techniques are reviewed and summarized to select the most appropriate one to perform a holistic and integrated analysis of risks at every stage of the water life cycle. Constraints to performing risk assessment are identified including gaps in databases, which require more advanced techniques such as modeling. Discussions on each risk associated with water and produced water management, mitigation strategies, and future research direction are presented. Further research on risks in onshore unconventional oil and gas will benefit not only the U.S. but also other countries with shale oil and gas resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The feeder system of the Toba supervolcano from the slab to the shallow reservoir.

    PubMed

    Koulakov, Ivan; Kasatkina, Ekaterina; Shapiro, Nikolai M; Jaupart, Claude; Vasilevsky, Alexander; El Khrepy, Sami; Al-Arifi, Nassir; Smirnov, Sergey

    2016-07-19

    The Toba Caldera has been the site of several large explosive eruptions in the recent geological past, including the world's largest Pleistocene eruption 74,000 years ago. The major cause of this particular behaviour may be the subduction of the fluid-rich Investigator Fracture Zone directly beneath the continental crust of Sumatra and possible tear of the slab. Here we show a new seismic tomography model, which clearly reveals a complex multilevel plumbing system beneath Toba. Large amounts of volatiles originate in the subducting slab at a depth of ∼150 km, migrate upward and cause active melting in the mantle wedge. The volatile-rich basic magmas accumulate at the base of the crust in a ∼50,000 km(3) reservoir. The overheated volatiles continue ascending through the crust and cause melting of the upper crust rocks. This leads to the formation of a shallow crustal reservoir that is directly responsible for the supereruptions.

  11. The feeder system of the Toba supervolcano from the slab to the shallow reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, Ivan; Kasatkina, Ekaterina; Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Jaupart, Claude; Vasilevsky, Alexander; El Khrepy, Sami; Al-Arifi, Nassir; Smirnov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    The Toba Caldera has been the site of several large explosive eruptions in the recent geological past, including the world's largest Pleistocene eruption 74,000 years ago. The major cause of this particular behaviour may be the subduction of the fluid-rich Investigator Fracture Zone directly beneath the continental crust of Sumatra and possible tear of the slab. Here we show a new seismic tomography model, which clearly reveals a complex multilevel plumbing system beneath Toba. Large amounts of volatiles originate in the subducting slab at a depth of ~150 km, migrate upward and cause active melting in the mantle wedge. The volatile-rich basic magmas accumulate at the base of the crust in a ~50,000 km3 reservoir. The overheated volatiles continue ascending through the crust and cause melting of the upper crust rocks. This leads to the formation of a shallow crustal reservoir that is directly responsible for the supereruptions.

  12. Mantle circulation and the lateral migration of subducted slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfunkel, Z.; Anderson, C. A.; Schubert, G.

    1986-01-01

    The geometry of transverse migration of subducted lithospheric slabs is examined, and the way in which this influences the flow in the mantle is studied. The migration of subducted slabs generally appears to be retrograde (at rates of 10-25 mm/yr), so that the descent of material is actually steeper than the slab dip. Retrograde slab migration is probably caused by the tendence of negatively buoyant slabs to sink in the surrounding mantle. The properties of the flow driven by such retrograde slab migration are explored in simple two-dimensional models. The results are used as a guide to infer the contribution of retrograde slab motion to the more complex mantle flow and to examine some consequences of the additional component of mantle flow. It is shown that slab migration is an important factor that causes mantle flow to be geometrically complex and time dependent.

  13. Anomalous transmission of electromagnetic energy through a plasma slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1982-05-01

    An electromagnetic wave, incident on a plasma slab, is considered. It is pointed out that the transmitted energy can be larger than the incident energy during restricted time intervals, if the slab density varies properly in time.

  14. A Simple Vertical Slab Gel Electrophoresis Apparatus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, J. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, easily constructed, and safe vertical slab gel kit used routinely for sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis research and student experiments. Five kits are run from a single transformer. Because toxic solutions are used, students are given plastic gloves and closely supervised during laboratory…

  15. Oceanic slab melting and mantle metasomatism.

    PubMed

    Scaillet, B; Prouteau, G

    2001-01-01

    Modern plate tectonic brings down oceanic crust along subduction zones where it either dehydrates or melts. Those hydrous fluids or melts migrate into the overlying mantle wedge trigerring its melting which produces arc magmas and thus additional continental crust. Nowadays, melting seems to be restricted to cases of young (< 50 Ma) subducted plates. Slab melts are silicic and strongly sodic (trondhjemitic). They are produced at low temperatures (< 1000 degrees C) and under water excess conditions. Their interaction with mantle peridotite produces hydrous metasomatic phases such as amphibole and phlogopite that can be more or less sodium rich. Upon interaction the slab melt becomes less silicic (dacitic to andesitic), and Mg, Ni and Cr richer. Virtually all exposed slab melts display geochemical evidence of ingestion of mantle material. Modern slab melts are thus unlike Archean Trondhjemite-Tonalite-Granodiorite rocks (TTG), which suggests that both types of magmas were generated via different petrogenetic pathways which may imply an Archean tectonic model of crust production different from that of the present-day, subduction-related, one.

  16. Effects of Edge Restraint on Slab Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    manufactured limestone sand fine aggregate. Two batches were prepared, one for each of the different thickness slab groups. A total of thirty-eight 4...Building Code Require- ments" 1983; Detroit, Mich. 4. T. Takehira, A. T. Derecho , and M. Iqbal; "Design Criteria for De- flection Capacity of

  17. Slab Ice Characterization on Martian Richardson Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, F.; Andrieu, F.; Douté, S.

    2016-09-01

    We compare two models: granular and slab in order to study the ice properties in the Richardson crater using spectroscopy. Thanks to radiative transfer modeling, we determine compactness of CO2 ice, grain size, and abundances of water ice and dust.

  18. A Simple Vertical Slab Gel Electrophoresis Apparatus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, J. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, easily constructed, and safe vertical slab gel kit used routinely for sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis research and student experiments. Five kits are run from a single transformer. Because toxic solutions are used, students are given plastic gloves and closely supervised during laboratory…

  19. Multiple stationary solutions of an irradiated slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. D.; Feltham, D. L.

    2005-04-01

    A mathematical model describing the heat budget of an irradiated medium is introduced. The one-dimensional form of the equations and boundary conditions are presented and analysed. Heat transport at one face of the slab occurs by absorption (and reflection) of an incoming beam of short-wave radiation with a fraction of this radiation penetrating into the body of the slab, a diffusive heat flux in the slab and a prescribed incoming heat flux term. The other face of the slab is immersed in its own melt and is considered to be a free surface. Here, temperature continuity is prescribed and evolution of the surface is determined by a Stefan condition. These boundary conditions are flexible enough to describe a range of situations such as a laser shining on an opaque medium, or the natural environment of polar sea ice or lake ice. A two-stream radiation model is used which replaces the simple Beer's law of radiation attenuation frequently used for semi-infinite domains. The stationary solutions of the governing equations are sought and it is found that there exists two possible stationary solutions for a given set of boundary conditions and a range of parameter choices. It is found that the existence of two stationary solutions is a direct result of the model of radiation absorption, due to its effect on the albedo of the medium. A linear stability analysis and numerical calculations indicate that where two stationary solutions exist, the solution corresponding to a larger thickness is always stable and the solution corresponding to a smaller thickness is unstable. Numerical simulations reveal that when there are two solutions, if the slab is thinner than the smaller stationary thickness it will melt completely, whereas if the slab is thicker than the smaller stationary thickness it will evolve toward the larger stationary thickness. These results indicate that other mechanisms (e.g. wave-induced agglomeration of crystals) are necessary to grow a slab from zero initial

  20. Mantle transition zone discontinuities beneath the Indochina Peninsula: Implications for slab subduction and mantle upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Youqiang; Gao, Stephen S.; Liu, Kelly H.; Yang, Ting; Xue, Mei; Le, Khanh Phon

    2017-07-01

    While the northward indentation of the Indian into Eurasian plates has been intensively investigated, its oblique subduction beneath the Indochina Peninsula (ICP) and the role it played on mantle structure and dynamics remain enigmatic. In this first regional-scale receiver function study of the mantle transition zone (MTZ) discontinuities beneath the ICP and its surrounding areas, we stack ˜12,000 receiver functions recorded at 33 stations using a non-plane wave common-conversion-point stacking technique. Systematic spatial variations of MTZ thickness with departures between -21 and +24 km from the globally averaged value are revealed, providing independent evidence for the presence of slab segments in the MTZ beneath the central and a slab window beneath the western ICP. The results also support the existence of broad mantle upwelling adjacent to the eastern edge of the slab segments, which might be responsible for the widespread Cenozoic volcanisms and pervasively observed upper mantle low velocities in the area.

  1. Necessity of the Ridge for the Flat Slab Subduction: Insights from the Peruvian Flat Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Long, M. D.; Zandt, G.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    Flattening of the subducting plate has been linked to the formation of various geological features, including basement-cored uplifts, the cessation of arc volcanism, ignimbrite flare-ups, and the formation of high plateaus and ore deposits [Humphreys et al., 2003; Gutscher et al., 2000; Rosenbaum et al., 2005]. However, the mechanism responsible for the slab flattening is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the Peruvian flat slab, where the Nazca plate starts to bend at ~80 km depth and travels horizontally for several hundred kilometers, at which point steep subduction resumes. Based on a 1500 km long volcanic gap and intermediate depth seismicity patterns, the Peruvian flat slab appears to have the greatest along-strike extent and, therefore, has been suggested as a modern analogue to the putative flat slab during the Laramide orogeny in the western United States (~80-55 Ma). Combining 3D shear wave velocity structure and Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy between ~10° and 18° S, we find that the subducting Nazca plate is not uniformly flat along the entire region, but fails to the north of the subducting Nazca Ridge. Our results show that, in combination with trench retreat, rapid overriding plate motion, and/or presence of a thick cratonic root, the subduction of buoyant overthickened oceanic crust, such as the Nazca Ridge, is necessary for the formation and sustainability of flat slabs. This finding has important implications for the formation of flat slabs both past and present.

  2. A biomechanical comparison of short segment long bone fracture fixation techniques: single large fragment plate versus 2 small fragment plates.

    PubMed

    Watts, Adriel; Weinhold, Paul; Kesler, William; Dahners, Laurence

    2012-09-01

    To determine whether using 2 small fragment plates (3.5 mm screw size) side by side is biomechanically superior to the use of 1 large fragment plate (4.5 mm screw size), in the fixation of "short segments" in long bone fractures. Fiber-filled epoxy bone surrogates were plated across 1-cm gaps with 3 different constructs. Six surrogates were fixed using 2 side-by-side 3.5-mm waisted compression plates and six 3.5-mm screws, 6 surrogates were fixed using one 4.5-mm waisted compression plate and two 4.5-mm screws, and 6 surrogates were fixed using one 3.5-mm waisted compression plate and three 3.5-mm screws. These constructs then underwent cyclic axial compression in 100-N increments until 500 N was reached. Then, they underwent cyclic cantilever bending at 2 Hz and at a 23.6 N·m moment until fatigue failure occurred. Also, a single load to failure test was performed in cantilever bending to evaluate plate strength. The cumulative gap length change after 500 cycles of loading up to 500 N was 3.4% ± 0.4% for the 3.5 mm double plate construct, 9.5% ± 1.4% for the 4.5 mm single plate construct, and 14.4% ± 0.9% for the 3.5 mm single plate construct. In cantilever bending, the 3.5 mm double plate construct failed after 15,345 ± 2493 cycles, the 4.5 mm single plate construct failed after 2713 ± 1811 cycles, and the 3.5 mm single plate construct failed in its first cycle. In single load to failure testing, the load at offset yield was higher in the 3.5 mm double plate construct than the 4.5 mm single plate construct. This study suggests that in situations where anatomy or other limitations limit the length of bone segments available for fixation, it may be preferable to use 2 small plates with more screws rather than 1 large plate with few screws.

  3. Transphyseal Distal Humerus Fracture.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua; Ho, Christine Ann; Ritzman, Todd F; Brighton, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Transphyseal distal humerus fractures typically occur in children younger than 3 years secondary to birth trauma, nonaccidental trauma, or a fall from a small height. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture is crucial for a successful outcome. Recognizing that the forearm is not aligned with the humerus on plain radiographs may aid in the diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture. Surgical management is most commonly performed with the aid of an arthrogram. Closed reduction and percutaneous pinning techniques similar to those used for supracondylar humerus fractures are employed. Cubitus varus caused by a malunion, osteonecrosis of the medial condyle, or growth arrest is the most common complication encountered in the treatment of transphyseal distal humerus fractures. A corrective lateral closing wedge osteotomy can be performed to restore a nearly normal carrying angle.

  4. Conservative treatment of fractures of the proximal phalanx: an option even for unstable fracture patterns.

    PubMed

    Held, Michael; Jordaan, Pieter; Laubscher, Maritz; Singer, Martin; Solomons, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of the conservative management of proximal phalangeal fractures in a dorsal plaster slab. Twenty-three consecutive patients with extra-articular proximal phalangeal fractures were included in this prospective study. Fourteen patients (62%) presented with fractures considered unstable. The fractures were reduced and the position was held with a dorsal plaster slab for three weeks. The patients were followed up for an average of seven weeks (range 2 to 45) after the injury. Range of motion of the finger and radiological evidence of union, non-union or malunion was documented after removal of the plaster. Ninety-one percent of fractures maintained an acceptable reduction. All cases measured less than 15° of angulation. On average 1,1 mm of shortening was measured. In two (9%) cases the reduction was not accepted on follow up assessment and the fractures were managed surgically. Most extra-articular proximal phalanx fractures can be managed conservatively with acceptable results.

  5. Fabrication of fracture-free nanoglassified substrates by layer-by-layer deposition with a paint gun technique for real-time monitoring of protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Linman, Matthew J; Culver, Sean P; Cheng, Quan

    2009-03-03

    New sensing materials that are robust, biocompatible, and amenable to array fabrication are vital to the development of novel bioassays. Herein we report the fabrication of ultrathin (ca. 5-8 nm) glass (silicate) layers on top of a gold surface for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing applications. The nanoglass layers are fabricated by layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH) and sodium silicate (SiO(x)), followed by calcination at high temperature. To deposit these layers in a uniform and reproducible manner, we employed a high-volume, low-pressure (HVLP) paint gun technique that offers high precision and better control through pressurized nitrogen gas. The new substrates are stable in solution for a long period of time, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images confirm that these films are nearly fracture-free. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicates that the surface roughness of the silicate layers is low (rms = 2 to 3 nm), similar to that of bare glass slides. By tuning the experimental parameters such as HVLP gun pressure and layers deposited, different surface morphology could be obtained as revealed by fluorescence microscopy and SEM images. To demonstrate the utility of these ultrathin, fracture-free substrates, lipid bilayer membranes composed of phosphorylated derivatives of phosphoinositides (PIs) were deposited on the new substrates for biosensing applications. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) data indicated that these lipid components in the membranes were highly mobile. Furthermore, interactions of PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(4)P lipids with their respective binding proteins were detected with high sensitivity by using SPR spectroscopy. This method of glass deposition can be combined with already well-developed surface chemistry for a range of planar glass assay applications, and the process is amenable to automation for mass production of nanometer thick silicate chips in a highly

  6. Anterior single odontoid screw placement for type II odontoid fractures: our modified surgical technique and initial results in a cohort study of 15 patients

    PubMed Central

    Munakomi, Sunil; Tamrakar, Karuna; Chaudhary, Pramod Kumar; Bhattarai, Binod

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Anterior odontoid screw fixation for type II odontoid fracture is the ideal management option. However in the context of unavailability of an O-arm or neuro-navigation and poor images from the available C-arm may be an obstacle to ideal trajectory and placement of the odontoid screw. We herein detail  our surgical technique so as to ensure a correct trajectory and subsequent good fusion in Type II odontoid fractures. This may be advantageous  in clinical set ups lacking state of the art facilities.  Methods and Results: In this cohort study we included 15 consecutive patients who underwent anterior odontoid screw placement. We routinely dissect the longus colli to completely visualize the entire width of C3 body. We then perform a median C2-C3 disectomy followed by creating a gutter in the superior end of C3 body. We then guide the Kirchsner (K) wire purchasing adequate anterior cortex of C2. Rest of the procedure follows the similar steps as described for odontoid screw placement. We achieved 100% correct trajectory and screw placement in our study. There were no instances of screw break out, pull out or nonunion. There was one patient mortality following myocardial infarction in our study. Conclusion: Preoperative imaging details, proper patient positioning, meticulous dissection, thorough anatomical knowledge and few added surgical nuances are the cornerstones in ideal odontoid screw placement. This may be pivotal in managing  patients in developing nations having rudimentary neurosurgical set up. PMID:27990259

  7. Three Dimensional Seismic Velocity Structure of the Subducted Pacific Slab Beneath NE Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Y.; Nakajima, J.; Okada, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    2006-12-01

    The occurrence of earthquakes in the subducting slab is an enigma because the fact that lithostatic pressure at such depths appears to be too high for any brittle fracture. Dehydration embrittlement has been proposed as a possible mechanism for triggering intraslab earthquakes. It is accepted that the slab is hydrated prior to subduction principally through infiltration of seawater via normal or transform faulting [e.g. Kirby et al., 1996] and/or through hot-spot magmatism [Seno and Yamanaka, 1996]. During subduction, the fluids released by dehydration reactions induce in situ mechanical instability and brittle deformation by increasing pore pressure. Mishra and Zhao [2004] revealed the existence of low-velocity zone around the hypocenter of the 2003 Miyagi- Oki intraslab earthquake (M7.1). Nakajima and Hasegawa [2006] detected a linear alignment of seismicity and a narrow low-velocity zone along it within the Pacific slab beneath Kanto, Japan. These results suggest that the occurrence of intraslab earthquakes is closely associated with the heterogeneous structure in the subducted slab. This study is the first attempt to investigate 3D seismic velocity structure in the subducted Pacific slab for the entire NE Japan. A detailed investigation of heterogeneous structure is essential to understand the mechanism for triggering intraslab earthquake. We apply the Double-Difference Tomogaphy method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) to arrival-time data of 208,026 and 142,259 P and S waves, respectively, obtained from 3131 earthquakes that occurred from October 1997 to March 2006. The total number of stations used in this study is 206. We adopted a grid spacing of 10km-40km in the horizontal direction and 5-30km in the vertical direction. At the first inversion, we used only absolute travel-time data and determine large scale velocity structure, and then differential travel-time data were added to the absolute data to investigate slab structure in detail. The obtained results show

  8. Phalangeal fractures: displaced/nondisplaced.

    PubMed

    Gaston, R Glenn; Chadderdon, Christopher

    2012-08-01

    Nonsurgical management is the preferred treatment of stable, extra-articular fractures of the proximal and middle phalanx, most distal phalanx fractures, and, rarely, nondisplaced intraarticular fractures in elite athletes. Techniques that afford maximal strength with minimal dissection, thus allowing earlier return to play, are ideal. Open reduction with internal fixation with plate fixation is most often chosen for unstable phalangeal shaft fractures in high-demand athletes to provide rigid internal fixation and allow immediate range of motion and more rapid return to sport. It is our practice to routinely treat unicondylar fractures with surgery with percutaneous headless compression screws in elite athletes.

  9. Avulsion fractures in athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Orava, S.; Ala-Ketola, L.

    1977-01-01

    34 cases of avulsion fractures are described. Each fracture took place during athletic training or competition. Excepting six sportsmen participating in a general fitness programme, every patient was an active competitive athlete. There were six women and 28 men; their average age was 20.1 years, raised by a few middle-aged "fitness sportsmen". Most avulsion fractures took place in sprinters and hurdlers; next were middle and long distance renner, footballers, fitness joggers, skiers and ice-hockey players. The most usual location of a fracture was the anterior pelvic spines; avulsion fractures were also detected in various parts of lower limbs. There were fewer avulsion fractures in the area of the trunk and upper extremities. Roetgenologically, the diagnosis of an avulsion fracture is generally easy to make. However, the diagnosis is facilitated by knowing the mechanism of the injury, the technique of the athletic event, and some of the training methods. Generally, a fracture heals well, even if it requires both sufficient immobilisation and some delay in resuming physical exertion. PMID:884433

  10. Ion trap electric field measurements using slab coupled optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumway, L.; Chadderdon, S.; Powell, A.; Li, A.; Austin, D.; Hawkins, A.; Selfridge, R.; Schultz, S.

    2014-03-01

    Ion traps are widely used in the field of mass spectrometry. These devices use high electric fields to mass-selectively trap, eject, and count the particles of a material, producing a mass spectrum of the given material. Because of their usefulness, technology pushes for smaller, more portable ion traps for field use. Making internal ion trap field measurements not yet feasible because current electric field sensors are often too bulky or their metallic composition perturbs field measurements. Using slab coupled optical sensor (SCOS) technology, we are able to build sensors that are compatible with the spacing constraints of the ion trap. These sensors are created by attaching a nonlinear crystal slab waveguide to an optical fiber. When a laser propagates through the fiber, certain wavelengths of light couple out of the fiber via the crystal and create "resonances" in the output light spectrum. These resonances shift in proportion to a given applied electric field, and by measuring that shift, we can approximate the electric field. Developing a sensor that can effectively characterize the electric fields within an ion trap will greatly assist in ion trap design, fabrication, and troubleshooting techniques.

  11. [Investigate progress of intraoperative periprosthetic fracture of total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Cong, Yu; Zhao, Jian-ning

    2011-02-01

    One of the complications of total hip arthroplasty is intraoperative periprosthetic fracture. Periprosthetic fracture is divided into acetabular fracture and femoral fracture. Risk factors for intraoperative periprosthetic fracture include use of minimally invasive techniques, press-fit cementless stems, revision operations and osteoporosis. It has been recognized that treatment of intraoperative periprosthetic fractures should be based on the classification of the Vancouver system for intraoperative fractures.

  12. [Atlas fractures].

    PubMed

    Schären, S; Jeanneret, B

    1999-05-01

    Fractures of the atlas account for 1-2% of all vertebral fractures. We divide atlas fractures into 5 groups: isolated fractures of the anterior arch of the atlas, isolated fractures of the posterior arch, combined fractures of the anterior and posterior arch (so-called Jefferson fractures), isolated fractures of the lateral mass and fractures of the transverse process. Isolated fractures of the anterior or posterior arch are benign and are treated conservatively with a soft collar until the neck pain has disappeared. Jefferson fractures are divided into stable and unstable fracture depending on the integrity of the transverse ligament. Stable Jefferson fractures are treated conservatively with good outcome while unstable Jefferson fractures are probably best treated operatively with a posterior atlanto-axial or occipito-axial stabilization and fusion. The authors preferred treatment modality is the immediate open reduction of the dislocated lateral masses combined with a stabilization in the reduced position using a transarticular screw fixation C1/C2 according to Magerl. This has the advantage of saving the atlanto-occipital joints and offering an immediate stability which makes immobilization in an halo or Minerva cast superfluous. In late instabilities C1/2 with incongruency of the lateral masses occurring after primary conservative treatment, an occipito-cervical fusion is indicated. Isolated fractures of the lateral masses are very rare and may, if the lateral mass is totally destroyed, be a reason for an occipito-cervical fusion. Fractures of the transverse processes may be the cause for a thrombosis of the vertebral artery. No treatment is necessary for the fracture itself.

  13. Fracture toughness testing of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental techniques and associated data analysis methods used to measure the resistance to interlaminar fracture, or 'fracture toughness', of polymer matrix composite materials are described. A review in the use of energy techniques to characterize fracture behavior in elastic solids is given. An overview is presented of the types of approaches employed in the design of delamination-resistant composite materials.

  14. The effect of subducting slabs in global shear wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chang; Grand, Stephen P.

    2016-05-01

    Subducting slabs create strong short wavelength seismic anomalies in the upper mantle where much of Earth's seismicity is located. As such, they have the potential to bias longer wavelength seismic tomography models. To evaluate the effect of subducting slabs in global tomography, we performed a series of inversions using a global synthetic shear wave traveltime data set for a theoretical slab model based on predicted thermal anomalies within slabs. The spectral element method was applied to predict the traveltime anomalies produced by the 3-D slab model for paths corresponding to our current data used in actual tomography models. Inversion tests have been conducted first using the raw traveltime anomalies to check how well the slabs can be imaged in global tomography without the effect of earthquake mislocation. Our results indicate that most of the slabs can be identified in the inversion result but with smoothed and reduced amplitude. The recovery of the total mass anomaly in slab regions is about 88 per cent. We then performed another inversion test to investigate the effect of mislocation caused by subducting slabs. We found that source mislocation largely removes slab signal and significantly degrades the imaging of subducting slabs-potentially reducing the recovery of mass anomalies in slab regions to only 41 per cent. We tested two source relocation procedures-an iterative relocation inversion and joint relocation inversion. Both methods partially recover the true source locations and improve the inversion results, but the joint inversion method worked significantly better than the iterative method. In all of our inversion tests, the amplitudes of artefact structures in the lower mantle caused by the incorrect imaging of slabs (up to ˜0.5 per cent S velocity anomalies) are comparable to some large-scale lower-mantle heterogeneities seen in global tomography studies. Based on our inversion tests, we suggest including a-priori subducting slabs in the

  15. Subduction zone earthquakes and stress in slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassiliou, M. S.; Hager, B. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simple viscous fluid models of subducting slabs are used to explain observations of the distribution of earthquakes as a function of depth and the orientation of stress axes of deep (greater than 300 km) and intermediate (70-300 km) earthquakes. Results suggest the following features in the distribution of earthquakes with depth: (1) an exponential decrease from shallow depths down to 250 to 300 km, (2) a minimum near 250 to 300 km, and (3) a deep peak below 300 km. Many shallow subducting slabs show only the first characteristic, while deeper extending regions tend to show all three features, with the deep peak varying in position and intensity. These data, combined with the results on the stress orientations of various-depth earthquakes, are consistent with the existence of a barrier of some sort at 670-km depth and a uniform viscosity mantle above this barrier.

  16. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  17. Subduction zone earthquakes and stress in slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassiliou, M. S.; Hager, B. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simple viscous fluid models of subducting slabs are used to explain observations of the distribution of earthquakes as a function of depth and the orientation of stress axes of deep (greater than 300 km) and intermediate (70-300 km) earthquakes. Results suggest the following features in the distribution of earthquakes with depth: (1) an exponential decrease from shallow depths down to 250 to 300 km, (2) a minimum near 250 to 300 km, and (3) a deep peak below 300 km. Many shallow subducting slabs show only the first characteristic, while deeper extending regions tend to show all three features, with the deep peak varying in position and intensity. These data, combined with the results on the stress orientations of various-depth earthquakes, are consistent with the existence of a barrier of some sort at 670-km depth and a uniform viscosity mantle above this barrier.

  18. Continental underplating after slab break-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, V.; Allen, M. B.; van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical models to investigate the dynamics of continental collision, and in particular what happens to the subducted continental lithosphere after oceanic slab break-off. We find that in some scenarios the subducting continental lithosphere underthrusts the overriding plate not immediately after it enters the trench, but after oceanic slab break-off. In this case, the continental plate first subducts with a steep angle and then, after the slab breaks off at depth, it rises back towards the surface and flattens below the overriding plate, forming a thick horizontal layer of continental crust that extends for about 200 km beyond the suture. This type of behaviour depends on the width of the oceanic plate marginal to the collision zone: wide oceanic margins promote continental underplating and marginal back-arc basins; narrow margins do not show such underplating unless a far field force is applied. Our models show that, as the subducted continental lithosphere rises, the mantle wedge progressively migrates away from the suture and the continental crust heats up, reaching temperatures >900 °C. This heating might lead to crustal melting, and resultant magmatism. We observe a sharp peak in the overriding plate rock uplift right after the occurrence of slab break-off. Afterwards, during underplating, the maximum rock uplift is smaller, but the affected area is much wider (up to 350 km). These results can be used to explain the dynamics that led to the present-day crustal configuration of the India-Eurasia collision zone and its consequences for the regional tectonic and magmatic evolution.

  19. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  20. Fast Waves in Smooth Coronal Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates the effect of transverse density structuring in coronal slab-like waveguides on the properties of fast waves. We generalized previous results obtained for the exponential and Epstein profiles to the case of an arbitrary transverse density distribution. The criteria are given to determine the possible (trapped or leaky) wave regime, depending on the type of density profile function. In particular, there are plasma slabs with transverse density structuring that support pure trapped fast waves for all wavelengths. Their phase speed is nearly equal to the external Alfvén speed for the typical parameters of coronal loops. Our findings are obtained on the basis of Kneser’s oscillation theorem. To confirm the results, we analytically solved the wave equation evaluated at the cutoff point and the original wave equation for particular cases of transverse density distribution. We also used the WKB method and obtained approximate solutions of the wave equation at the cutoff point for an arbitrary transverse density profile. The analytic results were supplemented by numerical solutions of the obtained dispersion relations. The observed high-quality quasi-periodic pulsations of flaring loops are interpreted in terms of the trapped fundamental fast-sausage mode in a slab-like coronal waveguide.

  1. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  2. Implementing slab solar water heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveendran, S. K.; Shen, C. Q.

    2015-08-01

    Water heating contributes a significant part of energy consumption in typical household. One of the most employed technologies today that helps in reducing the energy consumption of water heating would be conventional solar water heating system. However, this system is expensive and less affordable by most family. The main objective of this project is to design and implement an alternative type of solar water heating system that utilize only passive solar energy which is known as slab solar water heating system. Slab solar water heating system is a system that heat up cold water using the solar radiance from the sun. The unique part of this system is that it does not require any form of electricity in order to operate. Solar radiance is converted into heat energy through convection method and cold water will be heated up by using conduction method [1]. The design of this system is governed by the criteria of low implementation cost and energy saving. Selection of material in the construction of a slab solar water heating system is important as it will directly affect the efficiency and performance of the system. A prototype has been built to realize the idea and it had been proven that this system was able to provide sufficient hot water supply for typical household usage at any given time.

  3. Stress Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  4. Combustion of solid fuel slabs with gaseous oxygen in a hybrid motor analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.; Lu, Yeu-Cherng; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Serin, Nadir; Johnson, David K.

    1995-01-01

    Using a high-pressure, two-dimensional hybrid motor, an experimental investigation was conducted on fundamental processes involved in hybrid rocket combustion. HTPB (Hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene) fuel cross-linked with diisocyanate was burned with gaseous oxygen (GOX) under various operating conditions. Large-amplitude pressure oscillations were encountered in earlier test runs. After identifying the source of instability and decoupling the GOX feed-line system and combustion chamber, the pressure oscillations were drastically reduced from plus or minus 20% of the localized mean pressure to an acceptable range of plus or minus 1.5%. Embedded fine--wire thermocouples indicated that the surface temperature of the burning fuel was around 1000 K depending upon axial locations and operating conditions. Also, except near the leading edge region, the subsurface thermal wave profiles in the upstream locations are thicker than those in the downstream locations since the solid-fuel regression rate, in general, increases with distance along the fuel slab. The recovered solid fuel slabs in the laminar portion of the boundary layer exhibited smooth surfaces, indicating the existence of a liquid melt layer on the burning fuel surface in the upstream region. After the transition section, which displayed distinct transverse striations, the surface roughness pattern became quite random and very pronounced in the downstream turbulent boundary-layer region. Both real-time X-ray radiography and ultrasonic pulse echo techniques were used to determine the instantaneous web thicknesses and instantaneous solid-fuel regression rates over certain portions of the fuel slabs. Globally averaged and axially dependent but time-averaged regression rates were also obtained and presented. Several tests were conducted using, simultaneously, one translucent fuel slab and one fuel slab processed with carbon black powder. The addition of carbon black did not affect the measured regression rates or

  5. Combustion of solid fuel slabs with gaseous oxygen in a hybrid motor analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.; Lu, Yeu-Cherng; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Serin, Nadir; Johnson, David K.

    1995-01-01

    Using a high-pressure, two-dimensional hybrid motor, an experimental investigation was conducted on fundamental processes involved in hybrid rocket combustion. HTPB (Hydroxyl-terminated- Polybutadiene) fuel cross linked with diisocyanate was burned with GOX under various operating conditions. Large amplitude pressure oscillations were encountered in earlier test runs. After identifying the source of instability and decoupling the GOX feed line system and combustion chamber, the pressure oscillations were drastically reduced from +/- 20% of the localized mean pressure to an acceptable range of +/- 1.5%. Embedded fine-wire thermocouples indicated that the surface temperature of the burning fuel was around 1000 K depending upon axial locations and operating conditions. Also, except near the leading-edge region, the subsurface thermal wave profiles in the upstream locations arc thicker than those in the downstream locations since the solid-fuel regression rate, in general, increases with distance along the fuel slab. The recovered solid fuel slabs in the laminar portion of the boundary layer exhibited smooth surfaces, indicating the existence of a liquid melt layer on the burning fuel surface in the upstream region. After the transition section, which displayed distinct transverse striations, the surface roughness pattern became quite random and very pronounced in the downstream turbulent boundary-layer region. Both real time X-ray radiography and ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques were used to determine the instantaneous web thicknesses and instantaneous solid-fuel regression rates over certain portions of the fuel slabs. Globally averaged and axially dependent but time-averaged regression rates were also obtained and presented. Several tests were conducted using, simultaneously, one translucent fuel slab and one fuel slab processed with carbon black powder. The addition of carbon black did not affect the measured regression rates or surface temperatures in comparison

  6. Combustion of solid fuel slabs with gaseous oxygen in a hybrid motor analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaverini, Martin J.; Harting, George C.; Lu, Yeu-Cherng; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Serin, Nadir; Johnson, David K.

    1995-01-01

    Using a high-pressure, two-dimensional hybrid motor, an experimental investigation was conducted on fundamental processes involved in hybrid rocket combustion. HTPB (Hydroxyl-terminated- Polybutadiene) fuel cross linked with diisocyanate was burned with GOX under various operating conditions. Large amplitude pressure oscillations were encountered in earlier test runs. After identifying the source of instability and decoupling the GOX feed line system and combustion chamber, the pressure oscillations were drastically reduced from +/- 20% of the localized mean pressure to an acceptable range of +/- 1.5%. Embedded fine-wire thermocouples indicated that the surface temperature of the burning fuel was around 1000 K depending upon axial locations and operating conditions. Also, except near the leading-edge region, the subsurface thermal wave profiles in the upstream locations arc thicker than those in the downstream locations since the solid-fuel regression rate, in general, increases with distance along the fuel slab. The recovered solid fuel slabs in the laminar portion of the boundary layer exhibited smooth surfaces, indicating the existence of a liquid melt layer on the burning fuel surface in the upstream region. After the transition section, which displayed distinct transverse striations, the surface roughness pattern became quite random and very pronounced in the downstream turbulent boundary-layer region. Both real time X-ray radiography and ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques were used to determine the instantaneous web thicknesses and instantaneous solid-fuel regression rates over certain portions of the fuel slabs. Globally averaged and axially dependent but time-averaged regression rates were also obtained and presented. Several tests were conducted using, simultaneously, one translucent fuel slab and one fuel slab processed with carbon black powder. The addition of carbon black did not affect the measured regression rates or surface temperatures in comparison

  7. A Numerical Method for Obtaining Monoenergetic Neutron Flux Distributions and Transmissions in Multiple-Region Slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Harold

    1959-01-01

    This method is investigated for semi-infinite multiple-slab configurations of arbitrary width, composition, and source distribution. Isotropic scattering in the laboratory system is assumed. Isotropic scattering implies that the fraction of neutrons scattered in the i(sup th) volume element or subregion that will make their next collision in the j(sup th) volume element or subregion is the same for all collisions. These so-called "transfer probabilities" between subregions are calculated and used to obtain successive-collision densities from which the flux and transmission probabilities directly follow. For a thick slab with little or no absorption, a successive-collisions technique proves impractical because an unreasonably large number of collisions must be followed in order to obtain the flux. Here the appropriate integral equation is converted into a set of linear simultaneous algebraic equations that are solved for the average total flux in each subregion. When ordinary diffusion theory applies with satisfactory precision in a portion of the multiple-slab configuration, the problem is solved by ordinary diffusion theory, but the flux is plotted only in the region of validity. The angular distribution of neutrons entering the remaining portion is determined from the known diffusion flux and the remaining region is solved by higher order theory. Several procedures for applying the numerical method are presented and discussed. To illustrate the calculational procedure, a symmetrical slab ia vacuum is worked by the numerical, Monte Carlo, and P(sub 3) spherical harmonics methods. In addition, an unsymmetrical double-slab problem is solved by the numerical and Monte Carlo methods. The numerical approach proved faster and more accurate in these examples. Adaptation of the method to anisotropic scattering in slabs is indicated, although no example is included in this paper.