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Sample records for fragilis group isolates

  1. Susceptibility trends of Bacteroides fragilis group isolates from Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Fernández Canigia, L; Castello, L; Di Martino, A; Greco, G; Legaria, M C; Litterio, M; Predari, S C; Rollet, R; Rossetti, A; Carloni, G; Sarchi, M I; Bianchini, H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the susceptibility trends to seven antibiotics of Bacteroides fragilis group isolates based on three survey studies performed by the Committee of Anaerobic Bacteria between 1989 and 2002. Fifty three, 82 and 65 B. fragilis group isolates were collected during each period. The antimicrobial agents included were: ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam (2:1), cefoxitin, piperacillin, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined according to the reference agar dilution method described by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI, formerly NCCLS). The most active antibiotics for B. fragilis and non-B. fragilis species throughout the three periods were: imipenem with 99.1 and 100% of activity, respectively, and metronidazole with 100% of activity. The susceptibility to ampicillin-sulbactam showed a decrease, from 100% to 90.3% and to 82.4 % in the last period, for both B. fragilis and non-B. fragilis species, respectively. The overall susceptibility rates for cefoxitin, piperacillin, and clindamycin were significantly different between B. fragilis and non-B. fragilis species (84.2% vs. 56.5%; 85.9% vs. 66.7% and 88.8% vs. 64.7%, respectively, p < 0.05). Cefoxitin was the antibiotic that showed more variations as regards periods and species. The susceptibility rates for clindamycin were low, about 60%, for non-B. fragilis species during the last two periods. The variations observed in the susceptibility patterns of the B. fragilis group isolates emphasize the need to continue monitoring the emergence of resistance in order to guide the election of the most appropriate antibiotic therapy scheme for anaerobic infections.

  2. Development of EUCAST disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolates.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Elisabeth; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Eitel, Zsuzsa; Urbán, Edit

    2015-02-01

    With the emergence of antibiotic resistance among Bacteroides fragilis group isolates the need of susceptibility testing in routine laboratories is increasing. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing in case of different clinical isolates of Bacteroides spp by comparing zone diameter results with MICs obtained earlier during an Europe-wide antibiotic susceptibility surveillance, and to propose zone diameter breakpoints, which correlate for the EUCAST MIC breakpoints. We tested 381 clinical isolates of the B. fragilis group to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, clindamycin, imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tigecycline by agar dilution method previously. The inhibition zones of the same antibiotics including meropenem disc were determined by the disc diffusion on Brucella blood agar supplemented with haemin and vitamin K1. Plates were incubated at 37 °C in an anaerobic atmosphere for 24 h. The zone diameters were read at 100% inhibition. In case of discrepant results MICs were determined by gradient test and compared with the inhibition zones on the same plate. We found a good agreement between the inhibition zone diameters and the MICs for imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin and tigecyclin. The inhibition zone diameters of meropenem also separated clearly the isolates, which can be considered wild-type isolates. In case of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and piperacillin/tazobactam intermediate and susceptible isolates according to the MIC determination, overlap during the zone diameter determination. Isolates with an inhibition zone <23 mm for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and <25 mm for piperacillin/tazobactam should be retested by a MIC determination method. The 10 μg clindamycin disc clearly separated the resistant and the susceptible population of B. fragilis group strains. In the case of cefoxitin only resistant population could be separated with an inhibition

  3. Antimicrobial resistance in the Bacteroides fragilis group in faecal microbiota from healthy Danish children.

    PubMed

    Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Jensen, Betina Hebbelstrup; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2017-03-30

    The Bacteroides fragilis group constitute a significant portion of the human gut microbiota and comprise a major proportion of anaerobic bacteria isolated in human infections. We established a baseline of antimicrobial susceptibility rates in the B. fragilis group in the intestinal tract of relatively antibiotic-naive healthy Danish children. From 174 faecal samples collected from children attending day care, 359 non-duplicate isolates were screened for antimicrobial susceptibility. Of these, 0.0%, 1.9%, 5.0% and 21.2% of isolates were intermediate-susceptible or resistant to metronidazole, meropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam and clindamycin, respectively. Eighteen additional studies reporting susceptibility rates in the B. fragilis group bacteria were identified by conducting a literature search. Heterogeneity among results from studies of B. fragilis group antimicrobial susceptibility rates in faecal microbiota exists.

  4. Serogrouping of Bacteroides fragilis subsp. fragilis by the agglutination test.

    PubMed Central

    Lambe, D W; Moroz, D A

    1976-01-01

    The agglutination technique was used to establish a serological classification scheme for 98 strains of Bacteroides fragilis subsp. fragilis isolated from clinical specimens and normal human feces. Absorbed antisera were prepared to seven strains of B. fragilis subsp. fragilis. These seven absorbed antisera were species as well as subspecies specific and provided the basis of the serological classification scheme. This scheme was composed of 21 serogroups; seven of these serogroups contained only one group component. There was a total of 45 serological patterns. This serological scheme may be used for the serological classification of strains of B. fragilis subsp. fragilis and to study the epidemiology of this organism. PMID:950378

  5. First national survey of antibiotic susceptibility of the Bacteroides fragilis group: emerging resistance to carbapenems in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Canigia, Liliana; Litterio, Mirta; Legaria, María C; Castello, Liliana; Predari, Silvia C; Di Martino, Ana; Rossetti, Adelaida; Rollet, Raquel; Carloni, Graciela; Bianchini, Hebe; Cejas, Daniela; Radice, Marcela; Gutkind, Gabriel

    2012-03-01

    The antibiotic susceptibility rates of 363 clinical Bacteroides fragilis group isolates collected from 17 centers in Argentina during the period from 2006 to 2009 were as follows: piperacillin-tazobactam, 99%; ampicillin-sulbactam, 92%; cefoxitin, 72%; tigecycline, 100%; moxifloxacin, 91%; and clindamycin, 52%. No metronidazole resistance was detected in these isolates during this time period. Resistance to imipenem, doripenem, and ertapenem was observed in 1.1%, 1.6%, and 2.3% of B. fragilis group strains, respectively. B. fragilis species showed a resistance profile of 1.5% to imipenem, 1.9% to doripenem, and 2.4% to ertapenem. This is the first report of carbapenem resistance in Argentina. The cfiA gene was present in 8 out of 23 isolates, all of them belonging to the B. fragilis species and displaying reduced susceptibility or resistance to carbapenems (MICs ≥ 4 μg/ml). Three out of eight cfiA-positive isolates were fully resistant to carbapenems, while 5 out of 8 isolates showed low-level resistance (MICs, 4 to 8 μg/ml). The inhibition by EDTA was a good predictor of the presence of metallo-β-lactamases in the fully resistant B. fragilis strains, but discrepant results were observed for low-level resistant isolates. B. fragilis was more susceptible to antimicrobial agents than other Bacteroides species. Bacteroides vulgatus species was the most resistant to ampicillin-sulbactam and piperacillin-tazobactam, and B. thetaiotaomicron/ovatus strains showed the highest level of resistance to carbapenems, with an unknown resistance mechanism. B. vulgatus and the uncommon non-Bacteroides fragilis species were the most resistant to moxifloxacin, showing an overall resistance rate of 15.1%.

  6. Heterogeneity in resistant fecal Bacteroides fragilis group collected from healthy people.

    PubMed

    Narimani, T; Douraghi, M; Owlia, P; Rastegar, A; Esghaei, M; Nasr, B; Talebi, M

    2016-06-01

    Normal nonpathogenic flora would represent a constant lake of resistance genes potentially transferable to human pathogens. To assess the prevalence of resistance genes and genetic variability of Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) from normal flora, 177 Bacteroides isolates obtained from the fecal samples of healthy individuals. These isolates were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The isolates were further tested for the presence of ermF, tetQ and bft genes by PCR. Our results indicated the presence of different clonal strains (1 common type and 57 single types) among the resistant isolates. The resistance rate for the six antibiotics in this study was between 1% and 95%. Most of the isolates (99%) were susceptible to metronidazole. ermF and tetQ were detected in all erythromycin and tetracycline resistant isolates. None of the isolates were carried bft gene. These data suggest dissemination of heterogenic clonal groups in healthy persons and resistance to 5 high commonly used antibiotics.

  7. Update on resistance of Bacteroides fragilis group and related species with special attention to carbapenems 2006-2009.

    PubMed

    Snydman, D R; Jacobus, N V; McDermott, L A; Golan, Y; Goldstein, E J C; Harrell, L; Jenkins, S; Newton, D; Pierson, C; Rosenblatt, J; Venezia, R; Gorbach, S L; Queenan, A M; Hecht, D W

    2011-08-01

    The susceptibility trends for the species of the Bacteroides fragilis group against various antibiotics were determined using data from 4 years [2006-2009] on 1957 isolates referred by 8 medical centers participating in a National Survey for the Susceptibility of B. fragilis. The antibiotic test panel included doripenem, ertapenem, imipenem, meropenem, ampicillin:sulbactam, piperacillin:tazobactam, cefoxitin, clindamycin, moxifloxacin, tigecycline, chloramphenicol and metronidazole. MICs were determined using agar dilution methods following CLSI recommendations. Genetic analysis of isolates from 2008 with elevated MICs (>2 μg/mL) to one or more of the carbapenems to detect presence of the cfiA gene was performed using PCR methodology. The results showed an increase in the resistance rates to the β-lactam antibiotics. High resistance rates were seen for clindamycin and moxifloxacin (as high as 60% for clindamycin and >80% for moxifloxacin), with relatively stable low resistance (5.4%) for tigecycline. For carbapenems, resistance in B. fragilis was 1.1%-2.5% in 2008-9. One isolate resistant to metronidazole (MIC 32 μg/mL) was observed as well as isolates with elevated MICs to chloramphenicol (16 μg/mL). Genetic analysis indicated that the cfiA gene was present in some but not all of the isolates with high MICs to the carbapenems. These data indicate that there continue to be changes in susceptibility over time, and that resistance can be seen among the carbapenems. High antibiotic resistance rates tend to be associated with specific species.

  8. [Biological activity of lipopolysaccharides from clinical Bacteroides fragilis strains isolated in Poland determined in reaction with limulus amoebocyte lysate].

    PubMed

    Rokosz, Alicja; Górska, Paulina; Michałkiewicz, Jacek; Łuczak, Miroslaw

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a biological activity of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from clinical Bacterioides fragilis strains isolated in Poland by means of quantitative, photometric BET (LAL) method with Limulus polyphemus amoebocyte lysate and chromogenic substrate S-2423. Lipopolysaccharides were extracted from nine clinical B. fragilis strains by the procedure of Westphal and Jann (1965). Crude LPS preparations were purified with ultracentrifugation. Biological activities of bacterial endotoxins were determined by quantitative BET method with chromogenic substrate S-2423 (ENDOCHROME kit). Tests were performed according to the recommendations of the producer (Charles River Endosafe Ltd., USA). E. coli O55:B5 LPS and LPS preparations from reference B. fragilis strains were applied to compare the results of examinations. Activities of endotoxins from clinical B. fragilis strains isolated in Poland determined in reaction with Limulus amoebocyte lysate were differentiated. Among endotoxins of clinical B. fragilis strains the most active was the preparation from strain cultured in the case of pancreatic ulcer (B. fragilis 80/81 LPS). Lipopolysaccharides of examined B. fragilis strains were less active in BET test than E. coli O55:B5 LPS.

  9. New cfiA variant and novel insertion sequence elements in carbapenem-resistant Bacteroides fragilis isolates from Korea.

    PubMed

    Roh, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Sinyoung; Kim, Chang-Ki; Yum, Jong Hwa; Kim, Myung Sook; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, June Myung; Chong, Yunsop

    2010-04-01

    Of 276 nonduplicate Bacteroides fragilis clinical isolates recovered from 1997 to 2004, 3 were resistant to carbapenem. cepA and cfiA alleles were detected by polymerase chain reaction in 240 (87.0%) and 11 (4.0%) of the isolates, respectively. Insertion sequence (IS) elements were found only in the 3 carbapenem-resistant B. fragilis isolates, which produced metallo-beta-lactamase at a level detectable by UV spectrophotometry. Sequence analysis showed 1 new cfiA variant, cfiA(11), and 2 novel IS elements. The cfiA(11) gene revealed 5 amino acid substitutions compared to cfiA, with 97.6% amino acid identity. The transposase, terminal inverted repeat sequence, and target site duplication sequence of the 2 novel IS elements were unique. This study reconfirmed the correlation between ISs and carbapenem resistance in B. fragilis.

  10. Spinal epidural abscess caused by bacteroides fragilis group after dilation and curettage for incomplete abortion.

    PubMed

    Ohyagi, Masaki; Ohkubo, Takuya; Taniyama, Takashi; Tomizawa, Shoji; Okawa, Atsushi; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-04-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare infection complicated in patients who have some risk factors such as injection-drug use, diabetes mellitus, and several illnesses. However, no case of SEA associated with abortion has been reported. Here we report a case of SEA in a 30-year-old woman after dilation and curettage for incomplete abortion. The diagnosis of SEA was done by MRI and pus was drained after the cervical discectomy. Bacteroides fragilis group was cultured from the aspirated pus sample. The patient responded to surgical drainage and antibiotics.

  11. Cefoxitin inactivation by Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Cuchural, G J; Tally, F P; Jacobus, N V; Marsh, P K; Mayhew, J W

    1983-12-01

    We have surveyed the susceptibility of 1,575 clinical isolates of the Bacteroides fragilis group of organisms to cefoxitin and eight other antimicrobial agents. Eleven isolates, 0.7% of the total, were highly cefoxitin resistant and had minimum inhibitory concentrations of greater than or equal to 64 micrograms/ml. These isolates were also resistant to other beta-lactam antibiotics. Of 11 isolates, 4 were able to inactivate cefoxitin in broth cultures, as measured by microbiological and high-pressure liquid chromatography assays. Two distinct patterns of cefoxitin breakdown products were detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. The beta-lactamase inhibitors clavulanic acid and sulbactam failed to show synergism with cefoxitin. These data demonstrate that members of the B. fragilis group have acquired a novel resistance mechanism enabling them to inactivate cefoxitin.

  12. Factors affecting the in vitro activity of cefoperazone against the Bacteroides fragilis group.

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, V L; Kwok, Y Y

    1981-01-01

    The in vitro activity of cefoperazone against 32 strains of bacteria of the Bacteroides fragilis group was determined on four media by using a variety of test parameters. Lower mean minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were obtained on Mueller-Hinton blood agar and supplemented brain heart infusion agar than were obtained on brucella laked blood agar or Wilkins-Chalgren agar. Higher MICs were obtained with 6-h inocula than with 24-h inocula, and slightly higher MICs were obtained with tests read at 48 as compared with 24 h. Conducting tests in an anaerobic glove box had little effect. The greatest differences in mean MICs were seen with inoculum densities of 10(4) and 10(5) colony-forming units. PMID:6459765

  13. A Novel Selective Medium for Isolation of Bacteroides fragilis from Clinical Specimens.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Ho, Lok-Yan; Yau, Chong-Yee; Tong, Man-Ki; Chow, Kin-Hung

    2017-02-01

    A novel Bacteroides fragilis selective (BFS) medium, consisting of a brain heart infusion agar base supplemented with yeast extract, cysteine hydrochloride, bile salts, vitamin K, hemin, glucose, esculin, ferric ammonium citrate, bromothymol blue, gentamicin, kanamycin, and novobiocin, was evaluated. When BFS agar was tested with a collection of 303 bacteria of different genera, it allowed the growth of B. fragilis as large yellow colonies, with blackening of the medium after 48 h of anaerobic incubation, while the growth of most other anaerobes, facultative anaerobes, and aerobes was inhibited. In a prospective comparison of BFS agar with a routinely used medium (neomycin blood agar) in 1,209 clinical specimens, 60 B. fragilis bacteria were detected on BFS agar while 46 were detected on the routine agar (McNemar's test, P = 0.008). In conclusion, this novel medium may be added to improve the recovery of B. fragilis in clinical specimens and to facilitate surveillance of antimicrobial-resistant strains.

  14. Distribution, Detection of Enterotoxigenic Strains and Antimicrobial Drug Susceptibility Patterns of Bacteroides Fragilis Group in Diarrheic and Non-Diarrheic Feces from Brazilian Infants

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Débora Paula; Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Guimarães, Danielle Aparecida; Coelho, Cíntia Marques; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Farias, Luiz Macêdo; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Diniz, Claudio Galuppo

    2010-01-01

    Despite the importance of gastrointestinal diseases and their global distribution, affecting millions of individuals around the world, the role and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of anaerobic bacteria such as those in the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) are still unclear in young children. This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of species in the BFG and enterotoxigenic strains in the fecal microbiota of children and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Diarrheic (n=110) and non-diarrheic (n=65) fecal samples from children aged 0–5 years old were evaluated. BFG strains were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. Alternatively, bacteria and enterotoxigenic strains were detected directly from feces by molecular biology. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns were determined by the agar dilution method according to the guidelines for isolated bacteria. BFG was detected in 64.3% of the fecal samples (55% diarrheic and 80.4% non-diarrheic), and 4.6% were enterotoxigenic. Antimicrobial resistance was observed against ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem, ceftriaxone, clindamycin and chloramphenicol. The data show that these bacteria are prevalent in fecal microbiota at higher levels in healthy children. The molecular methodology was more effective in identifying the B. fragilis group when compared to the biochemical and physiological techniques. The observation of high resistance levels stimulates thoughts about the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs in early infancy. Further quantitative studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the role of these bacteria in acute diarrhea in children. PMID:24031535

  15. Distribution, detection of enterotoxigenic strains and antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns of bacteroides fragilis group in diarrheic and non-diarrheic feces from brazilian infants.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Débora Paula; Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Guimarães, Danielle Aparecida; Coelho, Cíntia Marques; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Farias, Luiz Macêdo; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Diniz, Claudio Galuppo

    2010-07-01

    Despite the importance of gastrointestinal diseases and their global distribution, affecting millions of individuals around the world, the role and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of anaerobic bacteria such as those in the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) are still unclear in young children. This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of species in the BFG and enterotoxigenic strains in the fecal microbiota of children and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Diarrheic (n=110) and non-diarrheic (n=65) fecal samples from children aged 0-5 years old were evaluated. BFG strains were isolated and identified by conventional biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. Alternatively, bacteria and enterotoxigenic strains were detected directly from feces by molecular biology. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns were determined by the agar dilution method according to the guidelines for isolated bacteria. BFG was detected in 64.3% of the fecal samples (55% diarrheic and 80.4% non-diarrheic), and 4.6% were enterotoxigenic. Antimicrobial resistance was observed against ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem, ceftriaxone, clindamycin and chloramphenicol. The data show that these bacteria are prevalent in fecal microbiota at higher levels in healthy children. The molecular methodology was more effective in identifying the B. fragilis group when compared to the biochemical and physiological techniques. The observation of high resistance levels stimulates thoughts about the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs in early infancy. Further quantitative studies are needed to gain a better understanding of the role of these bacteria in acute diarrhea in children.

  16. [Possible role of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in the etiology of infectious vaginitis].

    PubMed

    Polanco, Nina; Manzi, Lorna; Carmona, Oswaldo

    2012-03-01

    Vaginitis is a common gynecologic disorder. It is due to several causes, some even unknown. Bacteroides fragilis is the most important anaerobe in clinical bacteriology, some strains of this group are notable for being enterotoxigenic and they have been associated with intestinal and extraintestinal syndromes. They have recently been isolated from patients with vaginitis. The purpose of this study was to investigate a possible association of enterotoxigenic B. fragilis with infectious vaginitis. 265 samples of vaginal exudate were processed, 202 from symptomatic patients and 63 healthy women. The identification of the microorganisms was carried out by conventional methods. In 31.2% of symptomatic patients were identified: Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus, Candida albicans, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Streptococcus agalactiae. B. fragilis was identified in 27 symptomatic patients and 5 healthy women. These strains were cultivated in liquid medium and incubated during 48 h at 36 degrees C in anaerobe chambers. Supernatant activity was assayed in HT-29 cells. Eighteen B. fragilis strains isolated from symptomatic patients were enterotoxigenic, because induced alterations in target cell morphology. It was not identified in healthy women (P < 0.05). 77.7% of enterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains were not associated with other specific pathogens. This fact suggests that enterotoxigenic B. fragilis could be a cause for vaginitis. The effect of enterotoxin on E-cadherin of vaginal epithelium could facilitate invasion and its possible pathogenic role in the vagina. This is the first report that associates enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis as a possible cause of infectious vaginitis.

  17. [Use of reactions with Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) to determine biological activity of lipopolysaccharides from reference and clinical strains of the Bacteroides fragilis group].

    PubMed

    Rokosz, Alicja; Fiejka, Maria; Górska, Paulina; Aleksandrowicz, Janina; Meisel-Mikołajczyk, Felicja; Łuczak, MirosŁaw

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and compare a biological activity of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from reference and clinical strains of strictly anaerobic bacteria belonging to the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) by means of quantitative, photometric BET (LAL) method with Limulus polyphemus amoebocyte lysate and chromogenic substrate S-2423. Lipopolysaccharides of five BFG species were extracted by Westphal and Jann method (1965) from eight reference and two clinical strains of B. fragilis group. Crude LPS preparations were purified according to the procedure described by Gmeiner (1975) with ultracentrifugation and nuclease treatment. Biological activities of bacterial endotoxins were determined by quantitative BET method with chromogenic substrate S-2423 (ENDOCHROME kit, Charles River Endosafe Ltd., USA). Tests were performed according to the producer's recommendations. E. coli O55:B5 LPS was applied to compare its activity in reaction with LAL reagent with activities of LPS preparations from rods of the Bacteroides genus. Among examined bacterial compounds the most active in BET method was E. coli O55:B5 LPS. Activities of lipopolysaccharides from five species of BFG rods in reaction with Limulus amoebocyte lysate were differentiated. Greater ability to activate LAL proenzyme revealed lipopolysaccharides of these species of the Bacteroides genus, which are important from the clinical point of view--B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron.

  18. Occurrence of enterotoxigenic and nonenterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in calves and evaluation of their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fernanda S; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario J

    2007-07-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is considered an important clinical pathogen and the most common anaerobe isolated from human and animal clinical specimens; enterotoxigenic strains produce diarrhea. The presence of enterotoxigenic (ETBF) and nonenterotoxigenic B. fragilis in stool samples from calves with or without acute diarrhea and the antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains were evaluated. The stool samples were plated onto a selective B. fragilis-bile-esculin agar, and incubated anaerobically (10% CO(2)/90% N(2)), at 37 degrees C, for 72 h. Species of the B. fragilis group were identified by using the API 32-A kit. Enterotoxigenic strains were detected by PCR and the cytotoxic assay. From 54 diarrhea and 54 nondiarrhea stools, 124 and 92 members of the B. fragilis group, respectively, were recovered. Only two ETBF strains were isolated from two different diarrhea samples and the bft gene was detected in both. Moreover, the bft gene was detected in DNA from four different diarrheal stools samples but no ETBF strain was recovered. All the bacteria were susceptible to chloramphenicol, imipenem, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, metronidazole and tigecycline. Most of the isolates from both calves with and without diarrhea were resistant to all metals. Our results are of concern, and suggest the need to increase the surveillance of antibiotic and metal resistance of this microbial group isolated from animal production such as calves.

  19. Detection of Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, and Bacteroides ovatus in clinical specimens by immunofluorescence with a monoclonal antibody to B. fragilis lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Viljanen, M K; Linko, L; Lehtonen, O P

    1988-01-01

    A total of 1,897 clinical specimens (1,019 aspirates and 876 swabs) were studied by indirect immunofluorescence (IF) with a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) against a D-galactose oligomer of Bacteroides fragilis lipopolysaccharide. The MAb has been shown to react with 96% of clinical B. fragilis isolates and with about 50% of Bacteroides ovatus and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron isolates but not with other aerobic or anaerobic organisms tested. The sensitivity of IF in comparison with culturing was 78.9% for all three species. Of the 32 strains originating from culture-positive, IF-negative specimens, 13 lacked the target determinant for the MAb. Sensitivity was highest with specimens taken from the perineal area (87.1%) and lowest with those taken from undefined sites (56.6%). Sensitivity was better with aspirates (86.8%) than with swabs (72.6%). The specificity of IF was 95.6% for all of the material. Positive and negative predictive values were 51.1 and 98.0%, respectively. Neither long transportation times of specimens nor antimicrobial therapy seemed to correlate with the occurrence of IF-positive, culture-negative specimens. This study shows that a single MAb can be used to establish an IF assay that can complement isolation in the detection of these three members of the B. fragilis group. Images PMID:3281973

  20. Pirin-like proteins are regulated by oxidative stress and iron in bacteroides fragilis and involved in the modulation of central energy metabolism and metronidazole susceptibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most frequent anaerobe isolated from human infections. Clinical isolates of B. fragilis are among the highest aerotolerant anaerobic bacteria. The oxidative stress response (OSR) in B. fragilis induces an array of genes enabling them to survive prolonged oxygen exposure i...

  1. Dientamoeba fragilis, One of the Neglected Intestinal Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a single-celled protozoan, closely related to the trichomonads. Reported worldwide as causing human gastrointestinal symptoms, D. fragilis is very common and is second only to Blastocystis spp. Dientamoebiasis equals or exceeds the incidence of giardiasis. This minireview includes diagnostic options, clinical relevance, therapy, an animal model, the confirmed cyst stage, and sequencing data. The development of a rodent model, fulfilling Koch's postulates, and the confirmation of a cyst stage have clarified transmission routes, including fecal-oral transmission. The prevalence of D. fragilis varies between 0% to over 82%; results depend on the geographic location, group studied, and diagnostic methods used. PMID:27053676

  2. Dientamoeba fragilis, One of the Neglected Intestinal Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lynne S

    2016-09-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a single-celled protozoan, closely related to the trichomonads. Reported worldwide as causing human gastrointestinal symptoms, D. fragilis is very common and is second only to Blastocystis spp. Dientamoebiasis equals or exceeds the incidence of giardiasis. This minireview includes diagnostic options, clinical relevance, therapy, an animal model, the confirmed cyst stage, and sequencing data. The development of a rodent model, fulfilling Koch's postulates, and the confirmation of a cyst stage have clarified transmission routes, including fecal-oral transmission. The prevalence of D. fragilis varies between 0% to over 82%; results depend on the geographic location, group studied, and diagnostic methods used.

  3. Identification of a Collagen Type I Adhesin of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Bruna P. G. V.; Weber, Brandon W.; Rafudeen, Mohamed S.; Ferreira, Eliane O.; Patrick, Sheila; Abratt, Valerie R.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is an opportunistic pathogen which can cause life threatening infections in humans and animals. The ability to adhere to components of the extracellular matrix, including collagen, is related to bacterial host colonisation. Collagen Far Western analysis of the B. fragilis outer membrane protein (OMP) fraction revealed the presence two collagen adhesin bands of ∼31 and ∼34 kDa. The collagen adhesins in the OMP fraction were separated and isolated by two-dimensional SDS-PAGE and also purified by collagen affinity chromatography. The collagen binding proteins isolated by both these independent methods were subjected to tandem mass spectroscopy for peptide identification and matched to a single hypothetical protein encoded by B. fragilis NCTC 9343 (BF0586), conserved in YCH46 (BF0662) and 638R (BF0633) and which is designated in this study as cbp1 (collagen binding protein). Functionality of the protein was confirmed by targeted insertional mutagenesis of the cbp1 gene in B. fragilis GSH18 which resulted in the specific loss of both the ∼31 kDa and the ∼34 kDa adhesin bands. Purified his-tagged Cbp1, expressed in a B. fragilis wild-type and a glycosylation deficient mutant, confirmed that the cbp1 gene encoded the observed collagen adhesin, and showed that the 34 kDa band represents a glycosylated version of the ∼31 kDa protein. Glycosylation did not appear to be required for binding collagen. This study is the first to report the presence of collagen type I adhesin proteins in B. fragilis and to functionally identify a gene encoding a collagen binding protein. PMID:24618940

  4. Contribution of enzymatic properties, cell permeability, and enzyme expression to microbiological activities of beta-lactams in three Bacteroides fragilis isolates that harbor a metallo-beta-lactamase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, B A; Yang, Y; Jacobus, N; Bush, K

    1994-01-01

    The metallo-beta-lactamase gene, ccrA, has been cloned from three clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis, TAL3636, QMCN3, and QMCN4. Although all three isolates harbored a gene encoding a potent beta-lactamase, the MICs of benzylpenicillin, piperacillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, imipenem, and biapenem for the three isolates varied from 4- to > 128-fold. QMCN4 was the most susceptible of the three isolates, followed by QMCN3. TAL3636 was resistant to all of the beta-lactams. Previous DNA sequence analysis of the three ccrA genes revealed that the enzymes differed at 5 amino acid residues (B. A. Rasmussen, Y. Gluzman, and F. P. Tally, Mol. Microbiol. 5:1211-1219, 1991). Biochemical characterization of the three enzymes revealed only small differences in kcat and Km values for the majority of beta-lactams tested. Thus, the 5 amino acid substitutions affected the hydrolyzing activity of the enzymes only modestly. Crypticity differences between the three isolates showed that QMCN4 was the least permeable of the isolates to cephaloridine, followed by TAL3636, and that QMCN3 was highly permeable to cephaloridine. Therefore, neither catalytic activity nor permeability was a major contributor to the dramatic differences in the MICs. Instead, microbiological susceptibility was closely related to the level of metallo-beta-lactamase present in each isolate. Both biochemical and physical studies indicated that TAL3636 produced 5- to 10-fold and 50- to 100-fold more metallo-beta-lactamase than QMCN3 and QMCN4, respectively. Therefore, the level of CcrA enzyme production is the dominant contributing factor to high-level resistance among strains harboring a ccrA gene. Images PMID:7811029

  5. Contribution of enzymatic properties, cell permeability, and enzyme expression to microbiological activities of beta-lactams in three Bacteroides fragilis isolates that harbor a metallo-beta-lactamase gene.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, B A; Yang, Y; Jacobus, N; Bush, K

    1994-09-01

    The metallo-beta-lactamase gene, ccrA, has been cloned from three clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis, TAL3636, QMCN3, and QMCN4. Although all three isolates harbored a gene encoding a potent beta-lactamase, the MICs of benzylpenicillin, piperacillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, imipenem, and biapenem for the three isolates varied from 4- to > 128-fold. QMCN4 was the most susceptible of the three isolates, followed by QMCN3. TAL3636 was resistant to all of the beta-lactams. Previous DNA sequence analysis of the three ccrA genes revealed that the enzymes differed at 5 amino acid residues (B. A. Rasmussen, Y. Gluzman, and F. P. Tally, Mol. Microbiol. 5:1211-1219, 1991). Biochemical characterization of the three enzymes revealed only small differences in kcat and Km values for the majority of beta-lactams tested. Thus, the 5 amino acid substitutions affected the hydrolyzing activity of the enzymes only modestly. Crypticity differences between the three isolates showed that QMCN4 was the least permeable of the isolates to cephaloridine, followed by TAL3636, and that QMCN3 was highly permeable to cephaloridine. Therefore, neither catalytic activity nor permeability was a major contributor to the dramatic differences in the MICs. Instead, microbiological susceptibility was closely related to the level of metallo-beta-lactamase present in each isolate. Both biochemical and physical studies indicated that TAL3636 produced 5- to 10-fold and 50- to 100-fold more metallo-beta-lactamase than QMCN3 and QMCN4, respectively. Therefore, the level of CcrA enzyme production is the dominant contributing factor to high-level resistance among strains harboring a ccrA gene.

  6. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T.; Stark, Damien

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  7. Bacteremia due to Bacteroides fragilis after elective appendectomy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fisher, M C; Baluarte, H J; Long, S S

    1981-05-01

    Bacteremia caused by Bacteroides fragilis occurred in four of 75 children after renal transplantation, and B. fragilis was the most common cause of postoperative bacteremia. Bacteroides bacteremia was significantly associated with performance of elective appendectomy at the time of transplantation (P less than 0.01) and with profound lymphocytopenia (P = 0.01). No patient received antibiotics at the time of surgery or prior to the first positive blood culture, yet B. fragilis was the single organism isolated from blood and abscesses in these patients. A role for lymphocytes in containment of B. fragilis has not been suggested previously, although unexplained occurrence of bacteroides bacteremia in immunocompromised patients has occasionally been reported. Lymphocytes themselves may be important in this host-bacterium interaction, or lymphocytopenia may be the marker for a more generalized deficiency in host defenses.

  8. Activation of Bacteroides fragilis toxin by a novel bacterial protease contributes to anaerobic sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian M.; Herrou, Julien; Hecht, Aaron L.; Teoh, Wei Ping; Turner, Jerrold R.; Crosson, Sean; Wardenburg, Juliane Bubeck

    2016-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the leading cause of anaerobic bacteremia and sepsis 1. Enterotoxigenic strains producing B. fragilis toxin (BFT, fragilysin) contribute to colitis 2 and intestinal malignancy 3, yet are also isolated in bloodstream infection 4,5. It is not known whether these strains harbor unique genetic determinants that confer virulence in extra-intestinal disease. We demonstrate that BFT contributes to sepsis and identify a B. fragilis protease, fragipain (Fpn), which is required for endogenous activation of BFT through removal of its auto-inhibitory prodomain. Structural analysis of Fpn reveals a His-Cys catalytic dyad characteristic of C11 family cysteine proteases that are conserved in multiple pathogenic Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp. Fpn-deficient enterotoxigenic B. fragilis is attenuated in its ability to induce sepsis, however Fpn is dispensable in B. fragilis colitis wherein host proteases mediate BFT activation. Our findings define a role for B. fragilis enterotoxin and its activating protease in the pathogenesis of bloodstream infection, indicating a greater complexity of cellular targeting and action of BFT than previously appreciated. The expression of fpn by both toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains suggests this protease may contribute to anaerobic sepsis beyond its role in toxin activation, potentially serving as a target for disease modification. PMID:27089515

  9. Bacteriophages active against Bacteroides fragilis in sewage-polluted waters.

    PubMed Central

    Tartera, C; Jofre, J

    1987-01-01

    Twelve strains of different Bacteroides species were tested for their efficiency of detection of bacteriophages from sewage. The host range of several isolated phages was investigated. The results indicated that there was a high degree of strain specificity. Then, by using Bacteroides fragilis HSP 40 as the host, which proved to be the most efficient for the detection of phages, feces from humans and several animal species and raw sewage, river water, water from lagoons, seawater, groundwater, and sediments were tested for the presence of bacteriophages that were active against B. fragilis HSP 40. Phages were detected in feces of 10% of the human fecal samples tested and was never detected in feces of the other animal species studied. Moreover, bacteriophages were always recovered from sewage and sewage-polluted samples of waters and sediments, but not from nonpolluted samples. The titers recovered were dependent on the degree of pollution in analyzed waters and sediments. PMID:3662510

  10. Transmission of Dientamoeba fragilis: evaluation of the role of Enterobius vermicularis.

    PubMed

    Girginkardeşler, Nogay; Kurt, Ozgür; Kilimcioğlu, Ali A; Ok, Ulgen Z

    2008-03-01

    The role of Enterobius vermicularis in the transmission of Dientamoeba fragilis has been evaluated in two groups of patients admitted to the Parasitology Laboratory of Celal Bayar University: one group with E. vermicularis infection (n=187, Pinworm Group), and the other with D. fragilis infection (n=126, Dientamoeba Group). The presence of the other parasite, pinworm or Dientamoeba, was investigated with the microscopic examination of cellophane tape and stool samples for three consecutive days. In the Pinworm Group, 9.6% of the patients were found to be coinfected with D. fragilis, while 25.4% of the patients in the Dientamoeba Group were found to be coinfected with pinworms. The coincidence rates of D. fragilis and E. vermicularis, higher than the prevalence of each parasite in similar populations, suggest a common relation between these two parasites, possibly in entering the human body. E. vermicularis infection was found to be significantly more common in younger children (p<0.001), indicating that younger children may also be at higher risk for D. fragilis infection. These findings also raise the question of whether the unrelated symptoms of the pinworm infected patients such as abdominal pain and diarrhea may actually be due to overlooked Dientamoeba infections.

  11. Cellular immunity to Bacteroides fragilis capsular polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The polysaccharide capsule of Bacteroides fragilis has been shown to be important in the virulence of the organism. The capsular polysaccharide (CP) of B. fragilis has been extensively purified. Using a murine model of intraabdominal abscess formation, we have been able to demonstrate cellular immunity to the capsular polysaccharide of B. fragilis. Immunization of C57BL/10J mice with the CP over 5 wk prevents abscess formation when the mice are challenged with B. fragilis intraperitoneally. This immunity can be transferred to naive mice with spleen cells from immune animals. The immune cells bear Thy-1.2 and Ly- 2.2 antigens. The immune response has been shown to be antigen specific, but not H-2 restricted. The possibility that these immune cells are suppressor T cells is discussed. The experimental system presented provides a model for the examination of the cellular interactions responsible for abscess formation and the cellular response to bacterial pathogens. PMID:6174672

  12. The Bfp60 surface adhesin is an extracellular matrix and plasminogen protein interacting in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Ferreira, Eliane; Teixeira, Felipe; Cordeiro, Fabiana; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; Rocha, Edson R.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Domingues, Regina M C P

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen (Plg) is a highly abundant protein found in the plasma component of blood and is necessary for the degradation of fibrin, collagen, and other structural components of tissues. This fibrinolytic system is utilized by several pathogenic species of bacteria to manipulate the host plasminogen system and facilitate invasion of tissues during infection by modifying the activation of this process through the binding of Plg at their surface. Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated Gram-negative obligate anaerobe from human clinical infections, such as intra-abdominal abscesses and anaerobic bacteraemia. The ability of B. fragilis to convert plasminogen (Plg) into plasmin has been associated with an outer membrane protein named Bfp60. In this study, we characterized the function of Bfp60 protein in B. fragilis 638R by constructing the bfp60 defective strain and comparing its with that of the wild type regarding binding to laminin-1 (LMN-1) and activation of Plg into plasmin. Although the results showed in this study indicate that Bfp60 surface protein of B. fragilis is important for the recognition of LMN-1 and Plg activation, a significant slow activation of Plg into plasmin was observed in the mutant strain. For that reason, the possibility of another unidentified mechanism activating Plg is also present in B. fragilis can not be discarded. The results demonstrate that Bfp60 protein is responsible for the recognition of laminin and Plg-plasmin activation. Although the importance of this protein is still unclear in the pathogenicity of the species, it is accepted that since other pathogenic bacteria use this mechanism to disseminate through the extracellular matrix during the infection, it should also contribute to the virulence of B. fragilis. PMID:23850366

  13. Safety Evaluation of a Novel Strain of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Deng, Huimin; Li, Zhengchao; Tan, Yafang; Han, Yanping; Wang, Xiaoyi; Du, Zongmin; Liu, Yangyang; Yang, Ruifu; Bai, Yang; Bi, Yujing; Zhi, Fachao

    2017-01-01

    Commensal non-toxigenic Bacteroides fragilis confers powerful health benefits to the host, and has recently been identified as a promising probiotic candidate. We previously isolated B. fragilis strain ZY-312 and identified it as a novel strain based on 16S rRNA sequencing and morphological analyses. We also determined that ZY-312 displayed desirable probiotic properties, including tolerance to simulated digestive fluid, adherence, and in vitro safety. In this study, we aim to investigate whether ZY-312 meets the safety criteria required for probiotic bacteria through comprehensive and systematic evaluation. Consequently, the fatty acid profile, metabolite production, and biochemical activity of strain ZY-312 were found to closely resemble descriptions of B. fragilis in Bergey's manual. Taxonomic identification of strain ZY-312 based on whole genome sequencing indicated that ZY-312 and ATCC 25285 showed 99.99% similarity. The 33 putative virulence-associated factors identified in ZY-312 mainly encoded structural proteins and proteins with physiological activity, while the lack of bft indicated that ZY-312 was non-toxigenic. In vivo safety was proven in both normal and immune-deficient mice. The 11 identified antibiotic resistance genes were located on the chromosome rather than on a plasmid, ruling out the risk of plasmid-mediated transfer of antibiotic resistance. In vitro, ZY-312 showed resistance to cefepime, kanamycin, and streptomycin. Finally, and notably, ZY-312 exhibited high genetic stability after 100 passages in vitro. This study supplements the foundation work on the safety evaluation of ZY-312, and contributes to the development of the first probiotic representative from the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum.

  14. Safety Evaluation of a Novel Strain of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huimin; Li, Zhengchao; Tan, Yafang; Han, Yanping; Wang, Xiaoyi; Du, Zongmin; Liu, Yangyang; Yang, Ruifu; Bai, Yang; Bi, Yujing; Zhi, Fachao

    2017-01-01

    Commensal non-toxigenic Bacteroides fragilis confers powerful health benefits to the host, and has recently been identified as a promising probiotic candidate. We previously isolated B. fragilis strain ZY-312 and identified it as a novel strain based on 16S rRNA sequencing and morphological analyses. We also determined that ZY-312 displayed desirable probiotic properties, including tolerance to simulated digestive fluid, adherence, and in vitro safety. In this study, we aim to investigate whether ZY-312 meets the safety criteria required for probiotic bacteria through comprehensive and systematic evaluation. Consequently, the fatty acid profile, metabolite production, and biochemical activity of strain ZY-312 were found to closely resemble descriptions of B. fragilis in Bergey’s manual. Taxonomic identification of strain ZY-312 based on whole genome sequencing indicated that ZY-312 and ATCC 25285 showed 99.99% similarity. The 33 putative virulence-associated factors identified in ZY-312 mainly encoded structural proteins and proteins with physiological activity, while the lack of bft indicated that ZY-312 was non-toxigenic. In vivo safety was proven in both normal and immune-deficient mice. The 11 identified antibiotic resistance genes were located on the chromosome rather than on a plasmid, ruling out the risk of plasmid-mediated transfer of antibiotic resistance. In vitro, ZY-312 showed resistance to cefepime, kanamycin, and streptomycin. Finally, and notably, ZY-312 exhibited high genetic stability after 100 passages in vitro. This study supplements the foundation work on the safety evaluation of ZY-312, and contributes to the development of the first probiotic representative from the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum. PMID:28367145

  15. Isolated galaxies, pairs, and groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuneva, I.; Kalinkov, M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors searched for isolated galaxies, pairs and groups of galaxies in the CfA survey (Huchra et al. 1983). It was assumed that the distances to galaxies are given by R = V/H sub o, where H sub o = 100 km s(exp -1) Mpc(exp -1) and R greater than 6 Mpc. The searching procedure is close to those, applied to find superclusters of galaxies (Kalinkov and Kuneva 1985, 1986). A sphere with fixed radius r (asterisk) is described around each galaxy. The mean spatial density in the sphere is m. Let G (sup 1) be any galaxy and G (sup 2) be its nearest neighbor at a distance R sub 2. If R sub 2 exceeds the 95 percent quintile in the distribution of the distances of the second neighbors, then G (sup 1) is an isolated galaxy. Let the midpoint of G (sup 1) and G (sup 2) be O sub 2 and r sub 2=R sub 2/2. For the volume V sub 2, defined with the radius r sub 2, the density D sub 2 less than k mu, the galaxy G (sup 2) is a single one and the procedure for searching for pairs and groups, beginning with this object is over and we have to pass to another object. Here the authors present the groups - isolated and nonisolated - with n greater than 3, found in the CfA survey in the Northern galactic hemisphere. The parameters used are k = 10 and r (asterisk) = 5 Mpc. Table 1 contains: (1) the group number, (2) the galaxy, nearest to the multiplet center, (3) multiplicity n, (4) the brightest galaxy if it is not listed in (2); (5) and (6) are R.A. and Dec. (1950), (7) - mean distance D in Mpc. Further there are the mean density rho (8) of the multiplet (galaxies Mpc (exp -3), (9) the density rho (asterisk) for r (asterisk) = 5 Mpc and (10) the density rho sub g for the group with its nearest neighbor. The parenthesized digits for densities in the last three columns are powers of ten.

  16. Exploratory Investigation of Bacteroides fragilis Transcriptional Response during In vitro Exposure to Subinhibitory Concentration of Metronidazole

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Michele C. R.; Resende, Juliana A.; Ferreira-Machado, Alessandra B.; Saji, Guadalupe D. R. Q.; de Vasconcelos, Ana T. R.; da Silva, Vânia L.; Nicolás, Marisa F.; Diniz, Cláudio G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, member from commensal gut microbiota, is an important pathogen associated to endogenous infections and metronidazole remains a valuable antibiotic for the treatment of these infections, although bacterial resistance is widely reported. Considering the need of a better understanding on the global mechanisms by which B. fragilis survive upon metronidazole exposure, we performed a RNA-seq transcriptomic approach with validation of gene expression results by qPCR. Bacteria strains were selected after in vitro subcultures with subinhibitory concentration (SIC) of the drug. From a wild type B. fragilis ATCC 43859 four derivative strains were selected: first and fourth subcultures under metronidazole exposure and first and fourth subcultures after drug removal. According to global gene expression analysis, 2,146 protein coding genes were identified, of which a total of 1,618 (77%) were assigned to a Gene Ontology term (GO), indicating that most known cellular functions were taken. Among these 2,146 protein coding genes, 377 were shared among all strains, suggesting that they are critical for B. fragilis survival. In order to identify distinct expression patterns, we also performed a K-means clustering analysis set to 15 groups. This analysis allowed us to detect the major activated or repressed genes encoding for enzymes which act in several metabolic pathways involved in metronidazole response such as drug activation, defense mechanisms against superoxide ions, high expression level of multidrug efflux pumps, and DNA repair. The strains collected after metronidazole removal were functionally more similar to those cultured under drug pressure, reinforcing that drug-exposure lead to drastic persistent changes in the B. fragilis gene expression patterns. These results may help to elucidate B. fragilis response during metronidazole exposure, mainly at SIC, contributing with information about bacterial survival strategies under stress conditions in their

  17. Exploratory Investigation of Bacteroides fragilis Transcriptional Response during In vitro Exposure to Subinhibitory Concentration of Metronidazole.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Michele C R; Resende, Juliana A; Ferreira-Machado, Alessandra B; Saji, Guadalupe D R Q; de Vasconcelos, Ana T R; da Silva, Vânia L; Nicolás, Marisa F; Diniz, Cláudio G

    2016-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, member from commensal gut microbiota, is an important pathogen associated to endogenous infections and metronidazole remains a valuable antibiotic for the treatment of these infections, although bacterial resistance is widely reported. Considering the need of a better understanding on the global mechanisms by which B. fragilis survive upon metronidazole exposure, we performed a RNA-seq transcriptomic approach with validation of gene expression results by qPCR. Bacteria strains were selected after in vitro subcultures with subinhibitory concentration (SIC) of the drug. From a wild type B. fragilis ATCC 43859 four derivative strains were selected: first and fourth subcultures under metronidazole exposure and first and fourth subcultures after drug removal. According to global gene expression analysis, 2,146 protein coding genes were identified, of which a total of 1,618 (77%) were assigned to a Gene Ontology term (GO), indicating that most known cellular functions were taken. Among these 2,146 protein coding genes, 377 were shared among all strains, suggesting that they are critical for B. fragilis survival. In order to identify distinct expression patterns, we also performed a K-means clustering analysis set to 15 groups. This analysis allowed us to detect the major activated or repressed genes encoding for enzymes which act in several metabolic pathways involved in metronidazole response such as drug activation, defense mechanisms against superoxide ions, high expression level of multidrug efflux pumps, and DNA repair. The strains collected after metronidazole removal were functionally more similar to those cultured under drug pressure, reinforcing that drug-exposure lead to drastic persistent changes in the B. fragilis gene expression patterns. These results may help to elucidate B. fragilis response during metronidazole exposure, mainly at SIC, contributing with information about bacterial survival strategies under stress conditions in their

  18. Relevance of the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax fragilis in mucilage formations of the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Pistocchi, Rossella; Cangini, Monica; Totti, Cecilia; Urbani, Ranieri; Guerrini, Franca; Romagnoli, Tiziana; Sist, Paola; Palamidesi, Simona; Boni, Laurita; Pompei, Marinella

    2005-12-15

    Oceanographic cruises were carried out monthly from June 1999 to July 2002 to follow the mucilage formation process in the Northern Adriatic Sea. Results show that in correspondence with these events the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax fragilis (Schütt) Kofoid was observed both in the water column and within mucilage aggregates. In the water column, increasing abundances were observed from May until July, with values never exceeding 8500 cells l(-1). Much higher densities were observed within superficial gelatinous aggregates (22800-3400000 cells l(-1)). In mucilage samples, a large number of decomposing cells were present, together with abundant alive cells, enveloped in exudates. G. fragilis isolated from mucilage samples was cultured in three different culture media; it was characterized by a low growth rate but it produced a high amount of polysaccharides. The highest yield both in terms of cell number and carbohydrate production was observed in the medium having the highest nitrogen and phosphorus content and the lowest N/P ratio. The monomeric composition of G. fragilis carbohydrates, compared with that of mucilage samples, showed that in both natural and cultured samples galactose was the most abundant sugar; in addition, an overall good correlation, especially between the monomeric carbohydrate composition of G. fragilis grown in f/2 medium and that of a mucilage sample in which this species was present in high density, was observed.

  19. Biotypes of group A streptococci isolated from children.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Palani; Menon, Thangam; Lobo, Charmaine; Anbumani, N; Kumar, C P Girish; Shanmugasundaram, S

    2004-03-01

    Thirty-eight isolates of group A streptococci from patients with pharyngitis, 13 isolates from patients with pyoderma and 28 carrier strains were subjected to biotyping by carbohydrate fermentation tests and production of beta-glucuronidase. Biotype 10 was observed most frequently among clinical isolates and biotypes 3 and 4 were most common among carrier isolates.

  20. Role of Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in Children Less Than 5 Years of Age With Diarrhea in Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Jedari Seifi, Sirus; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Abdoli Oskuei, Shahram; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Memar, Mohammad Yousef; Alizadeh, Naser; Seifi Yarijan Sofla, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is the most frequent health problem among children in developing countries. Defining the etiology of acute diarrhea is critical to disease therapy and prevention. Some anaerobic bacteria such as Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) strains cause diarrheal disease by production of enterotoxin in children less than 5 years old. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of ETBF among common bacteria and viruses causing diarrhea in children aged less than five years. Materials and Methods One hundred diarrheal stools were cultured for detection of aerobic and anaerobic pathogen bacteria by direct plating on selective media and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed according to clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines on isolates of ETBF. The enterotoxigenic gene among B. fragilis isolates was also investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Detection of viral pathogens was carried out using the latex agglutination test. Results Ten B. fragilis were isolated from 100 diarrheal fecal specimens. All isolates were susceptible to metronidazole, while 10% were susceptible to clindamycin. Four (40%) ETBF were isolated. Rotaviruses (57.2%) and adenoviruses (18.6%) were the most frequently detected etiological agents. Conclusions ETBF is one of the etiological agents that may cause diarrhea in children but it is not the commonest of them. Metronidazole is still an effective antibiotic against B. fragilis. Viruses are the most important etiological agents of diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. PMID:27635209

  1. Bacteroides Fragilis OmpA: Utility as a Live Vaccine Vector for Biodefense Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 29-01-2008 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 DEC 2006...Microbiology Letters (the original manuscript was returned with some revisions requested and has been resubmitted.) The submitted manuscript is attached...cardiac myxoma [4]. Bacteroides fragilis, a non-spore-forming, Gram-negative rod, is the most common anaerobic organism isolated from clinical

  2. Prevalence of Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in Children with Diarrhea in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Naoki; Liu, Chengxu; Kato, Haru; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Nakamura, Haruhi; Iwai, Naoichi; Ueno, Kazue

    1999-01-01

    In age-matched controlled studies performed in Japan, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis was isolated from 14.9% of 114 children aged 1 to 14 years with antibiotic-unassociated diarrhea (AUD) and 6.5% of 108 children aged 1 to 6 years with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). The difference in comparison with control children, was significant for AUD children but not AAD children. PMID:9986859

  3. Novel Approach for Evaluation of Bacteroides fragilis Protective Role against Bartonella henselae Liver Damage in Immunocompromised Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Pagliuca, Chiara; Cicatiello, Annunziata G.; Colicchio, Roberta; Greco, Adelaide; Cerciello, Raimondo; Auletta, Luigi; Albanese, Sandra; Scaglione, Elena; Pagliarulo, Caterina; Pastore, Gabiria; Mansueto, Gelsomina; Brunetti, Arturo; Avallone, Bice; Salvatore, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Bartonella henselae is a gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium and is the causative agent of cat-scratch disease. Our previous data have established that Bacteroides fragilis colonization is able to prevent B. henselae damages through the polysaccharide A (PSA) in an experimental murine model. In order to determine whether the PSA is essential for the protection against pathogenic effects of B. henselae in immunocompromised hosts, SCID mice were co-infected with B. fragilis wild type or its mutant B. fragilis ΔPSA and the effects of infection on murine tissues have been observed by High-Frequency Ultrasound (HFUS), histopathological examination, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). For the first time, echostructure, hepatic lobes length, vascular alterations, and indirect signs of hepatic dysfunctions, routinely used as signs of disease in humans, have been analyzed in an immunocompromised murine model. Our findings showed echostructural alterations in all infected mice compared with the Phosphate Buffer Solution (PBS) control group; further, those infected with B. henselae and co-infected with B. henselae/B. fragilis ΔPSA presented the major echostructural alterations. Half of the mice infected with B. henselae and all those co-infected with B. henselae/B. fragilis ΔPSA have showed an altered hepatic echogenicity compared with the renal cortex. The echogenicity score of co-infected mice with B. henselae/B. fragilis ΔPSA differed significantly compared with the PBS control group (p < 0.05). Moreover the inflammation score of the histopathological evaluation was fairly concordant with ultrasound findings. Ultrastructural analysis performed by TEM revealed no significant alterations in liver samples of SCID mice infected with B. fragilis wild type while those infected with B. fragilis ΔPSA showed the presence of collagen around the main vessels compared with the PBS control group. The liver samples of mice infected with B. henselae showed

  4. Inactivation of a single gene enables microaerobic growth of the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, Brian M.; Baughn, Anthony D.; Gallegos, Rene; Malamy, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis can replicate in atmospheres containing ≤0.05% oxygen, but higher concentrations arrest growth by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that inactivation of a single gene, oxe (i.e., oxygen enabled) in B. fragilis allows for growth in concentrations as high as 2% oxygen while increasing the tolerance of this organism to room air. Known components of the oxidative stress response including the ahpC, kat, batA-E, and tpx genes were not individually important for microaerobic growth. However, a Δoxe strain scavenged H2O2 at a faster rate than WT, indicating that reactive oxygen species may play a critical role in limiting growth of this organism to low-oxygen environments. Clinical isolates of B. fragilis displayed a greater capacity for growth under microaerobic conditions than fecal isolates, with some encoding polymorphisms in oxe. Additionally, isolation of oxygen-enabled mutants of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron suggests that Oxe may mediate growth arrest of other anaerobes in oxygenated environments. PMID:22778399

  5. Self-Disclosure in Isolated Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Dalmas A.

    Analyses of self-disclosure behavior under multiple conditions of social isolation and confinement replicated earlier findings and generally confirmed hypotheses derived from social penetration theory. Major findings link self-disclosure to environmental parameters and interpersonal friction. In the Privacy without Stimulation condition, Ss…

  6. A study in vitro of the sensitivity to antibiotics of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Ingham, H R; Selkon, J B; Codd, A A; Hale, J H

    1968-07-01

    During a two-year period of observation Bacteroides species were isolated from specimens of pus and vaginal swabs from 115 patients in this hospital. Thirty-five representative strains proved on examination to be Bacteroides fragilis. Minimal inhibitory and minimal bactericidal concentrations of six antibiotics for these strains were determined. All strains were resistant to streptomycin, neomycin, and polymyxin, slightly sensitive to penicillin and ampicillin, and fully sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, and lincomycin. The minimum bactericidal concentrations of chloramphenicol, erythromycin, and lincomycin were two to four times the minimal inhibitory concentrations. Tetracycline failed to exert any consistent bactericidal effect.The treatment of patients with infections caused by B. fragilis is discussed in the light of the findings in vitro.

  7. Chromosomal DNA probes for the identification of Bacteroides tectum and Bacteroides fragilis from the oral cavity of cats.

    PubMed

    Love, D N; Bailey, G D

    1993-01-01

    A dot-blot hybridisation assay using high molecular weight DNA as whole chromosomal probes was used to differentiate Bacteroides tectum from Bacteroides fragilis. 32P-labelled probes were compared with digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled probes. The whole chromosomal probes were specific--differentiating B. tectum from B. fragilis and both from a variety of other species (including other members of the genera Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Prevotella) found in normal and abnormal mouths of cats and horses. However, even at very high stringencies, B. tectum homology groups I, II and III were not distinguishable from one another using either 32P-labelled or DIG-labelled probes. Thus, DIG-labelled whole chromosome probes directed against cellular DNA released directly onto nitrocellulose membranes is considered a useful method for diagnostic veterinary laboratories wishing to identify B. tectum and distinguish it from B. fragilis and other oral anaerobic flora of cats.

  8. Dientamoeba fragilis is more prevalent than Giardia duodenalis in children and adults attending a day care centre in Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Crotti, D; D'Annibale, M L; Fonzo, G; Lalle, M; Cacciò, S M; Pozio, E

    2005-06-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a well recognised enteropathogen, while Dientamoeba fragilis is rarely detected and consequently it is not recognised as an important human pathogen. In 2002-2003, a survey has been carried out on enteroparasites in faecal samples of outpatients attending a day care centre in the town of Perugia (Central Italy). To improve the detection level, at least three samples from each patient were collected at different days and within two hours from defecation. The coproparasitological examination has been carried out by direct microscopic examination, faecal concentration, and Giemsa and modified Ziehl-Nielsen stainings of faecal smears. The genotypes of Giardia duodenalis isolates were determined by PCR of the beta-giardin gene. Of 1,989 enrolled people (966 children, 1,023 adults), 165 persons (8.3%; 153 adults, 15.0%; 12 children, 1.2%), were positive for parasites, but only 1 12 adults (73.2% of those infected) and eight children (66.7% of those infected) harboured D. fragilis and G. duodenalis. Both the Assemblages A and B were detected in 18 G. duodenalis isolates examined at the beta-giardin gene. The higher prevalence of D. fragilis infections than that of G. duodenalis is probably related to the method used, a procedure, which is rarely followed in laboratories for the diagnosis of enteric parasites. These epidemiological data suggest that when faecal samples are examined after a period of time and without Giemsa staining, most D. fragilis infections goes undetected.

  9. Dientamoeba fragilis DNA detection in Enterobius vermicularis eggs

    PubMed Central

    Ögren, Jessica; Dienus, Olaf; Löfgren, Sture; Iveroth, Peter; Matussek, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is an intestinal protozoan suspected of causing gastrointestinal symptoms, and its mode of transmission is unknown, although first described almost a century ago. A hypothesis is that Enterobius vermicularis is a vector for D. fragilis, and recently, D. fragilis DNA was detected within surface-sterilized eggs of E. vermicularis. Using real-time PCR, we detected D. fragilis DNA in 18 (85%) of 21 samples of E. vermicularis eggs collected from patients harbouring D. fragilis in faeces. This finding supports the hypothesis that E. vermicularis may have an important role in the transmission of D. fragilis. This paper describes a protocol to wash and surface-sterilize E. vermicularis eggs, with the aim of showing presence of both E. vermicularis and D. fragilis specific DNA within, and the results from 20 co-infected patients. The study has merit as a confirmatory study of the trials by Röser et al. (2013), and includes improvements of the protocol. PMID:23893951

  10. Evidence for two groups of banana bunchy top virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Karan, M; Harding, R M; Dale, J L

    1994-12-01

    Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) DNA component 1 from isolates from 10 different countries was cloned and sequenced and the sequences were aligned and compared. This analysis indicated two groups: the South Pacific group (isolates from Australia, Burundi, Egypt, Fiji, India, Tonga and Western Samoa) and the Asian group (isolates from the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam). The mean sequence difference within each group was 1.9 to 3.0% and between isolates from the two groups was approximately 10%, but some parts of the sequences differed more than others. However, the protein encoded by the major open reading frame, which is probably a replicase, differed by approximately 5%. The region from the beginning of the stem-loop sequence to the potential TATA box was identical in all isolates except for a two nucleotide change in the Western Samoan isolate and a single change in that of the NSW isolate. These results, together with other evidence, suggest that BBTV has spread to bananas after the initial movement of bananas from the Asian Pacific regions to Africa and the Americas.

  11. In vitro utilization of mucin by Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Roberton, A M; Stanley, R A

    1982-01-01

    A method for isolating pig colon mucin in a soluble high-molecular-weight form, suitable for addition to bacterial growth media, is described. This preparation was utilized as a sole carbohydrate energy source by two strains of Bacteroides fragilis. The extent of degradation was compared with that of commercial pig gastric mucin by the same strains. Gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of the mucin carbohydrates and gel chromatography of the preparations were carried out before and after in vitro degradation. The mucin carbohydrates were utilized only to a very limited extent, colon mucin being more resistant to degradation than gastric mucin. Both mucins chromatographed at or near the excluded volume on Sepharose 4B, and only in the case of ATCC 25285 grown on gastric mucin was a significant degradation peak detected. If mucins are degraded in vivo by the sequential action of several bacteria, a pure culture in vitro might be expected to degrade mucins to a limited extent only. Techniques previously used to examine mucin utilization by pure cultures may have overlooked limited mucin degradation demonstrated by the methods used in this work. PMID:6174077

  12. Halogenated briarane diterpenes with acetyl migration from the gorgonian coral Junceella fragilis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Li, Xiaodan; Yin, Fuling; van Ofwegen, Leen; Lin, Wenhan

    2017-03-24

    Chemical examination of the gorgonian coral Junceella fragilis resulted in the isolation of four pairs of acetyl isomers belonging to briarane diterpenoids, including five new compounds. Their structures were determined on the basis of extensive spectroscopic (IR, MS, NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction) analysis in association with the chemical conversion. Each pair of isomers featured by dynamical interconversion through as acetyl migration in 1,2-diol, which was postulated to be generated under the formation of a cyclic orthoacetate intermediate. All compounds exerted the inhibitory activities against the NO production in RAW264.7 macrophage cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Mycotic Aneurysm Caused by Bacteroides fragilis in an Elderly Immunosuppressed Patient

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Takahiko; Kawasaki, Sadao; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koreeda, Daisuke; Ashikawa, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    An 82-year-old Japanese man, who presented with a fever and abdominal pain, was admitted to our hospital. According to enhanced computed tomography images, the probable diagnosis was abdominal aortic mycotic aneurysm. Eight sets of blood cultures obtained from the patient were negative. Despite administering treatment with vancomycin and ceftriaxone, the aneurysm progressively enlarged. He underwent open debridement surgery and in situ replacement because of an aneurysmal rupture. Bacteroides fragilis was isolated from the tissue culture of the aortic wall. Metronidazole was administered and discontinued without any infection relapse. When faced with similar cases, rare pathogens should thus be considered as possible causes of mycotic aneurysms. PMID:27904124

  14. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    PubMed Central

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  15. [Dientamoeba fragilis infection as cause of severe abdominal discomfort and flatulence].

    PubMed

    Halkjær, Sofie; Stensvold, Christen Rune; Petersen, Andreas Munk

    2015-01-26

    The clinical significance of Dientamoeba fragilis infection is controversial. We describe a case-history of a 16-year-old patient, who had suffered severe abdominal discomfort and flatulence through his lifetime. He was eventually diagnosed with D. fragilis infection, and eradication of D. fragilis with high-dose metronidazole kept him without symptoms for one year. Recurrence of the symptoms and recurrence of the D. fragilis infection was thereafter treated successfully with paromomycin.

  16. Internal character dictates transition dynamics between isolation and cohesive grouping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique, Pedro D.; Hui, Pak Ming; Johnson, Neil F.

    2015-12-01

    We show that accounting for internal character among interacting heterogeneous entities generates rich transition behavior between isolation and cohesive dynamical grouping. Our analytical and numerical calculations reveal different critical points arising for different character-dependent grouping mechanisms. These critical points move in opposite directions as the population's diversity decreases. Our analytical theory may help explain why a particular class of universality is so common in the real world, despite the fundamental differences in the underlying entities. It also correctly predicts the nonmonotonic temporal variation in connectivity observed recently in one such system.

  17. PREVALENCE OF DIENTAMOEBA FRAGILIS AMONG AN ORANG ASLI POPULATION IN RURAL MALAYSIA.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Hasim, Liyana; Moktar, Norhayati; Salleh, Fatmah Md; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M

    2015-09-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a trichomonad parasite that can infect the gastrointestinal tract of humans causing gastrointestinal disease. Little is known about its epidemiology. We evaluated the prevalence of D. fragilis by conducting a cross sectional study of an Orang Asli population in rural Malaysia. We examined stool samples from 150 participants for D. fragilis using Wheatley's trichrome stain and collected demographic data from each participant using a structured questionnaire. Five participants (3.3%) had D. fragilis in their stool; four of these were aged < 15 years; 3 were male and 2 were female. All participants with positive stool sample for D. fragilis were symptomatic; 3 had diarrhea and 2 had other gastrointestinal symptoms. D. fragilis is present in the study population. Further studies are needed to determine the virulence, pathogenicity and mode of transmission of D. fragilis in the study population.

  18. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown. PMID:26859882

  19. Characteristics of CDC group 1 and group 1-like coryneform bacteria isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, G; Lucchini, G M; Pfyffer, G E; Marchiani, M; von Graevenitz, A

    1993-01-01

    Fifteen strains of CDC group 1 coryneform and biochemically similar bacteria were isolated from clinical specimens. Of the 15 strains isolated, 11 were derived from abscesses and purulent lesions, mostly from the upper part of the body, and 3 were grown from blood cultures. Nine strains were associated with mixed anaerobic but no other aerobic flora. Seven strains exhibited the classical biochemical profile of CDC coryneform group 1; however, eight strains were unable to reduce nitrate and were called "group 1-like." Other reactions to differentiate CDC group 1 and group 1-like coryneform rods include alpha-hemolysis on human blood agar, fermentation of adonitol, and the presence of alkaline phosphatase. Fifteen strains showed marked CAMP reactions on different erythrocyte agars. Gas-liquid chromatography of volatile and nonvolatile fatty acids as well as cellular fatty acid patterns and the composition of cell wall components suggest that CDC group 1 and group 1-like coryneform bacteria do not belong to the genus Corynebacterium but possibly to the genus Actinomyces or Arcanobacterium. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed that group 1 and group 1-like strains represent different species. Images PMID:8263175

  20. Deficiency of the ferrous iron transporter FeoAB is linked with metronidazole resistance in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Veeranagouda, Yaligara; Husain, Fasahath; Boente, Renata; Moore, Jane; Smith, C. Jeffrey; Rocha, Edson R.; Patrick, Sheila; Wexler, Hannah M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Metronidazole is the most commonly used antimicrobial for Bacteroides fragilis infections and is recommended for prophylaxis of colorectal surgery. Metronidazole resistance is increasing and the mechanisms of resistance are not clear. Methods A transposon mutant library was generated in B. fragilis 638R (BF638R) to identify the genetic loci associated with resistance to metronidazole. Results Thirty-two independently isolated metronidazole-resistant mutants had a transposon insertion in BF638R_1421 that encodes the ferrous transport fusion protein (feoAB). Deletion of feoAB resulted in a 10-fold increased MIC of metronidazole for the strain. The metronidazole MIC for the feoAB mutant was similar to that for the parent strain when grown on media supplemented with excess iron, suggesting that the increase seen in the MIC of metronidazole was due to reduced cellular iron transport in the feoAB mutant. The furA gene repressed feoAB transcription in an iron-dependent manner and disruption of furA resulted in constitutive transcription of feoAB, regardless of whether or not iron was present. However, disruption of feoAB also diminished the capacity of BF638R to grow in a mouse intraperitoneal abscess model, suggesting that inorganic ferrous iron assimilation is essential for B. fragilis survival in vivo. Conclusions Selection for feoAB mutations as a result of metronidazole treatment will disable the pathogenic potential of B. fragilis and could contribute to the clinical efficacy of metronidazole. While mutations in feoAB are probably not a direct cause of clinical resistance, this study provides a key insight into intracellular metronidazole activity and the link with intracellular iron homeostasis. PMID:25028451

  1. Comparative antimicrobial efficacy of Metapex, Metronidazole, BioPure MTAD, Aztreonam on Bacteroides fragilis and Propionibacterium acne

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Rajkumar; Dubey, Sandeep; Dhole, Tapan Kumar N; Boruah, Lalit C; Srivastava, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the comparative antibacterial efficacy of Biopure MTAD, Metapex, Metronidazole, and Aztreonam against two obligate anerobic bacteria. Materials and Methods: Antimicrobial efficacy of selected medicaments against two obligate anaerobic bacteria Bacteroides fragilis and Propionibacterium acnes was done by Agar disc-diffusion method. Pre-sterilized Whatman paper discs, 6 mm in diameter and soaked with the test solution, were prepared and placed onto the previously seeded agar Petri plates. Each plate was incubated in anaerobic jar for anerobic environment at 37°C for 48 hours. A zone of inhibition was recorded for each plate and the results were analysed statistically. Saline and ethanol used as control group in this study. Results: Biopure MTAD, Metapex and Metronidazole were effective against all the selected microorganisms. Aztreonam was effective against Bacteroides fragilis. Saline and ethanol used as control were ineffective. Conclusions: Metronidazole showed the superior antibacterial property amongst the tested medicaments. PMID:23956535

  2. Saudi Moumouvirus, the First Group B Mimivirus Isolated from Asia.

    PubMed

    Bajrai, Leena H; de Assis, Felipe L; Azhar, Esam I; Jardot, Priscilla; Robert, Catherine; Abrahão, Jônatas; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel giant viruses identified and characterized from the recently proposed order Megavirales has increased in recent years and new questions have been raised regarding viral diversity and evolution. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of Saudi moumouvirus (SDMV), a new giant virus belonging to Mimivirus lineage B, isolated from a sewage sample taken from the King Abdulaziz University hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. SDMV presented 500 nm icosahedral particles with a 1,046,087 bp genome, which is larger than moumouvirus-like genomes which have been described in the past. The SDMV genome was predicted to encode 868 ORFs, ranging in size from 54 to 2,914 amino acids, with a mean size of 349 aa. Furthermore, this genome was predicted to encode 40 new genes (ORFans) without similarity with other sequences (ORFan L850 transcript was detected by qPCR in infected amoeba), in addition to 42 hypothetical proteins (pseudo-ORFs) with less than 100 aa, which matched other sequences in the NCBI nr database. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SDMV clustered together with mimiviruses from lineage B, including moumouvirus-like strains. It is, therefore, the third Mimivirus to be isolated in Asia and the first of group B.

  3. Saudi Moumouvirus, the First Group B Mimivirus Isolated from Asia

    PubMed Central

    Bajrai, Leena H.; de Assis, Felipe L.; Azhar, Esam I.; Jardot, Priscilla; Robert, Catherine; Abrahão, Jônatas; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel giant viruses identified and characterized from the recently proposed order Megavirales has increased in recent years and new questions have been raised regarding viral diversity and evolution. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of Saudi moumouvirus (SDMV), a new giant virus belonging to Mimivirus lineage B, isolated from a sewage sample taken from the King Abdulaziz University hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. SDMV presented 500 nm icosahedral particles with a 1,046,087 bp genome, which is larger than moumouvirus-like genomes which have been described in the past. The SDMV genome was predicted to encode 868 ORFs, ranging in size from 54 to 2,914 amino acids, with a mean size of 349 aa. Furthermore, this genome was predicted to encode 40 new genes (ORFans) without similarity with other sequences (ORFan L850 transcript was detected by qPCR in infected amoeba), in addition to 42 hypothetical proteins (pseudo-ORFs) with less than 100 aa, which matched other sequences in the NCBI nr database. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SDMV clustered together with mimiviruses from lineage B, including moumouvirus-like strains. It is, therefore, the third Mimivirus to be isolated in Asia and the first of group B. PMID:28066355

  4. Lipid-Enhanced Ethanol Production by Kluyveromyces fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Jacques H.; Burris, Neil; Woodward, Anne; Bailey, Richard B.

    1983-01-01

    The fermentation ability of a strain of Kluyveromyces fragilis, already selected for rapid lactose-fermenting capability, was improved dramatically by the addition of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol to the medium. The fermentation time of a 20% whey-lactose medium was decreased from over 90 h to less than 60 h. The lipids were shown to be taken up by the organism, and the effects on specific growth rate and biomass production were determined. PMID:16346208

  5. The enterotoxin of Bacteroides fragilis is a metalloprotease.

    PubMed Central

    Moncrief, J S; Obiso, R; Barroso, L A; Kling, J J; Wright, R L; Van Tassell, R L; Lyerly, D M; Wilkins, T D

    1995-01-01

    During the past decade, strains of Bacteroides fragilis that produce an enterotoxin have been implicated in diarrheal disease in animals and humans. The extracellular enterotoxin has been purified and characterized as a single polypeptide (M(r), approximately 20,000). Single specific primer-PCR was used to clone a portion of the B. fragilis enterotoxin gene. The recombinant protein expressed by the cloned gene fragment reacted with monospecific antibodies to B. fragilis enterotoxin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot analysis. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed a signature zinc-binding consensus motif (HEXXHXXGXXH/Met-turn) characteristic of metalloproteases termed metzincins. Sequence comparisons showed close identity to matrix metalloproteases (e.g., human fibroblast collagenase) within the zinc-binding and Met-turn region. Purified enterotoxin contained 1 g-atom of Zn2+ per molecule and hydrolyzed gelatin, azocoll, actin, tropomyosin, and fibrinogen. The enterotoxin also underwent autodigestion. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of two autodigestion products were identical to the deduced amino acid sequence of the recombinant enterotoxin and revealed cleavage at Cys-Leu and Ser-Leu peptide bonds. Gelatinase (type IV collagenase) activity comigrated with the toxin when analyzed by gel fractionation and zymography, indicating that protease activity is due to the enterotoxin and not to a contaminating protease(s). Optimal proteolytic activity occurred at 37 degrees C and pH 6.5. Primary proteolytic cleavage sites in actin were identified, revealing cleavage at Gly-Met and Thr-Leu peptide bonds. Enzymatic activity was inhibited by metal chelators but not by inhibitors of other classes of proteases. Additionally, cytotoxic activity of the enterotoxin on human carcinoma HT-29 cells was inhibited by acetoxymethyl ester EDTA. The metalloprotease activity of the enterotoxin suggests a possible mechanism for enterotoxicity and may have additional

  6. Early intestinal Bacteroides fragilis colonisation and development of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Vael, Carl; Nelen, Vera; Verhulst, Stijn L; Goossens, Herman; Desager, Kristine N

    2008-01-01

    Background The 'hygiene hypothesis' suggests that early exposure to microbes can be protective against atopic disease. The intestinal microbial flora could operate as an important postnatal regulator of the Th1/Th2 balance. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between early intestinal colonisation and the development of asthma in the first 3 years of life. Methods In a prospective birth cohort, 117 children were classified according to the Asthma Predictive Index. A positive index included wheezing during the first three years of life combined with eczema in the child in the first years of life or with a parental history of asthma. A faecal sample was taken at the age of 3 weeks and cultured on selective media. Results Asthma Predictive Index was positive in 26/117 (22%) of the children. The prevalence of colonisation with Bacteroides fragilis was higher at 3 weeks in index+ compared to index- children (64% vs. 34% p < 0,05). Bacteroides fragilis and Total Anaerobes counts at 3 weeks were significantly higher in children with a positive index as compared with those without. After adjusting for confounders a positive association was found between Bacteroides fragilis colonisation and Asthma Predictive Index (odds ratio: 4,4; confidence interval: 1,7 – 11,8). Conclusion Bacteroides fragilis colonisation at age 3 weeks is an early indicator of possible asthma later in life. This study could provide the means for more accurate targeting of treatment and prevention and thus more effective and better controlled modulation of the microbial milieu. PMID:18822123

  7. Lipid-enhanced ethanol production by Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, J.H.; Burris, N.; Woodward, A.; Bailey, R.B.

    1983-02-01

    The fermentation ability of a strain of Kluyveromyes fragilis, already selected for rapid lactose-fermenting capability, was improved dramatically by the addition of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol to the medium. The fermentation time of a 20% whey-lactose medium was decreased from over 90 hours to less than 60 hours. The lipids were shown to be taken up by the organism, and the effects on specific growth rate and biomass production were determined. (Refs. 23).

  8. Lipid-enhanced ethanol production by Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, J.H.; Burris, N.; Woodward, A.; Bailey, R.B.

    1983-02-01

    The fermentation ability of a strain of Kluyveromyces fragilis, already selected for rapid lactose-fermenting capability, was improved dramatically by the addition of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol to the medium. The fermentation time of a 20% whey-lactose medium was decreased from over 90 h to less than 60 h. The lipids were shown to be taken up by the organism, and the effects on specific growth rate and biomass production was determined.

  9. Linkage mapping in tetraploid willows: segregation of molecular markers and estimation of linkage phases support an allotetraploid structure for Salix alba x Salix fragilis interspecific hybrids.

    PubMed

    Barcaccia, G; Meneghetti, S; Albertini, E; Triest, L; Lucchin, M

    2003-02-01

    Salix alba-Salix fragilis complex includes closely related dioecious polyploid species, which are obligate outcrossers. Natural populations of these willows and their hybrids are represented by a mixture of highly heterozygous genotypes sharing a common gene pool. Since nothing is known about their genomic constitution, tetraploidy (2n=4x=76) in willow species makes basic and applied genetic studies difficult. We have used a two-way pseudotestcross strategy and single-dose markers (SDMs) to construct the first linkage maps for both pistillate and staminate willows. A total of 242 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and 50 selective amplifications of microsatellite polymorphic loci (SAMPL) markers, which showed 1:1 segregation in the F(1) mapping populations, were used in linkage analysis. In S. alba, 73 maternal and 48 paternal SDMs were mapped to 19 and 16 linkage groups covering 708 and 339 cM, respectively. In S. fragilis, 13 maternal and 33 paternal SDMs were mapped in six and 14 linkage groups covering 98 and 321 cM, respectively. For most cosegregation groups, a comparable number of markers linked in coupling and repulsion was identified. This finding suggests that most of chromosomes pair preferentially as occurs in allotetraploid species exhibiting disomic inheritance. The detection of 10 pairs of marker alleles from single parents showing codominant inheritance strengthens this hypothesis. The fact that, of the 1122 marker loci identified in the two male and female parents, the vast majority (77.5%) were polymorphic and as few as 22.5% were shared between parental species highlight that S. alba and S. fragilis genotypes are differentiated. The highly difference between S. alba- and S. fragilis-specific markers found in both parental combinations (on average, 65.3 vs 34.7%, respectively) supports the (phylogenetic) hypothesis that S. fragilis is derived from S. alba-like progenitors.

  10. Pyogenic arthritis of native joints due to Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nolla, Joan M.; Murillo, Oscar; Narvaez, Javier; Vaquero, Carmen Gómez; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Pedrero, Salvador; Cabo, Javier; Ariza, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pyogenic arthritis of native joints due to Bacteroides fragilis seems to be an infrequent disease. We analyzed the cases diagnosed in a tertiary hospital during a 22-year period and reviewed the literature to summarize the experience with this infectious entity. In our institution, of 308 patients with pyogenic arthritis of native joints, B fragilis was the causative organism in 2 (0.6%) cases. A MEDLINE search (1981–2015) identified 19 additional cases. Of the 21 patients available for review (13 men and 8 women, with a mean age, of 54.4 ± 17 years), 19 (90%) presented a systemic predisposing factor for infection; the most common associated illness was rheumatoid arthritis (8 patients). Bacteremia was documented in 65% (13/20) of cases. In 5 patients (24%), 1 or more concomitant infectious process was found. Metronidazole was the most frequently used antibiotic. Surgical drainage was performed in 11 cases (52%). The overall mortality rate was 5%. Pyogenic arthritis of native joints due to B fragilis is an infrequent disease that mainly affects elderly patients with underlying medical illnesses and in whom bacteremia and the presence of a concomitant infectious process are frequent conditions. PMID:27336895

  11. Superoxide dismutase and O2 lethality in Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Privalle, C T; Gregory, E M

    1979-01-01

    Exposure of midlog Bacteroides fragils (VPI 2393) to 2% O2-98% N2 caused a three- to fivefold increase in superoxide dismutase specific activity within the cells. The increase in specific activity was completed within 90 min after exposure to oxygen and was dependent upon protein synthesis. Cells containing the higher superoxide dismutase level were more resistant to the effects of 5 atm of oxygen tension than were cells containing the lower level of superoxide dismutase but were equally resistant to 5 atm of nitrogen tension. Similar results were observed upon comparing viability experiments with B. fragilis and B. vulgatus. Superoxide dismutase activity in sonic extracts of B. fragilis was rapidly inactivated by exposure to 5 mM H2O2 and was inhibited by 1 mM NaN3 but not 5 mM NaCN. The inhibition pattern is identical to the pattern demonstrated for the purified iron-containing enzyme from Escherichia coli B and suggests that the superoxide dismutase in B. fragilis is an iron enzyme. PMID:438129

  12. Bacteroides fragilis induce necrosis on mice peritoneal macrophages: In vitro and in vivo assays

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, J.M.B.D.; Seabra, S.H.; Vallim, D.C.; Americo, M.A.; Fracallanza, S.E.L.; Vommaro, R.C.; Domingues, R.M.C.P.

    2009-10-02

    Bacteroides fragilis is an anaerobic bacteria component of human intestinal microbiota and agent of infections. In the host B. fragilis interacts with macrophages, which produces toxic radicals like NO. The interaction of activated mice peritoneal macrophages with four strains of B. fragilis was evaluated on this study. Previously was shown that such strains could cause metabolic and morphologic alterations related to macrophage death. In this work propidium iodide staining showed the strains inducing macrophage necrosis in that the labeling was evident. Besides nitroblue tetrazolium test showed that B. fragilis stimulates macrophage to produce oxygen radicals. In vivo assays performed in BalbC mice have results similar to those for in vitro tests as well as scanning electron microscopy, which showed the same surface pore-like structures observed in vitro before. The results revealed that B. fragilis strains studied lead to macrophage death by a process similar to necrosis.

  13. Physiological effects of environmental acidification in the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.; Lovera, C.; Whaling, P. J.; Buck, K. R.; Pane, E. F.; Barry, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is now reaching depths over 1000 m in the Eastern Pacific, overlapping the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). Deep-sea animals are suspected to be especially sensitive to environmental acidification associated with global climate change. We have investigated the effects of elevated pCO2 and variable O2 on the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis, a species whose range of 200-1200 m depth includes the OMZ and spans a pCO2 range of approx. 600-1200 μatm (approx. pH 7.6 to 7.8). Individuals were evaluated during two exposure experiments (1-month and 4 month) at control and three levels of elevated pCO2 at in situ O2 levels of approx. 10% air saturation. A treatment of control pCO2 at 100% air saturation was also included in experiment two. During the first experiment, perivisceral coelomic fluid (PCF) acid-base balance was investigated during a one-month exposure; results show S. fragilis has limited ability to compensate for the respiratory acidosis brought on by elevated pCO2, due in part to low non-bicarbonate PCF buffering capacity. During the second experiment, individuals were separated into fed and fasted experimental groups, and longer-term effects of elevated pCO2 and variable O2 on righting time, feeding, growth, and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were investigated for both groups. Results suggest that the acidosis found during experiment one does not directly correlate with adverse effects during exposure to realistic future pCO2 levels.

  14. Stat3 Activation in Murine Colitis Induced by Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Elizabeth C.; Rabizadeh, Shervin; Albesiano, Emilia; Wu, XinQun; Wu, Shaoguang; Chan, June; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Ortega, Guillermo; Huso, David L.; Pardoll, Drew; Housseau, Franck; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), a molecular subclass of the common human commensal, B. fragilis, has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease. ETBF colitis is characterized by the activation of Stat3 and a Th17 immune response in the colonic mucosa. This study was designed to investigate the time course and cellular distribution of Stat3 activation in ETBF-colonized mice. Methods C57BL/6 wild-type, C57BL/6Stat3ΔIEC, or Rag-1 mice were inoculated with saline, nontoxigenic B. fragilis or ETBF. Histologic diagnosis and mucosal Stat activation (immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and/or electrophorectic mobility shift assay) were evaluated over time (6–24 h, 1–7 d, and 1–18 mo after inoculation). Mucosal permeability was evaluated at 16 hours, 1 day, and 3 days. Mucosal immune responses were evaluated at 1 week, and 12 and 18 months. Results ETBF induced rapid-onset colitis that persisted for up to 1 year. Stat3 activation (pStat3) was noted in the mucosal immune cells within 16 hours, with colonic epithelial cell activation evident at 24 hours after inoculation. ETBF-induced increased mucosal permeability was first observed at 24 hours after inoculation, after which the initial immune cell pStat3 activation was noted. Immune cell pStat3 was present in the absence of epithelial pStat3 (C57BL/ 6Stat3ΔIEC). Epithelial pStat3 was present in the absence of T and B cells (Rag-1 mice). pStat3 persisted in the epithelial and immune cells for 1 year, characterized by isolated pStat3-positive cell clusters, with varying intensity distributed through the proximal and distal colon. Similarly, mucosal Th17 immune responses persisted for up to 1 year. Loss of fecal ETBF colonization was associated with the loss of mucosal pStat3 and Th17 immune responses. Conclusions ETBF rapidly induces immune cell pStat3, which is independent of epithelial pStat3. This occurs before ETBF-induced mucosal permeability, suggesting that ETBF, likely through B

  15. Expression of Bacteroides fragilis hemolysins in vivo and role of HlyBA in an intra-abdominal infection model.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leandro A; Jenkins, Audrey L; Jeffrey Smith, C; Rocha, Edson R

    2013-04-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most frequent opportunistic pathogen isolated from anaerobic infections. However, there is a paucity of information regarding the genetic and molecular aspects of gene expression of its virulence factors during extra-intestinal infections. A potential virulence factor that has received little attention is the ability of B. fragilis to produce hemolysins. In this study, an implanted perforated table tennis "ping-pong" ball was used as an intra-abdominal artificial abscess model in the rat. This procedure provided sufficient infected exudate for gene expression studies in vivo. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to quantify the relative expression of hlyA, hlyB, hlyC, hlyD, hlyE, hlyF, hlyG, and hlyIII mRNAs. The hlyA mRNA was induced approximately sixfold after 4 days postinfection compared with the mRNA levels in the inoculum culture prior to infection. The hlyB mRNA increased approximately sixfold after 4 days and 12-fold after 8 days postinfection. Expression of hlyC mRNA increased sixfold after 1 day, 45-fold after 4 days, and 16-fold after 8 days postinfection, respectively. The hlyD and hlyE mRNAs were induced approximately 40-fold and 30-fold, respectively, after 4-days postinfection. The hlyF expression increased approximately threefold after 4-days postinfection. hlyG was induced approximately fivefold after 4 and 8 days postinfection. The hlyIII mRNA levels had a steady increase of approximately four-, eight-, and 12-fold following 1, 4, and 8 days postinfection, respectively. These findings suggest that B. fragilis hemolysins are induced and differentially regulated in vivo. Both parent and hlyBA mutant strains reached levels of approximately 3-8 × 10(9) cfu/mL after 1 day postinfection. However, the hlyBA mutant strain lost 2 logs in viable cell counts compared with the parent strain after 8 days postinfection. This is the first study showing HlyBA is a virulence factor which plays a

  16. Optimizing alcohol production from whey using computer technology. [Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Zertuche, L.; Zall, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken with the major goal of optimizing the ethanol production from whey using computer technology. To reach this goal, a mathematical model that would describe the fermentation and that could be used for the optimization was developed. Kluyveromyces fragilis was the microorganism used to ferment the lactose in the whey into ethanol. Preliminary studies showed that K. fragilis produced about 90% of the theoretical ethanol yield when grown in whey-complemented media. However, when this yeast is grown in nonsupplemented whey media, it does not produce more than 32% of that yield. Comparative batch fermentations of lactose and whey-complemented media showed that whey possibly contains enhancing components for yeast growth and ethanol production. To obtain the mathematical model, the one-to-one effect of the process variables (lactose and yeast extract concentrations, air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate) on the ethanol production were first investigated. Experiments on the pH effect showed that a decrease in pH from 7 to 4 produced an increase in ethanol concentration from 16.5 to 26.5 g/L (50 g/L initial lactose). The results obtained from modeling of the continuous fermentation using the previously listed variables showed that air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate were the process variables that most influence the production of ethanol.

  17. Cloning of Bacteroides fragilis plasmid genes affecting metronidazole resistance and ultraviolet survival in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Wehnert, G.U.; Abratt, V.R.; Goodman, H.J.; Woods, D.R. )

    1990-03-01

    Since reduced metronidazole causes DNA damage, resistance to metronidazole was used as a selection method for the cloning of Bacteroides fragilis genes affecting DNA repair mechanisms in Escherichia coli. Genes from B. fragilis Bf-2 were cloned on a recombinant plasmid pMT100 which made E. coli AB1157 and uvrA, B, and C mutant strains more resistant to metronidazole, but more sensitive to far uv irradiation under aerobic conditions. The loci affecting metronidazole resistance and uv sensitivity were linked and located on a 5-kb DNA fragment which originated from the small 6-kb cryptic plasmid pBFC1 present in B. fragilis Bf-2 cells.

  18. The utilization of 4-aminobutylphosphonate as sole nitrogen source by a strain of Kluyveromyces fragilis.

    PubMed

    Ternan, N G; McMullan, G

    2000-03-15

    A strain of the yeast Kluyveromyces fragilis was screened for its ability to utilize a range of synthetic and natural organophosphonate compounds as the sole source of phosphorus, nitrogen or carbon. Only 4-aminobutylphosphonate was utilized as sole nitrogen source with protein yields increasing proportionally with substrate concentrations up to 10 mM. No 4-aminobutylphosphonate metabolizing enzyme activity was detectable in cell-free extracts prepared from K. fragilis pregrown on 2.5 mM 4-aminobutylphosphonate. None of the organophosphonates tested served as a source of carbon or phosphorus for K. fragilis.

  19. Interaction of Bacteroides fragilis Toxin with Outer Membrane Vesicles Reveals New Mechanism of Its Secretion and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zakharzhevskaya, Natalya B.; Tsvetkov, Vladimir B.; Vanyushkina, Anna A.; Varizhuk, Anna M.; Rakitina, Daria V.; Podgorsky, Victor V.; Vishnyakov, Innokentii E.; Kharlampieva, Daria D.; Manuvera, Valentin A.; Lisitsyn, Fedor V.; Gushina, Elena A.; Lazarev, Vassili N.; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2017-01-01

    The only recognized virulence factor of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) that accompanies bloodstream infections is the zinc-dependent non-lethal metalloprotease B. fragilis toxin (BFT). The isolated toxin stimulates intestinal secretion, resulting in epithelial damage and necrosis. Numerous publications have focused on the interrelation of BFT with intestinal inflammation and colorectal neoplasia, but nothing is known about the mechanism of its secretion and delivery to host cells. However, recent studies of gram-negative bacteria have shown that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) could be an essential mechanism for the spread of a large number of virulence factors. Here, we show for the first time that BFT is not a freely secreted protease but is associated with OMVs. Our findings indicate that only outer surface-exposed BFT causes epithelial cell contact disruption. According to our in silico models confirmed by Trp quenching assay and NMR, BFT has special interactions with outer membrane components such as phospholipids and is secreted during vesicle formation. Moreover, the strong cooperation of BFT with polysaccharides is similar to the behavior of lectins. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of BFT secretion provides new perspectives for investigating intestinal inflammation pathogenesis and its prevention. PMID:28144586

  20. Detection of genetically diverse human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group M and O isolates by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Respess, R A; Butcher, A; Wang, H; Chaowanachan, T; Young, N; Shaffer, N; Mastro, T D; Biryahwaho, B; Downing, R; Tanuri, A; Schechter, M; Pascu, R; Zekeng, L; Kaptué, L; Gürtler, L; Eberle, J; Ellenberger, D; Fridlund, C; Rayfield, M; Kwok, S

    1997-01-01

    A panel of 136 genetically diverse group M and 5 group O adult isolates from outside the United States and Europe were evaluated by PCR with the Roche AMPLICOR HIV-1 test, a modified version of the AMPLICOR HIV-1 test, and a new primer pair/probe system. Detection of some of these isolates was less efficient with the AMPLICOR HIV-1 test; however, the assay was significantly improved by reducing the sample input and lowering the annealing temperature. The new primer pair/probe set detected 140 of 141 isolates, including the 5 group O isolates that were not detected with either of the AMPLICOR HIV-1 test formats. PMID:9114428

  1. Typing of feline calicivirus isolates from different clinical groups by virus neutralisation tests.

    PubMed

    Dawson, S; McArdle, F; Bennett, M; Carter, M; Milton, I P; Turner, P; Meanger, J; Gaskell, R M

    1993-07-03

    One hundred and thirteen isolates of feline calicivirus originating from seven different clinical groups were typed by virus neutralisation tests using eight different cat antisera. The clinical groups comprised 'healthy' cats, cases of acute oral/respiratory disease, chronic stomatitis, acute febrile lameness syndrome, vaccine reactions (clinical disease seen within 21 days of vaccination) and vaccine breakdowns (clinical disease seen more than 21 days after but within one year of vaccination). Isolates from the vaccine reaction cases were grouped into those associated with acute oral/respiratory disease alone and those associated with the lameness syndrome, and the latter group was further subdivided according to the vaccine used. Two groups appeared significantly different from others with some of the antisera. Thus the lameness vaccine reaction isolates associated with vaccine B were significantly different from the isolates from all the other clinical groups, including other lameness isolates, with a number of the antisera. In addition, the chronic stomatitis isolates were significantly different from those from the 'healthy' and the acute oral/respiratory disease groups with one or two of the antisera. Eighty-five to 88 per cent of the isolates were neutralised by antisera raised against F9 or F9-like vaccine strains at a dilution of 1 in 2. Twenty antibody units of such antisera neutralised 42 to 80 per cent of the isolates. A bivalent antiserum raised against a vaccine F9 strain and field strain LS015 neutralised 96 per cent of the isolates at a dilution of 1 in 2, and 20 antibody units neutralised 68 per cent of isolates. Antisera to field strain F65 neutralised all the remaining isolates at a dilution of 1 in 2 and 44 per cent of the remaining isolates at a dilution of 20 antibody units. Therefore, strains LS015 and F65 may be of use in the production of a polyvalent feline calicivirus vaccine, together with the widely used strain F9.

  2. On the clinical importance of Dientamoeba fragilis infections in childhood.

    PubMed

    Preiss, U; Ockert, G; Broemme, S; Otto, A

    1991-01-01

    Clinical and laboratory findings among 123 paediatric patients infected by intestinal protozoa were analysed. Dientamoeba fragilis (D. f) was found in 102 cases. The other patients proved to be carriers of Giardia lamblia or of mixed infections with several protozoa. Acute and recurrent diarrhoea have been found to be the most common symptoms, whereas abdominal pain was most common in children with chronic infections. Peripheral blood eosinophilia was seen in a third of the children with dientamoebiasis. Metronidazole, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, and erythromycin were effective drugs in the treatment of D. f. infections. The therapy coincidentally led to the elimination of protozoal infections as well as the abdominal complaints. These results underline the pathogenic role of D. f. in children with gastrointestinal symptoms.

  3. Genome Sequence of Youngiibacter fragilis, the Type Strain of the Genus Youngiibacter.

    PubMed

    Wawrik, Colin B; Callaghan, Amy V; Stamps, Blake W; Wawrik, Boris

    2014-01-23

    The genome of Youngiibacter fragilis, the type strain of the newly described genus Youngiibacter, was sequenced. The genome consists of 3.996 Mb, with a G+C content of 46.6 mol%. Y. fragilis originates from coal-bed methane-produced water and may provide insight into the microbiological basis of biogas production in coal beds.

  4. Cytologic and Genetic Characteristics of Endobiotic Bacteria and Kleptoplasts of Virgulinella fragilis (Foraminifera).

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masashi; Toyofuku, Takashi; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Brüchert, Volker; Collen, John; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kitazato, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The benthic foraminifer Virgulinella fragilis Grindell and Collen 1976 has multiple putative symbioses with both bacterial and kleptoplast endobionts, possibly aiding its survival in environments from dysoxia (5-45 μmol-O2 /L) to microxia (0-5 μmol-O2 /L) and in the dark. To clarify the origin and function of V. fragilis endobionts, we used genetic analyses and transmission electron microscope observations. Virgulinella fragilis retained δ-proteobacteria concentrated at its cell periphery just beneath the cell membranes. Unlike another foraminifer Stainforthia spp., which retains many bacterial species, V. fragilis has a less variable bacterial community. This suggests that V. fragilis maintains a specific intracellular bacterial flora. Unlike the endobiotic bacteria, V. fragilis klepto-plasts originated from various diatom species and are found in the interior cytoplasm. We found evidence of both retention and digestion of kleptoplasts, and of fragmentation of the kleptoplastid outer membrane that likely facilitates transport of kleptoplastid products to the host. Accumulations of mitochondria were observed encircling endobiotic bacteria. It is likely that the bacteria use host organic material for carbon oxidation. The mitochondria may use oxygen available around the δ-proteobacteria and synthesize adenosine triphosphate, perhaps for sulfide oxidation.

  5. Characterization of the RokA and HexA broad-substrate-specificity hexokinases from Bacteroides fragilis and their role in hexose and N-acetylglucosamine utilization.

    PubMed

    Brigham, Christopher J; Malamy, Michael H

    2005-02-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, a human gastrointestinal commensal and an opportunistic pathogen, utilizes simple and complex sugars and polysaccharides for growth in the large intestine and at sites of infection. Because B. fragilis lacks transport-linked sugar phosphorylation systems, cytoplasmic kinase(s) was expected to be required for the phosphorylation of hexoses and hexosamines. We have now identified two hexose kinases that are important for growth of B. fragilis on glucose, mannose, and other sugars. One kinase (RokA), a member of the ROK family of proteins, was found to be the sole kinase for activation of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (NAG). The other kinase (HexA) is responsible for the majority of the glucose kinase activity in the cell, although a hexA deletion mutant strain was not defective for growth on any substrate tested. Deletion of both the rokA and hexA kinase genes resulted in inability of the cell to use glucose, mannose, NAG, and many other sugars. We purified RokA and determined its approximate molecular mass to be 36.5 kDa. The purified RokA protein was shown to phosphorylate several substrates, including glucose, NAG, and mannose, but not N-acetylmannosamine or N-acetylneuraminic acid. Phylogenetic analysis of RokA showed that it is most similar to kinases from the Cytophaga-Flavibacterium-Bacteroides group, while HexA was most similar to other bacterial hexokinases and eukaryotic hexokinases.

  6. Phylogenetic groups among Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from Brazil: relationship with antimicrobial resistance and origin.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Maíra Espíndola Silva; Cabral, Adriane Borges; Maciel, Maria Amélia Vieira; da Silveira, Vera Magalhães; de Souza Lopes, Ana Catarina

    2011-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution of phylogenetic groups among Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from Recife, Brazil and to assess the relationship between the groups and the isolation sites and resistance profile. Ninety four isolates of K. pneumoniae from hospital or community infections and from normal microbiota were analyzed by gyrA PCR-RFLP, antibiotic susceptibility, and adonitol fermentation. The results revealed the distinction of three phylogenetic groups, as it has also been reported in Europe, showing that these clusters are highly conserved within K. pneumoniae. Group KpI was dominantly represented by hospital and community isolates while groups KpII and KpIII displayed mainly normal microbiota isolates. The resistance to third generation cephalosporins, aztreonam, imipenem, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and streptomycin was only observed in KpI. The percentage of resistance was higher in KpI, followed by KpII and KpIII. The differences in the distribution of K. pneumoniae phylogenetic groups observed in this study suggest distinctive clinical and epidemiological characteristics among the three groups, which is important to understand the epidemiology of infections caused by this organism. This is the first study in Brazil on K. pneumoniae isolates from normal microbiota and community infections regarding the distribution of phylogenetic groups based on the gyrA gene.

  7. Aflatoxin Production of Species and Strains of the Aspergillus flavus Group Isolated from Field Crops

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, H. W.; Boller, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Peanuts, cottonseed, rice, and sorghum from Texas were sampled over a 3-year period. To insure adequate isolation of alfatoxin-producing species of fungi, low-quality lots were sampled at a rate greater than their respective proportional representation. Aflatoxins were found each year in peanut and cottonseed and were found in 2 of 3 years in rice and sorghum. Aflatoxins were detected in all four crops. The Aspergillus flavus group was much more prevalent in peanut and rice than in cottonseed and sorghum. Of the isolates of the A. flavus group, 96% from peanuts, 79% from cottonseed, 49% from sorghum, and 35% from rice produced aflatoxins. The average toxin production of isolates from rice was much less than that from peanuts, cottonseed, or sorghum. More than 90% of all isolates of the A. flavus group were identified as the species A. flavus. A. parasiticus was isolated from all four crops. Only A. parasiticus produced aflatoxin G. PMID:4197766

  8. Phylogenetic grouping, epidemiological typing, analysis of virulence genes, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from healthy broilers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to investigate the possible etiology of avian colibacillosis by examining Escherichia coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers. Findings Seventy-eight E. coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers in Japan were subjected to analysis of phylogenetic background, virulence-associated gene profiling, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), and antimicrobial resistance profiling. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that 35 of the 78 isolates belonged to group A, 28 to group B1, one to group B2, and 14 to group D. Virulence-associated genes iutA, iss, cvaC, tsh, iroN, ompT, and hlyF were found in 23 isolates (29.5%), 16 isolates (20.5%), nine isolates (11.5%), five isolates (6.4%), 19 isolates (24.4%), 23 isolates (29.5%), and 22 isolates (28.2%) respectively. Although the genetic diversity of group D isolates was revealed by MLST, the group D isolates harbored iutA (10 isolates, 71.4%), iss (6 isolates, 42.9%), cvaC (5 isolates, 35.7%), tsh (3 isolates, 21.4%), hlyF (9 isolates, 64.3%), iroN (7 isolates, 50.0%), and ompT (9 isolates, 64.3%). Conclusions Our results indicated that E. coli isolates inhabiting the intestines of healthy broilers pose a potential risk of causing avian colibacillosis. PMID:25061511

  9. Classification of Italian isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi into three genomic groups.

    PubMed

    Cinco, M; De Giovannini, R; Fattorini, P; Florian, F; Graziosi, G

    1993-10-01

    In this study we investigated the genotypic characteristics of some locally isolated strains of B. burgdorferi by three different methodologies: restriction endonuclease analysis (REA), Southern blot hybridization with whole DNAs from Borrelia strains and Southern blot hybridization with rRNA 16 + 23S genes derived from E. coli. REA fingerprintings were evaluated by cluster analysis, according to the principles of numerical taxonomy. The genomas of the locally isolated strains were compared with borreliae originating from different countries of Europe, including Sweden and with the American reference strain B31. Among the European strains, some already described by Baranton (Baranton et al., 1992) as representatives of different genomic groups Borrelia sensu stricto and Borrelia garinii were used. By the different techniques the isolates were included in three genomic groups which could correspond to the three genospecies identified by Baranton, namely B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii and B. group VS461: in fact two strains were included in a homogeneous group, probably corresponding to the VS461 genomic group, together with other European borreliae; one isolate was included in a group consisting of B31 and some other European strains already described as belonging to Borrelia burgdorferi in sensu stricto. Finally two isolates were ascribed to a third genomic group probably corresponding to the genospecies indicated as Borrelia garinii. These findings indicate that a small number of Borrelia strains isolated from a very restricted area can be genetically heterogeneous.

  10. Dientamoeba fragilis - a Commensal in Children in Danish Day Care Centers.

    PubMed

    Jokelainen, Pikka; Hebbelstrup Jensen, Betina; Andreassen, Bente Utoft; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Röser, Dennis; Krogfelt, Karen A; Nielsen, Henrik V; Stensvold, Christen R

    2017-03-22

    Dientamoeba fragilis is an intestinal protozoan of debated clinical significance. Here, we present cross-sectional and longitudinal observations on D. fragilis in children aged 0-6 years from a 1-year multi-day-care-center cohort study set in Copenhagen, Denmark. The inclusion period for the cohort was 2009-2012. Stool samples collected from the children were accompanied by questionnaires completed by the parents or guardians of the children. Using real-time PCR, D. fragilis was detected in the first stool sample from 97 (68.3%) of 142 children. We evaluated associations between seven plausible risk factors (age, gender, having siblings, having domestic animals at home, having had infant colic, recent history of intake of antibiotics, and recent history of travel abroad) as well as six reported symptoms (lack of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, weight loss, and diarrhea) and testing positive for D. fragilis The final multivariable model identified being >3 years old and having a history of recent traveling abroad as risk factors for testing positive for D. fragilis Moreover, univariable analyses indicated that having siblings was a risk factor. There was no statistical association between a recent history of gastrointestinal symptoms and testing positive for D. fragilis Among the 108 children who were represented by ≥ 2 samples and thus included in the longitudinal analysis, 32 tested negative on first sample and positive later, and the last sample from each of the 108 children was positive. The results are in support of D. fragilis being a common enteric commensal in this population.

  11. Evidence for T Cell-dependent Immunity to Bacteroides fragilis in an Intraabdominal Abscess Model

    PubMed Central

    Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Markham, Richard B.; Zaleznik, Dori F.; Cisneros, Ronald L.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown that active immunization of rats with the capsular polysaccharide of Bacteroides fragilis protects these animals against abscess development following intraperitoneal challenge with this species. Passive transfer of hyperimmune globulin from immunized animals to nonimmune recipients provided protection against B. fragilis bacteremia in challenged animals, but did not confer protection against abscess development. On the other hand, adoptive transfer of spleen cells from immunized animals to nonimmunized recipients resulted in protection against abscesses following challenge with B. fragilis. These data suggested that a T cell-dependent immune response was involved in protection against abscess development after immunization with B. fragilis capsular antigen. To determine the possible role of cell-mediated immunity prompted by the capsular antigen, inbred congenitally athymic OLA/Rnu rats and their phenotypically normal littermates were actively immunized. Despite the development of high titers of anti-B. fragilis capsular antibody, 100% of actively immunized athymic rats developed abscesses, as did 100% of unimmunized athymic control rats. However, no phenotypically normal littermate control rats that were actively immunized developed abscesses, while 100% of phenotypically normal unimmunized rats developed abscesses. Additional studies showed that adoptive transfer of T cell-enriched spleen cell preparations from Wistar/Lewis rats immunized with the capsular polysaccharide to nonimmune recipients also resulted in protection against B. fragilis-induced abscesses. We conclude that the protection afforded by immunization with B. fragilis capsule against intraabdominal abscesses caused by that organism is T cell-mediated and does not require the presence of serum antibody. PMID:6976357

  12. Human and tick spotted fever group Rickettsia isolates from Israel: a genotypic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Manor, E; Ighbarieh, J; Sarov, B; Kassis, I; Regnery, R

    1992-01-01

    The genomes of spotted fever group rickettsiae isolated in different geographical areas of Israel (two from ticks and four from humans, obtained over a span of 20 years) were studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction endonuclease fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The human isolates were obtained from patients suffering from rickettsial disease of different degrees of severity. The PCR products obtained with five pairs of oligonucleotide primers (two primer sets derived from the 190-kDa polypeptide gene and three from the 120-kDa polypeptide gene) and cleaved with restriction endonucleases were used to study the Israeli isolates and reference Rickettsia conorii isolates. Subtle differences between the PCR-RFLP patterns of Israeli isolates and the two R. conorii reference strains (Moroccan and no. 7) were seen when the PCR products derived from the 190-kDa gene-derived primer sets were digested. All of the Israeli isolates were identical by RFLP analysis using all of the primer sets. This study showed that the Israeli spotted fever group isolates (from both ticks and humans) were genetically homogeneous by the criteria used in this study, despite the time and location differences in their original isolation, and different as a group from R. conorii. Images PMID:1356998

  13. Molecular characterization of serotype III group B-streptococcus isolates causing neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Philippe; Brahimi, Naima; Chalas, Céline; Aujard, Yannick; Bingen, Edouard

    2003-10-15

    We studied a collection of 110 serotype III group B streptococcus (GBS) isolates causing neonatal meningitis, by means of both pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with SmaI and Southern hybridization with probes for genes potentially associated with virulence (neuA, cpsA, scpB, and hylB and, for mobile genetic elements [MGEs], GBSi1 and IS1548), in comparison with 44 serotype III GBS isolates colonizing healthy neonates. Using polymerase chain reaction, we assessed both the insertion of MGEs downstream of the scpB gene and the insertion of IS1548 within the hylB gene. PFGE clustered the isolates into 3 main groups. One PFGE group accounted for 80% of typeable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) isolates, versus 24% of colonization isolates (P=1.8 x 10-9). GBSi1 was found in 67% of CSF isolates and in only 23% of colonization isolates (P=5.3 x 10-7). A 15-kbp SmaI restriction-DNA fragment bearing the neuA gene was significantly associated with CSF isolates (P=1.1 x 10-11).

  14. Group dynamics and catecholamines during long-duration confinement in an isolated environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Norbert O.; Lyons, Terence J.; Binder, Heidi

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objectives of this study were to investigate possible relationships between catecholamine excretion and long-duration confinement in an isolated environment. METHODS: Stays of long duration were made by Group I (n = 4, all Russian, weeks 1-34), Group II (n = 4, mixed nationality, weeks 3-18), and Group III (n = 4, mixed nationality, weeks 22-38); other groups joined the residents for 1-wk intervals at weeks #13, #19, and #33. Data were collected from Groups I and III. RESULTS: In both Group I and Group III, the daily epinephrine excretion was significantly elevated during and after confinement compared with the pre-isolation baseline (p < 0.05), but remained mostly within normal limits during the experiment. During isolation, epinephrine excretion was significantly higher, compared with other weeks in isolation, during weeks #19 and #27 for Group I, and during week #30 for Group III. In both Group I and Group II, norepinephrine excretion increased significantly during and after isolation (p < 0.05) and was above the normal range. The daily norepinephrine excretion was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in Group I during weeks #12, #13, and #27, and during week #30 for Group III. DISCUSSION: Epinephrine excretion generally remained in the normal range. However, occasional elevations occurred due to psychological stress, which apparently correlate with changes in group dynamics. Norepinephrine excretion was above the normal range and was correlated with social events. These results suggest that to ensure optimum crew performance, entire crews along with their visiting crews should be selected collectively, rather than individually.

  15. Antibiotic resistance and penicillin tolerance in clinical isolates of group B streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Betriu, C; Gomez, M; Sanchez, A; Cruceyra, A; Romero, J; Picazo, J J

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the susceptibility patterns of 100 group B streptococcal strains isolated in our hospital and to ascertain tolerance to penicillin by determining quantitative killing curves. We found two strains with intermediate susceptibility to penicillin and eight strains to ampicillin. Seventeen isolates were tolerant to penicillin, with bacterial counts decreasing 2 to 3 log during the first 8 h but still above 10(2) CFU/ml after 24 h. The kinetic study shows that penicillin tolerance is not rare among group B streptococci isolated in our hospital. PMID:7811042

  16. [Characteristics of bacteria in the genus Proteus isolated from patients with sporadic and group intestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Apollonin, A V; Romanenko, E E; Iorzh, A L; Zueva, L P

    1985-02-01

    The biochemical and biological properties of 148 Proteus strains isolated from patients both in sporadic intestinal infections and in a case of group infection in children's hospital was studied. The study revealed that the etiological factor of the group infection was P. mirabilis belonging to rare serovar 48:2. Proteus organisms isolated in sporadic infections belonged to a great number of serovars. No relationship between the isolated serovar and the nosological form of the intestinal disease was established. Among the Proteus strains under study, 82 strains showed atypical biochemical properties in 1 test or more. No correlation between the clinical diagnosis and the occurrence of atypical strains was established.

  17. Clostridium botulinum Group II Isolate Phylogenomic Profiling Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Weedmark, K. A.; Mabon, P.; Hayden, K. L.; Lambert, D.; Van Domselaar, G.; Austin, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum group II isolates (n = 163) from different geographic regions, outbreaks, and neurotoxin types and subtypes were characterized in silico using whole-genome sequence data. Two clusters representing a variety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types and subtypes were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. While one cluster included BoNT/B4/F6/E9 and nontoxigenic members, the other comprised a wide variety of different BoNT/E subtype isolates and a nontoxigenic strain. In silico MLST and core SNP methods were consistent in terms of clade-level isolate classification; however, core SNP analysis showed higher resolution capability. Furthermore, core SNP analysis correctly distinguished isolates by outbreak and location. This study illustrated the utility of next-generation sequence-based typing approaches for isolate characterization and source attribution and identified discrete SNP loci and MLST alleles for isolate comparison. PMID:26116673

  18. Clostridium botulinum Group II Isolate Phylogenomic Profiling Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Weedmark, K A; Mabon, P; Hayden, K L; Lambert, D; Van Domselaar, G; Austin, J W; Corbett, C R

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum group II isolates (n = 163) from different geographic regions, outbreaks, and neurotoxin types and subtypes were characterized in silico using whole-genome sequence data. Two clusters representing a variety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types and subtypes were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. While one cluster included BoNT/B4/F6/E9 and nontoxigenic members, the other comprised a wide variety of different BoNT/E subtype isolates and a nontoxigenic strain. In silico MLST and core SNP methods were consistent in terms of clade-level isolate classification; however, core SNP analysis showed higher resolution capability. Furthermore, core SNP analysis correctly distinguished isolates by outbreak and location. This study illustrated the utility of next-generation sequence-based typing approaches for isolate characterization and source attribution and identified discrete SNP loci and MLST alleles for isolate comparison.

  19. Association of social isolation and health across different racial and ethnic groups of older Americans.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Christina E

    2015-11-01

    Social isolation is a social and public health problem that affects people of all ages, especially elders. Previous studies have found that social isolation across numerous industrialised countries is associated with negative health outcomes. However, it is unknown whether and how this association differs by race/ethnicity and age. To begin to address this gap, this study examines the association of social isolation and physical and mental health among Black, White and Hispanic elders in the United States of America. Building on Cornwell and Waite's perceived isolation and social disconnectedness dimension model of social isolation, the author used multi-stage survey data from a nationally representative sample of 3,005 community-residing adults aged 57-85 from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. Tests for association were conducted on health by age, gender, marital status, education and race/ethnicity separately. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to test the association of social isolation and health exclusively and separately among these three groups. Results showed that social isolation is strongly associated with physical and mental health. Both perceived isolation and social disconnectedness had a significant negative association with physical and mental health among White elders. For Blacks, social disconnectedness is negatively associated with their physical health while perceived isolation had a negative association with mental health. Among Hispanic elders, there seemed to be no association between social isolation and physical health, but a significant negative association was found with their mental health. Despite various associated patterns, however, social isolation overall was associated with health outcomes that were similar across three elder groups. By identifying factors influencing social isolation and health among minority older Americans, this study has relevance to the development of culturally sensitive health

  20. Association of social isolation and health across different racial and ethnic groups of older Americans

    PubMed Central

    MIYAWAKI, CHRISTINA E.

    2015-01-01

    Social isolation is a social and public health problem that affects people of all ages, especially elders. Previous studies have found that social isolation across numerous industrialised countries is associated with negative health outcomes. However, it is unknown whether and how this association differs by race/ethnicity and age. To begin to address this gap, this study examines the association of social isolation and physical and mental health among Black, White and Hispanic elders in the United States of America. Building on Cornwell and Waite's perceived isolation and social disconnectedness dimension model of social isolation, the author used multi-stage survey data from a nationally representative sample of 3,005 community-residing adults aged 57–85 from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. Tests for association were conducted on health by age, gender, marital status, education and race/ethnicity separately. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to test the association of social isolation and health exclusively and separately among these three groups. Results showed that social isolation is strongly associated with physical and mental health. Both perceived isolation and social disconnectedness had a significant negative association with physical and mental health among White elders. For Blacks, social disconnectedness is negatively associated with their physical health while perceived isolation had a negative association with mental health. Among Hispanic elders, there seemed to be no association between social isolation and physical health, but a significant negative association was found with their mental health. Despite various associated patterns, however, social isolation overall was associated with health outcomes that were similar across three elder groups. By identifying factors influencing social isolation and health among minority older Americans, this study has relevance to the development of culturally sensitive health

  1. Multi-drug resistant Bacteroides fragilis recovered from blood and severe leg wounds caused by an improvised explosive device (IED) in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Jeffrey E; Fraser, Susan; Citron, Diane M; Wexler, Hana; Blakely, Garry; Jobling, Kelly; Patrick, Sheila

    2011-08-01

    This report summarizes the case of a 23 year-old otherwise healthy male that was injured in an improvised explosive device (IED) blast in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). He sustained bilateral open tibia and fibula fractures in the setting of being exposed to water contaminated with raw sewage. Despite long-term carbapenem therapy, the patient's wounds were repeatedly noted to have purulent drainage during surgical debridement and cultures from these wounds were persistently positive for Bacteroides fragilis. Apparent clinical failure persisted despite the addition of metronidazole to his regimen and an eventual trial of tigecycline. Susceptibility testing of the B. fragilis isolate was performed and resistance to penicillin, clindamycin,metronidazole, cefoxitin, meropenem, imipenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, and tigecycline was confirmed. The presence of a nimE gene on a potentially transferrable plasmid was also confirmed by plasmid sequencing. The only antibiotics that displayed in vitro susceptibility were moxifloxacin and linezolid. These antibiotics were initiated in combination with aggressive irrigation and serial surgical debridement. Conversion to left-sided internal fixation became feasible and his left lower extremity was salvaged without residual evidence of infection. The patient completed an eight week course of combination moxifloxacin and linezolid therapy without adverse event. This B. fragilis isolate displayed simultaneous high-level resistance to multiple antibiotics routinely utilized in anaerobic infections. This was evidenced by clinical failure, in vitro susceptibility testing, and demonstration of genes associated with resistance mechanisms. This case warrants review not only due to the rarity of this event but also the potential implications regarding anaerobic infections in traumatic wounds and the success of a novel treatment regimen utilizing combination therapy with moxifloxacin and linezolid.

  2. Lichens promote flowering Opuntia fragilis in west-central Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Bornar, C.R.; Harrington, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Clumps of the cactus Opuntia fragilis growing in association with mats of the lichens Cladina mitis, Cladina rangiferina and a spikemoss, Selaginella rupestris, were discovered in an agricultural field in Pepin County, Wisconsin, that had been abandoned for over 50 y. The association appeared to be beneficial to the cactus, which flowered almost exclusively in the presence of lichens. Of 294 cactus clumps examined in 2001, 127 grew in the presence of lichen mats and, of these, 24 flowered, producing 91 flowers, while none of the cacti growing in the absence of lichens flowered. In 2002, 19 out of 265 cactus clumps flowered, all but one in the presence of lichens. All sizes of cacti in the presence of lichens flowered and the probability of flowering increased with cactus size. In addition, the cacti that flowered had cladodes that were on average 19% heavier than those of cacti that did not flower. The presence of lichens lowered summer soil temperatures 2a??4 C compared to soil temperatures in the absence of lichens. Cooler soil temperatures conserve soil moisture better, which may enhance flowering in these cacti.

  3. Emerging from obscurity: biological, clinical, and diagnostic aspects of Dientamoeba fragilis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eugene H; Windsor, Jeffrey J; Clark, C Graham

    2004-07-01

    Ever since its first description in 1918, Dientamoeba fragilis has struggled to gain recognition as a significant pathogen. There is little justification for this neglect, however, since there exists a growing body of case reports from numerous countries around the world that have linked this protozoal parasite to clinical manifestations such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and anorexia. A number of studies have even incriminated D. fragilis as a cause of irritable bowel syndrome, allergic colitis, and diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus patients. Although D. fragilis is most commonly identified using permanently stained fecal smears, recent advances in culturing techniques are simplifying as well as improving the ability of investigators to detect this organism. However, there are limitations in the use of cultures since they cannot be performed on fecal samples that have been fixed. Significant progress has been made in the biological classification of this organism, which originally was described as an ameba. Analyses of small-subunit rRNA gene sequences have clearly demonstrated its close relationship to Histomonas, and it is now known to be a trichomonad. How the organism is transmitted remains a mystery, although there is some evidence that D. fragilis might be transmitted via the ova of the pinworm, Enterobius vermicularis. Also, it remains to be answered whether the two distinct genotypes of D. fragilis recently identified represent organisms with differing virulence.

  4. Environmental effects on growth and ethanol fermentation of immobilized Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.

    1988-01-01

    A trickle flow, short column reactor system using a natural sponge as a carrier was used to study the response of the immobilized yeast, Kluyveromyces fragilis NRRL 2415, to environmental and nutritional factors. The specific growth rate of adsorbed K. fragilis using a complete medium as feed during the start-up period was 0.0152 hr{sup {minus}1} which was much lower than 0.60 hr{sup {minus}1}, the value for free cells. The transient responses of immobilized cells to changes in lactose concentration and temperature were quick, reaching new steady state values within half an hour. There was little or no detectable CO{sub 2} evolved if the lactose concentration was below 3.8 g/l. The immobilized K. fragilis did not perform well at temperatures over 40{degree}C, although free cells maintained their viability at 40{degree}C. The inhibitory effect of added ethanol on immobilized K. fragilis was a nonlinear relationship. The thermotolerance of K. fragilis was significantly reduced by the presence of ethanol. A kinetic model was developed to determine the steady state productivity based upon growth and death rates as a function of temperature and ethanol concentration.

  5. Suppression of colorectal tumorigenesis by recombinant Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin-2 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lv, You; Ye, Tao; Wang, Hui-Peng; Zhao, Jia-Ying; Chen, Wen-Jie; Wang, Xin; Shen, Chen-Xia; Wu, Yi-Bin; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the impact of recombinant Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin-2 (BFT-2, or Fragilysin) on colorectal tumorigenesis in mice induced by azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS). METHODS Recombinant proBFT-2 was expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta (DE3) and BFT-2 was obtained and tested for its biological activity via colorectal adenocarcinoma cell strains SW-480. Seventy C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into a blank (BC; n = 10), model (AD; n = 20), model + low-dose toxin (ADLT; n = 20, 10 μg), and a model + high-dose toxin (ADHT; n = 20, 20 μg) group. Mice weight, tumor formation and pathology were analyzed. Immunohistochemistry determined Ki-67 and Caspase-3 expression in normal and tumor tissues of colorectal mucosa. RESULTS Recombinant BFT-2 was successfully obtained, along with its biological activity. The most obvious weight loss occurred in the AD group compared with the ADLT group (21.82 ± 0.68 vs 23.23 ± 0.91, P < 0.05) and the ADHT group (21.82 ± 0.68 vs 23.57 ± 1.06, P < 0.05). More tumors were found in the AD group than in the ADLT and ADHT groups (19.75 ± 3.30 vs 6.50 ± 1.73, P < 0.05; 19.75 ± 3.30 vs 6.00 ± 2.16, P < 0.05). Pathology showed that 12 mice had adenocarcinoma and 6 cases had adenoma in the AD group. Five mice had adenocarcinoma and 15 had adenoma in the ADLT group. Four mice had adenocarcinoma and 16 had adenoma in the ADHT group. The incidence of colorectal adenocarcinoma in both the ADHT group and the ADHT group was reduced compared to that in the AD group (P < 0.05, P < 0.05). The positive rate of Ki-67 in the ADLT group and the ADHT group was 50% and 40%, respectively, both of which were lower than that found in the AD group (94.44%, P < 0.05, P < 0.05). Caspase-3 expression in the ADLT group and the ADHT group was 45% and 55%, both of which were higher than that found in the BC group (16.67%, P < 0.05, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Oral administration with lower-dose biologically active recombinant BFT-2

  6. Cloning of a Bacteroides fragilis chromosomal determinant coding for 5-nitroimidazole resistance.

    PubMed

    Haggoud, A; Reysset, G; Sebald, M

    1992-08-01

    Strain BF8 is a plasmid-free Bacteroides fragilis, resistant to 5-nitroimidazole (5-Ni) antibiotics (metronidazole, ornidazole and tinidazole). The resistance was transferable by conjugation into Bacteroides fragilis BF638R. The total DNA of a Nir transconjugant was used for the construction of a Sau3A genomic library in a B. fragilis cloning vector pFK707 delta H1 (4.2 kb). By electrotransformation of strain BF638R, a recombinant plasmid containing an insert of 5.4 kb was obtained which conferred to the host strain the resistance to 5-Ni. The physical map of the insert was established. After deletion analysis of the insert, the Nir determinant was localized on a HpaII-HincII fragment of 1.6 kb in size. This Nir determinant has been compared by Southern-blot analysis with other Bacteroides Nir determinants of plasmid origin.

  7. Separate O-grouping schemes for serotyping clinical isolates of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Penner, J L; Hennessy, J N

    1980-09-01

    Antisera were prepared against type strains of the original scheme of B. Perch (Acta Pathol. Microbiol. Scand. 25:703-714, 1948) and against newly defined types to produce separate schemes for O-grouping Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis. In assessing the schemes for their effectiveness it was found that 82% of 208 P. vulgaris isolates and 88% of 194 P. mirabilis isolates from two hospitals were typable. Only 3.4% of the P. vulgaris isolates agglutinated in P. mirabilis antisera, and 1.5% of the P. mirabilis agglutinated in P. vulgaris antisera, indicating that separation of the schemes would be more advantageous in routine typing. P. mirabilis of groups O3, O6, O10, O29, and O30 were most frequently isolated. Of the P. vulgaris isolates, 25% belonged to newly defined O-groups, and one of these was the largest with 14% of all isolates of this species. The application of serotyping using separate schemes for each species was advocated in epidemiological studies.

  8. Classification of Isolates from the Pseudomonas fluorescens Complex into Phylogenomic Groups Based in Group-Specific Markers

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Sanz, Daniel; Arrebola, Eva; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; García-Méndez, Sonia; Muriel, Candela; Blanco-Romero, Esther; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens complex of species includes plant-associated bacteria with potential biotechnological applications in agriculture and environmental protection. Many of these bacteria can promote plant growth by different means, including modification of plant hormonal balance and biocontrol. The P. fluorescens group is currently divided into eight major subgroups in which these properties and many other ecophysiological traits are phylogenetically distributed. Therefore, a rapid phylogroup assignment for a particular isolate could be useful to simplify the screening of putative inoculants. By using comparative genomics on 71 P. fluorescens genomes, we have identified nine markers which allow classification of any isolate into these eight subgroups, by a presence/absence PCR test. Nine primer pairs were developed for the amplification of these markers. The specificity and sensitivity of these primer pairs were assessed on 28 field isolates, environmental samples from soil and rhizosphere and tested by in silico PCR on 421 genomes. Phylogenomic analysis validated the results: the PCR-based system for classification of P. fluorescens isolates has a 98.34% of accuracy and it could be used as a rapid and simple assay to evaluate the potential of any P. fluorescens complex strain. PMID:28360897

  9. Group B streptococcus colonization of Romanian women: phenotypic traits of isolates from vaginal swabs.

    PubMed

    Usein, Codruţa-Romaniţa; Petrini, Anca; Georgescu, Raluca; Grigore, Laura; Străuţ, Monica; Ungureanu, Vasilica

    2009-01-01

    In the attempt to enrich the local contemporary laboratory data regarding the group B streptococcus (GBS) colonization, isolates obtained from the vaginal swab cultures were characterized for their serotype distribution and antibiotic susceptibility. The 100 GBS isolates analyzed were collected during a four-month period of year 2009 from women screened in ambulatory for vaginal carriage of GBS. The GBS isolates were classified based on their capsular polysaccharide structures using commercially available antisera. Susceptibility to penicillin, ampicillin, erithromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, ofloxacin, and chloramphenicol was initially tested using antibiotic disk diffusion technique according to CLSI guidelines. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of erythromycin and tetracycline for the isolates with reduced susceptibility were evaluated according to the CLSI criteria and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance was investigated by a double-disk test with erythromycin and clindamycin disks. All the GBS isolates were serotypeable. Their distribution comprised six different serotypes of which serotypes II (26%), III (26%), and Ia (19%) prevailed and no serotype VI, VII, and VIII isolates were found. Overall, the GBS isolates were fully susceptible to penicillin and ampicillin, but the rates of susceptibility to the other antimicrobial agents tested were decreased, ranging from 87% for chloramphenicol to 5% for tetracycline. Reduced susceptibility to clindamycin and erythromycin was detected in 18% and 19% of isolates, respectively. For the latter, 84% displayed a constitutive MLSB phenotype, 11% had an inducible MLSB phenotype, and M phenotype was expressed by 5% of them. Erythromycin-resistant GBS isolates displayed concurrently resistance to at least one more antibiotic. In conclusion, according to our study the most frequent GBS serotypes isolated from the vaginal microflora were II and III, followed by serotype Ia. While the GBS isolates

  10. Effect of Habitat Size, Quality, and Isolation on Functional Groups of Beetles in Hollow Oaks

    PubMed Central

    Pilskog, Hanne Eik; Birkemoe, Tone; Framstad, Erik; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest threats to biodiversity is land use change and habitat loss. Hollow oaks (Quercus spp. L.) are well-defined patches that are hotspots for biodiversity and red-listed species, but they are often rare and fragmented in the landscape. We investigated the effect of patch size, habitat quality, and isolation on functional groups and red-listed saproxylic beetles in hollow oaks (n = 40) in Norway. The groups were defined by host tree association, trophic grouping, and red-listed status. Habitat quality, represented by tree form was most important in explaining species richness for most groups. Patch size, represented by circumference and amount of dead branches, was most important in explaining abundance. Isolation, that is single oaks compared with oaks in groups, had a negative effect on the abundance of beetles feeding both on wood and fungi (xylomycethopagous), as well as on species associated with broadleaved trees (oak semi-specialists), but did not affect species richness. This indicates that at this scale and in this landscape, isolated oaks are as species rich and valuable for conservation as other oaks, although some functional groups may be more vulnerable to isolation than others. The red-listed species only responded to patch size, indicating that oaks with large circumference and many dead branches are especially important for red-listed species and for conservation. PMID:26945089

  11. Effect of Habitat Size, Quality, and Isolation on Functional Groups of Beetles in Hollow Oaks.

    PubMed

    Pilskog, Hanne Eik; Birkemoe, Tone; Framstad, Erik; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest threats to biodiversity is land use change and habitat loss. Hollow oaks (Quercus spp. L.) are well-defined patches that are hotspots for biodiversity and red-listed species, but they are often rare and fragmented in the landscape. We investigated the effect of patch size, habitat quality, and isolation on functional groups and red-listed saproxylic beetles in hollow oaks (n = 40) in Norway. The groups were defined by host tree association, trophic grouping, and red-listed status. Habitat quality, represented by tree form was most important in explaining species richness for most groups. Patch size, represented by circumference and amount of dead branches, was most important in explaining abundance. Isolation, that is single oaks compared with oaks in groups, had a negative effect on the abundance of beetles feeding both on wood and fungi (xylomycethopagous), as well as on species associated with broadleaved trees (oak semi-specialists), but did not affect species richness. This indicates that at this scale and in this landscape, isolated oaks are as species rich and valuable for conservation as other oaks, although some functional groups may be more vulnerable to isolation than others. The red-listed species only responded to patch size, indicating that oaks with large circumference and many dead branches are especially important for red-listed species and for conservation.

  12. Evaluation of Multiplex Tandem Real-Time PCR for Detection of Cryptosporidium spp., Dientamoeba fragilis, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia intestinalis in Clinical Stool Samples ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stark, D.; Al-Qassab, S. E.; Barratt, J. L. N.; Stanley, K.; Roberts, T.; Marriott, D.; Harkness, J.; Ellis, J. T.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the first development and evaluation of a multiplex tandem PCR (MT-PCR) assay for the detection and identification of 4 common pathogenic protozoan parasites, Cryptosporidium spp., Dientamoeba fragilis, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia intestinalis, from human clinical samples. A total of 472 fecal samples submitted to the Department of Microbiology at St. Vincent's Hospital were included in the study. The MT-PCR assay was compared to four real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assays and microscopy by a traditional modified iron hematoxylin stain. The MT-PCR detected 28 G. intestinalis, 26 D. fragilis, 11 E. histolytica, and 9 Cryptosporidium sp. isolates. Detection and identification of the fecal protozoa by MT-PCR demonstrated 100% correlation with the RT-PCR results, and compared to RT-PCR, MT-PCR exhibited 100% sensitivity and specificity, while traditional microscopy of stained fixed fecal smears exhibited sensitivities and specificities of 56% and 100% for Cryptosporidium spp., 38% and 99% for D. fragilis, 47% and 97% for E. histolytica, and 50% and 100% for G. intestinalis. No cross-reactivity was detected in 100 stool samples containing various other bacterial, viral, and protozoan species. The MT-PCR assay was able to provide rapid, sensitive, and specific simultaneous detection and identification of the four most important diarrhea-causing protozoan parasites that infect humans. This study also highlights the lack of sensitivity demonstrated by microscopy, and thus, molecular methods such as MT-PCR must be considered the diagnostic methods of choice for enteric protozoan parasites. PMID:21048004

  13. Dientamoeba fragilis: initial evidence of pathogenicity in the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Lankester, Felix; Kiyang, John Anyam; Bailey, Wendi; Unwin, Steve

    2010-06-01

    A 7-yr-old female western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) shared an enclosure with 10 other gorillas at the Limbe Wildlife Centre (LWC), a wildlife rehabilitation centre in Cameroon. The gorilla had been living at the LWC for more than 6 yr prior to the exhibition of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like clinical signs. The gorilla improved dramatically after metronidazole therapy. The report suggests that metronidazole was effective because it eliminated the protozoa, Dientamoeba fragilis. Dientamoeba fragilis should be considered on the differential diagnosis list of any captive gorilla with IBS-like symptoms.

  14. Portability of tag SNPs across isolated population groups: an example from India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar Roy, N; Farheen, S; Roy, N; Sengupta, S; Majumder, P P

    2008-01-01

    Isolated population groups are useful in conducting association studies of complex diseases to avoid various pitfalls, including those arising from population stratification. Since DNA resequencing is expensive, it is recommended that genotyping be carried out at tagSNP (tSNP) loci. For this, tSNPs identified in one isolated population need to be used in another. Unless tSNPs are highly portable across populations this strategy may result in loss of information in association studies. We examined the issue of tSNP portability by sampling individuals from 10 isolated ethnic groups from India. We generated DNA resequencing data pertaining to 3 genomic regions and identified tSNPs in each population. We defined an index of tSNP portability and showed that portability is low across isolated Indian ethnic groups. The extent of portability did not significantly correlate with genetic similarity among the populations studied here. We also analyzed our data with sequence data from individuals of African and European descent. Our results indicated that it may be necessary to carry out resequencing in a small number of individuals to discover SNPs and identify tSNPs in the specific isolated population in which a disease association study is to be conducted.

  15. Genotyping of erythromycin resistant group C & G streptococci isolated in Chennai, south India

    PubMed Central

    Prabu, D.; Menon, Thangam

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Increasing resistance to erythromycin has been observed worldwide in group C and group G streptococci (GCS/GGS). The information available from India is scanty. The aim of the study was to identify erythromycin resistant GCS/GGS isolates in Chennai, south India, and to compare erythromycin resistant genotypes with emm types. Methods: One hundred and thirty one GCS/GGS isolates were tested for erythromycin resistance by disc diffusion and agar dilution methods. Erythromycin resistance genotypes [erm(A), erm(B) and mef(A)] were determined by a multiplex PCR. emm types of erythromycin resistant GCS/GGS isolates was also assessed using emm gene sequencing method. Results: Sixteen of the 131 isolates (12.21%) were resistant to erythromycin. Majority of the isolates were GGS (15/16). Eight of the 16 (50%) were S. dysgalactiae subsps. equisimilis. Twelve isolates (75%) were MLSB phenotype and four (25%) were M phenotype. Of the 12 isolates which exhibited MLSB resistance, seven showed cMLSB phenotype and were positive for erm(B) gene. The remaining five were iMLSB phenotype of which three were positive for erm(A) gene and two for erm(B) gene. erm(A) was common among carriers whereas erm(B) was common among clinical isolates. Interpretation & conclusions: MLSB was the predominant phenotype and erm(B) was the common genotype in the present study. The emm type stC1400.0 was frequently associated with erythromycin resistant GCS/GGS in our study. PMID:23481067

  16. Whole-Genome Sequences of Four Corynebacterium CDC Group F-1 Strains Isolated from Urine

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Anne-Marie; Peters, Geoffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Three draft and one complete genome sequence from strains isolated from urine and consistent with Corynebacterium CDC group F-1 were assembled and studied. Genome sizes ranged between 2.3 and 2.44 Mb, with G+C content between 60.4% and 60.7%. PMID:28153894

  17. Clinical features of group B Streptococcus prosthetic joint infections and molecular characterization of isolates.

    PubMed

    Corvec, S; Illiaquer, M; Touchais, S; Boutoille, D; van der Mee-Marquet, N; Quentin, R; Reynaud, A; Lepelletier, D; Bémer, P

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available.

  18. Clinical Features of Group B Streptococcus Prosthetic Joint Infections and Molecular Characterization of Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Corvec, S.; Illiaquer, M.; Touchais, S.; Boutoille, D.; van der Mee-Marquet, N.; Quentin, R.; Reynaud, A.; Lepelletier, D.; Bémer, P.

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available. PMID:21068273

  19. Streptococcus anginosus (milleri) Group Strains Isolated in Poland (1996-2012) and their Antibiotic Resistance Patterns.

    PubMed

    Obszańska, Katarzyna; Kern-Zdanowicz, Izabella; Kozińska, Aleksandra; Machura, Katarzyna; Stefaniuk, Elzbieta; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Sitkiewicz, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus constellatus form a group of related streptococcal species, namely the Streptococcus Anginosus Group (SAG). The group, previously called "milleri" had been rarely described until 1980/1990 as source of infections. Nowadays SAG bacteria are often described as pathogens causing predominantly purulent infections. The number of infections is highly underestimated, as SAG strains are often classified in the microbiology laboratory as less virulent "viridans streptococci" Epidemiological situation regarding SAG infections in Poland has been unrecognized, therefore we performed a retrospective analysis of strains isolated between 1996 and 2012. Strains suspected of belonging to SAG were re-identified using an automated biochemical approach (Vitek2) and MALDI-TOF MS. We performed first analysis of antibiotic resistance among SAG strains isolated in Poland using automated methods (Vitek2), disk diffusion tests and E-Tests. We also performed PCR detection of resistance determinants in antibiotic resistant strains. Clonal structure of analyzed strains was evaluated with PFGE and MLVF methods. All three species are difficult to distinguish using automated diagnostic methods and the same is true for automated MIC evaluation. Our analysis revealed SAG strains are rarely isolated in Poland, predominantly from purulent infections. All isolates are very diverse on the genomic level as estimated by PFGE and MLVF analyses. All analyzed strains are sensitive to penicillin, a substantial group of strains is resistant to macrolides and the majority of strains are resistant to tetracycline.

  20. Identification and characterization of genetic cluster groups of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from the human oral cavity.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; McKay, T L

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is recognized as a primary pathogen in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) within a collection of subgingival plaque isolates of this bacterium were identified and characterized as the first step in understanding the pathogenesis of LJP. Over 800 isolates, from members of 18 families (LJP families) with at least one member with active LJP or a documented history of the disease and one or more siblings, less than 13 years of age, having no clinical evidence of LJP and 32 healthy control subjects, were assigned to one of 13 distinct RFLP groups (II to XIV) by using a previously characterized 4.7-kb DNA probe cloned from the reference strain FDC Y4. Isolates belonging to RFLP groups II, IV, V, and XIII predominated subgingival sites in the subjects. Members of RFLP groups II, IV, VII, VIII, X, and XI were recovered only from LJP family subjects, while group XIII and XIV variants were found exclusively in healthy controls. A synthetic oligonucleotide, homologous to the 5' end of the leukotoxin gene (lktA), and the A. actinomycetemcomitans plasmid, pVT745, were tested for their abilities to subdivide the 13 RFLP groups. The leukotoxin probe specifically identified all RFLP group II variants because of the absence of a HindIII site in the upstream noncoding region of the lkt gene complex. The plasmid probe was not as selective but may be useful for identifying clinical isolates belonging to RFLP group I. The use of these probes for the identification of genetic variants of A. actinomycetemcomitans that may be preferentially colonize diseased and healthy subjects will facilitate the study of the role of this important pathogen in periodontal diseases. Images PMID:7907346

  1. Phylogeographic structure and northward range expansion in the barnacle Chthamalus fragilis.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Annette F; Bukša, Filip; Bockrath, Katherine; Wares, John P; Pineda, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The barnacle Chthamalus fragilis is found along the US Atlantic seaboard historically from the Chesapeake Bay southward, and in the Gulf of Mexico. It appeared in New England circa 1900 coincident with warming temperatures, and is now a conspicuous member of rocky intertidal communities extending through the northern shore of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The origin of northern C. fragilis is debated. It may have spread to New England from the northern end of its historic range through larval transport by ocean currents, possibly mediated by the construction of piers, marinas, and other anthropogenic structures that provided new hard substrate habitat. Alternatively, it may have been introduced by fouling on ships originating farther south in its historic distribution. Here we examine mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I sequence diversity and the distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes of C. fragilis from 11 localities ranging from Cape Cod, to Tampa Bay, Florida. We found significant genetic structure between northern and southern populations. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three well-supported reciprocally monophyletic haplogroups, including one haplogroup that is restricted to New England and Virginia populations. While the distances between clades do not suggest cryptic speciation, selection and dispersal barriers may be driving the observed structure. Our data are consistent with an expansion of C. fragilis from the northern end of its mid-19th century range into Massachusetts.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399

    PubMed Central

    Quarella, Sara; Lovrovich, Paola; Scalabrin, Simone; Campedelli, Ilenia; Backovic, Ana; Gatto, Veronica; Cattonaro, Federica; Turello, Alessandro; Felis, Giovanna E.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399, the first yeast approved as a probiotic for human consumption not belonging to the genus Saccharomyces. The genome is composed of 8 chromosomes, with a total size of 11.44 Mb, including mitochondrial DNA. PMID:27587830

  3. Phylogeographic structure and northward range expansion in the barnacle Chthamalus fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Bukša, Filip; Bockrath, Katherine; Wares, John P.; Pineda, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The barnacle Chthamalus fragilis is found along the US Atlantic seaboard historically from the Chesapeake Bay southward, and in the Gulf of Mexico. It appeared in New England circa 1900 coincident with warming temperatures, and is now a conspicuous member of rocky intertidal communities extending through the northern shore of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The origin of northern C. fragilis is debated. It may have spread to New England from the northern end of its historic range through larval transport by ocean currents, possibly mediated by the construction of piers, marinas, and other anthropogenic structures that provided new hard substrate habitat. Alternatively, it may have been introduced by fouling on ships originating farther south in its historic distribution. Here we examine mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I sequence diversity and the distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes of C. fragilis from 11 localities ranging from Cape Cod, to Tampa Bay, Florida. We found significant genetic structure between northern and southern populations. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three well-supported reciprocally monophyletic haplogroups, including one haplogroup that is restricted to New England and Virginia populations. While the distances between clades do not suggest cryptic speciation, selection and dispersal barriers may be driving the observed structure. Our data are consistent with an expansion of C. fragilis from the northern end of its mid-19th century range into Massachusetts. PMID:25945315

  4. Genome sequence of the Bacteroides fragilis phage ATCC 51477-B1

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Shawn A; Layton, Alice C; Ripp, Steven; Williams, Dan; Sayler, Gary S

    2008-01-01

    The genome of a fecal pollution indicator phage, Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 51477-B1, was sequenced and consisted of 44,929 bases with a G+C content of 38.7%. Forty-six putative open reading frames were identified and genes were organized into functional clusters for host specificity, lysis, replication and regulation, and packaging and structural proteins. PMID:18710568

  5. Genomic Characterization of Group C Orthobunyavirus Reference Strains and Recent South American Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Solórzano, Víctor Fiestas; Kuschner, Robert A.; Halsey, Eric S.; Jarman, Richard G.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2014-01-01

    Group C orthobunyaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus), discovered in the 1950s, are vector-borne human pathogens in the Americas. Currently there is a gap in genomic information for group C viruses. In this study, we obtained complete coding region sequences of reference strains of Caraparu (CARV), Oriboca (ORIV), Marituba (MTBV) and Madrid (MADV) viruses, and five clinical isolates from Peru and Bolivia, using an unbiased de novo approach consisting of random reverse transcription, random anchored PCR amplification, and high throughput pyrosequencing. The small, medium, and large segments encode for a 235 amino acid nucleocapsid protein, an approximately 1430 amino acid surface glycoprotein polyprotein precursor, and a 2248 amino acid RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, respectively. Additionally, the S segment encodes for an 83 amino acid non-structural protein, although this protein is truncated or silenced in some isolates. Phylogenetically, three clinical isolates clustered with CARV, one clustered with MTBV, and one isolate appeared to be a reassortant or a genetic drift resulted from the high variability of the medium segment which was also seen in a few other orthobunyaviruses. These data represent the first complete coding region sequences for this serocomplex of pathogenic orthobunyaviruses. The genome-wide phylogeny of reference strains is consistent with the antigenic properties of the viruses reported in the original serological studies conducted in the 1960s. Comparative analysis of conserved protein regions across group C virus strains and the other orthobunyavirus groups revealed that these group C viruses contain characteristic domains of potential structural and functional significance. Our results provide the basis for the developments of diagnostics, further genetic analyses, and future epidemiologic studies of group C viruses. PMID:24633174

  6. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of "Streptococcus milleri" group isolates from a Veterans Administration hospital population.

    PubMed

    Clarridge, J E; Osting, C; Jalali, M; Osborne, J; Waddington, M

    1999-11-01

    Because identification of the species within the "Streptococcus milleri" group is difficult for the clinical laboratory as the species share overlapping phenotypic characteristics, we wished to confirm biochemical identification with identification by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Ninety-four clinical isolates previously identified as the "Streptococcus milleri" group were reclassified as S. anginosus, S. constellatus, or S. intermedius with the API 20 Strep system (bioMerieux Vikek, Hazelton, Mo.) and the Fluo-card (Key Scientific, Round Rock, Tex.). In addition, we determined the Lancefield group, hemolysis, colony size, colony texture, repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) pattern, and cellular fatty acid (CFA) profile (MIDI, Newark, Del.). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis with 40 selected representative strains showed three distinct groups, with S. constellatus and S. intermedius found to be more closely related to each other than to S. anginosus, and further distinguished a biochemically distinct group of urogenital isolates within the S. anginosus group of isolates. Except for strains unreactive with the Fluo-card (8%), all S. anginosus and S. intermedius strains identified by sequencing were similarly identified by biochemical testing. However, 23% of the selected S. constellatus isolates identified by sequencing (9% of all S. constellatus isolates) would have been identified as S. anginosus or S. intermedius by biochemical tests. Although most S. anginosus strains formed one unique cluster by CFA analysis and most S. constellatus strains showed similar rep-PCR patterns, neither method was sufficiently dependable for identification. Whereas Lancefield group or lactose fermentation did not correspond to sequence or biochemical type, S. constellatus was most likely to be beta-hemolytic and S. intermedius was most likely to have a dry colony type. The most frequent isolate in our population was S. constellatus, followed by S. anginosus. There was an

  7. Population biology of intestinal enterococcus isolates from hospitalized and nonhospitalized individuals in different age groups.

    PubMed

    Tedim, Ana P; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Corander, Jukka; Rodríguez, Concepción M; Cantón, Rafael; Willems, Rob J; Baquero, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M

    2015-03-01

    The diversity of enterococcal populations from fecal samples from hospitalized (n = 133) and nonhospitalized individuals (n = 173) of different age groups (group I, ages 0 to 19 years; group II, ages 20 to 59 years; group III, ages ≥60 years) was analyzed. Enterococci were recovered at similar rates from hospitalized and nonhospitalized persons (77.44% to 79.77%) of all age groups (75.0% to 82.61%). Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were predominant, although seven other Enterococcus species were identified. E. faecalis and E. faecium (including ampicillin-resistant E. faecium) colonization rates in nonhospitalized persons were age independent. For inpatients, E. faecalis colonization rates were age independent, but E. faecium colonization rates (particularly the rates of ampicillin-resistant E. faecium colonization) significantly increased with age. The population structure of E. faecium and E. faecalis was determined by superimposing goeBURST and Bayesian analysis of the population structure (BAPS). Most E. faecium sequence types (STs; 150 isolates belonging to 75 STs) were linked to BAPS groups 1 (22.0%), 2 (31.3%), and 3 (36.7%). A positive association between hospital isolates and BAPS subgroups 2.1a and 3.3a (which included major ampicillin-resistant E. faecium human lineages) and between community-based ampicillin-resistant E. faecium isolates and BAPS subgroups 1.2 and 3.3b was found. Most E. faecalis isolates (130 isolates belonging to 58 STs) were grouped into 3 BAPS groups, BAPS groups 1 (36.9%), 2 (40.0%), and 3 (23.1%), with each one comprising widespread lineages. No positive associations with age or hospitalization were established. The diversity and dynamics of enterococcal populations in the fecal microbiota of healthy humans are largely unexplored, with the available knowledge being fragmented and contradictory. The study offers a novel and comprehensive analysis of enterococcal population landscapes and suggests that E. faecium

  8. Population Biology of Intestinal Enterococcus Isolates from Hospitalized and Nonhospitalized Individuals in Different Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Tedim, Ana P.; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Corander, Jukka; Rodríguez, Concepción M.; Cantón, Rafael; Willems, Rob J.; Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of enterococcal populations from fecal samples from hospitalized (n = 133) and nonhospitalized individuals (n = 173) of different age groups (group I, ages 0 to 19 years; group II, ages 20 to 59 years; group III, ages ≥60 years) was analyzed. Enterococci were recovered at similar rates from hospitalized and nonhospitalized persons (77.44% to 79.77%) of all age groups (75.0% to 82.61%). Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were predominant, although seven other Enterococcus species were identified. E. faecalis and E. faecium (including ampicillin-resistant E. faecium) colonization rates in nonhospitalized persons were age independent. For inpatients, E. faecalis colonization rates were age independent, but E. faecium colonization rates (particularly the rates of ampicillin-resistant E. faecium colonization) significantly increased with age. The population structure of E. faecium and E. faecalis was determined by superimposing goeBURST and Bayesian analysis of the population structure (BAPS). Most E. faecium sequence types (STs; 150 isolates belonging to 75 STs) were linked to BAPS groups 1 (22.0%), 2 (31.3%), and 3 (36.7%). A positive association between hospital isolates and BAPS subgroups 2.1a and 3.3a (which included major ampicillin-resistant E. faecium human lineages) and between community-based ampicillin-resistant E. faecium isolates and BAPS subgroups 1.2 and 3.3b was found. Most E. faecalis isolates (130 isolates belonging to 58 STs) were grouped into 3 BAPS groups, BAPS groups 1 (36.9%), 2 (40.0%), and 3 (23.1%), with each one comprising widespread lineages. No positive associations with age or hospitalization were established. The diversity and dynamics of enterococcal populations in the fecal microbiota of healthy humans are largely unexplored, with the available knowledge being fragmented and contradictory. The study offers a novel and comprehensive analysis of enterococcal population landscapes and suggests that E. faecium

  9. Comparison of the transport of Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli within saturated sand packs.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Jennifer J; Feriancikova, Lucia; Banerjee, Areen; Saffarini, Daâd A; Wang, Lixia; Li, Jin; Grundl, Timothy J; Xu, Shangping

    2014-11-01

    Pathogens in groundwater accounted for ∼50% of waterborne disease outbreaks in the United States between 1971 and 2006. The fast and reliable detection of groundwater microbial contamination and the identification of the contamination sources are of critical importance to the protection of public health. Recent studies suggested that fecal anaerobe Bacteriodes spp. could be employed as an effective tool for surface water microbial source tracking (MST). The usefulness of Bacteroides spp. for groundwater MST depends strongly on its mobility within the subsurface system. This research provides laboratory results comparing transport and attachment of E. coli K12 and B. fragilis within packed quartz sands. The results indicate that at low ionic strengths both E. coli K12 and B. fragilis are readily transported through saturated sand packs. At higher ionic strengths such as may be found near concentrated sources of fecal contamination, B. fragilis displayed significantly higher mobility than E. coli K12. Analysis of the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verweu-Overbeek (XDLVO) energy interactions for both types of bacteria showed a significant repulsive energy barrier exists between the sand surface and the bacteria, precluding attachment directly to the sand surface. However a secondary minimum energy level exists under higher ionic strength conditions. The depth of this energy low is greater for E. coli K12, which results in greater attachment of E. coli K12 than of B. fragilis. The high mobility of B. fragilis suggests that it represents a promising tool for the detection of groundwater fecal contamination as well as the identification of the microbial sources.

  10. Group dynamics during the EXEMSI isolation study. Experimental Campaign for the European Manned Space Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Cazes, C; Rosnet, E; Bachelard, C; Le Scanff, C; Rivolier, J

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the social behavior, interrelations, cohesion, efficiency and team formation of the crew during 60 days of isolation and confinement, to make a critical comparison of a variety of test methods used for this purpose and to formulate recommendations for their applications in selection, training and support for future studies of this kind. The study consisted of three phases: (1) the pre-isolation period, in which initial individual and group assessment were made to understand the motivation, characteristics, and styles of the crew members, the state of the crew, and to make a prognosis for the behavior of the group and its members, (2) the isolation period, with tests and observations to follow and analyze behavior and group dynamics of the crew, and to detect manifestations of stress, and (3) the post-isolation period with final assessment and debriefing. During these three periods individual and group tests were carried out. Direct methods, questionnaires and tests, as well as indirect methods, observations of behavior, were used. These had cognitive, affective-emotional and social components; they were quantitative, qualitative or a combination. Before isolation the crew members expressed strong confidence in the team and in their own personal capability. The leadership of the Commander seemed uncontested. Crew functioning during this period was conflict-free, but was structured in a rather rigid and defensive way (isolation of affects, denial of anxiety). Apparently, the members strongly needed to present a good image image of themselves. The relatively short period of the experiment, and the absence of real risk suggested that the crew would be able to maintain their cohesion, but in a real spaceflight situation this behavior could be inadequate and even dangerous. The pre-isolation prognosis for crew behavior during isolation was validated to a large extent. During isolation there were no clear manifestations of

  11. Two similar but atypical strains of coryneform group A-4 isolated from patients with endophthalmitis.

    PubMed Central

    Coudron, P E; Harris, R C; Vaughan, M G; Dalton, H P

    1985-01-01

    Corynebacterium species and other coryneform organisms isolated from clinical specimens are frequently considered contaminants. We isolated two strains of a gram-positive organism from the vitreous fluid of two patients with endophthalmitis who had previously received intraocular lens transplants. The biochemical characteristics and gas chromatographic patterns of both isolates were similar to those of coryneform group A-4 strains. Major differences included esculin hydrolysis, nitrate reduction, growth pigment, and lactic acid production. These two strains along with a limited number of strains collected at the Special Bacterial Pathogens Laboratory (Division of Bacterial Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga.) may represent a subgroup of coryneform group A-4. Results of in vitro susceptibility testing performed with antimicrobial agents commonly used to treat patients with bacterial endophthalmitis underscore the importance of determining MBCs for slow-growing organisms. This report cautions microbiologists not to discard organisms frequently considered contaminants when isolated from body fluids that are normally sterile and from patients receiving local steroids. PMID:3935657

  12. Direct evidence of hierarchical assembly at low masses from isolated dwarf galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stierwalt, S.; Liss, S. E.; Johnson, K. E.; Patton, D. R.; Privon, G. C.; Besla, G.; Kallivayalil, N.; Putman, M.

    2017-01-01

    The demographics of dwarf galaxy populations have long been in tension with predictions from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) paradigm 1-4 . If primordial density fluctuations were scale-free as predicted, dwarf galaxies should themselves host dark-matter subhaloes 5 , the most massive of which may have undergone star formation resulting in dwarf galaxy groups. Ensembles of dwarf galaxies are observed as sate­llites of more massive galaxies 6-9 , and there is observational 10 and theoretical 11 evidence to suggest that these satellites at redshift z = 0 were captured by the massive host halo as a group. However, the evolution of dwarf galaxies is highly susceptible to environment 12-14 , making these satellite groups imperfect probes of ΛCDM in the low-mass regime. Here we report one of the clearest examples yet of hierarchical structure formation at low masses: using deep multi-wavelength data, we identify seven isolated, spectroscopically confirmed groups of only dwarf galaxies. Each group hosts three to five known members, has a baryonic mass of ~4.4 × 109 to 2 × 1010 solar masses (M ⊙), and requires a mass-to-light ratio of <100 to be gravitationally bound. Such groups are predicted to be rare theoretically and found to be rare observationally at the current epoch, and thus provide a unique window into the possible formation mechanism of more massive, isolated galaxies.

  13. Fluorine-proton correlation from isolated trifluoromethyl groups using unresolved J-couplings.

    PubMed

    Howe, Peter W A

    2012-10-01

    Fluorine-containing compounds are rare in biological systems, so fluorine NMR spectroscopy can selectively detect and quantify fluorinated xenobiotics in crude biological extracts. The high sensitivity of fluorine NMR allows the detection of compounds containing isolated trifluoromethyl groups at nanogramme levels. However, it only provides limited structural information about trifluoromethyl-containing compounds owing to the difficulty of interpreting fluorine chemical shifts and the low sensitivity of HOESY experiments used to correlate fluorine nuclei with protons in the same compound. This paper demonstrates that long-range fluorine-proton J-couplings can be used to correlate isolated trifluoromethyl groups with nearby protons with significantly higher sensitivity than HOESY. Fluorine-observe fluorine-proton HMQC can even give correlations when the fluorine-proton J-couplings are less than the observed fluorine resonance linewidth, so it provides a useful alternative source of structural information about fluorinated xenobiotics.

  14. Biochemical characteristics and virulence of environmental group F bacteria isolated in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, R J; Allen, D A; Colwell, R R; Joseph, S W; Daily, O P

    1980-01-01

    Bacteria phenotypically resembling Aeromonas hydrophila, but requiring NaCl for growth, have been isolated form the New York Bight. The bacteria proved to be identical to group F organisms isolated from cases of human diarrhea in Indonesia and Bangladesh. Anaerogenic strains initiated responses in Y-1 tissue culture and rabbit ileal loop, consistent with those associated with cytotoxin- and enterotoxin-producing Aeromonas spp. strains. Separation on the basis of production of gas from glucose by group F strains was correlated with differences in mean guanine-plus-cytosine deoxyribonucleic acid base composition and in deoxyribonucleic acid relative reassociation. Both aerogenic and anaerogenic strains reassociated to a significantly greater extent with Vibrio spp. than with Aeromonas spp. and indeed should be considered a new species of the genus Vibrio. PMID:7425623

  15. Molecular Basis for Erythromycin Resistance in Group A Streptococcus Isolated From Skin and Soft Tissue Infections

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Thangam

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an increase in the use of erythromycin in the treatment of infections caused by bacteria other than Group A Streptococcus (GAS), which has resulted in increased resistance to this antibiotic. Erythromycin and other macrolides are alternative agents for treating GAS infections in patients, who are allergic to penicillin and its derivatives. Aim The main aim of this study was to identify frequency, pattern and genetic determinant of erythromycin resistance among the GAS isolated from skin and soft tissue infections. Materials and Methods A total 100 isolates of GAS were screened for erythromycin resistance by phenotypic and genotypic method. Results The results of the present study showed that 38% isolates were resistant to erythromycin. The iMLS (inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin) phenotype was predominant (55.26%) followed by M phenotype (26.32%) and cMLS (constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin) (18.42%). Conclusion Phenotypic and genotypic analysis showed that the MLSB phenotype with ermB mediated mechanism of resistance was found the most common (76.31%) followed by mefA (20.51%). The ermTR genes was absent in all the isolates. PMID:26672671

  16. Isolation of Streptococcus tigurinus - a novel member of Streptococcus mitis group from a case of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Dhotre, Shree V; Mehetre, Gajanan T; Dharne, Mahesh S; Suryawanshi, Namdev M; Nagoba, Basavraj S

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus tigurinus is a new member of the Streptococcus viridians group and is closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis. The type strain AZ_3a(T) of S. tigurinus was originally isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis. Accurate identification of S. tigurinus is facilitated only by newer molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene analysis. During the course of study on bacteraemia and infective endocarditis with reference to periodontitis and viridians group of streptococci, a strain of S. tigurinus isolated from subgingival plaque of a patient with periodontitis identified by 16S rRNA gene analysis, which was originally identified as Streptococcus pluranimalium by Vitek 2. Confirmation by 16S rRNA gene analysis showed 99.39% similarity (1476/1485 bp) with S. tigurinus AZ_3a(T) (AORU01000002). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of S. tigurinus from the oral cavity of a periodontitis patient.

  17. Development of a rapid identification method for Klebsiella pneumoniae phylogenetic groups and analysis of 420 clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Brisse, S; van Himbergen, T; Kusters, K; Verhoef, J

    2004-10-01

    A rapid method combining gyrA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, parC PCR and adonitol fermentation was developed to identify Klebsiella pneumoniae phylogenetic groups KpI, KpII and KpIII. Analysis of 420 clinical isolates from 26 hospitals showed that the three groups were widespread geographically. KpI comprised 80.3% of 305 isolates from blood and 82.2-97.2% of isolates from other clinical sources. KpIII was never found among isolates from urinary tract infections. KpI isolates from blood were generally less susceptible than KpIII isolates to the ten antimicrobial agents tested, with KpII being intermediate. The frequencies of ceftazidime resistance were 21.6% and 8.6% in KpI and KpIII isolates, respectively (p 0.01).

  18. Exploring the biodiversity of two groups of Oenococcus oeni isolated from grape musts and wines: Are they equally diverse?

    PubMed

    Cruz-Pio, Liz Erika; Poveda, Marta; Alberto, María Rosa; Ferrer, Sergi; Pardo, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    One hundred and four Oenococcus oeni isolates were characterised by the carbohydrate fermentation (CH) profile and DNA fingerprinting. Forty-four isolates came from grape must, and 60 from wines sampled at the end of alcoholic fermentation or during malolactic fermentation. The grape must isolates fermented more CH than the wine isolates. In genotypical terms, no clear boundary between grape must and wine isolates was found. Diversities were deduced by considering the isolates of grape must and of wine separately and jointly. By considering only CH fermentation abilities, the group of grape must isolates gave higher diversity index (DICH) values than those isolated from wine; i.e., these isolates were metabolically more diverse. The contrary occurred when the DNA fingerprints were used to calculate DIRAPD-VNTR: wine isolates were genotypically more diverse than grape must ones. With a polyphasic approach, which considered metabolic and genotypic data, the diversity index of both isolate groups (from grape must and wine) was the same, 0.993, which was slightly lower than that calculated from all the isolates (0.997).

  19. Low-Temperature Isolation of Disease-Suppressive Bacteria and Characterization of a Distinctive Group of Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, P. Maria; Wright, Sandra A. I.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors during isolation on the composition of potential biocontrol isolates is largely unknown. Bacterial isolates that efficiently suppressed wheat seedling blight caused by Fusarium culmorum were found by isolating psychrotrophic, root-associated bacteria and by screening them in a bioassay that mimicked field conditions. The impact of individual isolation factors on the disease-suppressive index (DSI) of almost 600 isolates was analyzed. The bacteria originated from 135 samples from 62 sites in Sweden and Switzerland. The isolation factors that increased the probability of finding isolates with high DSIs were sampling from arable land, Swiss origin of samples, and origination of isolates from plants belonging to the family Brassicaceae. The colony morphology of the isolates was characterized and compared to DSIs, which led to identification of a uniform morphological group containing 57 highly disease-suppressive isolates. Isolates in this group were identified as Pseudomonas sp.; they were fluorescent on King's medium B and had characteristic crystalline structures in their colonies. These isolates were morphologically similar to seven strains that had previously been selected for suppression of barley net blotch caused by Drechslera teres. Members of this morphological group grow at 1.5°C and produce an antifungal polyketide (2,3-deepoxy-2,3-didehydrorhizoxin [DDR]). They have similar two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profiles, phenotypic characteristics, and in vitro inhibition spectra of pathogens. In summary, in this paper we describe some isolation factors that are important for obtaining disease-suppressive bacteria in our system, and we describe a novel group of biocontrol pseudomonads. PMID:14602601

  20. Physiological and proteomic responses of different willow clones (Salix fragilis x alba) exposed to dredged sediment contaminated by heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Evlard, Aricia; Sergeant, Kjell; Ferrandis, Salvador; Printz, Bruno; Renaut, Jenny; Guignard, Cedric; Paul, Roger; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Campanella, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    High biomass producing species are considered as tools for remediation of contaminated soils. Willows (Salix spp.) are prominent study subjects in this regard. In this study, different willow clones (Salix fragilis x alba) were planted on heavy-metal polluted dredging sludge. A first objective was assessment of the biomass production for these clones. Using a Gupta statistic, four clones were identified as high biomass producers (HBP). For comparison, a group of four clones with lowest biomass production were selected (LBP). A second objective was to compare metal uptake as well as the physiological and proteomic responses of these two groups. All these complementary data's allow us to have a better picture of the health of the clones that would be used in phytoremediation programs. Cd, Zn, and Ni total uptake was higher in the HBPs but Pb total uptake was higher in LBPs. Our proteomic and physiological results showed that the LBPs were able to maintain cellular activity as much as the HBPs although the oxidative stress response was more pronounced in the LBPs. This could be due to the high Pb content found in this group although a combined effect of the other metals cannot be excluded.

  1. Susceptibility of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group O isolates to antiretroviral agents: in vitro phenotypic and genotypic analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Descamps, D; Collin, G; Letourneur, F; Apetrei, C; Damond, F; Loussert-Ajaka, I; Simon, F; Saragosti, S; Brun-Vézinet, F

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the phenotypic and genotypic susceptibility of 11 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group O strains to nucleoside and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors and protease inhibitors in vitro. Phenotypic susceptibility was determined by using a standardized in vitro assay of RT inhibition, taking into account the replication kinetics of each strain. HIV-1 group M and HIV-2 isolates were used as references. DNA from cocultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells was amplified by using pol-specific group O primers and cloned for sequencing. Group O isolates were highly sensitive to nucleoside inhibitors, but six isolates were naturally highly resistant to all of the nonnucleoside RT inhibitors tested. Phylogenetic analysis of the pol gene showed that these isolates formed a separate cluster within group O, and genotypic analysis revealed a tyrosine-to-cysteine substitution at residue 181. Differences in susceptibility to saquinavir and ritonavir (RTV) were not significant between group O and group M isolates, although the 50% inhibitory concentration of RTV for group O isolates was higher than that for the HIV-1 subtype B strains. The study of HIV-1 group O susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs revealed that the viruses tested had specific phenotypic characteristics contrasting with the group M phenotypic expression. PMID:9343254

  2. A proteomic approach towards understanding the cross talk between Bacteroides fragilis and Bifidobacterium longum in coculture.

    PubMed

    Rios-Covián, David; Sánchez, Borja; Martínez, Noelia; Cuesta, Isabel; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of the interactions among intestinal microbes is needed to decipher the complex cross talk that takes place within the human gut. Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium genera are among the most relevant intestinal bacteria, and it has been previously reported that coculturing of these 2 microorganisms affects their survival. Therefore, coculturing of Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bacteroides fragilis DSMZ2151 was performed with the aim of unravelling the mechanisms involved in their interaction. To this end, we applied proteomic (2D-DIGE) analyses, and by chromatographic techniques we quantified the bacterial metabolites produced during coincubation. Coculture stimulated the growth of B. longum, retarding that of B. fragilis, with concomitant changes in the production of some proteins and metabolites of both bacteria. The combined culture promoted upregulation of the bifidobacterial pyruvate kinase and downregulation of the Bacteroides phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase - 2 enzymes involved in the catabolism of carbohydrates. Moreover, B. fragilis FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, a protein with chaperone-like activity, was found to be overproduced in coculture, suggesting the induction of a stress response in this microorganism. This study provides mechanistic data to deepen our understanding of the interaction between Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium intestinal populations.

  3. Selection of strain, growth conditions, and extraction procedures for optimum production of lactase from Kluyveromyces fragilis.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, R R; Nickerson, T A; Whitaker, J R

    1975-11-01

    Forty-one strains of Kluyveromyces fragilis (Jörgensen) van der Walt 1909 varied 60-fold in ability to produce lactase (beta-galactosidase). The four best strains were UCD No. 55-31 (Northern Regional Research Center NRRL Y-1196), UCD No. C21(-), UCD No. 72-297(-), and UCD No. 55-61 (NRRL Y-1109). Biosynthesis of lactase during the growth of K. fragilis strain UCD No. 55-61 was followed on both lactose and sweet whey media. Maximum enzyme yield was obtained at the beginning of the stationary phase of growth. Bets lactase yields from K. fragilis UCD No. 55-61 were obtained with 15% lactose and an aeration rate of at least .2 mmol oxygen/liter per min. Supplementary growth factors were unneccessary for good lactase yeilds when yeast was grown on whey media. Best extraction of lactase from fresh yeast cells was obtained by toluene autolysis (2% vol/vol) at 37 C in .1 M potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, containing .1 mM manganese chloride and .5 mM magnesium sulfate. The enzyme was concentrated and purified partially by acetone precipitation. At least 95% of the enzyme activity of the concentrated solution was retained after storage for 7 days at 22 C, for 3 wk at 4 C, and for 6 wk at -20 C.

  4. Physiological compensation for environmental acidification is limited in the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.; Lovera, C.; Whaling, P. J.; Buck, K. R.; Pane, E. F.; Barry, J. P.

    2013-05-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is now reaching depths over 1000 m in the Eastern Pacific, overlapping the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). Deep-sea animals - particularly, calcifiers - are suspected to be especially sensitive to environmental acidification associated with global climate change. We have investigated the effects of hypercapnia and hypoxia on the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis, during two long-term exposure experiments (1 month and 4 month) at three levels of reduced pH at in situ O2 levels of approx. 10% saturation, and also to control pH at 100% O2 saturation. During the first experiment, internal acid-base balance was investigated during a one-month exposure; results show S. fragilis has limited ability to compensate for the respiratory acidosis brought on by reduced pH, due in part to low non-bicarbonate extracellular fluid buffering capacity. During the second experiment, longer-term effects of hypercapnia and variable O2 on locomotion, feeding, growth, and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were investigated; results show significant mortality and correlation of all measured parameters with environmental acidification at pH 6.6. Transient adverse effects on locomotion and feeding were seen at pH 7.2, without compromise of growth or GSI. Based on the expected changes in ocean pH and oxygen, results suggest extinction of S. fragilis in the eastern North Pacific is unlikely. Rather, we expect a shoaling and contraction of its bathymetric range.

  5. Nutritional profile of food yeast Kluyveromyces fragilis biomass grown on whey.

    PubMed

    Paul, Deepen; Mukhopadhyay, Rupak; Chatterjee, Bishnu P; Guha, Arun K

    2002-03-01

    Biomass of food yeast Kluyveromyces fragilis (MTCC 188) grown on deproteinized whey supplemented with 0.8% diammonium hydrogen phosphate and 10 ppm indole-3-acetic acid, had a crude protein content of 37%. The true protein content based on nitrogen fractionation procedure was 28.1%. Total nucleic acid content was 4.82%. This amount does not appear to be toxicologically offensive. Crude fiber, ash, and lipid content of K.fragilis dry cells were found to be 4.9%, 16%, and 7.8%, respectively. Essential fatty acids of both omega-3 and omega-6 series were found present in the fat of the yeast and represented 21.5% of the total fatty acids. All the essential amino acids were present in the proteins of K. fragilis; however, sulfur containing amino acids were found in lower amounts. Calculated protein scores indicate moderate biological value. B vitamins in the biomass were present as expected, but folic acid and pyridoxine were present in high concentration.

  6. Pyogenic arthritis of native joints due to Bacteroides fragilis: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nolla, Joan M; Murillo, Oscar; Narvaez, Javier; Vaquero, Carmen Gómez; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Pedrero, Salvador; Cabo, Javier; Ariza, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Pyogenic arthritis of native joints due to Bacteroides fragilis seems to be an infrequent disease. We analyzed the cases diagnosed in a tertiary hospital during a 22-year period and reviewed the literature to summarize the experience with this infectious entity.In our institution, of 308 patients with pyogenic arthritis of native joints, B fragilis was the causative organism in 2 (0.6%) cases. A MEDLINE search (1981-2015) identified 19 additional cases.Of the 21 patients available for review (13 men and 8 women, with a mean age, of 54.4 ± 17 years), 19 (90%) presented a systemic predisposing factor for infection; the most common associated illness was rheumatoid arthritis (8 patients). Bacteremia was documented in 65% (13/20) of cases. In 5 patients (24%), 1 or more concomitant infectious process was found. Metronidazole was the most frequently used antibiotic. Surgical drainage was performed in 11 cases (52%). The overall mortality rate was 5%.Pyogenic arthritis of native joints due to B fragilis is an infrequent disease that mainly affects elderly patients with underlying medical illnesses and in whom bacteremia and the presence of a concomitant infectious process are frequent conditions.

  7. Different metabolic features of Bacteroides fragilis growing in the presence of glucose and exopolysaccharides of bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Covian, David; Sánchez, Borja; Salazar, Nuria; Martínez, Noelia; Redruello, Begoña; Gueimonde, Miguel; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides is among the most abundant microorganism inhabiting the human intestine. They are saccharolytic bacteria able to use dietary or host-derived glycans as energy sources. Some Bacteroides fragilis strains contribute to the maturation of the immune system but it is also an opportunistic pathogen. The intestine is the habitat of most Bifidobacterium species, some of whose strains are considered probiotics. Bifidobacteria can synthesize exopolysaccharides (EPSs), which are complex carbohydrates that may be available in the intestinal environment. We studied the metabolism of B. fragilis when an EPS preparation from bifidobacteria was added to the growth medium compared to its behavior with added glucose. 2D-DIGE coupled with the identification by MALDI-TOF/TOF evidenced proteins that were differentially produced when EPS was added. The results were supported by RT-qPCR gene expression analysis. The intracellular and extracellular pattern of certain amino acids, the redox balance and the α-glucosidase activity were differently affected in EPS with respect to glucose. These results allowed us to hypothesize that three general main events, namely the activation of amino acids catabolism, enhancement of the transketolase reaction from the pentose-phosphate cycle, and activation of the succinate-propionate pathway, promote a shift of bacterial metabolism rendering more reducing power and optimizing the energetic yield in the form of ATP when Bacteroides grow with added EPSs. Our results expand the knowledge about the capacity of B. fragilis for adapting to complex carbohydrates and amino acids present in the intestinal environment. PMID:26347720

  8. Enterotoxin production in natural isolates of Bacillaceae outside the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Rebecca J; McKillip, John L

    2002-06-01

    Thirty-nine Bacillus strains obtained from a variety of environmental and food sources were screened by PCR for the presence of five gene targets (hblC, hblD, hblA, nheA, and nheB) in two enterotoxin operons (HBL and NHE) traditionally harbored by Bacillus cereus. Seven isolates exhibited a positive signal for at least three of the five possible targets, including Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, B. cereus, Bacillus circulans, Bacillus lentimorbis, Bacillus pasteurii, and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. PCR amplicons were confirmed by restriction enzyme digest patterns compared to a positive control strain. Enterotoxin gene expression of each strain grown in a model food system (skim milk) was monitored by gene-specific reverse transcription-PCR and confirmed with the Oxoid RPLA and Tecra BDE commercial kits. Lecithinase production was noted on egg yolk-polymyxin B agar for all strains except B. lentimorbis, whereas discontinuous beta hemolysis was exhibited by all seven isolates grown on 5% sheep blood agar plates. The results of this study confirm the presence of enterotoxin genes in natural isolates of Bacillus spp. outside the B. cereus group and the ability of these strains to produce toxins in a model food system under aerated conditions at 32 degrees C.

  9. Isolation and purification of blood group antigens using immuno-affinity chromatography on short monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Mönster, Andrea; Hiller, Oliver; Grüger, Daniela; Blasczyk, Rainer; Kasper, Cornelia

    2011-02-04

    Monolithic columns have gained increasing attention as stationary phases for the separation of biomolecules and biopharmaceuticals. In the present work the performance of monolithic convective interaction media (CIM(®)) chromatography for the purification of blood group antigens was established. The proteins employed in this study are derived from blood group antigens Knops, JMH and Scianna, equipped both with a His-tag and with a V5-tag by which they can be purified. In a first step a monoclonal antibody directed against the V5-tag was immobilized on a CIM(®) Disk with epoxy chemistry. After this, the immobilized CIM(®) Disk was used in immuno-affinity chromatography to purify the three blood group antigens from cell culture supernatant. Up-scaling of the applied technology was carried out using CIM(®) Tubes. In comparison to conventional affinity chromatography, blood group antigens were also purified via His-tag using a HiTrap(®) metal-affinity column. The two purifications have been compared regarding purity, yield and purification speed. Using the monolithic support, it was possible to isolate the blood group antigens with a higher flow rate than using the conventional bed-packed column.

  10. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns and prevalence of group B Streptococcus isolated from pregnant women in Misiones, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, M; Pegels, E; Oviedo, P; Pereyra, E; Vergara, M

    2008-04-01

    This study was performed to determine the susceptibility patterns and the colonization rate of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) in a population of pregnant women. From January 2004 to December 2006, vaginal-rectal swabs were obtained from 1105 women attending Dr. Ramón Madariaga Hospital, in Posadas, Misiones, Argentina. The carriage rate of GBS among pregnant women was 7.6%. A total of 62 GBS strains were randomly selected for in vitro susceptibility testing to penicillin G, ampicillin, tetracycline, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, vancomycin, rifampicin, trimethoprim- sulfametoxazol, nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, clindamycin and erythromycin, and determination of resistance phenotypes. No resistance to penicillin, ampicillin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, and vancomycin was found. Of the isolates examined 96.8%, 98.3%, 46.8%, and 29.0% were susceptible to rifampicin, nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim-sulfametoxazol and tetracycline, respectively. Rank order of susceptibility for the quinolones was: gatifloxacin (98.4%) > levofloxacin (93.5%) > ciprofloxacin (64.5%). The rate of resistance to erythromycin (9.7%) was higher than that of other reports from Argentina. High-level resistance to gentamicin was not detected in any of the isolates. Based on our finding of 50% of GBS isolates with MIC to gentamicin equal o lower than 8 μg/ml, a concentration used in one of the selective media recommended for GBS isolation, we suggested, at least in our population, the use of nalidixic acid and colistin in selective media with the aim to improve the sensitivity of screening cultures for GBS carriage in women.

  11. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns and prevalence of group B Streptococcus isolated from pregnant women in Misiones, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, M.; Pegels, E.; Oviedo, P.; Pereyra, E.; Vergara, M.

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the susceptibility patterns and the colonization rate of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) in a population of pregnant women. From January 2004 to December 2006, vaginal-rectal swabs were obtained from 1105 women attending Dr. Ramón Madariaga Hospital, in Posadas, Misiones, Argentina. The carriage rate of GBS among pregnant women was 7.6%. A total of 62 GBS strains were randomly selected for in vitro susceptibility testing to penicillin G, ampicillin, tetracycline, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, vancomycin, rifampicin, trimethoprim- sulfametoxazol, nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, clindamycin and erythromycin, and determination of resistance phenotypes. No resistance to penicillin, ampicillin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, and vancomycin was found. Of the isolates examined 96.8%, 98.3%, 46.8%, and 29.0% were susceptible to rifampicin, nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim-sulfametoxazol and tetracycline, respectively. Rank order of susceptibility for the quinolones was: gatifloxacin (98.4%) > levofloxacin (93.5%) > ciprofloxacin (64.5%). The rate of resistance to erythromycin (9.7%) was higher than that of other reports from Argentina. High-level resistance to gentamicin was not detected in any of the isolates. Based on our finding of 50% of GBS isolates with MIC to gentamicin equal o lower than 8 μg/ml, a concentration used in one of the selective media recommended for GBS isolation, we suggested, at least in our population, the use of nalidixic acid and colistin in selective media with the aim to improve the sensitivity of screening cultures for GBS carriage in women. PMID:24031210

  12. Is Penicillin Plus Gentamicin Synergistic against Clinical Group B Streptococcus isolates?: An In vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Ruppen, Corinne; Lupo, Agnese; Decosterd, Laurent; Sendi, Parham

    2016-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is increasingly causing invasive infections in non-pregnant adults. Elderly patients and those with comorbidities are at increased risk. On the basis of previous studies focusing on neonatal infections, penicillin plus gentamicin is recommended for infective endocarditis (IE) and periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) in adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a synergism with penicillin and gentamicin is present in GBS isolates that caused IE and PJI. We used 5 GBS isolates, two clinical strains and three control strains, including one displaying high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR). The results from the checkerboard and time-kill assays (TKAs) were compared. For TKAs, antibiotic concentrations for penicillin were 0.048 and 0.2 mg/L, and for gentamicin 4 mg/L or 12.5 mg/L. In the checkerboard assay, the median fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) of all isolates indicated indifference. TKAs for all isolates failed to demonstrate synergism with penicillin 0.048 or 0.2 mg/L, irrespective of gentamicin concentrations used. Rapid killing was seen with penicillin 0.048 mg/L plus either 4 mg/L or 12.5 mg/L gentamicin, from 2 h up to 8 h hours after antibiotic exposure. TKAs with penicillin 0.2 mg/L decreased the starting inoculum below the limit of quantification within 4-6 h, irrespective of the addition of gentamicin. Fast killing was seen with penicillin 0.2 mg/L plus 12.5 mg/L gentamicin within the first 2 h. Our in vitro results indicate that the addition of gentamicin to penicillin contributes to faster killing at low penicillin concentrations, but only within the first few hours. Twenty-four hours after antibiotic exposure, PEN alone was bactericidal and synergism was not seen.

  13. Is Penicillin Plus Gentamicin Synergistic against Clinical Group B Streptococcus isolates?: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruppen, Corinne; Lupo, Agnese; Decosterd, Laurent; Sendi, Parham

    2016-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is increasingly causing invasive infections in non-pregnant adults. Elderly patients and those with comorbidities are at increased risk. On the basis of previous studies focusing on neonatal infections, penicillin plus gentamicin is recommended for infective endocarditis (IE) and periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) in adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a synergism with penicillin and gentamicin is present in GBS isolates that caused IE and PJI. We used 5 GBS isolates, two clinical strains and three control strains, including one displaying high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR). The results from the checkerboard and time-kill assays (TKAs) were compared. For TKAs, antibiotic concentrations for penicillin were 0.048 and 0.2 mg/L, and for gentamicin 4 mg/L or 12.5 mg/L. In the checkerboard assay, the median fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) of all isolates indicated indifference. TKAs for all isolates failed to demonstrate synergism with penicillin 0.048 or 0.2 mg/L, irrespective of gentamicin concentrations used. Rapid killing was seen with penicillin 0.048 mg/L plus either 4 mg/L or 12.5 mg/L gentamicin, from 2 h up to 8 h hours after antibiotic exposure. TKAs with penicillin 0.2 mg/L decreased the starting inoculum below the limit of quantification within 4–6 h, irrespective of the addition of gentamicin. Fast killing was seen with penicillin 0.2 mg/L plus 12.5 mg/L gentamicin within the first 2 h. Our in vitro results indicate that the addition of gentamicin to penicillin contributes to faster killing at low penicillin concentrations, but only within the first few hours. Twenty-four hours after antibiotic exposure, PEN alone was bactericidal and synergism was not seen. PMID:27818657

  14. Cluster of oral atypical Candida albicans isolates in a group of human immunodeficiency virus-positive drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Boerlin, P; Boerlin-Petzold, F; Durussel, C; Addo, M; Pagani, J L; Chave, J P; Bille, J

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-one chlamydospore-forming and germ tube-positive Candida albicans clinical isolates from 15 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and 3 HIV-negative patients were examined by two different genetic methods. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and hybridization with the C. albicans-specific Ca3 probe showed that such isolates can be split into two genetically distinct groups that can be clearly distinguished. One group mainly contained strains with atypical sugar assimilation patterns and could be distinguished from the other group by the absence of intracellular beta-glucosidase activity. All 13 strains belonging to this group were isolated from the oral cavities of asymptomatic HIV-positive drug users and may be less pathogenic than the eight strains from the other group isolated either from HIV-positive patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis or from HIV-negative patients with invasive candidiasis. PMID:7615716

  15. Spacing and Site Isolation of Amine Groups in 3-Aminopropyl-Grafted Silica Materials - The Role of Protecting Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, Jason C; Dabestani, Reza T; Buchanan III, A C; Jones, Christopher W

    2006-01-01

    The relative spacing of amines in 3-aminopropylsilyl-grafted silica is studied by solid-state fluorescence spectroscopy of 1-pyrenecarboxylic acid (PCA) and 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) bound to traditionally prepared, deprotected benzyl- or deprotected trityl-spaced aminosilicas. Thermogravimetric analysis and FT-Raman spectroscopy results show evidence that the protected imine can be cleaved to yield the corresponding amine in essentially quantitative yield. The steady-state fluorescence spectroscopic data of either PCA or PBA indicate that the number of amine pairs on the surface separated by a distance of 1 nm or less decreases as the total amine loading decreases. Both the intensity ratio of the excimer band to the monomer band (I{sub 470}/I{sub 384} or I{sub exc}/I{sub mon}) and lifetime decay studies of the fluorophore are useful probes of the amine spacing. Separation of amines on the surface can be achieved by either use of a protected synthesis route or through reduction of the concentration of the unprotected 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane used in the grafting solution. However, the two routes lead to materials with significantly different average amine spacings. Due to clustering of unprotected amines in solution before grafting or on the surface during the grafting process, amine-amine distances on the surface of materials prepared by an unprotected synthesis are on average smaller than when a protected synthesis is used. With the protected synthesis, evidence suggests that the amines are more isolated, with larger average amine-amine distances when compared to corresponding materials with a similar amine loading prepared via an unprotected synthesis. This is attributed to both the steric influence of the protecting groups and a reduction in silane clustering in solution due to protection of the amines before grafting. Thus, the mechanism of surface amine spacing when using the protection-deprotection strategy appears to involve both of these factors

  16. Isolation and characterization of group II introns from Pseudomonas alcaligenes and Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Yeo, C C; Yiin, S; Tan, B H; Poh, C L

    2001-05-01

    Group II introns isolated from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867, Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9869, and P. putida KT2440 were closely related with nucleotide sequence identities of between 87 and 96%. The genome of P. alcaligenes also harbored a truncated group II intron of 682 bp that lacks the gene for the intron-encoded protein (IEP). Unlike most bacterial group II introns, the Pseudomonas introns were found to lack the Zn domains in their IEPs, did not appear to interrupt any genes, and were located downstream of open reading frames which were adjacent to hairpin loop structures that resemble rho-independent terminators. These structures also contain the intron binding sites 1 and 2 (IBS1 and IBS2 sequences) that were required for intron target site recognition in transposition. One of the group II introns found in P. alcaligenes, Xln3, was shown to have transposed from the chromosome to the endogenous pRA2 plasmid at a site adjacent to IBS1- and IBS2-like sequences.

  17. Demographic Histories, Isolation and Social Factors as Determinants of the Genetic Structure of Alpine Linguistic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Coia, Valentina; Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Pascali, Vincenzo; Scarnicci, Francesca; Boschi, Ilaria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Crivellaro, Federica; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B. J.; Capelli, Cristian; Maixner, Frank; Cipollini, Giovanna; Viazzo, Pier Paolo; Zink, Albert; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of “local ethnicity” on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet to be understood

  18. Identification of cell wall proteins of Bacteroides fragilis to which bacteriophage B40-8 binds specifically.

    PubMed

    Puig, A; Araujo, R; Jofre, J; Frias-Lopez, J

    2001-02-01

    Bacteriophage infecting Bacteroides fragilis, one of the most abundant bacteria in the human colon, have been proposed as indicators of virological faecal pollution. The first identification of a receptor for a bacteriophage in B. fragilis is reported here. First, resistant mutants were characterized following phage inactivation, and it was shown that cell wall proteins are involved in phage binding. Then the proteins involved were identified by various approaches: (i) comparison of the protein profiles of wild-type B. fragilis HSP40 and phage-resistant mutants; (ii) application of a modification of the virus overlay protein blot assay (VOPBA). At least two proteins of B. fragilis, with apparent molecular masses of 35 +/- 5 kDa and 65 +/- 5 kDa, bind to B40-8. This result was later confirmed by running a complex consisting of this phage bound to radiolabelled proteins of B. fragilis on an immunoaffinity column loaded with a specific antibody against the phage. Cell proteins retained in the column also coincided with the proteins that differed in the profiles of resistant mutants. Finally, to identify the potential function of these two proteins, their N-terminal sequences were determined and compared to published sequences, but no homologies were found.

  19. Strain Diversity of Pseudomonas fluorescens Group with Potential Blue Pigment Phenotype Isolated from Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Chierici, Margherita; Picozzi, Claudia; La Spina, Marisa Grazia; Orsi, Carla; Vigentini, Ileana; Zambrini, Vittorio; Foschino, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The blue discoloration in Mozzarella cheese comes from bacterial spoilage due to contamination with Pseudomonas. Fourteen Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from international collections and 55 new isolates of dominant bacterial populations from spoiled fresh cheese samples were examined to assess genotypic and phenotypic strain diversity. Isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and tested for the production of the blue pigment at various temperatures on Mascarpone agar and in Mozzarella preserving fluid (the salty water in which the cheese is conserved, which becomes enriched by cheese minerals and peptides during storage). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis after treatment with the endonuclease SpeI separated the isolates into 42 genotypes at a similarity level of 80%. Based on the pulsotype clustering, 12 representative strains producing the blue discoloration were chosen for the multilocus sequence typing targeting the gyrB, glnS, ileS, nuoD, recA, rpoB, and rpoD genes. Four new sequence typing profiles were discovered, and the concatenated sequences of the investigated loci grouped the tested strains into the so-called ''blue branch'' of the P. fluorescens phylogenetic tree, confirming the linkage between pigment production and a specific genomic cluster. Growth temperature affected pigment production; the blue discoloration appeared at 4 and 14°C but not at 30°C. Similarly, the carbon source influenced the phenomenon; the blue phenotype was generated in the presence of glucose but not in the presence of galactose, sodium succinate, sodium citrate, or sodium lactate.

  20. Differential abilities of capsulated and noncapsulated Staphylococcus aureus isolates from diverse agr groups to invade mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Buzzola, Fernanda R; Alvarez, Lucía P; Tuchscherr, Lorena P N; Barbagelata, María S; Lattar, Santiago M; Calvinho, Luis; Sordelli, Daniel O

    2007-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the bacterium most frequently isolated from milk of bovines with mastitis. Four allelic groups, which interfere with the regulatory activities among the different groups, have been identified in the accessory gene regulator (agr) system. The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of the different agr groups in capsulated and noncapsulated S. aureus bacteria isolated from mastitic bovines in Argentina and whether a given agr group was associated with MAC-T cell invasion and in vivo persistence. Eighty-eight percent of the bovine S. aureus strains were classified in agr group I. The remainder belonged in agr groups II, III, and IV (2, 8, and 2%, respectively). By restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis after PCR amplification of the agr locus variable region, six agr restriction types were identified. All agr group I strains presented a unique allele (A/1), whereas strains from groups II, III, and IV exhibited more diversity. Bovine S. aureus strains defined as being in agr group I (capsulated or noncapsulated) showed significantly increased abilities to be internalized within MAC-T cells, compared with isolates from agr groups II, III, and IV. agr group II or IV S. aureus strains were cleared more efficiently than agr group I strains from the murine mammary gland. The results suggest that agr group I S. aureus strains are more efficiently internalized within epithelial cells and can persist in higher numbers in mammary gland tissue than S. aureus strains classified in agr group II, III, or IV.

  1. Multiple Genes Cause Postmating Prezygotic Reproductive Isolation in the Drosophila virilis Group

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of speciation is a central problem in evolutionary biology. Studies of reproductive isolation have provided several insights into the genetic causes of speciation, especially in taxa that lend themselves to detailed genetic scrutiny. Reproductive barriers have usually been divided into those that occur before zygote formation (prezygotic) and after (postzygotic), with the latter receiving a great deal of attention over several decades. Reproductive barriers that occur after mating but before zygote formation [postmating prezygotic (PMPZ)] are especially understudied at the genetic level. Here, I present a phenotypic and genetic analysis of a PMPZ reproductive barrier between two species of the Drosophila virilis group: D. americana and D. virilis. This species pair shows strong PMPZ isolation, especially when D. americana males mate with D. virilis females: ∼99% of eggs laid after these heterospecific copulations are not fertilized. Previous work has shown that the paternal loci contributing to this incompatibility reside on two chromosomes, one of which (chromosome 5) likely carries multiple factors. The other (chromosome 2) is fixed for a paracentric inversion that encompasses nearly half the chromosome. Here, I present two results. First, I show that PMPZ in this species cross is largely due to defective sperm storage in heterospecific copulations. Second, using advanced intercross and backcross mapping approaches, I identify genomic regions that carry genes capable of rescuing heterospecific fertilization. I conclude that paternal incompatibility between D. americana males and D. virilis females is underlain by four or more genes on chromosomes 2 and 5. PMID:27729433

  2. PCR detection of cytK gene in Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from food samples.

    PubMed

    Oltuszak-Walczak, Elzbieta; Walczak, Piotr

    2013-11-01

    A method for detection of the cytotoxin K cytK structural gene and its active promoter preceded by the PlcR-binding box, controlling the expression level of this enterotoxin, was developed. The method was applied for the purpose of the analysis of 47 bacterial strains belonging to the Bacillus cereus group isolated from different food products. It was found that the majority of the analyzed strains carried the fully functional cytK gene with its PlcR regulated promoter. The cytK gene was not detected in four emetic strains of Bacillus cereus carrying the cesB gene and potentially producing an emetic toxin - cereulide. The cytotoxin K gene was detected in 4 isolates classified as Bacillus mycoides and one reference strain B. mycoides PCM 2024. The promoter region and the N-terminal part of the cytK gene from two strains of B. mycoides (5D and 19E) showed similarities to the corresponding sequences of Bacillus cereus W23 and Bacillus thuringiensis HD-789, respectively. It was shown for the first time that the cytK gene promoter region from strains 5D and 19E of Bacillus mycoides had a similar arrangement to the corresponding sequence of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579. The presence of the cytK gene in Bacillus mycoides shows that this species, widely recognized as nonpathogenic, may pose potential biohazard to human beings.

  3. Macrolide and Clindamycin Resistance in Group a Streptococci Isolated From Children With Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    DeMuri, Gregory P; Sterkel, Alana K; Kubica, Phillip A; Duster, Megan N; Reed, Kurt D; Wald, Ellen R

    2017-03-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is responsible for 15%-30% of cases of acute pharyngitis in children. Macrolides such as azithromycin have become popular for treating GAS pharyngitis. We report macrolide resistance rates in a primary care setting in our geographic area over the past 5 years and discuss the implications of resistance in making treatment decisions. Throat swabs were collected from children with pharyngitis from May 2011 to May 2015 in a primary care setting in Madison, Wisconsin. Susceptibility testing was performed for erythromycin and clindamycin using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. GAS was identified on 143 throat cultures. Overall, 15% of GAS isolates demonstrated nonsusceptibility for both clindamycin and erythromycin. Inducible resistance (positive D-test) was detected in 17 isolates (12%). The rate of detection of nonsusceptibility in each year of the study did not change over time. Azithromycin should only be used for patients with pharyngitis and substantial manifestations of penicillin hypersensitivity and when used, susceptibility testing should always be performed.

  4. Identification of "Streptococcus milleri" group isolates to the species level with a commercially available rapid test system.

    PubMed

    Flynn, C E; Ruoff, K L

    1995-10-01

    Clinical isolates of the "Streptococcus milleri" species group were examined by conventional methods and a rapid, commercially available method for the identification of these strains to the species level. The levels of agreement between the identifications obtained with the commercially available system (Fluo-Card Milleri; KEY Scientific, Round Rock, Tex.) and conventional methods were 98% for 50 Streptococcus anginosus strains, 97% for 31 Streptococcus constellatus strains, and 88% for 17 isolates identified as Streptococcus intermedius. Patient records were also studied in order to gain information on the frequency and sites of isolation of each of the three "S. milleri" group species.

  5. Genetic polymorphism of Malassezia furfur isolates from Han and Tibetan ethnic groups in China using DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Ruifeng; Ran, Yuping; Dai, Yaling; Lu, Yao; Wang, Peng

    2010-12-01

    Reported isolation rates of Malassezia yeast from human skin show geographic variations. In China, the populations of the Han (1,182.95 million) and Tibetan (5.41 million) ethnic groups are distributed over 9.6 and 3.27 million square kilometers respectively, making biodiversity research feasible and convenient. Malassezia furfur clinical strains (n = 29) isolated from different individuals, with or without associated dermatoses, of these two ethnic groups (15 Han and 12 Tibetan) were identified and analyzed with DNA fingerprinting using single primers specific to minisatellites. Using the Bionumerics software, we found that almost all M. furfur clinical isolates and type strains formed five distinct group clusters according to their associated skin diseases and the ethnic groups of the patients. These findings are the first to focus on the genetic diversity and relatedness of M. furfur in the Tibetan and Han ethnic groups in China and reveal genetic variation associated with related diseases, host ethnicity and geographic origin.

  6. Toxin Profile, Biofilm Formation, and Molecular Characterization of Emetic Toxin-Producing Bacillus cereus Group Isolates from Human Stools.

    PubMed

    Oh, Su Kyung; Chang, Hyun-Joo; Choi, Sung-Wook; Ok, Gyeongsik; Lee, Nari

    2015-11-01

    Emetic toxin-producing Bacillus cereus group species are an important problem, because the staple food for Korean is grains such as rice. In this study, we determined the prevalence (24 of 129 isolates) of emetic B. cereus in 36,745 stool samples from sporadic food-poisoning cases in Korea between 2007 and 2008. The toxin gene profile, toxin production, and biofilm-forming ability of the emetic B. cereus isolates were investigated. Repetitive element sequence polymorphism polymerase chain reaction fingerprints (rep-PCR) were also used to assess the intraspecific biodiversity of these isolates. Emetic B. cereus was present in 0.07% of the sporadic food-poisoning cases. The 24 emetic isolates identified all carried the nheABC and entFM genes and produced NHE enterotoxin. However, they did not have hemolysin BL toxin or related genes. A relationship between biofilm formation and toxin production was not observed in this study. The rep-PCR fingerprints of the B. cereus isolates were not influenced by the presence of toxin genes, or biofilm-forming ability. The rep-PCR assay discriminated emetic B. cereus isolates from nonemetic isolates, even if this assay did not perfectly discriminate these isolates. Further study on emetic isolates possessing a high degree of diversity may be necessary to evaluate the performance of the subtyping assay to discriminate emetic and nonemetic B. cereus isolates and could provide a more accurate indication of the risk from B. cereus strains.

  7. Isolation, phylogenetic group, drug resistance, biofilm formation, and adherence genes of Escherichia coli from poultry in central China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yi, Li; Wang, Yuxin; Wang, Yuanguo; Cai, Ying; Zhao, Wenpeng; Ding, Chan

    2016-12-01

    The isolation and identification, genetic typing, antibiotic sensitivity, and biofilm formation of avian Escherichia coli in central China was studied. A total of 256 isolates of E. coli were obtained, and classified into groups: A (50.78%, 130/256), B1 (11.72%, 30/256), B2 (17.58%, 45/256), and D (19.92%, 51/256). Drug susceptibility testing revealed that the strains showed a high drug resistance rate against penicillin, aztreonam, rifampicin, kanamycin, clindamycin, and gentamicin, with 92.19% of strains exhibiting multi-drug resistance. A biofilm assay revealed that 81.64% of isolates could form biofilms. Of the total isolates, 25.39% of isolates showed strong biofilm-formation ability, 31.25% showed moderate biofilm-formation ability, 28.90% showed weak biofilm-formation ability, and 18.36% were unable to form biofilms. Most adhesion-associated genes were distributed among 5 or 8 genes in strong biofilm-forming ability isolates. However, adhesion-associated genes distributed among 1 or 4 genes were found in weak biofilm-forming ability isolates and non-ability isolates. The results showed a high drug resistance rate and biofilm formation ability in E.coli strains isolated from poultry. The isolates which have strong biofilm-forming ability were mostly belong to pathogenic E. coli (B2, D). Furthermore, it was the first report to demonstrate a positive correlation between adhesion-encoding genes and biofilms phenotype.

  8. Cloacal aerobic bacterial flora and absence of viruses in free-living slow worms (Anguis fragilis), grass snakes (Natrix natrix) and European Adders (Vipera berus) from Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Volker; Mock, Ronja; Burgkhardt, Eileen; Junghanns, Anja; Ortlieb, Falk; Szabo, Istvan; Marschang, Rachel; Blindow, Irmgard; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    Disease problems caused by viral or bacterial pathogens are common in reptiles kept in captivity. There is no information available on the incidence of viral pathogens or the physiological cloacal bacterial flora of common free-living reptiles in Germany. Therefore, 56 free-living reptiles including 23 European adders (Vipera berus), 12 grass snakes (Natrix natrix) and 21 slow worms (Anguis fragilis) were investigated on the island Hiddensee in northeastern Germany. Pharyngeal and cloacal swabs were taken immediately after capture. Bacteriological examination was performed from the cloacal swabs to study the aerobic cloacal flora. Molecular biological examination included amplification of DNA or RNA from adeno-, rana- and ferlaviruses as well as culturing on Russell's viper heart cells for virus isolation. Salmonella spp. were isolated from European adders but not from the other reptiles examined. The minimal inhibitory concentration was determined from the isolated Salmonella spp. However, some potentially human pathogenic bacteria, such as Proteus vulgaris, Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli were isolated. Viruses were not detected in any of the examined reptiles. To the authors' best knowledge, the present study is the first survey of viral pathogens in free-living snakes and slow worms in Germany and the first survey of cloacal aerobic bacterial flora of slow worms.

  9. Theoretical and Experimental Characterization of the Scope of Protein O-Glycosylation in Bacteroides fragilis*

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, C. Mark; Coyne, Michael J.; Comstock, Laurie E.

    2011-01-01

    Among bacterial species demonstrated to have protein O-glycosylation systems, that of Bacteroides fragilis and related species is unique in that extracytoplasmic proteins are glycosylated at serine or threonine residues within the specific three-amino acid motif D(S/T)(A/I/L/M/T/V). This feature allows for computational analysis of the proteome to identify candidate glycoproteins. With the criteria of a signal peptidase I or II cleavage site or a predicted transmembrane-spanning region and the presence of at least one glycosylation motif, we identified 1021 candidate glycoproteins of B. fragilis. In addition to the eight glycoproteins identified previously, we confirmed that another 12 candidate glycoproteins are in fact glycosylated. These included four glycoproteins that are predicted to localize to the inner membrane, a compartment not previously shown to include glycosylated proteins. In addition, we show that four proteins involved in cell division and chromosomal segregation, two of which are encoded by candidate essential genes, are glycosylated. To date, we have not identified any extracytoplasmic proteins containing a glycosylation motif that are not glycosylated. Therefore, based on the list of 1021 candidate glycoproteins, it is likely that hundreds of proteins, comprising more than half of the extracytoplasmic proteins of B. fragilis, are glycosylated. Site-directed mutagenesis of several glycoproteins demonstrated that all are glycosylated at the identified glycosylation motif. By engineering glycosylation motifs into a naturally unglycosylated protein, we are able to bring about site-specific glycosylation at the engineered sites, suggesting that this glycosylation system may have applications for glycoengineering. PMID:21115495

  10. Modified fields' stain: ideal to differentiate Dientamoeba fragilis and Blastocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Ragavan, Anitamalar Devi; Govind, Suresh Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis, a trichomonad parasite is usually found in the gastrointestinal tract of human, and it is known to be the cause for gastrointestinal disease. The parasite is globally distributed and mostly found in rural and urban areas. The parasite is found in humans and nonhuman primates such as the macaques, baboons, and gorillas. Often, the parasite is confused with another largely found organism in stools called Blastocystis sp. especially when seen directly under light microscopy on culture samples containing both parasites. Both sometimes are seen with two nuclei with sizes tending to be similar which complicates identification. Stools were collected fresh from nine previously diagnosed persons infected with D. fragilis who also were found to be positive for Blastocystis sp. Samples were then cultured in Loeffler's medium and were stained with Giemsa, iron hematoxylin, and modified Fields' (MF) stain, respectively. D. fragilis was differentiated from Blastocystis sp. when stained with MF stain by the presence of a thinner outer membrane with clearly demarcated nuclei in the center of the cell whilst Blastocystis sp. had a darker and thicker stained outer membrane with the presence of two nuclei. The staining contrast was more evident with modified Fields' stain when compared with the other two. The simplicity in preparing the stain as well as the speed of the staining procedure make MF stain an ideal alternate. The modified Fields' stain is faster and easier to prepare when compared to the other two stains. MF stain provides a better contrast differentiating the two organisms and therefore provides a more reliable diagnostic method to precisely identify one from the other especially when cultures show mixed infections.

  11. Freezing tolerance and water relations of Opuntia fragilis from Canada and the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Loik, M.E.; Nobel, P.S. )

    1993-09-01

    To investigate the influence of winter climate on freezing tolerance at the population level, minimum January air temperatures in the field and cold acclimation determined in the laboratory were compared for Opuntia fragilis. Populations occurred at 20 locations as far north as 56[degrees]46' N latitude and at elevations up to 3029 m in Canada and the United States, most of which experience extreme freezing temperatures each winter. Low-temperature responses and water relations of stems were examined in the laboratory at day/night air temperatures of 25[degrees]/15[degrees]C and 14 d after the plants were shifted to a 5[degrees]/[minus]5[degrees]C temperature cycle. Cold acclimation averaged 17[degrees]C and freezing tolerance averaged [minus]29[degrees]C for the 20 populations following a shift to low day/night air temperatures, indicating that O. fragilis has the greatest cold acclimation ability and the greatest freezing tolerance reported for any cactus. Moreover, freezing tolerance and cold acclimation were both positively correlated (r[sup 2] [congruent] 0.7) with the minimum temperatures at the 20 locations. Plants lost water during low-temperature acclimation, leading to 30% decreases in cladode and chlorenchyma thickness; the decrease in water content was greater for the five warmest populations than for the five coldest ones. Over the same period, the average osmotic pressure of the chlorenchyma increased from 1.42 to 1.64 MPa, and the relative water content (RWC) decreased from 0.58 to 0.49, but the average osmotic pressure of saturated chlorenchyma was unchanged, indicating no net change in solute content during acclimation. Although the role of water relations in freezing tolerance is unclear, the substantial freezing tolerance and cold acclimation ability of O. fragilis leads to its distribution into regions of Canada and the United States that experience minimum temperatures below [minus]40[degrees]C during the winter. 47 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Application of Bacteroides fragilis phage as an alternative indicator of sewage pollution in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, M.R.; Rose, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Traditional fecal coliform bacterial indicators have been found to be severely limited in determining the significance and sources of fecal contamination in ambient waters of tropical and subtropical regions. The bacteriophages that infect Bacteroides fragilis have been suggested as better fecal indicators and at least one type may be human specific. In this study, the phages that infect B. fragilis host RYC2056 (RYC), including phage B56-3, and host ATCC 51477-HSP40 (HSP), including the human specific phage B40-8, were evaluated in the drainage basins of Tampa Bay, 7 samples (n = 62), or 11%, tested positive for the presence of phages infecting the host HSP, whereas 28 samples, or 45%, tested positive using the host RYC. A survival study was also done to compare the persistence of phages B56-3 and B40-8 to MS2 coliphage in seawater at various temperatures. The decay rates for MS2 were 0.239 log 10 d-1 at 10??C, but increased to 0.896 at 20??C and 2.62 log10 d-1 at 30??C. The two B. fragilis phages persisted much longer in the seawater compared to the coliphage and showed little variation between the temperatures. All sewage influents sampled from area wastewater treatment plants contained phages that infected the two B. fragilis hosts at levels from 1.2 ?? 104 to 1.11 ?? 10 5 pfu 100 ml-1 for host RYC and 67 to 350 pfu 100 ml -1 for host HSP. Of the 7 chlorinated effluent samples tested, 3 were positive for the presence of the phage using the host RYC and the phage enrichment method, with levels estimated to be <10 pfu 100 ml-1. No phages were detected using the host HSP in the treated sewage effluent. Coliphages were found in 3 of the 7 effluent samples at a range of 30 to 1.2 ?? 103 pfu 100 ml-1. ?? 2006 Estuarine Research Federation.

  13. Exploring dinosaur neuropaleobiology: viewpoint computed tomography scanning and analysis of an Allosaurus fragilis endocast.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S W

    1998-10-01

    The unique opportunity to examine an exceptionally well-preserved natural endocranial cast (endocast) from a carnivorous dinosaur of the late Jurassic period, Allosaurus fragilis, was afforded this neurobiologist. The endocast exhibits numerous surface features including the complete vestibular apparatus. Spiral computed tomography scanning revealed multiple internal features including putative blood vessels, connective tissue-like arrays, and a prominent symmetrical density consistent with the putative brain or its cast. The evidence suggests that this organism's neurobiology resembled closely that of modern crocodylian species and should be included for consideration when examining ideas of Allosaurus evolution, behavior, and eventual extinction.

  14. Adolescents' Information Behavior When Isolated from Peer Groups: Lessons from New Immigrant Adolescents' Everyday Life Information Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koo, Joung Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate how isolated immigrant adolescents seek and use necessary information when they are not able to use significant information sources--their peer groups--in the period of transition before new peer groups are established. Method: To achieve the study's purpose, sixteen recently arrived (three…

  15. Antibiotic Susceptibility Evaluation of Group A Streptococcus Isolated from Children with Pharyngitis: A Study from Iran

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of Group A streptococcus (GAS) to antibiotics usually used in Iran for treatment of GAS pharyngitis in children. Materials and Methods From 2011 to 2013, children 3-15 years of age with acute tonsillopharyngitis who attended Mofid Children's Hospital clinics and emergency ward and did not meet the exclusion criteria were enrolled in a prospective study in a sequential manner. The isolates strains from throat culture were identified as GAS by colony morphology, gram staining, beta hemolysis on blood agar, sensitivity to bacitracin, a positive pyrrolidonyl aminopeptidase (PYR) test result, and the presence of Lancefield A antigen determined by agglutination test. Antimicrobial susceptibility was identified by both disk diffusion and broth dilution methods. Results From 200 children enrolled in this study, 59 (30%) cases were culture positive for GAS. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin G. The prevalence of erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin resistance by broth dilution method was 33.9%, 57.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. Surprisingly, 8.4% of GAS strains were resistant to rifampin. In this study, 13.5% and 32.2% of the strains were resistant to clindamycin and ofloxacin, respectively. Conclusion The high rate of resistance of GAS to some antibiotics in this study should warn physicians, especially in Iran, to use antibiotics restrictedly and logically to prevent the rising of resistance rates in future. It also seems that continuous local surveillance is necessary to achieve the best therapeutic option for GAS treatment. PMID:26788405

  16. Domesticated horses differ in their behavioural and physiological responses to isolated and group housing.

    PubMed

    Yarnell, Kelly; Hall, Carol; Royle, Chris; Walker, Susan L

    2015-05-01

    The predominant housing system used for domestic horses is individual stabling; however, housing that limits social interaction and requires the horse to live in semi-isolation has been reported to be a concern for equine welfare. The aim of the current study was to compare behavioural and physiological responses of domestic horses in different types of housing design that provided varying levels of social contact. Horses (n = 16) were divided equally into four groups and exposed to each of four housing treatments for a period of five days per treatment in a randomized block design. The four housing treatments used were single housed no physical contact (SHNC), single housed semi-contact (SHSC), paired housed full contact (PHFC) and group housed full contact (GHFC). During each housing treatment, adrenal activity was recorded using non-invasive faecal corticosterone metabolite analysis (fGC). Thermal images of the eye were captured and eye temperature was assessed as a non-invasive measure of the stress response. Behavioural analysis of time budget was carried out and an ease of handling score was assigned to each horse in each treatment using video footage. SHNC horses had significantly higher (p = 0.01) concentrations of fGC and were significantly (p = 0.003) more difficult to handle compared to the other housing types. GHFC horses, although not significantly different, had numerically lower concentrations of fGC and were more compliant to handling when compared to all other housing treatments. Eye temperature was significantly (p = 0.0001) lower in the group housed treatment when compared to all other treatments. These results indicate that based on physiological and behavioural measures incorporating social contact into the housing design of domestic horses could improve the standard of domestic equine welfare.

  17. Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. (formerly DNA group 15 sensu Tjernberg & Ursing), isolated from humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Krizova, Lenka; McGinnis, Jana; Maixnerova, Martina; Nemec, Matej; Poirel, Laurent; Mingle, Lisa; Sedo, Ondrej; Wolfgang, William; Nemec, Alexandr

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to define the taxonomic status of 16 strains which were phenetically congruent with Acinetobacter DNA group 15 described by Tjernberg & Ursing in 1989. The strains were isolated from a variety of human and animal specimens in geographically distant places over the last three decades. Taxonomic analysis was based on an Acinetobacter-targeted, genus-wide approach that included the comparative sequence analysis of housekeeping, protein-coding genes, whole-cell profiling based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), an array of in-house physiological and metabolic tests, and whole-genome comparative analysis. Based on analyses of the rpoB and gyrB genes, the 16 strains formed respective, strongly supported clusters clearly separated from the other species of the genus Acinetobacter. The distinctness of the group at the species level was indicated by average nucleotide identity values of ≤82 % between the whole genome sequences of two of the 16 strains (NIPH 2171(T) and NIPH 899) and those of the known species. In addition, the coherence of the group was also supported by MALDI-TOF MS. All 16 strains were non-haemolytic and non-gelatinase-producing, grown at 41 °C and utilized a rather limited number of carbon sources. Virtually every strain displayed a unique combination of metabolic and physiological features. We conclude that the 16 strains represent a distinct species of the genus Acinetobacter, for which the name Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. is proposed to reflect its marked phenotypic heterogeneity. The type strain is NIPH 2171(T) ( = CIP 110486(T) = CCUG 26390(T) = CCM 8555(T)).

  18. Determination of members of a Borrelia afzelii-related group isolated from Ixodes nipponensis in Korea as Borrelia valaisiana.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, T; Fukui, T; Miyake, M; Oh, H B; Cho, M K; Chang, W H; Imai, Y; Yanagihara, Y

    1999-10-01

    The 16S rRNA sequences of the Korean Borrelia strains 5MT and 9MT, isolated from Ixodes nipponensis, showed identities of 99.0-99.1% to that of B. afzelii. The strains were tentatively classified as belonging to the B. afzelii-related group. In this study, Korean isolates, including these strains, were characterized further and compared with recently described new species. These strains generated a RFLP pattern that has not been found previously in RFLP analysis of the 5S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer and the flagellin gene. When phylogenetic trees were constructed, based on the 5S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer, flagellin gene and 16S rRNA sequences, these Korean isolates formed a cluster with the Borrelia strain Am501 isolated from Ixodes columnae in Japan and Borrelia valaisiana strains VS116T and UK isolated from Ixodes ricinus in Europe and were distinguishable from the other species. However, these three groups of strains were divergent from each other in the molecular masses of the putative outer surface protein A (OspA) and in the sequences of the ospA gene. These findings suggest that these Korean isolates and one Japanese isolate are members of B. valaisiana and that OspA of this species is divergent, as is that of Borrelia garinii. This led to the speculation that B. valaisiana strains are adapted to the vector ticks found in each locality.

  19. Laboratory and field evaluation of selective media for isolation of group B streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, B M; Pass, M A; Dillon, H C

    1979-01-01

    Problems encountered with currently recommended selective media for group B streptococci (GBS) (selective broth medium and CNA agar) prompted a searach for alternative culture methods in ongoing epidemiological studies. Previously recommended inhibitory agents were tested in vitro. Gentamicin, alone or in combination with nalidixic acid, proved inhibitory for many GBS strains. Among other agents tested, polymyxin was most complementary to the gram-negative spectrum of nalidixic acid, without compromising GBS growth. Crystal violet provided the simplest, most economical staphylococcal inhibitor. Broth and agar media, constituted with these three agents and designated NPC, were evaluated in vitro and in field studies. This investigation represents the first direct comparison of broth media containing inhibitory agents for the preferential isolation of GBS. In maternal colonization studies, NPC broth proved superior to Todd-Hewitt broth containing nalidixic acid and gentamicin at concentrations employed in the previously described selective broth medium (95% versus 59% recovery). Our comparisons were done without added sheep blood since GBS grow well in Todd-Hewitt broth. NPC broth proved more sensitive than NPC agar for detecting GBS colonization in newborns. The NPC agar medium was useful for further purification of broth cultures and quantitative culture techniques. PMID:379037

  20. Polyamine catabolism contributes to enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis-induced colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Andrew C; Destefano Shields, Christina E; Wu, Shaoguang; Huso, David L; Wu, XinQun; Murray-Stewart, Tracy R; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Rabizadeh, Shervin; Woster, Patrick M; Sears, Cynthia L; Casero, Robert A

    2011-09-13

    It is estimated that the etiology of 20-30% of epithelial cancers is directly associated with inflammation, although the direct molecular events linking inflammation and carcinogenesis are poorly defined. In the context of gastrointestinal disease, the bacterium enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) is a significant source of chronic inflammation and has been implicated as a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Spermine oxidase (SMO) is a polyamine catabolic enzyme that is highly inducible by inflammatory stimuli resulting in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage. We now demonstrate that purified B. fragilis toxin (BFT) up-regulates SMO in HT29/c1 and T84 colonic epithelial cells, resulting in SMO-dependent generation of ROS and induction of γ-H2A.x, a marker of DNA damage. Further, ETBF-induced colitis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with increased SMO expression and treatment of mice with an inhibitor of polyamine catabolism, N(1),N(4)-bis(2,3-butandienyl)-1,4-butanediamine (MDL 72527), significantly reduces ETBF-induced chronic inflammation and proliferation. Most importantly, in the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model, treatment with MDL 72527 reduces ETBF-induced colon tumorigenesis by 69% (P < 0.001). The results of these studies indicate that SMO is a source of bacteria-induced ROS directly associated with tumorigenesis and could serve as a unique target for chemoprevention.

  1. Polyamine catabolism contributes to enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis-induced colon tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Andrew C.; Shields, Christina E. Destefano; Wu, Shaoguang; Huso, David L.; Wu, XinQun; Murray-Stewart, Tracy R.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Rabizadeh, Shervin; Woster, Patrick M.; Sears, Cynthia L.; Casero, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated that the etiology of 20–30% of epithelial cancers is directly associated with inflammation, although the direct molecular events linking inflammation and carcinogenesis are poorly defined. In the context of gastrointestinal disease, the bacterium enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) is a significant source of chronic inflammation and has been implicated as a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Spermine oxidase (SMO) is a polyamine catabolic enzyme that is highly inducible by inflammatory stimuli resulting in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage. We now demonstrate that purified B. fragilis toxin (BFT) up-regulates SMO in HT29/c1 and T84 colonic epithelial cells, resulting in SMO-dependent generation of ROS and induction of γ-H2A.x, a marker of DNA damage. Further, ETBF-induced colitis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with increased SMO expression and treatment of mice with an inhibitor of polyamine catabolism, N1,N4-bis(2,3-butandienyl)-1,4-butanediamine (MDL 72527), significantly reduces ETBF-induced chronic inflammation and proliferation. Most importantly, in the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model, treatment with MDL 72527 reduces ETBF-induced colon tumorigenesis by 69% (P < 0.001). The results of these studies indicate that SMO is a source of bacteria-induced ROS directly associated with tumorigenesis and could serve as a unique target for chemoprevention. PMID:21876161

  2. Oxygen-independent killing of Bacteroides fragilis by granule extracts from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wetherall, B L; Pruul, H; McDonald, P J

    1984-01-01

    Granule proteins from human neutrophils were prepared by extraction with acetate, and their antibacterial activity against Bacteroides fragilis was determined. Activity was highly dependent on pH; greatest killing occurred at the most acid pH tested (pH 5.0). Optimum activity was observed at physiological ionic strength and low bacterial numbers. Killing was inhibited by incubation temperatures of less than 37 degrees C. Eight times more extract was required to kill 50% of stationary-phase bacteria, compared with those growing in logarithmic phase. The antibacterial effect of granule extract was destroyed by boiling, but some activity was retained after heating to 56 degrees C and 80 degrees C. Granule extract activity was tested under conditions in which oxygen-dependent antibacterial systems were inhibited. The rate and extent of killing was not affected by anaerobiosis, sodium azide, or cysteine hydrochloride. These results suggest that the activity of granule extract is independent of oxidative antibacterial systems, and therefore, under conditions that occur in anaerobic infections, potent leukocyte granule-associated mechanisms exist for the destruction of B. fragilis. PMID:6698601

  3. Colonization with enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis is associated with early-stage colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, John; Aitchison, Alan; Dixon, Liane; Frizelle, Frank A.; Keenan, Jacqueline I.

    2017-01-01

    Background Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) is a toxin-producing bacteria thought to possibly promote colorectal carcinogenesis by modulating the mucosal immune response and inducing epithelial cell changes. Here, we aim to examine the association of colonic mucosal colonization with ETBF and the presence of a range of lesions on the colonic neoplastic spectrum. Methods Mucosal tissue from up to four different colonic sites was obtained from a consecutive series of 150 patients referred for colonoscopy. The presence and relative abundance of the B. fragilis toxin gene (bft) in each tissue sample was determined using quantitative PCR, and associations with clinicopathological characteristics were analysed. Findings We found a high concordance of ETBF between different colonic sites (86%). Univariate analysis showed statistically significant associations between ETBF positivity and the presence of low-grade dysplasia (LGD), tubular adenomas (TA), and serrated polyps (P-values of 0.007, 0.027, and 0.007, respectively). A higher relative abundance of ETBF was significantly associated with LGD and TA (P-values of < 0.0001 and 0.025, respectively). Increased ETBF positivity and abundance was also associated with left-sided biopsies, compared to those from the right side of the colon. Conclusion Our results showing association of ETBF positivity and increased abundance with early-stage carcinogenic lesions underlines its importance in the development of colorectal cancer, and we suggest that detection of ETBF may be a potential marker of early colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:28151975

  4. Comparison of standard, quantitative and digital PCR in the detection of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Rachel V; Pearson, John; Frizelle, Frank A; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2016-09-30

    Gut colonization with enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) appears to be associated with the development of colorectal cancer. However, differences in carriage rates are seen with various testing methods and sampling sites. We compared standard PCR, SYBR green and TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) and digital PCR (dPCR) in detecting the B. fragilis toxin (bft) gene from cultured ETBF, and from matched luminal and faecal stool samples from 19 colorectal cancer patients. Bland-Altman analysis found that all three quantitative methods performed comparably in detecting bft from purified bacterial DNA, with the same limits of detection (<1 copy/μl). However, SYBR qPCR under-performed compared to TaqMan qPCR and dPCR in detecting bft in clinical stool samples; 13/38 samples were reported positive by SYBR, compared to 35 and 36 samples by TaqMan and dPCR, respectively. TaqMan qPCR and dPCR gave bft copy numbers that were 48-fold and 75-fold higher for the same samples than SYBR qPCR, respectively (p < 0.001). For samples that were bft-positive in both fecal and luminal stools, there was no difference in relative abundance between the sites, by any method tested. From our findings, we recommend the use of TaqMan qPCR as the preferred method to detect ETBF from clinical stool samples.

  5. Effect of distance from the polluting focus on relative concentrations of Bacteroides fragilis phages and coliphages in mussels.

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, F; Lasobras, J; McIntosh, D; Forcadell, M; Jofre, J

    1994-01-01

    Concentrations of fecal bacteria, somatic and F-specific coliphages, and phages infecting Bacteroides fragilis in naturally occurring black mussels (Mytilus edulis) were determined. Mussels were collected over a 7-month period at four sampling sites with different levels of fecal pollution. Concentrations of both fecal bacteria and bacteriophages in mussel meat paralleled the concentration of fecal bacteria in the overlying waters. Mussels bioaccumulated efficiently, although with different efficiencies, all of the microorganisms studied. Ratios comparing the levels of microorganisms in mussels were determined. These ratios changed in mussels collected at the different sites. They suggest that bacteriophages infecting B. fragilis and somatic coliphages have the lowest decay rates among the microorganisms studied, with the exception of Clostridium perfringens. On the contrary, concentrations of F-specific coliphages showed a greater rate of decay than the other bacteriophages at sites more distant from the focus of contamination. Additionally, levels of enteroviruses were studied in a number of samples, and in these samples, the B. fragilis bacteriophages clearly outnumbered the enteroviruses. The results of this study indicate that, under the environmental conditions studied, the fate of phages infecting B. fragilis released into the marine environment resembles that of human viruses more than any other microorganism examined. Images PMID:8074509

  6. Evaluation of Bacteroides fragilis GB-124 bacteriophages as novel human-associated faecal indicators in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phages infecting human-associated Bacteroides fragilis (GB-124 phages) have been employed in the European Union (EU) to identify human fecal pollution, but their utility for U.S. was unclear. Primary sewage effluent samples were collected seasonally from seven wastewater treatme...

  7. A perforated gastrovascular cavity in the symbiotic deep-water coral Leptoseris fragilis: A new strategy to optimize heterotrophic nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichter, Dietrich

    1991-12-01

    The organization of the zooxanthellate scleractinian coral Leptoseris fragilis was studied. The architecture of the corallite and the histology of the polyparium were analysed for adaptations that enable efficient capture and retention of suspended particles which would increase energy supply. The data indicate that the gastrovascular system of L. fragilis is not a blind but a flowthrough system. Water entering the coelenteron through the mouth leaves the body not only through the mouth but also through microscopic pores (≂ 1 2 μm) which are located near the crests of the sclerosepta in the oral epithelia. Irrigation is achieved by flagellar and probably also by muscular activity. This type of filtration enables L. fragilis, which lacks tentacles, to utilize suspended organic material including bacteria. The supposed suspension feeding in combination with effective photoadaptations (presented in former communications) seems to be the basis for the survival of L. fragilis in an extreme habitat (between-95 and-145 m) and for its, successful competion with other scleractinian species provided with larger catching surfaces, and with other invertebrates depending on filter feeding.

  8. Nasal Histopathology and Intracage Ammonia Levels in Female Groups and Breeding Mice Housed in Static Isolation Cages.

    PubMed

    Mexas, Angela M; Brice, Angela K; Caro, Adam C; Hillanbrand, Troy S; Gaertner, Diane J

    2015-09-01

    Many factors influence ammonia levels in rodent cages, and high intracage ammonia has been associated with specific types of abnormal nasal pathology in mice. The use of autoclaved corncob bedding and the maintenance of low room humidity reduce the accumulation of ammonia in mouse cages. However, there are no engineering standards that define the limits of ammonia exposure for mice housed in static isolation cages. Regulatory guidance indicates that solid bottom cages must be sanitized at least weekly and that cage components in direct contact with animals must be sanitized at least every 2 wk. Common practice is to replace the bottoms and bedding of static isolation cages once weekly. To determine whether changing static isolation cages once weekly is an appropriate performance standard for mice, we prospectively evaluated the relationship between ammonia levels, nasal histopathology, and housing densities in various grouping strategies of mice housed in static isolation cages. Here, we report that the average nasal pathology score per cage and intracage ammonia levels were correlated, but nasal pathology scores did not differ among mice housed in breeding pairs, breeding trios, or female groups. In light of ammonia levels and histopathology scores as performance standards, these results suggest that a weekly cage-change frequency for static isolation cages does not result in adverse effects. Our results provide evidence to support current practices in the use of static isolation cages for housing laboratory mice in modern vivaria.

  9. Nasal Histopathology and Intracage Ammonia Levels in Female Groups and Breeding Mice Housed in Static Isolation Cages

    PubMed Central

    Mexas, Angela M; Brice, Angela K; Caro, Adam C; Hillanbrand, Troy S

    2015-01-01

    Many factors influence ammonia levels in rodent cages, and high intracage ammonia has been associated with specific types of abnormal nasal pathology in mice. The use of autoclaved corncob bedding and the maintenance of low room humidity reduce the accumulation of ammonia in mouse cages. However, there are no engineering standards that define the limits of ammonia exposure for mice housed in static isolation cages. Regulatory guidance indicates that solid bottom cages must be sanitized at least weekly and that cage components in direct contact with animals must be sanitized at least every 2 wk. Common practice is to replace the bottoms and bedding of static isolation cages once weekly. To determine whether changing static isolation cages once weekly is an appropriate performance standard for mice, we prospectively evaluated the relationship between ammonia levels, nasal histopathology, and housing densities in various grouping strategies of mice housed in static isolation cages. Here, we report that the average nasal pathology score per cage and intracage ammonia levels were correlated, but nasal pathology scores did not differ among mice housed in breeding pairs, breeding trios, or female groups. In light of ammonia levels and histopathology scores as performance standards, these results suggest that a weekly cage-change frequency for static isolation cages does not result in adverse effects. Our results provide evidence to support current practices in the use of static isolation cages for housing laboratory mice in modern vivaria. PMID:26424245

  10. Virulence of human and bovine isolates of group B streptococci (types Ia and III) in experimental pregnant mouse models.

    PubMed Central

    Poutrel, B; Dore, J

    1985-01-01

    Two experimental mouse models were tested for their suitability in measuring virulence of two human and two bovine isolates (types Ia and III) of group B streptococci. In the first model, the kinetics of the number of bacteria in the spleen, liver, and placenta of mice inoculated intravenously on day 16 of pregnancy were monitored for 48 h after infection. In the second model, lethality and abortion were recorded for mice inoculated on day 13 of pregnancy. Levels of colonization in spleens or livers and lethality were significantly greater (P less than 0.001) for human isolates than for bovine isolates. In contrast, no statistically significant differences in the ability to colonize placentas and to induce abortions were noted between human and bovine isolates. The results showed that pregnant mice were more sensitive than nonpregnant mice to a challenge with group B streptococci. The results also suggest that placental colonization and abortion could be a suitable mouse model in evaluating the virulence of human and bovine isolates of group B streptococci. PMID:3880731

  11. Incidence, diversity and toxin gene characteristics of Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from food products marketed in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Samapundo, S; Heyndrickx, M; Xhaferi, R; Devlieghere, F

    2011-10-17

    The major objectives of this study were to determine the incidence, diversity and characteristics of Bacillus cereus group spp. isolated from food products marketed in Belgium. The food products investigated in this study included cooked pasta, lasagna, béchamel sauce, bolognaise sauce, fresh minced beef, fresh-cut vegetables and raw basmati rice. B. cereus group spp. were detected in 56.3% (324 of 575) of the samples giving rise to 380 strains. The highest incidence (100%) occurred in the raw basmati rice. Although only 10 (2.6%) of the 380 isolates were determined to be psychrotolerant (able to grow at ≤7°C), 25 (6.2%), 189 (49.7%) and 334 (87.9%) isolates were able to grow at mild temperature abuse conditions of 8°C, 9°C and 10°C, respectively. The large diversity of the isolates obtained (overall and between isolates obtained from the same product type) was highlighted by the results of the (GTG)(5) PCR fingerprinting of 80 selected isolates. Sixty-one of these 80 isolates belonged to 15 distinct clusters (≥85% Pearson correlation) whereas the remaining 19 were each clustered separately. Further diversity was also found in the distribution of toxin genes as 16 different profiles were observed in the 80 selected isolates. Whilst none of 80 selected strains harboured the ces gene required for the production of the emetic toxin cereulide, 42 strains (52.5%) carried all seven genes required for the production of the diarrhoeal enterotoxins: haemolytic BL, non-haemolytic enterotoxin and cytotoxin K. The results of this study highlight not only the omnipresence but also the highly diverse ecology of B. cereus spp. within and across several food product types available on the retail market in Belgium. They should also provide the impetus for more studies to enable detailed risk assessment studies to be performed.

  12. Summary of presentation for research on social structure, agreement, and conflict in groups in extreme and isolated environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Despite a vast amount of research, little is known concerning the effect of group structure, and individuals' understanding of that structure, on conflict in Antarctic groups. The overall objective of the research discussed is to determine the interrelationships of group structure, social cognition, and group function and conflict in isolated and extreme environments. In the two decades following WWII, a large body of research focused on the physiological, psychological, and social psychological factors affecting the functioning of individuals and groups in a variety of extreme and isolated environments in both the Arctic and Antarctic. There are two primary reasons for further research of this type. First, Antarctic polar stations are considered to be natural laboratories for the social and behavioral sciences and provide an opportunity to address certain theoretical and empirical questions concerned with agreement and conflict in social groups in general and group behavior in extreme, isolated environments in particular. Recent advances in the analysis of social networks and intracultural variation have improved the methods and have shifted the theoretical questions. The research is motivated by three classes of questions: (1) What are the characteristics of the social relations among individuals working and living together in extreme and isolated environments?; (2) What do individuals understand about their group, how does that understanding develop, and how is it socially distributed?; and (3) What is the relationship between that understanding and the functioning of the social group? Answers to these questions are important if we are to advance our knowledge of how individuals and groups adapt to extreme environments. Second, although Antarctic winter-over candidates may be evaluated as qualified on the basis of individual characteristics, they may fail to adapt because of certain characteristics of the social group. Consequently, the ability of winter-over-groups

  13. The gut bacterial communities associated with lab-raised and field-collected ants of Camponotus fragilis (Formicidae: Formicinae).

    PubMed

    He, Hong; Wei, Cong; Wheeler, Diana E

    2014-09-01

    Camponotus is the second largest ant genus and known to harbor the primary endosymbiotic bacteria of the genus Blochmannia. However, little is known about the effect of diet and environment changes on the gut bacterial communities of these ants. We investigated the intestinal bacterial communities in the lab-raised and field-collected ants of Camponotus fragilis which is found in the southwestern United States and northern reaches of Mexico. We determined the difference of gut bacterial composition and distribution among the crop, midgut, and hindgut of the two types of colonies. Number of bacterial species varied with the methods of detection and the source of the ants. Lab-raised ants yielded 12 and 11 species using classical microbial culture methods and small-subunit rRNA genes (16S rRNAs) polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis, respectively. Field-collected ants yielded just 4 and 1-3 species using the same methods. Most gut bacterial species from the lab-raised ants were unevenly distributed among the crop, midgut, and hindgut, and each section had its own dominant bacterial species. Acetobacter was the prominent bacteria group in crop, accounting for about 55 % of the crop clone library. Blochmannia was the dominant species in midgut, nearly reaching 90 % of the midgut clone library. Pseudomonas aeruginosa dominated the hindgut, accounting for over 98 % of the hindgut clone library. P. aeruginosa was the only species common to all three sections. A comparison between lab-raised and field-collected ants, and comparison with other species, shows that gut bacterial communities vary with local environment and diet. The bacterial species identified here were most likely commensals with little effect on their hosts or mild pathogens deleterious to colony health.

  14. Molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance of group G streptococci in Israel: comparison of invasive, non-invasive and carriage isolates.

    PubMed

    Halperin, T; Levine, H; Korenman, Z; Burstein, S; Amber, R; Sela, T; Valinsky, L

    2016-10-01

    Beta-hemolytic group G streptococci (GGS) are increasingly recognized as a source of substantial morbidity, causing mild to severe sporadic infections as well as outbreaks. The purpose of this study was to determine the genetic diversity and antibiotic resistance of GGS in Israel in order to aid in prevention and control. A total of 325 GGS isolates were collected in Israel between 2007 and 2011 from three determined settings: (1) carriage (n = 60), an observational longitudinal carriage study in the IF, (2) non-invasive (n = 166), clinical sporadic and epidemic non-invasive cases in the IDF, and (3) invasive (n = 99) cases of bacteremia collected during this period in Israel from a similar age group, at the national Streptococcal Reference Center. All isolates were characterized genetically and by their antibiotic-resistance profile. emm typing revealed 35 distinct types and subtypes among 228 S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) isolates, with high genetic diversity. An additional 97 GGS were identified as Streptococcus anginosus (SAG). The proportion of SDSE was higher in the invasive (100 %) and non-invasive (63.8 %) isolates compared to the carriage ones (38.3 %). Clindamycin, erythromycin, azithromycin and tetracycline resistance was detected in 6.6 %, 8.6 %, 9.7 % and 37.6 % of isolates, respectively. Overall, the most resistant isolates were in the invasive group and the fewest were in the SAG group. Considerable genetic diversity and common antibiotic resistance were revealed among GGS strains which differed according to the epidemiologic settings. Further clinical, epidemiological and basic research of GGS as a pathogen is warranted.

  15. An Atypical Clostridium Strain Related to the Clostridium botulinum Group III Strain Isolated from a Human Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ruimy, Raymond; Bouchier, Christiane; Faucher, Nathalie; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes. PMID:24088855

  16. Species identification of Streptococcus bovis group isolates causing bacteremia: a comparison of two MALDI-TOF MS systems.

    PubMed

    Agergaard, Charlotte N; Knudsen, Elisa; Dargis, Rimtas; Nielsen, Xiaohui C; Christensen, Jens J; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2017-02-20

    This study compared two MALDI-TOF MS systems (Biotyper and VITEK MS) on clinical Streptococcus bovis group isolates (n=66). The VITEK MS gave fewer misidentifications and a higher rate of correct identifications than the Biotyper. Only the identification of S. lutetiensis by the VITEK MS was reliable. Additional optimization of the available system databases is needed.

  17. An atypical Clostridium strain related to the Clostridium botulinum group III strain isolated from a human blood culture.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Philippe; Ruimy, Raymond; Bouchier, Christiane; Faucher, Nathalie; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes.

  18. Variability of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group O strains isolated from Cameroonian patients living in France.

    PubMed Central

    Loussert-Ajaka, I; Chaix, M L; Korber, B; Letourneur, F; Gomas, E; Allen, E; Ly, T D; Brun-Vézinet, F; Simon, F; Saragosti, S

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleotide sequences encoding p24Gag and the Env C2V3 region were obtained from seven patients who were selected on the basis of having paradoxical seronegativity on a subset of HIV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection kits and having atypical Western blot (immunoblot) reactivity. Sequence analyses showed that all of these strains were more closely related to the recently described Cameroonian HIV isolates of group O (HIV-1 outlier) than to group M (HIV-1 major). All seven patients had Cameroonian origins but were living in France at the time the blood samples were taken. Characterization of a large number of group M strains has to date revealed eight distinct genetic subtypes (A to H). Genetic distances between sequences from available group O isolates were generally comparable to those observed in M intersubtype sequence comparisons, showing that the group O viruses are genetically very diverse. Analysis of sequences from these seven new viral strains, combined with the three previously characterized group O strains, revealed few discernable phylogenetic clustering patterns among the 10 patients' viral sequences. The level of diversity among group O sequences suggests that they may have a comparable (or greater) age than the M group sequences, although for unknown reasons, the latter group dispersed first and is the dominant lineage in the pandemic. PMID:7637010

  19. Variability of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group O strains isolated from Cameroonian patients living in France.

    PubMed

    Loussert-Ajaka, I; Chaix, M L; Korber, B; Letourneur, F; Gomas, E; Allen, E; Ly, T D; Brun-Vézinet, F; Simon, F; Saragosti, S

    1995-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleotide sequences encoding p24Gag and the Env C2V3 region were obtained from seven patients who were selected on the basis of having paradoxical seronegativity on a subset of HIV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection kits and having atypical Western blot (immunoblot) reactivity. Sequence analyses showed that all of these strains were more closely related to the recently described Cameroonian HIV isolates of group O (HIV-1 outlier) than to group M (HIV-1 major). All seven patients had Cameroonian origins but were living in France at the time the blood samples were taken. Characterization of a large number of group M strains has to date revealed eight distinct genetic subtypes (A to H). Genetic distances between sequences from available group O isolates were generally comparable to those observed in M intersubtype sequence comparisons, showing that the group O viruses are genetically very diverse. Analysis of sequences from these seven new viral strains, combined with the three previously characterized group O strains, revealed few discernable phylogenetic clustering patterns among the 10 patients' viral sequences. The level of diversity among group O sequences suggests that they may have a comparable (or greater) age than the M group sequences, although for unknown reasons, the latter group dispersed first and is the dominant lineage in the pandemic.

  20. Briarane Diterpenoids Isolated from Octocorals between 2014 and 2016

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yin-Di; Su, Jui-Hsin; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Wu, Yang-Chang; Sung, Ping-Jyun

    2017-01-01

    The structures, names, bioactivities, and references of 124 briarane-type natural products, including 66 new metabolites, isolated between 2014 and 2016 are summarized in this review article. All of the briarane diterpenoids mentioned in this review were isolated from octocorals, mainly from Briareum violacea, Dichotella gemmacea, Ellisella dollfusi, Junceella fragilis, Junceella gemmacea, and Pennatula aculeata. Some of these compounds exhibited potential biomedical activities, including anti-inflammatory activity, antibacterial activity, and cytotoxicity towards cancer cells. PMID:28218675

  1. Antimicrobial resistance and epidemiological study of Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated in Portugal. The Multicentre Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bajanca-Lavado, M P; Casin, I; Vaz Pato, M V

    1996-10-01

    In the course of a multicentric surveillance study, nine laboratories sent 375 isolates of Haemophilus influenzae to the Sector de Resistência aos Antibióticos (SRA) from the National Institute of Health in Lisbon, between 1 January and 31 December 1992. The majority of the H. influenzae isolates were from the respiratory tract (84.8%); only 5.1% were of invasive origin. Overall resistance for ampicillin was 11.7%, tetracycline 3.7%, and chloramphenicol 2.4%. All isolates tested were fully susceptible to cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and rifampicin. Multiresistance was rare, occurring only in 2.4% of the isolates, although 50% of the ampicillin resistant strains had at least one additional resistance marker. Forty two isolates (11.2%) produced a TEM-1 type beta-lactamase, as shown by isoelectric focusing. beta-lactamase production was not detected in two of the ampicillin resistant strains. Fifteen of the 42 beta-lactamase producing strains (35.7%) contained detectable DNA plasmid: nine harboured large plasmids with an apparent molecular mass of 45 or 54 kb depending on their resistance phenotype and six harboured a small plasmid of 5 kb. In order to study transfer of resistance in both ampicillin and multiresistant strains conjugation experiments were performed for 14 isolates, seven of which harboured a large plasmid and seven had no detectable plasmid DNA. All 14 transferred their resistance phenotype but only a single large plasmid could be demonstrated in ten transconjugants. Restriction endonuclease analysis of plasmids from six representative transconjugants, isolated in different hospitals, revealed that there was no dissemination of a single R plasmid, which suggests an independent process of acquisition of resistance genes.

  2. Nest-Gallery Development and Caste Composition of Isolated Foraging Groups of the Drywood Termite, Incisitermes minor (Isoptera: Kalotermitidae)

    PubMed Central

    Himmi, S. Khoirul; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi; Yanase, Yoshiyuki; Oya, Masao; Torigoe, Toshiyuki; Akada, Masanori; Imadzu, Setsuo

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray computed-tomographic examination of nest-gallery development from timbers naturally infested by foraging groups of Incisitermes minor colonies was conducted. This study documents the colonization process of I. minor to new timbers and how the isolated groups maintain their nest-gallery system. The results suggested that development of a nest-gallery within a suitable wood item is not random, but shows selection for softer substrate and other adaptations to the different timber environments. Stigmergic coordinations were expressed in dynamic changes of the nest-gallery system; indicated by fortification behavior in sealing and re-opening a tunnel approaching the outer edge of the timber, and accumulating fecal pellets in particular chambers located beneath the timber surface. The study also examines the caste composition of isolated groups to discover how I. minor sustains colonies with and without primary reproductives. PMID:27455332

  3. Nest-Gallery Development and Caste Composition of Isolated Foraging Groups of the Drywood Termite, Incisitermes minor (Isoptera: Kalotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Himmi, S Khoirul; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi; Yanase, Yoshiyuki; Oya, Masao; Torigoe, Toshiyuki; Akada, Masanori; Imadzu, Setsuo

    2016-07-22

    An X-ray computed-tomographic examination of nest-gallery development from timbers naturally infested by foraging groups of Incisitermes minor colonies was conducted. This study documents the colonization process of I. minor to new timbers and how the isolated groups maintain their nest-gallery system. The results suggested that development of a nest-gallery within a suitable wood item is not random, but shows selection for softer substrate and other adaptations to the different timber environments. Stigmergic coordinations were expressed in dynamic changes of the nest-gallery system; indicated by fortification behavior in sealing and re-opening a tunnel approaching the outer edge of the timber, and accumulating fecal pellets in particular chambers located beneath the timber surface. The study also examines the caste composition of isolated groups to discover how I. minor sustains colonies with and without primary reproductives.

  4. Utilization of haem from the haptoglobin-haemoglobin complex by Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Otto, B R; Sparrius, M; Wors, D J; de Graaf, F K; MacLaren, D M

    1994-09-01

    Possession of specialized iron acquisition systems is a prerequisite for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in their host. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Bacteroides fragilis, a clinically important Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, possesses a specific haem-uptake system. Growth studies indicated that this microorganism can utilize haem from either haemoglobin or haptoglobin-haemoglobin as its sole source of iron. Iron-repressible haem-binding protein complexes (HBP complexes), involved in the uptake of haem from haptoglobin-haemoglobin were detected by means of lithium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (LDS-PAGE). Four polypeptides of approximately 60, 58, 49 and 35 kDa, which are part of these HBP complexes, were identified as haem-binding proteins. A 44 kDa iron-repressible outer-membrane protein is needed for a functional HBP complex, but the exact role of this protein in the uptake of haem is still unknown.

  5. The role of Bacteroides fragilis RecQ DNA helicases in cell survival after metronidazole exposure.

    PubMed

    Paul, Lynthia; Patrick, Sheila; Nord, Carl Erik; Abratt, Valerie

    2011-06-01

    The inactivation of Bacteroides fragilis genes encoding putative RecQ helicases recQ1, recQ2 and recQ3 (ORFs BF638R_3282, BF638R_3781, BF638R_3932) was used to determine whether these proteins are involved in cell survival following metronidazole exposure. The effects of the mutations on growth, cellular morphology and DNA integrity were also evaluated. Mutations in the RecQ DNA helicases caused increased sensitivity to metronidazole, with recQ1, recQ2 and recQ3 mutants being 1.32-fold, 41.88-fold and 23.18-fold more sensitive than the wild type, respectively. There was no difference in cell growth between the recQ1 and recQ3 mutants and the wild type. However, the recQ2 mutant exhibited reduced cell growth, aberrant cell division and increased pleiomorphism, with an increase in filamentous forms and chains of cells being observed using light, fluorescence and electron microscopy. There was no spontaneous accumulation of DNA single- or double-strand breaks in the recQ mutants, as compared with the wild type, during normal cell growth in the absence of metronidazole. Bacteroides fragilis RecQ DNA helicases, therefore, enhance cell survival following metronidazole damage. The abnormal cellular phenotype and growth characteristics of recQ2 mutant cells suggest that this gene, or the downstream gene of the operon in which it occurs, may be involved in cell division.

  6. Comparative study of the hygienic behavior of Carniolan and Africanized honey bees directed towards grouped versus isolated dead brood cells.

    PubMed

    Gramacho, K P; Gonçalves, L S

    2009-06-30

    In Apis mellifera, hygienic behavior involves recognition and removal of sick, damaged or dead brood from capped cells. We investigated whether bees react in the same way to grouped versus isolated damaged capped brood cells. Three colonies of wild-type Africanized honey bees and three colonies of Carniolan honey bees were used for this investigation. Capped worker brood cells aged 12 to 14 days old were perforated with the pin-killing method. After making holes in the brood cells, the combs were placed back into the hives; 24 h later the number of cleaned cells was recorded in areas with pin-killed and control brood cells. Four repetitions were made in each colony. Isolated cells were more frequently cleaned than grouped cells, though variance analysis showed no significant difference (P = 0.1421). Carniolan bees also were somewhat, though not significantly more hygienic than Africanized honey bees (P = 0.0840). We conclude that honey bees can detect and remove both isolated and grouped dead brood. The tendency towards greater hygienic efficiency directed towards grouped pin-killed brood may be a consequence of a greater concentration of volatiles emanating from the wounds in the dead pupae.

  7. Outbreeding lethality between toxic Group I and nontoxic Group III Alexandrium tamarense spp. isolates: Predominance of heterotypic encystment and implications for mating interactions and biogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Kulis, David M.; Solow, Andrew R.; Erdner, Deana L.; Percy, Linda; Lewis, Jane; Anderson, Donald M.

    2010-02-01

    We report the zygotic encystment of geographically dispersed isolates in the dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense, in particular, successful mating of toxic Group I and nontoxic Group III isolates. However, hypnozygotes produced in Group I/III co-cultures complete no more than three divisions after germinating. Previous reports have suggested a mate recognition mechanism whereby hypnozygotes produced in co-cultures could arise from either homotypic (inbred) or heterotypic (outbred) gamete pairs. To determine the extent to which each occurs, a nested PCR assay was developed to determine parentage of individual hypnozygotes. The vast majority of hypnozygotes from pairwise Group I/III co-cultures were outbred, so that inviability was a result of hybridization, not inbreeding. These findings support the assertion that complete speciation underlies the phylogenetic structure of the Alexandrium tamarense species complex. Additionally, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) copy numbers of both hybrid and single ribotype hypnozygotes were reduced substantially from those of haploid motile cells. The destruction of rDNA loci may be crucial for the successful mating of genetically distant conjugants and appears integral to the process of encystment. The inviability of Group I/III hybrids is important for public health because the presence of hybrid cysts may indicate ongoing displacement of a nontoxic population by a toxic one (or vice versa). Hybrid inviability also suggests a bloom control strategy whereby persistent, toxic Group I blooms could be mitigated by introduction of nontoxic Group III cells. The potential for hybridization in nature was investigated by applying the nested PCR assay to hypnozygotes from Belfast Lough, Northern Ireland, a region where Group I and III populations co-occur. Two hybrid cysts were identified in 14 successful assays, demonstrating that Group I and III populations do interbreed in that region. However, an analysis of mating data

  8. Survey of strain distribution and antibiotic resistance pattern of group B streptococci (Streptococcus agalactiae) isolated from clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Nasaj, Mona; Hosseini, Seyed Mostafa; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the present study were to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profils with particular emphasis on susceptible or resistant strains to macrolides and lincosamids antibiotics and to determine possible antibiotic resistance mechanisms occurring in group B streptococci (GBS) strains using PCR assay and disk diffusion method. Methods: A total of 62 clinical GBS strains were investigated. Antibacterial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method and inducible resistance test for clindamycin by standard double disk diffusion or D-zone test for all isolates to differentiate macrolide resistance phenotype (M), constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (cMLSB) and induced macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (iMLSB). In addition, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of penicillin were determined for all isolates. Finally, possible existence of antibiotic resistance genes for erythromycin (ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) and for clindamycin (linB) were examined among isolates using PCR assay. Results: All 62 isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, linezolid, cefazoline and vancomycin. However, 93.5% (n=58) of isolates showed an increased MIC to penicillin. The overall rate of erythromycin resistance was 35.5% (n=22). All erythromycin-resistant isolates displayed the M phenotype (100%, n=22). All three erythromycin resistance genes (i.e. ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) were found in erythromycin-resistant isolates. Conclusion: It was concluded that prescribing antibiotic without antibacterial susceptibility tests should be prevented because of the high prevalence of erythromycin-resistant GBS strains and the fact that erythromycin-resistant GBS strains has shown an increased MIC to penicillin, as the drug of choice for treating GBS infections. PMID:27648402

  9. Description of Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov., a Mycobacterium fortuitum group organism isolated from a posttraumatic osteitis inflammation.

    PubMed

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Stein, Andréas; Carvajal, Joseph; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2006-04-01

    A nonpigmented rapidly growing mycobacterium was isolated from wound liquid outflow, bone tissue biopsy, and excised skin tissue from a 31-year-old woman who suffered an accidental open right tibia fracture and prolonged stay in a river. The three isolates grew in 3 days at 24 to 37 degrees C. 16S rRNA sequence analyses over 1,483 bp showed that they were identical and shared 99.7% (4-bp difference) sequence similarity with that of Mycobacterium porcinum, the most closely related species. Partial rpoB (723 bp) sequence analyses showed that the isolates shared 97.0% sequence similarity with that of M. porcinum. Further polyphasic approaches, including biochemical tests, antimicrobial susceptibility analyses, and hsp65, sodA, and recA gene sequence analysis, as well as % G+C determination and cell wall fatty acid composition analysis supported the evidence that these isolates were representative of a new species. Phylogenetic analyses showed the close relationship with M. porcinum in the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The isolates were susceptible to most antibiotics and exhibited evidence for penicillinase activity, in contrast to M. porcinum. We propose the name Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov. for this new species associated with posttraumatic osteitis. The type strain is D16(T) (equivalent to CIP 108544(T) and CCUG 50187(T)).

  10. Description of Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov., a Mycobacterium fortuitum Group Organism Isolated from a Posttraumatic Osteitis Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Stein, Andréas; Carvajal, Joseph; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2006-01-01

    A nonpigmented rapidly growing mycobacterium was isolated from wound liquid outflow, bone tissue biopsy, and excised skin tissue from a 31-year-old woman who suffered an accidental open right tibia fracture and prolonged stay in a river. The three isolates grew in 3 days at 24 to 37°C. 16S rRNA sequence analyses over 1,483 bp showed that they were identical and shared 99.7% (4-bp difference) sequence similarity with that of Mycobacterium porcinum, the most closely related species. Partial rpoB (723 bp) sequence analyses showed that the isolates shared 97.0% sequence similarity with that of M. porcinum. Further polyphasic approaches, including biochemical tests, antimicrobial susceptibility analyses, and hsp65, sodA, and recA gene sequence analysis, as well as % G+C determination and cell wall fatty acid composition analysis supported the evidence that these isolates were representative of a new species. Phylogenetic analyses showed the close relationship with M. porcinum in the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The isolates were susceptible to most antibiotics and exhibited evidence for penicillinase activity, in contrast to M. porcinum. We propose the name Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov. for this new species associated with posttraumatic osteitis. The type strain is D16T (equivalent to CIP 108544T and CCUG 50187T). PMID:16597850

  11. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Novel Molecular Isolate of Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae from Northern Peru

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    ompA, and sca4) from two molecular isolates of Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae from two ticks ( Amblyomma maculatum and Ixodes boliviensis) col- lected...andeanae from two ticks ( Amblyomma maculatum and Ixodes boliviensis) collected from domestic horses liv- ing in two separate locations in Northern Peru...scribed previously.2 However, new primers were used for PCR and sequencing in this study (TABLE 1). The sequences (both forward and reverse) were

  12. Isolation and characterization of the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Group C TW3 from the tropical western Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, Yukiko; Chen, Yuh-ling Lee; Chen, Houng-Yung; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Ohki, Kaori

    2012-03-01

    A unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium strain of Group C, designated TW3, was isolated from the oligotrophic Kuroshio Current of the western Pacific Ocean. To our knowledge, this represents the first successful laboratory culture of a Group C unicellular diazotroph from oceanic water. TW3 cells are green rods, 2.5-3.0 µm in width and 4.0-6.0 µm in length. Phylogenetic analyses of both 16S rRNA and nifH gene fragments indicated that the TW3 sequences were over 98% identical to those of the previously isolated Cyanothece sp. ATCC51142 and Gloeocapsa sp., suggesting that TW3 is a member of the Group C unicellular diazotrophs. In addition, both TW3 and Cyanothece sp. ATCC51142 share morphological characteristics; both strains are sheathless and rod-shaped, display binary fission in a single plane, and possess dispersed thylakoids. TW3 grows aerobically in nitrogen-deficient artificial seawater, and exhibited the highest observed growth rate of 0.035 h(-1) when cultured at 30°C and 140 µmol m(-2) s(-1) of light intensity. The nitrogen fixation rate, when grown optimally using a 12 h/12 h light-dark cycle, was 7.31 × 10(-15) mol N cell(-1) day(-1) . Immunocytochemical staining using Trichodesmium sp. NIBB1067 nitrogenase antiserum revealed the existence of diazotrophic cells sharing morphological characteristics of TW3 in the Kuroshio water from which TW3 was isolated.

  13. Distribution and Morphology of Longidorus breviannulatus Norton &Hoffman, 1975 and Longidorus fragilis Thorne, 1974 (Nematoda: Longidoridae) from North America

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Weimin; Robbins, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    In a survey of ecotypes for longidorids, primarily from the rhizosphere hardwood trees growing in sandy soil along stream banks, 828 soil samples were collected from 37 Arkansas counties in 1999-2001. Eight populations of Longidorus breviannulatus were identified from the Arkansas survey samples. A total of 19 populations from California, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, and Wisconsin were identified from the collection of the second author. A few males were found in New York and Nebraska populations and are described herein. Seven populations of L. fragilis were identified in the Arkansas survey samples, and one population was found from Indiana. Four juvenile stages of L. fragilis are present, and data are given for them herein. PMID:19262810

  14. Evaluation of colistin and nalidixic acid in Todd-Hewitt broth for selective isolation of group B streptocci.

    PubMed

    Fenton, L J; Harper, M H

    1979-02-01

    Todd-Hewitt broth (THB) containing colistin and nalidixic acid was compared with four other media with respect to efficacy of isolation of group B streptocci. It was effective as plain THB, THB with gentamicin and nalidixic acid and blood, and THB with colistin, nalidixic acid, and blood. THB with gentamicin and nalidixic acid, but without blood, was inhibitory to group B streptocci. The value of THB with colistin and nalidixic acid lies in its ability to successfully inhibit gram-negative organisms and still promote group B streptococcal growth without the addition of blood. This greatly reduces the time and expense of media preparation and permits early determination of bacterial growth, so that other means of rapidly identifying group B streptocci can be applied at the earliest possible time.

  15. Evaluation of colistin and nalidixic acid in Todd-Hewitt broth for selective isolation of group B streptocci.

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, L J; Harper, M H

    1979-01-01

    Todd-Hewitt broth (THB) containing colistin and nalidixic acid was compared with four other media with respect to efficacy of isolation of group B streptocci. It was effective as plain THB, THB with gentamicin and nalidixic acid and blood, and THB with colistin, nalidixic acid, and blood. THB with gentamicin and nalidixic acid, but without blood, was inhibitory to group B streptocci. The value of THB with colistin and nalidixic acid lies in its ability to successfully inhibit gram-negative organisms and still promote group B streptococcal growth without the addition of blood. This greatly reduces the time and expense of media preparation and permits early determination of bacterial growth, so that other means of rapidly identifying group B streptocci can be applied at the earliest possible time. PMID:372220

  16. A statistical approach to study the interactive effects of process parameters on succinic acid production from Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Isar, Jasmine; Agarwal, Lata; Saran, Saurabh; Kaushik, Rekha; Saxena, Rajendra Kumar

    2007-04-01

    A statistical approach response surface methodology (RSM) was used to study the production of succinic acid from Bacteroides fragilis. The most influential parameters for succinic acid production obtained through one-at-a-time method were glucose, tryptone, sodium carbonate, inoculum size and incubation period. These resulted in the production of 5.4gL(-1) of succinic acid in 48h from B. fragilis under anaerobic conditions. Based on these results, a statistical method, face-centered central composite design (FCCCD) falling under RSM was employed for further enhancing the succinic acid production and to monitor the interactive effect of these parameters, which resulted in a more than 2-fold increase in yield (12.5gL(-1) in 24h). The analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed the adequacy of the model and the verification experiments confirmed its validity. On subsequent scale-up in a 10-L bioreactor using conditions optimized through RSM, 20.0gL(-1) of succinic acid was obtained in 24h. This clearly indicated that the model stood valid even on large scale. Thus, the statistical optimization strategy led to an approximately 4-fold increase in the yield of succinic acid. This is the first report on the use of FCCCD to improve succinic acid production from B. fragilis. The present study provides useful information about the regulation of succinic acid synthesis through manipulation of various physiochemical parameters.

  17. Reproductive isolation revealed in preliminary crossbreeding experiments using field collected Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) from three ITS–2 defined groups

    PubMed Central

    García, Mauricio; Menes, Marianela; Dorn, Patricia L.; Monroy, Carlota; Richards, Bethany; Panzera, Francisco; Bustamante, Dulce María

    2013-01-01

    Triatoma dimidiata, a Chagas disease vector distributed in Mexico, Central America, Colombia, Venezuela, Peru and Ecuador, has been studied using genetic markers and four groups have been defined by ITS–2 sequences: 1A, 1B, 2 and 3. To gather evidence on the divergence and reproductive isolation among T. dimidiata ITS–2 groups, we carried out 15 crossbreeding experiments with field–collected sylvan and domestic T. dimidiata from Guatemala where three groups are found: 1A, 2 and 3. Reciprocal crosses between individuals from groups 1A and 2, and a cross between group 2 individuals from different habitats, produced an average 129.78±42.29 eggs with hatching success ranging from 31.6% to 90.1%. The offspring of these crosses reached the adult stage, and crosses between F1 insects produced eggs. These results suggest that there are no pre– or post– zygotic reproductive barriers between groups 1A and 2, or within group 2. Crosses between group 3 females and males from groups 1A or 2 produced on average 85.67±30.26 eggs and none of them hatched. These results support the existence of pre– zygotic barriers between T. dimidiata group 3 and groups 1A and 2. The group 3 individuals were collected in sylvatic environments in Yaxha, Peten, Guatemala. Previously, distinct chromosomal characteristics (cytotype 3) were described in individuals from this population. Based on this evidence we suggest that this population is divergent at the species level from other T. dimidiata populations. PMID:24041592

  18. Rapid Determination of Macrolide and Lincosamide Resistance in Group B Streptococcus Isolated from Vaginal-Rectal Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Dela Cruz, Wilfred P.; Richardson, Joann Y.; Broestler, Judith M.; Thornton, Jennifer A.; Danaher, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Our objective was to assess the ability of real-time PCR to predict in vitro resistance in isolates of group B streptococcus (GBS). Methods. The first real-time PCR assays for the genes known to confer resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin in GBS were developed. Three hundred and forty clinical GBS isolates were assessed with these assays and compared with conventional disk diffusion. Results. The presence of an erythromycin ribosome methylation gene (ermB or ermTR variant A) predicted in vitro constitutive or inducible resistance to clindamycin with a sensitivity of 93% (95% CI 86%–97%), specificity of 90% (95% CI 85%–93%), positive predictive value of 76% (95% CI 67%–84%), and negative predictive value of 97% (95% CI 94%–99%). Conclusion. This rapid and simple assay can predict in vitro susceptibility to clindamycin within two hours of isolation as opposed to 18–24 hours via disk diffusion. The assay might also be used to screen large numbers of batched isolates to establish the prevalence of resistance in a given area. PMID:17710240

  19. Increasing antimicrobial resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius group bacteria and emergence of MRSP in the UK.

    PubMed

    Beever, L; Bond, R; Graham, P A; Jackson, B; Lloyd, D H; Loeffler, A

    2015-02-14

    Frequencies of antimicrobial resistance were determined amongst 14,555 clinical Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG) isolates from UK dogs and cats to estimate resistance trends and quantify the occurrence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP). Reports from two diagnostic laboratories (13,313 general submissions, 1242 referral centre only submissions) were analysed retrospectively (2003/2006-2012). MRSP were defined by phenotypic resistance to meticillin and concurrent broad β-lactam resistance; a subset was confirmed genetically (SIG-specific nuc and mecA). Trends were analysed by Cochran-Armitage test. Resistance remained below 10 per cent for cefalexin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and the fluoroquinolones. Increasing resistance trends were seen in both laboratories for ampicillin/amoxicillin (both P<0.001), cefovecin (both P<0.046) and enrofloxacin (both P<0.02). Resistance to cefalexin increased over time in referral hospital isolates (P<0.001) to clindamycin (P=0.01) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (P=0.001) amongst general laboratory submissions. Overall, 106 MRSP were isolated (0.7 per cent of submissions) including 32 (2.6 per cent of submissions, all genetically confirmed) from the referral centre population (inter-laboratory difference P<0.001). Against a background of widely susceptible SIG isolates, a new trend of increasing resistance to important antimicrobials was identified overtime and the emergence of MRSP from UK clinical cases was confirmed. Attention to responsible use of antibacterial therapy in small animal practice is urgently needed.

  20. Isolation of heart- and kidney-binding protein from group A streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M W; Bergey, E J

    1982-01-01

    Tritium-labeled, water-soluble components of Streptococcus pyogenes type M6 absorbed to cardiac tissue in vitro. Tissue binding was time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Chromatography of the crude bacterial extract on Bio-Gel P-300 indicated a molecular weight greater than 300,000 for the heart-binding component. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) dissociated this aggregate into a protein of 18,000 to 20,000 daltons as determined by Sephacryl S-200 chromatography and SDS-polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis. The tissue-binding protein was also purified from streptococcal extracts by absorption to immobilized heart components. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the protein desorbed from tissue revealed a radioactive band of 19,000 daltons. Indirect immunofluorescence tests on cardiac tissue treated with streptococcal extract showed an accumulation of a bacterial antigen on the sarcolemmal sheaths. Streptococcal components also adsorbed to basement membranes of kidney. Antisera prepared to isolated cytoplasmic membranes and water-soluble extracts of S. pyogenes type M6 were the most sensitive reagents for the detection of bacterial components bound to tissue. Antisera prepared to isolated cell walls and to intact bacteria were weakly reactive in these assays. Images PMID:7033140

  1. Identification and Genomic Analysis of a Novel Group C Orthobunyavirus Isolated from a Mosquito Captured near Iquitos, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Treangen, Todd J.; Schoeler, George; Phillippy, Adam M.; Bergman, Nicholas H.; Turell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Group C orthobunyaviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses found in both South and North America. Until very recently, and despite their status as important vector-borne human pathogens, no Group C whole genome sequences containing all three segments were available in public databases. Here we report a Group C orthobunyavirus, named El Huayo virus, isolated from a pool of Culex portesi mosquitoes captured near Iquitos, Peru. Although initial metagenomic analysis yielded only a handful of reads belonging to the genus Orthobunyavirus, single contig assemblies were generated for L, M, and S segments totaling over 200,000 reads (~0.5% of sample). Given the moderately high viremia in hamsters (>107 plaque-forming units/ml) and the propensity for Cx. portesi to feed on rodents, it is possible that El Huayo virus is maintained in nature in a Culex portesi/rodent cycle. El Huayo virus was found to be most similar to Peruvian Caraparu virus isolates and constitutes a novel subclade within Group C. PMID:27074162

  2. Evaluation of four chromogenic media for the isolation of Group B Streptococcus from vaginal specimens in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Salem, Nahim; Anderson, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Direct culture onto four commercial chromogenic media, selective for the isolation of Group B Streptococcus (GBS), were compared with the conventional pre-enrichment Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) method for the ability to isolate GBS from 242 pregnant women's self-collected vaginal/perineal swabs. The sensitivities and specificities for direct culture on to chromogenic agar were 92% and 100% for StrepBSelect (Bio-Rad Laboratories), 96% and 100% for Brilliance GBS (Thermo-Fisher Scientific), 94% and 100% for CHROMagar StrepB (CHROMagar, Dutec Diagnostics), 86% and 100% for ChromID Strepto B (bioMerieux). CDC recommended broth pre-enrichment then culture on blood containing selective agar had a sensitivity and specificity of 90.0% and 100% respectively. The chromogenic agar tested produced comparable results to the pre-enrichment CDC method.

  3. Mycobacterium setense sp. nov., a Mycobacterium fortuitum-group organism isolated from a patient with soft tissue infection and osteitis.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Brigitte; Marchandin, Hélène; Hamitouche, Kamel; Laurent, Frédéric

    2008-02-01

    A Gram-positive, rod-shaped acid-fast bacterium was isolated from a patient with a post-traumatic chronic skin abscess associated with osteitis. Morphological analysis, 16S rRNA, hsp65, sodA and rpoB gene sequence analysis, cell-wall fatty acid and mycolic acid composition analyses and biochemical tests showed that the isolate, designated ABO-M06(T), belonged to the genus Mycobacterium. Its phenotype was unique and genetic and phylogenetic findings suggest that strain ABO-M06(T) represents a novel species within the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The name Mycobacterium setense sp. nov. is proposed for this novel species, with the type strain ABO-M06(T) (=CIP 109395(T)=DSM 45070(T)).

  4. Comparison of Selective Media for Isolation of Presumptive Group D Streptococci from Human Feces

    PubMed Central

    Sabbaj, Jacobo; Sutter, Vera L.; Finegold, Sydney M.

    1971-01-01

    Pfizer Selective Enterococcus (PSE) agar, a medium containing bile, sodium azide, and esculin, was evaluated for its sensitivity and selectivity for detection and enumeration of presumptive group D streptococci in human feces. SF broth and SF broth plus agar (1.5%), representing selective media in common use, were studied simultaneously. Presumptive group D streptococci were recovered on PSE agar from the feces of all 25 subjects. No growth was observed in 8% of specimens in SF broth. No gram-negative organisms were recovered in any medium. PSE agar has the advantages of selecting out Streptococcus bovis, earlier appearance of distinctive reactions, and lack of requirement for special incubation temperature. PMID:4944799

  5. Structural characterization of neutral oligosaccharides with blood-group A and H activity isolated from bovine submaxillary mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Savage, A V; D'Arcy, S M; Donoghue, C M

    1991-01-01

    In this study we investigated the structures of 11 neutral oligosaccharides released from bovine submaxillary mucin by alkaline borohydride treatment and isolated by h.p.l.c. One hexa-, one penta-, three tetra-, four tri- and two di-saccharides containing core types 1, 2, 3 or 4 were obtained. We report their structures, determined by a combination of one- and two-dimensional 1H n.m.r. spectroscopy at 270 MHz and methylation analysis involving g.l.c.-m.s., along with their approximate molar ratios. Only three of these oligosaccharides have previously been reported in this source. Of the new oligosaccharides, one contains the blood-group-A antigenic determinant, two contain the blood-group-H type 2 determinant, while another contains the blood-group-H type 3 determinant. The oligosaccharide GlcNAc beta (1----6)[GlcNAc beta (1----3)]GalNAcol, although previously found as a core structure, has been isolated here as a novel trisaccharide. PMID:1718265

  6. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. Materials and Methods: One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. Results: A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Conclusions: Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26421133

  7. Structural analysis of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase from Bacteroides fragilis and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Grant, Joanna C; Farr, Carol L; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W; Miller, Mitchell D; Elsliger, Marc André; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2014-10-01

    The crystal structure of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase (API) from Bacteroides fragilis (bfAPI) was determined at 1.7 Å resolution and was found to be a tetramer of a single-domain sugar isomerase (SIS) with an endogenous ligand, CMP-Kdo (cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonate), bound at the active site. API catalyzes the reversible isomerization of D-ribulose 5-phosphate to D-arabinose 5-phosphate in the first step of the Kdo biosynthetic pathway. Interestingly, the bound CMP-Kdo is neither the substrate nor the product of the reaction catalyzed by API, but corresponds to the end product in the Kdo biosynthetic pathway and presumably acts as a feedback inhibitor for bfAPI. The active site of each monomer is located in a surface cleft at the tetramer interface between three monomers and consists of His79 and His186 from two different adjacent monomers and a Ser/Thr-rich region, all of which are highly conserved across APIs. Structure and sequence analyses indicate that His79 and His186 may play important catalytic roles in the isomerization reaction. CMP-Kdo mimetics could therefore serve as potent and specific inhibitors of API and provide broad protection against many different bacterial infections.

  8. Structural analysis of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase from Bacteroides fragilis and functional implications

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Grant, Joanna C.; Farr, Carol L.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase (API) from Bacteroides fragilis (bfAPI) was determined at 1.7 Å resolution and was found to be a tetramer of a single-domain sugar isomerase (SIS) with an endogenous ligand, CMP-Kdo (cytidine 5′-monophosphate-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonate), bound at the active site. API catalyzes the reversible isomerization of d-ribulose 5-phosphate to d-arabinose 5-phosphate in the first step of the Kdo biosynthetic pathway. Interestingly, the bound CMP-Kdo is neither the substrate nor the product of the reaction catalyzed by API, but corresponds to the end product in the Kdo biosynthetic pathway and presumably acts as a feedback inhibitor for bfAPI. The active site of each monomer is located in a surface cleft at the tetramer interface between three monomers and consists of His79 and His186 from two different adjacent monomers and a Ser/Thr-rich region, all of which are highly conserved across APIs. Structure and sequence analyses indicate that His79 and His186 may play important catalytic roles in the isomerization reaction. CMP-Kdo mimetics could therefore serve as potent and specific inhibitors of API and provide broad protection against many different bacterial infections. PMID:25286848

  9. An Orthologue of Bacteroides fragilis NanH Is the Principal Sialidase in Tannerella forsythia▿

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Hayley; Homer, Karen A.; Rao, Susmitha; Booth, Veronica; Hosie, Arthur H. F.

    2009-01-01

    Sialidase activity is a putative virulence factor of the anaerobic periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, but it is uncertain which genes encode this activity. Characterization of a putative sialidase, SiaHI, by others, indicated that this protein alone may not be responsible for all of the sialidase activity. We describe a second sialidase in T. forsythia (TF0035), an orthologue of Bacteroides fragilis NanH, and its expression in Escherichia coli. Sialidase activity of the expressed NanH was confirmed by using 2′-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant T. forsythia NanH indicated that it was active over a broad pH range, with optimum activity at pH 5.5. This enzyme has high affinity for 2′-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Km of 32.9 ± 10.3 μM) and rapidly releases 4-methylumbelliferone (Vmax of 170.8 ± 11.8 nmol of 4-methylumbelliferone min−1 mg of protein−1). E. coli lysates containing recombinant T. forsythia NanH cleave sialic acid from a range of substrates, with a preference for α2-3 glycosidic linkages. The genes adjacent to nanH encode proteins apparently involved in the metabolism of sialic acid, indicating that the NanH sialidase is likely to be involved in nutrient acquisition. PMID:19304852

  10. Relationship between heavy fuel oil phytotoxicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in Salicornia fragilis.

    PubMed

    Meudec, Anna; Poupart, Nathalie; Dussauze, Jacques; Deslandes, Eric

    2007-08-01

    Greenhouse experiments were carried out to study the effects of heavy fuel oil contamination on the growth and the development of Salicornia fragilis Ball and Tutin, a salt-marsh edible species. Plants were sampled in spring at the "Aber du Conquet" (Finistère, France), and artificially exposed by coating shoot sections with N degrees 6 fuel oil or by mixing it in their substratum. The impact of petroleum on plant development was followed by phytotoxicity assessments and PAH shoots assays. The plants exhibited visual symptoms of stress, i.e. chlorosis, yellowing, growth reduction and perturbations in developmental parameters. The contamination of plants by shoot coating appeared to be less than through soil. Moreover, the increase of the degree of pollution induced more marked effects on plants, likely because of the physical effects of fuel. However, bioaccumulation of PAHs in shoot tissues was also found to be significant, even at very low levels of contamination, and highly related to the conditions of exposure to oil. The strong relationships between the PAH contents of Salicornia plants and growth reduction suggest a chemical toxicity of fuel oil, compounds like PAHs being known to inhibit physiological processes in plants.

  11. An orthologue of Bacteroides fragilis NanH is the principal sialidase in Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hayley; Homer, Karen A; Rao, Susmitha; Booth, Veronica; Hosie, Arthur H F

    2009-06-01

    Sialidase activity is a putative virulence factor of the anaerobic periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, but it is uncertain which genes encode this activity. Characterization of a putative sialidase, SiaHI, by others, indicated that this protein alone may not be responsible for all of the sialidase activity. We describe a second sialidase in T. forsythia (TF0035), an orthologue of Bacteroides fragilis NanH, and its expression in Escherichia coli. Sialidase activity of the expressed NanH was confirmed by using 2'-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-alpha-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant T. forsythia NanH indicated that it was active over a broad pH range, with optimum activity at pH 5.5. This enzyme has high affinity for 2'-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-alpha-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid (K(m) of 32.9 +/- 10.3 microM) and rapidly releases 4-methylumbelliferone (V(max) of 170.8 +/- 11.8 nmol of 4-methylumbelliferone min(-1) mg of protein(-1)). E. coli lysates containing recombinant T. forsythia NanH cleave sialic acid from a range of substrates, with a preference for alpha2-3 glycosidic linkages. The genes adjacent to nanH encode proteins apparently involved in the metabolism of sialic acid, indicating that the NanH sialidase is likely to be involved in nutrient acquisition.

  12. Succinic acid production from Bacteroides fragilis: process optimization and scale up in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Isar, Jasmine; Agarwal, Lata; Saran, Saurabh; Saxena, Rajendra Kumar

    2006-01-01

    We report the effect of different physiological and nutritional parameters on succinic acid production from Bacteroides fragilis. This strain initially produced 0.70gL(-1) of succinic acid in 60h. However, when process optimization was employed, 5.4gL(-1) of succinic acid was produced in medium consisting of glucose (1.5%); tryptone (2.5%); Na(2)CO(3) (1.5%), at pH 7.0, when inoculated with 4% inoculum and incubated at 37 degrees C, 100rpm for 48h. A marked enhancement in succinic acid production was observed when the optimized conditions were employed in a 10L bioreactor. A total of 12.5gL(-1) of succinic acid was produced in 30h. This is approximately 12-fold increase in succinic acid production when compared to the initial un-optimized medium production. This enhancement in succinic acid production may be due to the control of CO(2) supply and the impeller speed. This is also resulted in the reduction of the production time. The present study provides useful information to the industrialists seeking environmentally benign technology for the production of bulk biomolecules through manipulation of various chemical parameters.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines can be divided in two distinct groups, including one displaying phenotypes similar to isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Myriam M.; Leduc, Annie; Nadeau, Christine; Barbeau, Jean; Charette, Steve J.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays broad genetic diversity, giving it an astonishing capacity to adapt to a variety of environments and to infect a wide range of hosts. While many P. aeruginosa isolates of various origins have been analyzed, isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have received the most attention. Less is known about the genetic and phenotypic diversity of P. aeruginosa isolates that colonize other environments where flourishing biofilms can be found. In the present study, 29 P. aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines and CF patients were collected and their genetic and phenotypes profiles were compared to determine whether environmental and clinical isolates are related. The isolates were first classified using the random amplified polymorphic DNA method. This made it possible to distribute the isolates into one clinical cluster and two environmental clusters. The isolates in the environmental cluster that were genetically closer to the clinical cluster also displayed phenotypes similar to the clinical isolates. The isolates from the second environmental cluster displayed opposite phenotypes, particularly an increased capacity to form biofilms. The isolates in this cluster were also the only ones harboring genes that encoded specific epimerases involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharides, which could explain their increased ability to form biofilms. In conclusion, the isolates from the dental unit waterlines could be distributed into two clusters, with some of the environmental isolates resembled the clinical isolates. PMID:25653647

  14. Uneven frequency of Vibrio alginolyticus-group isolates among different populations of Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

    PubMed

    Thaller, Maria C; Ciambotta, Marco; Sapochetti, Manuela; Migliore, Luciana; Tapia, Whashington; Cedeño, Virna; Gentile, Gabriele

    2010-02-01

    The presence of Vibrio isolates was investigated in cloacal swabs from the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhyncus cristatus). Such unique iguana is endemic to the Galápagos Archipelago, it is listed as vulnerable in the IUCN Red List (2009), and is strictly protected by CITES and Ecuador laws. Our results revealed an uneven isolation frequency of vibrios from animals living in different settings: maximal among the Santa Fe population, scarce at Bahía Tortuga but practically absent in the samples from Puerto Ayora and Plaza Sur. A 16S sequencing confirmed that the isolates belonged to the genus Vibrio, placing them within the V. alginolyticus group; the biochemical identification was, indeed, consistent with V. alginolyticus features. The reason of the observed discrepancy is not clear, but could be either linked to a higher pollution in the inhabited or more touristic places or to differential influence of chemical and physical parameters at a local scale. As V. alginolyticus is an opportunistic pathogen for man and it is known to cause disease in sea-living animals, the ability of these vibrios to enter and persist to a certain extent in the marine iguana gut should be regarded as a risk for health of both the animals and the human personnel involved in monitoring activities.

  15. Specificity of immunoglobulin M antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron by by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, A B; Bjornson, H S; Kitko, B P

    1980-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the specificity of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of Bacteroides fragilis 1365 and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron 1343 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Purified normal human IgM was adsorbed with washed heat-killed cells of the homologous strains and heterologous strains of B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides distasonis, and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus and with erythrocytes coated with outer membrane complex prepared from the homologous strains. Hypogammaglobulinemic serum was supplemented with the adsorbed IgM preparations, and the ability of the supplemented sera to support opsonophagocytosis and killing of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was measured in vitro under anaerobic conditions. Normal IgM adsorbed with heat-killed cells of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 or with erythrocytes coated with outer membrane complex prepared from these strains failed to restore the ability of hypogammaglobulinemic serum to support opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of the homologous strain. In contrast, adsorption of normal IgM with heat-killed cells of the heterologous strains did not alter its opsonophagocytosis-promoting activity for either test strain. These results indicated that the IgM antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 are directed against strain-specific antigenic determinants contained in the outer membrane complex. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6160104

  16. Interactions between aggregations and environmental factors explain spatio-temporal patterns of the brittle-star Ophiothrix fragilis in the eastern Bay of Seine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Méar, Yann; Murat, Anne; Poizot, Emmanuel; Lozach, Sophie; Beryouni, Khadija

    2013-10-01

    There is a paucity of studies showing long-term changes in the population dynamics of dominant benthic epifaunal species, especially echinoderms, in relation to biological and environmental factors. In the English Channel, the brittle-star Ophiothrix fragilis is a common epifaunal species, mainly found in strong tidal currents characterised by benthic habitats with pebbles. However, in the Bay of Seine, O. fragilis lives on gravel and coarse sandy sediments; more locally, it occurs where there are unexpected amounts of fine particles for such high hydrodynamic areas. This species forms dense aggregations, supporting large populations up to 7450 ind m-2. This paper analyses the long-term spatio-temporal changes of O. fragilis aggregations over the last 25 years in the eastern part of the Bay of Seine through observations obtained from several scientific programmes from 1986 to 2010. This area is characterised as a tidal environment affected by the Seine estuary and is subject to potential sediment supply from the dumping site of the Le Havre harbour dredging operations. During all surveys, there was a similar pattern: persistent patches with high abundances of O. fragilis and sites without O. fragilis, showing that there was a high heterogeneity of the spatial population pattern. Interactions between environmental conditions and ophiurid aggregations (e.g., storm waves, Seine floods and patches) are suggested to explain these patterns.

  17. Isolation of a very high molecular weight polylactosamine from an ovarian cyst mucin of blood group

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.S.S.; Bush, C.A.

    1986-05-01

    Treatment of a blood group A active ovarian cyst mucin glycoprotein with alkaline borohydride under conditions expected to cleave-O-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains releases a polysaccharide of average molecular weight 25,000 daltons. It contains no peptide or mannose at the 1% level and carbohydrate analysis gives fuc:galNAc:gal:glcNAc in the ratio of 1:1:2.5:2.5. The /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H NMR spectra show that the polysaccharide has non-reducing terminal side chains of the structure galNAc(..cap alpha..-1 ..-->.. 3)(fuc(..cap alpha..-1 ..-->.. 2)) gal(..beta..-1 ..-->.. 3) glcNAc (i.e. a type 1 chain). Periodate oxidation removes all the fucose and galNAc from the non-reducing terminal but leaves intact the backbone composed of ..beta..-linked gal and glcNAc as would be expected for a polylactosamine. They conclude that this is a high molecular weight polylactosamine which is related to the asparagine linked polylactosamine chains of cell surface glycoproteins which have been implicated in cell differentiation. However, the blood group A polysaccharide from the ovarian cyst mucin is unique in several respects. It has a much larger molecular weight than even the erythroglycan of the red cell membrane protein, band 3, and is linked to the protein by an -O-glycosidic bond rather than the -N-asparagine linkage of the previously known polylactosamines which have a trimannosyl core. Its blood group A side chains are on a type one core rather than type 2 which is found on other polylactosamines.

  18. Prevalence and antimicrogram of Staphylococcus intermedius group isolates from veterinary staff, companion animals, and the environment in veterinary hospitals in Korea.

    PubMed

    Youn, Jung-Ho; Yoon, Jang Won; Koo, Hye Cheong; Lim, Suk-Kyung; Park, Yong Ho

    2011-03-01

    The Staphylococcus intermedius bacterial group (SIG) includes 3 distinct genetically heterogenous species: S. intermedius, S. pseudintermedius, and S. delphini. This pathogen group is associated with many opportunistic skin and ear infections in companion animals. Human infections with S. intermedius and S. pseudintermedius isolates and the emergence of methicillin-resistant isolates have been recently reported, which emphasizes the importance of nationwide identification of SIG isolate prevalence and antibiotic resistance in veterinary clinics. In the present study, a total of 178 SIG isolates were obtained from veterinary staff (n  =  40), companion animals (n  =  115), and the local environment (n  =  23) in 8 Korean veterinary hospitals. Isolates were differentiated into 167 S. pseudintermedius (93.8%) and 11 S. intermedius (6.2%) isolates; S. delphini isolates were not identified. The most effective antibiotics against these isolates included amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, amikacin, nitrofloxacin, imipenem, and vancomycin; whereas ampicillin, penicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were not effective. Surprisingly, the 128 SIG isolates (71.9%) displayed multiple drug resistance (MDR) against 3 or more antibiotic classes. Out of 52 SIG isolates carrying the methicillin-resistance gene (mecA), only 34 (65.4%) were oxacillin-resistant, and 49 (94.2%) methicillin-resistant SIG were multidrug resistant. This finding suggests the presence of greater numbers of MDR phenotypes than other isolates (P < 0.05).

  19. Comparison of phenotypically indistinguishable but geographically distinct Neisseria meningitidis Group B isolates in a serum bactericidal antibody assay.

    PubMed

    Findlow, Jamie; Holland, Ann; Andrews, Nick; Weynants, Vincent; Sotolongo, Franklin; Balmer, Paul; Poolman, Jan; Borrow, Ray

    2007-11-01

    The "gold standard" assay for measuring serologic protection against Neisseria meningitidis group B (MenB) is the serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assay. Of vital importance to the outcome of the SBA assay is the choice of the target strain(s), which is often chosen on the basis of phenotype or genotype. We therefore investigated the effect on the results produced by the SBA assay of using phenotypically indistinguishable but geographically distinct MenB isolates. Nine PorA P1.19,15 and 11 PorA P1.7-2,4 MenB isolates were incorporated into the SBA assay using human complement and were assayed against sera obtained either before or after outer membrane vesicle vaccination. Large differences in the results produced by the isolates in the SBA assay were demonstrated. These included differences as great as 5.8-fold in SBA geometric mean titers and in the proportions of subjects with SBA titers of >/=4. Ranges of as many as 9 SBA titers were achieved by individual sera across the panels of isolates. To determine the reasons for the differences observed, investigations into the expression of capsular polysaccharide, PorA, PorB, Opc, and lipooligosaccharide (LOS) and into LOS sialylation were completed. However, minor differences were found between strains, indicating similar expression and no antigen masking. These results have implications for the choice of MenB target strains for inclusion in future studies of MenB vaccines and highlight the requirement for standardization of target strains between laboratories.

  20. Further enhancement of the second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) coefficient and the stability of NLO polymers that contain isolation chromophore moieties by using the "suitable isolation group" concept and the Ar/Ar(F) self-assembly effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenbo; Ye, Cheng; Qin, Jingui; Li, Zhen

    2013-08-01

    For the first time, a series of second-order NLO poly(arylene-ethynylene)s, in which an isolation chromophore was introduced to enhance the NLO coefficients, were successfully designed and synthesized. Thanks to the isolation chromophore, these polymers demonstrated good NLO activities and optical transparency. To further improve the comprehensive performance of the polymers, different isolation groups of various sizes were introduced to subtly modify the structure of the polymers according to the "suitable isolation group" concept. The naphthalene (Np) group was found to be a "suitable isolation group" in this series of polymers and polymer P3 demonstrated the highest d33 value (122.1 pm V(-1)) of these five polymers. Interestingly, polymer P5, which contained a pentafluorophenyl ring as an isolation group, exhibited a much higher NLO effect and stability than polymer P2, which just contained normal phenyl rings as isolation groups (97.2 versus 62.5 pm V(-1)), thus indicating the advantages of the Ar-Ar(F) self-assembly effect in the field of non-linear optics.

  1. Discrimination and divergence among Lactobacillus plantarum-group (LPG) isolates with reference to their probiotic functionalities from vegetable origin.

    PubMed

    Devi, Sundru Manjulata; Aishwarya, Subramanian; Halami, Prakash M

    2016-12-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the diversity and probiotic properties of Lactobacillus plantarum-group cultures from vegetable origin. First, genotypic diversity of L. plantarum (n=34) was achieved by PCR of Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA and recA gene-specific multiplex PCR. The isolates were segregated into five groups namely, Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus paraplantarum, Lactobacillus arizonensis, Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum and argentoratensis. Further discrimination was achieved by restriction fragment length polymorphism of probiotic adhesion genes viz.fbp, mub and msa gene. As determined by nucleotide sequence analysis and bioinformatics Pfam database, the putative Fbp protein had only one FBP domain, whereas Mub protein had 8-10 MUB domain repeats. However, L. pentosus (except CFR MFT9), L. plantarum subsp. argentoratensis (except CFR MFT5) and L. arizonensis (except CFR MFT2) isolates gave no amplicon for the tested marker genes. Selected cultures (n=15) showed tolerance to simulated digestive fluids (20-85%), exhibited auto-aggregation (10-77%), cellular hydrophobicity (12-78%), and broad spectrum of anti-microbial activity. Concurrently, high adherence capacity to mucin was achieved for L. plantarum subsp. plantarum (MCC 2974 and CFR MFT1) and L. paraplantarum (MTCC 9483, MCC 2977, MCC 2978), which had an additional MUB domain repeat.

  2. [Hazardous health effect of isolation. A clinical study of 2 groups of persons in custody].

    PubMed

    Gamman, T

    1995-08-10

    The possible effects of solitary confinement on prisoners' health were studied using a prospective design. 27 secluded prisoners were compared with 27 others who were held in custody. The latter group of prisoners was able to see other prisoners, visitors, friends and family members, and could participate in prison activities. The results showed that secluded prisoners had more health problems than prisoners serving less restrictive prison sentences did. The most usual complaints were headache, pain in the neck, stomach and shoulders, anxiety and depression. Psychotic symptoms were rare. The complaints tended to last for the whole period of solitary confinement and were difficult to treat while the prisoners remained secluded. Patients with chronic somatic diseases tended to deteriorate in solitary confinement. Most patients recovered when the seclusion was terminated.

  3. Extensive introgressive hybridization within the northern oriole group (Genus Icterus) revealed by three-species isolation with migration analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Frode; Omland, Kevin E

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, studies of divergence and gene flow among closely-related taxa were generally limited to pairs of sister taxa. However, organisms frequently exchange genes with other non-sister taxa. The “northern oriole” group within genus Icterus exemplifies this problem. This group involves the extensively studied hybrid zone between Baltimore oriole (Icterus galbula) and Bullock's oriole (I. bullockii), an alleged hybrid zone between I. bullockii and black-backed oriole (I. abeillei), and likely mtDNA introgression between I. galbula and I. abeillei. Here, we examine the divergence population genetics of the entire northern oriole group using a multipopulation Isolation-with-Migration (IM) model. In accordance with Haldane's rule, nuclear loci introgress extensively beyond the I. galbula–I. bullockii hybrid zone, while mtDNA does not. We found no evidence of introgression between I. bullockii and I. abeillei or between I. galbula and I. abeillei when all three species were analyzed together in a three-population model. However, traditional pairwise analysis suggested some nuclear introgression from I. abeillei into I. galbula, probably reflecting genetic contributions from I. bullockii unaccounted for in a two-population model. Thus, only by including all members of this group in the analysis was it possible to rigorously estimate the level of gene flow among these three closely related species. PMID:23145328

  4. Prevalence of Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, and Cryptosporidium spp in Da Nang, Vietnam, detected by a multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ögren, Jessica; Van Nguyen, Song; Nguyen, Minh Khac; Dimberg, Jan; Matussek, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We surveyed the prevalence of Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Cryptosporidium spp in individuals with and without gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms residing in and around Da Nang city, Vietnam. Fecal samples were collected from children (n = 100) and adults (n = 80) with GI symptoms and from healthy individuals (n = 88) reporting no GI symptoms. Parasite detection was performed by multiplex real-time PCR. Overall, except for G. duodenalis, we found a low prevalence (<5%) of D. fragilis and E. dispar and no detection of E. histolytica and C. spp in all participants with GI symptoms. Specifically for D. fragilis this contrasts with findings in European populations of children with GI symptoms showing prevalence up to 73%. Moreover, our results indicate that the prevalence of G. duodenalis is higher in patients with GI symptoms compared to asymptomatic individuals and this difference is most obvious in young patients.

  5. Bacteroides fragilis Lipopolysaccharide and Inflammatory Signaling in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lukiw, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiome consists of ~3.8 × 1013 symbiotic microorganisms that form a highly complex and dynamic ecosystem: the gastrointestinal (GI) tract constitutes the largest repository of the human microbiome by far, and its impact on human neurological health and disease is becoming increasingly appreciated. Bacteroidetes, the largest phylum of Gram-negative bacteria in the GI tract microbiome, while generally beneficial to the host when confined to the GI tract, have potential to secrete a remarkably complex array of pro-inflammatory neurotoxins that include surface lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and toxic proteolytic peptides. The deleterious effects of these bacterial exudates appear to become more important as GI tract and blood-brain barriers alter or increase their permeability with aging and disease. For example, presence of the unique LPSs of the abundant Bacteroidetes species Bacteroides fragilis (BF-LPS) in the serum represents a major contributing factor to systemic inflammation. BF-LPS is further recognized by TLR2, TLR4, and/or CD14 microglial cell receptors as are the pro-inflammatory 42 amino acid amyloid-beta (Aβ42) peptides that characterize Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain. Here we provide the first evidence that BF-LPS exposure to human primary brain cells is an exceptionally potent inducer of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-kB (p50/p65) complex, a known trigger in the expression of pathogenic pathways involved in inflammatory neurodegeneration. This ‘Perspectives communication’ will in addition highlight work from recent studies that advance novel and emerging concepts on the potential contribution of microbiome-generated factors, such as BF-LPS, in driving pro-inflammatory degenerative neuropathology in the AD brain. PMID:27725817

  6. Aeromonas jandaei (formerly genospecies DNA group 9 A. sobria), a new sucrose-negative species isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Carnahan, A; Fanning, G R; Joseph, S W

    1991-01-01

    . The esculin-, sucrose-, and cellobiose-negative and colistin-resistant profile distinguished A. jandaei from other Aeromonas species. These A. jandaei strains were isolated from blood (two strains), wounds (two strains), diarrheal stools (four strains), and a prawn (one strain). The blood and wound isolates, in particular, suggest that there is a possible clinical significance for this species and justify identification of and further research on this group of motile aeromonads. PMID:2037673

  7. Chemical history of isolated dwarf galaxies of the Local Group - I. dSphs: Cetus and Tucana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Vergara, N.; Carigi, L.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Durazo, R.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, we obtain chemical evolution models (CEMs) for Tucana and Cetus, two isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group. The CEMs have been built from the star formation histories (SFHs) and the metallicity histories, both obtained independently by the Local Cosmology from Isolated Dwarfs (LCID) project from deep colour-magnitude diagrams. Based on our models, we find that the chemical histories were complex and can be divided into different epochs and scenarios. In particular, during 75 per cent of the SFH, the galaxies behaved as closed boxes and, during the remaining 25 per cent, either received a lot of primordial gas by accretion or they lost metals through metal-rich winds. In order to discriminate between these two scenarios, abundances ratios in old stars are needed. At t ˜ 4.5 Gyr, the galaxies lost most of their gas due to a short-strong, well-mixed wind. We obtain very similar CEMs for both galaxies, although Cetus is twice as massive as Tucana. We conclude that the star formation in both galaxies began with only 1.5 per cent of the baryonic mass fraction predicted by Λ cold dark matter.

  8. Niemeyer Virus: A New Mimivirus Group A Isolate Harboring a Set of Duplicated Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Boratto, Paulo V. M.; Arantes, Thalita S.; Silva, Lorena C. F.; Assis, Felipe L.; Kroon, Erna G.; La Scola, Bernard; Abrahão, Jônatas S.

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that gene duplication/acquisition is a key factor for molecular evolution, being directly related to the emergence of new genetic variants. The importance of such phenomena can also be expanded to the viral world, with impacts on viral fitness and environmental adaptations. In this work we describe the isolation and characterization of Niemeyer virus, a new mimivirus isolate obtained from water samples of an urban lake in Brazil. Genomic data showed that Niemeyer harbors duplicated copies of three of its four aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes (cysteinyl, methionyl, and tyrosyl RS). Gene expression analysis showed that such duplications allowed significantly increased expression of methionyl and tyrosyl aaRS mRNA by Niemeyer in comparison to APMV. Remarkably, phylogenetic data revealed that Niemeyer duplicated gene pairs are different, each one clustering with a different group of mimivirus strains. Taken together, our results raise new questions about the origins and selective pressures involving events of aaRS gain and loss among mimiviruses. PMID:26635738

  9. Isolation and characterization of a unique group of slowly growing mycobacteria: description of Mycobacterium lentiflavum sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Springer, B; Wu, W K; Bodmer, T; Haase, G; Pfyffer, G E; Kroppenstedt, R M; Schröder, K H; Emler, S; Kilburn, J O; Kirschner, P; Telenti, A; Coyle, M B; Böttger, E C

    1996-01-01

    A distinct group of slowly growing mycobacteria was identified on the basis of growth characteristics, biochemical and lipid profiles, and nucleic acid analyses. The isolates showed growth at 22 to 37 degrees C, yellow pigmentation, and negative tests for Tween 80 hydrolysis, nicotinic acid, nitrate reductase, and urease; tests for arylsulfatase, pyrazinamidase, and heat-stable catalase were variable. Analysis of cellular fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography and mycolic acids by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography indicated a distinctive pattern which was unlike those of other species. Determination of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed a unique sequence closely related to Mycobacterium simiae and M. genavense. On the basis of DNA homology studies, we suggest that these organisms are representatives of a novel species, for which the name M. lentiflavum sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:8727884

  10. Determination of staphylococcal exotoxins, SCCmec types, and genetic relatedness of Staphylococcus intermedius group isolates from veterinary staff, companion animals, and hospital environments in Korea.

    PubMed

    Youn, Jung-Ho; Koo, Hye Cheong; Ahn, Kuk Ju; Lim, Suk-Kyung; Park, Yong Ho

    2011-09-01

    The Staphylococcus (S.) intermedius group (SIG) has been a main research subject in recent years. S. pseudintermedius causes pyoderma and otitis in companion animals as well as foodborne diseases. To prevent SIG-associated infection and disease outbreaks, identification of both staphylococcal exotoxins and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types among SIG isolates may be helpful. In this study, it was found that a single isolate (one out of 178 SIG isolates examined) harbored the canine enterotoxin SEC gene. However, the S. intermedius exfoliative toxin gene was found in 166 SIG isolates although the S. aureus-derived exfoliative toxin genes, such as eta, etb and etd, were not detected. SCCmec typing resulted in classifying one isolate as SCCmec type IV, 41 isolates as type V (including three S. intermedius isolates), and 10 isolates as non-classifiable. Genetic relatedness of all S. pseudintermedius isolates recovered from veterinary staff, companion animals, and hospital environments was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Strains having the same band patterns were detected in S. pseudintermedius isolates collected at 13 and 18 months, suggesting possible colonization and/or expansion of a specific S. pseudintermedius strain in a veterinary hospital.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies specific for Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxins BFT1 and BFT2 and their use in immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed 22 mouse IgG1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Bacteroides fragilis zinc metalloprotease toxins 1 and 2 (BFT1 and BFT2). Mice were immunized with recombinant BFT1 or BFT2 proteins with metalloprotease activity. Eight of the mAbs bind specifically to BFT1. One mAb, 2H6, binds specifically to BFT2. The remaining 13 mAbs bind to both BFT1 and BFT2. The eight BFT1-specific mAbs recognize at least five different epitopes on the toxin. Four of the BFT1-specific mAbs neutralized rBFT1 metalloprotease activity. Only one of these four mAbs, 1D9, neutralizes the cytotoxic effect of BFT1. Here, we describe the development of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) to detect BFT1 or BFT2 toxin in an isotype-specific manner. The sandwich ELISAs have a detection limit of 20 to 40 ng/ml when purified recombinant BFT protein is diluted into PBS. The sandwich ELISA can be used to distinguish and quantify levels of rBFT1 and rBFT2 in stool. This ELISA can be an important tool to investigate the association between BFT expression by enterotoxigenic B. fragilis and diseases such as diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. PMID:28257448

  12. First Report of Group CTX-M-9 Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases in Escherichia coli Isolates from Pediatric Patients in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Merida-Vieyra, Jocelin; De Colsa, Agustin; Calderon Castañeda, Yair; Arzate Barbosa, Patricia; Aquino Andrade, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the presence of group CTX-M-9 extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) in clinical Escherichia coli isolates from pediatric patients. A total of 404 non-repeated positive ESBL E. coli isolates were collected from documented clinical infections in pediatric patients over a 2-year period. The identification and susceptibility profiles were determined using an automated system. Isolates that suggested ESBL production based on their resistance profiles to third and fourth generation cephalosporin and monobactam were selected. ESBL production was phenotypically confirmed using a diffusion method with cefotaxime and ceftazidime discs alone and in combination with clavulanic acid. blaESBL gene identification was performed through PCR amplification and sequencing. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) were performed to establish the clonal relationships of the E. coli isolates. CTX-M-9-type ESBLs were detected in 2.5% of the isolates. The subtypes corresponded to blaCTX-M-14 (n = 4) and blaCTX-M-27 (n = 6). Additionally, coexistence with other beta-lactamases was observed. A clonal relationship was established in three isolates; the rest were classified as non-related. We found seven different sequence type (ST) in CTX-M-9- producing E. coli isolates. ST38 was the most frequent. This study is the first report in Mexico to document the presence of group CTX-M-9 ESBLs in E. coli isolates from pediatric patients. PMID:27992527

  13. Spread of the blaOXA–23-Containing Tn2008 in Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates Grouped in CC92 from China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yisheng; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Haomin; Ying, Chunmei

    2017-01-01

    The rapid expansion of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) clinical isolates is a big issue. We investigated the antibiotic susceptibility, molecular epidemiology and resistance gene of A. baumannii collected at two hospitals in Shanghai, China. Besides, the A. baumannii PCR-based replicon typing method (AB-PBRT) was conducted to categorize the plasmids into homogeneous groups on the basis of replicase genes. Most CRAB isolates showed high-level resistance to almost all antibiotics but retain susceptibility to colistin and tigecycline. A total of 101 isolates carried blaOXA-51-like gene. Sequencing identified the presence of blaOXA-66 for CRAB isolates. blaOXA–23 gene were discovered in all CRAB isolates. Each CRAB isolate contained 1–3 of 19 different plasmid replicase (rep) gene homology groups (GRs) and the GR6 (repAci6) was ubiquitous. Genotyping by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) showed seven defined MLST patterns and three novel STs were found. eBURST analysis indicated they were all grouped in CC92 (GCII) with the most frequent ST208 (50%). Two blaOXA–23-bearing transposons were found: Tn2006 and Tn2008. Tn2008 were detected in 54 (96.4%) isolates and Tn2006 in two remaining isolates. The blaOXA–23 carbapenem gene was vitally associated with repAci6 plasmid belong to CC92 clonal group. Our survey revealed severe drug resistance in A. baumannii isolates. Tn2008-containing CC92 A. baumannii were endemic, which may facilitate the blaoxa23 dissemination. PMID:28220115

  14. Use of single-strand conformation polymorphism of amplified 16S rDNA for grouping of bacteria isolated from foods.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hajime; Kimura, Bon; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Mori, Mayumi; Yokoi, Asami; Fujii, Tateo

    2008-04-01

    The grouping method for isolated strains from foods using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) after PCR amplification of a portion of 16S rDNA was developed. This method was able to group the strains from various food samples based on 16S rDNA sequence. As 97.8% of the isolated strains from various foods were grouped correctly, use of the PCR-SSCP method enables the prompt and labor-saving analysis of microbial population of food-derived bacterial strains. Advantages in speed and accuracy of bacterial population identification by the PCR-SSCP method have practical application for food suppliers and testing laboratories.

  15. Survey of the bp/tee genes from clinical group A streptococcus isolates in New Zealand - implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Steemson, John D; Moreland, Nicole J; Williamson, Deborah; Morgan, Julie; Carter, Philip E; Proft, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is responsible for a wide range of diseases ranging from superficial infections, such as pharyngitis and impetigo, to life-threatening diseases, such as toxic shock syndrome and acute rheumatic fever (ARF). GAS pili are hair-like extensions protruding from the cell surface and consist of highly immunogenic structural proteins: the backbone pilin (BP) and one or two accessory pilins (AP1 and AP2). The protease-resistant BP builds the pilus shaft and has been recognized as the T-antigen, which forms the basis of a major serological typing scheme that is often used as a supplement to M typing. A previous sequence analysis of the bp gene (tee gene) in 39 GAS isolates revealed 15 different bp/tee types. In this study, we sequenced the bp/tee gene from 100 GAS isolates obtained from patients with pharyngitis, ARF or invasive disease in New Zealand. We found 20 new bp/tee alleles and four new bp/tee types/subtypes. No association between bp/tee type and clinical outcome was observed. We confirmed earlier reports that the emm type and tee type are associated strongly, but we also found exceptions, where multiple tee types could be found in certain M/emm type strains, such as M/emm89. We also reported, for the first time, the existence of a chimeric bp/tee allele, which was assigned into a new subclade (bp/tee3.1). A strong sequence conservation of the bp/tee gene was observed within the individual bp/tee types/subtypes (>97 % sequence identity), as well as between historical and contemporary New Zealand and international GAS strains. This temporal and geographical sequence stability provided further evidence for the potential use of the BP/T-antigen as a vaccine target.

  16. Distribution of G (VP7) and P (VP4) genotypes in buffalo group A rotaviruses isolated in Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Pisanelli, Giuseppe; Martella, Vito; Pagnini, Ugo; De Martino, Luisa; Lorusso, Eleonora; Iovane, Giuseppe; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2005-09-30

    Group A rotaviruses are established agents of disease in buffalo calves. Early epidemiological studies in Italian buffalo herds revealed the predominance of strains with G8 specificity and detected strains with the rare, RRV-like, VP4 P[3] genotype. To acquire additional information on the VP4 and VP7 specificities of buffalo rotaviruses, a total of 125 fecal samples were collected from buffalo calves affected with diarrhoea, in seven dairy farms in Southern Italy. Rotaviruses were detected in 21 samples (16.8%) by an immunochromatographic assay and by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Analysis of the VP7 gene revealed that 57% (12 of 21) of the isolates were G6, 23.8% were G8 (5 of 21) and 19% (4 of 21) were G10. Analysis of the VP4 revealed that 71.4% (15 of 21) of the isolates were P[5] and that 28.6% (6 of 21) were P[1]. The most common combination of G and P types was P[5],G6 (57%), followed by P[1],G10 (19%), P[5],G8 (14%) and P[1],G8 (9.5%). While P[5],G6 rotaviruses are very common in Italian bovine herds, the antigenic combination P[1],G10 is unusual and presumably derives from reassortment between P[1] and G10 strains, that appear to be more frequent in buffaloes and bovines, respectively. The presence of bovine-like G and P serotypes suggests that in Italy the epidemiology of buffalo rotaviruses overlaps the epidemiology of bovine rotaviruses, presumably because of the strict species affinity and/or of the intermingled distribution over the same geographical areas of the buffalo and bovine herds.

  17. Isolation and characterization of type III group B streptococcal mutants defective in biosynthesis of the type-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M K; Mattingly, S J

    1983-01-01

    Four classes of mutants of type III group B streptococcus were isolated by serial subculture of the wild-type strain in the presence of type III-specific rabbit antiserum. Class I mutants no longer synthesized sialic acid but still elaborated the core antigen. Class II mutants maintained the ability to synthesize sialic acid but could not attach it to the core antigen. Class III mutants did not produce the core antigen but still synthesized intracellular sialic acid. Class IV mutants synthesized the complete antigen; however, only approximately 4% of the antigen synthesized was found associated with the cell wall peptidoglycan (in the wild-type strain greater than 85% of the antigen synthesized is covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan), whereas greater than 90% of the antigen was secreted into the growth medium. Production of other components (CAMP factor, group B antigen, beta-hemolysin, neuraminidase) by these mutants appeared similar to those of the wild-type strain. Mouse lethality studies of these strains indicated that all four classes have greater than 3 log10-higher 50% lethal dose values than that of the wild-type strain. To understand the basis for this variation, the invasive ability of the wild-type strain and the sialic acid-deficient mutant strain M-10 (class I) was examined. Mice received 10(5) CFU of each organism; they were then sacrificed at various times postinoculation, and viable group B streptococci from different organs were enumerated. Mice were able to clear M-10 more efficiently, with greater than 80% of M-10 cells being phagocytized by macrophages within 1 h, whereas the wild-type strain was able to evade phagocytic killing and disseminate to other tissues. These data, therefore, strongly indicate that the sialic acid moiety greatly enhances the virulence of the type III antigen. In addition, the level of cell-associated type-specific antigen appears to contribute significantly to the pathogenicity of the organism. PMID

  18. Biogeography, Competition, and Microclimate: The Barnacle Chthamalus fragilis in New England.

    PubMed

    Wethey, David S

    2002-08-01

    Geographic limits of species are commonly associated with climatic or physical boundaries, but the mechanisms of exclusion at the limits of distribution are poorly understood. In some intertidal populations, the strengths of interactions with natural enemies are mediated by microclimate, and determine geographic limits. The northern limit of the barnacle Chthamalus fragilis in New England is the south side of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. South of the cape, Chthamalus has a refuge from competition in the high intertidal, which is too hot for survival of its superior competitor Semibalanus balanoides. North of the cape, the high intertidal is cooler, and Semibalanus survives, so Chthamalus has no refuge. Thus, geographic variation in the strength of competition may determine the geographic limit of Chthamalus. Intolerance of cold by Chthamalus cannot account for the geographic limit: transplants of Chthamalus 80 km beyond its northern limit survived up to 8 yr in the absence of competition with Semibalanus. At the geographic limit of Chthamalus in the Cape Cod Canal there are two bridges, 5 km apart. On the southern bridge, Chthamalus is abundant and occupies a refuge above Semibalanus. On the northern bridge in 2001, only 7 individual Chthamalus were present. Despite the proximity of the bridges, their microclimates are very different. The southern bridge, where Chthamalus is abundant, is up to 8°C hotter than the northern bridge. This higher temperature creates a refuge in the high intertidal for Chthamalus. On the cooler northern bridge, there is no refuge for Chthamalus. Because of the difference in temperatures of the water masses that meet in the canal, heat storage in the rock of the bridge piers causes the temperatures to differ between the bridges. Thus, geographic change in microclimate alters the strength of competition, and determines the geographic limit."When we travel from south to north, or from a damp region to a dry, we invariably see some species

  19. [Ultrastructural characteristics of several constituants of limb buds in the embryos of the slowworm (Anguis fragilis L.) and the green lizard (Lacerta viridis Laur.)].

    PubMed

    Raynaud, A; Adrian, M

    1975-06-09

    Ultrastructural characteristics of the cells of the apical crest, of the mesoblast and of the ventral processes of somites, in the anlage of the anterior limb buds of embryos of the slow-worm (Anguis fragilis) and of the green lizard (Lacerta viridis) are described at early stages of the development. Differences between the two species studied are brought to light.

  20. Comparison between immobilized Kluyveromyces fragilis and saccharomyces cerevisiae coimmobilized with. beta. -galactosidase, with respect to continuous ethanol production from concentrated whey permeate

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn-Haegerdal, B.

    1985-06-01

    Kluyveromyces fragilis immobilized in calcium alginate gel was compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae coimmobilized with ..beta..-galactosidase, for continuous ethanol production from whey permeate in packed-bed-type columns. Four different whey concentrations were studied, equivalent to 4.5, 10, 15 and 20% lactose, respectively. In all cases the coimmobilized preparation produced more ethanol than Kluyveromyces fragilis. The study went on for more than 5 weeks. Kluyveromyces fragilis showed a decline in activity after 20 days, while the coimmobilized preparation was stable during the entire investigation. Under experimental conditions theoretical yields of ethanol were obtained from 4.5 and 10% lactose substrates with the coimmobilized system. Using 15% lactose substrate, theoretical yields were only obtained when a galactose-adapted immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae column was run in series with the coimmobilized column. Then a maximum of 71 g/l ethanol was produced with a productivity of 2.5 g/l hour. The coimmobilized column alone gave a maximum ethanol concentration of 52 g/l with a productivity of 4.5 g/l hour, whereas immobilized Kluyveromyces fragilis only produced 13 g/l ethanol with a productivity of 1.1 g/l hour. It was not possible to obtain theoretical yields of ethanol from the highest substrate concentration. 13 references.

  1. MLVA-16 typing of 295 marine mammal Brucella isolates from different animal and geographic origins identifies 7 major groups within Brucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Since 1994, Brucella strains have been isolated from a wide range of marine mammals. They are currently recognized as two new Brucella species, B. pinnipedialis for the pinniped isolates and B. ceti for the cetacean isolates in agreement with host preference and specific phenotypic and molecular markers. In order to investigate the genetic relationships within the marine mammal Brucella isolates and with reference to terrestrial mammal Brucella isolates, we applied in this study the Multiple Loci VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) Analysis (MLVA) approach. A previously published assay comprising 16 loci (MLVA-16) that has been shown to be highly relevant and efficient for typing and clustering Brucella strains from animal and human origin was used. Results 294 marine mammal Brucella strains collected in European waters from 173 animals and a human isolate from New Zealand presumably from marine origin were investigated by MLVA-16. Marine mammal Brucella isolates were shown to be different from the recognized terrestrial mammal Brucella species and biovars and corresponded to 3 major related groups, one specific of the B. ceti strains, one of the B. pinnipedialis strains and the last composed of the human isolate. In the B. ceti group, 3 subclusters were identified, distinguishing a cluster of dolphin, minke whale and porpoise isolates and two clusters mostly composed of dolphin isolates. These results were in accordance with published analyses using other phenotypic or molecular approaches, or different panels of VNTR loci. The B. pinnipedialis group could be similarly subdivided in 3 subclusters, one composed exclusively of isolates from hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) and the two others comprising other seal species isolates. Conclusion The clustering analysis of a large collection of marine mammal Brucella isolates from European waters significantly strengthens the current view of the population structure of these two species, and their

  2. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mutations in the parC, parE, and gyrA Genes of Clinical Isolates of Viridans Group Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    González, Irene; Georgiou, Marios; Alcaide, Fernando; Balas, Delia; Liñares, Josefina; de la Campa, Adela G.

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of the parC and gyrA genes from seven ciprofloxacin-resistant (Cpr) isolates of viridans group streptococci (two high-level Cpr Streptococcus oralis and five low-level Cpr Streptococcus mitis isolates) were determined and compared with those obtained from susceptible isolates. The nucleotide sequences of the QRDRs of the parE and gyrB genes from the five low-level Cpr S. mitis isolates and from the NCTC 12261 type strain were also analyzed. Four of these low-level Cpr isolates had changes affecting the subunits of DNA topoisomerase IV: three in Ser-79 (to Phe or Ile) of ParC and one in ParE at a position not previously described to be involved in quinolone resistance (Pro-424). One isolate did not show any mutation. The two high-level Cpr S. oralis isolates showed mutations affecting equivalent residue positions of ParC and GyrA, namely, Ser-79 to Phe and Ser-81 to Phe or Tyr, respectively. The parC mutations were able to transform Streptococcus pneumoniae to ciprofloxacin resistance, while the gyrA mutations transformed S. pneumoniae only when mutations in parC were present. These results suggest that DNA topoisomerase IV is a primary target of ciprofloxacin in viridans group streptococci, DNA gyrase being a secondary target. PMID:9797205

  3. The symbiotic bacterial surface factor polysaccharide A on Bacteroides fragilis inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammation in human fetal enterocytes via toll receptors 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fei; Meng, Di; Weng, Meiqian; Zhu, Weishu; Wu, Wenxue; Kasper, Dennis; Walker, W. Allan

    2017-01-01

    Colonizing bacteria interacting with the immature, unlike the mature, human intestine favors inflammation over immune homeostasis. As a result, ten percent of premature infants under 1500 grams weight develop an inflammatory necrosis of the intestine after birth, e.g., necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). NEC is a major health problem in this population causing extensive morbidity and mortality and an enormous expenditure of health care dollars. NEC can be prevented by giving preterm infants their mother’s expressed breast milk or ingesting selective probiotic organisms. Vaginally delivered, breast fed newborns develop health promoting bacteria (“pioneer” bacteria) which preferentially stimulate intestinal host defense and anti-inflammation. One such “pioneer” organism is Bacteroides fragilis with a polysaccharide (PSA) on its capsule. B. fragilis has been shown developmentally in intestinal lymphocytes and dendritic cells to produce a balanced T-helper cell (TH1/TH2) response and to reduce intestinal inflammation by activity through the TLR2 receptor stimulating IL-10 which inhibits IL-17 causing inflammation. No studies have been done on the role of B. fragilis PSA on fetal enterocytes and its increased inflammation. Accordingly, using human and mouse fetal intestinal models, we have shown that B. fragilis with PSA and PSA alone inhibits IL-1β-induced IL-8 inflammation in fetal and NEC intestine. We have also begun to define the mechanism for this unique inflammation noted in fetal intestine. We have shown that B. fragilis PSA anti-inflammation requires both the TLR2 and TLR4 receptor and is in part mediated by the AP1 transcription factor (TLR2) which is developmentally regulated. These observations may help to devise future preventative treatments of premature infants against NEC. PMID:28278201

  4. Genetic analysis and antigenic characterization of human respiratory syncytial virus group A viruses isolated in Germany 1996-2008.

    PubMed

    Adams, Ortwin; Werzmirzowsky, Judith; Hengel, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    The genetic and antigenic variability of 18 human respiratory syncytial virus group A viruses isolated in Germany from 1996 to 2008 was evaluated by nucleotide sequencing of the complete G and F genes and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis with anti-G and anti-F monoclonal antibodies. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the G-proteins clustered into the two genotypes GA2 and GA5. The antigenic analysis of G-gene was carried out with a panel of anti-G and anti-F monoclonal antibodies that recognized strain-specific or variable epitopes which were originally derived against long strain (subtype GA1) and MON-3-88 strain (GA2). An amino acid substitution was found in a potential O-glycosylation site leading to a loss of reactivity with a strain-specific MAb. A score was calculated for quantifying the overall reactivity of the antibodies. If reactivity of all MAbs was totalized, a net sum loss of reactivity was seen over the time suggesting that antigenic drift due to immune selection may be occurring.

  5. Tofla virus: A newly identified Nairovirus of the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever group isolated from ticks in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Satoshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Fuxun, Yu; Kurosaki, Yohei; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Sakaguchi, Miako; Fuchigami, Takeshi; Ono, Hokuto; Nishi, Kodai; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Uchida, Leo; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yasuda, Jiro; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Fujita, Hiromi; Morita, Kouichi; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Ixodid ticks transmit several important viral pathogens. We isolated a new virus (Tofla virus: TFLV) from Heamaphysalis flava and Heamaphysalis formsensis in Japan. The full-genome sequences revealed that TFLV belonged to the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. Phylogenetic analyses and neutralization tests suggested that TFLV is closely related to the Hazara virus and that it is classified into the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever group. TFLV caused lethal infection in IFNAR KO mice. The TFLV-infected mice exhibited a gastrointestinal disorder, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography images showed a significant uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in the intestinal tract. TFLV was able to infect and propagate in cultured cells of African green monkey-derived Vero E6 cells and human-derived SK-N-SH, T98-G and HEK-293 cells. Although TFLV infections in humans and animals are currently unknown, our findings may provide clues to understand the potential infectivity and to develop of pre-emptive countermeasures against this new tick-borne Nairovirus. PMID:26863911

  6. Inhibitory activity of Aloe vera gel on some clinically isolated cariogenic and periodontopathic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fani, Mohammadmehdi; Kohanteb, Jamshid

    2012-03-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant with anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antidiabetic and immune-boosting properties. In the present study we investigated the inhibitory activities of Aloe vera gel on some cariogenic (Streptococcus mutans), periodontopathic (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis) and an opportunistic periodontopathogen (Bacteroides fragilis) isolated from patients with dental caries and periodontal diseases. Twenty isolates of each of these bacteria were investigated for their sensitivity to Aloe vera gel using the disk diffusion and microdilution methods. S. mutans was the species most sensitive to Aloe vera gel with a MIC of 12.5 µg/ml, while A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and B. fragilis were less sensitive, with a MIC of 25-50 µg/ml (P < 0.01). Based on our present findings it is concluded that Aloe vera gel at optimum concentration could be used as an antiseptic for prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases.

  7. Synergism between Penicillin, Clindamycin, or Metronidazole and Gentamicin against Species of the Bacteroides melaninogenicus and Bacteroides fragilis Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    with other antibiotics, such as clinda- In this study. 30 strains of Bacreroides spp. were tested for mycin (4. 18) and spiramycin (111). which proved to...BACTEROIDES SPP. 77 This work was supported in panr by grant 68011 from the Upjohn -netronidazole- spiramycine : conlcenltrationls et syflergic in situ Co

  8. Characterisation of geographically and temporally diverse Yersinia ruckeri isolates: evidence that UK and mainland European biotype 2 isolates represent different clonal groups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There have been increased reports of outbreaks of Enteric Redmouth Disease (ERM) caused by Yersinia ruckeri in previously-vaccinated salmonids in Europe, with some of these outbreaks attributed to emergent non-motile, Tween 80 negative, biotype 2 isolates. To gain information about their likely orig...

  9. Langerhans cell tropism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype A through F isolates derived from different transmission groups.

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, M T; Simmons, G; Hibbitts, S; O'Hare, M; Louisirirotchanakul, S; Beddows, S; Weber, J; Clapham, P R; Weiss, R A

    1997-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that some subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), especially subtype E, are more likely to infect mature Langerhans cells (mLC), we titrated a panel of 26 primary HIV-1 isolates of subtypes A through F on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and mLC. The majority of HIV-1 isolates from heterosexually infected patients did not show a preferred tropism for mLC compared to homosexually transmitted HIV-1 isolates. Only 6 of 26 isolates, 2 from patients infected by homosexual contact and 4 from patients infected by heterosexual contact, showed a higher infectivity for mLC than for PBMC. Both syncytium-inducing and non-syncytium-inducing isolates were able to infect mLC which express mRNA for the chemokine receptors CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4. PMID:9311896

  10. Advancing allele group-specific amplification of the complete HLA-C gene--isolation of novel alleles from three allele groups (C*04, C*07 and C*08).

    PubMed

    Cisneros, E; Martínez-Pomar, N; Vilches, M; Martín, P; de Pablo, R; Nuñez Del Prado, N; Nieto, A; Matamoros, N; Moraru, M; Vilches, C

    2013-10-01

    A variety of strategies have been designed for sequence-based HLA typing (SBT) and for the isolation of new human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, but unambiguous characterization of complete genomic sequences remains a challenge. We recently reported a simple method for the group-specific amplification (GSA) and sequencing of a full-length C*04 genomic sequence in isolation from the accompanying allele. Here we build on this strategy and present homologous methods that enable the isolation of HLA-C alleles belonging to another two allele groups. Using this approach, which can be applied to sequence-based typing in some clinical settings, we have successfully characterized three novel HLA-C alleles (C*04:128, C*07:01:01:02, and C*08:62).

  11. Alcohol from whey permeate: strain selection, temperature, and medium optimization. [Candida pseudotropicalis, Kluyveromyces fragilis, and K. lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Vienne, P.; Von Stockar, U.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative study of shaken flask cultures of some yeast strains capable of fermenting lactose showed no significant differences in alcohol yield among the four best strains. Use of whey permeate concentrated three times did not affect the yields. An optimal growth temperature of 38/sup 0/C was determined for K. fragilis NRRL 665. Elemental analysis of both the permeate and the dry cell mass of two strains indicated the possibility of a stoichiometric limitation by nitrogen. Batch cultures in laboratory fermentors confirmed this finding and revealed in addition the presence of a limitation due to growth factors. Both types of limitations could be overcome by adding yeast extract. The maximum productivity of continuous cultures could thus be improved to 5.1 g/l-h. The maximum specific growth rate was of the order of 0.310 h/sup -1/. 15 references, 10 figures, 9 tables.

  12. Prevalence and characteristics of the epidemic multiresistant Escherichia coli ST131 clonal group among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E. coli isolates in Copenhagen, Denmark.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Bente; Hansen, Dennis S; Nilsson, Frida; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Leihof, Rikke Fleron; Struve, Carsten; Scheutz, Flemming; Johnston, Brian; Krogfelt, Karen A; Johnson, James R

    2013-06-01

    We report the characteristics of 115 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli clinical isolates, from 115 unique Danish patients, over a 1-year study interval (1 October 2008 to 30 September 2009). Forty-four (38%) of the ESBL isolates represented sequence type 131 (ST13)1, from phylogenetic group B2. The remaining 71 isolates were from phylogenetic groups D (27%), A (22%), B1 (10%), and B2 (3%). Serogroup O25 ST131 isolates (n = 42; 95% of ST131) comprised 7 different K antigens, whereas two ST131 isolates were O16:K100:H5. Compared to non-ST131 isolates, ST131 isolates were associated positively with CTX-M-15 and negatively with CTX-M-1 and CTX-M-14. They also were associated positively with 11 virulence genes, including afa and dra (Dr family adhesins), the F10 papA allele (P fimbria variant), fimH (type 1 fimbriae), fyuA (yersiniabactin receptor), iha (adhesin siderophore), iutA (aerobactin receptor), kpsM II (group 2 capsules), malX (pathogenicity island marker), ompT (outer membrane protease), sat (secreted autotransporter toxin), and usp (uropathogenicity-specific protein) and negatively with hra (heat-resistant agglutinin) and iroN (salmochelin receptor). The consensus virulence gene profile (>90% prevalence) of the ST131 isolates included fimH, fyuA, malX, and usp (100% each), ompT and the F10 papA allele (95% each), and kpsM II and iutA (93% each). ST131 isolates were also positively associated with community acquisition, extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) status, and the O25, K100, and H4 antigens. Thus, among ESBL E. coli isolates in Copenhagen, ST131 was the most prevalent clonal group, was community associated, and exhibited distinctive and comparatively extensive virulence profiles, plus a greater variety of capsular antigens than reported previously.

  13. THE ACS LCID PROJECT. IV. DETECTION OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH BUMP IN ISOLATED GALAXIES OF THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Monelli, M.; Hidalgo, S. L; Aparicio, A.; Gallart, C.; Cassisi, S.; Bernard, E. J.; Skillman, E. D. E-mail: carme@iac.e E-mail: shidalgo@iac.e E-mail: ejb@roe.ac.u

    2010-08-01

    We report the detection and analysis of the red giant branch (RGB) luminosity function bump in a sample of isolated dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. We have designed a new analysis approach comparing the observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with theoretical best-fit CMDs derived from precise estimates of the star formation histories of each galaxy. This analysis is based on studying the difference between the V magnitude of the RGB bump and the horizontal branch at the level of the RR Lyrae instability strip ({Delta}V {sup bump}{sub HB}) and we discuss here a technique for reliably measuring this quantity in complex stellar systems. By using this approach, we find that the difference between the observed and predicted values of {Delta}V {sup bump}{sub HB} is +0.13 {+-} 0.14 mag. This is smaller, by about a factor of 2, than the well-known discrepancy between theory and observation at low metallicity commonly derived for Galactic globular clusters (GCs). This result is confirmed by a comparison between the adopted theoretical framework and empirical estimates of the {Delta}V {sup bump}{sub HB} parameter for both a large database of Galactic GCs and for four other dwarf spheroidal galaxies for which this estimate is available in the literature. We also investigate the strength of the RGB bump feature (R{sub bump}), and find very good agreement between the observed and theoretically predicted R{sub bump} values. This agreement supports the reliability of the evolutionary lifetimes predicted by theoretical models of the evolution of low-mass stars.

  14. Genome sequence of Shimia str. SK013, a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from marine sediment

    DOE PAGES

    Kanukollu, Saranya; Voget, Sonja; Pohlner, Marion; ...

    2016-03-12

    Shimia strain SK013 is an aerobic, Gram-negative, rod shaped alphaproteobacterium affiliated with the Roseobacter group within the family Rhodobacteraceae. The strain was isolated from surface sediment (0-1 cm) of the Skagerrak at 114 m below sea level. The 4,049,808 bp genome of Shimia str. SK013 comprises 3,981 protein-coding genes and 47 RNA genes. It contains one chromosome and no extrachromosomal elements. The genome analysis revealed the presence of genes for a dimethylsulfoniopropionate lyase, demethylase and the trimethylamine methyltransferase (mttB) as well as genes for nitrate, nitrite and dimethyl sulfoxide reduction. This indicates that Shimia str. SK013 is able to switchmore » from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism and thus is capable of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur cycling at the seafloor. Among the ability to convert other sulfur compounds it has the genetic capacity to produce climatically active dimethyl sulfide. Growth on glutamate as a sole carbon source results in formation of cell-connecting filaments, a putative phenotypic adaptation of the surface-associated strain to the environmental conditions at the seafloor. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a flagellum (fla1) and a type IV pilus biogenesis, which is speculated to be a prerequisite for biofilm formation. This is also related to genes responsible for signalling such as N-acyl homoserine lactones, as well as quip-genes responsible for quorum quenching and antibiotic biosynthesis. Pairwise similarities of 16S rRNA genes (98.56 % sequence similarity to the next relative S. haliotis) and the in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (21.20 % sequence similarity to S. haliotis) indicated Shimia str. SK013 to be considered as a new species. In conclusion, the genome analysis of Shimia str. SK013 offered first insights into specific physiological and phenotypic adaptation mechanisms of Roseobacter-affiliated bacteria to the benthic environment.« less

  15. In vitro activity of tigecycline against patient isolates collected during phase 3 clinical trials for diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Peter J; Ruzin, Alexey; Tuckman, Margareta; Jones, C Hal

    2010-04-01

    The in vitro activity of tigecycline and comparative antimicrobial agents was evaluated against 1828 primary baseline pathogens isolated from 844 patients enrolled in the phase 3 clinical trials investigating the efficacy of tigecycline in diabetic foot infection (DFI). The trials were global, enrolling patients in 30 countries. Tigecycline was active against the most prevalent pathogens in DFI, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria with 95% of MICs < or =2 microg/mL for the entire collection. The spectrum of activity of tigecycline included important pathogens for DFI, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Bacteroides fragilis. As reported previously, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and several pathogens in the Proteeae group were generally less susceptible to tigecycline by comparison to other Gram-negative pathogens. The excellent in vitro expanded broad-spectrum activity of tigecycline in the clinical isolates confirmed the potential utility of tigecycline for pathogens associated with DFIs.

  16. Frequency of occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates from the intestinal and female genital tracts.

    PubMed

    Sutter, V L

    1983-01-01

    In the selection of empiric therapy for infections of the female genital tract and intraabdominal infections in humans, the requisite information includes (1) the frequency of isolation of bacterial species dominant in the normal gastrointestinal and female genital tracts and in intraabdominal and female genital tract infections and (2) the in vitro susceptibilities of the dominant species to drugs that may be used against them (e.g., penicillin G, cefoperazone, cefoxitin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, and metronidazole). The predominant bacteria in fecal contents are not necessarily those most frequently found in infections. Intraabdominal and perirectal infections are usually polymicrobial, resulting from mixtures of facultative species (coliforms and streptococci) and anaerobes. The predominant bacteria of the normal vagina and cervix are lactobacilli, facultative streptococci, Peptococcus species, and Peptostreptococcus species. Most infections of the female genital tract are due to mixtures of facultative enteric bacilli, streptococci, and anaerobes (Peptococcus and Peptostreptococcus species, Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides disiens, Bacteroides melaninogenicus, Bacteroides bivius, and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus). Of the antibiotics tested, clindamycin appears the most active against many of the groups of bacteria isolated.

  17. Genome Sequencing of Bacillus subtilis SC-8, Antagonistic to the Bacillus cereus Group, Isolated from Traditional Korean Fermented-Soybean Food

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, In-Cheol; Lee, Nam Keun

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis SC-8 is a Gram-positive bacterium displaying narrow antagonistic activity for the Bacillus cereus group. B. subtilis SC-8 was isolated from Korean traditional fermented-soybean food. Here we report the draft genome sequence of B. subtilis SC-8, including biosynthetic genes for antibiotics that may have beneficial effects for control of food-borne pathogens. PMID:22207744

  18. Kenyan isolates of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici from 2008 to 2014: Virulence to SrTmp in the Ug99 race group and implications for breeding programs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frequent emergence of new variants in the Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) Ug99 race group in Kenya has made pathogen survey a priority. We analyzed 140 isolates from 78 Pgt samples collected in Kenya between 2008 and 2014 and identified six races, including three not detected prior to 2013. G...

  19. Recovery of an unusual Flavobacterium group IIb-like isolate from a hand infection following pig bite.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Merkin, T E; Pickett, M J

    1990-01-01

    An unusual gram-negative rod (RMA 1571) was isolated from a hand infection following a pig bite. This unclassified isolate was characterized by growth requirements, microscopic examination, biochemical characteristics, antimicrobial susceptibility tests, and cellular fatty acid analysis. It was indole positive and produced yellow-pigmented growth, which placed it in the genus Flavobacterium, but its other features, including cellular fatty acid analysis, did not appear to be those of a named species. PMID:2351726

  20. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular characterization of virulence genes, phylogenetic groups of Escherichia coli isolated from diarrheic and healthy camel-calves in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Bessalah, Salma; Fairbrother, John Morris; Salhi, Imed; Vanier, Ghyslaine; Khorchani, Touhami; Seddik, Mouldi Mabrouk; Hammadi, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of virulence genes, serogroups, antimicrobial resistance and phylogenetic groups of Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrheic and healthy camel calves in Tunisia. From 120 fecal samples (62 healthy and 58 diarrheic camel calves aged less than 3 months), 70 E. coli isolates (53 from diarrheic herds and 17 from healthy herds) were examined by PCR for detection of the virulence genes associated with pathogenic E. coli in animals. A significantly greater frequency of the f17 gene was observed in individual camels and in herds with diarrhea, this gene being found in 44.7% and 41.5% of isolates from camels and herds with diarrhea versus 22.5% and 11.7% in camels (p=0.05) and herds without diarrhea (p=0.02). The aida, cnf1/2, f18, stx2 and paa genes were found only in isolates from camels with diarrhea, although at a low prevalence, 1.8%, 3.7%, 1.8%, 3.7% and 11.3%, respectively. Prevalence of afa8, cdtB, eae, east1, iroN, iss, kpsMTII, paa, sfa, tsh and papC genes did not differ significantly between herds with or without diarrhea. Genes coding for faeG, fanC, f41, estI, estII, CS31a and eltA were not detected in any isolates. All isolates were sensitive to amikacin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and ceftiofur and the highest frequency of resistance was observed to tetracycline, and ampicillin (52.8% and 37.1% respectively). The phylogenetic groups were identified by conventional triplex PCR. Results showed that E. coli strains segregated mainly in phylogenetic group B1, 52.8% in diarrheic herds and 52.9% in healthy herds.

  1. In vitro activities of eight macrolide antibiotics and RP-59500 (quinupristin-dalfopristin) against viridans group streptococci isolated from blood of neutropenic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, F; Carratala, J; Liñares, J; Gudiol, F; Martin, R

    1996-09-01

    From January 1988 to December 1994, 66 consecutive blood culture isolates of viridans group streptococci collected from febrile neutropenic cancer patients were tested for antimicrobial susceptibilities by the agar dilution method. The antibiotics studied were erythromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin, dirithromycin, azithromycin, josamycin, diacetyl-midecamycin, spiramycin, and quinupristin-dalfopristin. A total of 26 (39.4%) strains were resistant to erythromycin with an MIC range of 0.5 to > 128 micrograms/ml. The strains were classified into three groups according to their penicillin susceptibility: 42 (63.6%) were susceptible, 8 (12.1%) were intermediately resistant, and 16 (24.3%) were highly resistant. The percentages of erythromycin-resistant strains in each group were 23.8, 62.5, and 68.8%, respectively. Streptococcus mitis was the species most frequently isolated (83.3%) and showed the highest rates of penicillin (40%) and erythromycin (43.6%) resistance. MICs of all macrolide antibiotics tested and of quinupristin-dalfopristin were higher for penicillin-resistant strains than for penicillin-susceptible strains. All macrolide antibiotics tested had cross-resistance to erythromycin, which was not observed with quinupristin-dalfopristin. Our study shows a high rate of macrolide resistance among viridans group streptococci isolated from blood samples of neutropenic cancer patients, especially those infected with penicillin-resistant strains. These findings make macrolides unsuitable prophylactic agents against viridans group streptococcal bacteremia in this patient population.

  2. In vitro activities of eight macrolide antibiotics and RP-59500 (quinupristin-dalfopristin) against viridans group streptococci isolated from blood of neutropenic cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, F; Carratala, J; Liñares, J; Gudiol, F; Martin, R

    1996-01-01

    From January 1988 to December 1994, 66 consecutive blood culture isolates of viridans group streptococci collected from febrile neutropenic cancer patients were tested for antimicrobial susceptibilities by the agar dilution method. The antibiotics studied were erythromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin, dirithromycin, azithromycin, josamycin, diacetyl-midecamycin, spiramycin, and quinupristin-dalfopristin. A total of 26 (39.4%) strains were resistant to erythromycin with an MIC range of 0.5 to > 128 micrograms/ml. The strains were classified into three groups according to their penicillin susceptibility: 42 (63.6%) were susceptible, 8 (12.1%) were intermediately resistant, and 16 (24.3%) were highly resistant. The percentages of erythromycin-resistant strains in each group were 23.8, 62.5, and 68.8%, respectively. Streptococcus mitis was the species most frequently isolated (83.3%) and showed the highest rates of penicillin (40%) and erythromycin (43.6%) resistance. MICs of all macrolide antibiotics tested and of quinupristin-dalfopristin were higher for penicillin-resistant strains than for penicillin-susceptible strains. All macrolide antibiotics tested had cross-resistance to erythromycin, which was not observed with quinupristin-dalfopristin. Our study shows a high rate of macrolide resistance among viridans group streptococci isolated from blood samples of neutropenic cancer patients, especially those infected with penicillin-resistant strains. These findings make macrolides unsuitable prophylactic agents against viridans group streptococcal bacteremia in this patient population. PMID:8878591

  3. Comparative analysis of agr groups and virulence genes among subclinical and clinical mastitis Staphylococcus aureus isolates from sheep flocks of the Northeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Lara M; de Almeida, Mayra Zilta P R B; de Mendonça, Carla L; Mamizuka, Elsa M

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequent mastitis causative agents in small ruminants. The expression of most virulence genes of S. aureus is controlled by an accessory gene regulator (agr) locus. This study aimed to ascertain the prevalence of the different agr groups and to evaluate the occurrence of encoding genes for cytotoxin, adhesins and toxins with superantigen activity in S. aureus isolates from milk of ewes with clinical and subclinical mastitis in sheep flocks raised for meat production The agr groups I and II were identified in both cases of clinical and subclinical mastitis. Neither the arg groups III and IV nor negative agr were found. The presence of cflA gene was identified in 100% of the isolates. The frequency of hla and lukE-D genes was high - 77.3 and 82.8%, respectively and all isolates from clinical mastitis presented these genes. The sec gene, either associated to tst gene or not, was identified only in isolates from subclinical mastitis. None of the following genes were identified: bbp, ebpS, cna, fnbB, icaA, icaD, bap, hlg, lukM-lukF-PV and se-a-b-d-e.

  4. Further characterization of a new recombinant group of Plum pox virus isolates, PPV-T, found in orchards in the Ankara province of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Serçe, Ciğdem Ulubaş; Candresse, Thierry; Svanella-Dumas, Laurence; Krizbai, Laszlo; Gazel, Mona; Cağlayan, Kadriye

    2009-06-01

    Sixteen Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates collected in the Ankara region of Turkey were analyzed using available serological and molecular typing assays. Surprisingly, despite the fact that all isolates except one, which was a mix infection, were typed as belonging to the PPV-M strain in four independent molecular assays, nine of them (60%) reacted with both PPV-M specific and PPV-D specific monoclonal antibodies. Partial 5' and 3' genomic sequence analysis on four isolates demonstrated that irrespective of their reactivity towards the PPV-D specific monoclonal antibody, they were all closely related to a recombinant PPV isolate from Turkey, Ab-Tk. All three isolates for which the relevant genomic sequence was obtained showed the same recombination event as Ab-Tk in the HC-Pro gene, around position 1566 of the genome. Complete genomic sequencing of Ab-Tk did not provide evidence for additional recombination events in its evolutionary history. Taken together, these results indicate that a group of closely related PPV isolates characterized by a unique recombination in the HC-Pro gene is prevalent under field conditions in the Ankara region of Turkey. Similar to the situation with the PPV-Rec strain, we propose that these isolates represent a novel strain of PPV, for which the name PPV-T (Turkey) is proposed. Given that PPV-T isolates cannot be identified by currently available typing techniques, it is possible that their presence has been overlooked in other situations. Further efforts should allow a precise description of their prevalence and of their geographical distribution in Turkey and, possibly, in other countries.

  5. Distribution of emm genotypes among group A streptococcus isolates from patients with severe invasive streptococcal infections in Japan, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, T; Hirasawa, K; Suzuki, R; Ohya, H; Isobe, J; Tanaka, D; Katsukawa, C; Kawahara, R; Tomita, M; Ogata, K; Endoh, M; Okuno, R; Tada, Y; Okabe, N; Watanabe, H

    2007-10-01

    We surveyed emm genotypes of group A streptococcus (GAS) isolates from patients with severe invasive streptococcal infections during 2001-2005 and compared their prevalence with that of the preceding 5 years. Genotype emm1 remained dominant throughout 2001 to 2005, but the frequency rate of this type decreased compared with the earlier period. Various other emm types have appeared in recent years indicating alterations in the prevalent strains causing severe invasive streptococcal infections. The cover of the new 26-valent GAS vaccine fell from 93.5% for genotypes of isolates from 1996-2000 to 81.8% in 2001-2005.

  6. Septic thrombophlebitis of the superior mesenteric vein with bacteraemia caused by Bacteroides fragilis and Streptococcus intermedius as a complication of diverculitis.

    PubMed

    Hadano, Yoshiro; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2013-02-05

    A 68-year-old Japanese man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis was admitted to our hospital because of fever and haematemesis. On day 3, his blood culture became positive for Gram-negative bacilli and Gram-positive cocci, and contrast-enhanced abdominal CT revealed acute septic thrombophlebitis of the superior mesenteric vein with caecal diverculitis. Antimicrobial therapy with ampicillin-sulbactam and anticoagulant therapy were started and the blood culture grew Bacteroides fragilis and Streptococcus intermedius. On hospital day 7, the patient's condition began to improve in response to the therapy, therefore, the ampicillin-sulbactam and anticoagulant therapy was continued for 42 days. The patient was discharged home on hospital day 45. B fragilis bacteraemia of unknown source should caution the physician to search for an intra-abdominal focus, such as thrombosis of the portal vein or mesenteric vein.

  7. [Electron microscopic study of the penetration and distribution of somitic cells in the mesoblast of the limb buds of reptiles (Anguis fragilis and Lacerta viridis)].

    PubMed

    Raynaud, A; Adrian, M

    1975-09-29

    Based on characteristics of mitochondria and on the amount of lipid inclusions, a distinction between somitic cells and mesoblastic somatopleural cells is possible, at the early stages of the development of the limb bud in Reptiles (Anguis fragilis and Lacerta viridis). The dislocation of the ventral processes of the somites and the localisation of the somitic cells in the mesoblast of the anterior limb buds could be studied.

  8. Distribution of virulence factors and association with emm polymorphism or isolation site among beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsueh-Hsia; Cheng, Wei-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Distribution of virulence factors and association with emm polymorphism or isolation site among beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE), the dominant human pathogenic species among group G streptococci, is the causative agent of several invasive and non-invasive diseases worldwide. However, limited information is available about the distribution of virulence factors among SDSE isolates, or their association with emm types and the isolation sites. In this study, 246 beta-hemolytic group G SDSE isolates collected in central Taiwan between February 2007 and August 2011 were under investigation. Of these, 66 isolates were obtained from normally sterile sites and 180 from non-sterile sites. emm typing revealed 32 types, with the most prevalent one being stG10.0 (39.8%), followed by stG245.0 (15.4%), stG840.0 (12.2%), stG6.1 (7.7%), and stG652.0 (4.1%). The virulence genes lmb (encoding laminin-binding protein), gapC (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase), sagA (streptolysin S), and hylB (hyaluronidase) existed in all isolates. Also, 99.2% of the isolates possessed slo (streptolysin O) and scpA (C5a peptidase) genes. In addition, 72.8%, 14.6%, 9.4%, and 2.4% of the isolates possessed the genes ska (streptokinase), cbp (putative collagen-binding protein, SDEG_1781), fbp (putative fibronectin-binding protein, SDEG_0161), and sicG (streptococcal inhibitor of complement), respectively. The only superantigen gene detected was spegg (streptococcus pyrogenic exotoxin G(dys) ), which was possessed by 74.4% of the isolates; these isolates correlated with non-sterile sites. Positive correlations were observed between the following emm types and virulence genes: stG10.0 and stG840.0 with spegg, stG6.1 and stG652.0 with ska, and stG840.0 with cbp. On the other hand, negative correlations were observed between the following: stG245.0, stG6.1, and stG652.0 types with spegg, stG10.0 with ska

  9. A viral agent isolated from a case of "non-paralytic poliomyelitis" and pathogenic for suckling mice: its possible relation to the coxsackie group of viruses.

    PubMed

    CHEEVER, F S; DANIELS, J B; HERSEY, E F

    1950-08-01

    1. A viral agent, Powers, causing myocarditis, adipositis, pancreatitis, hepatitis, and encephalomyelitis but not myositis in suckling mice 1 to 2 days old has been isolated from the stool of a patient in whom the clinical diagnosis was "non-paralytic poliomyelitis." 2. Serological evidence linking the virus to the clinical disease observed was clear only in the case of "non-paralytic poliomyelitis" from which it was isolated. 3. The possible relation of this agent to the Coxsackie group of viruses is discussed. No serological relationship with the Connecticut 5, Ohio R, and High Point strains was demonstrated. 4. A second virus, Matulaitis, has been isolated from a concurrent case of "non-paralytic poliomyelitis" in the same area. Lesions produced in infant mice by the two agents show certain differences.

  10. Co-existence of zebra mussels and freshwater unionids: Population dynamics of Leptodea fragilis in a coastal wetland infested with zebra mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Amberg, Jon

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, thousands of live Leptodea fragilis were collected from a marsh located in the western basin of Lake Erie that was infested with zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha). Despite the presence of zebra mussels at this site for a number of years, this L. fragilis population showed no signs of competition-induced changes in population dynamics. Biofouling was limited: fewer than 1% of the L. fragilis showed evidence of recent or past zebra mussel colonization. Successful recruitment occurred yearly, with multiple year classes collected that ranged in age from 1 to 12 years. However, age and shell length were not well correlated. Seventy-one percent of the individuals collected were 51-80 mm long, but ranged in age from 2 to 4.5 years. Three different patterns of growth or shell deposition were found. Some individuals grew rapidly, reaching 105 mm in 3.5 years, while others grew only 4.5 mm over the same time period. A few grew poorly during some years but very rapidly in others. Individuals with a shell length of 41 mm or more were sexually mature and females were more common than males. The strong recruitment and steady growth of this population showed no change between the years before and after the zebra mussel invasion, indicating that this marsh is functioning as a natural refugium from potential problems caused by zebra mussels.

  11. Environmental Vibrio spp., isolated in Mozambique, contain a polymorphic group of integrative conjugative elements and class 1 integrons.

    PubMed

    Taviani, Elisa; Ceccarelli, Daniela; Lazaro, Nivalda; Bani, Stefania; Cappuccinelli, Piero; Colwell, Rita R; Colombo, Mauro M

    2008-04-01

    Circulation of mobile genetic elements linked to drug resistance spread was studied in Vibrio strains isolated from surface urban water (river and sea) and shellfish samples in 2002-2003 in Maputo, Mozambique. Class 1 integrons and integrating conjugative elements (ICE) were investigated by PCR and mating experiments in strains of major health interest: 10 Vibrio cholerae, six Vibrio parahaemolyticus, two Vibrio alginolyticus and one Vibrio fluvialis. Resistance to at least two antibiotics (predominantly beta-lactams) was detected in all the strains, with additional resistances to sulfamethoxazole, spectinomycin, streptomycin and/or trimethoprim. Class 1 integrons contributed partially to the expression of drug resistance and were found in five isolates: four V. cholerae (blaP1 cassette, one strain also contained the dfrA15 cassette) and one V. alginolyticus (aadA2 cassette). ICEs, apparently devoid of resistance genes, were found in eight V. cholerae, three V. parahaemolyticus and one V. fluvialis isolates. A wide variability was observed by molecular characterization of ICEs. Five ICEs were included in the SXT/R391 family and seven ICEs were not classified. Our results indicate that the SXT/R391 family and related ICEs comprise a large class of polymorphic genetic elements widely circulating in environmental Vibrio strains in Africa, beside those evidently linked to drug resistance in clinical isolates.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Isolates with Reduced Susceptibility to Glycopeptides Belong to Accessory Gene Regulator Group I or II

    PubMed Central

    Verdier, Isabelle; Reverdy, Marie-Elisabeth; Etienne, Jerome; Lina, Gérard; Bes, Michèle; Vandenesch, François

    2004-01-01

    We used multiplex PCR to determine the agr group membership of 18 European glycopeptide heterointermediate and intermediate-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. Of the 15 agr group I strains, 13 were resistant and 2 were susceptible to methicillin. The remaining three strains, like the United States and Japanese control strains, belonged to agr group II. PMID:14982800

  13. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013–2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread

  14. Strong conservation of rhoptry-associated-protein-1 (RAP-1) locus organization and sequence among Babesia isolates infecting sheep from China (Babesia motasi-like phylogenetic group).

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingli; Valentin, Charlotte; Bonsergent, Claire; Malandrin, Laurence

    2014-12-01

    Rhoptry-associated-protein 1 (RAP-1) is considered as a potential vaccine candidate due to its involvement in red blood cell invasion by parasites in the genus Babesia. We examined its value as a vaccine candidate by studying RAP-1 conservation in isolates of Babesia sp. BQ1 Ningxian, Babesia sp. Tianzhu and Babesia sp. Hebei, responsible for ovine babesiosis in different regions of China. The rap-1 locus in these isolates has very similar features to those described for Babesia sp. BQ1 Lintan, another Chinese isolate also in the B. motasi-like phylogenetic group, namely the presence of three types of rap-1 genes (rap-1a, rap-1b and rap-1c), multiple conserved rap-1b copies (5) interspaced with more or less variable rap-1a copies (6), and the 3' localization of one rap-1c. The isolates Babesia sp. Tianzhu, Babesia sp. BQ1 Lintan and Ningxian were almost identical (average nucleotide identity of 99.9%) over a putative locus of about 31 Kb, including the intergenic regions. Babesia sp. Hebei showed a similar locus organization but differed in the rap-1 locus sequence, for each gene and intergenic region, with an average nucleotide identity of 78%. Our results are in agreement with 18S rDNA phylogenetic studies performed on these isolates. However, in extremely closely related isolates the rap-1 locus seems more conserved (99.9%) than the 18S rDNA (98.7%), whereas in still closely related isolates the identities are much lower (78%) compared with the 18S rDNA (97.7%). The particularities of the rap-1 locus in terms of evolution, phylogeny, diagnosis and vaccine development are discussed.

  15. Molecular analysis of group A Streptococcus type emm18 isolates temporally associated with acute rheumatic fever outbreaks in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    PubMed

    Smoot, James C; Korgenski, E Kent; Daly, Judy A; Veasy, L George; Musser, James M

    2002-05-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and subsequent rheumatic heart disease are rare but serious sequelae of group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections in most western countries. Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah, and the surrounding intermountain region experienced a resurgence of ARF in 1985 which has persisted. The largest numbers of cases were encountered in 1985-1986 and in 1997-1998. Organisms with a mucoid colony phenotype when grown on blood agar plates were temporally associated with the higher incidence of ARF. To develop an understanding of the molecular population genetic structure of GAS strains associated with ARF in the SLC region, 964 mucoid and nonmucoid pharyngeal isolates recovered in SLC from 1984 to 1999 were studied by sequencing the emm gene. Isolates with an emm18 allele were further characterized by sequencing the spa, covR, and covS genes. Peak periods of ARF were associated with GAS isolates possessing an emm18 allele encoding the protein found in serotype M18 isolates. Among the serotype M18 isolates, the difference in the number of C repeats produced three size variants. Variation was limited in spa, a gene that encodes a streptococcal protective antigen, and covR and covS, genes that encode a two-component regulatory system that, when inactivated, results in a mucoid phenotype and enhanced virulence in mouse infection models. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed a single restriction profile for serotype M18 organisms isolated during both peak periods of ARF. In SLC, the incidence of ARF coresurged with the occurrence of GAS serotype M18 isolates that have very restricted genetic variation.

  16. Structural characterization of amphiphilic siderophores produced by a soda lake isolate, Halomonas sp. SL01, reveals cysteine-, phenylalanine- and proline-containing head groups.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Luis O'mar Serrano; Schwarz, Benjamin; Richards, Abigail M

    2015-11-01

    Soap Lake, located in Washington State, is a naturally occurring saline and alkaline lake. Several organisms inhabiting this lake have been identified as producers of siderophores that are unique in structure. Bacterial isolates, enriched from Soap Lake sediment and water samples, were screened for siderophore production using both the chrome azurol S (CAS) agar plate and liquid methods. Bacterial isolate Halomonas sp. SL01 was found to produce relatively high concentrations of siderophores in liquid medium (up to 40 µM). Siderophores from the isolate were separated from the culture supernatant using solid phase extraction and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Siderophore structure was determined using LC/MS/MS (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC. Two distinct new families of amphiphilic siderophores were produced by isolate SL01. All siderophores ranged in size from 989 to 1096 atomic mass units and consisted of a conserved peptidic head group (per family), which coordinates iron, coupled to fatty acid moieties. The fatty acyl moieties were C10-C14 in length and some with hydroxyl substitutions at the third α position. These siderophores resembled amphiphilic aquachelin siderophores produced by Halomonas aquamarina strain DS40M3, a marine bacterium as well as siderophores from isolate Halomonas sp. SL28 that was found to produce amphiphilic siderophores. Bacteria thriving under saline and alkaline conditions are capable of producing unique siderophores resembling those produced by microbes inhabiting marine environments.

  17. Correlations between major risk factors and closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates grouped by three current enotyping procedures: a population-based study in northeast Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Molina-Salinas, Gloria María; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Padilla-Rivas, Gerardo Raymundo; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Torres-de-la-Cruz, Víctor Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Yazmin Berenice; Ortega-García, Jorge Luis; Garza-Treviño, Elsa Nancy; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Becerril-Montes, Pola; Said-Fernández/, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) patients related to a chain of recent TB transmissions were investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates (120) were genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 (R), spacer oligotyping (S) and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (M) methods. The MTB isolates were clustered and the clusters were grouped according to the similarities of their genotypes. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients between the groups of MTB isolates with similar genotypes and those patient characteristics indicating a risk for a pulmonary TB (PTB) chain transmission were ana- lysed. The isolates showing similar genotypes were distributed as follows: SMR (5%), SM (12.5%), SR (1.67%), MR (0%), S (46.67%), M (5%) and R (0%). The remaining 35 cases were orphans. SMR exhibited a significant correlation (p < 0.05) with visits to clinics, municipalities and comorbidities (primarily diabetes mellitus). S correlated with drug consumption and M with comorbidities. SMR is needed to identify a social network in metropolitan areas for PTB transmission and S and M are able to detect risk factors as secondary components of a transmission chain of TB. PMID:25317710

  18. Relationship between growth behavior in vero cells and the molecular characteristics of recent isolated classified in the Asia 1 and 2 groups of canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Lan, Nguyen Thi; Yamaguchi, Ryoji; Hirai, Takuya; Kai, Kazushige; Morishita, Kazuhiro

    2009-04-01

    Ten recent isolates of canine distemper virus (CDV) strains were classified according to the growth ability and development of syncytial cytopathic effects (CPE) in Vero cells. Strains P94S, Ac96I, S124C, MD231, MS232, MSA5 and 095Cr were classified as Type 1 and exhibited hardly and did not develop CPE in Vero cells. Strains 007Lm, 009L and 011C were classified as Type 2 as grew well but failed to develop a syncytial CPE in Vero cells. A comparison of the phylogenetic trees of the H and P genes showed that all Type 1 strains belonged to the Asia 1 group and all Type 2 strains belonged to the Asia 2 group. Our findings suggest that the recent Asia 2 isolated of CDV in Japan, but not Asia 1 may grow in Vero cells, and their growth ability may be related with their molecular characteristics.

  19. Solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianlong E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu; Mallory, Frank B.; Mallory, Clelia W.; Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu

    2014-05-21

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  20. [Effects of cytosine-arabinofuranoside on the development of reptilian embryos (Lacerta viridis, Laur. and Anguis fragilis, L.)].

    PubMed

    Raynaud, A

    1982-01-01

    Administered into the yolk sac of eggs of Lacerta viridis as a single dose of 17 to 40 micrograms, cytosine-arabinoside (Ara-C) was compatible with survival of the embryo, from the sixth day of incubation, for at least 20 to 25 days. The LD50 was 40 to 50 micrograms per egg. Doses of 20 to 40 micrograms of Ara-C introduced in the yolk sac of eggs of the slow-worm (Anguis fragilis) cultured in vitro, at stages of the allantoid bud of 0,5 mm to 2,5 mm long, killed the embryo in 4 to 8 days (possibly due to alterations of capillary blood vessels of allantois and area vasculosa). In the two species, these doses caused cytotoxic effects on embryonic proliferating tissues, growth inhibition and a variety of developmental defects. In young embryos of Anguis fragilis, similar doses of 20 to 40 micrograms of Ara-C caused, in 2 to 4 days, death of many cells in the anlagen of growing organs: neural tube, sensory organs, bronchi, mesoderm of the limb bud, subcutaneous mesenchyme, anlage of dorsal skeletal structures, etc.; followed by growth inhibition and malformations. On the other hand, in the limb bud, the apical ridge was less retrogressed than in control embryos; the limb buds showed slightly better development in treated embryos than in controls, but, Ara-C induced severe damage in their mesoderm. In all embryos of Lacerta viridis, treated at the stage of 6 days or of 10 days of incubation by doses of 20 to 40 micrograms of Ara-C and killed 15 to 35 days later, there was a general reduction of size and of weight and external and internal malformations, more or less severe, were present: modifications of the form of the head, shortening of the lower jaw, labial clefts, microphthalmia, micromelia and other limbs defects, developmental defects of the tail. In some embryos, the only external defects observed were missing fingers and toes; in three of these embryos, the same digits were missing in the four limbs. Modifications of limb morphogenesis induced by Ara-C are

  1. [Post-marketing surveillance of antibacterial activities of cefozopran against various clinical isolates--II. Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Igari, Jun; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Nobuyoshi; Akiyama, Kazumitsu; Koyama, Tsuneo

    2002-02-01

    As a post-marketing surveillance, the in vitro antibacterial activities of cefozopran (CZOP), an agent of cephems, against various clinical isolates were yearly evaluated and compared with those of other cephems, oxacephems, penicillins, monobactams, and carbapenems. Changes in CZOP susceptibility for the bacteria were also evaluated with the bacterial resistance ratio calculated with the breakpoint MIC. Twenty-five species (3,362 strains) of Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from the clinical materials annually collected from 1996 to 2000, and consisted of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis (n = 136), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 289), Escherichia coli (n = 276), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 192), Klebsiella oxytoca (n = 157), Enterobacter cloacae (n = 189), Enterobacter aerogenes (n = 93), Serratia marcescens (n = 172), Serratia liquefaciens (n = 24), Citrobacter freundii (n = 177), Citrobacter koseri (n = 70), Proteus mirabilis (n = 113), Proteus vulgaris (n = 89), Morganella morganii (n = 116), Providencia spp. (n = 41), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 290), Pseudomonas fluorescens (n = 56), Pseudomonas putida (n = 63), Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 146), Acinetobacter lwoffii (n = 34), Burkholderia cepacia (n = 101), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (n = 169), Bacteroides fragilis group (n = 196), and Prevotella/Porphyromonas (n = 173). An antibacterial activity of CZOP against E. coli, K. pneumoniae, K. oxytoca, and S. marcescens was potent and consistent with or more preferable than the study results obtained until the new drug application approval. MIC90 of CZOP against M.(B.) catarrhalis, C. koseri, and P. aeruginosa was not considerably changed and consistent with the study results obtained until the new drug application approval. MIC90 of CZOP against E. cloacae, E. aerogenes, and P. mirabilis increased year by year. The increase in MIC90 of CZOP against E. aerogenes and P. mirabilis, however, was not considered to be an obvious decline in susceptibility. In

  2. Development of a high-resolution melting-based approach for efficient differentiation among Bacillus cereus group isolates.

    PubMed

    Antolinos, Vera; Fernández, Pablo S; Ros-Chumillas, María; Periago, Paula M; Weiss, Julia

    2012-09-01

    Strains belonging to Bacillus cereus Group include six different species, among which are Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus weihenstephanensis, and Bacillus cereus sensu stricto, a causative agent of food poisoning. Sequence of the panC-housekeeping gene is used for B. cereus Group affiliation to seven major phylogenetic groups (I-VII) with different ecological niches and variations in thermal growth range and spore heat resistance of B. cereus Group microorganisms varies among phylogenetic groups. We assigned a selection of B. cereus sensu stricto strains related to food poisoning from the Spanish cultivar Collection (Valencia) to Group IV strains based on panC gene sequence. Thermal inactivation assays revealed variability of spore heat resistance within these Group IV strains. Adequate food sanitizing treatments therefore require fast and reliable identification of particular strains. In the present study, feasibility of genotyping via high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was examined. HRM analysis of amplified polymorphic 16S-23 intergenic spacer region (ISR) region proved to be discriminatory for B. cereus sensu stricto strain typing, while two other polymorphic regions within the bacterial rRNA operon allowed differentiation between Bacillus species, demonstrating its applicability for discrimination on the species and strain level within B. cereus Group.

  3. Analysis of Arbovirus Isolates from Australia Identifies Novel Bunyaviruses Including a Mapputta Group Virus from Western Australia That Links Gan Gan and Maprik Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Vishal; Diviney, Sinead M.; Certoma, Andrea; Wang, Jianning; Johansen, Cheryl A.; Chowdhary, Rashmi; Mackenzie, John S.; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2016-01-01

    The Mapputta group comprises antigenically related viruses indigenous to Australia and Papua New Guinea that are included in the family Bunyaviridae but not currently assigned to a specific genus. We determined and analyzed the genome sequences of five Australian viruses isolated from mosquitoes collected during routine arbovirus surveillance in Western Australia (K10441, SW27571, K13190, and K42904) and New South Wales (12005). Based on matching sequences of all three genome segments to prototype MRM3630 of Trubanaman virus (TRUV), NB6057 of Gan Gan virus (GGV), and MK7532 of Maprik virus (MPKV), isolates K13190 and SW27571 were identified as TRUV, 12005 as GGV, and K42904 as a Mapputta group virus from Western Australia linking GGV and MPKV. The results confirmed serum neutralization data that had linked SW27571 to TRUV. The fifth virus, K10441 from Willare, was most closely related to Batai orthobunyavirus, presumably representing an Australian variant of the virus. Phylogenetic analysis also confirmed the close relationship of our TRUV and GGV isolates to two other recently described Australian viruses, Murrumbidgee virus and Salt Ash virus, respectively. Our findings indicate that TRUV has a wide circulation throughout the Australian continent, demonstrating for the first time its presence in Western Australia. Similarly, the presence of a virus related to GGV, which had been linked to human disease and previously known only from the Australian southeast, was demonstrated in Western Australia. Finally, a Batai virus isolate was identified in Western Australia. The expanding availability of genomic sequence for novel Australian bunyavirus variants supports the identification of suitably conserved or diverse primer-binding target regions to establish group-wide as well as virus-specific nucleic acid tests in support of specific diagnostic and surveillance efforts throughout Australasia. PMID:27764175

  4. [Medicogenetic study of isolates in Uzbekistan. I. Statement of the problem and characteristics of the groups studied].

    PubMed

    Bochkov, N P; Khaitov, M N; Kuleshov, N P; Anfalova, T V; Diachenko, S S

    1975-01-01

    The paper comprises results of studying some demographic and populaton characteristics of the inhabitans of the Samarkand region as a whole and two villages, Karakent and Ishan, inhabited with Uzbeks-Khoja, a special religious-social caste in the past. It is shown that 87.4% of marriages in the Samarkand region are of international character (the information has been obtained on 7995 married couples). The frequency of consanguineous marriages is 11.6%, and among them 40.5% are first-cousin marriages and 39.1% are marriages of remote relatives. The coefficients of inbreeding are rather high among the Jewish, Tajik and Uzbek communities. The coefficient of inbreeding as a whole is F=0.0042 in this region and approaches to the maximal level, characterizing a panmix population. The average size of a family in the villages of Karakent and Ishan is approximately 4.0 persons. The values of reproductive performance, the nature of termination of pregnancies do not differ from those of panmix population. The percentage of intravillage and consanguineous marriages are 56% and 12.5% for the first village, and 25% and 2% for the second one respectively. The coefficient of inbreeding for karakent is F=0.0064, for Ishan--F=0.0014. Taking into consideration the historical development of the two villages and the cumulative data, the conclusion is drawn that Karakent is an isolate on a religious ground whereas Ishan is a disintegrated isolate.

  5. Rabies Risk: Difficulties Encountered during Management of Grouped Cases of Bat Bites in 2 Isolated Villages in French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Franck; Desplanches, Noëlle; Baillargeaux, Sylvie; Joubert, Michel; Miller, Manuelle; Ribadeau-Dumas, Florence; Spiegel, André; Bourhy, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    In French Guiana, from 1984 to 2011, 14 animal rabies cases and 1 human rabies case (2008) were diagnosed. In January 2011, vampire-bat attacks occurred in 2 isolated villages. In mid-January, a medical team from the Cayenne Centre for Anti-Rabies Treatment visited the sites to manage individuals potentially exposed to rabies and, in April, an anti-rabies vaccination campaign for dogs was conducted. Twenty individuals were bitten by bats in 1 month, most frequently on the feet. The median time to start management was 15 days. The complete Zagreb vaccination protocol (2 doses on day 0 and 1 dose on days 7 and 21) was administered to 16 patients, 12 also received specific immunoglobulins. The antibody titration was obtained for 12 patients (different from those who received immunoglobulins). The antibody titers were ≥0.5 EU/mL for all of them. The serology has not been implemented for the 12 patients who received immunoglobulins. Accidental destruction of a vampire-bat colony could be responsible for the attacks. The isolation and absence of sensitization of the populations were the main explanations for the management difficulties encountered. Sensitization programs should be conducted regularly. PMID:23826400

  6. Evaluation of Oxacillin and Cefoxitin Disk and MIC Breakpoints for Prediction of Methicillin Resistance in Human and Veterinary Isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius Group

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M. T.; Westblade, L. F.; Dien Bard, J.; Wallace, M. A.; Stanley, T.; Burd, E.; Hindler, J.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a coagulase-positive species that colonizes the nares and anal mucosa of healthy dogs and cats. Human infections with S. pseudintermedius range in severity from bite wounds and rhinosinusitis to endocarditis; historically, these infections were thought to be uncommon, but new laboratory methods suggest that their true incidence is underreported. Oxacillin and cefoxitin disk and MIC tests were evaluated for the detection of mecA- or mecC-mediated methicillin resistance in 115 human and animal isolates of the Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG), including 111 Staphylococcus pseudintermediusand 4 Staphylococcus delphini isolates, 37 of which were mecA positive. The disk and MIC breakpoints evaluated included the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M100-S25 Staphylococcus aureus/Staphylococcus lugdunensis oxacillin MIC breakpoints and cefoxitin disk and MIC breakpoints, the CLSI M100-S25 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) oxacillin MIC breakpoint and cefoxitin disk breakpoint, the CLSI VET01-S2 S. pseudintermedius oxacillin MIC and disk breakpoints, and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) S. pseudintermedius cefoxitin disk breakpoint. The oxacillin results interpreted by the VET01-S2 (disk and MIC) and M100-S25 CoNS (MIC) breakpoints agreed with the results of mecA/mecC PCR for all isolates, with the exception of one false-resistant result (1.3% of mecA/mecC PCR-negative isolates). In contrast, cefoxitin tests performed poorly, ranging from 3 to 89% false susceptibility (very major errors) and 0 to 48% false resistance (major errors). BD Phoenix, bioMérieux Vitek 2, and Beckman Coulter MicroScan commercial automated susceptibility test panel oxacillin MIC results were also evaluated and demonstrated >95% categorical agreement with mecA/mecC PCR results if interpreted by using the M100-S25 CoNS breakpoint. The Alere penicillin-binding protein 2a test accurately detected all

  7. Contemporary Pharyngeal and Invasive emm1 and Invasive emm12 Group A Streptococcus Isolates Exhibit Similar In Vivo Selection for CovRS Mutants in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wenchao; Liu, Mengyao; Chen, Daniel G.; Yiu, Rossana; Fang, Ferric C.; Lei, Benfang

    2016-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes diverse infections ranging from common pharyngitis to rare severe invasive infections. Invasive GAS isolates can have natural mutations in the virulence regulator CovRS, which result in enhanced expression of multiple virulence genes, suppressed the expression of the protease SpeB, and increased virulence. It is believed that CovRS mutations arise during human infections with GAS carrying wild-type CovRS and are not transmissible. CovRS mutants of invasive GAS of the emm1 genotype arise readily during experimental infection in mice. It is possible that invasive GAS arises from pharyngeal GAS through rare genetic mutations that confer the capacity of mutated GAS to acquire covRS mutations during infection. The objective of this study was to determine whether contemporary pharyngeal emm1 GAS isolates have a reduced propensity to acquire CovRS mutations in vivo compared with invasive emm1 GAS and whether emm3, emm12, and emm28 GAS acquire CovRS mutants in mouse infection. The propensity of invasive and pharyngeal emm1 and invasive emm3, emm12, and emm28 SpeBA+ isolates to acquire variants with the SpeBA- phenotype was determined during subcutaneous infection of mice. The majority of both invasive and pharyngeal emm1 SpeBA+ isolates and two of three emm12 isolates, but not emm3 and emm28 isolates, were found to acquire SpeBA- variants during skin infection in mice. All analyzed SpeBA- variants of emm1 and emm12 GAS from the mouse infection acquired covRS mutations and produced more platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase SsE. Thus, contemporary invasive and pharyngeal emm1 GAS isolates and emm12 GAS have a similar capacity to acquire covRS mutations in vivo. The rarity of severe invasive infections caused by GAS does not appear to be attributable to a reduced ability of pharyngeal isolates to acquire CovRS mutations. PMID:27611332

  8. Sociometric and ethological approach to the assessment of individual and group behavior in extra long-term isolation during simulated interplanetary mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushin, Vadim; Tafforin, Carole; Kuznetsova, Polina; Vinokhodova, Alla; Chekalina, Angelina

    Several factors, such as hazard to life, reduced social communications, isolation, high workload, monotony, etc., can cause deconditioning of individual status and group dynamics in long-term spaceflight. New approaches to the assessment of group behavior are being developed in order to create necessary counter-measures and to keep optimal psychological climate in the crew. Psychological methods combined with ethological approach to dynamic monitoring of the isolated crew had been tested and validated in Mars-500 experiment. The experiment (duration of 520 days) was designed to simulate the living and working conditions of a piloted mission to Mars. The Mars-500 crew was composed of three Russians, two Europeans and one Chinese. We used psychological tests: sociometric questionnaire to assess group status (popularity) of the crewmembers (monthly), color choice test to assess the level of frustration and anxiety (twice a month). We performed observations from video recordings of group discussions (monthly) and during breakfast time (twice a month). The video analysis was supplied with a software based-solution: The Observer XT®. The results showed that occurrence of collateral acts may indicate psychological stress and fatigue in crewmembers under isolation and that facial expressions may indicate less anxiety. The data of psychological tests allowed to define two subgroups in the crew. The first one consisted of the subjects with high group status and lower level of frustration (not anxious), the second one consisted of less popular subjects, having respectively higher anxiety level. The video analysis showed two times more manifestations of facial expressions and interpersonal communications for the first subgroup. We also identified the subgroups on the basis of their verbal expressions in Russian and in English. Video observation of individual and group behavior, combined with other psychological tests gives opportunity to emphasize more objectively the signs

  9. Species identification of members of the Streptococcus milleri group isolated from the vagina by ID 32 Strep system and differential phenotypic characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmet, Z; Warren, M; Houang, E T

    1995-01-01

    The importance of bacterial vaginosis as a risk factor in obstetric and gynecological infections has recently been recognized. The bacterial vaginosis group of organisms includes members of the Streptococcus milleri group, the identification of which has caused much confusion. We prospectively surveyed the rates of carriage of S. milleri group organisms in 397 high vaginal swabs received in our laboratory. For the identification of 99 clinical isolates and 23 control strains, we compared the results obtained by the rapid ID 32 Strep system (Analytab Products) and by a scheme utilizing six differential phenotypic characteristics (presence of beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, alpha-glucosidase, beta-D-fucosidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, and beta-glucosidase) as described by Whiley et al. (R. A. Whiley, H. Fraser, J. M. Hardie, and D. Beighton, J. Clin. Microbiol. 28:1497-1501, 1990). We identified Streptococcus anginosus in 18% and Streptococcus constellatus in 0.05% of the specimens examined. Of the isolates of S. anginosus that reacted with grouping antisera, 20 of 25 belonged to Lancefield group F. The incubation conditions for bacterial cultures and for reaction mixtures affected the results of phenotypic characterization in the production of alpha-glucosidase, beta-galactosidase, and beta-glucosidase. However, by using bacterial cultures grown under hypercapnic conditions and incubating the reaction mixtures aerobically, consistent phenotypic characteristics were obtained, allowing identification similar to that obtained by the ID 32 Strep system. We therefore recommend the phenotypic scheme as an inexpensive, reliable, and convenient method for the initial identification of species of the S. milleri group. PMID:7650193

  10. Characterization of Alternaria isolates from the infectoria species-group and a new taxon from Arrhenatherum, Pseudoalternaria arrhenatheria sp. nov

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The infectoria species-group within the genus Alternaria was originally conceived by Simmons in 1993 and was based upon common morphological characteristics that included the development of conidial chains with primary, secondary, and tertiary branching resulting in substantial three-dimensional com...

  11. In vitro antibacterial activity of some antihistaminics belonging to different groups against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    El-Nakeeb, Moustafa A.; Abou-Shleib, Hamida M.; Khalil, Amal M.; Omar, Hoda G.; El-Halfawy, Omar M.

    2011-01-01

    Antihistaminics are widely used for various indications during microbial infection. Hence, this paper investigates the antimicrobial activities of 10 antihistaminics belonging to both old and new generations using multiresistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinical isolates. The bacteriostatic activity of antihistaminics was investigated by determining their MIC both by broth and agar dilution techniques against 29 bacterial strains. Azelastine, cyproheptadine, mequitazine and promethazine were the most active among the tested drugs. Diphenhydramine and cetirizine possessed weaker activity whereas doxylamine, fexofenadine and loratadine were inactive even at the highest tested concentration (1 mg/ml). The MIC of meclozine could not be determined as it precipitated with the used culture media. The MBC values of antihistaminics were almost identical to the corresponding MIC values. The bactericidal activity of antihistaminics was also studied by the viable count technique in sterile saline solution. Evident killing effects were exerted by mequitazine, meclozine, azelastine and cyproheptadine. Moreover, the dynamics of bactericidal activity of azelastine were studied by the viable count technique in nutrient broth. This activity was found to be concentration-dependant. This effect was reduced on increasing the inoculum size while it was increased on raising the pH. The post-antimicrobial effect of 100 μg/ml azelastine was also determined and reached up to 3.36 h. PMID:24031715

  12. Biodiversity of bacteriophages: morphological and biological properties of a large group of phages isolated from urban sewage

    PubMed Central

    Jurczak-Kurek, Agata; Gąsior, Tomasz; Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Topka, Gracja; Necel, Agnieszka; Jakubowska-Deredas, Magdalena; Narajczyk, Magdalena; Richert, Malwina; Mieszkowska, Agata; Wróbel, Borys; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    A large scale analysis presented in this article focuses on biological and physiological variety of bacteriophages. A collection of 83 bacteriophages, isolated from urban sewage and able to propagate in cells of different bacterial hosts, has been obtained (60 infecting Escherichia coli, 10 infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 4 infecting Salmonella enterica, 3 infecting Staphylococcus sciuri, and 6 infecting Enterococcus faecalis). High biological diversity of the collection is indicated by its characteristics, both morphological (electron microscopic analyses) and biological (host range, plaque size and morphology, growth at various temperatures, thermal inactivation, sensitivity to low and high pH, sensitivity to osmotic stress, survivability upon treatment with organic solvents and detergents), and further supported by hierarchical cluster analysis. By the end of the research no larger collection of phages from a single environmental source investigated by these means had been found. The finding was confirmed by whole genome analysis of 7 selected bacteriophages. Moreover, particular bacteriophages revealed unusual biological features, like the ability to form plaques at low temperature (4 °C), resist high temperature (62 °C or 95 °C) or survive in the presence of an organic solvents (ethanol, acetone, DMSO, chloroform) or detergent (SDS, CTAB, sarkosyl) making them potentially interesting in the context of biotechnological applications. PMID:27698408

  13. [Taxonomy of the Sokuluk virus (SOKV) (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus, Entebbe bat virus group) isolated from bats (Vespertilio pipistrellus Schreber, 1774), ticks (Argasidae Koch, 1844), and birds in Kyrgyzstan].

    PubMed

    L'vov, D K; Al'khovskiĭ, S V; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Shchetinin, A M; Deriabin, P G; Gitel'man, A K; Samokhvalov, E I; Botikov, A G

    2014-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of the Sokuluk virus (SOKV) isolated in Kyrgyzstan from bats Vespertilio pipistrellus and their obligatory parasites--Argasidae Koch, 1844, ticks was carried out. SOKV was classified as attributed to the Flaviviridae family, Flavivirus genus. The maximum homology (71% for nucleotide and 79% for amino acid sequences) was detected with respect to the Entebbe bat virus (ENTV). ENTV and SOKV form a group joining to the yellow fever virus (YFV) within the limits of the mosquito flavivirus branch. Close relation of SOKV with bat covers and human housings permits to assume SOKV potentially patogenic to human health.

  14. Isolation of Rickettsia parkeri and identification of a novel spotted fever group Rickettsia sp. from Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) in the United States.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Christopher D; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Sumner, John W; Goddard, Jerome; Elshenawy, Yasmin; Metcalfe, Maureen G; Loftis, Amanda D; Varela-Stokes, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    Until recently, Amblyomma maculatum (the Gulf Coast tick) had garnered little attention compared to other species of human-biting ticks in the United States. A. maculatum is now recognized as the principal vector of Rickettsia parkeri, a pathogenic spotted fever group rickettsia (SFGR) that causes an eschar-associated illness in humans that resembles Rocky Mountain spotted fever. A novel SFGR, distinct from other recognized Rickettsia spp., has also been detected recently in A. maculatum specimens collected in several regions of the southeastern United States. In this study, 198 questing adult Gulf Coast ticks were collected at 4 locations in Florida and Mississippi; 28% of these ticks were infected with R. parkeri, and 2% of these were infected with a novel SFGR. Seventeen isolates of R. parkeri from individual specimens of A. maculatum were cultivated in Vero E6 cells; however, all attempts to isolate the novel SFGR were unsuccessful. Partial genetic characterization of the novel SFGR revealed identity with several recently described, incompletely characterized, and noncultivated SFGR, including "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae" and Rickettsia sp. Argentina detected in several species of Neotropical ticks from Argentina and Peru. These findings suggest that each of these "novel" rickettsiae represent the same species. This study considerably expanded the number of low-passage, A. maculatum-derived isolates of R. parkeri and characterized a second, sympatric Rickettsia sp. found in Gulf Coast ticks.

  15. Isolation of a novel IS3 group insertion element and construction of an integration vector for Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D C; Klaenhammer, T R

    1994-01-01

    An insertion sequence (IS) element from Lactobacillus johnsonii was isolated, characterized, and exploited to construct an IS-based integration vector. L. johnsonii NCK61, a high-frequency conjugal donor of bacteriocin production (Laf+) and immunity (Lafr), was transformed to erythromycin resistance (Emr) with the shuttle vector pSA3. The NCK61 conjugative functions were used to mobilize pSA3 into a Laf- Lafs EMs recipient. DNA from the Emr transconjugants transformed into Escherichia coli MC1061 yielded a resolution plasmid with the same size as that of pSA3 with a 1.5-kb insertion. The gram-positive replication region of the resolution plasmid was removed to generate a pSA3-based suicide vector (pTRK327) bearing the 1.5-kb insert of Lactobacillus origin. Plasmid pTRK327 inserted randomly into the chromosomes of both Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 and VPI 11759. No homology was detected between plasmid and total host DNAs, suggesting a Rec-independent insertion. The DNA sequence of the 1.5-kb region revealed the characteristics of an IS element (designated IS1223): a length of 1,492 bp; flanking, 25-bp, imperfect inverted repeats; and two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). Sequence comparisons revealed 71.1% similarity, including 35.7% identity, between the deduced ORFB protein of the E. coli IS element IS150 and the putative ORFB protein encoded by the Lactobacillus IS element. A putative frameshift site was detected between the overlapping ORFs of the Lactobacillus IS element. It is proposed that, similar to IS150, IS1223 produces an active transposase via translational frameshifting between two tandem, overlapping ORFs. Images PMID:8071209

  16. Photoecology of the coral Leptoseris fragilis in the Red Sea twilight zone (an experimental study by submersible).

    PubMed

    Fricke, H W; Vareschi, E; Schlichter, D

    1987-09-01

    Depth-dependent photoadaptational responses of the Red Sea zooxanthellate coral (Leptoseris fragilis) were studied down to 160 m from the research submersible GEO. Light saturation curves for photosynthesis revealed, with I C=1-2, I K=10.9 and I sat=20 μE·cm(-2)·sec(-1), the lowest values of photokinetic parameters ever reported for a symbiotic coral. In summer, positive net production occurs only around noon at approx. 100m depth. Biomass parameters of corals at 100-135 m are negatively correlated with depth in algal cell density, protein, chlorophyll and carotenoid but not in pigment ratios or cell based pigment content. Coral size decreased with depth. Corals transplanted from 110-120 m original depth to 40, 70, 90 and 160 m showed high survival after one year. O2-production and dark O2-uptake increased with decreasing transplantation depth. After one year, transplants at 70 and 90 m but not at 40 m had higher algae density and pigment concentrations. The host light-harvesting systems described by Schlichter, Fricke and Weber (1986) are partially destroyed in 40 m but not in 70 and 90 m transplants. Different light exposures alter P-I-responses (P max, I C, I K, I sat) but not biomass parameters, indicating molecular or biochemical adaptation. The coraal's optimal light fields lie between 70 to 90 m. Its exceptional bathymetric distribution is linked with the newly discovered host light-harvesting systems which probably enhance photosynthetic performance in a dim environment.

  17. Analysis of the arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase of Bacteroides fragilis provides insight into regulation of single-domain arabinose phosphate isomerases.

    PubMed

    Cech, David; Wang, Pan Fen; Holler, Tod P; Woodard, Ronald W

    2014-08-01

    Arabinose-5-phosphate isomerases (APIs) catalyze the interconversion of d-ribulose-5-phosphate and D-arabinose-5-phosphate, the first step in the biosynthesis of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo), an essential component of the lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria. Classical APIs, such as Escherichia coli KdsD, contain a sugar isomerase domain and a tandem cystathionine beta-synthase domain. Despite substantial effort, little is known about structure-function relationships in these APIs. We recently reported an API containing only a sugar isomerase domain. This protein, c3406 from E. coli CFT073, has no known physiological function. In this study, we investigated a putative single-domain API from the anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium Bacteroides fragilis. This putative API (UniProt ID Q5LIW1) is the only protein encoded by the B. fragilis genome with significant identity to any known API, suggesting that it is responsible for lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in B. fragilis. We tested this hypothesis by preparing recombinant Q5LIW1 protein (here referred to by the UniProt ID Q5LIW1), characterizing its API activity in vitro, and demonstrating that the gene encoding Q5LIW1 (GenBank ID YP_209877.1) was able to complement an API-deficient E. coli strain. We demonstrated that Q5LIW1 is inhibited by cytidine 5'-monophospho-3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid, the final product of the Kdo biosynthesis pathway, with a Ki of 1.91 μM. These results support the assertion that Q5LIW1 is the API that supports lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in B. fragilis and is subject to feedback regulation by CMP-Kdo. The sugar isomerase domain of E. coli KdsD, lacking the two cystathionine beta-synthase domains, demonstrated API activity and was further characterized. These results suggest that Q5LIW1 may be a suitable system to study API structure-function relationships.

  18. High Prevalence of BlaCTX-M Group Genes in Aeromonas dhakensis Isolated from Aquaculture Fish Species in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    YI, Seung-Won; CHUNG, Tae-Ho; JOH, Seong-Joon; PARK, Chul; PARK, Byoung-Yong; SHIN, Gee-Wook

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of resistant genes against β-lactams in 119 Aeromonas strains was determined. A large number (99.2%) of the present fish strains were resistant to one or more β- lactams including ceftiofur, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, piperacillin and cefpodoxime. Among antibiotic resistance phenotypes, the simultaneous resistance to all β-lactams occurred in 25.2% (n=30) of all strains, which consisted of 18 strains of A. dhakensis, 8 strains of A. caviae, 2 strains of A. hydrophila and only one strain of A. veronii. For exploring genetic background of the antibiotic resistances, multiple PCR assays were subjected to detect β-lactamase-encoding genes, blaTEM, blaOXA-B and blaCTX-M. In the results, the blaTEM-1 gene was harbored in all strains, whereas only 3 strains harbored blaOXA gene. In the case of blaCTX-M gene, the gene was detected in 21.0% (25 out of 119) of all strains, which countered with 80% (20 out of 25) of A. dhakensis, 8% (2 out of 25) of A. caviae and 12% (3 out of 25) of A. hydrophila. In addition, most of the blaCTX-M positive strains showed simultaneous resistance to all β-lactams (18 out of 30 strains). In sequence analysis for blaCTX-M genes detected, they were CTX-M group 1-encoding genes including blaCTX-M-33 from 3 eel strains of A. dhakensis. Therefore, A. dhakensis obtained from cultured fish could represent a reservoir for spreading genes encoding CTX-M group 1 enzymes and hence should be carefully monitored, especially for its potential risk to public health. PMID:25649940

  19. High prevalence of blaCTX-M group genes in Aeromonas dhakensis isolated from aquaculture fish species in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Yi, Seung-Won; Chung, Tae-Ho; Joh, Seong-Joon; Park, Chul; Park, Byoung-Yong; Shin, Gee-Wook

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of resistant genes against β-lactams in 119 Aeromonas strains was determined. A large number (99.2%) of the present fish strains were resistant to one or more β- lactams including ceftiofur, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, piperacillin and cefpodoxime. Among antibiotic resistance phenotypes, the simultaneous resistance to all β-lactams occurred in 25.2% (n=30) of all strains, which consisted of 18 strains of A. dhakensis, 8 strains of A. caviae, 2 strains of A. hydrophila and only one strain of A. veronii. For exploring genetic background of the antibiotic resistances, multiple PCR assays were subjected to detect β-lactamase-encoding genes, bla(TEM), bla(OXA-B) and bla(CTX-M). In the results, the bla(TEM-1) gene was harbored in all strains, whereas only 3 strains harbored bla(OXA) gene. In the case of bla(CTX-M) gene, the gene was detected in 21.0% (25 out of 119) of all strains, which countered with 80% (20 out of 25) of A. dhakensis, 8% (2 out of 25) of A. caviae and 12% (3 out of 25) of A. hydrophila. In addition, most of the bla(CTX-M) positive strains showed simultaneous resistance to all β-lactams (18 out of 30 strains). In sequence analysis for bla(CTX-M) genes detected, they were CTX-M group 1-encoding genes including bla(CTX-M-33) from 3 eel strains of A. dhakensis. Therefore, A. dhakensis obtained from cultured fish could represent a reservoir for spreading genes encoding CTX-M group 1 enzymes and hence should be carefully monitored, especially for its potential risk to public health.

  20. Macrolides resistance of common bacteria isolated from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, S C; Chen, Y C; Luh, K T; Hsieh, W C

    1995-12-01

    To determine the susceptibility to macrolides of common pathogenic bacteria isolated from Taiwan, the in vitro activities of erythromycin, roxithromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and dirithromycin were tested against 492 clinical isolates of eight different bacteria, collected from the National Taiwan University Hospital. The results showed high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against most of the tested bacteria. The MIC90s for Staphylococcus aureus (both methicillin-resistant and -sensitive strains), coagulase-negative staphylococci (both methicillin-resistant and -sensitive strains), Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, enterococci, peptostreptococci, and Bacteroides fragilis were all > or = 256 micrograms/ml. The MIC50s for methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci, and enterococci were > or = 256 micrograms/ml. For S. pneumoniae, peptostreptococci, and B. fragilis, the MIC50s were > 8 micrograms/ml. The resistance rates to macrolides were 80% or more in methicillin-resistant staphylococci and about 30% in methicillin-sensitive staphylococci. Around 55% of S. pneumoniae strains and 37 approximately 42% of S. pyogenes strains were resistant to macrolides. Cross-resistance to different macrolides was clearly demonstrated in most of the resistant strains.

  1. Gentamicin-Based Medium for the Isolation of Group D Streptococci and Application of the Medium to Water Analysis †

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, L. Scott; Hartman, Paul A.

    1978-01-01

    Gentamicin-thallous-carbonate (GTC) medium contained (per liter): 40.0 g of Trypticase soy agar, 5.0 g of KH2PO4, 2.0 g of NaHCO2, 1.0 g of glucose, 1.0 g of esculin, 0.5 g of thallous acetate (TA), 0.5 g of ferric citrate, 0.75 ml of Tween 80, and 2.5 mg of gentamicin sulfate. The NaHCO3 (20 ml of a 10% solution that had been heated to boiling) was added after sterilization of the basal medium. The spread plate technique was used to compare GTC agar with Pfizer selective enterococcus, TA, and KF agars by using sewage as well as bovine and swine fecal samples. Significantly greater numbers of group D streptococci were recovered on GTC agar than on Pfizer selective enterococcus or KF agars, within and over all samples. Higher counts also were obtained on GTC than on TA agar, but the differences were not statistically significant. The percentage of false positives was about the same for all four media. Samples of riverwater also were plated on GTC, TA, and KF agars, and significantly higher recoveries were obtained with GTC agar. GTC agar was superior to the other media examined primarily because of increased recoveries of Streptococcus bovis and S. equinus; other advantages of GTC agar were large colony size and short (24-h) incubation period. The percentage of false positives from riverwater was 13% for GTC agar and 0% for TA and KF agars; therefore, confirmation would be necessary when GTC agar is used with some types of environmental samples. PMID:416754

  2. [Prevalence of beta-lactamase CTX-M-15 in phylogenetic groups of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from patients in the community of Merida, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Hernández, Erick; Araque, María; Millán, Ysheth; Millán, Beatriz; Vielma, Silvana

    2014-03-01

    In this study we determined the prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) in phylogenetic groups of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolated from patients in the community. Twenty one UPEC strains with reduced susceptibility to broad-spectrum cephalosporins were collected between January 2009 and July 2010, from patients with urinary tract infection who attended the Public Health Laboratory in Mérida, Venezuela. Genotypic characterization determined that all UPEC strains harbored blaBLEEs genes: 76.2% of the strains showed the presence of a single ESBL-producer gene, represented by blaCTX-M-15, whereas 23.8% of UPEC showed various combinations of bla genes (blacCTX-M-15 + blaTEM-1, blaCTX-M-15 + blaSHV and blaSHV + blaTEM-1). In this study, 61.9% of the isolates were placed in phylogroup A and the remaining strains were assigned to group B2 (38.1%). There was no evidence of spread of a particular UPEC clone; only seven strains belonged to a clonal group with an index of similarity greater than 85%. To our knowledge, this is the first description of blxCTX-M-15 in UPEC from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections, which shows that Venezuela is also part of the so-called CTX-M-15 pandemic. The findings in this study, as well as its clinical and epidemiological implications, lead to the need for monitoring and controlling the spread of CTX-M-15 producing UPECs, not only regionally, but also nationwide.

  3. The effects of elevated osmotic concentration on control of germination in the gemmules of freshwater sponges Eunapius fragilis and Anheteromeyania ryderi.

    PubMed

    Loomis, Stephen H; Bettridge, Aubrey; Branchini, Bruce R

    2009-01-01

    Freshwater sponges produce gemmules during the fall as an adaptation to survive cold winters. Most gemmules are produced in a state of diapause and must undergo a vernalization period before diapause is broken and they enter the quiescence state. Quiescent gemmules will germinate if placed at room temperature. We examined the mechanism of germination in two species of freshwater sponges, Eunapius fragilis and Anheteromeyania ryderi. Germination, cell division, and oxygen consumption are all inhibited when the osmotic concentration of the gemmules of either species is maintained at or above 50 mOsm by placing them in a solution of impermeable osmolytes. The internal osmotic concentration of cells of quiescent gemmules is maintained above 100 mOsm by the presence of sorbitol (in E. fragilis) and myoinositol (in A. ryderi). During the early stages of germination, levels of sorbitol and myoinositol decline to less than 50 mM by 20 h after the initiation of germination. The onset of cell division and beginning of germination correlate with the drop in osmolyte levels below 50 mOsm. Thus, an early trigger initiating germination is most likely the catabolism of sorbitol or myoinositol leading to a drop in the osmotic concentration of the cells.

  4. Group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in south-east Brazil: genetic diversity, resistance profile and the first report of human and equine isolates belonging to the same multilocus sequence typing lineage.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ligia Guedes; Genteluci, Gabrielle Limeira; Corrêa de Mattos, Marcos; Glatthardt, Thaís; Sá Figueiredo, Agnes Marie; Ferreira-Carvalho, Bernadete Teixeira

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) isolates are the most common group C streptococci in humans and reports of invasive infections associated with SDSE have been increasing. Molecular epidemiology studies are an important strategy to trace the emergence and spread of possible well-fit bacterial pathogens of humans and animals. In this work, we analysed the antimicrobial and clonal profiles of 115 SDSE infection and colonization isolates of human and equine origin. PFGE revealed the spread of two main clusters: clone A (57.4%) and clone A (26.1%). Remarkably, two isolates from clone B obtained from human colonization cases displayed identical PFGE patterns to those of three equine infection isolates. In addition, multilocus sequence typing allocated these isolates to ST129 (CC31). All of the SDSE isolates were susceptible to penicillin, vancomycin, gentamicin, levofloxacin and chloramphenicol. Tetracycline and erythromycin resistance rates were 65.2 and 13.9% respectively. Nevertheless, none of the isolates displaying sporadic PFGE patterns showed erythromycin resistance. The majority of erythromycin-resistant isolates from clone A had inducible resistance to macrolides, lincosamines and streptogramins B (iMLSB phenotype), which is associated with the presence of the ermA gene, whereas the resistant isolates from clone B showed the M phenotype, associated with the mefA gene. In conclusion, the data indicated that the analysed collection of SDSE isolates displayed a clonal structure and that the isolates found in human colonization cases could also be involved in equine infections.

  5. [Bacteria isolated from surgical infections and its susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents--special references to bacteria isolated between April 2010 and March 2011].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Nagao; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Hirata, Koichi; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Fukuhara, Kenichiro; Mizugucwi, Tohru; Osanai, Hiroyuki; Yanai, Yoshiyuki; Hata, Fumitake; Kihara, Chikasi; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Oono, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masashi; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Itaru; Kimura, Masami; Watabe, Kosho; Kobayashi, Yasuhito; Yamaue, Hiroki; Hirono, Seiko; Takesue, Yoshio; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Shinoura, Susumu; Kimura, Hideyuki; Hoshikawa, Tsuyoshi; Oshima, Hideki; Aikawa, Naoki; Sasaki, Junichi; Suzuki, Masaru; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Abe, Shinya; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Wakasugi, Takehiro; Mashita, Keiji; Tanaka, Moritsugu; Mizuno, Akira; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Iwai, Akihiko; Saito, Takaaki; Muramoto, Masayuki; Kubo, Shoji; Lee, Shigeru; Fukuhara, Kenichiro; Iwagaki, Hiromi; Tokunaga, Naoyuki; Sueda, Taijliro; Hiyama, Elso; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Ohge, Hiroki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Tsumura, Hiroaki; Kanehiro, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hitoshi; Tanakaya, Koujn; Iwasaki, Mitsuhiro

    2014-10-01

    fragilis and Bacteroides ovatus, and from surgical site infection, B. fragilis was most predominantly isolated, followed by Bacteroides thetaiotaomnicron, in this order. In this series, vancomycin-resistant MRSA (methicillin-resistant S. aureus), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. and multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa were not observed.

  6. Whole-genome sequence analysis of G3 and G14 equine group A rotaviruses isolated in the late 1990s and 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Manabu; Nagai, Makoto; Tsunemitsu, Hiroshi; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Furuya, Tetsuya; Shirai, Junsuke; Kondo, Takashi; Fujii, Yoshiki; Todaka, Reiko; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Mizutani, Tetsuya

    2015-05-01

    Equine group A rotavirus (RVA) G3P[12] and G14P[12] strains cause gastroenteritis in foals worldwide. Both of these strains have been co-circulating in Japan since G14P[12] strains emerged in the late 1990s. Although it is important to comprehensively understand the evolution of RVA strains, whole-genome sequence data on recent equine RVA strains in Japan are lacking. Therefore, in this study, whole-genome analysis of 23 equine RVA isolates from the late 1990s and 2009-2010 and the vaccine strain RVA/Horse-tc/JPN/HO-5/1982/G3P[12] (HO-5) was performed. The G3 strains, including strain HO-5, shared a G3-P[12]-I6-R2-C2-M3-A10-N2-T3-E2-H7 genotype constellation, and all of their 11 gene segments were highly conserved, regardless of the year of isolation. G14 strains also exhibited an identical genotype constellation (G14-P[12]-I2-R2-C2-M3-A10-N2-T3-E2-H7), but, phylogenetically, segregated into two lineages within the VP7-G14 and NSP4-E2 genotypes. G14 strains were closely related to G3 strains in their VP4, VP1-3, NSP1-3 and NSP5 gene segments. Interestingly, the NSP4 gene of all G3 and G14 strains isolated in the late 1990s branched into a bovine-RVA-like NSP4 gene cluster. These results indicate that, apart from VP7, VP6, and NSP4 genes, the Japanese equine RVA strains share a highly conserved genetic backbone, and that strains possessing a bovine-RVA-like NSP4 gene were predominant in the late 1990s in Japan.

  7. [Demonstration, by means of electron microscopy, of the penetration of somitic cells into the mesoblast of the limb buds of reptile embryos (Anguis fragilis, Lacerta viridis)].

    PubMed

    Raynaud, A; Adrian, M

    1975-01-01

    An electron microscopic study of the components of anterior limb buds of the slow-worm (Anguis fragilis) and of the green lizard (Lacerta viridis) (embryos of Anguis whose allantoic bud reach 0,7 to 4 mm of length; embryos of Lacerta 2 to 7 days old) provides data on the cytological characteristics of the components of the limb bud at these early stages. 1. The cells of the distal extremity of the somitic processes extending in the limb bud of Anguis and Lacerta, are elongated cells with ovoid nuclei containing large nucleolus; they possess mitochondria always thin and with dense matrix; they are rich in lipid droplets; they possess cilia; they are devoid of myofilaments; endoplasmic reticulum, free ribosomes and polyribosomes are abundant. Golgi networks display signs of activity. These characteristics are also observed in the cells of the "dermatome" layer of the dermo-myotome; and so, it appears probable that the cells of the "dermatome". Furthermore, in Anguis embryos, the cells of the distal extremities of the somitic processes possess numerous lysosomes and a certain number of cells among them, degenerate early. 2. The somatopleural mesoblastic cells of the limb bud of Anguis and Lacerta embryos keep the characters of the cells of the mesodermic layer of lateral plate from which they originate; they have rounded nuclei, cilia, and their mitochondria are always larger and more transparent to electrons, than the ones of cells of the somitic processes and of cells of the epiblastic apical crest. Golgi networks are well developped, endoplasmic reticulum is abundant, lipid droplets are rare. 3. The processes of somites which extend in the dorsal part of the limb bud of Anguis embryos are cords of cells with thin lumina; at the stage of the allantoic bud of 0,6 to 0,8 mm long, the distal extremity of these processes dislocate in group of cells which afterwards dissociate, releasing individual somitic cells which are integrated among the mesoblastic somatopleural

  8. Phylogenentic and enzymatic characterization of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant marine bacteria belong to γ-Proteobacteria group isolated from the sub-Antarctic Beagle Channel, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cristóbal, Héctor A; Benito, Juliana; Lovrich, Gustavo A; Abate, Carlos M

    2015-05-01

    The phylogenetic and physiological characteristics of cultivable-dependent approaches were determined to establish the diversity of marine bacteria associated with the intestines of benthonic organisms and seawater samples from the Argentina's Beagle Channel. A total of 737 isolates were classified as psychrophlic and psychrotolerant culturable marine bacteria. These cold-adapted microorganisms are capable of producing cold-active glycosyl hydrolases, such as β-glucosidases, celulases, β-galactosidases, xylanases, chitinases, and proteases. These enzymes could have potential biotechnological applications for use in low-temperature manufacturing processes. According to polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of part of genes encoding 16S ribosomal DNA (ARDRA) and DNA gyrase subunit B (gyrB-RFLP), 11 operational taxonomic units (OTU) were identified and clustered in known genera using InfoStat software. The 50 isolates selected were sequenced based on near full sequence analysis of 16S rDNA and gyrB sequences and identified by their nearest neighbors ranging between 96 and 99 % of identities. Phylogenetic analyses using both genes allowed relationships between members of the cultured marine bacteria belonging to the γ-Proteobacteria group (Aeromonas, Halteromonas, Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Shewanella, Serratia, Colwellia, Glacielocola, and Psychrobacter) to be evaluated. Our research reveals a high diversity of hydrolytic bacteria, and their products actuality has an industrial use in several bioprocesses at low-temperature manufacturing.

  9. Endomicrobium proavitum, the first isolate of Endomicrobia class. nov. (phylum Elusimicrobia)--an ultramicrobacterium with an unusual cell cycle that fixes nitrogen with a Group IV nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Dietrich, Carsten; Radek, Renate; Brune, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial tree contains many deep-rooting clades without any cultured representatives. One such clade is 'Endomicrobia', a class-level lineage in the phylum Elusimicrobia represented so far only by intracellular symbionts of termite gut flagellates. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the first free-living member of this clade from sterile-filtered gut homogenate of defaunated (starch-fed) Reticulitermes santonensis. Strain Rsa215 is a strictly anaerobic ultramicrobacterium that grows exclusively on glucose, which is fermented to lactate, acetate, hydrogen and CO2. Ultrastructural analysis revealed a Gram-negative cell envelope and a peculiar cell cycle. The genome contains a single set of nif genes that encode homologues of Group IV nitrogenases, which were so far considered to have functions other than nitrogen fixation. We documented nitrogenase activity and diazotrophic growth by measuring acetylene reduction activity and (15)N2 incorporation into cell mass, and demonstrated that transcription of nifH and nitrogenase activity occur only in the absence of ammonium. Based on the ancestral relationship to 'Candidatus Endomicrobium trichonymphae' and other obligate endosymbionts, we propose the name 'Endomicrobium proavitum' gen. nov., sp. nov. for the first isolate of this lineage and the name 'Endomicrobia' class. nov. for the entire clade.

  10. [Cytophotometric studies on the levels of proteins and RNA in the nuclei of the apical crest ane the epiblast of the limb bud of the green lizard (Lacerta viridis Laur.) and the blindworm (Anguis fragilis L)].

    PubMed

    Raynaud, A; Jeanny, J C; Gontcharoff, M

    1975-06-16

    Cytophotometric determinations establish that in the limb buds of young embryos of the slow worm (Anguis fragilis L.) and of the green lizard (Lacerta viridis Laur.) the level of nuclear proteins and RNA is higher in the cells of the apical crest than in the cells of the epiblast on either side of the crest. This relative increase is progressively y reduced.

  11. Genetic diversity, haplotypes and allele groups of Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is now recognized as the fifth species of Plasmodium that can cause human malaria. Like the region II of the Duffy binding protein of P. vivax (PvDBPII), the region II of the P. knowlesi Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) plays an essential role in the parasite’s invasion into the host’s erythrocyte. Numerous polymorphism studies have been carried out on PvDBPII, but none has been reported on PkDBPαII. In this study, the genetic diversity, haplotyes and allele groups of PkDBPαII of P. knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia were investigated. Methods Blood samples from 20 knowlesi malaria patients and 2 wild monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were used. These samples were collected between 2010 and 2012. The PkDBPαII region of the isolates was amplified by PCR, cloned into Escherichia coli, and sequenced. The genetic diversity, natural selection and haplotypes of PkDBPαII were analysed using MEGA5 and DnaSP ver. 5.10.00 programmes. Results Fifty-three PkDBPαII sequences from human infections and 6 from monkeys were obtained. Comparison at the nucleotide level against P. knowlesi strain H as reference sequence showed 52 synonymous and 76 nonsynonymous mutations. Analysis on the rate of these mutations indicated that PkDBPαII was under purifying (negative) selection. At the amino acid level, 36 different PkDBPαII haplotypes were identified. Twelve of the 20 human and 1 monkey blood samples had mixed haplotype infections. These haplotypes were clustered into 2 distinct allele groups. The majority of the haplotypes clustered into the large dominant group. Conclusions Our present study is the first to report the genetic diversity and natural selection of PkDBPαII. Hence, the haplotypes described in this report can be considered as novel. Although a high level of genetic diversity was observed, the PkDBPαII appeared to be under purifying selection. The distribution of the haplotypes was skewed

  12. Characterization of Two New Records of Mucoralean Species Isolated from Gut of Soldier Fly Larva in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Thuong Thuong; Duong, Tham Thi

    2016-01-01

    While surveying the diversity of fungi of the order Mucorales, two isolates, EML-PUKI12-1 and EML-PUKI06-1, were obtained from the gut of soldier fly larvae inhabiting the bulrush at a pond located in the Chonnam National University Arboretum, Gwangju, Korea. The isolates were confirmed as Mucor irregularis and Mucor fragilis species, respectively, based on the morphological characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of rDNA internal transcribed spacer region. Such mucoralean species belonging to undiscovered taxa has not previously been described in Korea. PMID:28154489

  13. Characterization of virulence factors and phylogenetic group determination of Escherichia coli isolated from diarrheic and non-diarrheic calves from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coura, Fernanda Morcatti; de Araújo Diniz, Soraia; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to detect virulence factors, pathovars, and phylogenetic groups of Escherichia coli strains obtained from feces of calves with and without diarrhea up to 70 days old and to determine the association between occurrence of diarrhea, phylogenetic groups, and pathovars. Phylo-typing analysis of the 336 E. coli strains isolated from calves with Clermont method showed that 21 (6.25 %) belong to phylogroup A, 228 (67.85 %) to phylogroup B1, 2 (0.6 %) to phylogroup B2, 5 (1.49 %) to phylogroup C, 57 (16.96 %) to phylogroup E, and 3 (0.9 %) to phylogroup F. Phylogroup D was not identified and 20 strains (5.95 %) were assigned as "unknown." The distribution of phylogenetic groups among pathovars showed that NTEC belong to phylogroups B1 (17) and C (4); EPEC to phylogroups B1 (6) and E (8); STEC to phylogroups A (5), B1 (56), B2 (2), C (1), and E (15); EHEC to phylogroups B1 (95) and E (5); and ETEC to phylogroups A (3), B1 (7), and E (10). The EAST-1 strains were phylogroups A (13), B1 (47), E (19), and F (3); E. coli strains of "unknown" phylogroups belonged to pathovars EPEC (1), EHEC (2), STEC (7), and EAST-1 strains (6). ETEC was associated with diarrhea (P = 0.002). Our study did not find association between the phylogenetic background and occurrence of diarrhea (P = 0.164) but did find some relationship in phylogenetic group and pathovar. The study showed that EHEC and STEC are classified as phylogroup B1, EAST-1 phylogroup A, ETEC, and EPEC phylogroup E.

  14. Genome sequence of the Roseovarius mucosus type strain (DSM 17069T), a bacteriochlorophyll a-containing representative of the marine Roseobacter group isolated from the dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Roseovarius mucosus Biebl et al. 2005 is a bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the marine Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae, which was isolated from the dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii. The marine Roseobacter group was found to be abundant in the ocean and plays an important role for global and biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the features of the R. mucosus strain DFL-24T together with its genome sequence and annotation generated from a culture of DSM 17069T. The 4,247,724 bp containing genome sequence encodes 4,194 protein-coding genes and 57 RNA genes. In addition to the presence of four plasmids, genome analysis revealed the presence of genes associated with host colonization, DMSP utilization, cytotoxins, and quorum sensing that could play a role in the interrelationship of R. mucosus with the dinoflagellate A. ostenfeldii and other marine organisms. Furthermore, the genome encodes genes associated with mixotrophic growth, where both reduced inorganic compounds for lithotrophic growth and a photoheterotrophic lifestyle using light as additional energy source could be used. PMID:26203330

  15. Serum Jo-1 Autoantibody and Isolated Arthritis in the Antisynthetase Syndrome: Review of the Literature and Report of the Experience of AENEAS Collaborative Group.

    PubMed

    Cavagna, Lorenzo; Nuño, Laura; Scirè, Carlo Alberto; Govoni, Marcello; Longo, Francisco Javier Lopez; Franceschini, Franco; Neri, Rossella; Castañeda, Santos; Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Caporali, Roberto; Iannone, Florenzo; Fusaro, Enrico; Paolazzi, Giuseppe; Pellerito, Raffaele; Schwarting, Andreas; Saketkoo, Lesley Ann; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Quartuccio, Luca; Bartoloni, Elena; Specker, Christof; Pina Murcia, Trinitario; La Corte, Renato; Furini, Federica; Foschi, Valentina; Bachiller Corral, Javier; Airò, Paolo; Cavazzana, Ilaria; Martínez-Barrio, Julia; Hinojosa, Michelle; Giannini, Margherita; Barsotti, Simone; Menke, Julia; Triantafyllias, Kostantinos; Vitetta, Rosetta; Russo, Alessandra; Bogliolo, Laura; Bajocchi, Gianluigi; Bravi, Elena; Barausse, Giovanni; Bortolotti, Roberto; Selmi, Carlo; Parisi, Simone; Salaffi, Fausto; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; González-Gay, Miguel Angel

    2017-02-01

    Anti-Jo-1 is the most frequently detectable antibody in the antisynthetase syndrome (ASSD), an autoimmune disease characterized by the occurrence of arthritis, myositis, and interstitial lung disease (ILD). Recently, we organized an international collaborative group called American and European NEtwork of Antisynthetase Syndrome (AENEAS) for the study of this rare and fascinating disease. The group collected and published one of the largest series of ASSD patients ever described and with one of the longer follow-up ever reported. The number of participating centers is steadily increasing, as well as the available cohort. In the first paper, we showed that arthritis, myositis, and ILD may be frequently the only feature at disease onset, raising problems to reach a correct diagnosis of this syndrome. Nevertheless, we first observed that the ex novo appearance of further manifestations is common during the follow-up, strengthening the importance of a correct diagnosis. In our cohort, the 24 % of the 243 patients up to now collected had isolated arthritis as a presenting feature. These patients represent the most intriguing group in terms of differential diagnosis and clinical time course. Furthermore, data on this aspect are scanty, the reason that lead us to evaluate these aspects in our cohort of patients, reviewing also available literature. In fact, the most relevant aspect is that ASSD is rarely suspected in this setting of patients, in particular in case of poliarticular involvement, positive rheumatoid factor (RF), or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) or evidence of joint erosions at plain radiographs. These findings were not rare in our cohort, and they have been also described in other series. Furthermore, manifestations such as Raynaud's phenomenon, mechanic's hands, and fever that may lead to the suspect of ASSD are observed only in a third of cases. If we consider the high rate of clinical picture progression in these patients, we feel

  16. Antimicrobial resistance, virulence profiles, and phylogenetic groups of fecal Escherichia coli isolates: a comparative analysis between dogs and their owners in Japan.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Okada, Erika; Shimizu, Takae; Kataoka, Yasushi; Sawada, Takuo; Takahashi, Toshio

    2012-03-01

    In this study, fecal Escherichia coli isolates (n=188) from 34 dog-owner pairs and 26 healthy control humans (2 isolates per individual) were tested for susceptibility to 6 antimicrobials and screened for virulence genes. Genetic diversity between canine and owner isolates was evaluated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Canine isolates exhibited significantly different rates of resistance to four and two antimicrobials, compared to control and owner isolates, respectively. Of the genes examined, the prevalence of sfa, hly, and cnf genes in canine isolates were higher than in control isolates, but not than in owner isolates. These results suggest that characteristics of owner isolates are somewhat similar to canine isolates, compared to isolates from non-dog owners. In addition, PFGE analysis revealed that transfer of E. coli between owners and their dogs had occurred within 3/34 (8.8%) households. Considering the effects of dog ownership on the population of E. coli isolates from owners, further epidemiological studies are required.

  17. Identification and characterization of a novel incompatibility group X3 plasmid carrying blaNDM-1 in Enterobacteriaceae isolates with epidemiological links to multiple geographical areas in China

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Li, Zhen; Lo, Wai-U; Cheung, Yuk-Yam; Lin, Chi-Ho; Sham, Pak-Chung; Chi-Chung Cheng, Vincent; Ng, Tak-Keung; Que, Tak-Lun; Chow, Kin-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) is one of the most important resistance traits in Enterobacteriaceae. We characterized nine blaNDM-1 producing Enterobacteriaceae recovered from seven patients who have recently travelled or been treated in India (n=1) or mainland China (n=6) during December 2010–May 2012. All the China-linked patients had no links to the Indian subcontinent. The blaNDM-1 carrying plasmids belonged to the novel IncX3 (∼50 kb, in seven isolates including two Escherichia coli, two Klebsiella pneumoniae, one Citrobacter freundii, one Enterobacter aerogenes and one E. cloacae), IncA/C2 (∼140 kb, in one E. coli) or FII-F1B groups (∼110 kb, in one E. coli). Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the seven IncX3 plasmids revealed identical pattern in six and two bands difference in the remaining one. The IncX3 plasmids carrying blaNDM-1 were epidemiologically linked to Guangzhou (n=1), Hunan (n=4), Haifeng (n=1) and Dongguan (n=1) in mainland China. Complete sequencing of the IncX3 plasmid pNDM-HN380 revealed that it was 54 035 bp long and encoded 52 open reading frames. The blaNDM-1 gene was found in a transposon-like structure flanked by ISAba125 and IS26, inserted into the plasmid genetic load region. The sequences of the blaNDM-1 containing module within the two IS elements were identical to those previously described for blaNDM-1-positive Tn125 in the plasmids or chromosome of Acinetobacter isolates. In summary, this is the first description of IncX3 plasmids carrying blaNDM-1. The findings indicate the worrisome involvement of an epidemic plasmid in the dissemination of NDM-1 in China. PMID:26038408

  18. Detection of a group II intron without an open reading frame in the alpha-toxin gene of Clostridium perfringens isolated from a broiler chicken.

    PubMed

    Ma, Menglin; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru; Misawa, Naoaki

    2007-03-01

    A DNA insertion of 834 bp, designated CPF-G2Im, was identified within the alpha toxin gene (cpa) of Clostridium perfringens strain CPBC16ML, isolated from a broiler chicken. Sequence analysis of CPF-G2Im indicated that it was integrated 340 nucleotides downstream of the start codon of cpa. However, the insertion did not abolish the phospholipase C and hemolytic activities of CPBC16ML. To investigate the expression of its alpha toxin, the intact copy of cpa was cloned into an expression vector and transformed into Escherichia coli M15 cells. Immunoblotting analysis showed that the protein expressed from the transformant as well as in the culture supernatant of C. perfringens strain CPBC16ML had the expected molecular weight detected in reference strains of C. perfringens. Northern hybridization and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that the entire CPF-G2Im insertion was completely spliced from the cpa precursor mRNA transcripts. The sequence of the insertion fragment has 95% and 97% identity to two noncoding regions corresponding to sequences that flank a predicted group II RT gene present in the pCPF4969 plasmid of C. perfringens. However, an RT was not encoded by the CPF-G2Im fragment. Based on the secondary structure prediction analysis, CPF-G2Im revealed typical features of group II introns. The present study shows that CPF-G2Im is capable of splicing in both C. perfringens and E. coli. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a group II intron without an open reading frame (ORF) is located in the cpa ORF of C. perfringens.

  19. Complete sequence of three plasmids from Bacillus thuringiensis INTA-FR7-4 environmental isolate and comparison with related plasmids from the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Amadio, Ariel F; Benintende, Graciela B; Zandomeni, Rubén O

    2009-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen used worldwide as a bioinsecticide. It belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group as well as Bacillus anthracis and B. cereus. Plasmids from this group of organisms have been implicated in pathogenicity as they carry the genes responsible for different types of diseases that affect mammals and insects. Some plasmids, like pAW63 and pBT9727, encode a functional conjugation machinery allowing them to be transferred to a recipient cell. They also share extensive homology with the non-functional conjugation apparatus of pXO2 from B. anthracis. In this study we report the complete sequence of three plasmids from an environmental B. thuringiensis isolate from Argentina, obtained by a shotgun sequencing method. We obtained the complete nucleotide sequence of plasmids pFR12 (12,095bp), pFR12.5 (12,459bp) and pFR55 (55,712bp) from B. thuringiensis INTA-FR7-4. pFR12 and pFR12.5 were classified as cryptic as they do not code for any obvious functions besides replication and mobilization. Both small plasmids were classified as RCR plasmids due to similarities with the replicases they encode. Plasmid pFR55 showed a structural organization similar to that observed for plasmids pAW63, pBT9727 and pXO2. pFR55 also shares a tra region with these plasmids, containing genes related to T4SS and conjugation. A comparison between pFR55 and conjugative plasmids led to the postulation that pFR55 is a conjugative plasmid. Genes related to replication functions in pFR55 are different to those described for plasmids with known complete sequences. pFR55 is the first completely sequenced plasmid with a replication machinery related to that of ori44. The analysis of the complete sequence of plasmids from an environmental isolate of B. thuringiensis permitted the identification of a near complete conjugation apparatus in pFR55, resembling those of plasmids pAW63, pBT9727 and pXO2. The availability of this sequence is a step forward in the study

  20. Highly variable penicillin resistance determinants PBP 2x, PBP 2b, and PBP 1a in isolates of two Streptococcus pneumoniae clonal groups, Poland 23F-16 and Poland 6B-20.

    PubMed

    Izdebski, Radoslaw; Rutschmann, Jens; Fiett, Janusz; Sadowy, Ewa; Gniadkowski, Marek; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2008-03-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in representatives of two Streptococcus pneumoniae clonal groups that are prevalent in Poland, Poland 23F-16 and Poland 6B-20, were investigated by PBP profile analysis, antibody reactivity pattern analysis, and DNA sequence analysis of the transpeptidase (TP) domain-encoding regions of the pbp2x, pbp2b, and pbp1a genes. The isolates differed in their MICs of beta-lactam antibiotics. The majority of the 6B isolates were intermediately susceptible to penicillin (penicillin MICs, 0.12 to 0.5 microg/ml), whereas all 23F isolates were penicillin resistant (MICs, >or=2 microg/ml). The 6B isolates investigated had the same sequence type (ST), determined by multilocus sequence typing, as the Poland 6B-20 reference strain (ST315), but in the 23F group, isolates with three distinct single-locus variants (SLVs) in the ddl gene (ST173, ST272, and ST1506) were included. None of the isolates showed an identical PBP profile after labeling with Bocillin FL and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and only one pair of 6B isolates and one pair of 23F isolates (ST173 and ST272) each contained an identical combination of PBP 2x, PBP 2b, and PBP 1a TP domains. Some 23F isolates contained PBP 3 with an apparently higher electrophoretic mobility, and this feature also did not correlate with their STs. The data document a highly variable pool of PBP genes as a result of multiple gene transfer and recombination events within and between different clonal groups.

  1. The antibiotic resistance patterns of Salmonella Typhi isolates in Italy, 1980-96. The Italian SALM-NET Working Group. Salmonella Network.

    PubMed Central

    Scuderi, G.; Fantasia, M.; Niglio, T.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we report the distribution of Salmonella Typhi isolates in Italy and their resistance patterns to antibiotics. The data were collected by the Italian SALM-NET surveillance system in a pilot retrospective study of the period 1980-96. Data on drug-resistance were available for 82 isolates out of 176 S. Typhi isolated in Italy. Of these 82 isolates, 32 (39%) were resistant or intermediate to 1 or more antibiotics. Eight isolates were resistant and 7 intermediate to streptomycin; 4 isolates were resistant to ampicillin alone or in association with other antibiotics; only 2 strains (1 isolated in Lombardia in 1993 and the other 1 in Lazio in 1994) were resistant to chloramphenicol, and 2 (isolated in Sardegna and Piemonte in 1995 and 1996, respectively) showed intermediate resistance to chloramphenicol. The strains showing resistance to 3 or more antibiotics were very scarce: 1 (with 5 complete resistances) was isolated in Lazio in 1994, and another 1 (with complete resistance to 10 antibiotics and intermediate resistance to 2 antibiotics) was isolated in Molise in 1988. In conclusion, besides the routine activities to control typhoid fever, an accurate and continuous surveillance is necessary in order to quickly identify multidrug-resistant (MDR) S. Typhi strains and prevent their spread, even though their level, in our country, is still quite low. PMID:10722125

  2. Variations of SSU rDNA group I introns in different isolates of Cordyceps militaris and the loss of an intron during cross-mating.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tiantian; Yang, Tao; Sun, Junde; Guo, Suping; Yang, Huaijun; Dong, Caihong

    2014-08-01

    Cordyceps militaris, the type species of genus Cordyceps, is one of the most popular mushrooms and a nutraceutical in eastern Asia. It is considered a model organism for the study of Cordyceps species because it can complete its life cycle when cultured in vitro. In the present study, the occurrence and sequence variation of SSU rDNA group I introns, Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, among different isolates of C. militaris were analyzed. Based on the secondary structure predictions, the Cmi.S943 intron has been placed in subgroup IC1, and the Cmi.S1199 intron has been placed in subgroup IE. No significant similarity between Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199 suggested different origins. Three genotypes, based on the frequency and distribution of introns, were described to discriminate the 57 surveyed C. militaris strains. It was found that the genotype was related to the stroma characteristics. The stromata of all of the genotype II strains, which possessed only Cmi.S943, could produce perithecium. In contrast, the stromata of all genotype III strains, which had both Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, could not produce perithecium. Cmi.S1199 showed the lowest level of intra-specific variation among the tested strains. Group I introns can be lost during strain cross-mating. Therefore, we presumed that during cross-mating and recombination, intron loss could be driven by positive Darwinian selection due to the energetic cost of transcribing long introns.

  3. Genome sequence of the Wenxinia marina type strain (DSM 24838T), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from oilfield sediments

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Spring, Stefan; Petersen, Jörn; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Wenxinia marina Ying et al. 2007 is the type species of the genus Wenxinia, a representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae, isolated from oilfield sediments of the South China Sea. This family was shown to harbor the most abundant bacteria especially from coastal and polar waters, but was also found in microbial mats, sediments and attached to different kind of surfaces. Here we describe the features of W. marina strain HY34T together with the genome sequence and annotation of strain DSM 24838T and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 4,181,754 bp containing genome sequence encodes 4,047 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. The genome of W. marina DSM 24838T was sequenced as part of the activities of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project funded by the DoE and the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197468

  4. Genome sequence of the Wenxinia marina type strain (DSM 24838(T)), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from oilfield sediments.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Spring, Stefan; Petersen, Jörn; Ivanova, Natalia N; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-15

    Wenxinia marina Ying et al. 2007 is the type species of the genus Wenxinia, a representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae, isolated from oilfield sediments of the South China Sea. This family was shown to harbor the most abundant bacteria especially from coastal and polar waters, but was also found in microbial mats, sediments and attached to different kind of surfaces. Here we describe the features of W. marina strain HY34(T) together with the genome sequence and annotation of strain DSM 24838(T) and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 4,181,754 bp containing genome sequence encodes 4,047 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. The genome of W. marina DSM 24838(T) was sequenced as part of the activities of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project funded by the DoE and the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

  5. Characterization of a variant of human T-lymphotropic virus type I isolated from a healthy member of a remote, recently contacted group in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagihara, R; Nerurkar, V R; Garruto, R M; Miller, M A; Leon-Monzon, M E; Jenkins, C L; Sanders, R C; Liberski, P P; Alpers, M P; Gajdusek, D C

    1991-01-01

    We report the characterization of a variant of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) isolated from an interleukin 2-dependent, CD8+ T-cell line derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy member of a remote, recently contacted hunter-horticulturalist group (Hagahai) in Madang province of Papua New Guinea. Antigenic characterization of this variant, designated PNG-1, by immunofluorescence, indicated no expression of gag-encoded proteins p19 and p24 (even after incubation with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine), using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against HTLV-I gag gene products. Virus-specific proteins of 15, 19, 46, 53, and 61/68 kDa were demonstrated by Western blot analysis, using sera from patients with serologically and/or virologically confirmed HTLV-I myeloneuropathy, sera from HTLV-I-infected rabbits, and antibodies prepared against the C terminus of the major envelope glycoprotein gp46. Restriction endonuclease maps of PNG-1 proviral DNA differed from that of a prototype strain of HTLV-I (MT-2), but, as verified by polymerase chain reaction, PNG-1 was definitely HTLV-I, not HTLV-II. Nucleotide sequencing and further molecular genetic studies of this variant may provide insights into the origin and evolution of HTLV-I. Images PMID:1996344

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cell Derived from Hip Joints: A Comparative Analysis with a Matched Control Knee Group

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Akihisa; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Tsukamoto, Manabu; Nakashima, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Eiichiro; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Sekiya, Ichiro; Sakai, Akinori

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the characteristics of MSCs from hip and compare them to MSCs from knee. Methods. Synovial tissues were obtained from both the knee and the hip joints in 8 patients who underwent both hip and knee arthroscopies on the same day. MSCs were isolated from the knee and hip synovial samples. The capacities of MSCs were compared between both groups. Results. The number of cells per unit weight at passage 0 of synovium from the knee was significantly higher than that from the hip (P < 0.05). While it was possible to observe the growth of colonies in all the knee synovial fluid samples, it was impossible to culture cells from any of the hip samples. In adipogenesis experiments, the frequency of Oil Red-O-positive colonies and the gene expression of adipsin were significantly higher in knee than in hip. In osteogenesis experiments, the expression of COL1A1 and ALPP was significantly less in the knee synovium than in the hip synovium. Conclusions. MSCs obtained from hip joint have self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials. However, in matched donors, adipogenesis and osteogenesis potentials of MSCs from the knees are superior to those from the hips. Knee synovium may be a better source of MSC for potential use in hip diseases. PMID:28115945

  7. The O4 specific antigen moiety of lipopolysaccharide but not the K54 group 2 capsule is important for urovirulence of an extraintestinal isolate of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, T; Brown, J J; Jodush, S T; Johnson, J R

    1996-01-01

    Group 2 capsules and lipopolysaccharides are regarded as important virulence factors in extraintestinal isolates of Escherichia coli, but their specific contributions to bladder and renal infections, if any, are unknown. Proven isogenic derivatives deficient in the K54 antigen alone (CP9.137), the O4 antigen alone (CP921), or both the K54 and O4 antigens (CP923) were compared with their wild-type parent (CP9 [O4/K54JH5]) for growth in human urine in vitro and for virulence in vivo in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection (UTI). Growth of CP9.137 and CP921 was equivalent to that of CP9 in human urine. CP923 demonstrated a small but reproducible decrease in log-phase growth but achieved the same plateau density. In the mouse model of UTI, the isogenic mutant deficient in the 04 antigen alone (CP921) and, to a greater degree, the derivative deficient in both the K54 and O4 antigens (CP923) were significantly less virulent in nearly all parameters measured. In contrast, the K54 knockout derivative was as virulent as its parent, CP9, in causing bladder infection and nearly as virulent in causing renal infection. These results demonstrate an important role for the O4 antigen moiety of lipopolysaccharide in the pathogenesis of UTI. The possibility that the K54 antigen also plays a minor role cannot be excluded. PMID:8675348

  8. Human Disease Isolates of Serotype M4 and M22 Group A Streptococcus Lack Genes Required for Hyaluronic Acid Capsule Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Anthony R.; Jewell, Brittany E.; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Beres, Stephen B.; Musser, James M.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes human pharyngitis and invasive infections and frequently colonizes individuals asymptomatically. Many lines of evidence generated over decades have shown that the hyaluronic acid capsule is a major virulence factor contributing to these infections. While conducting a whole-genome analysis of the in vivo molecular genetic changes that occur in GAS during longitudinal human pharyngeal interaction, we discovered that serotypes M4 and M22 GAS strains lack the hasABC genes necessary for hyaluronic acid capsule biosynthesis. Using targeted PCR, we found that all 491 temporally and geographically diverse disease isolates of these two serotypes studied lack the hasABC genes. Consistent with the lack of capsule synthesis genes, none of the strains produced detectable hyaluronic acid. Despite the lack of a hyaluronic acid capsule, all strains tested multiplied extensively ex vivo in human blood. Thus, counter to the prevailing concept in GAS pathogenesis research, strains of these two serotypes do not require hyaluronic acid to colonize the upper respiratory tract or cause abundant mucosal or invasive human infections. We speculate that serotype M4 and M22 GAS have alternative, compensatory mechanisms that promote virulence. PMID:23131832

  9. Group II intron-mediated deletion of lactate dehydrogenase gene in an isolated 1,3-propanediol producer Hafnia alvei AD27.

    PubMed

    Celińska, Ewelina; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Wita, Agnieszka; Juzwa, Wojciech; Białas, Wojciech; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Grajek, Włodzimierz

    2016-03-03

    Our previous studies showed that glycerol fermentation by Hafnia alvei AD27 strain was accompanied by formation of high quantities of lactate. The ultimate aim of this work was the elimination of excessive lactate production in the 1,3-propanediol producer cultures. Group II intron-mediated deletion of ldh (lactate dehydrogenase) gene in an environmental isolate of H. alvei AD27 strain was conducted. The effect of the Δldh genotype in H. alvei AD27 strain varied depending on the culture medium applied. Under lower initial glycerol concentration (20 gL(-1)), lactate and 1,3-propanediol production was fully abolished, and the main carbon flux was directed to ethanol synthesis. On the other hand, at higher initial glycerol concentrations (40 gL(-1)), 1,3-propanediol and lactate production was recovered in the recombinant strain. The final titers of 1,3-propanediol and ethanol were similar for the recombinant and the WT strains, while the Δldh genotype displayed significantly decreased lactate titer. The by-products profile was altered upon ldh gene deletion, while glycerol utilization and biomass accumulation remained unaltered. As indicated by flow-cytometry analyses, the internal pH was not different for the WT and the recombinant Δldh strains over the culture duration, however, the WT strain was characterized by higher redox potential.

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cell Derived from Hip Joints: A Comparative Analysis with a Matched Control Knee Group.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Akihisa; Uchida, Soshi; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Tsukamoto, Manabu; Nakashima, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Eiichiro; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Sekiya, Ichiro; Sakai, Akinori

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the characteristics of MSCs from hip and compare them to MSCs from knee. Methods. Synovial tissues were obtained from both the knee and the hip joints in 8 patients who underwent both hip and knee arthroscopies on the same day. MSCs were isolated from the knee and hip synovial samples. The capacities of MSCs were compared between both groups. Results. The number of cells per unit weight at passage 0 of synovium from the knee was significantly higher than that from the hip (P < 0.05). While it was possible to observe the growth of colonies in all the knee synovial fluid samples, it was impossible to culture cells from any of the hip samples. In adipogenesis experiments, the frequency of Oil Red-O-positive colonies and the gene expression of adipsin were significantly higher in knee than in hip. In osteogenesis experiments, the expression of COL1A1 and ALPP was significantly less in the knee synovium than in the hip synovium. Conclusions. MSCs obtained from hip joint have self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials. However, in matched donors, adipogenesis and osteogenesis potentials of MSCs from the knees are superior to those from the hips. Knee synovium may be a better source of MSC for potential use in hip diseases.

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Isolates of the Roseobacter Group, Sulfitobacter sp. Strains 3SOLIMAR09 and 1FIGIMAR09, from Harbors of Mallorca Island (Mediterranean Sea)

    PubMed Central

    Mas-Lladó, Maria; Piña-Villalonga, Joana Maria; Brunet-Galmés, Isabel; Nogales, Balbina

    2014-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequences of two isolates of the Roseobacter lineage, 3SOLIMAR09 and 1FIGIMAR09, which were obtained from harbors of Mallorca Island, Spain, and are affiliated with the Sulfitobacter genus. Both isolates harbor the complete gene set for protocatechuate catabolism and incomplete pathways for several additional monoaromatic compounds. PMID:24855294

  12. Isolation of Insertion Sequence ISRLdTAL1145-1 from a Rhizobium sp. (Leucaena diversifolia) and Distribution of Homologous Sequences Identifying Cross-Inoculation Group Relationships †

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Douglas J.; Somasegaran, Padma; MacGlashan, Kathryn; Bohlool, B. Ben

    1994-01-01

    Insertion sequence (IS) element ISRLdTAL1145-1 from Rhizobium sp. (Leucaena diversifolia) strain TAL 1145 was entrapped in the sacB gene of the positive selection vector pUCD800 by insertional inactivation. A hybridization probe prepared from the whole 2.5-kb element was used to determine the distribution of homologous sequences in a diverse collection of 135 Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium strains. The IS probe hybridized strongly to Southern blots of genomic DNAs from 10 rhizobial strains that nodulate both Phaseolus vulgaris (beans) and Leucaena leucocephala (leguminous trees), 1 Rhizobium sp. that nodulates Leucaena spp., 9 R. meliloti (alfalfa) strains, 4 Rhizobium spp. that nodulate Sophora chrysophylla (leguminous trees), and 1 nonnodulating bacterium associated with the nodules of Pithecellobium dulce from the Leucaena cross-inoculation group, producing distinguishing IS patterns for each strain. Hybridization analysis revealed that ISRLdTAL1145-1 was strongly homologous with and closely related to a previously isolated element, ISRm USDA1024-1 from R. meliloti, while restriction enzyme analysis found structural similarities and differences between the two IS homologs. Two internal segments of these IS elements were used to construct hybridization probes of 1.2 kb and 380 bp that delineate a structural similarity and a difference, respectively, of the two IS homologs. The internal segment probes were used to analyze the structures of homologous IS elements in other strains. Five types of structural variation in homolog IS elements were found. The predominate IS structural type naturally occurring in a strain can reasonably identify the strain's cross-inoculation group relationships. Three IS structural types were found in Rhizobium species that nodulate beans and Leucaena species, one of which included the designated type IIB strain of R. tropici (CIAT 899). Weak homology to the whole IS probe, but not with the internal segments, was found with two

  13. Identifying factors linked to the occurrence of alien gastropods in isolated woodland water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyra, Aneta; Strzelec, Małgorzata

    2014-03-01

    Biological invasions are a significant component of human-caused global change and is widely regarded as one of the main threats to natural biodiversity. Isolated anthropogenic water bodies created in the areas that are deprived of natural freshwater habitats allow the survival and reproduction of alien species on newly settled sites. They are often small with water level fluctuations causing frequent environmental disturbances. The colonisation success may be the result of the rate of their degradation. The aims of the study were to determine the environmental conditions that affect the existence of alien species of gastropods in this type of aquatic environment and to examine whether the occurrence of non-native species affects the community structure of the native species. This study made it possible to group woodland ponds according to the occurrence of the three invasive species in snail communities and discuss the environmental conditions present in these pond types. Analysis of water properties emphasised the distinctiveness of the selected pond types. In ponds of the Potamopyrgus antipodarum type, we found the highest values of some parameters mainly hardness, conductivity, and content of calcium and chlorides, in contrast with the Physella acuta type, which were characterised by the lowest values except for phosphates and nitrites. In the Ferrissia fragilis type, we found the highest nitrate content. Data on the occurrence of alien species in different water environments play an important role in actions which are taken to prevent new invasions and spread of non-native species as well as to reduce future impacts of invaders.

  14. Activity of Moxifloxacin, Imipenem, and Ertapenem against Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacteroides fragilis in Monocultures and Mixed Cultures in an In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model Simulating Concentrations in the Human Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    The activities of moxifloxacin, imipenem, and ertapenem against pathogens causing severe necrotizing pancreatitis were studied in an in vitro pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) model. Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacteroides fragilis were exposed in monocultures and mixed cultures to concentrations of the three agents comparable to those in the human pancreas. Moxifloxacin was more active than the two carbapenems in monocultures and mixed cultures, reducing the numbers of CFU more drastically and more rapidly. PMID:23070164

  15. Genome sequence of Shimia str. SK013, a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from marine sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Kanukollu, Saranya; Voget, Sonja; Pohlner, Marion; Vandieken, Verona; Petersen, Jörn; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Shapiro, Nicole; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans -Peter; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2016-03-12

    Shimia strain SK013 is an aerobic, Gram-negative, rod shaped alphaproteobacterium affiliated with the Roseobacter group within the family Rhodobacteraceae. The strain was isolated from surface sediment (0-1 cm) of the Skagerrak at 114 m below sea level. The 4,049,808 bp genome of Shimia str. SK013 comprises 3,981 protein-coding genes and 47 RNA genes. It contains one chromosome and no extrachromosomal elements. The genome analysis revealed the presence of genes for a dimethylsulfoniopropionate lyase, demethylase and the trimethylamine methyltransferase (mttB) as well as genes for nitrate, nitrite and dimethyl sulfoxide reduction. This indicates that Shimia str. SK013 is able to switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism and thus is capable of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur cycling at the seafloor. Among the ability to convert other sulfur compounds it has the genetic capacity to produce climatically active dimethyl sulfide. Growth on glutamate as a sole carbon source results in formation of cell-connecting filaments, a putative phenotypic adaptation of the surface-associated strain to the environmental conditions at the seafloor. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a flagellum (fla1) and a type IV pilus biogenesis, which is speculated to be a prerequisite for biofilm formation. This is also related to genes responsible for signalling such as N-acyl homoserine lactones, as well as quip-genes responsible for quorum quenching and antibiotic biosynthesis. Pairwise similarities of 16S rRNA genes (98.56 % sequence similarity to the next relative S. haliotis) and the in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (21.20 % sequence similarity to S. haliotis) indicated Shimia str. SK013 to be considered as a new species. In conclusion, the genome analysis of Shimia str. SK013 offered first insights into specific physiological and phenotypic adaptation mechanisms of Roseobacter-affiliated bacteria to the

  16. In vitro activity of moxifloxacin against 923 anaerobes isolated from human intra-abdominal infections.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Warren, Yumi A; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Merriam, C Vreni; Fernandez, Helen

    2006-01-01

    The in vitro activity of moxifloxacin against 923 recent anaerobic isolates obtained from pretreatment cultures in patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections was studied using the CLSI M11-A-6 agar dilution method. Moxifloxacin was active against 87% (96 of 110) Bacteroides fragilis strains at < or = 1 microg/ml and 87% (79 of 90) B. thetaiotaomicron strains at < or = 2 microg/ml. Species variation was seen, with B. uniformis, B. vulgatus, Clostridium clostridioforme, and C. symbiosum being least susceptible and accounting for most of the resistant isolates; excluding the aforementioned four resistant species, 86% (303 of 363) of Bacteroides species isolates and 94% (417 of 450) of all other genera and species were susceptible to < or = 2 microg/ml of moxifloxacin. Overall, moxifloxacin was active against 763 of 923 (83%) of strains at < or = 2 microg/ml, supporting its use as a monotherapy for some community-acquired intra-abdominal infections.

  17. Comparison of cold enrichment and U.S. Department of Agriculture methods for isolating Listeria monocytogenes from naturally contaminated foods. The Listeria Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, P S; Graves, L M; Ajello, G W; Swaminathan, B; Weaver, R E; Wenger, J D; Schuchat, A; Broome, C V

    1991-01-01

    We compared the cold enrichment (CE) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) methods for isolating Listeria monocytogenes by examining 402 food samples. The food samples were collected from refrigerators of listeriosis patients as part of a multistate active surveillance project to determine the role of foods in sporadic listeriosis in the United States. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 51 food samples (13%). The USDA method was significantly better (P less than 0.001) than the CE method. The isolation efficiencies of the USDA and CE methods were 96 and 59%, respectively. Quantitation of L. monocytogenes in the food samples revealed that many food samples containing less than 0.3 CFU/g were negative as determined by the CE method but positive as determined by the USDA method. PMID:1768082

  18. Willow (Salix fragilis Linn.): A multipurpose tree species under pest attack in the cold desert of Lahaul valley, northwestern Himalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Yashwant S; Oinam, Santaram S; Vishvakarma, Subhash C R; Kuniyal, Chandra P; Kuniyal, Jagdish C

    2006-02-01

    Salix fragilis is the most common willow species grown extensively under the indigenous agroforestry system in the cold desert of Lahaul valley located in the northwestern Himalayas, India. Presently, this tree is under severe pest attack, and other infections have made its survival in the area questionable. This deciduous multipurpose tree species provides vegetation cover to the barren landscape of Lahaul and is a significant contributor of fuel and fodder to the region. This study is a detailed profile of the plant in three villages within this region: Khoksar, Jahlma, and Hinsa. The willow provided 69.5%, 29%, and 42% of the total fuelwood requirements of Jahlma, Khoksar, and Hinsa respectively. A striking observation was that only 30.0 +/- 20.1% trees were healthy: 55.2 +/- 16.1% of the willows have dried up and 14.8 +/- 6.1% were in drying condition due to a combination of pest infestation and infection. To sustain this cultivation of willow under the existing agroforestry system in the region, we recommend that locally available wild species and other established varieties of willow growing in similar regions of the Himalayas be introduced on a trial basis.

  19. Improved production of 2'-fucosyllactose in engineered Escherichia coli by expressing putative α-1,2-fucosyltransferase, WcfB from Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Wook; Kim, Ji-Yeong; Kim, Jae-Han; Jung, Sang-Min; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-12-02

    2'-Fucosyllactose (2-FL) is one of most abundant oligosaccharides in human milk, which is involved in many biological functions for infant health. Since 2-FL has a great potential in application to functional food materials and pharmaceuticals, several microbial systems for mass production of 2-FL have been developed in recent years. Microbial production of 2-FL was suggested to be influenced by a number of factors including fucosylation activity of α-1,2-fucosyltransferase. In the present study, the wcfB gene coding for α-1,2-fucosyltransferase from Bacteroides fragilis was screened from eleven candidates of putative α-1,2-fucosyltransferase. Introduction of the wcfB gene allows the lacZ-deleted strain of E. coli expressing the genes for guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose biosynthetic enzymes to produce 2-FL. As a result of fed-batch fermentation, 15.4g/L extracellular concentration of 2-FL with 2-FL yield of 0.858g/g lactose and productivity of 0.530g/L/h were obtained. In addition, the feasibility of industrial production of 2-FL using this microbial system was demonstrated by performing fed-batch fermentation in a 75L bioreactor.

  20. Variable Nucleotide Tandem-Repeat Analysis Revealing a Unique Group of Leptospira interrogans Serovar Pomona Isolates Associated with California Sea Lions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona is commonly isolated from a variety of wildlife and domesticated livestock. It is difficult to assess whether disease outbreaks with serovar Pomona in given animal populations are due to endemic infections or accidental exposure. Unlike many leptospiral serovars...

  1. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of extracts of Tibouchina candolleana (melastomataceae), isolated compounds and semi-synthetic derivatives against endodontic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Fernanda M.; de Souza, Maria Gorete; Crotti, Antônio E. Miller; Martins, Carlos H. G.; Ambrósio, Sérgio R.; Veneziani, Rodrigo C. S.; e Silva, Márcio L. Andrade; Cunha, Wilson R.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the phytochemical study of the extracts from aerial parts of Tibouchina candolleana as well as the evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of extracts, isolated compounds, and semi-synthetic derivatives of ursolic acid against endodontic bacteria. HRGC analysis of the n-hexane extract of T. candolleana allowed identification of β-amyrin, α-amyrin, and β-sitosterol as major constituents. The triterpenes ursolic acid and oleanolic acid were isolated from the methylene chloride extract and identified. In addition, the flavonoids luteolin and genistein were isolated from the ethanol extract and identified. The antimicrobial activity was investigated via determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using the broth microdilution method. Amongst the isolated compounds, ursolic acid was the most effective against the selected endodontic bacteria. As for the semi-synthetic ursolic acid derivatives, only the methyl ester derivative potentiated the activity against Bacteroides fragilis. PMID:24031892

  2. Comparison and differentiation of potyvirus isolates and identification of strain-, virus-, subgroup-specific and potyvirus group-common epitopes using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jordan, R; Hammond, J

    1991-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) generated against an admixture of 12 potyvirus isolates was used to compare and differentiate diverse potyviruses. Both native and denatured virions of strains of bean yellow mosaic (BYMV), potato virus Y, tobacco etch, pea seed-borne mosaic, iris severe mosaic, iris mild mosaic and asparagus virus-1 potyviruses were used as immunogen and as antigen for screening of the hybridoma cell lines. Thirty cell lines secreting potyvirus-specific antibodies reactive in indirect antigen-coated plate (ACP-) ELISA were selected for detailed analysis. All 30 MAbs reacted with at least one strain of BYMV; 11 MAbs reacted with between one and eight of the nine BYMV strains and an additional three MAbs reacted only with isolates within the BYMV subgroup (BYMV, pea mosaic virus and clover yellow vein virus). The remaining 16 MAbs reacted with a BYMV isolate and with at least one of the other 43 potyvirus isolates tested. MAb PTY 1 reacted with all 55 potyvirus isolates tested (representing at least 33 different and distinct aphid-transmissible potyviruses). The potyvirus cross-reactive MAbs generally gave higher reactivity values in ACP-ELISA with dissociated virus than with polyclonal antibody-trapped intact virions in triple antibody sandwich ELISA (i.e. were cryptotope-specific). The BYMV strain- and virus-specific MAbs reacted strongly with both types of antigens (i.e. were metatope-specific). At least 25 distinct epitopes (12 cryptotopes and 13 metatopes) could be identified from the MAb-antigen reactivity patterns. The distribution of these epitopes between virus isolates can be used to detect and differentiate potyviruses in infected plant extracts and to examine virus architectures. Some of these epitopes are shared by potyvirus isolates not previously shown to be serologically related. The broad spectrum-reacting MAb PTY 1 recognizes a cryptotope conserved on all of the aphid-transmissible potyviruses examined and should be a

  3. [Post-marketing surveillance of antibacterial activities of cefozopran against various clinical isolates--II. Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Igari, Jun; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Nobuyoshi; Akiyama, Kazumitsu; Koyama, Tsuneo

    2003-10-01

    As a post-marketing surveillance, the in vitro antibacterial activities of cefozopran (CZOP), an agent of cephems, against various clinical isolates were yearly evaluated and compared with those of other cephems, oxacephems, carbapenems, monobactams, and penicillins. Changes in CZOP susceptibility among bacteria were also evaluated with the bacterial resistance ratio calculated from the breakpoint MIC. Twenty-five species (4,154 strains) of Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from the clinical materials annually collected from 1996 to 2001, and consisted of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Serratia marcescens, Serratia liquefaciens, Citrobacter freundii, Citrobacter koseri, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Morganella morganii, Providencia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter Iwoffii, Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Bacteroides fragilis group, and Prevotella/Porphyromonas. CZOP preserved its antibacterial activity against M. (B.) catarrhalis (MIC90: 4 micrograms/mL) and showed comparable activity to carbapenems against H. influenzae (MIC90: 1 microgram/mL). The antibacterial activity of CZOP against E. coli was preferable (MIC90: 0.125 microgram/mL) and comparable to those of cefpirome (CPR), cefepime (CFPM), and imipenem (IPM). The MIC90 of CZOP against K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca was 1 and 0.25 microgram/mL, respectively. The MIC90 of CZOP against E. cloacae increased during 6 years (32 to 128 micrograms/mL). The antibacterial activity of CZOP against E. aerogenes was preferable (MIC90: 1 microgram/mL). The antibacterial activities of CZOP against S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens were relatively potent (MIC90: 0.5 and 0.25 microgram/mL) and comparable to those of CPR, CFPM, and carumonam. CZOP preserved comparable antibacterial

  4. Evaluation of an Immunochromatographic Assay for Rapid Detection of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2a in Human and Animal Staphylococcus intermedius Group, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus schleiferi Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, A. R.; Ford, B. A.; McAllister, S. K.; Lonsway, D.; Albrecht, V.; Jerris, R. C.; Rasheed, J. K.; Limbago, B.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a rapid penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) detection assay, the Alere PBP2a culture colony test, was evaluated for identification of PBP2a-mediated beta-lactam resistance in human and animal clinical isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius group, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus schleiferi. The assay was sensitive and specific, with all PBP2a-negative and PBP2a-positive strains testing negative and positive, respectively. PMID:26677248

  5. Evaluation of an Immunochromatographic Assay for Rapid Detection of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2a in Human and Animal Staphylococcus intermedius Group, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus schleiferi Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Arnold, A R; Burnham, C-A D; Ford, B A; Lawhon, S D; McAllister, S K; Lonsway, D; Albrecht, V; Jerris, R C; Rasheed, J K; Limbago, B; Burd, E M; Westblade, L F

    2016-03-01

    The performance of a rapid penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) detection assay, the Alere PBP2a culture colony test, was evaluated for identification of PBP2a-mediated beta-lactam resistance in human and animal clinical isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius group, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus schleiferi. The assay was sensitive and specific, with all PBP2a-negative and PBP2a-positive strains testing negative and positive, respectively.

  6. Life-history traits maintain the genomic integrity of sympatric species of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) group on an isolated forest island

    PubMed Central

    Lumley, Lisa M; Sperling, Felix AH

    2011-01-01

    Identification of widespread species collected from islands can be challenging due to the potential for local ecological and phenotypic divergence in isolated populations. We sought to determine how many species of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) complex reside in Cypress Hills, an isolated remnant coniferous forest in western Canada. We integrated data on behavior, ecology, morphology, mitochondrial DNA, and simple sequence repeats, comparing Cypress Hills populations to those from other regions of North America to determine which species they resembled most. We identified C. fumiferana, C. occidentalis, C. lambertiana, and hybrid forms in Cypress Hills. Adult flight phenology and pheromone attraction were identified as key life-history traits involved in maintaining the genomic integrity of species. Our study highlights the importance of extensive sampling of both specimens and a variety of characters for understanding species boundaries in biodiversity research. PMID:22393489

  7. Life-history traits maintain the genomic integrity of sympatric species of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) group on an isolated forest island.

    PubMed

    Lumley, Lisa M; Sperling, Felix Ah

    2011-10-01

    Identification of widespread species collected from islands can be challenging due to the potential for local ecological and phenotypic divergence in isolated populations. We sought to determine how many species of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) complex reside in Cypress Hills, an isolated remnant coniferous forest in western Canada. We integrated data on behavior, ecology, morphology, mitochondrial DNA, and simple sequence repeats, comparing Cypress Hills populations to those from other regions of North America to determine which species they resembled most. We identified C. fumiferana, C. occidentalis, C. lambertiana, and hybrid forms in Cypress Hills. Adult flight phenology and pheromone attraction were identified as key life-history traits involved in maintaining the genomic integrity of species. Our study highlights the importance of extensive sampling of both specimens and a variety of characters for understanding species boundaries in biodiversity research.

  8. National Department of Defense Surveillance for Clinical Group A Streptococcal Isolates, Antibiotic Resistance, and emm Gene Types from 8 Basic Training Military Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-08

    is one of these important virulence factors, offering GAS several mechanisms of defense against the human immune system, most notably the ability to...statistically significant association with erythromycin resistance. This study was not able to assess the mechanism of resistance for these isolates, but other...studies have suggested the presence of efflux mechanisms and resistance genes [34, 35]. Though there was high prevalence of erythromycin resistance

  9. Preliminary selection for potential probiotic Bifidobacterium isolated from subjects of different Chinese ethnic groups and evaluation of their fermentation and storage characteristics in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Liu, W J; Chen, Y F; Kwok, L Y; Li, M H; Sun, T; Sun, C L; Wang, X N; Dan, T; Menghebilige; Zhang, H P; Sun, T S

    2013-01-01

    A total of 29 strains of Bifidobacterium were isolated from 18 samples of human feces in different ethnic minority regions of China. All isolates were identified as Bifidobacterium longum (9 strains) and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum (20 strains) based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. These strains were preliminarily tested for their suitability to become probiotics by assessing their ability to survive adequately at low pH conditions and their tolerance of different concentrations of bile salts and simulated gastrointestinal juices. In vitro tests were sequentially used to predict the survival of these strains in the simulated conditions in the human gastrointestinal tract. These strains were first exposed to pH 2.5 for 3h, and 7 out of the 29 strains were discriminated from the others by their high survival rates. Out of these 7 strains, 4 were found to grow and survive well at an even lower pH of 2.0 and in high bile salt concentration. Apart from the gastrointestinal survival capacity, both fermentation efficiency and storage characteristics are important criteria for selecting for suitable potential probiotic strains. Therefore, the fermentation efficiency in bovine milk and the bacterial viability during the storage in the resultant fermented milk were also evaluated for these 4 selected strains. In this study, we isolated and identified 29 novel Bifidobacterium strains. Based on our initial evaluation, at least 4 of them may serve as valuable resources for further dairy probiotic strain selection.

  10. Carbapenem-resistant Serratia marcescens isolates producing Bush group 2f beta-lactamase (SME-1) in the United States: results from the MYSTIC Programme.

    PubMed

    Gales, A C; Biedenbach, D J; Winokur, P; Hacek, D M; Pfaller, M A; Jones, R N

    2001-02-01

    Two carbapenem (imipenem, meropenem)-resistant Serratia marcescens strains were isolated in the United States (Chicago, IL) through the 1999 MYSTIC (Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection) Programme. The S. marcescens antimicrobial susceptible patterns were: susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, and cefepime (MICs, < or = 0.25 microg/ml), and resistance to the carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem; MIC, > 32 microg/ml) and aztreonam (MIC, > = 16 microg/ml). Each S. marcescens isolate shared an identical epidemiologic type (ribotype and PFGE) and the outer membrane protein profile was also identical to those of the wild type susceptible strains from the same medical center. The PCR utilizing bla(sme-1) primers amplified a gene product that was identified as consistent with SME-1 after DNA sequencing. Imipenem and meropenem resistance due to production of carbapenem-hydrolyzing enzymes among clinical isolates is still very rare, but microbiology laboratories should be aware of these chromosomally encoded enzymes among class C beta-lactamases producing enteric bacilli such as S. marcescens and Enterobacter cloacae.

  11. [Distribution of phylogenetic groups and virulence factors in CTX-M-15 β-lactamase-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from patients in the community of Mérida, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Millán, Ysheth; Hernández, Erick; Millán, Beatriz; Araque, María

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of phylogenetic groups and the genetic detection of virulence factors in CTX-M-15 β-lactamase-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains were analyzed. Twenty eight strains were isolated between January 2009 and July 2011 from patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) who attended the Public Health Laboratory at Mérida, Venezuela. Determination of phylogenetic groups and detection of six virulence genes, fimH, fyuA, kpsMTII, usp, PAI and papAH, were performed by PCR amplification. Fifteen of the 28 isolates were mainly located in the phylogenetic group A, followed by B2 (12/28) and D (1/28). No direct relationship between the severity or recurrence of UTI and the distribution of phylogroups was observed. All studied virulence factors were found in group B2 strains with the highest frequency. The prevalent virulence profile included the combination of three main genes: fimH, kpsMTII and fyuA and, to a lesser extent, the presence of other determinants such as usp, PAI and/or papAH. These results indicate that virulent UPEC incorporated three important properties: adhesion, iron uptake and evasion of phagocytosis, which favored the production of recurrent UTI. This is the first report describing the association of phylogenetic groups with the potential virulence of CTX-M-15 β-lactamase producing UPEC strains in Venezuela.

  12. Are isolated wetlands isolated?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Haukos, David A.

    2011-01-01

    While federal regulations during the past 10 years have treated isolated wetlands as unconnected to aquatic resources protected by the Clean Water Act, they provide critical ecosystem services to society that extend well beyond their wetland boundaries. The authors offer well-documented examples from the scientific literature on some of the ecosystem services provided by isolated wetlands to society and other ecosystems.

  13. Existence of two groups of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis based on biofilm formation, intracellular survival, capsular profile and agr-typing.

    PubMed

    Bardiau, Marjorie; Caplin, Jonathan; Detilleux, Johann; Graber, Hans; Moroni, Paolo; Taminiau, Bernard; Mainil, Jacques G

    2016-03-15

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is recognised worldwide as an important pathogen causing contagious acute and chronic bovine mastitis. Chronic mastitis account for a significant part of all bovine cases and represent an important economic problem for dairy producers. Several properties (biofilm formation, intracellular survival, capsular expression and group agr) are thought to be associated with this chronic status. In a previous study, we found the existence of two groups of strains based on the association of these features. The aim of the present work was to confirm on a large international and non-related collection of strains the existence of these clusters and to associate them with case history records. In addition, the genomes of eight strains were sequenced to study the genomic differences between strains of each cluster. The results confirmed the existence of both groups based on capsular typing, intracellular survival and agr-typing: strains cap8-positive, belonging to agr group II, showing a low invasion rate and strains cap5-positive, belonging to agr group I, showing a high invasion rate. None of the two clusters were associated with the chronic status of the cow. When comparing the genomes of strains belonging to both clusters, the genes specific to the group "cap5-agrI" would suggest that these strains are better adapted to live in hostile environment. The existence of these two groups is highly important as they may represent two clusters that are adapted differently to the host and/or the surrounding environment.

  14. Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 mediates growth promotion of crack willow (Salix fragilis) saplings in both clean and metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Adams, P; De-Leij, F A A M; Lynch, J M

    2007-08-01

    We investigated if the plant growth promoting fungus Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 (also known as "T22") could be used to enhance the establishment and growth of crack willow (Salix fragilis) in a soil containing no organic or metal pollutants and in a metal-contaminated soil by comparing this fungus with noninoculated controls and an ectomycorrhizal formulation commercially used to enhance the establishment of tree saplings. Crack willow saplings were grown in a temperature-controlled growth room over a period of 5 weeks' in a garden center topsoil and over 12 weeks in a soil which had been used for disposal of building materials and sewage sludge containing elevated levels of heavy metals including cadmium (30 mg kg(-1)), lead (350 mg kg(-1)), manganese (210 mg kg(-1)), nickel (210 mg kg(-1)), and zinc (1,100 mg kg(-1)). After 5 weeks' growth in clean soil, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 produced shoots and roots that were 40% longer than those of the controls and shoots that were 20% longer than those of saplings grown with ectomycorrhiza (ECM). T. harzianum T22 saplings produced more than double the dry biomass of controls and more than 50% extra biomass than the ECM-treated saplings. After 12 weeks' growth, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 in the metal-contaminated soil produced 39% more dry weight biomass and were 16% taller than the noninoculated controls. This is the first report of tree growth stimulation by application of Trichoderma to roots, and is especially important as willow is a major source of wood fuel in the quest for renewable energy. These results also suggest willow trees inoculated with T. harzianum T22 could be used to increase the rate of revegetation and phytostabilization of metal-contaminated sites, a property of the fungus never previously demonstrated.

  15. De novo synthesis of a 2-acetamido-4-amino-2,4,6-trideoxy-D-galactose (AAT) building block for the preparation of a Bacteroides fragilis A1 polysaccharide fragment.

    PubMed

    Pragani, Rajan; Stallforth, Pierre; Seeberger, Peter H

    2010-04-02

    Zwitterionic polysaccharides (ZPSs) are potent T-cell activators that naturally occur on the cell surface of bacteria and show potential as immunostimulatory agents. An unusual, yet important component of many ZPSs is 2-acetamido-4-amino-2,4,6-trideoxy-D-galactose (AAT). AAT building block 2 was prepared via a de novo synthesis from N-Cbz-L-threonine 5. Furthermore, building block 2 was used to synthesize disaccharide 15 that constitutes a fragment of zwitterionic polysaccharide A1 (PS A1) found in Bacteroides fragilis.

  16. Development of Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection and Quantification of Bacillus cereus Group Species: Differentiation of B. weihenstephanensis and Rhizoid B. pseudomycoides Isolates from Milk▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Oliwa-Stasiak, Kamila; Kolaj-Robin, Olga; Adley, Catherine C.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) offers an alternative method for the detection of bacterial contamination in food. This method provides the quantitation and determination of the number of gene copies. In our study, we established an RT-PCR assay using the LightCycler system to detect and quantify the Bacillus cereus group species, which includes B. cereus, B. anthracis, B. thuringiensis, B. weihenstephanensis, B. mycoides, and B. pseudomycoides. A TaqMan assay was designed to detect a 285-bp fragment of the motB gene encoding the flagellar motor protein, which was specific for the detection of the B. cereus group species, excluding B. pseudomycoides, and the detection of a 217-bp gene fragment of a hypothetical protein specific only for B. pseudomycoides strains. Based on three hydrolysis probes (MotB-FAM-1, MotB-FAM-2, and Bpm-FAM-1), it was possible to differentiate B. weihenstephanensis from the B. cereus group species with nonrhizoid growth and B. pseudomycoides from the whole B. cereus group. The specificity of the assay was confirmed with 119 strains belonging to the Bacillus cereus group species and was performed against 27 other Bacillus and non-Bacillus bacteria. A detection limit was determined for each assay. The assays performed well not only with purified DNA but also with DNA extracted from milk samples artificially contaminated with bacteria that belong to the B. cereus group species. This technique represents an alternative approach to traditional culture methods for the differentiation of B. cereus group species and differentiates B. weihenstephanensis and B. pseudomycoides in one reaction. PMID:21057027

  17. Development of real-time PCR assays for detection and quantification of Bacillus cereus group species: differentiation of B. weihenstephanensis and rhizoid B. pseudomycoides isolates from milk.

    PubMed

    Oliwa-Stasiak, Kamila; Kolaj-Robin, Olga; Adley, Catherine C

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) offers an alternative method for the detection of bacterial contamination in food. This method provides the quantitation and determination of the number of gene copies. In our study, we established an RT-PCR assay using the LightCycler system to detect and quantify the Bacillus cereus group species, which includes B. cereus, B. anthracis, B. thuringiensis, B. weihenstephanensis, B. mycoides, and B. pseudomycoides. A TaqMan assay was designed to detect a 285-bp fragment of the motB gene encoding the flagellar motor protein, which was specific for the detection of the B. cereus group species, excluding B. pseudomycoides, and the detection of a 217-bp gene fragment of a hypothetical protein specific only for B. pseudomycoides strains. Based on three hydrolysis probes (MotB-FAM-1, MotB-FAM-2, and Bpm-FAM-1), it was possible to differentiate B. weihenstephanensis from the B. cereus group species with nonrhizoid growth and B. pseudomycoides from the whole B. cereus group. The specificity of the assay was confirmed with 119 strains belonging to the Bacillus cereus group species and was performed against 27 other Bacillus and non-Bacillus bacteria. A detection limit was determined for each assay. The assays performed well not only with purified DNA but also with DNA extracted from milk samples artificially contaminated with bacteria that belong to the B. cereus group species. This technique represents an alternative approach to traditional culture methods for the differentiation of B. cereus group species and differentiates B. weihenstephanensis and B. pseudomycoides in one reaction.

  18. Effects of 20-day litter weight on weaned piglets’ fighting behavior after group mixing and on heart rate variability in an isolation test

    PubMed Central

    Sun, YaNan; Lian, XinMing; Bo, YuKun; Guo, YuGuang; Yan, PeiShi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 20-day litter weight on behavior and heart rate variability (HRV) of piglets under stress. Methods Forty four original litters were categorized as high litter weight (HW) litters (n = 22) and low litter weight (LW) litters (n = 22) by 20-day litter weight. From each original HW litter, three males and three females were randomly selected after weaning and the 12 piglets from two original litters with similar age of days were regrouped into one new high litter weight (NHW) litter (11 NHW litters in total). The original LW litters were treated with a same program, so that there were 11 new low litter weight (NLW) litters as well. The latencies to first fighting, fighting frequencies and duration within three hours were recorded after regrouping and the lesions on body surface within 48 hours were scored. Besides, HR (heart rate, bpm, beats per minute) and activity count (ACT), time domain indexes and frequency domain indexes of the piglets were measured in an isolation trial to analyze the discrepancy in coping with stress between the original HW and LW litters. Results The results exhibited that piglets from the HW litters launched fighting sooner and got statistically higher skin lesion score than those from the LW litters (p = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). Regarding the HRV detection, compared with the HW litters, the LW litters exhibited a lower mean HR (p<0.05). In the isolation test, a highly significant higher ACT value was observed between the HW litters, compared to the LW litters (p<0.01). Significant differences were observed in standard deviation of R-R intervals, standard deviation of all normal to normal intervals, and most frequency-domain indicators: very low-frequency, low-frequency, and high frequency between the HW and LW litters as well. The difference in LF:HF was not significant (p = 0.779). Conclusion This study suggests that compared with litters of low 20-day litter

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria in Ontario, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Marchand-Austin, Alex; Rawte, Prasad; Toye, Baldwin; Jamieson, Frances B; Farrell, David J; Patel, Samir N

    2014-08-01

    The local epidemiology of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in anaerobic bacteria is important in guiding the empiric treatment of infections. However, susceptibility data are very limited on anaerobic organisms, particularly among non-Bacteroides organisms. To determine susceptibility profiles of clinically-significant anaerobic bacteria in Ontario Canada, anaerobic isolates from sterile sites submitted to Public Health Ontario Laboratory (PHOL) for identification and susceptibility testing were included in this study. Using the E-test method, isolates were tested for various antimicrobials including, penicillin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam and metronidazole. The MIC results were interpreted based on guidelines published by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Of 2527 anaerobic isolates submitted to PHOL, 1412 were either from sterile sites or bronchial lavage, and underwent susceptibility testing. Among Bacteroides fragilis, 98.2%, 24.7%, 1.6%, and 1.2% were resistant to penicillin, clindamycin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and metronidazole, respectively. Clostridium perfringens was universally susceptible to penicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem, whereas 14.2% of other Clostridium spp. were resistant to penicillin. Among Gram-positive anaerobes, Actinomyces spp., Parvimonas micra and Propionibacterium spp. were universally susceptible to β-lactams. Eggerthella spp., Collinsella spp., and Eubacterium spp. showed variable resistance to penicillin. Among Gram-negative anaerobes, Fusobacterium spp., Prevotella spp., and Veillonella spp. showed high resistance to penicillin but were universally susceptible to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. The detection of metronidazole resistant B. fragilis is concerning as occurrence of these isolates is extremely rare. These data highlight the importance of ongoing surveillance to provide clinically relevant information to clinicians for empiric management of

  20. Whole-Genome Sequences of Four Strains Closely Related to Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae Group, Isolated from Biofilms in a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome sequences of four Mycobacterium chelonae group strains from biofilms obtained after a ‘chlorine burn’ in a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. These opportunistic pathogens have been detected in drinking and hospital water distr...

  1. [Surveillance of susceptibility of clinical isolates to cefmetazole between 2000 and 2002].

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomomi; Sato, Yuki; Sei, Masami

    2003-12-01

    The antibacterial activity of cefmetazole (CMZ) against clinical isolates from 15 medical institutions all over Japan was evaluated yearly for two years from June 2000 to March 2002 and compared with that of other parenteral beta-lactams, cefazolin (CEZ), cefotiam (CTM), sulbactam/cefoperazone (SBT/CPZ), and flomoxef (FMOX). In the first surveillance from June 2000 to March 2001, 575 isolates of 13 species were tested, and 548 isolates of the same 13 species were tested in the second surveillance from April 2001 to March 2002. In these surveillances spanning two years, the MIC90s of CMZ against the bacterial species tested hardly differed. Changes in percent resistance of each species to CMZ (MIC of CMZ > or = 32 micrograms/mL) were as follows: methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA, 0%-->0%), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, 73%-->87%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (19%-->32%), other coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (other CNS, 13%-->18%), Escherichia coli (4%-->1%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (3%-->4%), Klebsiella oxytoca (0%-->0%), Proteus mirabilis (2%-->2%), Proteus vulgaris (14%-->7%), Morganella morganii (7%-->0%), Providencia spp. (17%-->0%), Peptostreptococcus spp. (0%-->0%), Bacteroides fragilis (10%-->11%), and other Bacteroides spp. (79%-->88%). The change in percent resistance of MRSA, S. epidermidis, other CNS, and other Bacteroides spp. tended to increase. In addition, the percent resistance of B. fragilis was 10%. It is necessary to pay much attention to the trends observed in these species. Compared to other drugs tested, against MSSA, the activity of CMZ was inferior to that of CEZ, CTM, and FMOX and superior to that of SBT/CPZ. Against MRSA, S. epidermidis, and CNS, the tested drugs exhibited little activity. Against Gram-negative bacteria, the activity of CMZ was almost superior to that of CEZ and CTM, and inferior to that of FMOX. Against B. fragilis and other Bacteroides spp., the activity of CMZ was almost

  2. Enhanced Co-Worker Social Support in Isolated Work Groups and Its Mitigating Role on the Work-Family Conflict-Depression Loss Spiral.

    PubMed

    McTernan, Wesley P; Dollard, Maureen F; Tuckey, Michelle R; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2016-03-29

    This paper examines a loss spiral model (i.e., reciprocal relationships) between work-family conflict and depression, moderated by co-worker support. We expected that the moderation effect due to co-worker support would be evident among those working in isolation (i.e., mining workers) due to a greater level of intragroup attraction and saliency attributable to the proximity effects. We used a two wave panel study and data from a random population sample of Australian employees (n = 2793, [n = 112 mining, n = 2681 non-mining]). Using structural equation modelling we tested the reciprocal three way interaction effects. In line with our theory, co-worker support buffered the reciprocal relationship between WFC and depression, showing a protective effect in both pathways. These moderation effects were found in the mining industry only suggesting a proximity component moderates the social support buffer hypothesis (i.e., a three way interaction effect). The present paper integrates previous theoretical perspectives of stress and support, and provides insight into the changing dynamics of workplace relationships.

  3. Enhanced Co-Worker Social Support in Isolated Work Groups and Its Mitigating Role on the Work-Family Conflict-Depression Loss Spiral

    PubMed Central

    McTernan, Wesley P.; Dollard, Maureen F.; Tuckey, Michelle R.; Vandenberg, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines a loss spiral model (i.e., reciprocal relationships) between work-family conflict and depression, moderated by co-worker support. We expected that the moderation effect due to co-worker support would be evident among those working in isolation (i.e., mining workers) due to a greater level of intragroup attraction and saliency attributable to the proximity effects. We used a two wave panel study and data from a random population sample of Australian employees (n = 2793, [n = 112 mining, n = 2681 non-mining]). Using structural equation modelling we tested the reciprocal three way interaction effects. In line with our theory, co-worker support buffered the reciprocal relationship between WFC and depression, showing a protective effect in both pathways. These moderation effects were found in the mining industry only suggesting a proximity component moderates the social support buffer hypothesis (i.e., a three way interaction effect). The present paper integrates previous theoretical perspectives of stress and support, and provides insight into the changing dynamics of workplace relationships. PMID:27043592

  4. Aggregation in yellow mealworms,Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae : I. Individual and group attraction to frass and isolation of an aggregant.

    PubMed

    Weaver, D K; McFarlane, J E; Alli, I

    1989-05-01

    Late-instar larvalTenebrio molitor L. were found to be attracted to aqueous extracts of conspecific larval frass. The attraction was evident at both the individual and group level. The attraction of larval groups to frass indicated the possibility of an aggregation pheromone that would be chemically distinct in the mealworm environment. Chemical analysis of short carbon chain acids present in both the mealworm frass and the diet indicated that lactic acid was present in the mealworm frass only. Acetic acid was identified in both the diet and the larval frass. Larvae aggregated on filter papers treated with aqueous frass extracts that had been dried and also on those freshly wetted. The larvae also aggregated on dried or freshly wetted papers treated with lactic acid, but failed to aggregate on freshly wetted papers or dried papers treated with acetic acid. The role of excreted lactic acid as a discriminant of already infested and, therefore, safer environmental regions is discussed.

  5. Molecular and serological characterization of group a rotavirus isolates obtained from hospitalized children in Goiânia, Brazil, 1998-2000.

    PubMed

    Souza, M B L D; Rácz, M L; Leite, J P G; Soares, C M A; Martins, R M B; Munford, V; Cardoso, D D P

    2003-07-01

    Fecal samples positive for rotavirus group A ( n=120) were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay-monoclonal antibody (EIA-MAb) serotyping and/or reverse transcription/multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification to determine the prevalence of the [P] and G genotypes. The most prevalent G genotype/serotype detected was G1 (76.7%), followed by G2 (5.0%). Six samples were characterized as G9 by multiplex PCR, and one sample was characterized as G3 by EIA-MAb. The combinations of [P] and G genotypes found were P[8] and G1 (20.8%), P[6] and G1 (10.8%), P[6] and G9 (4.2%), P[8] and G2 (1.7%), and P[6] and G2 (0.8%). The diversity of rotavirus group A [P] and G genotypes/serotypes reinforces the need for continuous characterization of rotaviruses circulating in populations in Brazil.

  6. Bacteroides fragilis Enterotoxin Upregulates Heme Oxygenase-1 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells via a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase- and NF-κB-Dependent Pathway, Leading to Modulation of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Su Hyuk; Rho, Da Jeong; Jeon, Jong Ik; Kim, Young-Jeon; Woo, Hyun Ae; Lee, Yun Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin (BFT), a virulence factor of enterotoxigenic B. fragilis (ETBF), interacts with intestinal epithelial cells and can provoke signals that induce mucosal inflammation. Although expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is associated with regulation of inflammatory responses, little is known about HO-1 induction in ETBF infection. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of BFT on HO-1 expression in intestinal epithelial cells. Stimulation of intestinal epithelial cells with BFT resulted in upregulated expression of HO-1. BFT activated transcription factors such as NF-κB, AP-1, and Nrf2 in intestinal epithelial cells. Upregulation of HO-1 in intestinal epithelial cells was dependent on activated IκB kinase (IKK)–NF-κB signals. However, suppression of Nrf2 or AP-1 signals in intestinal epithelial cells did not result in significant attenuation of BFT-induced HO-1 expression. HO-1 induction via IKK–NF-κB in intestinal epithelial cells was regulated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, suppression of HO-1 activity led to increased apoptosis in BFT-stimulated epithelial cells. These results suggest that a signaling pathway involving p38 MAPK–IKK–NF-κB in intestinal epithelial cells is required for HO-1 induction during exposure to BFT. Following this induction, increased HO-1 expression may regulate the apoptotic process in responses to BFT stimulation. PMID:27324483

  7. Enhancement of anti-cancer immunity by a lipoteichoic-acid-related molecule isolated from a penicillin-killed group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, M; Ohe, G; Oshikawa, T; Furuichi, S; Nishikawa, H; Tano, T; Ahmed, S U; Yoshida, H; Moriya, Y; Saito, M; Sato, M

    2001-10-01

    We isolated the lipoteichoic-acid-related molecule (OK-PSA) from OK-432, a streptococcal preparation, by affinity chromatography on CNBr-activated Sepharose-4B-bound monoclonal antibody TS-2, which neutralizes the interferon (IFN)-gamma-inducing activity of OK-432. We have previously reported that OK-PSA is a potent inducer of Th1-type cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. In this study, we conducted an animal experiment to examine whether OK-PSA exhibits an anti-tumor effect in vivo by acting as a Th1 inducer in syngeneic Meth-A tumor-bearing BALB/c mice, in which the Th2 response is genetically dominant. It was found that OK-PSA induced Th1-type cytokines [IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12 and IL-18] in BALB/c mice bearing Meth-A tumor and caused a marked anti-tumor effect. Although it was suggested by an in vitro study. using spleen cells derived from the animals, that IL-18 plays the greatest role in the induction of the Th1-dominant state and tumor cell killing induced by OK-PSA, the in vivo experiments demonstrated that both IL-12 and IL-18 are essential in the anti-tumor effect exhibited by OK-PSA. These findings strongly suggest that OK-PSA is a major effector molecule of OK-432 and may be a useful immunotherapeutic agent, as a potent Th1 inducer, for cancer patients with a Th2-dominant state.

  8. The Interactions of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin with a chaperonin group of unique receptor protein isolated from a bacterial endosymbiont of the mustard aphid.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Santanu; Hess, Daniel; Majumder, Pralay; Roy, Debjani; Das, Sampa

    2004-05-28

    The homopteran sucking insect, Lipaphis erysimi (mustard aphid) causes severe damage to various crops. This pest not only affects plants by sucking on the phloem, but it also transmits single-stranded RNA luteoviruses while feeding, which cause disease and damage in the crop. The mannose-binding Allium sativum (garlic) leaf lectin has been found to be a potent control agent of L. erysimi. The lectin receptor protein isolated from brush border membrane vesicle of insect gut was purified to determine the mechanism of lectin binding to the gut. Purified receptor was identified as an endosymbiotic chaperonin, symbionin, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Symbionin from endosymbionts of other aphid species have been reported to play a significant role in virus transmission by binding to the read-through domain of the viral coat protein. To understand the molecular interactions of the said lectin and this unique symbionin molecule, the model structures of both molecules were generated using the Modeller program. The interaction was confirmed through docking of the two molecules forming a complex. A surface accessibility test of these molecules demonstrated a significant reduction in the accessibility of the complex molecule compared with that of the free symbionin molecule. This reduction in surface accessibility may have an effect on other molecular interactive processes, including "symbionin virion recognition", which is essential for such symbionin-mediated virus transmission. Thus, garlic leaf lectin provides an important component of a crop management program by controlling, on one hand, aphid attack and on the other hand, symbionin-mediated luteovirus transmission.

  9. Isolation and characterization of Ty1-copia group of LTRs in genome of three species of Datura: D. innoxia, D. stramonium and D. metel.

    PubMed

    Singh, Alka; Nirala, N K; Narula, Alka; Das, Sandip; Srivastava, Prem S

    2011-07-01

    Retrotransposons (RT) constitute a major fraction of plant genome. They are implicated in evolution and sequence organization. These elements have been proposed to have major role in evolution and variation in genome size. The sequence information of these RT regions in terms of divergence and conservation could be utilized for determining the interrelationship among various copia retrotransposons within the genome. In order to assess the diversity of Ty1-copia group of retroelements, reverse transcriptase (RT) sequence was amplified from genomes of three medicinally important Datura species: D. innoxia, D. stramonium and D. metel using the primers derived from two conserved domains of RT region. A total of twenty one independent amplicons from RT regions were cloned, sequenced and compared. The intra-family divergence at amino acid level ranged from 4 to 52 %. Though intra-family RT sequences are conserved, no two sequences are identical. Southern blot hybridization suggested that Ty1-copia-like retrotransposons are dispersed throughout the Datura genome. The results indicate a high degree of heterogeneity among the Ty1-copia group of retroelements in Datura species.

  10. Microsatellite isolation, linkage group identification and determination of recombination frequency in the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Sloane, M A; Sunnucks, P; Wilson, A C; Hales, D F

    2001-06-01

    Fifteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to establish linkage groups and relative rates of recombination in male and female Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) (peach-potato aphid). We cloned nine markers from M. persicae and for these we report primer sequences and levels of allelic diversity and heterozygosity in four Australian M. persicae populations. Of the remaining six loci, four loci, also cloned from M. persicae, were obtained from G. Malarky (Natural History Museum, London) and two loci from Sitobion miscanthi were used. Additionally, the primer sequences of locus M77, a locus monomorphic in M. persicae but polymorphic in the closely related Myzus antirrhinii, are presented. Eleven of the 15 polymorphic markers were autosomal and four were X-linked. A linkage analysis was performed on a European pedigree of aphids containing five families with between seven and 11 offspring each. There was no linkage between any loci in females. In males, several pairwise comparisons yielded no recombinant offspring. With the exception of locus M40, these observations were supported in a linkage analysis performed on larger families produced from Australian M. persicae crosses. Locus M40 showed segregation consistent with involvement in a translocation between autosomes 1 and 3 in European samples but not in the Australian samples. From the Australian crosses we report an absence of recombination in males but high recombination rates in females. One X chromosome and four autosomal linkage groups were identified and tentatively assigned to chromosomes. The relevance of achiasmate meiosis to the evolution of sex is discussed.

  11. Lipid domains in intact fiber-cell plasma membranes isolated from cortical and nuclear regions of human eye lenses of donors from different age groups.

    PubMed

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2015-03-01

    The results reported here clearly document changes in the properties and the organization of fiber-cell membrane lipids that occur with age, based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis of lens membranes of clear lenses from donors of age groups from 0 to 20, 21 to 40, and 61 to 80 years. The physical properties, including profiles of the alkyl chain order, fluidity, hydrophobicity, and oxygen transport parameter, were investigated using EPR spin-labeling methods, which also provide an opportunity to discriminate coexisting lipid domains and to evaluate the relative amounts of lipids in these domains. Fiber-cell membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments: bulk lipid domain, which appears minimally affected by membrane proteins, and two domains that appear due to the presence of membrane proteins, namely boundary and trapped lipid domains. In nuclear membranes the amount of boundary and trapped phospholipids as well as the amount of cholesterol in trapped lipid domains increased with the donors' age and was greater than that in cortical membranes. The difference between the amounts of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins in nuclear and cortical membranes increased with the donors' age. It was also shown that cholesterol was to a large degree excluded from trapped lipid domains in cortical membranes. It is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes was greater than that of cortical membranes for all age groups. The amount of lipids in domains of low oxygen permeability, mainly in trapped lipid domains, were greater in nuclear than cortical membranes and increased with the age of donors. These results indicate that the nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes were less permeable to oxygen than cortical membranes and become less permeable to oxygen with age. In clear lenses, age-related changes in the lens lipid and protein composition and organization appear to occur in ways that increase fiber

  12. Lipid Domains in Intact Fiber-Cell Plasma Membranes Isolated from Cortical and Nuclear Regions of Human Eye Lenses of Donors from Different Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O’Brien, William J.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2015-01-01

    The results reported here clearly document changes in the properties and the organization of fiber-cell membrane lipids that occur with age, based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis of lens membranes of clear lenses from donors of age groups from 0 to 20, 21 to 40, and 61 to 80 years. The physical properties, including profiles of the alkyl chain order, fluidity, hydrophobicity, and oxygen transport parameter, were investigated using EPR spin-labeling methods, which also provide an opportunity to discriminate coexisting lipid domains and to evaluate the relative amounts of lipids in these domains. Fiber-cell membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments: bulk lipid domain, which appears minimally affected by membrane proteins, and two domains that appear due to the presence of membrane proteins, namely boundary and trapped lipid domains. In nuclear membranes the amount of boundary and trapped phospholipids as well as the amount of cholesterol in trapped lipid domains increased with the donors’ age and was greater than that in cortical membranes. The difference between the amounts of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins in nuclear and cortical membranes increased with the donors’ age. It was also shown that cholesterol was to a large degree excluded from trapped lipid domains in cortical membranes. It is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes was greater than that of cortical membranes for all age groups. The amount of lipids in domains of low oxygen permeability, mainly in trapped lipid domains, were greater in nuclear than cortical membranes and increased with the age of donors. These results indicate that the nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes were less permeable to oxygen than cortical membranes and become less permeable to oxygen with age. In clear lenses, age-related changes in the lens lipid and protein composition and organization appear to occur in ways that increase fiber

  13. Cefuroxime, a New Parenteral Cephalosporin: Collaborative In Vitro Susceptibility Comparison with Cephalothin Against 5,887 Clinical Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ronald N.; Fuchs, Peter C.; Gavan, Thomas L.; Gerlach, E. Hugh; Barry, A. L.; Thornsberry, Clyde

    1977-01-01

    Cefuroxime, a new parenteral cephalosporin was compared with cephalothin by broth microdilution susceptibility testing against 5,887 routine clinical bacterial isolates in four large clinical laboratories. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of cefuroxime against the Enterobacteriaceae were consistently lower than those of cephalothin. This was most striking among the Enterobacter species, which were generally susceptible to cefuroxime (MIC ≤ 8 μg/ml), but resistant to cephalothin. Similar results occurred with Haemophilus species, Acinetobacter anitratus, meningococci, and Aeromonas hydrophilia, but Pseudomonas species and enterococci were resistant to high concentrations of both drugs. Streptococci showed slightly greater susceptibility to cefuroxime than to cephalothin. By contrast, staphylococci were more susceptible to cephalothin. Bacteroides fragilis was resistant to cefuroxime, but other anaerobes were generally susceptible. PMID:883818

  14. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  15. Molecular evolution of VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions in coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant isolates from acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Kuba, Yumani; Saitoh, Mika; Taira, Katsuya; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Mahoe, Yoko; Kyan, Hisako; Takara, Taketoshi; Okano, Sho; Kudaka, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromu; Oishi, Kazunori; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    A large acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) outbreak occurred in 2011 in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Ten strains of coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant (CA24v) were isolated from patients with AHC and full sequence analysis of the VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions performed. To assess time-scale evolution, phylogenetic analysis was performed using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In addition, similarity plots were constructed and pairwise distance (p-distance) and positive pressure analyses performed. A phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that the present strains belong to genotype 4 (G4). In addition, the present strains could have divided in about 2010 from the same lineages detected in other countries such as China, India and Australia. The mean rates of molecular evolution of four coding regions were estimated at about 6.15 to 7.86 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year. Similarity plot analyses suggested that nucleotide similarities between the present strains and a prototype strain (EH24/70 strain) were 0.77-0.94. The p-distance of the present strains was relatively short (<0.01). Only one positive selected site (L25H) was identified in the VP1 protein. These findings suggest that the present CA24v strains causing AHC are genetically related to other AHC strains with rapid evolution and emerged in around 2010.

  16. Characterization of AfaE adhesins produced by extraintestinal and intestinal human Escherichia coli isolates: PCR assays for detection of Afa adhesins that do or do not recognize Dr blood group antigens.

    PubMed

    Le Bouguénec, C; Lalioui, L; du Merle, L; Jouve, M; Courcoux, P; Bouzari, S; Selvarangan, R; Nowicki, B J; Germani, Y; Andremont, A; Gounon, P; Garcia, M I

    2001-05-01

    Operons of the afa family are expressed by pathogenic Escherichia coli strains associated with intestinal and extraintestinal infections in humans and animals. The recently demonstrated heterogeneity of these operons (L. Lalioui, M. Jouve, P. Gounon, and C. Le Bouguénec, Infect. Immun. 67:5048-5059, 1999) was used to develop a new PCR assay for detecting all the operons of the afa family with a single genetic tool. This PCR approach was validated by investigating three collections of human E. coli isolates originating from the stools of infants with diarrhea (88 strains), the urine of patients with pyelonephritis (97 strains), and the blood of cancer patients (115 strains). The results obtained with this single test and those previously obtained with several PCR assays were closely correlated. The AfaE adhesins encoded by the afa operons are variable, particularly with respect to the primary sequence encoded by the afaE gene. The receptor binding specificities have not been determined for all of these adhesins; some recognize the Dr blood group antigen (Afa/Dr(+) adhesins) on the human decay-accelerating factor (DAF) as a receptor, and others (Afa/Dr(-) adhesins) do not. Thus, the afa operons detected in this study were characterized by subtyping the afaE gene using specific PCRs. In addition, the DAF-binding capacities of as-yet-uncharacterized AfaE adhesins were tested by various cellular approaches. The afaE8 subtype (Afa/Dr(-) adhesin) was found to predominate in afa-positive isolates from sepsis patients (75%); it was frequent in afa-positive pyelonephritis E. coli (55.5%) and absent from diarrhea-associated strains. In contrast, Afa/Dr(+) strains (regardless of the afaE subtype) were associated with both diarrhea (100%) and extraintestinal infections (44 and 25% in afa-positive pyelonephritis and sepsis strains, respectively). These data suggest that there is an association between the subtype of AfaE adhesin and the physiological site of the infection

  17. Comparison of Short Versus Prolonged Infusion of Standard Dose of Meropenem Against Carbapenemase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates in Different Patient Groups: A Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Approach.

    PubMed

    Vourli, Sophia; Tsala, Marilena; Kotsakis, Stathis; Daikos, George L; Tzouvelekis, Leonidas; Miriagou, Vivi; Zerva, Loukia; Meletiadis, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Dose optimization is required to increase carbapenem's efficacy against carbapenemase-producing isolates. Four clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were used: one susceptible to meropenem with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.031 mg/L and 3 verona integron-borne metallo bete-lactamase-1-producing isolates with MICs 8, 16, and 128 mg/L. The human pharmacokinetics of short (0.5-h) and prolonged (3-h) infusion regimens of 1 g meropenem every 8 h were simulated in an in vitro pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model. Time-kill curves were constructed for each isolate and dosing regimen, and the %T > MIC associated with maximal bactericidal activity was estimated. The percentage of pharmacodynamic target attainment for isolates with different MICs was calculated for 350 ICU, surgical, and internal medicine patients. The isolates with MIC ≤8 mg/L were killed with both dosing regimens. The %T > MIC corresponding to maximal bactericidal activity was ∼40%. The percentages of target attainment were >90%, 61%-83%, 23%-33%, and <3% with the short infusion regimen and >90%, 98%-99%, 55%-79%, and <5% with the prolonged infusion regimen for isolates with MIC ≤2, 4, 8, and ≥16 mg/L, respectively. The lowest target attainment rates were observed for the ICU patients and the highest for internal medicine patients. The prolonged infusion regimen was more effective than the short infusion regimen against isolates with MIC 4-8 mg/L.

  18. The Victoria Isolation Scale, Form A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, A. J. W.; Feletti, Grahame I.

    1976-01-01

    The authors administered the Isolation Symptomatology Questionnaire to persons living in Antarctica who were either well or maladjusted to their environment. Eliminating those items not discriminating between the two groups, the authors constructed a new isolation scale. (SE)

  19. Group X

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  20. Identification of a pathogenic isolate-specific 30,000-Mr antigen of Entamoeba histolytica by using a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, H; Kobayashi, S; Kato, Y; Nagakura, K; Kaneda, Y; Takeuchi, T

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb) produced against trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica strain HM-1:IMSS, reacted with all of 42 isolates and 4 clones showing pathogenic zymodeme (Z) patterns, i.e., Z-II, Z-II alpha-, Z-II (glucose phosphate isomerase: gamma +), Z-VII, Z-VII (glucose phosphate isomerase: alpha lack, gamma +), Z-XI, Z-XIV, and Z-XIX, regardless of culture conditions, geographical origins, or host symptoms in an indirect fluorescence antibody test. In contrast, the MAb failed to react with 14 isolates possessing nonpathogenic zymodemes Z-I and Z-VIII and did not react with other enteric protozoan parasites, such as E. histolytica-like Laredo, Entamoeba hartmanni, Entamoeba coli, Endolimax nana, Dientamoeba fragilis, Trichomonas hominis, and Giardia lamblia. Western immunoblotting analysis showed that the molecular weight of the antigenic component recognized by the MAb was exclusively 30,000 in pathogenic isolates of different zymodemes. These results suggest that the 30,000-molecular-weight antigen is a marker of pathogenic isolates and that the indirect fluorescent-antibody test with the MAb is useful for the accurate discrimination of pathogenic amebae. Images PMID:2180826

  1. Antimicrobial resistance among anaerobes isolated from clinical specimens in Kuwait hospitals: comparative analysis of 11-year data.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Wafaa; Al Hashem, Ghayda; Rotimi, Vincent O

    2015-02-01

    Our objective was to compare the antimicrobial resistance trends among clinically relevant anaerobes against 9 different antibiotics over two periods, 2008-2012 and 2002-2007. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by determining the MICs using E test method. The interpretation of results was according to the breakpoints recommended by the Clinical Laboratory and Standard Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). A total of 2240 clinically significant isolates were collected between 2008 and 2012 in four teaching hospitals in Kuwait. The commonest isolates were Bacteroides fragilis (40.4%), Prevotella bivia (18.6%), Peptostreptococcus spp. (13.8%) and Bacteroides ovatus (11.1%). According to CLSI and EUCAST breakpoints used for the 2008-2012 and 2002-2007 isolates, high resistance rates to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, clindamycin, penicillin and piperacillin were noted among the Gram-negative isolates. They ranged between 0 and 0-62.1 and 62.1%, and 0 and 0-59.1 and 62.1%, respectively against clindamycin, 0 and 0-34.5 and 45.3%, and 0 and 0-45 and 57.5%, respectively against piperacillin and 0 and 0-24.2 and 24.2%, and 0 and 0-23.1 and 30.6%, respectively against amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. The mean interpretative results by both CLSI and EUCAST during the 2008-2012 and 2002-2007 periods showed that the B. fragilis isolates were highly resistant to penicillin (100 vs 100%), clindamycin (43.7 vs 44.2%), piperacillin (35.8 vs 42.7%) and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (13.2 vs 14%), respectively. When compared with 2002-2007, the CLSI, but not EUCAST, demonstrated statistically significant decreased resistance to clindamycin (P < 0.03). However, both interpretative criteria showed demonstrable statistically significant decrease in resistance rates to imipenem (P < 0.00097 vs P < 0.00074), meropenem (P < 0.000006 vs P < 0.0407) and piperacillin (P < 0.000017 vs P < 0.0461). Our data shows that

  2. Group Flow and Group Genius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  3. Isopermutation group

    SciTech Connect

    Muktibodh, A. S.

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  4. Home Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahler, Theresa M.

    All students enrolled in the entry level foundations course in the College of Education of Kutztown University (Pennsylvania) participate in home groups, a cooperative learning strategy. Each student is assigned to a five- or six-person home group on the first day of class. Although group placements are made on the basis of class lists, every…

  5. Differentiation among bacteria isolated from turkeys with coryza (rhinotracheitis).

    PubMed

    Rimler, R B; Simmons, D G

    1983-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria isolated from turkeys with coryza in the United States, the Federal Republic of Germany, and the Republic of South Africa were compared with known Alcaligenes species and Bordetella bronchiseptica. The turkey isolates were separated into three distinct groups based on biochemical and physiologic tests. Forty of the 68 isolates studied (group I) were different from Alcaligenes sp. and B. bronchiseptica. Isolates in group I produced a heat-labile hemagglutinin and did not grow on Simmons' citrate agar. Isolates in group II (25 isolates) were similar to A. faecalis and A. odorans, grew on Simmons' citrate agar, and did not produce a hemagglutinin. Isolates in group III were B. bronchiseptica. Isolates from groups I and II caused coryza in poults. Group III isolates were not pathogenic.

  6. [Bacteria isolated from surgical infections and its susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents - Special references to bacteria isolated between April 2011 and March 2012].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Nagao; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Hirata, Koichi; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Mizuguchi, Tohru; Osanai, Hiroyuki; Yanai, Yoshiyuki; Hata, Fumitake; Kihara, Chikasi; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Oono, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masashi; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Itaru; Kimura, Masami; Watabe, Kosho; Hoshikawa, Tsuyoshi; Oshima, Hideki; Aikawa, Naoki; Sasaki, Junichi; Suzuki, Masaru; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Abe, Shinya; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Wakasugi, Takehiro; Mashita, Keiji; Tanaka, Moritsugu; Mizuno, Akira; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Iwai, Akihiko; Saito, Takaaki; Muramoto, Masayuki; Kubo, Shoji; Lee, Shigeru; Fukuhara, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhito; Yamaue, Hiroki; Hirono, Seiko; Takesue, Yoshio; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Shinoura, Susumu; Kimura, Hideyuki; Iwagaki, Hiromi; Tokunaga, Naoyuki; Sueda, Taijiro; Hiyama, Eiso; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Ohge, Hiroki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Tsumura, Hiroaki; Kanehiro, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hitoshi; Tanakaya, Kouji; Iwasaki, Mitsuhiro

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria isolated from surgical infections during the period from April 2011 to March 2012 were investigated in a multicenter study in Japan, and the following results were obtained. In this series, 785 strains including 31 strains of Candida spp. were isolated from 204 (78.8%) of 259 patients with surgical infections. Five hundred and twenty three strains were isolated from primary infections, and 231 strains were isolated from surgical site infection. From primary infections, anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria were predominant, followed by aerobic Gram-negative bacteria, while from surgical site infection aerobic Gram-positive bacteria were predominant, followed by anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria. Among aerobic Gram-positive bacteria, the isolation rate of Enterococcus spp. was highest, followed by Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp., in this order, from primary infections, while Enterococcus spp. was highest, followed by Staphylococcus spp. from surgical site infection. Among aerobic Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli was the most predominantly isolated from primary infections, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae, in this order, and from surgical site infection, E. coli was most predominantly isolated, followed by P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and E. cloacae. Among anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria, the isolation rate of Eggerthella lenta was the highest from primary infections, followed by Parvimonas micra, Collinsella aerofaciens, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Finegoldia magna, and from surgical site infection, E. lenta was most predominantly isolated, followed by P micra and L. acidophilus, in this order. Among anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, the isolation rate of Bacteroidesfragilis was the highest from primary infections, followed by Bilophila wadsworthia, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides uniformis and Bacteroides vulgatus, and from surgical site infection, B. fragilis was most

  7. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  8. GROUP INEQUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Samuel; Loury, Glenn C.; Sethi, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    We explore the combined effect of segregation in social networks, peer effects, and the relative size of a historically disadvantaged group on the incentives to invest in market-rewarded skills and the dynamics of inequality between social groups. We identify conditions under which group inequality will persist in the absence of differences in ability, credit constraints, or labor market discrimination. Under these conditions, group inequality may be amplified even if initial group differences are negligible. Increases in social integration may destabilize an unequal state and make group equality possible, but the distributional and human capital effects of this depend on the demographic composition of the population. When the size of the initially disadvantaged group is sufficiently small, integration can lower the long-run costs of human capital investment in both groups and result in an increase the aggregate skill share. In contrast, when the initially disadvantaged group is large, integration can induce a fall in the aggregate skill share as the costs of human capital investment rise in both groups. We consider applications to concrete cases and policy implications. PMID:25554727

  9. Whitehead Groups of Spinor Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastyrnyĭ, A. P.; Yanchevskiĭ, V. I.

    1991-02-01

    The Whitehead groups of spinor groups are studied. The known Kneser-Tits conjecture for spinor groups is reduced to a spinor analogue of the Tannaka-Artin problem, namely, to the question of whether the group K1Spin(D), where D is a division ring of exponent 2 , is trivial. A counterexample to the Kneser-Tits problem is constructed in the class of spinor groups. The group K1Spin(D) is computed. The stability of the Whitehead groups of spinor groups under purely transcendental extensions of the ground field is established. The R-equivalence on the k-points of spinor groups and the weak approximation problem are considered. The study of spinor group completes the study of the Whitehead groups of algebraic groups of classical type, that was started in studying reduced K-theory (V.P. Platonov) and was continued for reduced unitary K-theory (V.I. Yanchevskiĭ) and Hermitian K-theory (Platonov and Yanchevskiĭ). Bibliography: 50 titles.

  10. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Conventional Technique Versus the No-touch Isolation Technique for Primary Tumor Resection in Patients with Colorectal Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1006

    PubMed Central

    Takii, Yasumasa; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Moriya, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Kenichi; Katayama, Hiroshi; Kimura, Aya; Shibata, Taro; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial is currently being conducted in Japan to demonstrate the superiority of the no-touch isolation technique over the conventional technique for patients with potentially curative colon and rectosigmoid cancer. The conventional technique procedure gives first priority to mobilization of the tumor-bearing segment of the colon, which is followed by central vascular ligation and ligation of other vasculature. Conversely, the no-touch isolation technique gives first priority to central vascular ligation, which is followed by mobilization of the tumor-bearing segment of the colon. A total of 850 patients will be enrolled in this trial. The primary endpoint is disease-free survival. Secondary endpoints are overall survival, relapse-free survival, liver metastasis-free survival, mode of recurrence, surgical morbidity, adverse events due to postoperative chemotherapy, serious adverse events and short-term clinical outcomes. PMID:24211857

  11. High rate of non-susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin in anaerobic isolates: Data from a clinical laboratory from Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Sadia Omer; Jabeen, Kauser; Qaiser, Saba; Ahsan, Syed Tanwir; Khan, Erum; Zafar, Afia

    2015-06-01

    Due to increasing resistance amongst anaerobic pathogens periodic surveillance of resistance has been recommended in regional/local settings. Anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility testing is not routinely performed in many laboratories in Pakistan, hence absence of local data may lead to inappropriate empirical therapy in serious cases. 121 clinically significant anaerobic strains (26/121; 21% bacteremic isolates) were isolated and saved from 2010 to 2011. Susceptibility testing against metronidazole, clindamycin, co-amoxiclav, meropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, linezolid and gatifloxacin was performed by determining minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). A high proportion of non-susceptible strains to metronidazole (10% of 121 isolates) and clindamycin (12% of 121 isolates) was seen, most noticeable in Bacteroides fragilis. Three Bacteroides species strains were non-susceptible to both metronidazole and clindamycin. One strain of Clostridium species was fully resistant to metronidazole and had intermediate resistance to clindamycin. No resistance to any of the other tested antibiotics was seen. Resistance to metronidazole was higher in bacteremic vs. non bacteremic isolates (p = value 0.07). In our setting where there is a high usage of empirical metronidazole and clindamycin for the treatment of serious anaerobic infections clinicians should be aware of increased resistance to these agents. Periodic surveillance of resistance to anti-anaerobic drugs especially metronidazole and clindamycin should be performed to generate antibiogram and guide appropriate empiric therapy.

  12. Group Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Brian

    The group interpretation approach to theatre production is defined as a method that will lead to production of plays that will appeal to "all the layers of the conscious and unconscious mind." In practice, it means that the group will develop and use resources of the theatre that orthodox companies too often ignore. The first two chapters of this…

  13. Group Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  14. Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Research suggests that cooperative learning works best when students are first taught group-processing skills, such as leadership, decision making, communication, trust building, and conflict management. Inadequate teacher training and boring assignments can torpedo cooperative learning efforts. Administrators should reassure teachers with…

  15. The evolution of groups and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlöber, S.; Klypin, A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Turchaninov, V.

    Using high resolution N -body simulations we study the formation and evolution of clusters and groups in a &Lambda CDM cosmological model. Groups of galaxies already form before z = 4. Merging of groups and accretion leads to cluster formation at z <&sim2. Some of the groups merge into large isolated halos.

  16. Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Not long after EDWIN HUBBLE established that galaxies are `island universes' similar to our home galaxy, the MILKY WAY, he realized that a few of these external galaxies are considerably closer to us than any others. In 1936 he first coined the term `Local Group' in his famous book The Realm of the Nebulae to identify our nearest galactic neighbors. More than 60 yr later, the galaxies of the Loca...

  17. Underrepresented groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The problem with the shortage of under represented groups in science and engineering is absolutely crucial, especially considering that U.S. will experience a shortage of 560,000 science and engineering personnel by the year 2010. Most studies by the National Science Foundation also concluded that projected shortages cannot be alleviated without significant increases in the involvement of Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, handicapped persons, and women.

  18. Group Connections: Whole Group Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Dorothy

    2002-01-01

    A learner-centered approach to adult group instruction involved learners in investigating 20th-century events. The approach allowed learners to concentrate on different activities according to their abilities and gave them opportunities to develop basic skills and practice teamwork. (SK)

  19. Isolating age-group differences in working memory load-related neural activity: assessing the contribution of working memory capacity using a partial-trial fMRI method.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Ilana J; Rivera, Hannah G; Rypma, Bart

    2013-05-15

    Previous studies examining age-group differences in working memory load-related neural activity have yielded mixed results. When present, age-group differences in working memory capacity are frequently proposed to underlie these neural effects. However, direct relationships between working memory capacity and working memory load-related activity have only been observed in younger adults. These relationships remain untested in healthy aging. Therefore, the present study examined patterns of working memory load-related activity in 22 younger and 20 older adults and assessed the contribution of working memory capacity to these load-related effects. Participants performed a partial-trial delayed response item recognition task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. In this task, participants encoded either 2 or 6 letters, maintained them during a delay, and then indicated whether a probe was present in the memory set. Behavioral results revealed faster and more accurate responses to load 2 versus 6, with age-group differences in this load condition effect for the accuracy measure. Neuroimaging results revealed one region (medial superior frontal gyrus) that showed age-group differences in load-related activity during the retrieval period, with less (greater) neural activity for the low versus high load condition in younger (older) adults. Furthermore, for older adults, load-related activity did not vary as a function of working memory capacity. Thus, working memory-related activity varies with healthy aging, but these patterns are not due solely to working memory capacity. Neurocognitive aging theories that feature capacity will need to account for these results.

  20. Isolated persistent hypermethioninemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, S H; Levy, H L; Tangerman, A; Boujet, C; Buist, N; Davidson-Mundt, A; Hudgins, L; Oyanagi, K; Nagao, M; Wilson, W G

    1995-01-01

    New information has been obtained on 30 patients with isolated persistent hypermethioninemia, most of them previously unreported. Biopsies to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of partially deficient activity of ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT; E.C.2.5.1.6) in liver were not performed on most of these patients. However, none showed the clinical findings or the extreme elevations of serum folate previously described in other patients with isolated hypermethioninemia considered not to have hepatic MAT deficiency. Patients ascertained on biochemical grounds had no neurological abnormalities, and 27/30 had IQs or Bayley development-index scores within normal limits or were judged to have normal mental development. Methionine transamination metabolites accumulated abnormally only when plasma methionine concentrations exceeded 300-350 microM and did so more markedly after 0.9 years of age. Data were obtained on urinary organic acids as well as plasma creatinine concentrations. Patterns of inheritance of isolated hypermethioninemia were variable. Considerations as to the optimal management of this group of patients are discussed. PMID:7573050

  1. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  2. Correlation between the genomic o454-nlpD region polymorphisms, virulence gene equipment and phylogenetic group of extraintestinal Escherichia coli (ExPEC) enables pathotyping irrespective of host, disease and source of isolation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mutS-rpoS intergenic region in E. coli displays a mosaic structure which revealed pathotype specific patterns. To assess the importance of this region as a surrogate marker for the identification of highly virulent extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains we aimed to: (i) characterize the genetic diversity of the mutS gene and the o454-nlpD genomic region among 510 E. coli strains from animals and humans; (ii) delineate associations between the polymorphism of this region and features such as phylogenetic background of E. coli, pathotype, host species, clinical condition, serogroup and virulence associated genes (VAG)s; and (iii) identify the most important VAGs for classification of the o454-nlpD region. Methods Size variation in the o454-nlpD region was investigated by PCR amplification and sequencing. Phylogenetic relationships were assessed by Ecor- and Multilocus sequence- typing (MLST), and a comparative analysis between mutS gene phylogenetic tree obtained with RAxML and the MLST grouping method was performed. Correlation between o454-nlpD patterns and the features described above were analysed. In addition, the importance of 47 PCR-amplified ExPEC-related VAGs for classification of o454-nlpD patterns was investigated by means of Random Forest algorithm. Results Four main structures (patterns I-IV) of the o454-nlpD region among ExPEC and commensal E. coli strains were identified. Statistical analysis showed a positive and exclusive association between pattern III and the ExPEC strains. A strong association between pattern III and either the Ecor group B2 or the sequence type complexes known to represent the phylogenetic background of highly virulent ExPEC strains (such as STC95, STC73 and STC131) was found as well. RF analyses determined five genes (csgA, malX, chuA, sit, and vat) to be suitable to predict pattern III strains. Conclusion The significant association between pattern III and group B2 strains suggested the o454-nlp

  3. The Isolated Appalachian Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence

    This paper investigates the isolation of the local black community within the social/cultural perspective. A profile of the community is given in terms of data collected from personal and family interviews. Personal interviews assessed how the Appalachian black viewed his group. Among the 13 variables studied are: trustworthiness, religion, work…

  4. A mutation in either dsbA or dsbB, a gene encoding a component of a periplasmic disulfide bond-catalyzing system, is required for high-level expression of the Bacteroides fragilis metallo-beta-lactamase, CcrA, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Alksne, L E; Keeney, D; Rasmussen, B A

    1995-01-01

    The metallo-beta-lactamase gene, ccrA, from Bacteroides fragilis is functionally expressed in Escherichia coli only in the presence of a genomic mutation in iarA or iarB (increased ampicillin resistance), identified in this study as dsbA or dsbB, respectively. DsbA and DsbB are components of a periplasmic protein disulfide bond-catalyzing system. Data indicated that DsbA interacted with CcrA, creating aberrant disulfide bond linkages that render CcrA proteolytically unstable. Mutations in dsbA or dsbB permissive for CcrA expression eliminated or greatly reduced DsbA activity, allowing CcrA to assume a disulfide bond-free and proteolytically stable conformation. PMID:7814337

  5. Isolated sleep paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep paralysis - isolated; Parasomnia - isolated sleep paralysis ... Episodes of isolated sleep paralysis last from a few seconds to 1 or 2 minutes. During these episodes the person is unable to move or ...

  6. Are T-Groups Brainwashing Sessions? Yes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manley, Robert S.

    1971-01-01

    The author considers T-groups akin to thought reform or brainwashing and describes them as dealing with an assault upon the individual's self-concept, isolation of individuals, and compulsory confessional behavior. (Author/JB)

  7. Are Isolated Indigenous Populations Headed toward Extinction?

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert S.; Kesler, Dylan C.; Hill, Kim R.

    2016-01-01

    At least 50 indigenous groups spread across lowland South America remain isolated and have only intermittent and mostly hostile interactions with the outside world. Except in emergency situations, the current policy of governments in Brazil, Colombia, and Peru towards isolated tribes is a “leave them alone” strategy, in which isolated groups are left uncontacted. However, these no-contact policies are based on the assumption that isolated populations are healthy and capable of persisting in the face of mounting external threats, and that they can maintain population viability in the long-term. Here, we test this assumption by tracking the sizes and movements of cleared horticultural areas made by 8 isolated groups over the last 10–14 years. We used deforestation data derived from remote sensing Landsat satellite sensors to identify clearings, and those were then validated and assessed with high-resolution imagery. We found only a single example of a relatively large and growing population (c. 50 cleared ha and 400 people), whereas all of the other 7 groups exhibited much smaller villages and gardens with no sizable growth through time. These results indicated that the smaller groups are critically endangered, and it prompts an urgent re-thinking of policies toward isolated populations, including plans for well-organized contacts that may help save lives and rescue isolated indigenous populations from imminent extinction. PMID:26954672

  8. Sequence diversity of wheat mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lucy R

    2016-02-02

    Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), transmitted by eriophyid wheat curl mites (Aceria tosichella) is the causal agent of High Plains disease in wheat and maize. WMoV and other members of the genus Emaravirus evaded thorough molecular characterization for many years due to the experimental challenges of mite transmission and manipulating multisegmented negative sense RNA genomes. Recently, the complete genome sequence of a Nebraska isolate of WMoV revealed eight segments, plus a variant sequence of the nucleocapsid protein-encoding segment. Here, near-complete and partial consensus sequences of five more WMoV isolates are reported and compared to the Nebraska isolate: an Ohio maize isolate (GG1), a Kansas barley isolate (KS7), and three Ohio wheat isolates (H1, K1, W1). Results show two distinct groups of WMoV isolates: Ohio wheat isolate RNA segments had 84% or lower nucleotide sequence identity to the NE isolate, whereas GG1 and KS7 had 98% or higher nucleotide sequence identity to the NE isolate. Knowledge of the sequence variability of WMoV isolates is a step toward understanding virus biology, and potentially explaining observed biological variation.

  9. Diversity and toxigenicity among members of the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Oh, Mi-Hwa; Ham, Jun-Sang; Cox, Julian M

    2012-01-03

    Members of the Bacillus cereus group were isolated from rice products by centrifugation-plating and conventional spread-plating methods. Random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) results showed broad diversity among the strains and revealed some associations among isolates from raw and cooked rice samples, at the genotypic level. A comparatively greater diversity among strains was observed in isolates from raw rice than those from cooked rice and, generally, the RAPD profiles of isolates from raw and cooked rice were different, with only a few of them common to both types of rice. The toxigenic potential of the isolates was also determined by molecular and immunoassay analyses. The results revealed that most isolates from the B. cereus group were potentially or actually toxigenic, and some isolates could produce both diarrhoeal and emetic toxins. Generally, isolates belonging to the B. cereus group with the same RAPD pattern were shown to have a similar profile of enterotoxigenicity.

  10. Compact optical isolator.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, F J

    1971-10-01

    This paper describes a compact Faraday rotation isolator using terbium aluminum garnet (TAG) as the Faraday rotation material and small high field permanent magnets made of copper-rare earth alloys. The nominal isolation is 26 dB with a 0.4-dB forward loss. The present isolator can be adjusted to provide effective isolation from 4880 A to 5145 A. Details of the design, fabrication, and performance of the isolator are presented.

  11. Molecular characterization of mycobacteria isolated from seals.

    PubMed

    Zumárraga, M J; Bernardelli, A; Bastida, R; Quse, V; Loureiro, J; Cataldi, A; Bigi, F; Alito, A; Castro Ramos, M; Samper, S; Otal, I; Martin, C; Romano, M I

    1999-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) was diagnosed in 10 seals from three species (Arctocephalus australis, Arctocephalus tropicalis and Otaria flavescens) found in South America. The mycobacteria isolated from these cases belonged to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, as determined by RFLP using an IS6110 probe, spoligotyping, analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and by PCR-restriction analysis of hsp65. Polymorphisms in gyrA, katG, oxyR and pncA were investigated in some of the isolates, as well as the presence of the MPB70 antigen. The insertion sequence IS6110 was present in three to seven copies in the genome of the mycobacteria isolated from seals. Using the IS6110 probe, six patterns (designated A, B, C, D, E and F) were identified from 10 different isolates. Patterns A and B were found for the mycobacteria isolated from two and four seals, respectively, indicating an epidemiological relationship between isolates grouped according to their IS6110 RFLP. The mycobacteria isolated from seals shared the majority of their IS6110 DNA-containing restriction fragments, and nine isolates had an identical spoligotype; only one isolate showed a minor difference in its spoligotype. In addition, none of these spoligotypes were found in other M. tuberculosis complex strains. These results suggest that the isolates from seals constitute a unique group of closely related strains. The mycobacteria isolated from seals showed polymorphisms at gyrA codon 95 and katG codon 463, as do group 1 M. tuberculosis, and M. bovis. Group 1 mycobacteria are associated with cluster cases. The spoligotypes found in the mycobacteria isolated from seals lack spacers 39-43, as does M. bovis, but the MPB70 antigen, which is highly expressed in M. bovis and minimally expressed in M. tuberculosis, was not detected in these mycobacteria. The mycobacteria isolated from seals also showed oxyR and pncA polymorphisms specific to M. tuberculosis. In conclusion, the mycobacteria that cause TB in seals in the South

  12. Isolating the Terrorists: The Abu Sayyaf Group Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-23

    was given by the Spanish colonizers to the Muslims in Mindanao whom they found to have the same religion and way oflife with the Moors of North... Basil an Province, the ASG became increasingly notorious with a series of bombings in Zamboanga City. This was followed by the treacherous attack on...usacac.leavenworth.army.mil/blog/blogs/llop/archive/2009/02/26/commander- interview-mgen-juancho-m-sabban.aspx, (accessed January 22, 2011) Clark, Yvorme. " Moors and

  13. Psychopathology of social isolation

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Sang-Bin

    2014-01-01

    The most important defining factor of being human is the use of symbolic language. Language or communication problem occurs during the growth, the child will have a higher risk of social isolation and then the survival will be threatened constantly. Today, adolescents and youths are familiar with computer and smart-phone devices, and communication with others by these devices is easy than face-to-face communication. As adolescents and youths live in the comfortable and familiar cyber-world rather than actively participating real society, so they make social isolation. Extreme form of this isolation in adolescents and youths is so-called Socially Withdrawn Youth. In this study, the psychopathological factors inducing social isolation were discussed. Development stages of social isolation in relation with types of social isolation, Ego-syntonic isolation and Ego-dystonic isolation, were also considered. PMID:25061592

  14. Isolation in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Sinclair

    This paper presents information on isolated children and describes a study being undertaken to examine the role of isolation in reported cases of child abuse and neglect. The effects of extreme isolation on language and psychological development are emphasized. The importance of early socialization is seen in relation to normal development.…

  15. Group typicality, group loyalty and cognitive development.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Meagan M

    2014-09-01

    Over the course of childhood, children's thinking about social groups changes in a variety of ways. Developmental Subjective Group Dynamics (DSGD) theory emphasizes children's understanding of the importance of conforming to group norms. Abrams et al.'s study, which uses DSGD theory as a framework, demonstrates the social cognitive skills underlying young elementary school children's thinking about group norms. Future research on children's thinking about groups and group norms should explore additional elements of this topic, including aspects of typicality beyond loyalty.

  16. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  17. Activity of the investigational fluoroquinolone finafloxacin and seven other antimicrobial agents against 114 obligately anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Genzel, G H; Stubbings, W; Stîngu, C S; Labischinski, H; Schaumann, R

    2014-11-01

    The activity of finafloxacin against 73 strains of the Bacteroides fragilis group, 10 other Gram-negative anaerobic rods and 31 Clostridium difficile strains was determined by the broth microdilution technique. The activity was compared with that of moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, imipenem, piperacillin/tazobactam and metronidazole. MIC(50/90) values (minimum inhibitory concentration, in μg/mL, at which 50% and 90% of the isolates tested are inhibited, respectively) for finafloxacin for the different species were determined: B. fragilis group, 0.5/2; other Gram-negative rods, 0.06/0.25; and C. difficile, 4/16. Furthermore, the MICs against 11 selected B. fragilis strains were determined under acidic conditions and resulted in MIC(50/90) values for finafloxacin of 0.25/4 μg/mL. Thus, finafloxacin shows promising activity against several pathogenic species of anaerobes. Furthermore, finafloxacin has increased activity against selected B. fragilis strains under acidic conditions compared with activity at neutral pH.

  18. Sequence comparison and classification of beet luteovirus isolates.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, J R; Stevens, M; de Bruyne, E; Smith, H G; Bird, C; Hull, R

    1995-01-01

    Three distinct sequence groups were found among partial nucleotide sequences of 38 isolates of beet western yellows virus (BWYV) and beet mild yellowing virus (BMYV) from Europe, Iran and the USA. The first group contains both sugar beet and oilseed rape specific isolates, and the differentiating characteristic linked to this host range specificity are 2 single base pair changes in a 1,200 nucleotide region of the genome. It is proposed that the European BWYV strains that can be transferred at low frequency between rape and sugar beet belong to this group. Also belonging to this group are the published BWYV sequences of Veidt et al. and of the California BWYV-ST9 isolate. The second group contains mostly rape-derived isolates which have an intergenic region highly distinct from that of group-1 isolates but similar polymerase and coat protein regions. It is proposed that the rape-specific BWYV isolates which cannot be transmitted to sugar beet belong to this group. The third group contains mostly beet-specific isolates from Southern Europe and Iran, and may be adapted to the Mediterranean climate and flora. It is distinct from groups 1 and 2 in all three genome regions investigated and its polymerase and intergenic regions are as much related to those of potato leafroll virus (PLRV) and curcurbit aphid borne yellows virus (CABYV) as they are to those of group-1 and group-2. On the basis of sequence similarities and established nomenclature it is proposed to use BWYV for groups 1 and 2 (BWYV-1 and BWYV-2 respectively) and to use BMYV for group-3 isolates, which are distinct enough from the other two groups to merit a separate nomenclature.

  19. Genetic features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients compared with those of isolates from other origins.

    PubMed

    Lanotte, Philippe; Watt, Stephane; Mereghetti, Laurent; Dartiguelongue, Nathalie; Rastegar-Lari, Aziz; Goudeau, Alain; Quentin, Roland

    2004-01-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the colonization of the pulmonary tract of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 162 isolates from five different ecological origins were studied. The genetic features of each isolate were determined by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and by searching for eight virulence genes (six known virulence genes, algD, lasB, toxA, plcH, plcN and exoS, and two genes encoding putative neuraminidases, nan1 and nan2). Five RAPD groups were identified. Most of the CF isolates were distributed equally in three of these groups (RA, RB and RC). The CF isolates in RB were related to isolates from a wide variety of origins. The CF isolates in RA were related to a population composed of 65 % of the non-CF isolates from pulmonary tract infections. RC was mainly composed of CF isolates that were related to 30 % of isolates from plants. All genes except exoS and nan1 were present in all isolates. The exoS and nan1 virulence factor genes were most prevalent in CF isolates. exoS, which encodes exoenzyme S, was present in 94 % of CF isolates but also in 80 % of non-CF isolates from pulmonary tract infections. nan1, which encodes a putative neuraminidase, was found in 82.5 % of the isolates from group RC, which was composed largely of CF isolates. In conclusion, three major genogroups of P. aeruginosa isolates, each of which exhibits peculiar genetic features, are able to colonize CF patients. This may have different consequences on the outcome of pulmonary disease.

  20. Mycobacterium bovis in Swine: Spoligotyping of Isolates from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Barandiaran, Soledad; Martínez Vivot, Marcela; Moras, Eduardo Vicente; Cataldi, Angel Adrián; Zumárraga, Martín José

    2011-01-01

    A total of 143 Mycobacterium bovis isolates of pigs, from the most productive swine area in Argentina, were typed by spoligotyping. Twenty-two different spoligotypes were identified, and 133 (93%) isolates were grouped into 12 clusters. One of them, designed SB0140, was the most frequent because it held 83 (58%) isolates. This spoligotype also grouped 362 (43%) out of 841 isolates from previously typed cattle and, thus, constitutes the most frequent in our country. In addition, 135 (94%) isolates revealed spoligotypes identical to those of cattle, showing an epidemiological link. On the other hand, there were seven novel spoligotypes, six of which were also unique since they had only one isolate each. This study aimed to identify the spoligotypes of M. bovis isolated from pigs to contribute to a better understanding of the distribution of bovine tuberculosis in the main productive area of Argentina. PMID:21547236

  1. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    PubMed

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended.

  2. Module isolation devices

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Cooke, John Albert; Buzinski, Michael David

    2010-04-27

    A gas flow isolation device includes a gas flow isolation valve movable from an opened condition to a closed condition. The module isolation valve in one embodiment includes a rupture disk in flow communication with a flow of gas when the module isolation valve is in an opened condition. The rupture disk ruptures when a predetermined pressure differential occurs across it causing the isolation valve to close. In one embodiment the valve is mechanically linked to the rupture disk to maintain the valve in an opened condition when the rupture disk is intact, and which permits the valve to move into a closed condition when the rupture disk ruptures. In another embodiment a crushable member maintains the valve in an open condition, and the flow of gas passed the valve upon rupturing of the rupture disk compresses the crushable member to close the isolation valve.

  3. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  4. Mutation and premating isolation.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  5. Identification and characterization of nine atypical Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Albaina, Olatz; Sahand, Ismail H; Brusca, María I; Sullivan, Derek J; Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo; Moragues, María D

    2015-02-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a pathogenic yeast of the genus Candida closely related to Candida albicans. The phenotypic similarity of these two species often leads to misidentification of C. dubliniensis isolates in clinical samples. DNA-based methods continue to be the most effective means of discriminating accurately between the two species. Here, we report on the identification of nine unusual Candida isolates that showed ambiguous identification patterns on the basis of their phenotypic and immunological traits. The isolates were categorized into two groups. Group I isolates were unable to produce germ tubes and chlamydospores, and to agglutinate commercial latex particles coated with a mAb highly specific for C. dubliniensis. Group II isolates grew as pink and white colonies on CHROMagar Candida and ChromID Candida, respectively. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles obtained with API/ID32C together with PCR amplification with specific primers and DNA sequencing allowed reliable identification of the nine unusual clinical isolates as C. dubliniensis.

  6. Genetic Attributes of E. coli Isolates from Chlorinated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Blyton, Michaela D. J.; Gordon, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli, is intimately associated with both human health and water sanitation. E. coli isolates from water can either be (i) host associated commensals, indicating recent faecal contamination; (ii) diarrheal pathogens or (iii) extra-intestinal pathogens that pose a direct health risk; or (iv) free-living. In this study we genetically characterised 28 E. coli isolates obtained from treated drinking water in south eastern Australia to ascertain their likely source. We used full genome sequencing to assign the isolates to their phylogenetic group and multi-locus sequence type. The isolates were also screened in silico for several virulence genes and genes involved in acquired antibiotic resistance. The genetic characteristics of the isolates indicated that four isolates were likely human pathogens. However, these isolates were not detected in sufficient numbers to present a health risk to the public. An additional isolate was a human associated strain. Nine isolates were water associated free-living strains that were unlikely to pose a health risk. Only 14% of the isolates belonged to the host associated phylogenetic group (B2) and only a single isolate had any antibiotic resistance genes. This suggests that the primary source of the drinking water E. coli isolates may not have been recent human faecal contamination. PMID:28107364

  7. Constructing Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimlich, Joe E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents guidelines for constructing group learning activities, describes group learning methods (discussion, gaming, role play, simulation, projects), and provides tips for facilitating group activities. (SK)

  8. In-group loyalty or out-group avoidance? Isolating the links between pathogens and in-group assortative sociality.

    PubMed

    Cashdan, Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    The target article gives two explanations for the correlation between pathogens, family ties, and religiosity: one highlights the benefits of xenophobic attitudes for reducing pathogen exposure, the other highlights the benefits of ethnic loyalty for mitigating the costs when a person falls ill. Preliminary data from traditional societies provide some support for the former explanation but not the latter.

  9. Multicenter Study of Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Anaerobic Bacteria in Korea in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yangsoon; Park, Yeon-Joon; Kim, Mi-Na; Uh, Young; Kim, Myung Sook

    2015-01-01

    Background Periodic monitoring of regional or institutional resistance trends of clinically important anaerobic bacteria is recommended, because the resistance of anaerobic pathogens to antimicrobial drugs and inappropriate therapy are associated with poor clinical outcomes. There has been no multicenter study of clinical anaerobic isolates in Korea. We aimed to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns of clinically important anaerobes at multiple centers in Korea. Methods A total of 268 non-duplicated clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria were collected from four large medical centers in Korea in 2012. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by the agar dilution method according to the CLSI guidelines. The following antimicrobials were tested: piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefoxitin, cefotetan, imipenem, meropenem, clindamycin, moxifloxacin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole, and tigecycline. Results Organisms of the Bacteroides fragilis group were highly susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, and meropenem, as their resistance rates to these three antimicrobials were lower than 6%. For B. fragilis group isolates and anaerobic gram-positive cocci, the resistance rates to moxifloxacin were 12-25% and 11-13%, respectively. Among B. fragilis group organisms, the resistance rates to tigecycline were 16-17%. Two isolates of Finegoldia magna were non-susceptible to chloramphenicol (minimum inhibitory concentrations of 16-32 mg/L). Resistance patterns were different among the different hospitals. Conclusions Piperacillin-tazobactam, cefoxitin, and carbapemems are highly active β-lactam agents against most of the anaerobes. The resistance rates to moxifloxacin and tigecycline are slightly higher than those in the previous study. PMID:26206683

  10. The Professional Carers' Group: Supporting Group Work for Young Sexual Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Susanne; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes the context, format, and goals of the Professional Carers' Group, a professional network designed to support a centralized treatment project for young people who have sexually abused others. Ways that group-based work with potentially isolated local professionals may help a treatment program maintain a systemic perspective is discussed.…

  11. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  12. Neonatal group B streptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, C J; Zanen, H C

    1984-01-01

    Bacteriological and clinical data on 68 children with neonatal group B streptococcal meningitis were analysed as part of a wider study of bacterial meningitis undertaken between 1976 and 1982. Twenty five per cent of patients died and there was no difference in the mortality rate between early and late onset disease. Sixteen per cent of the infants weighed less than 2500 g at birth but in 50% no predisposing aetiological factor was found. Streptococcus agalactiae type III was isolated in 57% of the patients. PMID:6375583

  13. Advanced Technology for Isolating Payloads in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C.

    1997-01-01

    torque orientation and other experimental activities will occur continually, both inside and outside the station. Since all vibration sources cannot be controlled, the task of attenuating the disturbances is the only realistic alternative. Several groups have independently developed technology to isolate payloads from the space environment. Since 1970, Honeywell's Satellite Systems Division has designed several payload isolation systems and vibration attenuators. From 1987 to 1992, NASA's Lewis Research Center (LeRC) performed research on isolation technology and developed a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) isolator and tested the system during 70 low gravity aircraft flight trajectories. Beginning in early 1995, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) jointly developed the STABLE (Suppression of Transient Accelerations By Levitation Evaluation) isolation system. This 5 month accelerated effort produced the first flight of an active microgravity vibration isolation system on STS-73/USML-02 in late October 1995. The Canadian Space Agency developed the Microgravity Vibration Isolation Mount (MIM) for isolating microgravity payloads and this system began operating on the Russian Mir Space Station in May 1996. The Boeing Defense & Space Group, Missiles & Space Division developed the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) for isolating payloads in a standard payload rack. ARIS was tested in September 1996 during the STS-79 mission to Mir. Although these isolation systems differ in their technological approach, the objective is to isolate payloads from disturbances. The following sections describe the technologies behind these systems and the different types of hardware used to perform isolation. The purpose of these descriptions is not to detail the inner workings of the hardware but to give the reader an idea of the technology and uses of the hardware components. Also included in the component descriptions is a paragraph detailing some of the

  14. Genetic diversity of Argentine isolates of feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, M R; Tomonaga, K; Miyazawa, T; Kawaguchi, Y; Sugita, S; Tohya, Y; Kai, C; Etcheverrigaray, M E; Mikami, T

    1996-09-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence and genetic diversity of part of the envelope (env) gene of four strains of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) isolated from Argentine domestic cats. The DNA encoding the V3 to V5 regions of the env gene of the FIV isolates were amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Argentine isolates did not cluster into a single group; one isolate clustered with subtype B FIV isolated in the USA and Japan, whereas the others formed a new cluster of FIV which might represent a prototype sequence for subtype E.

  15. Enterococcus plantarum sp. nov., isolated from plants.

    PubMed

    Svec, Pavel; Vandamme, Peter; Bryndová, Hana; Holochová, Pavla; Kosina, Marcel; Maslanová, Ivana; Sedlácek, Ivo

    2012-07-01

    Eight Gram-positive, catalase-negative bacterial strains were isolated during screening of enterococcal populations on plants. rep-PCR fingerprinting using the (GTG)(5) primer showed that the isolates constituted a single cluster that was separate from all known enterococcal species. 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogenetic analysis of three representative strains showed that the isolates belonged to the genus Enterococcus and that they clustered with the Enterococcus faecalis species group. Sequencing of the genes for the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase alpha subunit (pheS) and the RNA polymerase alpha subunit (rpoA) also revealed the isolates' separate taxonomic position. Application of whole-cell protein fingerprinting, automated ribotyping and extensive phenotyping demonstrated the genetic and phenotypic homogeneity of the isolates and confirmed their separate position within the E. faecalis species group. The isolates represent a novel species of the genus Enterococcus, for which the name Enterococcus plantarum sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is CCM 7889(T) (=LMG 26214(T)=C27(T)).

  16. Positive isolation disconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosener, A. A.; Jonkoniec, T. G.

    1975-01-01

    A positive isolation disconnect was developed for component replacement in serviced liquid and gaseous spacecraft systems. Initially a survey of feasible concepts was made to determine the optimum method for fluid isolation, sealing techniques, coupling concepts, and foolproofing techniques. The top concepts were then further evaluated, including the fabrication of a semifunctional model. After all tradeoff analyses were made, a final configuration was designed and fabricated for development testing. This resulted in a 6.35 mm (1/4 inch) line and 12.7 mm (1/2 inch) line positive isolation disconnect, each unit consisting of two coupled disconnect halves, each capable of fluid isolation with essentially zero clearance between them for zero leakage upon disconnect half disengagement. An interlocking foolproofing technique was incorporated that prevents uncoupling of disconnect halves prior to fluid isolation.

  17. Angular momentum in the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, A.; Laflamme, R.

    1994-04-01

    We briefly review models for the Local Group and the acquisition of its angular momentum. We describe early attempts to understand the origin of the spin of the galaxies discussing the hypothesis that the Local Group has little angular momentum. Finally we show that using Peebles` least action principle there should be a rather large amount of orbital angular momentum compared to the magnitude of the spin of its galaxies. Therefore the Local Group cannot be thought as tidally isolated. Using Peebles` trajectories we give a possible set of trajectories for Local Group galaxies which would predict their spin.

  18. Bacterial isolates from the bryozoan Membranipora membranacea: influence of culture media on isolation and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Heindl, Herwig; Thiel, Vera; Wiese, Jutta; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2012-03-01

    From specimens of the bryozoan Membranipora membranacea collected in the Baltic Sea, bacteria were isolated on four different media, which significantly increased the diversity of the isolated groups. All isolates were classified according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and tested for antimicrobial properties using a panel of five indicator strains and six different media. Each medium featured a unique set of isolated phylotypes, and a phylogenetically diverse collection of isolates was obtained. A total of 96 isolates were assigned to 49 phylotypes and 29 genera. Only one-third of the members of these genera had been isolated previously from comparable sources. The isolates were affiliated with Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria. A comparable large portion of up to 22 isolates, i.e., 15 phylotypes, probably represent new species. Likewise, 47 isolates (approximately 50%) displayed antibiotic activities, mostly against grampositive indicator strains. Of the active strains, 63.8 % had antibiotic traits only on one or two of the growth media, whereas only 12.7 % inhibited growth on five or all six media. The application of six different media for antimicrobial testing resulted in twice the number of positive hits as obtained with only a single medium. The use of different media for the isolation of bacteria as well as the variation of media considered suitable for the production of antibiotic substances significantly enhanced both the number of isolates obtained and the proportion of antibiotic active cultures. Thus the approach described herein offers an improved strategy in the search for new antibiotic compounds.

  19. Isolation and characterization of fenamiphos degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, J Alfonso; Kurtz, Andreas; Sikora, Richard A; Schouten, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    The biological factors responsible for the microbial breakdown of the organophosphorus nematicide fenamiphos were investigated. Microorganisms responsible for the enhanced degradation of fenamiphos were isolated from soil that had a long application history of this nematicide. Bacteria proved to be the most important group of microbes responsible for the fenamiphos biodegradation process. Seventeen bacterial isolates utilized the pure active ingredient fenamiphos as a carbon source. Sixteen isolates rapidly degraded the active ingredient in Nemacur 5GR. Most of the fenamiphos degrading bacteria were Microbacterium species, although Sinorhizobium, Brevundimonas, Ralstonia and Cupriavidus were also identified. This array of gram positive and gram negative fenamiphos degrading bacteria appeared to be pesticide-specific, since cross-degradation toward fosthiazate, another organophosphorus pesticide used for nematode control, did not occur. It was established that the phylogenetical relationship among nematicide degrading bacteria is closer than that to non-degrading isolates.

  20. Comparison of Virulence Markers of Peritoneal and Fallopian Tube Isolates with Endocervical Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Women with Acute Salpingitis

    PubMed Central

    Draper, D. L.; James, J. F.; Brooks, G. F.; Sweet, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains which cause acute salpingitis are presumed to ascend the genital tract from the cervix. Previous studies utilized isolates obtained from endocervical canal cultures, although it was not known if the isolates truly represented the organisms present in the fallopian tubes. In this study, we compared N. gonorrhoeae isolates from endocervical canal cultures with fallopian tube or peritoneal cul-de-sac isolates or isolates from both sites obtained at laparoscopy. Potential virulence markers were studied, including colony phenotype, auxotype, antimicrobial agent susceptibility, protein patterns on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and susceptibility to normal human serum. Six of seven cervical isolates had the same antibiograms and molecular weight for major outer membrane proteins as those of the corresponding peritoneal isolates. Auxotypes also were the same and included prototrophic, proline-requiring, and proline-and-arginine-requiring isolates. The isolates as a group appeared to be very susceptible to the bactericidal action of pooled serum from normal women. Colony phenotypes varied between sites; the fallopian tubecul-de-sac isolates were predominantly of transparent phenotype and piliated. The cervical isolates were either mixtures of equal quantities of opaque and transparent phenotypes or predominantly opaque phenotype. By these markers, patients' N. gonorrhoeae cervical isolates appeared to be the same as their isolates from fallopian tubes except for a difference or shift in colony phenotype. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6769811

  1. RACIAL CONTACT, PERSONALITY, AND GROUP PROBLEM SOLVING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ABNER, EDWARD V.; LEWIT, DAVID W.

    THIS STUDY TESTS THE HYPOTHESIS THAT BIRACIAL GROUPS IN WHICH RACEMATES WERE PAIRED FOR DIRECT CONTACT WOULD PERFORM BETTER THAN THOSE IN WHICH RACEMATES WERE ISOLATED. IT ALSO ASSUMED THAT ETHNOCENTRIC SUBJECTS WOULD PERFORM BETTER WITH CONTACT WITH A RACEMATE, AND THAT AGGRESSIVE SUBJECTS WOULD GET ALONG WELL WITHOUT IT. THE SUBJECTS WERE BOYS…

  2. Isolated adipic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Hasbini, D A; Mikati, M A; Habbal, Z M

    2001-01-01

    Adipic acid can appear, in combination with other dicarboxylic acids, in the urine of patients in a number of underlying metabolic diseases. A child with seizures and mental retardation of unknown etiology who was found to have elevated isolated adipic aciduria on investigation for metabolic diseases is reported. A dietary artifact was suspected, and the adipic aciduria resolved after the child was kept on a specific restricted diet for 3 days. This is the third report of isolated adipic aciduria secondary to food. Findings confirm the previous reports of dietary origin of isolated adipic aciduria and should alert clinicians to such artifact before committing patients to unnecessary treatments.

  3. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1994-01-01

    In order for a current satellite-based navigation system (such as the Global Positioning System, GPS) to meet integrity requirements, there must be a way of detecting erroneous measurements, without help from outside the system. This process is called Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI). Fault detection requires at least one redundant measurement, and can be done with a parity space algorithm. The best way around the fault isolation problem is not necessarily isolating the bad measurement, but finding a new combination of measurements which excludes it.

  4. Isolation of Chlamydomonas Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Craige, Branch; Brown, Jason M.; Witman, George B.

    2014-01-01

    A simple, scalable, and fast procedure for the isolation of Chlamydomonas flagella is described. Chlamydomonas can be synchronously deflagellated by treatment with chemicals, pH shock, or mechanical shear. The Basic Protocol describes the procedure for flagellar isolation using dibucaine to induce flagellar abscission; we also describe the pH shock method as an Alternate Protocol when flagellar regeneration is desirable. Sub-fractionation of the isolated flagella into axonemes and the membrane + matrix fraction is described in a Support Protocol. PMID:23728744

  5. Can Groups Learn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Elizabeth G.; Lotan, Rachel A.; Abram, Percy L.; Scarloss, Beth A.; Schultz, Susan E.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the work of sixth grade students' creative problem-solving groups, proposing that providing students with specific guidelines about what makes an exemplary group product would improve the character of the discussion and quality of the group product. Student groups did learn as a result of their discussions and creation of group products.…

  6. Small Groups in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suessmuth, Patrick

    1974-01-01

    Small groups can sometimes be difficult to set up and work with properly. A number of tips for small group instruction are divided into seven areas: (1) presenting tasks; (2) group seating; (3) task time; (4) answering questions; (5) teacher's role in observing groups; (6) group noise level patterns; and (7) serial take-ups. (BP)

  7. Strawberry vein banding virus isolates in eastern Canada are molecularly divergent from other isolates.

    PubMed

    Dickison, Virginia; MacKenzie, Tyler D B; Singh, Mathuresh; Lawrence, Janice; Nie, Xianzhou

    2017-02-11

    The complete sequence of a strawberry vein banding virus (SVBV) isolate collected in Nova Scotia, Canada, and designated NS8, was determined. The 7,856-nucleotide circular double-stranded DNA genome contains seven open-reading frames (ORFs), which is consistent with other SVBV isolates and other members of the genus Caulimovirus. Comparison of NS8 with other whole-genome sequences retrieved from databases revealed that NS8 shares the highest sequence similarity (96.5% identity) with isolate China (accession number HE681085) and the lowest (88.3% identity) with clone pSVBV-E3 (accession number X97304). Despite the overall high sequence similarity between NS8 and China, the coat protein encoding ORF IV of NS8 shares only 90.9% sequence identity with the China isolate. Phylogenetic analysis at the complete-genome level placed NS8 and all Chinese isolates in one clade and clone pSVBV-E3 in a separate clade. Interestingly, phylogenetic analysis of all available ORF IV sequences, including those retrieved from databases and newly sequenced samples in this study from Canada, revealed three distinct clades. All Canadian isolates grouped together as one clade, pSVBV-E3 and several others from Europe, Egypt and the USA grouped as a second clade, and isolates from China formed a third clade. These results demonstrate that SVBV is more divergent than previously reported.

  8. Child Maltreatment: Testing the Social Isolation Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coohey, Carol

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the construct of social isolation in child maltreatment and reports on a study comparing 300 maltreating and nonmaltreating low-income mothers. Considerable variation was found between the two groups' structural network properties, perception of support, and types of resources received. However, maltreating mothers were not…

  9. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  10. Group Time: Building Language at Group Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Ellen Booth

    2004-01-01

    This article features energizing and surprising activities for children at group time. In the drawing activity, children are asked to give instructions on how to draw a picture using vocabulary and descriptive language. In the mailbox activity, children will be surprised to discover that they have mail at group time. Mailboxes can be used for…

  11. Comparison of paramyxovirus isolates from snakes, lizards and a tortoise.

    PubMed

    Marschang, Rachel E; Papp, Tibor; Frost, Jens W

    2009-09-01

    Previously uncharacterized paramyxovirus (PMV) isolates from four snakes, three lizards and a tortoise were compared based on partial sequences of the L, HN, and U genes. Analysis of the sequences supported the classification of all reptilian PMVs in a separate genus (Ferlavirus) in the subfamily Paramyxovirinae. Within each of the gene segments, the squamatid isolates could be divided into two groups with a sequence divergence of 0.3-15.6% nt (0-6.8% aa) within the groups and 19.5-22.3% nt (5-7.4% aa) between the groups for the L gene, and 0.9-15.4% nt (0-6.9% aa) within the groups and 18.2-22.5% nt (4.4-9.5% aa) between the groups for the HN gene while higher values of 0.4-17.1% nt (0-13.3% aa) within the groups and 28.9-31.3% nt (25.5-27.8% aa) between the groups were found for the U gene. Isolates from lizards were found in both groups. There was no host species specificity in the grouping of the isolates from snakes and lizards. However, the L gene sequence obtained from the tortoise isolate differed significantly from the sequences obtained from the snake and lizard isolates. This isolate showed divergence values of 24.2-27% nt (18.5-20.9% aa) compared to the squamatid sequences. The tortoise isolate clustered together with the other reptilian PMVs, but not into any of the squamatid groups on the phylogenetic tree. It is hypothesized that this chelonian PMV has a more unique genome sequence as neither HN nor U gene parts could be amplified using newly designed consensus nested PCRs.

  12. Genetic diversity among sea otter isolates of Toxoplasma gondii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundar, N.; Cole, R.A.; Thomas, N.J.; Majumdar, D.; Dubey, J.P.; Su, C.

    2008-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) have been reported to become infected with Toxoplasma gondii and at times succumb to clinical disease. Here, we determined genotypes of 39 T. gondii isolates from 37 sea otters in two geographically distant locations (25 from California and 12 from Washington). Six genotypes were identified using 10 PCR-RFLP genetic markers including SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico, and by DNA sequencing of loci SAG1 and GRA6 in 13 isolates. Of these 39 isolates, 13 (33%) were clonal Type II which can be further divided into two groups at the locus Apico. Two of the 39 isolates had Type II alleles at all loci except a Type I allele at locus L358. One isolate had Type II alleles at all loci except the Type I alleles at loci L358 and Apico. One isolate had Type III alleles at all loci except Type II alleles at SAG2 and Apico. Two sea otter isolates had a mixed infection. Twenty-one (54%) isolates had an unique allele at SAG1 locus. Further genotyping or DNA sequence analysis for 18 of these 21 isolates at loci SAG1 and GRA6 revealed that there were two different genotypes, including the previously identified Type X (four isolates) and a new genotype named Type A (14 isolates). The results from this study suggest that the sea otter isolates are genetically diverse.

  13. Dynamical theory of dense groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that galaxies associate in groups and clusters. Perhaps 40% of all galaxies are found in groups of 4 to 20 galaxies (e.g., Tully 1987). Although most groups appear to be so loose that the galaxy interactions within them ought to be insignificant, the apparently densest groups, known as compact groups appear so dense when seen in projection onto the plane of the sky that their members often overlap. These groups thus appear as dense as the cores of rich clusters. The most popular catalog of compact groups, compiled by Hickson (1982), includes isolation among its selection critera. Therefore, in comparison with the cores of rich clusters, Hickson's compact groups (HCGs) appear to be the densest isolated regions in the Universe (in galaxies per unit volume), and thus provide in principle a clean laboratory for studying the competition of very strong gravitational interactions. The $64,000 question here is then: Are compact groups really bound systems as dense as they appear? If dense groups indeed exist, then one expects that each of the dynamical processes leading to the interaction of their member galaxies should be greatly enhanced. This leads us to the questions: How stable are dense groups? How do they form? And the related question, fascinating to any theorist: What dynamical processes predominate in dense groups of galaxies? If HCGs are not bound dense systems, but instead 1D change alignments (Mamon 1986, 1987; Walke & Mamon 1989) or 3D transient cores (Rose 1979) within larger looser systems of galaxies, then the relevant question is: How frequent are chance configurations within loose groups? Here, the author answers these last four questions after comparing in some detail the methods used and the results obtained in the different studies of dense groups.

  14. Group B Strep Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questions OverviewWhat is group B strep?Group B streptococcus, or group B strep for short, is a ... can develop an infection of the lungs (ca