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Sample records for fragilis group isolates

  1. Development of EUCAST disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolates.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Elisabeth; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Eitel, Zsuzsa; Urbán, Edit

    2015-02-01

    With the emergence of antibiotic resistance among Bacteroides fragilis group isolates the need of susceptibility testing in routine laboratories is increasing. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing in case of different clinical isolates of Bacteroides spp by comparing zone diameter results with MICs obtained earlier during an Europe-wide antibiotic susceptibility surveillance, and to propose zone diameter breakpoints, which correlate for the EUCAST MIC breakpoints. We tested 381 clinical isolates of the B. fragilis group to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, clindamycin, imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tigecycline by agar dilution method previously. The inhibition zones of the same antibiotics including meropenem disc were determined by the disc diffusion on Brucella blood agar supplemented with haemin and vitamin K1. Plates were incubated at 37 °C in an anaerobic atmosphere for 24 h. The zone diameters were read at 100% inhibition. In case of discrepant results MICs were determined by gradient test and compared with the inhibition zones on the same plate. We found a good agreement between the inhibition zone diameters and the MICs for imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin and tigecyclin. The inhibition zone diameters of meropenem also separated clearly the isolates, which can be considered wild-type isolates. In case of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and piperacillin/tazobactam intermediate and susceptible isolates according to the MIC determination, overlap during the zone diameter determination. Isolates with an inhibition zone <23 mm for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and <25 mm for piperacillin/tazobactam should be retested by a MIC determination method. The 10 μg clindamycin disc clearly separated the resistant and the susceptible population of B. fragilis group strains. In the case of cefoxitin only resistant population could be separated with an inhibition

  2. In vitro effect of antibiotics on biofilm formation by Bacteroides fragilis group strains isolated from intestinal microbiota of dogs and their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Silva, Janice Oliveira; Martins Reis, Ana Catarina; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; Pinheiro, Adriana Queiroz; Freire, Rosemary Souza; Oriá, Reinaldo Barreto; de Carvalho, Cibele Barreto Mano

    2014-08-01

    The Bacteroides fragilis group strains colonize the intestinal tract of dogs as commensal bacteria. Nevertheless, they can be opportunistic pathogens responsible for significant morbidity and mortality rates in dogs, like in oral infections, abscesses and wound infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility in B. fragilis strains isolated from dogs intestinal microbiota and to evaluate the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of some antimicrobials on biofilm formation. A total of 30 B. fragilis group strains were tested for susceptibility to ten antimicrobial agents by broth microdilution method. Thirteen B. fragilis strains were tested for biofilm formation and the biofilm producer strains were chosen to evaluate the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of six antimicrobials on biofilm formation. The isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, metronidazole, imipenem and chloramphenicol. Tetracycline and clindamycin were active against 50% and 33% of the strains, respectively. When biofilm-forming strains were grown in the presence of sub-MICs of imipenem and metronidazole, the inhibition of biofilm formation was observed. In contrast, enrofloxacin at ½ MIC caused a significant increase in biofilm formation in two of four strains examined. In conclusion, the B. fragilis group strains isolated were susceptible to most of the antimicrobials tested and the sub-MIC concentrations of imipenem, metronidazole and clindamycin were able to inhibit the biofilm formation.

  3. Longitudinal study of susceptibilities of species of the Bacteroides fragilis group to five antimicrobial agents in three medical centers.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, P; Turgeon, V; Gourdeau, M; Dubois, J; Lamothe, F

    1994-10-01

    A total of 579 clinical isolates of the Bacteroides fragilis group collected from three Canadian hospitals were tested for susceptibility to five antimicrobial agents by using an agar dilution method. During the 4-year survey, isolates from intra-abdominal infections were collected from the following sites: abdominal abscesses (48%), peritoneal fluid (39%), blood (10%), and bile (3%). B. fragilis was the most prevalent species (35.4%), followed by B. thetaiotaomicron (19.2%), B. ovatus (15.9%), and B. vulgatus (11%). No metronidazole- or imipenem-resistant strains were found during the survey. Resistance profiles varied among the different species tested: 7.8, 2.9, and 7.3% of B. fragilis strains (n = 205) and 68.1, 17.2, and 9.4% of non-B. fragilis strains (n = 373) were resistant to cefotetan, cefoxitin, and clindamycin, respectively. B. fragilis and B. vulgatus demonstrated lower resistance rates than B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus, B. distasonis, and B. caccae. During the study, rates of resistance to cefotetan and clindamycin fluctuated but rates of resistance to cefoxitin increased, particularly at one center. These data indicate a need to determine the susceptibility patterns of the B. fragilis group periodically at each hospital.

  4. Longitudinal study of susceptibilities of species of the Bacteroides fragilis group to five antimicrobial agents in three medical centers.

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, P; Turgeon, V; Gourdeau, M; Dubois, J; Lamothe, F

    1994-01-01

    A total of 579 clinical isolates of the Bacteroides fragilis group collected from three Canadian hospitals were tested for susceptibility to five antimicrobial agents by using an agar dilution method. During the 4-year survey, isolates from intra-abdominal infections were collected from the following sites: abdominal abscesses (48%), peritoneal fluid (39%), blood (10%), and bile (3%). B. fragilis was the most prevalent species (35.4%), followed by B. thetaiotaomicron (19.2%), B. ovatus (15.9%), and B. vulgatus (11%). No metronidazole- or imipenem-resistant strains were found during the survey. Resistance profiles varied among the different species tested: 7.8, 2.9, and 7.3% of B. fragilis strains (n = 205) and 68.1, 17.2, and 9.4% of non-B. fragilis strains (n = 373) were resistant to cefotetan, cefoxitin, and clindamycin, respectively. B. fragilis and B. vulgatus demonstrated lower resistance rates than B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus, B. distasonis, and B. caccae. During the study, rates of resistance to cefotetan and clindamycin fluctuated but rates of resistance to cefoxitin increased, particularly at one center. These data indicate a need to determine the susceptibility patterns of the B. fragilis group periodically at each hospital. PMID:7840557

  5. Isolation, Detection, and Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Payam; Wu, Shaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is an extensively studied anaerobic bacterium comprising the normal flora of the human gut. B. fragilis is known to be one of the most commonly isolated species from clinical samples and has been shown to cause a wide range of pathologies in humans [1, 2]. As an opportunistic pathogen B. fragilis can cause abscess formation and bacteremia [2]. Additionally in its enterotoxigenic form, B. fragilis is a known cause of diarrheal illness, is associated with inflammatory bowel disease, and has been recently characterized in patients with colon cancer [3 - 5]. As research in the field of the gut microbiome continues to expand at an ever increasing rate due to advances in the availability of next generation sequencing and analysis tools it is important to outline various molecular methods that can be employed in quickly detecting and isolating relevant strains of B. fragilis. This review outlines methods that are routinely employed in the isolation and detection of B. fragilis, with an emphasis on characterizing enterotoxigenic B. fragilis (ETBF) strains. PMID:27335618

  6. Effect of clavulanic acid on the activities of ten beta-lactam agents against members of the Bacteroides fragilis group.

    PubMed Central

    Lamothe, F; Auger, F; Lacroix, J M

    1984-01-01

    Clavulanic acid reduced the MICs of amoxicillin, carbencillin , cefamandole, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftizoxime, cephalothin, and penicillin G, but not of cefoxitin or moxalactam, against 77 isolates of the Bacteroides fragilis group, all rapidly beta-lactamase positive by the nitrocefin slide test. It had no effect on the susceptibilities of eight Bacteroides distasonis strains that were slowly beta-lactamase positive (18 h of incubation). PMID:6732233

  7. Population structure and distribution of virulence-related genes of Bacteroides fragilis isolates from Korea and Japan.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kwan Soo; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Lee, Kyungwon; Kook, Yoon-Hoh

    2009-07-01

    Sequences for rpoB, gyrB, pdiA, and ompA were determined from 63 Bacteroides fragilis isolates, which were from Korea and Japan and include 4 reference strains. All 4 gene sequences supported clear separation of the cfi(+) group from the cfi(-) group. Combined sequences of the 60 division I isolates (cfi(-)) produced 45 different clones. Apparent discordance of gene trees, index of association, maximum likelihood test, and homoplasy ratio all supported a high frequency of recombination. There was no association between the presence of virulence-related genes and phylogenetic clustering in any gene tree.

  8. Lactate dehydrogenase activity in Bacteroides fragilis group strains with induced resistance to metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Presečki Stanko, Aleksandra; Sóki, Jozsef; Varda Brkić, Dijana; Plečko, Vanda

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were to induce in vitro metronidazole resistance in nim-negative Bacteroides fragilis group strains and to determine the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity of the induced strains. A collection of B. fragilis group strains were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for metronidazole were determined by the agar dilution technique. The presence of nim genes was screened by PCR. A sample of 52 nim-negative metronidazole-susceptible strains were selected at random and were exposed to metronidazole in the resistance induction experiment. LDH activity was measured by spectrophotometry. Of the 52 selected strains, 12 (23.1%) acquired resistance to metronidazole. MICs ranged from 8mg/L to 96mg/L. Eight of the twelve induced strains displayed decreased LDH activity, whilst only one expressed a significant increase in LDH activity with LDH values of 49.1U/mg and 222.0U/mg, respectively. In conclusion, in vitro induction of metronidazole resistance could be selected in nim-negative B. fragilis group strains. A statistically significant decrease in LDH activity was in contrast to previous findings in which, underlying higher metronidazole MICs, an increase in LDH activity compensated for the decreased activity of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). These findings could be explained if the induction caused only physiological and not genetic changes. We believe that genetic mutations in the B. fragilis strain that demonstrated an emergent increase in LDH activity were responsible for the increased activity. PMID:27436459

  9. Isolation of a respiratory-deficient Kluyveromyces fragilis mutant for the production of ethanol from Jerusalem artichoke

    SciTech Connect

    Guiraud, J.P.; Bourgi, J.; Stervinou, M.; Claisse, M.; Galzy, P.

    1987-05-01

    A respiratory-deficient mutant of Kluyveromyces fragilis was isolated using a ethidium bromide mutagenesis. It was characterized by a loss of cytochromes a + a3 and by an improvement of its inulinase activity. Under anaerobic conditions this mutant was always better than the wild strain for ethanol production especially from Jerusalem artichoke extracts containing large amounts of high polyfructosans (early extracts).

  10. In vitro susceptibility testing of Dientamoeba fragilis.

    PubMed

    Nagata, N; Marriott, D; Harkness, J; Ellis, J T; Stark, D

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a commonly encountered trichomonad which has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease in humans. Despite the frequency of reports recording infections with this parasite, little research has been undertaken in terms of antimicrobial susceptibility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of D. fragilis to several commonly used antiparasitic agents: diloxanide furoate, furazolidone, iodoquinol, metronidazole, nitazoxanide, ornidazole, paromomycin, secnidazole, ronidazole, tetracycline, and tinidazole. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed on four clinical strains of D. fragilis, designated A, E, M, and V, respectively. Molecular testing followed, and all strains were determined to be genotype 1. The activities of antiprotozoal compounds at concentrations ranging from 2 μg/ml to 500 μg/ml were determined via cell counts of D. fragilis trophozoites grown in dixenic culture. Minimum lethal concentrations (MLCs) were as follows: ornidazole, 8 to 16 μg/ml; ronidazole, 8 to 16 μg/ml; tinidazole, 31 μg/ml; metronidazole, 31 μg/ml; secnidazole, 31 to 63 μg/ml; nitazoxanide, 63 μg/ml; tetracycline, 250 μg/ml; furazolidone, 250 to 500 μg/ml; iodoquinol, 500 μg/ml; paromomycin, 500 μg/ml; and diloxanide furoate, >500 μg/ml. This is the first study to report the profiles of susceptibility to a wide range of commonly used treatments for clinical isolates of D. fragilis. Our study indicated 5-nitroimidazole derivatives to be the most active compounds in vitro against D. fragilis. PMID:22024820

  11. In Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Dientamoeba fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, N.; Marriott, D.; Harkness, J.; Ellis, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a commonly encountered trichomonad which has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease in humans. Despite the frequency of reports recording infections with this parasite, little research has been undertaken in terms of antimicrobial susceptibility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of D. fragilis to several commonly used antiparasitic agents: diloxanide furoate, furazolidone, iodoquinol, metronidazole, nitazoxanide, ornidazole, paromomycin, secnidazole, ronidazole, tetracycline, and tinidazole. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed on four clinical strains of D. fragilis, designated A, E, M, and V, respectively. Molecular testing followed, and all strains were determined to be genotype 1. The activities of antiprotozoal compounds at concentrations ranging from 2 μg/ml to 500 μg/ml were determined via cell counts of D. fragilis trophozoites grown in dixenic culture. Minimum lethal concentrations (MLCs) were as follows: ornidazole, 8 to 16 μg/ml; ronidazole, 8 to 16 μg/ml; tinidazole, 31 μg/ml; metronidazole, 31 μg/ml; secnidazole, 31 to 63 μg/ml; nitazoxanide, 63 μg/ml; tetracycline, 250 μg/ml; furazolidone, 250 to 500 μg/ml; iodoquinol, 500 μg/ml; paromomycin, 500 μg/ml; and diloxanide furoate, >500 μg/ml. This is the first study to report the profiles of susceptibility to a wide range of commonly used treatments for clinical isolates of D. fragilis. Our study indicated 5-nitroimidazole derivatives to be the most active compounds in vitro against D. fragilis. PMID:22024820

  12. Discerning the Role of Bacteroides fragilis in Celiac Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, E.; Laparra, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is associated with intestinal dysbiosis, which can theoretically lead to dysfunctions in host-microbe interactions and contribute to the disease. In the present study, possible differences in Bacteroides spp. and their pathogenic features between CD patients and controls were investigated. Bacteroides clones (n = 274) were isolated, identified, and screened for the presence of the virulence genes (bft and mpII) coding for metalloproteases. The proteolytic activity of selected Bacteroides fragilis strains was evaluated by zymography and, after gastrointestinal digestion of gliadin, by high-pressure liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry. The effects of B. fragilis strains on Caco-2 cell culture permeability and inflammatory response to digested gliadin were determined. B. fragilis was more frequently identified in CD patients than in healthy controls, in contrast to Bacteroides ovatus. B. fragilis clones carrying virulence genes coding for metalloproteases were more abundant in CD patients than in controls. B. fragilis strains, representing the isolated clones and carrying metalloprotease genes, showed gelatinase activity and exerted the strongest adverse effects on the integrity of the Caco-2 cell monolayer. All B. fragilis strains also showed gliadin-hydrolyzing activity, and some of them generated immunogenic peptides that preserved or increased inflammatory cytokine production (tumor necrosis factor alpha) and showed increased ability to permeate through Caco-2 cell cultures. These findings suggest that increased abundance of B. fragilis strains with metalloprotease activities could play a role in CD pathogenesis, although further in vivo studies are required to support this hypothesis. PMID:22773639

  13. Ethnic diversity of gut microbiota: species characterization of Bacteroides fragilis group and genus Bifidobacterium in healthy Belgian adults, and comparison with data from Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Eiji; Matsuki, Takahiro; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Makino, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takafumi; Oishi, Kenji; Kushiro, Akira; Fujimoto, Junji; Watanabe, Koichi; Watanuki, Masaaki; Tanaka, Ryuichiro

    2013-08-01

    The composition of the human gut microbiota is related to host health, and it is thought that dietary habits may play a role in shaping this composition. Here, we examined the population size and prevalence of six predominant bacterial genera and the species compositions of genus Bifidobacterium (g-Bifid) and Bacteroides fragilis group (g-Bfra) in 42 healthy Belgian adults by quantitative PCR (qPCR) over a period of one month. The population sizes and prevalence of these bacteria were basically stable throughout the study period. The predominant g-Bifid species were Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium longum ss. longum, and the predominant g-Bfra species were Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides uniformis, and Bacteroides ovatus. The Belgian gut microbiota data were then compared with gut microbiota data from 46 Japanese subjects collected according to the same protocol (Matsuki et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 70, 167-173, 2004). The population size and prevalence of Bifidobacterium catenulatum group were significantly lower in the Belgian gut microbiota than in the Japanese gut microbiota (P < 0.001); however, the population size and prevalence of g-Bifid did not differ. This species-level qPCR analysis will be helpful for investigating the diversity of gut microbiota among ethnic groups.

  14. Dientamoeba fragilis, One of the Neglected Intestinal Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lynne S

    2016-09-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a single-celled protozoan, closely related to the trichomonads. Reported worldwide as causing human gastrointestinal symptoms, D. fragilis is very common and is second only to Blastocystis spp. Dientamoebiasis equals or exceeds the incidence of giardiasis. This minireview includes diagnostic options, clinical relevance, therapy, an animal model, the confirmed cyst stage, and sequencing data. The development of a rodent model, fulfilling Koch's postulates, and the confirmation of a cyst stage have clarified transmission routes, including fecal-oral transmission. The prevalence of D. fragilis varies between 0% to over 82%; results depend on the geographic location, group studied, and diagnostic methods used. PMID:27053676

  15. Dientamoeba fragilis, One of the Neglected Intestinal Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lynne S

    2016-09-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a single-celled protozoan, closely related to the trichomonads. Reported worldwide as causing human gastrointestinal symptoms, D. fragilis is very common and is second only to Blastocystis spp. Dientamoebiasis equals or exceeds the incidence of giardiasis. This minireview includes diagnostic options, clinical relevance, therapy, an animal model, the confirmed cyst stage, and sequencing data. The development of a rodent model, fulfilling Koch's postulates, and the confirmation of a cyst stage have clarified transmission routes, including fecal-oral transmission. The prevalence of D. fragilis varies between 0% to over 82%; results depend on the geographic location, group studied, and diagnostic methods used.

  16. Pirin-like proteins are regulated by oxidative stress and iron in bacteroides fragilis and involved in the modulation of central energy metabolism and metronidazole susceptibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most frequent anaerobe isolated from human infections. Clinical isolates of B. fragilis are among the highest aerotolerant anaerobic bacteria. The oxidative stress response (OSR) in B. fragilis induces an array of genes enabling them to survive prolonged oxygen exposure i...

  17. Neuraminidase in Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, J O; Lindqvist, L; Andersson, G; Nord, C E

    1983-01-01

    A neuraminidase from Bacteroides fragilis was purified 542-fold by isoelectric focusing, adsorption chromatography on Affi-Gel 202, and gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-200. On isoelectric focusing the neuraminidase was resolved into three differently charged fractions with pI values of 6.8, 7.1, and 7.4. The major component of pI 7.1 was used for further purification. The purified enzyme had optimal activity at pH 6.4 with N-acetylneuraminlactose as the substrate. Its molecular weight, determined by Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography, was 92,000. The neuraminidase hydrolyzed terminal neuraminic acid residues from N-acetylneuraminlactose, fetuin, bovine submaxillary mucin, and porcine stomach lining mucin. A new method for the detection of neuraminidase activity is described which is based on rocket affinoelectrophoresis. It utilizes the differences in the interaction of sialylated and desialylated mucin with Helix pomatia lectin, enzymatic activity being detected by formation of affinorockets after incubation of the neuraminidase with bovine submaxillary mucin. PMID:6614909

  18. A new spiro-sesquiterpene from the sponge Dysidea fragilis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z-G; Bi, K-S; Guo, Y-W; Mollo, E; Cimino, G

    2006-01-01

    A new spiro-sesquiterpene, spirofragilin (1), along with a known related sesquiterpene, dehydroherbadysidolide (2), have been isolated from the marine sponge Dysidea fragilis collected in the South China Sea. The structure of 1 was elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analysis.

  19. Contribution of enzymatic properties, cell permeability, and enzyme expression to microbiological activities of beta-lactams in three Bacteroides fragilis isolates that harbor a metallo-beta-lactamase gene.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, B A; Yang, Y; Jacobus, N; Bush, K

    1994-09-01

    The metallo-beta-lactamase gene, ccrA, has been cloned from three clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis, TAL3636, QMCN3, and QMCN4. Although all three isolates harbored a gene encoding a potent beta-lactamase, the MICs of benzylpenicillin, piperacillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, imipenem, and biapenem for the three isolates varied from 4- to > 128-fold. QMCN4 was the most susceptible of the three isolates, followed by QMCN3. TAL3636 was resistant to all of the beta-lactams. Previous DNA sequence analysis of the three ccrA genes revealed that the enzymes differed at 5 amino acid residues (B. A. Rasmussen, Y. Gluzman, and F. P. Tally, Mol. Microbiol. 5:1211-1219, 1991). Biochemical characterization of the three enzymes revealed only small differences in kcat and Km values for the majority of beta-lactams tested. Thus, the 5 amino acid substitutions affected the hydrolyzing activity of the enzymes only modestly. Crypticity differences between the three isolates showed that QMCN4 was the least permeable of the isolates to cephaloridine, followed by TAL3636, and that QMCN3 was highly permeable to cephaloridine. Therefore, neither catalytic activity nor permeability was a major contributor to the dramatic differences in the MICs. Instead, microbiological susceptibility was closely related to the level of metallo-beta-lactamase present in each isolate. Both biochemical and physical studies indicated that TAL3636 produced 5- to 10-fold and 50- to 100-fold more metallo-beta-lactamase than QMCN3 and QMCN4, respectively. Therefore, the level of CcrA enzyme production is the dominant contributing factor to high-level resistance among strains harboring a ccrA gene.

  20. Characterization of bactericidal activity of clindamycin against Bacteroides fragilis via kill curve methods.

    PubMed Central

    Klepser, M E; Banevicius, M A; Quintiliani, R; Nightingale, C H

    1996-01-01

    Kill curves were determined for five isolates of Bacteroides fragilis with clindamycin at concentrations equal to the MIC or to 4, 16, and 64 times the MIC. Examination of plots of log CFU per milliliter versus time revealed no association between the clindamycin concentration and the rate and extent of the bactericidal activity against B. fragilis at or below 64 times the MIC. PMID:8843310

  1. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T.; Stark, Damien

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  2. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T; Stark, Damien

    2012-12-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  3. Tetracycline transport in Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Fayolle, F; Privitera, G; Sebald, M

    1980-01-01

    In susceptible strain of Bacteroides fragilis, tetracycline uptake is biphasic. The initial phase is independent of adenosine 5'-triphosphate synthesis, which is coupled to fumarate reduction; this phase is not altered by expression of tetracycline resistance genes in a resistant strain. The second phase appears to occur by active transport, since it is largely reduced by rotenone, an inhibitor of electron transport to fumarate; moreover, this phase is under negative control of the tetracycline resistance gene. PMID:7447414

  4. Cryptic Genetic Diversity in Dientamoeba fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeanette A.; Clark, C. Graham

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainty surrounding the role of Dientamoeba fragilis in human disease could be due in part to the existence of pathogenic and nonpathogenic variants. Evidence for two genetically distinct forms was obtained using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of ribosomal genes. Future studies in humans will need to take D. fragilis diversity into account. PMID:11101615

  5. Properties of novel beta-lactamase produced by Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Yotsuji, A; Minami, S; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1983-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis strains were isolated from clinical specimens. B. fragilis G-237 was highly resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics due to beta-lactamase production. The purified enzyme from this strain gave a single protein band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric point was 4.8, and the molecular weight was estimated to be 26,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme activity was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate and iodine but not by clavulanic acid or sulbactam. The purified enzyme showed a unique substrate profile by hydrolyzing at a high rate most of the cephalosporins, including cephamycin derivatives, penicillins, and imipenem (formerly imipemide, N-formimidoyl thienamycin, or MK 0787). PMID:6607033

  6. Activation of Bacteroides fragilis toxin by a novel bacterial protease contributes to anaerobic sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Vivian M; Herrou, Julien; Hecht, Aaron L; Teoh, Wei Ping; Turner, Jerrold R; Crosson, Sean; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2016-05-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the leading cause of anaerobic bacteremia and sepsis. Enterotoxigenic strains that produce B. fragilis toxin (BFT, fragilysin) contribute to colitis and intestinal malignancy, yet are also isolated in bloodstream infection. It is not known whether these strains harbor unique genetic determinants that confer virulence in extra-intestinal disease. We demonstrate that BFT contributes to sepsis in mice, and we identify a B. fragilis protease called fragipain (Fpn) that is required for the endogenous activation of BFT through the removal of its auto-inhibitory prodomain. Structural analysis of Fpn reveals a His-Cys catalytic dyad that is characteristic of C11-family cysteine proteases that are conserved in multiple pathogenic Bacteroides spp. and Clostridium spp. Fpn-deficient, enterotoxigenic B. fragilis has an attenuated ability to induce sepsis in mice; however, Fpn is dispensable in B. fragilis colitis, wherein host proteases mediate BFT activation. Our findings define a role for B. fragilis enterotoxin and its activating protease in the pathogenesis of bloodstream infection, which indicates a greater complexity of cellular targeting and activity of BFT than previously recognized. The expression of fpn by both toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains suggests that this protease may contribute to anaerobic sepsis in ways that extend beyond its role in toxin activation. It could thus potentially serve as a target for disease modification.

  7. A novel strain of Bacteroides fragilis enhances phagocytosis and polarises M1 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huimin; Li, Zhengchao; Tan, Yafang; Guo, Zhaobiao; Liu, Yangyang; Wang, Ye; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Ruifu; Bi, Yujing; Bai, Yang; Zhi, Fachao

    2016-01-01

    Commensal Bacteroides fragilis possesses immune-regulatory characteristics. Consequently, it has been proposed as a potential novel probiotic because of its therapeutic effects on immune imbalance, mental disorders and inflammatory diseases. Macrophages play a central role in the immune response, developing either a classical-M1 or an alternative-M2 phenotype after stimulation with various signals. The interactions between macrophages and B. fragilis, however, remain to be defined. Here, a new isolate of B. fragilis, ZY-312, was shown to possess admirable properties, including tolerance to simulated gastric fluid, intestinal fluid and ox bile, and good safety (MOI = 100, 200) and adherent ability (MOI = 100) to LoVo cells. Isolate ZY-312 cell lysate promoted phagocytosis of fluorescent microspheres and pathogenic bacteria in bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMDM) cells. Gene expression of IL-12, iNOS and IL-1β in BMDM cells was increased after treatment with ZY-312, indicating the induction of M1 macrophages, consistent with enhanced secretion of NO. Cell surface expression of CD80 and CD86 was also increased. This study is the first to demonstrate that B. fragilis enhances the phagocytic functions of macrophages, polarising them to an M1 phenotype. Our findings provide insight into the close relationship between B. fragilis and the innate immune system. PMID:27381366

  8. Intragenomic Variation in the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 Region of Dientamoeba fragilis as a Molecular Epidemiological Marker▿

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Aldert; van der Heijden, Harold M.; Greve, Sophie; Speijer, Dave; Landman, Wil J.; van Gool, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a parasite that has been recognized to be a causative agent of gastrointestinal symptoms. Because in most studies only some infected persons experience symptoms, it is possible that D. fragilis is a heterogeneous species with variants that display similar morphologies but different pathogenicities. The search for genetic variation in D. fragilis was based on the small-subunit rRNA gene, which was not found to be useful for molecular epidemiology. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of additional rRNA gene cluster sequences, the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1)-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS-2 region. For comparative purposes, we also isolated the ITS-1-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS-2 region of Histomonas meleagridis, a protozoan parasite of birds and a close relative of D. fragilis. This region was found to be highly variable, and 11 different alleles of the ITS-1 sequence could be identified. Variation in the ITS-1 region was found to be intragenomic, with up to four different alleles in a single isolate. So-called C profiles were produced from the ITS-1 repertoire of single isolates,. Analysis of the C profiles of isolates from nonrelated patients identified several clearly distinguishable strains of D. fragilis. Within families, it was shown that members can be infected with the same or different strains of D. fragilis. In conclusion, the ITS-1 region can serve as a molecular epidemiological tool for the subtyping of D. fragilis directly from feces. This may serve as a means of studying the transmission, geographical distribution, and relationships between strains and the pathogenicity of this parasite. PMID:18650356

  9. Screening for enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Jacqueline I; Aitchison, Alan; Purcell, Rachel V; Greenlees, Rosie; Pearson, John F; Frizelle, Frank A

    2016-08-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a commensal bacterium found in the gut of most humans, however enterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains (ETBF) have been associated with diarrhoea and colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of this study was to establish a method of screening for the Bacteroides fragilis toxin (bft) gene in stool samples, as a means of determining if carriage of ETBF is detected more often in CRC patients than in age-matched healthy controls. Stool samples from 71 patients recently diagnosed with CRC, and 71 age-matched controls, were screened by standard and quantitative PCR using primers specific for the detection of the bft gene. Bacterial template DNA from stool samples was prepared by two methods: a sweep, where all colonies growing on Bacteroides Bile Esculin agar following stool culture for 48 h at 37 °C in an anaerobic environment were swept into sterile water and heat treated; and a direct DNA extraction from each stool sample. The bft gene was detected more frequently from DNA isolated from bacterial sweeps than from matched direct DNA extractions. qPCR was found to be more sensitive than standard PCR in detecting bft. The cumulative total of positive qPCR assays from both sample types revealed that 19 of the CRC patients had evidence of the toxin gene in their stool sample (27%), compared to seven of the age-matched controls (10%). This difference was significant (P = 0.016). Overall, ETBF carriage was detected more often in CRC patient stool samples compared to controls, but disparate findings from the different DNA preparations and testing methods suggests that poor sensitivity may limit molecular detection of ETBF in stool samples. PMID:27166180

  10. The Bfp60 surface adhesin is an extracellular matrix and plasminogen protein interacting in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Ferreira, Eliane; Teixeira, Felipe; Cordeiro, Fabiana; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; Rocha, Edson R.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Domingues, Regina M C P

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen (Plg) is a highly abundant protein found in the plasma component of blood and is necessary for the degradation of fibrin, collagen, and other structural components of tissues. This fibrinolytic system is utilized by several pathogenic species of bacteria to manipulate the host plasminogen system and facilitate invasion of tissues during infection by modifying the activation of this process through the binding of Plg at their surface. Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated Gram-negative obligate anaerobe from human clinical infections, such as intra-abdominal abscesses and anaerobic bacteraemia. The ability of B. fragilis to convert plasminogen (Plg) into plasmin has been associated with an outer membrane protein named Bfp60. In this study, we characterized the function of Bfp60 protein in B. fragilis 638R by constructing the bfp60 defective strain and comparing its with that of the wild type regarding binding to laminin-1 (LMN-1) and activation of Plg into plasmin. Although the results showed in this study indicate that Bfp60 surface protein of B. fragilis is important for the recognition of LMN-1 and Plg activation, a significant slow activation of Plg into plasmin was observed in the mutant strain. For that reason, the possibility of another unidentified mechanism activating Plg is also present in B. fragilis can not be discarded. The results demonstrate that Bfp60 protein is responsible for the recognition of laminin and Plg-plasmin activation. Although the importance of this protein is still unclear in the pathogenicity of the species, it is accepted that since other pathogenic bacteria use this mechanism to disseminate through the extracellular matrix during the infection, it should also contribute to the virulence of B. fragilis. PMID:23850366

  11. Differential proteomic analysis of outer membrane enriched extracts of Bacteroides fragilis grown under bile salts stress.

    PubMed

    Boente, Renata F; Pauer, Heidi; Silva, Deborah N S; Filho, Joaquim Santos; Sandim, Vanessa; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Ferreira, Rosana Barreto Rocha; Zingali, Russolina B; Domingues, Regina M C P; Lobo, Leandro A

    2016-06-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated anaerobic bacteria from infectious processes. Several virulence traits contribute to the pathogenic nature of this bacterium, including the ability to tolerate the high concentrations of bile found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The activity of bile salts is similar to detergents and may lead to membrane permeabilization and cell death. Modulation of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is considered a crucial event to bile salts resistance. The primary objective of the current work was to identify B. fragilis proteins associated with the stress induced by high concentration of bile salts. The outer membrane of B. fragilis strain 638R was isolated after growth either in the presence of 2% conjugated bile salts or without bile salts. The membrane fractions were separated on SDS-PAGE and analyzed by ESI-Q/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 37 proteins were identified; among them nine were found to be expressed exclusively in the absence of bile salts whereas eight proteins were expressed only in the presence of bile salts. These proteins are related to cellular functions such as transport through membrane, nutrient uptake, and protein-protein interactions. This study demonstrates the alteration of OMPs composition in B. fragilis during bile salts stress resistance and adaptation to environmental changes. Proteomics of OMPs was also shown to be a useful approach in the identification of new targets for functional analyses.

  12. The Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Gene Is Prevalent in the Colon Mucosa of Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boleij, Annemarie; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; Goodwin, Andrew C.; Badani, Ruchi; Stein, Ellen M.; Lazarev, Mark G.; Ellis, Brandon; Carroll, Karen C.; Albesiano, Emilia; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) produces the Bacteroides fragilis toxin, which has been associated with acute diarrheal disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and colorectal cancer (CRC). ETBF induces colon carcinogenesis in experimental models. Previous human studies have demonstrated frequent asymptomatic fecal colonization with ETBF, but no study has investigated mucosal colonization that is expected to impact colon carcinogenesis. Methods. We compared the presence of the bft gene in mucosal samples from colorectal neoplasia patients (cases, n = 49) to a control group undergoing outpatient colonoscopy for CRC screening or diagnostic workup (controls, n = 49). Single bacterial colonies isolated anaerobically from mucosal colon tissue were tested for the bft gene with touch-down polymerase chain reaction. Results. The mucosa of cases was significantly more often bft-positive on left (85.7%) and right (91.7%) tumor and/or paired normal tissues compared with left and right control biopsies (53.1%; P = .033 and 55.5%; P = .04, respectively). Detection of bft was concordant in most paired mucosal samples from individual cases or controls (75% cases; 67% controls). There was a trend toward increased bft positivity in mucosa from late- vs early-stage CRC patients (100% vs 72.7%, respectively; P = .093). In contrast to ETBF diarrheal disease where bft-1 detection dominates, bft-2 was the most frequent toxin isotype identified in both cases and controls, whereas multiple bft isotypes were detected more frequently in cases (P ≤ .02). Conclusions. The bft gene is associated with colorectal neoplasia, especially in late-stage CRC. Our results suggest that mucosal bft exposure is common and may be a risk factor for developing CRC. PMID:25305284

  13. Exploratory Investigation of Bacteroides fragilis Transcriptional Response during In vitro Exposure to Subinhibitory Concentration of Metronidazole

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Michele C. R.; Resende, Juliana A.; Ferreira-Machado, Alessandra B.; Saji, Guadalupe D. R. Q.; de Vasconcelos, Ana T. R.; da Silva, Vânia L.; Nicolás, Marisa F.; Diniz, Cláudio G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, member from commensal gut microbiota, is an important pathogen associated to endogenous infections and metronidazole remains a valuable antibiotic for the treatment of these infections, although bacterial resistance is widely reported. Considering the need of a better understanding on the global mechanisms by which B. fragilis survive upon metronidazole exposure, we performed a RNA-seq transcriptomic approach with validation of gene expression results by qPCR. Bacteria strains were selected after in vitro subcultures with subinhibitory concentration (SIC) of the drug. From a wild type B. fragilis ATCC 43859 four derivative strains were selected: first and fourth subcultures under metronidazole exposure and first and fourth subcultures after drug removal. According to global gene expression analysis, 2,146 protein coding genes were identified, of which a total of 1,618 (77%) were assigned to a Gene Ontology term (GO), indicating that most known cellular functions were taken. Among these 2,146 protein coding genes, 377 were shared among all strains, suggesting that they are critical for B. fragilis survival. In order to identify distinct expression patterns, we also performed a K-means clustering analysis set to 15 groups. This analysis allowed us to detect the major activated or repressed genes encoding for enzymes which act in several metabolic pathways involved in metronidazole response such as drug activation, defense mechanisms against superoxide ions, high expression level of multidrug efflux pumps, and DNA repair. The strains collected after metronidazole removal were functionally more similar to those cultured under drug pressure, reinforcing that drug-exposure lead to drastic persistent changes in the B. fragilis gene expression patterns. These results may help to elucidate B. fragilis response during metronidazole exposure, mainly at SIC, contributing with information about bacterial survival strategies under stress conditions in their

  14. Chemical constituents of the Gorgonian Dichotella fragilis (Ridleg) from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan-Ming; Shao, Chang-Lun; Wang, Chang-Yun; Huang, Hui; Xu, Ying; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    Two new steroidal glycosides, fragilioside A (1) and fragilioside B (2), along with five known compounds (3-7) were isolated from the gorgonian Dichotella fragilis (Ridleg) collected from the South China Sea. The structures of the new compounds (1 and 2) were elucidated by comprehensive analysis of spectral data, especially 2D NMR. The brine shrimp lethality and antifouling activity of the isolated compounds were also evaluated.

  15. Prospective Study of the Prevalence, Genotyping, and Clinical Relevance of Dientamoeba fragilis Infections in an Australian Population

    PubMed Central

    Stark, D.; Beebe, N.; Marriott, D.; Ellis, J.; Harkness, J.

    2005-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted over a 30-month period, in which fecal specimens from 6,750 patients were submitted to the Department of Microbiology at St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Trophozoites of Dientamoeba fragilis were detected in 60 (0.9%) patients by permanent staining, and confirmation was performed by PCR. Gastrointestinal symptoms were present in all patients, with diarrhea and abdominal pain the most common symptoms. Thirty-two percent of patients presented with chronic symptoms. The average age of infected patients was 39.8 years. No correlation was found between D. fragilis and Enterobius vermicularis, a proposed vector of transmission for D. fragilis. The genetic diversity of 50 D. fragilis isolates was examined by PCR, and the PCR products were analyzed for the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphisms. These results showed no variation in the small-subunit rRNA gene and demonstrated a single genotype for all Australian isolates. This study shows the potential pathogenic properties of D. fragilis and the need for all laboratories to routinely test for this organism. PMID:15956388

  16. Relevance of the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax fragilis in mucilage formations of the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Pistocchi, Rossella; Cangini, Monica; Totti, Cecilia; Urbani, Ranieri; Guerrini, Franca; Romagnoli, Tiziana; Sist, Paola; Palamidesi, Simona; Boni, Laurita; Pompei, Marinella

    2005-12-15

    Oceanographic cruises were carried out monthly from June 1999 to July 2002 to follow the mucilage formation process in the Northern Adriatic Sea. Results show that in correspondence with these events the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax fragilis (Schütt) Kofoid was observed both in the water column and within mucilage aggregates. In the water column, increasing abundances were observed from May until July, with values never exceeding 8500 cells l(-1). Much higher densities were observed within superficial gelatinous aggregates (22800-3400000 cells l(-1)). In mucilage samples, a large number of decomposing cells were present, together with abundant alive cells, enveloped in exudates. G. fragilis isolated from mucilage samples was cultured in three different culture media; it was characterized by a low growth rate but it produced a high amount of polysaccharides. The highest yield both in terms of cell number and carbohydrate production was observed in the medium having the highest nitrogen and phosphorus content and the lowest N/P ratio. The monomeric composition of G. fragilis carbohydrates, compared with that of mucilage samples, showed that in both natural and cultured samples galactose was the most abundant sugar; in addition, an overall good correlation, especially between the monomeric carbohydrate composition of G. fragilis grown in f/2 medium and that of a mucilage sample in which this species was present in high density, was observed. PMID:16289296

  17. Activity of cefazolin and two beta-lactamase inhibitors, clavulanic acid and sulbactam, against Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, T; McGowen, J; Cundy, K R

    1987-01-01

    One hundred clinical isolates of the Bacteroides fragilis group of bacteria were tested by agar dilution for susceptibility to cefazolin alone or in combination with clavulanic acid or sulbactam. For cefazolin, the MIC for 50% of the isolates (MIC50) was 32 micrograms/ml, the breakpoint for susceptibility. With the addition of 0.5 micrograms of clavulanic acid per ml, the MIC for 90% of the isolates (MIC90) was 8 micrograms/ml, well within the achievable range of concentrations in serum or tissue. Similarly, with the addition of 0.5 micrograms of sulbactam per ml, the MIC90 was 16 micrograms/ml. The addition of a higher concentration (4.0 micrograms/ml) of clavulanic acid or sulbactam resulted in MIC90S which were fourfold lower than those with 0.5 micrograms/ml. A fixed ratio of cefazolin-beta-lactamase inhibitor of 4:1 resulted in an MIC50 and MIC90 which were intermediate between the 0.5- and 4.0-micrograms/ml fixed concentration of beta-lactamase inhibitor. PMID:3032097

  18. Bis-sesquiterpene from the Marine Sponge Dysidea fragilis.

    PubMed

    Kiem, Phan Van; Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Tai, Bui Huu; Anh, Hoang Le Tuan; Hang, Dan Thi Thuy; Cuc, Nguyen Thi; Huyen, Le Thi; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Yen, Pham Hai; Thung, Do Cong; Minh, Chau Van

    2016-04-01

    Two new sesquiterpenes and one new bis-sesquiterpene, named dysinidins C-E (1-3) along with three known sterols, dysideasterol F, 9α,l lα-epoxycholest-7-en-3β,5α,6α-triol, and 9α,11α-epoxycholest-7-en-3β,5α,6α,19-tetrol 6-acetate (4-6) were isolated from the Vietnamese marine sponge Dysidea fragilis (Montagu, 1814). Their structures were determined by 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopies and HR-ESI-MS, as well as by comparison with reported literature data. Compounds 4-6 were found to inhibit eight human cancer cell lines (KB, LU-1, HL-60, LNCaP, SK-Mel-2, HepG-2, MCF-7, and PC-3), with IC50 values ranging from 7.3 to 31.5 µM. PMID:27396186

  19. Role of Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in Children Less Than 5 Years of Age With Diarrhea in Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Jedari Seifi, Sirus; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Abdoli Oskuei, Shahram; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Memar, Mohammad Yousef; Alizadeh, Naser; Seifi Yarijan Sofla, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is the most frequent health problem among children in developing countries. Defining the etiology of acute diarrhea is critical to disease therapy and prevention. Some anaerobic bacteria such as Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) strains cause diarrheal disease by production of enterotoxin in children less than 5 years old. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of ETBF among common bacteria and viruses causing diarrhea in children aged less than five years. Materials and Methods One hundred diarrheal stools were cultured for detection of aerobic and anaerobic pathogen bacteria by direct plating on selective media and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed according to clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines on isolates of ETBF. The enterotoxigenic gene among B. fragilis isolates was also investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Detection of viral pathogens was carried out using the latex agglutination test. Results Ten B. fragilis were isolated from 100 diarrheal fecal specimens. All isolates were susceptible to metronidazole, while 10% were susceptible to clindamycin. Four (40%) ETBF were isolated. Rotaviruses (57.2%) and adenoviruses (18.6%) were the most frequently detected etiological agents. Conclusions ETBF is one of the etiological agents that may cause diarrhea in children but it is not the commonest of them. Metronidazole is still an effective antibiotic against B. fragilis. Viruses are the most important etiological agents of diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. PMID:27635209

  20. Role of Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in Children Less Than 5 Years of Age With Diarrhea in Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Jedari Seifi, Sirus; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Abdoli Oskuei, Shahram; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Memar, Mohammad Yousef; Alizadeh, Naser; Seifi Yarijan Sofla, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is the most frequent health problem among children in developing countries. Defining the etiology of acute diarrhea is critical to disease therapy and prevention. Some anaerobic bacteria such as Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) strains cause diarrheal disease by production of enterotoxin in children less than 5 years old. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of ETBF among common bacteria and viruses causing diarrhea in children aged less than five years. Materials and Methods One hundred diarrheal stools were cultured for detection of aerobic and anaerobic pathogen bacteria by direct plating on selective media and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed according to clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines on isolates of ETBF. The enterotoxigenic gene among B. fragilis isolates was also investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Detection of viral pathogens was carried out using the latex agglutination test. Results Ten B. fragilis were isolated from 100 diarrheal fecal specimens. All isolates were susceptible to metronidazole, while 10% were susceptible to clindamycin. Four (40%) ETBF were isolated. Rotaviruses (57.2%) and adenoviruses (18.6%) were the most frequently detected etiological agents. Conclusions ETBF is one of the etiological agents that may cause diarrhea in children but it is not the commonest of them. Metronidazole is still an effective antibiotic against B. fragilis. Viruses are the most important etiological agents of diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age.

  1. Activity of benzimidazoles against Dientamoeba fragilis (Trichomonadida, Monocercomonadidae) in vitro and correlation of beta-tubulin sequences as an indicator of resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Damien; Barratt, Joel L.N.; Roberts, Tamalee; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John T.; Ellis, John

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Dientamoeba fragilis has emerged as a significant and common enteropathogen. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints and chronic symptoms are common. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Despite this, there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism. Benzimidazoles are a class of antiparasitic drugs that are commonly used for the treatment of protozoan and helminthic infections. Susceptibility testing was undertaken on four D. fragilis clinical isolates against the following benzimidazoles: albendazole, flubendazole, mebendazole, nocodazole, triclabendazole and thiabendazole. The activities of the antiprotozoal compounds at concentrations ranging from 2 μg/mL to 500 μg/mL were determined via cell counts of D. fragilis grown in xenic culture. All tested drugs showed no efficacy. The beta-tubulin transcript was sequenced from two of the D. fragilis isolates and amino acid sequences predicted a susceptibility to benzimidazoles. This is the first study to report susceptibility profiles for benzimidazoles against D. fragilis, all of which were not active against the organism. This study also found that beta-tubulin sequences cannot be used as a reliable marker for resistance of benzimidazoles in D. fragilis. PMID:25148459

  2. Self-Disclosure in Isolated Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Dalmas A.

    Analyses of self-disclosure behavior under multiple conditions of social isolation and confinement replicated earlier findings and generally confirmed hypotheses derived from social penetration theory. Major findings link self-disclosure to environmental parameters and interpersonal friction. In the Privacy without Stimulation condition, Ss…

  3. Treatment of Dientamoeba fragilis in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Engsbro, Anne Line; Stensvold, C. Rune; Nielsen, Henrik V.; Bytzer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The role of Dientamoeba fragilis in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is incompletely known. We aimed to investigate whether eradication of D. fragilis alleviates symptoms in IBS. Twenty-five D. fragilis-positive IBS patients were treated with Metronidazole (MZ) or Tetracycline. The patients were mostly female (89%), and mean age (SD) was 35.1 (8.2) years. Microbiological response, evaluated 2 weeks post-treatment, was observed in 15 of 25 patients (60%), all by MZ. Clinical response, defined as adequate relief of symptoms, was observed in 7 of 22 patients (32%), all by MZ. In a logistic regression analysis, we found no significant association between clinical and microbiological response. This case study did not support our hypothesis of a simple association between D. fragilis and IBS. Some D. fragilis-infections were insufficiently treated by MZ. Further studies into the prevalence and effect of eradication of D. fragilis in IBS and into efficient treatments of D. fragilis are warranted. PMID:23091195

  4. Dientamoeba fragilis DNA detection in Enterobius vermicularis eggs

    PubMed Central

    Ögren, Jessica; Dienus, Olaf; Löfgren, Sture; Iveroth, Peter; Matussek, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is an intestinal protozoan suspected of causing gastrointestinal symptoms, and its mode of transmission is unknown, although first described almost a century ago. A hypothesis is that Enterobius vermicularis is a vector for D. fragilis, and recently, D. fragilis DNA was detected within surface-sterilized eggs of E. vermicularis. Using real-time PCR, we detected D. fragilis DNA in 18 (85%) of 21 samples of E. vermicularis eggs collected from patients harbouring D. fragilis in faeces. This finding supports the hypothesis that E. vermicularis may have an important role in the transmission of D. fragilis. This paper describes a protocol to wash and surface-sterilize E. vermicularis eggs, with the aim of showing presence of both E. vermicularis and D. fragilis specific DNA within, and the results from 20 co-infected patients. The study has merit as a confirmatory study of the trials by Röser et al. (2013), and includes improvements of the protocol. PMID:23893951

  5. Vaginal carriage of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in pregnant women.

    PubMed Central

    Leszczynski, P; van Belkum, A; Pituch, H; Verbrugh, H; Meisel-Mikolajczyk, F

    1997-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is an anaerobic bacterial species that is involved in gynecological infections and pathology. The incidence of vaginal carriage is largely unknown, and in order to study this, 120 pregnant women attending a general hospital for delivery were examined. Cultures were positive for eight of these women (6.6%). Interestingly, potential clonal relatedness could be demonstrated among several of the nonenterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains. Among the strains, only one produced metalloprotease enterotoxin. The presence of the gene for the metalloprotease, giving rise to the pathogenic effect on cultured eukaryotic HT29/C1 cells, was confirmed by a newly designed specific PCR assay. The enterotoxigenic B. fragilis (ETBF) strain was analyzed with the help of arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and PCR-mediated ribotyping. The ETBF strain was shown to be genetically different compared to several other strains obtained from diverse sources. Our data indicate a relatively high vaginal B. fragilis carriage rate among pregnant women in Warsaw, Poland. Although neither ETBF nor B. fragilis colonization presented a clinical problem, the possible genetic relatedness among the colonizing B. fragilis strains indicates the need for additional research in the field of ETBF transmission and molecular epidemiology. PMID:9350755

  6. In vitro utilization of mucin by Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Roberton, A M; Stanley, R A

    1982-01-01

    A method for isolating pig colon mucin in a soluble high-molecular-weight form, suitable for addition to bacterial growth media, is described. This preparation was utilized as a sole carbohydrate energy source by two strains of Bacteroides fragilis. The extent of degradation was compared with that of commercial pig gastric mucin by the same strains. Gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of the mucin carbohydrates and gel chromatography of the preparations were carried out before and after in vitro degradation. The mucin carbohydrates were utilized only to a very limited extent, colon mucin being more resistant to degradation than gastric mucin. Both mucins chromatographed at or near the excluded volume on Sepharose 4B, and only in the case of ATCC 25285 grown on gastric mucin was a significant degradation peak detected. If mucins are degraded in vivo by the sequential action of several bacteria, a pure culture in vitro might be expected to degrade mucins to a limited extent only. Techniques previously used to examine mucin utilization by pure cultures may have overlooked limited mucin degradation demonstrated by the methods used in this work. PMID:6174077

  7. Pharmacodynamics of trovafloxacin and levofloxacin against Bacteroides fragilis in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Peterson, M L; Hovde, L B; Wright, D H; Brown, G H; Hoang, A D; Rotschafer, J C

    2002-01-01

    An in vitro pharmacodynamic investigation was conducted to explore whether the area under the concentration time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24))/MIC ratio could predict fluoroquinolone performance against Bacteroides fragilis. An in vitro model was used to generate kill curves for trovafloxacin (TVA) and levofloxacin (LVX) at AUC(0-24)/MIC ratios of 1 to 406 against three strains of B. fragilis (ATCC 25285, ATCC 23745, and clinical isolate M97-117). TVA and LVX were bolused prior to the start of experiments to achieve the corresponding AUC(0-24)/MIC ratio. Experiments were performed in duplicate over 24 h and in an anaerobic environment. Analyses of antimicrobial performance were conducted by comparing the rates of bacterial kill (K) using nonlinear regression analysis with 95% confidence intervals. Statistical significance was defined as a lack of overlap in the 95% confidence limits generated from the slope of each kill curve. For both TVA and LVX, K was maximized once an AUC(0-24)/MIC ratio of > or =40 was achieved and was not further increased despite a 10-fold increase in AUC(0-24)/MIC from approximately 40 to 400 against all three strains of B. fragilis. No significant differences were found in K between AUC(0-24)/MIC ratios of approximately 40 to 200. In experiments where AUC(0-24)/MIC ratios that were > or = 5 and < or = 44 were conducted, 64% demonstrated regrowth at 24 h. Resistant strains were selected in 50% of those experiments, demonstrating regrowth, which resulted in increased MICs of two- to 16-fold for both TVA and LVX. Regrowth did not occur, nor were resistant strains selected in any studies with an AUC/MIC that was > 44. Our findings suggest that fluoroquinolones provide antibacterial effects against B. fragilis in a concentration-independent manner associated with an AUC(0-24)/MIC ratio of > or =40. Also, the potential for the selection of resistant strains of B. fragilis may increase with an AUC(0-24)/MIC ratio of < or =44. PMID:11751135

  8. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples.

    PubMed

    Coura, Fernanda Morcatti; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  9. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    PubMed Central

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  10. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples.

    PubMed

    Coura, Fernanda Morcatti; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals.

  11. 60. Shock isolator at center, pneumatic control group panel at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. Shock isolator at center, pneumatic control group panel at left, power distribution box at right, all at right of entrance to lcc. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  12. Purification and characterization of 1-nitropyrene nitroreductases from Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Kinouchi, T; Ohnishi, Y

    1983-01-01

    We isolated four nitroreductases from Bacteroides fragilis GAI0624 and examined their physicochemical and functional properties. Two major enzyme activities were found in the adsorbed and unadsorbed fractions from DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. The adsorbed fraction was subjected to Sephadex G-200 column chromatography, and two further activities were separated. One has high nitroreductase activity (nitroreductase I), and the other has low activity and relatively high molecular weight (nitroreductase III). The nitroreductase I fraction was subjected to hydroxylapatite and chromatofocusing column chromatography, and nitroreductase I was purified about 416-fold with a yield of 6.77%. The unadsorbed fraction from DEAE-cellulose column chromatography was subjected to Sepharose 2B and Sepharose 6B column chromatography. Two enzyme activities were obtained by the Sepharose 6B column chromatography. One has high activity (nitroreductase II), and the other has low activity (nitroreductase IV). Nitroreductase II was rechromatographed by Sepharose 6B gel filtration and purified about 178-fold with a yield of 9.65%. The four enzymes (nitroreductases I, II, III, and IV) were shown to be different by several criteria. Their molecular weights, determined by gel filtration, were 52,000, 320,000, 180,000, and 680,000, respectively. The substrate specificity, the effect on mutagenicity of mutagenic nitro compounds, of nitroreductases I, III, and IV was relatively high for 1-nitropyrene, dinitropyrenes, and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide, respectively, but nitroreductase II had broad specificity. Nitroreductase activity required a coenzyme; nitroreductases II, III, and IV were NADPH linked, but nitroreductase I was NADH linked. All enzyme activity was enhanced by addition of flavin mononucleotide and inhibited significantly by dicumarol, p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, o-iodosobenzoic acid, sodium azide, and Cu2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:6639014

  13. Metronidazole- and carbapenem-resistant bacteroides thetaiotaomicron isolated in Rochester, Minnesota, in 2014.

    PubMed

    Sadarangani, Sapna P; Cunningham, Scott A; Jeraldo, Patricio R; Wilson, John W; Khare, Reeti; Patel, Robin

    2015-07-01

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance in members of the Bacteroides fragilis group is a concern in clinical medicine. Although metronidazole and carbapenem resistance have been reported in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a member of the B. fragilis group, they have not, to the best of our knowledge, been reported together in the same B. thetaiotaomicron isolate. Herein, we report isolation of piperacillin-tazobactam-, metronidazole-, clindamycin-, ertapenem-, and meropenem-resistant B. thetaiotaomicron from a patient with postoperative intra-abdominal abscess and empyema. Whole-genome sequencing demonstrated the presence of nimD with at least a portion of IS1169 upstream, a second putative nim gene, two β-lactamase genes (one of which has not been previously reported), two tetX genes, tetQ, ermF, two cat genes, and a number of efflux pumps. This report highlights emerging antimicrobial resistance in B. thetaiotaomicron and the importance of identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of selected anaerobic bacteria.

  14. PREVALENCE OF DIENTAMOEBA FRAGILIS AMONG AN ORANG ASLI POPULATION IN RURAL MALAYSIA.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Hasim, Liyana; Moktar, Norhayati; Salleh, Fatmah Md; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M

    2015-09-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a trichomonad parasite that can infect the gastrointestinal tract of humans causing gastrointestinal disease. Little is known about its epidemiology. We evaluated the prevalence of D. fragilis by conducting a cross sectional study of an Orang Asli population in rural Malaysia. We examined stool samples from 150 participants for D. fragilis using Wheatley's trichrome stain and collected demographic data from each participant using a structured questionnaire. Five participants (3.3%) had D. fragilis in their stool; four of these were aged < 15 years; 3 were male and 2 were female. All participants with positive stool sample for D. fragilis were symptomatic; 3 had diarrhea and 2 had other gastrointestinal symptoms. D. fragilis is present in the study population. Further studies are needed to determine the virulence, pathogenicity and mode of transmission of D. fragilis in the study population. PMID:26863855

  15. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown. PMID:26859882

  16. Bacteroides fragilis toxin 2 damages human colonic mucosa in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Riegler, M; Lotz, M; Sears, C; Pothoulakis, C; Castagliuolo, I; Wang, C; Sedivy, R; Sogukoglu, T; Cosentini, E; Bischof, G; Feil, W; Teleky, B; Hamilton, G; LaMont, J; Wenzl, E

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Strains of Bacteroides fragilis producing a 20 kDa protein toxin (B fragilis toxin (BFT) or fragilysin) are associated with diarrhoea in animals and humans. Although in vitro results indicate that BFT damages intestinal epithelial cells in culture, the effects of BFT on native human colon are not known. 
AIMS—To examine the electrophysiological and morphological effects of purified BFT-2 on human colonic mucosa in vitro. 
METHODS—For resistance (R) measurements, colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers was exposed to luminal or serosal BFT-2 (1.25-10 nM) and after four hours morphological damage was measured on haematoxylin and eosin stained sections using morphometry. F actin distribution was assessed using confocal microscopy. 
RESULTS—Serosal BFT-2 for four hours was four-, two-, seven-, and threefold more potent than luminal BFT-2 in decreasing resistance, increasing epithelial 3H-mannitol permeability, and damaging crypt and surface colonocytes, respectively (p<0.05). Confocal microscopy showed reduced colonocyte F actin staining intensity after exposure to BFT-2. 
CONCLUSIONS—BFT-2 increases human colonic permeability and damages human colonic epithelial cells in vitro. These effects may be important in the development of diarrhoea and intestinal inflammation caused by B fragilis in vivo. 

 Keywords: B fragilis toxin; toxin mediated colonocyte damage; actin filaments; transepithelial resistance; morphometry PMID:10075957

  17. Galaxies in extreme environments: Isolated galaxies versus compact groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbala, Adriana

    2009-06-01

    This Dissertation comprises two distinct studies of galaxies in dramatically different environments: extreme isolation versus compact groups. We emphasize empirically how "nature" (i.e. internal, secular processes) plays the dominant role in defining the evolution of isolated galaxies and how "nurture" dictates the fate of galaxies in very crowded environments. Two chapters report on a detailed photometric study of a well-defined sample of N ~100 isolated Sb-Sc spiral galaxies. Data source is Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using i-band images we perform three kinds of measures: (a) bulge/disk/bar decomposition, (b) CAS parametrization (Concentration, Asymmetry, Clumpiness), and (c) Fourier decomposition/analysis of spiral arms and bar properties including dynamical measures of the torque. Having quantified a large set of properties we look for: (i) the interplay between different components of the same galaxy, (ii) trends along the morphological sequence Sb-Sbc-Sc, and (iii) statistical differences between our "isolated" sample and samples of galaxies of similar morphology constructed without regard for isolation. We find that the majority of isolated late-type disk galaxies host pseudobulges rather than classical bulges. The pseudobulges probably form through internal secular processes and bars may play an important role. A clear separation is noted between Sb and Sbc/Sc in various measures, i.e. the former are redder, brighter, have larger disks and bars, more luminous bulges, are more concentrated, more symmetric and dumpier than the latter. Isolated galaxies host larger bars than galaxies in samples defined without isolation constraints. Longer bars are not necessarily stronger, but show a higher contrast in Fourier analysis. Another chapter is a multiwavelength study of Seyfert's Sextet, the highest density galaxy aggregate in the local Universe. Four of its five galaxies are interpreted as remnant bulges of accreted spirals and are now embedded in a luminous halo

  18. Internal character dictates transition dynamics between isolation and cohesive grouping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique, Pedro D.; Hui, Pak Ming; Johnson, Neil F.

    2015-12-01

    We show that accounting for internal character among interacting heterogeneous entities generates rich transition behavior between isolation and cohesive dynamical grouping. Our analytical and numerical calculations reveal different critical points arising for different character-dependent grouping mechanisms. These critical points move in opposite directions as the population's diversity decreases. Our analytical theory may help explain why a particular class of universality is so common in the real world, despite the fundamental differences in the underlying entities. It also correctly predicts the nonmonotonic temporal variation in connectivity observed recently in one such system.

  19. Flow cytometric analysis of within-strain variation in polysaccharide expression by Bacteroides fragilis by use of murine monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lutton, D A; Patrick, S; Crockard, A D; Stewart, L D; Larkin, M J; Dermott, E; McNeill, T A

    1991-10-01

    The reactivity of four different monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with populations of Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 9343, enriched by density gradient centrifugation for a large capsule, small capsule and electron-dense layer (EDL) only visible by electronmicroscopy, was examined. The MAbs reacted strongly with polysaccharides present in both the large capsule- and EDL-enriched populations but not in the small capsule-enriched populations. The pattern of labelling was determined by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence and immuno-electronmicroscopy, and flow cytometry. The MAbs labelled cell membrane-associated epitopes in the large capsule- and EDL-enriched populations and cell-free material in the EDL population. By immunoblotting, ladders of repeating polysaccharide subunits were evident in the EDL population but not in the large capsule population. The proportion of cells labelled within each population was determined by flow cytometry. The reactivity of another MAb with the small capsule population was confirmed by flow cytometry. A qualitative indication of epitope expression was obtained by examination of the flow cytometric profiles. Differential expression of the same saccharide epitope was observed both between and within structurally distinct B. fragilis populations. The MAbs were species-specific and cross-reacted with several recent clinical isolates. These polysaccharides may be relevant to the virulence of B. fragilis. PMID:1719202

  20. Lipid-enhanced ethanol production by Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, J.H.; Burris, N.; Woodward, A.; Bailey, R.B.

    1983-02-01

    The fermentation ability of a strain of Kluyveromyces fragilis, already selected for rapid lactose-fermenting capability, was improved dramatically by the addition of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol to the medium. The fermentation time of a 20% whey-lactose medium was decreased from over 90 h to less than 60 h. The lipids were shown to be taken up by the organism, and the effects on specific growth rate and biomass production was determined.

  1. Lipid-enhanced ethanol production by Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, J.H.; Burris, N.; Woodward, A.; Bailey, R.B.

    1983-02-01

    The fermentation ability of a strain of Kluyveromyes fragilis, already selected for rapid lactose-fermenting capability, was improved dramatically by the addition of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol to the medium. The fermentation time of a 20% whey-lactose medium was decreased from over 90 hours to less than 60 hours. The lipids were shown to be taken up by the organism, and the effects on specific growth rate and biomass production were determined. (Refs. 23).

  2. Activation Mechanism of the Bacteroides fragilis Cysteine Peptidase, Fragipain.

    PubMed

    Herrou, Julien; Choi, Vivian M; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Crosson, Sean

    2016-07-26

    Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis produces a secreted metalloprotease known as B. fragilis toxin (BFT), which contributes to anaerobic sepsis, colitis, and colonic malignancy in mouse models of disease. A C11 family cysteine protease, fragipain (Fpn), directly activates BFT in the B. fragilis cell by removing the BFT prodomain. Fpn is itself a proenzyme and is autoactivated upon cleavage at an arginine residue in its activation loop. We have defined the proteolytic active site of Fpn, demonstrated that Fpn autoactivation can occur by an in trans loop cleavage mechanism, and characterized structural features of the Fpn activation loop that control peptidase activity against several substrates, including BFT. An arginine residue at the autocleavage site determines the fast activation kinetics of Fpn relative to the homologous C11 protease, PmC11, which is cleaved at lysine. Arginine to alanine substitution at the cleavage site ablated peptidase activity, as did partial truncation of the Fpn activation loop. However, complete truncation of the activation loop yielded an uncleaved, pro form of Fpn that was active as a peptidase against both Fpn and BFT substrates. Thus, Fpn can be transformed into an active peptidase in the absence of activation loop cleavage. This study provides insight into the mechanism of fragipain activation and, more generally, defines the role of the C11 activation loop in the control of peptidase activity and substrate specificity.

  3. Linkage mapping in tetraploid willows: segregation of molecular markers and estimation of linkage phases support an allotetraploid structure for Salix alba x Salix fragilis interspecific hybrids.

    PubMed

    Barcaccia, G; Meneghetti, S; Albertini, E; Triest, L; Lucchin, M

    2003-02-01

    Salix alba-Salix fragilis complex includes closely related dioecious polyploid species, which are obligate outcrossers. Natural populations of these willows and their hybrids are represented by a mixture of highly heterozygous genotypes sharing a common gene pool. Since nothing is known about their genomic constitution, tetraploidy (2n=4x=76) in willow species makes basic and applied genetic studies difficult. We have used a two-way pseudotestcross strategy and single-dose markers (SDMs) to construct the first linkage maps for both pistillate and staminate willows. A total of 242 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and 50 selective amplifications of microsatellite polymorphic loci (SAMPL) markers, which showed 1:1 segregation in the F(1) mapping populations, were used in linkage analysis. In S. alba, 73 maternal and 48 paternal SDMs were mapped to 19 and 16 linkage groups covering 708 and 339 cM, respectively. In S. fragilis, 13 maternal and 33 paternal SDMs were mapped in six and 14 linkage groups covering 98 and 321 cM, respectively. For most cosegregation groups, a comparable number of markers linked in coupling and repulsion was identified. This finding suggests that most of chromosomes pair preferentially as occurs in allotetraploid species exhibiting disomic inheritance. The detection of 10 pairs of marker alleles from single parents showing codominant inheritance strengthens this hypothesis. The fact that, of the 1122 marker loci identified in the two male and female parents, the vast majority (77.5%) were polymorphic and as few as 22.5% were shared between parental species highlight that S. alba and S. fragilis genotypes are differentiated. The highly difference between S. alba- and S. fragilis-specific markers found in both parental combinations (on average, 65.3 vs 34.7%, respectively) supports the (phylogenetic) hypothesis that S. fragilis is derived from S. alba-like progenitors.

  4. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility of Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium species isolated from patients of the N. N. Blokhin Cancer Research Center, Moscow, Russia.

    PubMed

    Shilnikova, Irina I; Dmitrieva, Natalia V

    2015-02-01

    In total 122 non-duplicate Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium spp isolated from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014 were involved in this study. Most of the strains belonged to the B. fragilis group (55%), followed by Prevotella strains (34.4%) and Fusobacterium spp (10.6%). The species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and they were identified on species level with a log (score) >2.0. The most common isolates were B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus and B. vulgatus. Among Prevotella species, the most frequently isolated species were P. buccae, P. buccalis, P. oris, P. denticola and P. nigrescens, and most of the Fusobacterium spp. were F. nucleatum. Susceptibilities of the strains were determined by the E-test methodology. The percentage of the susceptibility of B. fragilis group isolates were: metronidazole (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 97%; imipenem (MIC ≤2 μg/ml), 95.5%; amoxicillin/clavulanate (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 95.5% and clindamycin (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 77.6%. Three B. fragilis isolates proved to be multidrug-resistant (parallel resistance to imipenem, amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole or clindamycin was observed). All Prevotella strains tested were susceptible to imipenem and amoxicillin/clavulanate, whereas 78.6% of the pigmented Prevotella species and 46.4% of the non-pigmented species were resistant to penicillin (MIC >0.5 μg/ml). The susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin were 93% and 88%, respectively. All Fusobacterium strains were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, including penicillin.

  5. Bacteroides fragilis in biopsies of patients with major abscesses and diabetic foot infections: direct molecular versus culture-based detection.

    PubMed

    Stappers, Mark H T; Hagen, Ferry; Reimnitz, Peter; Mouton, Johan W; Meis, Jacques F; Gyssens, Inge C

    2016-06-01

    Direct determination by pathogen-specific real-time PCR assay for Bacteroides fragilis was compared to culture in major abscess and diabetic foot infection biopsy samples. Real-time PCR resulted in an increased detection rate of 12% for B. fragilis and could improve the detection of B. fragilis in clinical samples. PMID:27112830

  6. Bacteroides fragilis induce necrosis on mice peritoneal macrophages: In vitro and in vivo assays

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, J.M.B.D.; Seabra, S.H.; Vallim, D.C.; Americo, M.A.; Fracallanza, S.E.L.; Vommaro, R.C.; Domingues, R.M.C.P.

    2009-10-02

    Bacteroides fragilis is an anaerobic bacteria component of human intestinal microbiota and agent of infections. In the host B. fragilis interacts with macrophages, which produces toxic radicals like NO. The interaction of activated mice peritoneal macrophages with four strains of B. fragilis was evaluated on this study. Previously was shown that such strains could cause metabolic and morphologic alterations related to macrophage death. In this work propidium iodide staining showed the strains inducing macrophage necrosis in that the labeling was evident. Besides nitroblue tetrazolium test showed that B. fragilis stimulates macrophage to produce oxygen radicals. In vivo assays performed in BalbC mice have results similar to those for in vitro tests as well as scanning electron microscopy, which showed the same surface pore-like structures observed in vitro before. The results revealed that B. fragilis strains studied lead to macrophage death by a process similar to necrosis.

  7. Cloning and characterization of the endogenous cephalosporinase gene, cepA, from Bacteroides fragilis reveals a new subgroup of Ambler class A beta-lactamases.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, M B; Parker, A C; Smith, C J

    1993-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis CS30 is a clinical isolate resistant to high concentrations of benzylpenicillin and cephaloridine but not to cephamycin or penem antibiotics. beta-Lactam resistance is mediated by a chromosomally encoded cephalosporinase produced at a high level. The gene encoding this beta-lactamase was cloned from genomic libraries constructed in Escherichia coli and then mated with B. fragilis 638 for identification of ampicillin-resistant (Apr) strains. Apr transconjugants contained a nitrocefin-reactive protein with the physical and enzymatic properties of the original CS30 isolate. The beta-lactamase gene (cepA) was localized by deletion analysis and subcloned, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The 903-bp cepA open reading frame encoded a 300-amino-acid precursor protein (predicted molecular mass, 34,070 Da). A beta-lactamase-deficient mutant strain of B. fragilis 638 was constructed by insertional inactivation with the cepA gene of CS30, demonstrating strict functional homology between these chromosomal beta-lactamase genes. An extensive comparison of the CepA protein sequence by alignment with other beta-lactamases revealed the strict conservation of at least four elements common to Ambler class A. A further comparison of the CepA protein sequence with protein sequences of beta-lactamases from two other Bacteroides species indicated that they constitute their own distinct subgroup of class A beta-lactamases. Images PMID:8285623

  8. Physiological effects of environmental acidification in the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.; Lovera, C.; Whaling, P. J.; Buck, K. R.; Pane, E. F.; Barry, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is now reaching depths over 1000 m in the Eastern Pacific, overlapping the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). Deep-sea animals are suspected to be especially sensitive to environmental acidification associated with global climate change. We have investigated the effects of elevated pCO2 and variable O2 on the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis, a species whose range of 200-1200 m depth includes the OMZ and spans a pCO2 range of approx. 600-1200 μatm (approx. pH 7.6 to 7.8). Individuals were evaluated during two exposure experiments (1-month and 4 month) at control and three levels of elevated pCO2 at in situ O2 levels of approx. 10% air saturation. A treatment of control pCO2 at 100% air saturation was also included in experiment two. During the first experiment, perivisceral coelomic fluid (PCF) acid-base balance was investigated during a one-month exposure; results show S. fragilis has limited ability to compensate for the respiratory acidosis brought on by elevated pCO2, due in part to low non-bicarbonate PCF buffering capacity. During the second experiment, individuals were separated into fed and fasted experimental groups, and longer-term effects of elevated pCO2 and variable O2 on righting time, feeding, growth, and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were investigated for both groups. Results suggest that the acidosis found during experiment one does not directly correlate with adverse effects during exposure to realistic future pCO2 levels.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Rotavirus Group C Isolated in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Uk; Park, Kwi-Sung; Kim, Jae-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus group C is the major etiological agent associated with acute gastroenteritis in all human age groups. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of human group C rotavirus (GpC-RV) isolated in South Korea. PMID:26404599

  10. Association of Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis Infection with Inflammatory Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Cynthia L.; Islam, Salequl; Saha, Amit; Arjumand, Maleka; Alam, Nur Haque; Faruque, A. S. G.; Salam, M. A.; Shin, Jai; Hecht, David; Weintraub, Andrej; Sack, R. Bradley; Qadri, Firdausi

    2011-01-01

    Background Diarrheal illnesses remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally, with increasing recognition of long-term sequelae, including postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome and growth faltering, as well as cognitive deficits in children. Identification of specific etiologic agents is often lacking. In vitro and in vivo data suggest that enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) may contribute to the burden of colonic inflammatory diarrheal disease. The study goal was to investigate the pathogenesis of ETBF diarrheal illnesses. Methods We performed an observational study of children and adults with acute diarrheal illnesses in Dhaka, Bangladesh, from January 2004 through November 2005, to define the clinical presentation, intestinal inflammatory responses, and systemic and intestinal antibody responses to ETBF. Other enteric pathogens were also evaluated. Results ETBF was identified to cause a clinical syndrome with marked abdominal pain and nonfebrile inflammatory diarrhea in both children (age, >1 year) and adults. Fecal leukocytes, lactoferrin, and proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin 8, tumor necrosis factor–α)—as well as B. fragilis toxin systemic antitoxin responses—increased rapidly in ETBF-infected patients. Evidence of intestinal inflammation often persisted for at least 3 weeks, despite antibiotic therapy. Conclusions ETBF infection is a newly recognized cause of inflammatory diarrhea in children and adults. Future studies are needed to evaluate the role of ETBF in persistent colonic inflammation and other morbid sequelae of acute diarrheal disease. PMID:18680416

  11. Optimizing alcohol production from whey using computer technology. [Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Zertuche, L.; Zall, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken with the major goal of optimizing the ethanol production from whey using computer technology. To reach this goal, a mathematical model that would describe the fermentation and that could be used for the optimization was developed. Kluyveromyces fragilis was the microorganism used to ferment the lactose in the whey into ethanol. Preliminary studies showed that K. fragilis produced about 90% of the theoretical ethanol yield when grown in whey-complemented media. However, when this yeast is grown in nonsupplemented whey media, it does not produce more than 32% of that yield. Comparative batch fermentations of lactose and whey-complemented media showed that whey possibly contains enhancing components for yeast growth and ethanol production. To obtain the mathematical model, the one-to-one effect of the process variables (lactose and yeast extract concentrations, air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate) on the ethanol production were first investigated. Experiments on the pH effect showed that a decrease in pH from 7 to 4 produced an increase in ethanol concentration from 16.5 to 26.5 g/L (50 g/L initial lactose). The results obtained from modeling of the continuous fermentation using the previously listed variables showed that air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate were the process variables that most influence the production of ethanol.

  12. Surface protein expression in group B streptococcal invasive isolates.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, P; Flores, A E

    1997-01-01

    Results from characterization of 211 GBS isolates from early-onset disease indicated that serotypes Ia, III and V accounted for almost 80% of the isolates, and that alpha was the protein most often expressed. Each of the common polysaccharide types had a characteristic predominant protein expression pattern: alpha for Ia, R4 for type III and R1+R4 for type V isolates. Expression of alpha protein was always mutually exclusive of R proteins. The presence of more than one species of R by a given isolate was confirmed by IEP. In addition, PAGE/WB studies verified the multiple MW forms of R1, and the variation from strain to strain in the highest form of R4 that we had previously reported. Our data not only showed the great complexity of the GBS cell surface but also demonstrated the advantage of using both type polysaccharides and surface-localized proteins as markers for characterization of GBS strains.

  13. A zymodeme study of Entamoeba histolytica in a group of South African schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Sargeaunt, P G; Williams, J E; Jackson, T F; Simjee, A E

    1982-01-01

    Using a biphasic culture medium, stocks of intestinal amoebae were isolated from a group of children attending school in Durban, South Africa. These were compared with stocks collected in other areas of the world already characterized using the electrophoretic patterns of four enzymes: glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI), phosphoglucomutase (PGM) L-malate: NADP+ oxido-reductase (oxalacetate-decarboxylating) (ME) and hexokinase (HK). 33% of 94 samples grew Entamoeba histolytica, only one of which gave a pattern indicative of a pathogenic stock. Entamoeba hartmanni, Dientamoeba fragilis and Entamoeba coli were also grown from some samples, increasing the total positive samples for all species isolated to 40%. PMID:6287686

  14. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  15. Bacteroides acidifaciens sp. nov., isolated from the caecum of mice.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Y; Itoh, K

    2000-01-01

    During studies of the bacterial flora in the intestines of mice, we isolated characteristic strains which lowered the pH of peptone-yeast broth containing Fildes' digest. Based on 16S rRNA sequence comparison, these isolates were considered to belong to the Bacteroides cluster in the bacteroides subgroup of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum, and were divided into two groups. Their phenotypic characteristics, i.e. growth in 20% bile, aesculin hydrolysis, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) activity, were the same as those of the 'Bacteroides fragilis group'. The low level of DNA-DNA hybridization with type strains in the Bacteroides cluster confirmed the novel species status of these isolates. It is proposed that these isolates be named Bacteroides acidifaciens, the type strain of which is A40T (= JCM 10556T). PMID:10826798

  16. Is paromomycin the drug of choice for eradication of Dientamoeba fragilis in adults?

    PubMed Central

    van Hellemond, Jaap J.; Molhoek, Nicky; Koelewijn, Rob; Wismans, Pieter J.; van Genderen, Perry J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a debated protozoan parasite that is often detected in stools of patients with chronic gastro-intestinal complaints. A retrospective follow-up study of a large cohort of patients was performed to better understand the natural course of the infection and possible treatment options. D. fragilis was spontaneously cleared in 41% of untreated cases. With an eradication rate of 98%, treatment with paromomycin appeared more effective than treatment with clioquinol (83%) or metronidazole (57%). PMID:24533277

  17. Augmentation of the in vitro activity of azlocillin against Bacteroides fragilis by clavulanic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, M B; Chuah, S K; Thadepalli, H

    1984-01-01

    Azlocillin was active against 90% of 154 strains of Bacteroides fragilis at a concentration of 64 micrograms/ml. Twenty-eight strains of B. fragilis with an azlocillin MIC of greater than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml were retested with a combination of azlocillin plus clavulanic acid. Of these strains, 71% showed a 4- to 32-fold decrease in the MIC of azlocillin plus clavulanic acid. PMID:6517552

  18. The mysterious practice of petrol sniffing in isolated indigenous groups.

    PubMed

    Cairney, Sheree; Dingwall, Kylie

    2010-09-01

    The practice of petrol sniffing is a unique and poorly understood phenomenon that is associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and social devastation in affected remote Indigenous communities. For these groups and for the wider community, much mystery has surrounded the practice and its effects. Here we introduce the epidemiology of petrol sniffing among Indigenous groups internationally, review its impact on the brain, behaviour and social functions and summarise related interventions.

  19. Cytologic and Genetic Characteristics of Endobiotic Bacteria and Kleptoplasts of Virgulinella fragilis (Foraminifera).

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masashi; Toyofuku, Takashi; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Brüchert, Volker; Collen, John; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kitazato, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The benthic foraminifer Virgulinella fragilis Grindell and Collen 1976 has multiple putative symbioses with both bacterial and kleptoplast endobionts, possibly aiding its survival in environments from dysoxia (5-45 μmol-O2 /L) to microxia (0-5 μmol-O2 /L) and in the dark. To clarify the origin and function of V. fragilis endobionts, we used genetic analyses and transmission electron microscope observations. Virgulinella fragilis retained δ-proteobacteria concentrated at its cell periphery just beneath the cell membranes. Unlike another foraminifer Stainforthia spp., which retains many bacterial species, V. fragilis has a less variable bacterial community. This suggests that V. fragilis maintains a specific intracellular bacterial flora. Unlike the endobiotic bacteria, V. fragilis klepto-plasts originated from various diatom species and are found in the interior cytoplasm. We found evidence of both retention and digestion of kleptoplasts, and of fragmentation of the kleptoplastid outer membrane that likely facilitates transport of kleptoplastid products to the host. Accumulations of mitochondria were observed encircling endobiotic bacteria. It is likely that the bacteria use host organic material for carbon oxidation. The mitochondria may use oxygen available around the δ-proteobacteria and synthesize adenosine triphosphate, perhaps for sulfide oxidation.

  20. Detection of Dientamoeba fragilis in animal faeces using species specific real time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Chan, Douglas; Barratt, Joel; Roberts, Tamalee; Phillips, Owen; Šlapeta, Jan; Ryan, Una; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John; Stark, Damien

    2016-08-30

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a potentially pathogenic, enteric, protozoan parasite with a worldwide distribution. While clinical case reports and prevalence studies appear regularly in the scientific literature, little attention has been paid to this parasite's biology, life cycle, host range, and possible transmission routes. Overall, these aspects of Dientamoeba biology remain poorly understood at best. In this study, a total of 420 animal samples, collected from Australia, were surveyed for the presence of Dientamoeba fragilis using PCR. Several PCR assays were evaluated for sensitivity and specificity. Two previously published PCR methods demonstrated cross reactivity with other trichomonads commonly found in animal samples. Only one assay exhibited excellent specificity. Using this assay D. fragilis was detected from one dog and one cat sample. This is the first report of D. fragilis from these animals and highlights the role companion animals may play in D. fragilis transmission. This study demonstrated that some published D. fragilis molecular assays cross react with other closely related trichomonads and consequently are not suitable for animal prevalence studies.

  1. Cytologic and Genetic Characteristics of Endobiotic Bacteria and Kleptoplasts of Virgulinella fragilis (Foraminifera).

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masashi; Toyofuku, Takashi; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Brüchert, Volker; Collen, John; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kitazato, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The benthic foraminifer Virgulinella fragilis Grindell and Collen 1976 has multiple putative symbioses with both bacterial and kleptoplast endobionts, possibly aiding its survival in environments from dysoxia (5-45 μmol-O2 /L) to microxia (0-5 μmol-O2 /L) and in the dark. To clarify the origin and function of V. fragilis endobionts, we used genetic analyses and transmission electron microscope observations. Virgulinella fragilis retained δ-proteobacteria concentrated at its cell periphery just beneath the cell membranes. Unlike another foraminifer Stainforthia spp., which retains many bacterial species, V. fragilis has a less variable bacterial community. This suggests that V. fragilis maintains a specific intracellular bacterial flora. Unlike the endobiotic bacteria, V. fragilis klepto-plasts originated from various diatom species and are found in the interior cytoplasm. We found evidence of both retention and digestion of kleptoplasts, and of fragmentation of the kleptoplastid outer membrane that likely facilitates transport of kleptoplastid products to the host. Accumulations of mitochondria were observed encircling endobiotic bacteria. It is likely that the bacteria use host organic material for carbon oxidation. The mitochondria may use oxygen available around the δ-proteobacteria and synthesize adenosine triphosphate, perhaps for sulfide oxidation. PMID:25510528

  2. Detection of Dientamoeba fragilis in animal faeces using species specific real time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Chan, Douglas; Barratt, Joel; Roberts, Tamalee; Phillips, Owen; Šlapeta, Jan; Ryan, Una; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John; Stark, Damien

    2016-08-30

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a potentially pathogenic, enteric, protozoan parasite with a worldwide distribution. While clinical case reports and prevalence studies appear regularly in the scientific literature, little attention has been paid to this parasite's biology, life cycle, host range, and possible transmission routes. Overall, these aspects of Dientamoeba biology remain poorly understood at best. In this study, a total of 420 animal samples, collected from Australia, were surveyed for the presence of Dientamoeba fragilis using PCR. Several PCR assays were evaluated for sensitivity and specificity. Two previously published PCR methods demonstrated cross reactivity with other trichomonads commonly found in animal samples. Only one assay exhibited excellent specificity. Using this assay D. fragilis was detected from one dog and one cat sample. This is the first report of D. fragilis from these animals and highlights the role companion animals may play in D. fragilis transmission. This study demonstrated that some published D. fragilis molecular assays cross react with other closely related trichomonads and consequently are not suitable for animal prevalence studies. PMID:27523936

  3. Detection of integron-associated gene cassettes and other antimicrobial resistance genes in enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anirban; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Dharanidharan, Ramamurthy; Ghosh, Amit; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2015-06-01

    Twenty seven Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) strains isolated from children in Kolkata, India, were tested for their antimicrobial resistance, presence of integrons and resistance encoding genes. Almost all the strains (>90%) were resistant to two or more antimicrobials. About 59-92% of the strains were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. Most of these antimicrobial agents have been used in the treatment of diarrhea and other infectious diseases. In addition, about half a number of strains (48-55%) were resistant to clindamycin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ampicillin/sulbactam and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Moxifloxacin and metronidazole resistance ranged from 30 to 40%. All strains however, were found to be susceptible to chloramphenicol and imipenem. Class 1 integrase (intI1) was detected in seven and class 2 integrase (intI2) in one of the twenty seven ETBF strains. Resistance gene cassettes carried by these integrons had different alleles of dfr or aad genes. Beside these integron-borne genes, other genes encoding different antimicrobial resistance were also detected. Resistance genes such as cep(A) and tet(Q) were detected in most of the ETBF strains. To the best of our knowledge, this work constituted the first extensive report from India on the detection of integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes in ETBF. PMID:25634362

  4. The protonema of Chara fragilis Desv.: regenerative formation, photomorphogenesis, and gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Hodick, D

    1993-10-01

    When exposed to constant white light for four weeks, isolated nodes of Chara fragilis Desv. regenerated side branches, rhizoids, and multicellular protonemata, the latter being similar to those germinated from oospores. When kept in darkness the nodes developed protonemata exclusively. These were single-celled, colourless, and tip-growing and, with the light microscope, they looked like rhizoids. Upon exposure to blue light, but not to red or far-red, the growth rates of the protonemata rapidly declined, the cell apices swelled, and the nucleus migrated acropetally. Within 24 h the cells went through the first of a series of divisions resulting in the formation of multicellular protonemata. When returned to darkness after a blue light pulse of 5 h the cell divisions proceeded normally, but the protonemata showed etiolated growth. While growth of the internode was drastically promoted, the development of the multicellular apex and the lateral initial were suppressed. Both uni- and multicellular etiolating protonemata showed negative gravitropism but were phototropically, insensitive. It is argued that the single-celled protonema is an organ specialized for the penetration of mud covering the nodes or oospores of Chara and thus serves to search for light, comparable to etiolated hypocotyls and stems in seedlings of higher plants.

  5. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Group B Streptococcal Isolates in Southern Brazil ▿

    PubMed Central

    Palmeiro, Jussara K.; Dalla-Costa, Libera M.; Fracalanzza, Sérgio E. L.; Botelho, Ana C. N.; da Silva Nogueira, Keite; Scheffer, Mara C.; de Almeida Torres, Rosângela S. L.; de Carvalho, Newton Sérgio; Cogo, Laura Lúcia; Madeira, Humberto M. F.

    2010-01-01

    One-hundred sixty-eight group B streptococcal (GBS) isolates from a Brazilian hospital were phenotypically and genotypically characterized. Isolates were recovered from human sources from April 2006 to May 2008 and classified as either invasive, noninvasive, or colonizing isolates. Classical methods for serotyping and antibiotic resistance profiling were employed. Clonal groups were also defined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results showed that susceptibility to beta-lactam antimicrobials was predominant among the isolates. Only 4.7% were resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin. The erm(B) gene was widely detected in our GBS isolates, according to our phenotypic results (constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [cMLSB] resistance phenotype), and the erm(A) gene was also detected in some isolates. MLSB resistance was restricted to strains isolated from patients with noninvasive infections and carriers. Serotype Ia was predominant (38.1%), serotype IV isolates were found at a high frequency (13.1%), and few isolates of serotype III were identified (3%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis results revealed a variety of types, reflecting the substantial genetic diversity among GBS strains, although a great number of isolates could be clustered into two major groups with a high degree of genetic relatedness. Three main PFGE clonal groups were found, and isolates sharing the same PFGE type were grouped into different serotypes. Furthermore, in a few cases, isolates from the same patients and possessing the same PFGE type were of different serotypes. These findings could be related to the occurrence of capsular switching by horizontal transfer of capsular genes. PMID:20881175

  6. Phylogenetic grouping, epidemiological typing, analysis of virulence genes, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from healthy broilers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to investigate the possible etiology of avian colibacillosis by examining Escherichia coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers. Findings Seventy-eight E. coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers in Japan were subjected to analysis of phylogenetic background, virulence-associated gene profiling, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), and antimicrobial resistance profiling. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that 35 of the 78 isolates belonged to group A, 28 to group B1, one to group B2, and 14 to group D. Virulence-associated genes iutA, iss, cvaC, tsh, iroN, ompT, and hlyF were found in 23 isolates (29.5%), 16 isolates (20.5%), nine isolates (11.5%), five isolates (6.4%), 19 isolates (24.4%), 23 isolates (29.5%), and 22 isolates (28.2%) respectively. Although the genetic diversity of group D isolates was revealed by MLST, the group D isolates harbored iutA (10 isolates, 71.4%), iss (6 isolates, 42.9%), cvaC (5 isolates, 35.7%), tsh (3 isolates, 21.4%), hlyF (9 isolates, 64.3%), iroN (7 isolates, 50.0%), and ompT (9 isolates, 64.3%). Conclusions Our results indicated that E. coli isolates inhabiting the intestines of healthy broilers pose a potential risk of causing avian colibacillosis. PMID:25061511

  7. Genomic Diversity of Enterotoxigenic Strains of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Jessica V.; Bernstein, Harris D.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic (ETBF) strains of Bacteroides fragilis are the subset of strains that secrete a toxin called fragilysin (Bft). Although ETBF strains are known to cause diarrheal disease and have recently been associated with colorectal cancer, they have not been well characterized. By sequencing the complete genome of four ETBF strains, we found that these strains exhibit considerable variation at the genomic level. Only a small number of genes that are located primarily in the Bft pathogenicity island (BFT PAI) and the flanking CTn86 conjugative transposon are conserved in all four strains and a fifth strain whose genome was previously sequenced. Interestingly, phylogenetic analysis strongly suggests that the BFT PAI was acquired by non-toxigenic (NTBF) strains multiple times during the course of evolution. At the phenotypic level, we found that the ETBF strains were less fit than the NTBF strain NCTC 9343 and were susceptible to a growth-inhibitory protein that it produces. The ETBF strains also showed a greater tendency to form biofilms, which may promote tumor formation, than NTBF strains. Although the genomic diversity of ETBF strains raises the possibility that they vary in their pathogenicity, our experimental results also suggest that they share common properties that are conferred by different combinations of non-universal genetic elements. PMID:27348220

  8. Lichens promote flowering Opuntia fragilis in west-central Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Bornar, C.R.; Harrington, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Clumps of the cactus Opuntia fragilis growing in association with mats of the lichens Cladina mitis, Cladina rangiferina and a spikemoss, Selaginella rupestris, were discovered in an agricultural field in Pepin County, Wisconsin, that had been abandoned for over 50 y. The association appeared to be beneficial to the cactus, which flowered almost exclusively in the presence of lichens. Of 294 cactus clumps examined in 2001, 127 grew in the presence of lichen mats and, of these, 24 flowered, producing 91 flowers, while none of the cacti growing in the absence of lichens flowered. In 2002, 19 out of 265 cactus clumps flowered, all but one in the presence of lichens. All sizes of cacti in the presence of lichens flowered and the probability of flowering increased with cactus size. In addition, the cacti that flowered had cladodes that were on average 19% heavier than those of cacti that did not flower. The presence of lichens lowered summer soil temperatures 2a??4 C compared to soil temperatures in the absence of lichens. Cooler soil temperatures conserve soil moisture better, which may enhance flowering in these cacti.

  9. A comparative study of three bacteriocins of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Riley, T V; Mee, B J

    1985-01-01

    Three different bacteriocins produced by strains of Bacteroides fragilis were compared in terms of their production kinetics, physico-chemical nature, and action on macromolecular synthesis in a common indicator strain. Bacteriocin 78/438 was produced during the logarithmic growth phase, was thermolabile and stable between pH 5 and 9. It was susceptible to trypsin and pepsin, and affected DNA, RNA and protein syntheses in susceptible cells. Bacteriocin A49 was produced during the stationary growth phase, was thermolabile and stable between pH 7 and 9. This bacteriocin was also susceptible to trypsin and pepsin, but only RNA synthesis was affected in the indicator strain. Bacteriocin A55 differed markedly from both 78/438 and A49, and was found to be predominantly cell-bound, resistant to inactivation by high temperatures and stable over a wide pH range of 2 to 12. It was susceptible to trypsin but resistant to pepsin. A55 had a delayed effect on macromolecular synthesis with DNA synthesis being inhibited after 60 min. With all three bacteriocins, killing of the indicator strain followed single hit kinetics with the interaction of bacteriocin and target cell occurring in two stages. Killing by bacteriocin A55 was much slower than the other two and this may be related to its effect on macromolecular synthesis. The killing action of all three bacteriocins was dependent on the growth phase of the susceptible cells.

  10. Multi-drug resistant Bacteroides fragilis recovered from blood and severe leg wounds caused by an improvised explosive device (IED) in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Jeffrey E; Fraser, Susan; Citron, Diane M; Wexler, Hana; Blakely, Garry; Jobling, Kelly; Patrick, Sheila

    2011-08-01

    This report summarizes the case of a 23 year-old otherwise healthy male that was injured in an improvised explosive device (IED) blast in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). He sustained bilateral open tibia and fibula fractures in the setting of being exposed to water contaminated with raw sewage. Despite long-term carbapenem therapy, the patient's wounds were repeatedly noted to have purulent drainage during surgical debridement and cultures from these wounds were persistently positive for Bacteroides fragilis. Apparent clinical failure persisted despite the addition of metronidazole to his regimen and an eventual trial of tigecycline. Susceptibility testing of the B. fragilis isolate was performed and resistance to penicillin, clindamycin,metronidazole, cefoxitin, meropenem, imipenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, and tigecycline was confirmed. The presence of a nimE gene on a potentially transferrable plasmid was also confirmed by plasmid sequencing. The only antibiotics that displayed in vitro susceptibility were moxifloxacin and linezolid. These antibiotics were initiated in combination with aggressive irrigation and serial surgical debridement. Conversion to left-sided internal fixation became feasible and his left lower extremity was salvaged without residual evidence of infection. The patient completed an eight week course of combination moxifloxacin and linezolid therapy without adverse event. This B. fragilis isolate displayed simultaneous high-level resistance to multiple antibiotics routinely utilized in anaerobic infections. This was evidenced by clinical failure, in vitro susceptibility testing, and demonstration of genes associated with resistance mechanisms. This case warrants review not only due to the rarity of this event but also the potential implications regarding anaerobic infections in traumatic wounds and the success of a novel treatment regimen utilizing combination therapy with moxifloxacin and linezolid.

  11. Group dynamics and catecholamines during long-duration confinement in an isolated environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Norbert O.; Lyons, Terence J.; Binder, Heidi

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objectives of this study were to investigate possible relationships between catecholamine excretion and long-duration confinement in an isolated environment. METHODS: Stays of long duration were made by Group I (n = 4, all Russian, weeks 1-34), Group II (n = 4, mixed nationality, weeks 3-18), and Group III (n = 4, mixed nationality, weeks 22-38); other groups joined the residents for 1-wk intervals at weeks #13, #19, and #33. Data were collected from Groups I and III. RESULTS: In both Group I and Group III, the daily epinephrine excretion was significantly elevated during and after confinement compared with the pre-isolation baseline (p < 0.05), but remained mostly within normal limits during the experiment. During isolation, epinephrine excretion was significantly higher, compared with other weeks in isolation, during weeks #19 and #27 for Group I, and during week #30 for Group III. In both Group I and Group II, norepinephrine excretion increased significantly during and after isolation (p < 0.05) and was above the normal range. The daily norepinephrine excretion was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in Group I during weeks #12, #13, and #27, and during week #30 for Group III. DISCUSSION: Epinephrine excretion generally remained in the normal range. However, occasional elevations occurred due to psychological stress, which apparently correlate with changes in group dynamics. Norepinephrine excretion was above the normal range and was correlated with social events. These results suggest that to ensure optimum crew performance, entire crews along with their visiting crews should be selected collectively, rather than individually.

  12. Emerging from obscurity: biological, clinical, and diagnostic aspects of Dientamoeba fragilis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eugene H; Windsor, Jeffrey J; Clark, C Graham

    2004-07-01

    Ever since its first description in 1918, Dientamoeba fragilis has struggled to gain recognition as a significant pathogen. There is little justification for this neglect, however, since there exists a growing body of case reports from numerous countries around the world that have linked this protozoal parasite to clinical manifestations such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and anorexia. A number of studies have even incriminated D. fragilis as a cause of irritable bowel syndrome, allergic colitis, and diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus patients. Although D. fragilis is most commonly identified using permanently stained fecal smears, recent advances in culturing techniques are simplifying as well as improving the ability of investigators to detect this organism. However, there are limitations in the use of cultures since they cannot be performed on fecal samples that have been fixed. Significant progress has been made in the biological classification of this organism, which originally was described as an ameba. Analyses of small-subunit rRNA gene sequences have clearly demonstrated its close relationship to Histomonas, and it is now known to be a trichomonad. How the organism is transmitted remains a mystery, although there is some evidence that D. fragilis might be transmitted via the ova of the pinworm, Enterobius vermicularis. Also, it remains to be answered whether the two distinct genotypes of D. fragilis recently identified represent organisms with differing virulence. PMID:15258093

  13. Environmental effects on growth and ethanol fermentation of immobilized Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.

    1988-01-01

    A trickle flow, short column reactor system using a natural sponge as a carrier was used to study the response of the immobilized yeast, Kluyveromyces fragilis NRRL 2415, to environmental and nutritional factors. The specific growth rate of adsorbed K. fragilis using a complete medium as feed during the start-up period was 0.0152 hr{sup {minus}1} which was much lower than 0.60 hr{sup {minus}1}, the value for free cells. The transient responses of immobilized cells to changes in lactose concentration and temperature were quick, reaching new steady state values within half an hour. There was little or no detectable CO{sub 2} evolved if the lactose concentration was below 3.8 g/l. The immobilized K. fragilis did not perform well at temperatures over 40{degree}C, although free cells maintained their viability at 40{degree}C. The inhibitory effect of added ethanol on immobilized K. fragilis was a nonlinear relationship. The thermotolerance of K. fragilis was significantly reduced by the presence of ethanol. A kinetic model was developed to determine the steady state productivity based upon growth and death rates as a function of temperature and ethanol concentration.

  14. Emerging from Obscurity: Biological, Clinical, and Diagnostic Aspects of Dientamoeba fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eugene H.; Windsor, Jeffrey J.; Clark, C. Graham

    2004-01-01

    Ever since its first description in 1918, Dientamoeba fragilis has struggled to gain recognition as a significant pathogen. There is little justification for this neglect, however, since there exists a growing body of case reports from numerous countries around the world that have linked this protozoal parasite to clinical manifestations such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and anorexia. A number of studies have even incriminated D. fragilis as a cause of irritable bowel syndrome, allergic colitis, and diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus patients. Although D. fragilis is most commonly identified using permanently stained fecal smears, recent advances in culturing techniques are simplifying as well as improving the ability of investigators to detect this organism. However, there are limitations in the use of cultures since they cannot be performed on fecal samples that have been fixed. Significant progress has been made in the biological classification of this organism, which originally was described as an ameba. Analyses of small-subunit rRNA gene sequences have clearly demonstrated its close relationship to Histomonas, and it is now known to be a trichomonad. How the organism is transmitted remains a mystery, although there is some evidence that D. fragilis might be transmitted via the ova of the pinworm, Enterobius vermicularis. Also, it remains to be answered whether the two distinct genotypes of D. fragilis recently identified represent organisms with differing virulence. PMID:15258093

  15. Isolation of Bacillus cereus Group from the Fecal Material of Endangered Wood Turtles.

    PubMed

    Nfor, Nancy Ngvumbo; Lapin, Carly N; McLaughlin, Richard William

    2015-10-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus group are opportunistic human pathogens. They can be found in a broad range of foods. Diarrheal food poisoning and/or emetic type syndromes can result from eating contaminated food. In this study, seven B. cereus group members were isolated from the fecal material of Wood Turtles (Glyptemys insculpta). The isolates were then assessed for the presence of enterotoxin genes (nheA, entFM, hblC, and cytK) using PCR. The most prevalent is the nonhemolytic enterotoxin gene which was found in all seven isolates. PMID:26175111

  16. Evaluation of Group B Streptococcus Differential Agar for detection and isolation of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Bou, G; Figueira, M; Canle, D; Cartelle, M; Eiros, J M; Villanueva, R

    2005-08-01

    In total, 320 vaginal or rectal swabs were cultured on Granada medium (GM) or Group B Streptococcus Differential Agar (GBSDA), and were also inoculated into LIM broth (Todd-Hewitt broth supplemented with selective antibiotics), for detection of group B Streptococcus (GBS). Overall, GBS isolates were detected on 53 of the 320 swabs; 47 of these isolates grew on both GM and GBSDA, five only on GBSDA, and one only following subculture from LIM broth. GBSDA appears to be a valid alternative to GM for the growth of GBS isolates from pregnant women.

  17. Isolation of Bacillus cereus Group from the Fecal Material of Endangered Wood Turtles.

    PubMed

    Nfor, Nancy Ngvumbo; Lapin, Carly N; McLaughlin, Richard William

    2015-10-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus group are opportunistic human pathogens. They can be found in a broad range of foods. Diarrheal food poisoning and/or emetic type syndromes can result from eating contaminated food. In this study, seven B. cereus group members were isolated from the fecal material of Wood Turtles (Glyptemys insculpta). The isolates were then assessed for the presence of enterotoxin genes (nheA, entFM, hblC, and cytK) using PCR. The most prevalent is the nonhemolytic enterotoxin gene which was found in all seven isolates.

  18. Metabolism of a 5-nitroimidazole in susceptible and resistant isogenic strains of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, J P; Sellier, N; Rager, M N; Reysset, G

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the metabolism of dimetridazole (1,2-dimethyl-5-nitroimidazole) (DMZ) by the resting cell method in a susceptible strain of Bacteroides fragilis and in the same strain containing the nimA gene, which conferred resistance to 5-nitroimidazole drugs. In both cases, under strict anaerobic conditions DMZ was metabolized without major ring cleavage or nitrate formation. However, one of two distinct metabolic pathways is involved, depending on the susceptibility of the strain. In the susceptible strain, the classical reduction pathway of nitroaromatic compounds is followed at least as far as the nitroso-radical anion, with further formation of the azo-dimer: 5,5'-azobis-(1,2-dimethylimidazole). In the resistant strain, DMZ is reduced to the amine derivative, namely, 5-amino-1,2-dimethylimidazole, preventing the formation of the toxic form of the drug. The specificity of the six-electron reduction of the nitro group, which is restricted to 4- and 5-nitroimidazole, suggests an enzymatic reaction. We thus conclude that nimA and related genes may encode a 5-nitroimidazole reductase. PMID:9210672

  19. Clostridium botulinum Group II Isolate Phylogenomic Profiling Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Weedmark, K. A.; Mabon, P.; Hayden, K. L.; Lambert, D.; Van Domselaar, G.; Austin, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum group II isolates (n = 163) from different geographic regions, outbreaks, and neurotoxin types and subtypes were characterized in silico using whole-genome sequence data. Two clusters representing a variety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types and subtypes were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. While one cluster included BoNT/B4/F6/E9 and nontoxigenic members, the other comprised a wide variety of different BoNT/E subtype isolates and a nontoxigenic strain. In silico MLST and core SNP methods were consistent in terms of clade-level isolate classification; however, core SNP analysis showed higher resolution capability. Furthermore, core SNP analysis correctly distinguished isolates by outbreak and location. This study illustrated the utility of next-generation sequence-based typing approaches for isolate characterization and source attribution and identified discrete SNP loci and MLST alleles for isolate comparison. PMID:26116673

  20. Association of social isolation and health across different racial and ethnic groups of older Americans

    PubMed Central

    MIYAWAKI, CHRISTINA E.

    2015-01-01

    Social isolation is a social and public health problem that affects people of all ages, especially elders. Previous studies have found that social isolation across numerous industrialised countries is associated with negative health outcomes. However, it is unknown whether and how this association differs by race/ethnicity and age. To begin to address this gap, this study examines the association of social isolation and physical and mental health among Black, White and Hispanic elders in the United States of America. Building on Cornwell and Waite's perceived isolation and social disconnectedness dimension model of social isolation, the author used multi-stage survey data from a nationally representative sample of 3,005 community-residing adults aged 57–85 from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. Tests for association were conducted on health by age, gender, marital status, education and race/ethnicity separately. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to test the association of social isolation and health exclusively and separately among these three groups. Results showed that social isolation is strongly associated with physical and mental health. Both perceived isolation and social disconnectedness had a significant negative association with physical and mental health among White elders. For Blacks, social disconnectedness is negatively associated with their physical health while perceived isolation had a negative association with mental health. Among Hispanic elders, there seemed to be no association between social isolation and physical health, but a significant negative association was found with their mental health. Despite various associated patterns, however, social isolation overall was associated with health outcomes that were similar across three elder groups. By identifying factors influencing social isolation and health among minority older Americans, this study has relevance to the development of culturally sensitive health

  1. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates from equine infectious endometritis belong to a distinct genetic group

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is the pathogen most commonly isolated from the uterus of mares. S. zooepidemicus is an opportunistic pathogen and part of the resident flora in the caudal reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a genotypically distinct subpopulation of S. zooepidemicus is associated with endometritis in the mare, by genotyping and comparing uterine S. zooepidemicus strains with isolates from the vagina and clitoral fossa. Mares with (n = 18) or without (n = 11) clinical symptoms of endometritis were included. Uterine samples were obtained using a guarded endometrial biopsy punch, whereas a swab was used to recover samples from the cranial vagina and the clitoral fossa. If S. zooepidemicus was present, up to three colonies were selected from each anatomical location (max. 9 isolates per mare). Bacterial isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). S. zooepidemicus was isolated from the endometrium of 12 mares. A total of 88 isolates were analyzed by PFGE: 31 from the endometrium, 26 from the cranial vagina and 31 isolates from the clitoral fossa. For MLST 21 isolates were chosen. Results demonstrated a higher genetic similarity of the isolates obtained from infectious endometritis compared to isolates obtained from the caudal reproductive tract. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that a genetically distinct group of S. zooepidemicus is associated with infectious endometritis in the mare. PMID:23597033

  2. Effect of the oral intake of yogurt containing Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on the cell numbers of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in microbiota.

    PubMed

    Odamaki, Toshitaka; Sugahara, Hirosuke; Yonezawa, Sumiko; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Tanabe, Soichi; Tominaga, Tomoya; Togashi, Hideo; Benno, Yoshimi; Xiao, Jin-zhong

    2012-02-01

    Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) strains have been suggested to be associated with acute and persistent diarrheal disease, inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer, although further epidemiological studies are needed for clarification. Here, a pilot study was performed to examine the effect of the oral administration of yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain on the cell numbers of fecal ETBF in a healthy population. Among 420 healthy adults, 38 subjects were found to be ETBF carriers, giving a prevalence of approximately 9%. Among them, 32 subjects were enrolled in an open, randomized, parallel-group study to ingest yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain, Bifidobacterium longum BB536 (BB536Y group), for 8 weeks, with milk provided to the control group (milk group). The cell numbers of ETBF and the dominant species of the B. fragilis group were measured by a quantitative PCR method. Compared with the baseline values, there was a significant decrease in the cell number of ETBF at week 8 in the BB536Y group but not in the milk group. Linear mixed models analysis for longitudinal data revealed a significant difference in the changes of ETBF cell number between the two groups during the intervention phase. These results imply the potential of probiotic yogurt for eliminating ETBF in the microbiota, but its clinical significance needs to be evaluated in the future. This is the first report of a possible effect of probiotic intake on ETBF in the microbiota.

  3. Dientamoeba fragilis: initial evidence of pathogenicity in the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Lankester, Felix; Kiyang, John Anyam; Bailey, Wendi; Unwin, Steve

    2010-06-01

    A 7-yr-old female western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) shared an enclosure with 10 other gorillas at the Limbe Wildlife Centre (LWC), a wildlife rehabilitation centre in Cameroon. The gorilla had been living at the LWC for more than 6 yr prior to the exhibition of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like clinical signs. The gorilla improved dramatically after metronidazole therapy. The report suggests that metronidazole was effective because it eliminated the protozoa, Dientamoeba fragilis. Dientamoeba fragilis should be considered on the differential diagnosis list of any captive gorilla with IBS-like symptoms.

  4. Evaluation of Multiplex Tandem Real-Time PCR for Detection of Cryptosporidium spp., Dientamoeba fragilis, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia intestinalis in Clinical Stool Samples ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stark, D.; Al-Qassab, S. E.; Barratt, J. L. N.; Stanley, K.; Roberts, T.; Marriott, D.; Harkness, J.; Ellis, J. T.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the first development and evaluation of a multiplex tandem PCR (MT-PCR) assay for the detection and identification of 4 common pathogenic protozoan parasites, Cryptosporidium spp., Dientamoeba fragilis, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia intestinalis, from human clinical samples. A total of 472 fecal samples submitted to the Department of Microbiology at St. Vincent's Hospital were included in the study. The MT-PCR assay was compared to four real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assays and microscopy by a traditional modified iron hematoxylin stain. The MT-PCR detected 28 G. intestinalis, 26 D. fragilis, 11 E. histolytica, and 9 Cryptosporidium sp. isolates. Detection and identification of the fecal protozoa by MT-PCR demonstrated 100% correlation with the RT-PCR results, and compared to RT-PCR, MT-PCR exhibited 100% sensitivity and specificity, while traditional microscopy of stained fixed fecal smears exhibited sensitivities and specificities of 56% and 100% for Cryptosporidium spp., 38% and 99% for D. fragilis, 47% and 97% for E. histolytica, and 50% and 100% for G. intestinalis. No cross-reactivity was detected in 100 stool samples containing various other bacterial, viral, and protozoan species. The MT-PCR assay was able to provide rapid, sensitive, and specific simultaneous detection and identification of the four most important diarrhea-causing protozoan parasites that infect humans. This study also highlights the lack of sensitivity demonstrated by microscopy, and thus, molecular methods such as MT-PCR must be considered the diagnostic methods of choice for enteric protozoan parasites. PMID:21048004

  5. Characterization of the Bacteroides fragilis bfr Gene Product Identifies a Bacterial DPS-Like Protein and Suggests Evolutionary Links in the Ferritin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Gauss, George H.; Reott, Michael A.; Rocha, Edson R.; Young, Mark J.; Douglas, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    A factor contributing to the pathogenicity of Bacteroides fragilis, the most common anaerobic species isolated from clinical infections, is the bacterium's extreme aerotolerance, which allows survival in oxygenated tissues prior to anaerobic abscess formation. We investigated the role of the bacterioferritin-related (bfr) gene in the B. fragilis oxidative stress response. The bfr mRNA levels are increased in stationary phase or in response to O2 or iron. In addition, bfr null mutants exhibit reduced aerotolerance, and the bfr gene product protects DNA from hydroxyl radical cleavage in vitro. Crystallographic studies revealed a protein with a dodecameric structure and greater similarity to an archaeal DNA protection in starved cells (DPS)-like protein than to the 24-subunit bacterioferritins. Similarity to the DPS-like (DPSL) protein extends to the subunit and includes a pair of conserved cysteine residues juxtaposed to a buried dimetal binding site within the four-helix bundle. Compared to archaeal DPSLs, however, this bacterial DPSL protein contains several unique features, including a significantly different conformation in the C-terminal tail that alters the number and location of pores leading to the central cavity and a conserved metal binding site on the interior surface of the dodecamer. Combined, these characteristics confirm this new class of miniferritin in the bacterial domain, delineate the similarities and differences between bacterial DPSL proteins and their archaeal homologs, allow corrected annotations for B. fragilis bfr and other dpsl genes within the bacterial domain, and suggest an evolutionary link within the ferritin superfamily that connects dodecameric DPS to the (bacterio)ferritin 24-mer. PMID:22020642

  6. Effect of Habitat Size, Quality, and Isolation on Functional Groups of Beetles in Hollow Oaks

    PubMed Central

    Pilskog, Hanne Eik; Birkemoe, Tone; Framstad, Erik; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest threats to biodiversity is land use change and habitat loss. Hollow oaks (Quercus spp. L.) are well-defined patches that are hotspots for biodiversity and red-listed species, but they are often rare and fragmented in the landscape. We investigated the effect of patch size, habitat quality, and isolation on functional groups and red-listed saproxylic beetles in hollow oaks (n = 40) in Norway. The groups were defined by host tree association, trophic grouping, and red-listed status. Habitat quality, represented by tree form was most important in explaining species richness for most groups. Patch size, represented by circumference and amount of dead branches, was most important in explaining abundance. Isolation, that is single oaks compared with oaks in groups, had a negative effect on the abundance of beetles feeding both on wood and fungi (xylomycethopagous), as well as on species associated with broadleaved trees (oak semi-specialists), but did not affect species richness. This indicates that at this scale and in this landscape, isolated oaks are as species rich and valuable for conservation as other oaks, although some functional groups may be more vulnerable to isolation than others. The red-listed species only responded to patch size, indicating that oaks with large circumference and many dead branches are especially important for red-listed species and for conservation. PMID:26945089

  7. Effect of Habitat Size, Quality, and Isolation on Functional Groups of Beetles in Hollow Oaks.

    PubMed

    Pilskog, Hanne Eik; Birkemoe, Tone; Framstad, Erik; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest threats to biodiversity is land use change and habitat loss. Hollow oaks (Quercus spp. L.) are well-defined patches that are hotspots for biodiversity and red-listed species, but they are often rare and fragmented in the landscape. We investigated the effect of patch size, habitat quality, and isolation on functional groups and red-listed saproxylic beetles in hollow oaks (n = 40) in Norway. The groups were defined by host tree association, trophic grouping, and red-listed status. Habitat quality, represented by tree form was most important in explaining species richness for most groups. Patch size, represented by circumference and amount of dead branches, was most important in explaining abundance. Isolation, that is single oaks compared with oaks in groups, had a negative effect on the abundance of beetles feeding both on wood and fungi (xylomycethopagous), as well as on species associated with broadleaved trees (oak semi-specialists), but did not affect species richness. This indicates that at this scale and in this landscape, isolated oaks are as species rich and valuable for conservation as other oaks, although some functional groups may be more vulnerable to isolation than others. The red-listed species only responded to patch size, indicating that oaks with large circumference and many dead branches are especially important for red-listed species and for conservation. PMID:26945089

  8. Expression of group B protective surface protein (BPS) by invasive and colonizing isolates of group B streptococci.

    PubMed

    Flores, Aurea E; Chhatwal, G S; Hillier, Sharon L; Baker, Carol J; Ferrieri, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Group B protective surface protein (BPS) is expressed on the cell surface of some group B streptococcal (GBS) (Streptococcus agalactiae) strains and adds to the identification by capsular polysaccharide (CPS), and c or R proteins. We investigated the prevalence of BPS among GBS clinical isolates (303 invasive, 4122 colonizing) collected over 11 years in four American cities. Hot HCl cell extracts were tested by immunoprecipitation in agarose with rabbit antisera to BPS; the alpha (α) and beta (β) components of c protein; R1, R3, and R4 species of R protein; and CPS serotypes Ia-VIII. BPS was found in 155 isolates (seven invasive, 148 colonizing). Of these, 87 were Ia, 37 II, 20 V; none were III. BPS was expressed usually with another protein: a species of R by 87 or a component of c by 39. The predominant CPS/protein profiles with BPS were Ia/R1,BPS and II/c(α + β),BPS. Thus, along with CPS serotype and other surface proteins, BPS can be a valuable marker for precise strain characterization of unique GBS clinical isolates with complex surface protein profiles.

  9. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of anpirtoline and citalopram in isolated and group housed mice.

    PubMed

    Rilke, O; Will, K; Jähkel, M; Oehler, J

    2001-07-01

    Acute effects of serotonergic drugs acting via different mechanisms were investigated by a social interaction test and subsequent determination of serotonin and dopamine metabolisms in mice housed in groups or isolated for 6 weeks. A resident/intruder test was performed with anpirtoline (5-HT1B receptor agonist in rodents; 1 mg/kg), citalopram (SSRI; 0.5 mg/kg) and saline treatment before animals were decapitated and different brain regions were frozen for subsequent HPLC-analyses. Behavioral investigations indicated a strong increase of aggressive behavior after 6 weeks of isolation housing. Acute citalopram treatment did not influence behavioral parameters of isolated and group housed mice. In contrast, anpirtoline antagonized isolation induced aggressive behavioral components in a specific manner. Analysis of dopamine and serotonin metabolism revealed that citalopram treatment did not affect dopamine metabolism, but reduced serotonin metabolism in the striatum, hippocampus, cortex and midbrain independent of housing conditions. In contrast, anpirtoline treatment increased dopamine metabolism in cortex, striatum and midbrain as well as influenced serotonin metabolism in a structure- and state-specific manner. Whereas anpirtoline decreased serotonin metabolism in the cortex, the midbrain and the hippocampus independent of housing conditions, in the striatum anpirtoline abolished the isolation induced decrease of serotonin metabolism. These results indicate that anpirtoline might induce antiaggressive effects via postsynaptic receptor- and structure-specific activation of serotonergic but also dopaminergic processes, whereas structure independent increase of synaptic serotonin via citalopram was ineffective to reverse aggressivity in isolated mice.

  10. Portability of tag SNPs across isolated population groups: an example from India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar Roy, N; Farheen, S; Roy, N; Sengupta, S; Majumder, P P

    2008-01-01

    Isolated population groups are useful in conducting association studies of complex diseases to avoid various pitfalls, including those arising from population stratification. Since DNA resequencing is expensive, it is recommended that genotyping be carried out at tagSNP (tSNP) loci. For this, tSNPs identified in one isolated population need to be used in another. Unless tSNPs are highly portable across populations this strategy may result in loss of information in association studies. We examined the issue of tSNP portability by sampling individuals from 10 isolated ethnic groups from India. We generated DNA resequencing data pertaining to 3 genomic regions and identified tSNPs in each population. We defined an index of tSNP portability and showed that portability is low across isolated Indian ethnic groups. The extent of portability did not significantly correlate with genetic similarity among the populations studied here. We also analyzed our data with sequence data from individuals of African and European descent. Our results indicated that it may be necessary to carry out resequencing in a small number of individuals to discover SNPs and identify tSNPs in the specific isolated population in which a disease association study is to be conducted.

  11. Description of Dientamoeba fragilis Cyst and Precystic Forms from Human Samples

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, L. S.; Barratt, J. L. N.; Phillips, O.; Roberts, T.; Marriott, D.; Harkness, J.; Ellis, J. T.

    2014-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a common enteropathogen of humans. Recently a cyst stage of the parasite was described in an animal model; however, no cyst stage has been described in detail from clinical samples. We describe both cyst and precystic forms from human clinical samples. PMID:24808242

  12. Phylogeographic structure and northward range expansion in the barnacle Chthamalus fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Bukša, Filip; Bockrath, Katherine; Wares, John P.; Pineda, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The barnacle Chthamalus fragilis is found along the US Atlantic seaboard historically from the Chesapeake Bay southward, and in the Gulf of Mexico. It appeared in New England circa 1900 coincident with warming temperatures, and is now a conspicuous member of rocky intertidal communities extending through the northern shore of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The origin of northern C. fragilis is debated. It may have spread to New England from the northern end of its historic range through larval transport by ocean currents, possibly mediated by the construction of piers, marinas, and other anthropogenic structures that provided new hard substrate habitat. Alternatively, it may have been introduced by fouling on ships originating farther south in its historic distribution. Here we examine mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I sequence diversity and the distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes of C. fragilis from 11 localities ranging from Cape Cod, to Tampa Bay, Florida. We found significant genetic structure between northern and southern populations. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three well-supported reciprocally monophyletic haplogroups, including one haplogroup that is restricted to New England and Virginia populations. While the distances between clades do not suggest cryptic speciation, selection and dispersal barriers may be driving the observed structure. Our data are consistent with an expansion of C. fragilis from the northern end of its mid-19th century range into Massachusetts. PMID:25945315

  13. Phylogeographic structure and northward range expansion in the barnacle Chthamalus fragilis.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Annette F; Bukša, Filip; Bockrath, Katherine; Wares, John P; Pineda, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The barnacle Chthamalus fragilis is found along the US Atlantic seaboard historically from the Chesapeake Bay southward, and in the Gulf of Mexico. It appeared in New England circa 1900 coincident with warming temperatures, and is now a conspicuous member of rocky intertidal communities extending through the northern shore of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The origin of northern C. fragilis is debated. It may have spread to New England from the northern end of its historic range through larval transport by ocean currents, possibly mediated by the construction of piers, marinas, and other anthropogenic structures that provided new hard substrate habitat. Alternatively, it may have been introduced by fouling on ships originating farther south in its historic distribution. Here we examine mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I sequence diversity and the distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes of C. fragilis from 11 localities ranging from Cape Cod, to Tampa Bay, Florida. We found significant genetic structure between northern and southern populations. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three well-supported reciprocally monophyletic haplogroups, including one haplogroup that is restricted to New England and Virginia populations. While the distances between clades do not suggest cryptic speciation, selection and dispersal barriers may be driving the observed structure. Our data are consistent with an expansion of C. fragilis from the northern end of its mid-19th century range into Massachusetts. PMID:25945315

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399.

    PubMed

    Quarella, Sara; Lovrovich, Paola; Scalabrin, Simone; Campedelli, Ilenia; Backovic, Ana; Gatto, Veronica; Cattonaro, Federica; Turello, Alessandro; Torriani, Sandra; Felis, Giovanna E

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399, the first yeast approved as a probiotic for human consumption not belonging to the genus Saccharomyces The genome is composed of 8 chromosomes, with a total size of 11.44 Mb, including mitochondrial DNA. PMID:27587830

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399

    PubMed Central

    Quarella, Sara; Lovrovich, Paola; Scalabrin, Simone; Campedelli, Ilenia; Backovic, Ana; Gatto, Veronica; Cattonaro, Federica; Turello, Alessandro; Felis, Giovanna E.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399, the first yeast approved as a probiotic for human consumption not belonging to the genus Saccharomyces. The genome is composed of 8 chromosomes, with a total size of 11.44 Mb, including mitochondrial DNA. PMID:27587830

  16. [Genetic diversity of group A rotavirus isolates found in Western Siberia in 2007-2011].

    PubMed

    Zhirakovskaia, E V; Aksanova, R Kh; Gorbunova, M G; Tikunov, A Iu; Kuril'shchikov, A M; Sokolov, S N; Netesov, S V; Tikunova, N V

    2012-01-01

    Genetic analysis of group A rotavirus recovered from fecal samples of children admitted to hospitals in Novosibirsk and Omsk during four epidemic seasons 2007, 2007/2008, 2009/2010, 2010/2011 was performed. A total of 1416 rotavirus isolates were genotyped using multiplex PCR. The isolates of the most common rotavirus genotypes G1P[8], G4P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8] co-circulated in Western Siberia during 2007-2011. In isolated cases G9P[8], G2P[8], G3P[9], and G4P[6] genotypes were detected. Change of dominant genotype from G1P[8] to G4P[8] occurred in 2008 in Omsk and in Novosibirsk in 2009 as well. Incidence and distribution of rotavirus genotypes differed and changed every epidemic season in both cities. The phylogenetic analysis based on VP4 (VP8*), VP7, and VP6 gene sequences showed that the majority of isolates from Novosibirsk and Omsk were clustered together and demonstrated high level homology with rotavirus isolates found in other regions of Eurasia. In addition, a rare P[8]b (OP354-like) subtype of the VP4 gene was identified in fourteen isolates (G9, G1, and G4) in Novosibirsk and in a single isolate Omsk08-381/G9P[8]b in Omsk. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the necessity of long-term monitoring of rotavirus isolates in Western Siberia. This is important for selection of rotavirus vaccine for immunization of infants, improvement of diagnostic kits and understanding of the epidemiology and the evolution of group A rotaviruses. PMID:23248851

  17. Clinical Features of Group B Streptococcus Prosthetic Joint Infections and Molecular Characterization of Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Corvec, S.; Illiaquer, M.; Touchais, S.; Boutoille, D.; van der Mee-Marquet, N.; Quentin, R.; Reynaud, A.; Lepelletier, D.; Bémer, P.

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available. PMID:21068273

  18. Clinical features of group B Streptococcus prosthetic joint infections and molecular characterization of isolates.

    PubMed

    Corvec, S; Illiaquer, M; Touchais, S; Boutoille, D; van der Mee-Marquet, N; Quentin, R; Reynaud, A; Lepelletier, D; Bémer, P

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available.

  19. Clinical features of group B Streptococcus prosthetic joint infections and molecular characterization of isolates.

    PubMed

    Corvec, S; Illiaquer, M; Touchais, S; Boutoille, D; van der Mee-Marquet, N; Quentin, R; Reynaud, A; Lepelletier, D; Bémer, P

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available. PMID:21068273

  20. Comparison of the transport of Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli within saturated sand packs.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Jennifer J; Feriancikova, Lucia; Banerjee, Areen; Saffarini, Daâd A; Wang, Lixia; Li, Jin; Grundl, Timothy J; Xu, Shangping

    2014-11-01

    Pathogens in groundwater accounted for ∼50% of waterborne disease outbreaks in the United States between 1971 and 2006. The fast and reliable detection of groundwater microbial contamination and the identification of the contamination sources are of critical importance to the protection of public health. Recent studies suggested that fecal anaerobe Bacteriodes spp. could be employed as an effective tool for surface water microbial source tracking (MST). The usefulness of Bacteroides spp. for groundwater MST depends strongly on its mobility within the subsurface system. This research provides laboratory results comparing transport and attachment of E. coli K12 and B. fragilis within packed quartz sands. The results indicate that at low ionic strengths both E. coli K12 and B. fragilis are readily transported through saturated sand packs. At higher ionic strengths such as may be found near concentrated sources of fecal contamination, B. fragilis displayed significantly higher mobility than E. coli K12. Analysis of the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verweu-Overbeek (XDLVO) energy interactions for both types of bacteria showed a significant repulsive energy barrier exists between the sand surface and the bacteria, precluding attachment directly to the sand surface. However a secondary minimum energy level exists under higher ionic strength conditions. The depth of this energy low is greater for E. coli K12, which results in greater attachment of E. coli K12 than of B. fragilis. The high mobility of B. fragilis suggests that it represents a promising tool for the detection of groundwater fecal contamination as well as the identification of the microbial sources.

  1. Identification, clinical aspects, susceptibility pattern, and molecular epidemiology of beta-haemolytic group G Streptococcus anginosus group isolates from central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Cheng; Lo, Hsueh-Hsia

    2013-07-01

    No literature is available on the prevalence and clinical aspects of beta-haemolytic group G Streptococcus anginosus group in central Taiwan. In this study, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer sequencing (where necessary) as the gold standard for molecular identification. Twenty-seven S. anginosus group isolates were identified from 273 beta-haemolytic GGS isolates collected from patients in central Taiwan between February 2007 and August 2011. Of the 27 isolates, 22 were S. anginosus and 5 were Streptococcus constellatus. The 3 commercial methods, Rapid ID 32 Strep, API 20 Strep, and Vitek 2 GP card, identified 77.8%, 40.7%, and 37.0% of S. anginosus group isolates, respectively, with acceptable %ID or probability level. All the S. constellatus isolates possessed the lmb gene (encoding laminin-binding protein); however, none of the S. anginosus isolates possessed this gene. All the 27 isolates were susceptible to penicillin. Five S. anginosus group isolates (18.5%) were resistant to erythromycin. The resistance genes, ermB and mefA, were detected in 3 (2 S. anginosus and 1 S. constellatus) and 2 (2 S. anginosus) isolates, respectively. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that most S. anginosus group isolates were genetically diverse. This is the first study to evaluate 3 commercial methods for the identification of beta-haemolytic group G S. anginosus group species, and only the Rapid ID 32 Strep system showed considerable ability. The clinical aspects, susceptibility pattern, and molecular epidemiology of beta-haemolytic group G S. anginosus group isolates from central Taiwan were also first presented.

  2. Intestinal carriage of Bacillus cereus: faecal isolation studies in three population groups.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, P C; Kramer, J M

    1985-12-01

    The results of examinations of stools for Bacillus cereus among three unrelated groups of individuals are presented. The groups consisted of (1) healthy school-children aged 6-11 years in a rural region of South Africa examined during each of the four seasons of the year; (2) 15 healthy volunteers comprising staff of a London microbiology laboratory and their families examined on each of 3 consecutive weeks; (3) 75 unrelated young children, 2 months to 5 years of age, in a second rural region of South Africa examined during a pilot study of 1 week's duration on the aetiology of rural gastroenteritis. The stools of the last group were submitted as being related to present or recent diarrhoea in the respective children. In group 1, B. cereus isolation rates ranged from 24.3% at the autumn visit to 43% at the summer visit with a significantly higher rate of isolation in the summer than at other seasons of the year (P less than 0.05). B. cereus was isolated from 40% of group 2 volunteers on week 1, none on week 2 and 20% on week 3. The organism was detected in the 12 positive specimens at levels of approximately 10(2)/g and constituted 2.5-30% of the total aerobic spore-forming bacillus population in the stools. In group 3, B. cereus was recovered from 18.7% of the stool samples and was isolated consecutively with other pathogens (enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and rotavirus) on only five occasions. In groups 1 and 3, less than 5% of the stools had '3+' levels of B. cereus (greater than 10 colonies per direct plate culture). B. cereus was readily isolated from all of 10 food samples, representative of the typical diet of the group 1 individuals, and was present in substantial numbers (10(4) to 5.5 X 10(6)/g) in half of them. The isolation results, supported by serotyping, indicated that carriage of B. cereus in stools is transient and its presence at any one time reflects solely its intake with foods.

  3. Intestinal carriage of Bacillus cereus: faecal isolation studies in three population groups.

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, P. C.; Kramer, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The results of examinations of stools for Bacillus cereus among three unrelated groups of individuals are presented. The groups consisted of (1) healthy school-children aged 6-11 years in a rural region of South Africa examined during each of the four seasons of the year; (2) 15 healthy volunteers comprising staff of a London microbiology laboratory and their families examined on each of 3 consecutive weeks; (3) 75 unrelated young children, 2 months to 5 years of age, in a second rural region of South Africa examined during a pilot study of 1 week's duration on the aetiology of rural gastroenteritis. The stools of the last group were submitted as being related to present or recent diarrhoea in the respective children. In group 1, B. cereus isolation rates ranged from 24.3% at the autumn visit to 43% at the summer visit with a significantly higher rate of isolation in the summer than at other seasons of the year (P less than 0.05). B. cereus was isolated from 40% of group 2 volunteers on week 1, none on week 2 and 20% on week 3. The organism was detected in the 12 positive specimens at levels of approximately 10(2)/g and constituted 2.5-30% of the total aerobic spore-forming bacillus population in the stools. In group 3, B. cereus was recovered from 18.7% of the stool samples and was isolated consecutively with other pathogens (enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and rotavirus) on only five occasions. In groups 1 and 3, less than 5% of the stools had '3+' levels of B. cereus (greater than 10 colonies per direct plate culture). B. cereus was readily isolated from all of 10 food samples, representative of the typical diet of the group 1 individuals, and was present in substantial numbers (10(4) to 5.5 X 10(6)/g) in half of them. The isolation results, supported by serotyping, indicated that carriage of B. cereus in stools is transient and its presence at any one time reflects solely its intake with foods. PMID:3937856

  4. Genetic variation and pathogenicity of anastomosis group 2 isolates of Rhizoctonia solani in Australia.

    PubMed

    Stodart, Benjamin J; Harvey, Paul R; Neate, Stephen M; Melanson, Dara L; Scott, Eileen S

    2007-08-01

    A collection of isolates of Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group (AG) 2 was examined for genetic diversity and pathogenicity. Anastomosis reactions classified the majority of isolates into the known subgroups of AG 2-1 and AG 2-2 but the classification of several isolates was ambiguous. Morphological characters were consistent with the species, with no discriminating characters existing between subgroups. Vertical PAGE of pectic enzymes enabled the separation of zymogram group (ZG) 5 and 6 within AG 2-1, but not the separation of ZG 4 and 10 within AG 2-2. PCR analysis using inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and the intron-splice junction (ISJ) region supported the separation of ZG 5 and 6, while the AG 2-2 isolates were separated by geographic region. A comparison of distance matrices produced by the zymogram analysis and PCR indicated a strong correlation between the marker types. Pathogenicity studies suggested canola (Brassica napus) cultivars were most severely affected by AG 2-1, while cultivars of two species of medic (Medicago truncatula cv. Caliph and M. littoralis cv. Herald) were susceptible to both AG 2-1 and 2-2. The results indicate that AG 2 is a polyphyletic group in which the classification of subtypes is sometimes difficult. Further investigation of the population structure within Australia is required to determine the extent and origin of the observed diversity.

  5. Virulence Characteristics and Antibiotic Resistance Patterns among Various Phylogenetic Groups of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolates.

    PubMed

    Derakhshandeh, Abdollah; Firouzi, Roya; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Arabshahi, Sina; Novinrooz, Aytak; Boroojeni, Azar Motamedi; Bahadori, Maryam; Heidari, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the resistance patterns of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates and to investigate the frequency of several virulence genes, including fimH, papA, hlyD, cnf-1, sitA, and tsh, among various phylogenetic groups of UPEC isolates. A total of 85 E. coli isolates were recovered from urine samples from outpatients with a clinical diagnosis of uncomplicated urinary tract infections. A molecular approach to examine the antimicrobial resistance patterns was employed using PCR and the disc diffusion method. The detected frequencies of the virulence factor genes determined using PCR were: fimH (34.1%), papA (9.4%), hlyD (21.2%), cnf-1 (3.5%), sitA (15.3%), and tsh (27.1%). These results revealed that the isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) (74.1%), cefotaxime (CTX) (68.2%), and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC) (94.1%), and they were relatively less resistant to N (56.5%). According to these results, further investigation is needed to determine exactly whether or not SXT, CTX, and AMC are appropriate antibiotics for the treatment of UPEC infections in southern Iran. Although these results demonstrate that fimH is the most frequent virulence gene among UPEC isolates, the high prevalence of isolates that do not encode fimH (75.9%) and the relatively low frequency of isolates that carry other virulence genes require further investigation to clarify the role of the other potential virulence factors in the pathogenesis of these isolates.

  6. Penicillin-susceptible group B streptococcal clinical isolates with reduced cephalosporin susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Noriyuki; Nagano, Yukiko; Toyama, Masami; Kimura, Kouji; Shibayama, Keigo; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2014-09-01

    We characterized penicillin-susceptible group B streptococcal (PSGBS) clinical isolates exhibiting no growth inhibition zone around a ceftibuten disk (CTB(r) PSGBS). The CTB(r) PSGBS isolates, for which augmented MICs of cefaclor and ceftizoxime were found, shared a T394A substitution in penicillin-binding protein 2X (PBP 2X) and a T567I substitution in PBP 2B, together with an additional G429S substitution in PBP 2X or a T145A substitution in PBP 1A, although the T145A substitution in the transglycosidase domain of PBP 1A would have no effect on the level of resistance to ceftibuten.

  7. Genomic Characterization of Group C Orthobunyavirus Reference Strains and Recent South American Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Solórzano, Víctor Fiestas; Kuschner, Robert A.; Halsey, Eric S.; Jarman, Richard G.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2014-01-01

    Group C orthobunyaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus), discovered in the 1950s, are vector-borne human pathogens in the Americas. Currently there is a gap in genomic information for group C viruses. In this study, we obtained complete coding region sequences of reference strains of Caraparu (CARV), Oriboca (ORIV), Marituba (MTBV) and Madrid (MADV) viruses, and five clinical isolates from Peru and Bolivia, using an unbiased de novo approach consisting of random reverse transcription, random anchored PCR amplification, and high throughput pyrosequencing. The small, medium, and large segments encode for a 235 amino acid nucleocapsid protein, an approximately 1430 amino acid surface glycoprotein polyprotein precursor, and a 2248 amino acid RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, respectively. Additionally, the S segment encodes for an 83 amino acid non-structural protein, although this protein is truncated or silenced in some isolates. Phylogenetically, three clinical isolates clustered with CARV, one clustered with MTBV, and one isolate appeared to be a reassortant or a genetic drift resulted from the high variability of the medium segment which was also seen in a few other orthobunyaviruses. These data represent the first complete coding region sequences for this serocomplex of pathogenic orthobunyaviruses. The genome-wide phylogeny of reference strains is consistent with the antigenic properties of the viruses reported in the original serological studies conducted in the 1960s. Comparative analysis of conserved protein regions across group C virus strains and the other orthobunyavirus groups revealed that these group C viruses contain characteristic domains of potential structural and functional significance. Our results provide the basis for the developments of diagnostics, further genetic analyses, and future epidemiologic studies of group C viruses. PMID:24633174

  8. Population Biology of Intestinal Enterococcus Isolates from Hospitalized and Nonhospitalized Individuals in Different Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Tedim, Ana P.; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Corander, Jukka; Rodríguez, Concepción M.; Cantón, Rafael; Willems, Rob J.; Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of enterococcal populations from fecal samples from hospitalized (n = 133) and nonhospitalized individuals (n = 173) of different age groups (group I, ages 0 to 19 years; group II, ages 20 to 59 years; group III, ages ≥60 years) was analyzed. Enterococci were recovered at similar rates from hospitalized and nonhospitalized persons (77.44% to 79.77%) of all age groups (75.0% to 82.61%). Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were predominant, although seven other Enterococcus species were identified. E. faecalis and E. faecium (including ampicillin-resistant E. faecium) colonization rates in nonhospitalized persons were age independent. For inpatients, E. faecalis colonization rates were age independent, but E. faecium colonization rates (particularly the rates of ampicillin-resistant E. faecium colonization) significantly increased with age. The population structure of E. faecium and E. faecalis was determined by superimposing goeBURST and Bayesian analysis of the population structure (BAPS). Most E. faecium sequence types (STs; 150 isolates belonging to 75 STs) were linked to BAPS groups 1 (22.0%), 2 (31.3%), and 3 (36.7%). A positive association between hospital isolates and BAPS subgroups 2.1a and 3.3a (which included major ampicillin-resistant E. faecium human lineages) and between community-based ampicillin-resistant E. faecium isolates and BAPS subgroups 1.2 and 3.3b was found. Most E. faecalis isolates (130 isolates belonging to 58 STs) were grouped into 3 BAPS groups, BAPS groups 1 (36.9%), 2 (40.0%), and 3 (23.1%), with each one comprising widespread lineages. No positive associations with age or hospitalization were established. The diversity and dynamics of enterococcal populations in the fecal microbiota of healthy humans are largely unexplored, with the available knowledge being fragmented and contradictory. The study offers a novel and comprehensive analysis of enterococcal population landscapes and suggests that E. faecium

  9. Population biology of intestinal enterococcus isolates from hospitalized and nonhospitalized individuals in different age groups.

    PubMed

    Tedim, Ana P; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Corander, Jukka; Rodríguez, Concepción M; Cantón, Rafael; Willems, Rob J; Baquero, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M

    2015-03-01

    The diversity of enterococcal populations from fecal samples from hospitalized (n = 133) and nonhospitalized individuals (n = 173) of different age groups (group I, ages 0 to 19 years; group II, ages 20 to 59 years; group III, ages ≥60 years) was analyzed. Enterococci were recovered at similar rates from hospitalized and nonhospitalized persons (77.44% to 79.77%) of all age groups (75.0% to 82.61%). Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were predominant, although seven other Enterococcus species were identified. E. faecalis and E. faecium (including ampicillin-resistant E. faecium) colonization rates in nonhospitalized persons were age independent. For inpatients, E. faecalis colonization rates were age independent, but E. faecium colonization rates (particularly the rates of ampicillin-resistant E. faecium colonization) significantly increased with age. The population structure of E. faecium and E. faecalis was determined by superimposing goeBURST and Bayesian analysis of the population structure (BAPS). Most E. faecium sequence types (STs; 150 isolates belonging to 75 STs) were linked to BAPS groups 1 (22.0%), 2 (31.3%), and 3 (36.7%). A positive association between hospital isolates and BAPS subgroups 2.1a and 3.3a (which included major ampicillin-resistant E. faecium human lineages) and between community-based ampicillin-resistant E. faecium isolates and BAPS subgroups 1.2 and 3.3b was found. Most E. faecalis isolates (130 isolates belonging to 58 STs) were grouped into 3 BAPS groups, BAPS groups 1 (36.9%), 2 (40.0%), and 3 (23.1%), with each one comprising widespread lineages. No positive associations with age or hospitalization were established. The diversity and dynamics of enterococcal populations in the fecal microbiota of healthy humans are largely unexplored, with the available knowledge being fragmented and contradictory. The study offers a novel and comprehensive analysis of enterococcal population landscapes and suggests that E. faecium

  10. Effect of oxygen radicals and peroxide on survival after ultraviolet irradiation and liquid holding recovery of Bacteroides fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, H.J.K.; Jones, D.T.; Woods, D.R.

    1981-08-01

    The survival of Bacteroides fragilis cells after far-ultraviolet irradiation under anaerobic and aerobic conditions and the liquid holding recovery under aerobic conditions were not affected by peroxide or quenchers of toxic oxygen derivatives.

  11. Frequency perception of individual and group successes as a function of competition, coaction, and isolation.

    PubMed

    Janssens, L; Nuttin, J R

    1976-11-01

    The frequency perception of successful and unsuccessful outcomes obtained in serial tasks was investigated in two experiments. Subjects were assigned to serial tasks in which the outcome stimuli ("right" and "wrong") immediately followed subjects' responses to each task item. Subjects' perceptual judgment about the number of "rights and wrongs" obtained was requested at the end of the serial task (incidental event perception). In Experiment 1, subjects performing in groups of four were compared with individual performers both in competing and noncompeting (coacting) conditions. In Experiment 2, the influence of verbal communication and competition versus isolation was examined. Significant and predicted differences in frequeency perception were found (a) in group performers as compared with individual performers, (b) in groups with verbal communication as compared with groups without verbal communication, and (c) in competing groups as compared with noncompeting, especially isolated, groups. The frequency perception of success is discussed in the context of impression formation processes, and its impact on person perception and learning is mentioned. A tentative explanation in terms of affective and cognitive processes related to social interaction is submitted. PMID:993983

  12. Biochemical characteristics and virulence of environmental group F bacteria isolated in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, R J; Allen, D A; Colwell, R R; Joseph, S W; Daily, O P

    1980-01-01

    Bacteria phenotypically resembling Aeromonas hydrophila, but requiring NaCl for growth, have been isolated form the New York Bight. The bacteria proved to be identical to group F organisms isolated from cases of human diarrhea in Indonesia and Bangladesh. Anaerogenic strains initiated responses in Y-1 tissue culture and rabbit ileal loop, consistent with those associated with cytotoxin- and enterotoxin-producing Aeromonas spp. strains. Separation on the basis of production of gas from glucose by group F strains was correlated with differences in mean guanine-plus-cytosine deoxyribonucleic acid base composition and in deoxyribonucleic acid relative reassociation. Both aerogenic and anaerogenic strains reassociated to a significantly greater extent with Vibrio spp. than with Aeromonas spp. and indeed should be considered a new species of the genus Vibrio. PMID:7425623

  13. Frequency of specific agr groups and antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis in the northeast of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohsenzadeh, Mohammad; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Azimian, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is generally regarded as a leading cause of mastitis in dairy cattle. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of agr groups and any possible relationship between agr groups and antibiotic resistance among S. aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis in Northeast of Iran. For this purpose, a total of 300 bovine mastitic milk samples were taken from dairy industry farms of Khorasan Razavi Province, Iran. S. aureus were isolated and identified according to the standard methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was conducted by disk diffusion method. In this study a total of 31 isolates of S. aureus were evaluated for agrD gene polymorphism by specific primers. Most of the isolates belonged to agr group I (54.8%), followed by agr group III (25.8%) and agr group II (19.4%). There was not any isolates belonging to group IV. Resistance to methicillin in agr group I isolates was more than other groups. Agr groups II and III were quite susceptible to methicillin. Due to high prevalent of S. aureus isolates and high antibiotic resistance rate in bovine mastitic isolates, it is important to verify the characteristics of S. aureus strains in Iran. PMID:26973764

  14. Prevalence of Macrolide Resistance Genes in Clinical Isolates of the Streptococcus anginosus (“S. milleri”) Group

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jan A.; van Baar, Gilles J.; London, Nancy H. H. J.; Tjhie, Jeroen H. T.; Schouls, Leo M.; Stobberingh, Ellen E.

    2001-01-01

    Twenty-two unrelated erythromycin-resistant anginosus group strains (3.2% resistance rate) were assessed for mechanisms of resistance. Streptococcus anginosus accounted for 16 of the 22 isolates. Fifteen isolates harbored the erm(B) gene. The erm(TR) and the mef(E) genes were carried by two isolates each. In three isolates, none of these resistance genes was detected by PCR. PMID:11451701

  15. A review of the Nearctic linyphiid spider Arcuphantes fragilis (Araneae, Linyphiidae) and closely related species.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuangchun; Marusik, Yuri M; Tu, Lihong

    2016-01-01

    The Western Nearctic species Arcuphantes fragilis Chamberlin & Ivie, 1943 and several closely related species are reviewed. Seven species are recognized, including two new species: A. cavaticus Chamberlin & Ivie, 1943, A. decoratus Chamberlin & Ivie, 1943, A. fragilis Chamberlin & Ivie, 1943, A. dentatus n. sp., A. curvomarginatus n. sp., A. potteri Chamberlin & Ivie, 1943, and A. sylvaticus Chamberlin & Ivie, 1943. The female of A. decoratus is described for the first time. These seven species share a same genital type, distinguishing them from other congeners, with small differences among them. Illustrations for A. dentatus n. sp., SEM images and digital photographs for all seven species are presented. Descriptions of new species, redescriptions of known species and a key for the seven species are provided. PMID:27470863

  16. Accumulation and effects of sulfadimethoxine in Salix fragilis L. plants: a preliminary study to phytoremediation purposes.

    PubMed

    Michelini, Lucia; Meggio, Franco; La Rocca, Nicoletta; Ferro, Stefania; Ghisi, Rossella

    2012-04-01

    The application of manure to fertilize arable lands is one of the major means through which veterinary sulfonamides (SAs) enter the environment. Little is known about the capacity of woody plants to phytoremediate this class of antibiotics. To this purpose we performed preliminary studies to evaluate Salix fragilis L. response to sulfadimethoxine (SDM) by investigating both its ability to absorb and tolerate doses of SDM found in fresh faeces of treated calves. Forty cuttings were exposed to either 0, 0.5, 1, or 2 mM of SDM for one month. Decreases in photosynthetic electron transport rate and net CO2 assimilation after 25 days for the higher SDM concentrations were noticed. Moreover, alterations in root morphology of treated plants were observed and further investigated through electron microscopy. However, collected data revealed high root accumulation potential. These preliminary results are promising as they demonstrate that Salix fragilis L. can both absorb and tolerate high concentrations of SAs. PMID:22567719

  17. Physiological and proteomic responses of different willow clones (Salix fragilis x alba) exposed to dredged sediment contaminated by heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Evlard, Aricia; Sergeant, Kjell; Ferrandis, Salvador; Printz, Bruno; Renaut, Jenny; Guignard, Cedric; Paul, Roger; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Campanella, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    High biomass producing species are considered as tools for remediation of contaminated soils. Willows (Salix spp.) are prominent study subjects in this regard. In this study, different willow clones (Salix fragilis x alba) were planted on heavy-metal polluted dredging sludge. A first objective was assessment of the biomass production for these clones. Using a Gupta statistic, four clones were identified as high biomass producers (HBP). For comparison, a group of four clones with lowest biomass production were selected (LBP). A second objective was to compare metal uptake as well as the physiological and proteomic responses of these two groups. All these complementary data's allow us to have a better picture of the health of the clones that would be used in phytoremediation programs. Cd, Zn, and Ni total uptake was higher in the HBPs but Pb total uptake was higher in LBPs. Our proteomic and physiological results showed that the LBPs were able to maintain cellular activity as much as the HBPs although the oxidative stress response was more pronounced in the LBPs. This could be due to the high Pb content found in this group although a combined effect of the other metals cannot be excluded.

  18. Antagonism of ampicillin and chloramphenicol for meningeal isolates of group B streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, J L; Mason, E O; Baker, C J

    1981-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae type b has led to the recommendation that ampicillin and chloramphenicol be given as the initial therapy for suspected bacterial meningitis in infants and children. However, during the first 2 months of life, H. influenzae type b is a rare cause of meningitis, whereas group B streptococcus is the most frequently isolated agent. Since ampicillin and chloramphenicol have been shown to be antagonistic for other streptococci, an in vitro study of their effect on group B streptococci was performed. The effect of ampicillin and chloramphenicol, alone and in combination, on 18 meningeal isolates was determined for 2 different inocula of group B streptococci, using microtiter broth dilution and growth kinetic assays. Isoboles, fractional lethal concentration indices, or both indicated antagonism for all strains. Growth kinetic assays for two representative strains demonstrated inhibition of the early bactericidal activity of ampicillin by chloramphenicol. These findings of in vitro antagonism suggest that this combination may be contraindicated for the treatment of infants with group B streptococcal meningitis. PMID:7030197

  19. Isolation of Streptococcus tigurinus - a novel member of Streptococcus mitis group from a case of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Dhotre, Shree V; Mehetre, Gajanan T; Dharne, Mahesh S; Suryawanshi, Namdev M; Nagoba, Basavraj S

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus tigurinus is a new member of the Streptococcus viridians group and is closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis. The type strain AZ_3a(T) of S. tigurinus was originally isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis. Accurate identification of S. tigurinus is facilitated only by newer molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene analysis. During the course of study on bacteraemia and infective endocarditis with reference to periodontitis and viridians group of streptococci, a strain of S. tigurinus isolated from subgingival plaque of a patient with periodontitis identified by 16S rRNA gene analysis, which was originally identified as Streptococcus pluranimalium by Vitek 2. Confirmation by 16S rRNA gene analysis showed 99.39% similarity (1476/1485 bp) with S. tigurinus AZ_3a(T) (AORU01000002). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of S. tigurinus from the oral cavity of a periodontitis patient.

  20. Characterisation of the first actinobacterial group isolated from a Mexican extremophile environment.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Erika T; Badillo, Ricardo Flores; Maldonado, Luis A

    2013-07-01

    The "Cave of Crystals" (aka 'Naica') in Chihuahua Mexico is a natural unique subterranean ecosystem which mainly consists of crystals made of calcium sulfate. The main system of caves are found at a depth of 300 meters (m) below sea level with crystals that range in size from a few centimeters to 15 m. The crystals date from nearly 400,000 years old and are thought to be formed when the cave was fully covered by water. At present time, this place shows a nearly constant temperature of 55 °C over the year and a humidity of 100 % which makes this place incomparable and unbearable to animal and/or human life. In the present study, two actinobacterial groups were isolated from within this system of caves and subjected to a systematic study to establish their phylogenetic relationship to microorganisms belonging to this vast group of Gram positive bacteria. Phenotypic properties, chemotaxonomic and 16S rRNA gene sequencing show that the microorganisms are members of the family Pseudonocardiaceae and are most closely related to the genus Prauserella. The present study is the first to report the isolation and presence of Actinobacteria or any other microbial form of life in this exceptional place. Moreover, this unexpected biodiversity can also provide an insight of the antibiotic resistome present in the isolates reported in this study.

  1. The isolation of nuclear envelopes. Effects of thiol-group oxidation and of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Comerford, S A; McLuckie, I F; Gorman, M; Scott, K A; Agutter, P S

    1985-02-15

    The effects of (a) oxidative cross-linking of protein thiol groups and (b) the presence or absence of Ca2+ ions on rat liver nuclear-envelope isolation were studied. Two envelope-isolation procedures were compared: a well characterized low-ionic-strength method and a recently developed high-ionic-strength method. The latter method seems preferable to the former in respect of lower intranuclear contamination of the envelopes, suppression of endogenous serine proteinase, and maintenance of high specific activities of envelope-associated enzymes. In both procedures, however, the presence of Ca2+ gave rise to a rapid, apparently irreversible, contamination of the envelopes by intranuclear material. This effect was half-maximal at 20 microM-Ca2+. In addition, the envelopes became contaminated with intranuclear material by a Ca2+-independent mechanism, apparently resulting from N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive intermolecular disulphide-bond formation. This oxidative process seemed to have two major kinetic components (half-life, t1/2, approx. 2 min and 10 min). In view of these findings, it is recommended that (i) for most purposes, nuclear envelopes be isolated by the newly developed high-ionic-strength procedure, (ii) irrespective of the method used, Ca2+-chelators be included in all the buffers, (iii) thiol-group oxidation be prevented or reversed during the procedure.

  2. The isolation of nuclear envelopes. Effects of thiol-group oxidation and of calcium ions.

    PubMed Central

    Comerford, S A; McLuckie, I F; Gorman, M; Scott, K A; Agutter, P S

    1985-01-01

    The effects of (a) oxidative cross-linking of protein thiol groups and (b) the presence or absence of Ca2+ ions on rat liver nuclear-envelope isolation were studied. Two envelope-isolation procedures were compared: a well characterized low-ionic-strength method and a recently developed high-ionic-strength method. The latter method seems preferable to the former in respect of lower intranuclear contamination of the envelopes, suppression of endogenous serine proteinase, and maintenance of high specific activities of envelope-associated enzymes. In both procedures, however, the presence of Ca2+ gave rise to a rapid, apparently irreversible, contamination of the envelopes by intranuclear material. This effect was half-maximal at 20 microM-Ca2+. In addition, the envelopes became contaminated with intranuclear material by a Ca2+-independent mechanism, apparently resulting from N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive intermolecular disulphide-bond formation. This oxidative process seemed to have two major kinetic components (half-life, t1/2, approx. 2 min and 10 min). In view of these findings, it is recommended that (i) for most purposes, nuclear envelopes be isolated by the newly developed high-ionic-strength procedure, (ii) irrespective of the method used, Ca2+-chelators be included in all the buffers, (iii) thiol-group oxidation be prevented or reversed during the procedure. PMID:2983687

  3. Physiological compensation for environmental acidification is limited in the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.; Lovera, C.; Whaling, P. J.; Buck, K. R.; Pane, E. F.; Barry, J. P.

    2013-05-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 is now reaching depths over 1000 m in the Eastern Pacific, overlapping the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). Deep-sea animals - particularly, calcifiers - are suspected to be especially sensitive to environmental acidification associated with global climate change. We have investigated the effects of hypercapnia and hypoxia on the deep-sea urchin Strongylocentrotus fragilis, during two long-term exposure experiments (1 month and 4 month) at three levels of reduced pH at in situ O2 levels of approx. 10% saturation, and also to control pH at 100% O2 saturation. During the first experiment, internal acid-base balance was investigated during a one-month exposure; results show S. fragilis has limited ability to compensate for the respiratory acidosis brought on by reduced pH, due in part to low non-bicarbonate extracellular fluid buffering capacity. During the second experiment, longer-term effects of hypercapnia and variable O2 on locomotion, feeding, growth, and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were investigated; results show significant mortality and correlation of all measured parameters with environmental acidification at pH 6.6. Transient adverse effects on locomotion and feeding were seen at pH 7.2, without compromise of growth or GSI. Based on the expected changes in ocean pH and oxygen, results suggest extinction of S. fragilis in the eastern North Pacific is unlikely. Rather, we expect a shoaling and contraction of its bathymetric range.

  4. Different metabolic features of Bacteroides fragilis growing in the presence of glucose and exopolysaccharides of bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Covian, David; Sánchez, Borja; Salazar, Nuria; Martínez, Noelia; Redruello, Begoña; Gueimonde, Miguel; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides is among the most abundant microorganism inhabiting the human intestine. They are saccharolytic bacteria able to use dietary or host-derived glycans as energy sources. Some Bacteroides fragilis strains contribute to the maturation of the immune system but it is also an opportunistic pathogen. The intestine is the habitat of most Bifidobacterium species, some of whose strains are considered probiotics. Bifidobacteria can synthesize exopolysaccharides (EPSs), which are complex carbohydrates that may be available in the intestinal environment. We studied the metabolism of B. fragilis when an EPS preparation from bifidobacteria was added to the growth medium compared to its behavior with added glucose. 2D-DIGE coupled with the identification by MALDI-TOF/TOF evidenced proteins that were differentially produced when EPS was added. The results were supported by RT-qPCR gene expression analysis. The intracellular and extracellular pattern of certain amino acids, the redox balance and the α-glucosidase activity were differently affected in EPS with respect to glucose. These results allowed us to hypothesize that three general main events, namely the activation of amino acids catabolism, enhancement of the transketolase reaction from the pentose-phosphate cycle, and activation of the succinate-propionate pathway, promote a shift of bacterial metabolism rendering more reducing power and optimizing the energetic yield in the form of ATP when Bacteroides grow with added EPSs. Our results expand the knowledge about the capacity of B. fragilis for adapting to complex carbohydrates and amino acids present in the intestinal environment. PMID:26347720

  5. A proteomic approach towards understanding the cross talk between Bacteroides fragilis and Bifidobacterium longum in coculture.

    PubMed

    Rios-Covián, David; Sánchez, Borja; Martínez, Noelia; Cuesta, Isabel; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of the interactions among intestinal microbes is needed to decipher the complex cross talk that takes place within the human gut. Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium genera are among the most relevant intestinal bacteria, and it has been previously reported that coculturing of these 2 microorganisms affects their survival. Therefore, coculturing of Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bacteroides fragilis DSMZ2151 was performed with the aim of unravelling the mechanisms involved in their interaction. To this end, we applied proteomic (2D-DIGE) analyses, and by chromatographic techniques we quantified the bacterial metabolites produced during coincubation. Coculture stimulated the growth of B. longum, retarding that of B. fragilis, with concomitant changes in the production of some proteins and metabolites of both bacteria. The combined culture promoted upregulation of the bifidobacterial pyruvate kinase and downregulation of the Bacteroides phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase - 2 enzymes involved in the catabolism of carbohydrates. Moreover, B. fragilis FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, a protein with chaperone-like activity, was found to be overproduced in coculture, suggesting the induction of a stress response in this microorganism. This study provides mechanistic data to deepen our understanding of the interaction between Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium intestinal populations.

  6. The rec A operon: a novel stress response gene cluster in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Samantha A; Smalley, Darren; Smith, C. Jeffrey; Abratt, Valerie R

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, an opportunistic pathogen of humans, is a leading cause of bacteraemias and anaerobic abscesses which are often treated with metronidazole, a drug which damages DNA. This study investigated the responses of the B. fragilis recA three gene operon to the stress experienced during metronidazole treatment and exposure to reactive oxygen species simulating those generated by the host immune system during infection. A transcriptionally regulated response was observed using quantitative RT-PCR after metronidazole and hydrogen peroxide treatment, with all three genes being upregulated under stress conditions. In vivo and in vitro analysis of the functional role of the second gene of the operon was done using heterologous complementation and protein expression (in Escherichia coli), with subsequent biochemical assay. This gene encoded a functional bacterioferritin co-migratory protein (BCP) which was thiol-specific and had antioxidant properties, including protection of the glutamine synthetase III enzyme. This in vitro data supports the hypothesis that the genes of the operon may be involved in protection of the bacteria from the oxidative burst during tissue invasion and may play a significant role in bacterial survival and metronidazole resistance during treatment of B. fragilis infections. PMID:24703997

  7. Discovery and Expansion of Gene Modules by Seeking Isolated Groups in a Random Graph Process

    PubMed Central

    Brumm, Jochen; Conibear, Elizabeth; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Bryan, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background A central problem in systems biology research is the identification and extension of biological modules–groups of genes or proteins participating in a common cellular process or physical complex. As a result, there is a persistent need for practical, principled methods to infer the modular organization of genes from genome-scale data. Results We introduce a novel approach for the identification of modules based on the persistence of isolated gene groups within an evolving graph process. First, the underlying genomic data is summarized in the form of ranked gene–gene relationships, thereby accommodating studies that quantify the relevant biological relationship directly or indirectly. Then, the observed gene–gene relationship ranks are viewed as the outcome of a random graph process and candidate modules are given by the identifiable subgraphs that arise during this process. An isolation index is computed for each module, which quantifies the statistical significance of its survival time. Conclusions The Miso (module isolation) method predicts gene modules from genomic data and the associated isolation index provides a module-specific measure of confidence. Improving on existing alternative, such as graph clustering and the global pruning of dendrograms, this index offers two intuitively appealing features: (1) the score is module-specific; and (2) different choices of threshold correlate logically with the resulting performance, i.e. a stringent cutoff yields high quality predictions, but low sensitivity. Through the analysis of yeast phenotype data, the Miso method is shown to outperform existing alternatives, in terms of the specificity and sensitivity of its predictions. PMID:18843375

  8. Low-temperature isolation of disease-suppressive bacteria and characterization of a distinctive group of pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Johansson, P Maria; Wright, Sandra A I

    2003-11-01

    The influence of environmental factors during isolation on the composition of potential biocontrol isolates is largely unknown. Bacterial isolates that efficiently suppressed wheat seedling blight caused by Fusarium culmorum were found by isolating psychrotrophic, root-associated bacteria and by screening them in a bioassay that mimicked field conditions. The impact of individual isolation factors on the disease-suppressive index (DSI) of almost 600 isolates was analyzed. The bacteria originated from 135 samples from 62 sites in Sweden and Switzerland. The isolation factors that increased the probability of finding isolates with high DSIs were sampling from arable land, Swiss origin of samples, and origination of isolates from plants belonging to the family Brassicaceae. The colony morphology of the isolates was characterized and compared to DSIs, which led to identification of a uniform morphological group containing 57 highly disease-suppressive isolates. Isolates in this group were identified as Pseudomonas sp.; they were fluorescent on King's medium B and had characteristic crystalline structures in their colonies. These isolates were morphologically similar to seven strains that had previously been selected for suppression of barley net blotch caused by Drechslera teres. Members of this morphological group grow at 1.5 degrees C and produce an antifungal polyketide (2,3-deepoxy-2,3-didehydrorhizoxin [DDR]). They have similar two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profiles, phenotypic characteristics, and in vitro inhibition spectra of pathogens. In summary, in this paper we describe some isolation factors that are important for obtaining disease-suppressive bacteria in our system, and we describe a novel group of biocontrol pseudomonads.

  9. Low-Temperature Isolation of Disease-Suppressive Bacteria and Characterization of a Distinctive Group of Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, P. Maria; Wright, Sandra A. I.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors during isolation on the composition of potential biocontrol isolates is largely unknown. Bacterial isolates that efficiently suppressed wheat seedling blight caused by Fusarium culmorum were found by isolating psychrotrophic, root-associated bacteria and by screening them in a bioassay that mimicked field conditions. The impact of individual isolation factors on the disease-suppressive index (DSI) of almost 600 isolates was analyzed. The bacteria originated from 135 samples from 62 sites in Sweden and Switzerland. The isolation factors that increased the probability of finding isolates with high DSIs were sampling from arable land, Swiss origin of samples, and origination of isolates from plants belonging to the family Brassicaceae. The colony morphology of the isolates was characterized and compared to DSIs, which led to identification of a uniform morphological group containing 57 highly disease-suppressive isolates. Isolates in this group were identified as Pseudomonas sp.; they were fluorescent on King's medium B and had characteristic crystalline structures in their colonies. These isolates were morphologically similar to seven strains that had previously been selected for suppression of barley net blotch caused by Drechslera teres. Members of this morphological group grow at 1.5°C and produce an antifungal polyketide (2,3-deepoxy-2,3-didehydrorhizoxin [DDR]). They have similar two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profiles, phenotypic characteristics, and in vitro inhibition spectra of pathogens. In summary, in this paper we describe some isolation factors that are important for obtaining disease-suppressive bacteria in our system, and we describe a novel group of biocontrol pseudomonads. PMID:14602601

  10. Nationwide surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of pathogens isolated from surgical site infections (SSI) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Takesue, Yoshio; Watanabe, Akira; Hanaki, Hideaki; Kusachi, Shinya; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Yagisawa, Morimasa; Sato, Junko; Oguri, Toyoko; Nakanishi, Kunio; Sumiyama, Yoshinobu; Kitagawa, Yuko; Wakabayashi, Go; Koyama, Isamu; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Konishi, Toshiro; Fukushima, Ryoji; Seki, Shiko; Imai, Shun; Shintani, Tsunehiro; Tsukada, Hiroki; Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Omura, Kenji; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Kusunoki, Masato; Kubo, Shoji; Shimizu, Junzo; Hirai, Toshihiro; Ohge, Hiroki; Kadowaki, Akio; Okamoto, Kohji; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the trends of antimicrobial resistance in pathogens isolated from surgical site infections (SSI), a Japanese surveillance committee conducted the first nationwide survey. Seven main organisms were collected from SSI at 27 medical centers in 2010 and were shipped to a central laboratory for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. A total of 702 isolates from 586 patients with SSI were included. Staphylococcus aureus (20.4 %) and Enterococcus faecalis (19.5 %) were the most common isolates, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.4 %) and Bacteroides fragilis group (15.4 %). Methicillin-resistant S. aureus among S. aureus was 72.0 %. Vancomycin MIC 2 μg/ml strains accounted for 9.7 %. In Escherichia coli, 11 of 95 strains produced extended-spectrum β-lactamase (Klebsiella pneumoniae, 0/53 strains). Of E. coli strains, 8.4 % were resistant to ceftazidime (CAZ) and 26.3 % to ciprofloxacin (CPFX). No P. aeruginosa strains produced metallo-β-lactamase. In P. aeruginosa, the resistance rates were 7.4 % to tazobactam/piperacillin (TAZ/PIPC), 10.2 % to imipenem (IPM), 2.8 % to meropenem, cefepime, and CPFX, and 0 % to gentamicin. In the B. fragilis group, the rates were 28.6 % to clindamycin, 5.7 % to cefmetazole, 2.9 % to TAZ/PIPC and IPM, and 0 % to metronidazole (Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron; 59.1, 36.4, 0, 0, 0 %). MIC₉₀ of P. aeruginosa isolated 15 days or later after surgery rose in TAZ/PIPC, CAZ, IPM, and CPFX. In patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score ≥3, the resistance rates of P. aeruginosa to TAZ/PIPC and CAZ were higher than in patients with ASA ≤2. The data obtained in this study revealed the trend of the spread of resistance among common species that cause SSI. Timing of isolation from surgery and the patient's physical status affected the selection of resistant organisms.

  11. Differentiation and grouping of isolates of the Ganoderma lucidum complex by random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR compared with grouping on the basis of internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Hseu, R S; Wang, H H; Wang, H F; Moncalvo, J M

    1996-01-01

    Laccate polypores of the Ganoderma lucidum species complex are widespread white rot fungi of economic importance, but isolates cannot be identified by traditional taxonomic methods. Parsimony analysis of nucleotide sequences from the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of the ribosomal gene (rDNA) distinguished six lineages in this species complex. Each ITS lineage may represent one or more putative species. While some isolates have identical ITS sequences, all of them could be clearly differentiated by genetic fingerprinting using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). To investigate the suitability of RAPD markers for taxonomic identification and grouping of isolates of the G. lucidum complex, RAPD fragments (RAPDs) were used as phenotypic characters in numerical and parsimony analyses. Results show that data from RAPDS do not distinguish the same clades as ITS data do. Groupings based on analysis of RAPD data were very sensitive to the choice of the grouping method used, and no consistent grouping of isolates could be proposed. However, analysis with RAPDs did resolve several robust terminal clades containing putatively conspecific isolates, suggesting that RAPDs might be helpful for systematics at the lower taxonomic levels that are unresolved by ITS sequence data. The limitations of RAPDs for systematics are briefly discussed. The conclusion of this study is that ITS sequences can be used to identify isolates of the G. lucidum complex, whereas RAPDs can be used to differentiate between isolates having identical ITS sequences. The practical implications of these results are briefly illustrated. PMID:8919797

  12. [Typing of group A streptococci isolated from urban population of different social status and age].

    PubMed

    Riapis, L A; Briko, N I; Dmitrieva, N F; Eshchina, A S; Pronskiĭ, A V; Filatov, N N; Ivanenko, A V; Salova, N Ia; Sizykh, E V; Pavlovskiĭ, S S; Skorkina, Iu A; Trofimov, D Iu; Kirillov, M Iu; Sobolev, V I

    2007-01-01

    Pulse-electrophoresis, sequencing of emm genes coding protein M and PCR analysis of speA, speB, and speC genes were used for characterization of group A streptococci (GAS) isolated in different years in Moscow and Tuapse mostly from children and military staff. It has been shown that epidemic process of streptococcal infection caused by GAS in Moscow is based on circulation of many independent clones of Streptococcus pyogenes. Obtained data on complex typing of S. pyogenes would be useful for study of molecular epidemiology of diseases caused by GAS and improvement of epidemiologic surveillance.

  13. Molecular characterization of Streptococcus pyogenes group A isolates from a tertiary hospital in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Karaky, Nathalie M; Araj, George F; Tokajian, Sima T

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A Streptococcus (GAS)] is one of the most important human pathogens, responsible for numerous diseases with diverse clinical manifestations. As the epidemiology of GAS infections evolves, a rapid and reliable characterization of the isolates remains essential for epidemiological analysis and infection control. This study investigated the epidemiological patterns and genetic characteristics of 150 GAS isolates from a tertiary hospital in Lebanon by emm typing, superantigens (SAgs) detection, PFGE and antibiotic profiling. The results revealed 41 distinct emm types, the most prevalent of which were emm89 (16 %), emm12 (10 %), emm2 (9 %) and emm1 (8 %). Testing for the presence of superantigens showed that speB (87 %), ssa (36 %) and speG (30 %) were predominant. PFGE detected 39 pulsotypes when a similarity cut-off value of 80 % was implemented. Antibiotic-susceptibility testing against seven different classes of antibiotics showed that 9 % of the isolates were resistant to clindamycin, 23 % were resistant to erythromycin and 4 % showed the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotype. The emergence of tetracycline-resistant strains (37 %) was high when compared with previous reports from Lebanon. This study provided comprehensive evidence of the epidemiology of GAS in Lebanon, highlighting the association between emm types and toxin genes, and providing valuable information about the origin and dissemination of this pathogen.

  14. Isolation and purification of blood group antigens using immuno-affinity chromatography on short monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Mönster, Andrea; Hiller, Oliver; Grüger, Daniela; Blasczyk, Rainer; Kasper, Cornelia

    2011-02-01

    Monolithic columns have gained increasing attention as stationary phases for the separation of biomolecules and biopharmaceuticals. In the present work the performance of monolithic convective interaction media (CIM(®)) chromatography for the purification of blood group antigens was established. The proteins employed in this study are derived from blood group antigens Knops, JMH and Scianna, equipped both with a His-tag and with a V5-tag by which they can be purified. In a first step a monoclonal antibody directed against the V5-tag was immobilized on a CIM(®) Disk with epoxy chemistry. After this, the immobilized CIM(®) Disk was used in immuno-affinity chromatography to purify the three blood group antigens from cell culture supernatant. Up-scaling of the applied technology was carried out using CIM(®) Tubes. In comparison to conventional affinity chromatography, blood group antigens were also purified via His-tag using a HiTrap(®) metal-affinity column. The two purifications have been compared regarding purity, yield and purification speed. Using the monolithic support, it was possible to isolate the blood group antigens with a higher flow rate than using the conventional bed-packed column.

  15. Viridans Group Streptococci Clinical Isolates: MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry versus Gene Sequence-Based Identification

    PubMed Central

    Angeletti, Silvia; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Avola, Alessandra; Crea, Francesca; Dedej, Etleva; Vailati, Francesca; Farina, Claudio; De Florio, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Viridans Group Streptococci (VGS) species-level identification is fundamental for patients management. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization—time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been used for VGS identification but discrimination within the Mitis group resulted difficult. In this study, VGS identifications with two MALDI-TOF instruments, the Biotyper (Bruker) and the VITEK MS (bioMérieux) have been compared to those derived from tuf, soda and rpoB genes sequencing. VGS isolates were clustered and a dendrogram constructed using the Biotyper 3.0 software (Bruker). RpoB gene sequencing resulted the most sensitive and specific molecular method for S. pneumonia identification and was used as reference method. The sensitivity and the specificity of the VITEK MS in S. pneumonia identification were 100%, while the Biotyper resulted less specific (92.4%). In non pneumococcal VGS strains, the group-level correlation between rpoB and the Biotyper was 100%, while the species-level correlation was 61% after database upgrading (than 37% before upgrading). The group-level correlation between rpoB and the VITEK MS was 100%, while the species-level correlation was 36% and increases at 69% if isolates identified as S. mitis/S. oralis are included. The less accurate performance of the VITEK MS in VGS identification within the Mitis group was due to the inability to discriminate between S. mitis and S. oralis. Conversely, the Biotyper, after the release of the upgraded database, was able to discriminate between the two species. In the dendrogram, VGS strains from the same group were grouped into the same cluster and had a good correspondence with the gene-based clustering reported by other authors, thus confirming the validity of the upgraded version of the database. Data from this study demonstrated that MALDI-TOF technique can represent a rapid and cost saving method for VGS identification even within the Mitis group but improvements of spectra database are

  16. [Isolation and identification methods of enterobacteria group and its technological advancement].

    PubMed

    Furuta, Itaru

    2007-08-01

    In the last half-century, isolation and identification methods of enterobacteria groups have markedly improved by technological advancement. Clinical microbiology tests have changed overtime from tube methods to commercial identification kits and automated identification. Tube methods are the original method for the identification of enterobacteria groups, that is, a basically essential method to recognize bacterial fermentation and biochemical principles. In this paper, traditional tube tests are discussed, such as the utilization of carbohydrates, indole, methyl red, and citrate and urease tests. Commercial identification kits and automated instruments by computer based analysis as current methods are also discussed, and those methods provide rapidity and accuracy. Nonculture techniques of nucleic acid typing methods using PCR analysis, and immunochemical methods using monoclonal antibodies can be further developed.

  17. Is Penicillin Plus Gentamicin Synergistic against Clinical Group B Streptococcus isolates?: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruppen, Corinne; Lupo, Agnese; Decosterd, Laurent; Sendi, Parham

    2016-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is increasingly causing invasive infections in non-pregnant adults. Elderly patients and those with comorbidities are at increased risk. On the basis of previous studies focusing on neonatal infections, penicillin plus gentamicin is recommended for infective endocarditis (IE) and periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) in adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a synergism with penicillin and gentamicin is present in GBS isolates that caused IE and PJI. We used 5 GBS isolates, two clinical strains and three control strains, including one displaying high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR). The results from the checkerboard and time-kill assays (TKAs) were compared. For TKAs, antibiotic concentrations for penicillin were 0.048 and 0.2 mg/L, and for gentamicin 4 mg/L or 12.5 mg/L. In the checkerboard assay, the median fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) of all isolates indicated indifference. TKAs for all isolates failed to demonstrate synergism with penicillin 0.048 or 0.2 mg/L, irrespective of gentamicin concentrations used. Rapid killing was seen with penicillin 0.048 mg/L plus either 4 mg/L or 12.5 mg/L gentamicin, from 2 h up to 8 h hours after antibiotic exposure. TKAs with penicillin 0.2 mg/L decreased the starting inoculum below the limit of quantification within 4–6 h, irrespective of the addition of gentamicin. Fast killing was seen with penicillin 0.2 mg/L plus 12.5 mg/L gentamicin within the first 2 h. Our in vitro results indicate that the addition of gentamicin to penicillin contributes to faster killing at low penicillin concentrations, but only within the first few hours. Twenty-four hours after antibiotic exposure, PEN alone was bactericidal and synergism was not seen.

  18. [A novel fungicide of the iturin group, obtained from a marine isolate of Bacillus subtilis. Isolation, physico-chemical and biochemical properties, identification].

    PubMed

    Oleĭnikova, G K; Shevchenko, L S; Kuznetsova, T A; Mikhaĭlov, V V

    1995-02-01

    Strain KMM 457 of Bacillus subtilis was isolated from a frozen sample of the soft coral Sarcophyton sp. The samples were collected in 1989 in the South China Sea near the Vietnam Shore during an expedition on the board of R/V "Akademik Oparin". Metabolites of the isolate were investigated and it was found to produce a number of physiologically active compounds. One of them designated as OGA showed fungicidal activity. By the physicochemical properties it was referred to the group of iturins. The comparison with the described antibiotics of the iturin group suggested that it was a new representative of the iturin group.

  19. Survival after pathogen exposure in group-living insects: don't forget the stress of social isolation!

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, P; Holländer, K; Meunier, J

    2016-09-01

    A major cost of group-living is its inherent risk of pathogen infection. To limit this risk, many group-living animals have developed the capability to prophylactically boost their immune system in the presence of group members and/or to mount collective defences against pathogens. These two phenomena, called density-dependent prophylaxis and social immunity, respectively, are often used to explain why, in group-living species, individuals survive better in groups than in isolation. However, this survival difference may also reflect an alternative and often overlooked process: a cost of social isolation on individuals' capability to fight against infections. Here, we disentangled the effects of density-dependent prophylaxis, social immunity and stress of social isolation on the survival after pathogen exposure in group-living adults of the European earwig Forficula auricularia. By manipulating the presence of group members both before and after pathogen exposure, we demonstrated that the cost of being isolated after infection, but not the benefits of social immunity or density-dependent prophylaxis, explained the survival of females. Specifically, females kept constantly in groups or constantly isolated had higher survival rates than females that were first in groups and then isolated after infection. Our results also showed that this cost of social isolation was absent in males and that social isolation did not reduce the survival of noninfected individuals. Overall, this study gives a new perspective on the role of pathogens in social evolution, as it suggests that an apparently nonadaptive, personal immune process may promote the maintenance of group-living under pathogenic environments. PMID:27272199

  20. Survival after pathogen exposure in group-living insects: don't forget the stress of social isolation!

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, P; Holländer, K; Meunier, J

    2016-09-01

    A major cost of group-living is its inherent risk of pathogen infection. To limit this risk, many group-living animals have developed the capability to prophylactically boost their immune system in the presence of group members and/or to mount collective defences against pathogens. These two phenomena, called density-dependent prophylaxis and social immunity, respectively, are often used to explain why, in group-living species, individuals survive better in groups than in isolation. However, this survival difference may also reflect an alternative and often overlooked process: a cost of social isolation on individuals' capability to fight against infections. Here, we disentangled the effects of density-dependent prophylaxis, social immunity and stress of social isolation on the survival after pathogen exposure in group-living adults of the European earwig Forficula auricularia. By manipulating the presence of group members both before and after pathogen exposure, we demonstrated that the cost of being isolated after infection, but not the benefits of social immunity or density-dependent prophylaxis, explained the survival of females. Specifically, females kept constantly in groups or constantly isolated had higher survival rates than females that were first in groups and then isolated after infection. Our results also showed that this cost of social isolation was absent in males and that social isolation did not reduce the survival of noninfected individuals. Overall, this study gives a new perspective on the role of pathogens in social evolution, as it suggests that an apparently nonadaptive, personal immune process may promote the maintenance of group-living under pathogenic environments.

  1. A comparison of the haemagglutinating and enzymic activities of Bacteroides fragilis whole cells and outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Patrick, S; McKenna, J P; O'Hagan, S; Dermott, E

    1996-04-01

    The haemagglutinating and enzymic activities of the obligately anaerobic pathogenic bacterium Bacteroides fragilis were examined. Outer membrane vesicles are released from the surface of B. fragilis. They can be detected by electron microscopy in ultrathin sections and bacterial suspensions after negative staining. Electron microscopy and immunogold labelling with a MAb specific for surface polysaccharide of B. fragilis confirmed that the vesicles carried outer membrane associated epitopes. The haemagglutinating activity of whole cells from populations of B. fragilis strains NCTC9343, BE3 and LS66 enriched by Percoll density gradient centrifugation for a large capsule (LC), electron dense layer (EDL); non-capsulate by light microscopy) and outer membrane vesicles (OMV) which had been purified by centrifugation from EDL-enriched populations were compared using human and horse erythrocytes. The enzymic activity of OMV, LC- and EDL-enriched populations, as detected by the API ZYM kit, was compared for strains NCTC 9343 and BE3. Purified OMV from the strains examined exhibited both haemagglutinating and enzymatic activity. Haemagglutination by the EDL-enriched population was sensitive to treatment with sodium periodate. The LC-enriched population haemagglutinated only after ultrasonic removal of the capsule. This indicates that the LC masks a haemagglutinin. The results suggest a potential role for OMV in the virulence of B. fragilis. PMID:8737489

  2. Demographic histories, isolation and social factors as determinants of the genetic structure of Alpine linguistic groups.

    PubMed

    Coia, Valentina; Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Pascali, Vincenzo; Scarnicci, Francesca; Boschi, Ilaria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Crivellaro, Federica; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B J; Capelli, Cristian; Maixner, Frank; Cipollini, Giovanna; Viazzo, Pier Paolo; Zink, Albert; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of "local ethnicity" on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet to be understood

  3. Demographic Histories, Isolation and Social Factors as Determinants of the Genetic Structure of Alpine Linguistic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Coia, Valentina; Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Pascali, Vincenzo; Scarnicci, Francesca; Boschi, Ilaria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Crivellaro, Federica; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B. J.; Capelli, Cristian; Maixner, Frank; Cipollini, Giovanna; Viazzo, Pier Paolo; Zink, Albert; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of “local ethnicity” on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet to be understood

  4. Phylogenetic grouping and pathotypic comparison of urine and fecal Escherichia coli isolates from children with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Navidinia, Masoumeh; Peerayeh, Shahin Najar; Fallah, Fatemeh; Bakhshi, Bita; Sajadinia, Raheleh Sadat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phylogenetic background and to assess hlyD (involved in the secretion of haemolysin A) and intI1 (encoding a class 1 integrase) in Escherichia coli isolates derived from urinary and fecal specimens. A total of 200 E. coli isolates was collected from patients presenting with urinary tract infection (UTI) during September 2009 to September 2010 and screened for hlyD and intI1 genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Phylogenetic analysis showed that E. coli is composed of four main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D) and that uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolates mainly belong to groups B2 (54%) and D (34%) whereas group A (44%) and D (26%) are predominant among commensal E. coli isolates. In this study, hlyD was present in 26% of UPEC and 2% of commensal E. coli isolates. However, hemolytic activity was detected for 42% of UPEC and 6% of commensal E. coli isolates (p < 0.05). intI1 gene was more frequently expressed in UPEC (24%) in comparison with commensal E. coli isolates (12%). Resistance to aztreonam, co-trimoxazole and cefpodoxime were frequently found among UPEC isolates whereas commensal E. coli isolates were commonly resistant to co-trimoxazole, nalidixic acid and cefotaxime. Concluding, a considerable difference between UPEC and commensal E. coli isolates was observed regarding their phylogenetic groups, presence of class 1 integron and hlyD gene, hemolysin activity and resistance pattern. The detection of class 1 integrons and hlyD gene was higher among UPEC compared with commensal E. coli isolates. These findings may contribute for a better understanding of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of UPEC.

  5. Phylogenetic grouping and pathotypic comparison of urine and fecal Escherichia coli isolates from children with urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Navidinia, Masoumeh; Peerayeh, Shahin Najar; Fallah, Fatemeh; Bakhshi, Bita; Sajadinia, Raheleh Sadat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phylogenetic background and to assess hlyD (involved in the secretion of haemolysin A) and intI1 (encoding a class 1 integrase) in Escherichia coli isolates derived from urinary and fecal specimens. A total of 200 E. coli isolates was collected from patients presenting with urinary tract infection (UTI) during September 2009 to September 2010 and screened for hlyD and intI1 genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Phylogenetic analysis showed that E. coli is composed of four main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D) and that uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolates mainly belong to groups B2 (54%) and D (34%) whereas group A (44%) and D (26%) are predominant among commensal E. coli isolates. In this study, hlyD was present in 26% of UPEC and 2% of commensal E. coli isolates. However, hemolytic activity was detected for 42% of UPEC and 6% of commensal E. coli isolates (p < 0.05). intI1 gene was more frequently expressed in UPEC (24%) in comparison with commensal E. coli isolates (12%). Resistance to aztreonam, co-trimoxazole and cefpodoxime were frequently found among UPEC isolates whereas commensal E. coli isolates were commonly resistant to co-trimoxazole, nalidixic acid and cefotaxime. Concluding, a considerable difference between UPEC and commensal E. coli isolates was observed regarding their phylogenetic groups, presence of class 1 integron and hlyD gene, hemolysin activity and resistance pattern. The detection of class 1 integrons and hlyD gene was higher among UPEC compared with commensal E. coli isolates. These findings may contribute for a better understanding of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of UPEC. PMID:25242935

  6. Differential Abilities of Capsulated and Noncapsulated Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Diverse agr Groups To Invade Mammary Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Buzzola, Fernanda R.; Alvarez, Lucía P.; Tuchscherr, Lorena P. N.; Barbagelata, María S.; Lattar, Santiago M.; Calvinho, Luis; Sordelli, Daniel O.

    2007-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the bacterium most frequently isolated from milk of bovines with mastitis. Four allelic groups, which interfere with the regulatory activities among the different groups, have been identified in the accessory gene regulator (agr) system. The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of the different agr groups in capsulated and noncapsulated S. aureus bacteria isolated from mastitic bovines in Argentina and whether a given agr group was associated with MAC-T cell invasion and in vivo persistence. Eighty-eight percent of the bovine S. aureus strains were classified in agr group I. The remainder belonged in agr groups II, III, and IV (2, 8, and 2%, respectively). By restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis after PCR amplification of the agr locus variable region, six agr restriction types were identified. All agr group I strains presented a unique allele (A/1), whereas strains from groups II, III, and IV exhibited more diversity. Bovine S. aureus strains defined as being in agr group I (capsulated or noncapsulated) showed significantly increased abilities to be internalized within MAC-T cells, compared with isolates from agr groups II, III, and IV. agr group II or IV S. aureus strains were cleared more efficiently than agr group I strains from the murine mammary gland. The results suggest that agr group I S. aureus strains are more efficiently internalized within epithelial cells and can persist in higher numbers in mammary gland tissue than S. aureus strains classified in agr group II, III, or IV. PMID:17145949

  7. Strain Diversity of Pseudomonas fluorescens Group with Potential Blue Pigment Phenotype Isolated from Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Chierici, Margherita; Picozzi, Claudia; La Spina, Marisa Grazia; Orsi, Carla; Vigentini, Ileana; Zambrini, Vittorio; Foschino, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The blue discoloration in Mozzarella cheese comes from bacterial spoilage due to contamination with Pseudomonas. Fourteen Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from international collections and 55 new isolates of dominant bacterial populations from spoiled fresh cheese samples were examined to assess genotypic and phenotypic strain diversity. Isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and tested for the production of the blue pigment at various temperatures on Mascarpone agar and in Mozzarella preserving fluid (the salty water in which the cheese is conserved, which becomes enriched by cheese minerals and peptides during storage). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis after treatment with the endonuclease SpeI separated the isolates into 42 genotypes at a similarity level of 80%. Based on the pulsotype clustering, 12 representative strains producing the blue discoloration were chosen for the multilocus sequence typing targeting the gyrB, glnS, ileS, nuoD, recA, rpoB, and rpoD genes. Four new sequence typing profiles were discovered, and the concatenated sequences of the investigated loci grouped the tested strains into the so-called ''blue branch'' of the P. fluorescens phylogenetic tree, confirming the linkage between pigment production and a specific genomic cluster. Growth temperature affected pigment production; the blue discoloration appeared at 4 and 14°C but not at 30°C. Similarly, the carbon source influenced the phenomenon; the blue phenotype was generated in the presence of glucose but not in the presence of galactose, sodium succinate, sodium citrate, or sodium lactate.

  8. Strain Diversity of Pseudomonas fluorescens Group with Potential Blue Pigment Phenotype Isolated from Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Chierici, Margherita; Picozzi, Claudia; La Spina, Marisa Grazia; Orsi, Carla; Vigentini, Ileana; Zambrini, Vittorio; Foschino, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The blue discoloration in Mozzarella cheese comes from bacterial spoilage due to contamination with Pseudomonas. Fourteen Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from international collections and 55 new isolates of dominant bacterial populations from spoiled fresh cheese samples were examined to assess genotypic and phenotypic strain diversity. Isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and tested for the production of the blue pigment at various temperatures on Mascarpone agar and in Mozzarella preserving fluid (the salty water in which the cheese is conserved, which becomes enriched by cheese minerals and peptides during storage). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis after treatment with the endonuclease SpeI separated the isolates into 42 genotypes at a similarity level of 80%. Based on the pulsotype clustering, 12 representative strains producing the blue discoloration were chosen for the multilocus sequence typing targeting the gyrB, glnS, ileS, nuoD, recA, rpoB, and rpoD genes. Four new sequence typing profiles were discovered, and the concatenated sequences of the investigated loci grouped the tested strains into the so-called ''blue branch'' of the P. fluorescens phylogenetic tree, confirming the linkage between pigment production and a specific genomic cluster. Growth temperature affected pigment production; the blue discoloration appeared at 4 and 14°C but not at 30°C. Similarly, the carbon source influenced the phenomenon; the blue phenotype was generated in the presence of glucose but not in the presence of galactose, sodium succinate, sodium citrate, or sodium lactate. PMID:27497132

  9. The enhancement of biofilm formation in Group B streptococcal isolates at vaginal pH.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yueh-Ren; Li, Chien-Ming; Yu, Chen-Hsiang; Lin, Yuh-Jyh; Wu, Ching-Ming; Harn, I-Chen; Tang, Ming-Jer; Chen, Yi-Ting; Shen, Fang-Chi; Lu, Chien-Yi; Tsai, Tai-Chun; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2013-04-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a common asymptomatic colonizer in acidic vagina of pregnant women and can transmit to newborns, causing neonatal pneumonia and meningitis. Biofilm formation is often associated with bacterial colonization and pathogenesis. Little is known about GBS biofilm and the effect of environmental stimuli on their growth along with biofilm formation. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival and biofilm formation of GBS, isolated from pregnant women, in nutrient-limited medium under various pH conditions. Growth and survival experiments were determined by optical density and viable counts. Crystal violet staining, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to analyze the capacity of biofilm production. Our results showed that GBS isolates proliferated with increasing pH with highest maximum specific growth rate (μmax) at pH 6.5, but survived at pH 4.5 for longer than 48 h. Biofilm formation of the 80 GBS isolates at pH 4.5 was significantly higher than at pH 7.0. This difference was confirmed by two other methods. The low elastic modulus obtained from samples at pH 4.5 by AFM revealed the softness of biofilm; in contrast, little or no biofilm was measured at pH 7.0. Under acidic pH, the capability of biofilm formation of serotypes III and V showed statistically significant difference from serotypes Ia and Ib. Our finding suggested that survival and enhanced biofilm formation at vaginal pH are potentially advantageous for GBS in colonizing vagina and increase the risk of vaginosis and neonatal infection. PMID:22797522

  10. Cloacal aerobic bacterial flora and absence of viruses in free-living slow worms (Anguis fragilis), grass snakes (Natrix natrix) and European Adders (Vipera berus) from Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Volker; Mock, Ronja; Burgkhardt, Eileen; Junghanns, Anja; Ortlieb, Falk; Szabo, Istvan; Marschang, Rachel; Blindow, Irmgard; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    Disease problems caused by viral or bacterial pathogens are common in reptiles kept in captivity. There is no information available on the incidence of viral pathogens or the physiological cloacal bacterial flora of common free-living reptiles in Germany. Therefore, 56 free-living reptiles including 23 European adders (Vipera berus), 12 grass snakes (Natrix natrix) and 21 slow worms (Anguis fragilis) were investigated on the island Hiddensee in northeastern Germany. Pharyngeal and cloacal swabs were taken immediately after capture. Bacteriological examination was performed from the cloacal swabs to study the aerobic cloacal flora. Molecular biological examination included amplification of DNA or RNA from adeno-, rana- and ferlaviruses as well as culturing on Russell's viper heart cells for virus isolation. Salmonella spp. were isolated from European adders but not from the other reptiles examined. The minimal inhibitory concentration was determined from the isolated Salmonella spp. However, some potentially human pathogenic bacteria, such as Proteus vulgaris, Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli were isolated. Viruses were not detected in any of the examined reptiles. To the authors' best knowledge, the present study is the first survey of viral pathogens in free-living snakes and slow worms in Germany and the first survey of cloacal aerobic bacterial flora of slow worms.

  11. Modified fields' stain: ideal to differentiate Dientamoeba fragilis and Blastocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Ragavan, Anitamalar Devi; Govind, Suresh Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis, a trichomonad parasite is usually found in the gastrointestinal tract of human, and it is known to be the cause for gastrointestinal disease. The parasite is globally distributed and mostly found in rural and urban areas. The parasite is found in humans and nonhuman primates such as the macaques, baboons, and gorillas. Often, the parasite is confused with another largely found organism in stools called Blastocystis sp. especially when seen directly under light microscopy on culture samples containing both parasites. Both sometimes are seen with two nuclei with sizes tending to be similar which complicates identification. Stools were collected fresh from nine previously diagnosed persons infected with D. fragilis who also were found to be positive for Blastocystis sp. Samples were then cultured in Loeffler's medium and were stained with Giemsa, iron hematoxylin, and modified Fields' (MF) stain, respectively. D. fragilis was differentiated from Blastocystis sp. when stained with MF stain by the presence of a thinner outer membrane with clearly demarcated nuclei in the center of the cell whilst Blastocystis sp. had a darker and thicker stained outer membrane with the presence of two nuclei. The staining contrast was more evident with modified Fields' stain when compared with the other two. The simplicity in preparing the stain as well as the speed of the staining procedure make MF stain an ideal alternate. The modified Fields' stain is faster and easier to prepare when compared to the other two stains. MF stain provides a better contrast differentiating the two organisms and therefore provides a more reliable diagnostic method to precisely identify one from the other especially when cultures show mixed infections.

  12. Freezing tolerance and water relations of Opuntia fragilis from Canada and the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Loik, M.E.; Nobel, P.S. )

    1993-09-01

    To investigate the influence of winter climate on freezing tolerance at the population level, minimum January air temperatures in the field and cold acclimation determined in the laboratory were compared for Opuntia fragilis. Populations occurred at 20 locations as far north as 56[degrees]46' N latitude and at elevations up to 3029 m in Canada and the United States, most of which experience extreme freezing temperatures each winter. Low-temperature responses and water relations of stems were examined in the laboratory at day/night air temperatures of 25[degrees]/15[degrees]C and 14 d after the plants were shifted to a 5[degrees]/[minus]5[degrees]C temperature cycle. Cold acclimation averaged 17[degrees]C and freezing tolerance averaged [minus]29[degrees]C for the 20 populations following a shift to low day/night air temperatures, indicating that O. fragilis has the greatest cold acclimation ability and the greatest freezing tolerance reported for any cactus. Moreover, freezing tolerance and cold acclimation were both positively correlated (r[sup 2] [congruent] 0.7) with the minimum temperatures at the 20 locations. Plants lost water during low-temperature acclimation, leading to 30% decreases in cladode and chlorenchyma thickness; the decrease in water content was greater for the five warmest populations than for the five coldest ones. Over the same period, the average osmotic pressure of the chlorenchyma increased from 1.42 to 1.64 MPa, and the relative water content (RWC) decreased from 0.58 to 0.49, but the average osmotic pressure of saturated chlorenchyma was unchanged, indicating no net change in solute content during acclimation. Although the role of water relations in freezing tolerance is unclear, the substantial freezing tolerance and cold acclimation ability of O. fragilis leads to its distribution into regions of Canada and the United States that experience minimum temperatures below [minus]40[degrees]C during the winter. 47 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Genetic isolation among sympatric vegetative compatibility groups of the aflatoxin-producing fungus Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Grubisha, L C; Cotty, P J

    2010-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus, a fungal pathogen of animals and both wild and economically important plants, is most recognized for producing aflatoxin, a cancer-causing secondary metabolite that contaminates food and animal feed globally. Aspergillus flavus has two self/nonself recognition systems, a sexual compatibility system and a vegetative incompatibility system, and both play a role in directing gene flow in populations. Aspergillus flavus reproduces clonally in wild and agricultural settings, but whether a cryptic sexual stage exists in nature is currently unknown. We investigated the distribution of genetic variation in 243 samples collected over 4 years from three common vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) in Arizona and Texas from cotton using 24 microsatellite loci and the mating type locus (MAT) to assess population structure and potential gene flow among A. flavus VCGs in sympatric populations. All isolates within a VCG had the same mating type with OD02 having MAT1-2 and both CG136 and MR17 having MAT1-1. Our results support the hypothesis that these three A. flavus VCGs are genetically isolated. We found high levels of genetic differentiation and no evidence of gene flow between VCGs, including VCGs of opposite mating-type. Our results suggest that these VCGs diverged before domestication of agricultural hosts (>10,000 yr bp).

  14. A bovine G8P[1] group A rotavirus isolated from an asymptomatically infected dog.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Michael; Rückner, Antje; Köhler, Christian; Burgener, Iwan; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are enteric pathogens with well-documented zoonotic transmissions to humans. The segmented genome of the virus enables reassortment events which might alter host susceptibility and/or disease course. Genetic analysis of rotavirus in dogs has so far only revealed RVAs with the VP7 and VP4 genome constellation G3P[3]. RVA G3P[3] have also been found in cats, humans, monkeys and bats. In the present study, we described an unusual RVA of genotype G8P[1] which was isolated from an asymptomatically infected young dog. The dog did not show signs of diarrhoea. Analysis of full-length segments of VP2, VP6 and VP7 as well as NSP1-NSP5 revealed a typical bovine-like genotype constellation G8-P[1]-I2-Rx-C2-Mx-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3. Phylogenetic analysis supported the hypothesis of an interspecies transmission from a bovine/artiodactyl species or from humans to the young dog. The isolate was likely to represent a multiple reassortant virus. PMID:25304653

  15. PCR detection of cytK gene in Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from food samples.

    PubMed

    Oltuszak-Walczak, Elzbieta; Walczak, Piotr

    2013-11-01

    A method for detection of the cytotoxin K cytK structural gene and its active promoter preceded by the PlcR-binding box, controlling the expression level of this enterotoxin, was developed. The method was applied for the purpose of the analysis of 47 bacterial strains belonging to the Bacillus cereus group isolated from different food products. It was found that the majority of the analyzed strains carried the fully functional cytK gene with its PlcR regulated promoter. The cytK gene was not detected in four emetic strains of Bacillus cereus carrying the cesB gene and potentially producing an emetic toxin - cereulide. The cytotoxin K gene was detected in 4 isolates classified as Bacillus mycoides and one reference strain B. mycoides PCM 2024. The promoter region and the N-terminal part of the cytK gene from two strains of B. mycoides (5D and 19E) showed similarities to the corresponding sequences of Bacillus cereus W23 and Bacillus thuringiensis HD-789, respectively. It was shown for the first time that the cytK gene promoter region from strains 5D and 19E of Bacillus mycoides had a similar arrangement to the corresponding sequence of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579. The presence of the cytK gene in Bacillus mycoides shows that this species, widely recognized as nonpathogenic, may pose potential biohazard to human beings.

  16. Stabilization of charges on isolated ionic groups sequestered in proteins by polarized peptide units.

    PubMed

    Quiocho, F A; Sack, J S; Vyas, N K

    Electrostatic interactions are of considerable importance in protein structure and function, and in a variety of cellular and biochemical processes. Here we report three similar findings from highly refined atomic structures of periplasmic binding proteins. Hydrogen bonds, acting primarily through backbone peptide units, are mainly responsible for the involvement of the positively charged arginine 151 residue in the ligand site of the arabinose-binding protein, for the association between teh sulphate-binding protein and the completely buried sulphate dianion, and for the formation of the complex of the leucine/isoleucine/valine-binding protein with the leucine zwitterion. We propose a general mechanism in which the isolated charges on the various buried, desolvated ionic groups are stabilized by the polarized peptide units. This mechanism also has broad application to processes requiring binding of uncompensated ions and charged ligands and stabilization of enzyme reaction charged intermediates, as well as activation of catalytic residues.

  17. Application of Bacteroides fragilis phage as an alternative indicator of sewage pollution in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, M.R.; Rose, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Traditional fecal coliform bacterial indicators have been found to be severely limited in determining the significance and sources of fecal contamination in ambient waters of tropical and subtropical regions. The bacteriophages that infect Bacteroides fragilis have been suggested as better fecal indicators and at least one type may be human specific. In this study, the phages that infect B. fragilis host RYC2056 (RYC), including phage B56-3, and host ATCC 51477-HSP40 (HSP), including the human specific phage B40-8, were evaluated in the drainage basins of Tampa Bay, 7 samples (n = 62), or 11%, tested positive for the presence of phages infecting the host HSP, whereas 28 samples, or 45%, tested positive using the host RYC. A survival study was also done to compare the persistence of phages B56-3 and B40-8 to MS2 coliphage in seawater at various temperatures. The decay rates for MS2 were 0.239 log 10 d-1 at 10??C, but increased to 0.896 at 20??C and 2.62 log10 d-1 at 30??C. The two B. fragilis phages persisted much longer in the seawater compared to the coliphage and showed little variation between the temperatures. All sewage influents sampled from area wastewater treatment plants contained phages that infected the two B. fragilis hosts at levels from 1.2 ?? 104 to 1.11 ?? 10 5 pfu 100 ml-1 for host RYC and 67 to 350 pfu 100 ml -1 for host HSP. Of the 7 chlorinated effluent samples tested, 3 were positive for the presence of the phage using the host RYC and the phage enrichment method, with levels estimated to be <10 pfu 100 ml-1. No phages were detected using the host HSP in the treated sewage effluent. Coliphages were found in 3 of the 7 effluent samples at a range of 30 to 1.2 ?? 103 pfu 100 ml-1. ?? 2006 Estuarine Research Federation.

  18. Efflux Pump Overexpression in Multiple-Antibiotic-Resistant Mutants of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Pumbwe, Lilian; Glass, Daniel; Wexler, Hannah M.

    2006-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant mutants of a wild-type Bacteroides fragilis strain (strain ADB77) and a quadruple resistance nodulation division family efflux pump deletion mutant (ADB77 ΔbmeB1 ΔbmeB3 ΔbmeB12 ΔbmeB15) were selected with antimicrobials. Ampicillin, doripenem, imipenem, levofloxacin, and metronidazole selected for mutants from both strains; cefoxitin selected for mutants from strain ADB77 only; and sodium dodecyl sulfate selected mutants from ADB77ΔbmeB1 ΔbmeB3 ΔbmeB12 ΔbmeB15 only. The mutants overexpressed one or more efflux pumps. PMID:16940115

  19. Exploring dinosaur neuropaleobiology: viewpoint computed tomography scanning and analysis of an Allosaurus fragilis endocast.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S W

    1998-10-01

    The unique opportunity to examine an exceptionally well-preserved natural endocranial cast (endocast) from a carnivorous dinosaur of the late Jurassic period, Allosaurus fragilis, was afforded this neurobiologist. The endocast exhibits numerous surface features including the complete vestibular apparatus. Spiral computed tomography scanning revealed multiple internal features including putative blood vessels, connective tissue-like arrays, and a prominent symmetrical density consistent with the putative brain or its cast. The evidence suggests that this organism's neurobiology resembled closely that of modern crocodylian species and should be included for consideration when examining ideas of Allosaurus evolution, behavior, and eventual extinction. PMID:9808455

  20. Exploring dinosaur neuropaleobiology: viewpoint computed tomography scanning and analysis of an Allosaurus fragilis endocast.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S W

    1998-10-01

    The unique opportunity to examine an exceptionally well-preserved natural endocranial cast (endocast) from a carnivorous dinosaur of the late Jurassic period, Allosaurus fragilis, was afforded this neurobiologist. The endocast exhibits numerous surface features including the complete vestibular apparatus. Spiral computed tomography scanning revealed multiple internal features including putative blood vessels, connective tissue-like arrays, and a prominent symmetrical density consistent with the putative brain or its cast. The evidence suggests that this organism's neurobiology resembled closely that of modern crocodylian species and should be included for consideration when examining ideas of Allosaurus evolution, behavior, and eventual extinction.

  1. Genetic polymorphism of Malassezia furfur isolates from Han and Tibetan ethnic groups in China using DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Ruifeng; Ran, Yuping; Dai, Yaling; Lu, Yao; Wang, Peng

    2010-12-01

    Reported isolation rates of Malassezia yeast from human skin show geographic variations. In China, the populations of the Han (1,182.95 million) and Tibetan (5.41 million) ethnic groups are distributed over 9.6 and 3.27 million square kilometers respectively, making biodiversity research feasible and convenient. Malassezia furfur clinical strains (n = 29) isolated from different individuals, with or without associated dermatoses, of these two ethnic groups (15 Han and 12 Tibetan) were identified and analyzed with DNA fingerprinting using single primers specific to minisatellites. Using the Bionumerics software, we found that almost all M. furfur clinical isolates and type strains formed five distinct group clusters according to their associated skin diseases and the ethnic groups of the patients. These findings are the first to focus on the genetic diversity and relatedness of M. furfur in the Tibetan and Han ethnic groups in China and reveal genetic variation associated with related diseases, host ethnicity and geographic origin.

  2. Evaluation of Three Diagnostic Methods, Including Real-Time PCR, for Detection of Dientamoeba fragilis in Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Stark, D.; Beebe, N.; Marriott, D.; Ellis, J.; Harkness, J.

    2006-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a protozoan parasite of humans that infects the mucosa of the large intestine and is associated with gastrointestinal disease. We developed a 5′ nuclease (TaqMan)-based real-time PCR assay, targeting the small subunit rRNA gene, for the detection of D. fragilis in human stool specimens and compared its sensitivity and specificity to conventional PCR and microscopic examination by a traditional modified iron-hematoxylin staining procedure. Real-time PCR exhibited 100% sensitivity and specificity. PMID:16390978

  3. Toxin Profile, Biofilm Formation, and Molecular Characterization of Emetic Toxin-Producing Bacillus cereus Group Isolates from Human Stools.

    PubMed

    Oh, Su Kyung; Chang, Hyun-Joo; Choi, Sung-Wook; Ok, Gyeongsik; Lee, Nari

    2015-11-01

    Emetic toxin-producing Bacillus cereus group species are an important problem, because the staple food for Korean is grains such as rice. In this study, we determined the prevalence (24 of 129 isolates) of emetic B. cereus in 36,745 stool samples from sporadic food-poisoning cases in Korea between 2007 and 2008. The toxin gene profile, toxin production, and biofilm-forming ability of the emetic B. cereus isolates were investigated. Repetitive element sequence polymorphism polymerase chain reaction fingerprints (rep-PCR) were also used to assess the intraspecific biodiversity of these isolates. Emetic B. cereus was present in 0.07% of the sporadic food-poisoning cases. The 24 emetic isolates identified all carried the nheABC and entFM genes and produced NHE enterotoxin. However, they did not have hemolysin BL toxin or related genes. A relationship between biofilm formation and toxin production was not observed in this study. The rep-PCR fingerprints of the B. cereus isolates were not influenced by the presence of toxin genes, or biofilm-forming ability. The rep-PCR assay discriminated emetic B. cereus isolates from nonemetic isolates, even if this assay did not perfectly discriminate these isolates. Further study on emetic isolates possessing a high degree of diversity may be necessary to evaluate the performance of the subtyping assay to discriminate emetic and nonemetic B. cereus isolates and could provide a more accurate indication of the risk from B. cereus strains.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance among Pseudomonas spp. and the Bacillus cereus group isolated from Danish agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L B; Baloda, S; Boye, M; Aarestrup, F M

    2001-06-01

    From four Danish pig farms, bacteria of Pseudomonas spp. and the Bacillus cereus group were isolated from soil and susceptibility towards selected antimicrobials was tested. From each farm, soil samples representing soil just before and after spread of animal waste and undisturbed agricultural soil, when possible, were collected. Soil from a well-characterized Danish farm soil (Højbakkegaard) was collected for comparison. The Pseudomonas spp. and B. cereus were chosen as representative for Gram-negative and Gram-positive indigenous soil bacteria to test the effect of spread of animal waste on selection of resistance among soil bacteria. No variations in resistance levels were observed between farms; but when the four differently treated soils were compared, resistance was seen for carbadox, chloramphenicol, nalidixan (nalidixic acid), nitrofurantoin, streptomycin and tetracycline for Pseudomonas spp., and for bacitracin, erythromycin, penicillin and streptomycin for the B. cereus group. Variations in resistance levels were observed when soil before and after spread of animal waste was compared, indicating an effect from spread of animal waste. PMID:11485227

  5. Mus cervicolor Murine Leukemia Virus Isolate M813 Belongs to a Unique Receptor Interference Group

    PubMed Central

    Prassolov, Vladimir; Hein, Sibyll; Ziegler, Marion; Ivanov, Dmitry; Münk, Carsten; Löhler, Jürgen; Stocking, Carol

    2001-01-01

    Murine leukemia virus (MuLV) M813 was originally isolated from the Southeast Asian rodent Mus cervicolor. As with the ecotropic MuLVs derived from Mus musculus, its host range is limited to rodent cells. Earlier studies have mapped its receptor to chromosome 2, but it has not been established whether M813 shares a common receptor with any other MuLVs. In this study, we have performed interference assays with M813 and viruses from four interference groups of MuLV. The infection efficiency of M813 was not compromised in cells expressing any one of the other MuLVs, demonstrating that M813 must use a distinct receptor for cell entry. The entire M813 env coding region was molecularly cloned. Sequence analysis revealed high similarity with other MuLVs but with a unique receptor-binding domain. Substitution of M813 env sequences in Moloney MuLV resulted in a replication-competent virus with a host range and interference profile similar to those of the biological clone M813. M813 thus defines a novel receptor interference group of type C MuLVs. PMID:11312319

  6. Mus cervicolor murine leukemia virus isolate M813 belongs to a unique receptor interference group.

    PubMed

    Prassolov, V; Hein, S; Ziegler, M; Ivanov, D; Münk, C; Löhler, J; Stocking, C

    2001-05-01

    Murine leukemia virus (MuLV) M813 was originally isolated from the Southeast Asian rodent Mus cervicolor. As with the ecotropic MuLVs derived from Mus musculus, its host range is limited to rodent cells. Earlier studies have mapped its receptor to chromosome 2, but it has not been established whether M813 shares a common receptor with any other MuLVs. In this study, we have performed interference assays with M813 and viruses from four interference groups of MuLV. The infection efficiency of M813 was not compromised in cells expressing any one of the other MuLVs, demonstrating that M813 must use a distinct receptor for cell entry. The entire M813 env coding region was molecularly cloned. Sequence analysis revealed high similarity with other MuLVs but with a unique receptor-binding domain. Substitution of M813 env sequences in Moloney MuLV resulted in a replication-competent virus with a host range and interference profile similar to those of the biological clone M813. M813 thus defines a novel receptor interference group of type C MuLVs.

  7. Molecular analysis of group A streptococcal isolates associated with scarlet fever in southern Taiwan between 1993 and 2002.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Jou; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Ko, Wen-Chien; Hsu, Shui-Yuan; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Yee-Shin; Lin, Ming T; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2003-10-01

    Collected between 1993 and 2002 at a Taiwanese university hospital, 77 group A streptococcus isolates associated with scarlet fever were grouped by emm typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The predominance of an emm1 clone before 1996 and the presence of genetically diverse emm1 and emm4 strains thereafter were found.

  8. Adolescents' Information Behavior When Isolated from Peer Groups: Lessons from New Immigrant Adolescents' Everyday Life Information Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koo, Joung Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate how isolated immigrant adolescents seek and use necessary information when they are not able to use significant information sources--their peer groups--in the period of transition before new peer groups are established. Method: To achieve the study's purpose, sixteen recently arrived (three…

  9. Antibiotic Susceptibility Evaluation of Group A Streptococcus Isolated from Children with Pharyngitis: A Study from Iran

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of Group A streptococcus (GAS) to antibiotics usually used in Iran for treatment of GAS pharyngitis in children. Materials and Methods From 2011 to 2013, children 3-15 years of age with acute tonsillopharyngitis who attended Mofid Children's Hospital clinics and emergency ward and did not meet the exclusion criteria were enrolled in a prospective study in a sequential manner. The isolates strains from throat culture were identified as GAS by colony morphology, gram staining, beta hemolysis on blood agar, sensitivity to bacitracin, a positive pyrrolidonyl aminopeptidase (PYR) test result, and the presence of Lancefield A antigen determined by agglutination test. Antimicrobial susceptibility was identified by both disk diffusion and broth dilution methods. Results From 200 children enrolled in this study, 59 (30%) cases were culture positive for GAS. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin G. The prevalence of erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin resistance by broth dilution method was 33.9%, 57.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. Surprisingly, 8.4% of GAS strains were resistant to rifampin. In this study, 13.5% and 32.2% of the strains were resistant to clindamycin and ofloxacin, respectively. Conclusion The high rate of resistance of GAS to some antibiotics in this study should warn physicians, especially in Iran, to use antibiotics restrictedly and logically to prevent the rising of resistance rates in future. It also seems that continuous local surveillance is necessary to achieve the best therapeutic option for GAS treatment. PMID:26788405

  10. Domesticated horses differ in their behavioural and physiological responses to isolated and group housing.

    PubMed

    Yarnell, Kelly; Hall, Carol; Royle, Chris; Walker, Susan L

    2015-05-01

    The predominant housing system used for domestic horses is individual stabling; however, housing that limits social interaction and requires the horse to live in semi-isolation has been reported to be a concern for equine welfare. The aim of the current study was to compare behavioural and physiological responses of domestic horses in different types of housing design that provided varying levels of social contact. Horses (n = 16) were divided equally into four groups and exposed to each of four housing treatments for a period of five days per treatment in a randomized block design. The four housing treatments used were single housed no physical contact (SHNC), single housed semi-contact (SHSC), paired housed full contact (PHFC) and group housed full contact (GHFC). During each housing treatment, adrenal activity was recorded using non-invasive faecal corticosterone metabolite analysis (fGC). Thermal images of the eye were captured and eye temperature was assessed as a non-invasive measure of the stress response. Behavioural analysis of time budget was carried out and an ease of handling score was assigned to each horse in each treatment using video footage. SHNC horses had significantly higher (p = 0.01) concentrations of fGC and were significantly (p = 0.003) more difficult to handle compared to the other housing types. GHFC horses, although not significantly different, had numerically lower concentrations of fGC and were more compliant to handling when compared to all other housing treatments. Eye temperature was significantly (p = 0.0001) lower in the group housed treatment when compared to all other treatments. These results indicate that based on physiological and behavioural measures incorporating social contact into the housing design of domestic horses could improve the standard of domestic equine welfare.

  11. Domesticated horses differ in their behavioural and physiological responses to isolated and group housing.

    PubMed

    Yarnell, Kelly; Hall, Carol; Royle, Chris; Walker, Susan L

    2015-05-01

    The predominant housing system used for domestic horses is individual stabling; however, housing that limits social interaction and requires the horse to live in semi-isolation has been reported to be a concern for equine welfare. The aim of the current study was to compare behavioural and physiological responses of domestic horses in different types of housing design that provided varying levels of social contact. Horses (n = 16) were divided equally into four groups and exposed to each of four housing treatments for a period of five days per treatment in a randomized block design. The four housing treatments used were single housed no physical contact (SHNC), single housed semi-contact (SHSC), paired housed full contact (PHFC) and group housed full contact (GHFC). During each housing treatment, adrenal activity was recorded using non-invasive faecal corticosterone metabolite analysis (fGC). Thermal images of the eye were captured and eye temperature was assessed as a non-invasive measure of the stress response. Behavioural analysis of time budget was carried out and an ease of handling score was assigned to each horse in each treatment using video footage. SHNC horses had significantly higher (p = 0.01) concentrations of fGC and were significantly (p = 0.003) more difficult to handle compared to the other housing types. GHFC horses, although not significantly different, had numerically lower concentrations of fGC and were more compliant to handling when compared to all other housing treatments. Eye temperature was significantly (p = 0.0001) lower in the group housed treatment when compared to all other treatments. These results indicate that based on physiological and behavioural measures incorporating social contact into the housing design of domestic horses could improve the standard of domestic equine welfare. PMID:25725117

  12. Identification and Characterization of Novel Antioxidant Peptides Involved in Redox Homeostasis of Frog, Limnonectes fragilis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haining; Qiao, Xue; Gao, Jiuxiang; Wang, Chen; Cai, Shasha; Feng, Lan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Yi-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have proved that a novel antioxidant system composed of various antioxidant peptides (AOPs) exists in the skin of ranid frogs, keeping the redox homeostasis. However, only a small number of AOPs have been identified so far. Here, a total of 47 cDNA sequences encoding 21 different AOPs belonging to 11 families were cloned from the skin cDNA library of Limnonectes fragilis. Among them, fragilin-A1 (VKRRGQDCIHGFCSD) and fragilin-B1 (GQFNDKRWIPFG) were also purified from skin secretions. They were selected with odorranain-Q-Lf (APIRMWYMYRKLTDMEPKPVA), the newest sequence among all 21 AOPs, to evaluate the antioxidant activities by direct free radical scavenging and lipid peroxidation inhibition assay. Results demonstrated that all peptides possessed strong DPPH and ABTS(.+) scavenging activities, and effectively inhibited lipid peroxidation in linoleic acid emulsion system during a 7- day test. No cytotoxic and hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes was observed for the three AOPs. The homology modeling analysis revealed that they all adopt tertiary structures ideally suited for the key residues to come into contact with the radicals. Current results reveal the existence of antioxidant system constituted of AOPs in the skin of the L. fragilis, and furthermore provide excellent templates for the development of novel antioxidant agents. PMID:26122987

  13. Formation of glycosidases in batch and continuous culture of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Berg, J O; Nord, C E; Wadström, T

    1978-02-01

    Nine strains of bacteroides fragilis were cultivated in stirred fermentors and tested for their ability to produce glycosidases. B. fragilis subsp. vulgatus B70 was used for optimizing the production of glycosidases. The highest bacterial yield was obtained in proteose peptone-yeast extract medium. The optimum pH for maximal bacterial yield was 7.0, and the optimum temperature for growth was 37 degrees C. The formation of glycosidases was optimal between pH 6.5 and 7.5, and the optimum temperature for synthesis of glycosidases was between 33 and 37 degrees C. Culture under controlled conditions in fermentors gave more reproducible production of glycosidases than static cultures in bottles. The strain was also grown in continuous culture at a dilution rate of 0.1 liter/h at pH 7.0 and 37 degrees C with a yield of 2.0 mg of dry weight per ml in the complex medium. The formation of glycosidases remained constant during the entire continuous process.

  14. Formation of beta-lactamase in Bacteroides fragilis: cell-bound and extracellular activity.

    PubMed

    Olsson, B; Nord, C E; Wadström, T

    1976-05-01

    Nine strains of Bacteroides fragilis were cultivated in stirred fermentors and tested for their ability to produce beta-lactamase. There was a correlation between formation of beta-lactamase and high values of the minimal inhibitory concentration against beta-lactam antibiotics. B. fragilis strain B70 was used for optimizing the production of beta-lactamase. The highest bacterial yield was obtained in a proteose peptone-yeast extract medium. Optimal conditions for growth and beta-lactamase production were obtained at 37 C and pH 7.0. The beta-lactamase was released into the surrounding medium during the growth period to about 50%. Osmotic shock released about 20% of the total activity, and remaining activity was found in the cytoplasmic fraction. Substrate profile studies on four beta-lactamase-producing strains showed that the enzymes were mainly cephalosporinases. They are inhibited by cloxacillin, p-chloromercuribenzoate, and iodine. Analytical isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel gave an isoelectric point of 4.9 +/- 0.2 for three of the strains and 5.6 +/- 0.2 for one. Comparison with beta-lactamases from aerobic gram-negative species with regard to isoelectric points showed no similarities. Also the molecular weight of the beta-lactamase from strain B70 of 43,000 indicates that this is a new class of beta-lactamase.

  15. Comparison of standard, quantitative and digital PCR in the detection of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Rachel V.; Pearson, John; Frizelle, Frank A.; Keenan, Jacqueline I.

    2016-01-01

    Gut colonization with enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) appears to be associated with the development of colorectal cancer. However, differences in carriage rates are seen with various testing methods and sampling sites. We compared standard PCR, SYBR green and TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) and digital PCR (dPCR) in detecting the B. fragilis toxin (bft) gene from cultured ETBF, and from matched luminal and faecal stool samples from 19 colorectal cancer patients. Bland-Altman analysis found that all three quantitative methods performed comparably in detecting bft from purified bacterial DNA, with the same limits of detection (<1 copy/μl). However, SYBR qPCR under-performed compared to TaqMan qPCR and dPCR in detecting bft in clinical stool samples; 13/38 samples were reported positive by SYBR, compared to 35 and 36 samples by TaqMan and dPCR, respectively. TaqMan qPCR and dPCR gave bft copy numbers that were 48-fold and 75-fold higher for the same samples than SYBR qPCR, respectively (p < 0.001). For samples that were bft-positive in both fecal and luminal stools, there was no difference in relative abundance between the sites, by any method tested. From our findings, we recommend the use of TaqMan qPCR as the preferred method to detect ETBF from clinical stool samples. PMID:27686415

  16. Identification, genetic diversity and cereulide producing ability of Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from Beninese traditional fermented food condiments.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Line; Azokpota, Paulin; Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Hounhouigan, D Joseph; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2010-08-15

    Bacillus cereus sensu lato is often detected in spontaneously fermented African foods but is rarely identified to species level. Only some of the B. cereus group species are reported to be pathogenic to humans and identification to species level is necessary to estimate the safety of these products. In the present study, a total of 19 Bacillus cereus group spp. isolated from afitin, iru and sonru, three spontaneously fermented African locust (Parkia biglobosa) bean based condiments produced in Benin, were investigated. The strains were isolated at 6, 12, 18, 24 and 48 h fermentation time. By using phenotypic and genotypic methods all of the isolates could be identified as B. cereus sensu stricto. The isolates were grouped according to their PM13 PCR (random amplification of polymorphic DNA PCR) fingerprint and formed two major clusters, one of which contained eight strains isolated from afitin (cluster 1). Highly similar PM13 profiles were obtained for seven of the isolates, one from afitin, one from iru and five from sonru (cluster 2). Four of the isolates, one from afitin and three from sonru, did not form any particular cluster. The PM13 profiles of cluster 2 isolates were identical to those which are specific to emetic toxin producers. Cereulide production of these isolates was confirmed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. This is the first report on cereulide producing B. cereus in African fermented foods. Occurrence of the opportunistic human pathogen B. cereus, which is able to produce emetic toxin in afitin, iru and sonru, could impose a health hazard. Interestingly, no reports on food poisoning from the consumption of the fermented condiments exist.

  17. Evaluation of Bacteroides fragilis GB-124 bacteriophages as novel human-associated faecal indicators in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phages infecting human-associated Bacteroides fragilis (GB-124 phages) have been employed in the European Union (EU) to identify human fecal pollution, but their utility for U.S. was unclear. Primary sewage effluent samples were collected seasonally from seven wastewater treatme...

  18. A perforated gastrovascular cavity in the symbiotic deep-water coral Leptoseris fragilis: A new strategy to optimize heterotrophic nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichter, Dietrich

    1991-12-01

    The organization of the zooxanthellate scleractinian coral Leptoseris fragilis was studied. The architecture of the corallite and the histology of the polyparium were analysed for adaptations that enable efficient capture and retention of suspended particles which would increase energy supply. The data indicate that the gastrovascular system of L. fragilis is not a blind but a flowthrough system. Water entering the coelenteron through the mouth leaves the body not only through the mouth but also through microscopic pores (≂ 1 2 μm) which are located near the crests of the sclerosepta in the oral epithelia. Irrigation is achieved by flagellar and probably also by muscular activity. This type of filtration enables L. fragilis, which lacks tentacles, to utilize suspended organic material including bacteria. The supposed suspension feeding in combination with effective photoadaptations (presented in former communications) seems to be the basis for the survival of L. fragilis in an extreme habitat (between-95 and-145 m) and for its, successful competion with other scleractinian species provided with larger catching surfaces, and with other invertebrates depending on filter feeding.

  19. Identification and molecular characterization of serological group C streptococci isolated from diseased pigs and monkeys in Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Soedarmanto, I; Pasaribu, F H; Wibawan, I W; Lämmler, C

    1996-01-01

    The present study was designed to comparatively investigate 34 beta-hemolytic streptococci isolated from infected pigs and monkeys from various islands in Indonesia. According to the serological and biochemical data, all 34 isolates were Lancefield's serological group C streptococci and could be identified as Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus. Of the 34 group C streptococci investigated, 28 grew on solid media in large, mucoid colonies, in fluid media at a uniform turbidity, and in soft agar in diffuse colonies. A decapsulation test with a hyaluronidase-producing Staphylococcus aureus strain revealed the hyaluronic acid nature of the capsular material. The remaining six streptococci grew on solid media in small, nonmucoid colonies, in fluid media as sediment with clear supernatant, and in soft agar in compact colonies. Determination of surface hydrophobicity by salt aggregation revealed a hydrophilic surface for the encapsulated bacteria and a hydrophobic surface for the unencapsulated group C streptococci. To further analyze the epidemiological relationships, all 34 mucoid and nonmucoid isolates from pigs and monkeys were subjected to protein and DNA fingerprinting. The latter was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The protein profiles of all 34 isolates and the DNA profiles of 32 isolates appeared to be identical, with the DNA profiles of 2 isolates being closely related, indicating that a single virulent clone is responsible for this disease outbreak in Indonesia. PMID:8862585

  20. Comparisons of the galaxy age, stellar velocity dispersion and K-band luminosity distributions between grouped galaxies and isolated ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Xin-Fa

    2016-02-01

    In two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10), we compare the age, stellar velocity dispersion and K-band luminosity distributions of grouped galaxies with those of isolated galaxies, to explore the environmental dependence of these properties of galaxies. It is found that grouped galaxies have preferentially larger stellar velocity dispersions and are preferentially older than isolated galaxies. We also note apparent difference of K-band luminosity distribution at both extremes of density in the luminous volume-limited Main galaxy sample: grouped galaxies are preferentially more luminous than isolated galaxies, while this difference in the faint volume-limited Main galaxy sample is very small.

  1. The gut bacterial communities associated with lab-raised and field-collected ants of Camponotus fragilis (Formicidae: Formicinae).

    PubMed

    He, Hong; Wei, Cong; Wheeler, Diana E

    2014-09-01

    Camponotus is the second largest ant genus and known to harbor the primary endosymbiotic bacteria of the genus Blochmannia. However, little is known about the effect of diet and environment changes on the gut bacterial communities of these ants. We investigated the intestinal bacterial communities in the lab-raised and field-collected ants of Camponotus fragilis which is found in the southwestern United States and northern reaches of Mexico. We determined the difference of gut bacterial composition and distribution among the crop, midgut, and hindgut of the two types of colonies. Number of bacterial species varied with the methods of detection and the source of the ants. Lab-raised ants yielded 12 and 11 species using classical microbial culture methods and small-subunit rRNA genes (16S rRNAs) polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis, respectively. Field-collected ants yielded just 4 and 1-3 species using the same methods. Most gut bacterial species from the lab-raised ants were unevenly distributed among the crop, midgut, and hindgut, and each section had its own dominant bacterial species. Acetobacter was the prominent bacteria group in crop, accounting for about 55 % of the crop clone library. Blochmannia was the dominant species in midgut, nearly reaching 90 % of the midgut clone library. Pseudomonas aeruginosa dominated the hindgut, accounting for over 98 % of the hindgut clone library. P. aeruginosa was the only species common to all three sections. A comparison between lab-raised and field-collected ants, and comparison with other species, shows that gut bacterial communities vary with local environment and diet. The bacterial species identified here were most likely commensals with little effect on their hosts or mild pathogens deleterious to colony health.

  2. Nasal Histopathology and Intracage Ammonia Levels in Female Groups and Breeding Mice Housed in Static Isolation Cages.

    PubMed

    Mexas, Angela M; Brice, Angela K; Caro, Adam C; Hillanbrand, Troy S; Gaertner, Diane J

    2015-09-01

    Many factors influence ammonia levels in rodent cages, and high intracage ammonia has been associated with specific types of abnormal nasal pathology in mice. The use of autoclaved corncob bedding and the maintenance of low room humidity reduce the accumulation of ammonia in mouse cages. However, there are no engineering standards that define the limits of ammonia exposure for mice housed in static isolation cages. Regulatory guidance indicates that solid bottom cages must be sanitized at least weekly and that cage components in direct contact with animals must be sanitized at least every 2 wk. Common practice is to replace the bottoms and bedding of static isolation cages once weekly. To determine whether changing static isolation cages once weekly is an appropriate performance standard for mice, we prospectively evaluated the relationship between ammonia levels, nasal histopathology, and housing densities in various grouping strategies of mice housed in static isolation cages. Here, we report that the average nasal pathology score per cage and intracage ammonia levels were correlated, but nasal pathology scores did not differ among mice housed in breeding pairs, breeding trios, or female groups. In light of ammonia levels and histopathology scores as performance standards, these results suggest that a weekly cage-change frequency for static isolation cages does not result in adverse effects. Our results provide evidence to support current practices in the use of static isolation cages for housing laboratory mice in modern vivaria.

  3. Preferential Acquisition and Activation of Plasminogen Glycoform II by PAM Positive Group A Streptococcal Isolates.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, David M P; Law, Ruby H P; Ly, Diane; Cook, Simon M; Quek, Adam J; McArthur, Jason D; Whisstock, James C; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2015-06-30

    Plasminogen (Plg) circulates in the host as two predominant glycoforms. Glycoform I Plg (GI-Plg) contains glycosylation sites at Asn289 and Thr346, whereas glycoform II Plg (GII-Plg) is exclusively glycosylated at Thr346. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that Plg binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM) exhibits comparative equal affinity for GI- and GII-Plg in the "closed" conformation (for GII-Plg, KD = 27.4 nM; for GI-Plg, KD = 37.0 nM). When Plg was in the "open" conformation, PAM exhibited an 11-fold increase in affinity for GII-Plg (KD = 2.8 nM) compared with that for GI-Plg (KD = 33.2 nM). The interaction of PAM with Plg is believed to be mediated by lysine binding sites within kringle (KR) 2 of Plg. PAM-GI-Plg interactions were fully inhibited with 100 mM lysine analogue ε-aminocaproic acid (εACA), whereas PAM-GII-Plg interactions were shown to be weakened but not inhibited in the presence of 400 mM εACA. In contrast, binding to the KR1-3 domains of GII-Plg (angiostatin) by PAM was completely inhibited in the presence 5 mM εACA. Along with PAM, emm pattern D GAS isolates express a phenotypically distinct SK variant (type 2b SK) that requires Plg ligands such as PAM to activate Plg. Type 2b SK was able to generate an active site and activate GII-Plg at a rate significantly higher than that of GI-Plg when bound to PAM. Taken together, these data suggest that GAS selectively recruits and activates GII-Plg. Furthermore, we propose that the interaction between PAM and Plg may be partially mediated by a secondary binding site outside of KR2, affected by glycosylation at Asn289. PMID:26029848

  4. Summary of presentation for research on social structure, agreement, and conflict in groups in extreme and isolated environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Despite a vast amount of research, little is known concerning the effect of group structure, and individuals' understanding of that structure, on conflict in Antarctic groups. The overall objective of the research discussed is to determine the interrelationships of group structure, social cognition, and group function and conflict in isolated and extreme environments. In the two decades following WWII, a large body of research focused on the physiological, psychological, and social psychological factors affecting the functioning of individuals and groups in a variety of extreme and isolated environments in both the Arctic and Antarctic. There are two primary reasons for further research of this type. First, Antarctic polar stations are considered to be natural laboratories for the social and behavioral sciences and provide an opportunity to address certain theoretical and empirical questions concerned with agreement and conflict in social groups in general and group behavior in extreme, isolated environments in particular. Recent advances in the analysis of social networks and intracultural variation have improved the methods and have shifted the theoretical questions. The research is motivated by three classes of questions: (1) What are the characteristics of the social relations among individuals working and living together in extreme and isolated environments?; (2) What do individuals understand about their group, how does that understanding develop, and how is it socially distributed?; and (3) What is the relationship between that understanding and the functioning of the social group? Answers to these questions are important if we are to advance our knowledge of how individuals and groups adapt to extreme environments. Second, although Antarctic winter-over candidates may be evaluated as qualified on the basis of individual characteristics, they may fail to adapt because of certain characteristics of the social group. Consequently, the ability of winter-over-groups

  5. Repression of In Vivo Synthesis of the Mitochondrial Elongation Factors T and G in Saccharomyces fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Richter, D.

    1973-01-01

    In vivo synthesis of the mitochondrial elongation factors T and G in the yeast Saccharomyces fragilis can be repressed. Enzymatic activity assays and immunochemical titration methods reveal that cells grown in the presence of 8% glucose or in the absence of oxygen contain relatively lower amounts of mitochondrial elongation factors than cells grown in the presence of lactate. In contrast, in vivo production of the cytoplasmic elongation factors 1 and 2 does not respond to such a change of extracellular conditions. The rate of growth does not affect the level of the mitochondrial elongation factors. Production of both enzymes is almost constant during logarithmic growth, but decreases when the stationary phase is reached. Chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis, does not block but, rather, seems to enhance the in vivo synthesis of mitochondrial T or G. PMID:4717524

  6. Molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance of group G streptococci in Israel: comparison of invasive, non-invasive and carriage isolates.

    PubMed

    Halperin, T; Levine, H; Korenman, Z; Burstein, S; Amber, R; Sela, T; Valinsky, L

    2016-10-01

    Beta-hemolytic group G streptococci (GGS) are increasingly recognized as a source of substantial morbidity, causing mild to severe sporadic infections as well as outbreaks. The purpose of this study was to determine the genetic diversity and antibiotic resistance of GGS in Israel in order to aid in prevention and control. A total of 325 GGS isolates were collected in Israel between 2007 and 2011 from three determined settings: (1) carriage (n = 60), an observational longitudinal carriage study in the IF, (2) non-invasive (n = 166), clinical sporadic and epidemic non-invasive cases in the IDF, and (3) invasive (n = 99) cases of bacteremia collected during this period in Israel from a similar age group, at the national Streptococcal Reference Center. All isolates were characterized genetically and by their antibiotic-resistance profile. emm typing revealed 35 distinct types and subtypes among 228 S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) isolates, with high genetic diversity. An additional 97 GGS were identified as Streptococcus anginosus (SAG). The proportion of SDSE was higher in the invasive (100 %) and non-invasive (63.8 %) isolates compared to the carriage ones (38.3 %). Clindamycin, erythromycin, azithromycin and tetracycline resistance was detected in 6.6 %, 8.6 %, 9.7 % and 37.6 % of isolates, respectively. Overall, the most resistant isolates were in the invasive group and the fewest were in the SAG group. Considerable genetic diversity and common antibiotic resistance were revealed among GGS strains which differed according to the epidemiologic settings. Further clinical, epidemiological and basic research of GGS as a pathogen is warranted.

  7. Molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance of group G streptococci in Israel: comparison of invasive, non-invasive and carriage isolates.

    PubMed

    Halperin, T; Levine, H; Korenman, Z; Burstein, S; Amber, R; Sela, T; Valinsky, L

    2016-10-01

    Beta-hemolytic group G streptococci (GGS) are increasingly recognized as a source of substantial morbidity, causing mild to severe sporadic infections as well as outbreaks. The purpose of this study was to determine the genetic diversity and antibiotic resistance of GGS in Israel in order to aid in prevention and control. A total of 325 GGS isolates were collected in Israel between 2007 and 2011 from three determined settings: (1) carriage (n = 60), an observational longitudinal carriage study in the IF, (2) non-invasive (n = 166), clinical sporadic and epidemic non-invasive cases in the IDF, and (3) invasive (n = 99) cases of bacteremia collected during this period in Israel from a similar age group, at the national Streptococcal Reference Center. All isolates were characterized genetically and by their antibiotic-resistance profile. emm typing revealed 35 distinct types and subtypes among 228 S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) isolates, with high genetic diversity. An additional 97 GGS were identified as Streptococcus anginosus (SAG). The proportion of SDSE was higher in the invasive (100 %) and non-invasive (63.8 %) isolates compared to the carriage ones (38.3 %). Clindamycin, erythromycin, azithromycin and tetracycline resistance was detected in 6.6 %, 8.6 %, 9.7 % and 37.6 % of isolates, respectively. Overall, the most resistant isolates were in the invasive group and the fewest were in the SAG group. Considerable genetic diversity and common antibiotic resistance were revealed among GGS strains which differed according to the epidemiologic settings. Further clinical, epidemiological and basic research of GGS as a pathogen is warranted. PMID:27325440

  8. Variation in Competitive ability among Isolates of Aspergillus flavus from Different Vegetative Compatibility Groups during Maize Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus, the primary causal agent of aflatoxin contamination, includes many genetically diverse vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs). Competitive ability during infection of living maize kernels varied among isolates from 38 VCGs. Kernels were inoculated with both a common VCG, CG136, a...

  9. Isolation of Flavimonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2) from catheter-induced bacteremia in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Mutters, R; Köppler, H; Krause, T

    1990-12-01

    Bacteria of the newly proposed genus and combination Flavimonas oryzihabitans, previously known as CDC group Ve-2 or Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, are uncommon pathogens. We report here the first isolation of the organism in Germany from a case of bacteremia and describe the phenotypic characteristics of the strain.

  10. Isolation of Flavimonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2) from catheter-induced bacteremia in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Mutters, R; Köppler, H; Krause, T

    1990-12-01

    Bacteria of the newly proposed genus and combination Flavimonas oryzihabitans, previously known as CDC group Ve-2 or Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, are uncommon pathogens. We report here the first isolation of the organism in Germany from a case of bacteremia and describe the phenotypic characteristics of the strain. PMID:2091948

  11. Variability of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group O strains isolated from Cameroonian patients living in France.

    PubMed Central

    Loussert-Ajaka, I; Chaix, M L; Korber, B; Letourneur, F; Gomas, E; Allen, E; Ly, T D; Brun-Vézinet, F; Simon, F; Saragosti, S

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleotide sequences encoding p24Gag and the Env C2V3 region were obtained from seven patients who were selected on the basis of having paradoxical seronegativity on a subset of HIV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection kits and having atypical Western blot (immunoblot) reactivity. Sequence analyses showed that all of these strains were more closely related to the recently described Cameroonian HIV isolates of group O (HIV-1 outlier) than to group M (HIV-1 major). All seven patients had Cameroonian origins but were living in France at the time the blood samples were taken. Characterization of a large number of group M strains has to date revealed eight distinct genetic subtypes (A to H). Genetic distances between sequences from available group O isolates were generally comparable to those observed in M intersubtype sequence comparisons, showing that the group O viruses are genetically very diverse. Analysis of sequences from these seven new viral strains, combined with the three previously characterized group O strains, revealed few discernable phylogenetic clustering patterns among the 10 patients' viral sequences. The level of diversity among group O sequences suggests that they may have a comparable (or greater) age than the M group sequences, although for unknown reasons, the latter group dispersed first and is the dominant lineage in the pandemic. PMID:7637010

  12. On the mechanism of uranium binding to cell wall of Chara fragilis.

    PubMed

    Daković, Marko; Kovacević, Maja; Andjus, Pavle R; Bacić, Goran

    2008-09-01

    Biosorption of uranium from nuclear waste liquids and contaminated surface waters and soils has recently attracted special interest. However, the detailed mechanism of uranium uptake by plants is not well understood. The aim of this work is to investigate the role of cell wall components of the freshwater alga Chara fragilis in uranium sequestration from its solution. Three types of algae preparations: extract of cell wall polysaccharides, dried and live algae were subjected to uranium solutions of different concentration and pH. FTIR and X-ray diffraction were used to assess both potential binding sites and the form of the uranyl sequestered by algae. Sorption of uranium by live and dry algae shows remarkable differences both in terms of overall uptake and mechanisms involved. All experiments are consistent with the conclusion that coprecipitation of uranyl species with CaCO3 is the major binding mechanism in uranium sequestration by Chara fragilis, while the direct exchange of Ca2+ with UO22+ has a minor role. Live algae are twice as efficient in sequestering uranium from solution than dried ones due to the formation of different crystalline forms such as aragonite and rutherfordine forming in live algae in the presence of the uranyl species in solution. It therefore appears that metabolic processes such as photosynthesis, most likely through the regulation of pH, play a key role in the uranium uptake by plants. Further understanding of the complex mechanism of metabolic control of the uranium uptake by plants is needed before the planning of bioremediation of this element.

  13. Assessing Site-Isolation of Amine Groups on Aminopropyl-Functionalized SBA-15 Materials via Spectroscopic and Reactivity Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, Jason C; Dabestani, Reza T; Buchanan III, A C; Jones, Christopher W

    2008-01-01

    The average degree of separation and the accessibility of aminopropyl groups on SBA-15 silica materials prepared using different silane grafting approaches are compared. Three specific synthetic approaches are used: (1) the traditional grafting of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane in toluene, (2) a protection/deprotection method using benzyl- or trityl-spacer groups, and (3) a cooperative dilution method where 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane and methyltrimethoxysilane are co-condensed on the silica surface as a silane mixture. The site-isolation and accessibility of the amine groups are probed via three methods: (a) evaluation of pyrene groups adsorbed onto the solids using fluorescence spectroscopy, (b) the reactions of chlorodimethyl(2,3,4,5-tetramethyl-2,4-cyclopentadien-1-yl)silane (Cp'Si(Me){sub 2}Cl) and chloro(cyclopenta-2,4-dienyl)dimethylsilane (CpSi(Me){sub 2}Cl) with the tethered amine sites, and (c) comparison of the reactivity of zirconium constrained-geometry-inspired catalysts (CGCs) prepared using the Cp'Si(Me){sub 2}-modified aminosilicas in the catalytic polymerization of ethylene to produce poly(ethylene). The spectroscopic probe of site-isolation suggests that both the protection/deprotection method and the cooperative dilution method yield similarly isolated amine sites that are markedly more isolated than sites on traditional aminosilica. In contrast, both reactivity probes show that the protection/deprotection strategy leads to more uniformly accessible amine groups. It is proposed that the reactivity probes are more sensitive tests for accessibility and site-isolation in this case.

  14. [Investigation of the serotype distribution, biofilm production and antibiotic susceptibilities of group B streptococci isolated from urinary samples].

    PubMed

    Baba, Sevinç; Aydın, Mustafa Derya

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS), a member of normal flora of human gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems, is a leading cause of sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia particularly in newborn. GBS can also cause severe infections in pregnant women and adults with underlying disease, as well as mild diseases, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs). GBS strains exhibit 10 different serotypes, and the identification of serotype distribution is important epidemiologically. The role of biofilm production is one of the virulence factors that has been discussed in the pathogenesis of GBS infections. Although resistance to penicillin and ampicillin has not been documented in GBS, different rates of resistance has been reported for the alternative antibiotics to penicillin. The aim of this study was to investigate the serotype distribution, the ability of biofilm formation and the antibiotic susceptibilities of S.agalactiae strains isolated from urine cultures. A total of 60 strains were included in the study, 40 of them were isolated from patients (38 female 2 male; mean age: 36.7 years) with urinary tract complaints whose cultures yielded single type of colonies in the number of ≥ 50.000 cfu/ml, whereas 20 of them were isolated from patients (19 female 1 male; mean age: 37.2 years) without urinary tract complaints whose cultures yielded mixed colonies in the number of ≤ 20.000 cfu/ml. Chromogenic media were used for the isolation and the isolates were identified by conventional methods. The isolates were then serotyped by latex agglutination method and their antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by disk diffusion method recommended by CLSI documents. Biofilm formation of the strains were investigated by microplate and Congo red agar (CRA) methods. In our study, the most frequently detected serotypes were V (n= 18; 30%) and II (n= 14; 23.3%), followed by serotype Ia (n= 10; 16.7%), III (n= 9; 15%), Ib (n= 3; 5%), VI (n= 1; 1.7%) and VII (n

  15. Spotted fever group rickettsia closely related to Rickettsia monacensis isolated from ticks in South Jeolla province, Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Choi, Yeon-Joo; Shin, Sun-Hye; Choi, Min-Kyung; Song, Hyeon-Je; Kim, Heung-Chul; Klein, Terry A; Richards, Allen L; Park, Kyung-Hee; Jang, Won-Jong

    2013-07-01

    Rickettsia monacensis, a spotted fever group rickettsia, was isolated from Ixodes nipponensis ticks collected from live-captured small mammals in South Jeolla province, Korea in 2006. Homogenates of tick tissues were inoculated into L929 and Vero cell monolayers using shell vial assays. After several passages, Giemsa staining revealed rickettsia-like organisms in the inoculated Vero cells, but not the L929 cells. Sequencing analysis revealed that the ompA-small part (25-614 bp region), ompA-large part (2849-4455 bp region), nearly full-length ompB (58-4889 bp region) and gltA (196-1236 bp region) of the isolates had similarities of 100%, 99.8%, 99.3% and 99.5%, respectively, to those of R. monacensis. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate was grouped into the cluster in the same way as R. monacensis in the trees of all genes examined. These results strongly suggest that the isolate is closely related to R. monacensis. As far as is known, this is the first report of isolation of R. monacensis from ticks in Korea.

  16. Silting up and development of anoxic conditions enhanced by high abundance of the geoengineer species Ophiothrix fragilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murat, A.; Méar, Y.; Poizot, E.; Dauvin, J. C.; Beryouni, K.

    2016-04-01

    In the English Channel, the brittle-star Ophiothrix fragilis is a common epifaunal species typically found on pebbles in habitats with strong tidal currents. This species forms dense aggregations on the seafloor, supporting populations that can reach up to 7500 ind m-2 in the eastern part of the Baie de Seine, offshore from Antifer harbour. Here, O. fragilis occurs in an area with unexpected amounts of fine-grained sediment. Some of these mud deposits are made up of unusually compact black muds, an indication of the development of anoxic conditions in surficial sediments. To highlight a potential link between silting up and dense O. fragilis populations, and identify the interactions between environmental conditions and the population dynamics of this species, we analyse the data from three surveys corresponding to exceptional situations: (1) just after a Seine flood; (2) just after a storm and (3) after a period of ten months without any flood or storm. Four parameters are taken into account: number of brittle stars per 0.25 m2, Fine Fraction percentage, Total Organic Carbon and Total Sulphur. The main environmental forcings appear to be Seine river inflow, regional circulation dependent on tidal currents and the occurrence of storms. O. fragilis is able to geoengineer its environment in various ways and at different rates. Silting up is enhanced by increasing abundance of O. fragilis and takes place at a very fast rate. As a result, floods and storms reflecting instantaneous events give rise to a steady-state situation established between the abundance of this species and the fine fraction percentage. Anoxic conditions are dependent on the degradation of organic matter and require more time to be established. After many months in the absence of any disturbing events, anoxic conditions are developed in non-compacted muddy sediments (stability situation) and represent the normal surficial situation when the sediment becomes compacted (compact black muds). The

  17. Nest-Gallery Development and Caste Composition of Isolated Foraging Groups of the Drywood Termite, Incisitermes minor (Isoptera: Kalotermitidae)

    PubMed Central

    Himmi, S. Khoirul; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi; Yanase, Yoshiyuki; Oya, Masao; Torigoe, Toshiyuki; Akada, Masanori; Imadzu, Setsuo

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray computed-tomographic examination of nest-gallery development from timbers naturally infested by foraging groups of Incisitermes minor colonies was conducted. This study documents the colonization process of I. minor to new timbers and how the isolated groups maintain their nest-gallery system. The results suggested that development of a nest-gallery within a suitable wood item is not random, but shows selection for softer substrate and other adaptations to the different timber environments. Stigmergic coordinations were expressed in dynamic changes of the nest-gallery system; indicated by fortification behavior in sealing and re-opening a tunnel approaching the outer edge of the timber, and accumulating fecal pellets in particular chambers located beneath the timber surface. The study also examines the caste composition of isolated groups to discover how I. minor sustains colonies with and without primary reproductives. PMID:27455332

  18. Nest-Gallery Development and Caste Composition of Isolated Foraging Groups of the Drywood Termite, Incisitermes minor (Isoptera: Kalotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Himmi, S Khoirul; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi; Yanase, Yoshiyuki; Oya, Masao; Torigoe, Toshiyuki; Akada, Masanori; Imadzu, Setsuo

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray computed-tomographic examination of nest-gallery development from timbers naturally infested by foraging groups of Incisitermes minor colonies was conducted. This study documents the colonization process of I. minor to new timbers and how the isolated groups maintain their nest-gallery system. The results suggested that development of a nest-gallery within a suitable wood item is not random, but shows selection for softer substrate and other adaptations to the different timber environments. Stigmergic coordinations were expressed in dynamic changes of the nest-gallery system; indicated by fortification behavior in sealing and re-opening a tunnel approaching the outer edge of the timber, and accumulating fecal pellets in particular chambers located beneath the timber surface. The study also examines the caste composition of isolated groups to discover how I. minor sustains colonies with and without primary reproductives. PMID:27455332

  19. Comparisons of coat protein gene sequences show that East African isolates of Sweet potato feathery mottle virus form a genetically distinct group.

    PubMed

    Kreuze, J F; Karyeija, R F; Gibson, R W; Valkonen, J P

    2000-01-01

    Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus Potyvirus) infects sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) worldwide, but no sequence data on isolates from Africa are available. Coat protein (CP) gene sequences from eight East African isolates from Madagascar and different districts of Uganda (the second biggest sweet potato producer in the world) and two West African isolates from Nigeria and Niger were determined. They were compared by phylogenetic analysis with the previously reported sequences of ten SPFMV isolates from other continents. The East African SPFMV isolates formed a distinct cluster, whereas the other isolates were not clustered according to geographic origin. These data indicate that East African isolates of SPFMV form a genetically unique group.

  20. Isolated Students in Secondary Schools: Cooperative Group Contingencies and Social Skills Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lew, Marvin; Mesch, Debra

    Group contingencies is a technology for using peers to influence behavioral change through contingencies; the use of contingent interdependent group rewards for specific group behaviors has been of interest to behavioral researchers. To sort out the effects on quiz scores and peer social interaction (PSI) of group contingencies based on academic…

  1. Allocation of Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Isolates into Four Distinct Groups by ompK36 Typing in a Taiwanese University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Po-Xing; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Wang, Li-Rong; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The OmpK36 porin plays a role in carbapenem resistance and may contribute to bacterial virulence in Klebsiella pneumoniae. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of different groups of K. pneumoniae separated by ompK36 typing. Among 226 nonduplicate K. pneumoniae bloodstream isolates collected at a Taiwanese hospital in 2011, four ompK36 types, designated types A, B, C, and D, were identified by PCR in 61, 28, 100, and 36 isolates, respectively; 1 isolate was untypeable. Statistical analysis showed significantly higher rates of antimicrobial resistance (all tested antibiotics except meropenem), extended-spectrum β-lactamases or DHA-1 (47.5% together), Qnr-type quinolone resistance determinants (50.8%), and IncFIIA-type plasmids (49.2%) in group A than in others. Seventeen isolates were identified as belonging to 3 international high-risk clones (4 sequence type 11 [ST11], 10 ST15, and 3 ST147 isolates); all isolates but 1 ST15 isolate were classified in group A. The significant characteristics of group C were hypermucoviscosity (62.0%) and a higher virulence gene content. This group included all serotype K1 (n = 30), K2 (n = 25), and K5 (n = 3) isolates, 6 of 7 K57 isolates, all isolates of major clones associated with pyogenic liver abscesses (29 ST23, 11 ST65, 5 ST86, 7 ST373, and 1 ST375 isolates), and 16 (94.1%) of 17 isolates causing bacteremic liver abscesses. Twelve (42.9%) of the group B isolates were responsible for bacteremic biliary tract infections. Group D was predominant (83.3%) among 12 K20 isolates. This study suggests that most clinical K. pneumoniae isolates can be allocated into four groups with distinct characteristics based on ompK36 types. PMID:26224840

  2. Allocation of Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Isolates into Four Distinct Groups by ompK36 Typing in a Taiwanese University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Jou; Zheng, Po-Xing; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Wang, Li-Rong; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2015-10-01

    The OmpK36 porin plays a role in carbapenem resistance and may contribute to bacterial virulence in Klebsiella pneumoniae. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of different groups of K. pneumoniae separated by ompK36 typing. Among 226 nonduplicate K. pneumoniae bloodstream isolates collected at a Taiwanese hospital in 2011, four ompK36 types, designated types A, B, C, and D, were identified by PCR in 61, 28, 100, and 36 isolates, respectively; 1 isolate was untypeable. Statistical analysis showed significantly higher rates of antimicrobial resistance (all tested antibiotics except meropenem), extended-spectrum β-lactamases or DHA-1 (47.5% together), Qnr-type quinolone resistance determinants (50.8%), and IncFIIA-type plasmids (49.2%) in group A than in others. Seventeen isolates were identified as belonging to 3 international high-risk clones (4 sequence type 11 [ST11], 10 ST15, and 3 ST147 isolates); all isolates but 1 ST15 isolate were classified in group A. The significant characteristics of group C were hypermucoviscosity (62.0%) and a higher virulence gene content. This group included all serotype K1 (n = 30), K2 (n = 25), and K5 (n = 3) isolates, 6 of 7 K57 isolates, all isolates of major clones associated with pyogenic liver abscesses (29 ST23, 11 ST65, 5 ST86, 7 ST373, and 1 ST375 isolates), and 16 (94.1%) of 17 isolates causing bacteremic liver abscesses. Twelve (42.9%) of the group B isolates were responsible for bacteremic biliary tract infections. Group D was predominant (83.3%) among 12 K20 isolates. This study suggests that most clinical K. pneumoniae isolates can be allocated into four groups with distinct characteristics based on ompK36 types.

  3. Antibacterial activity of diketopiperazines isolated from a marine fungus using t-butoxycarbonyl group as a simple tool for purification.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Bahaa El-Dien M; Rateb, Mostafa E

    2015-08-15

    Nine diketopiperazines were characterized from the culture of marine fungal isolate MR2012 which based on DNA amplification and sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was identified as Aspergillus fumigatus. The isolated fungal metabolites 4-12 were unambiguously identified as a series of simple and re-arranged diketopiperazines by analysis of spectroscopic data. t-Butoxycarbonyl group (BOC) derivatization was used to separate the intractable mixture of 4 and 5. When all compounds were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against gram positive bacteria, the isolated metabolites showed moderate to weak effects, while the semisynthetic derivatives 4a and 5a displayed strong activity comparable to the positive control, tetracycline against gram positive bacteria. PMID:26099531

  4. Antibacterial activity of diketopiperazines isolated from a marine fungus using t-butoxycarbonyl group as a simple tool for purification.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Bahaa El-Dien M; Rateb, Mostafa E

    2015-08-15

    Nine diketopiperazines were characterized from the culture of marine fungal isolate MR2012 which based on DNA amplification and sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was identified as Aspergillus fumigatus. The isolated fungal metabolites 4-12 were unambiguously identified as a series of simple and re-arranged diketopiperazines by analysis of spectroscopic data. t-Butoxycarbonyl group (BOC) derivatization was used to separate the intractable mixture of 4 and 5. When all compounds were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against gram positive bacteria, the isolated metabolites showed moderate to weak effects, while the semisynthetic derivatives 4a and 5a displayed strong activity comparable to the positive control, tetracycline against gram positive bacteria.

  5. Distribution and Morphology of Longidorus breviannulatus Norton &Hoffman, 1975 and Longidorus fragilis Thorne, 1974 (Nematoda: Longidoridae) from North America

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Weimin; Robbins, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    In a survey of ecotypes for longidorids, primarily from the rhizosphere hardwood trees growing in sandy soil along stream banks, 828 soil samples were collected from 37 Arkansas counties in 1999-2001. Eight populations of Longidorus breviannulatus were identified from the Arkansas survey samples. A total of 19 populations from California, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, and Wisconsin were identified from the collection of the second author. A few males were found in New York and Nebraska populations and are described herein. Seven populations of L. fragilis were identified in the Arkansas survey samples, and one population was found from Indiana. Four juvenile stages of L. fragilis are present, and data are given for them herein. PMID:19262810

  6. Outbreeding lethality between toxic Group I and nontoxic Group III Alexandrium tamarense spp. isolates: Predominance of heterotypic encystment and implications for mating interactions and biogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Kulis, David M.; Solow, Andrew R.; Erdner, Deana L.; Percy, Linda; Lewis, Jane; Anderson, Donald M.

    2010-02-01

    We report the zygotic encystment of geographically dispersed isolates in the dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense, in particular, successful mating of toxic Group I and nontoxic Group III isolates. However, hypnozygotes produced in Group I/III co-cultures complete no more than three divisions after germinating. Previous reports have suggested a mate recognition mechanism whereby hypnozygotes produced in co-cultures could arise from either homotypic (inbred) or heterotypic (outbred) gamete pairs. To determine the extent to which each occurs, a nested PCR assay was developed to determine parentage of individual hypnozygotes. The vast majority of hypnozygotes from pairwise Group I/III co-cultures were outbred, so that inviability was a result of hybridization, not inbreeding. These findings support the assertion that complete speciation underlies the phylogenetic structure of the Alexandrium tamarense species complex. Additionally, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) copy numbers of both hybrid and single ribotype hypnozygotes were reduced substantially from those of haploid motile cells. The destruction of rDNA loci may be crucial for the successful mating of genetically distant conjugants and appears integral to the process of encystment. The inviability of Group I/III hybrids is important for public health because the presence of hybrid cysts may indicate ongoing displacement of a nontoxic population by a toxic one (or vice versa). Hybrid inviability also suggests a bloom control strategy whereby persistent, toxic Group I blooms could be mitigated by introduction of nontoxic Group III cells. The potential for hybridization in nature was investigated by applying the nested PCR assay to hypnozygotes from Belfast Lough, Northern Ireland, a region where Group I and III populations co-occur. Two hybrid cysts were identified in 14 successful assays, demonstrating that Group I and III populations do interbreed in that region. However, an analysis of mating data

  7. Toxigenic diversity of two different RAPD groups of Stachybotrys chartarum isolates analyzed by potential for trichothecene production and for boar sperm cell motility inhibition.

    PubMed

    Peltola, J; Niessen, L; Nielsen, K F; Jarvis, B B; Andersen, B; Salkinoja-Salonen, M; Möller, E M

    2002-11-01

    Thirty-one isolates of Stachybotrys chartarum from indoor and outdoor environments were analyzed for the presence of the trichodiene synthase (Tri5) gene, trichothecenes, boar sperm cell motility inhibition, and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA banding patterns (RAPDs). Twenty-two S. chartarum isolates tested positive for the Tri5 gene and nine were negative when tested using novel Tri5 gene-specific PCR primer pair. The Tri5 gene positive isolates contained satratoxins (five isolates) or the simple trichothecene, trichodermol (11 isolates). The Tri5 gene negative isolates did not produce satratoxins or trichodermol. Nineteen S. chartarum isolates, distributed among the Tri5 gene negative and positive groups, inhibited boar spermatozoan motility at concentrations of < or = 60 microg of crude cell extract/mL. The inhibition of motility was independent of satratoxins or atranones. Unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis of RAPD fragments clustered the 31 S. chartarum isolates in two distinct groups designated as RAPD groups 1 and 2. The grouping of S. chartarum isolates obtained by UPGMA cluster analysis of RAPD fragments was identical to the grouping obtained by Tri5 gene-specific PCR. This indicates that the S. chartarum isolates belonging to different groups were genetically distinct in a much wider area than just the Tri5 gene. PMID:12556129

  8. Survey of strain distribution and antibiotic resistance pattern of group B streptococci (Streptococcus agalactiae) isolated from clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Nasaj, Mona; Hosseini, Seyed Mostafa; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the present study were to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profils with particular emphasis on susceptible or resistant strains to macrolides and lincosamids antibiotics and to determine possible antibiotic resistance mechanisms occurring in group B streptococci (GBS) strains using PCR assay and disk diffusion method. Methods: A total of 62 clinical GBS strains were investigated. Antibacterial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method and inducible resistance test for clindamycin by standard double disk diffusion or D-zone test for all isolates to differentiate macrolide resistance phenotype (M), constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (cMLSB) and induced macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (iMLSB). In addition, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of penicillin were determined for all isolates. Finally, possible existence of antibiotic resistance genes for erythromycin (ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) and for clindamycin (linB) were examined among isolates using PCR assay. Results: All 62 isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, linezolid, cefazoline and vancomycin. However, 93.5% (n=58) of isolates showed an increased MIC to penicillin. The overall rate of erythromycin resistance was 35.5% (n=22). All erythromycin-resistant isolates displayed the M phenotype (100%, n=22). All three erythromycin resistance genes (i.e. ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) were found in erythromycin-resistant isolates. Conclusion: It was concluded that prescribing antibiotic without antibacterial susceptibility tests should be prevented because of the high prevalence of erythromycin-resistant GBS strains and the fact that erythromycin-resistant GBS strains has shown an increased MIC to penicillin, as the drug of choice for treating GBS infections.

  9. Survey of strain distribution and antibiotic resistance pattern of group B streptococci (Streptococcus agalactiae) isolated from clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Nasaj, Mona; Hosseini, Seyed Mostafa; Arabestani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the present study were to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profils with particular emphasis on susceptible or resistant strains to macrolides and lincosamids antibiotics and to determine possible antibiotic resistance mechanisms occurring in group B streptococci (GBS) strains using PCR assay and disk diffusion method. Methods: A total of 62 clinical GBS strains were investigated. Antibacterial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method and inducible resistance test for clindamycin by standard double disk diffusion or D-zone test for all isolates to differentiate macrolide resistance phenotype (M), constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (cMLSB) and induced macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B phenotype (iMLSB). In addition, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of penicillin were determined for all isolates. Finally, possible existence of antibiotic resistance genes for erythromycin (ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) and for clindamycin (linB) were examined among isolates using PCR assay. Results: All 62 isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, linezolid, cefazoline and vancomycin. However, 93.5% (n=58) of isolates showed an increased MIC to penicillin. The overall rate of erythromycin resistance was 35.5% (n=22). All erythromycin-resistant isolates displayed the M phenotype (100%, n=22). All three erythromycin resistance genes (i.e. ermTR, ermB and mefA/E) were found in erythromycin-resistant isolates. Conclusion: It was concluded that prescribing antibiotic without antibacterial susceptibility tests should be prevented because of the high prevalence of erythromycin-resistant GBS strains and the fact that erythromycin-resistant GBS strains has shown an increased MIC to penicillin, as the drug of choice for treating GBS infections. PMID:27648402

  10. Analysis of the outer membrane proteome and secretome of Bacteroides fragilis reveals a multiplicity of secretion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Marlena M; Anderson, D Eric; Bernstein, Harris D

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a widely distributed member of the human gut microbiome and an opportunistic pathogen. Cell surface molecules produced by this organism likely play important roles in colonization, communication with other microbes, and pathogenicity, but the protein composition of the outer membrane (OM) and the mechanisms used to transport polypeptides into the extracellular space are poorly characterized. Here we used LC-MS/MS to analyze the OM proteome and secretome of B. fragilis NCTC 9343 grown under laboratory conditions. Of the 229 OM proteins that we identified, 108 are predicted to be lipoproteins, and 61 are predicted to be TonB-dependent transporters. Based on their proximity to genes encoding TonB-dependent transporters, many of the lipoprotein genes likely encode proteins involved in nutrient or small molecule uptake. Interestingly, protease accessibility and biotinylation experiments indicated that an unusually large fraction of the lipoproteins are cell-surface exposed. We also identified three proteins that are members of a novel family of autotransporters, multiple potential type I protein secretion systems, and proteins that appear to be components of a type VI secretion apparatus. The secretome consisted of lipoproteins and other proteins that might be substrates of the putative type I or type VI secretion systems. Our proteomic studies show that B. fragilis differs considerably from well-studied Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli in both the spectrum of OM proteins that it produces and the range of secretion strategies that it utilizes.

  11. Analysis of the outer membrane proteome and secretome of Bacteroides fragilis reveals a multiplicity of secretion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Marlena M; Anderson, D Eric; Bernstein, Harris D

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a widely distributed member of the human gut microbiome and an opportunistic pathogen. Cell surface molecules produced by this organism likely play important roles in colonization, communication with other microbes, and pathogenicity, but the protein composition of the outer membrane (OM) and the mechanisms used to transport polypeptides into the extracellular space are poorly characterized. Here we used LC-MS/MS to analyze the OM proteome and secretome of B. fragilis NCTC 9343 grown under laboratory conditions. Of the 229 OM proteins that we identified, 108 are predicted to be lipoproteins, and 61 are predicted to be TonB-dependent transporters. Based on their proximity to genes encoding TonB-dependent transporters, many of the lipoprotein genes likely encode proteins involved in nutrient or small molecule uptake. Interestingly, protease accessibility and biotinylation experiments indicated that an unusually large fraction of the lipoproteins are cell-surface exposed. We also identified three proteins that are members of a novel family of autotransporters, multiple potential type I protein secretion systems, and proteins that appear to be components of a type VI secretion apparatus. The secretome consisted of lipoproteins and other proteins that might be substrates of the putative type I or type VI secretion systems. Our proteomic studies show that B. fragilis differs considerably from well-studied Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli in both the spectrum of OM proteins that it produces and the range of secretion strategies that it utilizes. PMID:25658944

  12. Activities of new fluoroquinolones, ketolides, and other antimicrobials against blood culture isolates of viridans group streptococci from across Canada, 2000.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Andrea S; de Azavedo, Joyce C S; McGeer, Allison; Ostrowska, Krystyna I; Church, Deirdre; Hoban, Daryl J; Harding, Godfrey K M; Weiss, Karl; Abbott, Lewis; Smaill, Fiona; Gourdeau, Marie; Murray, Gilles; Low, Donald E

    2002-05-01

    The rates of nonsusceptibility to penicillin, erythromycin, and clindamycin of 191 blood culture isolates of viridans group streptococci collected from across Canada in 2000 were 36, 42, and 10%, respectively. Although 8% of the strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin (MIC >or= 4 microg/ml), the MICs of gemifloxacin, BMS 284756, telithromycin, and ABT 773 at which 90% of the strains were inhibited were 0.06, 0.06, 0.12, and 0.03 microg/ml, respectively.

  13. A Simple, Semiselective Medium for Anaerobic Isolation of Anginosus Group Streptococci from Patients with Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Richard D.; Wareham, David W.; Gardiner, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic isolation of anginosus group streptococci (AGS) from respiratory specimens containing diverse microbiota using a semiselective blood agar medium incorporating nalidixic acid and sulfamethazine (NAS) is described. AGS were detected in 60% of tested sputa from patients with cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and bronchiectasis. This demonstrates NAS to be a diagnostic tool for detecting AGS within the complex microbial communities associated with chronic lung disorders. PMID:22238446

  14. Isolation and identification of Pseudomonas syringae facilitated by a PCR targeting the whole P. syringae group.

    PubMed

    Guilbaud, Caroline; Morris, Cindy E; Barakat, Mohamed; Ortet, Philippe; Berge, Odile

    2016-01-01

    We present a reliable PCR-based method to avoid the biases related to identification based on the conventional phenotypes currently used in the identification of Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato, a ubiquitous environmental bacterium including plant pathogens. We identified a DNA target suitable for this purpose by applying a comparative genomic pipeline to Pseudomonas genomes. We designed primers and developed PCR conditions that led to a clean and strong PCR product from 97% of the 185 strains of P. syringae strains tested and gave a clear negative result for the 31 non-P. syringae strains tested. The sensitivity of standard PCR was determined with pure strains to be 10(6) bacteria mL(-1) or 0.4 ng of DNA μL(-1). Sensitivity could be improved with the touchdown method. The new PCR-assisted isolation of P. syringae was efficient when deployed on an environmental sample of river water as compared to the isolation based on phenotypes. This innovation eliminates the need for extensive expertise in isolating P. syringae colonies, was simpler, faster and very reliable. It will facilitate discovery of more diversity of P. syringae and research on emergence, dispersion and evolution to understand the varied functions of this environmental bacterium. PMID:26610434

  15. A snapshot of the predominant single nucleotide polymorphism cluster groups of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Varma-Basil, Mandira; Narang, Anshika; Chakravorty, Soumitesh; Garima, Kushal; Gupta, Shraddha; Kumar Sharma, Naresh; Giri, Astha; Zozio, Thierry; Couvin, David; Hanif, Mahmud; Bhatnagar, Anuj; Menon, Balakrishnan; Niemann, Stefan; Rastogi, Nalin; Alland, David; Bose, Mridula

    2016-09-01

    Several attempts have been made to associate phylogenetic differences among Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains to variations in the clinical outcome of the disease and to drug resistance. We genotyped 139 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis obtained from patients of pulmonary tuberculosis in North Delhi region. The isolates were analyzed using nine Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTRs; and the results were correlated with their drug susceptibility profile. Results of SNP cluster group (SCG) analysis (available for 138 isolates) showed that the most predominant cluster was SCG 3a, observed in 58.7% (81/138) of the isolates with 44.4% (36/81) of these being drug susceptible, while 16% (13/81) were multidrug resistant (MDR). Of the ancestral cluster SCG 1 observed in 19.5% (27/138) of the isolates, 14.8% (4/27) were MDR while 44.4% (12/27) were drug susceptible. SCG 2 formed 5.79% (8/138) of the isolates and 50% (4/8) of these were multidrug resistant (MDR). Spoligotyping subdivided the strains into 45 shared types (n = 125) and 14 orphan strains. The orphan strains were mostly associated with SCG 3a or SCG 1, reflecting the principal SCGs found in the Indian population. SCG 1 and SCG 2 genotypes were concordant with the East African Indian (EAI) and Beijing families respectively. Central Asian (CAS) clade and its sublineages were predominantly associated with SCG 3a. No consistent association was seen between the SCGs and Harlem, T or X clades. The 15 loci MIRU-VNTR typing revealed 123/136 isolates to be unclustered, while 13 isolates were present in 6 clusters of 2-3 isolates each. However, correlating the cluster analysis with patient details did not suggest any evidence of recent transmission. In conclusion, though our study revealed the preponderance of SCG 1 and 3a in the M. tuberculosis population circulating in the region, the diversity of strains highlights the changes occurring within lineages and reemphasizes the

  16. Antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial strains isolated from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections in France. Multicentre Study Group.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, F W

    2000-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the distribution and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of bacterial strains isolated from adults with community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI) in France. From December 1996 to March 1997, each of 15 private laboratories in France consecutively collected about 80 non-duplicate strains isolated from adult outpatients with UTI, including patients receiving care at home, and tested their susceptibility by the disk diffusion test. A total of 1160 strains were collected: 1031 gram-negative bacilli, including Escherichia coli (n = 865), Proteus mirabilis (n = 68) and Klebsiella spp. (n = 40), and 129 gram-positive cocci, including Staphylococcus aureus (n = 16), other staphylococci (n = 25), group B streptococci (n = 25) and enterococci (n = 63). In the case of 430 bacterial isolates, the patients had either been hospitalised in the last 6 months or received antibiotic treatment in the last 3 months. The antibiotic susceptibility rates for Escherichia coli were: amoxicillin (58.7%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (63.3%), ticarcillin (61.4%), cephalothin (66.8%) cefuroxime (77.6%), cefixime (83.6%), cefotaxime (99.8%), ceftazidime (99%), nalidixic acid (91.9%), norfloxacin (96.6%), ofloxacin (96.3%), ciprofloxacin (98.3%), cotrimoxazole (78.2%), fosfomycin (99.1%) and gentamicin (98.4%). Of the Enterobacteriaceae, five strains produced an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase. Methicillin resistance was detected in nine Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The most important findings were two extended-spectrum, beta-lactamase-producing and three methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from patients who had not been hospitalised in the last 6 months or taken antibiotics in the last 3 months. The findings indicate that these strains can spread within the community; therefore, monitoring antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria isolated in the community appears to be mandatory.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Functional Tripartite Group II Introns Using a Tn5-Based Genetic Screen

    PubMed Central

    Ritlop, Christine; Monat, Caroline; Cousineau, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Background Group II introns are RNA enzymes that splice themselves from pre-mRNA transcripts. Most bacterial group II introns harbour an open reading frame (ORF), coding for a protein with reverse transcriptase, maturase and occasionally DNA binding and endonuclease activities. Some ORF-containing group II introns were shown to be mobile retroelements that invade new DNA target sites. From an evolutionary perspective, group II introns are hypothesized to be the ancestors of the spliceosome-dependent nuclear introns and the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs – U1, U2, U4, U5 and U6) that are important functional elements of the spliceosome machinery. The ability of some group II introns fragmented in two or three pieces to assemble and undergo splicing in trans supports the theory that spliceosomal snRNAs evolved from portions of group II introns. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a transposon-based genetic screen to explore the ability of the Ll.LtrB group II intron from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis to be fragmented into three pieces in vivo. Trans-splicing tripartite variants of Ll.LtrB were selected using a highly efficient and sensitive trans-splicing/conjugation screen. We report that numerous fragmentation sites located throughout Ll.LtrB support tripartite trans-splicing, showing that this intron is remarkably tolerant to fragmentation. Conclusions/Significance This work unveils the great versatility of group II intron fragments to assemble and accurately trans-splice their flanking exons in vivo. The selected introns represent the first evidence of functional tripartite group II introns in bacteria and provide experimental support for the proposed evolutionary relationship between group II introns and snRNAs. PMID:22876289

  18. Reproductive isolation revealed in preliminary crossbreeding experiments using field collected Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) from three ITS–2 defined groups

    PubMed Central

    García, Mauricio; Menes, Marianela; Dorn, Patricia L.; Monroy, Carlota; Richards, Bethany; Panzera, Francisco; Bustamante, Dulce María

    2013-01-01

    Triatoma dimidiata, a Chagas disease vector distributed in Mexico, Central America, Colombia, Venezuela, Peru and Ecuador, has been studied using genetic markers and four groups have been defined by ITS–2 sequences: 1A, 1B, 2 and 3. To gather evidence on the divergence and reproductive isolation among T. dimidiata ITS–2 groups, we carried out 15 crossbreeding experiments with field–collected sylvan and domestic T. dimidiata from Guatemala where three groups are found: 1A, 2 and 3. Reciprocal crosses between individuals from groups 1A and 2, and a cross between group 2 individuals from different habitats, produced an average 129.78±42.29 eggs with hatching success ranging from 31.6% to 90.1%. The offspring of these crosses reached the adult stage, and crosses between F1 insects produced eggs. These results suggest that there are no pre– or post– zygotic reproductive barriers between groups 1A and 2, or within group 2. Crosses between group 3 females and males from groups 1A or 2 produced on average 85.67±30.26 eggs and none of them hatched. These results support the existence of pre– zygotic barriers between T. dimidiata group 3 and groups 1A and 2. The group 3 individuals were collected in sylvatic environments in Yaxha, Peten, Guatemala. Previously, distinct chromosomal characteristics (cytotype 3) were described in individuals from this population. Based on this evidence we suggest that this population is divergent at the species level from other T. dimidiata populations. PMID:24041592

  19. Increasing antimicrobial resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius group bacteria and emergence of MRSP in the UK.

    PubMed

    Beever, L; Bond, R; Graham, P A; Jackson, B; Lloyd, D H; Loeffler, A

    2015-02-14

    Frequencies of antimicrobial resistance were determined amongst 14,555 clinical Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG) isolates from UK dogs and cats to estimate resistance trends and quantify the occurrence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP). Reports from two diagnostic laboratories (13,313 general submissions, 1242 referral centre only submissions) were analysed retrospectively (2003/2006-2012). MRSP were defined by phenotypic resistance to meticillin and concurrent broad β-lactam resistance; a subset was confirmed genetically (SIG-specific nuc and mecA). Trends were analysed by Cochran-Armitage test. Resistance remained below 10 per cent for cefalexin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and the fluoroquinolones. Increasing resistance trends were seen in both laboratories for ampicillin/amoxicillin (both P<0.001), cefovecin (both P<0.046) and enrofloxacin (both P<0.02). Resistance to cefalexin increased over time in referral hospital isolates (P<0.001) to clindamycin (P=0.01) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (P=0.001) amongst general laboratory submissions. Overall, 106 MRSP were isolated (0.7 per cent of submissions) including 32 (2.6 per cent of submissions, all genetically confirmed) from the referral centre population (inter-laboratory difference P<0.001). Against a background of widely susceptible SIG isolates, a new trend of increasing resistance to important antimicrobials was identified overtime and the emergence of MRSP from UK clinical cases was confirmed. Attention to responsible use of antibacterial therapy in small animal practice is urgently needed.

  20. Identification and Genomic Analysis of a Novel Group C Orthobunyavirus Isolated from a Mosquito Captured near Iquitos, Peru.

    PubMed

    Treangen, Todd J; Schoeler, George; Phillippy, Adam M; Bergman, Nicholas H; Turell, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Group C orthobunyaviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses found in both South and North America. Until very recently, and despite their status as important vector-borne human pathogens, no Group C whole genome sequences containing all three segments were available in public databases. Here we report a Group C orthobunyavirus, named El Huayo virus, isolated from a pool of Culex portesi mosquitoes captured near Iquitos, Peru. Although initial metagenomic analysis yielded only a handful of reads belonging to the genus Orthobunyavirus, single contig assemblies were generated for L, M, and S segments totaling over 200,000 reads (~0.5% of sample). Given the moderately high viremia in hamsters (>107 plaque-forming units/ml) and the propensity for Cx. portesi to feed on rodents, it is possible that El Huayo virus is maintained in nature in a Culex portesi/rodent cycle. El Huayo virus was found to be most similar to Peruvian Caraparu virus isolates and constitutes a novel subclade within Group C.

  1. Identification and Genomic Analysis of a Novel Group C Orthobunyavirus Isolated from a Mosquito Captured near Iquitos, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Treangen, Todd J.; Schoeler, George; Phillippy, Adam M.; Bergman, Nicholas H.; Turell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Group C orthobunyaviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses found in both South and North America. Until very recently, and despite their status as important vector-borne human pathogens, no Group C whole genome sequences containing all three segments were available in public databases. Here we report a Group C orthobunyavirus, named El Huayo virus, isolated from a pool of Culex portesi mosquitoes captured near Iquitos, Peru. Although initial metagenomic analysis yielded only a handful of reads belonging to the genus Orthobunyavirus, single contig assemblies were generated for L, M, and S segments totaling over 200,000 reads (~0.5% of sample). Given the moderately high viremia in hamsters (>107 plaque-forming units/ml) and the propensity for Cx. portesi to feed on rodents, it is possible that El Huayo virus is maintained in nature in a Culex portesi/rodent cycle. El Huayo virus was found to be most similar to Peruvian Caraparu virus isolates and constitutes a novel subclade within Group C. PMID:27074162

  2. Unusual groups of Morganella ("Proteus") morganii isolated from clinical specimens: lysine-positive and ornithine-negative biogroups.

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, F W; Framer, J J; Steigerwalt, A G; Brenner, D J

    1980-01-01

    Morganella ("Proteus") morganii is the only species in the recently proposed genus Morganella, but we suspect there are yet undescribed species in the genus. Two candidates for new species were recently investigated. Nineteen strains isolated from clinical specimens resembled M. morganii but were lysine positive and nonmotile and fermented glycerol within 24 h. Typical M. morganii are lysine negative and motile and ferment glycerol slowly or not at all. The three-test variance from typical M. morganii suggested that this new group might be a new Morganella species; however, strains of the group were closely related to typical M. morganii by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-DNA hybridization. A second group of 14 strains isolated from clinical specimens was ornithine negative but was otherwise very similar to M. morganii. This group was also closely related to M. morganii by DNA hybridization. Both sets of strains clearly belong in the species Morganella morganii as distinct biogroups; they are not separate species as originally suspected. Initially both biogroups posed a problem in identification until their true relationship to M. morganii was determined. PMID:6775010

  3. Phylogeny of Flavobacteria Group Isolated from Freshwater Using Multilocus Sequencing Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Seyoung; Lee, Jungnam; Lee, Siwon; Han, Kyudong

    2013-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene has been widely used for the classification of microorganisms. However, we have been unable to clearly identify five Flavobacterium species isolated from a freshwater by using the gene as a single marker, because the evolutionary history is incomplete and the pace of DNA substitutions is relatively rapid in the bacteria. In this study, we tried to classify Flavobacterium species through multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), which is a practical and reliable technique for the identification or classification of bacteria. The five Flavobacterium species isolated from freshwater and 37 other strains were classified based on six housekeeping genes: gyrB, dnaK, tuf, murG, atpA, and glyA. The genes were amplified by PCR and subjected to DNA sequencing. Based on the combined DNA sequence (4,412 bp) of the six housekeeping genes, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationship among the Flavobacterium species. The results indicated that MLSA, based on the six housekeeping genes, is a trustworthy method for the identification of closely related Flavobacterium species. PMID:24465240

  4. A comparison of group A streptococcal serotypes isolated from the upper respiratory tract in the USA and Thailand: implications.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, E. L.; Johnson, D. R.; Nanthapisud, P.; Sirilertpanrana, S.; Chumdermpadetsuk, S.

    1992-01-01

    Characterization of group A beta-haemolytic streptococci in upper respiratory tract isolates from the USA and Thailand revealed that whereas 80% of the U.S. isolates could be M or opacity factor (OF) typed, less than 20% of the Thai isolates could be characterized with the available typing sera (P less than 0.001). There was also a statistically significant difference observed in the percentage of strains that could be characterized by the T-agglutination pattern (93% in the USA vs 61% in Thailand, P less than 0.001). Even among the identifiable strains, marked differences in the distribution of the recovered serotypes were noted between the two countries. These results show that there are a significant number of as yet unidentified group A streptococcal strains in parts of the world where streptococcal infections and their sequelae are important public health problems. They further imply that such findings must be taken into consideration in the future when designing possible streptococcal vaccines for worldwide use. PMID:1394774

  5. Structural analysis of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase from Bacteroides fragilis and functional implications

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Grant, Joanna C.; Farr, Carol L.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase (API) from Bacteroides fragilis (bfAPI) was determined at 1.7 Å resolution and was found to be a tetramer of a single-domain sugar isomerase (SIS) with an endogenous ligand, CMP-Kdo (cytidine 5′-monophosphate-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonate), bound at the active site. API catalyzes the reversible isomerization of d-ribulose 5-phosphate to d-arabinose 5-phosphate in the first step of the Kdo biosynthetic pathway. Interestingly, the bound CMP-Kdo is neither the substrate nor the product of the reaction catalyzed by API, but corresponds to the end product in the Kdo biosynthetic pathway and presumably acts as a feedback inhibitor for bfAPI. The active site of each monomer is located in a surface cleft at the tetramer interface between three monomers and consists of His79 and His186 from two different adjacent monomers and a Ser/Thr-rich region, all of which are highly conserved across APIs. Structure and sequence analyses indicate that His79 and His186 may play important catalytic roles in the isomerization reaction. CMP-Kdo mimetics could therefore serve as potent and specific inhibitors of API and provide broad protection against many different bacterial infections. PMID:25286848

  6. Structural analysis of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase from Bacteroides fragilis and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Grant, Joanna C; Farr, Carol L; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W; Miller, Mitchell D; Elsliger, Marc André; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2014-10-01

    The crystal structure of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase (API) from Bacteroides fragilis (bfAPI) was determined at 1.7 Å resolution and was found to be a tetramer of a single-domain sugar isomerase (SIS) with an endogenous ligand, CMP-Kdo (cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonate), bound at the active site. API catalyzes the reversible isomerization of D-ribulose 5-phosphate to D-arabinose 5-phosphate in the first step of the Kdo biosynthetic pathway. Interestingly, the bound CMP-Kdo is neither the substrate nor the product of the reaction catalyzed by API, but corresponds to the end product in the Kdo biosynthetic pathway and presumably acts as a feedback inhibitor for bfAPI. The active site of each monomer is located in a surface cleft at the tetramer interface between three monomers and consists of His79 and His186 from two different adjacent monomers and a Ser/Thr-rich region, all of which are highly conserved across APIs. Structure and sequence analyses indicate that His79 and His186 may play important catalytic roles in the isomerization reaction. CMP-Kdo mimetics could therefore serve as potent and specific inhibitors of API and provide broad protection against many different bacterial infections.

  7. Levofloxacin plus metronidazole administered once daily versus moxifloxacin monotherapy against a mixed infection of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Hermsen, Elizabeth D; Hovde, Laurie B; Sprandel, Kelly A; Rodvold, Keith A; Rotschafer, John C

    2005-02-01

    Moxifloxacin has been suggested as an option for monotherapy of intra-abdominal infections. Recent data support the use of a once-daily metronidazole regimen. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of levofloxacin (750 mg every 24 h [q24h]) plus metronidazole (1,500 mg q24h) compared with that of moxifloxacin (400 mg q24h) monotherapy in a mixed-infection model. By using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model in duplicate, Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis were exposed to peak concentrations of 8.5 mg of levofloxacin/liter q24h, 32 mg of metronidazole/liter q24h, and 2 mg for moxifloxacin/liter q24h for 24 h. The activities of levofloxacin, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, and levofloxacin plus metronidazole were evaluated against E. coli, B. fragilis, and E. coli plus B. fragilis. The targeted half-lives of levofloxacin, metronidazole, and moxifloxacin were 8, 8, and 12 h, respectively. Time-kill curves were analyzed for time to 3-log killing, slope, and regrowth. Pre- and postexposure MICs were determined. The preexposure levofloxacin, metronidazole, and moxifloxacin MICs for E. coli and B. fragilis were 0.5 and 1, >64 and 0.5, and 1 and 0.25 mg/liter, respectively. Levofloxacin and moxifloxacin achieved a 3-log killing against E. coli and B. fragilis in all experiments, as did metronidazole against B. fragilis. Metronidazole did not decrease the starting inoculum of E. coli. The area under the concentration-time curve/MIC ratios for E. coli and B. fragilis were 171.7 and 85.9, respectively, for levofloxacin and 26 and 103.9, respectively, for moxifloxacin. Levofloxacin plus metronidazole exhibited the fastest rates of killing. The levofloxacin and moxifloxacin MICs for B. fragilis increased 8- to 16-fold after the organism was exposed to moxifloxacin. No other changes in the postexposure MICs were found. Levofloxacin plus metronidazole administered once daily exhibited activity similar to that of moxifloxacin against the mixed E. coli and B

  8. Genetic heterogeneity in wild isolates of cellular slime mold social groups.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Santosh; Kaushik, Sonia; Lalremruata, Albert; Aggarwal, Ramesh K; Cavender, James C; Nanjundiah, Vidyanand

    2010-07-01

    This study addresses the issues of spatial distribution, dispersal, and genetic heterogeneity in social groups of the cellular slime molds (CSMs). The CSMs are soil amoebae with an unusual life cycle that consists of alternating solitary and social phases. Because the social phase involves division of labor with what appears to be an extreme form of "altruism", the CSMs raise interesting evolutionary questions regarding the origin and maintenance of sociality. Knowledge of the genetic structure of social groups in the wild is necessary for answering these questions. We confirm that CSMs are widespread in undisturbed forest soil from South India. They are dispersed over long distances via the dung of a variety of large mammals. Consistent with this mode of dispersal, most social groups in the two species examined for detailed study, Dictyostelium giganteum and Dictyostelium purpureum, are multi-clonal.

  9. Genetic heterogeneity in wild isolates of cellular slime mold social groups.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Santosh; Kaushik, Sonia; Lalremruata, Albert; Aggarwal, Ramesh K; Cavender, James C; Nanjundiah, Vidyanand

    2010-07-01

    This study addresses the issues of spatial distribution, dispersal, and genetic heterogeneity in social groups of the cellular slime molds (CSMs). The CSMs are soil amoebae with an unusual life cycle that consists of alternating solitary and social phases. Because the social phase involves division of labor with what appears to be an extreme form of "altruism", the CSMs raise interesting evolutionary questions regarding the origin and maintenance of sociality. Knowledge of the genetic structure of social groups in the wild is necessary for answering these questions. We confirm that CSMs are widespread in undisturbed forest soil from South India. They are dispersed over long distances via the dung of a variety of large mammals. Consistent with this mode of dispersal, most social groups in the two species examined for detailed study, Dictyostelium giganteum and Dictyostelium purpureum, are multi-clonal. PMID:20179919

  10. Interactions between aggregations and environmental factors explain spatio-temporal patterns of the brittle-star Ophiothrix fragilis in the eastern Bay of Seine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Méar, Yann; Murat, Anne; Poizot, Emmanuel; Lozach, Sophie; Beryouni, Khadija

    2013-10-01

    There is a paucity of studies showing long-term changes in the population dynamics of dominant benthic epifaunal species, especially echinoderms, in relation to biological and environmental factors. In the English Channel, the brittle-star Ophiothrix fragilis is a common epifaunal species, mainly found in strong tidal currents characterised by benthic habitats with pebbles. However, in the Bay of Seine, O. fragilis lives on gravel and coarse sandy sediments; more locally, it occurs where there are unexpected amounts of fine particles for such high hydrodynamic areas. This species forms dense aggregations, supporting large populations up to 7450 ind m-2. This paper analyses the long-term spatio-temporal changes of O. fragilis aggregations over the last 25 years in the eastern part of the Bay of Seine through observations obtained from several scientific programmes from 1986 to 2010. This area is characterised as a tidal environment affected by the Seine estuary and is subject to potential sediment supply from the dumping site of the Le Havre harbour dredging operations. During all surveys, there was a similar pattern: persistent patches with high abundances of O. fragilis and sites without O. fragilis, showing that there was a high heterogeneity of the spatial population pattern. Interactions between environmental conditions and ophiurid aggregations (e.g., storm waves, Seine floods and patches) are suggested to explain these patterns.

  11. Structural characterization of neutral oligosaccharides with blood-group A and H activity isolated from bovine submaxillary mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Savage, A V; D'Arcy, S M; Donoghue, C M

    1991-01-01

    In this study we investigated the structures of 11 neutral oligosaccharides released from bovine submaxillary mucin by alkaline borohydride treatment and isolated by h.p.l.c. One hexa-, one penta-, three tetra-, four tri- and two di-saccharides containing core types 1, 2, 3 or 4 were obtained. We report their structures, determined by a combination of one- and two-dimensional 1H n.m.r. spectroscopy at 270 MHz and methylation analysis involving g.l.c.-m.s., along with their approximate molar ratios. Only three of these oligosaccharides have previously been reported in this source. Of the new oligosaccharides, one contains the blood-group-A antigenic determinant, two contain the blood-group-H type 2 determinant, while another contains the blood-group-H type 3 determinant. The oligosaccharide GlcNAc beta (1----6)[GlcNAc beta (1----3)]GalNAcol, although previously found as a core structure, has been isolated here as a novel trisaccharide. PMID:1718265

  12. Effect of atmosphere and duration of incubation on primary isolation of group A streptococci from throat cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, B A; Reller, L B; Mirrett, S

    1983-01-01

    The optimal incubation conditions for isolation of group A streptococci from throat cultures are controversial. Therefore, we compared the effects of aerobic and anaerobic incubations after 24 and 48 h on the recovery of group A streptococci. Throat swabs submitted to the clinical laboratory were inoculated onto duplicate 5% sheep blood agar plates, incubated aerobically or anaerobically (GasPak jar) at 35 degrees C, and examined semiquantitatively after 24 and 48 h. Group A streptococci were identified by the fluorescent-antibody technique. Of 1,040 specimens, 506 (48.6%) grew beta-hemolytic streptococci, including 200 (19.2%) group A streptococci. Group A streptococci were recovered significantly more often with anaerobic incubation than with aerobic incubation after 24 h (182 versus 138; P less than 0.001) and after 48 h (193 versus 174; P less than 0.05). Non-group A beta-hemolytic streptococci also were recovered significantly more often with anaerobic incubation after 24 and 48 h (P less than 0.001). Colony counts were not affected by the incubation atmosphere. We conclude that incubation of throat cultures in an anaerobic atmosphere is superior to incubation in air for detection of group A streptococci. The greater sensitivity of anaerobic incubation, however, may not justify the extra laboratory effort and cost required to differentiate group A streptococci from the non-group A streptococci detected as a result of anaerobic incubation. Throat cultures should be examined after 24 and 48 h, especially if plates are incubated aerobically. PMID:6339551

  13. Activities of New Fluoroquinolones, Ketolides, and Other Antimicrobials against Blood Culture Isolates of Viridans Group Streptococci from across Canada, 2000

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Andrea S.; de Azavedo, Joyce C. S.; McGeer, Allison; Ostrowska, Krystyna I.; Church, Deirdre; Hoban, Daryl J.; Harding, Godfrey K. M.; Weiss, Karl; Abbott, Lewis; Smaill, Fiona; Gourdeau, Marie; Murray, Gilles; Low, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    The rates of nonsusceptibility to penicillin, erythromycin, and clindamycin of 191 blood culture isolates of viridans group streptococci collected from across Canada in 2000 were 36, 42, and 10%, respectively. Although 8% of the strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin (MIC ⩾ 4 μg/ml), the MICs of gemifloxacin, BMS 284756, telithromycin, and ABT 773 at which 90% of the strains were inhibited were 0.06, 0.06, 0.12, and 0.03 μg/ml, respectively. PMID:11959597

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines can be divided in two distinct groups, including one displaying phenotypes similar to isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Myriam M.; Leduc, Annie; Nadeau, Christine; Barbeau, Jean; Charette, Steve J.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays broad genetic diversity, giving it an astonishing capacity to adapt to a variety of environments and to infect a wide range of hosts. While many P. aeruginosa isolates of various origins have been analyzed, isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have received the most attention. Less is known about the genetic and phenotypic diversity of P. aeruginosa isolates that colonize other environments where flourishing biofilms can be found. In the present study, 29 P. aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines and CF patients were collected and their genetic and phenotypes profiles were compared to determine whether environmental and clinical isolates are related. The isolates were first classified using the random amplified polymorphic DNA method. This made it possible to distribute the isolates into one clinical cluster and two environmental clusters. The isolates in the environmental cluster that were genetically closer to the clinical cluster also displayed phenotypes similar to the clinical isolates. The isolates from the second environmental cluster displayed opposite phenotypes, particularly an increased capacity to form biofilms. The isolates in this cluster were also the only ones harboring genes that encoded specific epimerases involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharides, which could explain their increased ability to form biofilms. In conclusion, the isolates from the dental unit waterlines could be distributed into two clusters, with some of the environmental isolates resembled the clinical isolates. PMID:25653647

  15. Analysis of Group B Streptococcal Isolates from Infants and Pregnant Women in Portugal Revealing Two Lineages with Enhanced Invasiveness▿

    PubMed Central

    Martins, E. R.; Pessanha, M. A.; Ramirez, M.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2007-01-01

    The populations of group B streptococcus (GBS) associated with vaginal carriage in pregnant women and invasive neonatal infections in Portugal were compared. GBS isolates were characterized by serotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Serotypes III and V accounted for 44% of all colonization isolates (n = 269), whereas serotypes III and Ia amounted to 69% of all invasive isolates (n = 64). Whereas serotype Ia was associated with early-onset disease (EOD), serotype III was associated with late-onset disease (LOD). Characterization by PFGE and MLST identified very diverse populations in carriage and invasive disease. Serotype Ia was represented mainly by a single PFGE cluster defined by sequence type 23 (ST23) and the infrequent ST24. In contrast, serotype III was found in a large number of PFGE clusters and STs, but a single PFGE cluster defined by ST17 was found to be associated with invasive disease. Although serotype III was associated only with LOD, ST17 showed an enhanced capacity to cause both EOD and LOD. Our data reinforce the evidence for enhanced invasiveness of ST17 and identify a lineage expressing serotype Ia capsule and represented by ST23 and ST24 as having enhanced potential to cause EOD. PMID:17699641

  16. Further enhancement of the second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) coefficient and the stability of NLO polymers that contain isolation chromophore moieties by using the "suitable isolation group" concept and the Ar/Ar(F) self-assembly effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenbo; Ye, Cheng; Qin, Jingui; Li, Zhen

    2013-08-01

    For the first time, a series of second-order NLO poly(arylene-ethynylene)s, in which an isolation chromophore was introduced to enhance the NLO coefficients, were successfully designed and synthesized. Thanks to the isolation chromophore, these polymers demonstrated good NLO activities and optical transparency. To further improve the comprehensive performance of the polymers, different isolation groups of various sizes were introduced to subtly modify the structure of the polymers according to the "suitable isolation group" concept. The naphthalene (Np) group was found to be a "suitable isolation group" in this series of polymers and polymer P3 demonstrated the highest d33 value (122.1 pm V(-1)) of these five polymers. Interestingly, polymer P5, which contained a pentafluorophenyl ring as an isolation group, exhibited a much higher NLO effect and stability than polymer P2, which just contained normal phenyl rings as isolation groups (97.2 versus 62.5 pm V(-1)), thus indicating the advantages of the Ar-Ar(F) self-assembly effect in the field of non-linear optics.

  17. Isolation of a very high molecular weight polylactosamine from an ovarian cyst mucin of blood group

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.S.S.; Bush, C.A.

    1986-05-01

    Treatment of a blood group A active ovarian cyst mucin glycoprotein with alkaline borohydride under conditions expected to cleave-O-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains releases a polysaccharide of average molecular weight 25,000 daltons. It contains no peptide or mannose at the 1% level and carbohydrate analysis gives fuc:galNAc:gal:glcNAc in the ratio of 1:1:2.5:2.5. The /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H NMR spectra show that the polysaccharide has non-reducing terminal side chains of the structure galNAc(..cap alpha..-1 ..-->.. 3)(fuc(..cap alpha..-1 ..-->.. 2)) gal(..beta..-1 ..-->.. 3) glcNAc (i.e. a type 1 chain). Periodate oxidation removes all the fucose and galNAc from the non-reducing terminal but leaves intact the backbone composed of ..beta..-linked gal and glcNAc as would be expected for a polylactosamine. They conclude that this is a high molecular weight polylactosamine which is related to the asparagine linked polylactosamine chains of cell surface glycoproteins which have been implicated in cell differentiation. However, the blood group A polysaccharide from the ovarian cyst mucin is unique in several respects. It has a much larger molecular weight than even the erythroglycan of the red cell membrane protein, band 3, and is linked to the protein by an -O-glycosidic bond rather than the -N-asparagine linkage of the previously known polylactosamines which have a trimannosyl core. Its blood group A side chains are on a type one core rather than type 2 which is found on other polylactosamines.

  18. Prevalence of Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, and Cryptosporidium spp in Da Nang, Vietnam, detected by a multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ögren, Jessica; Van Nguyen, Song; Nguyen, Minh Khac; Dimberg, Jan; Matussek, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We surveyed the prevalence of Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Cryptosporidium spp in individuals with and without gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms residing in and around Da Nang city, Vietnam. Fecal samples were collected from children (n = 100) and adults (n = 80) with GI symptoms and from healthy individuals (n = 88) reporting no GI symptoms. Parasite detection was performed by multiplex real-time PCR. Overall, except for G. duodenalis, we found a low prevalence (<5%) of D. fragilis and E. dispar and no detection of E. histolytica and C. spp in all participants with GI symptoms. Specifically for D. fragilis this contrasts with findings in European populations of children with GI symptoms showing prevalence up to 73%. Moreover, our results indicate that the prevalence of G. duodenalis is higher in patients with GI symptoms compared to asymptomatic individuals and this difference is most obvious in young patients. PMID:27102222

  19. New type of exfoliatin obtained from staphylococcal strains, belonging to phage groups other than group II, isolated from patients with impetigo and Ritter's disease.

    PubMed

    Kondo, I; Sakurai, S; Sarai, Y

    1974-10-01

    Four strains of Staphylococcus aureus of a phage type other than the second group, isolated from patients with impetigo and Ritter's disease, were found to produce an exotoxin similar to those reported by Melish et al. (1972), Kapral and Miller (1971), and Arbuthnott et al. (1973). This toxin could elicit a general exfoliation of the epidermis with the so-called Nikolsky sign when subcutaneously inoculated into neonatal mice within 4 days after birth. The new toxin was serologically different from exfoliatin produced by the phage group II staphylococci previously reported (Kondo et al., 1973) and showed an electrophoretic pattern corresponding to that of the B-type toxin of the latter in acrylamide disc electrophoresis. It had the same molecular weight as that of the latter, which was estimated to be about 24,000. It was thermolabile and lost its toxic activity by heating at 60 C for 30 min; in addition, most of the toxicity was lost within 1 month of storage even at -30 C. We propose to designate the old typical heat-stable exfoliatin as S. aureus exfoliatin A and the new heat-susceptible exfoliatin as S. aureus exfoliatin B. PMID:4139120

  20. Bacteroides fragilis Lipopolysaccharide and Inflammatory Signaling in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lukiw, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiome consists of ~3.8 × 1013 symbiotic microorganisms that form a highly complex and dynamic ecosystem: the gastrointestinal (GI) tract constitutes the largest repository of the human microbiome by far, and its impact on human neurological health and disease is becoming increasingly appreciated. Bacteroidetes, the largest phylum of Gram-negative bacteria in the GI tract microbiome, while generally beneficial to the host when confined to the GI tract, have potential to secrete a remarkably complex array of pro-inflammatory neurotoxins that include surface lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and toxic proteolytic peptides. The deleterious effects of these bacterial exudates appear to become more important as GI tract and blood-brain barriers alter or increase their permeability with aging and disease. For example, presence of the unique LPSs of the abundant Bacteroidetes species Bacteroides fragilis (BF-LPS) in the serum represents a major contributing factor to systemic inflammation. BF-LPS is further recognized by TLR2, TLR4, and/or CD14 microglial cell receptors as are the pro-inflammatory 42 amino acid amyloid-beta (Aβ42) peptides that characterize Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain. Here we provide the first evidence that BF-LPS exposure to human primary brain cells is an exceptionally potent inducer of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-kB (p50/p65) complex, a known trigger in the expression of pathogenic pathways involved in inflammatory neurodegeneration. This ‘Perspectives communication’ will in addition highlight work from recent studies that advance novel and emerging concepts on the potential contribution of microbiome-generated factors, such as BF-LPS, in driving pro-inflammatory degenerative neuropathology in the AD brain. PMID:27725817

  1. Reactions of group 14 metal atoms with acetylene: a matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yun-Lei; Xu, Qiang

    2009-11-01

    Laser-ablated group 14 metal atoms have been codeposited at 4 K with acetylene in excess argon. Products, Ge(C2H2), HGeCCH, Sn(C2H2), Sn2CCH2, HSnCCH, and HPbCCH, have been formed in the present experiments and characterized using infrared spectroscopy on the basis of the results of the isotopic shifts, mixed isotopic splitting patterns, stepwise annealing, the change of reagent concentration and laser energy, and the comparison with theoretical predictions. Density functional theory calculations have been performed on these molecules. The agreement between the experimental and the calculated vibrational frequencies, relative absorption intensities, and isotopic shifts supports the identification of these molecules from the matrix infrared spectra. Plausible reaction mechanisms have been proposed to account for the formation of these molecules.

  2. Standard model group, QCD subgroup - dynamics isolating and testing the elementary QCD subprocess

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    QCD to an experimentalist is the theory of interactions of quarks and gluons. Experimentalists like QCD because QCD is analogous to QED. Thus, following Drell and others who have for many years studied the validity of QED, one has a ready-made menu for tests of QCD. There are the static and long distance tests. These topics are covered by Peter LePage in the static properties group. In this report, dynamic and short distance tests of QCD will be discussed, primarily via reactions with large transverse momenta. This report is an introduction and overview of the subject, to serve as a framework for other reports from the subgroup. In the last two sections, the author has taken the opportunity to discuss his own ideas and opinions.

  3. Rediscovery and a new record of Hemidactylus laevis (Reptilia: Gekkonidae) from Somaliland, with notes on and resurrection of Hemidactylus fragilis.

    PubMed

    Mazuch, Tomáš; Šmíd, Jiří; Bauer, Aaron M

    2016-01-01

    Hemidactylus laevis, a gekkonid lizard originally described from the Gaan Libah Mountains in Somaliland, is recorded herein from Erigavo, Sanaag Region, in the same state, which represents the second-ever known specimen and locality for this species in more than 100 years since its description. The species is endemic to Somaliland. Data on morphology and natural history, as well as the first life photographs are provided. Based on morphological data we conclude the species to be closely related to H. laticaudatus. Additionally, H. fragilis from southern Somalia and extreme south-east Ethiopia is resurrected from the synonymy of H. frenatus based on morphological data. PMID:27395191

  4. Extensive introgressive hybridization within the northern oriole group (Genus Icterus) revealed by three-species isolation with migration analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Frode; Omland, Kevin E

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, studies of divergence and gene flow among closely-related taxa were generally limited to pairs of sister taxa. However, organisms frequently exchange genes with other non-sister taxa. The “northern oriole” group within genus Icterus exemplifies this problem. This group involves the extensively studied hybrid zone between Baltimore oriole (Icterus galbula) and Bullock's oriole (I. bullockii), an alleged hybrid zone between I. bullockii and black-backed oriole (I. abeillei), and likely mtDNA introgression between I. galbula and I. abeillei. Here, we examine the divergence population genetics of the entire northern oriole group using a multipopulation Isolation-with-Migration (IM) model. In accordance with Haldane's rule, nuclear loci introgress extensively beyond the I. galbula–I. bullockii hybrid zone, while mtDNA does not. We found no evidence of introgression between I. bullockii and I. abeillei or between I. galbula and I. abeillei when all three species were analyzed together in a three-population model. However, traditional pairwise analysis suggested some nuclear introgression from I. abeillei into I. galbula, probably reflecting genetic contributions from I. bullockii unaccounted for in a two-population model. Thus, only by including all members of this group in the analysis was it possible to rigorously estimate the level of gene flow among these three closely related species. PMID:23145328

  5. Characterization of a New Vaccinia virus Isolate Reveals the C23L Gene as a Putative Genetic Marker for Autochthonous Group 1 Brazilian Vaccinia virus

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Danilo B.; Franco-Luiz, Ana P. M.; Campos, Rafael K.; Guedes, Maria I. M.; Fonseca, Flávio G.; Trindade, Giliane S.; Drumond, Betânia P.; Kroon, Erna G.; Abrahão, Jônatas S.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1999, several Vaccinia virus (VACV) isolates, the etiological agents of bovine vaccinia (BV), have been frequently isolated and characterized with various biological and molecular methods. The results from these approaches have grouped these VACV isolates into two different clusters. This dichotomy has elicited debates surrounding the origin of the Brazilian VACV and its epidemiological significance. To ascertain vital information to settle these debates, we and other research groups have made efforts to identify molecular markers to discriminate VACV from other viruses of the genus Orthopoxvirus (OPV) and other VACV-BR groups. In this way, some genes have been identified as useful markers to discriminate between the VACV-BR groups. However, new markers are needed to infer ancestry and to correlate each sample or group with its unique epidemiological and biological features. The aims of this work were to characterize a new VACV isolate (VACV DMTV-2005) molecularly and biologically using conserved and non-conserved gene analyses for phylogenetic inference and to search for new genes that would elucidate the VACV-BR dichotomy. The VACV DMTV-2005 isolate reported in this study is biologically and phylogenetically clustered with other strains of Group 1 VACV-BR, the most prevalent VACV group that was isolated during the bovine vaccinia outbreaks in Brazil. Sequence analysis of C23L, the gene that encodes for the CC-chemokine-binding protein, revealed a ten-nucleotide deletion, which is a new Group 1 Brazilian VACV genetic marker. This deletion in the C23L open reading frame produces a premature stop-codon that is shared by all Group 1 VACV-BR strains and may also reflect the VACV-BR dichotomy; the deletion can also be considered to be a putative genetic marker for non-virulent Brazilian VACV isolates and may be used for the detection and molecular characterization of new isolates. PMID:23189200

  6. Characterization of a new Vaccinia virus isolate reveals the C23L gene as a putative genetic marker for autochthonous Group 1 Brazilian Vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Assis, Felipe L; Almeida, Gabriel M F; Oliveira, Danilo B; Franco-Luiz, Ana P M; Campos, Rafael K; Guedes, Maria I M; Fonseca, Flávio G; Trindade, Giliane S; Drumond, Betânia P; Kroon, Erna G; Abrahão, Jônatas S

    2012-01-01

    Since 1999, several Vaccinia virus (VACV) isolates, the etiological agents of bovine vaccinia (BV), have been frequently isolated and characterized with various biological and molecular methods. The results from these approaches have grouped these VACV isolates into two different clusters. This dichotomy has elicited debates surrounding the origin of the Brazilian VACV and its epidemiological significance. To ascertain vital information to settle these debates, we and other research groups have made efforts to identify molecular markers to discriminate VACV from other viruses of the genus Orthopoxvirus (OPV) and other VACV-BR groups. In this way, some genes have been identified as useful markers to discriminate between the VACV-BR groups. However, new markers are needed to infer ancestry and to correlate each sample or group with its unique epidemiological and biological features. The aims of this work were to characterize a new VACV isolate (VACV DMTV-2005) molecularly and biologically using conserved and non-conserved gene analyses for phylogenetic inference and to search for new genes that would elucidate the VACV-BR dichotomy. The VACV DMTV-2005 isolate reported in this study is biologically and phylogenetically clustered with other strains of Group 1 VACV-BR, the most prevalent VACV group that was isolated during the bovine vaccinia outbreaks in Brazil. Sequence analysis of C23L, the gene that encodes for the CC-chemokine-binding protein, revealed a ten-nucleotide deletion, which is a new Group 1 Brazilian VACV genetic marker. This deletion in the C23L open reading frame produces a premature stop-codon that is shared by all Group 1 VACV-BR strains and may also reflect the VACV-BR dichotomy; the deletion can also be considered to be a putative genetic marker for non-virulent Brazilian VACV isolates and may be used for the detection and molecular characterization of new isolates.

  7. Detection of reduced RNA synthesis in UV-irradiated Cockayne syndrome group B cells using an isolated nuclear system.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ayumi; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2002-10-21

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human hereditary disorder characterized by UV sensitivity, developmental abnormalities and premature aging. CS cells display a selective deficiency in transcription-coupled repair (TCR), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) that preferentially removes lesions from transcribed strands. Following UV irradiation, the recovery of RNA synthesis is abnormally delayed in CS cells in conjunction with TCR deficiency. To date, TCR has been detected in cultured cells, but not in cell-free systems. In this study, we constructed an assay system using isolated nuclei. RNA synthesis catalyzed by RNA polymerases (pol I and II) was measured in nuclei prepared from UV-irradiated cells. In nuclei isolated from HeLa and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group C cells, RNA synthesis was relatively resistant to UV irradiation. In contrast, RNA synthesis by pol I and, in particular, pol II in CS-B nuclei was significantly inhibited upon UV irradiation. Our data support the utility of this assay system for the in vitro detection of the recovery of RNA synthesis in cultured cells. PMID:12379475

  8. Chemical history of isolated dwarf galaxies of the Local Group - I. dSphs: Cetus and Tucana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Vergara, N.; Carigi, L.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Durazo, R.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, we obtain chemical evolution models (CEMs) for Tucana and Cetus, two isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group. The CEMs have been built from the star formation histories (SFHs) and the metallicity histories, both obtained independently by the Local Cosmology from Isolated Dwarfs (LCID) project from deep colour-magnitude diagrams. Based on our models, we find that the chemical histories were complex and can be divided into different epochs and scenarios. In particular, during 75 per cent of the SFH, the galaxies behaved as closed boxes and, during the remaining 25 per cent, either received a lot of primordial gas by accretion or they lost metals through metal-rich winds. In order to discriminate between these two scenarios, abundances ratios in old stars are needed. At t ˜ 4.5 Gyr, the galaxies lost most of their gas due to a short-strong, well-mixed wind. We obtain very similar CEMs for both galaxies, although Cetus is twice as massive as Tucana. We conclude that the star formation in both galaxies began with only 1.5 per cent of the baryonic mass fraction predicted by Λ cold dark matter.

  9. Niemeyer Virus: A New Mimivirus Group A Isolate Harboring a Set of Duplicated Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Boratto, Paulo V. M.; Arantes, Thalita S.; Silva, Lorena C. F.; Assis, Felipe L.; Kroon, Erna G.; La Scola, Bernard; Abrahão, Jônatas S.

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that gene duplication/acquisition is a key factor for molecular evolution, being directly related to the emergence of new genetic variants. The importance of such phenomena can also be expanded to the viral world, with impacts on viral fitness and environmental adaptations. In this work we describe the isolation and characterization of Niemeyer virus, a new mimivirus isolate obtained from water samples of an urban lake in Brazil. Genomic data showed that Niemeyer harbors duplicated copies of three of its four aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes (cysteinyl, methionyl, and tyrosyl RS). Gene expression analysis showed that such duplications allowed significantly increased expression of methionyl and tyrosyl aaRS mRNA by Niemeyer in comparison to APMV. Remarkably, phylogenetic data revealed that Niemeyer duplicated gene pairs are different, each one clustering with a different group of mimivirus strains. Taken together, our results raise new questions about the origins and selective pressures involving events of aaRS gain and loss among mimiviruses. PMID:26635738

  10. Adult male mice emit context-specific ultrasonic vocalizations that are modulated by prior isolation or group rearing environment.

    PubMed

    Chabout, Jonathan; Serreau, Pierre; Ey, Elodie; Bellier, Ludovic; Aubin, Thierry; Bourgeron, Thomas; Granon, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Social interactions in mice are frequently analysed in genetically modified strains in order to get insight of disorders affecting social interactions such as autism spectrum disorders. Different types of social interactions have been described, mostly between females and pups, and between adult males and females. However, we recently showed that social interactions between adult males could also encompass cognitive and motivational features. During social interactions, rodents emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), but it remains unknown if call types are differently used depending of the context and if they are correlated with motivational state. Here, we recorded the calls of adult C57BL/6J male mice in various behavioral conditions, such as social interaction, novelty exploration and restraint stress. We introduced a modulator for the motivational state by comparing males maintained in isolation and males maintained in groups before the experiments. Male mice uttered USVs in all social and non-social situations, and even in a stressful restraint context. They nevertheless emitted the most important number of calls with the largest diversity of call types in social interactions, particularly when showing a high motivation for social contact. For mice maintained in social isolation, the number of calls recorded was positively correlated with the duration of social contacts, and most calls were uttered during contacts between the two mice. This correlation was not observed in mice maintained in groups. These results open the way for a deeper understanding and characterization of acoustic signals associated with social interactions. They can also help evaluating the role of motivational states in the emission of acoustic signals.

  11. Determination of staphylococcal exotoxins, SCCmec types, and genetic relatedness of Staphylococcus intermedius group isolates from veterinary staff, companion animals, and hospital environments in Korea.

    PubMed

    Youn, Jung-Ho; Koo, Hye Cheong; Ahn, Kuk Ju; Lim, Suk-Kyung; Park, Yong Ho

    2011-09-01

    The Staphylococcus (S.) intermedius group (SIG) has been a main research subject in recent years. S. pseudintermedius causes pyoderma and otitis in companion animals as well as foodborne diseases. To prevent SIG-associated infection and disease outbreaks, identification of both staphylococcal exotoxins and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types among SIG isolates may be helpful. In this study, it was found that a single isolate (one out of 178 SIG isolates examined) harbored the canine enterotoxin SEC gene. However, the S. intermedius exfoliative toxin gene was found in 166 SIG isolates although the S. aureus-derived exfoliative toxin genes, such as eta, etb and etd, were not detected. SCCmec typing resulted in classifying one isolate as SCCmec type IV, 41 isolates as type V (including three S. intermedius isolates), and 10 isolates as non-classifiable. Genetic relatedness of all S. pseudintermedius isolates recovered from veterinary staff, companion animals, and hospital environments was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Strains having the same band patterns were detected in S. pseudintermedius isolates collected at 13 and 18 months, suggesting possible colonization and/or expansion of a specific S. pseudintermedius strain in a veterinary hospital.

  12. Determination of staphylococcal exotoxins, SCCmec types, and genetic relatedness of Staphylococcus intermedius group isolates from veterinary staff, companion animals, and hospital environments in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Jung-Ho; Ahn, Kuk Ju; Lim, Suk-Kyung

    2011-01-01

    The Staphylococcus (S.) intermedius group (SIG) has been a main research subject in recent years. S. pseudintermedius causes pyoderma and otitis in companion animals as well as foodborne diseases. To prevent SIG-associated infection and disease outbreaks, identification of both staphylococcal exotoxins and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types among SIG isolates may be helpful. In this study, it was found that a single isolate (one out of 178 SIG isolates examined) harbored the canine enterotoxin SEC gene. However, the S. intermedius exfoliative toxin gene was found in 166 SIG isolates although the S. aureus-derived exfoliative toxin genes, such as eta, etb and etd, were not detected. SCCmec typing resulted in classifying one isolate as SCCmec type IV, 41 isolates as type V (including three S. intermedius isolates), and 10 isolates as non-classifiable. Genetic relatedness of all S. pseudintermedius isolates recovered from veterinary staff, companion animals, and hospital environments was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Strains having the same band patterns were detected in S. pseudintermedius isolates collected at 13 and 18 months, suggesting possible colonization and/or expansion of a specific S. pseudintermedius strain in a veterinary hospital. PMID:21897094

  13. The identification of gram-negative anaerobic bacilli isolated from clinical infections.

    PubMed Central

    Duerden, B. I.

    1980-01-01

    Gram-negative anaerobic bacilli isolated from specimens submitted to the routine diagnostic bacteriology laboratory and regarded as significant pathogens were identified by conventional bacteriological tests; 399 strains isolated from 356 specimens submitted from 332 patients were studied and most were readily identified by the results of a combined set of morphological, biochemical, tolerance and antibiotic disk resistance tests; B. fragilis has particular pathogenic potential and was the commonest species isolated, accounting for greater than 50% of strains. The next commonest was B. asaccharolyticus with 55 strains, and 16 other species or groups were represented by smaller numbers. Many (68%) were from infections related to the gastro-intestinal tract, but there were significant numbers from infections of the male and female genito-urinary tracts, the head, neck and central nervous system and from a variety of soft tissue infections. Most infections were mixed, and a pure culture of a Bacteroides sp. was obtained from only 26% of infections; two or more strains of Bacteroides were recovered from 55 infections. The specific identification of Bacteroides may help the bacteriologist to judge the significance of laboratory findings, influence the patient's management and prognosis and help determine the source of infection. PMID:6987300

  14. Biogeography, Competition, and Microclimate: The Barnacle Chthamalus fragilis in New England.

    PubMed

    Wethey, David S

    2002-08-01

    Geographic limits of species are commonly associated with climatic or physical boundaries, but the mechanisms of exclusion at the limits of distribution are poorly understood. In some intertidal populations, the strengths of interactions with natural enemies are mediated by microclimate, and determine geographic limits. The northern limit of the barnacle Chthamalus fragilis in New England is the south side of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. South of the cape, Chthamalus has a refuge from competition in the high intertidal, which is too hot for survival of its superior competitor Semibalanus balanoides. North of the cape, the high intertidal is cooler, and Semibalanus survives, so Chthamalus has no refuge. Thus, geographic variation in the strength of competition may determine the geographic limit of Chthamalus. Intolerance of cold by Chthamalus cannot account for the geographic limit: transplants of Chthamalus 80 km beyond its northern limit survived up to 8 yr in the absence of competition with Semibalanus. At the geographic limit of Chthamalus in the Cape Cod Canal there are two bridges, 5 km apart. On the southern bridge, Chthamalus is abundant and occupies a refuge above Semibalanus. On the northern bridge in 2001, only 7 individual Chthamalus were present. Despite the proximity of the bridges, their microclimates are very different. The southern bridge, where Chthamalus is abundant, is up to 8°C hotter than the northern bridge. This higher temperature creates a refuge in the high intertidal for Chthamalus. On the cooler northern bridge, there is no refuge for Chthamalus. Because of the difference in temperatures of the water masses that meet in the canal, heat storage in the rock of the bridge piers causes the temperatures to differ between the bridges. Thus, geographic change in microclimate alters the strength of competition, and determines the geographic limit."When we travel from south to north, or from a damp region to a dry, we invariably see some species

  15. Biogeography, Competition, and Microclimate: The Barnacle Chthamalus fragilis in New England.

    PubMed

    Wethey, David S

    2002-08-01

    Geographic limits of species are commonly associated with climatic or physical boundaries, but the mechanisms of exclusion at the limits of distribution are poorly understood. In some intertidal populations, the strengths of interactions with natural enemies are mediated by microclimate, and determine geographic limits. The northern limit of the barnacle Chthamalus fragilis in New England is the south side of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. South of the cape, Chthamalus has a refuge from competition in the high intertidal, which is too hot for survival of its superior competitor Semibalanus balanoides. North of the cape, the high intertidal is cooler, and Semibalanus survives, so Chthamalus has no refuge. Thus, geographic variation in the strength of competition may determine the geographic limit of Chthamalus. Intolerance of cold by Chthamalus cannot account for the geographic limit: transplants of Chthamalus 80 km beyond its northern limit survived up to 8 yr in the absence of competition with Semibalanus. At the geographic limit of Chthamalus in the Cape Cod Canal there are two bridges, 5 km apart. On the southern bridge, Chthamalus is abundant and occupies a refuge above Semibalanus. On the northern bridge in 2001, only 7 individual Chthamalus were present. Despite the proximity of the bridges, their microclimates are very different. The southern bridge, where Chthamalus is abundant, is up to 8°C hotter than the northern bridge. This higher temperature creates a refuge in the high intertidal for Chthamalus. On the cooler northern bridge, there is no refuge for Chthamalus. Because of the difference in temperatures of the water masses that meet in the canal, heat storage in the rock of the bridge piers causes the temperatures to differ between the bridges. Thus, geographic change in microclimate alters the strength of competition, and determines the geographic limit."When we travel from south to north, or from a damp region to a dry, we invariably see some species

  16. Comparison between immobilized Kluyveromyces fragilis and saccharomyces cerevisiae coimmobilized with. beta. -galactosidase, with respect to continuous ethanol production from concentrated whey permeate

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn-Haegerdal, B.

    1985-06-01

    Kluyveromyces fragilis immobilized in calcium alginate gel was compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae coimmobilized with ..beta..-galactosidase, for continuous ethanol production from whey permeate in packed-bed-type columns. Four different whey concentrations were studied, equivalent to 4.5, 10, 15 and 20% lactose, respectively. In all cases the coimmobilized preparation produced more ethanol than Kluyveromyces fragilis. The study went on for more than 5 weeks. Kluyveromyces fragilis showed a decline in activity after 20 days, while the coimmobilized preparation was stable during the entire investigation. Under experimental conditions theoretical yields of ethanol were obtained from 4.5 and 10% lactose substrates with the coimmobilized system. Using 15% lactose substrate, theoretical yields were only obtained when a galactose-adapted immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae column was run in series with the coimmobilized column. Then a maximum of 71 g/l ethanol was produced with a productivity of 2.5 g/l hour. The coimmobilized column alone gave a maximum ethanol concentration of 52 g/l with a productivity of 4.5 g/l hour, whereas immobilized Kluyveromyces fragilis only produced 13 g/l ethanol with a productivity of 1.1 g/l hour. It was not possible to obtain theoretical yields of ethanol from the highest substrate concentration. 13 references.

  17. Identification of molecular marker and aggressiveness for different groups of Bipolaris sorokiniana isolates causing spot blotch disease in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, S K; Sweta; Prasad, L C; Sharma, S; Kumar, S; Prasad, R; Pandey, S P; Chand, R; Joshi, A K

    2007-08-01

    One hundred fifty-five isolates of Bipolaris sorokiniana of wheat were studied for their morphopathological characterization. These isolates were grouped in five categories--black, brown/dull black, gray cottony growth, dull white/greenish black, and white--on the basis of their growth pattern. The frequency of the black suppressed type was maximum (45.63%), whereas the white isolate displayed lowest frequency (6.96%) in the natural population. Twenty RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) primers were used to observe the variability among the identified groups of B. sorokininana. From each group, eight random isolates were investigated. A total of 143 bands were amplified, out of which 107 (74.83%) were polymorphic and 36 (25.17%) were monomorphic. On an average, the total numbers of bands generated per primer were 7.15, of which 5.35 and 1.80 were polymorphic and monomorphic, respectively. Dendrograms based on molecular polymorphism unveiled a considerable amount of diversity among the isolates. Specific DNA bands were identified for selected isolates. The distinct markers appeared to be potential enough to be employed as genetic fingerprints for future strain identification and classification. The study indicated that the RAPD primers provide an easy, rapid, and simple technique for the preliminary assessment of genetic diversity among the fungal isolates.

  18. Survey of the bp/tee genes from clinical group A streptococcus isolates in New Zealand - implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Steemson, John D; Moreland, Nicole J; Williamson, Deborah; Morgan, Julie; Carter, Philip E; Proft, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is responsible for a wide range of diseases ranging from superficial infections, such as pharyngitis and impetigo, to life-threatening diseases, such as toxic shock syndrome and acute rheumatic fever (ARF). GAS pili are hair-like extensions protruding from the cell surface and consist of highly immunogenic structural proteins: the backbone pilin (BP) and one or two accessory pilins (AP1 and AP2). The protease-resistant BP builds the pilus shaft and has been recognized as the T-antigen, which forms the basis of a major serological typing scheme that is often used as a supplement to M typing. A previous sequence analysis of the bp gene (tee gene) in 39 GAS isolates revealed 15 different bp/tee types. In this study, we sequenced the bp/tee gene from 100 GAS isolates obtained from patients with pharyngitis, ARF or invasive disease in New Zealand. We found 20 new bp/tee alleles and four new bp/tee types/subtypes. No association between bp/tee type and clinical outcome was observed. We confirmed earlier reports that the emm type and tee type are associated strongly, but we also found exceptions, where multiple tee types could be found in certain M/emm type strains, such as M/emm89. We also reported, for the first time, the existence of a chimeric bp/tee allele, which was assigned into a new subclade (bp/tee3.1). A strong sequence conservation of the bp/tee gene was observed within the individual bp/tee types/subtypes (>97 % sequence identity), as well as between historical and contemporary New Zealand and international GAS strains. This temporal and geographical sequence stability provided further evidence for the potential use of the BP/T-antigen as a vaccine target. PMID:25190737

  19. Isolation and characterization of type III group B streptococcal mutants defective in biosynthesis of the type-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M K; Mattingly, S J

    1983-01-01

    Four classes of mutants of type III group B streptococcus were isolated by serial subculture of the wild-type strain in the presence of type III-specific rabbit antiserum. Class I mutants no longer synthesized sialic acid but still elaborated the core antigen. Class II mutants maintained the ability to synthesize sialic acid but could not attach it to the core antigen. Class III mutants did not produce the core antigen but still synthesized intracellular sialic acid. Class IV mutants synthesized the complete antigen; however, only approximately 4% of the antigen synthesized was found associated with the cell wall peptidoglycan (in the wild-type strain greater than 85% of the antigen synthesized is covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan), whereas greater than 90% of the antigen was secreted into the growth medium. Production of other components (CAMP factor, group B antigen, beta-hemolysin, neuraminidase) by these mutants appeared similar to those of the wild-type strain. Mouse lethality studies of these strains indicated that all four classes have greater than 3 log10-higher 50% lethal dose values than that of the wild-type strain. To understand the basis for this variation, the invasive ability of the wild-type strain and the sialic acid-deficient mutant strain M-10 (class I) was examined. Mice received 10(5) CFU of each organism; they were then sacrificed at various times postinoculation, and viable group B streptococci from different organs were enumerated. Mice were able to clear M-10 more efficiently, with greater than 80% of M-10 cells being phagocytized by macrophages within 1 h, whereas the wild-type strain was able to evade phagocytic killing and disseminate to other tissues. These data, therefore, strongly indicate that the sialic acid moiety greatly enhances the virulence of the type III antigen. In addition, the level of cell-associated type-specific antigen appears to contribute significantly to the pathogenicity of the organism. PMID

  20. MLVA-16 typing of 295 marine mammal Brucella isolates from different animal and geographic origins identifies 7 major groups within Brucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Since 1994, Brucella strains have been isolated from a wide range of marine mammals. They are currently recognized as two new Brucella species, B. pinnipedialis for the pinniped isolates and B. ceti for the cetacean isolates in agreement with host preference and specific phenotypic and molecular markers. In order to investigate the genetic relationships within the marine mammal Brucella isolates and with reference to terrestrial mammal Brucella isolates, we applied in this study the Multiple Loci VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) Analysis (MLVA) approach. A previously published assay comprising 16 loci (MLVA-16) that has been shown to be highly relevant and efficient for typing and clustering Brucella strains from animal and human origin was used. Results 294 marine mammal Brucella strains collected in European waters from 173 animals and a human isolate from New Zealand presumably from marine origin were investigated by MLVA-16. Marine mammal Brucella isolates were shown to be different from the recognized terrestrial mammal Brucella species and biovars and corresponded to 3 major related groups, one specific of the B. ceti strains, one of the B. pinnipedialis strains and the last composed of the human isolate. In the B. ceti group, 3 subclusters were identified, distinguishing a cluster of dolphin, minke whale and porpoise isolates and two clusters mostly composed of dolphin isolates. These results were in accordance with published analyses using other phenotypic or molecular approaches, or different panels of VNTR loci. The B. pinnipedialis group could be similarly subdivided in 3 subclusters, one composed exclusively of isolates from hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) and the two others comprising other seal species isolates. Conclusion The clustering analysis of a large collection of marine mammal Brucella isolates from European waters significantly strengthens the current view of the population structure of these two species, and their

  1. The Complete Genome Phylogeny of Geographically Distinct Dengue Virus Serotype 2 Isolates (1944-2013) Supports Further Groupings within the Cosmopolitan Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Akhtar; Ali, Ijaz

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) isolates have been implicated in deadly outbreaks of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in several regions of the world. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV-2 isolates collected from particular countries has been performed using partial or individual genes but only a few studies have examined complete whole-genome sequences collected worldwide. Herein, 50 complete genome sequences of DENV-2 isolates, reported over the past 70 years from 19 different countries, were downloaded from GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted and evolutionary distances of the 50 DENV-2 isolates were determined using maximum likelihood (ML) trees or Bayesian phylogenetic analysis created from complete genome nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) sequences or individual gene sequences. The results showed that all DENV-2 isolates fell into seven main groups containing five previously defined genotypes. A Cosmopolitan genotype showed further division into three groups (C-I, C-II, and C-III) with the C-I group containing two subgroups (C-IA and C-IB). Comparison of the aa sequences showed specific mutations among the various groups of DENV-2 isolates. A maximum number of aa mutations was observed in the NS5 gene, followed by the NS2A, NS3 and NS1 genes, while the smallest number of aa substitutions was recorded in the capsid gene, followed by the PrM/M, NS4A, and NS4B genes. Maximum evolutionary distances were found in the NS2A gene, followed by the NS4A and NS4B genes. Based on these results, we propose that genotyping of DENV-2 isolates in future studies should be performed on entire genome sequences in order to gain a complete understanding of the evolution of various isolates reported from different geographical locations around the world. PMID:26414178

  2. Tofla virus: A newly identified Nairovirus of the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever group isolated from ticks in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Satoshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Fuxun, Yu; Kurosaki, Yohei; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Sakaguchi, Miako; Fuchigami, Takeshi; Ono, Hokuto; Nishi, Kodai; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Uchida, Leo; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yasuda, Jiro; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Fujita, Hiromi; Morita, Kouichi; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Ixodid ticks transmit several important viral pathogens. We isolated a new virus (Tofla virus: TFLV) from Heamaphysalis flava and Heamaphysalis formsensis in Japan. The full-genome sequences revealed that TFLV belonged to the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. Phylogenetic analyses and neutralization tests suggested that TFLV is closely related to the Hazara virus and that it is classified into the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever group. TFLV caused lethal infection in IFNAR KO mice. The TFLV-infected mice exhibited a gastrointestinal disorder, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography images showed a significant uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in the intestinal tract. TFLV was able to infect and propagate in cultured cells of African green monkey-derived Vero E6 cells and human-derived SK-N-SH, T98-G and HEK-293 cells. Although TFLV infections in humans and animals are currently unknown, our findings may provide clues to understand the potential infectivity and to develop of pre-emptive countermeasures against this new tick-borne Nairovirus. PMID:26863911

  3. Tofla virus: A newly identified Nairovirus of the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever group isolated from ticks in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Satoshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Fuxun, Yu; Kurosaki, Yohei; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Sakaguchi, Miako; Fuchigami, Takeshi; Ono, Hokuto; Nishi, Kodai; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Uchida, Leo; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yasuda, Jiro; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Fujita, Hiromi; Morita, Kouichi; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Ixodid ticks transmit several important viral pathogens. We isolated a new virus (Tofla virus: TFLV) from Heamaphysalis flava and Heamaphysalis formsensis in Japan. The full-genome sequences revealed that TFLV belonged to the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. Phylogenetic analyses and neutralization tests suggested that TFLV is closely related to the Hazara virus and that it is classified into the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever group. TFLV caused lethal infection in IFNAR KO mice. The TFLV-infected mice exhibited a gastrointestinal disorder, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography images showed a significant uptake of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose in the intestinal tract. TFLV was able to infect and propagate in cultured cells of African green monkey-derived Vero E6 cells and human-derived SK-N-SH, T98-G and HEK-293 cells. Although TFLV infections in humans and animals are currently unknown, our findings may provide clues to understand the potential infectivity and to develop of pre-emptive countermeasures against this new tick-borne Nairovirus. PMID:26863911

  4. [Genetic Characteristics of Coxsackievirus Group A Type 4 Isolated from Patients with Acute Flaccid Paralysis in Shaanxi, China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongyan; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Shuangli; Si, Yuan; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Hui; Yang, Qian; Ji, Tianjiao; Xu, Wenbo

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed the genetic characteristics of coxsackievirus A4 (CV-A4) based on the entire VP1 coding region. Samples were isolated from patients with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in Shaanxi, China from 2006 to 2010. We wished to ascertain the predominant genotype and the relationship between CV-A4 infection and AFP. Sixty-eight non-polio enteroviruses were inoculated onto RD cells (to increase the virus titer) and molecular typing was undertaken. The entire VP1 coding region was amplified. Percentage of CV-A4 was 10.3% (7/68). Analyses of genetic identify and creation of phylogenetic trees revealed that CV-A4 could be classified into A, B and C genotypes. Seven CV-A4 strains from Shaanxi and other CV-A4 strains from China formed an independent evolution lineage located in group 4 and belonged to the C2 sub-genotype. These data suggested that CV-A4 strains of sub-genotype C2 were the predominant genotypes in China. These strains co-evolved and co-circulated with those from other provinces in China, so continued monitoring of CV-A4 (by clinical and genetic surveillance) should be enhanced. PMID:27396156

  5. Inhibitory activity of Aloe vera gel on some clinically isolated cariogenic and periodontopathic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fani, Mohammadmehdi; Kohanteb, Jamshid

    2012-03-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant with anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antidiabetic and immune-boosting properties. In the present study we investigated the inhibitory activities of Aloe vera gel on some cariogenic (Streptococcus mutans), periodontopathic (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis) and an opportunistic periodontopathogen (Bacteroides fragilis) isolated from patients with dental caries and periodontal diseases. Twenty isolates of each of these bacteria were investigated for their sensitivity to Aloe vera gel using the disk diffusion and microdilution methods. S. mutans was the species most sensitive to Aloe vera gel with a MIC of 12.5 µg/ml, while A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and B. fragilis were less sensitive, with a MIC of 25-50 µg/ml (P < 0.01). Based on our present findings it is concluded that Aloe vera gel at optimum concentration could be used as an antiseptic for prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases.

  6. Alcohol from whey permeate: strain selection, temperature, and medium optimization. [Candida pseudotropicalis, Kluyveromyces fragilis, and K. lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Vienne, P.; Von Stockar, U.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative study of shaken flask cultures of some yeast strains capable of fermenting lactose showed no significant differences in alcohol yield among the four best strains. Use of whey permeate concentrated three times did not affect the yields. An optimal growth temperature of 38/sup 0/C was determined for K. fragilis NRRL 665. Elemental analysis of both the permeate and the dry cell mass of two strains indicated the possibility of a stoichiometric limitation by nitrogen. Batch cultures in laboratory fermentors confirmed this finding and revealed in addition the presence of a limitation due to growth factors. Both types of limitations could be overcome by adding yeast extract. The maximum productivity of continuous cultures could thus be improved to 5.1 g/l-h. The maximum specific growth rate was of the order of 0.310 h/sup -1/. 15 references, 10 figures, 9 tables.

  7. Characterization of the primary starch utilization operon in the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis: Regulation by carbon source and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Spence, Cheryl; Wells, W Greg; Smith, C Jeffrey

    2006-07-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Bacteroides fragilis is a commensal organism in the large intestine, where it utilizes both dietary and host-derived polysaccharides as a source of carbon and energy. In this study, a four-gene operon required for starch utilization was identified. The operon also was found to be oxygen responsive and thus was designated osu for oxygen-induced starch utilization. The first three genes in the operon were predicted to encode outer membrane proteins involved in starch binding, and a fourth gene, osuD, encoded an amylase involved in starch hydrolysis. Insertional mutation of the osuA gene (Omega osuA) resulted in the inability to utilize starch or glycogen and an insertional mutation into the osuD gene (Omega osuD) was severely impaired for growth on starch media. Transcriptional studies indicated that maltose, maltooligosaccharides, and starch were inducers of osu expression and that maltose was the strongest inducer. A transcriptional activator of osuABCD, OsuR, was identified and found to mediate maltose induction. The Omega osuA and Omega osuD mutants were able to grow on maltose but not starch, whereas a mutation in osuR abolished growth on both substrates, indicating that additional genes under the control of OsuR are needed for maltose utilization. The osuABCD operon also was induced by exposure to oxygen and was shown to be part of the oxidative stress response important for aerotolerance of B. fragilis. Transcriptional analyses showed that osuA was induced 20-fold by oxygen, but OsuR was not required for this activation. Analysis of osu mutants suggested that expression of the operon was important for survival during oxygen exposure but not to hydrogen peroxide stress.

  8. Relationship between phylogenetic groups, antibiotic resistance and patient characteristics in terms of adhesin genes in cystitis and pyelonephritis isolates of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Er, Doganhan Kadir; Dundar, Devrim; Uzuner, Huseyin; Osmani, Agim

    2015-12-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) is considered as the main causative agent of urinary tract infections worldwide. The relationship between antimicrobial resistance, phylogenetic groups, patient characteristics and adhesin virulence genes are complex and not fully understood. In this study, among 146 urinary isolates of E. coli, phylogenetic groups and various adhesin virulence genes were examined with multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction methods. Patient characteristics divided into sex, cystitis and pyelonephritis; community-acquired and hospital-acquired; complicated and uncomplicated infection. Antimicrobial resistance was also determined. The papAH gene was seen more often in pyelonephritis than cystitis and female than male patients. iha gene was more frequent in hospital-acquired infections than in community-acquired infections. sfa/focDE was more frequent in ampicillin, amikacin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, cefazolin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole susceptible and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and multi-drug resistance (MDR) negative isolates. focG was seen more often in nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin susceptible and MDR negative isolates. fimH and papAH were more commonly observed in amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and cefotaxime susceptible isolates, respectively. iha and afa/draBC genes were more frequent in resistant isolates than the susceptible ones; for iha, in ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, nalidixic acid, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone resistant and ESBL and MDR positive isolates; for afa/draBC, in cefotaxime, cefuroxime, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistant and ESBL and MDR positive isolates, this trend was observed. ST 131 E. coli virulence gene pattern has a direct effect on resistance profile. Isolates belong to that clonal group has MDR and commonly harbour afa/draBC and iha genes. Our findings may

  9. Characterisation of geographically and temporally diverse Yersinia ruckeri isolates: evidence that UK and mainland European biotype 2 isolates represent different clonal groups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There have been increased reports of outbreaks of Enteric Redmouth Disease (ERM) caused by Yersinia ruckeri in previously-vaccinated salmonids in Europe, with some of these outbreaks attributed to emergent non-motile, Tween 80 negative, biotype 2 isolates. To gain information about their likely orig...

  10. Advancing allele group-specific amplification of the complete HLA-C gene--isolation of novel alleles from three allele groups (C*04, C*07 and C*08).

    PubMed

    Cisneros, E; Martínez-Pomar, N; Vilches, M; Martín, P; de Pablo, R; Nuñez Del Prado, N; Nieto, A; Matamoros, N; Moraru, M; Vilches, C

    2013-10-01

    A variety of strategies have been designed for sequence-based HLA typing (SBT) and for the isolation of new human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, but unambiguous characterization of complete genomic sequences remains a challenge. We recently reported a simple method for the group-specific amplification (GSA) and sequencing of a full-length C*04 genomic sequence in isolation from the accompanying allele. Here we build on this strategy and present homologous methods that enable the isolation of HLA-C alleles belonging to another two allele groups. Using this approach, which can be applied to sequence-based typing in some clinical settings, we have successfully characterized three novel HLA-C alleles (C*04:128, C*07:01:01:02, and C*08:62).

  11. Prevalence and Characteristics of the Epidemic Multiresistant Escherichia coli ST131 Clonal Group among Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing E. coli Isolates in Copenhagen, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Dennis S.; Nilsson, Frida; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Leihof, Rikke Fleron; Struve, Carsten; Scheutz, Flemming; Johnston, Brian; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Johnson, James R.

    2013-01-01

    We report the characteristics of 115 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli clinical isolates, from 115 unique Danish patients, over a 1-year study interval (1 October 2008 to 30 September 2009). Forty-four (38%) of the ESBL isolates represented sequence type 131 (ST13)1, from phylogenetic group B2. The remaining 71 isolates were from phylogenetic groups D (27%), A (22%), B1 (10%), and B2 (3%). Serogroup O25 ST131 isolates (n = 42; 95% of ST131) comprised 7 different K antigens, whereas two ST131 isolates were O16:K100:H5. Compared to non-ST131 isolates, ST131 isolates were associated positively with CTX-M-15 and negatively with CTX-M-1 and CTX-M-14. They also were associated positively with 11 virulence genes, including afa and dra (Dr family adhesins), the F10 papA allele (P fimbria variant), fimH (type 1 fimbriae), fyuA (yersiniabactin receptor), iha (adhesin siderophore), iutA (aerobactin receptor), kpsM II (group 2 capsules), malX (pathogenicity island marker), ompT (outer membrane protease), sat (secreted autotransporter toxin), and usp (uropathogenicity-specific protein) and negatively with hra (heat-resistant agglutinin) and iroN (salmochelin receptor). The consensus virulence gene profile (>90% prevalence) of the ST131 isolates included fimH, fyuA, malX, and usp (100% each), ompT and the F10 papA allele (95% each), and kpsM II and iutA (93% each). ST131 isolates were also positively associated with community acquisition, extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) status, and the O25, K100, and H4 antigens. Thus, among ESBL E. coli isolates in Copenhagen, ST131 was the most prevalent clonal group, was community associated, and exhibited distinctive and comparatively extensive virulence profiles, plus a greater variety of capsular antigens than reported previously. PMID:23554186

  12. Prevalence and characteristics of the epidemic multiresistant Escherichia coli ST131 clonal group among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E. coli isolates in Copenhagen, Denmark.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Bente; Hansen, Dennis S; Nilsson, Frida; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Leihof, Rikke Fleron; Struve, Carsten; Scheutz, Flemming; Johnston, Brian; Krogfelt, Karen A; Johnson, James R

    2013-06-01

    We report the characteristics of 115 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli clinical isolates, from 115 unique Danish patients, over a 1-year study interval (1 October 2008 to 30 September 2009). Forty-four (38%) of the ESBL isolates represented sequence type 131 (ST13)1, from phylogenetic group B2. The remaining 71 isolates were from phylogenetic groups D (27%), A (22%), B1 (10%), and B2 (3%). Serogroup O25 ST131 isolates (n = 42; 95% of ST131) comprised 7 different K antigens, whereas two ST131 isolates were O16:K100:H5. Compared to non-ST131 isolates, ST131 isolates were associated positively with CTX-M-15 and negatively with CTX-M-1 and CTX-M-14. They also were associated positively with 11 virulence genes, including afa and dra (Dr family adhesins), the F10 papA allele (P fimbria variant), fimH (type 1 fimbriae), fyuA (yersiniabactin receptor), iha (adhesin siderophore), iutA (aerobactin receptor), kpsM II (group 2 capsules), malX (pathogenicity island marker), ompT (outer membrane protease), sat (secreted autotransporter toxin), and usp (uropathogenicity-specific protein) and negatively with hra (heat-resistant agglutinin) and iroN (salmochelin receptor). The consensus virulence gene profile (>90% prevalence) of the ST131 isolates included fimH, fyuA, malX, and usp (100% each), ompT and the F10 papA allele (95% each), and kpsM II and iutA (93% each). ST131 isolates were also positively associated with community acquisition, extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) status, and the O25, K100, and H4 antigens. Thus, among ESBL E. coli isolates in Copenhagen, ST131 was the most prevalent clonal group, was community associated, and exhibited distinctive and comparatively extensive virulence profiles, plus a greater variety of capsular antigens than reported previously.

  13. Klebsiella pneumoniae lipopolysaccharide O typing: revision of prototype strains and O-group distribution among clinical isolates from different sources and countries.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D S; Mestre, F; Alberti, S; Hernández-Allés, S; Alvarez, D; Doménech-Sánchez, A; Gil, J; Merino, S; Tomás, J M; Benedí, V J

    1999-01-01

    We have previously described an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method for the O typing of O1 lipopolysaccharide from Klebsiella pneumoniae which overcomes the technical problems and limitations of the classical O-typing method. In this study, we have extended the method to all of the currently recognized O types. The method was validated by studying the prototype strains that have defined the O groups by the classical tube agglutinatination O-typing method. Based on these results, we confirmed the O types of 60 of 64 typeable strains, and we propose a revised O-antigenic scheme, with minor but necessary changes, consisting of serogroups or serotypes O1, O2, O2ac, O3, O4, O5, O7, O8, and O12. Application of this typing method to 638 K. pneumoniae clinical isolates from Denmark, Spain, and the United States from different sources (blood, urine, and others) showed that up to 80% of these isolates belong to serotypes or serogroups O1, O2, O3, and O5, independently of the source of isolation, and that a major group of nontypeable isolates, representing about 17% of the total, consists of half O+ and half O- strains. Differences were observed, however, in the prevalence of the lipopolysaccharide O types or groups, depending on the country and isolation source.

  14. Genome sequence of Shimia str. SK013, a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from marine sediment

    DOE PAGES

    Kanukollu, Saranya; Voget, Sonja; Pohlner, Marion; Vandieken, Verona; Petersen, Jörn; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Shapiro, Nicole; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans -Peter; et al

    2016-03-12

    Shimia strain SK013 is an aerobic, Gram-negative, rod shaped alphaproteobacterium affiliated with the Roseobacter group within the family Rhodobacteraceae. The strain was isolated from surface sediment (0-1 cm) of the Skagerrak at 114 m below sea level. The 4,049,808 bp genome of Shimia str. SK013 comprises 3,981 protein-coding genes and 47 RNA genes. It contains one chromosome and no extrachromosomal elements. The genome analysis revealed the presence of genes for a dimethylsulfoniopropionate lyase, demethylase and the trimethylamine methyltransferase (mttB) as well as genes for nitrate, nitrite and dimethyl sulfoxide reduction. This indicates that Shimia str. SK013 is able to switchmore » from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism and thus is capable of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur cycling at the seafloor. Among the ability to convert other sulfur compounds it has the genetic capacity to produce climatically active dimethyl sulfide. Growth on glutamate as a sole carbon source results in formation of cell-connecting filaments, a putative phenotypic adaptation of the surface-associated strain to the environmental conditions at the seafloor. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a flagellum (fla1) and a type IV pilus biogenesis, which is speculated to be a prerequisite for biofilm formation. This is also related to genes responsible for signalling such as N-acyl homoserine lactones, as well as quip-genes responsible for quorum quenching and antibiotic biosynthesis. Pairwise similarities of 16S rRNA genes (98.56 % sequence similarity to the next relative S. haliotis) and the in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (21.20 % sequence similarity to S. haliotis) indicated Shimia str. SK013 to be considered as a new species. In conclusion, the genome analysis of Shimia str. SK013 offered first insights into specific physiological and phenotypic adaptation mechanisms of Roseobacter-affiliated bacteria to the benthic environment.« less

  15. Absence of a functional erm gene in isolates of Mycobacterium immunogenum and the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group, based on in vitro clarithromycin susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Hanson, Kimberly; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Nash, Kevin A; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Parodi, Nicholas; Smith, Terry; Gee, Martha; Strong, Anita; Barker, Adam; Cohen, Samuel; Muir, Haleina; Slechta, E Susan; Wallace, Richard J

    2015-03-01

    Macrolide resistance has been linked to the presence of a functional erythromycin ribosomal methylase (erm) gene in most species of pathogenic rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). For these Mycobacterium isolates, extended incubation in clarithromycin is necessary to determine macrolide susceptibility. In contrast, the absence of a detectable erm gene in isolates of M. chelonae, M. senegalense, and M. peregrinum and a nonfunctional erm gene in M. abscessus subsp. massiliense and 15% to 20% of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates renders these species intrinsically macrolide susceptible. Not all RGM species have been screened for the presence of an erm gene, including the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group (M. mucogenicum, M. phocaicum, and M. aubagnense) and Mycobacterium immunogenum. A total of 356 isolates of these two pathogenic RGM taxa from two reference laboratories (A.R.U.P. Reference Laboratories and the Mycobacteria/Nocardia Laboratory at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler) underwent clarithromycin susceptibility testing with readings at 3 to 5 days and 14 days. Only 13 of the 356 isolates had resistant clarithromycin MICs at initial extended MIC readings, and repeat values on all available isolates were ≤2 μg/ml. These studies suggest that these two additional RGM groups do not harbor functional erm genes and, like M. chelonae, do not require extended clarithromycin susceptibility testing. We propose to the Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute that isolates belonging to these above-mentioned six rapidly growing mycobacterial groups based on molecular identification with no known functional erm genes undergo only 3 to 5 days of susceptibility testing (to exclude mutational resistance). PMID:25568437

  16. Absence of a Functional erm Gene in Isolates of Mycobacterium immunogenum and the Mycobacterium mucogenicum Group, Based on In Vitro Clarithromycin Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Kimberly; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Nash, Kevin A.; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Parodi, Nicholas; Smith, Terry; Gee, Martha; Strong, Anita; Barker, Adam; Cohen, Samuel; Muir, Haleina; Slechta, E. Susan; Wallace, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide resistance has been linked to the presence of a functional erythromycin ribosomal methylase (erm) gene in most species of pathogenic rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). For these Mycobacterium isolates, extended incubation in clarithromycin is necessary to determine macrolide susceptibility. In contrast, the absence of a detectable erm gene in isolates of M. chelonae, M. senegalense, and M. peregrinum and a nonfunctional erm gene in M. abscessus subsp. massiliense and 15% to 20% of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates renders these species intrinsically macrolide susceptible. Not all RGM species have been screened for the presence of an erm gene, including the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group (M. mucogenicum, M. phocaicum, and M. aubagnense) and Mycobacterium immunogenum. A total of 356 isolates of these two pathogenic RGM taxa from two reference laboratories (A.R.U.P. Reference Laboratories and the Mycobacteria/Nocardia Laboratory at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler) underwent clarithromycin susceptibility testing with readings at 3 to 5 days and 14 days. Only 13 of the 356 isolates had resistant clarithromycin MICs at initial extended MIC readings, and repeat values on all available isolates were ≤2 μg/ml. These studies suggest that these two additional RGM groups do not harbor functional erm genes and, like M. chelonae, do not require extended clarithromycin susceptibility testing. We propose to the Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute that isolates belonging to these above-mentioned six rapidly growing mycobacterial groups based on molecular identification with no known functional erm genes undergo only 3 to 5 days of susceptibility testing (to exclude mutational resistance). PMID:25568437

  17. Comparison of cefoxitin disk diffusion test and mecA gene PCR results for methicillin resistance detection in Staphylococcus intermedius group isolates from canine origin in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Penna, Bruno; Rabello, Renata F; Lilenbaum, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The study evaluated cefoxitin disk diffusion tests breakpoints and their correlation to mecA gene PCR results for detecting Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus intermedius Group (MRSP) isolates from dogs in Brazil. Agreement using proposed breakpoint (resistant ≤ 30 mm) was encouraging. The current study reinforces that an epidemiological breakpoint can be established to predict presence of MRSP.

  18. Comparison of cefoxitin disk diffusion test and mecA gene PCR results for methicillin resistance detection in Staphylococcus intermedius group isolates from canine origin in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Penna, Bruno; Rabello, Renata F; Lilenbaum, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The study evaluated cefoxitin disk diffusion tests breakpoints and their correlation to mecA gene PCR results for detecting Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus intermedius Group (MRSP) isolates from dogs in Brazil. Agreement using proposed breakpoint (resistant ≤ 30 mm) was encouraging. The current study reinforces that an epidemiological breakpoint can be established to predict presence of MRSP. PMID:24948938

  19. Comparison of the prevalence and genomic characteristics of Clostridium difficile isolated from various production groups in a vertically integrated swine operation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006. Isolation of C. difficile was performed utilizing an enrichment technique and restrictive media. Prelim...

  20. Kenyan isolates of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici from 2008 to 2014: Virulence to SrTmp in the Ug99 race group and implications for breeding programs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frequent emergence of new variants in the Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) Ug99 race group in Kenya has made pathogen survey a priority. We analyzed 140 isolates from 78 Pgt samples collected in Kenya between 2008 and 2014 and identified six races, including three not detected prior to 2013. G...

  1. Frequency of factor H-binding protein modular groups and susceptibility to cross-reactive bactericidal activity in invasive meningococcal isolates.

    PubMed

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T; Harrison, Lee H; Granoff, Dan M

    2010-02-25

    Meningococcal factor H-binding protein (fHbp) is a promising vaccine candidate that elicits serum bactericidal antibodies in humans. Based on sequence variability of the entire protein, fHbp has been divided into three variant groups or two sub-families. We recently reported that the fHbp architecture was modular, consisting of five variable segments, each encoded by genes from one of two lineages. Based on combinations of segments from different lineages, all 70 known fHbp sequence variants could be classified into one of six modular groups. In this study, we analyzed sequences of 172 new fHbp variants that were available from public databases. All but three variants could be classified into one of the six previously described modular groups. Among systematically collected invasive group B isolates from the U.S. and Europe, modular group I overall was most common (60%) but group IV (natural chimeras) accounted for 23% of UK isolates and <1% of U.S. isolates (P<0.0001). Mouse antisera to recombinant fHbp from each of the modular groups showed modular group-specific bactericidal activity against strains with low fHbp expression but had broader activity against strains with higher fHbp expression. Thus both modular group and relative expression of fHbp affected strain susceptibility to anti-fHbp bactericidal activity. The results confirmed the modular architecture of fHbp and underscored its importance for the design of broadly protective group B vaccines in different regions.

  2. Autologous bone marrow transplantation for treatment of isolated central nervous system relapse of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. AIEOP/FONOP-TMO group. Associzione Italiana Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica.

    PubMed

    Messina, C; Valsecchi, M G; Aricò, M; Locatelli, F; Rossetti, F; Rondelli, R; Cesaro, S; Uderzo, C; Conter, V; Pession, A; Sotti, G; Loiacono, G; Santoro, N; Miniero, R; Dini, G; Favre, C; Meloni, G; Testi, A M; Werner, B; Silvestri, D; Arrighini, A; Varotto, S; Pillon, M; Basso, G; Zanesco, L

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the role of ABMT in children with ALL who are in 2nd CR after an early isolated CNS relapse. All children experiencing an isolated CNS relapse at 10 AIEOP centers (Associazione Italiana Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica) from 1986 to 1992 were eligible for this study. The series included 69 patients who relapsed within 3 years from diagnosis: 19 underwent ABMT, nine patients underwent ALLO-BMT from an HLA-identical sibling, and 41 received conventional chemotherapy (CHEMO). Statistical analysis was performed using a Cox's regression model, adjusting for the waiting time before transplantation and prognostic factors. The 5 years DFS was 56.3% (s.e. 12.3) for patients in the ABMT group. This compared favorably with the poor result (12.6% (s.e. 5.9)) seen in the CHEMO group. The risk of failures was reduced by one-third in the ABMT group as compared to the CHEMO group in the multivariate analysis (P < 0.01). In the ALLO group four out of nine patients were in CCR 4-5 years post-transplant. This study suggests that ABMT may also represent a valuable therapeutic choice for patients lacking a matched familiar donor in 2nd CR after an early isolated CNS relapse.

  3. Co-existence of zebra mussels and freshwater unionids: Population dynamics of Leptodea fragilis in a coastal wetland infested with zebra mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Amberg, Jon

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, thousands of live Leptodea fragilis were collected from a marsh located in the western basin of Lake Erie that was infested with zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha). Despite the presence of zebra mussels at this site for a number of years, this L. fragilis population showed no signs of competition-induced changes in population dynamics. Biofouling was limited: fewer than 1% of the L. fragilis showed evidence of recent or past zebra mussel colonization. Successful recruitment occurred yearly, with multiple year classes collected that ranged in age from 1 to 12 years. However, age and shell length were not well correlated. Seventy-one percent of the individuals collected were 51-80 mm long, but ranged in age from 2 to 4.5 years. Three different patterns of growth or shell deposition were found. Some individuals grew rapidly, reaching 105 mm in 3.5 years, while others grew only 4.5 mm over the same time period. A few grew poorly during some years but very rapidly in others. Individuals with a shell length of 41 mm or more were sexually mature and females were more common than males. The strong recruitment and steady growth of this population showed no change between the years before and after the zebra mussel invasion, indicating that this marsh is functioning as a natural refugium from potential problems caused by zebra mussels.

  4. Comparative analysis of agr groups and virulence genes among subclinical and clinical mastitis Staphylococcus aureus isolates from sheep flocks of the Northeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Lara M; de Almeida, Mayra Zilta P R B; de Mendonça, Carla L; Mamizuka, Elsa M

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequent mastitis causative agents in small ruminants. The expression of most virulence genes of S. aureus is controlled by an accessory gene regulator (agr) locus. This study aimed to ascertain the prevalence of the different agr groups and to evaluate the occurrence of encoding genes for cytotoxin, adhesins and toxins with superantigen activity in S. aureus isolates from milk of ewes with clinical and subclinical mastitis in sheep flocks raised for meat production The agr groups I and II were identified in both cases of clinical and subclinical mastitis. Neither the arg groups III and IV nor negative agr were found. The presence of cflA gene was identified in 100% of the isolates. The frequency of hla and lukE-D genes was high - 77.3 and 82.8%, respectively and all isolates from clinical mastitis presented these genes. The sec gene, either associated to tst gene or not, was identified only in isolates from subclinical mastitis. None of the following genes were identified: bbp, ebpS, cna, fnbB, icaA, icaD, bap, hlg, lukM-lukF-PV and se-a-b-d-e.

  5. In vitro activities of 22 beta-lactam antibiotics against penicillin-resistant and penicillin-susceptible viridans group streptococci isolated from blood.

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, F; Liñares, J; Pallares, R; Carratala, J; Benitez, M A; Gudiol, F; Martin, R

    1995-01-01

    A total of 410 strains of viridans group streptococci isolated consecutively from blood were tested by the microdilution method for in vitro susceptibility to 22 beta-lactam antibiotics. One hundred thirty-eight strains (33.6%) were resistant to penicillin with a MIC range of 0.25 to 8 micrograms/ml. MICs of all beta-lactam agents tested were higher for penicillin-resistant strains than for susceptible strains. These antibiotics were classified into three groups according to their in vitro activities (MICs at which 50 and 90% of the isolates are inhibited). Beta-Lactams of the first group (these included imipenem, cefpirome, FK-037, cefditoren, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and cefepime) showed activities higher than or similar to that of penicillin against penicillin-resistant viridans group streptococci. However, 80% of highly penicillin-resistant Streptococcus mitis organisms required cefotaxime and ceftriaxone MICs of > or = 2 micrograms/ml (range, 2 to 16 micrograms/ml). Beta-Lactams of the second group (cefpodoxime, ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, piperacillin, and cefuroxime) showed lower activities than penicillin. Finally, antibiotics of the third group (cephalothin, oxacillin, ceftazidime, cefixime, cefaclor, cefetamet, cefadroxil, cephalexin, and ceftibuten) showed poor in vitro activities. Therefore, some of the beta-lactam agents included in the first group could be an acceptable alternative in the treatment of serious infections due to strains highly resistant to penicillin, although clinical experience is needed. PMID:8619576

  6. Distribution of virulence factors and association with emm polymorphism or isolation site among beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsueh-Hsia; Cheng, Wei-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Distribution of virulence factors and association with emm polymorphism or isolation site among beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE), the dominant human pathogenic species among group G streptococci, is the causative agent of several invasive and non-invasive diseases worldwide. However, limited information is available about the distribution of virulence factors among SDSE isolates, or their association with emm types and the isolation sites. In this study, 246 beta-hemolytic group G SDSE isolates collected in central Taiwan between February 2007 and August 2011 were under investigation. Of these, 66 isolates were obtained from normally sterile sites and 180 from non-sterile sites. emm typing revealed 32 types, with the most prevalent one being stG10.0 (39.8%), followed by stG245.0 (15.4%), stG840.0 (12.2%), stG6.1 (7.7%), and stG652.0 (4.1%). The virulence genes lmb (encoding laminin-binding protein), gapC (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase), sagA (streptolysin S), and hylB (hyaluronidase) existed in all isolates. Also, 99.2% of the isolates possessed slo (streptolysin O) and scpA (C5a peptidase) genes. In addition, 72.8%, 14.6%, 9.4%, and 2.4% of the isolates possessed the genes ska (streptokinase), cbp (putative collagen-binding protein, SDEG_1781), fbp (putative fibronectin-binding protein, SDEG_0161), and sicG (streptococcal inhibitor of complement), respectively. The only superantigen gene detected was spegg (streptococcus pyrogenic exotoxin G(dys) ), which was possessed by 74.4% of the isolates; these isolates correlated with non-sterile sites. Positive correlations were observed between the following emm types and virulence genes: stG10.0 and stG840.0 with spegg, stG6.1 and stG652.0 with ska, and stG840.0 with cbp. On the other hand, negative correlations were observed between the following: stG245.0, stG6.1, and stG652.0 types with spegg, stG10.0 with ska

  7. Resistance to ceftriaxone and other beta-lactams in bacteria isolated in the community. The Vigil'Roc Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, F W; Péan, Y; Gertner, J

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of bacterial species and their susceptibilities to ceftriaxone and other beta-lactams from patients with community-acquired infections were evaluated in a multicenter study over a 4-month period. A total of 5,768 bacterial isolates were classified according to whether the patient had been previously hospitalized or had received antibiotic treatment. The most relevant findings were the presence of 33.8% penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, 25% beta-lactamase-producing Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 36.4% amoxicillin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates. All of these bacteria were fully susceptible to ceftriaxone. Nosocomial multiply-resistant bacteria, and particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus, were found, as expected, at a higher frequency among previously hospitalized patients. However, such bacteria may be present in the community; their incidence is high in particular clinical settings, and such bacteria should be considered when one is choosing a first-line therapy for the treatment of severe infections. PMID:8585736

  8. Antibiotic resistance, phylogenetic grouping and virulence potential of Escherichia coli isolated from the faeces of intensively farmed and free range poultry.

    PubMed

    Obeng, Akua Serwaah; Rickard, Heather; Ndi, Olasumbo; Sexton, Margaret; Barton, Mary

    2012-01-27

    Antibiotic use in poultry production is a risk factor for promoting the emergence of resistant Escherichia coli. To ascertain differences in different classes of chickens, the resistance profile, some virulence genes and phylogenetic grouping on 251 E. coli isolates from intensive meat (free range and indoor commercial) and free range egg layer chickens collected between December 2008 and June 2009 in South Australia were performed. Among the 251 strains, 102 (40.6%) and 67 (26.7%) were found to be resistant to tetracycline and ampicillin respectively. Resistance was also observed to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (12.4%), streptomycin (10.8%), spectinomycin (9.6%), neomycin (6.0%) and florfenicol (2.0%) but no resistance was found to ceftiofur, ciprofloxacin or gentamicin. Amplification of DNA of the isolates by polymerase chain reaction revealed the presence of genes that code for resistant determinants: tetracycline (tet(A), tet(B) and tet(C)), ampicillin (bla(TEM) and bla(SHV)), trimethoprim (dhfrV and dhfrXIII), sulphonamide (sulI and sulII), neomycin (aph(3)-Ia(aphA1)), and spectinomycin-streptinomycin (aadA2). In addition, 32.3-39.4% of the isolates were found to belong to commensal groups (A and B1) and 11.2-17.1% belonged to the virulent groups (B2 and D). Among the 251 E. coli isolates, 25 (10.0%) carried two or more virulence genes typical of Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Furthermore, 17 of the isolates with multi-resistance were identified to be groups B2 and D. Although no significant difference was observed between isolates from free range and indoor commercial meat chickens (P>0.05), significant differences was observed between the different classes of meat chickens (free range and indoor commercial) and egg layers (P<0.05). While this study assessed the presence of a limited number of virulence genes, our study re emphasises the zoonotic potential of poultry E. coli isolates.

  9. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013–2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread

  10. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C D

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013-2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread of

  11. Strong conservation of rhoptry-associated-protein-1 (RAP-1) locus organization and sequence among Babesia isolates infecting sheep from China (Babesia motasi-like phylogenetic group).

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingli; Valentin, Charlotte; Bonsergent, Claire; Malandrin, Laurence

    2014-12-01

    Rhoptry-associated-protein 1 (RAP-1) is considered as a potential vaccine candidate due to its involvement in red blood cell invasion by parasites in the genus Babesia. We examined its value as a vaccine candidate by studying RAP-1 conservation in isolates of Babesia sp. BQ1 Ningxian, Babesia sp. Tianzhu and Babesia sp. Hebei, responsible for ovine babesiosis in different regions of China. The rap-1 locus in these isolates has very similar features to those described for Babesia sp. BQ1 Lintan, another Chinese isolate also in the B. motasi-like phylogenetic group, namely the presence of three types of rap-1 genes (rap-1a, rap-1b and rap-1c), multiple conserved rap-1b copies (5) interspaced with more or less variable rap-1a copies (6), and the 3' localization of one rap-1c. The isolates Babesia sp. Tianzhu, Babesia sp. BQ1 Lintan and Ningxian were almost identical (average nucleotide identity of 99.9%) over a putative locus of about 31 Kb, including the intergenic regions. Babesia sp. Hebei showed a similar locus organization but differed in the rap-1 locus sequence, for each gene and intergenic region, with an average nucleotide identity of 78%. Our results are in agreement with 18S rDNA phylogenetic studies performed on these isolates. However, in extremely closely related isolates the rap-1 locus seems more conserved (99.9%) than the 18S rDNA (98.7%), whereas in still closely related isolates the identities are much lower (78%) compared with the 18S rDNA (97.7%). The particularities of the rap-1 locus in terms of evolution, phylogeny, diagnosis and vaccine development are discussed.

  12. Structural characterization of amphiphilic siderophores produced by a soda lake isolate, Halomonas sp. SL01, reveals cysteine-, phenylalanine- and proline-containing head groups.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Luis O'mar Serrano; Schwarz, Benjamin; Richards, Abigail M

    2015-11-01

    Soap Lake, located in Washington State, is a naturally occurring saline and alkaline lake. Several organisms inhabiting this lake have been identified as producers of siderophores that are unique in structure. Bacterial isolates, enriched from Soap Lake sediment and water samples, were screened for siderophore production using both the chrome azurol S (CAS) agar plate and liquid methods. Bacterial isolate Halomonas sp. SL01 was found to produce relatively high concentrations of siderophores in liquid medium (up to 40 µM). Siderophores from the isolate were separated from the culture supernatant using solid phase extraction and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Siderophore structure was determined using LC/MS/MS (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC. Two distinct new families of amphiphilic siderophores were produced by isolate SL01. All siderophores ranged in size from 989 to 1096 atomic mass units and consisted of a conserved peptidic head group (per family), which coordinates iron, coupled to fatty acid moieties. The fatty acyl moieties were C10-C14 in length and some with hydroxyl substitutions at the third α position. These siderophores resembled amphiphilic aquachelin siderophores produced by Halomonas aquamarina strain DS40M3, a marine bacterium as well as siderophores from isolate Halomonas sp. SL28 that was found to produce amphiphilic siderophores. Bacteria thriving under saline and alkaline conditions are capable of producing unique siderophores resembling those produced by microbes inhabiting marine environments.

  13. Structural characterization of amphiphilic siderophores produced by a soda lake isolate, Halomonas sp. SL01, reveals cysteine-, phenylalanine- and proline-containing head groups.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Luis O'mar Serrano; Schwarz, Benjamin; Richards, Abigail M

    2015-11-01

    Soap Lake, located in Washington State, is a naturally occurring saline and alkaline lake. Several organisms inhabiting this lake have been identified as producers of siderophores that are unique in structure. Bacterial isolates, enriched from Soap Lake sediment and water samples, were screened for siderophore production using both the chrome azurol S (CAS) agar plate and liquid methods. Bacterial isolate Halomonas sp. SL01 was found to produce relatively high concentrations of siderophores in liquid medium (up to 40 µM). Siderophores from the isolate were separated from the culture supernatant using solid phase extraction and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Siderophore structure was determined using LC/MS/MS (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC. Two distinct new families of amphiphilic siderophores were produced by isolate SL01. All siderophores ranged in size from 989 to 1096 atomic mass units and consisted of a conserved peptidic head group (per family), which coordinates iron, coupled to fatty acid moieties. The fatty acyl moieties were C10-C14 in length and some with hydroxyl substitutions at the third α position. These siderophores resembled amphiphilic aquachelin siderophores produced by Halomonas aquamarina strain DS40M3, a marine bacterium as well as siderophores from isolate Halomonas sp. SL28 that was found to produce amphiphilic siderophores. Bacteria thriving under saline and alkaline conditions are capable of producing unique siderophores resembling those produced by microbes inhabiting marine environments. PMID:26439615

  14. Correlations between major risk factors and closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates grouped by three current genotyping procedures: a population-based study in northeast Mexico.

    PubMed

    Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Molina-Salinas, Gloria María; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Padilla-Rivas, Gerardo Raymundo; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Torres-de-la-Cruz, Víctor Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Yazmin Berenice; Ortega-García, Jorge Luis; Garza-Treviño, Elsa Nancy; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Becerril-Montes, Pola; Said-Fernández, Salvador

    2014-09-01

    The characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) patients related to a chain of recent TB transmissions were investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates (120) were genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 (R), spacer oligotyping (S) and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (M) methods. The MTB isolates were clustered and the clusters were grouped according to the similarities of their genotypes. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between the groups of MTB isolates with similar genotypes and those patient characteristics indicating a risk for a pulmonary TB (PTB) chain transmission were ana- lysed. The isolates showing similar genotypes were distributed as follows: SMR (5%), SM (12.5%), SR (1.67%), MR (0%), S (46.67%), M (5%) and R (0%). The remaining 35 cases were orphans. SMR exhibited a significant correlation (p < 0.05) with visits to clinics, municipalities and comorbidities (primarily diabetes mellitus). S correlated with drug consumption and M with comorbidities. SMR is needed to identify a social network in metropolitan areas for PTB transmission and S and M are able to detect risk factors as secondary components of a transmission chain of TB.

  15. Correlations between major risk factors and closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates grouped by three current enotyping procedures: a population-based study in northeast Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Molina-Salinas, Gloria María; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Padilla-Rivas, Gerardo Raymundo; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Torres-de-la-Cruz, Víctor Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Yazmin Berenice; Ortega-García, Jorge Luis; Garza-Treviño, Elsa Nancy; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Becerril-Montes, Pola; Said-Fernández/, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) patients related to a chain of recent TB transmissions were investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates (120) were genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 (R), spacer oligotyping (S) and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (M) methods. The MTB isolates were clustered and the clusters were grouped according to the similarities of their genotypes. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients between the groups of MTB isolates with similar genotypes and those patient characteristics indicating a risk for a pulmonary TB (PTB) chain transmission were ana- lysed. The isolates showing similar genotypes were distributed as follows: SMR (5%), SM (12.5%), SR (1.67%), MR (0%), S (46.67%), M (5%) and R (0%). The remaining 35 cases were orphans. SMR exhibited a significant correlation (p < 0.05) with visits to clinics, municipalities and comorbidities (primarily diabetes mellitus). S correlated with drug consumption and M with comorbidities. SMR is needed to identify a social network in metropolitan areas for PTB transmission and S and M are able to detect risk factors as secondary components of a transmission chain of TB. PMID:25317710

  16. [Post-marketing surveillance of antibacterial activities of cefozopran against various clinical isolates--II. Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Igari, Jun; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Nobuyoshi; Akiyama, Kazumitsu; Koyama, Tsuneo

    2002-02-01

    As a post-marketing surveillance, the in vitro antibacterial activities of cefozopran (CZOP), an agent of cephems, against various clinical isolates were yearly evaluated and compared with those of other cephems, oxacephems, penicillins, monobactams, and carbapenems. Changes in CZOP susceptibility for the bacteria were also evaluated with the bacterial resistance ratio calculated with the breakpoint MIC. Twenty-five species (3,362 strains) of Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from the clinical materials annually collected from 1996 to 2000, and consisted of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis (n = 136), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 289), Escherichia coli (n = 276), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 192), Klebsiella oxytoca (n = 157), Enterobacter cloacae (n = 189), Enterobacter aerogenes (n = 93), Serratia marcescens (n = 172), Serratia liquefaciens (n = 24), Citrobacter freundii (n = 177), Citrobacter koseri (n = 70), Proteus mirabilis (n = 113), Proteus vulgaris (n = 89), Morganella morganii (n = 116), Providencia spp. (n = 41), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 290), Pseudomonas fluorescens (n = 56), Pseudomonas putida (n = 63), Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 146), Acinetobacter lwoffii (n = 34), Burkholderia cepacia (n = 101), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (n = 169), Bacteroides fragilis group (n = 196), and Prevotella/Porphyromonas (n = 173). An antibacterial activity of CZOP against E. coli, K. pneumoniae, K. oxytoca, and S. marcescens was potent and consistent with or more preferable than the study results obtained until the new drug application approval. MIC90 of CZOP against M.(B.) catarrhalis, C. koseri, and P. aeruginosa was not considerably changed and consistent with the study results obtained until the new drug application approval. MIC90 of CZOP against E. cloacae, E. aerogenes, and P. mirabilis increased year by year. The increase in MIC90 of CZOP against E. aerogenes and P. mirabilis, however, was not considered to be an obvious decline in susceptibility. In

  17. Solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianlong E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu; Mallory, Frank B.; Mallory, Clelia W.; Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu

    2014-05-21

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  18. The Transcriptome Sequence of Dientamoeba fragilis Offers New Biological Insights on its Metabolism, Kinome, Degradome and Potential Mechanisms of Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Joel L N; Cao, Maisie; Stark, Damien J; Ellis, John T

    2015-09-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a human bowel parasite with a worldwide distribution. Dientamoeba was once described as a rare and harmless commensal though recent reports suggest it is common and potentially pathogenic. Molecular data on Dientamoeba is scarce which limits our understanding of this parasite. To address this, sequencing of the Dientamoeba transcriptome was performed. Messenger RNA was extracted from cultured Dientamoeba trophozoites originating from clinical stool specimens, and sequenced using Roche GS FLX and Illumina HiSeq technologies. In total 6,595 Dientamoeba transcripts were identified. These sequences were analysed using the BLAST2GO software suite and via BLAST comparisons to sequences available from TrichDB, GenBank, MEROPS and kinase.com. Several novel KEGG pathway maps were generated and gene ontology analysis was also performed. These results are thoroughly discussed guided by knowledge available for other related protozoa. Attention is paid to the novel biological insights afforded by this data including peptidases and kinases of Dientamoeba, as well as its metabolism, novel chemotherapeutics and possible mechanisms of pathogenicity. Currently, this work represents the largest contribution to our understanding of Dientamoeba molecular biology and also represents a major contribution to our understanding of the trichomonads generally, many of which are important pathogens of humans and animals.

  19. Identification of strains isolated as total and fecal coliforms and comparison of both groups as indicators of fecal pollution in tropical climates.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, M C

    1983-06-01

    This study was undertaken to better characterize the groups of total coliforms (TC) and fecal coliforms (FC) and to evaluate both groups as indicators of fecal contamination of drinking well water in a tropical climate (The Ivory Coast, West Africa). Isolated colonies obtained as TC or FC on membrane filters were identified using the API-20E system. From the well water samples, 58 golden-green colonies with a metallic sheen isolated on Endo medium (TC) were identified as Escherichia coli (55%), Enterobacter (26%), Klebsiella (14%), Proteus (3%), and Citrobacter (2%). Among 132 colonies isolated on Endo medium as non-TC (not showing the characteristic golden metallic sheen), 10% were identified as E. coli. The 196 blue colonies isolated on M-FC medium at 44.5 degrees C (FC) were identified as E. coli (66%), Klebsiella (12%), Enterobacter (10%), Citrobacter (5%), Salmonella (3%), Serratia (3%), Proteus (2%), and Yersinia (0.5%). Among 24 nonblue colonies on M-FC medium, none were identified as E. coli. Of the colonies isolated from human feces, E. coli represents 92% of the TC and 89% of the FC. Although these results are limited, they tend to confirm the greater specificity of the fecal coliform technique over that of total coliform for the detection of fecal contamination of untreated well water. From the results presented here and the observations of other workers, it is suggested that the use of FC instead of TC should be considered as the method of choice for determining drinking water pollution of untreated groundwater supplies.

  20. A Hyperhemolytic/Hyperpigmented Group B Streptococcus Strain with a CovR Mutation Isolated from an Adolescent Patient with Sore Throat

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Claire; Vornhagen, Jay; Frando, Andrew; Harrell, Maria Isabel; McAdams, Ryan; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococci (GBS) are ß-hemolytic, gram-positive bacteria that are typically associated with infections in human newborns or immunocompromised adults. However, mutation in the two-component regulator CovR/S relieves repression of hemolysin, potentially increasing virulence of GBS. We report the isolation of hyperhemolytic/hyperpigmented GBS strain from an adolescent patient who presented to the University of Washington clinic with symptoms of sore throat. While the patient also tested positive for mononucleosis, a GBS strain with increased hemolysis was isolated from the throat swab obtained from the patient. As hyperhemolytic/hyperpigmented GBS strains are typically associated with mutations in the regulator CovR/CovS, we sequenced the covR/S loci in the clinical isolate. An adenine to cytosine mutation resulting in a change in amino acid coding sequence from glutamine at position 120 to proline in CovR (Q120P) was identified. Introduction of the Q120P amino acid substitution in a CovR complementation plasmid abolished complementation of a ΔcovR mutant derived from the wild type GBS serotype Ia strain A909; these results confirm that the hyperhemolysis observed in the clinical isolate is due to the Q120P substitution in CovR. Antibiotic was prescribed and the patient's symptoms resolved without reported complications. This study represents the first report of the isolation of a hyperhemolytic/hyperpigmented GBS strain due to a covR/S mutation from an adolescent patient with persistent sore throat who was also diagnosed with mononucleosis. The isolation of GBS CovR/S mutants indicates their presence in settings of co-infections and includes adolescents. PMID:26913295

  1. Development of a high-resolution melting-based approach for efficient differentiation among Bacillus cereus group isolates.

    PubMed

    Antolinos, Vera; Fernández, Pablo S; Ros-Chumillas, María; Periago, Paula M; Weiss, Julia

    2012-09-01

    Strains belonging to Bacillus cereus Group include six different species, among which are Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus weihenstephanensis, and Bacillus cereus sensu stricto, a causative agent of food poisoning. Sequence of the panC-housekeeping gene is used for B. cereus Group affiliation to seven major phylogenetic groups (I-VII) with different ecological niches and variations in thermal growth range and spore heat resistance of B. cereus Group microorganisms varies among phylogenetic groups. We assigned a selection of B. cereus sensu stricto strains related to food poisoning from the Spanish cultivar Collection (Valencia) to Group IV strains based on panC gene sequence. Thermal inactivation assays revealed variability of spore heat resistance within these Group IV strains. Adequate food sanitizing treatments therefore require fast and reliable identification of particular strains. In the present study, feasibility of genotyping via high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was examined. HRM analysis of amplified polymorphic 16S-23 intergenic spacer region (ISR) region proved to be discriminatory for B. cereus sensu stricto strain typing, while two other polymorphic regions within the bacterial rRNA operon allowed differentiation between Bacillus species, demonstrating its applicability for discrimination on the species and strain level within B. cereus Group.

  2. Analysis of Arbovirus Isolates from Australia Identifies Novel Bunyaviruses Including a Mapputta Group Virus from Western Australia That Links Gan Gan and Maprik Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Vishal; Diviney, Sinead M.; Certoma, Andrea; Wang, Jianning; Johansen, Cheryl A.; Chowdhary, Rashmi; Mackenzie, John S.; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2016-01-01

    The Mapputta group comprises antigenically related viruses indigenous to Australia and Papua New Guinea that are included in the family Bunyaviridae but not currently assigned to a specific genus. We determined and analyzed the genome sequences of five Australian viruses isolated from mosquitoes collected during routine arbovirus surveillance in Western Australia (K10441, SW27571, K13190, and K42904) and New South Wales (12005). Based on matching sequences of all three genome segments to prototype MRM3630 of Trubanaman virus (TRUV), NB6057 of Gan Gan virus (GGV), and MK7532 of Maprik virus (MPKV), isolates K13190 and SW27571 were identified as TRUV, 12005 as GGV, and K42904 as a Mapputta group virus from Western Australia linking GGV and MPKV. The results confirmed serum neutralization data that had linked SW27571 to TRUV. The fifth virus, K10441 from Willare, was most closely related to Batai orthobunyavirus, presumably representing an Australian variant of the virus. Phylogenetic analysis also confirmed the close relationship of our TRUV and GGV isolates to two other recently described Australian viruses, Murrumbidgee virus and Salt Ash virus, respectively. Our findings indicate that TRUV has a wide circulation throughout the Australian continent, demonstrating for the first time its presence in Western Australia. Similarly, the presence of a virus related to GGV, which had been linked to human disease and previously known only from the Australian southeast, was demonstrated in Western Australia. Finally, a Batai virus isolate was identified in Western Australia. The expanding availability of genomic sequence for novel Australian bunyavirus variants supports the identification of suitably conserved or diverse primer-binding target regions to establish group-wide as well as virus-specific nucleic acid tests in support of specific diagnostic and surveillance efforts throughout Australasia. PMID:27764175

  3. Group G Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcal Bacteremia Characterized by 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Fung, Ami M. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about the relative importance of the four species of Lancefield group G beta-hemolytic streptococci in causing bacteremia and the factors that determine the outcome for patients with group G beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia. From 1997 to 2000, 75 group G beta-hemolytic streptococcal strains were isolated from the blood cultures of 66 patients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of the group G beta-hemolytic streptococci showed that all 75 isolates were Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis. The API system (20 STREP) and Vitek system (GPI) successfully identified 65 (98.5%) and 62 (93.9%) isolates, respectively, as S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis with >95% confidence, whereas the ATB Expression system (ID32 STREP) only successfully identified 49 isolates (74.2%) as S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis with >95% confidence. The median age of the patients was 76 years (range, 33 to 99 years). Fifty-six patients (85%) were over 60 years old. All patients had underlying diseases. No source of the bacteremia was identified (primary bacteremia) in 34 patients (52%), whereas 17 (26%) had cellulitis and 8 (12%) had bed sore or wound infections. Fifty-eight patients (88%) had community-acquired group G streptococcal bacteremia. Sixty-two patients (94%) had group G Streptococcus recovered in one blood culture, whereas 4 patients (6%) had it recovered in multiple blood cultures. Fifty-nine patients (89%) had group G Streptococcus as the only bacterium recovered in their blood cultures, whereas in 7 patients other bacteria were recovered concomitantly with the group G Streptococcus in the blood cultures (Staphylococcus aureus in 3, Clostridium perfringens in 2, Citrobacter freundii in 1, and Bacteroides fragilis in 1). Overall, 10 patients (15%) died. Male sex, diagnosis other than cellulitis, hospital-acquired bacteremia, and multiple positive blood cultures were associated with mortality {P < 0.005 (relative risk [RR] = 7.6), P < 0

  4. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of clinical isolates of CDC coryneform group A-3: proposal of a new species of Cellulomonas, Cellulomonas denverensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Brown, June M; Frazier, Rodrick P; Morey, Roger E; Steigerwalt, Arnold G; Pellegrini, Gerald J; Daneshvar, Maryam I; Hollis, Dannie G; McNeil, Michael M

    2005-04-01

    CDC coryneform group A-3 bacteria are rare human pathogens. In this study, six group A-3 isolates (two from blood, one from cerebrospinal fluid, and one each from homograft valve, lip wound, and pilonidal cyst) were compared to the type strains of phenotypically related organisms, Cellulomonas fimi, Cellulomonas hominis, Oerskovia turbata, and Sanguibacter suarezii, and characterized by phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and genotypic studies. DNA-DNA reassociation analysis identified two genomic groups, and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence identified the taxonomic positions of these groups to genus level. Two groups were defined, and both were more closely related to Cellulomonas species: one group of three strains, for which we propose the new species Cellulomonas denverensis sp. nov., with the type strain W6929 (ATCC BAA-788(T) or DSM 15764(T)), was related to C. hominis ATCC 51964(T) (98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), and the second group of three strains was related to C. hominis ATCC 51964(T) (99.8 to 99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The definition of this new Cellulomonas species and the confirmation of three strains as C. hominis serve to further clarify the complex taxonomy of CDC coryneform group A-3 bacteria and will assist in our understanding of the epidemiology and clinical significance of these microorganisms.

  5. Phenotypic and Genetic Characterization of Clinical Isolates of CDC Coryneform Group A-3: Proposal of a New Species of Cellulomonas, Cellulomonas denverensis sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, June M.; Frazier, Rodrick P.; Morey, Roger E.; Steigerwalt, Arnold G.; Pellegrini, Gerald J.; Daneshvar, Maryam I.; Hollis, Dannie G.; McNeil, Michael M.

    2005-01-01

    CDC coryneform group A-3 bacteria are rare human pathogens. In this study, six group A-3 isolates (two from blood, one from cerebrospinal fluid, and one each from homograft valve, lip wound, and pilonidal cyst) were compared to the type strains of phenotypically related organisms, Cellulomonas fimi, Cellulomonas hominis, Oerskovia turbata, and Sanguibacter suarezii, and characterized by phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and genotypic studies. DNA-DNA reassociation analysis identified two genomic groups, and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence identified the taxonomic positions of these groups to genus level. Two groups were defined, and both were more closely related to Cellulomonas species: one group of three strains, for which we propose the new species Cellulomonas denverensis sp. nov., with the type strain W6929 (ATCC BAA-788T or DSM 15764T), was related to C. hominis ATCC 51964T (98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), and the second group of three strains was related to C. hominis ATCC 51964T (99.8 to 99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The definition of this new Cellulomonas species and the confirmation of three strains as C. hominis serve to further clarify the complex taxonomy of CDC coryneform group A-3 bacteria and will assist in our understanding of the epidemiology and clinical significance of these microorganisms. PMID:15814993

  6. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry-based identification of group A Streptococcus isolated from areas of the 2011 scarlet fever outbreak in china.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Di; You, Yuanhai; Bi, Zhenwang; Wang, Haibin; Zhang, Yongchan; Hu, Bin; Song, Yanyan; Zhang, Huifang; Kou, Zengqiang; Yan, Xiaomei; Zhang, Menghan; Jin, Lianmei; Jiang, Xihong; Su, Peng; Bi, Zhenqiang; Luo, Fengji; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2013-03-01

    There was a dramatic increase in scarlet fever cases in China from March to July 2011. Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is the only pathogen known to cause scarlet fever. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) coupled to Biotyper system was used for GAS identification in 2011. A local reference database (LRD) was constructed, evaluated and used to identify GAS isolates. The 75 GAS strains used to evaluate the LRD were all identified correctly. Of the 157 suspected β-hemolytic strains isolated from 298 throat swab samples, 127 (100%) and 120 (94.5%) of the isolates were identified as GAS by the MALDI-TOF MS system and the conventional bacitracin sensitivity test method, respectively. All 202 (100%) isolates were identified at the species level by searching the LRD, while 182 (90.1%) were identified by searching the original reference database (ORD). There were statistically significant differences with a high degree of credibility at species level (χ(2)=6.052, P<0.05 between the LRD and ORD). The test turnaround time was shortened 36-48h, and the cost of each sample is one-tenth of the cost of conventional methods. Establishing a domestic database is the most effective way to improve the identification efficiency using a MALDI-TOF MS system. MALDI-TOF MS is a viable alternative to conventional methods and may aid in the diagnosis and surveillance of GAS.

  7. Evaluation of Oxacillin and Cefoxitin Disk and MIC Breakpoints for Prediction of Methicillin Resistance in Human and Veterinary Isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius Group.

    PubMed

    Wu, M T; Burnham, C-A D; Westblade, L F; Dien Bard, J; Lawhon, S D; Wallace, M A; Stanley, T; Burd, E; Hindler, J; Humphries, R M

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a coagulase-positive species that colonizes the nares and anal mucosa of healthy dogs and cats. Human infections with S. pseudintermedius range in severity from bite wounds and rhinosinusitis to endocarditis; historically, these infections were thought to be uncommon, but new laboratory methods suggest that their true incidence is underreported. Oxacillin and cefoxitin disk and MIC tests were evaluated for the detection of mecA- or mecC-mediated methicillin resistance in 115 human and animal isolates of the Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG), including 111 Staphylococcus pseudintermediusand 4 Staphylococcus delphini isolates, 37 of which were mecA positive. The disk and MIC breakpoints evaluated included the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M100-S25 Staphylococcus aureus/Staphylococcus lugdunensis oxacillin MIC breakpoints and cefoxitin disk and MIC breakpoints, the CLSI M100-S25 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) oxacillin MIC breakpoint and cefoxitin disk breakpoint, the CLSI VET01-S2 S. pseudintermedius oxacillin MIC and disk breakpoints, and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) S. pseudintermedius cefoxitin disk breakpoint. The oxacillin results interpreted by the VET01-S2 (disk and MIC) and M100-S25 CoNS (MIC) breakpoints agreed with the results of mecA/mecC PCR for all isolates, with the exception of one false-resistant result (1.3% of mecA/mecC PCR-negative isolates). In contrast, cefoxitin tests performed poorly, ranging from 3 to 89% false susceptibility (very major errors) and 0 to 48% false resistance (major errors). BD Phoenix, bioMérieux Vitek 2, and Beckman Coulter MicroScan commercial automated susceptibility test panel oxacillin MIC results were also evaluated and demonstrated >95% categorical agreement with mecA/mecC PCR results if interpreted by using the M100-S25 CoNS breakpoint. The Alere penicillin-binding protein 2a test accurately detected all

  8. Evaluation of Oxacillin and Cefoxitin Disk and MIC Breakpoints for Prediction of Methicillin Resistance in Human and Veterinary Isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius Group

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M. T.; Westblade, L. F.; Dien Bard, J.; Wallace, M. A.; Stanley, T.; Burd, E.; Hindler, J.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a coagulase-positive species that colonizes the nares and anal mucosa of healthy dogs and cats. Human infections with S. pseudintermedius range in severity from bite wounds and rhinosinusitis to endocarditis; historically, these infections were thought to be uncommon, but new laboratory methods suggest that their true incidence is underreported. Oxacillin and cefoxitin disk and MIC tests were evaluated for the detection of mecA- or mecC-mediated methicillin resistance in 115 human and animal isolates of the Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG), including 111 Staphylococcus pseudintermediusand 4 Staphylococcus delphini isolates, 37 of which were mecA positive. The disk and MIC breakpoints evaluated included the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M100-S25 Staphylococcus aureus/Staphylococcus lugdunensis oxacillin MIC breakpoints and cefoxitin disk and MIC breakpoints, the CLSI M100-S25 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) oxacillin MIC breakpoint and cefoxitin disk breakpoint, the CLSI VET01-S2 S. pseudintermedius oxacillin MIC and disk breakpoints, and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) S. pseudintermedius cefoxitin disk breakpoint. The oxacillin results interpreted by the VET01-S2 (disk and MIC) and M100-S25 CoNS (MIC) breakpoints agreed with the results of mecA/mecC PCR for all isolates, with the exception of one false-resistant result (1.3% of mecA/mecC PCR-negative isolates). In contrast, cefoxitin tests performed poorly, ranging from 3 to 89% false susceptibility (very major errors) and 0 to 48% false resistance (major errors). BD Phoenix, bioMérieux Vitek 2, and Beckman Coulter MicroScan commercial automated susceptibility test panel oxacillin MIC results were also evaluated and demonstrated >95% categorical agreement with mecA/mecC PCR results if interpreted by using the M100-S25 CoNS breakpoint. The Alere penicillin-binding protein 2a test accurately detected all

  9. Contemporary Pharyngeal and Invasive emm1 and Invasive emm12 Group A Streptococcus Isolates Exhibit Similar In Vivo Selection for CovRS Mutants in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wenchao; Liu, Mengyao; Chen, Daniel G.; Yiu, Rossana; Fang, Ferric C.; Lei, Benfang

    2016-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes diverse infections ranging from common pharyngitis to rare severe invasive infections. Invasive GAS isolates can have natural mutations in the virulence regulator CovRS, which result in enhanced expression of multiple virulence genes, suppressed the expression of the protease SpeB, and increased virulence. It is believed that CovRS mutations arise during human infections with GAS carrying wild-type CovRS and are not transmissible. CovRS mutants of invasive GAS of the emm1 genotype arise readily during experimental infection in mice. It is possible that invasive GAS arises from pharyngeal GAS through rare genetic mutations that confer the capacity of mutated GAS to acquire covRS mutations during infection. The objective of this study was to determine whether contemporary pharyngeal emm1 GAS isolates have a reduced propensity to acquire CovRS mutations in vivo compared with invasive emm1 GAS and whether emm3, emm12, and emm28 GAS acquire CovRS mutants in mouse infection. The propensity of invasive and pharyngeal emm1 and invasive emm3, emm12, and emm28 SpeBA+ isolates to acquire variants with the SpeBA- phenotype was determined during subcutaneous infection of mice. The majority of both invasive and pharyngeal emm1 SpeBA+ isolates and two of three emm12 isolates, but not emm3 and emm28 isolates, were found to acquire SpeBA- variants during skin infection in mice. All analyzed SpeBA- variants of emm1 and emm12 GAS from the mouse infection acquired covRS mutations and produced more platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase SsE. Thus, contemporary invasive and pharyngeal emm1 GAS isolates and emm12 GAS have a similar capacity to acquire covRS mutations in vivo. The rarity of severe invasive infections caused by GAS does not appear to be attributable to a reduced ability of pharyngeal isolates to acquire CovRS mutations. PMID:27611332

  10. Contemporary Pharyngeal and Invasive emm1 and Invasive emm12 Group A Streptococcus Isolates Exhibit Similar In Vivo Selection for CovRS Mutants in Mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenchao; Liu, Mengyao; Chen, Daniel G; Yiu, Rossana; Fang, Ferric C; Lei, Benfang

    2016-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes diverse infections ranging from common pharyngitis to rare severe invasive infections. Invasive GAS isolates can have natural mutations in the virulence regulator CovRS, which result in enhanced expression of multiple virulence genes, suppressed the expression of the protease SpeB, and increased virulence. It is believed that CovRS mutations arise during human infections with GAS carrying wild-type CovRS and are not transmissible. CovRS mutants of invasive GAS of the emm1 genotype arise readily during experimental infection in mice. It is possible that invasive GAS arises from pharyngeal GAS through rare genetic mutations that confer the capacity of mutated GAS to acquire covRS mutations during infection. The objective of this study was to determine whether contemporary pharyngeal emm1 GAS isolates have a reduced propensity to acquire CovRS mutations in vivo compared with invasive emm1 GAS and whether emm3, emm12, and emm28 GAS acquire CovRS mutants in mouse infection. The propensity of invasive and pharyngeal emm1 and invasive emm3, emm12, and emm28 SpeBA+ isolates to acquire variants with the SpeBA- phenotype was determined during subcutaneous infection of mice. The majority of both invasive and pharyngeal emm1 SpeBA+ isolates and two of three emm12 isolates, but not emm3 and emm28 isolates, were found to acquire SpeBA- variants during skin infection in mice. All analyzed SpeBA- variants of emm1 and emm12 GAS from the mouse infection acquired covRS mutations and produced more platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase SsE. Thus, contemporary invasive and pharyngeal emm1 GAS isolates and emm12 GAS have a similar capacity to acquire covRS mutations in vivo. The rarity of severe invasive infections caused by GAS does not appear to be attributable to a reduced ability of pharyngeal isolates to acquire CovRS mutations. PMID:27611332

  11. Brief communication genotyping of Burkholderia pseudomallei revealed high genetic variability among isolates from a single population group

    PubMed Central

    Zueter, Abdelrahman Mohammad; Rahman, Zaidah Abdul; Yean, Chan Yean; Harun, Azian

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a soil dwelling Gram-negative bacteria predominates in Southeast Asia zone and the tropical part of Australia. Genetic diversity has been explored among various populations and environments worldwide. To date, little data is available on MLST profiling of clinical B. pseudomallei isolates in peninsular Malaysia. In this brief report, thirteen culture positive B. pseudomallei cases collected from a single population of Terengganu state in the Western Peninsular Malaysia and were confirmed by In-house TTS1-PCR. Isolates were subjected for multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to explore their genotypic diversity and to investigate for possible clonal clustering of a certain sequence type. Patient’s clinical information was examined to investigate for clinical correlation among the different genotypes. In spite of small sample set, MLST results indicated predictive results; considerable genotypic diversity, predominance and novelty among B. pseudomallei collected over a single geographically-located population in Malaysia. Massive genotypic heterogeneity was observed; 8 different sequence types with predominance of sequence type 54 and discovery of two novel sequence types. However, no clear pathogenomic or organ tropism clonal relationships were predicted. PMID:26417404

  12. Rabies Risk: Difficulties Encountered during Management of Grouped Cases of Bat Bites in 2 Isolated Villages in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Berger, Franck; Desplanches, Noëlle; Baillargeaux, Sylvie; Joubert, Michel; Miller, Manuelle; Ribadeau-Dumas, Florence; Spiegel, André; Bourhy, Hervé

    2013-06-01

    In French Guiana, from 1984 to 2011, 14 animal rabies cases and 1 human rabies case (2008) were diagnosed. In January 2011, vampire-bat attacks occurred in 2 isolated villages. In mid-January, a medical team from the Cayenne Centre for Anti-Rabies Treatment visited the sites to manage individuals potentially exposed to rabies and, in April, an anti-rabies vaccination campaign for dogs was conducted. Twenty individuals were bitten by bats in 1 month, most frequently on the feet. The median time to start management was 15 days. The complete Zagreb vaccination protocol (2 doses on day 0 and 1 dose on days 7 and 21) was administered to 16 patients, 12 also received specific immunoglobulins. The antibody titration was obtained for 12 patients (different from those who received immunoglobulins). The antibody titers were ≥0.5 EU/mL for all of them. The serology has not been implemented for the 12 patients who received immunoglobulins. Accidental destruction of a vampire-bat colony could be responsible for the attacks. The isolation and absence of sensitization of the populations were the main explanations for the management difficulties encountered. Sensitization programs should be conducted regularly. PMID:23826400

  13. Rabies Risk: Difficulties Encountered during Management of Grouped Cases of Bat Bites in 2 Isolated Villages in French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Franck; Desplanches, Noëlle; Baillargeaux, Sylvie; Joubert, Michel; Miller, Manuelle; Ribadeau-Dumas, Florence; Spiegel, André; Bourhy, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    In French Guiana, from 1984 to 2011, 14 animal rabies cases and 1 human rabies case (2008) were diagnosed. In January 2011, vampire-bat attacks occurred in 2 isolated villages. In mid-January, a medical team from the Cayenne Centre for Anti-Rabies Treatment visited the sites to manage individuals potentially exposed to rabies and, in April, an anti-rabies vaccination campaign for dogs was conducted. Twenty individuals were bitten by bats in 1 month, most frequently on the feet. The median time to start management was 15 days. The complete Zagreb vaccination protocol (2 doses on day 0 and 1 dose on days 7 and 21) was administered to 16 patients, 12 also received specific immunoglobulins. The antibody titration was obtained for 12 patients (different from those who received immunoglobulins). The antibody titers were ≥0.5 EU/mL for all of them. The serology has not been implemented for the 12 patients who received immunoglobulins. Accidental destruction of a vampire-bat colony could be responsible for the attacks. The isolation and absence of sensitization of the populations were the main explanations for the management difficulties encountered. Sensitization programs should be conducted regularly. PMID:23826400

  14. Sociometric and ethological approach to the assessment of individual and group behavior in extra long-term isolation during simulated interplanetary mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushin, Vadim; Tafforin, Carole; Kuznetsova, Polina; Vinokhodova, Alla; Chekalina, Angelina

    Several factors, such as hazard to life, reduced social communications, isolation, high workload, monotony, etc., can cause deconditioning of individual status and group dynamics in long-term spaceflight. New approaches to the assessment of group behavior are being developed in order to create necessary counter-measures and to keep optimal psychological climate in the crew. Psychological methods combined with ethological approach to dynamic monitoring of the isolated crew had been tested and validated in Mars-500 experiment. The experiment (duration of 520 days) was designed to simulate the living and working conditions of a piloted mission to Mars. The Mars-500 crew was composed of three Russians, two Europeans and one Chinese. We used psychological tests: sociometric questionnaire to assess group status (popularity) of the crewmembers (monthly), color choice test to assess the level of frustration and anxiety (twice a month). We performed observations from video recordings of group discussions (monthly) and during breakfast time (twice a month). The video analysis was supplied with a software based-solution: The Observer XT®. The results showed that occurrence of collateral acts may indicate psychological stress and fatigue in crewmembers under isolation and that facial expressions may indicate less anxiety. The data of psychological tests allowed to define two subgroups in the crew. The first one consisted of the subjects with high group status and lower level of frustration (not anxious), the second one consisted of less popular subjects, having respectively higher anxiety level. The video analysis showed two times more manifestations of facial expressions and interpersonal communications for the first subgroup. We also identified the subgroups on the basis of their verbal expressions in Russian and in English. Video observation of individual and group behavior, combined with other psychological tests gives opportunity to emphasize more objectively the signs

  15. Distribution of virulence genes and multiple drug-resistant patterns amongst different phylogenetic groups of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from patients with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Derakhshandeh, A; Firouzi, R; Motamedifar, M; Motamedi Boroojeni, A; Bahadori, M; Arabshahi, S; Novinrooz, A; Heidari, S

    2015-02-01

    A total of 85 Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates were screened against ceftiofur, oxacillin, nitrofurantoin and lincospectin using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method, following CLSI guidelines. Prevalence of virulent factor genes amongst the isolates was determined by PCR, using gene-specific primers against the different virulent factors. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using SPSS software. The prevalence of traT, ompT, Iss, malX and ibeA genes was 47.1%, 38.8%, 20%, 16.5% and 9.4%, respectively. The most prevalent gene in group A and D was traT, whilst in group B2 was Iss. The highest resistance has been shown against oxacillin (98.8%), followed by ceftiofur (77.6%), whilst resistance to lincospectin (2.4%) and nitrofurantoin (12.9%) had the lowest frequencies. Multidrug resistance was shown in 82.35% of the isolates, whilst this study recommend lincospectin and nitrofurantoin as choice drugs for treatment, but more investigation of the bacterial pathogenicity associated with urinary tract infection (UTI) may contribute to a better medical intervention.

  16. Occurrence of novel groups of the domain Bacteria as revealed by analysis of genetic material isolated from an Australian terrestrial environment.

    PubMed Central

    Liesack, W; Stackebrandt, E

    1992-01-01

    A molecular ecological study was performed on an Australian soil sample to unravel a substantial portion of the bacterial diversity. A large fragment of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified, using DNA isolated by lysing the microorganisms directly within the soil matrix, and a clone library was generated. Comparative sequence analysis of 30 clones and dot blot hybridization of 83 additional clones with defined oligonucleotide probes revealed the presence of three major groups of prokaryotes of the domain Bacteria. The first one comprises 57 clones that indicate relatives of nitrogen-fixing bacteria of the alpha-2 subclass of the class Proteobacteria; the second group of 7 clones originates from members of the order Planctomycetales that, however, reveal no close relationship to any of the described Planctomycetales species; 22 clones of the third group are indicative of members of a novel main line of descent, sharing a common ancestry with members of planctomycetes and chlamydiae. Images PMID:1629164

  17. Identification and characterization of a distinct banana bunchy top virus isolate of Pacific-Indian Oceans group from North-East India.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amrita; Roy, Somnath; Behere, Ganesh T; Roy, Subhra Saikat; Dutta, Sudip Kumar; Ngachan, S V

    2014-04-01

    Banana bunch top virus (BBTV) is considered to be a serious threat to banana production. A new isolate of the virus (BBTV-Umiam) was identified and characterized from local banana mats growing in mid-hills of Meghalaya in North-East India. The complete nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the presence of six full-length ssDNA components (DNA R, DNA U3, DNA S, DNA M, DNA C and DNA N) sharing major common region (CR-M) and a stem-loop common region (CR-SL). BBTV-Umiam showed a unique deletion of 20 nucleotides in the intergenic region of DNA R, the absence of predicted open reading frame (ORF) in DNA U3 and probability for a small ORF in DNA U3 expecting functional evidence at transcriptional level. Phylogenetic analysis based on 88 complete nucleotide sequence of BBTV DNA R available in GenBank generated two broad clusters of Pacific-Indian Oceans (PIO) and South-East Asian (SEA) groups including BBTV-Umiam within PIO cluster. However, BBTV-Umiam was identified as the most distinct member of the PIO group with 100% bootstrap support. This was further supported by the phylogenetic grouping of each genomic component of BBTV-Umiam at the distant end of PIO group during clustering of 21 complete BBTV sequences. BBTV-Umiam shared relatively less nucleotide identity with PIO group for each genomic component (85.0-95.4%) and corresponding ORF (93.8-97.5%) than that of earlier PIO isolates (91.5-99.6% and 96.0-99.3%, respectively). Recombination analysis revealed two intra-component and five inter-component recombination events in BBTV-Umiam, but none of them was unique. Moreover, the isolate was identified as major parental sequence for intra-component recombination event spanning the replication-associated protein encoding region in Tongan BBTV DNA R. The current study indicated differential evolution of BBTV in North-East India (Meghalaya). The natural occurrence of hybrids of Musa balbisiana and M. acuminata in this geographically isolated region could be the

  18. Giant Septic Lymphadenitis with Marked Gas Formation Caused by Bacteroides fragilis in a Patient with Adult T-cell Leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tomoyose, Takeaki; Nakachi, Sawako; Nishi, Yukiko; Morichika, Kazuho; Tedokon, Iori; Tamaki, Keita; Shimabukuro, Natsuki; Hanashiro, Taeko; Samura, Hironori; Fukushima, Takuya; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) sometimes causes opportunistic infections. A 53-year-old woman with systemic lymphadenopathies was diagnosed with ATL by inguinal lymph node biopsies and underwent oral chemotherapy. Two months later, high grade fever, lower abdominal pain and lymphadenopathy recurred. Computed tomography revealed the presence of lymphadenopathy with marked gas formation in the pelvic lesion. Blood cultures were suggestive of septic lymphadenitis by Bacteroides fragilis (BF). This represents the first demonstration of giant lymphadenitis with gas formation caused by BF in a patient with ATL. Notably, septic lymphadenitis is pivotal in the differential diagnosis of systemic lymphadenopathy in ATL.

  19. Analysis of the arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase of Bacteroides fragilis provides insight into regulation of single-domain arabinose phosphate isomerases.

    PubMed

    Cech, David; Wang, Pan Fen; Holler, Tod P; Woodard, Ronald W

    2014-08-01

    Arabinose-5-phosphate isomerases (APIs) catalyze the interconversion of d-ribulose-5-phosphate and D-arabinose-5-phosphate, the first step in the biosynthesis of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo), an essential component of the lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria. Classical APIs, such as Escherichia coli KdsD, contain a sugar isomerase domain and a tandem cystathionine beta-synthase domain. Despite substantial effort, little is known about structure-function relationships in these APIs. We recently reported an API containing only a sugar isomerase domain. This protein, c3406 from E. coli CFT073, has no known physiological function. In this study, we investigated a putative single-domain API from the anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium Bacteroides fragilis. This putative API (UniProt ID Q5LIW1) is the only protein encoded by the B. fragilis genome with significant identity to any known API, suggesting that it is responsible for lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in B. fragilis. We tested this hypothesis by preparing recombinant Q5LIW1 protein (here referred to by the UniProt ID Q5LIW1), characterizing its API activity in vitro, and demonstrating that the gene encoding Q5LIW1 (GenBank ID YP_209877.1) was able to complement an API-deficient E. coli strain. We demonstrated that Q5LIW1 is inhibited by cytidine 5'-monophospho-3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid, the final product of the Kdo biosynthesis pathway, with a Ki of 1.91 μM. These results support the assertion that Q5LIW1 is the API that supports lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in B. fragilis and is subject to feedback regulation by CMP-Kdo. The sugar isomerase domain of E. coli KdsD, lacking the two cystathionine beta-synthase domains, demonstrated API activity and was further characterized. These results suggest that Q5LIW1 may be a suitable system to study API structure-function relationships.

  20. Isolated group B streptococcal endogenous endophthalmitis simulating retinoblastoma or persistent fetal vasculature in a healthy full-term infant.

    PubMed

    McCourt, Emily A; Hink, Eric M; Durairaj, Vikram D; Oliver, Scott C N

    2010-08-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a potentially devastating neonatal pathogen that most commonly causes meningitis, sepsis, and pneumonia. It is also a very rare cause of endogenous endophthalmitis. We present the second case of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by GBS in a healthy newborn and the first case of endogenous endophthalmitis by GBS in a newborn mimicking retinoblastoma and resulting in enucleation. PMID:20637664

  1. Characterization of Alternaria isolates from the infectoria species-group and a new taxon from Arrhenatherum, Pseudoalternaria arrhenatheria sp. nov

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The infectoria species-group within the genus Alternaria was originally conceived by Simmons in 1993 and was based upon common morphological characteristics that included the development of conidial chains with primary, secondary, and tertiary branching resulting in substantial three-dimensional com...

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus mitis Strain SVGS_061 Isolated from a Neutropenic Patient with Viridans Group Streptococcal Shock Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Petrosyan, Varduhi; Holder, Michael; Ajami, Nadim J.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Thompson, Erika J.; Kalia, Awdhesh

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mitis frequently causes invasive infections in neutropenic cancer patients, with a subset of patients developing viridans group streptococcal (VGS) shock syndrome. We report here the first complete genome sequence of S. mitis strain SVGS_061, which caused VGS shock syndrome, to help elucidate the pathogenesis of severe VGS infection. PMID:27056234

  3. Acute abdomen due to group A streptococcus bacteremia caused by an isolate with a mutation in the csrS gene.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masahiko; Maruta, Masaki; Shikata, Hisaharu; Hanayama, Masakazu; Ikebe, Tadayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) is an aerobic gram-positive coccus that causes infections ranging from non-invasive pharyngitis to severely invasive necrotizing fasciitis. Mutations in csrS/csrR and rgg, negative regulator genes of group A streptococcus, are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, which is a severe, invasive infection characterized by sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure, resulting in a high mortality rate. Here we present a case of group A streptococcal bacteremia in a 28-year-old Japanese woman with no relevant previous medical history. The patient developed progressive abdominal symptoms that may have been due to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, followed by a state of shock, which did not fulfill the proposed criteria for streptococcal toxic shock. The isolate was found to harbor a mutation in the negative regulator csrS gene, whereas the csrR and rgg genes were intact. It was noteworthy that this strain carrying a csrS mutation had caused group A streptococcal bacteremia characterized by acute abdomen as the presenting symptom in a young individual who had been previously healthy. This case indicates that group A streptococcus with csrS mutations has potential virulence factors that are associated with the onset of group A streptococcal bacteremia that does not meet the diagnostic criteria for streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

  4. [Taxonomy of the Sokuluk virus (SOKV) (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus, Entebbe bat virus group) isolated from bats (Vespertilio pipistrellus Schreber, 1774), ticks (Argasidae Koch, 1844), and birds in Kyrgyzstan].

    PubMed

    L'vov, D K; Al'khovskiĭ, S V; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Shchetinin, A M; Deriabin, P G; Gitel'man, A K; Samokhvalov, E I; Botikov, A G

    2014-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of the Sokuluk virus (SOKV) isolated in Kyrgyzstan from bats Vespertilio pipistrellus and their obligatory parasites--Argasidae Koch, 1844, ticks was carried out. SOKV was classified as attributed to the Flaviviridae family, Flavivirus genus. The maximum homology (71% for nucleotide and 79% for amino acid sequences) was detected with respect to the Entebbe bat virus (ENTV). ENTV and SOKV form a group joining to the yellow fever virus (YFV) within the limits of the mosquito flavivirus branch. Close relation of SOKV with bat covers and human housings permits to assume SOKV potentially patogenic to human health.

  5. Biodiversity of bacteriophages: morphological and biological properties of a large group of phages isolated from urban sewage

    PubMed Central

    Jurczak-Kurek, Agata; Gąsior, Tomasz; Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Topka, Gracja; Necel, Agnieszka; Jakubowska-Deredas, Magdalena; Narajczyk, Magdalena; Richert, Malwina; Mieszkowska, Agata; Wróbel, Borys; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    A large scale analysis presented in this article focuses on biological and physiological variety of bacteriophages. A collection of 83 bacteriophages, isolated from urban sewage and able to propagate in cells of different bacterial hosts, has been obtained (60 infecting Escherichia coli, 10 infecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 4 infecting Salmonella enterica, 3 infecting Staphylococcus sciuri, and 6 infecting Enterococcus faecalis). High biological diversity of the collection is indicated by its characteristics, both morphological (electron microscopic analyses) and biological (host range, plaque size and morphology, growth at various temperatures, thermal inactivation, sensitivity to low and high pH, sensitivity to osmotic stress, survivability upon treatment with organic solvents and detergents), and further supported by hierarchical cluster analysis. By the end of the research no larger collection of phages from a single environmental source investigated by these means had been found. The finding was confirmed by whole genome analysis of 7 selected bacteriophages. Moreover, particular bacteriophages revealed unusual biological features, like the ability to form plaques at low temperature (4 °C), resist high temperature (62 °C or 95 °C) or survive in the presence of an organic solvents (ethanol, acetone, DMSO, chloroform) or detergent (SDS, CTAB, sarkosyl) making them potentially interesting in the context of biotechnological applications. PMID:27698408

  6. In vitro antibacterial activity of some antihistaminics belonging to different groups against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    El-Nakeeb, Moustafa A; Abou-Shleib, Hamida M; Khalil, Amal M; Omar, Hoda G; El-Halfawy, Omar M

    2011-07-01

    Antihistaminics are widely used for various indications during microbial infection. Hence, this paper investigates the antimicrobial activities of 10 antihistaminics belonging to both old and new generations using multiresistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinical isolates. The bacteriostatic activity of antihistaminics was investigated by determining their MIC both by broth and agar dilution techniques against 29 bacterial strains. Azelastine, cyproheptadine, mequitazine and promethazine were the most active among the tested drugs. Diphenhydramine and cetirizine possessed weaker activity whereas doxylamine, fexofenadine and loratadine were inactive even at the highest tested concentration (1 mg/ml). The MIC of meclozine could not be determined as it precipitated with the used culture media. The MBC values of antihistaminics were almost identical to the corresponding MIC values. The bactericidal activity of antihistaminics was also studied by the viable count technique in sterile saline solution. Evident killing effects were exerted by mequitazine, meclozine, azelastine and cyproheptadine. Moreover, the dynamics of bactericidal activity of azelastine were studied by the viable count technique in nutrient broth. This activity was found to be concentration-dependant. This effect was reduced on increasing the inoculum size while it was increased on raising the pH. The post-antimicrobial effect of 100 μg/ml azelastine was also determined and reached up to 3.36 h. PMID:24031715

  7. Importance of sulfate groups for the macrophage-stimulating activities of ascophyllan isolated from the brown alga Ascophyllum nodosum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zedong; Ueno, Mikinori; Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Abu, Ryogo; Isaka, Shogo; Okimura, Takasi; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2013-10-18

    To investigate the role of sulfate groups on the macrophage-stimulating activities of ascophyllan, we prepared desulfated ascophyllan, and its effects on RAW264.7 cells were compared with native ascophyllan. The chemical structural analysis revealed that nearly 21% of sulfate groups of ascophyllan were removed by desulfation reaction, while no significant changes in the molecular mass and monosaccharide composition occurred after desulfation. NO- and cytokine- (TNF-α and G-CSF) inducing activities of the desulfated ascophyllan on RAW264.7 cells were significantly decreased as compared to native ascophyllan. Furthermore, the activity of desulfated ascophyllan to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation from RAW264.7 cells decreased to almost negligible level. Our results suggest that the level of sulfate groups of ascophyllan is an important structural element responsible for the macrophage-stimulating activities. Probably, even the limited removal of sulfate residues sensitive to desulfation reaction may result in significant decrease in the bioactivities of ascophyllan. PMID:24025707

  8. Group A streptococcal infections in Sweden: a comparative study of invasive and noninvasive infections and analysis of dominant T28 emm28 isolates.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Björn K G; Norgren, Mari; McGregor, Karen; Spratt, Brian G; Normark, Birgitta Henriques

    2003-11-01

    Surveillance of group A streptococcus (GAS) infections in Sweden during 1996-1997 indicated that T28 isolates were dominant, whereas T1M1 infections were uncommon. Circulating T28 isolates were nearly all emm28, MLST52, and these clones had also been prevalent 10 years earlier. Isolates from invasive and noninvasive infections were of similar types and prevalences. The average national incidence of invasive episodes was 2.9/100,000 population but varied between 0 and 8.3/100,000 population in different counties. It increased markedly with age, reaching 22.9 episodes/100,000 among people aged > or =90 years. The incidence of puerperal sepsis was higher than expected (22.4/100,000 of those at risk), with 1 death. Overall mortality was 16% and was associated with preexisting chronic disease (P=.002). Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) developed in approximately 15% of patients with invasive episodes, with a mortality rate of 45%. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was not found to be associated with the development of STSS.

  9. Isolation of a novel IS3 group insertion element and construction of an integration vector for Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D C; Klaenhammer, T R

    1994-01-01

    An insertion sequence (IS) element from Lactobacillus johnsonii was isolated, characterized, and exploited to construct an IS-based integration vector. L. johnsonii NCK61, a high-frequency conjugal donor of bacteriocin production (Laf+) and immunity (Lafr), was transformed to erythromycin resistance (Emr) with the shuttle vector pSA3. The NCK61 conjugative functions were used to mobilize pSA3 into a Laf- Lafs EMs recipient. DNA from the Emr transconjugants transformed into Escherichia coli MC1061 yielded a resolution plasmid with the same size as that of pSA3 with a 1.5-kb insertion. The gram-positive replication region of the resolution plasmid was removed to generate a pSA3-based suicide vector (pTRK327) bearing the 1.5-kb insert of Lactobacillus origin. Plasmid pTRK327 inserted randomly into the chromosomes of both Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 and VPI 11759. No homology was detected between plasmid and total host DNAs, suggesting a Rec-independent insertion. The DNA sequence of the 1.5-kb region revealed the characteristics of an IS element (designated IS1223): a length of 1,492 bp; flanking, 25-bp, imperfect inverted repeats; and two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). Sequence comparisons revealed 71.1% similarity, including 35.7% identity, between the deduced ORFB protein of the E. coli IS element IS150 and the putative ORFB protein encoded by the Lactobacillus IS element. A putative frameshift site was detected between the overlapping ORFs of the Lactobacillus IS element. It is proposed that, similar to IS150, IS1223 produces an active transposase via translational frameshifting between two tandem, overlapping ORFs. Images PMID:8071209

  10. Biochemical Characteristics of Typhus Group Rickettsiae with Special Attention to the Rickettsia prowazekii Strains Isolated from Flying Squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Dasch, Gregory A.; Samms, Jonathan R.; Weiss, Emilio

    1978-01-01

    Six strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, two derived from human infections and four isolated from flying squirrels, two strains of R. typhi, and the single available strain of R. canada, were characterized by several biochemical procedures. The electrophoretic patterns on polyacrylamide gels of rickettsial proteins solubilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate revealed several species differences, but strains of the same species appeared to have identical patterns. Cytoplasmic fractions of the rickettsiae were examined for enzymatic activities and for polyacrylamide gel isoelectric focusing patterns. Some species differences were encountered in the activities or ratios of activities of glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase. When polyacrylamide gels were stained for malate dehydrogenase after electrophoresis, a single band became apparent with single extracts or mixtures of two strains of R. prowazekii, but two bands were seen with mixtures of a strain of R. prowazekii and one of R. typhi. The isoelectric focusing patterns of the soluble proteins revealed numerous species differences, especially between R. canada and the other two species, and a few differences among the strains of R. prowazekii. The patterns of the two human strains, Breinl and ER, differed in at least one location, and both differed from the flying squirrel strains in the displacement of one band. One of the flying squirrel strains, GvF-16, contained a protein band not seen in the other five strains. Despite these minor differences, a striking similarity was revealed by all the biochemical tests performed between the R. prowazekii strains of human and flying squirrel origin. Images PMID:415982

  11. Three phylogenetic groups of nodA and nifH genes in Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium isolates from leguminous trees growing in Africa and Latin America.

    PubMed

    Haukka, K; Lindström, K; Young, J P

    1998-02-01

    The diversity and phylogeny of nodA and nifH genes were studied by using 52 rhizobial isolates from Acacia senegal, Prosopis chilensis, and related leguminous trees growing in Africa and Latin America. All of the strains had similar host ranges and belonged to the genera Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium, as previously determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The restriction patterns and a sequence analysis of the nodA and nifH genes divided the strains into the following three distinct groups: sinorhizobia from Africa, sinorhizobia from Latin America, and mesorhizobia from both regions. In a phylogenetic tree also containing previously published sequences, the nodA genes of our rhizobia formed a branch of their own, but within the branch no correlation between symbiotic genes and host trees was apparent. Within the large group of African sinorhizobia, similar symbiotic gene types were found in different chromosomal backgrounds, suggesting that transfer of symbiotic genes has occurred across species boundaries. Most strains had plasmids, and the presence of plasmid-borne nifH was demonstrated by hybridization for some examples. The nodA and nifH genes of Sinorhizobium teranga ORS1009T grouped with the nodA and nifH genes of the other African sinorhizobia, but Sinorhizobium saheli ORS609T had a totally different nodA sequence, although it was closely related based on the 16S rRNA gene and nifH data. This might be because this S. saheli strain was originally isolated from Sesbania sp., which belongs to a different cross-nodulation group than Acacia and Prosopis spp. The factors that appear to have influenced the evolution of rhizobial symbiotic genes vary in importance at different taxonomic levels.

  12. Three Phylogenetic Groups of nodA and nifH Genes in Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium Isolates from Leguminous Trees Growing in Africa and Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Haukka, Kaisa; Lindström, Kristina; Young, J. Peter W.

    1998-01-01

    The diversity and phylogeny of nodA and nifH genes were studied by using 52 rhizobial isolates from Acacia senegal, Prosopis chilensis, and related leguminous trees growing in Africa and Latin America. All of the strains had similar host ranges and belonged to the genera Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium, as previously determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The restriction patterns and a sequence analysis of the nodA and nifH genes divided the strains into the following three distinct groups: sinorhizobia from Africa, sinorhizobia from Latin America, and mesorhizobia from both regions. In a phylogenetic tree also containing previously published sequences, the nodA genes of our rhizobia formed a branch of their own, but within the branch no correlation between symbiotic genes and host trees was apparent. Within the large group of African sinorhizobia, similar symbiotic gene types were found in different chromosomal backgrounds, suggesting that transfer of symbiotic genes has occurred across species boundaries. Most strains had plasmids, and the presence of plasmid-borne nifH was demonstrated by hybridization for some examples. The nodA and nifH genes of Sinorhizobium teranga ORS1009T grouped with the nodA and nifH genes of the other African sinorhizobia, but Sinorhizobium saheli ORS609T had a totally different nodA sequence, although it was closely related based on the 16S rRNA gene and nifH data. This might be because this S. saheli strain was originally isolated from Sesbania sp., which belongs to a different cross-nodulation group than Acacia and Prosopis spp. The factors that appear to have influenced the evolution of rhizobial symbiotic genes vary in importance at different taxonomic levels. PMID:9464375

  13. Sampling epifauna, a necessity for a better assessment of benthic ecosystem functioning: an example of the epibenthic aggregated species Ophiothrix fragilis from the Bay of Seine.

    PubMed

    Lozach, Sophie; Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Méar, Yann; Murat, Anne; Davoult, Dominique; Migné, Aline

    2011-12-01

    Sampling the sea bottom surface remains difficult because of the surface hydraulic shock due to water flowing through the gear (i.e., the bow wave effect) and the loss of epifauna organisms due to the gear's closing mechanism. Slow-moving mobile epifauna, such as the ophiuroid Ophiothrix fragilis, form high-density patches in the English Channel, not only on pebbles like in the Dover Strait or offshore Brittany but also on gravel in the Bay of Seine (>5000 ind m(-2)). Such populations form high biomasses and control the water transfer from the water column to the sediment. Estimating their real density and biomass is essential for the assessment of benthic ecosystem functioning using trophic web modelling. In this paper, we present and discuss the patch patterns and sampling efficiency of the different methods for collecting in the dense beds of O. fragilis in the Bay of Seine. The large Hamon grab (0.25 m(-2)) highly under-estimated the ophiuroid density, while the Smith McIntyre appeared adequate among the tested sampling grabs. Nowadays, diving sampling, underwater photography and videos with remote operated vehicle appear to be the recommended alternatives to estimate the real density of such dense slow-moving mobile epifauna. PMID:21967863

  14. Study on the mitochondrial activity and membrane potential after exposing later stage oocytes of two gorgonian corals (Junceella juncea and Junceella fragilis) to cryoprotectants.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S; Spikings, E; Huang, I-C; Lin, C

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs provide a valuable habitat for many economically valuable fish and invertebrates. However, they are in serious jeopardy, threatened by increasing over-exploitation, pollution, habitat destruction, disease and global climate change. Here, we examined the effect of cryoprotectant exposure on mitochondrial activity and membrane potential in coral oocytes in order to find suitable cryoprotectants towards their successful cryopreservation. According to the No Observed Effect Concentrations (NOECs), methanol was found to be the least toxic cryoprotectant whilst DMSO was the most toxic cryoprotectant. The results also demonstrated that there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in ATP concentrations between Junceella juncea and Junceella fragilis after exposure to all concentrations of all cryoprotectants for 30 min. Using confocal microscopy, JC-1 (5,50,6,60-tetrachloro-1,10,3,30-tetraethyl-imidacarbocyanine iodide) staining indicated that the mitochondrial membrane potential of Junceella fragilis oocytes reduced after 1 M and 2 M methanol treatment and a loss of the mitochondrial distribution pattern and poor green fluorescence after 3M methanol treatment. Therefore, even oocytes that show no adverse effect of cryoprotectants on survival might suffer some more subtle impacts. The results obtained from this study will provide a basis for development of protocols to cryopreserve the oocytes of gorgonian corals.

  15. High prevalence of blaCTX-M group genes in Aeromonas dhakensis isolated from aquaculture fish species in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Yi, Seung-Won; Chung, Tae-Ho; Joh, Seong-Joon; Park, Chul; Park, Byoung-Yong; Shin, Gee-Wook

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of resistant genes against β-lactams in 119 Aeromonas strains was determined. A large number (99.2%) of the present fish strains were resistant to one or more β- lactams including ceftiofur, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, piperacillin and cefpodoxime. Among antibiotic resistance phenotypes, the simultaneous resistance to all β-lactams occurred in 25.2% (n=30) of all strains, which consisted of 18 strains of A. dhakensis, 8 strains of A. caviae, 2 strains of A. hydrophila and only one strain of A. veronii. For exploring genetic background of the antibiotic resistances, multiple PCR assays were subjected to detect β-lactamase-encoding genes, bla(TEM), bla(OXA-B) and bla(CTX-M). In the results, the bla(TEM-1) gene was harbored in all strains, whereas only 3 strains harbored bla(OXA) gene. In the case of bla(CTX-M) gene, the gene was detected in 21.0% (25 out of 119) of all strains, which countered with 80% (20 out of 25) of A. dhakensis, 8% (2 out of 25) of A. caviae and 12% (3 out of 25) of A. hydrophila. In addition, most of the bla(CTX-M) positive strains showed simultaneous resistance to all β-lactams (18 out of 30 strains). In sequence analysis for bla(CTX-M) genes detected, they were CTX-M group 1-encoding genes including bla(CTX-M-33) from 3 eel strains of A. dhakensis. Therefore, A. dhakensis obtained from cultured fish could represent a reservoir for spreading genes encoding CTX-M group 1 enzymes and hence should be carefully monitored, especially for its potential risk to public health.

  16. Isolation of the Rhizobium leguminosarum NodF nodulation protein: NodF carries a 4'-phosphopantetheine prosthetic group.

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, O; Spaink, H P; Kennedy, E P

    1991-01-01

    Rhizobium species produce a protein product of the nodF gene that has a limited but recognizable homology to the well-characterized acyl carrier protein (ACP) of Escherichia coli. NodF functions together with NodE in generating a host-specific response to the plant host in the interchange of signals leading to the effective nodulation of roots (H.P. Spaink, J. Weinman, M.A. Djordjevic, C.A. Wijffelman, R.J.H. Okker, and B. J.J. Lugtenberg, EMBO J. 8:2811-2818, 1989; B. Scheres, C. van de Wiel, A. Zalensky, B. Horvath, H. Spaink, H. van Eck, F. Zwartkruis, A.M. Wolters, T. Gloudemans, A. van Kammen, and T. Bisseling, Cell 60:281-294, 1990). The nodFE region of Rhizobium leguminosarum has been cloned into a multicopy plasmid and has been shown in R. leguminosarum to code for a flavonoid-inducible protein that is effectively labeled by radioactive beta-alanine added to the growth medium. After purification, the labeled protein migrates as a single band with an apparent molecular weight of 5,000 during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, more rapidly than E. coli ACP. In contrast, in native gels the protein is resolved into two bands, both identified as NodF by analysis of the amino terminus and both migrating more slowly than E. coli ACP. Pulse-chase experiments with labeled beta-alanine suggested that the slower-moving band may be the precursor of the faster band. The NodF protein carries a 4'-phosphopantetheine as a prosthetic group. A NodF fusion protein under the control of the lac promoter is expressed in E. coli and is labeled with beta-alanine, indicating that it is recognized by the ACP synthase of E. coli. The ACP phosphodiesterase of E. coli, which catalyzes the release of phosphopantetheine from E. coli ACP, does not remove phosphopantetheine from NodF. Images PMID:2019559

  17. Natural Disruption of Two Regulatory Networks in Serotype M3 Group A Streptococcus Isolates Contributes to the Virulence Factor Profile of This Hypervirulent Serotype

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tram N.; Liu, Zhuyun; Cao, Tran H.; Pflughoeft, Kathryn J.; Treviño, Jeanette; Danger, Jessica L.; Beres, Stephen B.; Musser, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the public health challenges associated with the emergence of new pathogenic bacterial strains and/or serotypes, there is a dearth of information regarding the molecular mechanisms that drive this variation. Here, we began to address the mechanisms behind serotype-specific variation between serotype M1 and M3 strains of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (the group A Streptococcus [GAS]). Spatially diverse contemporary clinical serotype M3 isolates were discovered to contain identical inactivating mutations within genes encoding two regulatory systems that control the expression of important virulence factors, including the thrombolytic agent streptokinase, the protease inhibitor-binding protein-G-related α2-macroglobulin-binding (GRAB) protein, and the antiphagocytic hyaluronic acid capsule. Subsequent analysis of a larger collection of isolates determined that M3 GAS, since at least the 1920s, has harbored a 4-bp deletion in the fasC gene of the fasBCAX regulatory system and an inactivating polymorphism in the rivR regulator-encoding gene. The fasC and rivR mutations in M3 isolates directly affect the virulence factor profile of M3 GAS, as evident by a reduction in streptokinase expression and an enhancement of GRAB expression. Complementation of the fasC mutation in M3 GAS significantly enhanced levels of the small regulatory RNA FasX, which in turn enhanced streptokinase expression. Complementation of the rivR mutation in M3 GAS restored the regulation of grab mRNA abundance but did not alter capsule mRNA levels. While important, the fasC and rivR mutations do not provide a full explanation for why serotype M3 strains are associated with unusually severe invasive infections; thus, further investigation is warranted. PMID:24516115

  18. Phylogenentic and enzymatic characterization of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant marine bacteria belong to γ-Proteobacteria group isolated from the sub-Antarctic Beagle Channel, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cristóbal, Héctor A; Benito, Juliana; Lovrich, Gustavo A; Abate, Carlos M

    2015-05-01

    The phylogenetic and physiological characteristics of cultivable-dependent approaches were determined to establish the diversity of marine bacteria associated with the intestines of benthonic organisms and seawater samples from the Argentina's Beagle Channel. A total of 737 isolates were classified as psychrophlic and psychrotolerant culturable marine bacteria. These cold-adapted microorganisms are capable of producing cold-active glycosyl hydrolases, such as β-glucosidases, celulases, β-galactosidases, xylanases, chitinases, and proteases. These enzymes could have potential biotechnological applications for use in low-temperature manufacturing processes. According to polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of part of genes encoding 16S ribosomal DNA (ARDRA) and DNA gyrase subunit B (gyrB-RFLP), 11 operational taxonomic units (OTU) were identified and clustered in known genera using InfoStat software. The 50 isolates selected were sequenced based on near full sequence analysis of 16S rDNA and gyrB sequences and identified by their nearest neighbors ranging between 96 and 99 % of identities. Phylogenetic analyses using both genes allowed relationships between members of the cultured marine bacteria belonging to the γ-Proteobacteria group (Aeromonas, Halteromonas, Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Shewanella, Serratia, Colwellia, Glacielocola, and Psychrobacter) to be evaluated. Our research reveals a high diversity of hydrolytic bacteria, and their products actuality has an industrial use in several bioprocesses at low-temperature manufacturing. PMID:25344742

  19. Endomicrobium proavitum, the first isolate of Endomicrobia class. nov. (phylum Elusimicrobia)--an ultramicrobacterium with an unusual cell cycle that fixes nitrogen with a Group IV nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Dietrich, Carsten; Radek, Renate; Brune, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial tree contains many deep-rooting clades without any cultured representatives. One such clade is 'Endomicrobia', a class-level lineage in the phylum Elusimicrobia represented so far only by intracellular symbionts of termite gut flagellates. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the first free-living member of this clade from sterile-filtered gut homogenate of defaunated (starch-fed) Reticulitermes santonensis. Strain Rsa215 is a strictly anaerobic ultramicrobacterium that grows exclusively on glucose, which is fermented to lactate, acetate, hydrogen and CO2. Ultrastructural analysis revealed a Gram-negative cell envelope and a peculiar cell cycle. The genome contains a single set of nif genes that encode homologues of Group IV nitrogenases, which were so far considered to have functions other than nitrogen fixation. We documented nitrogenase activity and diazotrophic growth by measuring acetylene reduction activity and (15)N2 incorporation into cell mass, and demonstrated that transcription of nifH and nitrogenase activity occur only in the absence of ammonium. Based on the ancestral relationship to 'Candidatus Endomicrobium trichonymphae' and other obligate endosymbionts, we propose the name 'Endomicrobium proavitum' gen. nov., sp. nov. for the first isolate of this lineage and the name 'Endomicrobia' class. nov. for the entire clade.

  20. Genetic diversity, haplotypes and allele groups of Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is now recognized as the fifth species of Plasmodium that can cause human malaria. Like the region II of the Duffy binding protein of P. vivax (PvDBPII), the region II of the P. knowlesi Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) plays an essential role in the parasite’s invasion into the host’s erythrocyte. Numerous polymorphism studies have been carried out on PvDBPII, but none has been reported on PkDBPαII. In this study, the genetic diversity, haplotyes and allele groups of PkDBPαII of P. knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia were investigated. Methods Blood samples from 20 knowlesi malaria patients and 2 wild monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were used. These samples were collected between 2010 and 2012. The PkDBPαII region of the isolates was amplified by PCR, cloned into Escherichia coli, and sequenced. The genetic diversity, natural selection and haplotypes of PkDBPαII were analysed using MEGA5 and DnaSP ver. 5.10.00 programmes. Results Fifty-three PkDBPαII sequences from human infections and 6 from monkeys were obtained. Comparison at the nucleotide level against P. knowlesi strain H as reference sequence showed 52 synonymous and 76 nonsynonymous mutations. Analysis on the rate of these mutations indicated that PkDBPαII was under purifying (negative) selection. At the amino acid level, 36 different PkDBPαII haplotypes were identified. Twelve of the 20 human and 1 monkey blood samples had mixed haplotype infections. These haplotypes were clustered into 2 distinct allele groups. The majority of the haplotypes clustered into the large dominant group. Conclusions Our present study is the first to report the genetic diversity and natural selection of PkDBPαII. Hence, the haplotypes described in this report can be considered as novel. Although a high level of genetic diversity was observed, the PkDBPαII appeared to be under purifying selection. The distribution of the haplotypes was skewed

  1. A new sesquiterpene antibiotic, heptelidic acid producing organisms, fermentation, isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Y; Kodama, K; Furuya, K; Takahashi, S; Haneishi, T; Takiguchi, Y; Arai, M

    1980-05-01

    A new sesquiterpene antibiotic, heptelidic acid, was found in the culture filtrate of three different strains of fungi isolated from soil samples. These strains were identified as Gliocladium virens, Chaetomium globosum and Trichoderma viride. Heptelidic acid was produced by conventional submerged culture and purified by successive column chromatography on silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 and finally by preparative TLC on silica gel. The molecular formula of heptelidic acid was determined as C15H20O5 on the basis of elementary analysis and high resolution mass spectrometry of its monomethyl ester. The antimicrobial spectrum of the antibiotic revealed its specific activity against anaerobic bacteria, especially against Bacteroides fragilis. PMID:7191847

  2. Identification and characterization of a novel incompatibility group X3 plasmid carrying blaNDM-1 in Enterobacteriaceae isolates with epidemiological links to multiple geographical areas in China

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Li, Zhen; Lo, Wai-U; Cheung, Yuk-Yam; Lin, Chi-Ho; Sham, Pak-Chung; Chi-Chung Cheng, Vincent; Ng, Tak-Keung; Que, Tak-Lun; Chow, Kin-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) is one of the most important resistance traits in Enterobacteriaceae. We characterized nine blaNDM-1 producing Enterobacteriaceae recovered from seven patients who have recently travelled or been treated in India (n=1) or mainland China (n=6) during December 2010–May 2012. All the China-linked patients had no links to the Indian subcontinent. The blaNDM-1 carrying plasmids belonged to the novel IncX3 (∼50 kb, in seven isolates including two Escherichia coli, two Klebsiella pneumoniae, one Citrobacter freundii, one Enterobacter aerogenes and one E. cloacae), IncA/C2 (∼140 kb, in one E. coli) or FII-F1B groups (∼110 kb, in one E. coli). Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the seven IncX3 plasmids revealed identical pattern in six and two bands difference in the remaining one. The IncX3 plasmids carrying blaNDM-1 were epidemiologically linked to Guangzhou (n=1), Hunan (n=4), Haifeng (n=1) and Dongguan (n=1) in mainland China. Complete sequencing of the IncX3 plasmid pNDM-HN380 revealed that it was 54 035 bp long and encoded 52 open reading frames. The blaNDM-1 gene was found in a transposon-like structure flanked by ISAba125 and IS26, inserted into the plasmid genetic load region. The sequences of the blaNDM-1 containing module within the two IS elements were identical to those previously described for blaNDM-1-positive Tn125 in the plasmids or chromosome of Acinetobacter isolates. In summary, this is the first description of IncX3 plasmids carrying blaNDM-1. The findings indicate the worrisome involvement of an epidemic plasmid in the dissemination of NDM-1 in China. PMID:26038408

  3. Group B Streptococcus and E. coli LPS-induced NO-dependent hyporesponsiveness to noradrenaline in isolated intrapulmonary arteries of neonatal piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Villamor, E.; Pérez-Vizcaíno, F.; Ruiz, T.; Leza, J. C.; Moro, M.; Tamargo, J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of endotoxin (E. coli lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and heat inactivated group B Streptococcus (GBS) were studied on the contractile responses to noradrenaline (NA) in isolated pulmonary arteries and on the activity of the constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in lung fragments of neonatal piglets. 2. Short-term (< or = 5 h) incubation with LPS (1 micrograms ml-1) or GBS (3 x 10(7) colonies forming units ml-1) did not modify the vascular responsiveness to NA (10(-8) M-10(-4) M) in isolated intrapulmonary arteries. However, long-term incubation (20 h) with LPS or GBS produced a significant reduction in the maximal contractile responses and shifted the concentration-response curve for NA downwards. 3. Endothelium removal or the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor meclofenamate (10(-5) M) did not affect the GBS- and LPS-induced hyporesponsiveness to NA. 4. The presence of the nitric oxide (NO) precursor, L-arginine (10(-5) M), 30 min prior to the contractility challenge increased the LPS- and GBS-induced pulmonary vascular hyporesponsiveness to NA. In contrast, the addition, prior to the challenge with NA, of the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10(-4) M) or coincubation with dexamethasone (3 x 10(-6) M), a potent inhibitor of the induction of NOS, or with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (10(-5) M) completely restored the reactivity to NA in LPS- and GBS-treated pulmonary arteries.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7545518

  4. Complete sequence of three plasmids from Bacillus thuringiensis INTA-FR7-4 environmental isolate and comparison with related plasmids from the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Amadio, Ariel F; Benintende, Graciela B; Zandomeni, Rubén O

    2009-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen used worldwide as a bioinsecticide. It belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group as well as Bacillus anthracis and B. cereus. Plasmids from this group of organisms have been implicated in pathogenicity as they carry the genes responsible for different types of diseases that affect mammals and insects. Some plasmids, like pAW63 and pBT9727, encode a functional conjugation machinery allowing them to be transferred to a recipient cell. They also share extensive homology with the non-functional conjugation apparatus of pXO2 from B. anthracis. In this study we report the complete sequence of three plasmids from an environmental B. thuringiensis isolate from Argentina, obtained by a shotgun sequencing method. We obtained the complete nucleotide sequence of plasmids pFR12 (12,095bp), pFR12.5 (12,459bp) and pFR55 (55,712bp) from B. thuringiensis INTA-FR7-4. pFR12 and pFR12.5 were classified as cryptic as they do not code for any obvious functions besides replication and mobilization. Both small plasmids were classified as RCR plasmids due to similarities with the replicases they encode. Plasmid pFR55 showed a structural organization similar to that observed for plasmids pAW63, pBT9727 and pXO2. pFR55 also shares a tra region with these plasmids, containing genes related to T4SS and conjugation. A comparison between pFR55 and conjugative plasmids led to the postulation that pFR55 is a conjugative plasmid. Genes related to replication functions in pFR55 are different to those described for plasmids with known complete sequences. pFR55 is the first completely sequenced plasmid with a replication machinery related to that of ori44. The analysis of the complete sequence of plasmids from an environmental isolate of B. thuringiensis permitted the identification of a near complete conjugation apparatus in pFR55, resembling those of plasmids pAW63, pBT9727 and pXO2. The availability of this sequence is a step forward in the study

  5. Variations of SSU rDNA group I introns in different isolates of Cordyceps militaris and the loss of an intron during cross-mating.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tiantian; Yang, Tao; Sun, Junde; Guo, Suping; Yang, Huaijun; Dong, Caihong

    2014-08-01

    Cordyceps militaris, the type species of genus Cordyceps, is one of the most popular mushrooms and a nutraceutical in eastern Asia. It is considered a model organism for the study of Cordyceps species because it can complete its life cycle when cultured in vitro. In the present study, the occurrence and sequence variation of SSU rDNA group I introns, Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, among different isolates of C. militaris were analyzed. Based on the secondary structure predictions, the Cmi.S943 intron has been placed in subgroup IC1, and the Cmi.S1199 intron has been placed in subgroup IE. No significant similarity between Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199 suggested different origins. Three genotypes, based on the frequency and distribution of introns, were described to discriminate the 57 surveyed C. militaris strains. It was found that the genotype was related to the stroma characteristics. The stromata of all of the genotype II strains, which possessed only Cmi.S943, could produce perithecium. In contrast, the stromata of all genotype III strains, which had both Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, could not produce perithecium. Cmi.S1199 showed the lowest level of intra-specific variation among the tested strains. Group I introns can be lost during strain cross-mating. Therefore, we presumed that during cross-mating and recombination, intron loss could be driven by positive Darwinian selection due to the energetic cost of transcribing long introns.

  6. Variations of SSU rDNA group I introns in different isolates of Cordyceps militaris and the loss of an intron during cross-mating.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tiantian; Yang, Tao; Sun, Junde; Guo, Suping; Yang, Huaijun; Dong, Caihong

    2014-08-01

    Cordyceps militaris, the type species of genus Cordyceps, is one of the most popular mushrooms and a nutraceutical in eastern Asia. It is considered a model organism for the study of Cordyceps species because it can complete its life cycle when cultured in vitro. In the present study, the occurrence and sequence variation of SSU rDNA group I introns, Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, among different isolates of C. militaris were analyzed. Based on the secondary structure predictions, the Cmi.S943 intron has been placed in subgroup IC1, and the Cmi.S1199 intron has been placed in subgroup IE. No significant similarity between Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199 suggested different origins. Three genotypes, based on the frequency and distribution of introns, were described to discriminate the 57 surveyed C. militaris strains. It was found that the genotype was related to the stroma characteristics. The stromata of all of the genotype II strains, which possessed only Cmi.S943, could produce perithecium. In contrast, the stromata of all genotype III strains, which had both Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, could not produce perithecium. Cmi.S1199 showed the lowest level of intra-specific variation among the tested strains. Group I introns can be lost during strain cross-mating. Therefore, we presumed that during cross-mating and recombination, intron loss could be driven by positive Darwinian selection due to the energetic cost of transcribing long introns. PMID:24996897

  7. Genome sequence of the Wenxinia marina type strain (DSM 24838T), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from oilfield sediments

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Spring, Stefan; Petersen, Jörn; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Wenxinia marina Ying et al. 2007 is the type species of the genus Wenxinia, a representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae, isolated from oilfield sediments of the South China Sea. This family was shown to harbor the most abundant bacteria especially from coastal and polar waters, but was also found in microbial mats, sediments and attached to different kind of surfaces. Here we describe the features of W. marina strain HY34T together with the genome sequence and annotation of strain DSM 24838T and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 4,181,754 bp containing genome sequence encodes 4,047 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. The genome of W. marina DSM 24838T was sequenced as part of the activities of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project funded by the DoE and the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197468

  8. Genome sequence of the Wenxinia marina type strain (DSM 24838(T)), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from oilfield sediments.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Spring, Stefan; Petersen, Jörn; Ivanova, Natalia N; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-15

    Wenxinia marina Ying et al. 2007 is the type species of the genus Wenxinia, a representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae, isolated from oilfield sediments of the South China Sea. This family was shown to harbor the most abundant bacteria especially from coastal and polar waters, but was also found in microbial mats, sediments and attached to different kind of surfaces. Here we describe the features of W. marina strain HY34(T) together with the genome sequence and annotation of strain DSM 24838(T) and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 4,181,754 bp containing genome sequence encodes 4,047 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. The genome of W. marina DSM 24838(T) was sequenced as part of the activities of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project funded by the DoE and the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Isolates of the Roseobacter Group, Sulfitobacter sp. Strains 3SOLIMAR09 and 1FIGIMAR09, from Harbors of Mallorca Island (Mediterranean Sea)

    PubMed Central

    Mas-Lladó, Maria; Piña-Villalonga, Joana Maria; Brunet-Galmés, Isabel; Nogales, Balbina

    2014-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequences of two isolates of the Roseobacter lineage, 3SOLIMAR09 and 1FIGIMAR09, which were obtained from harbors of Mallorca Island, Spain, and are affiliated with the Sulfitobacter genus. Both isolates harbor the complete gene set for protocatechuate catabolism and incomplete pathways for several additional monoaromatic compounds. PMID:24855294

  10. Identifying factors linked to the occurrence of alien gastropods in isolated woodland water bodies.

    PubMed

    Spyra, Aneta; Strzelec, Małgorzata

    2014-03-01

    Biological invasions are a significant component of human-caused global change and is widely regarded as one of the main threats to natural biodiversity. Isolated anthropogenic water bodies created in the areas that are deprived of natural freshwater habitats allow the survival and reproduction of alien species on newly settled sites. They are often small with water level fluctuations causing frequent environmental disturbances. The colonisation success may be the result of the rate of their degradation. The aims of the study were to determine the environmental conditions that affect the existence of alien species of gastropods in this type of aquatic environment and to examine whether the occurrence of non-native species affects the community structure of the native species. This study made it possible to group woodland ponds according to the occurrence of the three invasive species in snail communities and discuss the environmental conditions present in these pond types. Analysis of water properties emphasised the distinctiveness of the selected pond types. In ponds of the Potamopyrgus antipodarum type, we found the highest values of some parameters mainly hardness, conductivity, and content of calcium and chlorides, in contrast with the Physella acuta type, which were characterised by the lowest values except for phosphates and nitrites. In the Ferrissia fragilis type, we found the highest nitrate content. Data on the occurrence of alien species in different water environments play an important role in actions which are taken to prevent new invasions and spread of non-native species as well as to reduce future impacts of invaders.

  11. Identifying factors linked to the occurrence of alien gastropods in isolated woodland water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyra, Aneta; Strzelec, Małgorzata

    2014-03-01

    Biological invasions are a significant component of human-caused global change and is widely regarded as one of the main threats to natural biodiversity. Isolated anthropogenic water bodies created in the areas that are deprived of natural freshwater habitats allow the survival and reproduction of alien species on newly settled sites. They are often small with water level fluctuations causing frequent environmental disturbances. The colonisation success may be the result of the rate of their degradation. The aims of the study were to determine the environmental conditions that affect the existence of alien species of gastropods in this type of aquatic environment and to examine whether the occurrence of non-native species affects the community structure of the native species. This study made it possible to group woodland ponds according to the occurrence of the three invasive species in snail communities and discuss the environmental conditions present in these pond types. Analysis of water properties emphasised the distinctiveness of the selected pond types. In ponds of the Potamopyrgus antipodarum type, we found the highest values of some parameters mainly hardness, conductivity, and content of calcium and chlorides, in contrast with the Physella acuta type, which were characterised by the lowest values except for phosphates and nitrites. In the Ferrissia fragilis type, we found the highest nitrate content. Data on the occurrence of alien species in different water environments play an important role in actions which are taken to prevent new invasions and spread of non-native species as well as to reduce future impacts of invaders.

  12. Genetically Diverse Group A Streptococci from Children in Far-Western Nepal Share High Genetic Relatedness with Isolates from Other Countries

    PubMed Central

    Sakota, Varja; Fry, Alicia M.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Facklam, Richard R.; Li, Zhongya; Beall, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    The genetic diversity of group A streptococci (GAS) throughout much of the world has not been adequately explored. To assess genetic variation among GAS in western Nepal, 120 noninvasive GAS, collected from eight different villages, were genetically characterized using emm typing, sof sequencing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A high level of genetic diversity was observed among these isolates, with 51 genotypes based upon 51 multilocus sequence types (STs), 45 emm sequence types, and 28 sof sequence types. On the basis of shared ST-emm and sof-emm associations, 40 of the 51 genotypes were identical or highly related to genotypes characterized from locations outside of Nepal, even though most of the emm sequence and clonal types are rare among GAS within the United States. When analyzing all known STs highly related to Nepal STs, only one example of similar STs shared between a sof PCR-positive strain and a sof PCR-negative strain was observed. Since previous data indicate free exchange of MLST loci between sof-positive and sof-negative strains, there is possibly selection against the expansion of subclones resulting from horizontal transfers of sof or emm genes between sof-positive and sof-negative strains. All 45 emm types encountered in Nepal have also been documented from other countries. These data, together with data encompassing the past decade of emm type surveillance, support the possibility that most existing GAS emm types have been discovered. Similarly, since most (40/51) strain types were highly related to strains found elsewhere, it is likely that a major fraction of the existing GAS clonal complexes have been discovered. PMID:16757615

  13. Isolation of Insertion Sequence ISRLdTAL1145-1 from a Rhizobium sp. (Leucaena diversifolia) and Distribution of Homologous Sequences Identifying Cross-Inoculation Group Relationships †

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Douglas J.; Somasegaran, Padma; MacGlashan, Kathryn; Bohlool, B. Ben

    1994-01-01

    Insertion sequence (IS) element ISRLdTAL1145-1 from Rhizobium sp. (Leucaena diversifolia) strain TAL 1145 was entrapped in the sacB gene of the positive selection vector pUCD800 by insertional inactivation. A hybridization probe prepared from the whole 2.5-kb element was used to determine the distribution of homologous sequences in a diverse collection of 135 Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium strains. The IS probe hybridized strongly to Southern blots of genomic DNAs from 10 rhizobial strains that nodulate both Phaseolus vulgaris (beans) and Leucaena leucocephala (leguminous trees), 1 Rhizobium sp. that nodulates Leucaena spp., 9 R. meliloti (alfalfa) strains, 4 Rhizobium spp. that nodulate Sophora chrysophylla (leguminous trees), and 1 nonnodulating bacterium associated with the nodules of Pithecellobium dulce from the Leucaena cross-inoculation group, producing distinguishing IS patterns for each strain. Hybridization analysis revealed that ISRLdTAL1145-1 was strongly homologous with and closely related to a previously isolated element, ISRm USDA1024-1 from R. meliloti, while restriction enzyme analysis found structural similarities and differences between the two IS homologs. Two internal segments of these IS elements were used to construct hybridization probes of 1.2 kb and 380 bp that delineate a structural similarity and a difference, respectively, of the two IS homologs. The internal segment probes were used to analyze the structures of homologous IS elements in other strains. Five types of structural variation in homolog IS elements were found. The predominate IS structural type naturally occurring in a strain can reasonably identify the strain's cross-inoculation group relationships. Three IS structural types were found in Rhizobium species that nodulate beans and Leucaena species, one of which included the designated type IIB strain of R. tropici (CIAT 899). Weak homology to the whole IS probe, but not with the internal segments, was found with two

  14. The reduction of murine norovirus 1, B. fragilis HSP40 infecting phage B40-8 and E. coli after a mild thermal pasteurization process of raspberry puree.

    PubMed

    Baert, L; Uyttendaele, M; Van Coillie, E; Debevere, J

    2008-10-01

    Pasteurization processes of raspberry puree are nowadays limited to short times and rather low temperatures to maintain flavor and nutritional quality. Norovirus (NoV) outbreaks associated with raspberries highlight the need to determine the survival of NoV on this type of soft fruit. Therefore, resistance of murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate for human NoV, B. fragilis HSP40 infecting phage B40-8, and E. coli towards mild pasteurization was tested. Raspberry puree heat treated at 65 degrees C for 30s showed a 1.86, 2.77, and 3.89 log reduction of, respectively, MNV-1, E. coli, and B40-8. Heating at 75 degrees C for 15s established a 2.81 log reduction of MNV-1 while a 3.44 and 3.61 log reduction of B40-8 and E. coli was observed. No supplementary lethal effect of holding the heat-treated raspberry puree at 4 degrees C overnight was noticed. B40-8 failed to be useful as a tool to monitor NoV inactivation during mild pasteurization processes. Moreover, <3 log reductions of MNV-1 were observed suggesting that upon high initial contamination load, infectious NoV particles may remain on mildly pasteurized raspberry puree.

  15. RAPD of controlled crosses and clones from the field suggests that hybrids are rare in the Salix alba-Salix fragilis complex.

    PubMed

    Triest, L; De Greef, B; De Bondt, R; Van Slycken, J

    2000-05-01

    The polyploid Salix alba-Salix fragilis hybrid complex is rather difficult to study when using only morphological characters. Most of the features have a low diagnostic value for unambiguously identifying the hybrids, introgression patterns and population structures, though morphological traits have proved to be useful in making a hybrid index. Morphology and molecular variation from RAPDs were investigated in several case studies on willows from Belgium. A thorough screening of full-sib progenies of interspecific controlled crosses was made to select homologous amplification products. The selected amplified products proved to be useful in a principal coordinate analysis for the estimation of variability of hybrid progenies. On the basis of genetic similarities and ordination analysis, a method for the identification of clones in the field was established using presumed pure species and presumed introgressants. The chosen reference clones were checked against additional European samples of putative pure species to ensure the reliability of the method beyond a regional scale. The RAPDs suggested that both species have kept their gene pools well separated and that hybridization actually does not seem to be a dominating process. The observation that molecular markers do not always follow the morphological traits or allozyme data is discussed.

  16. The Dysregulation of Polyamine Metabolism in Colorectal Cancer Is Associated with Overexpression of c-Myc and C/EBPβ rather than Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Snezhkina, Anastasiya V.; Lipatova, Anastasiya V.; Sadritdinova, Asiya F.; Kardymon, Olga L.; Fedorova, Maria S.; Kaprin, Andrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is well known that the chronic inflammation can promote the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). Recently, a number of studies revealed a potential association between colorectal inflammation, cancer progression, and infection caused by enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF). Bacterial enterotoxin activates spermine oxidase (SMO), which produces spermidine and H2O2 as byproducts of polyamine catabolism, which, in turn, enhances inflammation and tissue injury. Using qPCR analysis, we estimated the expression of SMOX gene and ETBF colonization in CRC patients. We found no statistically significant associations between them. Then we selected genes involved in polyamine metabolism, metabolic reprogramming, and inflammation regulation and estimated their expression in CRC. We observed overexpression of SMOX, ODC1, SRM, SMS, MTAP, c-Myc, C/EBPβ (CREBP), and other genes. We found that two mediators of metabolic reprogramming, inflammation, and cell proliferation c-Myc and C/EBPβ may serve as regulators of polyamine metabolism genes (SMOX, AZIN1, MTAP, SRM, ODC1, AMD1, and AGMAT) as they are overexpressed in tumors, have binding site according to ENCODE ChIP-Seq data, and demonstrate strong coexpression with their targets. Thus, increased polyamine metabolism in CRC could be driven by c-Myc and C/EBPβ rather than ETBF infection. PMID:27433286

  17. Regulation of expression of mouse interferon-induced transmembrane protein like gene-3, Ifitm3 (mil-1, fragilis), in germ cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satomi S; Nagamatsu, Go; Tokitake, Yuko; Kasa, Miyuki; Tam, Patrick P L; Matsui, Yasuhisa

    2004-08-01

    Mouse interferon-induced transmembrane protein (IFITM) gene, Ifitm3 (previously known as mil-1 and fragilis), is expressed in primordial germ cells (PGCs), in their precursors, and in germ cells of the fetal gonads (Saitou et al. [2002] Nature 418:293-300; Tanaka and Matsui [2002] Mech Dev 119S:S261-S267). By examining the expression of green fluorescent protein transgene under the control of DNA sequences flanking exon 1, we have identified domains that direct Ifitm3 transcription in PGCs and their precursors in gastrula stage and 13.5 days post coitum embryos. Germ cell-specific expression is achieved by the activity of a consensus element unique to the Ifitm genes, which may act to suppress Ifitm3 expression in somatic tissues. The lack of any influence of the interferon-stimulable response elements on transgene expression in the germ-line suggests that interferon-mediated response is not critical for activating Ifitm3. PMID:15254899

  18. Comparison of cold enrichment and U.S. Department of Agriculture methods for isolating Listeria monocytogenes from naturally contaminated foods. The Listeria Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, P S; Graves, L M; Ajello, G W; Swaminathan, B; Weaver, R E; Wenger, J D; Schuchat, A; Broome, C V

    1991-01-01

    We compared the cold enrichment (CE) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) methods for isolating Listeria monocytogenes by examining 402 food samples. The food samples were collected from refrigerators of listeriosis patients as part of a multistate active surveillance project to determine the role of foods in sporadic listeriosis in the United States. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 51 food samples (13%). The USDA method was significantly better (P less than 0.001) than the CE method. The isolation efficiencies of the USDA and CE methods were 96 and 59%, respectively. Quantitation of L. monocytogenes in the food samples revealed that many food samples containing less than 0.3 CFU/g were negative as determined by the CE method but positive as determined by the USDA method. PMID:1768082

  19. Stabilization of a two-coordinate, acyclic diaminosilylene (ADASi): completion of the series of isolable diaminotetrylenes, :E(NR(2))(2) (E = group 14 element).

    PubMed

    Hadlington, Terrance J; Abdalla, Joseph A B; Tirfoin, Rémi; Aldridge, Simon; Jones, Cameron

    2016-01-28

    An extremely bulky boryl-amide ligand, [N(SiMe3){B(DAB)}](-) (TBoN; DAB = (DipNCH)2, Dip = C6H3Pr(i)2-2,6), has been utilised in the preparation of the first isolable, two-coordinate acyclic diaminosilylene (ADASi), viz. :Si(TBoN)2. This is shown to have a frontier orbital energy separation, and presumed level of reactivity, intermediate between those of the two classes of previously reported isolable two-coordinate, acyclic silylenes. PMID:26666776

  20. Variable Nucleotide Tandem-Repeat Analysis Revealing a Unique Group of Leptospira interrogans Serovar Pomona Isolates Associated with California Sea Lions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona is commonly isolated from a variety of wildlife and domesticated livestock. It is difficult to assess whether disease outbreaks with serovar Pomona in given animal populations are due to endemic infections or accidental exposure. Unlike many leptospiral serovars...

  1. Comparison and differentiation of potyvirus isolates and identification of strain-, virus-, subgroup-specific and potyvirus group-common epitopes using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jordan, R; Hammond, J

    1991-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) generated against an admixture of 12 potyvirus isolates was used to compare and differentiate diverse potyviruses. Both native and denatured virions of strains of bean yellow mosaic (BYMV), potato virus Y, tobacco etch, pea seed-borne mosaic, iris severe mosaic, iris mild mosaic and asparagus virus-1 potyviruses were used as immunogen and as antigen for screening of the hybridoma cell lines. Thirty cell lines secreting potyvirus-specific antibodies reactive in indirect antigen-coated plate (ACP-) ELISA were selected for detailed analysis. All 30 MAbs reacted with at least one strain of BYMV; 11 MAbs reacted with between one and eight of the nine BYMV strains and an additional three MAbs reacted only with isolates within the BYMV subgroup (BYMV, pea mosaic virus and clover yellow vein virus). The remaining 16 MAbs reacted with a BYMV isolate and with at least one of the other 43 potyvirus isolates tested. MAb PTY 1 reacted with all 55 potyvirus isolates tested (representing at least 33 different and distinct aphid-transmissible potyviruses). The potyvirus cross-reactive MAbs generally gave higher reactivity values in ACP-ELISA with dissociated virus than with polyclonal antibody-trapped intact virions in triple antibody sandwich ELISA (i.e. were cryptotope-specific). The BYMV strain- and virus-specific MAbs reacted strongly with both types of antigens (i.e. were metatope-specific). At least 25 distinct epitopes (12 cryptotopes and 13 metatopes) could be identified from the MAb-antigen reactivity patterns. The distribution of these epitopes between virus isolates can be used to detect and differentiate potyviruses in infected plant extracts and to examine virus architectures. Some of these epitopes are shared by potyvirus isolates not previously shown to be serologically related. The broad spectrum-reacting MAb PTY 1 recognizes a cryptotope conserved on all of the aphid-transmissible potyviruses examined and should be a

  2. Distribution of capsular types and antimicrobial susceptibility of invasive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Colombian children. Pneumococcal Study Group in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, E; Leal, A L; Castillo, O; De La Hoz, F; Vela, M C; Arango, M; Trujillo, H; Levy, A; Gama, M E; Calle, M; Valencia, M L; Parra, W; Agudelo, N; Mejía, G I; Jaramillo, S; Montoya, F; Porras, H; Sánchez, A; Saa, D; Di Fabio, J L; Homma, A

    1997-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading bacterial cause of childhood pneumonia in the developing world. This study describes the type distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of invasive pneumococcal isolates from Colombian children and is part of the Sistema Regional de Vacunas (SIREVA), a PAHO regional initiative designed to determine the ideal serotype composition of a protein polysaccharide pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for use in children less than 5 years old in Latin America. In Colombia, during the study period, centres in Bogota, Medellin, and Cali collected 324 S. pneumoniae isolates from invasive diseases, 238 (73.5%) from children under the age of 2. Pneumonia was the clinical diagnosis in 41.3% cases, meningitis in 41%, and sepsis in 11.2%. The seven most frequent types included 14(21.9%), 5(10.5%), 23F(9.6%), 1(9%), 6B(9%), 19F(7.1%), and 6A(6.2%). The frequency of diminished susceptibility to penicillin (DSP) was 12%, with 8.9% of isolates showing intermediate level resistance and 3.1% showing high level resistance. Among DSP isolates, 23% were also resistant to cefotaxime, 33.3% to erythromycin, 48.7% to chloramphenicol, and 74.3% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Multiple resistance was detected in 59% of the isolates that have DSP. Penicillin resistance was associated with types 23F (53.8%) and 14 (25.6%). These data provides information on capsular types prevalent in Colombia that will not only allow the formulation of an ideal vaccine for the region but also reinforce the need for ongoing regional surveillance.

  3. Evaluation of an Immunochromatographic Assay for Rapid Detection of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2a in Human and Animal Staphylococcus intermedius Group, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus schleiferi Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Arnold, A R; Burnham, C-A D; Ford, B A; Lawhon, S D; McAllister, S K; Lonsway, D; Albrecht, V; Jerris, R C; Rasheed, J K; Limbago, B; Burd, E M; Westblade, L F

    2016-03-01

    The performance of a rapid penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) detection assay, the Alere PBP2a culture colony test, was evaluated for identification of PBP2a-mediated beta-lactam resistance in human and animal clinical isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius group, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus schleiferi. The assay was sensitive and specific, with all PBP2a-negative and PBP2a-positive strains testing negative and positive, respectively.

  4. Life-history traits maintain the genomic integrity of sympatric species of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) group on an isolated forest island

    PubMed Central

    Lumley, Lisa M; Sperling, Felix AH

    2011-01-01

    Identification of widespread species collected from islands can be challenging due to the potential for local ecological and phenotypic divergence in isolated populations. We sought to determine how many species of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) complex reside in Cypress Hills, an isolated remnant coniferous forest in western Canada. We integrated data on behavior, ecology, morphology, mitochondrial DNA, and simple sequence repeats, comparing Cypress Hills populations to those from other regions of North America to determine which species they resembled most. We identified C. fumiferana, C. occidentalis, C. lambertiana, and hybrid forms in Cypress Hills. Adult flight phenology and pheromone attraction were identified as key life-history traits involved in maintaining the genomic integrity of species. Our study highlights the importance of extensive sampling of both specimens and a variety of characters for understanding species boundaries in biodiversity research. PMID:22393489

  5. Full-Length Genome Sequence of Type M/emm83 Group A Streptococcus pyogenes Strain STAB1101, Isolated from Clustered Cases in Brittany.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Nicolas; Vincent, Pascal; Auger, Gabriel; Cariou, Marie-Estelle; Moullec, Séverine; Lagente, Vincent; Ygout, Jean-François; Kayal, Samer; Faili, Ahmad

    2015-01-22

    Here, we announce the complete annotated genome sequence of a Streptococcus pyogenes M/emm83 strain, STAB1101, isolated from clustered cases in homeless persons in Brittany (France). The genome is composed of 1,709,790 bp, with a G+C content of 38.4% and 1,550 identified coding sequences (CDS), and it harbors a Tn916-like transposon.

  6. [Distribution of phylogenetic groups and virulence factors in CTX-M-15 β-lactamase-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from patients in the community of Mérida, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Millán, Ysheth; Hernández, Erick; Millán, Beatriz; Araque, María

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of phylogenetic groups and the genetic detection of virulence factors in CTX-M-15 β-lactamase-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains were analyzed. Twenty eight strains were isolated between January 2009 and July 2011 from patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) who attended the Public Health Laboratory at Mérida, Venezuela. Determination of phylogenetic groups and detection of six virulence genes, fimH, fyuA, kpsMTII, usp, PAI and papAH, were performed by PCR amplification. Fifteen of the 28 isolates were mainly located in the phylogenetic group A, followed by B2 (12/28) and D (1/28). No direct relationship between the severity or recurrence of UTI and the distribution of phylogroups was observed. All studied virulence factors were found in group B2 strains with the highest frequency. The prevalent virulence profile included the combination of three main genes: fimH, kpsMTII and fyuA and, to a lesser extent, the presence of other determinants such as usp, PAI and/or papAH. These results indicate that virulent UPEC incorporated three important properties: adhesion, iron uptake and evasion of phagocytosis, which favored the production of recurrent UTI. This is the first report describing the association of phylogenetic groups with the potential virulence of CTX-M-15 β-lactamase producing UPEC strains in Venezuela.

  7. Are isolated wetlands isolated?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Haukos, David A.

    2011-01-01

    While federal regulations during the past 10 years have treated isolated wetlands as unconnected to aquatic resources protected by the Clean Water Act, they provide critical ecosystem services to society that extend well beyond their wetland boundaries. The authors offer well-documented examples from the scientific literature on some of the ecosystem services provided by isolated wetlands to society and other ecosystems.

  8. Characterization of fHbp, nhba (gna2132), nadA, porA, sequence type (ST), and genomic presence of IS1301 in group B meningococcal ST269 clonal complex isolates from England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Lucidarme, Jay; Comanducci, Maurizio; Findlow, Jamie; Gray, Stephen J; Kaczmarski, Edward B; Guiver, Malcolm; Kugelberg, Elisabeth; Vallely, Pamela J; Oster, Philipp; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; Tang, Christoph M; Borrow, Ray

    2009-11-01

    Highly effective glycoconjugate vaccines exist against four of the five major pathogenic groups of meningococci: A, C, W-135, and Y. An equivalent vaccine against group B meningococci (menB) has remained elusive due to the poorly immunogenic capsular polysaccharide. A promising alternative, the investigational recombinant menB (rMenB)- outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine, contains fHBP, NHBA (previously GNA2132), NadA, and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from the New Zealand MeNZB vaccine. MenB currently accounts for 90% of meningococcal disease in England and Wales, where the multilocus sequence type (ST) 269 (ST269) clonal complex (cc269) has recently expanded to account for a third of menB cases. To assess the potential cc269 coverage of the rMenB-OMV vaccine, English and Welsh cc269 isolates from the past decade were genetically characterized with respect to fHBP, NHBA, and NadA. All of the isolates harbored fHbp and nhba alleles, while 98% of the cc269 isolates were devoid of nadA. Subvariant profiling of fHbp, nhba, and porA against STs revealed the presence of two broadly distinct and well-defined clusters of isolates, centered around ST269 and ST275, respectively. An additional molecular marker, insertion sequence IS1301, was found to be present in 100% and <2% of isolates of the respective clusters. On the basis of the genetic data, the potential rMenB-OMV coverage of cc269 in England and Wales is high (up to 100%) within both clusters. Expression studies and serum bactericidal antibody assays will serve to enhance predictions of coverage and will augment ongoing studies regarding the significance of IS1301 within the ST269 cluster.

  9. Quantitative Profiling of Colorectal Cancer-Associated Bacteria Reveals Associations between Fusobacterium spp., Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) and Clinicopathological Features of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, Katie S.; Dakshinamurthy, Amirtha; Goldberg, Paul; Blackburn, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli) in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a) the presence and b) the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples) and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples) were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively) and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples) levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV) colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5). We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05), age (FDR = 0.03) or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01). Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  10. Quantitative profiling of colorectal cancer-associated bacteria reveals associations between fusobacterium spp., enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Katie S; Dakshinamurthy, Amirtha; Goldberg, Paul; Blackburn, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli) in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a) the presence and b) the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples) and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples) were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively) and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples) levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV) colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5). We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05), age (FDR = 0.03) or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01). Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  11. Quantitative profiling of colorectal cancer-associated bacteria reveals associations between fusobacterium spp., enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Katie S; Dakshinamurthy, Amirtha; Goldberg, Paul; Blackburn, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli) in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a) the presence and b) the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples) and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples) were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively) and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples) levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV) colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5). We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05), age (FDR = 0.03) or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01). Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  12. Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 mediates growth promotion of crack willow (Salix fragilis) saplings in both clean and metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Adams, P; De-Leij, F A A M; Lynch, J M

    2007-08-01

    We investigated if the plant growth promoting fungus Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 (also known as "T22") could be used to enhance the establishment and growth of crack willow (Salix fragilis) in a soil containing no organic or metal pollutants and in a metal-contaminated soil by comparing this fungus with noninoculated controls and an ectomycorrhizal formulation commercially used to enhance the establishment of tree saplings. Crack willow saplings were grown in a temperature-controlled growth room over a period of 5 weeks' in a garden center topsoil and over 12 weeks in a soil which had been used for disposal of building materials and sewage sludge containing elevated levels of heavy metals including cadmium (30 mg kg(-1)), lead (350 mg kg(-1)), manganese (210 mg kg(-1)), nickel (210 mg kg(-1)), and zinc (1,100 mg kg(-1)). After 5 weeks' growth in clean soil, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 produced shoots and roots that were 40% longer than those of the controls and shoots that were 20% longer than those of saplings grown with ectomycorrhiza (ECM). T. harzianum T22 saplings produced more than double the dry biomass of controls and more than 50% extra biomass than the ECM-treated saplings. After 12 weeks' growth, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 in the metal-contaminated soil produced 39% more dry weight biomass and were 16% taller than the noninoculated controls. This is the first report of tree growth stimulation by application of Trichoderma to roots, and is especially important as willow is a major source of wood fuel in the quest for renewable energy. These results also suggest willow trees inoculated with T. harzianum T22 could be used to increase the rate of revegetation and phytostabilization of metal-contaminated sites, a property of the fungus never previously demonstrated.

  13. Existence of two groups of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis based on biofilm formation, intracellular survival, capsular profile and agr-typing.

    PubMed

    Bardiau, Marjorie; Caplin, Jonathan; Detilleux, Johann; Graber, Hans; Moroni, Paolo; Taminiau, Bernard; Mainil, Jacques G

    2016-03-15

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is recognised worldwide as an important pathogen causing contagious acute and chronic bovine mastitis. Chronic mastitis account for a significant part of all bovine cases and represent an important economic problem for dairy producers. Several properties (biofilm formation, intracellular survival, capsular expression and group agr) are thought to be associated with this chronic status. In a previous study, we found the existence of two groups of strains based on the association of these features. The aim of the present work was to confirm on a large international and non-related collection of strains the existence of these clusters and to associate them with case history records. In addition, the genomes of eight strains were sequenced to study the genomic differences between strains of each cluster. The results confirmed the existence of both groups based on capsular typing, intracellular survival and agr-typing: strains cap8-positive, belonging to agr group II, showing a low invasion rate and strains cap5-positive, belonging to agr group I, showing a high invasion rate. None of the two clusters were associated with the chronic status of the cow. When comparing the genomes of strains belonging to both clusters, the genes specific to the group "cap5-agrI" would suggest that these strains are better adapted to live in hostile environment. The existence of these two groups is highly important as they may represent two clusters that are adapted differently to the host and/or the surrounding environment.

  14. Microorganisms isolated from the water phase of tropospheric clouds at the Puy de Dôme: major groups and growth abilities at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Amato, Pierre; Parazols, Marius; Sancelme, Martine; Laj, Paolo; Mailhot, Gilles; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2007-02-01

    This work constitutes the first large report on aerobic cultivable microorganisms present in cloud water. Seven cloud-event samples were collected at the Puy de Dôme summit, and cultivation was performed leading to the isolation of 71 bacterial, 42 fungal and 15 yeast strains. Most of the fungi isolated were of Cladosporium or Trametes affiliation, and yeasts were of Cryptococcus affiliation. Bacteria, identified on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequence, were found to belong to Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria (Alpha, Beta and Gamma subclasses) and Bacteroidetes phyla, and mainly to the genera Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Staphylococcus, Streptomyces, and Arthrobacter. These strains appear to be closely related to some bacteria described from cold environments, water (sea and freshwater), soil or vegetation. Comparison of the distribution of Gram-negative vs. Gram-positive bacteria shows that the number of Gram-negative bacteria is greater in summer than in winter. Finally, a very important result of this study concerns the ability of half of the tested strains to grow at low temperatures (5 degrees C): most of these are Gram-negative bacteria, and a few are even shown to be psychrophiles. On the whole, these results give a good picture of the microbial content of cloud water in terms of classification, and suggest that a large proportion of bacteria present in clouds have the capacity to be metabolically active there. This is of special interest with respect to the potential role of these microorganisms in atmospheric chemistry.

  15. Matrix isolation and theoretical investigation of the photochemical reaction of CrCl 2O 2 with benzenes substituted with electron withdrawing groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoops, Michael D.; Ault, Bruce S.

    2007-04-01

    The matrix isolation technique, combined with infrared spectroscopy and theoretical calculations, has been used to characterize the products of the photochemical reactions of chlorobenzene, α,α,α-trifluorotoluene, benzonitrile, and nitrobenzene with CrCl 2O 2. While initial twin jet deposition of the reagents led to no visible changes in the recorded spectra, product bands were noted following irradiation with light of λ > 300 nm. The irradiation was shown to lead to oxygen atom transfer, forming complexes between the corresponding cyclic ketone derivatives and CrCl 2O. With benzonitrile, cyanophenol complexed to CrCl 2O was also observed. This latter result arises from C-H bond activation and oxygen atom insertion into a C-H bond. The identification of the complexes were further supported by density functional calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G++(d, 2p) level. Product distributions were rationalized by an analysis of the electron density distribution.

  16. Structural investigation of an exopolysaccharide substituted with a lactyl ether group produced by Raoultella terrigena Ez-555-6 isolated in the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

    PubMed

    Pillon, M; Pau-Roblot, C; Lequart, V; Pilard, S; Courtois, B; Courtois, J; Pawlicki-Jullian, N

    2010-06-16

    Raoultella terrigena strain Ez-555-6, isolated from a root nodule of Medicago sativa harvested in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, produces a non-referenced high-molecular-mass exopolysaccharide (EPS). The structure of this EPS was determined using a combination approach including monosaccharide composition (GLC-FID, HPAEC-PAD), determination of glycosylation sites (GLC-EIMS) and 1D/2D NMR ((1)H, (13)C) and ESIMS (HR, MS/MS) studies of oligosaccharides obtained from mild acid hydrolysis. The EPS was found to be a charged pentasaccharide with a repeating unit composed of D-galactose, D-glucose, D-mannose and D-glucuronic acid (1:2:1:1). Lactic acid and O-acetyl substituents were localized on galactose and glucose residues, respectively, as presented in the following structure:

  17. Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin induces intestinal epithelial cell secretion of interleukin-8 through mitogen-activated protein kinases and a tyrosine kinase-regulated nuclear factor-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaoguang; Powell, Jan; Mathioudakis, Nes; Kane, Sheryl; Fernandez, Ellen; Sears, Cynthia L

    2004-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) secretes a 20-kDa metalloprotease toxin termed B. fragilis toxin (BFT). ETBF disease in animals is associated with an acute inflammatory response in the intestinal mucosa, and lethal hemorrhagic colitis may occur in rabbits. In this study, we confirmed recent reports (J. M. Kim, Y. K. Oh, Y. J. Kim, H. B. Oh, and Y. J. Cho, Clin. Exp. Immunol. 123:421-427, 2001; L. Sanfilippo, C. K. Li, R. Seth, T. J. Balwin, M. J. Menozzi, and Y. R. Mahida, Clin. Exp. Immunol. 119:456-463, 2000) that purified BFT stimulates interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion by human intestinal epithelial cells (HT29/C1 cells) and demonstrate that stimulation of IL-8 production is dependent on biologically active BFT and independent of serum. Induction of IL-8 mRNA expression occurs rapidly and ceases by 6 h after BFT treatment, whereas IL-8 secretion continues to increase for at least 18 h. Our data suggest that BFT-stimulated IL-8 secretion involves tyrosine kinase-dependent activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) as well as activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), p38 and extracellular signal-related kinase. Simultaneous activation of NF-kappaB and MAPKs appears necessary for secretion of IL-8 by HT29/C1 cells treated with BFT.

  18. Whole-Genome Sequences of Four Strains Closely Related to Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae Group, Isolated from Biofilms in a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome sequences of four Mycobacterium chelonae group strains from biofilms obtained after a ‘chlorine burn’ in a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. These opportunistic pathogens have been detected in drinking and hospital water distr...

  19. A novel HLA-DQB1 allele, DQB1*05022, isolated from the Jing ethnic group in South-west China.

    PubMed

    Fu, Y; Chen, W; Liu, Z; Lin, J; Jia, Z; Pan, D; Xu, A

    2002-07-01

    A novel DQB1 allele, DQB1*05022, has been identified from an individual of the Jing ethnic group in South-west China. The sequence was confirmed by cloning and sequencing. The allele differs from DQB1*05021 at codon 47 (TAC to TAT) and from DQB1*05031 at codon 57 (GAC to AGC).

  20. Enhanced Co-Worker Social Support in Isolated Work Groups and Its Mitigating Role on the Work-Family Conflict-Depression Loss Spiral.

    PubMed

    McTernan, Wesley P; Dollard, Maureen F; Tuckey, Michelle R; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines a loss spiral model (i.e., reciprocal relationships) between work-family conflict and depression, moderated by co-worker support. We expected that the moderation effect due to co-worker support would be evident among those working in isolation (i.e., mining workers) due to a greater level of intragroup attraction and saliency attributable to the proximity effects. We used a two wave panel study and data from a random population sample of Australian employees (n = 2793, [n = 112 mining, n = 2681 non-mining]). Using structural equation modelling we tested the reciprocal three way interaction effects. In line with our theory, co-worker support buffered the reciprocal relationship between WFC and depression, showing a protective effect in both pathways. These moderation effects were found in the mining industry only suggesting a proximity component moderates the social support buffer hypothesis (i.e., a three way interaction effect). The present paper integrates previous theoretical perspectives of stress and support, and provides insight into the changing dynamics of workplace relationships. PMID:27043592

  1. Enhanced Co-Worker Social Support in Isolated Work Groups and Its Mitigating Role on the Work-Family Conflict-Depression Loss Spiral.

    PubMed

    McTernan, Wesley P; Dollard, Maureen F; Tuckey, Michelle R; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2016-03-29

    This paper examines a loss spiral model (i.e., reciprocal relationships) between work-family conflict and depression, moderated by co-worker support. We expected that the moderation effect due to co-worker support would be evident among those working in isolation (i.e., mining workers) due to a greater level of intragroup attraction and saliency attributable to the proximity effects. We used a two wave panel study and data from a random population sample of Australian employees (n = 2793, [n = 112 mining, n = 2681 non-mining]). Using structural equation modelling we tested the reciprocal three way interaction effects. In line with our theory, co-worker support buffered the reciprocal relationship between WFC and depression, showing a protective effect in both pathways. These moderation effects were found in the mining industry only suggesting a proximity component moderates the social support buffer hypothesis (i.e., a three way interaction effect). The present paper integrates previous theoretical perspectives of stress and support, and provides insight into the changing dynamics of workplace relationships.

  2. Enhanced Co-Worker Social Support in Isolated Work Groups and Its Mitigating Role on the Work-Family Conflict-Depression Loss Spiral

    PubMed Central

    McTernan, Wesley P.; Dollard, Maureen F.; Tuckey, Michelle R.; Vandenberg, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines a loss spiral model (i.e., reciprocal relationships) between work-family conflict and depression, moderated by co-worker support. We expected that the moderation effect due to co-worker support would be evident among those working in isolation (i.e., mining workers) due to a greater level of intragroup attraction and saliency attributable to the proximity effects. We used a two wave panel study and data from a random population sample of Australian employees (n = 2793, [n = 112 mining, n = 2681 non-mining]). Using structural equation modelling we tested the reciprocal three way interaction effects. In line with our theory, co-worker support buffered the reciprocal relationship between WFC and depression, showing a protective effect in both pathways. These moderation effects were found in the mining industry only suggesting a proximity component moderates the social support buffer hypothesis (i.e., a three way interaction effect). The present paper integrates previous theoretical perspectives of stress and support, and provides insight into the changing dynamics of workplace relationships. PMID:27043592

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of probable non-human genes of group A rotaviruses isolated from children with acute gastroenteritis in Belém, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Régis Piloni; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; Neri, Darivaldo Luz; Soares, Luana da Silva; Guerra, Sylvia de Fatima Dos Santos; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; Farias, Yasmin Nascimento; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira

    2012-12-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are the main cause of acute viral gastroenteritis in both humans and young animals of various species such as calves, horses, pigs, dogs, cats, and birds. The genetic diversity of RVs is related to a variety of evolutionary mechanisms, including point mutation, and genome reassortment. The objective of this study was to characterize molecularly genes that encode structural and nonstructural proteins in unusual RV strains. The clinical specimens selected for this study were obtained from children and newborn with RV gastroenteritis, who participated in research projects on viral gastroenteritis conducted at the Evandro Chagas Institute. Structural (VP1-VP4, VP6, and VP7) and nonstructural (NSP1-NSP6) genes were amplified from stool samples by the polymerase chain reaction and subsequently sequenced. Eight unusual RV strains isolated from children and newborn with gastroenteritis were studied. Reassortment between genes of animal origin were observed in 5/8 (62.5%) strains analyzed. These results demonstrate that, although rare, interspecies (animal-human) transmission of RVs occurs in nature, as observed in the present study in strains NB150, HSP034, HSP180, HST327, and RV10109. This study is the first to be conducted in the Amazon region and supports previous data showing a close relationship between genes of human and animal origin, representing a challenge to the large-scale introduction of RV vaccines in national immunization programs. PMID:23080508

  4. Isolation of L-3-phenyllactyl-Leu-Arg-Asn-NH sub 2 (Antho-RNamide), a sea anemone neuropeptide containing an unusual amino-terminal blocking group

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C.J.P.; Jacob, E.; Graff, D.; Reinscheid, R.K.; Nothacker, H.P. ); Rinehart, K.L.; Staley, A.L. )

    1990-07-01

    Using a radioimmunoassay for the carboxyl-terminal sequence Arg-Asn-NH{sub 2}, the authors have purified a peptide from acetic acid extracts of the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima. By classical amino acid analyses, mass spectrometry, and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, the structure of this peptide was determined as 3-phenyllactyl-Leu-Arg-Asn-NH{sub 2}. By using reversed-phase HPLC and a chiral mobile phase, it was shown that the 3-phenyllactyl group had the L configuration. Immunocytochemical staining with antiserum against Arg-Asn-NH{sub 2} showed that L-3-phenyllactyl-Leu-Arg-Asn-NH{sub 2} (Antho-RNamide) was localized in neutrons of sea anemones. The L-3-phenyllactyl group has not been found earlier in neuropeptides of vertebrates or higher invertebrates. They propose that this residue renders Antho-RNamide resistant to nonspecific aminopeptidases, thereby increasing the stability of the peptide after neuronal release.

  5. Aggregation in yellow mealworms,Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae : I. Individual and group attraction to frass and isolation of an aggregant.

    PubMed

    Weaver, D K; McFarlane, J E; Alli, I

    1989-05-01

    Late-instar larvalTenebrio molitor L. were found to be attracted to aqueous extracts of conspecific larval frass. The attraction was evident at both the individual and group level. The attraction of larval groups to frass indicated the possibility of an aggregation pheromone that would be chemically distinct in the mealworm environment. Chemical analysis of short carbon chain acids present in both the mealworm frass and the diet indicated that lactic acid was present in the mealworm frass only. Acetic acid was identified in both the diet and the larval frass. Larvae aggregated on filter papers treated with aqueous frass extracts that had been dried and also on those freshly wetted. The larvae also aggregated on dried or freshly wetted papers treated with lactic acid, but failed to aggregate on freshly wetted papers or dried papers treated with acetic acid. The role of excreted lactic acid as a discriminant of already infested and, therefore, safer environmental regions is discussed.

  6. The differential impact of social defeat on mice living in isolation or groups in an enriched environment: plasma corticosterone and monoamine variations.

    PubMed

    McQuaid, Robyn J; Audet, Marie-Claude; Jacobson-Pick, Shlomit; Anisman, Hymie

    2013-03-01

    Social defeat in mice is a potent stressor that promotes the development of depressive- and anxiety-like behaviours, as well as variations of neuroendocrine and brain neurotransmitter activity. Although environmental enrichment may protect against some of the adverse behavioural and biological effects of social defeat, it seems that, among male group-housed mice maintained in an enriched environment (EE), aggressive behaviours may be more readily instigated, thus promoting distress and exacerbating psychopathological features. Thus, although an EE can potentially have numerous beneficial effects, these may depend on the general conditions in which mice were raised. It was observed in the current investigations that EE group-housed BALB/cByJ mice displayed increased anxiety-like behaviours compared to their counterparts maintained in a standard environment (SE). Furthermore, in response to social defeat, EE group-housed male mice exhibited decreased weight gain, exaggerated corticosterone elevations and altered hippocampal norepinephrine utilization compared to their SE counterparts. These effects were not apparent in the individually housed EE mice and, in fact, enrichment among these mice appeared to buffer against serotonin changes induced by social defeat. It is possible that some potentially beneficial effects of enrichment were precluded among group-housed mice, possibly owing to social disturbances that might occur in these conditions. In fact, even if social interaction is an essential feature of enrichment, it seems that some of the positive effects of this housing condition might be optimal when mice are housed individually, particularly with regard to buffering the effects of social defeat.

  7. [High prevalence of antiHTLV-1 antibodies in the Boni, an ethnic group of African origin isolated in French Guiana since the 18th century].

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Calender, A; Strobel, M; Lefait-Robin, R; de Thé, G

    1984-01-01

    Antibodies to HTLV-1 (ELISA test using disrupted virus) were studied in different ethnic groups in French Guiana, including 135 blood donors from Cayenne, 97 Boni Blacks and 57 Wayana Indians from Maripasoula area, and 57 Hmong from Cacao village. We observed significant differences between Boni Blacks and Wayana Indians, having respectively 10.3% versus 0% of high antibody titers. The Hmong, recent refugees from Kampuchea, exhibited an intermediate level (3.5%) of infection. These results favour an African origin of HTLV-1 and raise, for the Hmong, the question of an infection acquired in Guiana.

  8. [Taxonomic status of the Burana virus (BURV) (Bunyaviridae, Nairovirus, Tamdy group) isolated from the ticks Haemaphysalis punctata Canestrini et Fanzago, 1877 and Haem. concinna Koch, 1844 (Ixodidae, Haemaphysalinae) in Kyrgyzstan].

    PubMed

    L'vov, D K; Al'khovskiĭ, S V; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Shchetinin, A M; Deriabin, P G; Gitel'man, A K; Aristova, V A; Botikov, A G

    2014-01-01

    Complete genome sequence of the Burana virus (BURV) was determined using the next-generation sequencing approach (ID GenBank KF801651). The prototype strain of BURV LEIV-Krg760 was originally isolated from the ticks Haemaphysalis punctata Canestrini et Fanzago, 1877 (Ixodidae, Haemaphysalinae), collected from cows in Tokmak wildlife sanctuary, eastern part of the Chu valley (43 degrees 10' N, 74 degrees 40' E) near Burana village, Kirgizia, in April 1971. Molecular genetics and phylogenetic analyses showed that the BURV belonged to the Nairovirus genus, Bunyaviridae and is related to Tamdy virus (TAMV) that is also associated with the ixodidae ticks of pasture biocenosis in Central Asia. Previous studies showed that TAMV is the prototypic virus of new phylogenetic Tamdy group in the Nairovirus genus. Thus, BURV was classified as a new virus of the Tamdy group, Nairovirus, Bunyaviridae. PMID:25549462

  9. Complete genome sequence of the bacteriochlorophyll a-containing Roseibacterium elongatum type strain (DSM 19469(T)), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from Australian coast sand.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-15

    Roseibacterium elongatum Suzuki et al. 2006 is a pink-pigmented and bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the marine 'Roseobacter group' were found to be abundant in the ocean and play an important role in global and biogeochemical processes. In the present study we describe the features of R. elongatum strain OCh 323(T) together with its genome sequence and annotation. The 3,555,102 bp long genome consists of one circular chromosome with no extrachromosomal elements and is one of the smallest known Roseobacter genomes. It contains 3,540 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a photosynthetic gene cluster, which putatively enables a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. Gene sequences associated with quorum sensing, motility, surface attachment, and thiosulfate and carbon monoxide oxidation could be detected. The genome was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197467

  10. Lipid domains in intact fiber-cell plasma membranes isolated from cortical and nuclear regions of human eye lenses of donors from different age groups.

    PubMed

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2015-03-01

    The results reported here clearly document changes in the properties and the organization of fiber-cell membrane lipids that occur with age, based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis of lens membranes of clear lenses from donors of age groups from 0 to 20, 21 to 40, and 61 to 80 years. The physical properties, including profiles of the alkyl chain order, fluidity, hydrophobicity, and oxygen transport parameter, were investigated using EPR spin-labeling methods, which also provide an opportunity to discriminate coexisting lipid domains and to evaluate the relative amounts of lipids in these domains. Fiber-cell membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments: bulk lipid domain, which appears minimally affected by membrane proteins, and two domains that appear due to the presence of membrane proteins, namely boundary and trapped lipid domains. In nuclear membranes the amount of boundary and trapped phospholipids as well as the amount of cholesterol in trapped lipid domains increased with the donors' age and was greater than that in cortical membranes. The difference between the amounts of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins in nuclear and cortical membranes increased with the donors' age. It was also shown that cholesterol was to a large degree excluded from trapped lipid domains in cortical membranes. It is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes was greater than that of cortical membranes for all age groups. The amount of lipids in domains of low oxygen permeability, mainly in trapped lipid domains, were greater in nuclear than cortical membranes and increased with the age of donors. These results indicate that the nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes were less permeable to oxygen than cortical membranes and become less permeable to oxygen with age. In clear lenses, age-related changes in the lens lipid and protein composition and organization appear to occur in ways that increase fiber

  11. Lipid Domains in Intact Fiber-Cell Plasma Membranes Isolated from Cortical and Nuclear Regions of Human Eye Lenses of Donors from Different Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O’Brien, William J.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2015-01-01

    The results reported here clearly document changes in the properties and the organization of fiber-cell membrane lipids that occur with age, based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis of lens membranes of clear lenses from donors of age groups from 0 to 20, 21 to 40, and 61 to 80 years. The physical properties, including profiles of the alkyl chain order, fluidity, hydrophobicity, and oxygen transport parameter, were investigated using EPR spin-labeling methods, which also provide an opportunity to discriminate coexisting lipid domains and to evaluate the relative amounts of lipids in these domains. Fiber-cell membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments: bulk lipid domain, which appears minimally affected by membrane proteins, and two domains that appear due to the presence of membrane proteins, namely boundary and trapped lipid domains. In nuclear membranes the amount of boundary and trapped phospholipids as well as the amount of cholesterol in trapped lipid domains increased with the donors’ age and was greater than that in cortical membranes. The difference between the amounts of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins in nuclear and cortical membranes increased with the donors’ age. It was also shown that cholesterol was to a large degree excluded from trapped lipid domains in cortical membranes. It is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes was greater than that of cortical membranes for all age groups. The amount of lipids in domains of low oxygen permeability, mainly in trapped lipid domains, were greater in nuclear than cortical membranes and increased with the age of donors. These results indicate that the nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes were less permeable to oxygen than cortical membranes and become less permeable to oxygen with age. In clear lenses, age-related changes in the lens lipid and protein composition and organization appear to occur in ways that increase fiber

  12. Complete genome sequence of the bacteriochlorophyll a-containing Roseibacterium elongatum type strain (DSM 19469T), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from Australian coast sand

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Roseibacterium elongatum Suzuki et al. 2006 is a pink-pigmented and bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the marine ‘Roseobacter group’ were found to be abundant in the ocean and play an important role in global and biogeochemical processes. In the present study we describe the features of R. elongatum strain OCh 323T together with its genome sequence and annotation. The 3,555,102 bp long genome consists of one circular chromosome with no extrachromosomal elements and is one of the smallest known Roseobacter genomes. It contains 3,540 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a photosynthetic gene cluster, which putatively enables a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. Gene sequences associated with quorum sensing, motility, surface attachment, and thiosulfate and carbon monoxide oxidation could be detected. The genome was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197467

  13. Association and Virulence Gene Expression Vary among Serotype III Group B Streptococcus Isolates following Exposure to Decidual and Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Korir, Michelle L.; Knupp, David; LeMerise, Kathryn; Boldenow, Erica; Loch-Caruso, Rita; Aronoff, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) causes severe disease in neonates, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. GBS species are highly diverse and can be classified by serotype and multilocus sequence typing. Sequence type 17 (ST-17) strains cause invasive neonatal disease more frequently than strains of other STs. Attachment and invasion of host cells are key steps in GBS pathogenesis. We investigated whether four serotype III strains representing ST-17 (two strains), ST-19, and ST-23 differ in their abilities to attach to and invade both decidual cells and lung epithelial cells. Virulence gene expression following host cell association and exposure to amnion cells was also tested. The ST-17 strains differed in their abilities to attach to and invade decidual cells, whereas there were no differences with lung epithelial cells. The ST-19 and ST-23 strains, however, attached to and invaded decidual cells less than both ST-17 strains. Although the ST-23 strain attached to lung epithelial cells better than ST-17 and -19 strains, none of the strains effectively invaded the lung epithelial cells. Notably, the association with host cells resulted in the differential expression of several virulence genes relative to basal expression levels. Similar expression patterns of some genes were observed regardless of cell type used. Collectively, these results show that GBS strains differ in their abilities to attach to distinct host cell types and express key virulence genes that are relevant to the disease process. Enhancing our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms could aid in the identification of novel therapeutic targets or vaccine candidates that could potentially decrease morbidity and mortality associated with neonatal infections. PMID:25135682

  14. K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O: A UV Nonlinear Optical Crystal with Isolated [B3O4(OH)4](3-) Anion Groups.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Yang, Zhihua; Zhang, Fangfang; Liu, Lili; Han, Jian; Li, Zhi; Pan, Shilie

    2016-09-01

    A potential ultraviolet (UV) nonlinear optical (NLO) material, K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O, was successfully synthesized by hydrothermal methods. The compound crystallizes into the Cmc21 space group and exhibits isolated [B3O4(OH)4](3-) anion groups connected by O-H···O hydrogen bonds. The UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum shows that K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O has a wide transparency range with an absorption edge below 190 nm. Powder second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements using 1064 nm radiation revealed a moderate efficiency, 0.8 × KDP. Additional particle size vs SHG efficiency measurements indicate that K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O is type I phase-matchable. Our calculated results show that the borate groups as well as the waters of hydration determine the NLO properties of K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O.

  15. K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O: A UV Nonlinear Optical Crystal with Isolated [B3O4(OH)4](3-) Anion Groups.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Yang, Zhihua; Zhang, Fangfang; Liu, Lili; Han, Jian; Li, Zhi; Pan, Shilie

    2016-09-01

    A potential ultraviolet (UV) nonlinear optical (NLO) material, K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O, was successfully synthesized by hydrothermal methods. The compound crystallizes into the Cmc21 space group and exhibits isolated [B3O4(OH)4](3-) anion groups connected by O-H···O hydrogen bonds. The UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum shows that K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O has a wide transparency range with an absorption edge below 190 nm. Powder second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements using 1064 nm radiation revealed a moderate efficiency, 0.8 × KDP. Additional particle size vs SHG efficiency measurements indicate that K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O is type I phase-matchable. Our calculated results show that the borate groups as well as the waters of hydration determine the NLO properties of K3B3O4(OH)4·2H2O. PMID:27504674

  16. Characterization of fHbp, nhba (gna2132), nadA, porA, and sequence type in group B meningococcal case isolates collected in England and Wales during January 2008 and potential coverage of an investigational group B meningococcal vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lucidarme, Jay; Comanducci, Maurizio; Findlow, Jamie; Gray, Stephen J; Kaczmarski, Edward B; Guiver, Malcolm; Vallely, Pamela J; Oster, Philipp; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; Borrow, Ray

    2010-06-01

    Invasive disease caused by meningococcal capsular groups A, C, W-135, and Y is now preventable by means of glycoconjugate vaccines that target their respective polysaccharide capsules. The capsule of group B meningococci (MenB) is poorly immunogenic and may induce autoimmunity. Vaccines based on the major immunodominant surface porin, PorA, are effective against clonal epidemics but, thus far, have a limited scope of coverage against the wider MenB population at large. In an alternative approach, the first-generation, investigational, recombinant MenB (rMenB) plus outer membrane vesicle (OMV) (rMenB-OMV) vaccine contains a number of relatively conserved surface proteins, fHBP, NHBA (previously GNA2132), and NadA, alongside PorA P1.4-containing OMVs from the New Zealand MeNZB vaccine. MenB currently accounts for approximately 90% of cases of meningococcal disease in England and Wales. To assess potential rMenB-OMV vaccine coverage of pathogenic MenB isolates within this region, all English and Welsh MenB case isolates from January 2008 (n = 87) were genetically characterized with respect to fHBP, NHBA, NadA, and PorA. Alleles for fHbp, nhba, and porA were identified in all of the isolates, of which 22% were also found to harbor nadA alleles. On the basis of genotypic data and predicted immunological cross-reactivity, the potential level of rMenB-OMV vaccine coverage in England and Wales ranges from 66% to 100%.

  17. Isolation of 6-deoxytetrodotoxin from the pufferfish, Takifugu pardalis, and a comparison of the effects of the C-6 and C-11 hydroxy groups of tetrodotoxin on its activity.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yuta; Finn, Julian; Fukushima, Kohei; Sakugawa, Satsuki; Cho, Yuko; Konoki, Keiichi; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2014-04-25

    Identification of new tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1) analogues would be significant in the elucidation of its biosynthetic pathway and a study of its structure-activity relationships. In this study, a new TTX analogue, 6-deoxyTTX (2), was isolated from the ovary of the pufferfish, Takifugu pardalis, and the structure was determined using spectroscopic methods. Compound 2 was also identified in other marine animals, Nassarius snail and blue-ringed octopuses, using LC-MS. Furthermore, we investigated the voltage-gated sodium channel blocking activity of 2 by examination of the inhibitory activities to cytotoxicity induced by ouabain and veratridine in mouse neuroblastoma cells (Neuro-2a). The activities were then compared with those of 1, 11-deoxyTTX (3), and 6,11-dideoxyTTX (4). The EC50 value for 2 was estimated to be 6.5±2.2 nM, approximately 3-fold larger than that of 1 (2.1±0.6 nM) and approximately 20-fold smaller than that of 3. These results suggested that contribution of the C-6 hydroxy group to the activity is less than that of the C-11 hydroxy group. PMID:24654947

  18. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa generalized transducing phage phiPA3 is a new member of the phiKZ-like group of 'jumbo' phages, and infects model laboratory strains and clinical isolates from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Monson, Rita; Foulds, Ian; Foweraker, Juliet; Welch, Martin; Salmond, George P C

    2011-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients, and a model organism for the study of nosocomially acquired infections, biofilms and intrinsic multidrug resistance. In this study we characterize ϕPA3, a new generalized transducing bacteriophage for P. aeruginosa. ϕPA3 transduced chromosomal mutations between PAO1 strains, and infected multiple P. aeruginosa clinical isolates as well as the P. aeruginosa model laboratory strains PAK and PA14. Electron microscopy imaging was used to classify ϕPA3 in the order Caudovirales and the family Myoviridae. The genome of ϕPA3 was sequenced and found to contain 309,208 bp, the second-largest bacteriophage currently deposited in GenBank. The genome contains 378 ORFs and five tRNAs. Many ORF products in the ϕPA3 genome are similar to proteins encoded by P. aeruginosa phage ϕKZ and Pseudomonas chlororaphis phage 201ϕ2-1, and so ϕPA3 was classified genetically as a member of the ϕKZ-like group of phages. This is the first report of a member of this group of phages acting as a generalized transducer. Given its wide host range, high transduction efficiency and large genome size, the 'jumbo' phage ϕPA3 could be a powerful tool in functional genomic analysis of diverse P. aeruginosa strains of fundamental and clinical importance.

  19. Evaluation of the in vitro activity of six broad-spectrum beta-lactam antimicrobial agents tested against over 2,000 clinical isolates from 22 medical centers in Japan. Japan Antimicrobial Resistance Study Group.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Mathai, D; Biedenbach, D J; Lewis, M T; Gales, A C; Jones, R N

    1999-06-01

    -generation" cephalosporins > ceftazidime > C/S > piperacillin. Possible extended spectrum beta-lactamase phenotypes were identified in 2.9-8.6% of these isolates. Isolates of C. freundii, Enterobacter spp., Proteae, and Serratia spp. that were resistant to ceftazidime and piperacillin remained susceptible to imipenem (0.0-4.5% resistance) and cefepime (0.0-5.0%). Acinetobacters were inhibited best by C/S (99.5% susceptible) and least susceptible to piperacillin (MIC90, > 256 micrograms/ml; 21.7% susceptible) activity. P. aeruginosa isolates were most susceptible to cefepime (83.6%) and this zwitterionic cephalosporin also had the lowest level of resistance (9.1% of MICs at > or = 32 micrograms/ml). Several multi-resistant organisms were identified in participant medical centers including S. marcescens strains resistant to cefepime, imipenem, or both observed in six hospitals. Clonal spread was documented in two medical centers; one hospital having two distinct epidemic clusters. Also a multi-resistant E. cloacae was found in two patients in the same hospital. Evaluations of carbapenem resistance in four species discovered only two strains (in same hospital) among 40 P. aeruginosa isolates (5.0%) with a metallo-enzyme, with nearly all of the remaining strains inhibited by an Ambler Class C enzyme inhibitor (BRL42715) indicating a hyperproduction of a chromosomal cephalosporinase. These results indicate that most newer beta-lactams remain widely useable in medical centers in Japan, but emerging often clonal, resistances have occurred. The overall rank order of antimicrobial spectrum against all ten tested bacterial groups favors the "fourth-generation" cephalosporin, cefepime (96.4% susceptible) as an equal to imipenem (95.9%) > C/S (90.9%) = cefpirome (90.0%) > ceftazidime (75.1%) = penicillins, either oxacillin or piperacillin (76.4%).

  20. Molecular evolution of VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions in coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant isolates from acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Kuba, Yumani; Saitoh, Mika; Taira, Katsuya; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Mahoe, Yoko; Kyan, Hisako; Takara, Taketoshi; Okano, Sho; Kudaka, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromu; Oishi, Kazunori; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    A large acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) outbreak occurred in 2011 in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Ten strains of coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant (CA24v) were isolated from patients with AHC and full sequence analysis of the VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions performed. To assess time-scale evolution, phylogenetic analysis was performed using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In addition, similarity plots were constructed and pairwise distance (p-distance) and positive pressure analyses performed. A phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that the present strains belong to genotype 4 (G4). In addition, the present strains could have divided in about 2010 from the same lineages detected in other countries such as China, India and Australia. The mean rates of molecular evolution of four coding regions were estimated at about 6.15 to 7.86 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year. Similarity plot analyses suggested that nucleotide similarities between the present strains and a prototype strain (EH24/70 strain) were 0.77-0.94. The p-distance of the present strains was relatively short (<0.01). Only one positive selected site (L25H) was identified in the VP1 protein. These findings suggest that the present CA24v strains causing AHC are genetically related to other AHC strains with rapid evolution and emerged in around 2010.

  1. [In vitro activity of faropenem against beta-lactamase producing clinical isolates].

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, T; Matsuzaki, K; Koyama, H; Saika, T; Hasegawa, M; Kobayashi, I

    2000-03-01

    Each 20 strains of beta-lactamase producing methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis, and Bacteroides fragilis group were used as the test strains. Drug susceptibility of these strains to faropenem (FRPM), cefdinir, cefditoren, cefcapene, cefteram, cefaclor, and ampicillin was determined by an agar dilution method according to the NCCLS guideline M100-S9. beta-Lactamase activity of the test strains was determined by a spectrophotometric method. In the present study, FRPM was highly active against beta-lactamase-producing strains, and no close correlation was found between the MICs of FRPM for the test strains and their beta-lactamase activities. These results suggest that FRPM has potential in successful application for the treatment of infectious diseases with various types of bacterial pathogens including beta-lactamase producing strains. PMID:10834149

  2. EKG isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, E.; Rasquin, J. R.; Smith, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Light beam transmits heartbeat signal from electrodes on patient to electrocardiograph without exposing patient to possible severe electrical shock. System provides complete isolation between patient and EKG instrumentation.

  3. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  4. Pre-incubation of cell-free HIV-1 group M isolates with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors blocks subsequent viral replication in co-cultures of dendritic cells and T cells.

    PubMed

    Njai, Harr F; Lewi, Paul J; Janssen, Cornelus G M; Garcia, Sergio; Fransen, Katrien; Kestens, Luc; Vanham, Guido; Janssen, Paul A J

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the inhibitory effect of various reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) on cell-free HIV, we adapted a recently described in vitro system, based on co-cultures of dendritic cells and resting CD4 T cells, modelling early target cells during sexual transmission. The compounds tested included the second-generation non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI) TMC-120 (R147681, dapivirine) and TMC-125 (R165335, travertine), as well as the reference nucleoside RTI AZT (zidovudine), the nucleotide RTI PMPA (tenofovir) and the NNRTI UC-781. The virus strains included the reference strain HIV-1Ba-L and six primary isolates, representative of the HIV-1 group M pandemic. They all display the non-syncytium-inducing and CCR5 receptor-using (NSI/R5) phenotype, important in transmission. Cell-free virus was immobilized on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)-treated microwell plate and incubated with compound for 1 h. Afterwards, the compound was thoroughly washed away; target cells were added and cultured for 2 weeks, followed by an extended culture with highly susceptible mitogen-activated T cells. Viral production in the cultures was measured on supernatant with HIV antigen ELISA. Negative results were confirmed by showing absence of proviral DNA in the cells. TMC-120 and TMC-125 inhibited replication of HIV-1Ba-L with average EC50 values of 38 nM and 117 nM, respectively, whereas the EC50 of UC-781 was 517 nM. Complete suppression of virus and provirus was observed at compound concentrations of 100, 300 and 1000 nM, respectively. Inhibition of all primary isolates followed the same pattern as HIV-1Ba-L. In contrast, pre-treating the virus with the nucleotide RTI PMPA and AZT failed to inhibit infection even at a concentration of 100000 nM. These data clearly suggest that NNRTIs inactivate RT enzymatic activity of different viral clades (predominant in the epidemic) and might be proposed for further testing as a sterilizing microbicide worldwide. PMID:15865220

  5. The Victoria Isolation Scale, Form A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, A. J. W.; Feletti, Grahame I.

    1976-01-01

    The authors administered the Isolation Symptomatology Questionnaire to persons living in Antarctica who were either well or maladjusted to their environment. Eliminating those items not discriminating between the two groups, the authors constructed a new isolation scale. (SE)

  6. Social isolation

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, John T.; Hawkley, Louise C.; Norman, Greg J.; Berntson, Gary G.

    2011-01-01

    Social species, by definition, form organizations that extend beyond the individual. These structures evolved hand in hand with behavioral, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms to support them because the consequent social behaviors helped these organisms survive, reproduce, and care for offspring sufficiently long that they too reproduced. Social isolation represents a lens through which to investigate these behavioral, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms. Evidence from human and nonhuman animal studies indicates that isolation heightens sensitivity to social threats (predator evasion) and motivates the renewal of social connections. The effects of perceived isolation in humans share much in common with the effects of experimental manipulations of isolation in nonhuman social species: increased tonic sympathetic tonus and HPA activation, and decreased inflammatory control, immunity, sleep salubrity, and expression of genes regulating glucocorticoid responses. Together, these effects contribute to higher rates of morbidity and mortality in older adults. PMID:21651565

  7. Training Groups, Encounter Groups, Sensitivity Groups and Group Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Louis A.; Pattison, E. Mansell; Schafer, Donald W.

    1971-01-01

    Descriptions and comparison of group therapies and the new group procedures (training groups and sensitivity groups—an outgrowth of the so-called Laboratory Movement methods of the mid-1930's) have been provided for the better understanding of non-psychiatric physicians. A group leader must have proper training and must help his group in its search for its avowed goals, whether he is a group therapist, a sensitivity trainer, or anyone else interested in utilizing group processes. Those goals are either the therapeutic benefit of the individual, as defined in group psychotherapy, or a better understanding of how one functions in groups, as in T-groups or the other group processes in the area of sensitive living. All group situations contain powerful tools which must be handled with proper respect. When so handled by experienced leaders, the individuals involved can achieve their goals in these group experiences. PMID:18730582

  8. Group Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Clarence A.

    1971-01-01

    This article reviews the major concerns of group counseling and differentiates among group guidance, group counseling, and group therapy. It also evaluates the research status of group counseling and presents implications for the future of this approach. Comment by Carl E. Thoresen follows. (Author)

  9. Identification of a pathogenic isolate-specific 30,000-Mr antigen of Entamoeba histolytica by using a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, H; Kobayashi, S; Kato, Y; Nagakura, K; Kaneda, Y; Takeuchi, T

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb) produced against trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica strain HM-1:IMSS, reacted with all of 42 isolates and 4 clones showing pathogenic zymodeme (Z) patterns, i.e., Z-II, Z-II alpha-, Z-II (glucose phosphate isomerase: gamma +), Z-VII, Z-VII (glucose phosphate isomerase: alpha lack, gamma +), Z-XI, Z-XIV, and Z-XIX, regardless of culture conditions, geographical origins, or host symptoms in an indirect fluorescence antibody test. In contrast, the MAb failed to react with 14 isolates possessing nonpathogenic zymodemes Z-I and Z-VIII and did not react with other enteric protozoan parasites, such as E. histolytica-like Laredo, Entamoeba hartmanni, Entamoeba coli, Endolimax nana, Dientamoeba fragilis, Trichomonas hominis, and Giardia lamblia. Western immunoblotting analysis showed that the molecular weight of the antigenic component recognized by the MAb was exclusively 30,000 in pathogenic isolates of different zymodemes. These results suggest that the 30,000-molecular-weight antigen is a marker of pathogenic isolates and that the indirect fluorescent-antibody test with the MAb is useful for the accurate discrimination of pathogenic amebae. Images PMID:2180826

  10. Identification of a pathogenic isolate-specific 30,000-Mr antigen of Entamoeba histolytica by using a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, H; Kobayashi, S; Kato, Y; Nagakura, K; Kaneda, Y; Takeuchi, T

    1990-04-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb) produced against trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica strain HM-1:IMSS, reacted with all of 42 isolates and 4 clones showing pathogenic zymodeme (Z) patterns, i.e., Z-II, Z-II alpha-, Z-II (glucose phosphate isomerase: gamma +), Z-VII, Z-VII (glucose phosphate isomerase: alpha lack, gamma +), Z-XI, Z-XIV, and Z-XIX, regardless of culture conditions, geographical origins, or host symptoms in an indirect fluorescence antibody test. In contrast, the MAb failed to react with 14 isolates possessing nonpathogenic zymodemes Z-I and Z-VIII and did not react with other enteric protozoan parasites, such as E. histolytica-like Laredo, Entamoeba hartmanni, Entamoeba coli, Endolimax nana, Dientamoeba fragilis, Trichomonas hominis, and Giardia lamblia. Western immunoblotting analysis showed that the molecular weight of the antigenic component recognized by the MAb was exclusively 30,000 in pathogenic isolates of different zymodemes. These results suggest that the 30,000-molecular-weight antigen is a marker of pathogenic isolates and that the indirect fluorescent-antibody test with the MAb is useful for the accurate discrimination of pathogenic amebae. PMID:2180826

  11. Group X

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  12. Group Flow and Group Genius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  13. Isopermutation group

    SciTech Connect

    Muktibodh, A. S.

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  14. Hot Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Collaborators sparked by creative ideas and obsessed by a common task may not realize they're part of a "hot group"--a term coined by business professors Harold J. Leavitt and Jean Lipman-Blumen. Spawned by group decision making and employee empowerment, hot groups can flourish in education settings. They're typically small, short lived, and goal…

  15. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  16. High rate of non-susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin in anaerobic isolates: Data from a clinical laboratory from Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Sadia Omer; Jabeen, Kauser; Qaiser, Saba; Ahsan, Syed Tanwir; Khan, Erum; Zafar, Afia

    2015-06-01

    Due to increasing resistance amongst anaerobic pathogens periodic surveillance of resistance has been recommended in regional/local settings. Anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility testing is not routinely performed in many laboratories in Pakistan, hence absence of local data may lead to inappropriate empirical therapy in serious cases. 121 clinically significant anaerobic strains (26/121; 21% bacteremic isolates) were isolated and saved from 2010 to 2011. Susceptibility testing against metronidazole, clindamycin, co-amoxiclav, meropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, linezolid and gatifloxacin was performed by determining minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). A high proportion of non-susceptible strains to metronidazole (10% of 121 isolates) and clindamycin (12% of 121 isolates) was seen, most noticeable in Bacteroides fragilis. Three Bacteroides species strains were non-susceptible to both metronidazole and clindamycin. One strain of Clostridium species was fully resistant to metronidazole and had intermediate resistance to clindamycin. No resistance to any of the other tested antibiotics was seen. Resistance to metronidazole was higher in bacteremic vs. non bacteremic isolates (p = value 0.07). In our setting where there is a high usage of empirical metronidazole and clindamycin for the treatment of serious anaerobic infections clinicians should be aware of increased resistance to these agents. Periodic surveillance of resistance to anti-anaerobic drugs especially metronidazole and clindamycin should be performed to generate antibiogram and guide appropriate empiric therapy.

  17. GROUP INEQUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Samuel; Loury, Glenn C.; Sethi, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    We explore the combined effect of segregation in social networks, peer effects, and the relative size of a historically disadvantaged group on the incentives to invest in market-rewarded skills and the dynamics of inequality between social groups. We identify conditions under which group inequality will persist in the absence of differences in ability, credit constraints, or labor market discrimination. Under these conditions, group inequality may be amplified even if initial group differences are negligible. Increases in social integration may destabilize an unequal state and make group equality possible, but the distributional and human capital effects of this depend on the demographic composition of the population. When the size of the initially disadvantaged group is sufficiently small, integration can lower the long-run costs of human capital investment in both groups and result in an increase the aggregate skill share. In contrast, when the initially disadvantaged group is large, integration can induce a fall in the aggregate skill share as the costs of human capital investment rise in both groups. We consider applications to concrete cases and policy implications. PMID:25554727

  18. Group Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  19. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of

  20. Group dynamics.

    PubMed

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  1. Isolated neurosarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Bianca; Crişan, Doiniţa; Tompa, I; Szabo, I

    2011-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory granulomatous disease affecting multiple organ systems. Neurosarcoidosis (central nervous system involvement) is seen in approximately 25% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis, although it is subclinical in most of these cases. Clinical presentations and imaging findings in nervous system were varied. Cranial nerve abnormalities were the most common clinical presentation and involvement of the optic nerve in particular was associated with a poor prognosis for visual recovery. A patient is described who presented with decreased visual acuity, hypoesthesia of the face and multiple tumors of the eyelids on both eyes. Initial biopsy of one of the tumor of the eyelids revealed a non-caseating granulomatous inflammatory process with nodular infiltrates made up of epithelioid cells, Langhans-type giant multinucleated cells and mononuclear cells; the diagnosis of sarcoidosis was suspected. After two years of clinical and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) follow up, the diagnosis of isolated neurosarcoidosis was confirmed by histology. In this study, we analyzed clinical and radiologic records of this patient with biopsy proven and clinically diagnosed neurosarcoidosis for the following reasons: (1) to assess the concordance between abnormalities noted on MRI with neurologic symptoms at presentation; (2) to correlate changes in imaging findings during follow-up with clinical worsening; and (3) to show up the characteristic feature of this case with no general sign/symptoms of sarcoidosis.

  2. Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Research suggests that cooperative learning works best when students are first taught group-processing skills, such as leadership, decision making, communication, trust building, and conflict management. Inadequate teacher training and boring assignments can torpedo cooperative learning efforts. Administrators should reassure teachers with…

  3. Isolated persistent hypermethioninemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, S H; Levy, H L; Tangerman, A; Boujet, C; Buist, N; Davidson-Mundt, A; Hudgins, L; Oyanagi, K; Nagao, M; Wilson, W G

    1995-01-01

    New information has been obtained on 30 patients with isolated persistent hypermethioninemia, most of them previously unreported. Biopsies to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of partially deficient activity of ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT; E.C.2.5.1.6) in liver were not performed on most of these patients. However, none showed the clinical findings or the extreme elevations of serum folate previously described in other patients with isolated hypermethioninemia considered not to have hepatic MAT deficiency. Patients ascertained on biochemical grounds had no neurological abnormalities, and 27/30 had IQs or Bayley development-index scores within normal limits or were judged to have normal mental development. Methionine transamination metabolites accumulated abnormally only when plasma methionine concentrations exceeded 300-350 microM and did so more markedly after 0.9 years of age. Data were obtained on urinary organic acids as well as plasma creatinine concentrations. Patterns of inheritance of isolated hypermethioninemia were variable. Considerations as to the optimal management of this group of patients are discussed. PMID:7573050

  4. Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Not long after EDWIN HUBBLE established that galaxies are `island universes' similar to our home galaxy, the MILKY WAY, he realized that a few of these external galaxies are considerably closer to us than any others. In 1936 he first coined the term `Local Group' in his famous book The Realm of the Nebulae to identify our nearest galactic neighbors. More than 60 yr later, the galaxies of the Loca...

  5. Underrepresented groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The problem with the shortage of under represented groups in science and engineering is absolutely crucial, especially considering that U.S. will experience a shortage of 560,000 science and engineering personnel by the year 2010. Most studies by the National Science Foundation also concluded that projected shortages cannot be alleviated without significant increases in the involvement of Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, handicapped persons, and women.

  6. Genome sequence of the pink to light reddish-pigmented Rubellimicrobium mesophilum type strain (DSM 19309T), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from soil, and emended description of the species

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Spring, Stefan; Fiebig, Anne; Petersen, Jörn; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Rubellimicrobium mesophilum Dastager et al. 2008 is a mesophilic and light reddish-pigmented representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the Roseobacter group play an important role in the marine biogeochemical cycles and were found in a broad variety of marine environments associated with algal blooms, different kinds of sediments, and surfaces of invertebrates and vertebrates. Roseobacters were shown to be widely distributed, especially within the total bacterial community found in coastal waters, as well as in mixed water layers of the open ocean. Here we describe the features of R. mesophilum strain MSL-20T together with its genome sequence and annotation generated from a culture of DSM 19309T. The 4,927,676 bp genome sequence consists of one chromosome and probably one extrachromosomal element. It contains 5,082 protein-coding genes and 56 RNA genes. As previously reported, the G+C content is significantly different from the actual genome sequence-based G+C content and as the type strain tests positively for oxidase, the species description is emended accordingly. The genome was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197472

  7. Extinction Deficits in Socially Isolated Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, John P.; Sackett, Gene P.

    1976-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys were reared in total isolation, in partial isolation, or under normal conditions with access to mothers and peers. Each group was compared on the rate of acquisition of a simple operant response. (GO)

  8. Correlation between the genomic o454-nlpD region polymorphisms, virulence gene equipment and phylogenetic group of extraintestinal Escherichia coli (ExPEC) enables pathotyping irrespective of host, disease and source of isolation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mutS-rpoS intergenic region in E. coli displays a mosaic structure which revealed pathotype specific patterns. To assess the importance of this region as a surrogate marker for the identification of highly virulent extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains we aimed to: (i) characterize the genetic diversity of the mutS gene and the o454-nlpD genomic region among 510 E. coli strains from animals and humans; (ii) delineate associations between the polymorphism of this region and features such as phylogenetic background of E. coli, pathotype, host species, clinical condition, serogroup and virulence associated genes (VAG)s; and (iii) identify the most important VAGs for classification of the o454-nlpD region. Methods Size variation in the o454-nlpD region was investigated by PCR amplification and sequencing. Phylogenetic relationships were assessed by Ecor- and Multilocus sequence- typing (MLST), and a comparative analysis between mutS gene phylogenetic tree obtained with RAxML and the MLST grouping method was performed. Correlation between o454-nlpD patterns and the features described above were analysed. In addition, the importance of 47 PCR-amplified ExPEC-related VAGs for classification of o454-nlpD patterns was investigated by means of Random Forest algorithm. Results Four main structures (patterns I-IV) of the o454-nlpD region among ExPEC and commensal E. coli strains were identified. Statistical analysis showed a positive and exclusive association between pattern III and the ExPEC strains. A strong association between pattern III and either the Ecor group B2 or the sequence type complexes known to represent the phylogenetic background of highly virulent ExPEC strains (such as STC95, STC73 and STC131) was found as well. RF analyses determined five genes (csgA, malX, chuA, sit, and vat) to be suitable to predict pattern III strains. Conclusion The significant association between pattern III and group B2 strains suggested the o454-nlp

  9. Isolated sleep paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep paralysis - isolated; Parasomnia - isolated sleep paralysis ... Episodes of isolated sleep paralysis last from a few seconds to 1 or 2 minutes. During these episodes the person is unable to move ...

  10. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  11. Sensitivity Training and Group Encounter, an Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siroka, Robert W., Ed.; And Others

    "Sensitivity Training and Group Encounter" attempts to explore group interaction on many levels--verbal, sensory, and physical. It can be utilized as a model for dealing with various forms of interpersonal relations, from ongoing social issues to the isolation, alienation, and distrust felt by the members of a group. Presented as a guide to this…

  12. Are Isolated Indigenous Populations Headed toward Extinction?

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert S; Kesler, Dylan C; Hill, Kim R

    2016-01-01

    At least 50 indigenous groups spread across lowland South America remain isolated and have only intermittent and mostly hostile interactions with the outside world. Except in emergency situations, the current policy of governments in Brazil, Colombia, and Peru towards isolated tribes is a "leave them alone" strategy, in which isolated groups are left uncontacted. However, these no-contact policies are based on the assumption that isolated populations are healthy and capable of persisting in the face of mounting external threats, and that they can maintain population viability in the long-term. Here, we test this assumption by tracking the sizes and movements of cleared horticultural areas made by 8 isolated groups over the last 10-14 years. We used deforestation data derived from remote sensing Landsat satellite sensors to identify clearings, and those were then validated and assessed with high-resolution imagery. We found only a single example of a relatively large and growing population (c. 50 cleared ha and 400 people), whereas all of the other 7 groups exhibited much smaller villages and gardens with no sizable growth through time. These results indicated that the smaller groups are critically endangered, and it prompts an urgent re-thinking of policies toward isolated populations, including plans for well-organized contacts that may help save lives and rescue isolated indigenous populations from imminent extinction.

  13. Are Isolated Indigenous Populations Headed toward Extinction?

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert S.; Kesler, Dylan C.; Hill, Kim R.

    2016-01-01

    At least 50 indigenous groups spread across lowland South America remain isolated and have only intermittent and mostly hostile interactions with the outside world. Except in emergency situations, the current policy of governments in Brazil, Colombia, and Peru towards isolated tribes is a “leave them alone” strategy, in which isolated groups are left uncontacted. However, these no-contact policies are based on the assumption that isolated populations are healthy and capable of persisting in the face of mounting external threats, and that they can maintain population viability in the long-term. Here, we test this assumption by tracking the sizes and movements of cleared horticultural areas made by 8 isolated groups over the last 10–14 years. We used deforestation data derived from remote sensing Landsat satellite sensors to identify clearings, and those were then validated and assessed with high-resolution imagery. We found only a single example of a relatively large and growing population (c. 50 cleared ha and 400 people), whereas all of the other 7 groups exhibited much smaller villages and gardens with no sizable growth through time. These results indicated that the smaller groups are critically endangered, and it prompts an urgent re-thinking of policies toward isolated populations, including plans for well-organized contacts that may help save lives and rescue isolated indigenous populations from imminent extinction. PMID:26954672

  14. Are Isolated Indigenous Populations Headed toward Extinction?

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert S; Kesler, Dylan C; Hill, Kim R

    2016-01-01

    At least 50 indigenous groups spread across lowland South America remain isolated and have only intermittent and mostly hostile interactions with the outside world. Except in emergency situations, the current policy of governments in Brazil, Colombia, and Peru towards isolated tribes is a "leave them alone" strategy, in which isolated groups are left uncontacted. However, these no-contact policies are based on the assumption that isolated populations are healthy and capable of persisting in the face of mounting external threats, and that they can maintain population viability in the long-term. Here, we test this assumption by tracking the sizes and movements of cleared horticultural areas made by 8 isolated groups over the last 10-14 years. We used deforestation data derived from remote sensing Landsat satellite sensors to identify clearings, and those were then validated and assessed with high-resolution imagery. We found only a single example of a relatively large and growing population (c. 50 cleared ha and 400 people), whereas all of the other 7 groups exhibited much smaller villages and gardens with no sizable growth through time. These results indicated that the smaller groups are critically endangered, and it prompts an urgent re-thinking of policies toward isolated populations, including plans for well-organized contacts that may help save lives and rescue isolated indigenous populations from imminent extinction. PMID:26954672

  15. Analysis of the biologic differences between porcine circovirus type 2 Group-1 and Group-2 viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phylogenetically, porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) isolates have been divided into two subgroups: Group-1 and Group-2. Although the genomic nucleotide sequences of Group-1 and Group-2 viruses differ by less than 5 percent, distinct amino acid residue motifs have been noted in the coding sequences o...

  16. Two phospholipase A2 inhibitors from the plasma of Cerrophidion (Bothrops) godmani which selectively inhibit two different group-II phospholipase A2 myotoxins from its own venom: isolation, molecular cloning and biological properties.

    PubMed Central

    Lizano, S; Angulo, Y; Lomonte, B; Fox, J W; Lambeau, G; Lazdunski, M; Gutiérrez, J M

    2000-01-01

    Myotoxic phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)s; group II) account for most of the muscle-tissue damage that results from envenomation by viperid snakes. In the venom of the Godman's viper (Cerrophidion godmani, formerly Bothrops godmani), an enzymically active PLA(2) (myotoxin I) and an inactive, Lys-49 variant (myotoxin II) induce extensive muscle damage and oedema. In this study, two distinct myotoxin inhibitor proteins of C. godmani, CgMIP-I and CgMIP-II, were purified directly from blood plasma by selective binding to affinity columns containing either myotoxin I or myotoxin II, respectively. Both proteins are glycosylated, acidic (pI=4) and composed of 20-25-kDa subunits that form oligomers of 110 kDa (CgMIP-I) or 180 kDa (CgMIP-II). In inhibition studies, CgMIP-I specifically neutralized the PLA(2) and the myotoxic, oedema-forming and cytolytic activities of myotoxins I, whereas CgMIP-II selectively inhibited the toxic properties of myotoxin II. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis and sequencing of cDNAs encoding the two inhibitors revealed that CgMIP-I is similar to gamma-type inhibitors, which share a pattern of cysteine residues present in the Ly-6 superfamily of proteins, whereas CgMIP-II shares sequence identity with alpha-type inhibitors that contain carbohydrate-recognition-like domains, also found in C-type lectins and mammalian PLA(2) receptors. N-terminal sequencing of myotoxin I revealed a different primary structure from myotoxin II [De Sousa, Morhy, Arni, Ward, Díaz and Gutiérrez (1998) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1384, 204-208], which provides insight into the nature of such pharmacological specificity. PMID:10698689

  17. Are T-Groups Brainwashing Sessions? Yes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manley, Robert S.

    1971-01-01

    The author considers T-groups akin to thought reform or brainwashing and describes them as dealing with an assault upon the individual's self-concept, isolation of individuals, and compulsory confessional behavior. (Author/JB)

  18. Genetic diversity of Acanthamoeba isolates from ocean sediments

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua; Ha, Young-Ran; Lee, Sung-Tae; Hong, Yean-Chul; Kong, Hyun-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Genetic diversity of 18 Acanthamoeba isolates from ocean sediments was evaluated by comparing mitochondrial (mt) DNA RFLP, 18S rDNA sequences and by examining their cytopathic effects on human corneal epithelial cells versus reference strains. All isolates belonged to morphologic group II. Total of 16 restriction phenotypes of mtDNA from 18 isolates demonstrated the genetic diversity of Acanthamoeba in ocean sediments. Phylogenetic analysis using 18s rDNA sequences revealed that the 18 isolates were distinct from morphological groups I and III. Fifteen isolates showed close relatedness with 17 clinical isolates and A. castellanii Castellani and formed a lineage equivalent to T4 genotype of Byers' group. Two reference strains from ocean sediment, A. hatchetti BH-2 and A. griffini S-7 clustered unequivocally with these 15 isolates. Diversity among isolates was also evident from their cytopathic effects on human corneal cells. This is the first time describing Acanthamoeba diversity in ocean sediments in Korea. PMID:16809959

  19. Cryogenic Faraday isolator

    SciTech Connect

    Zheleznov, D S; Zelenogorskii, V V; Katin, E V; Mukhin, I B; Palashov, O V; Khazanov, Efim A

    2010-05-26

    A Faraday isolator is described in which thermal effects are suppressed by cooling down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The principal scheme, main characteristics and modifications of the isolator are presented. The isolation degree is studied experimentally for the subkilowatt average laser radiation power. It is shown that the isolator can be used at radiation powers up to tens of kilowatts. (quantum electronic devices)

  20. Isolation of marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Houssen, Wael E; Jaspars, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    Marine macro- and micro-biota offer a wealth of chemically diverse compounds that have been evolutionary preselected to modulate biochemical pathways. Many industrial and academic groups are accessing this source using advanced technology platforms. The previous edition of this chapter offered some practical guidance in the process of extraction and isolation of marine natural products with more emphasis on the procedures adapted to the physical and chemical characteristics of the isolated compounds. Automation and direct integration of the isolation technology into high-throughput screening (HTS) systems were also reported. In this edition, we refer to some new topics which are heavily represented in the literature. These include methods for sampling the deep ocean and the procedures for culturing high-pressure-adapted (piezophilic) marine microorganisms to be amenable to laboratory investigation. A brief discussion on genomic-guided approaches to detect the presence of biosynthetic loci even those that are silent or cryptic is also included.

  1. Apelin Levels In Isolated Coronary Artery Ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, İbrahim; Yıldız, Abdulkadir; Akıl, Mehmet Ata; Acet, Halit; Yüksel, Murat; Polat, Nihat; Aydın, Mesut; Oylumlu, Mustafa; Ertaș, Faruk; Kaya, Hasan; Alan, Sait

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives The etiopathogenesis of coronary artery ectasia (CAE) is not known completely. In most of the cases, CAE is associated with atherosclerosis; however, isolated CAE has a nonatherosclerotic mechanism. The association between atherosclerotic coronary artery disease and apelin has been examined in previous studies. However, the role of plasma apelin in isolated coronary artery ectasia has not been studied. In this study, we investigated the relationship between plasma apelin levels and isolated coronary artery ectasia. Subjects and Methods The study population included a total of 54 patients. Twenty-six patients had isolated CAE (53.6±8.1 years); 28 patients with normal coronary arteries (51.6±8.8 years) and with similar risk factors and demographic characteristics served as the control group. Apelin levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunoassay kit. Results Apelin level in the CAE group was significantly lower (apelin=0.181±0.159 ng/mL) than that in the control group (apelin=0.646±0.578 ng/mL) (p=0.033). Glucose, creatinine, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion In this study, we showed that patients with isolated CAE have decreased plasma apelin levels compared with the control group. Based on the data, a relationship between plasma apelin and isolated CAE was determined. PMID:26413106

  2. Insulin Secretory Defect and Insulin Resistance in Isolated Impaired Fasting Glucose and Isolated Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama-Sasabe, Sae; Fukushima, Mitsuo; Xin, Xin; Taniguchi, Ataru; Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Mitsui, Rie; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hideaki; Yabe, Daisuke; Yasuda, Koichiro; Kurose, Takeshi; Inagaki, Nobuya; Seino, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the characteristics of isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), we analyzed the factors responsible for elevation of 2-hour postchallenge plasma glucose (2 h PG) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels. Methods. We investigated the relationship between 2 h PG and FPG levels who underwent 75 g OGTT in 5620 Japanese subjects at initial examination for medical check-up. We compared clinical characteristics between isolated IGT and isolated IFG and analyzed the relationships of 2 h PG and FPG with clinical characteristics, the indices of insulin secretory capacity, and insulin sensitivity. Results. In a comparison between isolated IGT and isolated IFG, insulinogenic index was lower in isolated IGT than that of isolated IFG (0.43 ± 0.34 versus 0.50 ± 0.47, resp.; p < 0.01). ISI composite was lower in isolated IFG than that of isolated IGT (6.87 ± 3.38 versus 7.98 ± 4.03, resp.; p < 0.0001). In isolated IGT group, insulinogenic index showed a significant correlation with 2 h PG (r = −0.245, p < 0.0001) and had the strongest correlation with 2 h PG (β = −0.290). In isolated IFG group, ISI composite showed a significant correlation with FPG (r = −0.162, p < 0.0001) and had the strongest correlation with FPG (β = −0.214). Conclusions. We have elucidated that decreased early-phase insulin secretion is the most important factor responsible for elevation of 2 h PG levels in isolated IGT subjects, and decreased insulin sensitivity is the most important factor responsible for elevation of FPG levels in isolated IFG subjects. PMID:26788515

  3. Mycobacteria isolated from Chesapeake Bay fish.

    PubMed

    Stine, C B; Kane, A S; Baya, A M

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis in fish can result in ulcers, emaciation, and in some cases death. Mycobacteria have been previously isolated from a variety of Chesapeake Bay fish species, and the current study was designed to identify potential host specificity and location fidelity of mycobacterial isolates. Mycobacteria were isolated from wild fish of the Chesapeake Bay collected from the Upper Bay, the Choptank River, Herring Bay, the Chicamacomico River, the Pocomoke River and the Potomac River in 2003-2006. Mycobacterial isolates were recovered from striped bass, Morone saxatilis, Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, white perch, Morone americana, summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, spot, Leiostomus xanthurus, largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, common carp, Cyprinus carpio carpio, spotted seatrout, Cynoscion nebulosus, killifish, Fundulus sp., blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis, American gizzard shad, Dorosoma cepedianum and American silver perch, Bairdiella chrysoura. Twenty-nine well-defined mycobacterial groups resulted from gas chromatography dendrogram clustering of isolates. The majority of groups included more than one host species and more than one site of collection. However, four groups contained only striped bass isolates, three of which were similar to M. shottsii. Therefore, multiple Chesapeake Bay fish species are colonized with multiple mycobacterial isolates, of which few appear to be host or location specific. PMID:19909394

  4. Mycobacteria isolated from Chesapeake Bay fish.

    PubMed

    Stine, C B; Kane, A S; Baya, A M

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis in fish can result in ulcers, emaciation, and in some cases death. Mycobacteria have been previously isolated from a variety of Chesapeake Bay fish species, and the current study was designed to identify potential host specificity and location fidelity of mycobacterial isolates. Mycobacteria were isolated from wild fish of the Chesapeake Bay collected from the Upper Bay, the Choptank River, Herring Bay, the Chicamacomico River, the Pocomoke River and the Potomac River in 2003-2006. Mycobacterial isolates were recovered from striped bass, Morone saxatilis, Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, white perch, Morone americana, summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, spot, Leiostomus xanthurus, largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, common carp, Cyprinus carpio carpio, spotted seatrout, Cynoscion nebulosus, killifish, Fundulus sp., blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis, American gizzard shad, Dorosoma cepedianum and American silver perch, Bairdiella chrysoura. Twenty-nine well-defined mycobacterial groups resulted from gas chromatography dendrogram clustering of isolates. The majority of groups included more than one host species and more than one site of collection. However, four groups contained only striped bass isolates, three of which were similar to M. shottsii. Therefore, multiple Chesapeake Bay fish species are colonized with multiple mycobacterial isolates, of which few appear to be host or location specific.

  5. Psychopathology of social isolation.

    PubMed

    Baek, Sang-Bin

    2014-06-01

    The most important defining factor of being human is the use of symbolic language. Language or communication problem occurs during the growth, the child will have a higher risk of social isolation and then the survival will be threatened constantly. Today, adolescents and youths are familiar with computer and smart-phone devices, and communication with others by these devices is easy than face-to-face communication. As adolescents and youths live in the comfortable and familiar cyber-world rather than actively participating real society, so they make social isolation. Extreme form of this isolation in adolescents and youths is so-called Socially Withdrawn Youth. In this study, the psychopathological factors inducing social isolation were discussed. Development stages of social isolation in relation with types of social isolation, Ego-syntonic isolation and Ego-dystonic isolation, were also considered.

  6. Seven consecutive successful clinical islet isolations with pancreatic ductal injection.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shinichi; Noguichi, Hirofumi; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Jackson, Andrew; Tamura, Yoshiko; Olson, Greg; Fujita, Yasutaka; Chujo, Daisuke; Takita, Morihito; Kobayashi, Naoya; Onaca, Nicholas; Levy, Marlon

    2010-01-01

    Inconsistent islet isolation is one of the issues of clinical islet transplantation. In the current study, we applied ductal injection to improve the consistency of islet isolation. Seven islet isolations were performed with the ductal injection of ET-Kyoto solution (DI group) and eight islet isolations were performed without the ductal injection (standard group) using brain-dead donor pancreata. Isolated islets were evaluated based on the Edmonton protocol for transplantation. The DI group had significantly higher islet yields (588,566 +/- 64,319 vs. 354,836 +/- 89,649 IE, p < 0.01) and viability (97.3 +/- 1.2% vs. 92.6 +/- 1.2%, p < 0.02) compared with the standard group. All seven isolated islet preparations in the DI group (100%), versus only three out of eight isolated islet preparations (38%) in the standard group met transplantation criteria. The islets from the DI group were transplanted into three type 1 diabetic patients and all three patients became insulin independent. Ductal injection significantly improved quantity and quality of isolated islets and resulted in high success rate of clinical islet transplantation. This simple modification will reduce the risk of failure of clinical islet isolation.

  7. Analog signal isolation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.

    1992-12-31

    This paper discusses several techniques for isolating analog signals in an accelerator environment. The techniques presented here encompass isolation amplifiers, voltage-to-frequency converters (VIFCs), transformers, optocouplers, discrete fiber optics, and commercial fiber optic links. Included within the presentation of each method are the design issues that must be considered when selecting the isolation method for a specific application.

  8. Analog signal isolation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses several techniques for isolating analog signals in an accelerator environment. The techniques presented here encompass isolation amplifiers, voltage-to-frequency converters (VIFCs), transformers, optocouplers, discrete fiber optics, and commercial fiber optic links. Included within the presentation of each method are the design issues that must be considered when selecting the isolation method for a specific application.

  9. A Handbook for Helping Parents "Group."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Catherine; And Others

    A home based project serving special needs children 0 to 5 years old in a rural area developed a mothers' group designed to increase parents' self esteem, decrease their isolation, and provide more information about their child's development. An introductory section outlines general assumptions of the group and describes a sequence of activities…

  10. Behavioral Group Work in a Home for the Aged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsk, N.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Elderly people in institutions frequently become isolated and noncommunicative. By using behavioral measurements of group workers and group members, the authors have formulated ways of treatment that encourage members to participate more actively. (Author)

  11. Lung isolation, one-lung ventilation and hypoxaemia during lung isolation

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Atul; Bhargava, Suresh; Mangal, Vandana; Parashar, Vinod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Lung isolation is being used more frequently in both adult and paediatric age groups due to increasing incidence of thoracoscopy and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in these patients. Various indications for lung isolation and one-lung ventilation include surgical and non-surgical reasons. Isolation can be achieved by double-lumen endotracheal tubes or bronchial blocker. Different issues arise in prone and semi-prone position. The management of hypoxia with lung isolation is a stepwise drill of adding inhaled oxygen, adding positive end-expiratory pressure to ventilated lung and continuous positive airway pressure to non-ventilated side. PMID:26556920

  12. Evaluation of Telephone Support Groups for Persons with HIV Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rounds, Kathleen A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes the development and testing of a telephone support group project for persons with HIV. Examined five outcomes: self-efficacy, social isolation, social support, coping with HIV, and evaluation of the group experience. Found significant positive changes only in some aspects of self-efficacy and in social isolation. Participants rated the…

  13. Origin of floral isolation between ornithophilous and sphingophilous plant species.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, V

    1993-01-01

    Three plant groups in temperate western North America contain closely related ornithophilous and sphingophilous species: the Aquilegia formosa/Aquilegia caerulea group (Ranunculaceae), the Ipomopsis aggregata group (Polemoniaceae), and the Diplacus longiflorus group (Scrophulariaceae). The ornithophilous and sphingophilous species are products of allopatric speciation on the diploid level. Geographical races which are adapted to one class of pollinators in one area where these pollinators are abundant and effective and to another class of pollinators in another geographically isolated area (pollination races) represent a probable intermediate stage in the process of allopatric speciation. Mechanical and ethological isolation (collectively, floral isolation) is a byproduct of the divergence in pollination systems. Selection for reproductive isolation per se has not played any detectable role in the origin of the floral isolation in the three plant groups. PMID:11607421

  14. Erythromycin resistance genes in group A streptococci in Finland. The Finnish Study Group for Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kataja, J; Huovinen, P; Skurnik, M; Seppälä, H

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes isolates (group A streptococcus) of different erythromycin resistance phenotypes were collected from all over Finland in 1994 and 1995 and studied; they were evaluated for their susceptibilities to 14 antimicrobial agents (396 isolates) and the presence of different erythromycin resistance genes (45 isolates). The erythromycin-resistant isolates with the macrolide-resistant but lincosamide- and streptogramin B-susceptible phenotype (M phenotype) were further studied for their plasmid contents and the transferability of resistance genes. Resistance to antimicrobial agents other than macrolides, clindamycin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol was not found. When compared to our previous study performed in 1990, the rate of resistance to tetracycline increased from 10 to 93% among isolates with the inducible resistance (IR) phenotype of macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance. Tetracycline resistance was also found among 75% of the MLSB-resistant isolates with the constitutive resistance (CR) phenotype. Resistance to chloramphenicol was found for the first time in S. pyogenes in Finland; 3% of the isolates with the IR phenotype were resistant. All the chloramphenicol-resistant isolates were also resistant to tetracycline. Detection of erythromycin resistance genes by PCR indicated that, with the exception of one isolate with the CR phenotype, all M-phenotype isolates had the macrolide efflux (mefA) gene and all the MLSB-resistant isolates had the erythromycin resistance methylase (ermTR) gene; the isolate with the CR phenotype contained the ermB gene. No plasmid DNA could be isolated from the M-phenotype isolates, but the mefA gene was transferred by conjugation.

  15. Recent advances in nonlinear passive vibration isolators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, R. A.

    2008-07-01

    The theory of nonlinear vibration isolation has witnessed significant developments due to pressing demands for the protection of structural installations, nuclear reactors, mechanical components, and sensitive instruments from earthquake ground motion, shocks, and impact loads. In view of these demands, engineers and physicists have developed different types of nonlinear vibration isolators. This article presents a comprehensive assessment of recent developments of nonlinear isolators in the absence of active control means. It does not deal with other means of linear or nonlinear vibration absorbers. It begins with the basic concept and features of nonlinear isolators and inherent nonlinear phenomena. Specific types of nonlinear isolators are then discussed, including ultra-low-frequency isolators. For vertical vibration isolation, the treatment of the Euler spring isolator is based on the post-buckling dynamic characteristics of the column elastica and axial stiffness. Exact and approximate analyses of axial stiffness of the post-buckled Euler beam are outlined. Different techniques of reducing the resonant frequency of the isolator are described. Another group is based on the Gospodnetic-Frisch-Fay beam, which is free to slide on two supports. The restoring force of this beam resembles to a great extent the restoring roll moment of biased ships. The base isolation of buildings, bridges, and liquid storage tanks subjected to earthquake ground motion is then described. Base isolation utilizes friction elements, laminated-rubber bearings, and the friction pendulum. Nonlinear viscoelastic and composite material springs, and smart material elements are described in terms of material mechanical characteristics and the dependence of their transmissibility on temperature and excitation amplitude. The article is closed by conclusions, which highlight resolved and unresolved problems and recommendations for future research directions.

  16. Mycobacterium bovis in Swine: Spoligotyping of Isolates from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Barandiaran, Soledad; Martínez Vivot, Marcela; Moras, Eduardo Vicente; Cataldi, Angel Adrián; Zumárraga, Martín José

    2011-01-01

    A total of 143 Mycobacterium bovis isolates of pigs, from the most productive swine area in Argentina, were typed by spoligotyping. Twenty-two different spoligotypes were identified, and 133 (93%) isolates were grouped into 12 clusters. One of them, designed SB0140, was the most frequent because it held 83 (58%) isolates. This spoligotype also grouped 362 (43%) out of 841 isolates from previously typed cattle and, thus, constitutes the most frequent in our country. In addition, 135 (94%) isolates revealed spoligotypes identical to those of cattle, showing an epidemiological link. On the other hand, there were seven novel spoligotypes, six of which were also unique since they had only one isolate each. This study aimed to identify the spoligotypes of M. bovis isolated from pigs to contribute to a better understanding of the distribution of bovine tuberculosis in the main productive area of Argentina. PMID:21547236

  17. Mutation and premating isolation.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  18. Module isolation devices

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Cooke, John Albert; Buzinski, Michael David

    2010-04-27

    A gas flow isolation device includes a gas flow isolation valve movable from an opened condition to a closed condition. The module isolation valve in one embodiment includes a rupture disk in flow communication with a flow of gas when the module isolation valve is in an opened condition. The rupture disk ruptures when a predetermined pressure differential occurs across it causing the isolation valve to close. In one embodiment the valve is mechanically linked to the rupture disk to maintain the valve in an opened condition when the rupture disk is intact, and which permits the valve to move into a closed condition when the rupture disk ruptures. In another embodiment a crushable member maintains the valve in an open condition, and the flow of gas passed the valve upon rupturing of the rupture disk compresses the crushable member to close the isolation valve.

  19. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  20. Identification and characterization of nine atypical Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Albaina, Olatz; Sahand, Ismail H; Brusca, María I; Sullivan, Derek J; Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo; Moragues, María D

    2015-02-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a pathogenic yeast of the genus Candida closely related to Candida albicans. The phenotypic similarity of these two species often leads to misidentification of C. dubliniensis isolates in clinical samples. DNA-based methods continue to be the most effective means of discriminating accurately between the two species. Here, we report on the identification of nine unusual Candida isolates that showed ambiguous identification patterns on the basis of their phenotypic and immunological traits. The isolates were categorized into two groups. Group I isolates were unable to produce germ tubes and chlamydospores, and to agglutinate commercial latex particles coated with a mAb highly specific for C. dubliniensis. Group II isolates grew as pink and white colonies on CHROMagar Candida and ChromID Candida, respectively. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles obtained with API/ID32C together with PCR amplification with specific primers and DNA sequencing allowed reliable identification of the nine unusual clinical isolates as C. dubliniensis. PMID:25480879

  1. Group Work Publication-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  2. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  3. An isolation effect in serial memory for spatial information.

    PubMed

    Guérard, Katherine; Hughes, Robert W; Tremblay, Sébastien

    2008-05-01

    This paper reports the first demonstration of an isolation effect or von Restorff effect (von Restorff, 1933) in the context of a spatial-memory task: Short-term serial recall was enhanced for both the location and the serial position of one red dot presented amongst a sequence of otherwise black dots. When the serial position of the isolate was fixed, the spatial isolation effect only emerged when participants received a control block of trials before the block of isolation trials (Experiment 1). However, when the serial position of the isolate was varied across isolation trials, an isolation effect was still produced regardless of condition order (Experiment 2). It is suggested that both temporal grouping strategies and greater item-specific processing may have contributed to the enhanced retention of the isolate.

  4. Characteristics of Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from diseased and healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Asako; Shimizu, Akira; Kawano, Junichi; Wakita, Yoshihisa; Hayashi, Toshikatsu; Ootsuki, Shigenobu

    2005-01-01

    Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from diseased and healthy dogs were examined for production of extracellular enzymes and toxins, and phage patterns. There were no significant differences between the two groups of isolates in the production rates of DNase, protease, lipase, gelatinase, hyaluronidase, hemolysins, protein A, and TSST-1, or in phage patterns. But the production rate of enterotoxins in isolates from diseased dogs was significantly higher than that in isolates from healthy dogs. PFGE analysis was performed with isolates from different body sites in individual dogs. In 3 of 6 healthy dogs, identical PFGE patterns were seen in isolates from the nares, external auditory meatus or skin. The remaining 3 dogs yielded isolates of different patterns. In 4 of 6 diseased dogs, identical patterns were seen in isolates from lesions as well as from the other normal sites.

  5. Phylogenetic Relationships of Southern African West Nile Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Grobbelaar, Antoinette A.; Leman, Patricia A.; Anthony, Fiona S.; Gibson, Georgina V.F.; Swanepoel, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships were examined for 29 southern African West Nile virus (formal name West Nile virus [WNV]) isolates from various sources in four countries from 1958 to 2001. In addition sequence data were retrieved from GenBank for another 23 WNV isolates and Kunjin and Japanese encephalitis viruses. All isolates belonged to two lineages. Lineage 1 isolates were from central and North Africa, Europe, Israel, and North America; lineage 2 isolates<