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Sample records for fragments stabs final

  1. Ultraselective Sorbents. Task 2: Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs)/Stabilized Antibody Fragments (STABs). Final Report FY 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Scott D.

    2004-09-01

    This report describes the preparation and application of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the highly selective analysis of target signature compounds. The overall goal of this project task is to exploit the high selectivity of MIPs to generate a pure and enriched fraction of target analyte from environmental samples, either during the sampling stage or immediately thereafter. Due to the high purity of analyte fraction obtained, simplified field portable instrumentation that is capable of high performance trace analysis can be constructed. Major sections contained in this FY 2004 Final Report describe: (1) the synthesis and evaluation of MIPs specific toward explosives, (2) the design, construction, and performance of a novel instrument for the trace aqueous analysis of G-series nerve agent hydrolysis compounds, and (3) interfacing MIP separations with ion mobility spectrometric detection.

  2. Stab or throw? Biomechanical studies on the injuring potential of glass fragments.

    PubMed

    Sterzik, Vera; Kneubuehl, Beat; Rupp, Wolf; Bohnert, Michael

    2010-06-15

    During a Christmas party, two male guests started fighting. The perpetrator was allegedly pushed onto a glass table by the victim or fell into the table together with that man so that the glass top broke and caused a cut wound on the perpetrator's back. According to his statement he then threw a fragment of the broken glass table in the direction of the other man hitting him accidentally in a way so that the subclavian artery was severed and he died from exsanguination. Tests on the breaking characteristics of the glass table, the flying behaviour and the kinetics of thrown glass fragments conducted on various models supported the conclusion that the fatal injury on the victim's neck could not have been caused by a thrown glass fragment. It was much more likely that a stab with a blade-shaped glass fragment was the cause of the fatal injuries. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-11

    a mixture of lead azide, lead styphnate , barium nitrate, antimony sulfides, and tetracene) mJ millijoule (10–3 J) FINAL REPORT PP...initiating mix (NOL-130) and transfer charge of current stab detonators contain hazardous materials such as lead azide, lead styphnate , and barium nitrate...tetracene) and heavy metal constituents (e.g., lead styphnate , lead azide, barium nitrate, and antimony sulfides) present in the NOL-130 initiating

  4. Pressure-balanced stab connection

    SciTech Connect

    Best, M.J.A.; Jones, R.H.; Hynes, J.H.; Pond, R.J.; Gordon, C.R.

    1987-09-22

    This patent describes an apparatus for sealingly connecting a flow bore of a wellhead to a flowline. It consists of: a stab member including a stab body. The stab body has a stab body bore. One end of the stab body bore exiting from the stab body and being in fluid communication with the flow bore and the other end of the stab body bore exiting from a side of the stab body through a stab body side port; a stab receptacle mounted on the wellhead and having a stab receiving bore for receiving the stab body; the stab receptacle having a receptacle flow bore. One end of the receptacle flow bore being in fluid communication with the stab receiving bore and the other end of the receptacle flow bore exiting the stab receptacle and being in fluid communication with the flowline; means for establishing fluid communication between the stab body side port and the one end of the receptacle flow bore when the stab body is received within the stab receiving bore. It includes means disposed on the stab member for orienting the stab member with respect to the Christmas tree for ensuring the alignment of the stab body side port with the one end of the receptable flow bore when the stab body is received within the stab receiving bore; and first and second sealing means disposed on the stab body above and below the stab body side port, respectively, for sealing engagement with the walls of the stab receiving bore above and below the one end of the receptable flow bore for establishing a non-blow-apart, fluid pressure sealed flow passage between the stab body bore of the stab member and the receptacle flow bore of the stab receptacle when the stab body is landed within the stab receiving bore.

  5. Back stab

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Susitna; Baerlocher, Mark Otto; Asch, Murray R.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the evidence supporting use of percutaneous vertebroplasty for relief of pain and mechanical stability in patients with vertebral compression fractures unrelieved by conventional measures. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE Ovid MEDLINE was searched from January 1966 to December2006 for all English-language papers on vertebroplasty. The quality of evidence in these papers was graded according to the 4-point classification system of evidence-based medicine. Level II evidence currently supports use of vertebroplasty. MAIN MESSAGE Vertebroplasty alleviates pain from vertebral compression fractures that result from osteoporosis, hemangiomas, malignancies, and vertebral osteonecrosis. Vertebroplasty has provided substantial pain relief in 60% to 100% of patients; has decreasedanalgesic use in 34% to 91% of patients; and has improved physical mobility in 29% to 100% of patients. Contraindications to vertebroplasty include asymptomatic compression fractures of the vertebral body, vertebra plana, retropulsed bone fragments or tumours, active infection, uncorrectable coagulopathy, allergy to the bone cement or opacification agent, severe cardiopulmonary disease, pregnancy, and pre-existing radiculopathy. The short-term complication rate was found to be 0.5% to 54%. Rare but serious complications include compression of the spinal cord or nerve root, infection, cement embolization causing pulmonary infarct and clinical symptoms, paradoxical embolization of the cerebral artery, and severe hematomas. CONCLUSION Vertebroplasty is a safe and effective treatment for vertebral fractures that cannot be treated using conservative measures. PMID:17872813

  6. Stab water supply system

    SciTech Connect

    Hammett, D.S.

    1983-02-08

    Apparatus and method for fire suppression on offshore oil platforms including a stab receptacle on an outer surface of a platform connected to a fluid distribution system within the platform for distributing fire suppressing fluid to selected locations, a stab carrying a fluid conduit from a self-propelled service vessel, with the stab being in turn supported on a boom extending from the service vessel, a pumping system on the service vessel for supplying fire suppressing fluid through the conduit to the stab and thereby to the preselected locations. The service vessel is preferably a semi-submersible and includes a system for dynamic positioning of the vessel such as side thrusters in addition to a main propulsion unit.

  7. Primary stabbing headache.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Juan A; Sjaastad, Ottar

    2010-01-01

    Primary stabbing headache is characterized by transient, cephalic ultrashort stabs of pain. It is a frequent complaint with a prevalence of 35.2%, a female preponderance, and a mean age of onset of 28 years (Vågå study). Attacks are generally characterized by moderate to severe, jabbing or stabbing pain, lasting from a fraction of a second to 3s. Attack frequency is generally low, with one or a few attacks per day. The paroxysms generally occur spontaneously, during daytime. Most patients exhibit a sporadic pattern, with an erratic, unpredictable alternation between symptomatic and non-symptomatic periods. Paroxysms are almost invariably unilateral. Temporal and fronto-ocular areas are most frequently affected. Attacks tend to move from one area to another, in either the same or the opposite hemicranium. Jabs may be accompanied by a shock-like feeling and even by head movement - "jolts" -or vocalization. On rare occasions, conjunctival hemorrhage and monocular vision loss have been described as associated features. Primary stabbing headache may concur, synchronously or independently, with other primary headaches. In contrast to what is the case in adults, in childhood it is not usually associated with other headaches. Treatment is rarely necessary. Indomethacin, 75-150 mg daily, may seem to be of some avail. Celecoxib, nifedipine, melatonin, and gabapentin have been reported to be effective in isolated cases and small series of patients. The drug studies need corroboration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A

    2005-12-21

    Many energetic systems can be activated via mechanical means. Percussion primers in small caliber ammunition and stab detonators used in medium caliber ammunition are just two examples. Current medium caliber (20-60mm) munitions are detonated through the use of impact sensitive stab detonators. Stab detonators are very sensitive and must be small, as to meet weight and size limitations. A mix of energetic powders, sensitive to mechanical stimulus, is typically used to ignite such devices. Stab detonators are mechanically activated by forcing a firing pin through the closure disc of the device and into the stab initiating mix. Rapid heating caused by mechanically driven compression and friction of the mixture results in its ignition. The rapid decomposition of these materials generates a pressure/temperature pulse that is sufficient to initiate a transfer charge, which has enough output energy to detonate the main charge. This general type of ignition mix is used in a large variety of primers, igniters, and detonators.[1] Common primer mixes, such as NOL-130, are made up of lead styphnate (basic) 40%, lead azide (dextrinated) 20%, barium nitrate 20%, antimony sulfide 15%, and tetrazene 5%.[1] These materials pose acute and chronic toxicity hazards during mixing of the composition and later in the item life cycle after the item has been field functioned. There is an established need to replace these mixes on toxicity, health, and environmental hazard grounds. This effort attempts to demonstrate that environmentally acceptable energetic solgel coated flash metal multilayer nanocomposites can be used to replace current impact initiated devices (IIDs), which have hazardous and toxic components. Successful completion of this project will result in IIDs that include innocuous compounds, have sufficient output energy for initiation, meet current military specifications, are small, cost competitive, and perform as well as or better than current devices. We expect flash

  9. Primary and secondary stabbing headache.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew S; Evans, Randolph W

    2015-04-01

    Eight out of the 33 cases of primary stabbing headache seen in a general neurology clinic (40% have headache as their chief complaint) in the last 3.5 years are presented. The epidemiology, association with other primary headache disorders, secondary associations, testing, and treatment of primary stabbing headache are reviewed.

  10. Biomechanics of knife stab attacks.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, E K; Nicol, A C; Lane, J V; Gray, T G

    1999-10-25

    Equipment, materials and methods for the measurement of the biomechanical parameters governing knife stab attacks have been developed and data have been presented that are relevant to the improvement of standards for the testing of stab-resistant materials. A six-camera Vicon motion analysis system was used to measure velocity, and derive energy and momentum during the approach phase of the attack and a specially developed force-measuring knife was used to measure three-dimensional forces and torque during the impact phase. The body segments associated with the knife were modelled as a series of rigid segments: trunk, upper arm, forearm and hand. The velocities of these segments, together with knowledge of the mass distribution from biomechanical tables, allowed the calculation of the individual segment energy and momentum values. The instrumented knife measured four components of load: axial force (along the length of the blade), cutting force (parallel to the breadth of the blade), lateral force (across the blade) and torque (twisting action) using foil strain gauges. Twenty volunteers were asked to stab a target with near maximal effort. Three styles of stab were used: a short thrust forward, a horizontal style sweep around the body and an overhand stab. These styles were chosen based on reported incidents, providing more realistic data than had previously existed. The 95th percentile values for axial force and energy were 1885 N and 69 J, respectively. The ability of current test methods to reproduce the mechanical parameters measured in human stab attacks has been assessed. It was found that current test methods could reproduce the range of energy and force values measured in the human stab attacks, although the simulation was not accurate in some respects. Non-axial force and torque values were also found to be significant in the human tests, but these are not reproduced in the standard mechanical tests.

  11. [Stab wounds in emergency department].

    PubMed

    Bège, T; Berdah, S V; Brunet, C

    2013-12-01

    Stab wounds represent the most common cause of penetrating wounds, occurring mainly in case of aggression or suicide attempt. Clinical severity depends on the superficial or penetrating aspect of the wound, its location and damaged organs. Medical management must be known because the vital risk is involved in penetrating wounds. Hemodynamically unstable patients should be operated without delay after performing a chest X-ray and ultrasound Focus assisted sonography for trauma (FAST) to guide the surgery. In the stable patients, the general clinical examination, exploration of the wound and medical imaging detect injuries requiring surgical management. Stab penetrating wounds require close and rapid collaboration between medical teams, tailored to the institution's resources.

  12. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E

    2006-07-07

    The coupling of energetic metallic multilayers (a.k.a. flash metal) with energetic sol-gel synthesis and processing is an entirely new approach to forming energetic devices for several DoD and DOE needs. They are also practical and commercially viable manufacturing techniques. Improved occupational safety and health, performance, reliability, reproducibility, and environmentally acceptable processing can be achieved using these methodologies and materials. The development and fielding of this technology will enhance mission readiness and reduce the costs, environmental risks and the necessity of resolving environmental concerns related to maintaining military readiness while simultaneously enhancing safety and health. Without sacrificing current performance, we will formulate new impact initiated device (IID) compositions to replace materials from the current composition that pose significant environmental, health, and safety problems associated with functions such as synthesis, material receipt, storage, handling, processing into the composition, reaction products from testing, and safe disposal. To do this, we will advance the use of nanocomposite preparation via the use of multilayer flash metal and sol-gel technologies and apply it to new small IIDs. This work will also serve to demonstrate that these technologies and resultant materials are relevant and practical to a variety of energetic needs of DoD and DOE. The goal will be to produce an IID whose composition is acceptable by OSHA, EPA, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Recovery Act, etc. standards, without sacrificing current performance. The development of environmentally benign stab detonators and igniters will result in the removal of hazardous and toxic components associated with their manufacturing, handling, and use. This will lead to improved worker safety during manufacturing as well as reduced exposure of Service personnel during their storage and or use in operations. The

  13. Analytical assessment of woven fabrics under vertical stabbing - The role of protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Sayyed Mahdi; Kadivar, Nastaran; Sajjadi, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Knives are being used more commonly in street fights and muggings. Therefore, this work presents an analytical model for woven fabrics under vertical stabbing loads. The model is based on energy method and the fabric is assumed to be unidirectional comprised of N layers. Thus, the ultimate stab resistance of fabric was determined based on structural parameters of fabric and geometrical characteristics of blade. Moreover, protective clothing is nowadays considered as a strategic branch in technical textile industry. The main idea of the present work is improving the stab resistance of woven textiles by using metal coating method. In the final, a series of vertical stabbing tests were conducted on cotton, polyester and polyamide fabrics. Consequently, it was found that the model predicts with a good accuracy the ultimate stab resistance of the sample fabrics.

  14. Stab Sensitivity of Energetic Nanolaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A; Barbee, T; Cervantes, O

    2006-05-22

    This work details the stab ignition, small-scale safety, and energy release characteristics of bimetallic Al/Ni(V) and Al/Monel energetic nanolaminate freestanding thin films. The influence of the engineered nanostructural features of the energetic multilayers is correlated with both stab initiation and small-scale energetic materials testing results. Structural parameters of the energetic thin films found to be important include the bi-layer period, total thickness of the film, and presence or absence of aluminum coating layers. In general the most sensitive nanolaminates were those that were relatively thick, possessed fine bi-layer periods, and were not coated. Energetic nanolaminates were tested for their stab sensitivity as freestanding continuous parts and as coarse powders. The stab sensitivity of mock M55 detonators loaded with energetic nanolaminate was found to depend strongly upon both the particle size of the material and the configuration of nanolaminate material, in the detonator cup. In these instances stab ignition was observed with input energies as low as 5 mJ for a coarse powder with an average particle dimension of 400 {micro}m. Selected experiments indicate that the reacting nanolaminate can be used to ignite other energetic materials such as sol-gel nanostructured thermite, and conventional thermite that was either coated onto the multilayer substrate or pressed on it. These results demonstrate that energetic nanolaminates can be tuned to have precise and controlled ignition thresholds and can initiate other energetic materials and therefore are viable candidates as lead-free impact initiated igniters or detonators.

  15. An assessment of human performance in stabbing.

    PubMed

    Horsfall, I; Prosser, P D; Watson, C H; Champion, S M

    1999-06-28

    Stab-resistant body armour is now becoming a standard item of equipment for police officers in the United Kingdom. In the UK these are usually required to have a stab resistance as specified by the Police Scientific Development Branch KR42 standard [G. Parker, PSDB Stab Resistant Body Armour Test Procedure, Police Scientific Development Branch, Publication No 10/93, 1993]. There are several other test standards, all of which specify that body armour must resist penetration by a specific blade type delivered at a specific energy level or range of levels. However, the actual range of energy levels specified varies over almost an order of magnitude and the basis for these levels is not clearly defined. This paper describes tests to determine the energy range and characteristics of stabbing actions that might be directed against stab resistant body armour by an assailant. The energy and velocity that can be achieved in stabbing actions has been determined for a number of sample populations. Volunteers were asked to stab a target using an instrumented knife that measured the axial force and acceleration during the stabbing. The maximum energy obtained in underarm stabbing actions was 64 J whilst overarm stabbing actions could produce 115 J. The loads produced on contact with the target often approached 1000 N.

  16. Stabbing balls and simplifying proteins.

    PubMed

    Daescu, Ovidiu; Luo, Jun

    2009-01-01

    We address the problem of stabbing a sequence of indexed balls B = {B1,B2, . . . , Bn} in R(3), where Bi (1 stabs the ball Bk; the goal is to minimise m. The problem finds applications in simplification of molecule chains for visualisation, matching and efficient searching in molecule and protein databases. We implemented the algorithm and created a web server where one can input a pdb file and get the simplified protein chains. We did experiments on thousands of proteins from the PDB Bank to estimate the simplification ratio achieved.

  17. Pediatric-onset extracephalic stabbing pain.

    PubMed

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Kano, Shinsuke; Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Kure, Shigeo

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic stabbing headache is a primary headache defined as "transient stabs of pain in the head that occur spontaneously in the absence of underlying organic disease." Although its variant form, stabbing pain with extracephalic distribution, has been reported in rare adult cases, pediatric presentation is extremely rare. We report an 8-year-old boy suffering from severe stabbing pain in the left side of the chest, right side of the abdomen, and right knee lasting 2 to 3 minutes with increasing frequency. He was completely normal between attacks. The attack was not accompanied with headache initially. Investigation showed no abnormality. A diagnosis of extracephalic stabbing pain was made. The patient's symptoms were ameliorated by administration of valproic acid. This report illustrates that extracephalic stabbing pain can occur in pediatric patients. It is important to be aware of this peculiar condition because the pain is so severe, and it can be treatable with medication. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. Improved Barriers to Turbine Engine Fragments: Final Annual Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    failure behavior in the vicinity of a pegged hole. A series of these fabric corner failure tests in both Zylon and Kevlar fabrics determined that...barrier) upon the ballistic efficiency of the barrier. In some cases, Keviar could be as effective as (or more effective than) Zylon , due to the larger...fraction of impact energy consumed in producing comer tearing. A considerable database of large-scale fragment impact tests into Zylon and Kevlar fabric

  19. FY04&05 LDRD Final Report Fission Fragment Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B; Trelenberg, T; Meier, T; Felter, T; Sturgeon, J; Kuboda, A; Wolfer, B

    2006-02-22

    Fission fragments born within the first 7 {micro}m of the surface of U metal can eject a thousand or more atoms per fission event. Existing data in the literature show that the sputtering yield ranges from 10 to 10,000 atoms per fission event near the surface, but nothing definitive is known about the energy of the sputtered clusters. Experimental packages were constructed allowing the neutron irradiation of natural uranium foils to investigate the amount of material removed per fission event and the kinetic energy distribution of the sputtered atoms. Samples were irradiated but were never analyzed after irradiation. Similar experiments were attempted in a non-radioactive environment using accelerator driven ions in place of fission induced fragments. These experiments showed that tracks produced parallel to the surface (and not perpendicular to the surface) are the primary source of the resulting particulate ejecta. Modeling studies were conducted in parallel with the experimental work. Because the reactor irradiation experiments were not analyzed, data on the energy of the resulting particulate ejecta was not obtained. However, some data was found in the literature on self sputtering of {sup 252}Cf that was used to estimate the velocity and hence the energy of the ejected particulates. Modeling of the data in the literature showed that the energy of the ejecta was much lower than had been anticipated. A mechanism to understand the nature of the ejecta was pursued. Initially it was proposed that the fission fragment imparts its momenta on the electrons which then impart their momenta on the nuclei. Once the nuclei are in motion, the particulate ejecta would result. This initial model was wrong. The error was in the assumption that the secondary electrons impart their momenta directly on the nuclei. Modeling and theoretical considerations showed that the secondary electrons scatter many times before imparting all their momenta. As a result, their energy transfer is

  20. Development of a high-density nonwoven structure to improve the stab resistance of protective clothing material.

    PubMed

    Bao, Limin; Wang, Yanling; Baba, Takeichiro; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Wakatsuki, Kaoru; Morikawa, Hideaki

    2017-10-05

    The purpose of this research was to enhance the stab resistance of protective clothing material by developing a new high-density nonwoven structure. Ice picks often injure Japanese police officers due to the strict regulation of swords in the country. Consequently, this study was designed to improve stab resistance against ice picks. Most existing anti-stab protective clothing research has focused on various fabrics impregnated with resin, an approach that brings with it problems of high cost and complicated processing. Seldom has research addressed the potential for improving stab resistance by using nonwoven structures, which exhibit better stab resistance than fabric. In this research, we prepared a series of nonwoven structures with densities ranging from about 0.14 g/cm(3) to 0.46 g/cm(3) by varying the number of stacked layers of Kevlar/polyester nonwoven under a hot press. We then proposed two methods for producing such hot-press nonwovens: the multilayer hot-press method and the monolayer hot-press method. Stab resistance was evaluated according to NIJ Standard-0115.00. We also investigated the relationship among nonwoven density, stab resistance, and flexural rigidity, and here we discuss the respective properties of the two proposed methods. Our results show that stab resistance and flexural rigidity increase with nonwoven density, but flexural rigidity of nonwovens prepared using the monolayer hot-press method only shows a slight change as nonwoven density increases. Though the two methods exhibit little difference in maximum load, the flexural rigidity of nonwovens prepared using the monolayer hot-press method is much lower, which contributes to superior wear comfort. Finally, we investigated the mechanism behind the stabbing process. Stabbing with an ice pick is a complicated process that involves many factors. Our findings indicate that nonwovens stop penetration primarily in two ways: nonwoven deformation and fiber fractures.

  1. Merging, spinning and bouncing in catastrophic collisions: Consequences for final fragment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Benz, W.; Tanga, P.; Richardson, D. C.

    2001-11-01

    We present new simulations of collisions between asteroids which take into account the production of gravitationally reaccumulated spinning bodies, using a procedure which divides the process into two phases. Using a 3D SPH hydrocode, the fragmentation of the solid target through crack propagation is first computed. Then the simulation of the gravitational evolution and possible reaccumulation of the resulting new fragments is performed using the parallel N-body code pkdgrav. Our first simulations succeeded in reproducing fundamental properties of some well-identified asteroid families. We have now included the possibility of fragments bouncing (instead of strictly merging) when collisions occur at high speed during the gravitational phase. We present comparisons of simulations in three different impact regimes, from highly catastrophic to barely disruptive, using different values of the coefficient of restitution. The largest fragment mass resulting from the reaccumulation of smaller fragments and the ejection velocities of these fragments remain statistically similar for each regime despite the different values of the coefficient of restitution. The final fragment size distribution is also unchanged in the barely disruptive regime, whereas fewer fragments at intermediate sizes seem to be produced at higher impact energy, due to high-speed collisions between fragments during the gravitational phase which prevent merging. Distributions of fragment spins have been analyzed and results are consistent with observations, which supports the idea that disruptive impacts destroy the memory of initial spin. We also observe the natural production of satellite systems around some fragments. We plan to continue our investigations using this procedure and to improve upon the modelling of fundamental physical effects during collisions.

  2. [Adequate management of stab and gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Tonus, C; Preuss, M; Kasparek, S; Nier, H

    2003-11-01

    It is difficult to verify the treatment of stab and gunshot wounds with prospective randomized studies. That is why the results of observational studies are so important. From 1 January 1989 to 31 December 1998, we saw 74 patients because of stab (64) and gunshot (ten) wounds. Most of the patients, whose injuries were caused mainly for criminal reasons (criminal 54, autoaggressive 14, accidental 4, unknown 2), came to hospital on weekends. We saw 38 abdominal, 23 thoracic, and 13 mixed injuries. On average, 3.8 h passed between the time of injury and getting first aid. Concerning abdominal injuries, we counted 21 negative intraoperative results. Two of 12 thoracic injuries showed no further damage. The patients stayed in hospital for 13.1 days on average. The morbidity was 28.38%, and mortality was 5.41%. Abdominal gunshot wounds need immediate surgical treatment. Concerning stab wounds, obligatory as well as selective surgical methods are both acceptable. Because of valid diagnostic options, thoracic stab wounds allow several ways of treatment.

  3. Forensic evidence in apparel fabrics due to stab events.

    PubMed

    Kemp, S E; Carr, D J; Kieser, J; Niven, B E; Taylor, M C

    2009-10-30

    Stab injuries and fatalities have been reported to be the most common crimes of violence in several countries, particularly in those where access to firearms is restricted [J.M. Taupin, F.-P. Adolf, J. Robertson, Examination of damage to textiles, in: J. Robertson, M. Grieve (Eds.), Forensic Examination of Fibres, CRC Press, United States of America, 1999, pp. 65-87; A.C. Hunt, R.J. Cowling, Murder by stabbing, Forensic Sci. Int. 52 (1991) 107-112; D.A. Rouse, Patterns of stab wounds: a six year study, Med. Sci. Law 34 (1994) 67-71]. Analysis of damaged apparel may provide important information about the cause of death and the events leading up to and after the victim's final moments [M.T. Pailthorpe, N.A.G. Johnson, The private forensic scientist and the criminal justice system, in: D. Biles, J. Vernon (Eds.), Private Sector and Community Involvement in the Criminal Justice System: Conference Proceedings, vol. 23, Australian Institute of Criminology, Wellington, 1994, 231-240]. A high proportion of stab wounds occur in the chest and as this area is generally clothed many sharp force cases involve damage to fabrics [J.M. Taupin, F.-P. Adolf, J. Robertson, Examination of damage to textiles, in: J. Robertson, M. Grieve (Eds.), Forensic Examination of Fibres, CRC Press, United States of America, 1999, pp. 65-87; A.C. Hunt, R.J. Cowling, Murder by stabbing, Forensic Sci. Int. 52 (1991) 107-112; D.A. Rouse, Patterns of stab wounds: a six year study, Med. Sci. Law 34 (1994) 67-71]. The structural stabilisation and degradation of fabric due to laundering significantly alters fabric properties [S.E. Gore, R.M. Laing, C.A. Wilson, D.J. Carr, B.E. Niven, Standardizing a pre-treatment cleaning procedure and effects of application on apparel fabrics, Text. Res. J. 76 (2006) 455-464], yet the effect of such on severance morphology does not appear to have been investigated. In this work the effect of blade type (hunting knife, kitchen knife, screwdriver) on new and laundered

  4. Primary stabbing "ice-pick" headache.

    PubMed

    Mukharesh, Loulwah O; Jan, Mohammed M S

    2011-10-01

    Primary stabbing "ice-pick" headache is rarely reported in children. It is characterized by transient, sharp stabbing pain that occurs within a localized area of the scalp for seconds. Five children were diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders Diagnostic Criteria, Second Edition. Ages at diagnosis ranged from 6-16 years (mean age, 9.8 years), with signs lasting for 3-12 months (mean, 6.5 months) before assessment. All children presented with recurrent daily to monthly headaches that were very brief, lasting for seconds. The headache was orbital in one child, temporal in one child, and occipital in three children. Three children manifested other associated migraine headache types, and two had a positive family history of migraine. Amitriptyline was prescribed to two patients because of headache frequency and severity. The signs gradually subsided in all patients during follow-up of 3 months to 5 years (mean, 27 months). Primary stabbing headache may occasionally occur in children with features different from those encountered in adults. The headache is less frequent and often occipital in location. Its signs respond well to amitriptyline. However, larger prospective pediatric studies are needed to describe this syndrome further.

  5. Transient stabbing headache from an acute thalamic hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew S

    2011-06-01

    Stabbing headache can be encountered in both primary and secondary forms, but has been infrequently reported among patients with stroke, and is not known to be associated with a small well-circumscribed brain lesion. A 95-year-old woman taking warfarin presented with the sudden onset of stabbing headache strictly in the right frontal and supraorbital regions, along with gait imbalance and dysarthria. Neuroimaging revealed a small left thalamic hematoma. This association of an acute thalamic lesion with stabbing headache in the contralateral trigeminal distribution is discussed, along with a brief review of stabbing headache occurring in cerebrovascular disease.

  6. Herpes simplex virus following stab phlebectomy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Lum, Ying Wei; Heller, Jennifer A

    2017-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection following surgery is an unusual postoperative phenomenon. Many mechanisms have been suggested, with the most likely explanation related to latent virus reactivation due to a proinflammatory response in the setting of local trauma. Here, we present a case of herpes simplex virus reactivation in an immunocompetent female following a conventional right lower extremity stab phlebectomy. Salient clinical and physical examination findings are described, and management strategies for herpes simplex virus reactivation are outlined. This is the first known case report of herpes simplex virus reactivation following lower extremity phlebectomy.

  7. A Comparison of Self-Inflicted Stab Wounds Versus Assault-Induced Stab Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sanghyun; Kim, Dong Jin; Paik, Kwang Yeol; Chung, Jae Hee; Park, Woo-Chan; Kim, Wook; Lee, In Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Background Although self-inflicted and assault-induced knife injuries might have different mortality and morbidity rates, no studies have actually evaluated the importance of the cause of knife injuries in terms of patient outcomes and treatment strategies. Objectives The aims of this study were to assess the difference between the outcomes of patients presenting with self-inflicted stab wounds (SISW) versus assault-induced stab wounds (AISW). Patients and Methods A retrospective review of the relevant electronic medical records was performed for the period between January 2000 and December 2012 for patients who were referred to the department of surgery for stab wounds by the trauma team. The patients were divided into either SISW (n = 10) or AISW groups (n = 11), depending on the cause of the injury. Results A total of 19 patients had undergone exploratory laparotomy. Of the nine patients with SISW undergoing this procedure, no injury was found in seven of the patients. In the AISW group, eight of the ten laparotomies were therapeutic. Three patients in the AISW group died during hospital admission. The average number of stab wounds was 1.2 for the SISW group and 3.5 for the AISW group. Organ injuries were more frequent in the AISW group, affecting the lung (2), diaphragm (3), liver (5), small bowel (2), colon (2), and kidney (1). Conclusions Although evaluations of the initial vital signs and physical examinations are still important, the history regarding the source of the stab wounds (AISW vs. SISW) may be helpful in determining the appropriate treatment methods and predicting patient outcomes. PMID:28184363

  8. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of 34U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2008-12-01

    The kinetic energy distribution as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of $^{234}U$, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al. presents a peak around m=108 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number; and the second peak to the distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy. Nevertheless, the theoretical calculations related to primary distribution made by Faust et al. do not result in a peak around m = 122. In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without peaks on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on the standard deviation of the kinetic energy distribution around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as big as the measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass, the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass.

  9. Retained garden fork following cranial stab injury.

    PubMed

    Gonya, Sonwabile; Mbatha, Andile; Moyeni, Nondabula; Enicker, Basil

    2016-01-07

    Retained garden fork is a rare complication of penetrating cranial trauma. Retained knife blade is the most commonly reported presentation. We report an unusual case of a 30-year-old male patient treated at our institution, who presented with a retained garden fork following a stab to the head, with no associated neurological deficits. Computerized tomographic scan of the brain was performed preoperatively to assess the trajectory of the weapon and parenchymal injury. A craniectomy was performed to facilitate removal of the weapon in the operating theatre under general anaesthesia. Intravenous prophylactic antibiotics were administered pre- and postoperatively to prevent septic complications. The patient recovered well and was discharged home. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016.

  10. Ultrasonic Weld Sealing of M55 Stab Detonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    Single-base Fluorocarbon HIGH EXPLOSIVES PRIMERS Cannon Electric Pistol Shot Stab Lithium aluminum hydride Magnesium hydride Bromine...trifluoride Nitronium perchlorate Fluoboric acid Inhibited red fuming nitric acid (IRFNA) Phosphorus sesquisulfide, red phosphorus and potassium

  11. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion.

  12. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion. PMID:26834329

  13. Mesenteric calcification following abdominal stab wound

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Caitlin W.; Velopulos, Catherine G.; Sacks, Justin M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Heterotopic ossification (HO) refers to the formation of bone in non-ossifying tissue. Heterotopic mesenteric ossification is a rare form of HO that is characterized by the formation of an ossifying pseudotumour at the base of the mesentery, usually following abdominal surgery. PRESENTATION OF CASE We describe a case of mesenteric HO in a young male who presented for elective ventral incisional hernia repair following a stab wound to the abdomen requiring exploratory laparotomy 21 months earlier. Preoperative workup was unremarkable, but a hard, bone-like lesion was noted to encircle the base of the mesentery upon entering the abdomen, consistent with HO. The lesion was excised with close margins, and his hernia was repaired without incident. DISCUSSION Traumatic HO describes the ossification of extra-skeletal tissue that specifically follows a traumatic event. It usually occurs adjacent to skeletal tissue, but has been occasionally described in the abdomen as well, usually in patients who suffer abdominal trauma. Overall the prognosis of HO is good, as it is considered a benign lesion with no malignant potential. However, the major morbidity associated with mesenteric HO is bowel obstruction. CONCLUSION The size, location, and symptoms related to our patient's mesenteric HO put him risk for obstruction in the future. As a result, the mass was surgically excised during his ventral hernia repair with good outcomes. PMID:24981165

  14. Assault induced stab injuries: epidemiology and actual treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    El-Abdellati, E; Messaoudi, N; Van Hee, R

    2011-01-01

    To investigate and analyse epidemiology, demographics and patterns of presentation of assault induced stab injuries in a main Belgian trauma centre. To evaluate surgical management, complications and postoperative follow-up of the stab wound victims. One hundred and seventy assaulted patients, hospitalised because of stab injuries from January 2000 to June 2007 are studied retrospectively. Ninety-five percent of the assaults occurred on men and the mean age of the patients was 31.1 +/- 9.7 years. Ethnic minorities represent 77% of the patients hospitalised for assaults and 26.5% of all patients proved to be under toxic influence, predominantly from alcohol (21.8%). A decline of admissions of patients with stab injuries during the period 2002-2004 is recorded. However, the incidence doubled in the next two-year period. A weekend peak and circadian rhythm is apparent with more than 20% of the patients admitted between 4 and 6 am. The trunk is most frequently stabbed (54.5%) resulting in a laparotomy rate of 51%. One third of the patients who underwent thoraco-abdominal surgery revealed diaphragmatic injuries. Seventy-five percent of the patients left the hospital in a good condition while 2.4% had neuromuscular lesions. Two patients had serious vascular complications during follow-up. During the study period, no mortality was recorded. Stab wounds were recorded mainly in young and middle-aged men from ethnic minorities, whereas almost 27% were under the influence of drugs. A conservative approach was generally used resulting in a low laparotomy and thoracotomy rate without affecting mortality. Neuromuscular lesions are important long-term complications of stab injuries.

  15. Puncture wounds caused by glass mistaken for with stab wounds with a knife.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, M A; Karger, B; Schneider, V

    2001-10-01

    Three cases are presented where fatal puncture wounds caused by broken glass were very similar to stab wounds inflicted by a knife with a single-edged blade. Thus, all three cases caused a murder investigation to be initiated. It could only be determined that these wounds had been caused by glass after a detailed forensic autopsy. In two of the three cases, the only evidence for this was the identification of glass fragments in the wounds. The importance of X-ray examinations is underlined because modern glass in common use is radiopaque. Glass fragments lodged in the wounds can reduce the loss of blood and thus, prolong the capacity to act despite severe injuries.

  16. Impact of prompt-neutron corrections on final fission-fragment distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adili, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Pomp, S.; Oberstedt, S.

    2012-11-01

    Background: One important quantity in nuclear fission is the average number of prompt neutrons emitted from the fission fragments, the prompt neutron multiplicity, ν¯. The total number of prompt fission neutrons, ν¯tot, increases with increasing incident neutron energy. The prompt-neutron multiplicity is also a function of the fragment mass and the total kinetic energy of the fragmentation. Those data are only known in sufficient detail for a few thermal-neutron-induced fission reactions on, for example, 233,235U and 239Pu. The enthralling question has always been asked how the additional excitation energy is shared between the fission fragments. The answer to this question is important in the analysis of fission-fragment data taken with the double-energy technique. Although in the traditional approach the excess neutrons are distributed equally across the mass distribution, a few experiments showed that those neutrons are predominantly emitted by the heavy fragments.Purpose: We investigated the consequences of the ν(A,TKE,En) distribution on the fission fragment observables.Methods: Experimental data obtained for the 234U(n,f) reaction with a Twin Frisch Grid Ionization Chamber, were analyzed assuming two different methods for the neutron evaporation correction. The effect of the two different methods on the resulting fragment mass and energy distributions is studied.Results: We found that the preneutron mass distributions obtained via the double-energy technique become slightly more symmetric, and that the impact is larger for postneutron fission-fragment distributions. In the most severe cases, a relative yield change up to 20-30% was observed.Conclusions: We conclude that the choice of the prompt-neutron correction method has strong implications on the understanding and modeling of the fission process and encourages new experiments to measure fission fragments in coincidence with prompt fission neutrons. Even more, the correct determination of postneutron

  17. Maintenance of Helicobacter pylori Cultures in Agar Stabs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinghua; Czinn, Steven J.; Blanchard, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori requires frequent passage at 37 °C with reduced oxygen tension to maintain viability, and recovery from frozen stocks can be unpredictable and slow. Agar stab cultures were assessed as a possible means of maintaining viability without the need to passage every 4–7 days. Materials and Methods Agar stabs prepared from either Brucella or Brain Heart Infusion media were inoculated deeply with H. pylori strains or H. felis and grown under varying conditions for up to 13 weeks. Subcultures were prepared from these stabs at various intervals to test for viability. Results Established cultures in agar stabs failed to survive at room temperature but did survive at 37 °C with 10% CO2 for up to 56 days. H. felis remained viable for up to 28 days. No difference was observed between the two media formulations. Conclusion H. pylori grown in agar stabs remains viable for prolonged periods of time without the need to subculture and may represent an improved method for storing H. pylori for infrequent use. PMID:21083755

  18. Selective Nonoperative Management of Abdominal Stab Wounds.

    PubMed

    Murry, Jason S; Hoang, David M; Ashragian, Sogol; Liou, Doug Z; Barmparas, Galinos; Chung, Rex; Alban, Rodrigo F; Margulies, Daniel R; Ley, Eric J

    2015-10-01

    Stab wounds (SW) to the abdomen traditionally require urgent exploration when associated with shock, evisceration, or peritonitis. Hemodynamically stable patients without evisceration may benefit from serial exams even with peritonitis. We compared patients taken directly to the operating room with abdominal SWs (ED-OR) to those admitted for serial exams (ADMIT). We retrospectively reviewed hemodynamically stable patients presenting with any abdominal SW between January 2000 and December 2012. Exclusions included evidence of evisceration, systolic blood pressure ≤110 mm Hg, or blood transfusion. NON-THER was defined as abdominal exploration without identification of intra-abdominal injury requiring repair. Of 142 patients included, 104 were ED-OR and 38 were ADMIT. When ED-OR was compared with ADMIT, abdominal Abbreviated Injury Score was higher (2.4 vs 2.1; P = 0.01) and hospital length of stay was longer (4.8 vs 3.3 days; P = 0.04). Incidence of NON-THER was higher in ED-OR cohort (71% vs 13%; P ≤ 0.001). In a regression model, ED-OR was a predictor of NON-THER (adjusted odds ratio 16.6; P < 0.001). One patient from ED-OR expired after complications from NON-THER. There were no deaths in the ADMIT group. For those patients with abdominal SWs who present with systolic blood pressure ≥110 mm Hg, no blood product transfusion in the emergency department and lacking evisceration, admission for serial abdominal exams may be preferred regardless of abdominal exam.

  19. Char particle fragmentation and its effect on unburned carbon during pulverized coal combustion. Final report, March 20, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.E.

    1997-12-31

    This document is the final report of work on a project concerned with the fragmentation of char particles during pulverized coal combustion that was conducted at the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University, Stanford, California. The project is intended to satisfy, in part, PETC`s research efforts to understand the chemical and physical processes that govern coal combustion. The overall objectives of the project were: (1) to characterize the fragmentation events as a function of combustion environment, (2) to characterize fragmentation with respect to particle porosity and mineral loadings, (3) to assess overall mass loss rates with respect to particle fragmentation, and (4) to quantify the impact of fragmentation on unburned carbon in ash. The knowledge obtained during the course of this project can be used to predict accurately the overall mass loss rates of coals based on both the physical and chemical characteristics of their chars. The work provides a means of assessing reasons for unburned carbon in the ash of coal fired boilers and furnaces.

  20. [Stab injury of the brain by kitchen knife].

    PubMed

    Mashiyama, Shoji; Fukawa, Osamu; Kawase, Makoto; Noshita, Norio; Takada, Shihomi

    2006-05-01

    A 32-year-old male attempted suicide by stabbing his forehead with a kitchen knife, and was sent to our hospital. On admission, he was confused (20-30/JCS), but was able to move his both extremities. Skull X-p, CT scan indicated that the kitchen knife penetrated the frontal bone, reached the cerebrum by way of the frontal sinus. Cerebral angiography was performed, and showed no vascular lesions. Emergent craniotomy was performed and the kitchen knife was removed with minimum movement. Traumatic intracerebral hematoma was removed, and injured frontal sinus, dura mater and frontal bone were repaired. Postoperative course was excellent and he was discharged with the wounds well healded, no neurological deficits on the 17th day after the operation. There are several reported cases of such stab injury. Stab injury of the brain was discussed in the literature.

  1. Assessment of Reporting, Attitudes and Knowledge About the Stab Incidents and Professional Risk of Viral Infection among Health Care Professionals in Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Becirovic, Sabina; Pranjic, Nurka; Sarajlic-Spahic, Selvedina; Ahmetagic, Sead; Huseinagic, Senad

    2013-01-01

    Conflict of interest: none declared. Goal The goal of the research is to determine the relationship between frequency and reporting of stab incidents, attitudes and knowledge about stab incidents and occupational risk for transmission of viral infection with HBV, HCV or HIV among health care professionals employed in primary health care. Material and methods Conducted is prospective, cross-section study by questionnaires in 2012. The survey included health professionals in Primary Health Care Center in Tuzla. The final sample has 131 respondents (85% women). Statistical analysis was performed using the statistical package SPSS version 20.0. Results The prevalence rate of stab incidents throughout their career in our study was 66%; while the rate of reported incidents was 4.83 ˜ 5 times lower than the actual prevalence. In 49 out of 87 cases this was a case of hollow needle prick. The most common causes of stab incidents are the time pressure, unforeseen reactions of patients and lack of concentration. Conclusion Stab incidents are often not reported in in developing countries. Training in order to raise awareness and knowledge about the problem, proper procedures, good organization of work and anti-stress program, safer disposal, conducting prophylaxis before and after exposure monitored by the relevant institutions of occupational medicine should contribute to solving this problem. PMID:24082835

  2. [Suicide by 120 stab wounds of the chest?].

    PubMed

    Lieske, K; Püschel, K; Bussmann, E

    1987-01-01

    The case history of a suicide due to 120 stab wounds of the chest is presented. The victim was a 41 years old man with a paranoid-hallucinative psychosis. The problem to distinguish homicides and suicides is discussed by the well-known criminalistic and forensic-medical criterias. Induced by this very unusual case the autopsy material with stab wounds was analyzed retrospectively (n = 246, out of about 14,000 autopsies at the Institut of Forensic Medicine in Hamburg). Cases with more than 40 single lesions are normally homicides. However, the pattern of the injuries is more important than the number--especially in doubtful cases.

  3. Primary stabbing headache in adults and pediatrics: a review.

    PubMed

    Hagler, Suzanne; Ballaban-Gil, Karen; Robbins, Matthew S

    2014-10-01

    Primary stabbing headache (PSH) is an under-recognized primary headache disorder, which often goes undiagnosed. It is mainly characterized by its ultrashort stabbing quality and can be easily overlooked both by patients and providers as it is often not severe enough to interfere significantly with daily life. However, PSH may be severe and require therapy, and it is important for providers to recognize this headache type, both in adult and pediatric populations, as well as to be able to distinguish it from secondary headache disorders. PSH also may be more common than previously thought.

  4. The correlation between stabbing-related upper extremity wounds and survival of stabbing victims with abdominal and thoracic injuries.

    PubMed

    Rozenfeld, Michael; Peleg, Kobi; Givon, Adi; Kessel, Boris

    2017-07-01

    When treating patients with stab injuries of the torso, clinicians often lack timely information about the degree and nature of internal organ damage. An externally observable sign significantly associated with characteristics of torso injuries may therefore be useful for practitioners. One such potential sign is the presence of wounds to the hands, sometimes sustained during victims' attempt to defend themselves during the violent altercation. Thus, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the association between presence of upper extremity wounds and the severity of the thoracic and intra-abdominal injuries due to stabbing. This study was carried out retrospectively using data on 8714 patients with stabbing-related injuries from 19 trauma centers that participated in the Israeli National Trauma Registry (INTR) between January 1st1997 and December 31st 2013. Patients with wounds of upper extremities in addition to torso injuries (UE group) were compared to other patients with torso injuries (TO group) in terms of demographics, injury characteristics and clinical outcome. The compared groups were found to be homogeneous in terms of age and systolic blood pressure; the number of sustained torso injuries was also identical. The UE group comprised a slightly greater percentage of females, however both groups were predominantly male. Patients with upper extremity injuries had a lower proportion of internal organ damage (36% vs. 38.5%) and lower mortality (0.9% vs. 2%). The higher mortality of patients without upper extremity wounds remained significantly different even when adjusted by other epidemiological parameters (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.33-5.08).The number of sustained upper extremity injuries was positively associated with deeper penetration of the torso by the stabbing instrument. Patients with stabbing-related upper extremity wounds had a significant survival advantage over patients without such injuries. However, a greater number of sustained upper extremity

  5. The effect of knife handle shape on stabbing performance.

    PubMed

    Horsfall, Ian; Watson, Celia; Champion, Steve; Prosser, Philip; Ringrose, Trevor

    2005-07-01

    A quantitative knowledge of stabbing ability is a pre-requisite to establishing protection standards for stab resistant body armour. In order to determine the validity of measurements it is necessary to understand all the mechanisms that determine performance. This paper describes a series of tests that were performed in order to determine the effect of handle size and shape on the forces and impact energy that could be produced during stabbing of an armoured target. It was found that the single largest variable was that of the test participants with all other variables such as handle size and shape having only slight effects on the magnitude of impact energy. The use of a finger guard or hilt was shown to increase the mean energy delivered to the target by approximately 5J compared to a handle having no guard. It was also found that the characteristics of energy delivery were strongly influenced by the position of the grip relative to this guard. This reinforces the conclusions of previous work (Horsfall et al., 1999; Chadwick et al., 1999) on the serial nature of momentum transfer during a stabbing impact.

  6. Anterior abdominal stab injury: a comparison of self-inflicted and intentional third-party stabbings.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aman; Zhou, Hannah Y; Kelly, Katherine B; Downs, Bianca D; Como, John J; Claridge, Jeffrey A

    2013-03-01

    There is minimal literature comparing self-inflicted (SI) with non-self-inflicted (NSI) anterior abdominal stab wounds (AASW). Adult patients treated at a level 1 trauma center from 2006 through 2011 with an AASW were reviewed. There were 215 patients with an AASW; 20% were SI. NSI patients had more nonabdominal injuries (47% vs 16%, P < .01) and disposition directly to the operating room (45% vs 26%, P = .02). Intra-abdominal injury rates were similar. One hundred twenty-eight patients had isolated AASWs; 28% were SI. SI patients had higher admission rates (86% vs 63%, P = .01). One hundred three patients had isolated stable/asymptomatic AASWs; 31% were SI. SI patients had more admissions (84% vs 52%, P < .01), had higher intensive care unit admission rates (23% vs 5%, P = .01), longer LOS (3.2 vs 1.4, P < .01), and higher hospital charges ($18,000 vs $11,000, P < .01). The rates of intra-abdominal injury were again similar. Controlling for extra-abdominal injuries, SI AASW patients have similar rates of intra-abdominal injury but use more resources. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Striation patterns in serrated blade stabs to cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pounder, Derrick J; Reeder, Francesca D

    2011-05-20

    Stab wounds were made in porcine cartilage with 13 serrated knives, amongst which 4 were drop-point and 9 straight-spine; 9 coarsely serrated, 3 finely serrated and 1 with mixed pattern serrations. The walls of the stab tracks were cast with dental impression material, and the casts photographed together with the knife blades for comparison. All 13 serrated blades produced an "irregularly regular" pattern of striations on cartilage in all stabbings. Unusual and distinctive blade serration patterns produced equally distinctive wound striation patterns. A reference collection of striation patterns and corresponding blades might prove useful for striation pattern analysis. Drop-point blades produced similar striations to straight-spine blades except that the striations were not parallel but rather fan-shaped, converging towards the wound exit. The fan-shaped striation pattern characteristic of drop-point blades is explained by the initial lateral movement of the blade through the cartilage imposed by the presence of the drop point shape. It appears that the greater the overall angle of the drop point, the shorter the blade length over which the drop point occurs, and the closer the first serration is to the knife tip, the more obvious is the fan-shaped pattern. We anticipate that micro-irregularities producing individualising characteristics in non-serrated drop point blades, provided they were located at the tip opposite the drop point, should also show a fan-shaped pattern indicative of a drop point blade. The examination of the walls of stab wounds to cartilage represents an under-utilised source of forensic information to assist in knife identification.

  8. Atypical stab injury suggesting ritual suicide.

    PubMed

    Kučerová, Štěpánka; Vojtíšek, Tomáš; Hejna, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Sharp weapons have been one of the most common deadly tools in cases of homicide and suicide for a long time. Tentative incisions accompany the majority of suicides by sharp force and the absence of hesitation marks provokes questions about the manner of death. We present the bizarre fatality of a 41-year-old male with an isolated circumscribed incision on the right neck, where the body was found lying in a pool of blood in the shower of his apartment. The internal examination revealed a 4-cm-long channel-like defect running inwardly and downwardly along the right sternocleidomastoid region. The cause of death was external bleeding from an injured right carotid artery and internal jugular vein. The wound had clean non-contused margins without any conspicuous hesitation injuries. A fragment of a razor blade, found in blood splatters, was identified as the only potential injuring tool. The case was classified as a suicide.

  9. The stab resistant properties of Kevlar/STF composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinhua; Cao, Hailin; Li, Xia; Wan, Junxi; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2012-04-01

    A colloidal shear thickening fluid (STF) was prepared by dispersing submicron silica particles in Polyethylene glycol 200(PEG200) with ball-milling technique. Kevlar/STF composites were fabricated by soaking Kevlar in the solution of STF diluted by ethanol. The rheological behavior of the fluid with various concentrations and the effect of dilution ratio on stab resistant properties of Kevlar/STF composites were studied. The result shows that the initial viscosity and the highest viscosity of the fluid increase as the weight fraction of SiO2 increasing with the weight fraction ranging from 50% to 60%, while the critical shear rate decrease as the weight fraction increasing. The fluid has notable shear thickening behavior at SiO2 weight fraction of 59%. Two solutions with 1:0.5 and 1:1weight ratio of STF:ethanol were used to fabricate Kevlar/STF composites. It is found that the composites fabricated by solution with dilution ratio 1:1 show better stab resistant properties. The Kevlar/STF composites exhibit better stab resistant properties than the neat Kevlar with the same areal density.

  10. The stab resistant properties of Kevlar/STF composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinhua; Cao, Hailin; Li, Xia; Wan, Junxi; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2011-11-01

    A colloidal shear thickening fluid (STF) was prepared by dispersing submicron silica particles in Polyethylene glycol 200(PEG200) with ball-milling technique. Kevlar/STF composites were fabricated by soaking Kevlar in the solution of STF diluted by ethanol. The rheological behavior of the fluid with various concentrations and the effect of dilution ratio on stab resistant properties of Kevlar/STF composites were studied. The result shows that the initial viscosity and the highest viscosity of the fluid increase as the weight fraction of SiO2 increasing with the weight fraction ranging from 50% to 60%, while the critical shear rate decrease as the weight fraction increasing. The fluid has notable shear thickening behavior at SiO2 weight fraction of 59%. Two solutions with 1:0.5 and 1:1weight ratio of STF:ethanol were used to fabricate Kevlar/STF composites. It is found that the composites fabricated by solution with dilution ratio 1:1 show better stab resistant properties. The Kevlar/STF composites exhibit better stab resistant properties than the neat Kevlar with the same areal density.

  11. Ranula Decompression Using Stitch and Stab Method: The Aluko Technique.

    PubMed

    Aluko-Olokun, Bayo; Olaitan, Ademola Abayomi

    2017-06-01

    A ranula is a cystic lesion in the floor of the mouth, formed either as a retention cyst or pseudocyst as a result of extravasation of mucus in the surrounding tissue. It may be treated by micro-marsupialization, marsupialization or excision of lesion with or without the associated salivary gland. Marsupialization is usually achieved by cutting a slit and thereafter stitching the edges such that the epithelium of the exterior becomes continuous with that of the interior of a cyst. A stitch-and-stab technique of achieving patency of the created slit of marsupialized ranula is hereby presented. A stitch and stab technique using four parallel consecutive strokes of the needle with attached polyglactin 910 suture material in alternately opposing directions was employed in treatment of 31 consecutive ranula patients. 100 % success was achieved using this technique in 31 ranulas. This stitch-and-stab technique for marsupialization has proven to be very successful. It is recommended for use by the general medical community, as it requires the Clinician to possess only minimal surgical skills. Bartholin's cyst can be so treated.

  12. Abdominal and lower back pain in pediatric idiopathic stabbing headache.

    PubMed

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Ohara, Tomoichiro; Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Kure, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic stabbing headache (ISH) is a primary headache syndrome characterized by transient, sharp, stabbing pains located in the first division of the trigeminal nerve. Reports of pediatric ISH are rare, and extracephalic pain in pediatric ISH is extremely rare. Here we report the case of a 7-year-old male patient suffering from frequent, short, stabbing headache, which was occasionally associated with abdominal and lower back pain. Various investigations were normal. He was diagnosed with ISH, and valproic acid was administered to relieve his headache and accompanying symptoms. Our case demonstrates that abdominal and lower back pain may occur in pediatric ISH. This case may provide new evidence linking ISH and migraine by showing that extracephalic symptoms accompanying ISH are similar to those of migraine. We hypothesize that the mechanism underlying the headache and abdominal and lower back pain associated with ISH may be similar to that of a migraine headache. Accumulating additional cases by asking specific questions regarding the presence of the unusual symptoms presented in our case may help to establish a detailed clinical profile of these unfamiliar and peculiar symptoms in the pediatric ISH population.

  13. The development of a stabbing machine for forensic textile damage analysis.

    PubMed

    Benson, Natasha; Dos Santos, Robson Oliveria; Griffiths, Kate; Cole, Nerida; Doble, Philip; Roux, Claude; Blanes, Lucas

    2017-04-01

    This article describes the development of a horizontal stabbing machine with an interchangeable knife holder to simulate stab events. The machine consists of a motorised arm with a pneumatic system designed to deliver 60 unique stabbing positions. The mechanics were robust and the positioning system highly reproducible with standard deviations of less than 1.0mm in the x-axis and 2.3mm in the y-axis for a given stab position. The force of the instrument may be varied by the operator to a maximum of approximately 221N. The suitability of the instrument for simulating stab events was evaluated by measuring the severance length and textile damage from stab delivered from four different knives and nine penetrating angles.

  14. An Analytical Model for Predicting Stab Resistance of Flexible Woven Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Limin; Sun, Baozhong; Gu, Bohong

    2013-08-01

    Flexible woven composites have been widely used in geotextiles and light weight building structures. The stab resistance behavior of the flexible woven composite is an important factor for the application design. This paper reports an analytical model for predicting stab resistance of flexible woven composites under perpendicular stab with a blunt steel penetrator. The analytical model was established based on the microstructure and the deformation shape of the flexible woven composite under normal penetration. During the quasi-static stab penetration, the strain energies of warp and weft yarns and resins have been calculated. The stab resistance was calculated from the strain energies of the flexible woven composite. Furthermore, the contributions of the warp and weft yarns, resins to the stab resistance have been analyzed. It was found the three constituents have near the same contribution to the stab resistance. The higher value of weaving density, strength of yarns and especially the higher strength coating resins will lead the higher stab resistance. With the analytical model, the stab resistance would be expected to be designed in an efficient way with an acceptable precision.

  15. A concealed atriopleural fistula resulting from a cardiac stab wound.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Arnáiz, Javier; Pontón, Alejandro; Pulitani, Ivana; González-Santos, Jose María; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Bueno-Codoñer, María E; Arnáiz-García, Ana María

    2014-09-01

    A young male presented with a right parasternal stab wound. The chest radiography was normal and transthoracic echocardiography ruled out pericardial tamponade. He remained hemodynamically stable until three hours later when signs of progressive anemia were observed. Chest computed tomography showed massive right-sided hemothorax. The patient underwent surgery, which revealed an active bleeding atriopleural fistula connecting the right atrium and draining into the right pleura resulting from the negative pressure generated during respiration. This mechanism prevented cardiac tamponade and maintained initial hemodynamically stability.

  16. The application of PA/CF in stab resistance body armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, M. Q.; Liu, Y.; Gong, Z.; Qian, X. M.

    2017-06-01

    Stab resistance body armor (SRBA) is an essential defensive equipment to protect human body against injuries from stabbing. The conventional SRBAs shared low wearing frequency since they are heavy and poor in flexibility. This paper designed a structured stab-resistance plate using the model of crocodile armor and manufactured using 3D printing technology-laser sintering (LS). CF(Carbon fiber) was applied to enhance the stab resistance properties of SRBA. The effects of the material and structure were analysed through the stab resistance property tests based on the national standard GA68-2008. It is found that the stab resistance property of flat plates sintered by PA powder and PA/CF are both weaker than that of the structured plate. The penetrating depth of PA/CF structured plate is significantly 2-mm-less than the pure PA structured plate. The SEM observations confirmed the conclusion that addition of the CF largely improved the plate stab resistance property. Moreover, using PA/CF structured plate to produce the stab resistance body armor would result in a weight reduction by about 30-40% as compared to the existing SRBA that was made up of metal plates, which could largely reduce the wearer physical burden and improve the wearing frequency.

  17. 76 FR 22920 - Stab Resistance of Personal Body Armor (2000) Standard Special Technical Committee Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Stab Resistance of Personal Body Armor (2000) Standard Special Technical... Institute of Justice (NIJ) is in the process of revising its Stab Resistance of Personal Body Armor...

  18. Management of stab wounds to the anterior abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Rezende-Neto, João Baptista; Vieira, Hélio Machado; Rodrigues, Bruno de Lima; Rizoli, Sandro; Nascimento, Barto; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The meeting of the Publication "Evidence Based Telemedicine - Trauma and Emergency Surgery" (TBE-CiTE), through literature review, selected three recent articles on the treatment of victims stab wounds to the abdominal wall. The first study looked at the role of computed tomography (CT) in the treatment of patients with stab wounds to the abdominal wall. The second examined the use of laparoscopy over serial physical examinations to evaluate patients in need of laparotomy. The third did a review of surgical exploration of the abdominal wound, use of diagnostic peritoneal lavage and CT for the early identification of significant lesions and the best time for intervention. There was consensus to laparotomy in the presence of hemodynamic instability or signs of peritonitis, or evisceration. The wound should be explored under local anesthesia and if there is no injury to the aponeurosis the patient can be discharged. In the presence of penetration into the abdominal cavity, serial abdominal examinations are safe without CT. Laparoscopy is well indicated when there is doubt about any intracavitary lesion, in centers experienced in this method.

  19. Variability of simulants used in recreating stab events.

    PubMed

    Carr, D J; Wainwright, A

    2011-07-15

    Forensic investigators commonly use simulants/backing materials to mount fabrics and/or garments on when recreating damage due to stab events. Such work may be conducted in support of an investigation to connect a particular knife to a stabbing event by comparing the severance morphology obtained in the laboratory to that observed in the incident. There does not appear to have been a comparison of the effect of simulant type on the morphology of severances in fabrics and simulants, nor on the variability of simulants. This work investigates three simulants (pork, gelatine, expanded polystyrene), two knife blades (carving, bread), and how severances in the simulants and an apparel fabric typically used to manufacture T-shirts (single jersey) were affected by (i) simulant type and (ii) blade type. Severances were formed using a laboratory impact apparatus to ensure a consistent impact velocity and hence impact energy independently of the other variables. The impact velocity was chosen so that the force measured was similar to that measured in human performance trials. Force-time and energy-time curves were analysed and severance morphology (y, z directions) investigated. Simulant type and knife type significantly affected the critical forensic measurements of severance length (y direction) in the fabric and 'skin' (Tuftane). The use of EPS resulted in the lowest variability in data, further the severances recorded in both the fabric and Tuftane more accurately reflected the dimensions of the impacting knives.

  20. Violence-related Versus Terror-related Stabbings: Significant Differences in Injury Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rozenfeld, Michael; Givon, Adi; Peleg, Kobi

    2017-01-24

    To demonstrate the gap between injury epidemiology of terror-related stabbings (TRS) and non-terror-related intentional stabbings. Terror attacks with sharp instruments have multiplied recently, with many victims of these incidents presented to hospitals with penetrating injuries. Because most practical experience of surgeons with intentional stabbing injuries comes from treating victims of interpersonal violence, potential gaps in knowledge may exist if injuries from TRS significantly differ from interpersonal stabbings (IPS). A retrospective study of 1615 patients from intentional stabbing events recorded in the Israeli National Trauma Registry during the period of "Knife Intifada" (January 2013-March 2016). All stabbings were divided into TRS and IPS. The 2 categories were compared in terms of sustained injuries, utilization of hospital resources, and clinical outcomes. TRS patients were older, comprised more females and were ethnically homogenous. Most IPS incidents happened on weekdays and at night hours, whereas TRS events peaked midweek during morning and afternoon hours. TRS patients had more injuries of head, face, and neck, and severe head and neck injuries. IPS patients had more abdomen injuries; however, respective injuries in the TRS group were more severe. Greater injury severity of the TRS patients reflected on their higher hospital resources utilization and greater in-hospital mortality. Victims of terror stabbings are profoundly different in their characteristics, sustain injuries of a different profile and greater severity, require more hospital resources, and have worse off clinical outcomes, emphasizing the need of the healthcare systems to adjust itself appropriately to deal successfully with future terror attacks.

  1. The spectrum of injuries in buttock stab wounds.

    PubMed

    Campion, T; Cross, S

    2017-07-01

    Buttock stab wounds are a surprisingly common and increasing source of presentations to emergency departments. These injuries can have a significant impact on quality of life, and there are a number of often subtle, but significant, injuries that the radiologist must be alert to when interpreting computed tomography examinations in these patients. In this review, we will examine briefly the sociological reasons for the increase in these injuries, discuss appropriate imaging techniques, and provide imaging examples of the clinically important injuries that may be encountered in this region. These injuries include rectal or colonic perforation; genito-urinary trauma, for example urethral injury; injury to the sciatic nerve; and a spectrum of vascular trauma including transection and pseudoaneurysm or arteriovenous fistula formation. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Suicide by more than 90 stab wounds including perforation of the skull.

    PubMed

    Karger, B; Vennemann, B

    2001-12-01

    A man committed suicide in his bathroom using a small pocket knife. At the autopsy a total of 92 stab wounds on the forehead, in both temples, the anterior aspect of the neck, the back of the neck, the chest and the sides of the trunk were found. In addition, repeated stabbing had caused a large soft tissue defect on the forehead. The frontal bone showed 3 perforations but no brain injury was present and two ribs were severed in the bony part, one of which carried a star-like pattern from repeated stabbing. No major vessels were injured and the cause of death was exsanguination after a considerable survival time. The large number of stab wounds, the perforation of bone and some injury sites, especially the head and back of the neck, are extraordinary findings in suicides which were probably favoured by insufficient anatomical knowledge and the use of a short-bladed knife. A psychiatric history could not be verified.

  3. Scissors stab wound to the cervical spinal cord at the craniocervical junction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Ying-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Stab wounds resulting in spinal cord injury of the craniocervical junction are rare. A scissors stab wound to the cervical spinal cord has been reported only once in the literature. This paper aimed to report a case of Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome in an 8-year-old boy secondary to a scissors stab wound at the craniocervical junction. Case report and review of the literature. Case report of an 8-year-old boy accidentally stabbed in the neck by scissors, which were thrown as a dart. The case study of an 8-year-old boy who was hospitalized because of a scissors stab wound at the craniocervical junction. The patient developed Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome on the left side of the body. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a laceration of the spinal cord at the craniocervical junction with cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Careful cleansing and interrupted sutures of the wounds were performed to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Rehabilitation therapy was performed 2 days later. A follow-up examination revealed complete recovery of the neurologic deficit 8 months post-injury. Treatment of scissors stab wounds to the cervical spinal cord, whether conservative management or thorough surgical exploration, should be individualized based on history, examination, and imaging. As shown in this case report, despite conservative management, complete recovery, which was unexpected, was attributed to the initial mild laceration of the spinal cord and ipsilateral spinal cord functional compensation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Candida albicans spondylodiscitis following an abdominal stab wound: forensic considerations.

    PubMed

    Savall, Frederic; Dedouit, Fabrice; Telmon, Norbert; Rougé, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Candida albicans spondylodiscitis is a fungal infection of the spine which is still unusual in spite of the increasing frequency of predisposing factors. A 22-year-old man received an abdominal stab wound during a physical assault. Initial medical care included surgery, prolonged use of indwelling vascular catheters with administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and hospitalization in intensive care. Two months after the event, the victim experienced back pain in the right lumbar region and septic spondylodiscitis secondary to C. albicans was diagnosed three weeks later. This case is noteworthy because of its clinical forensic context. In France, the public prosecutor orders a medico-legal assessment after an assault for all living victims in order to establish a causal relationship between the assault and its complications. In our case, the patient presented numerous risk factors for candidemia and the forensic specialist reasonably accepted that the causal relationship was certain but indirect. We have only found one published case of spondylodiscitis after an abdominal penetrating injury and the pathogenic agent was not mentioned. We have found no case reported in a forensic context. This unusual observation shows that it may be genuinely difficult to prove the causal relationship between an abdominal penetrating injury and an unusual infectious complication such as fungal spondylodiscitis.

  5. Occult diaphragmatic injury from stab wounds to the lower chest and abdomen.

    PubMed

    Madden, M R; Paull, D E; Finkelstein, J L; Goodwin, C W; Marzulli, V; Yurt, R W; Shires, G T

    1989-03-01

    Ninety-five patients with stab wounds to the lower chest and abdomen underwent routine abdominal exploration. Eighteen of these patients had diaphragmatic injury and in five patients it was the only injury found. Isolated diaphragmatic injury in asymptomatic patients cannot be reliably delineated by either serial physical examination or peritoneal lavage. Delayed recognition of incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia after stab wounds to the lower left chest and upper abdomen has an associated mortality rate of 36%. The anatomic area of concern can be defined as stab wounds that penetrate the left side of the chest below the fourth intercostal space anteriorly, the sixth intercostal space laterally, and the tip of the scapula posteriorly. Exploratory laparotomy is necessary in these patients until a reliable nonoperative method is established that can exclude injuries to the diaphragm.

  6. [Penetrating stab injury to the lumbar spinal cord in a child].

    PubMed

    Scheiderer, B; Mild, K; Gebhard, F; Scola, A

    2016-03-01

    This article reports the case of an 8-year-old boy with a knife stab injury to the lumbar spine without neurological deficits. The computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a longitudinal penetration of the conus medullaris at the level of the first lumbar vertebra. The knife blade was extracted and primary closure was carried out on the stab wound. The immediately postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as the follow-up examinations after 1 and 6 weeks showed no evidence of compressive spinal bleeding, myelopathy or cerebrospinal fluid leakage. In addition, no secondary changes of the neurological status developed. Consequently, in cases of neurologically asymptomatic patients without concomitant injuries the surgical exploration of a stab wound does not seem to be absolutely necessary.

  7. Experimental study of thermal comfort on stab resistant body armor.

    PubMed

    Ji, Tingchao; Qian, Xinming; Yuan, Mengqi; Jiang, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to investigate the impacts of exercise intensity and sequence on human physiology parameters and subjective thermal sensation when wearing stab resistant body armor under daily working conditions in China [26 and 31 °C, 45-50 % relative humidity (RH)], and to investigate on the relationship between subjective judgments and objective parameters. Eight male volunteers were recruited to complete 3 terms of exercises with different velocity set on treadmill for 90 min at 26 °C and 31 °C, 45-50 % RH. In Exercise 1 volunteers were seated during the test. In Exercise 2, volunteers walked with the velocity of 3 km/h in the first 45 min and 6 km/h in the left 45 min. In Exercise 3, volunteers walked with the velocity of 6 km/h in the first 45 min and 3 km/h in the left 45 min. The body core temperature, skin temperature and subjective judgments were recorded during the whole process. Analysis of variance was performed among all the tests. Individual discrepancy of Exercise 1 is larger than that of Exercise 2 and 3. On the premise of the same walking distance and environmental conditions, core temperature in Exercise 3 is about 0.2 °C lower than that in Exercise 2 in the end; and with the velocity decrease from 6 km/h to 3 km/h in the end, thermal tolerance of Exercise 3 is about 1 degree lower than that in Exercise 2. Skin temperatures of human trunk were at least 1 °C higher than that of limbs. Activity narrows the individual discrepancy on core temperature. Within experimental conditions, decreasing of intensity at last stage makes the core temperature lower and the whole process much tolerable. The core temperature is more sensitive to the external disturbance on the balance of the whole body, and it can reflect the subjective thermal sensation and physical exertion.

  8. Stabbing headache in an 8-year-old girl: primary or drug induced headache?

    PubMed

    Biedroł, Agnieszka; Kaciłski, Marek; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of stabbing headaches in children requires a thorough diagnostic approach that excludes secondary headaches. The organic background should be taken into consideration when alarming symptoms occur, such as a purely 1-sided location, a change in the character of the headache, or possibly a link to physical activity. The current study describes the case of an 8-year-old girl who suffered short-lasting stabbing headache attacks. The headaches with increasing intensity and frequency started 1 month before her hospitalization and were usually preceded by physical activity (dancing, running). The pain, which was located in the right supraorbital region, lasted 1 second and occurred several times during the day. No associated symptoms were observed. In addition, the girl suffered from allergic rhinitis and was on antiallergic treatment (levocetirizine, fluticasone nasal spray). On admission she was in good general condition, and a pediatric and neurologic examination revealed no abnormalities. Her brain MRI was normal. The initial diagnosis was that the patient was suffering from primary stabbing headaches. However, during a follow-up visit 4 months later, a relationship was observed between the cessation of the headache attacks and the discontinuation of an antihistaminic drug. Six months later, the girl remained headache free. In cases involving differential diagnoses of stabbing headaches, it is important to consider the adverse reactions of the drugs used.

  9. Clinical patterns of primary stabbing headache: a single clinic-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Yeop; Lee, Mi Ji; Choi, Hyun Ah; Choi, Hanna; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2017-12-01

    The clinical features and disease courses of primary stabbing headache (PSH) are diverse. We aimed to identify distinct clinical patterns of PSH. We prospectively screened consecutive first-visit patients who presented with stabbing headache at the Samsung Medical Centre Headache Clinic from June 2015 to March 2016. Demographics, headache characteristics, and disease courses were prospectively evaluated. After discerning factors related to the chronicity at the time of presentation, clinical patterns were identified based on the frequency (daily vs. intermittent), clinical course (remitted or not), and total disease duration (<3 or >3 months). In the 65 patients with PSH included in this study, monophasic (n = 31), intermittent (n = 17), and chronic daily (n = 12) patterns were identified. The median disease durations were 9 days for monophasic PSH, 9 months for chronic daily PSH, and 2 years for intermittent PSH. The features of monophasic PSH were greater severity, single and side-locked locations, more attacks per day, daily occurrence, and good treatment response. Chronic daily PSH was associated with female predominance, longer-lasting stabs, and multiple or migrating locations on bilateral or alternating sides. The characteristics of intermittent PSH included female predominance and sporadic stabs with less intensity. Our study demonstrated distinct clinical patterns of PSH. In addition to help early recognition of disease, our findings suggest different pathophysiologic mechanisms. Future prospective studies are required to reveal the etiologies of these different PSH patterns and their optimal treatment strategies.

  10. Reversible Cortical Blindness Following Successful Surgical Repair Of Two Stab Wounds In The Heart

    PubMed Central

    El Gatit, A; Abdul Razeq, M; El Snaini, F; Saad, K; Zaiton, A

    2008-01-01

    This report describes a case of cortical blindness that followed successful surgical repair of two stab wounds in the heart in a 29-year old Libyan man. The patient presented in a state of pre cardiac arrest (shock and low cardiac output status), following multiple chest stab wounds. Chest tube was immediately inserted. Surgery was urgently performed suturing the two wounds; in the root of the aorta and in the left ventricle, and haemostasis was secured. Cardiac arrest was successfully prevented. The patient recovered smoothly, but 24 hours later he declared total blindness. Ophtalmic and neurological examinations and investigations that included fundoscopy, Electroencephalograms (EEGs) and Computed Tomography Scans revealed no abnormalities, apart from absence of alpha waves in the EEGs. We diagnosed the case as cortical blindness and continued caring for the patient conservatively. Three days later, the patient regained his vision gradually and was discharged on the 7th postoperative day without any remarks. PMID:21516165

  11. Suicide by skull stab wounds: a case of drug-induced psychosis.

    PubMed

    Jousset, Nathalie; Rougé-Maillart, Clotilde; Turcant, Alain; Guilleux, Michel; Le Bouil, Anne; Tracqui, Antoine

    2010-12-01

    Suicide by stabbing to the head and/or driving sharp objects into the skull is of extreme rarity. This article reports the case of a 27-year-old man, who committed suicide by multiple knife stabs and cuts to the head, the torso, one shoulder and the forearms. Autopsy showed a perforating wound of the skull and the 10-cm long broken blade of the knife being still embedded in the right temporal lobe of the brain. The deceased had no history of psychiatric illness but was currently treated by mefloquine, a quinine derivative associated with a high rate of psychiatric adverse effects. Toxicological examination confirmed a recent intake of mefloquine together with chloroquine, another antimalarial drug. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a completed suicide with very strong evidence of mefloquine implication. Discussion focuses upon mefloquine-induced psychiatric disorders and highlights the importance of performing toxicological investigations in cases of unusual suicides.

  12. Occupational deaths due to penetrating chest injuries from sledgehammer fragments: two case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael E; Zumwalt, Ross

    2004-03-01

    Occupational deaths due to projectiles from hand tools are rare. We report 2 unusual cases of individuals killed by metallic projectiles produced by the fragmentation of the head of a sledgehammer. At initial examination, these wounds appear similar to atypical gunshot or stab wounds. Proper evaluation requires radiographic examination, scene correlation, and, when possible, comparison of metallic fragments retrieved at autopsy and tools from the scene.

  13. Brown-Sequard syndrome associated with unusual spinal cord injury by a screwdriver stab wound

    PubMed Central

    Beer-Furlan, André Luiz; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Tavares, Wagner Malagó; de Andrade, Almir Ferreira; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Stab wounds resulting in spinal cord injuries are very rare. In direct central back stabbings, the layers of muscles and the spinal column tends to deflect blades, rarely causing injuries to the spinal cord. We report an unusual case of traumatic spinal cord injury by a screwdriver stab, presented as Brown-Séquard syndrome and discuss possible pitfalls on the surgical treatment. Case report: A 34 year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a group assault with a single screwdriver stab wound on the back. Neurological examination revealed an incomplete Brown-Sequard syndrome, with grade IV motor deficit on the left leg and contralateral hemihypoalgesia below T9 level. Radiological evaluation showed a retained 9 cm screwdriver that entered and trespassed the spinal canal at T6 level, reaching the posterior mediastinum with close relation to the thoracic aorta. Vascular injury could not be excluded. The joint decision between the neurosurgery and the vascular surgery teams was the surgical removal of the screwdriver under direct visualization. A left mini-thoracotomy was performed. Simultaneously, a careful dissection was done and screwdriver was firmly pulled back on the opposite path of entry under direct visualization of the aorta. The neurological deficit was maintained immediately after the surgical procedure. Follow-up visit after 1 year showed minor motor deficit and good healing. Conclusions: It is important to consider all aspects of secondary injury on the surgical planning of penetrating spinal cord injury. The secondary injury can be minimized with multidisciplinary planning of the surgical procedure. PMID:24482724

  14. Brown-Sequard syndrome associated with unusual spinal cord injury by a screwdriver stab wound.

    PubMed

    Beer-Furlan, André Luiz; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Tavares, Wagner Malagó; de Andrade, Almir Ferreira; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2014-01-01

    Stab wounds resulting in spinal cord injuries are very rare. In direct central back stabbings, the layers of muscles and the spinal column tends to deflect blades, rarely causing injuries to the spinal cord. We report an unusual case of traumatic spinal cord injury by a screwdriver stab, presented as Brown-Séquard syndrome and discuss possible pitfalls on the surgical treatment. A 34 year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a group assault with a single screwdriver stab wound on the back. Neurological examination revealed an incomplete Brown-Sequard syndrome, with grade IV motor deficit on the left leg and contralateral hemihypoalgesia below T9 level. Radiological evaluation showed a retained 9 cm screwdriver that entered and trespassed the spinal canal at T6 level, reaching the posterior mediastinum with close relation to the thoracic aorta. Vascular injury could not be excluded. The joint decision between the neurosurgery and the vascular surgery teams was the surgical removal of the screwdriver under direct visualization. A left mini-thoracotomy was performed. Simultaneously, a careful dissection was done and screwdriver was firmly pulled back on the opposite path of entry under direct visualization of the aorta. The neurological deficit was maintained immediately after the surgical procedure. Follow-up visit after 1 year showed minor motor deficit and good healing. It is important to consider all aspects of secondary injury on the surgical planning of penetrating spinal cord injury. The secondary injury can be minimized with multidisciplinary planning of the surgical procedure.

  15. An analysis of predictors of morbidity after stab wounds of the pancreas in 78 consecutive injuries.

    PubMed

    Krige, J E J; Kotze, U K; Sayed, R; Navsaria, P H; Nicol, A J

    2014-09-01

    Penetrating injuries of the pancreas may result in serious complications. This study assessed the factors influencing morbidity after stab wounds of the pancreas. A retrospective univariate cohort analysis was carried out of 78 patients (74 men) with a median age of 26 years (range: 16-62 years) with stab wounds of the pancreas between 1982 and 2011. The median revised trauma score (RTS) was 7.8 (range: 2.0-7.8). Injuries involved the body (n=36), tail (n=24), head/uncinate process (n=16) and neck (n=2) of the pancreas. All 78 patients underwent a laparotomy. Sixty-five patients had AAST (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma) grade I or II pancreatic injuries and thirteen had grade III, IV or V injuries. Eight patients (10.3%) had an initial damage control operation. Sixty-nine patients (84.6%) had drainage of the pancreas only, six had a distal pancreatectomy and one had a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Most pancreas related complications occurred in patients with AAST grade III injuries; eight patients (10.2%) developed a pancreatic fistula. Four patients (5.1%) died. Grade of pancreatic injury (AAST grade I-II vs grade III-V injuries, p<0.001), RTS (odds ratio [OR]: 5.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46-17.19, p<0.007), presence of shock on admission (OR: 3.31, 95% CI: 1.16-9.42, p=0.022), need for a blood transfusion (OR: 6.46, 95% CI: 2.40-17.40, p<0.001) and repeat laparotomy (p<0.001) had a significant influence on the development of general complications. Although mortality was low after a pancreatic stab wound, morbidity was high. Increasing AAST grade of injury, high RTS, shock on admission to hospital, need for blood transfusion and repeat laparotomy were significant factors related to morbidity.

  16. Stabbing and safeguarding in children and young people: a Pan-London service evaluation and audit.

    PubMed

    Apps, John R; Williams, Carrie; McGuinness, Anne; Gabbie, Susie; Sutcliffe, Alastair G

    2013-07-01

    To characterize paediatric presentations of stabbing to emergency departments across London and to audit existing referral rates to the police and social services against the new standard set by the General Medical Council. Retrospective multi-centre service evaluation/audit. All emergency departments within London. Patients under 18 years of age presenting to emergency departments with non-accidental stabbing between 1 April 2007 and 30 April 2009. Patient age, nature of assault, assailant, injuries and management. Rates of documented referral to police and social services, as mandated by GMC guidance. A total of 381 presentations were identified from 20 out of the 32 hospitals in London, 160 of whom were less than 16 years old. The majority were seen only by emergency department staff and only a minority (28%) were admitted. Three died in the departments. A knife was the commonest weapon and the limbs the most common site of injury. Referrals to police were documented in only 30% of patients (43% if <16 years old) and to social services in 16% (31% if <16 years old) of those discharged. In the majority, there was no documentation (police 64%, social services 79%). A significant number of paediatric stabbings present to emergency departments across London. The majority of these are discharged directly from departments. Of those discharged, documentation regarding referral rates to Police and Social Services was poor, and documented referral rates low. This study covered a period prior to the introduction of new General Medical Council guidance and a repeat audit to assess subsequent documented referrals is required.

  17. A stab-and-roll biopsy technique to maintain gingival epithelium for desquamative gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hiroyasu; Rees, Terry D; Allen, Edward P; Kuyama, Kayo; Aoki, Shinichiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Ito, Takanori

    2014-06-01

    Desquamative gingivitis (DG) is a clinical manifestation common to several diseases. It is known that most cases of DG are caused by mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP), oral lichen planus (OLP), or pemphigus vulgaris (PV). Early recognition and treatment of these diseases can improve the prognosis, but diagnostic delays are common in patients with DG because obtaining a diagnostic biopsy is technically challenging. A biopsy technique designed to maintain the gingival epithelium for patients with DG was developed. The usefulness of this technique is discussed. This study is based on a retrospective review of 27 DG cases. A stab-and-roll technique was used to obtain gingival tissue. This technique is designed to reduce lateral forces on the epithelium during the procedure and to thereby prevent the inadvertent removal of the epithelium from the biopsy specimen. A total of 52 biopsies comprising 27 for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained samples and 25 for direct immunofluorescence (DIF) testing were reviewed. Fifty-one of the 52 biopsies (98.1%) maintained the epithelium. Only one biopsy (1.9%) showed that the epithelium was totally absent. Therefore, H&E and DIF features of 51 biopsies were analyzed. Definitive diagnoses of the diseases causing DG included MMP (13 cases), PV (eight cases), and OLP (six cases). A diagnostic biopsy was obtained from the gingiva of patients with DG using the stab-and-roll technique. The gingival epithelium was well maintained, and the relationship with the underlying connective tissue was diagnostic. In the future, this stab-and-roll biopsy technique may facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of diseases causing DG.

  18. Spinal stab injury with retained knife blades: 51 Consecutive patients managed at a regional referral unit.

    PubMed

    Enicker, Basil; Gonya, Sonwabile; Hardcastle, Timothy C

    2015-09-01

    Spinal stab wounds presenting with retained knife blades (RKB) are uncommon, often resulting in spinal cord injury (SCI) with catastrophic neurological consequences. The purpose of this study is to report a single unit's experience in management of this pattern of injury at this regional referral centre. Retrospective review of medical records identified 51 consecutive patients with spinal stabs presenting with a RKB at the Neurosurgery Department at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital between January 2003 and February 2015. The data was analyzed for patient characteristics, level of the RKB, neurological status using the ASIA impairment scale, associated injuries, radiological investigations, management, hospital length of stay, complications and mortality. The mean age was 28±10.9 years (range 14-69), with 45 (88%) males (M: F=7.5:1). The median Injury Severity Score was 16 (range 4-26). RKB were located in the cervical [9,18%], thoracic [38,74%], lumbar [2,4%] and sacral [2,4%] spine. Twelve patients (24%) sustained complete SCI (ASIA A), while 21 (41%) had incomplete (ASIA B, C, D), of which 17 had features of Brown-Sequard syndrome. Eighteen (35%) patients were neurologically intact (ASIA E). There were 8 (16%) associated pneumothoraces and one vertebral artery injury. Length of hospital stay was 10±7.1 days (range 1-27). One patient (2%) died during this period. Stab injuries to the spine presenting with RKB are still prevalent in South Africa. Resources should be allocated to prevention strategies that decrease the incidence of inter-personal violence. All RKBs should be removed in the operating theatre by experienced surgeons to minimise complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stabbing and safeguarding in children and young people: a Pan-London service evaluation and audit

    PubMed Central

    Apps, John R; Williams, Carrie; McGuinness, Anne; Gabbie, Susie; Sutcliffe, Alastair G

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To characterize paediatric presentations of stabbing to emergency departments across London and to audit existing referral rates to the police and social services against the new standard set by the General Medical Council. Design Retrospective multi-centre service evaluation/audit. Setting All emergency departments within London. Participants Patients under 18 years of age presenting to emergency departments with non-accidental stabbing between 1 April 2007 and 30 April 2009. Main outcome measures Patient age, nature of assault, assailant, injuries and management. Rates of documented referral to police and social services, as mandated by GMC guidance. Results A total of 381 presentations were identified from 20 out of the 32 hospitals in London, 160 of whom were less than 16 years old. The majority were seen only by emergency department staff and only a minority (28%) were admitted. Three died in the departments. A knife was the commonest weapon and the limbs the most common site of injury. Referrals to police were documented in only 30% of patients (43% if <16 years old) and to social services in 16% (31% if <16 years old) of those discharged. In the majority, there was no documentation (police 64%, social services 79%). Conclusions A significant number of paediatric stabbings present to emergency departments across London. The majority of these are discharged directly from departments. Of those discharged, documentation regarding referral rates to Police and Social Services was poor, and documented referral rates low. This study covered a period prior to the introduction of new General Medical Council guidance and a repeat audit to assess subsequent documented referrals is required. PMID:23885300

  20. Cervical spondylodiscitis with epidural abscess after knife stab wounds to the neck: A case report.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Anna; von der Hoeh, Nicolas H; Gulow, Jens; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard

    2015-08-01

    Cervical spondylodiscitis is usually caused by pyogenic infections, associated with retropharyngeal abscesses, or due to the swallowing of foreign bodies. No cases of cervical spondylodiscitis caused by a penetrating neck injury have been published in the literature. We describe a case of cervical spondylodiscitis after multiple knife stab wounds to the lateral soft tissue of the neck. Case report and review of the literature. A 54-year-old patient was brought to our clinic with destructive spondylodiscitis C3/4 with paravertebral and epidural abscesses. He had been involved in a fight and had suffered multiple stab wounds to his neck with a knife 1 month prior. The initial CT scan had revealed one deeper wound canal behind the sternocleidomastoid muscle on the left side without any injury to the vessels. The wound was cleaned and an antibiotic therapy with cefuroxime was given for 1 week. After an uneventful and complete healing of the wound the patient developed severe neck pain. Inflammatory laboratory parameters were elevated, and a MRI of the neck revealed a distinct spondylodiscitis C3/4 with paravertebral and epidural abscess formations. Surgery was performed and included debridement, abscess drainage, decompression of the spinal canal, fusion of the C3/4 segment using an autologous iliac crest bone graft and a plate osteosynthesis. A course of calculated antibiotic therapy was administered for 8 weeks. Normal laboratory parameters and no radiological signs of an ongoing inflammatory process were observed during follow-up examinations. The C3/4 segment was consolidated. Stab wound injuries to the neck not only bear the risk of injuries to the nerves, vessels and organs of the neck but also increase the risk of developing secondary spondylodiscitis. Specifically, cervical spondylodiscitis can result in distinct neurological symptoms, and surgical intervention should be performed in a timely manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stab injury and device implantation within the brain results in inversely multiphasic neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Kelsey A.; Buck, Amy C.; Self, Wade K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2012-08-01

    An estimated 25 million people in the US alone rely on implanted medical devices, ˜2.5 million implanted within the nervous system. Even though many devices perform adequately for years, the host response to medical devices often severely limits tissue integration and long-term performance. This host response is believed to be particularly limiting in the case of intracortical microelectrodes, where it has been shown that glial cell encapsulation and localized neuronal cell loss accompany intracortical microelectrode implantation. Since neuronal ensembles must be within ˜50 µm of the electrode to obtain neuronal spikes and local field potentials, developing a better understanding of the molecular and cellular environment at the device-tissue interface has been the subject of significant research. Unfortunately, immunohistochemical studies of scar maturation in correlation to device function have been inconclusive. Therefore, here we present a detailed quantitative study of the cellular events and the stability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following intracortical microelectrode implantation and cortical stab injury in a chronic survival model. We found two distinctly inverse multiphasic profiles for neuronal survival in device-implanted tissue compared to stab-injured animals. For chronically implanted animals, we observed a biphasic paradigm between blood-derived/trauma-induced and CNS-derived inflammatory markers driving neurodegeneration at the interface. In contrast, stab injured animals demonstrated a CNS-mediated neurodegenerative environment. Collectively these data provide valuable insight to the possibility of multiple roles of chronic neuroinflammatory events on BBB disruption and localized neurodegeneration, while also suggesting the importance to consider multiphasic neuroinflammatory kinetics in the design of therapeutic strategies for stabilizing neural interfaces.

  2. Delayed myelopathy secondary to stab wound with a retained blade tip within the laminae: case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Delayed neurologic deficit after a stab wound with a retained foreign body near the spinal canal is unusual, adequate radiological examination is fundamental in detecting retained foreign bodies, especially the CT scan, surgical extraction of the foreign body is the primary task and the surgical outcome is satisfactory. Here, we report a rare case of delayed myelopathy caused by spinal stenosis secondary to broken blade tip within thoracic laminae in an old man, who was injured in a knife attack 39 years ago. The incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis and prognosis are discussed. PMID:26629221

  3. A review of stab wound injuries at a tertiary trauma centre in Singapore: are self-inflicted ones less severe?

    PubMed Central

    Leow, Jeffrey J; Lingam, Pravin; Lim, Vanessa W; Go, Karen TS; Chiu, Ming Terk; Teo, Li Tserng

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In Singapore, as strict laws are a strong deterrent against armed violence, little is known about the epidemiology of penetrating stab wound injuries. Our study aimed to investigate the epidemiology of stab wound injuries at a major trauma centre in Singapore and determine if there was a difference in severity between self-inflicted stab wound (SI) injuries and those inflicted by others (IO). METHODS We retrospectively reviewed all penetrating injuries at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, and identified and categorised all stab wound injuries as SI or IO. Basic demographic information, injury severity characteristics and outcome data were compared between these two groups. A review of all mortalities was performed, including recording the causes of death. RESULTS Between 2005 and 2010, there were a total of 149 stab wound injuries, of which 24 (16.1%) were SI and 125 (83.9%) were IO injuries. Patients tended to be young (mean age 34.1 ± 14.2 years). The mean Injury Severity Score was significantly different between the SI and IO groups (8.8 ± 6.5 vs. 12.3 ± 8.1; p = 0.03). In both groups, the majority underwent an operative procedure (83.3% vs. 85.6%) and had an average hospital stay of four days. CONCLUSION The study confirms our hypothesis that SI injuries tend to be less severe than IO injuries and are more likely to occur at home rather than at a public area. This finding may be useful in the triage of patients with stab wound injuries. PMID:26831311

  4. [Treatment of cardiac stab wounds. A thirty-one-year experience].

    PubMed

    Mihalache, St; Adăscăliţei, P D

    2005-01-01

    Penetrating cardiac wounds represent a dramatically pathology of the general surgery because of their clinical presentation and outcome. The cardiorrhaphy with the three successive times, carried out with maximum rapidity is the only safe and efficient surgical technique which leads to hemostasis and healing. The aim of this study was to evaluate our results and experience of penetrating cardiac injuries treated at the Clinic of Surgical Emergencies from Iaşi. 20 patients, 17 men and 3 women, of mean age 34 years (range 18-51), with stab wounds, underwent cardiorrhaphy between 1974 and 2004. The clinical aspects were: "white injured" (hemorrhagic shock) in 3 patients, "blue injured" (cardiac tamponade) in 8 patients, both being implied with some patients, one of the aspects being predominant. 9 patients (45%) had only cardiac injuries and 11 (55%) had other associated injuries. There were 7 intraoperative cardiac arrests and 2 postoperative pulmonary complications. In 16 cases the outcome of patients with cardiac stab wounds was favourable. We recorded 4 deaths. Mortality results from the wounds of the right auricle. The high rate of survival (80%) proves that a penetrating cardiac injury with a heavy prognosis may be turned into a relative traumatism harmless for those patients who will remain alive until they arrive in hospital.

  5. FVIIIra, CD15, and tryptase performance in the diagnosis of skin stab wound vitality in forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Gauchotte, Guillaume; Wissler, Marie-Pierre; Casse, Jean-Matthieu; Pujo, Julien; Minetti, Christophe; Gisquet, Héloïse; Vigouroux, Charlène; Plénat, François; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Martrille, Laurent

    2013-09-01

    The timing of skin wounds is one of the most challenging problems in forensic pathology. In the first minutes or hours after infliction, histological examination fails to determine whether a wound was sustained before or after death. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of three immunohistochemical markers (FVIIIra, CD15, and tryptase) for the interpretation of the timing of cutaneous stab wounds. We evaluated these markers in intravital wounds from autopsy cases (n = 12) and surgical specimens (n = 58). As controls, we used normal skin samples from autopsies (n = 8) and an original ex vivo surgical human model of recent postmortem wounds (n = 24). We found overexpression of FVIIIra in 100 % of vital wounds, but also in 53 % of the controls. The number of CD15-positive cells was higher in wound margins than in internal controls (p < 0.0001) and was significantly correlated with the time interval between incision and devascularization (p = 0.0005; minimal time for positivity, 9 min). Using the anti-tryptase antibody, we found that the mast cell degranulation rate was higher in wound margins (p < 0.0001) and correlated with the time interval (minimal time, 1 min). The sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of vitality were respectively 100 and 47 % for FVIIIra, 47 and 100 % for CD15, and 60 and 100 % for tryptase. The inter-observer agreement coefficients were 0.68 for FVIIIra, 0.90 for CD15, and 0.46 for tryptase. Finally, we demonstrated that these markers were not reliable in putrefied or desiccated specimens. In conclusion, CD15 and tryptase, but not FVIIIra, may be useful markers for differentiating recent antemortem from postmortem injuries.

  6. Fragmentation Pathways in the Uracil Radical Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Congyi; Matsika, Spiridoula; Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C.

    2012-08-24

    We investigate pathways for fragmentation in the uracil radical cation using ab initio electronic structure calculations. We focus on the main fragments produced in pump–probe dissociative ionization experiments. These are fragments with mass to charge ratios (m/z) of 69, 28, 41, and 42. Barriers to dissociation along the ground ionic surface are reported, which provide an estimate of the energetic requirements for the production of the main fragments. Finally, direct and sequential fragmentation mechanisms have been analyzed, and it is concluded that sequential fragmentation after production of fragment with m/z 69 is the dominant mechanism for the production of the smaller fragments.

  7. A glass fragment for a dagger--never mind your own hand.

    PubMed

    Fracasso, T; Karger, B

    2009-07-01

    A case of homicide is reported where a woman was killed by her boyfriend. He used a dagger-like fragment of a broken window glass to cause 10 atypical stab wounds to the neck and face and several incised wounds in other body regions. The cause of death was exsanguination, mainly from a severed internal jugular vein. The morphology of glass fragment injuries, both in the victim and perpetrator, is discussed and the possibility of homicide in such cases, which commonly represent accidents, is stressed. The use of an unsuited sharp force weapon carrying a high potential for self-injury can be explained by an excited state of mind.

  8. [Gunshot and stab wounds in Germany--epidemiology and outcome: analysis from the TraumaRegister DGU®].

    PubMed

    Bieler, D; Franke, A F; Hentsch, S; Paffrath, T; Willms, A; Lefering, R; Kollig, E W

    2014-11-01

    The management of gunshot wounds is a rare challenge for trauma surgeons in Germany and Central Europe as a result of the low incidence of this type of trauma. Penetrating injuries occur with an incidence of 5% in Germany. They are caused by gunshots or more commonly by knives or other objects, for example during accidents. Since even the number of patients who are treated at level 1 trauma centres is limited by the low incidence, the objective of this study was to assess the epidemiology and outcome of gunshot and stab wounds in Germany. Since 2009, the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society (TraumaRegister DGU®) has been used to assess not only whether a trauma was penetrating but also whether it was caused by a gunshot or a stabbing. On the basis of this registry, we identified relevant cases and defined the observation period. Data were taken from the standard documentation forms that participating German hospitals completed between 2009 and 2011. We did not specify exclusion criteria in order to obtain as comprehensive a picture as possible of the trauma entities investigated in this study. As a result of the high incidence of gunshot wounds to the head and the implications of this type of injury for the entire group, a subgroup of patients without head injuries was analysed. From 2009 to 2011, there were 305 patients with gunshot wounds and 871 patients with stab wounds. The high proportion of suicide-related gunshot wounds to the head resulted in a cumulative mortality rate of 39.7%. Stab wounds were associated with a lower mortality rate (6.2%). Every fourth patient with a gunshot or stab wound presented with haemorrhagic shock, which was considerably more frequently seen during the prehospital phase than during the inhospital phase of patient management. Of the patients with gunshot wounds, 26.9% required transfusions. This percentage was three times higher than that for patients with blunt trauma. In Germany, gunshot and stab wounds have a low

  9. An analysis of predictors of morbidity after stab wounds of the pancreas in 78 consecutive injuries

    PubMed Central

    Kotze, UK; Sayed, R; Navsaria, PH; Nicol, AJ

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Penetrating injuries of the pancreas may result in serious complications. This study assessed the factors influencing morbidity after stab wounds of the pancreas. Methods A retrospective univariate cohort analysis was carried out of 78 patients (74 men) with a median age of 26 years (range: 16–62 years) with stab wounds of the pancreas between 1982 and 2011. Results The median revised trauma score (RTS) was 7.8 (range: 2.0–7.8). Injuries involved the body (n=36), tail (n=24), head/uncinate process (n=16) and neck (n=2) of the pancreas. All 78 patients underwent a laparotomy. Sixty-five patients had AAST (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma) grade I or II pancreatic injuries and thirteen had grade III, IV or V injuries. Eight patients (10.3%) had an initial damage control operation. Sixty-nine patients (84.6%) had drainage of the pancreas only, six had a distal pancreatectomy and one had a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Most pancreas related complications occurred in patients with AAST grade III injuries; eight patients (10.2%) developed a pancreatic fistula. Four patients (5.1%) died. Grade of pancreatic injury (AAST grade I–II vs grade III–V injuries, p<0.001), RTS (odds ratio [OR]: 5.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46–17.19, p<0.007), presence of shock on admission (OR: 3.31, 95% CI: 1.16–9.42, p=0.022), need for a blood transfusion (OR: 6.46, 95% CI: 2.40–17.40, p<0.001) and repeat laparotomy (p<0.001) had a significant influence on the development of general complications. Conclusions Although mortality was low after a pancreatic stab wound, morbidity was high. Increasing AAST grade of injury, high RTS, shock on admission to hospital, need for blood transfusion and repeat laparotomy were significant factors related to morbidity. PMID:25198973

  10. Differences between postmortem computed tomography and conventional autopsy in a stabbing murder case

    PubMed Central

    Zerbini, Talita; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Ferro, Antonio Carlos Gonçalves; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Junior, Edson Amaro; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto Gonçalves; do Nascimento Saldiva, Paulo Hilario

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present work is to analyze the differences and similarities between the elements of a conventional autopsy and images obtained from postmortem computed tomography in a case of a homicide stab wound. METHOD: Comparison between the findings of different methods: autopsy and postmortem computed tomography. RESULTS: In some aspects, autopsy is still superior to imaging, especially in relation to external examination and the description of lesion vitality. However, the findings of gas embolism, pneumothorax and pulmonary emphysema and the relationship between the internal path of the instrument of aggression and the entry wound are better demonstrated by postmortem computed tomography. CONCLUSIONS: Although multislice computed tomography has greater accuracy than autopsy, we believe that the conventional autopsy method is fundamental for providing evidence in criminal investigations. PMID:25518020

  11. An unusual case of orbito-frontal rod fence stab injury with a good outcome.

    PubMed

    Miscusi, Massimo; Arangio, Paolo; De Martino, Luca; De-Giorgio, Fabio; Cascone, Piero; Raco, Antonino

    2013-08-13

    High-energy non-missile penetrating injuries (stab injuries) account for a small percentage of penetrating head injuries and they present a series of special features. A 35-year-old man suffered orbito-frontal? and trans-cranial injuries after falling five meters from a terrace onto a rod iron fence. The removal of the metal rod was performed outside the operating room. The orbital roof was exposed and repaired through a bifrontal craniotomy and the frontal sinuses were cranialised. The orbital floor and zygoma were plated with micro-screws. The patient recovered without significant complications, apart from a slight paresis of the right superior rectus; the ocular globe remained intact.The positive outcome obtained in this very challenging case is attributable to the competency of the Neurotrauma Unit and to the use of a synergistic approach which involved the contribution of neurosurgeons, maxillo-facial surgeons, radiologists and anaesthesiologists.

  12. Complex suicide by self-stabbing with subsequent drowning in the sea.

    PubMed

    Kaliszan, Michał; Karnecki, Karol; Tomczak, Ewa; Gos, Tomasz; Jankowski, Zbigniew

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents a unique case of a complex suicide committed by a young man, mostly probably triggered by a disappointment in love. The uniqueness of the suicide lies in the fact that the victim inflicted several deep stab wounds on himself, in the chest and abdomen, while standing partly submerged in the sea and, having done so, he dropped and disappeared in the water. The postmortem examination showed, apart from deep wounds in the trunk, characteristics of drowning that manifested itself in the form of aqueous emphysema of the lungs. Suicide was clearly determined on the basis of the circumstances preceding death, the location, and arrangement of the trunk wounds and the testimony given by a witness of the incident. The circumstances preceding the suicidal act clearly suggest an underlying undiagnosed mental disorder. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. An unusual case of orbito-frontal rod fence stab injury with a good outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-energy non-missile penetrating injuries (stab injuries) account for a small percentage of penetrating head injuries and they present a series of special features. Case presentation A 35-year-old man suffered orbito-frontal? and trans-cranial injuries after falling five meters from a terrace onto a rod iron fence. The removal of the metal rod was performed outside the operating room. The orbital roof was exposed and repaired through a bifrontal craniotomy and the frontal sinuses were cranialised. The orbital floor and zygoma were plated with micro-screws. Conclusion The patient recovered without significant complications, apart from a slight paresis of the right superior rectus; the ocular globe remained intact. The positive outcome obtained in this very challenging case is attributable to the competency of the Neurotrauma Unit and to the use of a synergistic approach which involved the contribution of neurosurgeons, maxillo-facial surgeons, radiologists and anaesthesiologists. PMID:23941677

  14. Spinal Cord Injury Caused by Stab Wounds: Incidence, Natural History, and Relevance for Future Research.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Euan J; Purcell, Mariel; Barnett, Susan C; Allan, David B

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury caused by stab wounds (SCISW) results from a partial or complete transection of the cord, and presents opportunities for interventional research. It is recognized that there is low incidence, but little is known about the natural history or the patient's suitability for long-term clinical outcome studies. This study aims to provide population-based evidence of the demographics of SCISW, and highlight the issues regarding the potential for future research. The database of the Queen Elizabeth National Spinal Injuries Unit (QENSIU), the sole center for treating SCI in Scotland, was reviewed between 1994 and 2013 to ascertain the incidence, demographics, functional recovery, and mortality rates for new SCISW. During this 20 year period, 35 patients with SCISW were admitted (97.1% male, mean age 30.0 years); 31.4% had a cervical injury, 60.0% had a thoracic injury, and 8.6% had a lumbar injury. All had a neurological examination, with 42.9% diagnosed as motor complete on admission and 77.1% discharged as motor incomplete. A total of 70.4% of patients with an American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) level of A to C on admission had an improved AIS level on discharge. Nine (25.7%) patients have died since discharge, with mean life expectancy for these patients being 9.1 years after injury (20-65 years of age). Patients had higher levels of comorbidities, substance abuse, secondary events, and poor compliance compared with the general SCI population, which may have contributed to the high mortality rate observed post-discharge. The low incidence, heterogeneous nature, spontaneous recovery rate, and problematic follow-up makes those with penetrating stab injuries of the spinal cord a challenging patient group for SCI research.

  15. Postmortem ventilation in cases of penetrating gunshot and stab wounds to the chest.

    PubMed

    Germerott, Tanja; Preiss, Ulrich S; Ross, Steffen G; Thali, Michael J; Flach, Patricia M

    2013-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of postmortem ventilation in combination with a suction pump in cases showing penetrating trauma to the chest with haemo- and/or pneumothorax, for better evaluation of the lungs in postmortem computed tomography (PMCT). The study included 6 subjects (1 female, 5 male; age 32-67years) with a penetrating gunshot or stab wound to the chest and consecutive pneumo- and/or haemothorax. The pneumo- and haemothorax were evacuated by a suction pump, and postmortem ventilation was applied using a home care ventilator. PMCT images with and without postmortem ventilation were compared, as well as the autopsy results. In three cases haemo- and pneumothorax was clearly reduced. Postmortem ventilation led to distinct re-expansion of the lungs in two cases, and to re-expansion of single lung lobes in two cases with shotgun injuries. No visible effect was seen in the remaining two cases, because of extensive destruction of lung tissue and blood aspiration. In two cases the injuries sustained in the individual lung lobes were successfully located during postmortem ventilation. The bullet channel was apparent in one case; in another case, injury of the pericardium became visible by generating pneumopericardium. The present method is capable of improving evaluation of the postmortem lung in the presence of single stab or gunshot wounds and if there is no severe destruction of the respiratory system and aspiration. Forensic autopsy should still be considered as the gold standard, although in some cases the present method might be helpful, especially where no autopsy is required.

  16. Chameleon fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    A scalar field dark energy candidate could couple to ordinary matter and photons, enabling its detection in laboratory experiments. Here we study the quantum properties of the chameleon field, one such dark energy candidate, in an ''afterglow'' experiment designed to produce, trap, and detect chameleon particles. In particular, we investigate the possible fragmentation of a beam of chameleon particles into multiple particle states due to the highly non-linear interaction terms in the chameleon Lagrangian. Fragmentation could weaken the constraints of an afterglow experiment by reducing the energy of the regenerated photons, but this energy reduction also provides a unique signature which could be detected by a properly-designed experiment. We show that constraints from the CHASE experiment are essentially unaffected by fragmentation for φ{sup 4} and 1/φ potentials, but are weakened for steeper potentials, and we discuss possible future afterglow experiments.

  17. Fatal delayed cardiac tamponade due to rupture of micropseudoaneurysm of left anterior descending coronary artery following stab to the chest.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jingjun; Li, Shangxun; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yi; Duan, Yijie; Li, Wenhe; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic coronary pseudoaneurysm has been described to be mainly associated to iatrogenic lesion of the coronary arteries. However, chest-stab-wound-related coronary pseudoaneurysm caused by isolated partial incision of a coronary artery giving rise to fatal delayed cardiac tamponade is very rare. We describe an autopsy case in which this potentially fatal complication developed 8 days later after a thoracic stab wound. Unfortunately, the imaging examination failed to detect this defect during hospitalization. Postmortem examination revealed that the posterior wall of the left anterior descending coronary artery was intact but that the anterior wall was incised, forming a micropseudoaneurysm which had ruptured. This case highlights that isolated coronary artery injuries must be considered in any patient with a penetrating wound to the thorax, and coronary pseudoaneurysms should not be missed in these patients.

  18. A case of cerebellar infarction caused by vertebral artery injury from a stab wound to the neck.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Je; Shim, Hyun Seok; Jeong, Jae Ho; Whang, Soo Hyun; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Jeon, Sea Young; Kwon, Oh Jin

    2007-09-01

    Vertebral artery injuries are the least common arterial injuries because of the deep location of the vessel in a bony canal. Injury of this vessel has not been associated with neurological deficits, and it is thought that many of these injuries are not recognized. The incidence of vertebral artery injury occurring after a penetration wound to the neck varies from 1.0% in gunshot wounds to 7.4% in stab wounds. However, even with vertebral artery injury in penetration wounds of the neck the association with cerebellar infarction is a rare occurrence. We describe a case of cerebellar infarction caused by vertebral artery injury from a stab wound that severed the vessel between the transverse processes of C3 and C4 with a hypoplastic contralateral vertebral artery. The patient ultimately suffered infarction of the cerebellum due to the lack of preservation of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery blood flow. Management is discussed and the medical literature is reviewed.

  19. Double stent technique for the treatment of an internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm caused by zone III stab injury.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yuzo; Kiyosue, Hiro; Kashiwagi, Junichi; Asano, Tomoshige; Shuto, Rieko; Matsumoto, Yushi; Nagatomi, Hirofumi; Mori, Hiromu

    2007-10-01

    A 77-year-old man was transferred to the hospital with swelling of his neck and oropharynx after a stab injury to his oral cavity with pruning shears. Findings at complete neurologic examination were normal. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm at the pharyngeal portion of the right internal carotid artery. Endovascular treatment was undertaken by using the double bare stent technique. The pseudoaneurysm was completely occluded immediately after the procedure. There were no complications. There were no further symptoms or evidence of recurrence of the aneurysm during the 18-month follow-up period. The double bare stent technique is safe and effective for the treatment of zone III carotid artery stab injuries.

  20. Unusual intracranial stab wounds inflicted with metal tent stakes for a case involving a family murder suicide.

    PubMed

    Oki, Takahito; Asamura, Hideki; Hayashi, Tokutaro; Ota, Masao

    2010-10-10

    This article presents a highly unusual homicide involving intracranial stab wounds. Of three members of a family killed by intracranial stab wounds apparently inflicted with metal tent stakes, two also showed signs of wounds inflicted during an apparent struggle with the assailant. A wooden mallet appears to be the implement use to drive the metal stakes into the cranial cavity. In all victims, toxicological analysis indicated the presence of brotizolam at concentrations ranging from 30 to 50ngml(-1). The one victim who showed no signs of wounds incurred during a defensive struggle was found to have blood alcohol levels of 2.87mgml(-1). The assailant, another family member with a history of major psychiatric disorders, apparently committed suicide by drowning following the attacks.

  1. Fragmentation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Colm T.

    2012-12-01

    Preface; 1. Direct and resonant double-photoionization: from atoms to solids L. Avaldi and G. Stefani; 2. The application of propagation exterior complex scaling to atomic collisions P. L. Bartlett and A. T. Stelbovics; 3. Fragmentation of molecular-ion beams in intense ultra-short laser pulses I. Ben-Itzhak; 4. Atoms with one and two active electrons in strong laser fields I. A. Ivanov and A. S. Kheifets; 5. Experimental aspects of ionization studies by positron and positronium impact G. Laricchia, D. A. Cooke, Á. Kövér and S. J. Brawley; 6. (e,2e) spectroscopy using fragmentation processes J. Lower, M. Yamazaki and M. Takahashi; 7. A coupled pseudostate approach to the calculation of ion-atom fragmentation processes M. McGovern, H. R. J. Walters and C. T. Whelan; 8. Electron Impact Ionization using (e,2e) coincidence techniques from threshold to intermediate energies A. J. Murray; 9. (e,2e) processes on atomic inner shells C. T. Whelan; 10. Spin resolved atomic (e,2e) processes J. Lower and C. T. Whelan; Index.

  2. Compartment syndrome as a complication of a stab wound to the thigh: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, John J; Hacker, Andrew; Patel, Vipul

    2007-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is a rare but potentially devastating condition, in which the pressure within the osseofascial compartment rises above the capillary perfusion gradient, leading to cellular anoxia, muscle ischaemia and death. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent long term disability. It is most often associated with crush injuries and femoral fracture. We present a previously unreported case of thigh compartment syndrome following a stab injury, treated by emergent fasciotomy. PMID:17954836

  3. A Penetrating Stab Wound of the Perianal Area Causing a Combined Rectal and Bladder Injury: One Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Ahallal, Youness; Riyach, Omar; El Ammari, Jalal Eddine; El Fassi, Mohammed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Although the management of either isolated rectal or bladder injury is no more controversial, their combined effect and their optimal management has been seldom reported in the English literature. From a case report of a 45-year-old male who was found to have a combined bladder and rectal injury secondary to a stab wound of the perianal area, the authors develop a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for the management of this uncommon trauma. PMID:22844630

  4. The 2-repeat allele of the MAOA gene confers an increased risk for shooting and stabbing behaviors.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Kevin M; Barnes, J C; Boutwell, Brian B

    2014-09-01

    There has been a great deal of research examining the link between a polymorphism in the promoter region of the MAOA gene and antisocial phenotypes. The results of these studies have consistently revealed that low activity MAOA alleles are related to antisocial behaviors for males who were maltreated as children. Recently, though, some evidence has emerged indicating that a rare allele of the MAOA gene-that is, the 2-repeat allele-may have effects on violence that are independent of the environment. The current study builds on this research and examines the association between the 2-repeat allele and shooting and stabbing behaviors in a sample of males drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Analyses revealed that African-American males who carry the 2-repeat allele are significantly more likely than all other genotypes to engage in shooting and stabbing behaviors and to report having multiple shooting and stabbing victims. The limitations of the study are discussed and suggestions for future research are offered.

  5. Surgical judgment in the management of abdominal stab wounds. Utilizing clinical criteria from a 10-year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W C; Uddo, J F; Nance, F C

    1984-01-01

    A 10-year retrospective study of patients with stab wounds to the abdomen managed under a protocol of selective management has been performed. Patients were assessed on the basis of clinical presentation and physical examination, with minimal diagnostic studies. Peritoneal lavage was not utilized in the evaluation of the patients. Two hundred and nineteen such patients were identified. One hundred and eleven of these patients were treated nonoperatively. Ninety patients were treated by immediate laparotomy. Eighteen patients, initially observed, underwent delayed laparotomy. One patient, not explored despite clear-cut indications for laparotomy, died of sepsis, emphasizing the need for strict adherence to the stated protocol. The negative or unnecessary laparotomy rate was 7.8%. The false-negative examination rate was 5.5%. Overall mortality rate was 2.3%. The accuracy of careful clinical evaluation and observation is comparable to, or better than, any other method currently available to identify intra-abdominal injuries in patients with abdominal stab wounds. The study suggests that selective management of stab wounds of the abdomen may be safely practiced in a smaller community hospital. PMID:6721604

  6. Endovascular Repair of an Actively Hemorrhaging Stab Wound Injury to the Abdominal Aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Qasim; Maleux, Geert Heye, Sam; Fourneau, Inge

    2008-09-15

    Traumatic injury of the abdominal aorta is rare and potentially lethal (Yeh et al., J Vasc Surg 42(5):1007-1009, 2005; Chicos et al., Chirurgia (Bucur) 102(2):237-240, 2007) as it can result in major retroperitoneal hemorrhage, requiring an urgent open surgery. In case of concomitant bowel injury or other conditions of hostile abdomen, endovascular repair can be an alternative treatment. This case report deals with a 50-year-old man presenting at the emergency ward with three stab wounds: two in the abdomen and one in the chest. During explorative laparotomy, liver laceration and bowel perforation were repaired. One day later, abdominal CT-scan revealed an additional retroperitoneal hematoma associated with an aortic pseudoaneurysm, located anteriorly 3 cm above the aortic bifurcation. Because of the risk of graft infection, an endovascular repair of the aortic injury using a Gore excluder stent-graft was performed. Radiological and clinical follow-up revealed a gradual shrinkage of the pseudo-aneurysm and no sign of graft infection at two years' follow-up.

  7. A new method of ergonomic testing of gloves protecting against cuts and stabs during knife use.

    PubMed

    Irzmańska, Emilia; Tokarski, Tomasz

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents a new method of ergonomic evaluation of gloves protecting against cuts and stabs during knife use, consisting of five manual dexterity tests. Two of them were selected based on the available literature and relevant safety standards, and three were developed by the authors. All of the tests were designed to simulate occupational tasks associated with meat processing as performed by the gloved hand in actual workplaces. The tests involved the three most common types of protective gloves (knitted gloves made of a coverspun yarn, metal mesh gloves, and metal mesh gloves with an ergonomic polyurethane tightener) and were conducted on a group of 20 males. The loading on the muscles of the upper limb (adductor pollicis, flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis, and biceps brachii) was measured using surface electromyography. For the obtained muscle activity values, correlations were found between the glove type and loading of the upper limb. ANOVA showed that the activity of all muscles differed significantly between the five tests. A relationship between glove types and electromyographic results was confirmed at a significance level of α = 0.05.

  8. An unusual autopsy case of a victim stabbed during sadomasochistic prostitution.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, M; Terada, M; Tun, Z; Takikita, S; Honda, K; Matoba, R; Shinohara, T

    1999-04-01

    A 29-year-old male who lived alone was found dead with his back leaning against the wall of his room. He had been stabbed in his abdomen with a survival-type knife. The victim's mouth was plugged with a pink-colored glove and was sealed with packing tape. His wrists were tightly tied behind his back with the same type of packing tape. The cause of death was diagnosed as hemorrhage from the right common iliac artery and vein. Due to the strange circumstances of the crime scene, the police initially considered the possibility of homicide by a group of assassins. Two months later, the police arrested a male suspect who was a member of a vice racketeer. The victim was characterized as a masochist and bisexual. He often hired the male suspect to perform sadomasochistic activities. On the day of the crime, the victim prepared a survival-type knife and packing tape himself to experience fear and pain more strongly. The victim hoped to use the knife to increase sexual excitement. In this case of sadomasochistic prostitution leading to death, the legal issues of homicide for money, malicious request of injury by the victim and accidental death were involved.

  9. Stiletto stabbing: penetrating injury to the hypothalamus with hyperacute diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Itshayek, Eyal; Gomori, John Moshe; Spektor, Sergey; Cohen, José E

    2010-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a well documented complication observed after traumatic head injuries. We report a case of hyperacute onset DI in a 19-year-old male who sustained a hypothalamic-pituitary injury when he was stabbed in the head with a 30-cm long thin-bladed knife. At CT, our patient showed significant hemorrhagic contusions of the lower hypothalamus. He developed polydipsia, polyuria, and mild hypernatremia in the Emergency Department. Diagnostic digital subtraction angiography showed a hypervascular congestive pituitary gland with prominent draining veins. On the third day his hypernatremia became severe (183mEq/L). He was managed with parenteral fluids and a regimen of intranasal DDAVP (1-desamino 8-d-arginine vasopressin), leading to improved plasmatic sodium levels, urine output, and urinary specific gravity. In patients presenting with hyperacute posttraumatic DI, emergency room physicians and neurosurgeons should rule out direct injury to the hypothalamus and/or the posterior lobe of the pituitary, and initiate early pharmacological treatment.

  10. The spectrum of injuries resulting from posterior abdominal stab wounds: a South African experience.

    PubMed

    Kong, V Y; Oosthuizen, G V; Clarke, D L

    2015-05-01

    The spectrum of injury associated with anterior abdominal stab wounds (SWs) is well established. The literature on the spectrum of organ injury associated with SWs to the posterior abdomen, however, is limited. We reviewed our experience of 105 consecutive patients who had established indications for laparotomy managed over a 4-year period in a high volume trauma service in South Africa. Of the 105 patients, 97 (92%) were male and the overall mean age was 24 years. Fifty-seven patients (54%) had immediate indications for laparotomy. The remaining 48 patients (46%) initially underwent active clinical observation and the indications for laparotomy became apparent during the observation period. Of the 105 laparotomies performed, 94 (90%) were positive and 11 (10%) were negative. Of the 94 positive laparotomies, 92 were therapeutic and 2 were non-therapeutic. A total of 176 organ injuries were identified: 50 (53%) of the 94 patients sustained a single organ injury while the remaining 44 (47%) sustained multiple organ injuries. The most commonly injured organs were the colon (n=63), spleen (n=21) and kidney (n=19). The pattern of intra-abdominal injuries secondary to SWs to the posterior abdomen is different to that seen with the anterior abdomen. Colonic injury is most commonly encountered, followed by injuries to the spleen and kidney. Clinicians must remain vigilant because of the potential for occult injuries.

  11. Determining injuries from posterior and flank stab wounds using computed tomography tractography.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Vishal; Reid, Chris M; Fortlage, Dale; Lee, Jeanne; Kobayashi, Leslie; Doucet, Jay; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-04-01

    Unlike anterior stab wounds (SW), in which local exploration may direct management, posterior SW can be challenging to evaluate. Traditional triple contrast computed tomography (CT) imaging is cumbersome and technician-dependent. The present study examines the role of CT tractography as a strategy to manage select patients with back and flank SW. Hemodynamically stable patients with back and flank SW were studied. After resuscitation, Betadine- or Visipaque®-soaked sterile sponges were inserted into each SW for the estimated depth of the wound. Patients underwent abdominal helical CT scanning, including intravenous contrast, as the sole abdominal imaging study. Images were reviewed by an attending radiologist and trauma surgeon. The tractogram was evaluated to determine SW trajectory and injury to intra- or retroperitoneal organs, vascular structures, the diaphragm, and the urinary tract. Complete patient demographics including operative management and injuries were collected. Forty-one patients underwent CT tractography. In 11 patients, tractography detected violation of the intra- or retroperitoneal cavity leading to operative exploration. Injuries detected included: the spleen (two), colon (one), colonic mesentery (one), kidney (kidney), diaphragm (kidney), pneumothorax (seven), hemothorax (two), iliac artery (one), and traumatic abdominal wall hernia (two). In all patients, none had negative CT findings that failed observation. In this series, CT tractography is a safe and effective imaging strategy to evaluate posterior torso SW. It is unknown whether CT tractography is superior to traditional imaging modalities. Other uses for CT tractography may include determining trajectory from missile wounds and tangential penetrating injuries.

  12. [Forensic medical expertise of the stab wounds: the current state-of-the art].

    PubMed

    Sarkisian, B A; Karpov, D A

    2014-01-01

    This review of special literature encompasses the publications on the injuries inflicted by piercing objects. The results of analysis of these materials indicate that both the mechanisms of formation and the morphological features of stab wounds and damages to the clothes are studied perfectly well. Their shape and morphological patterns are shown to be dependent on the size, shape, and cross-section area of the great variety of the piercing objects. However, investigations carried out thus far did not take into consideration the formation of the signs of skin plastic deformation, such as edge portions of borderline thickening, stretching of epidermis over the walls, transformation of the epidermal network pattern into longitudinal folding, etc. It is concluded that further studies are necessary to better characterize injuries inflicted by piercing objects differing in the sharpness and the shape of cross section and thereby to obtain a deeper insight in the morphological features. It can be expected that such studies will provide a basis for the development of criteria for the individual and intra-group expert identification of the traumatic agents.

  13. [Stab wound to the left solitary kidney: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Rabii, R; Joual, A; Bennani, S; Hafiani, M; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2000-08-01

    A forty-four-years old man with a left solitary kidney presented a stab wound in the left lumbar region. Upon admission, the patient was hemodynamically stable, the abdominal ultrasonography showed a small perirenal hematoma and the intravenous pyelography was normal. Two days later, he had no hematuria and was discharged from the hospital, with a computed tomography scan control two weeks later. Unfortunately, seven days later, the patient was admitted to emergency for left lumbar pain, a 40 degrees C fever and pyuria. The creatinine level was 72 ng/mL, and the computed tomography scan showed a large urohematoma. The patient was operated and required partial upper polar nephrectomy for distorted upper pole with infected hematoma. A large hematoma was removed and a nephrostomy tube was introduced. The renal function returned to normal six days postoperatively and the nephrostomy tube was removed after nephrostogram at 12 days. Concerning this uncommon case, we emphasize the advantage of the computed tomography scan and the necessity of emergency management in a patient with solitary traumatic kidney.

  14. Does cone beam CT actually ameliorate stab wound analysis in bone?

    PubMed

    Gaudio, D; Di Giancamillo, M; Gibelli, D; Galassi, A; Cerutti, E; Cattaneo, C

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at verifying the potential of a recent radiological technology, cone beam CT (CBCT), for the reproduction of digital 3D models which may allow the user to verify the inner morphology of sharp force wounds within the bone tissue. Several sharp force wounds were produced by both single and double cutting edge weapons on cancellous and cortical bone, and then acquired by cone beam CT scan. The lesions were analysed by different software (a DICOM file viewer and reverse engineering software). Results verified the limited performances of such technology for lesions made on cortical bone, whereas on cancellous bone reliable models were obtained, and the precise morphology within the bone tissues was visible. On the basis of such results, a method for differential diagnosis between cutmarks by sharp tools with a single and two cutting edges can be proposed. On the other hand, the metrical computerised analysis of lesions highlights a clear increase of error range for measurements under 3 mm. Metric data taken by different operators shows a strong dispersion (% relative standard deviation). This pilot study shows that the use of CBCT technology can improve the investigation of morphological stab wounds on cancellous bone. Conversely metric analysis of the lesions as well as morphological analysis of wound dimension under 3 mm do not seem to be reliable.

  15. Computational and Experimental Determination of Fragmentation for Naturally Fragmenting Warheads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    Table Page I Chemical analysis of Armco iron and HF-I steel ....................... 3 2 Summary of tensile-pull measurements for transverse-direction...ntered) REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE - E-EFORE COMTLETING FORM I REPORT NUMBER 2 GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3 RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBERNSWC TR 80-238 4 TITLE (and...Sulbtitle) S TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL 1 Final DETERMINATION OF FRAGMENTATION FOR NATURALLY FRAGMENTING WARHEADS

  16. IMPACT fragmentation model developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.

    2016-09-01

    The IMPACT fragmentation model has been used by The Aerospace Corporation for more than 25 years to analyze orbital altitude explosions and hypervelocity collisions. The model is semi-empirical, combining mass, energy and momentum conservation laws with empirically derived relationships for fragment characteristics such as number, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and spreading velocity as well as event energy distribution. Model results are used for several types of analysis including assessment of short-term risks to satellites from orbital altitude fragmentations, prediction of the long-term evolution of the orbital debris environment and forensic assessments of breakup events. A new version of IMPACT, version 6, has been completed and incorporates a number of advancements enabled by a multi-year long effort to characterize more than 11,000 debris fragments from more than three dozen historical on-orbit breakup events. These events involved a wide range of causes, energies, and fragmenting objects. Special focus was placed on the explosion model, as the majority of events examined were explosions. Revisions were made to the mass distribution used for explosion events, increasing the number of smaller fragments generated. The algorithm for modeling upper stage large fragment generation was updated. A momentum conserving asymmetric spreading velocity distribution algorithm was implemented to better represent sub-catastrophic events. An approach was developed for modeling sub-catastrophic explosions, those where the majority of the parent object remains intact, based on estimated event energy. Finally, significant modifications were made to the area-to-mass ratio distribution to incorporate the tendencies of different materials to fragment into different shapes. This ability enabled better matches between the observed area-to-mass ratios and those generated by the model. It also opened up additional possibilities for post-event analysis of breakups. The paper will discuss

  17. Brown-Séquard syndrome without vascular injury associated with Horner's syndrome after a stab injury to the neck.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephen; Jones, Margaret; Zumsteg, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This case reviews the acute care and rehabilitation course of a 44-year-old right-handed woman after an assault with a pocketknife. She suffered multiple stab wounds including penetrating injury to the left side of her neck. Physical examination revealed left hemiplegia (motor score = 57), impaired pinprick sensation on the right caudal to the C5 dermatome, impaired joint position sense on the left, and left ptosis and miosis. Initially she was unable to stand without maximum assistance. MR imaging revealed transection of the left hemicord at the C5 level without cord hemorrhage. CTA of the neck was negative for vascular injury. She completed 18 days of acute inpatient rehabilitation. She used forearm crutches for ambulation at time of discharge. Prior to discharge the patient provided written permission for a case report. Stab wounds are the most common cause of traumatic Brown-Séquard syndrome. Horner's syndrome is common in spinal cord lesions occurring in the cervical or thoracic region, however the combination of Horner's and Brown-Séquard syndromes is less commonly reported. In this case report, we review recommendations regarding initial imaging following cervical stab wounds, discuss anatomy and associated neurological findings in Brown-Séquard and Horner's syndromes, and review the expected temporal course of motor recovery. Facilitating motor recovery and optimizing function after Brown-Séquard spinal cord injury are important roles for the rehabilitation team. Imaging is necessary to rule out cord hemorrhage or vascular injury and to clinically correlate cord damage with physical examination findings and expected functional impairments. Documenting associated anisocoria and explaining this finding to the patient is an important element of spinal cord injury education. Commonly, patients with Brown-Séquard injuries demonstrate remarkable motor recovery and regain voluntary motor strength and functional ambulation.

  18. Brown-Séquard syndrome without vascular injury associated with Horner's syndrome after a stab injury to the neck

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Margaret; Zumsteg, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Case Description This case reviews the acute care and rehabilitation course of a 44-year-old right-handed woman after an assault with a pocketknife. She suffered multiple stab wounds including penetrating injury to the left side of her neck. Physical examination revealed left hemiplegia (motor score = 57), impaired pinprick sensation on the right caudal to the C5 dermatome, impaired joint position sense on the left, and left ptosis and miosis. Initially she was unable to stand without maximum assistance. MR imaging revealed transection of the left hemicord at the C5 level without cord hemorrhage. CTA of the neck was negative for vascular injury. She completed 18 days of acute inpatient rehabilitation. She used forearm crutches for ambulation at time of discharge. Prior to discharge the patient provided written permission for a case report. Discussion Stab wounds are the most common cause of traumatic Brown-Séquard syndrome. Horner's syndrome is common in spinal cord lesions occurring in the cervical or thoracic region, however the combination of Horner's and Brown-Séquard syndromes is less commonly reported. In this case report, we review recommendations regarding initial imaging following cervical stab wounds, discuss anatomy and associated neurological findings in Brown-Séquard and Horner's syndromes, and review the expected temporal course of motor recovery. Conclusions Facilitating motor recovery and optimizing function after Brown-Séquard spinal cord injury are important roles for the rehabilitation team. Imaging is necessary to rule out cord hemorrhage or vascular injury and to clinically correlate cord damage with physical examination findings and expected functional impairments. Documenting associated anisocoria and explaining this finding to the patient is an important element of spinal cord injury education. Commonly, patients with Brown-Séquard injuries demonstrate remarkable motor recovery and regain voluntary motor strength and functional

  19. [Repair of Cardiac and Pulmonary Damage caused by Stabbing with a Kitchen Knife;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Odate, Tomohiro; Hashizume, Kouji; Yamasaki, Naoya; Miyazaki, Takuro; Ariyoshi, Tsuneo; Hisata, Youichi; Tanigawa, Kazuyoshi; Miura, Takashi; Nagaji, Shun; Tasaki, Yuichi; Eishi, Kiyoyuki

    2015-02-01

    A 51-year-old woman was stabbed in the chest with a kitchen knife. Twenty minutes after arrival at our hospital by ambulance, she was transferred to the operating room, and a cardiopulmonary bypass was established from the right femoral artery and vein, and a median sternotomy was performed. The knife had damaged the surface of the heart and penetrated the lingular segment of the left lung. Both wounds were directly sutured. Chest X-rays taken after closing the chest showed bleeding in the left lung probably because of the administration of heparin. Bleeding was controlled by lingulectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  20. Comparison of single incision and multi incision diagnostic laparoscopy on evaluation of diaphragmatic status after left thoracoabdominal penetrating stab wounds

    PubMed Central

    İlhan, Mehmet; Gök, Ali Fuat Kaan; Bademler, Süleyman; Cücük, Ömer Cenk; Soytaş, Yiğit; Yanar, Hakan Teoman

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Single incision diagnostic laparoscopy (SIDL) may be an alternative procedure to multi-incision diagnostic laparoscopy (MDL) for penetrating thoracoabdominal stab wounds. The purpose of this study is sharing our experience and comparing two techniques for diaphragmatic status. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records of 102 patients with left thoracoabdominal penetrating stab injuries who admitted to Istanbul School of Medicine, Trauma and Emergency Surgery Clinic between February 2012 and April 2016 were examined. The patients were grouped according to operation technique. Patient records were retrospectively reviewed for data including, age, sex, length of hospital stay, diaphragm injury rate, surgical procedure, operation time and operation time with wound repair, post-operative complications and accompanying injuries. RESULTS: The most common injury location was the left anterior thoracoabdomen. SIDL was performed on 26 patients. Nine (34.6%) of the 26 patients had a diaphragm injury. Seventy-six patients underwent MDL. Diaphragmatic injury was detected in 20 (26.3%) of 76 patients. The average operation time and post-operative complications were similar; there was no statistically significant difference between MDL and SIDL groups. CONCLUSION: SIDL can be used as a safe and feasible procedure in the repair of a diaphragm wounds. SIDL may be an alternative method in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. PMID:27934791

  1. Fatal tiger attack: a case report with emphasis on typical tiger injuries characterized by partially resembling stab-like wounds.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Hrishikesh; Borkar, Jaydeo; Dixit, Pradeep; Dhawane, Shailendra; Shrigiriwar, Manish; Dingre, Niraj

    2013-10-10

    Fatalities due to attacks by tigers on humans are uncommon and are rarely described in the medico-legal literature. We herein present a forensic investigation in a unique case of a fatal tiger attack in the wild on a 35 year old female in India by an Indian Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris). The attack resulted in two pairs of puncture wounds over the nape area with occult cervical spine injuries resulting from transfixing of spine due to the tiger canines; multiple puncture wounds, numerous scratches and abrasions consistent with the tiger claw injuries and injury to the right jugulocarotid vessels. This case outlines the characteristic injury pattern from such an attack along with the multiple sources of the tiger injuries. The analysis of these injuries might reveal the motivation behind the attack and the big cat species involved in the attack. A tiger injury is sometimes compared with a stab injury, as the patterned injuries due to a tiger bite are characterized by multiple penetrating, stab-like wounds. So, a special attention is paid toward establishment of the cause of death from bites by the animal teeth under unknown circumstances of trauma and to exclude the possibility of a homicide beyond reasonable doubt in such cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stab wounds of the anterior abdomen. Analysis of a management plan using local wound exploration and quantitative peritoneal lavage.

    PubMed Central

    Oreskovich, M R; Carrico, C J

    1983-01-01

    A management plan for stab wounds to the anterior abdomen incorporating local wound exploration and quantitative peritoneal lavage was applied to 572 patients. One hundred eighty-five of these patients presented with shock, peritonitis, or evisceration and underwent immediate exploratory laparotomy with the finding of an intraperitoneal organ injury in 183 (99%). The remaining 387 patients with a negative physical examination underwent exploration of the stab wound to determine fascial penetration. Wound exploration was negative in 151 of these patients and they were discharged from the emergency room. Two hundred thirty-six additional patients had penetration of the fascia and underwent peritoneal lavage. Ninety-two per cent of patients with lavage counts greater than 50,000 had an intraperitoneal organ injury. No patients with lavage counts less than 1,000 red cells had an organ injury. Forty-three per cent of patients in the intermediate group (1,000-50,000 RBCs/mm3) had an organ injury and 59% included penetration of a hollow viscus. An approach incorporating local wound exploration and quantitative peritoneal lavage followed by exploratory laparotomy for red blood cell counts greater than 1,000 should result in less than 10% negative laparotomies and no missed injuries. PMID:6625712

  3. Explosive fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vledouts, Alexandre; Graña-Otero, José; Quinard, Joel; Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2013-11-01

    We report on an experiment consisting in forcing the fast radial expansion of a spherical liquid shell. The shell is formed by the capillary pinch off of a water thin annular jet surrounding a jet of reactive gaseous mixture at ambient pressure. The encapsulated gas in the resulting water bubble is a mixture of Hydrogen and Oxygen in controlled relative proportions, which is ignited by a laser plasma aimed at the center of the bubble. The strongly exothermic combustion of the mixture induces the expansion of the hot burnt gas, pushing the shell radially outwards in a violently accelerated motion. That motion triggers the instability of the shell, developing thickness modulations ultimately piercing it in a number of holes. The capillary retraction of the holes concentrates the liquid constitutive of the shell into a web of ligaments, whose breakup leads to stable drops. We document the overall process, from the kinematics of the shell initial expansion, to the final drops size distribution as a function of the composition of the gas mixture and bubble shell thickness.

  4. [Stab wounds of the hand and forearm due to Kuluna in Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo): types of injuries and treatment].

    PubMed

    Kibadi, K; Portaels, F; Pichot, Y; Kapinga, M; Moutet, F

    2015-01-01

    Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a particular form of juvenile delinquency and insecurity intensifies in the city of Kinshasa. This is the phenomenon Kuluna. It is organized gangs equipped with machetes and other weapons. The main objective of this study is to know the phenomenon Kuluna and describe the upper limb injuries caused by machetes, while insisting on the specifics of the management of these lesions in our communities. This retrospective descriptive study examines 14 cases of wounds of the hand and forearm due to stab phenomenon Kuluna, in Kinshasa. It covers the period from 1 November 2010 to 1 November 2013. Among the 14 patients with lesions in the hand and forearm admitted and treated at the Unit of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns, University Clinics of Kinshasa to attacks due to the phenomenon Kuluna. We have 11 men and 3 women. The average age was 33, 5 years (extremes of 21 and 56 years). The right upper limb is reached that the left upper limb, respectively 12 patients and 2 patients. The lesions are localized to the wrist in the majority of cases (10 patients) in the palm of hand and in 3 patients in the fingers in 1 patient. The palmar surface is reached (10 cases) and the dorsal (4 cases). Zone 5 of the International Classification of flexor and Zone 8 topographic classification extensors at hand are the predilection sites of lesions respectively the palmar surface (6 out of 10) and the dorsal (2 case 4). The median nerve at the wrist is cut in half the cases. On bone lesions localized to the forearm, we observed a high incidence of fracture of the ulna (62.5%). The treatment begins with the stabilization of bone pieces, gestures revascularization and nerve sutures and suture tendon and finally skin coverage. Rehabilitation was mandatory, she supervises the actions of repair and it continues until the recovery of function.

  5. Robust Object Tracking Using Valid Fragments Selection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Tian, Peng; Luo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Local features are widely used in visual tracking to improve robustness in cases of partial occlusion, deformation and rotation. This paper proposes a local fragment-based object tracking algorithm. Unlike many existing fragment-based algorithms that allocate the weights to each fragment, this method firstly defines discrimination and uniqueness for local fragment, and builds an automatic pre-selection of useful fragments for tracking. Then, a Harris-SIFT filter is used to choose the current valid fragments, excluding occluded or highly deformed fragments. Based on those valid fragments, fragment-based color histogram provides a structured and effective description for the object. Finally, the object is tracked using a valid fragment template combining the displacement constraint and similarity of each valid fragment. The object template is updated by fusing feature similarity and valid fragments, which is scale-adaptive and robust to partial occlusion. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is accurate and robust in challenging scenarios. PMID:27430036

  6. Reframing landscape fragmentation's effects on ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Matthew G E; Suarez-Castro, Andrés F; Martinez-Harms, Maria; Maron, Martine; McAlpine, Clive; Gaston, Kevin J; Johansen, Kasper; Rhodes, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    Landscape structure and fragmentation have important effects on ecosystem services, with a common assumption being that fragmentation reduces service provision. This is based on fragmentation's expected effects on ecosystem service supply, but ignores how fragmentation influences the flow of services to people. Here we develop a new conceptual framework that explicitly considers the links between landscape fragmentation, the supply of services, and the flow of services to people. We argue that fragmentation's effects on ecosystem service flow can be positive or negative, and use our framework to construct testable hypotheses about the effects of fragmentation on final ecosystem service provision. Empirical efforts to apply and test this framework are critical to improving landscape management for multiple ecosystem services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of Cry3A yields in Bacillus thuringiensis by use of sporulation-dependent promoters in combination with the STAB-SD mRNA sequence

    Treesearch

    Hyun-woo Park; Baoxue Ge; Leah S. Bauer; Brian A. Federici

    1998-01-01

    The insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis strains toxic to coleopterous insects is due to Cry3 proteins assembled into small rectangular crystals. Toxin synthesis in these strains is dependent primarily upon a promoter that is active in the stationary phase and a STAB-SD sequence that stabilizes the cry3 transcript-ribosome complex. Here we show that...

  8. The Role of Shear-Thickening Fluids (STFs) in Ballistic and Stab-Resistance Improvement of Flexible Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanzadeh, M.; Mottaghitalab, V.

    2014-04-01

    This paper provides a detailed review on relevant literature related to rheological properties of STFs with particular emphasis on efforts to improve their impact resistance. The review has concisely demonstrated that there are many factors affecting shear-thickening behavior of colloidal suspensions. Nanoparticle characteristics such as shape, size, distribution, solid volume fraction, and interaction with other particles as well as properties related to suspending phase and also flow field could affect the rheological properties of STFs. Recent studies on application of STFs to textile fabrics, preparation techniques, and the factors determining the performance of STF/fabric composites are summarized. Particular emphasis is laid on researches that explore the ballistic, stab, and puncture protective properties of STF-based materials and body armors.

  9. Free zinc increases at the site of injury after cortical stab wounds in mature but not immature rat brain.

    PubMed

    Yeiser, E C; Lerant, A A; Casto, R M; Levenson, C W

    1999-12-24

    The accumulation of free zinc (Zn2+) appears to play a role in the neuronal degeneration that occurs after brain injury. Given that neonates respond to brain injury with increased plasticity compared to adults, this study compared the effect of age on free Zn2+ and the Zn2+-binding protein metallothionein-3 (MT-3) after injury. Unilateral cortical stab wounds were produced in 3-day-old and adult rats. Four weeks later, brains were removed for in situ visualization of free Zn2+ and measurement of MT-3 mRNA. Free Zn2+ and MT-3 mRNA accumulated after 4 weeks at the site of injury site when injury occurred in adults. However, 4 weeks after neonatal injury there was no increase in free Zn2+ or MT-3 mRNA in or around the site of injury.

  10. Diagnostic Accuracy of Abdominal wall Ultrasonography and Local Wound Exploration in Predicting the Need for Laparotomy following Stab Wound

    PubMed Central

    Vafaei, Ali; Heidari, Kamran; Saboorizadeh, Afshin; shams akhtari, Amin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Screening of patients with anterior abdominal penetrating trauma in need for laparotomy is an important issue in management of these cases. This study aimed to compare the accuracy of abdominal wall ultrasonography (AWU) and local wound exploration (LWE) in this regard. Methods: This diagnostic accuracy study was conducted on ≥ 18 year-old patients presenting to emergency department with anterior abdominal stab wound and stable hemodynamics, to compare the characteristics of AWU and LWE in screening of patients in need of laparotomy. Results: 50 cases with the mean age of 28.44 ± 7.14 years were included (80% male). Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of AWU were 70.58 (95% CI: 44.04 – 88.62), 93.33 (95% CI: 76.49 – 98.83), and 81.96 (95% CI: 69.91 – 94.01), respectively. These measures were 88.23 (62.25 – 97.93), 93.33 (76.49 – 98.83), and 90.78 (95% CI: 81.67 – 99.89) for LWE, respectively. The difference in overall accuracy of the two methods was not statistically significant (p = 0.0641). Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, AWU and LWE had the same specificity but different sensitivities in screening of anterior abdominal stab wound patients in need of laparotomy. The overall accuracy of LWE was slightly higher (91.48% versus 85.1%). PMID:28286841

  11. Generalized fragmentation functions for fractal jet observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Benjamin T.; Procura, Massimiliano; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J.; Zhou, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a broad class of fractal jet observables that recursively probe the collective properties of hadrons produced in jet fragmentation. To describe these collinear-unsafe observables, we generalize the formalism of fragmentation functions, which are important objects in QCD for calculating cross sections involving identified final-state hadrons. Fragmentation functions are fundamentally nonperturbative, but have a calculable renormalization group evolution. Unlike ordinary fragmentation functions, generalized fragmentation functions exhibit nonlinear evolution, since fractal observables involve correlated subsets of hadrons within a jet. Some special cases of generalized fragmentation functions are reviewed, including jet charge and track functions. We then consider fractal jet observables that are based on hierarchical clustering trees, where the nonlinear evolution equations also exhibit tree-like structure at leading order. We develop a numeric code for performing this evolution and study its phenomenological implications. As an application, we present examples of fractal jet observables that are useful in discriminating quark jets from gluon jets.

  12. Coal char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.

    1995-07-01

    A series of investigations of coal and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion is reported for a suite of coals ranging in rank from lignite to low-volatile (lv) bituminous coal under combustion conditions similar to those found in commercial-scale boilers. Experimental measurements are described that utilize identical particle sizing characteristics to determine initial and final size distributions. Mechanistic interpretation of the data suggest that coal fragmentation is an insignificant event and that char fragmentation is controlled by char structure. Chars forming cenospheres fragment more extensively than solid chars. Among the chars that fragment, large particles produce more fine material than small particles. In all cases, coal and char fragmentation are seen to be sufficiently minor as to be relatively insignificant factors influencing fly ash size distribution, particle loading, and char burnout.

  13. Double jeopardy revisited: clinical decision making in unstable patients with, thoraco-abdominal stab wounds and, potential injuries in multiple body cavities.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Damian L; Gall, Tamara M H; Thomson, Sandie R

    2011-05-01

    In the setting of the hypovolaemic patient with a thoraco-abdominal stab wound and potential injuries in both the chest and abdomen, deciding which cavity to explore first may be difficult.Opening the incorrect body cavity can delay control of tamponade or haemorrhage and exacerbate hypothermia and fluid shifts. This situation has been described as one of double jeopardy. All stab victims from July 2007 to July 2009 requiring a thoracotomy and laparotomy at the same operation were identified from a database. Demographics, site and nature of injuries, admission observations and investigations as well as operative sequence were recorded. Correct sequencing was defined as first opening the cavity with most lethal injury. Incorrect sequencing was defined as opening a cavity and finding either no injury or an injury of less severity than a simultaneous injury in the unopened cavity. The primary outcome was survival or death. Sixteen stab victims underwent thoracotomy and laparotomy during the same operation. All were male with an age range of 18–40 (mean/median 27). Median systolic blood pressure on presentation was 90 mm Hg. (quartile range 80–90 mm Hg). Median base excess was 6.5 (quartile range 12 to 2.2). All the deaths were the result of cardiac injuries. Incorrect sequencing occurred in four patients (25%). In this group there were four negative abdominal explorations prior to thoracotomy with two deaths. There was one death in the correct sequencing group. Incorrect sequencing in stab victims who require both thoracotomy and laparotomy at the same sitting is associated with a high mortality. This is especially true when the abdomen is incorrectly entered first whilst the life threatening pathology is in the chest. Clinical signs may be confusing, leading to incorrect sequencing of exploration. The common causes for confusion include failure to appreciate that cardiac tamponade does not present with bleeding and difficulty in assessing peritonism in an

  14. Parton fragmentation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, A.; Vossen, A.

    2016-11-01

    The field of fragmentation functions of light quarks and gluons is reviewed. In addition to integrated fragmentation functions, attention is paid to the dependence of fragmentation functions on transverse momenta and on polarization degrees of freedom. Higher-twist and di-hadron fragmentation functions are considered as well. Moreover, the review covers both theoretical and experimental developments in hadron production in electron-positron annihilation, deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and proton-proton collisions.

  15. Fragmentation Analysis - Fundamental Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Wausau quartzite and anorthosite of 3.0 to 3.5 inch size were fragmented in this device. An analysis of the fragment distribution results of the drop...disc-shaped specimens of Wausau quartzite, anorthosite , and Felch marble were then fragmented with the impact pendulum device. Computer programs were

  16. Selectable fragmentation warhead

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, C.S.; Paisley, D.L.; Montoya, N.I.; Stahl, D.B.

    1992-12-31

    This report discusses a selectable fragmentation warhead which is capable of producing a predetermined number of fragments from a metal plate, and accelerating the fragments toward a target. A first explosive located adjacent to the plate is detonated at selected number of points by laser-driven slapper detonators. In one embodiment, a smoother-disk and a second explosive, located adjacent to the first explosive, serve to increase acceleration of the fragments toward a target. The ability to produce a selected number of fragments allows for effective destruction of a chosen target.

  17. Selectable fragmentation warhead

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Courtney S.; Paisley, Dennis L.; Montoya, Nelson I.; Stahl, David B.

    1993-01-01

    A selectable fragmentation warhead capable of producing a predetermined number of fragments from a metal plate, and accelerating the fragments toward a target. A first explosive located adjacent to the plate is detonated at selected number of points by laser-driven slapper detonators. In one embodiment, a smoother-disk and a second explosive, located adjacent to the first explosive, serve to increase acceleration of the fragments toward a target. The ability to produce a selected number of fragments allows for effective destruction of a chosen target.

  18. Fragment-based drug design: combining philosophy with technology.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Sandra; Fincham, Christopher I; Fattori, Daniela

    2007-07-01

    Fragment-based drug design began more than ten years ago and has been steadily gaining in popularity. This review discusses how fragments have been used to choose druggable targets, and what parameters need to be evaluated if a fragment hit is to be considered a suitable ligand for development. Examples of fragment-based screening from the recent literature are reviewed to highlight the various approaches used, along with the possible application of additional techniques to fragment screening against immobilized targets. Finally, mention is made of two different areas, multi-target drug discovery and selective tumor cell targeting, where fragment-based approaches may play an important role in the future.

  19. Molecular energies from an incremental fragmentation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitei, Oinam Romesh; Heßelmann, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The systematic molecular fragmentation method by Collins and Deev [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 104104 (2006)] has been used to calculate total energies and relative conformational energies for a number of small and extended molecular systems. In contrast to the original approach by Collins, we have tested the accuracy of the fragmentation method by utilising an incremental scheme in which the energies at the lowest level of the fragmentation are calculated on an accurate quantum chemistry level while lower-cost methods are used to correct the low-level energies through a high-level fragmentation. In this work, the fragment energies at the lowest level of fragmentation were calculated using the random-phase approximation (RPA) and two recently developed extensions to the RPA while the incremental corrections at higher levels of the fragmentation were calculated using standard density functional theory (DFT) methods. The complete incremental fragmentation method has been shown to reproduce the supermolecule results with a very good accuracy, almost independent on the molecular type, size, or type of decomposition. The fragmentation method has also been used in conjunction with the DFT-SAPT (symmetry-adapted perturbation theory) method which enables a breakdown of the total nonbonding energy contributions into individual interaction energy terms. Finally, the potential problems of the method connected with the use of capping hydrogen atoms are analysed and two possible solutions are supplied.

  20. Molecular energies from an incremental fragmentation method.

    PubMed

    Meitei, Oinam Romesh; Heßelmann, Andreas

    2016-02-28

    The systematic molecular fragmentation method by Collins and Deev [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 104104 (2006)] has been used to calculate total energies and relative conformational energies for a number of small and extended molecular systems. In contrast to the original approach by Collins, we have tested the accuracy of the fragmentation method by utilising an incremental scheme in which the energies at the lowest level of the fragmentation are calculated on an accurate quantum chemistry level while lower-cost methods are used to correct the low-level energies through a high-level fragmentation. In this work, the fragment energies at the lowest level of fragmentation were calculated using the random-phase approximation (RPA) and two recently developed extensions to the RPA while the incremental corrections at higher levels of the fragmentation were calculated using standard density functional theory (DFT) methods. The complete incremental fragmentation method has been shown to reproduce the supermolecule results with a very good accuracy, almost independent on the molecular type, size, or type of decomposition. The fragmentation method has also been used in conjunction with the DFT-SAPT (symmetry-adapted perturbation theory) method which enables a breakdown of the total nonbonding energy contributions into individual interaction energy terms. Finally, the potential problems of the method connected with the use of capping hydrogen atoms are analysed and two possible solutions are supplied.

  1. The combined fragmentation and systematic molecular fragmentation methods.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael A; Cvitkovic, Milan W; Bettens, Ryan P A

    2014-09-16

    fragmentation methods to accurately estimate derivatives of the molecular and crystal energies. Finally, to provide some common applications of CFM and SMF, we present some specific examples of energy calculations for moderately large molecules. For computational chemists, this fragmentation approach represents an important practical advance. It reduces the computer time required to estimate the energies of molecules so dramatically, that accurate calculations of the energies and reactivity of very large organic and biological molecules become feasible.

  2. Comparison Of Flat-Knitted Structures Made Of Poly(P-Phenylene-2,6-Benzobisoxazole) And Para-Aramid Referring To Their Stab Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, M.; Aumann, S.; Heimlich, F.; Weber, M. O.; Schwarz-Pfeiffer, A.

    2016-07-01

    In the field of protective gear, developers always aim for lighter and more flexible material in order to increase the wearing comfort. Suppliers now work on knitted garments in the sports-sector as well as in workwear and protective gear for policemen or security-agents. In a recent project different knitted structures made of a poly(p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole) (PBO)-multifilament were compared to their counterparts made of para-aramid. In focus of the comparison stood the stab-resistance linked to either the mass per unit area or the stitch density. The tested fabrics were produced on hand flat knitting machines as well as on electronical flat knitting machines of the type Stoll CMS 330TC4, in order to analyse fabrics with different tightness factor and machine gauges. The stab resistance of the different knitted fabrics was examined according to the standard of the Association of Test Laboratories for Bullet, Stab or Pike Resistant Materials and Construction Standards. The presentation includes the depiction of the results of the test series and their interpretation. Furthermore it will give an outlook on most suitable combinations of materials and structures to be used in protective gear.

  3. A stab wound to the axilla illustrating the importance of brachial plexus anatomy in an emergency context: a case report.

    PubMed

    Casal, Diogo; Cunha, Teresa; Pais, Diogo; Iria, Inês; Angélica-Almeida, Maria; Millan, Gerardo; Videira-Castro, José; Goyri-O'Neill, João

    2017-01-04

    Although open injuries involving the brachial plexus are relatively uncommon, they can lead to permanent disability and even be life threatening if accompanied by vascular damage. We present a case report of a brachial plexus injury in which the urgency of the situation precluded the use of any ancillary diagnostic examinations and forced a rapid clinical assessment. We report a case of a Portuguese man who had a stabbing injury at the base of his left axilla. On observation in our emergency room an acute venous type of bleeding was present at the wound site and, as a result of refractory hypotension after initial management with fluids administered intravenously, he was immediately carried to our operating room. During the course of transportation, we observed that he presented hypoesthesia of the medial aspect of his arm and forearm, as well as of the ulnar side of his hand and of the palmar aspect of the last three digits and of the dorsal aspect of the last two digits. Moreover, he was not able to actively flex the joints of his middle, ring, and small fingers or to adduct or abduct all fingers. Exclusively relying on our anatomical knowledge of the axillary region, the site of the stabbing wound, and the physical neurologic examination, we were able to unequivocally pinpoint the place of the injury between the anterior division of the lower trunk of his brachial plexus and the proximal portion of the following nerves: ulnar, medial cutaneous of his arm and forearm, and the medial aspect of his median nerve. Surgery revealed a longitudinal laceration of the posterior aspect of his axillary vein, and confirmed a complete section of his ulnar nerve, his medial brachial and antebrachial cutaneous nerves, and an incomplete section of the ulnar aspect of his median nerve. All structures were repaired microsurgically. Three years after the surgery he showed a good functional outcome. We believe that this case report illustrates the relevance of a sound anatomical

  4. Assessment of missile hazards: identification of reference fragmentation patterns.

    PubMed

    Gubinelli, Gianfilippo; Cozzani, Valerio

    2009-04-30

    Industrial accidents involving fragment projection were investigated. The analysis of fracture mechanics fundamentals allowed the exploration of the relations between the fracture characteristics and the final event leading to equipment collapse. Reference fragmentation patterns were defined on the basis of the geometrical characteristics of the categories of process vessels that are more frequently involved in fragmentation accidents. Primary scenarios leading to fragment projection were correlated to specific fragmentation patterns. A database reporting a detailed analysis of more than 140 vessel fragmentation events provided the data needed to support and validate the approach. The available data also allowed the calculation of the expected probability of fragment projection following vessel fragmentation, and the probability of the alternative fragmentation patterns with respect to the different accidental scenarios, based on the observed frequencies over the available data set.

  5. Universality of fragment shapes

    PubMed Central

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  6. Universality of fragment shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-03-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism.

  7. Effects of teat cistern mural biopsy and teatoscopy stab versus longitudinal incision with or without tube implant on incisional healing in lactating dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Tulleners, E; Hamir, A

    1990-08-01

    Effects of teat cistern mural biopsy and full-thickness stab and longitudinal incisional healing were evaluated experimentally on clinically normal teats in 12 lactating dairy cattle. Each teat on each cow was assigned by Latin-square design to 1 of 4 surgical interventions: (I) teatoscopy only; (II) teatoscopy, stab incision, and mural biopsy; (III) longitudinal incision and mural biopsy; and (IV) longitudinal incision, mural biopsy, and tube implantation. Teatoscopy was done with a 4-mm OD arthroscope introduced through the teat canal and attached to a television camera. Teatoscopy was quicker to perform and provided a more detailed videotaped examination of the teat and gland cistern, compared with gross inspection through a longitudinal incision. In intervention-II cows, the Ferris-Smith biopsy instrument jaws introduced through a longitudinal 1-cm midteat stab incision were easy to visualize and manipulate accurately. Stab incisions closed with only 1 or 2 skin sutures healed without complications in all 12 teats. On palpation, stab incisions were significantly (P less than 0.01) less thick than longitudinal incisions at 8 weeks and were microscopically indistinguishable from the normal tissue. However, in 24 teatoscopically examined teats, 9 (38%) had microscopic evidence of teat canal injury and 12 (50%) of the quarters developed mastitis. This was attributed to trauma resulting from introduction of the arthroscope through the teat canal. Intervention III yielded satisfactory results with the least complications. All 12 longitudinal incisions healed by primary intention, and all teats remained patent. Mastitis developed in 4 (33%) quarters. Intervention IV caused considerable complications associated with the tube implant and no improvement in biopsy site healing, compared with interventions II and III. Eleven longitudinal incisions healed by primary intention. One incision dehisced, 2 (17%) tube implants dislodged, 2 (17%) became obstructed proximally, and

  8. The direct cost of traumatic secretion transfer in hermaphroditic land snails: individuals stabbed with a love dart decrease lifetime fecundity

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kazuki; Chiba, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Several taxa of simultaneously hermaphroditic land snails exhibit a conspicuous mating behaviour, the so-called shooting of love darts. During mating, such land snail species transfer a specific secretion by stabbing a mating partner's body with the love dart. It has been shown that sperm donors benefit from this traumatic secretion transfer, because the secretions manipulate the physiology of a sperm recipient and increase the donors' fertilization success. However, it is unclear whether reception of dart shooting is costly to the recipients. Therefore, the effect of sexual conflict and antagonistic arms races on the evolution of traumatic secretion transfer in land snails is still controversial. To examine this effect, we compared lifetime fecundity and longevity between the individuals that received and did not receive dart shooting from mating partners in Bradybaena pellucida. Our experiments showed that the dart-receiving snails suffered reduction in lifetime fecundity and longevity. These results suggest that the costly mating behaviour, dart shooting, generates conflict between sperm donors and recipients and that sexually antagonistic arms races have contributed to the diversification of the morphological and behavioural traits relevant to dart shooting. Our findings also support theories suggesting a violent escalation of sexual conflict in hermaphroditic animals. PMID:25761713

  9. Selective non-operative management of stab wounds to the posterior abdomen is safe: the Pietermaritzburg experience.

    PubMed

    Kong, Victor; Oosthuizen, George; Sartorius, Benn; Clarke, Damian

    2015-09-01

    The selective non-operative management (SNOM) of stab injuries of the anterior abdomen is well established, but its application to the posterior abdomen remains controversial. A retrospective review of 1013 patients was undertaken at a major trauma service in South Africa over a five-year period. Ninety per cent of patients were males, and the mean age was 25 years. The mean time from injury to presentation was 4h and 73% of all injuries were inflicted by knives. A total of 9% (93) of patients required a laparotomy [Group A] and 82% (833) were successfully observed without the need for operative intervention [Group B]. CT imaging was performed on 52 patients (5%) who had haematuria [Group C], 25 (3%) who had neurological deficits [Group D], and 10 (1%) with retained weapon injuries [Group E]. The accuracy of physical examination for identifying the presence of organ injury was 88%. All observed patients who required laparotomy declared themselves within 24h. There were no mortalities as direct result of our current management protocol. Selective management based on active clinical observation and serial physical examination is safe, and when coupled with the judicious use of advanced imaging, is a prudent and reliable approach in a resource constrained environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The direct cost of traumatic secretion transfer in hermaphroditic land snails: individuals stabbed with a love dart decrease lifetime fecundity.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kazuki; Chiba, Satoshi

    2015-04-07

    Several taxa of simultaneously hermaphroditic land snails exhibit a conspicuous mating behaviour, the so-called shooting of love darts. During mating, such land snail species transfer a specific secretion by stabbing a mating partner's body with the love dart. It has been shown that sperm donors benefit from this traumatic secretion transfer, because the secretions manipulate the physiology of a sperm recipient and increase the donors' fertilization success. However, it is unclear whether reception of dart shooting is costly to the recipients. Therefore, the effect of sexual conflict and antagonistic arms races on the evolution of traumatic secretion transfer in land snails is still controversial. To examine this effect, we compared lifetime fecundity and longevity between the individuals that received and did not receive dart shooting from mating partners in Bradybaena pellucida. Our experiments showed that the dart-receiving snails suffered reduction in lifetime fecundity and longevity. These results suggest that the costly mating behaviour, dart shooting, generates conflict between sperm donors and recipients and that sexually antagonistic arms races have contributed to the diversification of the morphological and behavioural traits relevant to dart shooting. Our findings also support theories suggesting a violent escalation of sexual conflict in hermaphroditic animals. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Stab wound with lodged knife tip causing spinal cord and vertebral artery injuries: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinlei; Zhang, Fan; Lu, Feizhou; Jiang, Jianyuan; Wang, Lixun; Ma, Xiaosheng

    2012-07-01

    Case report and literature review. To report the case of a young patient who sustained a penetrating wound with a knife tip retained in his cervical vertebrae and to review the literature. Stab wound with foreign body retained, associated with spinal cord injury and vertebral artery injury, is not commonly reported. The timing and approach of surgical intervention are still controversial. A 17-year-old boy with a wound in the neck presented with diminishing feeling and dysfunction of the left leg and arm. Radiographs demonstrated a foreign body at the C4 level, and possible spinal cord and vertebral artery injuries were detected by computed tomography. Digital subtracted angiography showed a small lateral opening of the injured artery, which was successfully embolized. The knife tip was removed from the original wound without severe cerebrospinal fluid leakage or bleeding, The patient achieved immediate improvement after the operation. Cases of simultaneous spinal cord injury and vertebral artery injury in which the foreign body is retained are uncommonly reported. Digital subtracted angiography is necessary for cervical penetrating wounds and surgical approach should be individualized.

  12. Fragmentation properties of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Kipp, M.E.

    1996-06-01

    In the present study we are developing an experimental fracture material property test method specific to dynamic fragmentation. Spherical test samples of the metals of interest are subjected to controlled impulsive stress loads by acceleration to high velocities with a light-gas launcher facility and subsequent normal impact on thin plates. Motion, deformation and fragmentation of the test samples are diagnosed with multiple flash radiography methods. The impact plate materials are selected to be transparent to the x-ray method so that only test metal material is imaged. Through a systematic series of such tests, both strain-to-failure and fragmentation resistance properties are determined through this experimental method. Fragmentation property data for several steels, copper, aluminum, tantalum and titanium have been obtained to date. Aspects of the dynamic data have been analyzed with computational methods to achieve a better understanding of the processes leading to failure and fragmentation, and to test an existing computational fragmentation model.

  13. Fragment Hazard Investigation Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    53 Ballistic Density (k) ............................................. 53 Ejection A ngle (a...54 Ejection Velocity (V) ................................................. 54 DEVELOPMENT OF EMPIRICAL RELATION...5S 54 Fragment Weight Versus Gamma for Test QD-155-08 ......................... 56 55 Fragment Range Versus Ejection Angle as a Function of

  14. Fragments and Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Can teachers contact the inner coherence of mathematics while working in a context fragmented by always-new objectives, criteria, and initiatives? How, more importantly, can learners experience the inner coherence of mathematics while working in a context fragmented by testing, modular curricular, short-term learning objectives, and lessons that…

  15. Fragmentation of fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancey, Ryan T.; Oddershede, Lene; Harris, Frank E.; Sabin, John R.

    2003-04-01

    We have performed classical molecular-dynamics simulations of the fragmentation collisions of neutral fullerenes (C24, C60, C100, and C240) with a hard wall. The interactions between the carbon atoms are modeled by a Tersoff potential and the position of each carbon atom at each time step is calculated using a sixth-order predictor-corrector method. The statistical distribution of the fragments depends on impact energy. At low energies, the fragment distribution appears symmetric, with both the large and small fragment distributions well fitted by an exponential function of the same exponent, the value of which decreases with impact energy. At intermediate energies, the distribution of the smallest fragments can be fitted equally well by a power law or an exponential function. At high impact energies, the entire fragmentation pattern is well described by a single exponential function, the exponent increasing with energy. The observed tendencies in fragment distributions as well as the obtained exponents are in agreement with experimental observations. The fragmentation behavior of the four investigated fullerenes is very similar, and it is noted that C60 appears to be the most stable.

  16. Fragmentation of Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittel, F.; Kun, F.; Herrmann, H. J.; Kröplin, B. H.

    2004-07-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the fragmentation of closed thin shells made of a disordered brittle material. Experiments were performed on brown and white hen egg shells under two different loading conditions: impact with a hard wall and explosion by a combustible mixture. Both give rise to power law fragment size distributions. A three-dimensional discrete element model of shells is worked out. Based on simulations of the model, we give evidence that power law fragment mass distributions arise due to an underlying phase transition which proved to be abrupt for explosion and continuous for impact. We demonstrate that the fragmentation of closed shells defines a new universality class of fragmentation phenomena.

  17. Fragmentation in massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Beuther, Henrik; Schilke, Peter

    2004-02-20

    Studies of evolved massive stars indicate that they form in a clustered mode. During the earliest evolutionary stages, these regions are embedded within their natal cores. Here we present high-spatial-resolution interferometric dust continuum observations disentangling the cluster-like structure of a young massive star-forming region. The derived protocluster mass distribution is consistent with the stellar initial mass function. Thus, fragmentation of the initial massive cores may determine the initial mass function and the masses of the final stars. This implies that stars of all masses can form via accretion processes, and coalescence of intermediate-mass protostars appears not to be necessary.

  18. A survey on spinal cord injuries resulting from stabbings: a case series study of 12 years' experience.

    PubMed

    Saeidiborojeni, Hamid Reza; Moradinazar, Mehdi; Saeidiborojeni, Sepehr; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Penetrating spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are an uncommon injury and not reported very frequently. SCIs cause sensory, motor and genitourinary system problems or a combination of sensorimotor dysfunctions. These are among the most debilitating kinds of disorders and negatively affect quality of life, not only for the patient, but also for their family members. Therefore, the present study aims to evaluate complete or incomplete SCIs and the course of the injury and the prognosis for SCIs caused by stab wounds. This case-series design study was performed on 57 patients attending the emergency department of Taleqani Trauma Center (Kermanshah, Iran) due to SCIs caused by violent encounters involving sharp objects such as a knife, dagger, whittle and Bowie-knife between 1999 and 2011. An assessment of sensory and motor functions was performed as part of the neurological examination on admission, and during the treatment, using the Frankel Classification grading system, and the results were recorded. The average age of patients was 27 years (SD= 7.9, Range=17 to 46 years). The results of the study showed a proportion of cervical, thoracic and lumbar injuries of 23 (40%), 24 (42%) and 10 (18%), respectively. There was no case of cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSF) or infection at the wound site in the subjects. Regarding the extent of the SCI, the combined neurological assessment showed that several patients (43%) had a complete SCI with no sensory and motor functions in the sacral segments and the segments below the site of injury. In 32 patients (57%) incomplete injuries were observed; i.e. they showed only some degrees of sensory-motor functions that were below the neurological level. Both complete and incomplete SCIs are of great importance because the prognosis of SCI is directly associated with the location and extent of injury. It should be considered that partial recovery from SCIs is possible in few cases of complete injuries. Therefore, all the patients should be

  19. Opaque rock fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Abhijit, B.; Molinaroli, E.; Olsen, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors describe a new, rare, but petrogenetically significant variety of rock fragments from Holocene detrital sediments. Approximately 50% of the opaque heavy mineral concentrates from Holocene siliciclastic sands are polymineralic-Fe-Ti oxide particles, i.e., they are opaque rock fragments. About 40% to 70% of these rock fragments show intergrowth of hm + il, mt + il, and mt + hm +/- il. Modal analysis of 23,282 opaque particles in 117 polished thin sections of granitic and metamorphic parent rocks and their daughter sands from semi-arid and humid climates show the following relative abundances. The data show that opaque rock fragments are more common in sands from igneous source rocks and that hm + il fragments are more durable. They assume that equilibrium conditions existed in parent rocks during the growth of these paired minerals, and that the Ti/Fe ratio did not change during oxidation of mt to hm. Geothermometric determinations using electron probe microanalysis of opaque rock fragments in sand samples from Lake Erie and the Adriatic Sea suggest that these rock fragments may have equilibrated at approximately 900/sup 0/ and 525/sup 0/C, respectively.

  20. Fragmentation trees reloaded.

    PubMed

    Böcker, Sebastian; Dührkop, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics commonly uses liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to measure abundances of metabolites; subsequent tandem mass spectrometry is used to derive information about individual compounds. One of the bottlenecks in this experimental setup is the interpretation of fragmentation spectra to accurately and efficiently identify compounds. Fragmentation trees have become a powerful tool for the interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry data of small molecules. These trees are determined from the data using combinatorial optimization, and aim at explaining the experimental data via fragmentation cascades. Fragmentation tree computation does not require spectral or structural databases. To obtain biochemically meaningful trees, one needs an elaborate optimization function (scoring). We present a new scoring for computing fragmentation trees, transforming the combinatorial optimization into a Maximum A Posteriori estimator. We demonstrate the superiority of the new scoring for two tasks: both for the de novo identification of molecular formulas of unknown compounds, and for searching a database for structurally similar compounds, our method SIRIUS 3, performs significantly better than the previous version of our method, as well as other methods for this task. SIRIUS 3 can be a part of an untargeted metabolomics workflow, allowing researchers to investigate unknowns using automated computational methods.Graphical abstractWe present a new scoring for computing fragmentation trees from tandem mass spectrometry data based on Bayesian statistics. The best scoring fragmentation tree most likely explains the molecular formula of the measured parent ion.

  1. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  2. Fragmentation of the Chelyabinsk Fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, J.

    2013-12-01

    The most intense bolide since the 1908 Tunguska event occurred in the early morning hours of 15 February 2013 near the Russian town of Chelyabinsk. The impacting asteroid ranged between 17 and 20 m diameter with a mass of about 10,000 tons. Its estimated pre-atmospheric velocity was about 18.6 km/sec at a low angle of 20° from the horizontal. The resulting airburst occurred at an altitude of about 23 km and released an estimated total energy of about 440 kT (1.7 x 1015 J). The blast wave shattered windows on the ground over a wide area and collapsed the roof of a zinc factory. In spite of the size of the initital asteroid, only small fragments (a few kg, so far) have been recovered. The entry of an asteroid into Earth's atmosphere and its aerodynamic fragmentation and deceleration has been modeled by a number of authors over the past few decades. Full-featured numerical simulations are presently limited in their ability to simultaneously incorporate fragmentation, energy coupling between solid fragments and the atmosphere, and thermal radiation, but an approximate treatment of the fragmentation and dispersion of a large entering meteoroid called the 'pancake model' has achieved good fits to other observed events, including the Tunguska explosion, the 1947 Shikote-Alin fall and strewn fields from larger iron meteorite falls, such as the Henbury craters. Simulations using the pancake model can fit the overall observations of the Chelyabinsk event using an 18 m diameter asteroid of density 3000 kg/m3 following the observed trajectory and possessing an initial strength of about 7 MPa, which is relatively high for a stony meteoroid. This suggests that the asteroid was not a strengthless rubble pile, but in fact possessed considerable strength, compared to other stony meteorites of similar type. Aerodynamic breakup begins at an altitude of 31 km and the final airburst occurs at 22 km, releasing about 250 kT at this time. Subsequent to this airburst, large fragments

  3. Universality in Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Holian, B. L.; Timonen, J.

    2000-04-01

    Fragmentation of a two-dimensional brittle solid by impact and ``explosion,'' and a fluid by ``explosion'' are all shown to become critical. The critical points appear at a nonzero impact velocity, and at infinite explosion duration, respectively. Within the critical regimes, the fragment-size distributions satisfy a scaling form qualitatively similar to that of the cluster-size distribution of percolation, but they belong to another universality class. Energy balance arguments give a correlation length exponent that is exactly one-half of its percolation value. A single crack dominates fragmentation in the slow-fracture limit, as expected.

  4. Recovery of Uranium Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. R.; McElrue, D. H.; Winter, R. E.

    2002-07-01

    We describe a theory for calculating the penetration of fragments into foam. Comparisons with regular projectiles show that the drag term is similar in value to the analogous term in aerodynamics. This, plus the simple model used to describe porosity, enables the theory to be used in predicting the levels of stress present when uranium fragments are arrested in foam catchers. Consequently the theory can be used to assist in the design of catchers which will not distort uranium fragments travelling at 1-3 km/s. The theory is tested against experiments using some current designs.

  5. On disciplinary fragmentation and scientific progress.

    PubMed

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called "schools of thought". We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model's implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science.

  6. On Disciplinary Fragmentation and Scientific Progress

    PubMed Central

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called “schools of thought”. We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model’s implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science. PMID:25790025

  7. Literalism, perspectivism, chaotic fragmentalism and psychotherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Leitner, L M

    1982-12-01

    Literalism and chaotic fragmentalism have been advanced as two concepts to explain psychopathology while perspectivism has been used to explain psychological health (Landfield, 1980 a). It is hypothesized that, to the extent that they are therapeutic, all therapies move clients toward perspectivism and away from literalism and chaotic fragmentalism. Eight major schools of psychotherapy are discussed in terms of the principles of technique which enable them to change literalism and chaotic fragmentalism. The advantages of a unifying theory permitting diversity of techniques are discussed in relation to the ability of the clinician to be flexible yet not confused. Further, the unifying concepts of literalism, perspectivism, and chaotic fragmentalism are used to understand systematically the strengths and weaknesses of many therapeutic techniques. Finally, the implications of the differences in therapeutic techniques for changing different types of literalisms are discussed.

  8. Fragmentation in Biaxial Tension

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G H; Archbold, G C; Hurricane, O A; Miller, P L

    2006-06-13

    We have carried out an experiment that places a ductile stainless steel in a state of biaxial tension at a high rate of strain. The loading of the ductile metal spherical cap is performed by the detonation of a high explosive layer with a conforming geometry to expand the metal radially outwards. Simulations of the loading and expansion of the metal predict strain rates that compare well with experimental observations. A high percentage of the HE loaded material was recovered through a soft capture process and characterization of the recovered fragments provided high quality data, including uniform strain prior to failure and fragment size. These data were used with a modified fragmentation model to determine a fragmentation energy.

  9. Fates of the dense cores formed by fragmentation of filaments: do they fragment again or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimura, Kazuyuki; Mizuno, Yurina; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2017-08-01

    Fragmentation of filaments into dense cores is thought to be an important step in forming stars. The bar-mode instability of spherically collapsing cores found in previous linear analysis invokes a possibility of refragmentation of the cores due to their ellipsoidal (prolate or oblate) deformation. To investigate this possibility, here we perform three-dimensional self-gravitational hydrodynamics simulations that follow all the way from filament fragmentation to subsequent core collapse. We assume that the gas is polytropic with index γ, which determines the stability of the bar mode. For the case that the fragmentation of isolated hydrostatic filaments is triggered by the most unstable fragmentation mode, we find that the bar mode grows as collapse proceeds if γ < 1.1, in agreement with the linear analysis. However, it takes more than 10 orders-of-magnitude increase in the central density for the distortion to become non-linear. In addition to this fiducial case, we also study non-fiducial ones such as the fragmentation is triggered by a fragmentation mode with a longer wavelength and it occurs during radial collapse of filaments and find that the distortion rapidly grows. In most of astrophysical applications, the effective polytropic index of collapsing gas exceeds 1.1 before 10 orders-of-magnitude increase in the central density. Thus, supposing the fiducial case of filament fragmentation, refragmentation of dense cores would not be likely and their final mass would be determined when the filaments fragment.

  10. Fragmentation and restructuring of soft-agglomerates under shear.

    PubMed

    Eggersdorfer, M L; Kadau, D; Herrmann, H J; Pratsinis, S E

    2010-02-15

    Soft-agglomerate restructuring, break-up (or fragmentation) and relaxation are studied in a simple shear flow by a discrete element method (DEM). The agglomerates, held together by van der Waals forces, rotate in the shear flow and are stretched into nearly linear structures (fractal dimension approaches unity) until they fracture at their weakest point resulting in lognormally-shaped fragment size distributions asymptotically. Individual fragments relax in the flow towards more compact agglomerates than the parent ones. The evolution of the average number of particles per fragment is described by generalized scaling laws between shear rate, onset (time-lag) of fragmentation, asymptotic fragment mass and size consistent with experimental and theoretical studies in the literature. The initial effective fractal dimension of the agglomerates influences the final one of the fragments. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A comparative audit of gunshot wounds and stab wounds to the neck in a South African metropolitan trauma service.

    PubMed

    Madsen, A S; Laing, G L; Bruce, J L; Clarke, D L

    2016-09-01

    Introduction The aim of this comparative study of gunshot wounds (GSWs) and stab wounds (SWs) to the neck was to quantify the impact of the mechanism of injury on the outcome and management of penetrating neck injury (PNI). Methods A prospective trauma registry was interrogated retrospectively. Data were analysed pertaining to demographics and injury severity score (ISS), physiology on presentation, anatomical site of wounds and injuries sustained, investigations, management, outcome and complications. Results There were 452 SW and 58 GSW cases over the 46 months of the study. Patients with GSWs were more likely to have extracervical injuries than those with SWs (69% vs 63%). The incidence of a 'significant cervical injury' was almost twice as high in the GSW cohort (55% vs 31%). For patients with transcervical GSWs, this increased to 80%. The mean ISS was 17 for GSW and 11 for SW patients. Those in the GSW cohort presented with threatened airways and a requirement for an emergency airway three times as often as patients with SWs (24% vs 7% and 14% vs 5% respectively). The incidence among GSW and SW patients respectively was 5% and 6% for airway injuries, 12% and 8% for injuries to the digestive tract, 21% and 16% for vascular injuries, 59% and 10% for associated cervical injuries, 36% and 14% for maxillofacial injuries, 16% and 9% for injuries to the head, and 35% and 45% for injuries to the chest. In the GSW group, 91% underwent computed tomography angiography (CTA), with 23% of these being positive for a vascular injury. For SWs, 74% of patients underwent CTA, with 17% positive for a vascular injury. Slightly more patients with GSWs required operative intervention than those with SWs (29% vs 26%). Conclusions Patients with GSWs to the neck have a worse outcome than those with injuries secondary to SWs. However, the proportion of neck injuries actually requiring direct surgical intervention is not increased and most cases with PNI secondary to GSWs can be managed

  12. A comparative audit of gunshot wounds and stab wounds to the neck in a South African metropolitan trauma service

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, AS; Laing, GL; Bruce, JL

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this comparative study of gunshot wounds (GSWs) and stab wounds (SWs) to the neck was to quantify the impact of the mechanism of injury on the outcome and management of penetrating neck injury (PNI). Methods A prospective trauma registry was interrogated retrospectively. Data were analysed pertaining to demographics and injury severity score (ISS), physiology on presentation, anatomical site of wounds and injuries sustained, investigations, management, outcome and complications. Results There were 452 SW and 58 GSW cases over the 46 months of the study. Patients with GSWs were more likely to have extracervical injuries than those with SWs (69% vs 63%). The incidence of a ‘significant cervical injury’ was almost twice as high in the GSW cohort (55% vs 31%). For patients with transcervical GSWs, this increased to 80%. The mean ISS was 17 for GSW and 11 for SW patients. Those in the GSW cohort presented with threatened airways and a requirement for an emergency airway three times as often as patients with SWs (24% vs 7% and 14% vs 5% respectively). The incidence among GSW and SW patients respectively was 5% and 6% for airway injuries, 12% and 8% for injuries to the digestive tract, 21% and 16% for vascular injuries, 59% and 10% for associated cervical injuries, 36% and 14% for maxillofacial injuries, 16% and 9% for injuries to the head, and 35% and 45% for injuries to the chest. In the GSW group, 91% underwent computed tomography angiography (CTA), with 23% of these being positive for a vascular injury. For SWs, 74% of patients underwent CTA, with 17% positive for a vascular injury. Slightly more patients with GSWs required operative intervention than those with SWs (29% vs 26%). Conclusions Patients with GSWs to the neck have a worse outcome than those with injuries secondary to SWs. However, the proportion of neck injuries actually requiring direct surgical intervention is not increased and most cases with PNI secondary to GSWs can be

  13. An unusual homicidal stab wound of the cervical spinal cord: A single case examined by post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA).

    PubMed

    Savall, Frederic; Dedouit, Fabrice; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Rougé, Daniel; Saint-Martin, Pauline; Telmon, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of homicidal stab wound of the cervical spinal cord, which illustrates the value of post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA) in cases of vascular injury. First, we noted a posterior and horizontal trajectory to the neck with complete section of the cervical spinal cord between the first and second cervical vertebrae. This lesion was accompanied by section of the right vertebral and right deep cervical arteries. We also noted an anterior cervical trajectory with an injury to the right internal jugular vein and an anterior right chest wound with a lung trajectory and section of the internal mammary vessels. Cases of spinal cord injuries secondary to stab wounds are rare in the literature. Only one large series has been published from Cape Town. Complete section of the cervical spinal cord accounts for only 4.5% of all cases. Furthermore, lethal cases are rare and classically victims survive and present neurological sequelae. We found only one similar case but despite the transection of the cervical spinal cord the patient survived. Some studies suggest that PMCTA may be very helpful in visualizing vascular system injuries. Our observations are consistent with this proposal. The use of different-time acquisitions was essential for detection of the injured vessels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A; Barbee, T; Simpson, R; Satcher, J; Walton, C

    2003-12-15

    This effort attempts to demonstrate that environmentally acceptable energetic sol-gel coated flash metal multilayer nanocomposites can be used to replace current impact initiated devices (IIDs) which have hazardous and toxic components. Successful completion of this project will result in IIDs that include innocuous compounds, have sufficient output energy for initiation, meet current military specifications, are small, cost competitive, and perform as well as or better than current devices. We expect flash metal multilayer and sol-gel to be generic technologies applicable to a wide range of devices, especially in small caliber ammunition and sub-munitions. We will replace the NOL-130 mixture with a nanocomposite that consists of a mechanically robust energetic multilayer foil that has been coated with a sol-gel energetic material. The exothermic reactions are activated in this nanocomposite are the transformation of the multilayer material to its respective intermetallic alloy and the thermite reaction, which is characterized by very high temperatures, a small pressure pulse, and hot particle ejection. The proposed materials and their reaction products consist of, but are not limited to aluminum, nickel, iron, aluminum oxide, titanium, iron oxide and boron. These materials have much more desirable environmental and health characteristics than the NOL-130 composition.

  15. Wildlife habitat fragmentation.

    Treesearch

    John. Lehmkuhl

    2005-01-01

    A primary issue in forest wildlife management is habitat fragmentation and its effects on viability, which is the "bottom line" for plant and animal species of conservation concern. Population viability is the likelihood that a population will be able to maintain itself (remain viable) over a long period of time-usually 100 years or more. Though it is true...

  16. Enhanced Fragmentation Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Hardware Front Hardware Top Figure 8 Front View Top View The figure 8 shows a Lagrangian mesh from Ls- Dyna3D of this...predictions. Ls- Dyna3D has been shown to be extremely useful in predicting the trajectories of each fragment. Figure 11 shows this control and predictive

  17. Comment on diquark fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Fredriksson, S.; Larsson, T.

    1983-07-01

    We discuss diquark fragmentation and suggest that a spectator uu system in deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering has a larger breakup probability than a ud system. The reason for this is argued to be that half of the leftover ud systems are in bound (ud)/sub 0/ diquark configurations, while no such bound uu diquarks exist.

  18. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.W.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Shinn, J.L.; Townsend, L.W.

    1993-02-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  19. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  20. The Fragmentation of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Information and communication technologies, especially the Internet, have vastly increased access to information and educational opportunities. Steadily increasing consumer demand is driving the development of online educational materials. The end result may be a "fragmentation" of learning involving multiple learning providers and delivery modes,…

  1. Fluctuations and symmetry energy in nuclear fragmentation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Colonna, M

    2013-01-25

    Within a dynamical description of nuclear fragmentation, based on the liquid-gas phase transition scenario, we explore the relation between neutron-proton density fluctuations and nuclear symmetry energy. We show that, along the fragmentation path, isovector fluctuations follow the evolution of the local density and approach an equilibrium value connected to the local symmetry energy. Higher-density regions are characterized by smaller average asymmetry and narrower isotopic distributions. This dynamical analysis points out that fragment final state isospin fluctuations can probe the symmetry energy of the density domains from which fragments originate.

  2. Efficacy of transvaginal ultrasound-guided twin reduction in the mare by embryonic or fetal stabbing compared with yolk sac or allantoic fluid aspiration.

    PubMed

    Journée, S L; de Ruijter-Villani, M; Hendriks, W K; Stout, T A E

    2013-09-01

    Transvaginal ultrasound-guided pregnancy reduction (TUGR) is a procedure described for the management of twins post-fixation in the horse. Success rates are often disappointing but are reported to be more favorable for bilaterally situated twins and when intervention takes place before day 35 of gestation. This study aimed to determine whether stabbing the embryo/fetus rather than aspirating conceptus fluids improved the likelihood of success, measured as the birth of a normal live singleton foal. Data from 103 TUGR interventions were analyzed by logistic regression analysis; method of treatment, relative conceptus location (i.e., uni- vs. bilateral), and stage of gestation were included as interdependent factors that potentially influence the outcome. Overall, 34/103 (33%) TUGR interventions resulted in a single live foal. There was no significant difference (P = 0.14) in the outcome between TUGR based on fetal stabbing (12/28: 42.9%) versus fluid aspiration (22/75: 29.3%). There was also no significant influence (P = 0.11) of the conceptuses being located unilaterally (19/65: 29.2%) versus bilaterally (15/38: 39.5%). However, TUGR was numerically more successful (P = 0.05) when performed ≤ Day 35 of gestation (21/53: 39.6%), as opposed to > Day 35 (13/50: 26%). Day 45 may represent an even more critical time point because only 2 out of 15 TUGRs (13.3%) performed beyond this day resulted in the birth of a live foal, compared with 11/35 (31.4%) performed between Days 36 and 45. Although the numbers are low, this suggests that TUGR is not the method of choice for reducing > Day 45 twins. Four pregnancy losses were recorded 1 to 7 months post-TUGR (4/38: 10.5%), and although it is tempting to attribute the losses to TUGR, this rate of late gestation pregnancy loss is normal. We conclude that TUGR by fetal stabbing does not offer significant advantages over fluid aspiration. However, TUGR should be performed before Day 35 of gestation and is considered primarily a

  3. Statistical models of brittle fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.

    2006-06-01

    Recent developments in statistical models for fragmentation of brittle material are reviewed. The generic objective of these models is understanding the origin of the fragment size distributions (FSDs) that result from fracturing brittle material. Brittle fragmentation can be divided into two categories: (1) Instantaneous fragmentation for which breakup generations are not distinguishable and (2) continuous fragmentation for which generations of chronological fragment breakups can be identified. This categorization becomes obvious in mining industry applications where instantaneous fragmentation refers to blasting of rock and continuous fragmentation to the consequent crushing and grinding of the blasted rock fragments. A model of unstable cracks and crack-branch merging contains both of the FSDs usually related to instantaneous fragmentation: the scale invariant FSD with the power exponent (2-1/D) and the double exponential FSD which relates to Poisson process fragmentation. The FSDs commonly related to continuous fragmentation are: the lognormal FSD originating from uncorrelated breakup and the power-law FSD which can be modeled as a cascade of breakups. Various solutions to the generic rate equation of continuous fragmentation are briefly listed. Simulations of crushing experiments reveal that both cascade and uncorrelated fragmentations are possible, but that also a mechanism of maximizing packing density related to Apollonian packing may be relevant for slow compressive crushing.

  4. Heterogeneous fragmentation of metallic liquid microsheet with high velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An-Min, He; Pei, Wang; Jian-Li, Shao

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets with high velocity gradient. Dynamic fragmentation of the system involves the formation of a network of fragments due to the growth and coalescence of holes, decomposition of the network into filaments, and further breakup of the filaments into spherical clusters. The final size distribution of the fragmented clusters in the large volume limit is found to obey a bilinear exponential form, which is resulted from the heterogeneous breakup of quasi-cylindrical filaments. The main factors contributing to fragmentation heterogeneity are introduced, including strain rate inhomogeneity and matter distribution nonuniformity of fragments produced during decomposition of the network structure. Project supported by the Science and Technology Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2013A0201010 and 2015B0201039) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402032).

  5. Fragmentation of Fractal Random Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elçi, Eren Metin; Weigel, Martin; Fytas, Nikolaos G.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the fragmentation behavior of random clusters on the lattice under a process where bonds between neighboring sites are successively broken. Modeling such structures by configurations of a generalized Potts or random-cluster model allows us to discuss a wide range of systems with fractal properties including trees as well as dense clusters. We present exact results for the densities of fragmenting edges and the distribution of fragment sizes for critical clusters in two dimensions. Dynamical fragmentation with a size cutoff leads to broad distributions of fragment sizes. The resulting power laws are shown to encode characteristic fingerprints of the fragmented objects.

  6. Cryobiology of coral fragments.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Mary; Farrell, Ann; Carter, Virginia L

    2013-02-01

    Around the world, coral reefs are dying due to human influences, and saving habitat alone may not stop this destruction. This investigation focused on the biological processes that will provide the first steps in understanding the cryobiology of whole coral fragments. Coral fragments are a partnership of coral tissue and endosymbiotic algae, Symbiodinium sp., commonly called zooxanthellae. These data reflected their separate sensitivities to chilling and a cryoprotectant (dimethyl sulfoxide) for the coral Pocillopora damicornis, as measured by tissue loss and Pulse Amplitude Modulated fluorometry 3weeks post-treatment. Five cryoprotectant treatments maintained the viability of the coral tissue and zooxanthellae at control values (1M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0h exposures, and 1.5M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0 and 1.5h exposures, P>0.05, ANOVA), whereas 2M concentrations did not (P<0.05, ANOVA). A seasonal response to chilling was observed in the coral tissue, but not in the zooxanthellae. During the winter when the fragments were chilled, the coral tissue remained relatively intact (∼25% loss) post-treatment, but the zooxanthellae numbers in the tissue declined after 5min of chilling (P<0.05, ANOVA). However, in the late spring, coral tissue (∼75% loss) and zooxanthellae numbers declined in response to chilling alone (P<0.05, ANOVA). When a cryoprotectant (1M dimethyl sulfoxide) was used in concert with chilling it protected the coral against tissue loss after 45min of cryoprotectant exposure (P>0.05, ANOVA), but it did not protect against the loss of zooxanthellae (P<0.05, ANOVA). The zooxanthellae are the most sensitive element in the coral fragment complex and future cryopreservation protocols must be guided by their greater sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Rho kinase regulates fragmentation and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Orlando, Kelly A.; Stone, Nicole L.; Pittman, Randall N. . E-mail: pittman@pharm.med.upenn.edu

    2006-01-01

    During the execution phase of apoptosis, a cell undergoes cytoplasmic and nuclear changes that prepare it for death and phagocytosis. The end-point of the execution phase is condensation into a single apoptotic body or fragmentation into multiple apoptotic bodies. Fragmentation is thought to facilitate phagocytosis; however, mechanisms regulating fragmentation are unknown. An isoform of Rho kinase, ROCK-I, drives membrane blebbing through its activation of actin-myosin contraction; this raises the possibility that ROCK-I may regulate other execution phase events, such as cellular fragmentation. Here, we show that COS-7 cells fragment into a number of small apoptotic bodies during apoptosis; treating with ROCK inhibitors (Y-27632 or H-1152) prevents fragmentation. Latrunculin B and blebbistatin, drugs that interfere with actin-myosin contraction, also inhibit fragmentation. During apoptosis, ROCK-I is cleaved and activated by caspases, while ROCK-II is not activated, but rather translocates to a cytoskeletal fraction. siRNA knock-down of ROCK-I but not ROCK-II inhibits fragmentation of dying cells, consistent with ROCK-I being required for apoptotic fragmentation. Finally, cells dying in the presence of the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 are not efficiently phagocytized. These data show that ROCK plays an essential role in fragmentation and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells.

  8. Stab Wound in the Skull Treated with a Medial Supraorbital Craniotomy Through an Incision in the Eyebrow-a Minimally Invasive Approach.

    PubMed

    Araujo, João Luiz Vitorino; Ferraz, Vinicius Ricieri; Vilela, Denes; Sette, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    The eyebrow incision associated with medial supraorbital craniotomy is a minimally invasive alternative approach to the lesions located in the medial anterior cranial fossa. The main advantages of the medial supraorbital craniotomy regarding frontolateral supraorbital craniotomy are the absence of manipulation of the temporal muscle, less risk of injury to the frontotemporal branch of the facial nerve and a more medial view of the anterior structures such as frontal sinus, olfatory groove and frontal lobe. We report a unique case of cranial stab wound in which a piece of the knife stayed in the frontal sinus and removal was performed using the medial supraorbital approach. There were no complications during surgery, the patient reported mild hypoesthesia in the left frontal region and was discharged on the 7th postoperative day. During follow-up after 2 months, good cosmetic result of the surgical wound and preserved sensitivity of the left frontal region were noted.

  9. Electroeluting DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Zarzosa-Alvarez, Ana L; Sandoval-Cabrera, Antonio; Torres-Huerta, Ana L; Bermudez-Cruz, Rosa M

    2010-09-05

    Purified DNA fragments are used for different purposes in Molecular Biology and they can be prepared by several procedures. Most of them require a previous electrophoresis of the DNA fragments in order to separate the band of interest. Then, this band is excised out from an agarose or acrylamide gel and purified by using either: binding and elution from glass or silica particles, DEAE-cellulose membranes, "crush and soak method", electroelution or very often expensive commercial purification kits. Thus, selecting a method will depend mostly of what is available in the laboratory. The electroelution procedure allows one to purify very clean DNA to be used in a large number of applications (sequencing, radiolabeling, enzymatic restriction, enzymatic modification, cloning etc). This procedure consists in placing DNA band-containing agarose or acrylamide slices into sample wells of the electroeluter, then applying current will make the DNA fragment to leave the agarose and thus be trapped in a cushion salt to be recovered later by ethanol precipitation.

  10. Fragment formula calculator (FFC): determination of chemical formulas for fragment ions in mass spectrometric data.

    PubMed

    Wegner, André; Weindl, Daniel; Jäger, Christian; Sapcariu, Sean C; Dong, Xiangyi; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Hiller, Karsten

    2014-02-18

    a fragment ion repository that contains the chemical formulas and retained carbon atoms of a wide range of trimethylsilyl and tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatized compounds. In total, we report the chemical formulas and backbone carbon compositions for 160 fragment ions of 43 alkylsilyl-derivatives of primary metabolites. Finally, we implemented the FFC algorithm in an easy-to-use graphical user interface and made it publicly available at http://www.ffc.lu .

  11. Investigation on laser induced salivary stone fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Pongratz, Thomas; Eder, Matthias; Domes, Mona; Vogeser, Michael; Johnson, Thorsten; Siedeck, Vanessa; Schroetzlmair, Florian; Zengel, Pamela

    2014-03-01

    Objective: It was the objective of this in-vitro study to investigate photon-based techniques for identifying the composition and fragmentation of salivary stones using a Ho:YAG laser. Materials and Method: Salivary stones (n=47) extracted from patients with clinical symptoms of sialolithiasis were examined in-vitro. After extraction, the stones were kept in Ringers solution until size and volume measurements could be performed. Thereafter, dual-energy CT scans (DECT) were performed to classify the composition of the stones. Subsequently, fluorescence measurements were performed by taking images under blue light excitation as well as by fluorescence spectroscopy, measuring excitation-emission-matrixes (EEM). Further investigation to identify the exact composition of the stone was performed by Raman spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy of stone fragments and debris. Fragmentation was performed in an aquarium set-up equipped with a mesh (hole: 1.5mm) using a Ho:YAG-laser to deliver laser pulses of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5J/pulse at a frequency of 3Hz through a 200μm-fibre to the stone surface. The collected data were analyzed and fragmentation rates were calculated. Finally, correlation between stone composition and fragmentation was performed. Results: Blue light fluorescence excitation resulted in either fluorescence in the green spectral region or in a combination of green and red fluorescence emission. EEM-measurement showed the corresponding spectra. Raman spectroscopy showed a mixture of carbonate apatite and keratin. DECT results in evidence of calcium containing components. FTIR-spectroscopy results showed that carbonate apatite is the main component. Fragmentation experiment showed a dependency on the energy per pulse applied if the evaluation implies the ratio of fragmented weight to pulse, while the ratio fragmented weight to energy remains about constant for the three laser parameter used. Conclusion: The composition of salivary stones could be determined using

  12. Dynamic fragmentation of brittle materials: analytical mechanics-based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drugan, W. J.

    2001-06-01

    Two analytical mechanics-based models of dynamic fragmentation in brittle materials are proposed and solved to predict fragment size and time to fragmentation onset in terms of fundamental material properties and the applied strain rate. Previous widely adopted analytical models of dynamic fragmentation are based on relatively simple energy balance arguments, and assume that the fragmentation event occurs instantaneously. The present models account for the actual time-varying dynamic deformation that occurs prior to fragmentation onset. One of the models treats the fragmenting material as initially flaw-free, and determines the minimum fragment size predicted by a dynamic instability analysis. The second model accounts for initial flaw spacing (which may correlate physically with, for example, grain size), and a dynamic instability analysis is employed to determine which flaws become critical. The fragment size predictions of the present models and two previous energy-based models are found to agree at extremely high strain rates (≈5×10 7/s for dense alumina), but the present, more realistic analysis indicates that the regime of validity of the energy-based models is rather restricted. The predictions of the present models are also shown to agree with those of a recent numerical finite element simulation of dynamic fragmentation which applies to a lower strain rate regime. Comparisons of the two new models show that if a material contains initial flaws whose spacing is smaller than the predicted fragment size of an equivalent "unflawed" material, the fragment size of the preflawed material will be smaller in general, but usually not as small as the initial flaw spacing. The analysis also permits determination of the evolution of the strain rate distribution in a prospective fragment before and after fragmentation initiation; results are presented for some example cases. Finally, closed-form analytical results are derived for minimum fragment size and time to

  13. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ≲ 1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    SciTech Connect

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert; Fuente, Asunción; Fontani, Francesco; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Commerçon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick; Busquet, Gemma; Bontemps, Sylvain; Zapata, Luis A.; Zhang, Qizhou; Di Francesco, James

    2014-04-10

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  14. Fragmentation of Massive Dense Cores Down to <~ 1000 AU: Relation between Fragmentation and Density Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, Aina; Estalella, Robert; Girart, Josep M.; Fuente, Asunción; Fontani, Francesco; Commerçon, Benoit; Busquet, Gemma; Bontemps, Sylvain; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Zapata, Luis A.; Zhang, Qizhou; Hennebelle, Patrick; di Francesco, James

    2014-04-01

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope is operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the United Kingdom, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, and the National Research Council of Canada.

  15. Tube Fragmentation of Multiple Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornhill, T. F.; Chhabildas, L. C.; Vogler, T. J.

    2006-07-01

    In the current study we are developing an experimental fracture material property test method specific to dynamic fragmentation. This test method allows the study of fracture fragmentation in a reproducible laboratory environment under well-controlled loading conditions. Motion and fragmentation of the specimen are diagnosed using framing camera, VISAR and soft recovery methods. Fragmentation properties of several steels, nitinol, tungsten alloy, copper, aluminum, and titanium have been obtained to date. The values for fragmentation toughness, and failure threshold will be reported, as well as effects in these values as the material strain-rate is varied through changes in wall thickness and impact conditions.

  16. New Scalings in Nuclear Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, E.; Bougault, R.; Galichet, E.; Gagnon-Moisan, F.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, P.; Marini, P.; Parlog, M.

    2010-10-01

    Fragment partitions of fragmenting hot nuclei produced in central and semiperipheral collisions have been compared in the excitation energy region 4-10 MeV per nucleon where radial collective expansion takes place. It is shown that, for a given total excitation energy per nucleon, the amount of radial collective energy fixes the mean fragment multiplicity. It is also shown that, at a given total excitation energy per nucleon, the different properties of fragment partitions are completely determined by the reduced fragment multiplicity (i.e., normalized to the source size). Freeze-out volumes seem to play a role in the scalings observed.

  17. Fragmentation of Chitosan by Acids

    PubMed Central

    Arul, Joseph; Charlet, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Fragmentation of chitosan in aqueous solution by hydrochloric acid was investigated. The kinetics of fragmentation, the number of chain scissions, and polydispersity of the fragments were followed by viscometry and size exclusion chromatography. The chemical structure and the degree of N-acetylation (DA) of the original chitosan and its fragments were examined by 1H NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The kinetic data indicates that the reaction was of first order. The results of polydispersity and the DA suggest that the selected experimental conditions (temperature and concentration of acid) were appropriate to obtain the fragments having the polydispersity and the DA similar to or slightly different from those of the original one. A procedure to estimate molecular weight of fragments as well as the number of chain scissions of the fragments under the experimental conditions was also proposed. PMID:24302858

  18. Scaling behavior of fragment shapes.

    PubMed

    Kun, F; Wittel, F K; Herrmann, H J; Kröplin, B H; Måløy, K J

    2006-01-20

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of the shape of fragments generated by explosive and impact loading of closed shells. Based on high speed imaging, we have determined the fragmentation mechanism of shells. Experiments have shown that the fragments vary from completely isotropic to highly anisotropic elongated shapes, depending on the microscopic cracking mechanism of the shell. Anisotropic fragments proved to have a self-affine character described by a scaling exponent. The distribution of fragment shapes exhibits a power-law decay. The robustness of the scaling laws is illustrated by a stochastic hierarchical model of fragmentation. Our results provide a possible improvement of the representation of fragment shapes in models of space debris.

  19. Fragmentation of random trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Z.; Ben-Naim, E.

    2015-01-01

    We study fragmentation of a random recursive tree into a forest by repeated removal of nodes. The initial tree consists of N nodes and it is generated by sequential addition of nodes with each new node attaching to a randomly-selected existing node. As nodes are removed from the tree, one at a time, the tree dissolves into an ensemble of separate trees, namely, a forest. We study statistical properties of trees and nodes in this heterogeneous forest, and find that the fraction of remaining nodes m characterizes the system in the limit N\\to ∞ . We obtain analytically the size density {{φ }s} of trees of size s. The size density has power-law tail {{φ }s}˜ {{s}-α } with exponent α =1+\\frac{1}{m}. Therefore, the tail becomes steeper as further nodes are removed, and the fragmentation process is unusual in that exponent α increases continuously with time. We also extend our analysis to the case where nodes are added as well as removed, and obtain the asymptotic size density for growing trees.

  20. Fragmentation of random trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Ziya; Ben-Naim, Eli

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the fragmentation of a random recursive tree by repeated removal of nodes, resulting in a forest of disjoint trees. The initial tree is generated by sequentially attaching new nodes to randomly chosen existing nodes until the tree contains N nodes. As nodes are removed, one at a time, the tree dissolves into an ensemble of separate trees, namely a forest. We study the statistical properties of trees and nodes in this heterogeneous forest. In the limit N --> ∞ , we find that the system is characterized by a single parameter: the fraction of remaining nodes m. We obtain analytically the size density ϕs of trees of size s, which has a power-law tail ϕs ~s-α , with exponent α = 1 + 1 / m . Therefore, the tail becomes steeper as further nodes are removed, producing an unusual scaling exponent that increases continuously with time. Furthermore, we investigate the fragment size distribution in a growing tree, where nodes are added as well as removed, and find that the distribution for this case is much narrower.

  1. Fracture, failure, and fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dienes, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    A general approach is required for describing matter of behavior when the failure is likely to involve growth and coalescence of a large number of fractures. Failures of this kind appear frequently in rapid dynamic processes, particularly in the formation of spall fragments. An approach to formulating constitutive relations that accounts for the opening, shear and growth of an ensemble of cracks is discussed. The approach accounts for plastic flow accompanying fragmentation. The resulting constitutive relations were incorporated into a Lagrangian computer program. A theoretical approach to coalescence is described. The simplest formulation uses a linear Liouville equation, with crack growth limited by the mean free path of cracks, assumed constant. This approach allows for an anisotropic distribution of cracks. An alternative approach in which the decrease of the mean free path with increasing crack size is accounted for, but the crack distribution is assumed isotropic is described. A reduction of the governing Liouville equation to an ordinary differential equation of third order is possible, and the result can be used to determine how mean free path decreases with increasing crack size.

  2. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-03-11

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure-function relationship.

  3. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure–function relationship. PMID:26978354

  4. SPR-based fragment screening: advantages and applications.

    PubMed

    Neumann, T; Junker, H-D; Schmidt, K; Sekul, R

    2007-01-01

    Fragment-based screening has recently evolved into a promising strategy in drug discovery, and a range of biophysical methods can be employed for fragment library screening. Relevant approaches, such as X-ray, NMR and tethering are briefly introduced focussing on their suitability for fragment-based drug discovery. In particular the application of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) techniques to the primary screening of large libraries comprising small molecules is discussed in detail. SPR is known to be a powerful tool for studying biomolecular interactions in a sensitive and label-free detection format. Advantages of SPR methods over more traditional assay formats are discussed and the application of available channel and array based SPR systems to biosensing are reviewed. Today, SPR protocols have been applied to secondary screening of compound libraries and hit conformation, but primary screening of large fragment libraries for drug discovery is often hampered by the throughput of available systems. Chemical microarrays, in combination with SPR imaging, can simultaneously generate affinity data for protein targets with up to 9,216 immobilized fragments per array. This approach has proven to be suitable for screening fragment libraries of up to 110,000 compounds in a high throughput fashion. The design of fragment libraries and appropriate immobilization chemistries are discussed, as well as suitable follow-up strategies for fragment hit optimization. Finally, described case studies demonstrate the successful identification of selective low molecular weight inhibitors for pharmacologically relevant drug targets through the SPR screening of fragment libraries.

  5. Habitat specialization predicts genetic response to fragmentation in tropical birds.

    PubMed

    Khimoun, Aurélie; Eraud, Cyril; Ollivier, Anthony; Arnoux, Emilie; Rocheteau, Vincent; Bely, Marine; Lefol, Emilie; Delpuech, Martin; Carpentier, Marie-Laure; Leblond, Gilles; Levesque, Anthony; Charbonnel, Anaïs; Faivre, Bruno; Garnier, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Habitat fragmentation is one of the most severe threats to biodiversity as it may lead to changes in population genetic structure, with ultimate modifications of species evolutionary potential and local extinctions. Nonetheless, fragmentation does not equally affect all species and identifying which ecological traits are related to species sensitivity to habitat fragmentation could help prioritization of conservation efforts. Despite the theoretical link between species ecology and extinction proneness, comparative studies explicitly testing the hypothesis that particular ecological traits underlies species-specific population structure are rare. Here, we used a comparative approach on eight bird species, co-occurring across the same fragmented landscape. For each species, we quantified relative levels of forest specialization and genetic differentiation among populations. To test the link between forest specialization and susceptibility to forest fragmentation, we assessed species responses to fragmentation by comparing levels of genetic differentiation between continuous and fragmented forest landscapes. Our results revealed a significant and substantial population structure at a very small spatial scale for mobile organisms such as birds. More importantly, we found that specialist species are more affected by forest fragmentation than generalist ones. Finally, our results suggest that even a simple habitat specialization index can be a satisfying predictor of genetic and demographic consequences of habitat fragmentation, providing a reliable practical and quantitative tool for conservation biology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Fragmentation of a jet with small radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lin; Kim, Chul; Leibovich, Adam K.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we consider the fragmentation of a parton into a jet with small jet radius R . Perturbatively, logarithms of R can appear, which for narrow jets can lead to large corrections. Using soft-collinear effective theory, we introduce the fragmentation function to a jet (FFJ), which describes the fragmentation of a parton into a jet. We discuss how these objects are related to the standard jet functions. Calculating the FFJ to next-to-leading order, we show that these objects satisfy the standard Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equations, with a natural scale that depends upon R . By using the standard renormalization group evolution, we can therefore resum logarithms of R . We further use the soft-collinear effective theory to prove a factorization theorem where the FFJs naturally appear, for the fragmentation of a hadron within a jet with small R . Finally, we also show how this formalism can be used to resum the ratio of jet radii for a subjet to be emitted from within a fat jet.

  7. Recovery of Depleted Uranium Fragments from Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, C.P.; Alecksen, T.J.; Heronimus, R.S.; Simonds, M.H.; Farrar, D.R.; Baker, K.R.; Miller, M.L.

    2008-07-01

    A cost-effective method was demonstrated for recovering depleted uranium (DU) fragments from soil. A compacted clean soil pad was prepared adjacent to a pile of soil containing DU fragments. Soil from the contaminated pile was placed on the pad in three-inch lifts using conventional construction equipment. Each lift was scanned with an automatic scanning system consisting of an array of radiation detectors coupled to a detector positioning system. The data were downloaded into ArcGIS for data presentation. Areas of the pad exhibiting scaler counts above the decision level were identified as likely locations of DU fragments. The coordinates of these locations were downloaded into a PDA that was wirelessly connected to the positioning system. The PDA guided technicians to the locations where hand-held trowels and shovels were used to remove the fragments. After DU removal, the affected areas were re-scanned and the new data patched into the data base to replace the original data. This new data set along with soil sample results served as final status survey data. (authors)

  8. Universality in fragment inclusive yields from Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insolia, A.; Tuvè, C.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D.; Chacon, A. D.; Chance, J. L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Elliott, J. B.; Gilkes, M.; Hauger, J. A.; Hirsch, A. S.; Hjort, E. L.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Lisa, M.; Matis, H. S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Olson, D. L.; Partlan, M. D.; Porile, N. T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Romero, J. L.; Russo, G. V.; Scharenberg, R.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Srivastava, B. K.; Symons, T. J. M.; Tincknell, M. L.; Wang, S.; Warren, P. G.; Wieman, H. H.; Wolf, K. L.

    2001-11-01

    The inclusive light fragment (Z⩽7) yield data in Au+Au reactions, measured by the EOS Collaboration at the LBNL Bevalac, are presented and discussed. For peripheral collisions the measured charge distributions develop progressively according to a power law which can be fitted by a single τ exponent independently of the bombarding energy in the range 250-1200 A MeV. In addition to this universal feature, we observe that the location of the maximum in the individual yields of different charged fragments shift towards lower multiplicity as the fragment charge increases from Z=3 to Z=7. This trend is common to all six measured beam energies. Moments of charge distributions and correlations among different moments are reported. Finally, the THe,DT thermometer has been constructed for central and peripheral collisions using the double yield ratios of He and D, T projectile fragments. The measured nuclear temperatures are in agreement with experimental findings in other fragmentation reactions.

  9. Nonequilibrium effects in fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernomoretz, A.; Ison, M.; Ortiz, S.; Dorso, C. O.

    2001-08-01

    We study, using molecular dynamics techniques, how boundary conditions affect the process of fragmentation of finite, highly excited, Lennard-Jones systems. We analyze the behavior of the caloric curves (CC), the associated thermal response functions (TRF), and cluster mass distributions for constrained and unconstrained hot drops. It is shown that the resulting CC for the constrained case differ from the one in the unconstrained case, mainly in the presence of a ``vapor branch.'' This branch is absent in the free expanding case even at high energies. This effect is traced to the role played by the collective expansion motion. On the other hand, we found that the recently proposed characteristic features of a first order phase transition taking place in a finite isolated system, i.e., abnormally large kinetic energy fluctuations and a negative branch in the TRF, are present for the constrained (dilute) as well as the unconstrained case. The microscopic origin of this behavior is also analyzed.

  10. The Largest Fragment of a Homogeneous Fragmentation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyprianou, Andreas; Lane, Francis; Mörters, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We show that in homogeneous fragmentation processes the largest fragment at time t has size e^{-t Φ '(overline{p})}t^{-3/2 (log Φ )'(overline{p})+o(1)}, where Φ is the Lévy exponent of the fragmentation process, and overline{p} is the unique solution of the equation (log Φ )'(bar{p})=1/1+bar{p}. We argue that this result is in line with predictions arising from the classification of homogeneous fragmentation processes as logarithmically correlated random fields.

  11. Quantitative experimental modelling of fragmentation during explosive volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordén Haug, Ø.; Galland, O.; Gisler, G.

    2012-04-01

    Phreatomagmatic eruptions results from the violent interaction between magma and an external source of water, such as ground water or a lake. This interaction causes fragmentation of the magma and/or the host rock, resulting in coarse-grained (lapilli) to very fine-grained (ash) material. The products of phreatomagmatic explosions are classically described by their fragment size distribution, which commonly follows power laws of exponent D. Such descriptive approach, however, considers the final products only and do not provide information on the dynamics of fragmentation. The aim of this contribution is thus to address the following fundamental questions. What are the physics that govern fragmentation processes? How fragmentation occurs through time? What are the mechanisms that produce power law fragment size distributions? And what are the scaling laws that control the exponent D? To address these questions, we performed a quantitative experimental study. The setup consists of a Hele-Shaw cell filled with a layer of cohesive silica flour, at the base of which a pulse of pressurized air is injected, leading to fragmentation of the layer of flour. The fragmentation process is monitored through time using a high-speed camera. By varying systematically the air pressure (P) and the thickness of the flour layer (h) we observed two morphologies of fragmentation: "lift off" where the silica flour above the injection inlet is ejected upwards, and "channeling" where the air pierces through the layer along sub-vertical conduit. By building a phase diagram, we show that the morphology is controlled by P/dgh, where d is the density of the flour and g is the gravitational acceleration. To quantify the fragmentation process, we developed a Matlab image analysis program, which calculates the number and sizes of the fragments, and so the fragment size distribution, during the experiments. The fragment size distributions are in general described by power law distributions of

  12. Effect of Fibrin Packing on Managing Hepatic Hemorrhage and Liver Wound Healing in a Model of Liver Stab Wound in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Banihashemi, Mehrzad; Safari, Azam; Nezafat, Navid; Tahamtan, Mahmoodreza; Negahdaripour, Manica; Azarpira, Negar; Ghasemi, Younes

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of fibrin perihepatic packing on controlling liver hemorrhage and liver wound healing.   Methods: In this animal experimental study, 20 adult male Sprague Dawley rats, weighing 200-220 g, were included. Stab wound injury was created by number 15 scalpel, so that bilateral liver capsules and liver tissue were cut, and acute bleeding was accrued. The animals were divided into 2 study groups: control (with a primary gauze packing treatment) and test group (with fibrin packing treatment). Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and total serum bilirubin (TSB) levels were measured as a liver function test during the treatment period. Blood loss was calculated for estimation of hepatic hemorrhage during surgery. After four weeks, the liver wound repair was evaluated by sampling and Hematoxylin and Eosin staining (H&E). Results: In the test group, all of animals were alive (mortality rate= 0%). Significantly, ALT and AST levels were raised after surgery, followed by a decrease ALT (p=0.783) and AST (p=0.947) to the normal level during 4 days. Estimated blood loss was 2.89 ± 0.73 mL (about 19.65% of estimated blood volume). Hematocrit levels returned to the normal level (p=0.109) after 48 hours. In the control group, the mortality rate was 50% during 12h after surgery. ALT (p=0.773) and AST (p=0.853) were decreased to normal level during 6 days, and estimated blood loss was 4.98 ± 0.77 mL (about 32.98% of estimated blood volume) in the remaining animals. Moreover, hematocrit levels returned to the normal level (p=0.432) after 72 hours. Estimated blood loss in the test group was significantly less than control group (p<0.001). Total serum bilirubin levels were not significantly different from the normal level, before and after surgery in both groups. Histopathology sections from the post-hepatectomy specimens showed that the site of the previous incision was completely repaired, and a dense fibrous septum

  13. Species–fragmented area relationship

    PubMed Central

    Hanski, Ilkka; Zurita, Gustavo A.; Bellocq, M. Isabel; Rybicki, Joel

    2013-01-01

    The species–area relationship (SAR) gives a quantitative description of the increasing number of species in a community with increasing area of habitat. In conservation, SARs have been used to predict the number of extinctions when the area of habitat is reduced. Such predictions are most needed for landscapes rather than for individual habitat fragments, but SAR-based predictions of extinctions for landscapes with highly fragmented habitat are likely to be biased because SAR assumes contiguous habitat. In reality, habitat loss is typically accompanied by habitat fragmentation. To quantify the effect of fragmentation in addition to the effect of habitat loss on the number of species, we extend the power-law SAR to the species–fragmented area relationship. This model unites the single-species metapopulation theory with the multispecies SAR for communities. We demonstrate with a realistic simulation model and with empirical data for forest-inhabiting subtropical birds that the species–fragmented area relationship gives a far superior prediction than SAR of the number of species in fragmented landscapes. The results demonstrate that for communities of species that are not well adapted to live in fragmented landscapes, the conventional SAR underestimates the number of extinctions for landscapes in which little habitat remains and it is highly fragmented. PMID:23858440

  14. Meteoroid fragments dynamics: Collimation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barri, N. G.

    2010-02-01

    There is significant evidence that some fraction of meteoric bodies is destroyed in the atmosphere. The evolution of the fragment cloud depends on a large number of factors, amound them: the meteoroid’s altitude and velocity at the moment of greakup, fragment sizes and properties of a body material. The interaction of shock waves forming in front of the fragments may lead to both an increase and decrease of the midsection area of the fragment cloud (Artem’eva & Shuvalov, 1996; Laurence et al., 2007). In this work, we consider the interaction of the fragments in a supersonic flow. The configuration properties of two spherical bodies of different radii are considered. Via numerical simulations, we calculate the pressure distribution in the flow around the two bodies for different relative positions. We construct the functions of the coefficients of transverse and drag forces from the angle between the central line of the two bodies and the flow direction for different distances between the two fragments. We find the conditions for the collimation effect, i.e., fragment involving into the wake of the leading (usually, the largest) fragment. We systematize the simulation results for drag and transverse forces and infer the basic aerodynamic properties of the meteoroid fragments.

  15. Thermodynamical string fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Nadine; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2017-01-01

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from the LHC. While some improvements can be noted, it turns out to be nontrivial to obtain effects as big as required, and further work is called for.

  16. Fragmentation of stratospheric intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appenzeller, C.; Davies, H. C.; Norton, W. A.

    1996-01-01

    Evidence is presented pointing to the existence of rich and coherent subsynoptic and mesoscale flow features at tropopause levels. These features are related to, and evolve from, the classical V-shaped intrusions of stratospheric air down to tropospheric elevations. It is shown that intrusions can develop into elongated (˜2000-3000 km) and slender (˜200 km) streamers, and that thereafter such a streamer can roll up to form a train of stalactite-shaped vortex subentities with an accompanying substantial thinning of the intervening filament. In addition there are indications that the vortices themselves can develop a spirallike interior structure of interleaved stratospheric and tropospheric air. These inferences are based upon two independent but complementary sources: analysis of the potential vorticity distribution on tropopause transcending isentropic surfaces derived from the analysis fields of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts either directly, or indirectly using a contour advection technique; and imagery from the water vapor channel of the European Space Agency Meteosat 4 satellite. Streamers were observed to occur with a frequency of approximately one per week over central and southern Europe during the winter of 1991-1992. The fragmentation is linked to the instability or self-development of a filament of enhanced potential vorticity and it can modify or instigate surface weather systems. Moreover, by inducing a substantial and rapid enlargement of the intrusion's surface area it greatly enhances the potential for local irreversible mixing of stratospheric and tropospheric air.

  17. Longitudinal Changes in the Structure and Inflammatory Response of the Intervertebral Disc Due to Stab Injury in a Murine Organ Culture Model

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Adam C.; Liu, Jennifer W.; Tang, Simon Y.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the significant public health impact of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and low back pain, it remains challenging to investigate the multifactorial molecular mechanisms that drive the degenerative cascade. Organ culture model systems offer the advantage of allowing cells to live and interact with their native extracellular matrix, while simultaneously reducing the amount of biological variation and complexity present at the organismal level. Murine organ cultures in particular also allow the use of widely available genetically modified animals with molecular level reporters that would reveal insights on the degenerative cascade. Here, we utilize an organ culture system of murine lumbar functional spinal units where we are able to maintain the cellular, metabolic, and structural, and mechanical stability of the whole organ over a 21-day period. Furthermore, we describe a novel approach in organ culture by using tissues from animals with an NF-κB-luc reporter in combination with a mechanical injury model, and are able to show that proinflammatory factors and cytokines such as NF-κB and IL-6 produced by IVD cells can be monitored longitudinally during culture in a stab injury model. Taken together, we utilize a murine organ culture system that maintains the cellular and tissue level behavior of the intervertebral disc and apply it to transgenic animals that allow the monitoring of the inflammatory profile of IVDs. This approach could provide important insights on the molecular and metabolic mediators that regulate the homeostasis of the IVD. PMID:27273204

  18. An Enumerative Combinatorics Model for Fragmentation Patterns in RNA Sequencing Provides Insights into Nonuniformity of the Expected Fragment Starting-Point and Coverage Profile.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Celine; Haeseler, Arndt Von

    2017-03-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has emerged as the method of choice for measuring the expression of RNAs in a given cell population. In most RNA-seq technologies, sequencing the full length of RNA molecules requires fragmentation into smaller pieces. Unfortunately, the issue of nonuniform sequencing coverage across a genomic feature has been a concern in RNA-seq and is attributed to biases for certain fragments in RNA-seq library preparation and sequencing. To investigate the expected coverage obtained from fragmentation, we develop a simple fragmentation model that is independent of bias from the experimental method and is not specific to the transcript sequence. Essentially, we enumerate all configurations for maximal placement of a given fragment length, F, on transcript length, T, to represent every possible fragmentation pattern, from which we compute the expected coverage profile across a transcript. We extend this model to incorporate general empirical attributes such as read length, fragment length distribution, and number of molecules of the transcript. We further introduce the fragment starting-point, fragment coverage, and read coverage profiles. We find that the expected profiles are not uniform and that factors such as fragment length to transcript length ratio, read length to fragment length ratio, fragment length distribution, and number of molecules influence the variability of coverage across a transcript. Finally, we explore a potential application of the model where, with simulations, we show that it is possible to correctly estimate the transcript copy number for any transcript in the RNA-seq experiment.

  19. Fragmentation functions in nuclear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassot, Rodolfo; Stratmann, Marco; Zurita, Pia

    2010-03-01

    We perform a detailed phenomenological analysis of how well hadronization in nuclear environments can be described in terms of effective fragmentation functions. The medium modified fragmentation functions are assumed to factorize from the partonic scattering cross sections and evolve in the hard scale in the same way as the standard or vacuum fragmentation functions. Based on precise data on semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering off nuclei and hadron production in deuteron-gold collisions, we extract sets of effective fragmentation functions for pions and kaons at next-to-leading order accuracy. The obtained sets provide a rather accurate description of the kinematical dependence of the analyzed cross sections and are found to differ significantly from standard fragmentation functions both in shape and magnitude. Our results support the notion of factorization and universality in the studied nuclear environments, at least in an effective way and within the precision of the available data.

  20. Fragment screening and HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Joseph D; Patel, Disha; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Fragment screening has proven to be a powerful alternative to traditional methods for drug discovery. Biophysical methods, such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance, are used to screen a diverse library of small molecule compounds. Although compounds identified via this approach have relatively weak affinity, they provide a good platform for lead development and are highly efficient binders with respect to their size. Fragment screening has been utilized for a wide range of targets, including HIV-1 proteins. Here, we review the fragment screening studies targeting HIV-1 proteins using X-ray crystallography or surface plasmon resonance. These studies have successfully detected binding of novel fragments to either previously established or new sites on HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase. In addition, fragment screening against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been used as a tool to better understand the complex nature of ligand binding to a flexible target.

  1. Rock fragment movement in shallow rill flow - A laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Kerstin; Wirtz, Stefan; Seeger, Manuel; Gronz, Oliver; Remke, Alexander; Iserloh, Thomas; Brings, Christine; Casper, Markus; Ries, Johannes B.

    2014-05-01

    Studies concerning rill erosion mainly deal with the erosion and transport of fine material. The transport of rock fragments is examined mostly for mountain rivers. But there are important differences between the conditions and processes in rivers and in rills: (1) In most cases, the river cuts into a coarse substrate, where fine material is sparse, whereas rill erosion occurs on arable land. So the main part of the substrate is fine material and only single rock fragments influence the processes. (2) In rivers, the water depth is relatively high. There are a lot of studies about hydraulic parameters in such flows, but there is almost nothing known about hydraulic conditions in surface runoff events of a few centimeters. Additionally, little information exists about the rock fragment movement as a part of rill erosion processes on arable land. This knowledge should be increased because rock fragments cause non-stationary water turbulences in rills, which enhance the erosive force of flowing water. Field experiments can only show the fact that a certain rock fragment has moved: The starting point and the final position can be estimated. But the moving path and especially the initiation of the movement is not detectable under field conditions. Hence, we developed a laboratory setup to analyze the movement of rock fragments depending on rock fragment properties (size, form), slope gradient, flow velocity and surface roughness. By observing the rock fragments with cameras from two different angles we are able (1) to measure the rotation angles of a rock fragment during the experiment and (2) to deduce different rock fragment movement patterns. On this poster we want to present the experimental setup, developed within the scope of a master thesis, and the results of these experiments.

  2. Electroproduction in the Target Fragmentation Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avagyan, Harut

    2014-09-01

    The Semi-Inclusive DIS process in the Target Fragmentation Region (TFR), when the hadron is produced in the fragmentation process of the target remnants, can be described through the so-called Fracture Functions (FFs). They represent the joint probability of producing the final hadron from the target remnants, when a parton of the target nucleon is struck by the virtual photon in a hard scattering process. Like the ordinary parton distribution functions, the FFs are universal objects, thus they can be measured in one experiment at a given hard scale and then used to make predictions for other experiments, at another hard scale. Measurements of the Lambda multiplicities and polarization asymmetries in TFR, in particular, will provide information on corresponding Fracture Functions. The study of its Q2 dependence at JLab and EIC also will test the perturbative framework implied by Fracture Functions, simultaneously encoding the information on the interacting parton and on the fragmentation of the spectator system. We will present ongoing studies of electroproduction in TFR at Jefferson Lab, and proposed future measurement at upgraded JLab and Electron Ion Collider.

  3. Driven fragmentation of granular gases.

    PubMed

    Cruz Hidalgo, Raúl; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of homogeneously heated granular gases which fragment due to particle collisions is analyzed. We introduce a kinetic model which accounts for correlations induced at the grain collisions and analyze both the kinetics and relevant distribution functions these systems develop. The work combines analytical and numerical studies based on direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. A broad family of fragmentation probabilities is considered, and its implications for the system kinetics are discussed. We show that generically these driven materials evolve asymptotically into a dynamical scaling regime. If the fragmentation probability tends to a constant, the grain number diverges at a finite time, leading to a shattering singularity. If the fragmentation probability vanishes, then the number of grains grows monotonously as a power law. We consider different homogeneous thermostats and show that the kinetics of these systems depends weakly on both the grain inelasticity and driving. We observe that fragmentation plays a relevant role in the shape of the velocity distribution of the particles. When the fragmentation is driven by local stochastic events, the long velocity tail is essentially exponential independently of the heating frequency and the breaking rule. However, for a Lowe-Andersen thermostat, numerical evidence strongly supports the conjecture that the scaled velocity distribution follows a generalized exponential behavior f(c) approximately exp(-cn) , with n approximately 1.2 , regarding less the fragmentation mechanisms.

  4. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION OF THE ORION MOLECULAR FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung; Teixeira, Paula S.; Zapata, Luis A.

    2013-01-20

    We present a high angular resolution map of the 850 {mu}m continuum emission of the Orion Molecular Cloud-3 (OMC 3) obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA); the map is a mosaic of 85 pointings covering an approximate area of 6.'5 Multiplication-Sign 2.'0 (0.88 Multiplication-Sign 0.27 pc). We detect 12 spatially resolved continuum sources, each with an H{sub 2} mass between 0.3-5.7 M {sub Sun} and a projected source size between 1400-8200 AU. All the detected sources are on the filamentary main ridge (n{sub H{sub 2}}{>=}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}), and analysis based on the Jeans theorem suggests that they are most likely gravitationally unstable. Comparison of multi-wavelength data sets indicates that of the continuum sources, 6/12 (50%) are associated with molecular outflows, 8/12 (67%) are associated with infrared sources, and 3/12 (25%) are associated with ionized jets. The evolutionary status of these sources ranges from prestellar cores to protostar phase, confirming that OMC-3 is an active region with ongoing embedded star formation. We detect quasi-periodical separations between the OMC-3 sources of Almost-Equal-To 17''/0.035 pc. This spatial distribution is part of a large hierarchical structure that also includes fragmentation scales of giant molecular cloud ( Almost-Equal-To 35 pc), large-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 1.3 pc), and small-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 0.3 pc), suggesting that hierarchical fragmentation operates within the Orion A molecular cloud. The fragmentation spacings are roughly consistent with the thermal fragmentation length in large-scale clumps, while for small-scale cores it is smaller than the local fragmentation length. These smaller spacings observed with the SMA can be explained by either a helical magnetic field, cloud rotation, or/and global filament collapse. Finally, possible evidence for sequential fragmentation is suggested in the northern part of the OMC-3 filament.

  5. Considerations in producing preferentially reduced half-antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Makaraviciute, Asta; Jackson, Carolyn D; Millner, Paul A; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2016-02-01

    Half-antibody fragments are a promising reagent for biosensing, drug-delivery and labeling applications, since exposure of the free thiol group in the Fc hinge region allows oriented reaction. Despite the structural variations among the molecules of different IgG subclasses and those obtained from different hosts, only generalized preferential antibody reduction protocols are currently available. Preferential reduction of polyclonal sheep anti-digoxin, rabbit anti-Escherichia coli and anti-myoglobin class IgG antibodies to half-antibody fragments has been investigated. A mild reductant 2-mercaptoethylamine (2-MEA) and a slightly stronger reductant tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) were used and the fragments obtained were quantitatively determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. It has been shown that the yields of half-antibody fragments could be increased by lowering the pH of the reduction mixtures. However, antibody susceptibility to the reductants varied. At pH4.5 the highest yield of sheep anti-digoxin IgG half-antibody fragments was obtained with 1M 2-MEA. Conversely, rabbit IgG half-antibody fragments could only be obtained with the stronger reductant TCEP. Preferential reduction of rabbit anti-myoglobin IgG antibodies was optimized and the highest half-antibody yield was obtained with 35 mM TCEP. Finally, it has been demonstrated that produced anti-myoglobin half-IgG fragments retained their binding activity.

  6. The effect of radiative feedback on disc fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, Anthony; Stamatellos, Dimitris

    2017-02-01

    Protostellar discs may become massive enough to fragment producing secondary low-mass objects: planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We study the effect of radiative feedback from such newly formed secondary objects using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We compare the results of simulations without any radiative feedback from secondary objects with those where two types of radiative feedback are considered: (i) continuous and (ii) episodic. We find that (i) continuous radiative feedback stabilizes the disc and suppresses further fragmentation, reducing the number of secondary objects formed; (ii) episodic feedback from secondary objects heats and stabilizes the disc when the outburst occurs, but shortly after the outburst stops, the disc becomes unstable and fragments again. However, fewer secondary objects are formed compared to the case without radiative feedback. We also find that the mass growth of secondary objects is mildly suppressed due to the effect of their radiative feedback. However, their mass growth also depends on where they form in the disc and on their subsequent interactions, such that their final masses are not drastically different from the case without radiative feedback. We find that the masses of secondary objects formed by disc fragmentation are from a few MJ to a few 0.1 M⊙. Planets formed by fragmentation tend to be ejected from the disc. We conclude that planetary-mass objects on wide orbits (wide-orbit planets) are unlikely to form by disc fragmentation. Nevertheless, disc fragmentation may be a significant source of free-floating planets and brown dwarfs.

  7. Genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation during a range expansion

    PubMed Central

    Mona, S; Ray, N; Arenas, M; Excoffier, L

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effect of habitat fragmentation on the genetic diversity of a species experiencing a range expansion. These two evolutionary processes have not been studied yet, at the same time, owing to the difficulties of deriving analytic results for non-equilibrium models. Here we provide a description of their interaction by using extensive spatial and temporal coalescent simulations and we suggest guidelines for a proper genetic sampling to detect fragmentation. To model habitat fragmentation, we simulated a two-dimensional lattice of demes partitioned into groups (patches) by adding barriers to dispersal. After letting a population expand on this grid, we sampled lineages from the lattice at several scales and studied their coalescent history. We find that in order to detect fragmentation, one needs to extensively sample at a local level rather than at a landscape level. This is because the gene genealogy of a scattered sample is less sensitive to the presence of genetic barriers. Considering the effect of temporal changes of fragmentation intensities, we find that at least 10, but often >100, generations are needed to affect local genetic diversity and population structure. This result explains why recent habitat fragmentation does not always lead to detectable signatures in the genetic structure of populations. Finally, as expected, long-distance dispersal increases local genetic diversity and decreases levels of population differentiation, efficiently counteracting the effects of fragmentation. PMID:24149654

  8. Genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation during a range expansion.

    PubMed

    Mona, S; Ray, N; Arenas, M; Excoffier, L

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the effect of habitat fragmentation on the genetic diversity of a species experiencing a range expansion. These two evolutionary processes have not been studied yet, at the same time, owing to the difficulties of deriving analytic results for non-equilibrium models. Here we provide a description of their interaction by using extensive spatial and temporal coalescent simulations and we suggest guidelines for a proper genetic sampling to detect fragmentation. To model habitat fragmentation, we simulated a two-dimensional lattice of demes partitioned into groups (patches) by adding barriers to dispersal. After letting a population expand on this grid, we sampled lineages from the lattice at several scales and studied their coalescent history. We find that in order to detect fragmentation, one needs to extensively sample at a local level rather than at a landscape level. This is because the gene genealogy of a scattered sample is less sensitive to the presence of genetic barriers. Considering the effect of temporal changes of fragmentation intensities, we find that at least 10, but often >100, generations are needed to affect local genetic diversity and population structure. This result explains why recent habitat fragmentation does not always lead to detectable signatures in the genetic structure of populations. Finally, as expected, long-distance dispersal increases local genetic diversity and decreases levels of population differentiation, efficiently counteracting the effects of fragmentation.

  9. Depleted Uranium Test Range Fragment Reclamation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    fragment drying was necessary in order to obtain adequate vacuum levels in the VIR furnaces . e. Vacuujm Induction Remelting Fragments and Casting...Acid Pickle and Water Rinse .... ........ 2 d. Drying the Fragments .... ............... 2 e. Vacuum Induction Remelting Fragments and Casting...feasibility of reclaiming test range fragments by vacuum induction remelting (VIR). The technical direction of Phase 11 was highly dependent upon the

  10. Recovery of depleted uranium fragments from soil.

    PubMed

    Farr, C P; Alecksen, T J; Heronimus, R S; Simonds, M H; Farrar, D R; Miller, M L; Baker, K R

    2010-02-01

    A "proof of concept" was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a survey method for cost-effective recovery of depleted uranium (DU) fragments from contaminated soil piles at Sandia National Laboratories. First, DU fragments ranging from less than a gram up to 48 g were covered by various thicknesses of soil and used for detector efficiency measurements. The efficiencies were measured for three different sodium iodide detectors: a 5.1-cm by 5.1-cm (2-inch by 2-inch) detector, a 7.6-cm by 7.6-cm (3-inch by 3-inch) detector, and a Field Instrument for the Detection of Low Energy Radiation (FIDLER) detector. The FIDLER detector was found to be superior to the other detectors in each measurement. Next, multiple 7.6-cm (3-inch) layers of soil, taken from the contaminated piles, were applied to a clean pad of soil. Each layer was scanned by an array of eight FIDLER detectors pulled by a tractor. The array, moving 10.2 to 12.7 cm s(-1) (4 to 5 inches per second), automatically recorded radiation count data along with associated detector coordinates at 3-s intervals. The DU fragments were located and identified with a handheld system consisting of a FIDLER detector and a positioning system and then removed. After DU removal, the affected areas were re-scanned and a new lift of contaminated soil was applied. The detection capability of the system as a function of DU fragment mass and burial depth was modeled and determined to be sufficient to ensure that the dose-based site concentration goals would be met. Finally, confirmation soil samples were taken from random locations and from decontaminated soil areas. All samples had concentrations of U that met the goal of 400-500 pCi g(-1).

  11. Calculus fragmentation in laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Welch, A J; Kang, H W; Lee, H; Teichman, J M H

    2004-03-01

    The intracorporeal treatment of urinary calculi with lasers is presented, which describes laser-calculus interactions associated with lithotripsy. Reliable fragmentation of calculi with diverse compositions and minimal collateral tissue damage are primarily contingent upon laser parameters (wavelength, pulse duration, and pulse energy) and physical properties of calculi (optical, mechanical, and chemical). The pulse duration governs the dominant mechanism in calculi fragmentation, which is either photothermal or photoacoustical/photomechanical. Lasers with long pulse durations (i.e. > tens of micros) induce a temperature rise in the laser-affected zone with minimal acoustic waves; material is removed by means of vaporization, melting, mechanical stress, and/or chemical decomposition. Short-pulsed laser ablation (i.e. < 10 micros), on the other hand, produces shock waves, and the resultant mechanical energy fragments calculi. Work continues throughout the world to evaluate the feasibility of advanced lasers in lithotripsy and to optimize laser parameters and light delivery systems pertinent to efficient fragmentation of calculi.

  12. Fragmentation of drying paint layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Katinka; Dombi, András; Járai-Szabó, Ferenc; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-11-01

    Fragmentation of thin layers of drying granular materials on a frictional surface are studied both by experiments and computer simulations. Besides a qualitative description of the fragmentation phenomenon, the dependence of the average fragment size as a function of the layer thickness is thoroughly investigated. Experiments are done using a special nail polish, which forms characteristic crack structures during drying. In order to control the layer thickness, we diluted the nail polish in acetone and evaporated in a controlled manner different volumes of this solution on glass surfaces. During the evaporation process we managed to get an instable paint layer, which formed cracks as it dried out. In order to understand the obtained structures a previously developed spring-block model was implemented in a three-dimensional version. The experimental and simulation results proved to be in excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement. An earlier suggested scaling relation between the average fragment size and the layer thickness is reconfirmed.

  13. CFTR mutations altering CFTR fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Tosoni, Kendra; Stobbart, Michelle; Cassidy, Diane M.; Venerando, Andrea; Pagano, Mario A.; Luz, Simão; Amaral, Margarida D.; Kunzelmann, Karl; Pinna, Lorenzo A.; Farinha, Carlos M.; Mehta, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Most CF (cystic fibrosis) results from deletion of a phenylalanine (F508) in the CFTR {CF transmembrane-conductance regulator; ABCC7 [ABC (ATP-binding cassette) sub-family C member 7]} which causes ER (endoplasmic reticulum) degradation of the mutant. Using stably CFTR-expressing BHK (baby-hamster kidney) cell lines we demonstrated that wild-type CTFR and the F508delCFTR mutant are cleaved into differently sized N- and C-terminal-bearing fragments, with each hemi-CFTR carrying its nearest NBD (nucleotide-binding domain), reflecting differential cleavage through the central CFTR R-domain. Similar NBD1-bearing fragments are present in the natively expressing HBE (human bronchial epithelial) cell line. We also observe multiple smaller fragments of different sizes in BHK cells, particularly after F508del mutation (ladder pattern). Trapping wild-type CFTR in the ER did not generate a F508del fragmentation fingerprint. Fragments change their size/pattern again post-mutation at sites involved in CFTR's in vitro interaction with the pleiotropic protein kinase CK2 (S511A in NBD1). The F508del and S511A mutations generate different fragmentation fingerprints that are each unlike the wild-type; yet, both mutants generate new N-terminal-bearing CFTR fragments that are not observed with other CK2-related mutations (S511D, S422A/D and T1471A/D). We conclude that the F508delCFTR mutant is not degraded completely and there exists a relationship between CFTR's fragmentation fingerprint and the CFTR sequence through putative CK2-interactive sites that lie near F508. PMID:23067305

  14. A semiempirical nuclear fragmentation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Badavi, F. F.

    1987-01-01

    An abrasion/ablation model of heavy ion fragmentation is derived which includes a second order correction for the surface energy term and provides a reasonable representation of the present elemental fragmentation cross sections. The full development of the model must await the resolution of disagreement among different experiments and an expansion of the experimental data base to a broader set of projectile-target combinations.

  15. QGP and Modified Jet Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-04-18

    Recent progresses in the study of jet modification in hotmedium and their consequences in high-energy heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. In particular, I will discuss energy loss for propagating heavy quarks and the resulting modified fragmentation function. Medium modification of the parton fragmentation function due to quark recombination are formulated within finite temperature field theory and their implication on the search for deconfined quark-gluon plasma is also discussed.

  16. Jet mass dependence of fragmentation in positron-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urmossy, K.

    2017-02-01

    We propose the characterization of fragmentation functions by the energy fraction tilde{x} a hadron takes away from the energy of the jet measured in the frame co-moving with the jet. Besides, we propose the usage of the jet mass as the fragmentation scale tilde{Q}. We show that these two Lorentz-invariant variables emerge naturally in a microcanonical ensemble with conserved four-momentum. Then, we construct a statistical hadronisation model, in which, two features of the hadronic final states in various high-energy reactions (power law spectra and negative-binomial multiplicity distributions) can be connected simply. Finally, we analyse the scale dependence of the parameters of the model (power of the spectrum and mean energy per hadron) in the φ3 theory. Fitting fragmentation functions in diffractive positron-proton collisions, we obtain a prediction for the jet mass dependence of the hadron multiplicity distribution inside jets.

  17. Longitudinal changes in the structure and inflammatory response of the intervertebral disc due to stab injury in a murine organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Adam C; Liu, Jennifer W; Tang, Simon Y

    2016-08-01

    Despite the significant public health impact of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and low back pain, it remains challenging to investigate the multifactorial molecular mechanisms that drive the degenerative cascade. Organ culture model systems offer the advantage of allowing cells to live and interact with their native extracellular matrix, while simultaneously reducing the amount of biological variation and complexity present at the organismal level. Murine organ cultures in particular also allow the use of widely available genetically modified animals with molecular level reporters that would reveal insights on the degenerative cascade. Here, we utilize an organ culture system of murine lumbar functional spinal units where we are able to maintain the cellular, metabolic, and structural, and mechanical stability of the whole organ over a 21-day period. Furthermore, we describe a novel approach in organ culture by using tissues from animals with an NF-κB-luc reporter in combination with a mechanical injury model, and are able to show that proinflammatory factors and cytokines such as NF-κB and IL-6 produced by IVD cells can be monitored longitudinally during culture in a stab injury model. Taken together, we utilize a murine organ culture system that maintains the cellular and tissue level behavior of the intervertebral disc and apply it to transgenic animals that allow the monitoring of the inflammatory profile of IVDs. This approach could provide important insights on the molecular and metabolic mediators that regulate the homeostasis of the IVD. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1431-1438, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Low intensity rTMS has sex-dependent effects on the local response of glia following a penetrating cortical stab injury.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Darren; Penrose, Marissa A; Harvey, Alan R; Rodger, Jennifer; Bates, Kristyn A

    2017-09-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a non-invasive form of brain stimulation, has shown experimental and clinical efficacy in a range of neuromodulatory models, even when delivered at low intensity (i.e. subthreshold for action potential generation). After central nervous system (CNS) injury, studies suggest that reactive astrocytes and microglia can have detrimental but also beneficial effects; thus modulating glial activity, for example through application of rTMS, could potentially be a useful therapeutic tool following neurotrauma. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure the effect of low intensity rTMS (LI-rTMS) on GFAP (astrocyte), IBA1 (microglial), and CS56 (proteoglycan) expression in a unilateral penetrating cortical stab injury model of glial scarring in young adult and aged male and female C57BL6/J mice. Mice received contralateral low frequency, ipsilateral low frequency, ipsilateral high frequency or sham LI-rTMS (4-5mT intensity), for two weeks following injury. There was no significant difference in the overall volume of tissue containing GFAP positive ((+)) astrocytes, IBA1(+) microglia, or proteoglycan expression, between sham and LI-rTMS-treated mice of all ages and sex. Importantly however, the density of GFAP(+) astrocytes and IBA1(+) microglia immediately adjacent to the injury was significantly reduced following ipsilateral low and high frequency stimulation in adult and aged females (p≤0.05), but was significantly increased in adult and aged males (p≤0.05). LI-rTMS effects were generally of greater magnitude in aged mice compared to young adult mice. These results suggest that sex differences need to be factored into therapeutic rTMS protocols. In particular, more work analyzing frequency and intensity specific effects, especially in relation to age and sex, is required to determine how rTMS can best be used to modify glial reactivity and phenotype following neurotrauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  19. Particle size statistics in dynamic fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E. )

    1990-12-15

    Condensed matter, when subjected to intense disrupting forces through impact or radiation deposition, will break up into a randomly distributed array of fragments. An earlier analysis of random fragmentation is extended to account for fragmentation in bodies which are finite in extent and for bodies within which the minimum fragment size is bounded. The statistical fragment size relations are compared with molecular dynamic simulations of dynamic fragmentation, with fragmentation caused by the high-energy collision of nuclear particles, and with the distribution of galaxies in the universe which are assumed to be fragment debris from the primordial Big Bang.

  20. Isomer-dependent fragmentation dynamics of inner-shell photoionized difluoroiodobenzene

    DOE PAGES

    Ablikim, Utuq; Bomme, Cédric; Savelyev, Evgeny; ...

    2017-05-11

    The fragmentation dynamics of 2,6- and 3,5-difluoroiodobenzene after iodine 4d inner-shell photoionization with soft X-rays are studied using coincident electron and ion momentum imaging. By analyzing the momentum correlation between iodine and fluorine cations in three-fold ion coincidence events, we can distinguish the two isomers experimentally. Classical Coulomb explosion simulations are in overall agreement with the experimentally determined fragment ion kinetic energies and momentum correlations and point toward different fragmentation mechanisms and time scales. Finally, while most three-body fragmentation channels show clear evidence for sequential fragmentation on a time scale larger than the rotational period of the fragments, the breakupmore » into iodine and fluorine cations and a third charged co-fragment appears to occur within several hundred femtoseconds.« less

  1. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  2. Procedure for assessing the performance of a rockfall fragmentation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matas, Gerard; Lantada, Nieves; Corominas, Jordi; Gili, Josep Antoni; Ruiz-Carulla, Roger; Prades, Albert

    2017-04-01

    final parameters selected after the calibration process are a compromise which meet all considered criteria. This methodology has been tested in some recent rockfall where high fragmentation was observed. The RockGIS tool and the fragmentation laws using data collected from recent rockfall have been developed within the RockRisk project (2014-2016, BIA2013-42582-P). This project was funded by the Spanish Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad.

  3. Fragmentation of DNA by sonication.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Joseph; Russell, David W

    2006-09-01

    INTRODUCTIONDNA fragmentation is often necessary prior to library construction or subcloning for DNA sequencing. This protocol describes a method for DNA fragmentation by sonication. During sonication, DNA samples are subjected to hydrodynamic shearing by exposure to brief periods of sonication. DNA that has been sonicated for excessive periods of time is extremely difficult to clone. Most sonicators will not shear DNA to a size of less than 300-500 bp, and it is tempting to continue sonication until the entire DNA population has been reduced in size. However, the yield of subclones is usually greater if sonication is stopped when the fragments of the target DNA first reach a size of ~700 bp.

  4. Fragment Mass Distribution of Debris

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-30

    distribution (3) is referred to as Rosin - Rammler -Sperrling (RRS) distribution, which goes back to the description of the grain size distribution in grin...the total fragment mass, Mot and then be divided by Mo. The corresponding 1 oga - rithms can then be plotted in a log-log- diagram. k g n...Fig. 2 Easy determination of the constants B and X from the log-log plot . 4. FRAGMENT MASS DISTRIBUTION OF AN 155 MM HE-ROUND Table 1 gives the

  5. Biological restorations using tooth fragments.

    PubMed

    Busato, A L; Loguercio, A D; Barbosa, A N; Sanseverino, M do C; Macedo, R P; Baldissera, R A

    1998-02-01

    A "biological" restoration technique using dental fragments and adhesive materials is described. These fragments were obtained from extracted human teeth which had been previously sterilized and stored in a tooth bank. The advantages are: the use of extracted teeth as restorative material, esthetics, and treatment cost. The positive sensation of having back the missing tooth was the most mentioned comment among patients. The disadvantages are: the difficulty of obtaining teeth with the needed characteristics, problems of making an indirect restoration, matching the original color, and the non-acceptance by some patients who consider it strange to have other people's teeth placed in their mouths.

  6. Characterization of hypervelocity metal fragments for explosive initiation

    DOE PAGES

    Yeager, John D.; Bowden, Patrick R.; Guildenbecher, Daniel R.; ...

    2017-07-17

    The fragment impact response of two plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) formulations was studied using explosively driven aluminum fragments. A generic aluminum-capped detonator generated sub-mm aluminum particles moving at hypersonic velocities. The ability of these fragments to initiate reaction or otherwise damage two PBX materials was assessed using go/no-go experiments at standoff distances of up to 160 mm. Lower density PBX 9407 (RDX-based) was initiable at up to 115 mm, while higher density PBX 9501 (HMX-based) was only initiable at up to 6 mm. Several techniques were used to characterize the size, distribution, and velocity of the particles. Witness plate materials, includingmore » copper and polycarbonate, and backlit high speed video were used to characterize the distribution of particles, finding that the aluminum cap did not fragment homogeneously but rather with larger particles in a ring surrounding finer particles. Finally, precise digital holography experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional shape and size of the fastest-moving fragments, which ranged between 100 and 700 μm and traveled between 2.2 and 3.2 km/s. Crucially, these experiments showed variability in the fragmentation in terms of the number of fragments at the leading edge of the fragment field, indicating that both single and multiple shock impacts could be imparted to the target material. As a result, these types of data are critical for safety experiments and hydrocode simulations to quantify shock-to-detonation transition mechanisms and the associated risk-margins for these materials.« less

  7. Characterization of hypervelocity metal fragments for explosive initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeager, John D.; Bowden, Patrick R.; Guildenbecher, Daniel R.; Olles, Joseph D.

    2017-07-01

    The fragment impact response of two plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) formulations was studied using explosively driven aluminum fragments. A generic aluminum-capped detonator generated sub-mm aluminum particles moving at hypersonic velocities. The ability of these fragments to initiate reaction or otherwise damage two PBX materials was assessed using go/no-go experiments at standoff distances of up to 160 mm. Lower density PBX 9407 (RDX-based) was initiable at up to 115 mm, while higher density PBX 9501 (HMX-based) was only initiable at up to 6 mm. Several techniques were used to characterize the size, distribution, and velocity of the particles. Witness plate materials, including copper and polycarbonate, and backlit high speed video were used to characterize the distribution of particles, finding that the aluminum cap did not fragment homogeneously but rather with larger particles in a ring surrounding finer particles. Finally, precise digital holography experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional shape and size of the fastest-moving fragments, which ranged between 100 and 700 μm and traveled between 2.2 and 3.2 km/s. Crucially, these experiments showed variability in the fragmentation in terms of the number of fragments at the leading edge of the fragment field, indicating that both single and multiple shock impacts could be imparted to the target material. These types of data are critical for safety experiments and hydrocode simulations to quantify shock-to-detonation transition mechanisms and the associated risk-margins for these materials.

  8. Advanced Techniques for Analyzing Dynamic Fragments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    example, the fragments produced behind target plates have been recovered by stopping them in celotex and the masses of the fragments and their...alternative method to capturing the fragments in celotex is to capture images of the fragments in flight on film by pulsing orthogonal X-ray tubes at known

  9. Considerations of Protein Subpockets in Fragment-Based Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Bartolowits, Matthew; Davisson, V Jo

    2016-01-01

    While the fragment-based drug design approach continues to gain importance, gaps in the tools and methods available in the identification and accurate utilization of protein subpockets have limited the scope. The importance of these features of small molecule-protein recognition is highlighted with several examples. A generalized solution for the identification of subpockets and corresponding chemical fragments remains elusive, but there are numerous advancements in methods that can be used in combination to address subpockets. Finally, additional examples of approaches that consider the relative importance of small-molecule co-dependence of protein conformations are highlighted to emphasize an increased significance of subpockets, especially at protein interfaces.

  10. A thermodynamic theory of dynamic fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Yew, Ching H.; Taylor, P.A.

    1993-08-01

    We present a theory of dynamic fragmentation of brittle materials based on thermodynamic arguments. We recover the expressions for average fragment size and number as originally derived by Grady. We extend the previous work by obtaining descriptions of fragment size distribution and compressibility change due to the fragmentation process. The size distribution is assumed to be proportional to the spectral power of the strain history and a sample distribution is presented for a fragmentation process corresponding to a constant rate strain history. The description of compressibility change should be useful in computational studies of fragmentation. These results should provide insight into the process of fragmentation of brittle materials from hypervelocity impact.

  11. Metapopulation persistence in random fragmented landscapes.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Jacopo; Barabás, György; Allesina, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    Habitat destruction and land use change are making the world in which natural populations live increasingly fragmented, often leading to local extinctions. Although local populations might undergo extinction, a metapopulation may still be viable as long as patches of suitable habitat are connected by dispersal, so that empty patches can be recolonized. Thus far, metapopulations models have either taken a mean-field approach, or have modeled empirically-based, realistic landscapes. Here we show that an intermediate level of complexity between these two extremes is to consider random landscapes, in which the patches of suitable habitat are randomly arranged in an area (or volume). Using methods borrowed from the mathematics of Random Geometric Graphs and Euclidean Random Matrices, we derive a simple, analytic criterion for the persistence of the metapopulation in random fragmented landscapes. Our results show how the density of patches, the variability in their value, the shape of the dispersal kernel, and the dimensionality of the landscape all contribute to determining the fate of the metapopulation. Using this framework, we derive sufficient conditions for the population to be spatially localized, such that spatially confined clusters of patches act as a source of dispersal for the whole landscape. Finally, we show that a regular arrangement of the patches is always detrimental for persistence, compared to the random arrangement of the patches. Given the strong parallel between metapopulation models and contact processes, our results are also applicable to models of disease spread on spatial networks.

  12. Preliminary insights into a model for mafic magma fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matt; Pioli, Laura; Andronico, Daniele; Cristaldi, Antonio; Scollo, Simona

    2017-04-01

    phase durations obtained from the network of fixed INGV cameras, early insight into possible links between fragmentation and eruption conditions are identified. A link between fragmentation and magma properties is also examined. We discuss the relationship between the conventional and new analytical methods and their potential in unraveling key information on the fragmentation process and analyse how the dataset on the May eruption can be modelled with the current fragmentation theories. Finally, we suggest the systematic use of a comprehensive TGSD dataset to develop a fragmentation model for mafic eruptions.

  13. The Fragmentation of Literary Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Syllabi from some 20 colleges and universities were reviewed with prominent English and literature departments and a discussion was held with a number of professors who teach literary theory. It is suggested that devolution and fragmentation of theory might be a survival strategy, an adaptation to the new realties of academic institutions.

  14. Economical technique for fragmentation testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. H., III; Snoke, B. A.

    1974-01-01

    Automatic rifle was modified for remote, single-shot use. To simulate statistically--determined fragment size from rocket-motor casing blunt-nosed bullet was made of same alloy. Cartridge was loaded with enough powder to make bullet reach target at same estimated velocity as shrapnel from rocket casing.

  15. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting 230,232Th and 235,238U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for 230,232Th and 235,238U are around 0.7-0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  16. Controlled Dynamic Fragmentation of Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-14

    mechanism determining ballistic impact performance of ceramic armors as well as reliability of gun barrels. This program, which was sponsored by the...Research Office Fragmentation is a key damage mechanism determining ballistic impact performance of ceramic armors as well as reliability of gun ...the defect distributions that were considered (Weibull, Gauss and Uniform) fall on a single universal curve. Sdf

  17. Percolative fragmentation and spontaneous agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, R.; Davis, K.

    1999-03-01

    Captive particle imaging experiments were performed on over 200 coal and char particles in the pulverized size range from four coals of various rank at oxygen concentration from 3--19 mol% and at gas temperatures of about 1250 K. Despite wide variations in single-particle behavior, the data set reveals two clear trends that provide new information on the nature of char combustion. First, the low-rank coal chars are observed to maintain their high reactivity through the late stages of combustion, thus avoiding the near-extinction events and long burnout tails observed for bituminous coal chars. Secondly, percolative fragmentation in the late stages of combustion is a rare event under these conditions. Some particles reach a percolation threshold rate in combustion, but typically undergo spontaneous agglomeration rather than liberation of the incipient fragments. It is concluded that percolative fragmentation behavior in the pulverized size range is determined not only by solid-phase connectivity, but also by a real competition between disruptive and cohesive forces present at the time of formation of the colloidal-sized incipient fragments.

  18. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  19. Isospin dependence of fragment spectra in heavy/super-heavy colliding nuclei at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Chugh, Rajiv Kumar, Rohit; Vinayak, Karan Singh

    2016-05-06

    Using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) approach, we performed a theoretical investigation of the evolution of various kinds of fragments in heavy and superheavy-ion reactions in the intermediate/medium energy domain. We demonstrated direct impact of symmetry energy and Coulomb interactions on the evolution of fragments. Final fragment spectra (yields) obtained from the analysis of various heavy/super-heavy ion reactions at different reaction conditions show high sensitivity towards Coulomb interactions and less significant sensitivity to symmetry energy forms. No inconsistent pattern of fragment structure is obtained in case of super-heavy ion involved reactions for all the parameterizations of density dependence of symmetry energy.

  20. Experimental Volcanology: Fragmentation and Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieler, O.

    2005-12-01

    An increasing number of scientists design new experiments to analyse processes that control the dynamics of explosive eruptions. There research is mostly coupled to numerical models and aims toward its controlling parameters. The fragmentation process, its threshold and the speed of the fragmentation wave as well as the energy consumed by the fragmentation are some hot spots of the experimental volcanology. Analysing the fragmentation behaviour of volcaniclastics as close to the natural system as possible, we found a number of physical constrains. Identifying the porosity as determining factor of the threshold, we realised that neither threshold nor the speed of the fragmentation process are solely controlled by the rock density. The later results of the shock tube type apparatus lead to the analysis of the specific surface area and permeability as direct links to textural features. Permeability analysis performed in a modified shock tube type apparatus, show two clear, distinct trends for dome rock and pyroclastic samples. The specific surface determined by Argon sorbtion (BET) as well as textural features of pumices from Campi Flegrei, Montserrat and Krakatoa (1883) give in contrary evidence of a more complex story. Large spherical, or ellipsoidal bubbles around fractured crystals prove that the high permeability of the pumice has partially developed after the fixing of the bubble size distribution. This puts up the question, if permeability measurements on pyroclastic samples reveal relevant numbers! The surface tension controlled 'self sealing' behaviour of surfaces from foaming obsidian hinders in situ measurements. Close textural investigations will have to clarify how the 'post process' samples deviate from the syneruptive conduit filling.

  1. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, Kevin R.

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  2. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    DeTar, Carleton

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  3. DNA fragment editing of genomes by CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Jinhuan, Li; Jia, Shou; Qiang, Wu

    2015-10-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) system from bacteria and archaea emerged recently as a new powerful technology of genome editing in virtually any organism. Due to its simplicity and cost effectiveness, a revolutionary change of genetics has occurred. Here, we summarize the recent development of DNA fragment editing methods by CRISPR/Cas9 and describe targeted DNA fragment deletions, inversions, duplications, insertions, and translocations. The efficient method of DNA fragment editing provides a powerful tool for studying gene function, regulatory elements, tissue development, and disease progression. Finally, we discuss the prospects of CRISPR/Cas9 system and the potential applications of other types of CRISPR system.

  4. Computational approaches for fragment-based and de novo design.

    PubMed

    Loving, Kathryn; Alberts, Ian; Sherman, Woody

    2010-01-01

    Fragment-based and de novo design strategies have been used in drug discovery for years. The methodologies for these strategies are typically discussed separately, yet the applications of these techniques overlap substantially. We present a review of various fragment-based discovery and de novo design protocols with an emphasis on successful applications in real-world drug discovery projects. Furthermore, we illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches and discuss how one method can be used to complement another. We also discuss how the incorporation of experimental data as constraints in computational models can produce novel compounds that occupy unique areas in intellectual property (IP) space yet are biased toward the desired chemical property space. Finally, we present recent research results suggesting that computational tools applied to fragment-based discovery and de novo design can have a greater impact on the discovery process when coupled with the right experiments.

  5. Fragmentation

    Treesearch

    K.H. Riitters

    2009-01-01

    Effective resource management takes into account the administrative and biophysical settings within which natural resources occur. A setting may be described in many ways; for example, by forest land ownership, by reserved and roadless designation, or by the distribution of human populations in relation to forest (chapter 3). The physical arrangement of forest in a...

  6. Fragments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    This performance autoethnography shows the author's struggle in finding his place, scholarship, voice, and body, into the academic setting. Mixing together memories of his lived experience with sugar cane workers, notes, and leftovers of different fieldworks, plus 6 years of life as grad student at the University of Illinois, the author looks for…

  7. Fragments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    This performance autoethnography shows the author's struggle in finding his place, scholarship, voice, and body, into the academic setting. Mixing together memories of his lived experience with sugar cane workers, notes, and leftovers of different fieldworks, plus 6 years of life as grad student at the University of Illinois, the author looks for…

  8. Fragments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Lowery

    Based on experiences growing out of a high school course on visual education, exercise cards are presented which are concerned with the boundaries of experience. They may act as preparation and stimulus for traditional art classes. The activities are divided into groups of enduring activities: mapping, representing; sensory awareness; inner…

  9. Analytical and experimental evaluation of a proposed self-forging fragment munition

    SciTech Connect

    Tuft, D.B.; Folsom, E.N.

    1982-12-27

    Analytical and experimental tools have been used to study the formation of a proposed self-forging fragment projectile. The primary objective of this study is the determination of the interior and exterior shape of the fully formed fragment, and to determine if the fragment tumbles in flight. In addition, it is of interest to compare computer predictions to experimental results. An experiment was performed using high speed photography and high-energy flash x-ray radiography to study liner and case motion and projectile formation. Fabrication and assembly tolerances were closely controlled in an effort to eliminate tolerances as a possible source of fragment instability. X-ray film-density contours were analyzed to determine the fully formed fragment interior and exterior shape. Down-range yaw screens showed fragment tumbling in flight. The computed fragment shape was compared to experimental results and it was found that a retaining ring in the computational model near the liner periphery had a significant effect on the final computed fragment shape. With the retaining ring in the computational model and full two-way sliding between all material interfaces, the final computed fragment showed very good agreement with the experiment on both exterior and interior shapes.

  10. Evolution of Particle Size Distributions in Fragmentation Over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new model of fragmentation based on a probabilistic calculation of the repeated fracture of a particle population. The resulting continuous solution, which is in closed form, gives the evolution of fragmentation products from an initial block, through a scale-invariant power-law relationship to a final comminuted powder. Models for the fragmentation of particles have been developed separately in mainly two different disciplines: the continuous integro-differential equations of batch mineral grinding (Reid, 1965) and the fractal analysis of geophysics (Turcotte, 1986) based on a discrete model with a single probability of fracture. The first gives a time-dependent development of the particle-size distribution, but has resisted a closed-form solution, while the latter leads to the scale-invariant power laws, but with no time dependence. Bird (2009) recently introduced a bridge between these two approaches with a step-wise iterative calculation of the fragmentation products. The development of the particle-size distribution occurs with discrete steps: during each fragmentation event, the particles will repeatedly fracture probabilistically, cascading down the length scales to a final size distribution reached after all particles have failed to further fragment. We have identified this process as the equivalent to a sequence of trials for each particle with a fixed probability of fragmentation. Although the resulting distribution is discrete, it can be reformulated as a continuous distribution in maturity over time and particle size. In our model, Turcotte's power-law distribution emerges at a unique maturation index that defines a regime boundary. Up to this index, the fragmentation is in an erosional regime with the initial particle size setting the scaling. Fragmentation beyond this index is in a regime of comminution with rebreakage of the particles down to the size limit of fracture. The maturation index can increment continuously, for example under

  11. Relativistic heavy ion fragmentation at HISS (Heavy Ion Spectrometer System)

    SciTech Connect

    Tull, C.E.

    1990-10-01

    An experiment was conducted at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to measure projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions. Charge identification was obtained by the use of a Cerenkov Hodoscope operating above the threshold for total internal reflection, while velocity measurement was performed by use of a second set of Cerenkov radiators operating at the threshold for total internal reflection. Charge and mass resolution for the system was {sigma}{sub Z} = 0.2 e and {sigma}{sub A} = 0.2 u. Measurements of the elemental and isotopic production cross sections for the fragmentation of {sup 40}Ar at 1.65{center dot}A GeV have been compared with an Abrasion-Ablation Model based on the evaporation computer code GEMINI. The model proves to be an accurate predictor of the cross sections for fragments between Chlorine and Boron. The measured cross section were reproduced using simple geometry with charge dispersions induced by zero-point vibrations of the giant dipole resonance for the prompt abrasion stage, and injecting an excitation energy spectrum based on a final state interaction with scaling factor E{sub fsi} = 38.8 MeV/c. Measurement of the longitudinal momentum distribution widths for projectile fragments are consistent with previous experiment and can be interpreted as reflecting the Fermi momentum distribution in the initial projectile nucleus. Measurement of the transverse momentum indicate an additional, unexplained dependence of the reduced momentum widths on fragment mass. This dependence has the same sign and similar slope to previously measured fragments of {sup 139}La, and to predictions based on phase-space constraints on the final state of the system.

  12. Contribution of rock fragments to soil fertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korboulewsky, Nathalie; Besnault, Adeline; Tétégan, Marion; Cousin, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    other types. Indeed limestones, compared to chert and flint, contained 20 times higher exchangeable Ca (2.3 g Ca/kg for limestones compared to 0.08 and 0.03 g Ca/kg for chert and flint) and 7 to 10 times higher Mg (19.3g Mg/kg for limestones compared to 2.7 and 1.7 g Mg/kg for chert and flint). Potassium showed a completely different trend with the highest exchangeable K found for chert and marly limestone, intermediate levels for lithographic limestone and flint, and lowest levels for oolitic limestone. In addition, whatever the pebble origin, calcium was the element the most released. Limestones released more Mg than K, and chert and flint more K than Mg. Further, released exchangeable Ca and Mg were closely related to the dry mass of pebbles, but exchangeable K was not. As mentioned above, much more cations were extracted from limestones compared to chert and flint. Besides, chert released twice as much as flint for the three cations. Finally, the fertilisation potential of these pebbles and especially limestones is far to be negligible. For instance, the exchangeable Ca, Mg and K released from lithographic pebbles represent respectively about 50%, 20% and 10% of those released from the surrounding fine earth. These results confirm the potential contribution of rock fragments to soil fertility. Furthermore, important differences in exchangeable cations in relation to their origin were measured. Further analyses are being carried out on pebbles from other origins and on available phosphorus. We believe that this work is a first step towards a better understanding of the role of rock fragments in plant-soil relationships.

  13. Detecting Fragmentation Extinction Thresholds for Forest Understory Plant Species in Peninsular Spain

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Marta; Moreno Saiz, Juan Carlos; Morales-Castilla, Ignacio; Albuquerque, Fabio S.; Ferrero, Mila; Rodríguez, Miguel Á.

    2015-01-01

    Ecological theory predicts that fragmentation aggravates the effects of habitat loss, yet empirical results show mixed evidences, which fail to support the theory instead reinforcing the primary importance of habitat loss. Fragmentation hypotheses have received much attention due to their potential implications for biodiversity conservation, however, animal studies have traditionally been their main focus. Here we assess variation in species sensitivity to forest amount and fragmentation and evaluate if fragmentation is related to extinction thresholds in forest understory herbs and ferns. Our expectation was that forest herbs would be more sensitive to fragmentation than ferns due to their lower dispersal capabilities. Using forest cover percentage and the proportion of this percentage occurring in the largest patch within UTM cells of 10-km resolution covering Peninsular Spain, we partitioned the effects of forest amount versus fragmentation and applied logistic regression to model occurrences of 16 species. For nine models showing robustness according to a set of quality criteria we subsequently defined two empirical fragmentation scenarios, minimum and maximum, and quantified species’ sensitivity to forest contraction with no fragmentation, and to fragmentation under constant forest cover. We finally assessed how the extinction threshold of each species (the habitat amount below which it cannot persist) varies under no and maximum fragmentation. Consistent with their preference for forest habitats probability occurrences of all species decreased as forest cover contracted. On average, herbs did not show significant sensitivity to fragmentation whereas ferns were favored. In line with theory, fragmentation yielded higher extinction thresholds for two species. For the remaining species, fragmentation had either positive or non-significant effects. We interpret these differences as reflecting species-specific traits and conclude that although forest amount is of

  14. Detecting fragmentation extinction thresholds for forest understory plant species in peninsular Spain.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Marta; Moreno Saiz, Juan Carlos; Morales-Castilla, Ignacio; Albuquerque, Fabio S; Ferrero, Mila; Rodríguez, Miguel Á

    2015-01-01

    Ecological theory predicts that fragmentation aggravates the effects of habitat loss, yet empirical results show mixed evidences, which fail to support the theory instead reinforcing the primary importance of habitat loss. Fragmentation hypotheses have received much attention due to their potential implications for biodiversity conservation, however, animal studies have traditionally been their main focus. Here we assess variation in species sensitivity to forest amount and fragmentation and evaluate if fragmentation is related to extinction thresholds in forest understory herbs and ferns. Our expectation was that forest herbs would be more sensitive to fragmentation than ferns due to their lower dispersal capabilities. Using forest cover percentage and the proportion of this percentage occurring in the largest patch within UTM cells of 10-km resolution covering Peninsular Spain, we partitioned the effects of forest amount versus fragmentation and applied logistic regression to model occurrences of 16 species. For nine models showing robustness according to a set of quality criteria we subsequently defined two empirical fragmentation scenarios, minimum and maximum, and quantified species' sensitivity to forest contraction with no fragmentation, and to fragmentation under constant forest cover. We finally assessed how the extinction threshold of each species (the habitat amount below which it cannot persist) varies under no and maximum fragmentation. Consistent with their preference for forest habitats probability occurrences of all species decreased as forest cover contracted. On average, herbs did not show significant sensitivity to fragmentation whereas ferns were favored. In line with theory, fragmentation yielded higher extinction thresholds for two species. For the remaining species, fragmentation had either positive or non-significant effects. We interpret these differences as reflecting species-specific traits and conclude that although forest amount is of

  15. An Enumerative Combinatorics Model for Fragmentation Patterns in RNA Sequencing Provides Insights into Nonuniformity of the Expected Fragment Starting-Point and Coverage Profile

    PubMed Central

    Haeseler, Arndt Von

    2017-01-01

    Abstract RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has emerged as the method of choice for measuring the expression of RNAs in a given cell population. In most RNA-seq technologies, sequencing the full length of RNA molecules requires fragmentation into smaller pieces. Unfortunately, the issue of nonuniform sequencing coverage across a genomic feature has been a concern in RNA-seq and is attributed to biases for certain fragments in RNA-seq library preparation and sequencing. To investigate the expected coverage obtained from fragmentation, we develop a simple fragmentation model that is independent of bias from the experimental method and is not specific to the transcript sequence. Essentially, we enumerate all configurations for maximal placement of a given fragment length, F, on transcript length, T, to represent every possible fragmentation pattern, from which we compute the expected coverage profile across a transcript. We extend this model to incorporate general empirical attributes such as read length, fragment length distribution, and number of molecules of the transcript. We further introduce the fragment starting-point, fragment coverage, and read coverage profiles. We find that the expected profiles are not uniform and that factors such as fragment length to transcript length ratio, read length to fragment length ratio, fragment length distribution, and number of molecules influence the variability of coverage across a transcript. Finally, we explore a potential application of the model where, with simulations, we show that it is possible to correctly estimate the transcript copy number for any transcript in the RNA-seq experiment. PMID:27661099

  16. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: Approximately twice as efficient if one can directly convert the fission fragment energy into electricity; by reducing the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor one could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collecting the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Petrology of some lithic fragments from Luna 20

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1973-01-01

    Microscopic and electron microprobe studies were made of polished thin sections of part of a 30-mg sample of 250-500 ??m lunar soil returned by Luna 20 from a point between Mare Fecunditatis and Mare Crisium. Very fine-grained lithic (crystalline) rock fragments, composing about one fifth of the total sample, have mineralogical compositions equivalent to various types of gabbro, anorthositic gabbro, gabbroic anorthosite and troctolite, with minor basalt. The textures now observed in these fragments are in large part metamorphic. Twentyseven electron microprobe analyses of minerals from these fragments are presented, including olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, spinel, nickel-iron and a Zr-Ti-REE mineral possibly similar to 'phase B' of Lovering and Wark (1971). Analyses of seven melt inclusions and twenty-eight defocused beam analyses of lithic fragments are also given. Some of the fragments contain 'gas' inclusions which, along with the fine grain size, are believed to indicate final crystallization under low pressure near surface conditions. The almost complete absence of granophyric material in this sample raises the question of whether or not there are at least two distinct magmas for the plagioclase-rich terrae rocks from which this soil sample was derived in part. ?? 1973.

  18. Petrology of some lithic fragments from Luna 20.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Microscopic and electron microprobe studies were made of polished thin sections of part of a 30-mg sample of 250- to 500-micron lunar soil returned by Luna 20 from a point between Mare Fecunditatis and Mare Crisium. Very fine-grained lithic (crystalline) rock fragments, composing about one-fifth of the total sample, have mineralogical compositions equivalent to various types of gabbro, anorthositic gabbro, gabbroic anorthosite, and troctolite, with minor basalt. The textures now observed in these fragments are in large part metamorphic. Twenty-seven electron microprobe analyses of minerals from these fragments are presented, including olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, spinel, nickel-iron, and a Zr-Ti-REE mineral possibly similar to 'phase B' of Lovering and Wark (1971). Analyses of seven melt inclusions and 28 defocused beam analyses of lithic fragments are also given. Some of the fragments contain 'gas' inclusions which, along with the fine grain size, are believed to indicate final crystallization under low pressure near surface conditions.

  19. Stabbing simulations and DNA transfer.

    PubMed

    Samie, Lydie; Hicks, Tacha; Castella, Vincent; Taroni, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Technical developments have made it possible to analyze very low amounts of DNA. This has many advantages, but the drawback of this technological progress is that interpretation of the results becomes increasingly complex: the number of mixed DNA profiles increased relatively to single source DNA profiles and stochastic effects in the DNA profile, such as drop-in and drop-out, are more frequently observed. Moreover, the relevance of low template DNA material regarding the activities alleged is not as straightforward as it was a few years ago, when for example large quantities of blood were recovered. The possibility of secondary and tertiary transfer is now becoming an issue. The purpose of this research is twofold: first, to study the transfer of DNA from the handler and secondly, to observe if handlers would transfer DNA from persons closely connected to them. We chose to mimic cases where the offender would attack a person with a knife. As a first approach, we envisaged that the defense would not give an alternative explanation for the origin of the DNA. In our transfer experiments (4 donors, 16 experiments each, 64 traces), 3% of the traces were single DNA profiles. Most of the time, the DNA profile of the person handling the knife was present as the major profile: in 83% of the traces the major contributor profile corresponded to the stabber's DNA profile (in single stains and mixtures). Mixture with no clear major/minor fraction (12%) were observed. 5% of the traces were considered of insufficient quality (more than 3 contributors, presence of a few minor peaks). In that case, we considered that the stabber's DNA was absent. In our experiments, no traces allowed excluding the stabber, however it must be noted that precautions were taken to minimize background DNA as knives were cleaned before the experiments. DNA profiles of the stabber's colleagues were not observed. We hope that this study will allow for a better understanding of the transfer mechanism and of how to assess and describe results given activity level propositions. In this preliminary research, we have focused on the transfer of DNA on the hand of the person. Besides, more research is needed to assign the probability of the results given an alternative activity proposed by the defense, for instance when the source of the DNA is not contested, but that the activities are.

  20. A penetrating orbitocranial stab wound.

    PubMed Central

    MacEwen, C J; Fullarton, G

    1986-01-01

    An unusual case of intracranial penetration of a bread knife through the orbit is described. Despite the proximity of the blade to the internal carotids, the optic nerves and chiasm, and the pituitary the patient survived with only a minimal field defect affecting the eye opposite to the entry site; otherwise no neurological or endocrine deficit was evident. Images PMID:3947613

  1. A Stab in the Dark?

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Test the influence of darkness in the street robbery crime event alongside temperature. Methods: Negative binomial regression models tested darkness and temperature as predictors of street robbery. Units of analysis were four 6-hr time intervals in two U.K. study areas that have different levels of darkness and variations of temperature throughout the year. Results: Darkness is a key factor related to robbery events in both study areas. Traversing from full daylight to full darkness increased the predicted volume of robbery by a multiple of 2.6 in London and 1.2 in Glasgow. Temperature was significant only in the London study area. Interaction terms did not enhance the predictive power of the models. Conclusion: Darkness is an important driving factor in seasonal variation of street robbery. A further implication of the research is that time of the day patterns are crucial to understanding seasonal trends in crime data. PMID:25076797

  2. Golgi fragmentation in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Gunjan; Bekier, Michael E.; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2015-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is an essential cellular organelle for post-translational modifications, sorting, and trafficking of membrane and secretory proteins. Proper functionality of the Golgi requires the formation of its unique cisternal-stacking morphology. The Golgi structure is disrupted in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting a common mechanism and contribution of Golgi defects in neurodegenerative disorders. A recent study on Alzheimer's disease (AD) revealed that phosphorylation of the Golgi stacking protein GRASP65 disrupts its function in Golgi structure formation, resulting in Golgi fragmentation. Inhibiting GRASP65 phosphorylation restores the Golgi morphology from Aβ-induced fragmentation and reduces Aβ production. Perturbing Golgi structure and function in neurons may directly impact trafficking, processing, and sorting of a variety of proteins essential for synaptic and dendritic integrity. Therefore, Golgi defects may ultimately promote the development of AD. In the current review, we focus on the cellular impact of impaired Golgi morphology and its potential relationship to AD disease development. PMID:26441511

  3. Workflow Design Using Fragment Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, Sébastien; Blay-Fornarino, Mireille; France, Robert

    The Service-Oriented Architecture (Soa) paradigm supports the assembly of atomic services to create applications that implement complex business processes. Assembly can be accomplished by service orchestrations defined by Soa architects. The Adore method allows Soa architects to model complex orchestrations of services by composing models of smaller orchestrations called orchestration fragments. The Adore method can also be used to weave fragments that address new concerns into existing application models. In this paper we illustrate how the Adore method can be used to separate and compose process aspects in a Soa design of the Car Crash Crisis Management System. The paper also includes a discussion of the benefits and limitations of the Adore method.

  4. Fragmentation of suddenly heated liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Blink, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    Fragmentation of free liquids in Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors could determine the upper bound on reactor pulse rate. The x-ray ablated materials must cool and recondense to allow driver beam propagation. The increased surface area caused by fragmentation will enhance the cooling and condensation rates. Relaxation from the suddenly heated state will move a liquid into the negative pressure region under the liquid-vapor P-V dome. The lithium equation of state was used to demonstrate that neutron-induced vaporization uses only a minor fraction of the added heat, much less than would be required to drive the expansion. A 77% expansion of the lithium is required before the rapid vaporization process of spinodal decomposition could begin, and nucleation and growth are too slow to contribute to the expansion.

  5. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-01

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping Atotal fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of 197Au+27Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  6. Approaches to rotor fragment protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oconnor, M. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Key airworthiness design criteria considerations for fragment protection as found in various FAA requirements in FAR Parts 25 and 33, and in interpretive 8110 orders are reviewed. The impact of providing aircraft armor in lieu of engine armor for typical three- and four-engine wide bodied transports for protection within the length of the engine case as well as from fragments exiting ahead of the enlet engine inlet flange is assessed. For protection within the length of the engine case, armor weight penalties, plus fuel burned and dollar cost of carrying the armor protection are defined. Immediately ahead of the inlet flange, direct tangential impacts are predominant, but further forward, rebound impacts predominate. Armor thickness requirements and fuel cost impact of protection are given.

  7. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-06

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping At{sub otal} fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of {sup 197}Au+{sup 27}Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  8. Fragmentation in the biopharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Andrew D; Varela, Francisco E

    2017-02-01

    The large number of biopharmaceutical mergers and acquisitions (M&A) that occurred over the past decade has generated questions about whether the industry is consolidating around too-few players, negatively impacting both the number of medicines developed and overall innovation. However, closer examination of the level of biopharmaceutical consolidation by prescription sales shows that the industry was more fragmented in 2015 than in 2003. The trend towards increasing fragmentation is also observed across noncommercial and independent metrics over the same time period. The number and size of M&A deals has masked an active and competitive marketplace in which market growth and the number of companies entering the market exceeded the apparent reduction in the number of players caused by acquisitions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The fragmentation of Kosmos 2163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    On 6 Dec. 1991 Kosmos 2163, a maneuverable Soviet spacecraft which had been in orbit for 58 days, experienced a major breakup at an altitude of approximately 210 km. Although numerous pieces of debris were created, the fragments decayed rapidly leaving no long-term impact on the near-Earth environment. The assessed cause of the event is the deliberate detonation of an explosive device. Details of this event are presented.

  10. Fragmentation: Is the message clear?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bissonette, J.A.; Storch, Ilse

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we briefly discuss some of the fundamental problems arising from the inherent complexity of larger-scale ecological systems. We examine the tenuous assumption of a direct correspondence between ecological data and theory, we comment on a recent report that evaluated the efficacy of fragmentation experiments, and we briefly assess its implications for ecological research and conservation practice on the landscape scale. Copyright ?? 2002 by the author(s). Published here under licence by The Resilience Alliance.

  11. Fragmentation: Is the message clear?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bissonnette, J.A.; Storch, Ilse

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we briefly discuss some of the fundamental problems arising from the inherent complexity of larger-scale ecological systems. We examine the tenuous assumption of a direct correspondence between ecological data and theory, we comment on a recent report that evaluated the efficacy of fragmentation experiments, and we briefly assess its implications for ecological research and conservation practice on the landscape scale.

  12. Fragment Penetration Tests of Armor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-15

    Identify by block numbhr) Provides techniques for evaluating armor resistance to attack by HE projectile fragments. Includes static detonations of shell...DISTRIBUTION D. REFERENCES * . . . ........ . ........... D-1 1. SCOPE. This TOP describes the available techniques for testing armor for resistance to attack by...Projectiles Against Armor Plates ("Yankee Stadium" Test-). 4.1.1 hCjective. The objective is to determine the resistance to penetration of various armor

  13. Modeling of Fragmentation of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Carlozzi, Alexander; Hart, Kenneth; Bryson, Katie; Sears, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand fragmentation and fracture of a given asteroid and mechanisms of break-up. The focus of the present work is to develop modeling techniques for stony asteroids in 10m-100m range to answer two questions: 1) What is the role of material makeup of an asteroid in the stress distribution? 2)How is stress distribution altered in the presence of pre-existing defects?

  14. Injecting asteroid fragments into resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farinella, Paolo; Gonczi, R.; Froeschle, Christiane; Froeschle, Claude

    1992-01-01

    We have quantitatively modeled the chance insertion of asteroid collisional fragments into the 3:1 and g = g(sub 6) resonances, through which they can achieve Earth-approaching orbits. Although the results depend on some poorly known parameters, they indicate that most meteorites and near-earth asteroids probably come from a small and non-representative sample of asteroids, located in the neighborhood of the two resonances.

  15. Shattering transitions in collision-induced fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Ben-Naim, E.

    2003-08-01

    We investigate the kinetics of nonlinear collision-induced fragmentation. We obtain the fragment mass distribution analytically by utilizing its traveling wave behavior. The system undergoes a shattering transition in which a finite fraction of the mass is lost to infinitesimal fragments (dust). The nature of the shattering transition depends on the fragmentation process. When the larger of the two colliding fragments splits, the transition is discontinuous and the entire mass is transformed into dust at the transition point. When the smaller fragment splits, the transition is continuous with the dust gaining mass steadily on the account of the fragments. At the transition point, the fragment mass distribution diverges algebraically for small masses, c(m)˜m-α, with α=1.201 91… .

  16. Comparison of calculations of fragment production

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    This note compares estimates of fragment production rates in debris collisions through calculations performed with consistent debris distribution functions implicit in integrated collision frequencies provided by Attachment A. Differences between estimates of fragment production rates in space debris collisions are shown to be due primarily to different choices of the exponent in the fragment production function and the distinction between catastrophic and all collisions. Sensitivity to the fragment production parameter over the range of values consistent with experimental data is discussed.

  17. Evaluating Fragment Construction Policies for SDT Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    allocates a fragment and begins translation. Once a termination condition is met, Strata emits any trampolines that are necessary. Trampolines are pieces... trampolines (unless its target previously exists in the fragment cache). Once a CTI’s target instruction becomes available in the fragment cache, the CTI is...linked directly to the destination, avoiding future uses of the trampoline . This mechanism is called Fragment Linking and avoids significant overhead

  18. Fragmentation of cosmic-string loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    The fragmentation of cosmic string loops is discussed, and the results of a simulation of this process are presented. The simulation can evolve any of a large class of loops essentially exactly, including allowing fragments that collide to join together. Such reconnection enhances the production of small fragments, but not drastically. With or without reconnections, the fragmentation process produces a collection of nonself-intersecting loops whose typical length is on the order of the persistence length of the initial loop.

  19. Global-scale patterns of forest fragmentation

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; James D. Wickham; R. O' Neill; B. Jones; E. Smith

    2000-01-01

    We report an analysis of forest fragmentation based on 1-km resolution land-cover maps for the globe. Measurements in analysis windows from 81 km 2 (9 x 9 pixels, "small" scale) to 59,049 km 2 (243 x 243 pixels, "large" scale) were used to characterize the fragmentation around each forested pixel. We identified six categories of fragmentation (...

  20. Modelling rock fragmentation of Extremely Energetic Rockfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Blasio, Fabio; Dattola, Giuseppe; Battista Crosta, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Extremely energetic rockfalls (EER) are phenomena for which the combination of a large volume (at least some thousands of m ) and a free fall height of hundreds of metres, results in a large released energy. We fix a threshold value of around 1/50 of kilotons to define such a type of events. Documented examples include several events with dif-ferent size in the Alps (Dru, 2005, 2011, 265,000, 59,200 m3; val Fiscalina - Cima Una, 2007, 40,000 m3; Thurwieser 2004, ca 2 Mm3; Cengalo, 2011, 1.5*105 m3 in 2016, in Switzerland; Civetta, 2013, ca 50,000 m3;), in the Apennines (Gran Sasso, 2006, 30,000 m3), Rocky Mountains (Yosemite, Happy Isles, 38,000 m3), and Himalaya. EERs may become more frequent on steep and sharp mountain peaks as a consequence of permafrost thawing at higher altitudes. In contrast to low energy rockfalls where block disintegration is limited, in EERs the impact after free fall causes an immediate and efficient release of energy much like an explosion. The severe disintegration of the rock and the corresponding air blast are capable of snapping trees many hundreds of metres ahead of the fall area. Pulverized rock at high speed can abrade tree logs, and the resulting suspension flow may travel much further the impact zone, blanketing vast surrounding areas. Using both published accounts of some of these events and collecting direct data for some of them, we present some basic models to describe the involved processes based on analogies with explosions and explosive fragmentation. Of the initial energy, one part is used up in the rock disintegration, and the rest is shared between the shock wave and air blast. The fragmentation energy is calculated based on the fitting of the dust size spectrum by using different proba-bilistic distribution laws and the definition of a surface energy and by considering the involved strain rate. We find the fragmentation is around one third of the initial boulder energy. Finally, we evaluate the velocity of the

  1. Plumes, orogenesis, and supercontinental fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalziel, I. W. D.; Lawver, L. A.; Murphy, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    A time-space relationship between large igneous provinces (LIPS), present day hot spots, and the fragmentation of Pangea has been documented over several decades, but the cause of fragmentation has remained elusive. LIPS are regarded either as the result of impingement of a mantle plume on the base of the lithosphere, or as the initial products of adiabatic decompression melting of anomalously hot mantle. Do LIPS therefore constitute evidence of an active role for plumes from the deep mantle in supercontinental fragmentation, or are they merely the first indications of a large-scale but near-surface tectonic process? Two long recognized and enigmatic orogenic events may offer a solution to this geologically important 'chicken or egg' conundrum. The reconstructed early Mesozoic Gondwanide fold belt of South America, southern Africa, and Antarctica, could have resulted from 'plume-modified orogeny', flattening of a downgoing lithospheric slab due to the buoyancy of a plume rising beneath a continental margin subduction zone. If so, the ˜180 Ma Karroo and Ferrar LIPS associated with the opening of the ocean basin between East and West Gondwanaland at ˜165 Ma resulted from impingement of this plume and are unrelated to the thermal insulation of the shallow mantle beneath Gondwanaland. It would then follow that the plume itself played an active, possibly critical, role in the initial breakup of the supercontinent. The Late Paleozoic 'Ancestral Rockies' deformation in the southwestern United States could be yet another example of orogeny driven by a plume that initiated the break-up of Pangea approximately 15 Myr earlier in the Central Atlantic region.

  2. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stinis, Panos

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  3. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, Gary E.

    2013-04-23

    This is the final report of a two year project entitled "Governing Nanotechnology Risks and Benefits in the Transition to Regulation: Innovative Public and Private Approaches." This project examined the role of new governance or "soft law" mechanisms such as codes of conduct, voluntary programs and partnership agreements to manage the risks of emerging technologies such as nanotechnology. A series of published or in publication papers and book chapters are attached.

  4. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Paul Drake

    2001-11-30

    This final report describes work involving 22 investigators from 11 institutions to explore the dynamics present in supernova explosions by means of experiments on the Omega laser. The specific experiments emphasized involved the unstable expansion of a spherical capsule and the coupling of perturbations at a first interface to a second interface by means of a strong shock. Both effects are present in supernovae. The experiments were performed at Omega and the computer simulations were undertaken at several institutions. B139

  5. Burried broken extraction instrument fragment

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite adequate effort to perform tooth removal carefully, some accidents may happen when defective instruments are unknowingly used. This article reports of a non-symptomatic case of a retained fractured dental elevator tip during an uneventful extraction a decade earlier. Patient was not aware till routine radiographic examination revealed its presence. Use of three dimensional imaging techniques in this case is highlighted. Rarely, instruments breakage may occur during surgical procedures. It is duty of the dentists to check the surgical instrument for signs of breakage and be prepared to solve a possible emergency. Retained fragments should be carefully studied prior to attempt of removal. PMID:23662269

  6. The Chemistry of Energetic Fragments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-15

    fragmentation reactions Cyc opentadienylidene anion radical 1,2-and 1,4-addition Phe v nitrene anion radical A& AN1V cr ecom,4 meses ad* ow neweemw an...8217 and1\\ h nitrene t_(A Ii,- were produ:dl in the PA and the ion-molecule chemistry of thee to peceswas determined. From the results of bracketing reactions...cyclopentadienyl anion (c-C5H5 ), and (c) phenyl- nitrene anion radical (PhN*). Our usual reaction conditions are helium as the buffer gas, PHe " 0.5

  7. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  8. Self-organized criticality in fragmenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddershede, Lene; Dimon, Peter; Bohr, Jakob

    1993-11-01

    The measured mass distributions of fragments from 26 fractured objects of gypsum, soap, stearic paraffin, and potato show evidence of obeying scaling laws; this suggests the possibility of self-organized criticality in fragmenting. The probability of finding a fragment scales inversely to a power of the mass; the power, or scaling exponent, was found to depend on the shape of the object rather than on the material. For objects of different shapes (balls, cubes, half cubes, plates, and bars) scaling was found for fragment sizes smaller than the smallest dimension of the object undergoing fragmentation.

  9. Ternary fission of nuclei into comparable fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2015-07-15

    The problem of nuclear fission into three comparable fragments is considered. A mechanism of true ternary fission is proposed. In contrast to sequential fission, where the three fragments arise upon two sequential events of binary fission, the mechanism in question relies on a scenario that originally involves fission into three fragments. This mechanism is driven by a hexadecapole deformation of the fissioning nucleus, in contrast to binary fission associated with quadrupole vibrations of the nuclear surface. The fragment-mass ratios are estimated. The dynamics of formation of collinear fragments and their subsequent motion in opposite directions is traced. The calculated probability of true ternary fission complies with observed values.

  10. Fragmentation alters stream fish community structure in dendritic ecological networks.

    PubMed

    Perkin, Joshuah S; Gido, Keith B

    2012-12-01

    Effects of fragmentation on the ecology of organisms occupying dendritic ecological networks (DENs) have recently been described through both conceptual and mathematical models, but few hypotheses have been tested in complex, real-world ecosystems. Stream fishes provide a model system for assessing effects of fragmentation on the structure of communities occurring within DENs, including how fragmentation alters metacommunity dynamics and biodiversity. A recently developed habitat-availability measure, the "dendritic connectivity index" (DCI), allows for assigning quantitative measures of connectivity in DENs regardless of network extent or complexity, and might be used to predict fish community response to fragmentation. We characterized stream fish community structure in 12 DENs in the Great Plains, USA, during periods of dynamic (summer) and muted (fall) discharge regimes to test the DCI as a predictive model of fish community response to fragmentation imposed by road crossings. Results indicated that fish communities in stream segments isolated by road crossings had reduced species richness (alpha diversity) relative to communities that maintained connectivity with the surrounding DEN during summer and fall. Furthermore, isolated communities had greater dissimilarity (beta diversity) to downstream sites notisolated by road crossings during summer and fall. Finally, dissimilarity among communities within DENs decreased as a function of increased habitat connectivity (measured using the DCI) for summer and fall, suggesting that communities within highly connected DENs tend to be more homogeneous. Our results indicate that the DCI is sensitive to community effects of fragmentation in riverscapes and might be used by managers to predict ecological responses to changes in habitat connectivity. Moreover, our findings illustrate that relating structural connectivity of riverscapes to functional connectivity among communities might aid in maintaining metacommunity

  11. Local Morphological Response of the Distal Femoral Articular–Epiphyseal Cartilage Complex of Young Foals to Surgical Stab Incision and Potential Relevance to Cartilage Injury and Repair in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Eli H.S.; Ekman, Stina; Carlson, Cathy S.; Dolvik, Nils I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Describe the local morphological response of the articular–epiphyseal cartilage complex to surgical stab incision in the distal femur of foals, with emphasis on the relationship between growth cartilage injury, enchondral ossification, and repair. Design: Nine foals were induced into general anesthesia at the age of 13 to 15 days. Four full-thickness stab incision defects were created in the cartilage on the lateral aspect of the lateral trochlear ridge of the left distal femur. Follow-up examination was carried out from 1 to 49 days postoperatively, including examination of intact bones, sawed slabs, and histological sections. Results: Incision defects filled with cells displaying fibroblast-, chondrocyte-, and osteoblast-like characteristics, potentially validating the rationale behind the drilling of stable juvenile osteochondritis dissecans lesions in children. Incisions induced necrosis within the cartilage on the margins at all depths of the defects. Sharp dissection may therefore be contraindicated in cartilage repair in young individuals. Incisions caused a focal delay in enchondral ossification in 2 foals, apparently related to the orientation of the incision defect relative to the direction of ossification. Defects became progressively surrounded by subchondral bone, in which granulation tissue containing clasts and foci of osteoblast-like cells was observed. Continued enchondral ossification was therefore likely to result in healing of uncomplicated defects to morphologically normal bone. Conclusions: Epiphyseal growth cartilage injury had the potential to exert a negative effect on enchondral ossification. Enchondral ossification exerted a beneficial effect on repair. This relationship warrants consideration in future studies of cartilage injury and repair within the articular–epiphyseal cartilage complex of all species. PMID:26069670

  12. Impact of numerical models on fragmentation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renouf, Mathieu; Gezahengn, Belien; Abbas, Micheline; Bourgeois, Florent

    2013-06-01

    Simulated fragmentation process in granular assemblies is a challenging problem which date back the beginning of the 90'. If first approaches have focus on the fragmentation on a single particle, with the development of robust, fast numerical method is is possible today to simulated such process in a large collection of particles. But the question of the fragmentation problem is still open: should the fragmentation be done dynamically (one particle becoming two fragments) and according which criterion or should the fragment paths be defined initially and which is the impact of the discretization and the model of fragments? The present contribution proposes to investigate the second aspect i.e. the impact of fragment modeling on the fragmentation processes. First to perform such an analysis, the geometry of fragments (disks/sphere or polygon/polyhedra), their behavior (rigid/deformable) and the law governing their interactions are investigated. Then such model will be used in a grinding application where the evolution of fragments and impact on the behavior of the whole packing are investigate.

  13. Heavy Ion Fragmentation Experiments at the Bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using the heavy-ion capability of the Bevatron were studied. The purpose was to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Attempts were also made to: (1) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (2) test the applicability of high-energy multi-particle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (3) apply the cross-section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (4) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross sections.

  14. Fragmentation in filamentary molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Yanett; Garay, Guido; Rathborne, Jill M.; Sanhueza, Patricio

    2016-02-01

    Recent surveys of dust continuum emission at sub-mm wavelengths have shown that filamentary molecular clouds are ubiquitous along the Galactic plane. These structures are inhomogeneous, with overdensities that are sometimes associated with infrared emission and active of star formation. To investigate the connection between filaments and star formation, requires an understanding of the processes that lead to the fragmentation of filaments and a determination of the physical properties of the overdensities (clumps). In this paper, we present a multiwavelength study of five filamentary molecular clouds, containing several clumps in different evolutionary stages of star formation. We analyse the fragmentation of the filaments and derive the physical properties of their clumps. We find that the clumps in all filaments have a characteristic spacing consistent with the prediction of the `sausage' instability theory, regardless of the complex morphology of the filaments or their evolutionary stage. We also find that most clumps have sufficient mass and density to form high-mass stars, supporting the idea that high-mass stars and clusters form within filaments.

  15. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  16. Binding thermodynamics discriminates fragments from druglike compounds: a thermodynamic description of fragment-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Williams, Glyn; Ferenczy, György G; Ulander, Johan; Keserű, György M

    2016-12-01

    Small is beautiful - reducing the size and complexity of chemical starting points for drug design allows better sampling of chemical space, reveals the most energetically important interactions within protein-binding sites and can lead to improvements in the physicochemical properties of the final drug. The impact of fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) on recent drug discovery projects and our improved knowledge of the structural and thermodynamic details of ligand binding has prompted us to explore the relationships between ligand-binding thermodynamics and FBDD. Information on binding thermodynamics can give insights into the contributions to protein-ligand interactions and could therefore be used to prioritise compounds with a high degree of specificity in forming key interactions.

  17. Quantitative structure-hydrophobicity relationships of molecular fragments and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian-Wei; Huang, Meilan; Huang, Jian-Xiang; Hu, Gui-Xiang; Jiang, Yong-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models were firstly established for the hydrophobic substituent constant (πX) using the theoretical descriptors derived solely from electrostatic potentials (EPSs) at the substituent atoms. The descriptors introduced are found to be related to hydrogen-bond basicity, hydrogen-bond acidity, cavity, or dipolarity/polarizability terms in linear solvation energy relationship, which endows the models good interpretability. The predictive capabilities of the models constructed were also verified by rigorous Monte Carlo cross-validation. Then, eight groups of meta- or para-disubstituted benzenes and one group of substituted pyridines were investigated. QSPR models for individual systems were achieved with the ESP-derived descriptors. Additionally, two QSPR models were also established for Rekker's fragment constants (foct), which is a secondary-treatment quantity and reflects average contribution of the fragment to logP. It has been demonstrated that the descriptors derived from ESPs at the fragments, can be well used to quantitatively express the relationship between fragment structures and their hydrophobic properties, regardless of the attached parent structure or the valence state. Finally, the relations of Hammett σ constant and ESP quantities were explored. It implies that σ and π, which are essential in classic QSAR and represent different type of contributions to biological activities, are also complementary in interaction site.

  18. DNA Fragments Assembly Based on Nicking Enzyme System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Yan; Shi, Zhen-Yu; Guo, Ying-Ying; Chen, Jin-Chun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    A couple of DNA ligation-independent cloning (LIC) methods have been reported to meet various requirements in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. The principle of LIC is the assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments by single-stranded (ss) DNA overlaps annealing. Here we present a method to generate single-stranded DNA overlaps based on Nicking Endonucleases (NEases) for LIC, the method was termed NE-LIC. Factors related to cloning efficiency were optimized in this study. This NE-LIC allows generating 3′-end or 5′-end ss DNA overlaps of various lengths for fragments assembly. We demonstrated that the 10 bp/15 bp overlaps had the highest DNA fragments assembling efficiency, while 5 bp/10 bp overlaps showed the highest efficiency when T4 DNA ligase was added. Its advantage over Sequence and Ligation Independent Cloning (SLIC) and Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent (USER) was obvious. The mechanism can be applied to many other LIC strategies. Finally, the NEases based LIC (NE-LIC) was successfully applied to assemble a pathway of six gene fragments responsible for synthesizing microbial poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB). PMID:23483947

  19. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    PETER, GARY F.

    2014-07-16

    Excellent progress was made in standardizing three complementary methods: Magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray micro CT, and MALDI imaging linear ion trap mass spectroscopy to image biomass and chemical, anatomical and functional changes that occur during pretreatment and hydrolysis. Magnetic resonance microscopy provides excellent images with as low as 5 uM resolution with hydrated biomass samples. We visualized dramatic changes in signal associated with the hydrolysis of the carbohydrates by strong acids. Quantitative diffusion approaches were used to probe more subtle structural changes in biomass. Diffusion tensor calculations reflect diffusion anisotropy and fractional anisotropy maps clearly show the longer range diffusion within the vessels compared to within the fiber cells. The diffusion is increased along the cell walls of the vessels. Suggesting that further research with NMR imaging should be pursued. X-ray CT provides excellent images at as low as 3.5 uM resolution from dried biomass. Small increases in surface area, and decreases in local density have been quantified in with wood after mild pretreatments; these changes are expected to be underestimates of the hydrated wood, due to the ~12% shrinkage that occurs upon drying untreated wood. MALDI-MS spectra show high ion intensities at most mass to charge ratios in untreated and pretreated woody material. MALDI-MSn is required to improve specificity and reduce background for imaging. MALDI-TOF is not specific enough for carbohydrate identification. Using MALDI-LIT/MSn we can readily identify oligomeric glucans and xylans and their fragmentation patterns as well as those of the glucuronic acid side chains of birch 4-O-methyl glucuronxylan. Imaging of glucan and xylan oligomers show that many contain isobaric ions with different distributions, indicating again that MSn is needed for accurate imaging of lignocellulosic materials. We are now starting to integrate the three imaging methods by using the same set

  20. Permeable Gas Flow Influences Magma Fragmentation Speed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, D.; Scheu, B.; Spieler, O.; Dingwell, D.

    2008-12-01

    Highly viscous magmas undergo fragmentation in order to produce the pyroclastic deposits that we observe, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. The overpressure required to initiate fragmentation depends on a number of physical parameters, such as the magma's vesicularity, permeability, tensile strength and textural properties. It is clear that these same parameters control also the speed at which a fragmentation front travels through magma when fragmentation occurs. Recent mathematical models of fragmentation processes consider most of these factors, but permeable gas flow has not yet been included in these models. However, it has been shown that permeable gas flow through a porous rock during a sudden decompression event increases the fragmentation threshold. Fragmentation experiments on natural samples from Bezymianny (Russia), Colima (Mexico), Krakatau (Indonesia) and Augustine (USA) volcanoes confirm these results and suggest in addition that high permeable flow rates may increase the speed of fragmentation. Permeability from the investigated samples ranges from as low as 5 x 10-14 to higher than 9 x 10- 12 m2 and open porosity ranges from 16 % to 48 %. Experiments were performed for each sample series at applied pressures up to 35 MPa. Our results indicate that the rate of increase of fragmentation speed is higher when the permeability is above 10-12 m2. We confirm that it is necessary to include the influence of permeable flow on fragmentation dynamics.

  1. Exploring fragment spaces under multiple physicochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pärn, Juri; Degen, Jörg; Rarey, Matthias

    2007-06-01

    We present a new algorithm for the enumeration of chemical fragment spaces under constraints. Fragment spaces consist of a set of molecular fragments and a set of rules that specifies how fragments can be combined. Although fragment spaces typically cover an infinite number of molecules, they can be enumerated in case that a physicochemical profile of the requested compounds is given. By using min-max ranges for a number of corresponding properties, our algorithm is able to enumerate all molecules which obey these properties. To speed up the calculation, the given ranges are used directly during the build-up process to guide the selection of fragments. Furthermore, a topology based fragment filter is used to skip most of the redundant fragment combinations. We applied the algorithm to 40 different target classes. For each of these, we generated tailored fragment spaces from sets of known inhibitors and additionally derived ranges for several physicochemical properties. We characterized the target-specific fragment spaces and were able to enumerate the complete chemical subspaces for most of the targets.

  2. Single chain Fab (scFab) fragment.

    PubMed

    Hust, Michael; Jostock, Thomas; Menzel, Christian; Voedisch, Bernd; Mohr, Anja; Brenneis, Mariam; Kirsch, Martina I; Meier, Doris; Dübel, Stefan

    2007-03-08

    The connection of the variable part of the heavy chain (VH) and and the variable part of the light chain (VL) by a peptide linker to form a consecutive polypeptide chain (single chain antibody, scFv) was a breakthrough for the functional production of antibody fragments in Escherichia coli. Being double the size of fragment variable (Fv) fragments and requiring assembly of two independent polypeptide chains, functional Fab fragments are usually produced with significantly lower yields in E. coli. An antibody design combining stability and assay compatibility of the fragment antigen binding (Fab) with high level bacterial expression of single chain Fv fragments would be desirable. The desired antibody fragment should be both suitable for expression as soluble antibody in E. coli and antibody phage display. Here, we demonstrate that the introduction of a polypeptide linker between the fragment difficult (Fd) and the light chain (LC), resulting in the formation of a single chain Fab fragment (scFab), can lead to improved production of functional molecules. We tested the impact of various linker designs and modifications of the constant regions on both phage display efficiency and the yield of soluble antibody fragments. A scFab variant without cysteins (scFabDeltaC) connecting the constant part 1 of the heavy chain (CH1) and the constant part of the light chain (CL) were best suited for phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. Beside the expression system E. coli, the new antibody format was also expressed in Pichia pastoris. Monovalent and divalent fragments (DiFabodies) as well as multimers were characterised. A new antibody design offers the generation of bivalent Fab derivates for antibody phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. This antibody format is of particular value for high throughput proteome binder generation projects, due to the avidity effect and the possible use of common standard sera for detection.

  3. Single chain Fab (scFab) fragment

    PubMed Central

    Hust, Michael; Jostock, Thomas; Menzel, Christian; Voedisch, Bernd; Mohr, Anja; Brenneis, Mariam; Kirsch, Martina I; Meier, Doris; Dübel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Background The connection of the variable part of the heavy chain (VH) and and the variable part of the light chain (VL) by a peptide linker to form a consecutive polypeptide chain (single chain antibody, scFv) was a breakthrough for the functional production of antibody fragments in Escherichia coli. Being double the size of fragment variable (Fv) fragments and requiring assembly of two independent polypeptide chains, functional Fab fragments are usually produced with significantly lower yields in E. coli. An antibody design combining stability and assay compatibility of the fragment antigen binding (Fab) with high level bacterial expression of single chain Fv fragments would be desirable. The desired antibody fragment should be both suitable for expression as soluble antibody in E. coli and antibody phage display. Results Here, we demonstrate that the introduction of a polypeptide linker between the fragment difficult (Fd) and the light chain (LC), resulting in the formation of a single chain Fab fragment (scFab), can lead to improved production of functional molecules. We tested the impact of various linker designs and modifications of the constant regions on both phage display efficiency and the yield of soluble antibody fragments. A scFab variant without cysteins (scFabΔC) connecting the constant part 1 of the heavy chain (CH1) and the constant part of the light chain (CL) were best suited for phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. Beside the expression system E. coli, the new antibody format was also expressed in Pichia pastoris. Monovalent and divalent fragments (DiFabodies) as well as multimers were characterised. Conclusion A new antibody design offers the generation of bivalent Fab derivates for antibody phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. This antibody format is of particular value for high throughput proteome binder generation projects, due to the avidity effect and the possible use of common standard sera

  4. SPY: A new scission point model based on microscopic ingredients to predict fission fragments properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, J.-F.; Dubray, N.; Hilaire, S.; Panebianco, S.; Sida, J.-L.

    2013-12-01

    Our purpose is to determine fission fragments characteristics in a framework of a scission point model named SPY for Scission Point Yields. This approach can be considered as a theoretical laboratory to study fission mechanism since it gives access to the correlation between the fragments properties and their nuclear structure, such as shell correction, pairing, collective degrees of freedom, odd-even effects. Which ones are dominant in final state? What is the impact of compound nucleus structure? The SPY model consists in a statistical description of the fission process at the scission point where fragments are completely formed and well separated with fixed properties. The most important property of the model relies on the nuclear structure of the fragments which is derived from full quantum microscopic calculations. This approach allows computing the fission final state of extremely exotic nuclei which are inaccessible by most of the fission model available on the market.

  5. Fragmentation processes in two-phase materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, H. A.; Guimarães, A. V.; Andrade, J. S.; Nikolakopoulos, I.; Wittel, F. K.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the fragmentation process of solid materials with crystalline and amorphous phases using the the discrete element method. Damage initiates inside spherical samples above the contact zone in a region where the circumferential stress field is tensile. Cracks initiated in this region grow to form meridional planes. If the collision energy exceeds a critical value which depends on the material's internal structure, cracks reach the sample surface resulting in fragmentation. We show that this primary fragmentation mechanism is very robust with respect to the internal structure of the material. For all configurations, a sharp transition from the damage to the fragmentation regime is observed, with smaller critical collision energies for crystalline samples. The mass distribution of the fragments follows a power law for small fragments with an exponent that is characteristic for the branching merging process of unstable cracks. Moreover this exponent depends only on the dimensionally of the system and not on the microstructure.

  6. Impact failure and fragmentation properties of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Kipp, M.E.

    1998-03-01

    In the present study we describe the development of an experimental fracture material property test method specific to dynamic fragmentation. Spherical test samples of the metals of interest are subjected to controlled impulsive stress loads by acceleration to high velocities with a light-gas launcher facility and subsequent normal impact on thin plates. Motion, deformation and fragmentation of the test samples are diagnosed with multiple flash radiography methods. The impact plate materials are selected to be transparent to the x-ray method so that only test metal material is imaged. Through a systematic series of such tests both strain-to-failure and fragmentation resistance properties are determined through this experimental method. Fragmentation property data for several steels, copper, aluminum, tantalum and titanium have been obtained to date. Aspects of the dynamic data have been analyzed with computational methods to achieve a better understanding of the processes leading to failure and fragmentation, and to test an existing computational fragmentation model.

  7. Fragmentation of interstellar clouds and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1982-01-01

    The principal issues are addressed: the fragmentation of molecular clouds into units of stellar mass and the impact of star formation on molecular clouds. The observational evidence for fragmentation is summarized, and the gravitational instability described of a uniform spherical cloud collapsing from rest. The implications are considered of a finite pressure for the minimum fragment mass that is attainable in opacity-limited fragmentation. The role of magnetic fields is discussed in resolving the angular momentum problem and in making the collapse anisotropic, with notable consequences for fragmentation theory. Interactions between fragments are described, with emphasis on the effect of protostellar winds on the ambient cloud matter and on inhibiting further star formation. Such interactions are likely to have profound consequences for regulating the rate of star formation and on the energetics and dynamics of molecular clouds.

  8. Fission-fragment excitation of metal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Martynenko, Yu.V.; Yavlinskii, Yu.N.

    1987-08-01

    The authors mathematically formulate the formation and relaxation of excited-electron regions along the paths of fission fragments under conditions of first wall sputtering and ionization and fission fragment transport into the wall. Their model incorporates all collisional and absorptional aspects of energy transfer between fragments and electrons and includes thermal diffusion and heat transfer between electrons and the metal lattice. Interactions with quasi particles in the solid-state regime are also given consideration.

  9. Tooth fragment reattachment: An esthetic, biological restoration

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Ajay; Garg, Rakesh; Bhalla, Anindya; Khatri, Rohit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Coronal fractures of the anterior teeth are a common form of dental trauma. If the original tooth fragment is retained following fracture, reattachment of the fractured fragment to the remaining tooth can provide better and long lasting esthetics, improved function, a positive psychological response, and is a faster and less complicated procedure. This paper reports on coronal tooth fracture case that was successfully treated using adhesive reattachment of fractured fragment and post placement. PMID:25810662

  10. Complex fragment emission from hot compound nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    The experimental evidence for compound nucleus emission of complex fragments at low energies is used to interpret the emission of the same fragments at higher energies. The resulting experimental picture is that of highly excited compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion processes which decay statistically. In particular, complex fragments appear to be produced mostly through compound nucleus decay. In the appendix a geometric-kinematic theory for incomplete fusion and the associated momentum transfer is outlined. 10 refs., 19 figs.

  11. Filter for interpretation of fragmentation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-10-01

    Objects that fragment cascade and decelerate abruptly, producing short, bright, signatures which can be used to estimate object diameter and speed. Other objects can be incorporated into a generalized fragmentation filter. This note summarizes the results of previous reports on the prediction and inversion of signatures from objects that radiate, ablate, and fragment during entry and uses them to produce models for the parameters of entering objects.

  12. Interaction of three fission fragments and yields of various ternary fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Pilipenko, N. A.; Sedykh, I. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction potential energy of the three deformed fragments formed in fission of 252Cf is studied for various combinations of three-fragment fission. The lowest height of the potential energy ridge between three touching and separated deformed fragments is sought. The excitation energies of various three-deformed-fragment configurations, at the lowest barrier heights related to the yield of the corresponding configuration, are considered in detail. The most probable three-fragment fission configurations are discussed. The yields of various ternary fragments in fission of 250Cf agree well with available experimental data.

  13. Quantification of airway deposition of intact and fragmented pollens.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Alpár; Balásházy, Imre; Farkas, Arpád; Sárkány, Zoltán; Hofmann, Werner; Czitrovszky, Aladár; Dobos, Erik

    2011-12-01

    Although pollen is one of the most widespread agents that can cause allergy, its airway transport and deposition is far from being fully explored. The objective of this study was to characterize the airway deposition of pollens and to contribute to the debate related to the increasing number of asthma attacks registered after thunderstorms. For the quantification of the deposition of inhaled pollens in the airways computer simulations were performed. Our results demonstrated that smaller and fragmented pollens may penetrate into the thoracic airways and deposit there, supporting the theory that fragmented pollen particles are responsible for the increasing incidence of asthma attacks following thunderstorms. Pollen deposition results also suggest that children are the most exposed to the allergic effects of pollens. Finally, pollens between 0.5 and 20 μm deposit more efficiently in the lung of asthmatics than in the healthy lung, especially in the bronchial region.

  14. Optical model calculations of heavy-ion target fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Norbury, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The fragmentation of target nuclei by relativistic protons and heavy ions is described within the context of a simple abrasion-ablation-final-state interaction model. Abrasion is described by a quantum mechanical formalism utilizing an optical model potential approximation. Nuclear charge distributions of the excited prefragments are calculated by both a hypergeometric distribution and a method based upon the zero-point oscillations of the giant dipole resonance. Excitation energies are estimated from the excess surface energy resulting from the abrasion process and the additional energy deposited by frictional spectator interactions of the abraded nucleons. The ablation probabilities are obtained from the EVA-3 computer program. Isotope production cross sections for the spallation of copper targets by relativistic protons and for the fragmenting of carbon targets by relativistic carbon, neon, and iron projectiles are calculated and compared with available experimental data.

  15. The dihadron fragmentation function and its evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, Abhijit; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2004-02-24

    Dihadron fragmentation functions and their evolution arestudied in the process of e+e- annihilation. Under the collinearfactorization approximation and facilitated by the cut-vertex technique,the two hadron inclusive cross section at leading order (LO) is shown tofactorize into a short distance parton cross section and a long distancedihadron fragmentation function. We provide the definition of such adihadron fragmentation function in terms of parton matrix elements andderive its DGLAP evolution equation at leading log. The evolutionequation for the non-singlet quark fragmentation function is solvednumerically with a simple ansatz for the initial condition and resultsare presented for cases of physical interest.

  16. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Robert C.; Kamon, Teruki; Toback, David; Safonov, Alexei; Dutta, Bhaskar; Dimitri, Nanopoulos; Pope, Christopher; White, James

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  17. Gene prediction in metagenomic fragments based on the SVM algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metagenomic sequencing is becoming a powerful technology for exploring micro-ogranisms from various environments, such as human body, without isolation and cultivation. Accurately identifying genes from metagenomic fragments is one of the most fundamental issues. Results In this article, we present a novel gene prediction method named MetaGUN for metagenomic fragments based on a machine learning approach of SVM. It implements in a three-stage strategy to predict genes. Firstly, it classifies input fragments into phylogenetic groups by a k-mer based sequence binning method. Then, protein-coding sequences are identified for each group independently with SVM classifiers that integrate entropy density profiles (EDP) of codon usage, translation initiation site (TIS) scores and open reading frame (ORF) length as input patterns. Finally, the TISs are adjusted by employing a modified version of MetaTISA. To identify protein-coding sequences, MetaGun builds the universal module and the novel module. The former is based on a set of representative species, while the latter is designed to find potential functionary DNA sequences with conserved domains. Conclusions Comparisons on artificial shotgun fragments with multiple current metagenomic gene finders show that MetaGUN predicts better results on both 3' and 5' ends of genes with fragments of various lengths. Especially, it makes the most reliable predictions among these methods. As an application, MetaGUN was used to predict genes for two samples of human gut microbiome. It identifies thousands of additional genes with significant evidences. Further analysis indicates that MetaGUN tends to predict more potential novel genes than other current metagenomic gene finders. PMID:23735199

  18. A highly bent fragment of Crithidia fasciculata kinetoplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Kitchin, P A; Klein, V A; Ryan, K A; Gann, K L; Rauch, C A; Kang, D S; Wells, R D; Englund, P T

    1986-08-25

    Kinetoplast DNA minicircles from Crithidia fasciculata contain a single major region of bent helix. Restriction fragments containing this bent helix have electrophoretic behavior on polyacrylamide gels which is much more anomalous than that of previously studied bent fragments. Therefore, the C. fasciculata fragments probably have a more extreme curvature. Sequencing part of a cloned minicircle revealed an unusual structure for the bent region. In a sequence of 200 bases, the bent region contains 18 runs of 4-6 As with 16 of these runs in the same strand. In some parts of this sequence the A runs are regularly spaced with a periodicity of about 10 base pairs. This spacing is nearly in phase with the twist of the DNA helix. This same sequence arrangement has been observed in other bent fragments, but the number of A runs is much greater in this C. fasciculata sequence. It is likely that there are small bends associated with each A run which, because of their periodic spacing, add up to produce substantial curvature in this molecule. In addition to having highly anomalous electrophoretic behavior, the fragment has unusual circular dichroism spectra. Its spectrum in the absence of ethanol is that of B DNA, but ethanol in the concentration range of 51-71% (w/w) induces changes to forms which are different from those of any well characterized DNA structure. The C. fasciculata bent helix is neither cleaved by S1 nuclease nor modified by bromoacetaldehyde under conditions in which other unusual DNA structures (such as cruciforms or B-Z junctions) are susceptible to attack by these reagents. Finally, a two-dimensional agarose gel analysis of a family of topoisomers of a plasmid containing the bent helix revealed no supercoil-induced relaxation.

  19. Victim fragmentation patterns and seat location supplements crash data: American Airlines flight 587.

    PubMed

    Vidoli, Giovanna M; Mundorff, Amy Z

    2012-04-01

    In 2001, American Airlines flight 587 crashed shortly after takeoff. All 260 people aboard and 5 people on the ground were killed. This study's objective was to explore the extent of victim injuries and fragmentation patterns along with their assumed seat locations as related to the crash event and the plane's structural damage. There were 2058 body fragments recovered and, of those, 1750 have been identified. Autopsy reports detailing injuries and extent of fragmentation, flight manifest, and the NTSB Aircraft Accident Report were examined for correlations among injuries, seat location, and crash event. Using the AIS as a model, a fragmentation scale was designed to record injury location and severity, with a focus on the extremities. More whole bodies were recovered from victims seated on the plane's right side and back half. Conversely, significantly more fragments for victims seated on the plane's left side were recovered. The increased fragmentation from victims on the left side is an irregular pattern, particularly because the last information from the flight data recorder showed the plane's sideslip to the right. However, there are no data for the flight's final 13.6 s. Most eyewitnesses recount the plane rolling left before crashing. The increased fragmentation of victims seated on the left is consistent with structural damage from a left side impact, corroborating eyewitness accounts. Correlating victim injuries and fragmentation patterns, seat location, and the plane's structural damage can assist an investigation into plane crashes, particularly if flight data are missing.

  20. Dynamic fragmentation in a quenched two-mode Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shu-Yuan; Zhong, Hong-Hua; Huang, Jia-Hao; Qin, Xi-Zhou; Lee, Chao-Hong

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the fragmentation in a two-mode Bose-Einstein condensate with Josephson coupling. We explore how the fragmentation and entropy of the ground state depend on the intermode asymmetry and interparticle interactions. Owing to the interplay between the asymmetry and the interactions, a sequence of notches and plateaus in the fragmentation appears with the single-atom tunneling and interaction blockade, respectively. We then analyze the dynamical properties of the fragmentation in three typical quenches of the asymmetry: linear, sudden, and periodic quenches. In a linear quench, the final state is a fragmented state due to the sequential Landau-Zener tunneling, which can be analytically explained by applying the two-level Landau-Zener formula for each avoided level crossing. In a sudden quench, the fragmentation exhibits persistent fluctuations that sensitively depend on the interparticle interactions and intermode coupling. In a periodic quench, the fragmentation is modulated by the periodic driving, and a suitable modulation may allow one to control the fragmentation.

  1. The role of thermodynamics in disc fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatellos, Dimitris; Whitworth, Anthony P.

    2009-12-01

    Thermodynamics play an important role in determining the way a protostellar disc fragments to form planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We explore the effect that different treatments of radiative transfer have in simulations of fragmenting discs. Three prescriptions for the radiative transfer are used: (i) the diffusion approximation of Stamatellos et al.; (ii) the barotropic equation of state (EOS) of Goodwin et al. and (iii) the barotropic EOS of Bate et al. The barotropic approximations capture the general evolution of the density and temperature at the centre of each proto-fragment but (i) they do not make any adjustments for particular circumstances of a proto-fragment forming in the disc and (ii) they do not take into account thermal inertia effects that are important for fast-forming proto-fragments in the outer disc region. As a result, the number of fragments formed in the disc and their properties are different, when a barotropic EOS is used. This is important not only for disc studies but also for simulations of collapsing turbulent clouds, as in many cases in such simulations stars form with discs that subsequently fragment. We also examine the difference in the way proto-fragments condense out in the disc at different distances from the central star using the diffusion approximation and following the collapse of each proto-fragment until the formation of the second core (ρ ~= 10-3gcm-3). We find that proto-fragments forming closer to the central star tend to form earlier and evolve faster from the first to the second core than proto-fragments forming in the outer disc region. The former have a large pool of material in the inner disc region that they can accrete from and grow in mass. The latter accrete more slowly and they are hotter because they generally form in a quick abrupt event.

  2. Understanding Fragmentation of Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Skolarus, Ted A.; Zhang, Yun; Hollenbeck, Brent K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cancer survivors are particularly prone to the effects of a fragmented health care delivery system. The implications of fragmented cancer care across providers likely include greater spending and worse quality of care. For this reason, the authors measured relations between increasing fragmentation of cancer care, expenditures, and quality of care among prostate cancer survivors. METHODS A total of 67,736 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1992 and 2005 were identified using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data. Using the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index and a measure of the average number of prostate cancer providers over time, patients were sorted into 3 fragmentation groups (low, intermediate, and high). The authors then examined annual per capita survivorship expenditures and a measure of quality (ie, repetitive prostate-specific antigen [PSA] testing within 30 days) according to their fragmentation exposure using multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS Patients with highly fragmented cancer care tended to be younger, white, and of higher socioeconomic status (all P < .001). Prostate cancer survivorship interventions were most common among patients with the highest fragmentation of care across providers (P < .001). After adjustment for clinical characteristics and prostate cancer survivorship interventions, higher degrees of fragmentation continued to be associated with repetitive PSA testing (13.6% for high vs 7.0% for low fragmentation; P < .001) and greater spending, particularly among patients not treated with androgen deprivation therapy. CONCLUSIONS Fragmented prostate cancer survivorship care is expensive and associated with potentially unnecessary services. Efforts to improve care coordination via current policy initiatives, electronic medical records, and the implementation of cancer survivorship tools may help to decrease fragmentation of care and mitigate downstream consequences for prostate cancer

  3. The Argonne fragment mass analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Larson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) is currently under construction at the ATLAS facility. The FMA is an eight-meter long recoil mass spectrometer which will be used to separate nuclear reaction products from the primary heavy-ion beam and disperse them by A/q (mass/charge) at the focal plane. The FMA will be used in many different types of experiments. Gamma rays originating from very weak fusion-evaporation channels can be observed in coincidence with the recoil nucleus identified at the FMA focal plane. Production and decay of nuclei far from stability will be studied at the focal plane by implanting exotic recoils directly into detectors or by using a fast tape transport system. The FMA will also be used for reaction mechanism studies. A radioactive beam facility behind the focal plane is planned, which will allow beta-NMR and nuclear moment measurements to be made. The FMA will utilize the wide range of beam and intensities to be provided by the new ECR-positive ion injector also under construction at ATLAS. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, B. W.

    2002-08-02

    Final report for program on the study of structure and properties of epitaxial oxide films. The defect structure of epitaxial oxide thin films was investigated. Both binary and complex oxides were studied. Epitaxial oxides were synthesized by organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD). This technique has been found to be highly versatile for the synthesis of a wide range of epitaxial oxide including dielectrics, ferroelectrics and high T{sub c} superconductors. Systems investigated include the binary oxides ZnO and TiO{sub 2} and ferroelectric oxides BaTiO{sub 3}, BaSrTiO{sub 3} and KNbO{sub 3}. Techniques used to evaluate the defect structure included deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), photocapacitance spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. High purity, stoichiometric oxide films were deposited and their defect structure evaluated. Epitaxial ZnO was deposited at temperatures as low as 250 C. PL indicated only near band edge ultraviolet emission showing that both extrinsic and intrinsic point defects could be significantly lowered in OMCVD derived thin films compared to that of the bulk. This presumably was a result of low deposition temperatures and high purity starting materials. Ferroelectric oxides epitaxial thin films of BaTiO{sub 3} and the solid solution BaSrTiO{sub 3} were synthesized and the defect structure determined. Photocapacitance spectroscopy was developed to quantify electrically active defects in the oxides. Defects with concentrations as low as 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} were observed and their properties determined. A new model was developed for the electronic transport properties of intrinsic and extrinsic BaTiO{sub 3}. A transport model was proposed whereby conduction in La doped films occurs via hopping in localized states within a pseudogap formed between a lower Hubbard band and the conduction band edge. The influence of the size effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in the thin films was investigated. The

  5. Fungal Fragments as Indoor Air Biocontaminants

    PubMed Central

    Górny, Rafał L.; Reponen, Tiina; Willeke, Klaus; Schmechel, Detlef; Robine, Enric; Boissier, Marjorie; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2002-01-01

    The aerosolization process of fungal propagules of three species (Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium melinii, and Cladosporium cladosporioides) was studied by using a newly designed and constructed aerosolization chamber. We discovered that fungal fragments are aerosolized simultaneously with spores from contaminated agar and ceiling tile surfaces. Concentration measurements with an optical particle counter showed that the fragments are released in higher numbers (up to 320 times) than the spores. The release of fungal propagules varied depending on the fungal species, the air velocity above the contaminated surface, and the texture and vibration of the contaminated material. In contrast to spores, the release of fragments from smooth surfaces was not affected by air velocity, indicating a different release mechanism. Correlation analysis showed that the number of released fragments cannot be predicted on the basis of the number of spores. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with monoclonal antibodies produced against Aspergillus and Penicillium fungal species showed that fragments and spores share common antigens, which not only confirmed the fungal origin of the fragments but also established their potential biological relevance. The considerable immunological reactivity, the high number, and the small particle size of the fungal fragments may contribute to human health effects that have been detected in buildings with mold problems but had no scientific explanation until now. This study suggests that future fungal spore investigations in buildings with mold problems should include the quantitation of fungal fragments. PMID:12089037

  6. The Family Circle: A Study in Fragmentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    1976-01-01

    Presents data describing the fragmentation of the family, suggests causes for the fragmentation, and offers suggestions for reversing the trend. The suggestions focus on day care, part-time employment practices, enhancing the position of women, and work and responsibility. (IRT)

  7. Sizing of DNA fragments by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.; Goodwin, P.M.; Ambrose, W.P.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Individual, stained DNA fragments were sized using a modified flow cytometer with high sensitivity fluorescence detection. The fluorescent intercalating dye ethidium homodimer was used to stain stoichiometrically lambda phage DNA and a Kpn I digest of lambda DNA. Stained, individual fragments of DNA were passed through a low average power, focused, mode-locked laser beam, and the fluorescence from each fragment was collected and quantified. Time-gated detection was used to discriminate against Raman scattering from the water solvent. The fluorescence burst from each fragment was related directly to its length, thus providing a means to size small quantities of kilobase lengths of DNA quickly. Improvements of several orders of magnitude in analysis time and sample size over current gel electrophoresis techniques were realized. Fragments of 17.1,29.9, and 48.5 thousand base pairs were well resolved, and were sized in 164 seconds. Less than one pg of DNA was required for analysis. We have demonstrated sizing of individual, stained DNA fragments with resolution approaching that of gel electrophoresis for moderately large fragments, but with significant reductions in the analysis time and the amount of sample required. Furthermore, system response is linear with DNA fragment length, in contrast to the logarithmic response in gel electrophoresis. There exists the potential to perform this sizing using relatively simple instrumentation, i.e. a continuous wave laser of low power and current mode detection.

  8. Sizing of DNA fragments by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.; Goodwin, P.M.; Ambrose, W.P.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Jett, J.H.; Keller, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    Individual, stained DNA fragments were sized using a modified flow cytometer with high sensitivity fluorescence detection. The fluorescent intercalating dye ethidium homodimer was used to stain stoichiometrically lambda phage DNA and a Kpn I digest of lambda DNA. Stained, individual fragments of DNA were passed through a low average power, focused, mode-locked laser beam, and the fluorescence from each fragment was collected and quantified. Time-gated detection was used to discriminate against Raman scattering from the water solvent. The fluorescence burst from each fragment was related directly to its length, thus providing a means to size small quantities of kilobase lengths of DNA quickly. Improvements of several orders of magnitude in analysis time and sample size over current gel electrophoresis techniques were realized. Fragments of 17.1,29.9, and 48.5 thousand base pairs were well resolved, and were sized in 164 seconds. Less than one pg of DNA was required for analysis. We have demonstrated sizing of individual, stained DNA fragments with resolution approaching that of gel electrophoresis for moderately large fragments, but with significant reductions in the analysis time and the amount of sample required. Furthermore, system response is linear with DNA fragment length, in contrast to the logarithmic response in gel electrophoresis. There exists the potential to perform this sizing using relatively simple instrumentation, i.e. a continuous wave laser of low power and current mode detection.

  9. The Stellar IMF from turbulent fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padoan, P.; Nordlund, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is unavoidable in super-sonically turbulent molecular clouds, and given the success of the present model to predict the observed shape of the Stellar IMF, they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is essential to the origin of the stellar IMF.

  10. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  11. Fragmentation of eastern United States forest types

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; John W. Coulston

    2013-01-01

    Fragmentation is a continuing threat to the sustainability of forests in the Eastern United States, where land use changes supporting a growing human population are the primary driver of forest fragmentation (Stein and others 2009). While once mostly forested, approximately 40 percent of the original forest area has been converted to other land uses, and most of the...

  12. The Stellar IMF from turbulent fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padoan, P.; Nordlund, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is unavoidable in super-sonically turbulent molecular clouds, and given the success of the present model to predict the observed shape of the Stellar IMF, they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is essential to the origin of the stellar IMF.

  13. Long-term effects of fragmentation and fragment properties on bird species richness in Hawaiian forests

    Treesearch

    David J. Flaspohler; Christian P. Giardina; Gregory P. Asner; Patrick Hart; Jonathan Price; Cassie Ka’apu Lyons; Xeronimo. Castaneda

    2010-01-01

    Forest fragmentation is a common disturbance affecting biological diversity, yet the impacts of fragmentation on many forest processes remain poorly understood. Forest restoration is likely to be more successful when it proceeds with an understanding of how native and exotic vertebrates utilize forest patches of different size. We used a system of forest fragments...

  14. Sheared DNA fragment sizing: comparison of techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Ordahl, C P; Johnson, T R; Caplan, A I

    1976-01-01

    DNA fragmented by conventional French press shearing procedures (30,000 lbs/in2) has a number-average fragment size of 230 base pairs. This is considerably smaller than the 450 base pairs typically reported for DNA sheared by this method. Comparison of 5 sizing techniques indicates that sheared DNA fragment size is overestimated by either measurement of velocity sedimentation or Kleinschmidt Electron Microscopic visualization. Both adsorption grid electron microscopic visualization and gel electrophoresis yield the most reliable estimates of the mean size of small DNA fragment populations. In addition, the assessment of fragment size distribution (not possible from sedimentation analysis) potentially allows more critical evaluation of DNA hybridization and reassociation kinetic and measurement parameters. Images PMID:1034292

  15. First principles approach to ionicity of fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Valone, Steven M.

    2015-02-01

    We develop a first principles approach towards the ionicity of fragments. In contrast to the bond ionicity, the fragment ionicity refers to an electronic property of the constituents of a larger system, which may vary from a single atom to a functional group or a unit cell to a crystal. The fragment ionicity is quantitatively defined in terms of the coefficients of contributing charge states in a superposition of valence configurations of the system. Utilizing the constrained density functional theory-based computations, a practical method to compute the fragment ionicity from valence electron charge densities, suitably decomposed according to the Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model prescription for those electron densities, is presented for the first time. The adopted approach is illustrated using BeO, MgO and CaO diatomic molecules as simple examples. The results are compared and discussed with respect to the bond ionicity scales of Phillips and Pauling.

  16. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Fred C.

    2003-01-15

    species of flagellates, Spumella sp. and Bodo sp. (identifications are tentative) were isolated from South Oyster sediments by repetitive serial dilution/extinction method. Protistan cells were cultured with Cereal leaf Prescott medium and pelleted by centrifugation. Protistan DNAs were extracted with a DNA extraction kit (Sigma Co.) and the sequencing of their SSrDNA is underway. Finally, to follow up on our collaboration of Dr. Bill Johnson (Univ. of Utah), one of the co-PIs under the same NABIR umbrella, we are pleased to report we have successfully tested antibody-ferrographic capture of protists (See previous year's report for more background). Polyclonal FITC-conjugated antibody specific for a flagellate, Spumella sp., was produced by Rockland Inc., and we now are able to enumerate that species using ferrographic capture. There are, however, some issues of non-specific staining that remain to be resolved.

  17. In Situ X-Ray Observations of Dendritic Fragmentation During Directional Solidification of a Sn-Bi Alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Gibbs, John W.; Tourret, Damien; Gibbs, Paul J.; ...

    2015-09-25

    Dendrite fragmentation is an important phenomenon in microstructural development during solidification. For instance, it plays a key role in initiating the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). In this paper, we use x-ray radiography to study dendrite fragmentation rate in a Sn-39.5 wt.% Bi alloy during directional solidification. Experiments were performed in which solidification was parallel and anti-parallel to gravity, leading to significantly different fragmentation rates. We quantify the distribution of fragmentation rate as a function of distance from the solidification front, time in the mushy zone, and volume fraction of solid. Finally, while the observed fragmentation rate can be high, there ismore » no evidence of a CET, illustrating that it requires more than just fragmentation to occur.« less

  18. In Situ X-Ray Observations of Dendritic Fragmentation During Directional Solidification of a Sn-Bi Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, John W.; Tourret, Damien; Gibbs, Paul J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Meghan Jane; Walker, Brandon A.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-09-25

    Dendrite fragmentation is an important phenomenon in microstructural development during solidification. For instance, it plays a key role in initiating the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). In this paper, we use x-ray radiography to study dendrite fragmentation rate in a Sn-39.5 wt.% Bi alloy during directional solidification. Experiments were performed in which solidification was parallel and anti-parallel to gravity, leading to significantly different fragmentation rates. We quantify the distribution of fragmentation rate as a function of distance from the solidification front, time in the mushy zone, and volume fraction of solid. Finally, while the observed fragmentation rate can be high, there is no evidence of a CET, illustrating that it requires more than just fragmentation to occur.

  19. Mass yields and kinetic energy of fragments from fission of highly-excited nuclei with A≲220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Margitych, T. O.; Sedykh, I. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that the potential energy surface of the two separated fragments has the saddle point, which takes place at small distance between the surfaces of well-deformed fragments. The height of this two-body saddle point is larger than the height of one-body fission barrier for nuclei with A ≲ 220. The mass yields of the fission fragments, which are appearing at the fission of nuclei with A ≲ 220, are related to the number of states of the two-fragment systems at the two-body saddle points. The characteristics of kinetic energy of fragments are described by using the trajectory motion equations with the dissipation terms. The Gaussian distribution of the final kinetic energy around the classical value of this energy induced by the stochastic fluctuations is taken into account at an evaluation of the total kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments.

  20. Frozen Impacted Drop: from Fragmentation to Hierarchical Crack Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Séon, Thomas; Ghabache, Elisabeth; Josserand, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the quenching of a liquid pancake, obtained through the impact of a water drop on a cold solid substrate (0°C to -60°C). We show that, below a certain substrate temperature, fractures appear on the frozen pancake and the crack patterns change from a 2D fragmentation regime to a hierarchical fracture regime as the thermal shock increases. The different regimes are discussed and the transition temperatures are estimated through classical fracture scaling arguments. Finally, a phase diagram presents how these regimes can be controlled by the drop impact parameters.

  1. Frozen Impacted Drop: From Fragmentation to Hierarchical Crack Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Josserand, Christophe; Séon, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We investigate experimentally the quenching of a liquid pancake, obtained through the impact of a water drop on a cold solid substrate (0 °C to -60 ° C ). We show that, below a certain substrate temperature, fractures appear on the frozen pancake and the crack patterns change from a 2D fragmentation regime to a hierarchical fracture regime as the thermal shock increases. The different regimes are discussed and the transition temperatures are estimated through classical fracture scaling arguments. Finally, a phase diagram presents how these regimes can be controlled by the drop impact parameters.

  2. Aggregation-fragmentation model of robust concentration gradient formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Timothy E.

    2015-02-01

    Concentration gradients of signaling molecules are essential for patterning during development and they have been observed in both unicellular and multicellular systems. In subcellular systems, clustering of the signaling molecule has been observed. We develop a theoretical model of cluster-mediated concentration gradient formation based on the Becker-Döring equations of aggregation-fragmentation processes. We show that such a mechanism produces robust concentration gradients on realistic time and spatial scales so long as the process of clustering does not significantly stabilize the signaling molecule. Finally, we demonstrate that such a model is applicable to the pom1p subcellular gradient in fission yeast.

  3. Coordination of dibensothiophenes and corannulenes to organometallic ruthenium (II) fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchi, Paul Anthony

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation contains five papers in the format required for journal publication which describe (in part) my research accomplishments as a graduate student at Iowa State University. This work can be broadly categorized as the binding of weakly-coordinating ligands to cationic organometallic ruthenium fragments, and consists of two main areas of study. Chapters 2-4 are investigations into factors that influence the binding of dibenzothiophenes to [Cp'Ru(CO)2(+ fragments, where Cp' = η5-C5H5 (Cp) and η5-C5Me5 (Cp*). Chapters 5 and 6 present the synthesis and structural characterization of complexes containing corannulene buckybowls that are η6-coordinated to [Cp*Ru(+ fragments. The first chapter contains a brief description of the difficulty in lowering sulfur levels in diesel fuel along with a review of corannulene derivatives and their metal complexes. After the final paper is a short summary of the work herein (Chapter 7). Each chapter is independent, and all equations, schemes, figures, tables, references, and appendices in this dissertation pertain only to the chapter in which they appear.

  4. Intravitreal Phacoemulsification Using Torsional Handpiece for Retained Lens Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Takkar, Brijesh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of intravitreal phacoemulsification with torsional hand piece in eyes with posteriorly dislocated lens fragments. Methods: In this prospective, interventional case series, 15 eyes with retained lens fragments following phacoemulsification were included. All patients underwent standard three-port pars plana vitrectomy and intravitreal phacoemulsification using sleeveless, torsional hand piece (OZiL™, Alcon's Infiniti Vision System). Patients were followed up for a minimum of six months to evaluate the visual outcomes and complications. Results: The preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from light perception to 0.3. No complications such as thermal burns of the scleral wound, retinal damage due to flying lens fragments, or difficult lens aspiration occurred during intravitreal phacoemulsification. Mean post-operative BCVA at the final follow-up was 0.5. Two eyes developed cystoid macular edema, which was managed medically. No retinal detachment was noted. Conclusion: Intravitreal phacoemulsification using torsional hand piece is a safe and effective alternative to conventional longitudinal phacofragmentation. PMID:27621783

  5. An algorithm for a semiempirical nuclear fragmentation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, F. F.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Norbury, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    In the present paper, an algorithm for HZE (High Charge and Energy) fragmentation based upon a combination of a two step abrasion/ablation model and electromagnetic dissociation is presented. Development of the model and detailed comparison with available experimental data are given elsewhere. The abrasion process accounts for the removal of nuclear matter in the overlap region of the colliding ions. An average transmission factor is used for the projectile and target nuclei at a given impact parameter to account for the finite mean free path in nuclear matter. The ions are treated otherwise on a geometric basis assuming uniform spheres. The ablation process is treated as a single nucleon-evaporation for every 10 MeV of excitation energy as used by Bowman in the original form of the model. The charge distribution of final fragments are calculated according to the Rudstam formula, except for some correction in mass 5, 8 and 9 fragments which show strong structure effects and correspondingly significant deviation from Rudstam's values. The nuclear electromagnetic dissociation is based on the Weizsacker-Williams (WW) method of virtual quanta where due to its simplicity, the virtual photon spectrum for individual multipoles, and finite extent of the charge distribution are not included. Comparisons of the model are made with the available experimental data here and more extensively elsewhere.

  6. Virtual fragment screening: an exploration of various docking and scoring protocols for fragments using Glide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawatkar, Sameer; Wang, Hongming; Czerminski, Ryszard; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane

    2009-08-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery approaches allow for a greater coverage of chemical space and generally produce high efficiency ligands. As such, virtual and experimental fragment screening are increasingly being coupled in an effort to identify new leads for specific therapeutic targets. Fragment docking is employed to create target-focussed subset of compounds for testing along side generic fragment libraries. The utility of the program Glide with various scoring schemes for fragment docking is discussed. Fragment docking results for two test cases, prostaglandin D2 synthase and DNA ligase, are presented and compared to experimental screening data. Self-docking, cross-docking, and enrichment studies are performed. For the enrichment runs, experimental data exists indicating that the docking decoys in fact do not inhibit the corresponding enzyme being examined. Results indicate that even for difficult test cases fragment docking can yield enrichments significantly better than random.

  7. Heavy ion fragmentation experiments at the bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    Collaborative research efforts to study the fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using heavy ion beams of the Bevatron/Bevalac are described. The goal of the program is to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Effects were also made to: (a) study processes of heavy nuclei in matter, (b) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (c) test the applicability of high energy multiparticle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (d) apply the cross section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (e) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross-sections.

  8. Fragmentation of ice by low velocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Low-velocity impact experiments (0.14 to 1 km/s) carried out in polycrystalline water ice targets at 257 and 81 K reveal interactions which are assigned to four fragmentation classes: cratering, erosion, disruption, and total fragmentation. The specific kinetic energies for the transitions between these classes are found to be about one to two orders of magnitude below those for silicate rocks. The mass vs. cumulative number distribution of fragments in the experiments is described by a simple power law, similar to that observed in fragmented rocks both in the laboratory and in nature. The logarithmic slopes of cumulative number vs. fragment weight range from -0.9 to -1.8; they decrease with increasing projectile energy and are approximately independent of target temperature. The shapes of fragments resulting from erosion and disruption of ice targets are found to be significantly less spherical for 257 K targets than for 81 K targets. Fragment sphericity increases with increasing projectile energy at 257 K; however, no similar trend is observed for 81 K ice.

  9. Filamentary fragmentation in a turbulent medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Hubber, D. A.

    2017-06-01

    We present the results of smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations investigating the evolution and fragmentation of filaments that are accreting from a turbulent medium. We show that the presence of turbulence and the resulting inhomogeneities in the accretion flow play a significant role in the fragmentation process. Filaments that experience a weakly turbulent accretion flow fragment in a two-tier hierarchical fashion, similar to the fragmentation pattern seen in the Orion Integral Shaped Filament. Increasing the energy in the turbulent velocity field results in more sub-structure within the filaments, and one sees a shift from gravity-dominated fragmentation to turbulence-dominated fragmentation. The sub-structure formed in the filaments is elongated and roughly parallel to the longitudinal axis of the filament, similar to the fibres seen in observations of Taurus, and suggests that the fray and fragment scenario is a possible mechanism for the production of fibres. We show that the formation of these fibre-like structures is linked to the vorticity of the velocity field inside the filament and the filament's accretion from an inhomogeneous medium. Moreover, we find that accretion is able to drive and sustain roughly sonic levels of turbulence inside the filaments, but is not able to prevent radial collapse once the filaments become supercritical. However, the supercritical filaments that contain fibre-like structures do not collapse radially, suggesting that fibrous filaments may not necessarily become radially unstable once they reach the critical line-density.

  10. Use of antibody fragments (Fv) in immunocytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kleymann, G; Ostermeier, C; Heitmann, K; Haase, W; Michel, H

    1995-06-01

    We developed a novel antibody fragment (Fv) technique for localization and determination of the surface topology of membrane protein complexes by immunogold electron microscopy. Several hybridoma cell lines producing murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against bacterial membrane proteins were established. The cDNAs coding for the variable domains of the MAbs were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The engineered Fv fragments served as trifunctional adapter molecules. The Fv fragment binds to the epitope of the membrane protein. The Strep tag fused to the VH chain was used for one-step affinity purification of the Fv fragments. Immunological detection of the membrane protein-bound Fv fragments in electron microscopy was accomplished either via the Strep tag with colloidal gold-labeled streptavidin or via the c-myc tag, which was fused to the VL chain, in combination with the c-myc tag-specific antibody 9E10 and a colloidal gold-labeled secondary antibody. We examined four Fv fragments directed against the cytochrome c oxidase or the ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase of Paracoccus denitrificans and bacteriorhodopsin of Halobacterium halobium to show that this method is generally applicable. In all cases the Fv fragments showed the same results as their corresponding parent antibodies in electron microscopic immunostaining and other applications.

  11. Mechanics of wave propagation in fragmented geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2017-04-01

    The Earth's crust has blocky or fragmented structure at different scales. Laboratory experiments and in-situ measurements reported in the literature show that the wave propagation in blocky media is characterised by the presence of unusually low frequencies in the spectrum and by low wave velocities (so-called pendulum-type waves). What was overlooked is that the fragments relatively free to move are at most held together by weak gouge. Mechanically, this implies two important phenomena. First, the large-scale stress-strain behaviour is highly non-linear and is characterised by considerably different moduli in tension and compression. In compression the resistance is controlled by contacts between the fragments and hence the corresponding moduli are determined by the deformation moduli of the fragments. In tension the moduli are determined by usually low stiffness of the gouge. We show that this leads to low wave velocities. Since in order for the wave to propagate through fragmented media, the wave lengths must be considerably larger than the dimensions of fragments, the low wave velocities only permit propagation of low frequency waves. Second, the fragments can have independent rotational degrees of freedom. Furthermore, rotations of fragments in the presence of compression (the prevalent state of stress in the Earth's crust) can exhibit the effect of negative stiffness. This changes the resonance spectrum of the fragmented medium leading to formation of low resonance frequencies. We propose simple models of these two phenomena, which can improve the understanding of the wave propagation and its utilisation for deciphering the Earth's crust structure.

  12. Composite Overwrap Fragmentation Observations, Concerns, and Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangham, Mike; Hovater, Mary

    2017-01-01

    A series of test activities has raised some concerns about the generation of orbital debris caused by failures of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). These tests have indicated that a large number of composite fragments can be produced by either pressure burst failures or by high-speed impacts. A review of prior high-speed tests with COPV indicates that other tests have produced large numbers of composite fragments. As was the case with the test referenced here, the tests tended to produce a large number of small composite fragments with relatively low velocities induced by the impact and or gas expansion.

  13. Bone fragments a body can make

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, S.D.; Ross, L.M. Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    Data obtained from various analytical techniques applied to a number of small bone fragments recovered from a crime scene were used to provide evidence for the occurrence of a fatality. Microscopic and histomorphometric analyses confirmed that the fragments were from a human skull. X-ray microanalysis of darkened areas on the bone fragments revealed a chemical signature that matched the chemical signature of a shotgun pellet recovered at the scene of the crime. The above findings supported the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fingerprint evidence which, along with other evidence, was used to convict a man for the murder of his wife, even though her body was never recovered.

  14. DNA sequence from Cretaceous period bone fragments.

    PubMed

    Woodward, S R; Weyand, N J; Bunnell, M

    1994-11-18

    DNA was extracted from 80-million-year-old bone fragments found in strata of the Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation in the roof of an underground coal mine in eastern Utah. This DNA was used as the template in a polymerase chain reaction that amplified and sequenced a portion of the gene encoding mitochondrial cytochrome b. These sequences differ from all other cytochrome b sequences investigated, including those in the GenBank and European Molecular Biology Laboratory databases. DNA isolated from these bone fragments and the resulting gene sequences demonstrate that small fragments of DNA may survive in bone for millions of years.

  15. Prediction of fragment velocities and trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulesz, J. J.; Vargas, L. M.; Moseley, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical techniques are described which predict: (1) the velocities of two unequal fragments from bursting cylindrical pressure vessels; (2) the velocity and range of portions of vessels containing a fluid which, when the vessel ruptures, causes the fragment to accelerate as the fluid changes from the liquid to the gaseous phase; and (3) the ranges of fragments subjected to drag and lift forces during flight. Numerous computer runs were made with various initial conditions in an effort to generalize the results for maximum range in plots of dimensionless range versus dimensionless velocity.

  16. Shear-Induced Fragmentation in Silicic Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, H. M.; Manga, M.

    2003-12-01

    Fragmentation of magma, containing abundant gas bubbles, is considered as the defining characteristic of explosive eruptions. When viscous stresses associated with the growth of bubbles and the flow of the ascending magma exceed the strength of the melt, it breaks into disconnected fragments suspended within an expanding gas phase. While repeated effusive and explosive eruptions for individual volcanoes are common, the dynamics governing the transition between explosive and effusive eruptions remain unclear. Magmas for both types of eruptions originate from sources with similar volatile content, yet effusive lavas erupt considerably more degassed than their explosive counterparts. Recent observations suggest that magma fragmentation may not be restricted to explosive eruptions and we find corroborating evidence of magma fragmentation, reannealing and elongation of fragments into flow banding from obsidians from Big Glass Mountain rhyolite dome, California. One mechanism for degassing during magma ascent is the generation of intermittent permeable fracture networks through non-explosive fragmentation near the conduit walls. To gain insight into the mechanics governing fragmentation in silicic volcanoes, we have developed a numerical model for magma ascent in the volcanic conduit. The ascending magma (melt + bubbles) is modelled as steady, isothermal flow of a single-phase liquid at constant mass flux in a cylindrical conduit of constant radius. We specify a pressure, number density of bubbles, and relaxed Newtonian melt viscosity at the base of the conduit and solve the joint problem of bubble growth and magma ascent. Rather than include the transition to fragmentation and flow of fragmented magma, we determine the ascent distance above the conduit entry at which magma fragmentation by viscous shear should first occur. The model is quasi-one-dimensional and for a given depth computes the radially varying vertical component of magma velocity. We show that shear

  17. Fragmentation transitions in multistate voter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Gesa A.; Gross, Thilo

    2012-06-01

    Adaptive models of opinion formation among humans can display a fragmentation transition, where a social network breaks into disconnected components. Here we investigate this transition in a class of models with arbitrary number of opinions. In contrast to previous work we do not assume that opinions are equidistant or arranged on a one-dimensional conceptual axis. Our investigation reveals detailed analytical results on fragmentations in a three-opinion model, which are confirmed by agent-based simulations. Furthermore, we show that in certain models the number of opinions can be reduced without affecting the fragmentation points.

  18. Simulation of collisional fragmentation with explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    For practical reasons, experimental studies of collisional fragmentation must at times rely on explosives to fragment a target body. For example, Housen et al., described experiments in which spheres were fragmented in a pressurized atmosphere. Explosives were used because impacts could not be performed in the pressure chamber. Explosives can also be used to study targets much larger than those which can be disrupted by conventional light-gas guns, thereby allowing size- and rate-effects to be investigated. The purpose of this study is to determine the charge burial depth required to simulate various aspects of collisions.

  19. Fission Fragment Properties from a Microscopic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dubray, N.; Goutte, H.; Delaroche, J.-P.

    2008-04-17

    We calculate potential energy surfaces in the elongation-asymmetry plane, up to very large deformations, with the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method and the Gogny nucleon-nucleon effective interaction DIS, for the {sup 226}Th and {sup 256,258,260}Fm fissioning systems. We then define a criterion based on the nuclear density, in order to discriminate between pre- and post-scission configurations. Using this criterion, many scission configurations are identified, and are used for the calculation of several fragment properties, like fragment deformations, deformation energies, energy partitioning, neutron binding energies at scission, charge polarization, total fragment kinetic energies and neutron multiplicities.

  20. The multiple roles of computational chemistry in fragment-based drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Richard; Barker, Oliver; Barker, John J.; Hesterkamp, Thomas; Godemann, Robert; Andersen, Ole; Fryatt, Tara; Courtney, Steve; Hallett, Dave; Whittaker, Mark

    2009-08-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) represents a change in strategy from the screening of molecules with higher molecular weights and physical properties more akin to fully drug-like compounds, to the screening of smaller, less complex molecules. This is because it has been recognised that fragment hit molecules can be efficiently grown and optimised into leads, particularly after the binding mode to the target protein has been first determined by 3D structural elucidation, e.g. by NMR or X-ray crystallography. Several studies have shown that medicinal chemistry optimisation of an already drug-like hit or lead compound can result in a final compound with too high molecular weight and lipophilicity. The evolution of a lower molecular weight fragment hit therefore represents an attractive alternative approach to optimisation as it allows better control of compound properties. Computational chemistry can play an important role both prior to a fragment screen, in producing a target focussed fragment library, and post-screening in the evolution of a drug-like molecule from a fragment hit, both with and without the available fragment-target co-complex structure. We will review many of the current developments in the area and illustrate with some recent examples from successful FBDD discovery projects that we have conducted.

  1. Simulated effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on a solitary, mustellid predator

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, Yetta; Carr, Eric A; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann

    2005-01-01

    Brine spills associated with petroleum extraction can reduce the amount of suitable habitat and increase habitat fragmentation for many terrestrial animals. We conducted a simulation study to quantify the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on a solitary mammal predator. To provide focus, we adopted biological attributes of the American badger (Taxidea taxus) and environmental attributes of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in Oklahoma. We simulated badger activities on landscapes with different degrees of habitat loss and fragmentation using a spatially explicit and individual-based population model. Both habitat loss and fragmentation increased the incidence of habitat-related mortality and decreased the proportion of eligible females that mated, which decreased final population sizes and the likelihood of persistence. Parameter exploration suggested that steep, threshold-like, responses to habitat loss occurred when animals included high-risk habitat in their territories. Badger populations showed a steeper decline with increasing habitat loss on landscapes fragmented by spills than on less fragmented landscapes. Habitat fragmentation made it difficult for badgers to form high-quality territories, and exposed individuals to higher risk while seeking to establish a territory. Our simulations also suggest that an inability to find mates (an Allee effect) becomes increasingly important for landscapes that support a sparse distribution of territories. Thus, the presence of unmated females with territories may foreshadow population decline in solitary species that do not normally tolerate marginal adults.

  2. The multiple roles of computational chemistry in fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Law, Richard; Barker, Oliver; Barker, John J; Hesterkamp, Thomas; Godemann, Robert; Andersen, Ole; Fryatt, Tara; Courtney, Steve; Hallett, Dave; Whittaker, Mark

    2009-08-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) represents a change in strategy from the screening of molecules with higher molecular weights and physical properties more akin to fully drug-like compounds, to the screening of smaller, less complex molecules. This is because it has been recognised that fragment hit molecules can be efficiently grown and optimised into leads, particularly after the binding mode to the target protein has been first determined by 3D structural elucidation, e.g. by NMR or X-ray crystallography. Several studies have shown that medicinal chemistry optimisation of an already drug-like hit or lead compound can result in a final compound with too high molecular weight and lipophilicity. The evolution of a lower molecular weight fragment hit therefore represents an attractive alternative approach to optimisation as it allows better control of compound properties. Computational chemistry can play an important role both prior to a fragment screen, in producing a target focussed fragment library, and post-screening in the evolution of a drug-like molecule from a fragment hit, both with and without the available fragment-target co-complex structure. We will review many of the current developments in the area and illustrate with some recent examples from successful FBDD discovery projects that we have conducted.

  3. Design and characterization of libraries of molecular fragments for use in NMR screening against protein targets.

    PubMed

    Baurin, Nicolas; Aboul-Ela, Fareed; Barril, Xavier; Davis, Ben; Drysdale, Martin; Dymock, Brian; Finch, Harry; Fromont, Christophe; Richardson, Christine; Simmonite, Heather; Hubbard, Roderick E

    2004-01-01

    We have designed four generations of a low molecular weight fragment library for use in NMR-based screening against protein targets. The library initially contained 723 fragments which were selected manually from the Available Chemicals Directory. A series of in silico filters and property calculations were developed to automate the selection process, allowing a larger database of 1.79 M available compounds to be searched for a further 357 compounds that were added to the library. A kinase binding pharmacophore was then derived to select 174 kinase-focused fragments. Finally, an additional 61 fragments were selected to increase the number of different pharmacophores represented within the library. All of the fragments added to the library passed quality checks to ensure they were suitable for the screening protocol, with appropriate solubility, purity, chemical stability, and unambiguous NMR spectrum. The successive generations of libraries have been characterized through analysis of structural properties (molecular weight, lipophilicity, polar surface area, number of rotatable bonds, and hydrogen-bonding potential) and by analyzing their pharmacophoric complexity. These calculations have been used to compare the fragment libraries with a drug-like reference set of compounds and a set of molecules that bind to protein active sites. In addition, an analysis of the overall results of screening the library against the ATP binding site of two protein targets (HSP90 and CDK2) reveals different patterns of fragment binding, demonstrating that the approach can find selective compounds that discriminate between related binding sites.

  4. Protein-templated fragment ligations - from molecular recognition to drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Jaegle, Mike; Wong, Ee Lin; Tauber, Carolin; Nawrotzky, Eric; Arkona, Christoph; Rademann, Jörg

    2017-01-24

    The understanding and manipulation of molecular recognition events is the key to modern approaches in drug discovery. Protein-templated fragment ligation is a novel concept to support drug discovery and can help to improve the efficacy of already existing protein ligands. Protein-templated fragment ligations are chemical reactions between small molecules ("fragments") that utilize a protein´s surface as a template to combine and to form a protein ligand with increased binding affinity. The approach exploits the molecular recognition of reactive small molecule fragments by proteins both for ligand assembly and for the identification of bioactive fragment combinations. Chemical synthesis and bioassay are thus integrated in one single step. In this article we portrait the biophysical basis of reversible and irreversible fragment ligations and the available methods to detect protein-templated ligation products. The scope of known chemical reactions providing templated ligation products is reviewed and the possibilities to extend the reaction portfolio are discussed. Selected recent applications of the method in protein ligand discovery are reported. Finally, the strengths and limitations of the concept are discussed and an outlook on the future impact of templated fragment ligations on the drug discovery process is given.

  5. Enhanced multiparametric hyaluronan degradation for production of molar-mass-defined fragments.

    PubMed

    Holubova, Lucie; Korecka, Lucie; Podzimek, Stepan; Moravcova, Veronika; Rotkova, Jana; Ehlova, Tereza; Velebny, Vladimir; Bilkova, Zuzana

    2014-11-04

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is known to serve as a dynamic mediator intervening in many physiological functions. Its specific effect has been repeatedly confirmed to be strongly influenced by the molecular size of hyaluronan fragments. However common technological approaches of HA fragments production have their limitations. In many cases, the final products do not meet the strict pharmaceutical requirements, specifically due to size polydispersity and reaction contaminants. We present novel methodology based on combination of unique incidental ability of the plant-derived protease papain to split the glycosidic bonds and an indispensable advantages of biocompatible macroporous material with incorporated ferrous ions serving as carrier for covalent papain fixation. This atypical and yet unpublished highly efficient multiparametric approach allows enhanced HA fragmentation for easily and safely producing molar-mass-defined HA fragments with narrow size distribution. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and size exclusion chromatography/multi-angle light scattering (SEC-MALS) confirmed the effectiveness of our multiparametric approach.

  6. Quantification of DNA fragmentation in processed foods using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Nishitsuji, Yasuyuki; Kikuchi, Yosuke; Fukudome, Shin-Ichi; Hayashida, Takuya; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Kurimoto, Youichi; Noguchi, Akio; Kondo, Kazunari; Teshima, Reiko; Takabatake, Reona; Kitta, Kazumi

    2017-07-01

    DNA analysis of processed foods is performed widely to detect various targets, such as genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Food processing often causes DNA fragmentation, which consequently affects the results of PCR analysis. In order to assess the effects of DNA fragmentation on the reliability of PCR analysis, we investigated a novel methodology to quantify the degree of DNA fragmentation. We designed four real-time PCR assays that amplified 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences common to various plants at lengths of approximately 100, 200, 400, and 800 base pairs (bp). Then, we created an indicator value, "DNA fragmentation index (DFI)", which is calculated from the Cq values derived from the real-time PCR assays. Finally, we demonstrated the efficacy of this method for the quality control of GMO detection in processed foods by evaluating the relationship between the DFI and the limit of detection.

  7. EJECTA KNOT FLICKERING, MASS ABLATION, AND FRAGMENTATION IN CASSIOPEIA A

    SciTech Connect

    Fesen, Robert A.; Zastrow, Jordan A.; Hammell, Molly C.; Shull, J. Michael; Silvia, Devin W.

    2011-08-01

    Ejecta knot flickering, ablation tails, and fragmentation are expected signatures associated with the gradual dissolution of high-velocity supernova (SN) ejecta caused by their passage through an inhomogeneous circumstellar medium or interstellar medium (ISM). Such phenomena mark the initial stages of the gradual merger of SN ejecta with and the enrichment of the surrounding ISM. Here we report on an investigation of this process through changes in the optical flux and morphology of several high-velocity ejecta knots located in the outskirts of the young core-collapse SN remnant Cassiopeia A using Hubble Space Telescope images. Examination of WFPC2 F675W and combined ACS F625W + F775W images taken between 1999 June and 2004 December of several dozen debris fragments in the remnant's northeast ejecta stream and along the remnant's eastern limb reveal substantial emission variations ('flickering') over timescales as short as nine months. Such widespread and rapid variability indicates knot scale lengths {approx_equal} 10{sup 15} cm and a highly inhomogeneous surrounding medium. We also identify a small percentage of ejecta knots located all around the remnant's outer periphery which show trailing emissions typically 0.''2-0.''7 in length aligned along the knot's direction of motion suggestive of knot ablation tails. We discuss the nature of these trailing emissions as they pertain to ablation cooling, knot disruption, and fragmentation, and draw comparisons to the emission 'strings' seen in {eta} Car. Finally, we identify several tight clusters of small ejecta knots which resemble models of shock-induced fragmentation of larger SN ejecta knots caused by a high-velocity interaction with a lower density ambient medium.

  8. Gravitational fragmentation of the Carina Flare supershell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünsch, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We study the gravitational fragmentation of a thick shell comparing the analytical theory to 3D hydrodynamic simulations and to observations of the Carina Flare supershell. We use both grid-based (AMR) and particle-based (SPH) codes to follow the idealised model of the fragmenting shell and found an excellent agreement between the two codes. Growth rates of fragments at different wavelength are well described by the pressure assisted gravitational instability (PAGI) - a new theory of the thick shell fragmentation. Using the APEX telescope we observe a part of the surface of the Carina Flare supershell (GSH287+04-17) in the 13CO(2-1) line. We apply a new clump-finding algorithm DENDROFIND to identify 50 clumps. We determine the clump mass function and we construct the minimum spanning tree connecting clumps positions to estimate the typical distance among clumps. We conclude that the observed masses and distances correspond well to the prediction of PAGI.

  9. Universal Dynamic Fragmentation in D Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Âström, J. A.; Ouchterlony, F.; Linna, R. P.; Timonen, J.

    2004-06-01

    A generic model is introduced for brittle fragmentation in D dimensions, and this model is shown to lead to a fragment-size distribution with two distinct components. In the small fragment-size limit a scale-invariant size distribution results from a crack branching-merging process. At larger sizes the distribution becomes exponential as a result of a Poisson process, which introduces a large-scale cutoff. Numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the validity of the distribution for D=2. Data from laboratory-scale experiments and large-scale quarry blastings of granitic gneiss confirm its validity for D=3. In the experiments the nonzero grain size of rock causes deviation from the ideal model distribution in the small-size limit. The size of the cutoff seems to diverge at the minimum energy sufficient for fragmentation to occur, but the scaling exponent is not universal.

  10. FOREST FRAGMENTATION AS AN ECONOMIC INDICATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite concern over the ecological consequences of conversion of land from natural cover to anthropogenic uses, there are few studies that show a quantitative relationship between fragmentation and economic factors. For the southside economic region of Virginia, we generated a ...

  11. History of on-orbit satellite fragmentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. L.; Gabbard, J. R.; Devere, G. T.; Johnson, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    The causes of on-orbit fragmentations are varied and may be intentional or accidental. The cause of many fragmentations remains unknown. While a few cases are currently under investigation as on-orbit collision candidates, man is directly responsible for the vast majority of artificial debris polluting the near-Earth space environment. It should be emphasized that the number of fragments listed with each event in this document represent only those debris officially cataloged by NORAD. Each known on-orbit satellite fragementation is described within this document in module format. Also listed are pertinent characteristics of each fragmentation event. Comments regarding the nature of the satellite and additional details of the events are given.

  12. The NJL Model for Quark Fragmentation Functions

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ito, W. Bentz, I. Cloet, A W Thomas, K. Yazaki

    2009-10-01

    A description of fragmentation functions which satisfy the momentum and isospin sum rules is presented in an effective quark theory. Concentrating on the pion fragmentation function, we first explain the reason why the elementary (lowest order) fragmentation process q → qπ is completely inadequate to describe the empirical data, although the “crossed” process π → qq describes the quark distribution functions in the pion reasonably well. Then, taking into account cascade-like processes in a modified jet-model approach, we show that the momentum and isospin sum rules can be satisfied naturally without introducing any ad-hoc parameters. We present numerical results for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the invariant mass regularization scheme, and compare the results with the empirical parametrizations. We argue that this NJL-jet model provides a very useful framework to calculate the fragmentation functions in an effective chiral quark theory.

  13. Dispersal and extinction in fragmented landscapes.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C D

    2000-01-01

    Evolutionary and population dynamics models suggest that the migration rate will affect the probability of survival in fragmented landscapes. Using data for butterfly species in the fragmented British landscape and in immediately adjoining areas of the European continent, this paper shows that species of intermediate mobility have declined most, followed by those of low mobility, whereas high-mobility species are generally surviving well. Compared to the more sedentary species, species of intermediate mobility require relatively large areas where they breed at slightly lower local densities. Intermediate mobility species have probably fared badly through a combination of metapopulation (extinction and colonization) dynamics and the mortality of migrating individuals which fail to find new habitats in fragmented landscapes. Habitat fragmentation is likely to result in the non-random extinction of populations and species characterized by different levels of dispersal, although the details are likely to depend on the taxa, habitats and regions considered. PMID:10687818

  14. The Fragmentation of the College Mathematics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper examines to what extent and asking reason the fragmentation of college mathematics have attained the present development in the course of looking at the history of mathematics education. (Contains 1 table.)

  15. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Hunter R.; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C.; Daza, Riza; Gligorich, Keith M.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134–144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132–145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA. PMID:27428049

  16. Fragmentation of Care in Ectopic Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Debra B; Dahlquist, Irma; Jarosch, Christina; Lindau, Stacy T

    2016-05-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Women who experience fragmented care may undergo unnecessary delays to diagnosis and treatment. Based on ectopic pregnancy cases observed in clinical practice that raised our concern about fragmentation of care, we designed an exploratory study to describe the number, characteristics, and outcomes of fragmented care among patients with ectopic pregnancy at one urban academic hospital. Chart review with descriptive statistics. Fragmented care was defined as a patient being evaluated at an outside facility for possible ectopic pregnancy and transferred, referred, or discharged before receiving care at the study institution. Of 191 women seen for possible or definite ectopic pregnancy during the study period, 42 (22 %) met the study definition of fragmented care. The study was under-powered to observe statistically significant differences across groups, but we found concerning, non-significant trends: patients with fragmented care were more likely to be Medicaid recipients (65.9 vs. 58.8 %) and to experience a complication (23.8 vs. 18.1 %) compared to those with non-fragmented care. Most patients (n = 37) received no identifiable treatment prior to transfer and arrived to the study hospital with no communication to the receiving hospital from the outside provider (n = 34). Nine patients (21 %) presented with ruptured ectopic pregnancies. The fragmentation we observed in our study may contribute to previously identified socio-economic disparities in ectopic pregnancy outcomes. If future research confirms these findings, health information exchanges and regional coordination of care may be important strategies for reducing maternal mortality.

  17. Observations of Titan IIIC Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Buckalew, B.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan IIIC Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the U. S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper presents a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots are also shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) thought to be associated with the Titan Transtage break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9-m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN 25001, 33509, and 33510) and the parent rocket body (SSN 3432). Color index data are used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In order to better characterize the break-up fragments, spectral measurements were acquired on three Titan fragments (one fragment observed over two different time periods) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra of SSN 25000 (May 2012 and January 2013), SSN 38690, and SSN 38699 are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., aluminum and various paints) to determine the surface material.

  18. Factors Controlling the Fragmentation Behavior of Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, D.; Scheu, B.; Mueller, S.; Spieler, O.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2006-12-01

    Five volcanoes of explosive eruptive behavior from the Ring of Fire were selected to investigate the processes responsible for their degree of explosivity and eruptive style. These volcanoes are Colima, (Mexico), St. Augustine (USA), Bezymianny (Russia), Krakatau and Kelut (Indonesia). In an attempt to better understand the processes controlling fragmentation at these volcanoes, we performed shock-tube experiments with natural samples from these volcanoes at overpressures between 4 and 35 MPa at room temperature. Both fragmentation threshold and speed of fragmentation were determined. Previous studies have already shown that porosity is a first order parameter in eruption models and our recent results support this statement. However, it is clear that other factors such as permeability need to be considered to explain variations observed in fragmentation behavior. Colima sample series of 24 % porosity require overpressures of over 11 MPa to fragment, whereas other Colima sample series of 15 % porosity require overpressures of only 8 MPa to fragment. Permeability measurements confirmed a permeability of about one order of magnitude higher for the samples of 24 % porosity. However, this information alone does not necessarily provide an explanation for the large scatter seen in the fragmentation speed data within one sample series. Experimental data will be supported by textural microscopic analyses in order to provide more constraints on the dominant factors responsible for the scatter in fragmentation behavior. Explaining this scatter will help to shed light on the respective eruptive behavior of the investigated volcanoes and thus help to understand why, at the first glance, very "similar" volcanic systems may react in very different ways. This work is part of the BMBF project SUNDAARC, which aims to quantify the potential risk of selected highly-explosive volcanoes by combining field and laboratory investigations.

  19. Ebstein Anomaly With QRS Fragmentation on Electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Prakash; Ang, Jonathan Ross; Gitler, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital disorder that involves the tricuspid valve and the right ventricle. It is associated with interatrial communication, which allows for paradoxical embolization causing unilateral blindness. Abnormal conduction through the atrialized right ventricle leads to QRS fragmentation on electrocardiogram. Its presence suggests a more severe abnormality and a higher risk of arrhythmia. The QRS fragmentation disappears after corrective surgery with resection of the atrialized right ventricle.

  20. Fragmentation of Continental United States Forests

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; James D. Wickham; Robert V. O' Neill; K. Bruce Jones; Elizabeth R. Smith; John W. Coulston; Timothy G. Wade; Jonathan H. Smith

    2002-01-01

    We report a multiple-scale analysis of forest fragmentation based on 30-m (0.09 ha pixel-1) land- cover maps for the conterminous United States. Each 0.09-ha unit of forest was classified according to fragmentation indexes measured within the surrounding landscape, for five landscape sizes including 2.25, 7.29, 65.61, 590.49, and 5314.41 ha....

  1. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Hunter R; Kitzman, Jacob O; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C; Daza, Riza; Baker, Daniel N; Gligorich, Keith M; Rostomily, Robert C; Bronner, Mary P; Shendure, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134-144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132-145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA.

  2. Relationships between Liquid Atomization and Solid Fragmentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Relationships between Liquid Atomization and Solid Fragmentation Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. March 2016...4.535 924 × 10 –1 kilogram (kg) unified atomic mass unit (amu) 1.660 539 × 10 –27 kilogram (kg) pound-mass per cubic foot (lb ft –3 ) 1.601 846 × 10...penetrate and pinch off fragments. For example, for jet atomization , Marmottant & Villermaux (2004b) say: “Liquid destabilization proceeds from a two

  3. Radar Measurements of MACRO Fragmentation in Meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggaley, W. J.; Grant, J.

    2004-12-01

    Fragmentation of an ablating meteoroid is a process that depends on the physical constitution of the body and the internal structure. These parameters are thought to control temperature gradients within the body. Phase signatures from the University of Canterbury’s AMOR facility are shown to be able to resolve instances in which meteors are subject to gross macro-fragmentation where the meteoroid body disrupts into a few discrete components.

  4. Measuring the photon fragmentation function at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, E. W. N.; Morgan, A. G.

    1994-06-01

    Using an algorithm that treats photons and hadrons democratically, we discuss how the quark to photon fragmentation function, D q →γ, might be measured in ‘photon’ + jet events at LEP. Simple analytic results are given at lowest order. The possibility of determining the gluon to photon fragmentation function, D g →γ, in ‘photon’ + 2 jet events is also discussed, however, the prospects for doing so seem bleak.

  5. Ebstein Anomaly With QRS Fragmentation on Electrocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Prakash; Ang, Jonathan Ross; Gitler, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital disorder that involves the tricuspid valve and the right ventricle. It is associated with interatrial communication, which allows for paradoxical embolization causing unilateral blindness. Abnormal conduction through the atrialized right ventricle leads to QRS fragmentation on electrocardiogram. Its presence suggests a more severe abnormality and a higher risk of arrhythmia. The QRS fragmentation disappears after corrective surgery with resection of the atrialized right ventricle. PMID:28203575

  6. Observations of Titan IIIC Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowardin, H.; Buckalew, B.; Barker, E.; Abercromby, K.; Seitzer, P.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-09-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan IIIC Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the U. S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6 m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper presents a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots are also shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) thought to be associated with the Titan Transtage break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9 m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN 25001, 33509, and 33510) and the parent rocket body (SSN 3432). Color index data are used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In order to better characterize the break-up fragments, spectral measurements were acquired on three Titan fragments (one fragment observed over two different time periods) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra of SSN 25000 (May 2012 and January 2013), SSN 38690, and SSN 38699 are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., aluminum and various paints) to determine the surface material.

  7. Mass distribution of fission fragments within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomorski, K.; Ivanyuk, F. A.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B.

    2017-03-01

    The fission fragments mass-yield of 236 U is obtained by an approximate solution of the eigenvalue problem of the collective Hamiltonian that describes the dynamics of the fission process whose degrees of freedom are: the fission (elongation), the neck and mass-asymmetry modes. The macroscopic-microscopic method is used to evaluate the potential energy surface. The macroscopic energy part is calculated using the liquid drop model and the microscopic corrections are obtained using a Woods-Saxon single-particle levels. The four-dimensional modified Cassini ovals shape parametrization is used to describe the shape of the fissioning nucleus. The mass tensor is taken within a cranking-type approximation. The final fragment mass distribution is obtained by weighting the adiabatic density distribution in the collective space with the neck-dependent fission probability. The neck degree of freedom is found to play a significant role in determining the final fragment mass distribution.

  8. Microstructural characterization of pipe bomb fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Otto; Oxley, Jimmie; Smith, James; Platek, Michael; Ghonem, Hamouda; Bernier, Evan; Downey, Markus; Cumminskey, Christopher

    2010-03-15

    Recovered pipe bomb fragments, exploded under controlled conditions, have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and microhardness. Specifically, this paper examines the microstructural changes in plain carbon-steel fragments collected after the controlled explosion of galvanized, schedule 40, continuously welded, steel pipes filled with various smokeless powders. A number of microstructural changes were observed in the recovered pipe fragments: deformation of the soft alpha-ferrite grains, deformation of pearlite colonies, twin formation, bands of distorted pearlite colonies, slip bands, and cross-slip bands. These microstructural changes were correlated with the relative energy of the smokeless powder fillers. The energy of the smokeless powder was reflected in a reduction in thickness of the pipe fragments (due to plastic strain prior to fracture) and an increase in microhardness. Moreover, within fragments from a single pipe, there was a radial variation in microhardness, with the microhardness at the outer wall being greater than that at the inner wall. These findings were consistent with the premise that, with the high energy fillers, extensive plastic deformation and wall thinning occurred prior to pipe fracture. Ultimately, the information collected from this investigation will be used to develop a database, where the fragment microstructure and microhardness will be correlated with type of explosive filler and bomb design. Some analyses, specifically wall thinning and microhardness, may aid in field characterization of explosive devices.

  9. DNA fragmentation status in patients with necrozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Brahem, Sonia; Jellad, Sonia; Ibala, Samira; Saad, Ali; Mehdi, Meriem

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a relationship exists between the levels of sperm DNA fragmentation and necrospermia in infertile men. Semen samples obtained from 70 men consulting for infertility evaluation were analyzed according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Patients were subdivided into three groups according to the percentage of necrotic spermatozoa: normozoospermia (<30%; n = 20), moderate necrozoospermia (50-80%; n = 30), and severe necrozoospermia (>80%; n = 20). DNA fragmentation was detected by the terminal desoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) was 9.28 ± 2.98% in patients with a normal level of necrotic spermatozoa, 20.25 ± 3.21% in patients with moderate necrozoospermia, and 35.31 ± 5.25% in patients with severe necrozoospermia. There was a statistically significant increase of DNA fragmentation in the necrozoospermic group (P < 0.01). A strong correlation was found between the degree of necrozoospermia and sperm DNA fragmentation. We concluded that patients with necrozoospermia showed a high level of DNA fragmentation compared to normozoospermic men. Severe necrozoospermia (>80%) is a predictive factor for increased sperm DNA damage.

  10. Electroweak fragmentation functions for dark matter annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavasonza, Leila Ali; Krämer, Michael; Pellen, Mathieu

    2015-02-18

    Electroweak corrections can play a crucial role in dark matter annihilation. The emission of gauge bosons, in particular, leads to a secondary flux consisting of all Standard Model particles, and may be described by electroweak fragmentation functions. To assess the quality of the fragmentation function approximation to electroweak radiation in dark matter annihilation, we have calculated the flux of secondary particles from gauge-boson emission in models with Majorana fermion and vector dark matter, respectively. For both models, we have compared cross sections and energy spectra of positrons and antiprotons after propagation through the galactic halo in the fragmentation function approximation and in the full calculation. Fragmentation functions fail to describe the particle fluxes in the case of Majorana fermion annihilation into light fermions: the helicity suppression of the lowest-order cross section in such models cannot be lifted by the leading logarithmic contributions included in the fragmentation function approach. However, for other classes of models like vector dark matter, where the lowest-order cross section is not suppressed, electroweak fragmentation functions provide a simple, model-independent and accurate description of secondary particle fluxes.

  11. Fragmentation of metal particles during heterogeneous explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, R. C.; Donahue, L.; Zhang, F.

    2015-03-01

    Heterogeneous explosives contain a mixture of standard explosive material and reactive metal particles. The inclusion of metal particles alters the energy density and energy release timescales involved in the blast event. Available experimental evidence indicates that metal particles may be damaged or fragmented during heterogeneous blast, altering the distribution of particle sizes from their initial state. This paper discusses adaptation and application of fragmentation theory and physical models for particle damage during condensed matter detonation, aerodynamic breakup of molten particles, and particle impact fragmentation with nearby structures. The shock compression and impact fragmentation models are based on the energy methods for dynamic fragmentation by Grady and Kipp, while aerodynamic breakup is treated according to Weber number stability criteria for droplets. These particle fragmentation models are validated against fundamental test cases from the literature. The models are then applied to heterogeneous blast scenarios including free field and wall reflection in a semi-confined urban street. Comparison with experimental records of pressure shows good agreement despite challenges inherent in the complexity of heterogeneous blast measurement and multiphase simulation.

  12. Communication: Fragment-based Hamiltonian model of electronic charge-excitation gaps and gap closure

    DOE PAGES

    Valone, Steven Michael; Pilania, Ghanshyam; Liu, Xiang-Yang; ...

    2015-11-13

    Capturing key electronic properties such as charge excitation gaps within models at or above the atomic scale presents an ongoing challenge to understanding molecular, nanoscale, and condensed phase systems. One strategy is to describe the system in terms of properties of interacting material fragments, but it is unclear how to accomplish this for charge-excitation and charge-transfer phenomena. Hamiltonian models such as the Hubbard model provide formal frameworks for analyzing gap properties but are couched purely in terms of states of electrons, rather than the states of the fragments at the scale of interest. The recently introduced Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) modelmore » uses fragments in different charge states as its building blocks, enabling a uniform, quantum-mechanical treatment that captures the charge-excitation gap. These gaps are preserved in terms of inter-fragment charge-transferhopping integrals T and on-fragment parameters U(FH). The FH model generalizes the standard Hubbard model (a single intra-band hopping integral t and on-site repulsion U) from quantum states for electrons to quantum states for fragments. In this paper, we demonstrate that even for simple two-fragment and multi-fragment systems, gap closure is enabled once T exceeds the threshold set by U(FH), thus providing new insight into the nature of metal-insulator transitions. Finally, this result is in contrast to the standard Hubbard model for 1d rings, for which Lieb and Wu proved that gap closure was impossible, regardless of the choices for t and U.« less

  13. Grain fragmentation in ultrasonic-assisted TIG weld of pure aluminum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qihao; Lin, Sanbao; Yang, Chunli; Fan, Chenglei; Ge, Hongliang

    2017-11-01

    Under the action of acoustic waves during an ultrasonic-assisted tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process, a grain of a TIG weld of aluminum alloy is refined by nucleation and grain fragmentation. Herein, effects of ultrasound on grain fragmentation in the TIG weld of aluminum alloy are investigated via systematic welding experiments of pure aluminum. First, experiments involving continuous and fixed-position welding are performed, which demonstrate that ultrasound can break the grain of the TIG weld of pure aluminum. The microstructural characteristics of an ultrasonic-assisted TIG weld fabricated by fixed-position welding are analyzed. The microstructure is found to transform from plane crystal, columnar crystal, and uniform equiaxed crystal into plane crystal, deformed columnar crystal, and nonuniform equiaxed crystal after application of ultrasound. Second, factors influencing ultrasonic grain fragmentation are investigated. The ultrasonic amplitude and welding current are found to have a considerable effect on grain fragmentation. The degree of fragmentation first increases and then decreases with an increase in ultrasonic amplitude, and it increases with an increase in welding current. Measurement results of the vibration of the weld pool show that the degree of grain fragmentation is related to the intensity of acoustic nonlinearity in the weld pool. The greater the intensity of acoustic nonlinearity, the greater is the degree of grain fragmentation. Finally, the mechanism of ultrasonic grain fragmentation in the TIG weld of pure aluminum is discussed. A finite element simulation is used to simulate the acoustic pressure and flow in the weld pool. The acoustic pressure in the weld pool exceeds the cavitation threshold, and cavitation bubbles are generated. The flow velocity in the weld pool does not change noticeably after application of ultrasound. It is concluded that the high-pressure conditions induced during the occurrence of cavitation, lead to grain

  14. Shuttle data book: SRM fragment velocity model. Presented to the SRB Fragment Model Review Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the velocity of fragments generated by the range safety destruction (RSD) or random failure of a Space Transportation System (STS) Solid Rocket Motor (SRM). The specific requirement was to provide a fragment model for use in those Galileo and Ulysses RTG safety analyses concerned with possible fragment impact on the spacecraft radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS). Good agreement was obtained between predictions and observations for fragment velocity, velocity distributions, azimuths, and rotation rates. Based on this agreement with the entire data base, the model was used to predict the probable fragment environments which would occur in the event of an STS-SRM RSD or randon failure at 10, 74, 84 and 110 seconds. The results of these predictions are the basis of the fragment environments presented in the Shuttle Data Book (NSTS-08116). The information presented here is in viewgraph form.

  15. Implications of promiscuous Pim-1 kinase fragment inhibitor hydrophobic interactions for fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Good, Andrew C; Liu, Jinyu; Hirth, Bradford; Asmussen, Gary; Xiang, Yibin; Biemann, Hans-Peter; Bishop, Kimberly A; Fremgen, Trisha; Fitzgerald, Maria; Gladysheva, Tatiana; Jain, Annuradha; Jancsics, Katherine; Metz, Markus; Papoulis, Andrew; Skerlj, Renato; Stepp, J David; Wei, Ronnie R

    2012-03-22

    We have studied the subtleties of fragment docking and binding using data generated in a Pim-1 kinase inhibitor program. Crystallographic and docking data analyses have been undertaken using inhibitor complexes derived from an in-house surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fragment screen, a virtual needle screen, and a de novo designed fragment inhibitor hybrid. These investigations highlight that fragments that do not fill their binding pocket can exhibit promiscuous hydrophobic interactions due to the lack of steric constraints imposed on them by the boundaries of said pocket. As a result, docking modes that disagree with an observed crystal structure but maintain key crystallographically observed hydrogen bonds still have potential value in ligand design and optimization. This observation runs counter to the lore in fragment-based drug design that all fragment elaboration must be based on the parent crystal structure alone.

  16. Fragment library design: using cheminformatics and expert chemists to fill gaps in existing fragment libraries.

    PubMed

    Kutchukian, Peter S; So, Sung-Sau; Fischer, Christian; Waller, Chris L

    2015-01-01

    Fragment based screening (FBS) has emerged as a mainstream lead discovery strategy in academia, biotechnology start-ups, and large pharma. As a prerequisite of FBS, a structurally diverse library of fragments is desirable in order to identify chemical matter that will interact with the range of diverse target classes that are prosecuted in contemporary screening campaigns. In addition, it is also desirable to offer synthetically amenable starting points to increase the probability of a successful fragment evolution through medicinal chemistry. Herein we describe a method to identify biologically relevant chemical substructures that are missing from an existing fragment library (chemical gaps), and organize these chemical gaps hierarchically so that medicinal chemists can efficiently navigate the prioritized chemical space and subsequently select purchasable fragments for inclusion in an enhanced fragment library.

  17. The Conversion of Smaller Borane Fragments to Larger Structures. Systematics of Boron Hydride Reactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-31

    Robert W. Parry and Goji Kodama Contract DAAG-29-8rl-K-Ol0l S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK S Department of...Entered; THE CONVERSION OF SMALLER BORANE FRAGMENTS TO LARGER STRUCTURES - SYSTEMATICS OF BORON HYDRIDE REACTIONS FINAL REPORT ROBERT W. PARRY AND GOJI

  18. Development and Evaluation of an Automatic Fragment-Weighing Apparatus,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    mainly attributable to the large variation in size and geometry of the fragments and the need to separate and feed each of the fragments singly onto the...for separating and feeding the fragments to the balance pan Fragments introduced into the vibrating sorter are forced to travel slowly upwards along...Fragment feed rate from the spiral can be further controlled by the amplitude of vibration of the spiral (speed of fragment ascent) as well as the

  19. On the fragmentation of biomolecules: Fragmentation of alanine dipeptide along the polypeptide chain

    SciTech Connect

    Solov'yov, I. A. Yakubovich, A. V.; Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W.

    2006-09-15

    The interaction potential between amino acids in alanine dipeptide has been studied for the first time taking into account exact molecular geometry. Ab initio calculation has been performed in the framework of density functional theory taking into account all electrons in the system. The fragmentation of dipeptide along the polypeptide chain, as well as the interaction between alanines, has been considered. The energy of the system has been analyzed as a function of the distance between fragments for all possible dipeptide fragmentation channels. Analysis of the energy barriers makes it possible to estimate the characteristic fragmentation times and to determine the degree of applicability of classical electrodynamics for describing the system energy.

  20. Hypervelocity Impact Test Fragment Modeling: Modifications to the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouge, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests on test satellites are performed by members of the orbital debris scientific community in order to understand and typify the on-orbit collision breakup process. By analysis of these test satellite fragments, the fragment size and mass distributions are derived and incorporated into various orbital debris models. These same fragments are currently being put to new use using emerging technologies. Digital models of these fragments are created using a laser scanner. A group of computer programs referred to as the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve code uses these digital representations in a multitude of ways that describe, measure, and model on-orbit fragments and fragment behavior. The Dynamic Rotation subroutine generates all of the possible reflected intensities from a scanned fragment as if it were observed to rotate dynamically while in orbit about the Earth. This calls an additional subroutine that graphically displays the intensities and the resulting frequency of those intensities as a range of solar phase angles in a Probability Density Function plot. This document reports the additions and modifications to the subset of the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve concerned with the Dynamic Rotation and Probability Density Function plotting subroutines.

  1. History of on-orbit satellite fragmentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nauer, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Since the first serious satellite fragmentation occurred in Jun. 1961, and instantaneously increased the total Earth satellite population by more than 400 percent, the issue of space operations within the finite region of space around the Earth has been the subject of increasing interest and concern. The prolific satellite fragmentations of the 1970's and the marked increase in the number of fragmentations in the 1980's served to widen international research into the characteristics and consequences of such events. Plans for large, manned space stations in the next decade and beyond demand a better understanding of the hazards of the dynamic Earth satellite population. The contribution of satellite fragmentations to the growth of the Earth satellite population is complex and varied. The majority of detectable fragmentation debris have already fallen out of orbit, and the effects of 40 percent of all fragmentations have completely disappeared. In this volume, satellite fragmentations are categorized by their assessed nature and to a lesser degree by their effect on the near-Earth space environment. A satellite breakup is the usually destructive disassociation of an orbital payload, rocket body, or structure, often with a wide range of ejecta velocities. A satellite breakup may be accidental or the result of intentional actions, e.g., due to a propulsion system malfunction or a space weapons test, respectively. An anomalous event is the unplanned separation, usually at low velocity, of one or more detectable objects from a satellite which remains essentially intact. Anomalous events can be caused by material deterioration of items such as thermal blankets, protective shields, or solar panels. As a general rule, a satellite breakup will produce considerably more debris, both trackable and non-trackable, than an anomalous event. From one perspective, satellite breakups may be viewed as a measure of the effects of man's activity on the environment, while anomalous

  2. Measurement Techniques for Hypervelocity Impact Test Fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Nicole E.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to classify the size and shape of individual orbital debris fragments provides a better understanding of the orbital debris environment as a whole. The characterization of breakup fragmentation debris has gradually evolved from a simplistic, spherical assumption towards that of describing debris in terms of size, material, and shape parameters. One of the goals of the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office is to develop high-accuracy techniques to measure these parameters and apply them to orbital debris observations. Measurement of the physical characteristics of debris resulting from groundbased, hypervelocity impact testing provides insight into the shapes and sizes of debris produced from potential impacts in orbit. Current techniques for measuring these ground-test fragments require determination of dimensions based upon visual judgment. This leads to reduced accuracy and provides little or no repeatability for the measurements. With the common goal of mitigating these error sources, allaying any misunderstandings, and moving forward in fragment shape determination, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office recently began using a computerized measurement system. The goal of using these new techniques is to improve knowledge of the relation between commonly used dimensions and overall shape. The immediate objective is to scan a single fragment, measure its size and shape properties, and import the fragment into a program that renders a 3D model that adequately demonstrates how the object could appear in orbit. This information would then be used to aid optical methods in orbital debris shape determination. This paper provides a description of the measurement techniques used in this initiative and shows results of this work. The tradeoffs of the computerized methods are discussed, as well as the means of repeatability in the measurements of these fragments. This paper serves as a general description of methods for the measurement and shape analysis of

  3. Invariant object recognition based on extended fragments.

    PubMed

    Bart, Evgeniy; Hegdé, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Visual appearance of natural objects is profoundly affected by viewing conditions such as viewpoint and illumination. Human subjects can nevertheless compensate well for variations in these viewing conditions. The strategies that the visual system uses to accomplish this are largely unclear. Previous computational studies have suggested that in principle, certain types of object fragments (rather than whole objects) can be used for invariant recognition. However, whether the human visual system is actually capable of using this strategy remains unknown. Here, we show that human observers can achieve illumination invariance by using object fragments that carry the relevant information. To determine this, we have used novel, but naturalistic, 3-D visual objects called "digital embryos." Using novel instances of whole embryos, not fragments, we trained subjects to recognize individual embryos across illuminations. We then tested the illumination-invariant object recognition performance of subjects using fragments. We found that the performance was strongly correlated with the mutual information (MI) of the fragments, provided that MI value took variations in illumination into consideration. This correlation was not attributable to any systematic differences in task difficulty between different fragments. These results reveal two important principles of invariant object recognition. First, the subjects can achieve invariance at least in part by compensating for the changes in the appearance of small local features, rather than of whole objects. Second, the subjects do not always rely on generic or pre-existing invariance of features (i.e., features whose appearance remains largely unchanged by variations in illumination), and are capable of using learning to compensate for appearance changes when necessary. These psychophysical results closely fit the predictions of earlier computational studies of fragment-based invariant object recognition.

  4. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J; Fedder, J

    2017-07-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated. In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage. The present decade continues within this research area. Some of the more novel methods recently submerging are sorting of cells with increased DNA fragmentation and hyaluronic acid (HA) binding techniques. The clinical value of these tests remains to be elucidated. In spite of half a century of research within the area, this analysis is not routinely implemented into the fertility clinics. The underlying causes are multiple. The abundance of methods has impeded the need for a clinical significant threshold. One of the most promising methods was commercialized in 2005 and has been reserved for larger licensed laboratories. Myriads of reviews and meta-analyses on studies using different assays for analysis of DNA fragmentation, different clinical Artificial Reproductive Treatments (ART), different definitions of successful ART outcome and small patient cohorts have been published. Although the area of DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa is highly relevant in the fertility clinics, the need for further studies focusing on standardization of the methods and clinical

  5. Demonstration of protein-fragment complementation assay using purified firefly luciferase fragments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human interactome is predicted to contain 150,000 to 300,000 protein-protein interactions, (PPIs). Protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA) is one of the most widely used methods to detect PPI, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). To date, successful applications of firefly luciferase (Fluc)-based PCA have been reported in vivo, in cultured cells and in cell-free lysate, owing to its high sensitivity, high signal-to-background (S/B) ratio, and reversible response. Here we show the assay also works with purified proteins with unexpectedly rapid kinetics. Results Split Fluc fragments both fused with a rapamycin-dependently interacting protein pair were made and expressed in E. coli system, and purified to homogeneity. When the proteins were used for PCA to detect rapamycin-dependent PPI, they enabled a rapid detection (~1 s) of PPI with high S/B ratio. When Fn7-8 domains (7 nm in length) that was shown to abrogate GFP mutant-based FRET was inserted between split Fluc and FKBP12 as a rigid linker, it still showed some response, suggesting less limitation in interacting partner’s size. Finally, the stability of the probe was investigated. Preincubation of the probes at 37 degreeC up to 1 h showed marked decrease of the luminescent signal to 1.5%, showing the limited stability of this system. Conclusion Fluc PCA using purified components will enable a rapid and handy detection of PPIs with high S/B ratio, avoiding the effects of concomitant components. Although the system might not be suitable for large-scale screening due to its limited stability, it can detect an interaction over larger distance than by FRET. This would be the first demonstration of Fluc PCA in vitro, which has a distinct advantage over other PPI assays. Our system enables detection of direct PPIs without risk of perturbation by PPI mediators in the complex cellular milieu. PMID:23536995

  6. Supramolecular gel electrophoresis of large DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Shohei; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Oyoshi, Takanori; Yamanaka, Masamichi

    2017-07-06

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is a frequent technique used to separate exceptionally large DNA fragments. In a typical continuous field electrophoresis, it is challenging to separate DNA fragments larger than 20 kbp because they migrate at a comparable rate. To overcome this challenge, it is necessary to develop a novel matrix for the electrophoresis. Here, we describe the electrophoresis of large DNA fragments up to 166 kbp using a supramolecular gel matrix and a typical continuous field electrophoresis system. C3 -symmetric tris-urea self-assembled into a supramolecular hydrogel in tris-boric acid-EDTA buffer, a typical buffer for DNA electrophoresis, and the supramolecular hydrogel was used as a matrix for electrophoresis to separate large DNA fragments. Three types of DNA marker, the λ-Hind III digest (2 to 23 kbp), Lambda DNA-Mono Cut Mix (10 to 49 kbp), and Marker 7 GT (10 to 165 kbp), were analyzed in this study. Large DNA fragments of greater than 100 kbp showed distinct mobility using a typical continuous field electrophoresis system. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Global-scale patterns of forest fragmentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riitters, K.; Wickham, J.; O'Neill, R.; Jones, B.; Smith, E.

    2000-01-01

    We report an analysis of forest fragmentation based on 1-km resolution land-cover maps for the globe. Measurements in analysis windows from 81 km 2 (9 ?? 9 pixels, "small" scale) to 59,049 km 2 (243 ?? 243 pixels, "large" scale) were used to characterize the fragmentation around each forested pixel. We identified six categories of fragmentation (interior, perforated, edge, transitional, patch, and undetermined) from the amount of forest and its occurrence as adjacent forest pixels. Interior forest exists only at relatively small scales; at larger scales, forests are dominated by edge and patch conditions. At the smallest scale, there were significant differences in fragmentation among continents; within continents, there were significant differences among individual forest types. Tropical rain forest fragmentation was most severe in North America and least severe in Europe - Asia. Forest types with a high percentage of perforated conditions were mainly in North America (five types) and Europe - Asia (four types), in both temperate and subtropical regions. Transitional and patch conditions were most common in 11 forest types, of which only a few would be considered as "naturally patchy" (e.g., dry woodland). The five forest types with the highest percentage of interior conditions were in North America; in decreasing order, they were cool rain forest, coniferous, conifer boreal, cool mixed, and cool broadleaf. Copyright ?? 2000 by The Resilience Alliance.

  8. Stream Hydrological Fragmentation Drives Bacterioplankton Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Fazi, Stefano; Vázquez, Eusebi; Casamayor, Emilio O.; Amalfitano, Stefano; Butturini, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In Mediterranean intermittent streams, the hydrological fragmentation in summer and the successive water flow re-convergence in autumn allow exploring how local processes shape the microbial community within the same habitat. The objectives of this study were to determine how bacterial community composition responded to hydrological fragmentation in summer, and to evaluate whether the seasonal shifts in community composition predominate over the effects of episodic habitat fragmentation. The bacterial community was assessed along the intermittent stream Fuirosos (Spain), at different levels of phylogenetic resolution by in situ hybridization, fingerprinting, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The hydrological fragmentation of the stream network strongly altered the biogeochemical conditions with the depletion of oxidized solutes and caused changes in dissolved organic carbon characteristics. In the isolated ponds, beta-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria increased their abundance with a gradual reduction of the alpha-diversity as pond isolation time increased. Moreover, fingerprinting analysis clearly showed a shift in community composition between summer and autumn. In the context of a seasonal shift, the temporary stream fragmentation simultaneously reduced the microbial dispersion and affected local environmental conditions (shift in redox regime and quality of the dissolved organic matter) tightly shaping the bacterioplankton community composition. PMID:23741302

  9. Modelling of the Pele Fragmentation Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreault, Jimmy

    2013-06-01

    The Penetrator with Enhanced Lateral Effect (PELE) is a type of explosive-free projectile that undergoes radial fragmentation upon an impact with a target plate. This type of projectile is composed of a brittle cylindrical shell (the jacket) filled in its core with a material characterized with a large Poisson's ratio. Upon an impact with a target, the axial compression causes the filling to expand in the radial direction. However, due to the brittleness of the jacket material, very little radial deformation can occur which creates a radial stress between the two materials and a hoop stress in the jacket. Fragmentation of the jacket occurs if the hoop stress exceeds the material's ultimate stress. The PELE fragmentation dynamics is explored via Finite-Element Method (FEM) simulations using the AUTODYN explicit dynamics hydrocode. The numerical results are compared with an analytical model based on wave interactions, as well as with the experimental investigation of Paulus and Schirm (1996). The comparison is based on the mechanical stress in the filling, the resulting radial velocity of the fragments, the number of fragments generated and their mass distribution.

  10. Ultrafast ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane

    SciTech Connect

    Sayres, Scott G.; Ross, Matt W.; Castleman, A. W. Jr.

    2010-09-15

    The ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane is examined here with laser intensities ranging between 7x10{sup 12} and 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} at 624 nm. The ionization potential of silane determined using both multiphoton ionization (MPI) and tunneling ionization (TI) models agrees with the vertical ionization potential of the molecule. In addition, the application of the tunneling ionization model is extended here to the fragments of silane to determine their appearance potentials. MPI values for SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, SiH{sub 2}{sup +}, SiH{sup +}, Si{sup +}, as well as H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are consistent with vertical potentials, whereas the TI measurements are found to be in accord with adiabatic potentials. The tunneling appearance potentials observed for the fragments H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are lower than reported for other techniques. In fact, the appearance potential measurements for these species resulting from silane are lower than their ionization potentials. The fragmentation rate of silane is determined to be nearly 20 times larger than the ionization rate. The main precursor for producing amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films, SiH{sub 3}{sup +} is the dominant fragmentation product making up roughly a third of the total ion yield, a substantial increase from other techniques.

  11. Statistical Theories of Fragmentation and Nuclear Disassembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Kevin Charles

    A general statistical study of fragmentation and aggregation processes is presented and applied to the fragmentation and thermodynamics of heated nuclear matter. Emphasis is placed on distinguishing combinatorial aspects from the statistical and thermodynamic ones. Combinatorial objects pertinent to fragmentation include integer, vector and set partitions as well as permutations. Algorithms for enumerating and randomly selecting these objects, important for statistical models invoking these objects, are presented. Statistical concepts introduced include approximate methods such as Monte Carlo sampling and Markov processes, and exact methods such as recursion relations and generating function identities. Statistical models introduced and solved exactly include the equipartition weight and the Gibbs weight. The canonical Gibbs model is studied extensively, and is shown to be related to symmetric functions and Polyade Bruijn enumeration theory. These exactly solvable models have been applied to Bose-Einstein condensation, the lambda transition in liquid ^4He, polymer gelation, Ewens' sampling formula in population genetics, group social dynamics, statistical shattering, and the enumeration of involutions, graphs and digraphs, indicating their flexibility and power. The application of these models to nuclear fragmentation results in a computationally simplified model which contains most of the essential physics. This model is shown to maintain its structure under coarse graining with suitable conditions on its parameters. The thermodynamics of nuclei allowed to fragment is studied in this context, and predictions are compared with experimental data. A critical comparison of this model to the competing percolation model indicates certain advantages to this approach.

  12. Short read DNA fragment anchoring algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendi; Zhang, Peiheng; Liu, Xinchun

    2009-01-30

    The emerging next-generation sequencing method based on PCR technology boosts genome sequencing speed considerably, the expense is also get decreased. It has been utilized to address a broad range of bioinformatics problems. Limited by reliable output sequence length of next-generation sequencing technologies, we are confined to study gene fragments with 30 - 50 bps in general and it is relatively shorter than traditional gene fragment length. Anchoring gene fragments in long reference sequence is an essential and prerequisite step for further assembly and analysis works. Due to the sheer number of fragments produced by next-generation sequencing technologies and the huge size of reference sequences, anchoring would rapidly becoming a computational bottleneck. We compared algorithm efficiency on BLAT, SOAP and EMBF. The efficiency is defined as the count of total output results divided by time consumed to retrieve them. The data show that our algorithm EMBF have 3 - 4 times efficiency advantage over SOAP, and at least 150 times over BLAT. Moreover, when the reference sequence size is increased, the efficiency of SOAP will get degraded as far as 30%, while EMBF have preferable increasing tendency. In conclusion, we deem that EMBF is more suitable for short fragment anchoring problem where result completeness and accuracy is predominant and the reference sequences are relatively large.

  13. Formation of wide binaries by turbulent fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Seokho; Dunham, Michael M.; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Choi, Minho; Bergin, Edwin A.; Evans, Neal J.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the formation of wide-binary systems of very low-mass stars (M ≤ 0.1 solar masses, M⊙) is challenging 1,2,3 . The most obvious route is through widely separated low-mass collapsing fragments produced by turbulent fragmentation of a molecular core4,5. However, close binaries or multiples from disk fragmentation can also evolve to wide binaries over a few initial crossing times of the stellar cluster through tidal evolution6. Finding an isolated low-mass wide-binary system in the earliest stage of formation, before tidal evolution could occur, would prove that turbulent fragmentation is a viable mechanism for (very) low-mass wide binaries. Here we report high-resolution ALMA observations of a known wide-separation protostellar binary, showing that each component has a circumstellar disk. The system is too young7 to have evolved from a close binary, and the disk axes are misaligned, providing strong support for the turbulent fragmentation model. Masses of both stars are derived from the Keplerian rotation of the disks; both are very low-mass stars.

  14. Simvastatin inhibits CD44 fragmentation in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Terabe, Kenya; Takahashi, Nobunori; Takemoto, Toki; Knudson, Warren; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-08-15

    In human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, the hyaluronan receptor CD44 undergoes proteolytic cleavage at the cell surface. CD44 cleavage is thought to require transit of CD44 into cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether statins exert a protective effect on articular chondrocytes due to diminution of cholesterol. Three model systems of chondrocytes were examined including human HCS-2/8 chondrosarcoma cells, human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and normal bovine articular chondrocytes. Treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M resulted in a substantial increase in CD44 fragmentation in each of the three chondrocyte models. Pre-incubation with simvastatin prior to treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M decreased the level of CD44 fragmentation, decreased the proportion of CD44 that transits into the lipid raft fractions, decreased ADAM10 activity and diminished the interaction between CD44 and ADAM10. In HCS-2/8 cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, fragmentation of CD44 was blocked by the knockdown of ADAM10. Inhibition of CD44 fragmentation by simvastatin also resulted in improved retention of pericellular matrix. Addition of cholesterol and farnesyl-pyrophosphate reversed the protective effects of simvastatin. Thus, the addition of simvastatin exerts positive effects on chondrocytes including reduced CD44 fragmentation and enhanced the retention of pericellular matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stream hydrological fragmentation drives bacterioplankton community composition.

    PubMed

    Fazi, Stefano; Vázquez, Eusebi; Casamayor, Emilio O; Amalfitano, Stefano; Butturini, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In Mediterranean intermittent streams, the hydrological fragmentation in summer and the successive water flow re-convergence in autumn allow exploring how local processes shape the microbial community within the same habitat. The objectives of this study were to determine how bacterial community composition responded to hydrological fragmentation in summer, and to evaluate whether the seasonal shifts in community composition predominate over the effects of episodic habitat fragmentation. The bacterial community was assessed along the intermittent stream Fuirosos (Spain), at different levels of phylogenetic resolution by in situ hybridization, fingerprinting, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The hydrological fragmentation of the stream network strongly altered the biogeochemical conditions with the depletion of oxidized solutes and caused changes in dissolved organic carbon characteristics. In the isolated ponds, beta-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria increased their abundance with a gradual reduction of the alpha-diversity as pond isolation time increased. Moreover, fingerprinting analysis clearly showed a shift in community composition between summer and autumn. In the context of a seasonal shift, the temporary stream fragmentation simultaneously reduced the microbial dispersion and affected local environmental conditions (shift in redox regime and quality of the dissolved organic matter) tightly shaping the bacterioplankton community composition.

  16. Projectile fragmentation of {sup 40,48}Ca and isotopic scaling in a transport approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailova, T. I. Erdemchimeg, B.; Artukh, A. G.; Toro, M. Di; Wolter, H. H.

    2016-07-15

    We investigate theoretically projectile fragmentation in reactions of {sup 40,48}Ca on {sup 9}Be and {sup 181}Ta targets using a Boltzmann-type transport approach, which is supplemented by a statistical decay code to describe the de-excitation of the hot primary fragments. We determine the thermodynamical properties of the primary fragments and calculate the isotope distributions of the cold final fragments. These describe the data reasonably well. For the pairs of projectiles with different isotopic content we analyze the isotopic scaling (or isoscaling) of the final fragment distributions, which has been used to extract the symmetry energy of the primary source. The calculation exhibits isoscaling behavior for the total yields as do the experiments. We also perform an impact-parameter-dependent isoscaling analysis in view of the fact that the primary systems at different impact parameters have very different properties. Then the isoscaling behavior is less stringent, which we can attribute to specific structure effects of the {sup 40,48}Ca pair. The symmetry energy determined in this way depends on these structure effects.

  17. a Study of Proton Induced Nuclear Fragmentation in the Threshold Region: 1 TO 20 GEV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, Thomas Craig

    This thesis contains the details of the experimental set-up and final results of BNL E-778. The experimental objective was to study proton induced nuclear fragmentation using an internal gas jet target facility that was specifically designed for this experiment and installed in the AGS main ring. The fragment telescopes were designed to measure a broad range of fragment charge (2 to 14) and kinetic energy (5 to 100 MeV). Using a mixed gas target (1% or 3% Xe with H(,2)), normalized fragment production cross sections were obtained by separately measuring p-p elastic production from the H(,2) component. Fragment production cross sections are observed to rise dramatically ((TURN) x 10) for incident proton energies between 1 and 10 GeV, while above 10 GeV, fragment production appears to be independent of the incident proton energy. The measured differential cross sections (above 10 GeV) are found to agree (within 20%) with the differential cross sections measured during a previous internal target experiment (E-591) conducted at FNAL, where the lowest available proton energies were 50 GeV. The measured fragment kinetic energy spectra (above 10 GeV) are fit with a functional form motivated by the observation that fragment production in an excited nuclear system is consistent with a critical phenomenon (a liquid -gas phase transition). The failure of this functional form at the lowest available incident energies (below 10 GeV) is interpreted as the observation of an additional fragment production mechanism. Recent theoretical and experimental evidence for an asymmetric fission process (binary decay), is used to modify the original functional form for the two-component spectra. It is concluded that, in the threshold region, two fragment production mechanisms are observed. Although insufficient information is available to uniquely separate the two components, certain features of the asymmetric fission mechanism are identified. The observed p-nucleus systematics are also

  18. Performance of phased rotation, conformation and translation function: accurate protein model building with tripeptidic and tetrapeptidic fragments.

    PubMed

    Pavelcík, Frantisek; Václavík, Jirí

    2010-09-01

    The automatic building of protein structures with tripeptidic and tetrapeptidic fragments was investigated. The oligopeptidic conformers were positioned in the electron-density map by a phased rotation, conformation and translation function and refined by a real-space refinement. The number of successfully located fragments lay within the interval 75-95% depending on the resolution and phase quality. The overlaps of partially located fragments were analyzed. The correctly positioned fragments were connected into chains. Chains formed in this way were extended directly into the electron density and a sequence was assigned. In the initial stage of the model building the number of located fragments was between 60% and 95%, but this number could be increased by several cycles of reciprocal-space refinement and automatic model rebuilding. A nearly complete structure can be obtained on the condition that the resolution is reasonable. Computer graphics will only be needed for a final check and small corrections.

  19. On the effect of grain burnback on STS-SRM fragment velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, M.B.; Mukunda, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Concerns raised during the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Review (FSAR) process called the solid rocket motor (SRM) fragment velocity prediction model into question. The specific area of concern was that there was a section of the SRM casing which was exposed to SRM chamber pressure as the grain (fuel) was consumed. These questions centered on the velocity of fragments which originated from the field joint region given that failure occurred between 37 and 72 seconds mission elapsed time (MET). Two dimensional coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian calculations were performed to assess the hot gas flow field which resulted from SRM casing fragmentation. The fragment to gas interface-pressure time-history obtained from these analyses was reduced to a boundary condition algorithm which was applied to an explicit-time-integration, finite element, three dimensional shell model of the SRM casing and unburned fuel. The results of these calculations showed that the velocity of fragments originating in the field joint was adequately described by the range of velocities given in the Shuttle Data Book (1988). Based on these results, no further analyses were required, and approval was obtained from the Launch Abort Subpanel of the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel to use the SRM fragment velocity environments presented in the Ulysses FSAR (1990).

  20. On the effect of grain burnback on STS-SRM fragment velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera

    Concerns raised during the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Review (FSAR) process called the solid rocket motor (SRM) fragment velocity prediction model into question. The specific area of concern was that there was a section of the SRM casing which was exposed to SRM chamber pressure as the grain (fuel) was consumed. These questions centered on the velocity of fragments which originated from the field joint region given that failure occurred between 37 and 72 seconds mission elapsed time (MET). Two dimensional coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian calculations were performed to assess the hot gas flow field which resulted from SRM casing fragmentation. The fragment to gas interface-pressure time-history obtained from these analyses was reduced to a boundary condition algorithm which was applied to an explicit-time-integration, finite element, three dimensional shell model of the SRM casing and unburned fuel. The results of these calculations showed that the velocity of fragments originating in the field joint was adequately described by the range of velocities given in the Shuttle Data Book (1988). Based on these results, no further analyses were required, and approval was obtained from the Launch Abort Subpanel of the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel to use the SRM fragment velocity environments presented in the Ulysses FSAR (1990).

  1. On the effect of grain burnback on STS-SRM fragment velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera

    1991-01-01

    Concerns raised during the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Review (FSAR) process called the solid rocket motor (SRM) fragment velocity prediction model into question. The specific area of concern was that there was a section of the SRM casing which was exposed to SRM chamber pressure as the grain (fuel) was consumed. These questions centered on the velocity of fragments which originated from the field joint region given that failure occurred between 37 and 72 seconds mission elapsed time (MET). Two dimensional coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian calculations were performed to assess the hot gas flow field which resulted from SRM casing fragmentation. The fragment to gas interface-pressure time-history obtained from these analyses was reduced to a boundary condition algorithm which was applied to an explicit-time-integration, finite element, three dimensional shell model of the SRM casing and unburned fuel. The results of these calculations showed that the velocity of fragments originating in the field joint was adequately described by the range of velocities given in the Shuttle Data Book (1988). Based on these results, no further analyses were required, and approval was obtained from the Launch Abort Subpanel of the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel to use the SRM fragment velocity environments presented in the Ulysses FSAR (1990).

  2. Anti-fouling properties of Fab' fragments immobilized on silane-based adlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivianu-Gaita, Victor; Romaschin, Alexander; Thompson, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Biosensors require surfaces that are highly specific towards the target analyte and that are minimally fouling. However, surface tuning to minimize fouling is a difficult task. The last decade has seen an increase in the use of immobilized antigen-binding antibody fragments (Fab') in biosensors. One Fab' linker compound S-(11-trichlorosilyl-undecanyl)-benzothiosulfonate (TUBTS) and three spacers were used to create the silane-based adlayers. The ultra-high frequency electromagnetic piezoelectric acoustic sensor (EMPAS) was used to gauge the fouling properties of the various surfaces using bovine serum albumin (BSA), goat IgG, and mouse serum. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to characterize the surfaces. It was discovered that immobilized oriented Fab' fragments reduced the fouling levels of surfaces up to 80% compared to the surfaces without fragments. An explanation for this phenomenon is that the antibody fragments increase the hydration of the surfaces and aid in the formation of an anti-fouling water barrier. The anti-fouling effect of the Fab' fragments is at its maximum when there is an even distribution of fragments across the surfaces. Finally, using Fab'-covered surfaces, a cancer biomarker was detected from serum, showing the applicability of this work to the field of biodetection.

  3. Comparison of mitotic cell death by chromosome fragmentation to premature chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mitotic cell death is an important form of cell death, particularly in cancer. Chromosome fragmentation is a major form of mitotic cell death which is identifiable during common cytogenetic analysis by its unique phenotype of progressively degraded chromosomes. This morphology however, can appear similar to the morphology of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and thus, PCC has been at times confused with chromosome fragmentation. In this analysis the phenomena of chromosome fragmentation and PCC are reviewed and their similarities and differences are discussed in order to facilitate differentiation of the similar morphologies. Furthermore, chromosome pulverization, which has been used almost synonymously with PCC, is re-examined. Interestingly, many past reports of chromosome pulverization are identified here as chromosome fragmentation and not PCC. These reports describe broad ranging mechanisms of pulverization induction and agree with recent evidence showing chromosome fragmentation is a cellular response to stress. Finally, biological aspects of chromosome fragmentation are discussed, including its application as one form of non-clonal chromosome aberration (NCCA), the driving force of cancer evolution. PMID:20959006

  4. Yeast vacuoles fragment in an asymmetrical two-phase process with distinct protein requirements.

    PubMed

    Zieger, Martin; Mayer, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Yeast vacuoles fragment and fuse in response to environmental conditions, such as changes in osmotic conditions or nutrient availability. Here we analyze osmotically induced vacuole fragmentation by time-lapse microscopy. Small fragmentation products originate directly from the large central vacuole. This happens by asymmetrical scission rather than by consecutive equal divisions. Fragmentation occurs in two distinct phases. Initially, vacuoles shrink and generate deep invaginations that leave behind tubular structures in their vicinity. Already this invagination requires the dynamin-like GTPase Vps1p and the vacuolar proton gradient. Invaginations are stabilized by phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) produced by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase complex II. Subsequently, vesicles pinch off from the tips of the tubular structures in a polarized manner, directly generating fragmentation products of the final size. This phase depends on the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate and the Fab1 complex. It is accelerated by the PI(3)P- and phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate-binding protein Atg18p. Thus vacuoles fragment in two steps with distinct protein and lipid requirements.

  5. Systematic investigation of projectile fragmentation using beams of unstable B and C isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thies, R.; Heinz, A.; Adachi, T.; Aksyutina, Y.; Alcantara-Núñes, J.; Altstadt, S.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ashwood, N.; Aumann, T.; Avdeichikov, V.; Barr, M.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Benlliure, J.; Bertulani, C. A.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Burgunder, G.; Camaño, M.; Caesar, C.; Casarejos, E.; Catford, W.; Cederkäll, J.; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, M.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Crespo, R.; Datta, U.; Díaz Fernández, P.; Dillmann, I.; Elekes, Z.; Enders, J.; Ershova, O.; Estradé, A.; Farinon, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Freer, M.; Freudenberger, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubev, P.; Gonzalez Diaz, D.; Hagdahl, J.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Heine, M.; Henriques, A.; Holl, M.; Ickert, G.; Ignatov, A.; Jakobsson, B.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Knöbel, R.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, N.; Labiche, M.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Lindberg, S.; Machado, J.; Marganiec, J.; Maroussov, V.; Mostazo, M.; Movsesyan, A.; Najafi, A.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Perea, A.; Petri, M.; Pietri, S.; Plag, R.; Prochazka, A.; Rahaman, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Reifarth, R.; Ribeiro, G.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Rigollet, C.; Riisager, K.; Röder, M.; Rossi, D.; Sanchez del Rio, J.; Savran, D.; Scheit, H.; Simon, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stoica, V.; Streicher, B.; Taylor, J. T.; Tengblad, O.; Terashima, S.; Togano, Y.; Uberseder, E.; Van de Walle, J.; Velho, P.; Volkov, V.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Wheldon, C.; Wilson, G.; Wimmer, C.; Winfield, J. S.; Woods, P.; Yakorev, D.; Zhukov, M. V.; Zilges, A.; Zuber, K.; R3B Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Background: Models describing nuclear fragmentation and fragmentation fission deliver important input for planning nuclear physics experiments and future radioactive ion beam facilities. These models are usually benchmarked against data from stable beam experiments. In the future, two-step fragmentation reactions with exotic nuclei as stepping stones are a promising tool for reaching the most neutron-rich nuclei, creating a need for models to describe also these reactions. Purpose: We want to extend the presently available data on fragmentation reactions towards the light exotic region on the nuclear chart. Furthermore, we want to improve the understanding of projectile fragmentation especially for unstable isotopes. Method: We have measured projectile fragments from 10,12 -18C and B-1510 isotopes colliding with a carbon target. These measurements were all performed within one experiment, which gives rise to a very consistent data set. We compare our data to model calculations. Results: One-proton removal cross sections with different final neutron numbers (1 p x n ) for relativistic 10,12 -18C and B-1510 isotopes impinging on a carbon target. Comparing model calculations to the data, we find that the epax code is not able to describe the data satisfactorily. Using abrabla07 on the other hand, we find that the average excitation energy per abraded nucleon needs to be decreased from 27 MeV to 8.1 MeV. With that decrease abrabla07 describes the data surprisingly well. Conclusions: Extending the available data towards light unstable nuclei with a consistent set of new data has allowed a systematic investigation of the role of the excitation energy induced in projectile fragmentation. Most striking is the apparent mass dependence of the average excitation energy per abraded nucleon. Nevertheless, this parameter, which has been related to final-state interactions, requires further study.

  6. An Investigation of Fragments Produced in the 58,64Ni + 9Be Fragmentation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Ma, C. W.; Wang, S. S.; Qiao, C. Y.

    The cross sections of the fragments produced in the 140A MeV 58,64Ni + 9Be reactions have been studied using the empirical parametrization formula EPAX2 and EPAX3, the modified statistical abrasion-ablation (SAA) model, and the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) model. The calculated cross sections of fragments are compared and discussed.

  7. Transversity from two pion interference fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    She Jun; Huang Yang; Barone, Vincenzo; Ma Boqiang

    2008-01-01

    We present calculation on the azimuthal spin asymmetries for pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) process at both HERMES and COMPASS kinematics, with transversely polarized proton, deuteron, and neutron targets. We calculate the asymmetry by adopting a set of parametrization of the interference fragmentation functions and two different models for the transversity. We find that the result for the proton target is insensitive to the approaches of the transversity but more helpful to understand the interference fragmentation functions. However, for the neutron target, which can be obtained through using deuteron and {sup 3}He targets, we find different predictions for different approaches to the transversity. Thus probing the two pion interference fragmentation from the neutron can provide us more interesting information on the transversity.

  8. Fragmentation of Kozai-Lidov Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the gravitational instability (GI) of a locally isothermal inclined disk around one component of a binary system. Such a disk can undergo global Kozai-Lidov (KL) cycles if the initial disk tilt is above the critical KL angle (of about 40◦). During these cycles, an initially circular disk exchanges its inclination for eccentricity, and vice versa. Self-gravity may suppress the cycles under some circumstances. However, with hydrodynamic simulations that include self-gravity, we show that for a sufficiently high initial disk tilts and for certain disk masses, disks can undergo KL oscillations and fragment due to GI, even when the Toomre Q value for an equivalent undisturbed disk is well within the stable regime (Q> 2). We suggest that KL triggered disk fragmentation provides a mechanism for the efficient formation of giant planets in binary systems and may enhance the fragmentation of disks in massive black hole binaries.

  9. Fragmented-condensate solid of dipolar excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, S. V.

    2017-05-01

    We discuss a possible link between the recently observed macroscopic ordering of ultracold dipolar excitons (MOES) and the phenomenon of supersolidity. In the dilute limit we predict a stable supersolid state for a quasi-one-dimensional system of bosonic dipoles characterized by two- and three-body contact repulsion. We phenomenologically extend our theory to the strongly-correlated regime and find a critical value of the contact interaction parameter at which the supersolid exhibits a quantum phase transition to a fragmented state. The wavelength of the fragmented-condensate solid is defined by the balance between the quantum pressure and the entropy due to fluctuations of the relative phases between the fragments. Our model appears to be in good agreement with the relevant experimental data, including the very recent results on commensurability effect and wavelength of the MOES.

  10. Fragmentation of wind-blown snow crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comola, Francesco; Kok, Jasper F.; Gaume, Johan; Paterna, Enrico; Lehning, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics driving the transformation of snowfall crystals into blowing snow particles is critical to correctly account for the energy and mass balances in polar and alpine regions. Here we propose a fragmentation theory of fractal snow crystals that explicitly links the size distribution of blowing snow particles to that of falling snow crystals. We use discrete element modeling of the fragmentation process to support the assumptions made in our theory. By combining this fragmentation model with a statistical mechanics model of blowing snow, we are able to reproduce the characteristic features of blowing snow size distributions measured in the field and in a wind tunnel. In particular, both model and measurements show the emergence of a self-similar scaling for large particle sizes and a systematic deviation from this scaling for small particle sizes.

  11. Micromachined fragment capturer for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Soo; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2011-11-01

    Due to changes in modern diet, a form of heart disease called chronic total occlusion has become a serious disease to be treated as an emergency. In this study, we propose a micromachined capturer that is designed and fabricated to collect plaque fragments generated during surgery to remove the thrombus. The fragment capturer consists of a plastic body made by rapid prototyping, SU-8 mesh structures using MEMS techniques, and ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) actuators. An array of IPMC actuators combined with the SU-8 net structure was optimized to effectively collect plaque fragments. The evaporation of solvent through the actuator's surface was prevented using a coating of SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane thin film on the actuator. This approach improved the available operating time of the IPMC, which primarily depends on solvent loss. Our preliminary results demonstrate the possibility of using the capturer for biomedical applications.

  12. Micromachined fragment capturer for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Soo; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2011-11-01

    Due to changes in modern diet, a form of heart disease called chronic total occlusion has become a serious disease to be treated as an emergency. In this study, we propose a micromachined capturer that is designed and fabricated to collect plaque fragments generated during surgery to remove the thrombus. The fragment capturer consists of a plastic body made by rapid prototyping, SU-8 mesh structures using MEMS techniques, and ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) actuators. An array of IPMC actuators combined with the SU-8 net structure was optimized to effectively collect plaque fragments. The evaporation of solvent through the actuator's surface was prevented using a coating of SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane thin film on the actuator. This approach improved the available operating time of the IPMC, which primarily depends on solvent loss. Our preliminary results demonstrate the possibility of using the capturer for biomedical applications.

  13. Fragmentation of methane molecules by antiproton impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehzadeh, Arash; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Extending previous work for proton impact, we have investigated the fragmentation of methane molecules due to collisions with antiprotons in the 25 keV to 5 MeV impact energy range. The multi-center nature of the problem is addressed by using a spectral representation of the molecular Hartree-Fock-level Hamiltonian and a single-center expansion of the initially populated molecular orbitals. The two-center basis generator method (TC-BGM) is used for orbital propagation. Electron-removal cross sections obtained from the TC-BGM solutions are complemented with a dynamical decay-route fragmentation model to calculate cross sections for the production of fragment ions. Good agreement with the available experimental data is observed for CH4+,CH3+,CH2+and CH+. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  14. Crystallographic Fragment Based Drug Discovery: Use of a Brominated Fragment Library Targeting HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Tiefenbrunn, Theresa; Forli, Stefano; Happer, Meaghan; Gonzalez, Ana; Tsai, Yingssu; Soltis, Michael; Elder, John H.; Olson, Arthur J.; Stout, C. David

    2013-01-01

    A library of 68 brominated fragments was screened against a new crystal form of inhibited HIV-1 protease in order to probe surface sites in soaking experiments. Often fragments are weak binders with partial occupancy, resulting in weak, difficult-to-fit electron density. The use of a brominated fragment library addresses this challenge, as bromine can be located unequivocally via anomalous scattering. Data collection was carried out in an automated fashion using AutoDrug at SSRL. Novel hits were identified in the known surface sites: 3-bromo-2,6-dimethoxybenzoic acid (Br6) in the flap site, and 1-bromo-2-naphthoic acid (Br27) in the exosite, expanding the chemistry of known fragments for development of higher affinity potential allosteric inhibitors. At the same time, mapping the binding sites of a number of weaker binding Br-fragments provides further insight into the nature of these surface pockets. PMID:23998903

  15. Crystallographic fragment-based drug discovery: use of a brominated fragment library targeting HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Tiefenbrunn, Theresa; Forli, Stefano; Happer, Meaghan; Gonzalez, Ana; Tsai, Yingssu; Soltis, Michael; Elder, John H; Olson, Arthur J; Stout, Charles D

    2014-02-01

    A library of 68 brominated fragments was screened against a new crystal form of inhibited HIV-1 protease in order to probe surface sites in soaking experiments. Often, fragments are weak binders with partial occupancy, resulting in weak, difficult-to-fit electron density. The use of a brominated fragment library addresses this challenge, as bromine can be located unequivocally via anomalous scattering. Data collection was carried out in an automated fashion using AutoDrug at SSRL. Novel hits were identified in the known surface sites: 3-bromo-2,6-dimethoxybenzoic acid (Br6) in the flap site and 1-bromo-2-naphthoic acid (Br27) in the exosite, expanding the chemistry of known fragments for development of higher affinity potential allosteric inhibitors. At the same time, mapping the binding sites of a number of weaker binding Br-fragments provides further insight into the nature of these surface pockets.

  16. Analysis of fission-fragment mass distribution within the quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pardeep; Kaur, Harjeet

    2016-11-01

    The fission-fragment mass distribution is analysed for the 208Pb(18O, f) reaction within the quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT). The reaction potential has been calculated by taking the binding energies, Coulomb potential and proximity potential of all possible decay channels and a stationary Schrödinger equation has been solved numerically to calculate the fission-fragment yield. The overall results for mass distribution are compared with those obtained in experiment. Fine structure dips in yield, corresponding to fragment shell closures at Z = 50 and N=82, which are observed by Bogachev et al., are reproduced successfully in the present calculations. These calculations will help to estimate the formation probabilities of fission fragments and to understand many related phenomena occurring in the fission process.

  17. Effect of forest fragmentation on bird populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.

    1979-01-01

    Many of the insectivorous songbird species that winter in the tropics are dependent on large unbroken tracts of forest during the breeding season. These species are disappearing from localities where forests are becoming fragmented. By long-range planning, managers can prevent local extinctions of these area-sensitive birds through use of such techniques as management in large units, retention of connecting corridors, and prevention of excessive isolation of forest fragments. Edge conditions can be provided, where appropriate to meet the needs of upland game species.

  18. Angular Momentum Population in Projectile Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolyák, Zs.; Gladnishki, K. A.; Gerl, J.; Hellström, M.; Kopatch, Y.; Mandal, S.; Górska, M.; Regan, P. H.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Gsi-Isomer Collaboration

    2004-02-01

    Isomeric states in neutron-deficient nuclei around A ≈190 have been identified following the projectile fragmentation of a relativistic energy 238U beam. The deduced isomeric ratios are compared with a model based on the abrasion-ablation description. The experimental isomeric ratios are lower by a factor of ≈2 than the calculated ones assuming the `sharp cutoff' approximation. The observation of the previously reported isomeric Iπ=43/2- state in 215Ra represents the current record for the highest discrete spin state observed following a projectile fragmentation reaction.

  19. Analytical pyrolysis of cells and cell fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Faix, O.; Bertelt, E.

    1995-12-01

    Wood of spruce, beech and birch was disintegrated without chemical pretreatment after 10 minutes of steaming at 110{degrees}C in a laboratory defibrator. Fibers, vessels, and fragments of secondary wall were separated by wet screening. A hydrocylon was used for separation of middle lamellae. By using analytical pyrolysis-GC/MS, parenchymatic cells were found to be richer in lignin than the other cells. The lignin content of middle lamellae was 35% (beech, spruce) and 39% (birch). In agreement with the literature, the S/G ratios of the vessels and middle lamellae was lower than those of the other cells and cell fragments.

  20. Statistical fragmentation of small neutral carbon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Tendero, S.; Alcami, M.; Martin, F.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2005-03-01

    We present a statistical fragmentation study of the C{sub 5}, C{sub 7}, and C{sub 9} carbon clusters using the Metropolis Monte Carlo and Weisskopf methods. We show that inclusion of several isomeric forms as well as rotational effects is essential to reproduce the experimental observations. We have found that, for cluster excitation energies around 10 eV, several fragmentation channels are efficiently populated, but the dominant one always corresponds to C{sub n-3}/C{sub 3}. For high enough excitation energies, we observe first-order phase transitions corresponding to a complete breakup of the cluster.

  1. Treatment imprudence leading to missed tooth fragment

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Pranamee; Chaudhary, Seema; Kaur, Harsimran; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries (TDI) represent one of the most common oral health problems in children and adolescents. Dental trauma requires a special consideration when it accompanies soft tissue lacerations. Tooth fragments occasionally penetrate into soft tissues and may cause severe complications. This article describes the case of a 12-year-old girl with a fractured tooth fragment embedded in the lower lip for 4 months, which went unnoticed at her primary health centre. This report highlights the importance of proper radiographic diagnosis along with clinical examination after trauma in order to prevent any future complications. PMID:23606390

  2. Parton Propagation and Fragmentation in QCD Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alberto Accardi, Francois Arleo, William Brooks, David D'Enterria, Valeria Muccifora

    2009-12-01

    We review recent progress in the study of parton propagation, interaction and fragmentation in both cold and hot strongly interacting matter. Experimental highlights on high-energy hadron production in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering, proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions, as well as Drell-Yan processes in hadron-nucleus collisions are presented. The existing theoretical frameworks for describing the in-medium interaction of energetic partons and the space-time evolution of their fragmentation into hadrons are discussed and confronted to experimental data. We conclude with a list of theoretical and experimental open issues, and a brief description of future relevant experiments and facilities.

  3. Evolution of parton fragmentation functions at finitetemperature

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Jonathan; Wang, Enke; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2002-06-12

    The first order correction to the parton fragmentation functions in a thermal medium is derived in the leading logarithmic approximation in the framework of thermal field theory. The medium-modified evolution equations of the parton fragmentation functions are also derived. It is shown that all infrared divergences, both linear and logarithmic, in the real processes are canceled among themselves and by corresponding virtual corrections. The evolution of the quark number and the energy loss (or gain) induced by the thermal medium are investigated.

  4. Computer Model Of Fragmentation Of Atomic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Norbury, John W.; KHAN FERDOUS; Badavi, Francis F.

    1995-01-01

    High Charge and Energy Semiempirical Nuclear Fragmentation Model (HZEFRG1) computer program developed to be computationally efficient, user-friendly, physics-based program for generating data bases on fragmentation of atomic nuclei. Data bases generated used in calculations pertaining to such radiation-transport applications as shielding against radiation in outer space, radiation dosimetry in outer space, cancer therapy in laboratories with beams of heavy ions, and simulation studies for designing detectors for experiments in nuclear physics. Provides cross sections for production of individual elements and isotopes in breakups of high-energy heavy ions by combined nuclear and Coulomb fields of interacting nuclei. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77.

  5. Design of compound libraries for fragment screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, Niklas; Cosgrove, David A.; Kenny, Peter W.; Kolmodin, Karin

    2009-08-01

    Approaches to the design of libraries for fragment screening are illustrated with reference to a 20 k generic fragment screening library and a 1.2 k generic NMR screening library. Tools and methods for library design that have been developed within AstraZeneca are described, including Foyfi fingerprints and the Flush program for neighborhood characterization. It will be shown how Flush and the BigPicker, which selects maximally diverse sets of compounds, are used to apply the Core and Layer method for library design. Approaches to partitioning libraries into cocktails are also described.

  6. Laser photoluminescence spectroscopy of photodissociation fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, W. M.; Cody, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Laser induced photoluminescence spectroscopy has been used to study the energy partitioning among CN fragments produced by the photodissociation of C2N2. The CN radicals are produced in both the A 2Pi and the X 2Sigma+ states. The A state is formed primarily in the nu-prime = 0 level, and the X state is formed in the lower vibrational levels. Since the photodissociation process does not produce the maximum amount of vibrational excitation in the CN fragments, it is suggested that the excess energy goes into either translational and/or rotational excitation of the CN.

  7. The Penetration of Fragments into Collection Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    S_1-2(v/v )a dv1 (vo) = vl d0( represents the integral on the right in equation 4. In Collins’ test, the impact medium was Celotex , with a density of...8217 calibration data (Table A-I) gives v and P for numerous shots of the steel spheres into the Celotex impact medium. Tests yielding penetrations of...fragments impacting the Celotex impact medium. Collins’ data for small fragments (approximately the same mass as the calibration spheres), presented

  8. Radio Frequency Fragment Separator at NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, D.; Andreev, V.; Becerril, A.; Doléans, M.; Mantica, P. F.; Ottarson, J.; Schatz, H.; Stoker, J. B.; Vincent, J.

    2009-07-01

    A new device has been designed and built at NSCL which provides additional filtering of radioactive beams produced via projectile fragmentation. The Radio Frequency Fragment Separator (RFFS) uses the time micro structure of the beams accelerated by the cyclotrons to deflect particles according to their time-of-flight, in effect producing a phase filtering. The transverse RF (Radio Frequency) electric field of the RFFS has superior filtering performance compared to other electrostatic devices, such as Wien filters. Such filtering is critical for radioactive beams produced on the neutron-deficient side of the valley of stability, where strong contamination occurs at intermediate energies from 50 to 200 MeV/u.

  9. Explosive fragmentation of orbiting propellant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, F. J.; Kays, R. L.; Bishop, C. V.; Eck, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    An examination is made of the in-orbit explosive characteristics of the Delta second stage and Ariane third stage, with a view to the vehicle breakups of the Ariane SPOT third-stage fuel tank in November, 1986, and of two Delta second stage tanks. Attention is given to the possible role of residual propellants in these breakups. After reviewing orbital data and comparing predicted fragment velocities with observed fragment velocities in debris patterns, a comparison has been made of total debris energy with total calculated explosion energy. Both physical and chemical explosions are deemed possible.

  10. Computer Model Of Fragmentation Of Atomic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Norbury, John W.; KHAN FERDOUS; Badavi, Francis F.

    1995-01-01

    High Charge and Energy Semiempirical Nuclear Fragmentation Model (HZEFRG1) computer program developed to be computationally efficient, user-friendly, physics-based program for generating data bases on fragmentation of atomic nuclei. Data bases generated used in calculations pertaining to such radiation-transport applications as shielding against radiation in outer space, radiation dosimetry in outer space, cancer therapy in laboratories with beams of heavy ions, and simulation studies for designing detectors for experiments in nuclear physics. Provides cross sections for production of individual elements and isotopes in breakups of high-energy heavy ions by combined nuclear and Coulomb fields of interacting nuclei. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77.

  11. Combined Effects of UV Exposure Duration and Mechanical Abrasion on Microplastic Fragmentation by Polymer Type.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee; Jang, Mi; Han, Gi Myung; Jung, Seung Won; Shim, Won Joon

    2017-03-28

    It is important to understand the fragmentation processes and mechanisms of plastic litter to predict microplastic production in the marine environment. In this study, accelerated weathering experiments were performed in the laboratory, with ultraviolet (UV) exposure for up to 12 months followed by mechanical abrasion (MA) with sand for 2 months. Fragmentation of low-density polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and expanded polystyrene (EPS) was evaluated under conditions that simulated a beach environment. PE and PP were minimally fragmented by MA without photooxidation by UV (8.7 ± 2.5 and 10.7 ± 0.7 particles/pellet, respectively). The rate of fragmentation by UV exposure duration increased more for PP than PE. A 12-month UV exposure and 2-month MA of PP and PE produced 6084 ± 1061 and 20 ± 8.3 particles/pellet, respectively. EPS pellets were susceptible to MA alone (4220 ± 33 particles/pellet), while the combination of 6 months of UV exposure followed by 2 months of MA produced 12,152 ± 3276 particles/pellet. The number of fragmented polymer particles produced by UV exposure and mechanical abrasion increased with decreasing size in all polymer types. The size-normalized abundance of the fragmented PE, PP, and EPS particles according to particle size after UV exposure and MA was predictable. Up to 76.5% of the initial EPS volume was unaccounted for in the final volume of pellet produced particle fragments, indicating that a large proportion of the particles had fragmented into undetectable submicron particles.

  12. Particle Size Reduction in Geophysical Granular Flows: The Role of Rock Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, G.; Sklar, L. S.

    2016-12-01

    Particle size reduction in geophysical granular flows is caused by abrasion and fragmentation, and can affect transport dynamics by altering the particle size distribution. While the Sternberg equation is commonly used to predict the mean abrasion rate in the fluvial environment, and can also be applied to geophysical granular flows, predicting the evolution of the particle size distribution requires a better understanding the controls on the rate of fragmentation and the size distribution of resulting particle fragments. To address this knowledge gap we are using single-particle free-fall experiments to test for the influence of particle size, impact velocity, and rock properties on fragmentation and abrasion rates. Rock types tested include granodiorite, basalt, and serpentinite. Initial particle masses and drop heights range from 20 to 1000 grams and 0.1 to 3.0 meters respectively. Preliminary results of free-fall experiments suggest that the probability of fragmentation varies as a power function of kinetic energy on impact. The resulting size distributions of rock fragments can be collapsed by normalizing by initial particle mass, and can be fit with a generalized Pareto distribution. We apply the free-fall results to understand the evolution of granodiorite particle-size distributions in granular flow experiments using rotating drums ranging in diameter from 0.2 to 4.0 meters. In the drums, we find that the rates of silt production by abrasion and gravel production by fragmentation scale with drum size. To compare these rates with free-fall results we estimate the particle impact frequency and velocity. We then use population balance equations to model the evolution of particle size distributions due to the combined effects of abrasion and fragmentation. Finally, we use the free-fall and drum experimental results to model particle size evolution in Inyo Creek, a steep, debris-flow dominated catchment, and compare model results to field measurements.

  13. Flexible fragmentation rules for next-generation OPC: tag prior to fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shih-Ying; Lynn, Eric C.

    2002-07-01

    Fragmentation, cutting polygon edge into piecewise of small segments that are later allowed to move individually, has been widely accepted as the work-around methodology in modern model-based optical proximity correction (OPC) tools. As tuning a model-based OPC recipe, most engineers spend much time on the model fitting to make simulated curves a better fit to empirical data (CD measurements). Most failure cases, however, do not result from a model with bad fitting. Instead it has been frequently found that undesired OPC outcomes were derived from fragmentation process. Tuning fragmentation parameters may not be sufficient to resolve some failure cases since it could be intrinsic issues of the current fragmentation mechanism. An illustrative example is the poor correction of a hammerhead line end, in which current fragmentation mechanisms fail to identify it as a line end and later improper compensation (correction) is installed. Other examples include asymmetric OPC results are frequently found. In the present study, several examples were used to assist the analysis of current fragmentation mechanisms in the aspects of effectiveness and limitations. For the coming 0.1 micron or even more advanced generations of technologies, the role of fragmentation mechanism renders its importance more profoundly. Therefore, more powerful fragmentation mechanism will be one of major factors for the success of OPC process. It is the main goal of this study to propose a new fragmentation mechanism. Edges are tagged specifically according to their environment prior to the process of cutting edge into smaller segments. The pseudo code of the new fragmentation mechanism will be given with detailed descriptions.

  14. Dynamical effects in the Coulomb expansion following nuclear fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.C.; Donangelo, R.; Schechter, H.

    1987-09-01

    The effects of the Coulomb expansion on the fragment kinetic energy spectrum for a fragmentating hot nuclear system is investigated. In particular, /sup 12/C-fragment spectra are calculated and compared with those predicted by the uniform expansion approximation. The results indicate that the energy spectra of fragments are quite sensitive to the details of the Coulomb expansion treatment.

  15. Exploring the temperature dependence of failure mechanisms in fragmenting metal cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David; Chapman, David; Hazell, Paul; Bland, Simon; Eakins, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    We present current work to investigate the influence of temperature on the dynamic fragmentation of metals. Pre-heated/cooled cylinders of Ti-6Al-4V were subjected to rapid radial expansion up to and past the point of failure using a modified expanding insert method on a single stage gas gun. Additional experiments were performed using an electromagnetic drive system to produce uniform deformations on targets of differing dimensions (radius, wall thickness). Issues concerning the geometry of the experiments, methods of heating and cooling the sample and diagnostics are covered. Finally, the role of temperature on adiabatic shear banding and fragment distribution statistics is discussed.

  16. The Zero-Degree Detector System for Fragmentation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Howell, L. W.; Kuznetsov, E.

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of nuclear fragmentation cross sections requires the detection and identification of individual projectile fragments. If light and heavy fragments are recorded in 'ne same detector, it may be impossible distinguish the signal from the light fragment. To overcome this problem, we have developed the Zero-Degree Detector System. The ZDDS enables the measurement of cross sections for light fragment production by using pixelated detectors to separately measure the signals of each fragment. The system has been used to measure the fragmentation of beams as heavy as Fe at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan.

  17. DNA fragment sizing and sorting by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Mark L.; Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Martin, John C.

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for sizing DNA fragments using high speed detection systems, such as flow cytometry to determine unique characteristics of DNA pieces from a sample. In one characterization the DNA piece is fragmented at preselected sites to produce a plurality of DNA fragments. The DNA piece or the resulting DNA fragments are treated with a dye effective to stain stoichiometrically the DNA piece or the DNA fragments. The fluorescence from the dye in the stained fragments is then examined to generate an output functionally related to the number of nucleotides in each one of the DNA fragments. In one embodiment, the intensity of the fluorescence emissions from each fragment is linearly related to the fragment length. The distribution of DNA fragment sizes forms a characterization of the DNA piece for use in forensic and research applications.

  18. Internal energy and fragmentation of ions produced in electrospray sources.

    PubMed

    Gabelica, Valérie; De Pauw, Edwin

    2005-01-01

    This review addresses the determination of the internal energy of ions produced by electrospray ionization (ESI) sources, and the influence of the internal energy on analyte fragmentation. A control of the analyte internal energy is crucial for several applications of electrospray mass spectrometry, like structural studies, construction of reproducible and exportable spectral libraries, analysis of non-covalent complexes. Sections II and III summarize the Electrospray mechanisms and source design considerations which are relevant to the problem of internal energy, and Section IV gives an overview of the inter-relationships between ion internal energy, reaction time scale, and analyte fragmentation. In these three sections we tried to make the most important theoretical elements understandable by all ESI users, and their understanding requires a minimal background in physical chemistry. We then present the different approaches used to experimentally determine the ion internal energy, as well as various attempts in modeling the internal energy uptake in electrospray sources. Finally, a tentative comparison between electrospray and other ionization sources is made. As the reader will see, although many reports appeared on the subject, the knowledge in the field of internal energy of ions produced by soft ionization sources is still scarce, because of the complexity of the system, and this is what makes this area of research so interesting. The last section presents some perspectives for future research.

  19. RNA-level unscrambling of fragmented genes in Diplonema mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kiethega, Georgette N.; Yan, Yifei; Turcotte, Marcel; Burger, Gertraud

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported a unique genome with systematically fragmented genes and gene pieces dispersed across numerous circular chromosomes, occurring in mitochondria of diplonemids. Genes are split into up to 12 short fragments (modules), which are separately transcribed and joined in a way that differs from known trans-splicing. Further, cox1 mRNA includes six non-encoded uridines indicating RNA editing. In the absence of recognizable cis-elements, we postulated that trans-splicing and RNA editing are directed by trans-acting molecules. Here, we provide insight into the post-transcriptional processes by investigating transcription, RNA processing, trans-splicing and RNA editing in cox1 and at a newly discovered site in cob. We show that module precursor transcripts are up to several thousand nt long and processed accurately at their 5′ and 3′ termini to yield the short coding-only regions. Processing at 5′ and 3′ ends occurs independently, and a processed terminus engages in trans-splicing even if the module’s other terminus is yet unprocessed. Moreover, only cognate module transcripts join, though without directionality. In contrast, module transcripts requiring RNA editing only trans-splice when editing is completed. Finally, experimental and computational analyses suggest the existence of RNA trans-factors with the potential for guiding both trans-splicing and RNA editing. PMID:23324603

  20. First assembly times and equilibration in stochastic coagulation-fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D’Orsogna, Maria R.; Lei, Qi; Chou, Tom

    2015-07-07

    We develop a fully stochastic theory for coagulation and fragmentation (CF) in a finite system with a maximum cluster size constraint. The process is modeled using a high-dimensional master equation for the probabilities of cluster configurations. For certain realizations of total mass and maximum cluster sizes, we find exact analytical results for the expected equilibrium cluster distributions. If coagulation is fast relative to fragmentation and if the total system mass is indivisible by the mass of the largest allowed cluster, we find a mean cluster-size distribution that is strikingly broader than that predicted by the corresponding mass-action equations. Combinations of total mass and maximum cluster size under which equilibration is accelerated, eluding late-stage coarsening, are also delineated. Finally, we compute the mean time it takes particles to first assemble into a maximum-sized cluster. Through careful state-space enumeration, the scaling of mean assembly times is derived for all combinations of total mass and maximum cluster size. We find that CF accelerates assembly relative to monomer kinetic only in special cases. All of our results hold in the infinite system limit and can be only derived from a high-dimensional discrete stochastic model, highlighting how classical mass-action models of self-assembly can fail.

  1. Identification of B. anthracis N(5)-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide mutase (PurE) active site binding compounds via fragment library screening.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hao; Jones, Christopher; Zhu, Tian; Patel, Kavankumar; Wolf, Nina M; Fung, Leslie W-M; Lee, Hyun; Johnson, Michael E

    2016-02-15

    The de novo purine biosynthesis pathway is an attractive target for antibacterial drug design, and PurE from this pathway has been identified to be crucial for Bacillus anthracis survival in serum. In this study we adopted a fragment-based hit discovery approach, using three screening methods-saturation transfer difference nucleus magnetic resonance (STD-NMR), water-ligand observed via gradient spectroscopy (WaterLOGSY) NMR, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), against B. anthracis PurE (BaPurE) to identify active site binding fragments by initially testing 352 compounds in a Zenobia fragment library. Competition STD NMR with the BaPurE product effectively eliminated non-active site binding hits from the primary hits, selecting active site binders only. Binding affinities (dissociation constant, KD) of these compounds varied between 234 and 301μM. Based on test results from the Zenobia compounds, we subsequently developed and applied a streamlined fragment screening strategy to screen a much larger library consisting of 3000 computationally pre-selected fragments. Thirteen final fragment hits were confirmed to exhibit binding affinities varying from 14μM to 700μM, which were categorized into five different basic scaffolds. All thirteen fragment hits have ligand efficiencies higher than 0.30. We demonstrated that at least two fragments from two different scaffolds exhibit inhibitory activity against the BaPurE enzyme.

  2. Vocabularies Clashing: "The Fragmented Generation" Describes Itself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    After reading Scott Seider and Howard Gardner's essay "The Fragmented Generation" (2009) in a college freshman writing class, students responded by providing their own labels for their generation. This article includes excerpts from their essays. Following these excerpts is the instructor's theoretical justification for this kind of classroom…

  3. [Fragmented QRS. Relevance in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Steger, Alexander; Sinnecker, Daniel; Berkefeld, Anna; Müller, Alexander; Gebhardt, Josef; Dommasch, Michael; Huster, Katharina M; Barthel, Petra; Schmidt, Georg

    2015-09-01

    The QRS complex represents the electrical depolarization of ventricular myocardium. In the case of an undisturbed depolarization, the QRS complex has a normal configuration and duration, but abnormal electrical conduction leads to widening of the QRS complex. The block of one of the Tawara branches results in a typical bundle branch block pattern. A QRS complex that cannot be classified as bundle branch block due to an atypical configuration and contains notched R or S waves is called a fragmented QRS. The underlying pathophysiologies are manifold and include myocardial scars induced by ischemic heart disease, myocardial fibrosis due to other diseases, primary cardiac pathologies as well as systemic diseases with cardiac involvement. Pathologies on the cellular level, such as ion channel dysfunctions, also correlate with fragmented QRS. Besides the diagnostic relevance, fragmented QRS is known to have prognostic properties, for example in identifying high risk patients with coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, Brugada syndrome and acquired long QT syndrome; however, fragmented QRS may also be detected in ECGs of healthy individuals.

  4. Fragman: an R package for fragment analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Determination of microsatellite lengths or other DNA fragment types is an important initial component of many genetic studies such as mutation detection, linkage and QTL mapping, genetic diversity, pedigree analysis, and detection of heterozygosity. A handful of commercial and freely available softw...

  5. Enriching screening libraries with bioactive fragment space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Zhao, Hongtao

    2016-08-01

    By deconvoluting 238,073 bioactive molecules in the ChEMBL library into extended Murcko ring systems, we identified a set of 2245 ring systems present in at least 10 molecules. These ring systems belong to 2221 clusters by ECFP4 fingerprints with a minimum intracluster similarity of 0.8. Their overlap with ring systems in commercial libraries was further quantified. Our findings suggest that success of a small fragment library is driven by the convergence of effective coverage of bioactive ring systems (e.g., 10% coverage by 1000 fragments vs. 40% by 2million HTS compounds), high enrichment of bioactive ring systems, and low molecular complexity enhancing the probability of a match with the protein targets. Reconciling with the previous studies, bioactive ring systems are underrepresented in screening libraries. As such, we propose a library of virtual fragments with key functionalities via fragmentation of bioactive molecules. Its utility is exemplified by a prospective application on protein kinase CK2, resulting in the discovery of a series of novel inhibitors with the most potent compound having an IC50 of 0.5μM and a ligand efficiency of 0.41kcal/mol per heavy atom. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA fragmentation by charged particle tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenerlöw, B.; Höglund, E.; Carlsson, J.

    High-LET (linear energy transfer) charged particles induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in a non-random fashion in mammalian cells. The clustering of DSB, probably determined by track structure as well as chromatin conformation, results in an excess of small- and intermediate-sized DNA fragments. DNA fragmentation in normal human fibroblasts (GM5758) was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after irradiation with photons ( 60Co) or 125 keV/μm nitrogen ions. Compared to conventional DSB analysis, i.e. assays only measuring the fraction of DNA smaller than a single threshold, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for DSB induction increased with 100%. Further, the size distribution of DNA fragments showed a significant dependence on radiation quality, with an excess of fragments up to 1 Mbp. Irradiation of naked genomic DNA without histone proteins increased the DSB yields 25 and 13 times for photons and nitrogen ions, respectively. The results suggest possible roles of both track structure and chromatin organization in the distribution of DNA double-strand breaks along the chromosome.

  7. Achieving climate connectivity in a fragmented landscape.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jenny L; Lawler, Joshua J; McRae, Brad H; Nuñez, Tristan A; Theobald, David M

    2016-06-28

    The contiguous United States contains a disconnected patchwork of natural lands. This fragmentation by human activities limits species' ability to track suitable climates as they rapidly shift. However, most models that project species movement needs have not examined where fragmentation will limit those movements. Here, we quantify climate connectivity, the capacity of landscape configuration to allow species movement in the face of dynamically shifting climate. Using this metric, we assess to what extent habitat fragmentation will limit species movements in response to climate change. We then evaluate how creating corridors to promote climate connectivity could potentially mitigate these restrictions, and we assess where strategies to increase connectivity will be most beneficial. By analyzing fragmentation patterns across the contiguous United States, we demonstrate that only 41% of natural land area retains enough connectivity to allow plants and animals to maintain climatic parity as the climate warms. In the eastern United States, less than 2% of natural area is sufficiently connected. Introducing corridors to facilitate movement through human-dominated regions increases the percentage of climatically connected natural area to 65%, with the most impactful gains in low-elevation regions, particularly in the southeastern United States. These climate connectivity analyses allow ecologists and conservation practitioners to determine the most effective regions for increasing connectivity. More importantly, our findings demonstrate that increasing climate connectivity is critical for allowing species to track rapidly changing climates, reconfiguring habitats to promote access to suitable climates.

  8. Fragmentation and hydration of tektites and microtektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, B.P.; Muenow, D.W.; Bohor, B.F.; Meeker, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    An examination of data collected over the last 30 years indicates that the percent of glass fragments vs. whole splash forms in the Cenozoic microtektite strewn fields increases towards the source crater (or source region). We propose that this is due to thermal stress produced when tektites and larger microtektites fall into water near the source crater while still relatively hot (>1150 ??C). We also find evidence (low major oxide totals, frothing when melted) for hydration of most of the North American tektite fragments and microtektites found in marine sediments. High-temperature mass spectrometry indicates that these tektite fragments and microtektites contain up to 3.8 wt% H2O. The H2O-release behavior during the high-temperature mass-spectrometric analysis, plus high Cl abundances (???0.05 wt%), indicate that the North. American tektite fragments and microtektites were hydrated in the marine environment (i.e., the H2O was not trapped solely on quenching from a melt). The younger Ivory Coast and Australasian microtektites do not exhibit much evidence of hydration (at least not in excess of 0.5 wt% H2O); this suggests that the degree of hydration increases with age. In addition, we find that some glass spherules (with 65 wt% SiO2 can undergo simple hydration in the marine environment, while impact glasses (with <65 wt% SiO2) can also undergo palagonitization.

  9. Fragmentation of Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Erich J.; Ho, Tin-Lun; Ueda, Masahito; Baym, Gordon

    2006-09-01

    We present the theory of bosonic systems with multiple condensates, providing a unified description of various model systems that are found in the literature. We discuss how degeneracies, interactions, and symmetries conspire to give rise to this unusual behavior. We show that as degeneracies multiply, so do the varieties of fragmentation, eventually leading to strongly correlated states with no trace of condensation.

  10. Vocabularies Clashing: "The Fragmented Generation" Describes Itself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    After reading Scott Seider and Howard Gardner's essay "The Fragmented Generation" (2009) in a college freshman writing class, students responded by providing their own labels for their generation. This article includes excerpts from their essays. Following these excerpts is the instructor's theoretical justification for this kind of classroom…

  11. Conformational studies of cellulosic fragments by DFT

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The study of cellulosic fragments by DFTr is a continuation of our efforts to produce quality structural data that will be valuable to those working in the field of cellulose structure and enzymatic degradation. Using a reduced basis set and density functional DFTr (B3LYP), optimization of cellulosi...

  12. DFT STUDIES OF DP-3 AMYLOSE FRAGMENTS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study extends our work on mono- and disaccharides to structures with three glucose residues by two alpha-[1-4] bridges, denoted herein as DP-3's. DFT optimization studies of DP-3 fragments have been carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. Different hydroxymethyl conformations (gg...

  13. Modelling of the PELE fragmentation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreault, J.

    2014-05-01

    The Penetrator with Enhanced Lateral Effect (PELE) is a type of explosive-free projectile that undergoes radial fragmentation upon an impact with a target plate. This type of projectile is composed of a brittle cylindrical shell (the jacket) filled in its core with a material characterized with a large Poisson's ratio. Upon an impact with a target, the axial compression causes the filling to expand in the radial direction. However, due to the brittleness of the jacket material, very little radial deformation can occur which creates a radial stress between the two materials and a hoop stress in the jacket. Fragmentation of the jacket occurs if the hoop stress exceeds the material's ultimate stress. The PELE fragmentation dynamics is explored via Finite-Element Method (FEM) simulations using the Autodyn explicit dynamics hydrocode. The numerical results are compared with an analytical model based on wave interactions, as well as with the experimental investigation of Paulus and Schirm (1996). The comparison is based on the mechanical stress in the filling and the qualitative fragmentation of the jacket.

  14. RESPONSE TO "THE OPTIMAL FRAGMENTATION PRINCIPLE".

    EPA Science Inventory

    Response to "The Optimal Fragmentation Principle"

    To follow up on my comment to Dale Johnson and to respond to his entertaining and provocative letter, I confess to some frustration in seeing a show-and-tell of a sophisticated tool for data mining and exploration, without ...

  15. Dynamic rock fragmentation: oil shale applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boade, R. R.; Grady, D. E.; Kipp, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Explosive rock fragmentation techniques used in many resource recovery operations have in the past relied heavily upon traditions of field experience for their design. As these resources, notably energy resources, become less accessible, it becomes increasingly important that fragmentation techniques be optimized and that methods be developed to effectively evaluate new or modified explosive deployment schemes. Computational procedures have significant potential in these areas, but practical applications must be preceded by a thorough understanding of the rock fracture phenomenon and the development of physically sound computational models. This paper presents some of the important features of a rock fragmentation model that was developed as part of a program directed at the preparation of subterranean beds for in situ processing of oil shale. The model, which has been implemented in a two-dimensional Lagrangian wavecode, employs a continuum damage concept to quantify the degree of fracturing and takes into account experimental observations that fracture strength and fragment dimensions depend on tensile strain rates. The basic premises of the model are considered in the paper as well as some comparisons between calculated results and observations from blasting experiments.

  16. Modified Fragmentation Function from Quark Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Wang, Enke; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-07-26

    Within the framework of the constituent quark model, it isshown that the single hadron fragmentation function of a parton can beexpressed as a convolution of shower diquark or triquark distributionfunction and quark recombination probability, if the interference betweenamplitudes of quark recombination with different momenta is neglected.Therecombination probability is determined by the hadron's wavefunction inthe constituent quark model. The shower diquark or triquark distributionfunctions of a fragmenting jet are defined in terms of overlappingmatrices of constituent quarks and parton field operators. They aresimilar in form to dihadron or trihadron fragmentation functions in termsof parton operator and hadron states. Extending the formalism to thefield theory at finite temperature, we automatically derive contributionsto the effective single hadron fragmentation function from therecombination of shower and thermal constituent quarks. Suchcontributions involve single or diquark distribution functions which inturn can be related to diquark or triquark distribution functions via sumrules. We also derive QCD evolution equations for quark distributionfunctions that in turn determine the evolution of the effective jetfragmentation functions in a thermal medium.

  17. Physical laws of cholesterol gallstone fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Neubrand, M; Greinwald, I; Lobentanzer, H; Paumgartner, G; Hermeking, H; Sauerbruch, T

    1997-03-01

    Efficient fragmentation is the most important prerequisite for successful treatment of gallstones by extracorporeally induced shock waves. No data are available on the amount of energy necessary for stone disintegration and on the threshold energy below which no further fragmentation occurs. We therefore performed an in vitro investigation on human cholesterol gallstones to elucidate physical laws governing shock-wave lithotripsy. First, the focal pressure of the lithotripter was measured to calculate the energy traversing a stone. Second, 96 gallstones from 16 gall bladders were analysed with respect to physicochemical composition, radiological features and ultrasound before fragmentation was performed. Energy for stone disintegration was constant within each stone family but varied between 4.6 mL-1 and 36.8J mL-1 in different families. This energy correlated linearly with stone volume. None of the radiological and physicochemical factors revealed a clear-cut correlation of the different energies necessary for similar stone disintegration. The threshold energy differed between 0.26 mJ and 1.04 mJ per pulse. In conclusion, stone volume was the best parameter predicting stone fragmentation. However, in cholesterol stones with a similar composition the required energy per volume varies considerably together with the threshold energy. Radiological and ultrasound parameters appear to be of minor importance in explaining these differences.

  18. The injection of asteroid fragments into resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinella, P.; Gonczi, R.; Froeschle, Ch.; Froeschle, C.

    1993-02-01

    A model is presented for the ejection of fragments from impact cratering or breakup of existing asteroids and the chance insertion of the escaping fragments into the 'dangerous' regions of the phase spaces close to the 3:1 and g = g6 resonances, where chaotic behavior may arise. It is found that both resonances are effective channels for fragment collection and delivery and their efficiencies are of the same order of magnitude, but they sample in a different way the orbital elements and the physical properties of the parent objects. Although this depends on the poorly known size distribution of small asteroids, it seems possible that a large fraction of near-earth asteroids and meteorites are generated by a small sample of the asteroid population, mostly located in the vicinity of resonances, whose average properties do not necessarily coincide with those of the general population. The g = g6 resonance is probably an effective fragment delivery channel in the moderate-inclination regions near 2.4 and 2.7 AU and near the inner edge of the belt.

  19. Achieving climate connectivity in a fragmented landscape

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, Joshua J.; McRae, Brad H.; Nuñez, Tristan A.; Theobald, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The contiguous United States contains a disconnected patchwork of natural lands. This fragmentation by human activities limits species’ ability to track suitable climates as they rapidly shift. However, most models that project species movement needs have not examined where fragmentation will limit those movements. Here, we quantify climate connectivity, the capacity of landscape configuration to allow species movement in the face of dynamically shifting climate. Using this metric, we assess to what extent habitat fragmentation will limit species movements in response to climate change. We then evaluate how creating corridors to promote climate connectivity could potentially mitigate these restrictions, and we assess where strategies to increase connectivity will be most beneficial. By analyzing fragmentation patterns across the contiguous United States, we demonstrate that only 41% of natural land area retains enough connectivity to allow plants and animals to maintain climatic parity as the climate warms. In the eastern United States, less than 2% of natural area is sufficiently connected. Introducing corridors to facilitate movement through human-dominated regions increases the percentage of climatically connected natural area to 65%, with the most impactful gains in low-elevation regions, particularly in the southeastern United States. These climate connectivity analyses allow ecologists and conservation practitioners to determine the most effective regions for increasing connectivity. More importantly, our findings demonstrate that increasing climate connectivity is critical for allowing species to track rapidly changing climates, reconfiguring habitats to promote access to suitable climates. PMID:27298349

  20. Fragmentation of parton jets at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, R.

    1985-08-01

    The parton fragmentation function is calculated in the region of small x in the doubly logarithmic approximation of QCD. For this, the method of separating the softest particle, which has hitherto been applied only in the Regge kinematic region, is developed. Simple arguments based on unitarity and gauge invariance are used to derive the well known condition of ordering of the emission angles.