Science.gov

Sample records for fragments stabs final

  1. Stab or throw? Biomechanical studies on the injuring potential of glass fragments.

    PubMed

    Sterzik, Vera; Kneubuehl, Beat; Rupp, Wolf; Bohnert, Michael

    2010-06-15

    During a Christmas party, two male guests started fighting. The perpetrator was allegedly pushed onto a glass table by the victim or fell into the table together with that man so that the glass top broke and caused a cut wound on the perpetrator's back. According to his statement he then threw a fragment of the broken glass table in the direction of the other man hitting him accidentally in a way so that the subclavian artery was severed and he died from exsanguination. Tests on the breaking characteristics of the glass table, the flying behaviour and the kinetics of thrown glass fragments conducted on various models supported the conclusion that the fatal injury on the victim's neck could not have been caused by a thrown glass fragment. It was much more likely that a stab with a blade-shaped glass fragment was the cause of the fatal injuries.

  2. Pressure-balanced stab connection

    SciTech Connect

    Best, M.J.A.; Jones, R.H.; Hynes, J.H.; Pond, R.J.; Gordon, C.R.

    1987-09-22

    This patent describes an apparatus for sealingly connecting a flow bore of a wellhead to a flowline. It consists of: a stab member including a stab body. The stab body has a stab body bore. One end of the stab body bore exiting from the stab body and being in fluid communication with the flow bore and the other end of the stab body bore exiting from a side of the stab body through a stab body side port; a stab receptacle mounted on the wellhead and having a stab receiving bore for receiving the stab body; the stab receptacle having a receptacle flow bore. One end of the receptacle flow bore being in fluid communication with the stab receiving bore and the other end of the receptacle flow bore exiting the stab receptacle and being in fluid communication with the flowline; means for establishing fluid communication between the stab body side port and the one end of the receptacle flow bore when the stab body is received within the stab receiving bore. It includes means disposed on the stab member for orienting the stab member with respect to the Christmas tree for ensuring the alignment of the stab body side port with the one end of the receptable flow bore when the stab body is received within the stab receiving bore; and first and second sealing means disposed on the stab body above and below the stab body side port, respectively, for sealing engagement with the walls of the stab receiving bore above and below the one end of the receptable flow bore for establishing a non-blow-apart, fluid pressure sealed flow passage between the stab body bore of the stab member and the receptacle flow bore of the stab receptacle when the stab body is landed within the stab receiving bore.

  3. Back stab

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Susitna; Baerlocher, Mark Otto; Asch, Murray R.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the evidence supporting use of percutaneous vertebroplasty for relief of pain and mechanical stability in patients with vertebral compression fractures unrelieved by conventional measures. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE Ovid MEDLINE was searched from January 1966 to December2006 for all English-language papers on vertebroplasty. The quality of evidence in these papers was graded according to the 4-point classification system of evidence-based medicine. Level II evidence currently supports use of vertebroplasty. MAIN MESSAGE Vertebroplasty alleviates pain from vertebral compression fractures that result from osteoporosis, hemangiomas, malignancies, and vertebral osteonecrosis. Vertebroplasty has provided substantial pain relief in 60% to 100% of patients; has decreasedanalgesic use in 34% to 91% of patients; and has improved physical mobility in 29% to 100% of patients. Contraindications to vertebroplasty include asymptomatic compression fractures of the vertebral body, vertebra plana, retropulsed bone fragments or tumours, active infection, uncorrectable coagulopathy, allergy to the bone cement or opacification agent, severe cardiopulmonary disease, pregnancy, and pre-existing radiculopathy. The short-term complication rate was found to be 0.5% to 54%. Rare but serious complications include compression of the spinal cord or nerve root, infection, cement embolization causing pulmonary infarct and clinical symptoms, paradoxical embolization of the cerebral artery, and severe hematomas. CONCLUSION Vertebroplasty is a safe and effective treatment for vertebral fractures that cannot be treated using conservative measures. PMID:17872813

  4. [Experimental stab wound].

    PubMed

    Hirt, Miroslav; Vorel, František; Zelený, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Stab wounds caused by knives and daggers are usually of different appearances. The knife wound has one edge sharp while the second one is blunt. The wound caused by blow of dagger has both edges sharp. The forensic expert must very often decide whether the knife or dagger was used. The aim of this experimental work was to show how a single-edged knife penetrates the skin and causes the wound typical for the double-edged dagger. The fact was verified. The wound typical for dagger can be found if the knife is used only according to the scheme. The forensic expert can say that a one cutting edge knife was used if the one edge of wound is squared and the other one is sharp. If the both of them are sharp, forensic expert must be very careful in his decision.Key words: stab wounds - knife - dagger - forensic expertise. PMID:25671417

  5. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A

    2005-12-21

    Many energetic systems can be activated via mechanical means. Percussion primers in small caliber ammunition and stab detonators used in medium caliber ammunition are just two examples. Current medium caliber (20-60mm) munitions are detonated through the use of impact sensitive stab detonators. Stab detonators are very sensitive and must be small, as to meet weight and size limitations. A mix of energetic powders, sensitive to mechanical stimulus, is typically used to ignite such devices. Stab detonators are mechanically activated by forcing a firing pin through the closure disc of the device and into the stab initiating mix. Rapid heating caused by mechanically driven compression and friction of the mixture results in its ignition. The rapid decomposition of these materials generates a pressure/temperature pulse that is sufficient to initiate a transfer charge, which has enough output energy to detonate the main charge. This general type of ignition mix is used in a large variety of primers, igniters, and detonators.[1] Common primer mixes, such as NOL-130, are made up of lead styphnate (basic) 40%, lead azide (dextrinated) 20%, barium nitrate 20%, antimony sulfide 15%, and tetrazene 5%.[1] These materials pose acute and chronic toxicity hazards during mixing of the composition and later in the item life cycle after the item has been field functioned. There is an established need to replace these mixes on toxicity, health, and environmental hazard grounds. This effort attempts to demonstrate that environmentally acceptable energetic solgel coated flash metal multilayer nanocomposites can be used to replace current impact initiated devices (IIDs), which have hazardous and toxic components. Successful completion of this project will result in IIDs that include innocuous compounds, have sufficient output energy for initiation, meet current military specifications, are small, cost competitive, and perform as well as or better than current devices. We expect flash

  6. Biomechanics of knife stab attacks.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, E K; Nicol, A C; Lane, J V; Gray, T G

    1999-10-25

    Equipment, materials and methods for the measurement of the biomechanical parameters governing knife stab attacks have been developed and data have been presented that are relevant to the improvement of standards for the testing of stab-resistant materials. A six-camera Vicon motion analysis system was used to measure velocity, and derive energy and momentum during the approach phase of the attack and a specially developed force-measuring knife was used to measure three-dimensional forces and torque during the impact phase. The body segments associated with the knife were modelled as a series of rigid segments: trunk, upper arm, forearm and hand. The velocities of these segments, together with knowledge of the mass distribution from biomechanical tables, allowed the calculation of the individual segment energy and momentum values. The instrumented knife measured four components of load: axial force (along the length of the blade), cutting force (parallel to the breadth of the blade), lateral force (across the blade) and torque (twisting action) using foil strain gauges. Twenty volunteers were asked to stab a target with near maximal effort. Three styles of stab were used: a short thrust forward, a horizontal style sweep around the body and an overhand stab. These styles were chosen based on reported incidents, providing more realistic data than had previously existed. The 95th percentile values for axial force and energy were 1885 N and 69 J, respectively. The ability of current test methods to reproduce the mechanical parameters measured in human stab attacks has been assessed. It was found that current test methods could reproduce the range of energy and force values measured in the human stab attacks, although the simulation was not accurate in some respects. Non-axial force and torque values were also found to be significant in the human tests, but these are not reproduced in the standard mechanical tests.

  7. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E

    2006-07-07

    The coupling of energetic metallic multilayers (a.k.a. flash metal) with energetic sol-gel synthesis and processing is an entirely new approach to forming energetic devices for several DoD and DOE needs. They are also practical and commercially viable manufacturing techniques. Improved occupational safety and health, performance, reliability, reproducibility, and environmentally acceptable processing can be achieved using these methodologies and materials. The development and fielding of this technology will enhance mission readiness and reduce the costs, environmental risks and the necessity of resolving environmental concerns related to maintaining military readiness while simultaneously enhancing safety and health. Without sacrificing current performance, we will formulate new impact initiated device (IID) compositions to replace materials from the current composition that pose significant environmental, health, and safety problems associated with functions such as synthesis, material receipt, storage, handling, processing into the composition, reaction products from testing, and safe disposal. To do this, we will advance the use of nanocomposite preparation via the use of multilayer flash metal and sol-gel technologies and apply it to new small IIDs. This work will also serve to demonstrate that these technologies and resultant materials are relevant and practical to a variety of energetic needs of DoD and DOE. The goal will be to produce an IID whose composition is acceptable by OSHA, EPA, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Recovery Act, etc. standards, without sacrificing current performance. The development of environmentally benign stab detonators and igniters will result in the removal of hazardous and toxic components associated with their manufacturing, handling, and use. This will lead to improved worker safety during manufacturing as well as reduced exposure of Service personnel during their storage and or use in operations. The

  8. Stab Sensitivity of Energetic Nanolaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A; Barbee, T; Cervantes, O

    2006-05-22

    This work details the stab ignition, small-scale safety, and energy release characteristics of bimetallic Al/Ni(V) and Al/Monel energetic nanolaminate freestanding thin films. The influence of the engineered nanostructural features of the energetic multilayers is correlated with both stab initiation and small-scale energetic materials testing results. Structural parameters of the energetic thin films found to be important include the bi-layer period, total thickness of the film, and presence or absence of aluminum coating layers. In general the most sensitive nanolaminates were those that were relatively thick, possessed fine bi-layer periods, and were not coated. Energetic nanolaminates were tested for their stab sensitivity as freestanding continuous parts and as coarse powders. The stab sensitivity of mock M55 detonators loaded with energetic nanolaminate was found to depend strongly upon both the particle size of the material and the configuration of nanolaminate material, in the detonator cup. In these instances stab ignition was observed with input energies as low as 5 mJ for a coarse powder with an average particle dimension of 400 {micro}m. Selected experiments indicate that the reacting nanolaminate can be used to ignite other energetic materials such as sol-gel nanostructured thermite, and conventional thermite that was either coated onto the multilayer substrate or pressed on it. These results demonstrate that energetic nanolaminates can be tuned to have precise and controlled ignition thresholds and can initiate other energetic materials and therefore are viable candidates as lead-free impact initiated igniters or detonators.

  9. Differentiation of serrated and non-serrated blades from stab marks in bone.

    PubMed

    Thompson, T J U; Inglis, J

    2009-03-01

    Although evidence of sharp-force trauma on the human body, particularly the skeleton, can be extremely useful in providing information regarding the manner and context of death, there is still a lack of necessary detail available to the investigator. Using ribs, radii, scapulae, vertebrae and carpal bones, this study demonstrated that distinctions could be made between the stab marks left by serrated blades and those of non-serrated blades. Low power and scanning electron microscopy were used to record distinctive 'T'-shaped stab marks from non-serrated blades and 'Y'-shaped stab marks from serrated blades. In addition, elemental evidence of the presence of the blade in the stab-mark kerf was recoverable even when no metal fragment was visible.

  10. Intracranial complications of transorbital stab wounds.

    PubMed Central

    De Villiers, J C; Sevel, D

    1975-01-01

    Oscular and orbital injuries due to stab wounds may mask underlying serious intracranial damage. The correct clinical assessment and treatment of such cases require the attention of a team comprising a neurosurgeon, ophthalmologist, otolaryngologist, and plastic surgeon. Images PMID:1125159

  11. Forensic evidence in apparel fabrics due to stab events.

    PubMed

    Kemp, S E; Carr, D J; Kieser, J; Niven, B E; Taylor, M C

    2009-10-30

    Stab injuries and fatalities have been reported to be the most common crimes of violence in several countries, particularly in those where access to firearms is restricted [J.M. Taupin, F.-P. Adolf, J. Robertson, Examination of damage to textiles, in: J. Robertson, M. Grieve (Eds.), Forensic Examination of Fibres, CRC Press, United States of America, 1999, pp. 65-87; A.C. Hunt, R.J. Cowling, Murder by stabbing, Forensic Sci. Int. 52 (1991) 107-112; D.A. Rouse, Patterns of stab wounds: a six year study, Med. Sci. Law 34 (1994) 67-71]. Analysis of damaged apparel may provide important information about the cause of death and the events leading up to and after the victim's final moments [M.T. Pailthorpe, N.A.G. Johnson, The private forensic scientist and the criminal justice system, in: D. Biles, J. Vernon (Eds.), Private Sector and Community Involvement in the Criminal Justice System: Conference Proceedings, vol. 23, Australian Institute of Criminology, Wellington, 1994, 231-240]. A high proportion of stab wounds occur in the chest and as this area is generally clothed many sharp force cases involve damage to fabrics [J.M. Taupin, F.-P. Adolf, J. Robertson, Examination of damage to textiles, in: J. Robertson, M. Grieve (Eds.), Forensic Examination of Fibres, CRC Press, United States of America, 1999, pp. 65-87; A.C. Hunt, R.J. Cowling, Murder by stabbing, Forensic Sci. Int. 52 (1991) 107-112; D.A. Rouse, Patterns of stab wounds: a six year study, Med. Sci. Law 34 (1994) 67-71]. The structural stabilisation and degradation of fabric due to laundering significantly alters fabric properties [S.E. Gore, R.M. Laing, C.A. Wilson, D.J. Carr, B.E. Niven, Standardizing a pre-treatment cleaning procedure and effects of application on apparel fabrics, Text. Res. J. 76 (2006) 455-464], yet the effect of such on severance morphology does not appear to have been investigated. In this work the effect of blade type (hunting knife, kitchen knife, screwdriver) on new and laundered

  12. FY04&05 LDRD Final Report Fission Fragment Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B; Trelenberg, T; Meier, T; Felter, T; Sturgeon, J; Kuboda, A; Wolfer, B

    2006-02-22

    Fission fragments born within the first 7 {micro}m of the surface of U metal can eject a thousand or more atoms per fission event. Existing data in the literature show that the sputtering yield ranges from 10 to 10,000 atoms per fission event near the surface, but nothing definitive is known about the energy of the sputtered clusters. Experimental packages were constructed allowing the neutron irradiation of natural uranium foils to investigate the amount of material removed per fission event and the kinetic energy distribution of the sputtered atoms. Samples were irradiated but were never analyzed after irradiation. Similar experiments were attempted in a non-radioactive environment using accelerator driven ions in place of fission induced fragments. These experiments showed that tracks produced parallel to the surface (and not perpendicular to the surface) are the primary source of the resulting particulate ejecta. Modeling studies were conducted in parallel with the experimental work. Because the reactor irradiation experiments were not analyzed, data on the energy of the resulting particulate ejecta was not obtained. However, some data was found in the literature on self sputtering of {sup 252}Cf that was used to estimate the velocity and hence the energy of the ejected particulates. Modeling of the data in the literature showed that the energy of the ejecta was much lower than had been anticipated. A mechanism to understand the nature of the ejecta was pursued. Initially it was proposed that the fission fragment imparts its momenta on the electrons which then impart their momenta on the nuclei. Once the nuclei are in motion, the particulate ejecta would result. This initial model was wrong. The error was in the assumption that the secondary electrons impart their momenta directly on the nuclei. Modeling and theoretical considerations showed that the secondary electrons scatter many times before imparting all their momenta. As a result, their energy transfer is

  13. Emergency surgery for stab wounds to the heart.

    PubMed Central

    Reece, I. J.; Davidson, K. G.

    1983-01-01

    A cardiac stab wound is an uncommon and potentially lethal injury. With appropriate treatment, better than 90% of those admitted alive will survive. This paper outlines the presentation and management of patients with cardiac stab wounds, based on the experience of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary and a review of the literature, illustrated by relevant case histories. PMID:6614765

  14. The effect of fabric and stabbing variables on severance appearance.

    PubMed

    Cowper, E J; Carr, D J; Horsfall, I; Fergusson, S M

    2015-04-01

    During a stabbing, apparel fabrics are usually damaged and may be penetrated. Despite numerous studies considering forces required to penetrate skin and human stabbing performance, none have systematically evaluated which variables affect severance appearance from a textile science perspective using a human stabbing participant assessment. Although the human performance aspects of stabbing attacks have been previously studied, there has been a bias towards male assailants. The effects of fabric elasticity and tension applied have been identified as major factors influencing the severance profile in the fabric resulting from a stab attack. However, previous studies have considered limited fabric types with little emphasis on the physical and mechanical textile properties. The purpose of the current research was to use a human participant study (male n=5; female n=5) to determine the effect of fabric extension (0%, 10%) on the severance profile. Fabric type (single jersey; 100% cotton; 93% cotton/7% elastane), age (not laundered; laundered 60 times) and knife type (carving, bread) were also considered. Severance length was affected by participant sex, fabric type, laundering and knife type. The severances formed in this study were not significantly affected by the amount a fabric was extended when stabbed. Variability was observed in the severance appearance among participants where prior training influenced the angle of impact and knife withdrawal technique.

  15. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion.

  16. Epidemic of stab injuries: an Alice Springs dilemma.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Abraham O; Boseto, Fred; Ollapallil, Jacob

    2007-08-01

    This study is unique in that it strives to unfold, perhaps for the first time, the problem of stab injuries and resultant significant mortality and morbidity within the Aboriginal population of Central Australia. Demographic features presented in the study are quite different from other published Australasian and overseas experiences. There were 1550 stab injury admissions to Alice Springs Hospital during a 7-year period (July 1998 to June 2005). Thirty-two patients were dead before arrival, and there were only three deaths in the hospital during the period of study. The most unique demographic feature was that 99.99% were Aborigines, 53% were women and the most common location of injury was in town camps and homes. The mean age of this population was 31 years, and the average length of stay in hospital was 3 days. The most common site of the stab injuries was the thigh with a total of 605 (38%). Stab injuries to the abdomen were significantly low with 68 (<1%). Twenty-one per cent (332) presented 24 h to 10 days after stabbing. Another 21% (335) absconded before the completion of treatment. Of the victims, 31% (481) were under the influence of alcohol. Twenty per cent (311) of the patients presented with repeat stabbings during the study period. Traditional punishment is still practised in Central Australia and thus explains the high number of thigh injuries. A particular pattern of traditional stab injuries was also noted; medial thigh to kill, posterior thigh to permanently disable and lateral thigh to punish. Rampant alcoholism and social and family breakdown are thought to be significant contributors to the high incidence of violence in Alice Springs. There were only five firearm traumas during this period, two were self-inflicted and three were accidental. PMID:17635272

  17. [Survived stab to the heart in a schizophrenic man].

    PubMed

    Fieseler, Sybille; Zinka, Bettina; Kunz, Sebastian N

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with a significant risk of suicide. According to recent research, 10-15 % of all schizophrenic patients die by suicide. It is not uncommon that the victims show sharp force injuries, so that the forensic pathologist first has to differentiate between self-infliction and involvement of another person. The authors' case report presents a 68-year-old schizophrenic patient who committed suicide by jumping out of a window of his apartment located on the second floor after inflicting multiple stab wounds to his thoracic region. At autopsy, an older stab wound to the apex of the heart was detected. In the criminal investigation, a suicide attempt made 13 days before could be ascertained. As the patient did not want to be taken to a hospital at that time, the injury had never been examined or documented. Since there was no evidence suggesting homicide, the older stab to the heart was interpreted as a tentative injury. PMID:22039699

  18. Assessment of Reporting, Attitudes and Knowledge About the Stab Incidents and Professional Risk of Viral Infection among Health Care Professionals in Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Becirovic, Sabina; Pranjic, Nurka; Sarajlic-Spahic, Selvedina; Ahmetagic, Sead; Huseinagic, Senad

    2013-01-01

    Conflict of interest: none declared. Goal The goal of the research is to determine the relationship between frequency and reporting of stab incidents, attitudes and knowledge about stab incidents and occupational risk for transmission of viral infection with HBV, HCV or HIV among health care professionals employed in primary health care. Material and methods Conducted is prospective, cross-section study by questionnaires in 2012. The survey included health professionals in Primary Health Care Center in Tuzla. The final sample has 131 respondents (85% women). Statistical analysis was performed using the statistical package SPSS version 20.0. Results The prevalence rate of stab incidents throughout their career in our study was 66%; while the rate of reported incidents was 4.83 ˜ 5 times lower than the actual prevalence. In 49 out of 87 cases this was a case of hollow needle prick. The most common causes of stab incidents are the time pressure, unforeseen reactions of patients and lack of concentration. Conclusion Stab incidents are often not reported in in developing countries. Training in order to raise awareness and knowledge about the problem, proper procedures, good organization of work and anti-stress program, safer disposal, conducting prophylaxis before and after exposure monitored by the relevant institutions of occupational medicine should contribute to solving this problem. PMID:24082835

  19. The effect of knife handle shape on stabbing performance.

    PubMed

    Horsfall, Ian; Watson, Celia; Champion, Steve; Prosser, Philip; Ringrose, Trevor

    2005-07-01

    A quantitative knowledge of stabbing ability is a pre-requisite to establishing protection standards for stab resistant body armour. In order to determine the validity of measurements it is necessary to understand all the mechanisms that determine performance. This paper describes a series of tests that were performed in order to determine the effect of handle size and shape on the forces and impact energy that could be produced during stabbing of an armoured target. It was found that the single largest variable was that of the test participants with all other variables such as handle size and shape having only slight effects on the magnitude of impact energy. The use of a finger guard or hilt was shown to increase the mean energy delivered to the target by approximately 5J compared to a handle having no guard. It was also found that the characteristics of energy delivery were strongly influenced by the position of the grip relative to this guard. This reinforces the conclusions of previous work (Horsfall et al., 1999; Chadwick et al., 1999) on the serial nature of momentum transfer during a stabbing impact.

  20. Class characteristics of serrated knife stabs to cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pounder, Derrick J; Cormack, Lesley; Broadbent, Elizabeth; Millar, John

    2011-06-01

    A total of 136 stab wounds were made in cartilage with 8 serrated knives and 72 stabs with 4 nonserrated knives. The walls of the stab track were documented by photography, cast with dental impression material, and the casts photographed. Staining the translucent cartilage surface with blue or green food dye improved photography. Serrated blades produced striations on cartilage in all stabbings. Patterns of blade serration beyond the broad categories of coarse and fine were recognizable. The overall pattern of striations was "irregularly regular." The distance between the blade-spine wound end and the first serration striation is a class characteristic of the knife which produced the defect, as are distances to the subsequent serration striations, which become ever close together and eventually merge near the blade-edge wound end. Serrated knives may be ground (scalloped) on either the left side or the right side of the blade and this class characteristic is identifiable from the walls of the wound track, on which the scalloped blade surface produces broad ridges and narrow striation valleys, with a reverse image on the opposing wound wall. A drop point serrated blade consistently produced an additional oblique mark angled from the blade-spine wound end, accurately reflecting the shape of the blade tip, and representing a chatter mark.

  1. Stabilization of antibody fragments in adverse environments.

    PubMed

    Dooley, H; Grant, S D; Harris, W J; Porter, A J

    1998-08-01

    Antibody fragments have the potential to be used as sensitive and specific binding agents in a broad range of industrial applications. Genetic manipulation has been used to design a series of antibody fragment configurations with a flexible linker and/or a disulphide bond between the heavy chain and light chain of an antibody fragment against the herbicide atrazine. The thermostability and stability to a range of denaturants, polar and non-polar solvents, surfactants and proteases have been compared. It has been found that a novel antibody fragment construct (STAB: stabilized antibody) containing both a flexible linker and a disulphide bond can be effectively produced and shows greatly improved stability in these diverse environments. These STABs should be useful in environmental diagnostics and remediation, and may provide a generic approach for stabilizing antibody fragments in formulations containing detergents and penetrants for topical application in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries.

  2. Emergency first-aid treatment of gunshot and stab wounds.

    PubMed

    Melby, V; Deeny, P

    The number of violent crimes in Great Britain is on the increase and therefore there is a possibility that nurses will encounter a casualty with stab or gunshot wounds. On encountering a casualty with stab or gunshot wounds, the first aider must immediately assess the scene to avoid personal injury or risk to life. No matter how ugly or bad the injuries look, the basic principles of first aid still apply. Never attempt to remove any penetrating object still in situ as this may cause more serious bleeding. Any penetrating injury to the chest may result in instant respiratory distress. Make use of people present at the scene of the injury. Always ensure that the emergency services are notified immediately. PMID:8038560

  3. Striation patterns in serrated blade stabs to cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pounder, Derrick J; Reeder, Francesca D

    2011-05-20

    Stab wounds were made in porcine cartilage with 13 serrated knives, amongst which 4 were drop-point and 9 straight-spine; 9 coarsely serrated, 3 finely serrated and 1 with mixed pattern serrations. The walls of the stab tracks were cast with dental impression material, and the casts photographed together with the knife blades for comparison. All 13 serrated blades produced an "irregularly regular" pattern of striations on cartilage in all stabbings. Unusual and distinctive blade serration patterns produced equally distinctive wound striation patterns. A reference collection of striation patterns and corresponding blades might prove useful for striation pattern analysis. Drop-point blades produced similar striations to straight-spine blades except that the striations were not parallel but rather fan-shaped, converging towards the wound exit. The fan-shaped striation pattern characteristic of drop-point blades is explained by the initial lateral movement of the blade through the cartilage imposed by the presence of the drop point shape. It appears that the greater the overall angle of the drop point, the shorter the blade length over which the drop point occurs, and the closer the first serration is to the knife tip, the more obvious is the fan-shaped pattern. We anticipate that micro-irregularities producing individualising characteristics in non-serrated drop point blades, provided they were located at the tip opposite the drop point, should also show a fan-shaped pattern indicative of a drop point blade. The examination of the walls of stab wounds to cartilage represents an under-utilised source of forensic information to assist in knife identification.

  4. The stab resistant properties of Kevlar/STF composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinhua; Cao, Hailin; Li, Xia; Wan, Junxi; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2012-04-01

    A colloidal shear thickening fluid (STF) was prepared by dispersing submicron silica particles in Polyethylene glycol 200(PEG200) with ball-milling technique. Kevlar/STF composites were fabricated by soaking Kevlar in the solution of STF diluted by ethanol. The rheological behavior of the fluid with various concentrations and the effect of dilution ratio on stab resistant properties of Kevlar/STF composites were studied. The result shows that the initial viscosity and the highest viscosity of the fluid increase as the weight fraction of SiO2 increasing with the weight fraction ranging from 50% to 60%, while the critical shear rate decrease as the weight fraction increasing. The fluid has notable shear thickening behavior at SiO2 weight fraction of 59%. Two solutions with 1:0.5 and 1:1weight ratio of STF:ethanol were used to fabricate Kevlar/STF composites. It is found that the composites fabricated by solution with dilution ratio 1:1 show better stab resistant properties. The Kevlar/STF composites exhibit better stab resistant properties than the neat Kevlar with the same areal density.

  5. The stab resistant properties of Kevlar/STF composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinhua; Cao, Hailin; Li, Xia; Wan, Junxi; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2011-11-01

    A colloidal shear thickening fluid (STF) was prepared by dispersing submicron silica particles in Polyethylene glycol 200(PEG200) with ball-milling technique. Kevlar/STF composites were fabricated by soaking Kevlar in the solution of STF diluted by ethanol. The rheological behavior of the fluid with various concentrations and the effect of dilution ratio on stab resistant properties of Kevlar/STF composites were studied. The result shows that the initial viscosity and the highest viscosity of the fluid increase as the weight fraction of SiO2 increasing with the weight fraction ranging from 50% to 60%, while the critical shear rate decrease as the weight fraction increasing. The fluid has notable shear thickening behavior at SiO2 weight fraction of 59%. Two solutions with 1:0.5 and 1:1weight ratio of STF:ethanol were used to fabricate Kevlar/STF composites. It is found that the composites fabricated by solution with dilution ratio 1:1 show better stab resistant properties. The Kevlar/STF composites exhibit better stab resistant properties than the neat Kevlar with the same areal density.

  6. Computer modeling program for fragment trajectories within a bomb stack. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, D.A.; Clark, D.P.

    1989-05-25

    The large aerial bombs used by the Air Force are arranged in stack arrays within storage magazines. The effects of the inadvertent detonation of one bomb on other bombs in the stack or within the magazine are of critical importance and a means to prevent sympathetic detonation from occurring must be found if the integrity of the stored bombs is to be maintained. Los Alamos National Laboratory has been funded to explore the phenomena involved in the bomb stack and to evaluate systems to prevent the mutual detonation of adjacent bombs in the event of the detonation of a single bomb. A problem in addressing this project is the acceleration and deceleration of high velocity fragments emerging from the detonating bomb and the trajectories of these fragments through the bomb stack. Tests were conducted by the Air Force using a 3-row by 5-column bomb stack array. The array was fitted with a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) mitigation system consisting of blocks both between all adjacent bombs as well as in the center of each four-bomb rectangular array. The outside-upper corner bomb (1-1) was detonated (the donor). While bombs adjacent to the donor were protected from the effects of the blast by the PMMA mitigators, bombs sympathetically detonated were two rows and three columns away (3-4) and two rows and four columns away (3-5) from the donor. The purpose of this program was to perform numerical modeling of the physical processes involved in the flow of fragments within the bomb stack. The desired result was to predict the paths of the fragments and their impact velocities on any other bomb in the stack. In the modeling work covered by this report, the fragments are allowed to collide with stack elements, rebound from them, or travel unimpeded through the array. Elements of the bomb stack are acted on by gravity and drag forces as well as blast winds generated from the detonating explosive.

  7. 76 FR 35024 - National Institute of Justice Stab-Resistant Body Armor Standard Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice Stab-Resistant Body Armor Standard Workshop AGENCY: National Institute of Justice, DOJ. ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Stab-Resistant Body Armor...

  8. Paroxysmal stabbing headache in the multiple dermatomes of the head and neck: a variant of primary stabbing headache or occipital neuralgia?

    PubMed

    Shin, J H; Song, H K; Lee, J H; Kim, W K; Chu, M K

    2007-10-01

    A paroxysmal stabbing or icepick-like headache in the multiple nerve dermatomes, especially involving both trigeminal and cervical nerves, has not been fully explained or classified by the International Classification of Headache Disorder, 2(nd) Edition (ICHD-II). Of patients with acute-onset paroxysmal stabbing headache who had visited the Hallym University Medical Center during the last four years, 28 subjects with a repeated stabbing headache involving multiple dermatomes at the initial presentation or during the course were prospectively enrolled. All patients were neurologically and otologically symptom free. A coincidental involvement of both trigeminal and cervical nerve dermatomes included seven cases. Six cases involved initially the trigeminal and then cervical nerve dermatomes. Five cases showed an involvement of the cervical and then trigeminal nerve dermatomes. The remaining patients involved multiple cervical nerve branches (the lesser occipital, greater occipital and greater auricular). Pain lasted very shortly and a previous history of headache with the same nature was reported in 13 cases. Preceding symptom of an infection and physical and/or mental stress were manifested in seven and six subjects, respectively. All patients showed a self-limited benign course and completely recovered within a few hours to 30 days. Interestingly, a seasonal gradient in occurrence of a stabbing headache was found in this study. A paroxysmal stabbing headache manifested on multiple dermatomes can be explained by the characteristics of pain referral, and may be considered to be a variant of primary stabbing headache or occipital neuralgia. PMID:17725653

  9. Tool mark striations in pig skin produced by stabs from a serrated blade.

    PubMed

    Pounder, Derrick J; Bhatt, Shivani; Cormack, Lesley; Hunt, Bill A C

    2011-03-01

    Stab wounds produced by serrated blades are generally indistinguishable from stab wounds produced by non-serrated blades, except when visible tool mark striations are left on severed cartilage. Using a pig-skin experimental model, we explored the possibility that similar striations may be left in skin. Stabs into pig skin were made using a straight spine coarsely serrated blade (121), a drop point finely serrated blade (20), a clip point irregular coarsely serrated blade (20), a drop point coarsely serrated blade (15), and as controls 2 non-serrated blades (40). Tool mark striations could be seen on the skin wall of the stab canal in all stabs made using serrated blades but in none with non-serrated blades.The striation pattern, reflecting the class characteristics of the serrated blade, was the same as that described in cartilage but less well defined. Fixation of the specimen with Carnoy's solution best preserved visible striations, and fixation with formaldehyde after staining with 5% Neutral Red was also satisfactory. Casting with vinyl polysiloxane dental impression material greatly facilitated photo-documentation. Applying the technique to homicidal stabbings may help identify stab wounds produced with serrated blades.

  10. 76 FR 22920 - Stab Resistance of Personal Body Armor (2000) Standard Special Technical Committee Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Stab Resistance of Personal Body Armor (2000) Standard Special Technical... Justice, DOJ. ACTION: Request for Proposals for Certification and Testing Expertise. SUMMARY: The...

  11. Measuring knife stab penetration into skin simulant using a novel biaxial tension device.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, M D; Keenan, S; Curtis, M; Cassidy, M; Byrne, G; Destrade, M

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes the development and use of a biaxial measurement device to analyse the mechanics of knife stabbings. In medicolegal situations it is typical to describe the consequences of a stabbing incident in relative terms that are qualitative and descriptive without being numerically quantitative. Here, the mechanical variables involved in the possible range of knife-tissue penetration events are considered so as to determine the necessary parameters that would need to be controlled in a measurement device. These include knife geometry, in-plane mechanical stress state of skin, angle and speed of knife penetration, and underlying fascia such as muscle or cartilage. Four commonly available household knives with different geometries were used: the blade tips in all cases were single-edged, double-sided and without serrations. Appropriate synthetic materials were used to simulate the response of skin, fat and cartilage, namely polyurethane, compliant foam and ballistic soap, respectively. The force and energy applied by the blade of the knife and the out of plane displacement of the skin were all used successfully to identify the occurrence of skin penetration. The skin tension is shown to have a direct effect on both the force and energy for knife penetration and the depth of out of plane displacement of the skin simulant prior to penetration: larger levels of in-plane tension in the skin are associated with lower penetration forces, energies and displacements. Less force and energy are also required to puncture the skin when the plane of the blade is parallel to a direction of greater skin tension than when perpendicular. This is consistent with the observed behaviour when cutting biological skin: less force is required to cut parallel to the Langer lines than perpendicularly and less force is required to cut when the skin is under a greater level of tension. Finally, and perhaps somewhat surprisingly, evidence is shown to suggest that the quality control

  12. A combined experimental and numerical study of stab-penetration forces.

    PubMed

    Annaidh, Aisling Ní; Cassidy, Marie; Curtis, Michael; Destrade, Michel; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2013-12-10

    The magnitude of force used in a stabbing incident can be difficult to quantify, although the estimate given by forensic pathologists is often seen as 'critical' evidence in medico-legal situations. The main objective of this study is to develop a quantitative measure of the force associated with a knife stabbing biological tissue, using a combined experimental and numerical technique. A series of stab-penetration tests were performed to quantify the force required for a blade to penetrate skin at various speeds and using different 'sharp' instruments. A computational model of blade penetration was developed using ABAQUS/EXPLICIT, a non-linear finite element analysis (FEA) commercial package. This model, which incorporated element deletion along with a suitable failure criterion, is capable of systematically quantifying the effect of the many variables affecting a stab event. This quantitative data could, in time, lead to the development of a predictive model that could help indicate the level of force used in a particular stabbing incident. PMID:24314495

  13. Macroscopic and microscopic analysis of knife stab wounds on fleshed and clothed ribs.

    PubMed

    Ferllini, Roxana

    2012-05-01

    Stab wounds upon bone are analyzed to interpret the weapon used and the physical context in which the attack occurred. The literature demonstrates that most research conducted pertaining to wound patterns has been carried out on defleshed and unclothed bone samples, not adequately replicating actual circumstances. For this research, six half pig torsos (Sus scrofa), fleshed (including muscle, fat, epidermis, and dermis layers) and clothed, were stabbed using three knife types, applying both straight and downward thrusts. Analysis conducted macroscopically and through a scanning electron microscope with an environmental secondary electron detector revealed a general lack of consistency in wound pattern and associated secondary effects. Consequently, it was not possible to establish wound pattern per knife type as suggested in previous research or relate it to stab motion. Advantage of microscopic analysis was evident in recognizing wound traits and observation of trace evidence not visible macroscopically.

  14. An acute fatality from suicidal caustic soda ingestion complicated by stab wound penetrating the stomach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bao-Li; Oritani, Shigeki; Ishida, Kaori; Quan, Li; Taniguchi, Mari; Li, Dong-Ri; Kamikodai, Yasunobu; Fujita, Masaki Q; Ogawa, Masafumi; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2002-03-01

    Acute death from caustic ingestion is uncommon. We report an autopsy case of acute fatality from suicidal ingestion of a liquid caustic soda solution with peritoneal leakage due to a stab wound to the stomach. The victim was a 58-year-old man, who died about 1 h after being transported to a hospital emergency care unit. There were corrosive erosions around the mouth and a stab wound in the lower chest. The tongue, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, stomach and the proximal portion of the duodenum were all eroded and edematous. The stab wound perforated the diaphragm and stomach, accompanied by liquefactive corrosion in the left-lower thoracic and left-upper peritoneal cavities. There was a marked elevation of the postmortem serum sodium concentration and alkalosis. The observations suggested peritoneal absorption of leaked caustic soda solution, which may have greatly contributed to the acute fatality despite an intensive clinical life support.

  15. [Identification of the mode of stab-and-hack wound infliction to the chest based on wound features].

    PubMed

    Zakirov, T R; Viter, V I

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain morphological characteristics of stab-and-hack wounds inflicted by falling down on the knife blade. A formula is derived based on the results of discrimination analysis that can be used in combination with wound morphological features to differentiate between chest stabbing modes.

  16. Stab Incision Glaucoma Surgery: A Modified Guarded Filtration Procedure for Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Soosan; Figus, Michele; Ashok Kumar, Dhivya; Areeckal Incy, Saijimol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To describe a modified guarded filtration surgery, stab incision glaucoma surgery (SIGS), for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. This prospective, interventional case series included patients with POAG (IOP ≥21 mmHg with glaucomatous visual field defects). After sliding superior conjunctiva down over limbus, 2.8 mm bevel-up keratome was used to create conjunctival entry and superficial corneoscleral tunnel in a single step starting 1.5 mm behind limbus. Lamellar corneoscleral tunnel was carefully dissected 0.5–1 mm into cornea and anterior chamber (AC) was entered. Kelly Descemet's punch (1 mm) was slid along the tunnel into AC to punch internal lip of the tunnel, thereby compromising it. Patency of ostium was assessed by injecting fluid in AC and visualizing leakage from tunnel. Conjunctival incision alone was sutured. Results. Mean preoperative IOP was 27.41 ± 5.54 mmHg and mean postoperative IOP was 16.47 ± 4.81 mmHg (n = 17). Mean reduction in IOP was 38.81 ± 16.55%. There was significant reduction of IOP (p < 0.000). 64.7% had IOP at final follow-up of <18 mmHg without medication and 82.35% had IOP <18 mmHg with ≤2 medications. No sight threatening complications were encountered. Conclusion. Satisfactory IOP control was noted after SIGS in interim follow-up (14.18 ± 1.88 months). PMID:27144015

  17. Stabbing headache in an 8-year-old girl: primary or drug induced headache?

    PubMed

    Biedroł, Agnieszka; Kaciłski, Marek; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of stabbing headaches in children requires a thorough diagnostic approach that excludes secondary headaches. The organic background should be taken into consideration when alarming symptoms occur, such as a purely 1-sided location, a change in the character of the headache, or possibly a link to physical activity. The current study describes the case of an 8-year-old girl who suffered short-lasting stabbing headache attacks. The headaches with increasing intensity and frequency started 1 month before her hospitalization and were usually preceded by physical activity (dancing, running). The pain, which was located in the right supraorbital region, lasted 1 second and occurred several times during the day. No associated symptoms were observed. In addition, the girl suffered from allergic rhinitis and was on antiallergic treatment (levocetirizine, fluticasone nasal spray). On admission she was in good general condition, and a pediatric and neurologic examination revealed no abnormalities. Her brain MRI was normal. The initial diagnosis was that the patient was suffering from primary stabbing headaches. However, during a follow-up visit 4 months later, a relationship was observed between the cessation of the headache attacks and the discontinuation of an antihistaminic drug. Six months later, the girl remained headache free. In cases involving differential diagnoses of stabbing headaches, it is important to consider the adverse reactions of the drugs used.

  18. Virtual casting of stab wounds in cartilage using micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pounder, Derrick J; Sim, Louise J

    2011-06-01

    In homicidal stabbings using a serrated knife, stab wounds involving costal cartilage leave striations on the cut surface of the cartilage from the serration points on the blade edge. Class characteristics of the serrated blade can be determined from the striation marks, and individualizing characteristics may be seen also. The traditional method for recording the striation marks involves the pernickety technique of casting with dental impression material. We assessed the potential utility of micro-computed tomography scanning of the stab track as a technique for nondestructive recording of striation patterns and virtual casting of them. Stab tracks in porcine cartilage, produced with a coarsely serrated blade, were scanned with a bench-top micro-computed tomography scanner. The typical irregularly regular striation pattern could be demonstrated, and the images manipulated, using proprietary software to produce a virtual cast. Whether the technology will have sufficient resolution to image not only class characteristic tool marks but also the much finer individualizing tool marks remains to be evaluated, but the technology shows considerable promise.

  19. Stabbing headache in an 8-year-old girl: primary or drug induced headache?

    PubMed

    Biedroł, Agnieszka; Kaciłski, Marek; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of stabbing headaches in children requires a thorough diagnostic approach that excludes secondary headaches. The organic background should be taken into consideration when alarming symptoms occur, such as a purely 1-sided location, a change in the character of the headache, or possibly a link to physical activity. The current study describes the case of an 8-year-old girl who suffered short-lasting stabbing headache attacks. The headaches with increasing intensity and frequency started 1 month before her hospitalization and were usually preceded by physical activity (dancing, running). The pain, which was located in the right supraorbital region, lasted 1 second and occurred several times during the day. No associated symptoms were observed. In addition, the girl suffered from allergic rhinitis and was on antiallergic treatment (levocetirizine, fluticasone nasal spray). On admission she was in good general condition, and a pediatric and neurologic examination revealed no abnormalities. Her brain MRI was normal. The initial diagnosis was that the patient was suffering from primary stabbing headaches. However, during a follow-up visit 4 months later, a relationship was observed between the cessation of the headache attacks and the discontinuation of an antihistaminic drug. Six months later, the girl remained headache free. In cases involving differential diagnoses of stabbing headaches, it is important to consider the adverse reactions of the drugs used. PMID:24664098

  20. A technical trick which reduces the need for stab incisions when using bone tenaculums for fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Alves, Kristin; Dahners, Laurence E

    2012-06-01

    During the reduction of fractures using a bone tenaculum, rather than making a stab incision, a frequently successful strategy can be to place a folded operative towel placed between the patient's skin and the head of the tenaculum. Using this technique, the surgeon can decrease scarring and potential stab wound complications. When the angle is too steep for the towel to allow the tenaculum to remain stable during the reduction, the surgeon can use the towel as a safe means of trial and error to determine the necessary alignment of the tenaculum to achieve reduction and consequently the best location at which to make the stab incision for the tine of the tenaculum.

  1. Stab injury and device implantation within the brain results in inversely multiphasic neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Kelsey A.; Buck, Amy C.; Self, Wade K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2012-08-01

    An estimated 25 million people in the US alone rely on implanted medical devices, ˜2.5 million implanted within the nervous system. Even though many devices perform adequately for years, the host response to medical devices often severely limits tissue integration and long-term performance. This host response is believed to be particularly limiting in the case of intracortical microelectrodes, where it has been shown that glial cell encapsulation and localized neuronal cell loss accompany intracortical microelectrode implantation. Since neuronal ensembles must be within ˜50 µm of the electrode to obtain neuronal spikes and local field potentials, developing a better understanding of the molecular and cellular environment at the device-tissue interface has been the subject of significant research. Unfortunately, immunohistochemical studies of scar maturation in correlation to device function have been inconclusive. Therefore, here we present a detailed quantitative study of the cellular events and the stability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following intracortical microelectrode implantation and cortical stab injury in a chronic survival model. We found two distinctly inverse multiphasic profiles for neuronal survival in device-implanted tissue compared to stab-injured animals. For chronically implanted animals, we observed a biphasic paradigm between blood-derived/trauma-induced and CNS-derived inflammatory markers driving neurodegeneration at the interface. In contrast, stab injured animals demonstrated a CNS-mediated neurodegenerative environment. Collectively these data provide valuable insight to the possibility of multiple roles of chronic neuroinflammatory events on BBB disruption and localized neurodegeneration, while also suggesting the importance to consider multiphasic neuroinflammatory kinetics in the design of therapeutic strategies for stabilizing neural interfaces.

  2. Delayed myelopathy secondary to stab wound with a retained blade tip within the laminae: case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Delayed neurologic deficit after a stab wound with a retained foreign body near the spinal canal is unusual, adequate radiological examination is fundamental in detecting retained foreign bodies, especially the CT scan, surgical extraction of the foreign body is the primary task and the surgical outcome is satisfactory. Here, we report a rare case of delayed myelopathy caused by spinal stenosis secondary to broken blade tip within thoracic laminae in an old man, who was injured in a knife attack 39 years ago. The incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis and prognosis are discussed.

  3. Delayed myelopathy secondary to stab wound with a retained blade tip within the laminae: case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Delayed neurologic deficit after a stab wound with a retained foreign body near the spinal canal is unusual, adequate radiological examination is fundamental in detecting retained foreign bodies, especially the CT scan, surgical extraction of the foreign body is the primary task and the surgical outcome is satisfactory. Here, we report a rare case of delayed myelopathy caused by spinal stenosis secondary to broken blade tip within thoracic laminae in an old man, who was injured in a knife attack 39 years ago. The incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis and prognosis are discussed. PMID:26629221

  4. A Rare Etiology of Heart Failure: Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistula Due to Stab Injury 17 Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Hüseyin, Serhat; Yüksel, Volkan; Güçlü, Orkut; Yılmaztepe, Mustafa; Canbaz, Suat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although traumatic fistula is frequently encountered, high-output heart failure due to fistula is a very rare condition. Despite an indefinitive history of trauma, arteriovenous (AV) fistula may develop insidiously, and therefore identification of a shunt is highly important for treatment. Case Report: Here we report a 46-year-old male patient with heart failure due to traumatic femoral arteriovenous fistula developed following a penetrating stab injury 17 years ago. Conclusion: Traumatic AV fistula is a curable cause of heart failure. Also, careful examination of the patient is as significant as radiological imaging methods. PMID:26185721

  5. An investigation of the psychometric properties of the Social Thoughts and Beliefs Scale (STABS) and structure of cognitive symptoms in participants with social anxiety disorder and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Gros, Daniel F; Sarver, Nina Wong

    2014-04-01

    Despite the recent increase of measures developed to assess the cognitive symptoms of social anxiety disorder (SOC), their validation is still largely preliminary. Thus, the present studies sought to replicate and extend the psychometric evaluation of the Social Thoughts and Beliefs Scale (STABS). Study 1 involved both participants with SOC (n=206) and healthy controls (n=222) that completed the STABS and other related measures of anxiety. In Study 2, participants with SOC (n=66) completed exposure-based psychotherapy for SOC with the STABS used to track symptom changes. Together, the two studies provided additional support for the validity and reliability of the STABS as a measure of the cognitive symptoms of SOC. However, contrary to previous research with two subscales, a single total scale was suggested as the best interpretation of the STABS, as well as the possible general presentation of the cognitive symptoms of SOC.

  6. How sharp is sharp? Towards quantification of the sharpness and penetration ability of kitchen knives used in stabbings.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, S V; Delaney, R J; Rutty, G N

    2008-07-01

    Stabbing is the most common method for violent death in the UK. As part of their investigation, forensic pathologists are commonly asked to estimate or quantify the degree of force required to create a wound. The force required to penetrate the skin and body by a knife is a complex function of the sharpness of the knife, the area of the body and alignment with cleavage lines of the skin, the angle of attack and the relative movement of the person stabbing relative to the victim being stabbed. This makes it difficult for the forensic pathologist to give an objective answer to the question; hence, subjective estimations are often used. One area where some degree of quantification is more tractable is in assessing how sharp an implement (particularly a knife) is. This paper presents results of a systematic study of how the different aspects of knife geometry influence sharpness and presents a simple test for assessing knife sharpness using drop testing. The results show that the radius of the blunt edge at the tip is important for controlling the penetration ability of a kitchen knife. Using high-speed video, it also gives insight into the mechanism of knife penetration into the skin. The results of the study will aid pathologists in giving a more informed answer to the question of the degree of force used in stabbing.

  7. Complex suicide by self-stabbing with subsequent drowning in the sea.

    PubMed

    Kaliszan, Michał; Karnecki, Karol; Tomczak, Ewa; Gos, Tomasz; Jankowski, Zbigniew

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents a unique case of a complex suicide committed by a young man, mostly probably triggered by a disappointment in love. The uniqueness of the suicide lies in the fact that the victim inflicted several deep stab wounds on himself, in the chest and abdomen, while standing partly submerged in the sea and, having done so, he dropped and disappeared in the water. The postmortem examination showed, apart from deep wounds in the trunk, characteristics of drowning that manifested itself in the form of aqueous emphysema of the lungs. Suicide was clearly determined on the basis of the circumstances preceding death, the location, and arrangement of the trunk wounds and the testimony given by a witness of the incident. The circumstances preceding the suicidal act clearly suggest an underlying undiagnosed mental disorder. PMID:23866029

  8. Differences between postmortem computed tomography and conventional autopsy in a stabbing murder case

    PubMed Central

    Zerbini, Talita; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Ferro, Antonio Carlos Gonçalves; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Junior, Edson Amaro; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto Gonçalves; do Nascimento Saldiva, Paulo Hilario

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present work is to analyze the differences and similarities between the elements of a conventional autopsy and images obtained from postmortem computed tomography in a case of a homicide stab wound. METHOD: Comparison between the findings of different methods: autopsy and postmortem computed tomography. RESULTS: In some aspects, autopsy is still superior to imaging, especially in relation to external examination and the description of lesion vitality. However, the findings of gas embolism, pneumothorax and pulmonary emphysema and the relationship between the internal path of the instrument of aggression and the entry wound are better demonstrated by postmortem computed tomography. CONCLUSIONS: Although multislice computed tomography has greater accuracy than autopsy, we believe that the conventional autopsy method is fundamental for providing evidence in criminal investigations. PMID:25518020

  9. How to mend a broken heart: a major stab wound of the left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old male admitted with a stab wound under his left nipple, underwent emergency surgery because of confusion, a decreasing blood pressure and increasing tachycardia. A median sternotomy incision was made and after establishing cardiopulmonary bypass, a 7 cm wound in the left ventricle and a smaller wound in the left atrium were repaired. An injured segment of lung was resected and the left anterior descending and circumflex arteries were grafted after weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was initially unsuccessful. Although the patient suffered a stroke, probably due to prehospital hypoperfusion, he eventually recovered without major sequelae. In addition to the case report we present a literature review of the last 15 years pertaining the management of penetrating cardiac injury. PMID:22640705

  10. Lethal penetrating stab injury to the vertebral artery: A case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarkari, Avijit; Singh, Pankaj K.; Mahapatra, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    The vertebral arteries are rarely injured in penetrating neck trauma due to their deep location in the foramen transversarium. These injuries in isolation are not associated with neurological deficits or ischemic changes on radiology as the collaterals are usually sufficient. We report a case of fatal unilateral vertebral artery stab injury leading to bilateral cerebellar and brainstem infarction. The carotid Doppler ruled out the presence of any carotid artery injury. Life-threatening injuries are possible in the presence of hypoplastic contralateral vertebral artery or inadequate flow from the anterior circulation not making up for the deficit. This emphasizes that thorough evaluation and timely management of suspected injuries to even a single vertebral artery should be undertaken. PMID:27366277

  11. Spinal Cord Injury Caused by Stab Wounds: Incidence, Natural History, and Relevance for Future Research.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Euan J; Purcell, Mariel; Barnett, Susan C; Allan, David B

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury caused by stab wounds (SCISW) results from a partial or complete transection of the cord, and presents opportunities for interventional research. It is recognized that there is low incidence, but little is known about the natural history or the patient's suitability for long-term clinical outcome studies. This study aims to provide population-based evidence of the demographics of SCISW, and highlight the issues regarding the potential for future research. The database of the Queen Elizabeth National Spinal Injuries Unit (QENSIU), the sole center for treating SCI in Scotland, was reviewed between 1994 and 2013 to ascertain the incidence, demographics, functional recovery, and mortality rates for new SCISW. During this 20 year period, 35 patients with SCISW were admitted (97.1% male, mean age 30.0 years); 31.4% had a cervical injury, 60.0% had a thoracic injury, and 8.6% had a lumbar injury. All had a neurological examination, with 42.9% diagnosed as motor complete on admission and 77.1% discharged as motor incomplete. A total of 70.4% of patients with an American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) level of A to C on admission had an improved AIS level on discharge. Nine (25.7%) patients have died since discharge, with mean life expectancy for these patients being 9.1 years after injury (20-65 years of age). Patients had higher levels of comorbidities, substance abuse, secondary events, and poor compliance compared with the general SCI population, which may have contributed to the high mortality rate observed post-discharge. The low incidence, heterogeneous nature, spontaneous recovery rate, and problematic follow-up makes those with penetrating stab injuries of the spinal cord a challenging patient group for SCI research.

  12. Fragmentation Pathways in the Uracil Radical Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Congyi; Matsika, Spiridoula; Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C.

    2012-08-24

    We investigate pathways for fragmentation in the uracil radical cation using ab initio electronic structure calculations. We focus on the main fragments produced in pump–probe dissociative ionization experiments. These are fragments with mass to charge ratios (m/z) of 69, 28, 41, and 42. Barriers to dissociation along the ground ionic surface are reported, which provide an estimate of the energetic requirements for the production of the main fragments. Finally, direct and sequential fragmentation mechanisms have been analyzed, and it is concluded that sequential fragmentation after production of fragment with m/z 69 is the dominant mechanism for the production of the smaller fragments.

  13. Multiple self-inflicted stab wounds to neck, chest and abdomen as a unique manner of suicide.

    PubMed

    Kaliszan, Michał; Kernbach-Wighton, Gerhard; Bouhaidar, Ralph

    2010-05-01

    This is a case report of a 30-year-old man found dead in his flat lying on the floor with multiple stab wounds over the body, surrounded by an extensive volume of blood. Examination of the scene of death showed a secure flat, locked from inside. A blood-stained knife was present close to the body and two unstained notes left on the sofa at the locus. A small plastic bag containing white powder (which following toxicological examinations appeared to be cocaine) and an almost full bottle of beer were present on a table. Autopsy revealed more than 40 stab wounds to neck, chest, and abdomen arranged in isolated groups within which the wounds showed similar directions and had a transverse orientation. Together with hesitation marks located on the neck and wrists these characteristics allowed to interpret this case as a suicide. PMID:20202068

  14. Unusual intracranial stab wounds inflicted with metal tent stakes for a case involving a family murder suicide.

    PubMed

    Oki, Takahito; Asamura, Hideki; Hayashi, Tokutaro; Ota, Masao

    2010-10-10

    This article presents a highly unusual homicide involving intracranial stab wounds. Of three members of a family killed by intracranial stab wounds apparently inflicted with metal tent stakes, two also showed signs of wounds inflicted during an apparent struggle with the assailant. A wooden mallet appears to be the implement use to drive the metal stakes into the cranial cavity. In all victims, toxicological analysis indicated the presence of brotizolam at concentrations ranging from 30 to 50ngml(-1). The one victim who showed no signs of wounds incurred during a defensive struggle was found to have blood alcohol levels of 2.87mgml(-1). The assailant, another family member with a history of major psychiatric disorders, apparently committed suicide by drowning following the attacks. PMID:20570454

  15. The 2-repeat allele of the MAOA gene confers an increased risk for shooting and stabbing behaviors.

    PubMed

    Beaver, Kevin M; Barnes, J C; Boutwell, Brian B

    2014-09-01

    There has been a great deal of research examining the link between a polymorphism in the promoter region of the MAOA gene and antisocial phenotypes. The results of these studies have consistently revealed that low activity MAOA alleles are related to antisocial behaviors for males who were maltreated as children. Recently, though, some evidence has emerged indicating that a rare allele of the MAOA gene-that is, the 2-repeat allele-may have effects on violence that are independent of the environment. The current study builds on this research and examines the association between the 2-repeat allele and shooting and stabbing behaviors in a sample of males drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Analyses revealed that African-American males who carry the 2-repeat allele are significantly more likely than all other genotypes to engage in shooting and stabbing behaviors and to report having multiple shooting and stabbing victims. The limitations of the study are discussed and suggestions for future research are offered.

  16. Magma Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2015-05-01

    Magma fragmentation is the breakup of a continuous volume of molten rock into discrete pieces, called pyroclasts. Because magma contains bubbles of compressible magmatic volatiles, decompression of low-viscosity magma leads to rapid expansion. The magma is torn into fragments, as it is stretched into hydrodynamically unstable sheets and filaments. If the magma is highly viscous, resistance to bubble growth will instead lead to excess gas pressure and the magma will deform viscoelastically by fracturing like a glassy solid, resulting in the formation of a violently expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. In either case, fragmentation represents the conversion of potential energy into the surface energy of the newly created fragments and the kinetic energy of the expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. If magma comes into contact with external water, the conversion of thermal energy will vaporize water and quench magma at the melt-water interface, thus creating dynamic stresses that cause fragmentation and the release of kinetic energy. Lastly, shear deformation of highly viscous magma may cause brittle fractures and release seismic energy.

  17. Stabbing Yourself in the Heart: A Case of Autoimmunity Gone Awry

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswaran, Hari; Parikh, Leslie; Poppas, Athena

    2015-01-01

    Within internal medicine, cardiac and neurologic pathology comprises a vast majority of patient complaints. Physicians and advanced-care practitioners must be highly educated and comfortable in the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of these entities. Chest pain accounts for millions of annual visits to the emergency room with pericarditis diagnosed in approximately four percent of patients with nonischemic chest pain. Guillain-Barre Syndrome is autoimmune polyneuropathy that often results in transient paralysis. Simultaneous diagnosis of both entities is a rare but described phenomenon. Here, we present a clinical case of GBS associated pericarditis. A fifty-five-year-old man with history of renal transplant presented with lower extremity weakness and urinary incontinence. Physical exam and diagnostic studies confirmed Guillain-Barre Syndrome. Patient subsequently developed stabbing chest pain with clinical presentation and electrocardiogram consistent with pericarditis. The patient was successfully treated for both diseases. This case highlights that although infrequent, internal medicine care providers must be cognizant of this correlation to ensure timely diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26664359

  18. Endovascular Repair of an Actively Hemorrhaging Stab Wound Injury to the Abdominal Aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Qasim; Maleux, Geert Heye, Sam; Fourneau, Inge

    2008-09-15

    Traumatic injury of the abdominal aorta is rare and potentially lethal (Yeh et al., J Vasc Surg 42(5):1007-1009, 2005; Chicos et al., Chirurgia (Bucur) 102(2):237-240, 2007) as it can result in major retroperitoneal hemorrhage, requiring an urgent open surgery. In case of concomitant bowel injury or other conditions of hostile abdomen, endovascular repair can be an alternative treatment. This case report deals with a 50-year-old man presenting at the emergency ward with three stab wounds: two in the abdomen and one in the chest. During explorative laparotomy, liver laceration and bowel perforation were repaired. One day later, abdominal CT-scan revealed an additional retroperitoneal hematoma associated with an aortic pseudoaneurysm, located anteriorly 3 cm above the aortic bifurcation. Because of the risk of graft infection, an endovascular repair of the aortic injury using a Gore excluder stent-graft was performed. Radiological and clinical follow-up revealed a gradual shrinkage of the pseudo-aneurysm and no sign of graft infection at two years' follow-up.

  19. Does cone beam CT actually ameliorate stab wound analysis in bone?

    PubMed

    Gaudio, D; Di Giancamillo, M; Gibelli, D; Galassi, A; Cerutti, E; Cattaneo, C

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at verifying the potential of a recent radiological technology, cone beam CT (CBCT), for the reproduction of digital 3D models which may allow the user to verify the inner morphology of sharp force wounds within the bone tissue. Several sharp force wounds were produced by both single and double cutting edge weapons on cancellous and cortical bone, and then acquired by cone beam CT scan. The lesions were analysed by different software (a DICOM file viewer and reverse engineering software). Results verified the limited performances of such technology for lesions made on cortical bone, whereas on cancellous bone reliable models were obtained, and the precise morphology within the bone tissues was visible. On the basis of such results, a method for differential diagnosis between cutmarks by sharp tools with a single and two cutting edges can be proposed. On the other hand, the metrical computerised analysis of lesions highlights a clear increase of error range for measurements under 3 mm. Metric data taken by different operators shows a strong dispersion (% relative standard deviation). This pilot study shows that the use of CBCT technology can improve the investigation of morphological stab wounds on cancellous bone. Conversely metric analysis of the lesions as well as morphological analysis of wound dimension under 3 mm do not seem to be reliable.

  20. IMPACT fragmentation model developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.

    2016-09-01

    The IMPACT fragmentation model has been used by The Aerospace Corporation for more than 25 years to analyze orbital altitude explosions and hypervelocity collisions. The model is semi-empirical, combining mass, energy and momentum conservation laws with empirically derived relationships for fragment characteristics such as number, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and spreading velocity as well as event energy distribution. Model results are used for several types of analysis including assessment of short-term risks to satellites from orbital altitude fragmentations, prediction of the long-term evolution of the orbital debris environment and forensic assessments of breakup events. A new version of IMPACT, version 6, has been completed and incorporates a number of advancements enabled by a multi-year long effort to characterize more than 11,000 debris fragments from more than three dozen historical on-orbit breakup events. These events involved a wide range of causes, energies, and fragmenting objects. Special focus was placed on the explosion model, as the majority of events examined were explosions. Revisions were made to the mass distribution used for explosion events, increasing the number of smaller fragments generated. The algorithm for modeling upper stage large fragment generation was updated. A momentum conserving asymmetric spreading velocity distribution algorithm was implemented to better represent sub-catastrophic events. An approach was developed for modeling sub-catastrophic explosions, those where the majority of the parent object remains intact, based on estimated event energy. Finally, significant modifications were made to the area-to-mass ratio distribution to incorporate the tendencies of different materials to fragment into different shapes. This ability enabled better matches between the observed area-to-mass ratios and those generated by the model. It also opened up additional possibilities for post-event analysis of breakups. The paper will discuss

  1. Fatal tiger attack: a case report with emphasis on typical tiger injuries characterized by partially resembling stab-like wounds.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Hrishikesh; Borkar, Jaydeo; Dixit, Pradeep; Dhawane, Shailendra; Shrigiriwar, Manish; Dingre, Niraj

    2013-10-10

    Fatalities due to attacks by tigers on humans are uncommon and are rarely described in the medico-legal literature. We herein present a forensic investigation in a unique case of a fatal tiger attack in the wild on a 35 year old female in India by an Indian Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris). The attack resulted in two pairs of puncture wounds over the nape area with occult cervical spine injuries resulting from transfixing of spine due to the tiger canines; multiple puncture wounds, numerous scratches and abrasions consistent with the tiger claw injuries and injury to the right jugulocarotid vessels. This case outlines the characteristic injury pattern from such an attack along with the multiple sources of the tiger injuries. The analysis of these injuries might reveal the motivation behind the attack and the big cat species involved in the attack. A tiger injury is sometimes compared with a stab injury, as the patterned injuries due to a tiger bite are characterized by multiple penetrating, stab-like wounds. So, a special attention is paid toward establishment of the cause of death from bites by the animal teeth under unknown circumstances of trauma and to exclude the possibility of a homicide beyond reasonable doubt in such cases.

  2. Fatal tiger attack: a case report with emphasis on typical tiger injuries characterized by partially resembling stab-like wounds.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Hrishikesh; Borkar, Jaydeo; Dixit, Pradeep; Dhawane, Shailendra; Shrigiriwar, Manish; Dingre, Niraj

    2013-10-10

    Fatalities due to attacks by tigers on humans are uncommon and are rarely described in the medico-legal literature. We herein present a forensic investigation in a unique case of a fatal tiger attack in the wild on a 35 year old female in India by an Indian Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris). The attack resulted in two pairs of puncture wounds over the nape area with occult cervical spine injuries resulting from transfixing of spine due to the tiger canines; multiple puncture wounds, numerous scratches and abrasions consistent with the tiger claw injuries and injury to the right jugulocarotid vessels. This case outlines the characteristic injury pattern from such an attack along with the multiple sources of the tiger injuries. The analysis of these injuries might reveal the motivation behind the attack and the big cat species involved in the attack. A tiger injury is sometimes compared with a stab injury, as the patterned injuries due to a tiger bite are characterized by multiple penetrating, stab-like wounds. So, a special attention is paid toward establishment of the cause of death from bites by the animal teeth under unknown circumstances of trauma and to exclude the possibility of a homicide beyond reasonable doubt in such cases. PMID:23993646

  3. [Stab wounds of the hand and forearm due to Kuluna in Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo): types of injuries and treatment].

    PubMed

    Kibadi, K; Portaels, F; Pichot, Y; Kapinga, M; Moutet, F

    2015-01-01

    Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a particular form of juvenile delinquency and insecurity intensifies in the city of Kinshasa. This is the phenomenon Kuluna. It is organized gangs equipped with machetes and other weapons. The main objective of this study is to know the phenomenon Kuluna and describe the upper limb injuries caused by machetes, while insisting on the specifics of the management of these lesions in our communities. This retrospective descriptive study examines 14 cases of wounds of the hand and forearm due to stab phenomenon Kuluna, in Kinshasa. It covers the period from 1 November 2010 to 1 November 2013. Among the 14 patients with lesions in the hand and forearm admitted and treated at the Unit of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns, University Clinics of Kinshasa to attacks due to the phenomenon Kuluna. We have 11 men and 3 women. The average age was 33, 5 years (extremes of 21 and 56 years). The right upper limb is reached that the left upper limb, respectively 12 patients and 2 patients. The lesions are localized to the wrist in the majority of cases (10 patients) in the palm of hand and in 3 patients in the fingers in 1 patient. The palmar surface is reached (10 cases) and the dorsal (4 cases). Zone 5 of the International Classification of flexor and Zone 8 topographic classification extensors at hand are the predilection sites of lesions respectively the palmar surface (6 out of 10) and the dorsal (2 case 4). The median nerve at the wrist is cut in half the cases. On bone lesions localized to the forearm, we observed a high incidence of fracture of the ulna (62.5%). The treatment begins with the stabilization of bone pieces, gestures revascularization and nerve sutures and suture tendon and finally skin coverage. Rehabilitation was mandatory, she supervises the actions of repair and it continues until the recovery of function. PMID:26837110

  4. [Stab wounds of the hand and forearm due to Kuluna in Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo): types of injuries and treatment].

    PubMed

    Kibadi, K; Portaels, F; Pichot, Y; Kapinga, M; Moutet, F

    2015-01-01

    Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a particular form of juvenile delinquency and insecurity intensifies in the city of Kinshasa. This is the phenomenon Kuluna. It is organized gangs equipped with machetes and other weapons. The main objective of this study is to know the phenomenon Kuluna and describe the upper limb injuries caused by machetes, while insisting on the specifics of the management of these lesions in our communities. This retrospective descriptive study examines 14 cases of wounds of the hand and forearm due to stab phenomenon Kuluna, in Kinshasa. It covers the period from 1 November 2010 to 1 November 2013. Among the 14 patients with lesions in the hand and forearm admitted and treated at the Unit of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns, University Clinics of Kinshasa to attacks due to the phenomenon Kuluna. We have 11 men and 3 women. The average age was 33, 5 years (extremes of 21 and 56 years). The right upper limb is reached that the left upper limb, respectively 12 patients and 2 patients. The lesions are localized to the wrist in the majority of cases (10 patients) in the palm of hand and in 3 patients in the fingers in 1 patient. The palmar surface is reached (10 cases) and the dorsal (4 cases). Zone 5 of the International Classification of flexor and Zone 8 topographic classification extensors at hand are the predilection sites of lesions respectively the palmar surface (6 out of 10) and the dorsal (2 case 4). The median nerve at the wrist is cut in half the cases. On bone lesions localized to the forearm, we observed a high incidence of fracture of the ulna (62.5%). The treatment begins with the stabilization of bone pieces, gestures revascularization and nerve sutures and suture tendon and finally skin coverage. Rehabilitation was mandatory, she supervises the actions of repair and it continues until the recovery of function.

  5. Reframing landscape fragmentation's effects on ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Matthew G E; Suarez-Castro, Andrés F; Martinez-Harms, Maria; Maron, Martine; McAlpine, Clive; Gaston, Kevin J; Johansen, Kasper; Rhodes, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    Landscape structure and fragmentation have important effects on ecosystem services, with a common assumption being that fragmentation reduces service provision. This is based on fragmentation's expected effects on ecosystem service supply, but ignores how fragmentation influences the flow of services to people. Here we develop a new conceptual framework that explicitly considers the links between landscape fragmentation, the supply of services, and the flow of services to people. We argue that fragmentation's effects on ecosystem service flow can be positive or negative, and use our framework to construct testable hypotheses about the effects of fragmentation on final ecosystem service provision. Empirical efforts to apply and test this framework are critical to improving landscape management for multiple ecosystem services.

  6. Fractals and fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of renormalization group techniques on fragmentation problems is examined. The equations which represent fractals and the size-frequency distributions of fragments are presented. Method for calculating the size distributions of asteriods and meteorites are described; the frequency-mass distribution for these interplanetary objects are due to fragmentation. The application of two renormalization group models to fragmentation is analyzed. It is observed that the models yield a fractal behavior for fragmentation; however, different values for the fractal dimension are produced . It is concluded that fragmentation is a scale invariant process and that the fractal dimension is a measure of the fragility of the fragmented material.

  7. Aquaporin 4-dependent expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and tenascin-C in activated astrocytes in stab wound mouse brain and in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Ikeshima-Kataoka, Hiroko; Abe, Yoichiro; Yasui, Masato

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that aquaporin 4 (AQP4) has a neuroimmunological function via astrocytes and microglial cells involving osteopontin. AQP4 is a water channel localized in the endofoot of astrocytes in the brain, and its expression is upregulated after a stab wound to the mouse brain or the injection of methylmercury in common marmosets. In this study, the correlation between the expression of AQP4 and the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or tenascin-C (TN-C) in reactive astrocytes was examined in primary cultures and brain tissues of AQP4-deficient mice (AQP4/KO). In the absence of a stab wound to the brain or of any stimulation of the cells, the expressions of both GFAP and TN-C were lower in astrocytes from AQP4/KO mice than in those from wild-type (WT) mice. High levels of GFAP and TN-C expression were observed in activated astrocytes after a stab wound to the brain in WT mice; however, the expressions of GFAP and TN-C were insignificant in AQP4/KO mice. Furthermore, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation activated primary culture of astrocytes and upregulated GFAP and TN-C expression in cells from WT mice, whereas the expressions of GFAP and TN-C were slightly upregulated in cells from AQP4/KO mice. Moreover, the stimulation of primary culture of astrocytes with LPS also upregulated inflammatory cytokines in cells from WT mice, whereas modest increases were observed in cells from AQP4/KO mice. These results suggest that AQP4 expression accelerates GFAP and TN-C expression in activated astrocytes induced by a stab wound in the mouse brain and LPS-stimulated primary culture of astrocytes.

  8. Full-Length Genome Sequence of Type M/emm83 Group A Streptococcus pyogenes Strain STAB1101, Isolated from Clustered Cases in Brittany.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Nicolas; Vincent, Pascal; Auger, Gabriel; Cariou, Marie-Estelle; Moullec, Séverine; Lagente, Vincent; Ygout, Jean-François; Kayal, Samer; Faili, Ahmad

    2015-01-22

    Here, we announce the complete annotated genome sequence of a Streptococcus pyogenes M/emm83 strain, STAB1101, isolated from clustered cases in homeless persons in Brittany (France). The genome is composed of 1,709,790 bp, with a G+C content of 38.4% and 1,550 identified coding sequences (CDS), and it harbors a Tn916-like transposon.

  9. Comparison Of Flat-Knitted Structures Made Of Poly(P-Phenylene-2,6-Benzobisoxazole) And Para-Aramid Referring To Their Stab Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, M.; Aumann, S.; Heimlich, F.; Weber, M. O.; Schwarz-Pfeiffer, A.

    2016-07-01

    In the field of protective gear, developers always aim for lighter and more flexible material in order to increase the wearing comfort. Suppliers now work on knitted garments in the sports-sector as well as in workwear and protective gear for policemen or security-agents. In a recent project different knitted structures made of a poly(p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole) (PBO)-multifilament were compared to their counterparts made of para-aramid. In focus of the comparison stood the stab-resistance linked to either the mass per unit area or the stitch density. The tested fabrics were produced on hand flat knitting machines as well as on electronical flat knitting machines of the type Stoll CMS 330TC4, in order to analyse fabrics with different tightness factor and machine gauges. The stab resistance of the different knitted fabrics was examined according to the standard of the Association of Test Laboratories for Bullet, Stab or Pike Resistant Materials and Construction Standards. The presentation includes the depiction of the results of the test series and their interpretation. Furthermore it will give an outlook on most suitable combinations of materials and structures to be used in protective gear.

  10. Coal char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.

    1995-07-01

    A series of investigations of coal and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion is reported for a suite of coals ranging in rank from lignite to low-volatile (lv) bituminous coal under combustion conditions similar to those found in commercial-scale boilers. Experimental measurements are described that utilize identical particle sizing characteristics to determine initial and final size distributions. Mechanistic interpretation of the data suggest that coal fragmentation is an insignificant event and that char fragmentation is controlled by char structure. Chars forming cenospheres fragment more extensively than solid chars. Among the chars that fragment, large particles produce more fine material than small particles. In all cases, coal and char fragmentation are seen to be sufficiently minor as to be relatively insignificant factors influencing fly ash size distribution, particle loading, and char burnout.

  11. The direct cost of traumatic secretion transfer in hermaphroditic land snails: individuals stabbed with a love dart decrease lifetime fecundity.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kazuki; Chiba, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    Several taxa of simultaneously hermaphroditic land snails exhibit a conspicuous mating behaviour, the so-called shooting of love darts. During mating, such land snail species transfer a specific secretion by stabbing a mating partner's body with the love dart. It has been shown that sperm donors benefit from this traumatic secretion transfer, because the secretions manipulate the physiology of a sperm recipient and increase the donors' fertilization success. However, it is unclear whether reception of dart shooting is costly to the recipients. Therefore, the effect of sexual conflict and antagonistic arms races on the evolution of traumatic secretion transfer in land snails is still controversial. To examine this effect, we compared lifetime fecundity and longevity between the individuals that received and did not receive dart shooting from mating partners in Bradybaena pellucida. Our experiments showed that the dart-receiving snails suffered reduction in lifetime fecundity and longevity. These results suggest that the costly mating behaviour, dart shooting, generates conflict between sperm donors and recipients and that sexually antagonistic arms races have contributed to the diversification of the morphological and behavioural traits relevant to dart shooting. Our findings also support theories suggesting a violent escalation of sexual conflict in hermaphroditic animals. PMID:25761713

  12. The direct cost of traumatic secretion transfer in hermaphroditic land snails: individuals stabbed with a love dart decrease lifetime fecundity

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kazuki; Chiba, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Several taxa of simultaneously hermaphroditic land snails exhibit a conspicuous mating behaviour, the so-called shooting of love darts. During mating, such land snail species transfer a specific secretion by stabbing a mating partner's body with the love dart. It has been shown that sperm donors benefit from this traumatic secretion transfer, because the secretions manipulate the physiology of a sperm recipient and increase the donors' fertilization success. However, it is unclear whether reception of dart shooting is costly to the recipients. Therefore, the effect of sexual conflict and antagonistic arms races on the evolution of traumatic secretion transfer in land snails is still controversial. To examine this effect, we compared lifetime fecundity and longevity between the individuals that received and did not receive dart shooting from mating partners in Bradybaena pellucida. Our experiments showed that the dart-receiving snails suffered reduction in lifetime fecundity and longevity. These results suggest that the costly mating behaviour, dart shooting, generates conflict between sperm donors and recipients and that sexually antagonistic arms races have contributed to the diversification of the morphological and behavioural traits relevant to dart shooting. Our findings also support theories suggesting a violent escalation of sexual conflict in hermaphroditic animals. PMID:25761713

  13. The direct cost of traumatic secretion transfer in hermaphroditic land snails: individuals stabbed with a love dart decrease lifetime fecundity.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kazuki; Chiba, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    Several taxa of simultaneously hermaphroditic land snails exhibit a conspicuous mating behaviour, the so-called shooting of love darts. During mating, such land snail species transfer a specific secretion by stabbing a mating partner's body with the love dart. It has been shown that sperm donors benefit from this traumatic secretion transfer, because the secretions manipulate the physiology of a sperm recipient and increase the donors' fertilization success. However, it is unclear whether reception of dart shooting is costly to the recipients. Therefore, the effect of sexual conflict and antagonistic arms races on the evolution of traumatic secretion transfer in land snails is still controversial. To examine this effect, we compared lifetime fecundity and longevity between the individuals that received and did not receive dart shooting from mating partners in Bradybaena pellucida. Our experiments showed that the dart-receiving snails suffered reduction in lifetime fecundity and longevity. These results suggest that the costly mating behaviour, dart shooting, generates conflict between sperm donors and recipients and that sexually antagonistic arms races have contributed to the diversification of the morphological and behavioural traits relevant to dart shooting. Our findings also support theories suggesting a violent escalation of sexual conflict in hermaphroditic animals.

  14. Selectable fragmentation warhead

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, C.S.; Paisley, D.L.; Montoya, N.I.; Stahl, D.B.

    1992-12-31

    This report discusses a selectable fragmentation warhead which is capable of producing a predetermined number of fragments from a metal plate, and accelerating the fragments toward a target. A first explosive located adjacent to the plate is detonated at selected number of points by laser-driven slapper detonators. In one embodiment, a smoother-disk and a second explosive, located adjacent to the first explosive, serve to increase acceleration of the fragments toward a target. The ability to produce a selected number of fragments allows for effective destruction of a chosen target.

  15. Selectable fragmentation warhead

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Courtney S.; Paisley, Dennis L.; Montoya, Nelson I.; Stahl, David B.

    1993-01-01

    A selectable fragmentation warhead capable of producing a predetermined number of fragments from a metal plate, and accelerating the fragments toward a target. A first explosive located adjacent to the plate is detonated at selected number of points by laser-driven slapper detonators. In one embodiment, a smoother-disk and a second explosive, located adjacent to the first explosive, serve to increase acceleration of the fragments toward a target. The ability to produce a selected number of fragments allows for effective destruction of a chosen target.

  16. The combined fragmentation and systematic molecular fragmentation methods.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael A; Cvitkovic, Milan W; Bettens, Ryan P A

    2014-09-16

    fragmentation methods to accurately estimate derivatives of the molecular and crystal energies. Finally, to provide some common applications of CFM and SMF, we present some specific examples of energy calculations for moderately large molecules. For computational chemists, this fragmentation approach represents an important practical advance. It reduces the computer time required to estimate the energies of molecules so dramatically, that accurate calculations of the energies and reactivity of very large organic and biological molecules become feasible. PMID:24972052

  17. The mechanisms of stone fragmentation in ESWL.

    PubMed

    Eisenmenger, W

    2001-05-01

    Currently, several mechanisms of kidney stone fragmentation in extracorporal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) are under discussion. As a new mechanism, the circumferential quasistatic compression or "squeezing" by evanescent waves in the stone has been introduced. In fragmentation experiments with self-focussing electromagnetic shock-wave generators with focal diameters comparable to or larger than the stone diameter, we observed first cleavage surfaces either parallel or perpendicular to the wave propagation direction. This is in agreement with the expectation of the "squeezing" mechanism. Because, for positive pulse pressures below 35 MPa and stones with radii of 15 mm or smaller, cleavage into only two fragments was observed, we developed a quantitative model of binary fragmentation by "quasistatic squeezing." This model predicts the ratio of the number of pulses for the fragmentation to 2-mm size and of the number of pulses required for the first cleavage into two parts. This "fragmentation-ratio" depends linearly alone on the stone radius and on the final size of the fragments. The experimental results for spherical artificial stones of 5 mm, 12 mm and 15 mm diameter at a pulse pressure of 11 MPa are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. Thus, binary fragmentation by quasistatic squeezing in ESWL as a new efficient fragmentation mechanism is also quantitatively verified.

  18. Properties of fragmented repulsive condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Streltsov, Alexej I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2005-06-15

    Repulsive Bose-Einstein condensates immersed into a double-well trap potential are studied within the framework of the recently introduced mean-field approach which allows for bosons to reside in several different orthonormal orbitals. In the case of a one-orbital mean-field theory (Gross-Pitaevskii) the ground state of the system reveals a bifurcation scenario at some critical values of the interparticle interaction and/or the number of particles. At about the same values of the parameters the two-orbital mean field predicts that the system becomes twofold fragmented. By applying the three-orbital mean field we verify numerically that for the double-well external potential studied here the overall best mean field is achieved with two orbitals. The variational principle minimizes the energy at a vanishing population of the third orbital. To discuss the energies needed to remove a boson from and the energies gained by adding a boson to the condensate, we introduce boson ionization potentials and boson affinities and relate them to the chemical potentials. The impact of the finite number of bosons in the condensate on these quantities is analyzed. We recall that within the framework of the multiorbital mean-field theory each fragment is characterized by its own chemical potential. Finally, the stability of fragmented states is discussed in terms of the boson transfer energy which is the energy needed to transfer a boson from one fragment to another.

  19. Universality of fragment shapes

    PubMed Central

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  20. Universality of fragment shapes.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  1. Fragmentation properties of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Kipp, M.E.

    1996-06-01

    In the present study we are developing an experimental fracture material property test method specific to dynamic fragmentation. Spherical test samples of the metals of interest are subjected to controlled impulsive stress loads by acceleration to high velocities with a light-gas launcher facility and subsequent normal impact on thin plates. Motion, deformation and fragmentation of the test samples are diagnosed with multiple flash radiography methods. The impact plate materials are selected to be transparent to the x-ray method so that only test metal material is imaged. Through a systematic series of such tests, both strain-to-failure and fragmentation resistance properties are determined through this experimental method. Fragmentation property data for several steels, copper, aluminum, tantalum and titanium have been obtained to date. Aspects of the dynamic data have been analyzed with computational methods to achieve a better understanding of the processes leading to failure and fragmentation, and to test an existing computational fragmentation model.

  2. Fragmentation in the First Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Bromm, Volker; Milosavljević, Miloš

    2010-11-01

    Motivated by recent simulations of galaxy formation in which protogalaxies acquire their baryonic content through cold accretion, we study the gravitational fragmentation of cold streams flowing into a typical first galaxy. We use a one-zone hydrodynamical model to examine the thermal evolution of the gas flowing into a 108 M sun dark matter halo at redshift z = 10. The goal is to gain an understanding of the expected fragmentation mass scale and thus the characteristic mass of the first population of stars to form by shock fragmentation. Our model accurately describes the chemical and thermal evolution of the gas as we are specifically concerned with how the chemical abundances and initial conditions of the low-density, metal-enriched, cold accretion streams that pass an accretion shock alter the cooling properties and tendency to fragment in the post-shock gas. Cold accretion flows are not shock heated at the virial radius but instead flow along high-baryonic-density filaments of the cosmic web and penetrate deep into the host halo of the protogalaxy. In this physical regime, if molecular cooling is absent because of a strong Lyman-Werner background, we find there to be a sharp drop in the fragmentation mass at a metallicity of Z ~ 10-4 Z sun. If, however, H2 and HD molecules are present, they dominate the cooling at T < 104 K, and metallicity then has no effect on the fragmentation properties of the cold stream. For a solar abundance pattern of metallicity, O is the most effective metal coolant throughout the evolution, while for a pair instability supernova (PISN) metallicity yield, Si+ is the most effective coolant. PISN abundance patterns also exhibit a slightly smaller critical metallicity. Dust grains are not included in our chemical model, but we argue that their inclusion would not significantly alter the results. We also find that this physical scenario allows for the formation of stellar clusters and large, 104 M sun bound fragments, possibly the

  3. FRAGMENTATION IN THE FIRST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Bromm, Volker; Milosavljevic, Milos

    2010-11-10

    , 10{sup 4} M{sub sun} bound fragments, possibly the precursors to globular clusters and supermassive black holes. Finally, we conclude that the usual assumption of isobaricity for galactic shocks breaks down in gas of a sufficiently high metallicity, suggesting that metal cooling leads to thermal instabilities.

  4. A comparative audit of gunshot wounds and stab wounds to the neck in a South African metropolitan trauma service.

    PubMed

    Madsen, A S; Laing, G L; Bruce, J L; Clarke, D L

    2016-09-01

    Introduction The aim of this comparative study of gunshot wounds (GSWs) and stab wounds (SWs) to the neck was to quantify the impact of the mechanism of injury on the outcome and management of penetrating neck injury (PNI). Methods A prospective trauma registry was interrogated retrospectively. Data were analysed pertaining to demographics and injury severity score (ISS), physiology on presentation, anatomical site of wounds and injuries sustained, investigations, management, outcome and complications. Results There were 452 SW and 58 GSW cases over the 46 months of the study. Patients with GSWs were more likely to have extracervical injuries than those with SWs (69% vs 63%). The incidence of a 'significant cervical injury' was almost twice as high in the GSW cohort (55% vs 31%). For patients with transcervical GSWs, this increased to 80%. The mean ISS was 17 for GSW and 11 for SW patients. Those in the GSW cohort presented with threatened airways and a requirement for an emergency airway three times as often as patients with SWs (24% vs 7% and 14% vs 5% respectively). The incidence among GSW and SW patients respectively was 5% and 6% for airway injuries, 12% and 8% for injuries to the digestive tract, 21% and 16% for vascular injuries, 59% and 10% for associated cervical injuries, 36% and 14% for maxillofacial injuries, 16% and 9% for injuries to the head, and 35% and 45% for injuries to the chest. In the GSW group, 91% underwent computed tomography angiography (CTA), with 23% of these being positive for a vascular injury. For SWs, 74% of patients underwent CTA, with 17% positive for a vascular injury. Slightly more patients with GSWs required operative intervention than those with SWs (29% vs 26%). Conclusions Patients with GSWs to the neck have a worse outcome than those with injuries secondary to SWs. However, the proportion of neck injuries actually requiring direct surgical intervention is not increased and most cases with PNI secondary to GSWs can be managed

  5. An unusual homicidal stab wound of the cervical spinal cord: A single case examined by post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA).

    PubMed

    Savall, Frederic; Dedouit, Fabrice; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Rougé, Daniel; Saint-Martin, Pauline; Telmon, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of homicidal stab wound of the cervical spinal cord, which illustrates the value of post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA) in cases of vascular injury. First, we noted a posterior and horizontal trajectory to the neck with complete section of the cervical spinal cord between the first and second cervical vertebrae. This lesion was accompanied by section of the right vertebral and right deep cervical arteries. We also noted an anterior cervical trajectory with an injury to the right internal jugular vein and an anterior right chest wound with a lung trajectory and section of the internal mammary vessels. Cases of spinal cord injuries secondary to stab wounds are rare in the literature. Only one large series has been published from Cape Town. Complete section of the cervical spinal cord accounts for only 4.5% of all cases. Furthermore, lethal cases are rare and classically victims survive and present neurological sequelae. We found only one similar case but despite the transection of the cervical spinal cord the patient survived. Some studies suggest that PMCTA may be very helpful in visualizing vascular system injuries. Our observations are consistent with this proposal. The use of different-time acquisitions was essential for detection of the injured vessels.

  6. Fragmentation in massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Beuther, Henrik; Schilke, Peter

    2004-02-20

    Studies of evolved massive stars indicate that they form in a clustered mode. During the earliest evolutionary stages, these regions are embedded within their natal cores. Here we present high-spatial-resolution interferometric dust continuum observations disentangling the cluster-like structure of a young massive star-forming region. The derived protocluster mass distribution is consistent with the stellar initial mass function. Thus, fragmentation of the initial massive cores may determine the initial mass function and the masses of the final stars. This implies that stars of all masses can form via accretion processes, and coalescence of intermediate-mass protostars appears not to be necessary.

  7. Selectable fragmentation warhead

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, C.S.; Paisley, D.L.; Montoya, N.I.; Stahl, D.B.

    1993-07-20

    A selectable fragmentation warhead is described comprising: a case having proximal and distal ends; a fragmenting plate mounted in said distal end of said casing; first explosive means cast adjacent to said fragmenting plate for creating a predetermined number of fragments from said fragmenting plate; three or more first laser-driven slapper detonators located adjacent to said first explosive means for detonating said first explosive means in a predetermined pattern; smoother-disk means located adjacent to said first means for accelerating said fragments; second explosive means cast adjacent to said smoother-disk means for further accelerating said fragments; at least one laser-driven slapper detonators located in said second explosive means; a laser located in said proximal end of said casing; optical fibers connecting said laser to said first and second laser-driven slapper detonators; and optical switch means located in series with said optical fibers connected to said plurality of first laser-driven slapper detonators for blocking or passing light from said laser to said plurality of first laser-driven slapper detonators.

  8. Opaque rock fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Abhijit, B.; Molinaroli, E.; Olsen, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors describe a new, rare, but petrogenetically significant variety of rock fragments from Holocene detrital sediments. Approximately 50% of the opaque heavy mineral concentrates from Holocene siliciclastic sands are polymineralic-Fe-Ti oxide particles, i.e., they are opaque rock fragments. About 40% to 70% of these rock fragments show intergrowth of hm + il, mt + il, and mt + hm +/- il. Modal analysis of 23,282 opaque particles in 117 polished thin sections of granitic and metamorphic parent rocks and their daughter sands from semi-arid and humid climates show the following relative abundances. The data show that opaque rock fragments are more common in sands from igneous source rocks and that hm + il fragments are more durable. They assume that equilibrium conditions existed in parent rocks during the growth of these paired minerals, and that the Ti/Fe ratio did not change during oxidation of mt to hm. Geothermometric determinations using electron probe microanalysis of opaque rock fragments in sand samples from Lake Erie and the Adriatic Sea suggest that these rock fragments may have equilibrated at approximately 900/sup 0/ and 525/sup 0/C, respectively.

  9. Auroral fragmentation into patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiokawa, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Ayumi; Hori, Tomoaki; Sakaguchi, Kaori; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Donovan, Eric; Spanswick, Emma; Connors, Martin; Otsuka, Yuichi; Oyama, Shin-Ichiro; Nozawa, Satonori; McWilliams, Kathryn

    2014-10-01

    Auroral patches in diffuse auroras are very common features in the postmidnight local time. However, the processes that produce auroral patches are not yet well understood. In this paper we present two examples of auroral fragmentation which is the process by which uniform aurora is broken into several fragments to form auroral patches. These examples were observed at Athabasca, Canada (geomagnetic latitude: 61.7°N), and Tromsø, Norway (67.1°N). Captured in sequences of images, the auroral fragmentation occurs as finger-like structures developing latitudinally with horizontal-scale sizes of 40-100 km at ionospheric altitudes. The structures tend to develop in a north-south direction with speeds of 150-420 m/s without any shearing motion, suggesting that pressure-driven instability in the balance between the earthward magnetic-tension force and the tailward pressure gradient force in the magnetosphere is the main driving force of the auroral fragmentation. Therefore, these observations indicate that auroral fragmentation associated with pressure-driven instability is a process that creates auroral patches. The observed slow eastward drift of aurora during the auroral fragmentation suggests that fragmentation occurs in low-energy ambient plasma.

  10. Fragmentation of the Chelyabinsk Fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, J.

    2013-12-01

    The most intense bolide since the 1908 Tunguska event occurred in the early morning hours of 15 February 2013 near the Russian town of Chelyabinsk. The impacting asteroid ranged between 17 and 20 m diameter with a mass of about 10,000 tons. Its estimated pre-atmospheric velocity was about 18.6 km/sec at a low angle of 20° from the horizontal. The resulting airburst occurred at an altitude of about 23 km and released an estimated total energy of about 440 kT (1.7 x 1015 J). The blast wave shattered windows on the ground over a wide area and collapsed the roof of a zinc factory. In spite of the size of the initital asteroid, only small fragments (a few kg, so far) have been recovered. The entry of an asteroid into Earth's atmosphere and its aerodynamic fragmentation and deceleration has been modeled by a number of authors over the past few decades. Full-featured numerical simulations are presently limited in their ability to simultaneously incorporate fragmentation, energy coupling between solid fragments and the atmosphere, and thermal radiation, but an approximate treatment of the fragmentation and dispersion of a large entering meteoroid called the 'pancake model' has achieved good fits to other observed events, including the Tunguska explosion, the 1947 Shikote-Alin fall and strewn fields from larger iron meteorite falls, such as the Henbury craters. Simulations using the pancake model can fit the overall observations of the Chelyabinsk event using an 18 m diameter asteroid of density 3000 kg/m3 following the observed trajectory and possessing an initial strength of about 7 MPa, which is relatively high for a stony meteoroid. This suggests that the asteroid was not a strengthless rubble pile, but in fact possessed considerable strength, compared to other stony meteorites of similar type. Aerodynamic breakup begins at an altitude of 31 km and the final airburst occurs at 22 km, releasing about 250 kT at this time. Subsequent to this airburst, large fragments

  11. On disciplinary fragmentation and scientific progress.

    PubMed

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called "schools of thought". We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model's implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science.

  12. On Disciplinary Fragmentation and Scientific Progress

    PubMed Central

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called “schools of thought”. We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model’s implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science. PMID:25790025

  13. Fragment capture device

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Lloyd R.; Cole, David L.

    2010-03-30

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point of the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.

  14. Fragmentation in Biaxial Tension

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G H; Archbold, G C; Hurricane, O A; Miller, P L

    2006-06-13

    We have carried out an experiment that places a ductile stainless steel in a state of biaxial tension at a high rate of strain. The loading of the ductile metal spherical cap is performed by the detonation of a high explosive layer with a conforming geometry to expand the metal radially outwards. Simulations of the loading and expansion of the metal predict strain rates that compare well with experimental observations. A high percentage of the HE loaded material was recovered through a soft capture process and characterization of the recovered fragments provided high quality data, including uniform strain prior to failure and fragment size. These data were used with a modified fragmentation model to determine a fragmentation energy.

  15. Large scale meta-analysis of fragment-based screening campaigns: privileged fragments and complementary technologies.

    PubMed

    Kutchukian, Peter S; Wassermann, Anne Mai; Lindvall, Mika K; Wright, S Kirk; Ottl, Johannes; Jacob, Jaison; Scheufler, Clemens; Marzinzik, Andreas; Brooijmans, Natasja; Glick, Meir

    2015-06-01

    A first step in fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) often entails a fragment-based screen (FBS) to identify fragment "hits." However, the integration of conflicting results from orthogonal screens remains a challenge. Here we present a meta-analysis of 35 fragment-based campaigns at Novartis, which employed a generic 1400-fragment library against diverse target families using various biophysical and biochemical techniques. By statistically interrogating the multidimensional FBS data, we sought to investigate three questions: (1) What makes a fragment amenable for FBS? (2) How do hits from different fragment screening technologies and target classes compare with each other? (3) What is the best way to pair FBS assay technologies? In doing so, we identified substructures that were privileged for specific target classes, as well as fragments that were privileged for authentic activity against many targets. We also revealed some of the discrepancies between technologies. Finally, we uncovered a simple rule of thumb in screening strategy: when choosing two technologies for a campaign, pairing a biochemical and biophysical screen tends to yield the greatest coverage of authentic hits. PMID:25550355

  16. Fragmentation and restructuring of soft-agglomerates under shear.

    PubMed

    Eggersdorfer, M L; Kadau, D; Herrmann, H J; Pratsinis, S E

    2010-02-15

    Soft-agglomerate restructuring, break-up (or fragmentation) and relaxation are studied in a simple shear flow by a discrete element method (DEM). The agglomerates, held together by van der Waals forces, rotate in the shear flow and are stretched into nearly linear structures (fractal dimension approaches unity) until they fracture at their weakest point resulting in lognormally-shaped fragment size distributions asymptotically. Individual fragments relax in the flow towards more compact agglomerates than the parent ones. The evolution of the average number of particles per fragment is described by generalized scaling laws between shear rate, onset (time-lag) of fragmentation, asymptotic fragment mass and size consistent with experimental and theoretical studies in the literature. The initial effective fractal dimension of the agglomerates influences the final one of the fragments. PMID:19948345

  17. Heavy fragment radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.B.

    1987-12-10

    This recently discovered mode of radioactive decay, like alpha decay and spontaneous fission, is believed to involve tunneling through the deformation-energy barrier between a very heavy nucleus and two separated fragments the sum of whose masses is less than the mass of the parent nucleus. In all known cases the heavier of the two fragments is close to doubly magic /sup 208/Pb, and the lighter fragment has even Z. Four isotopes of Ra are known to emit /sup 14/C nuclei; several isotopes of U as well as /sup 230/Th and /sup 231/Pa emit Ne nuclei; and /sup 234/U exhibits four hadronic decay modes: alpha decay, spontaneous fission, Ne decay and Mg decay.

  18. Okazaki fragment metabolism.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Lata; Bambara, Robert A

    2013-02-01

    Cellular DNA replication requires efficient copying of the double-stranded chromosomal DNA. The leading strand is elongated continuously in the direction of fork opening, whereas the lagging strand is made discontinuously in the opposite direction. The lagging strand needs to be processed to form a functional DNA segment. Genetic analyses and reconstitution experiments identified proteins and multiple pathways responsible for maturation of the lagging strand. In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes the lagging-strand fragments are initiated by RNA primers, which are removed by a joining mechanism involving strand displacement of the primer into a flap, flap removal, and then ligation. Although the prokaryotic fragments are ~1200 nucleotides long, the eukaryotic fragments are much shorter, with lengths determined by nucleosome periodicity. The prokaryotic joining mechanism is simple and efficient. The eukaryotic maturation mechanism involves many enzymes, possibly three pathways, and regulation that can shift from high efficiency to high fidelity.

  19. Allogenous tooth fragment reattachment

    PubMed Central

    Maitin, Nitin; Maitin, Shipra; Rastogi, Khushboo; Bhushan, Rajarshi

    2013-01-01

    Coronal fractures of the anterior teeth are a common form of dental trauma and its sequelae may impair the establishment and accomplishment of an adequate treatment plan. Among the various treatment options, reattachment of a crown fragment obtained from a previously extracted tooth is a conservative treatment that should be considered for crown fractures of anterior teeth. This article reports reattachment of an allogenous tooth fragment in a fractured maxillary lateral incisor in a 38-year-old patient. It is suggested that allogenous reattachment in a fractured anterior tooth serves to be a better alternative and should be further researched. Aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of a fractured complicated anterior crown using allogenous tooth fragment is a better alternative to other more conventional treatment options. PMID:23845684

  20. Fragmentation methods in laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi X.; Whitehurst, Colin; King, Terence A.

    1991-07-01

    Following a series of opto-acoustic-mechanical and spectroscopic studies into the basic mechanisms of laser lithotripsy, a plasma-mediated opto-mechanical energy transfer model is presented. Laser energy, first absorbed by the calculi material at the surface and couples into the initiated plasma following ionization of vaporized material, is finally transformed into destructive mechanical energy via a shock wave induced by the impulsive expansion of the resulting plasma. This leads to the fragmentation of the calculi. The laser-plasma energy coupling gives a new definition for the fluence threshold to laser induced breakdown, which agrees with shock wave detection and analysis. A laser pulse shape with initial low intensity and sufficient fluence to vaporize a required amount of target material (lasting a few microsecond(s) ) and terminating in a short, intense pulse of about 1microsecond(s) or less, to couple most of the laser energy into the dense young plasma and so create high pressures, is required to produce optimum effect for laser lithotripsy. An opto-mechanical coupler has been designed which transfers the maximum laser energy into mechanically destructive energy, and successfully fragments various types of urinary and biliary calculi even including those calculi with poor surface absorptance, like pure white cystine. A solid state laser, Ho:YAG (2.1 micrometers wavelength and 150 microsecond(s) pulse width), has also been tested as an alternative to the flashlamp-excited dye laser. The underwater shock wave induced by this laser has been measured and has successfully fragmented calculi with poor absorptance in the visible region.

  1. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  2. Fragment Separator ACCULINNA-2

    SciTech Connect

    Krupko, S. A.; Fomichev, A. S.; Chudoba, V.; Daniel, A. V.; Golovkov, M. S.; Gorshkov, V. A.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Sidorchuk, S. I.; Slepnev, R. S.; Stepantsov, S. V.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Wolski, R.; Grigorenko, L. V.; Tarasov, O. B.; Ershov, S. N.; Lukyanov, V. K.; Danilin, B. V.; Korsheninnikov, A. A.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Mukha, I. G.

    2010-04-30

    Project of a new in-flight fragment separator is proposed as a part of the third generation DRIBs facilities in Dubna. As compared to the existing separator ACCULINNA, beam intensity should be increased by a factor 10-15, the beam quality improved and the RIB assortment should broaden considerably at ACCULINNA-2. Research program and structure are outlined for the new instrument.

  3. Comment on diquark fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Fredriksson, S.; Larsson, T.

    1983-07-01

    We discuss diquark fragmentation and suggest that a spectator uu system in deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering has a larger breakup probability than a ud system. The reason for this is argued to be that half of the leftover ud systems are in bound (ud)/sub 0/ diquark configurations, while no such bound uu diquarks exist.

  4. Fluctuations and symmetry energy in nuclear fragmentation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Colonna, M

    2013-01-25

    Within a dynamical description of nuclear fragmentation, based on the liquid-gas phase transition scenario, we explore the relation between neutron-proton density fluctuations and nuclear symmetry energy. We show that, along the fragmentation path, isovector fluctuations follow the evolution of the local density and approach an equilibrium value connected to the local symmetry energy. Higher-density regions are characterized by smaller average asymmetry and narrower isotopic distributions. This dynamical analysis points out that fragment final state isospin fluctuations can probe the symmetry energy of the density domains from which fragments originate.

  5. Cryobiology of coral fragments.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Mary; Farrell, Ann; Carter, Virginia L

    2013-02-01

    Around the world, coral reefs are dying due to human influences, and saving habitat alone may not stop this destruction. This investigation focused on the biological processes that will provide the first steps in understanding the cryobiology of whole coral fragments. Coral fragments are a partnership of coral tissue and endosymbiotic algae, Symbiodinium sp., commonly called zooxanthellae. These data reflected their separate sensitivities to chilling and a cryoprotectant (dimethyl sulfoxide) for the coral Pocillopora damicornis, as measured by tissue loss and Pulse Amplitude Modulated fluorometry 3weeks post-treatment. Five cryoprotectant treatments maintained the viability of the coral tissue and zooxanthellae at control values (1M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0h exposures, and 1.5M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0 and 1.5h exposures, P>0.05, ANOVA), whereas 2M concentrations did not (P<0.05, ANOVA). A seasonal response to chilling was observed in the coral tissue, but not in the zooxanthellae. During the winter when the fragments were chilled, the coral tissue remained relatively intact (∼25% loss) post-treatment, but the zooxanthellae numbers in the tissue declined after 5min of chilling (P<0.05, ANOVA). However, in the late spring, coral tissue (∼75% loss) and zooxanthellae numbers declined in response to chilling alone (P<0.05, ANOVA). When a cryoprotectant (1M dimethyl sulfoxide) was used in concert with chilling it protected the coral against tissue loss after 45min of cryoprotectant exposure (P>0.05, ANOVA), but it did not protect against the loss of zooxanthellae (P<0.05, ANOVA). The zooxanthellae are the most sensitive element in the coral fragment complex and future cryopreservation protocols must be guided by their greater sensitivity.

  6. Fragmentation of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, Siva; Kamyabi, Nabiollah

    Tumor cells have to travel through blood capillaries to be able to metastasize and colonize in distant organs. Among the numerous cells that are shed by the primary tumor, very few survive in circulation. In vivo studies have shown that tumor cells can undergo breakup at microcapillary junctions affecting their survival. It is currently unclear what hydrodynamic and biomechanical factors contribute to fragmentation and moreover how different are the breakup dynamics of highly and weakly metastatic cells. In this study, we use microfluidics to investigate flow-induced breakup of prostate and breast cancer cells. We observe several different modes of breakup of cancer cells, which have striking similarities with breakup of viscous drops. We quantify the breakup time and find that highly metastatic cancer cells take longer to breakup than lowly metastatic cells suggesting that tumor cells may dynamically modify their deformability to avoid fragmentation. We also identify the role that cytoskeleton and membrane plays in the breakup process. Our study highlights the important role that tumor cell fragmentation plays in cancer metastasis. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.

  7. Fracture, failure, and fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Though continuum descriptions of material behavior are useful for many kinds of problems, particularly those involving plastic flow, a more general approach is required when the failure is likely to involve growth and coalescence of a large number of fractures, as in fragmentation. Failures of this kind appear frequently in rapid dynamic processes such as those resulting from impacts and explosions, particularly in the formation of spall fragments. In the first part of this paper an approach to formulating constitutive relations that accounts for the opening, shear and growth of an ensemble of cracks is discussed. The approach also accounts for plastic flow accompanying fragmentation. The resulting constitutive relations have been incorporated into a Lagrangean computer program. In the second part of this paper a theoretical approach to coalescence is described. The simplest formulation makes use of a linear Liouville equation, with crack growth limited by the mean free path of cracks, assumed constant. This approach allows for an anisotropic distribution of cracks. An alternative approach is also described in which the decrease of the mean free path with increasing crack size is accounted for, but the crack distribution is assumed isotropic. A reduction of the governing Liouville equation to an ordinary differential equation of third order is possible, and the result can be used to determine how mean-free-path decreases with increasing crack size.

  8. Rho kinase regulates fragmentation and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Orlando, Kelly A.; Stone, Nicole L.; Pittman, Randall N. . E-mail: pittman@pharm.med.upenn.edu

    2006-01-01

    During the execution phase of apoptosis, a cell undergoes cytoplasmic and nuclear changes that prepare it for death and phagocytosis. The end-point of the execution phase is condensation into a single apoptotic body or fragmentation into multiple apoptotic bodies. Fragmentation is thought to facilitate phagocytosis; however, mechanisms regulating fragmentation are unknown. An isoform of Rho kinase, ROCK-I, drives membrane blebbing through its activation of actin-myosin contraction; this raises the possibility that ROCK-I may regulate other execution phase events, such as cellular fragmentation. Here, we show that COS-7 cells fragment into a number of small apoptotic bodies during apoptosis; treating with ROCK inhibitors (Y-27632 or H-1152) prevents fragmentation. Latrunculin B and blebbistatin, drugs that interfere with actin-myosin contraction, also inhibit fragmentation. During apoptosis, ROCK-I is cleaved and activated by caspases, while ROCK-II is not activated, but rather translocates to a cytoskeletal fraction. siRNA knock-down of ROCK-I but not ROCK-II inhibits fragmentation of dying cells, consistent with ROCK-I being required for apoptotic fragmentation. Finally, cells dying in the presence of the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 are not efficiently phagocytized. These data show that ROCK plays an essential role in fragmentation and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells.

  9. Investigation on laser induced salivary stone fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Pongratz, Thomas; Eder, Matthias; Domes, Mona; Vogeser, Michael; Johnson, Thorsten; Siedeck, Vanessa; Schroetzlmair, Florian; Zengel, Pamela

    2014-03-01

    Objective: It was the objective of this in-vitro study to investigate photon-based techniques for identifying the composition and fragmentation of salivary stones using a Ho:YAG laser. Materials and Method: Salivary stones (n=47) extracted from patients with clinical symptoms of sialolithiasis were examined in-vitro. After extraction, the stones were kept in Ringers solution until size and volume measurements could be performed. Thereafter, dual-energy CT scans (DECT) were performed to classify the composition of the stones. Subsequently, fluorescence measurements were performed by taking images under blue light excitation as well as by fluorescence spectroscopy, measuring excitation-emission-matrixes (EEM). Further investigation to identify the exact composition of the stone was performed by Raman spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy of stone fragments and debris. Fragmentation was performed in an aquarium set-up equipped with a mesh (hole: 1.5mm) using a Ho:YAG-laser to deliver laser pulses of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5J/pulse at a frequency of 3Hz through a 200μm-fibre to the stone surface. The collected data were analyzed and fragmentation rates were calculated. Finally, correlation between stone composition and fragmentation was performed. Results: Blue light fluorescence excitation resulted in either fluorescence in the green spectral region or in a combination of green and red fluorescence emission. EEM-measurement showed the corresponding spectra. Raman spectroscopy showed a mixture of carbonate apatite and keratin. DECT results in evidence of calcium containing components. FTIR-spectroscopy results showed that carbonate apatite is the main component. Fragmentation experiment showed a dependency on the energy per pulse applied if the evaluation implies the ratio of fragmented weight to pulse, while the ratio fragmented weight to energy remains about constant for the three laser parameter used. Conclusion: The composition of salivary stones could be determined using

  10. Virtual fragment preparation for computational fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Ludington, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) has become an important component of the drug discovery process. The use of fragments can accelerate both the search for a hit molecule and the development of that hit into a lead molecule for clinical testing. In addition to experimental methodologies for FBDD such as NMR and X-ray Crystallography screens, computational techniques are playing an increasingly important role. The success of the computational simulations is due in large part to how the database of virtual fragments is prepared. In order to prepare the fragments appropriately it is necessary to understand how FBDD differs from other approaches and the issues inherent in building up molecules from smaller fragment pieces. The ultimate goal of these calculations is to link two or more simulated fragments into a molecule that has an experimental binding affinity consistent with the additive predicted binding affinities of the virtual fragments. Computationally predicting binding affinities is a complex process, with many opportunities for introducing error. Therefore, care should be taken with the fragment preparation procedure to avoid introducing additional inaccuracies.This chapter is focused on the preparation process used to create a virtual fragment database. Several key issues of fragment preparation which affect the accuracy of binding affinity predictions are discussed. The first issue is the selection of the two-dimensional atomic structure of the virtual fragment. Although the particular usage of the fragment can affect this choice (i.e., whether the fragment will be used for calibration, binding site characterization, hit identification, or lead optimization), general factors such as synthetic accessibility, size, and flexibility are major considerations in selecting the 2D structure. Other aspects of preparing the virtual fragments for simulation are the generation of three-dimensional conformations and the assignment of the associated atomic point charges

  11. New Scalings in Nuclear Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, E.; Bougault, R.; Galichet, E.; Gagnon-Moisan, F.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, P.; Marini, P.; Parlog, M.

    2010-10-01

    Fragment partitions of fragmenting hot nuclei produced in central and semiperipheral collisions have been compared in the excitation energy region 4-10 MeV per nucleon where radial collective expansion takes place. It is shown that, for a given total excitation energy per nucleon, the amount of radial collective energy fixes the mean fragment multiplicity. It is also shown that, at a given total excitation energy per nucleon, the different properties of fragment partitions are completely determined by the reduced fragment multiplicity (i.e., normalized to the source size). Freeze-out volumes seem to play a role in the scalings observed.

  12. Fragmentation function measurements at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Ralf; Vossen, Anselm; Leitgab, Martin; Grosse-Perdekamp, Matthias; Giordano, Francesca; Ogawa, Akio

    2011-12-14

    The precision measurement of fragmentation functions is an important requirement to study the spin structure of the nucleon. Unpolarized fragmentation functions at reasonably low scale and high fractional energy are necessary to complement the measurements mostly performed at LEP in order to obtain high enough precision for measurements at semi-inclusive DIS experiments and at RHIC. Those can be obtained from the abundant data collected with the Belle detector at the e{sup +}e{sup -} collider KEKB. In addition one can cleanly measure the transversely polarized fragmentation functions such as the Collins fragmentation function and the interference fragmentation functions. Both have been obtained with great precision at Belle.

  13. Fragmentation of Massive Dense Cores Down to <~ 1000 AU: Relation between Fragmentation and Density Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, Aina; Estalella, Robert; Girart, Josep M.; Fuente, Asunción; Fontani, Francesco; Commerçon, Benoit; Busquet, Gemma; Bontemps, Sylvain; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Zapata, Luis A.; Zhang, Qizhou; Hennebelle, Patrick; di Francesco, James

    2014-04-01

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope is operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the United Kingdom, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, and the National Research Council of Canada.

  14. Fragment oriented molecular shapes.

    PubMed

    Hain, Ethan; Camacho, Carlos J; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Molecular shape is an important concept in drug design and virtual screening. Shape similarity typically uses either alignment methods, which dynamically optimize molecular poses with respect to the query molecular shape, or feature vector methods, which are computationally less demanding but less accurate. The computational cost of alignment can be reduced by pre-aligning shapes, as is done with the Volumetric-Aligned Molecular Shapes (VAMS) method. Here, we introduce and evaluate fragment oriented molecular shapes (FOMS), where shapes are aligned based on molecular fragments. FOMS enables the use of shape constraints, a novel method for precisely specifying molecular shape queries that provides the ability to perform partial shape matching and supports search algorithms that function on an interactive time scale. When evaluated using the challenging Maximum Unbiased Validation dataset, shape constraints were able to extract significantly enriched subsets of compounds for the majority of targets, and FOMS matched or exceeded the performance of both VAMS and an optimizing alignment method of shape similarity search. PMID:27085751

  15. Automated reassembly of file fragmented images using greedy algorithms.

    PubMed

    Memon, Nasir; Pal, Anandabrata

    2006-02-01

    The problem of restoring deleted files from a scattered set of fragments arises often in digital forensics. File fragmentation is a regular occurrence in hard disks, memory cards, and other storage media. As a result, a forensic analyst examining a disk may encounter many fragments of deleted digital files, but is unable to determine the proper sequence of fragments to rebuild the files. In this paper, we investigate the specific case where digital images are heavily fragmented and there is no file table information by which a forensic analyst can ascertain the correct fragment order to reconstruct each image. The image reassembly problem is formulated as a k-vertex disjoint graph problem and reassembly is then done by finding an optimal ordering of fragments. We provide techniques for comparing fragments and describe several algorithms for image reconstruction based on greedy heuristics. Finally, we provide experimental results showing that images can be reconstructed with high accuracy even when there are thousands of fragments and multiple images involved.

  16. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure–function relationship. PMID:26978354

  17. Habitat specialization predicts genetic response to fragmentation in tropical birds.

    PubMed

    Khimoun, Aurélie; Eraud, Cyril; Ollivier, Anthony; Arnoux, Emilie; Rocheteau, Vincent; Bely, Marine; Lefol, Emilie; Delpuech, Martin; Carpentier, Marie-Laure; Leblond, Gilles; Levesque, Anthony; Charbonnel, Anaïs; Faivre, Bruno; Garnier, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Habitat fragmentation is one of the most severe threats to biodiversity as it may lead to changes in population genetic structure, with ultimate modifications of species evolutionary potential and local extinctions. Nonetheless, fragmentation does not equally affect all species and identifying which ecological traits are related to species sensitivity to habitat fragmentation could help prioritization of conservation efforts. Despite the theoretical link between species ecology and extinction proneness, comparative studies explicitly testing the hypothesis that particular ecological traits underlies species-specific population structure are rare. Here, we used a comparative approach on eight bird species, co-occurring across the same fragmented landscape. For each species, we quantified relative levels of forest specialization and genetic differentiation among populations. To test the link between forest specialization and susceptibility to forest fragmentation, we assessed species responses to fragmentation by comparing levels of genetic differentiation between continuous and fragmented forest landscapes. Our results revealed a significant and substantial population structure at a very small spatial scale for mobile organisms such as birds. More importantly, we found that specialist species are more affected by forest fragmentation than generalist ones. Finally, our results suggest that even a simple habitat specialization index can be a satisfying predictor of genetic and demographic consequences of habitat fragmentation, providing a reliable practical and quantitative tool for conservation biology. PMID:27314987

  18. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis as a Strategy for Fragment Evolution against GSK3β.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yikai; Wach, Jean-Yves; Sheehan, Patrick; Zhong, Cheng; Zhan, Chenyang; Harris, Richard; Almo, Steven C; Bishop, Joshua; Haggarty, Stephen J; Ramek, Alexander; Berry, Kayla N; O'Herin, Conor; Koehler, Angela N; Hung, Alvin W; Young, Damian W

    2016-09-01

    Traditional fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) relies heavily on structural analysis of the hits bound to their targets. Herein, we present a complementary approach based on diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS). A DOS-based fragment collection was able to produce initial hit compounds against the target GSK3β, allow the systematic synthesis of related fragment analogues to explore fragment-level structure-activity relationship, and finally lead to the synthesis of a more potent compound. PMID:27660690

  19. Chapter 4 embedded metal fragments.

    PubMed

    Kalinich, John F; Vane, Elizabeth A; Centeno, Jose A; Gaitens, Joanna M; Squibb, Katherine S; McDiarmid, Melissa A; Kasper, Christine E

    2014-01-01

    The continued evolution of military munitions and armor on the battlefield, as well as the insurgent use of improvised explosive devices, has led to embedded fragment wounds containing metal and metal mixtures whose long-term toxicologic and carcinogenic properties are not as yet known. Advances in medical care have greatly increased the survival from these types of injuries. Standard surgical guidelines suggest leaving embedded fragments in place, thus individuals may carry these retained metal fragments for the rest of their lives. Nursing professionals will be at the forefront in caring for these wounded individuals, both immediately after the trauma and during the healing and rehabilitation process. Therefore, an understanding of the potential health effects of embedded metal fragment wounds is essential. This review will explore the history of embedded fragment wounds, current research in the field, and Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs guidelines for the identification and long-term monitoring of individuals with embedded fragments.

  20. Binary stars - Formation by fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1988-01-01

    Theories of binary star formation by capture, separate nuclei, fission and fragmentation are compared, assessing the success of theoretical attempts to explain the observed properties of main-sequence binary stars. The theory of formation by fragmentation is examined, discussing the prospects for checking the theory against observations of binary premain-sequence stars. It is concluded that formation by fragmentation is successful at explaining many of the key properties of main-sequence binary stars.

  1. Quantitative experimental modelling of fragmentation during explosive volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordén Haug, Ø.; Galland, O.; Gisler, G.

    2012-04-01

    Phreatomagmatic eruptions results from the violent interaction between magma and an external source of water, such as ground water or a lake. This interaction causes fragmentation of the magma and/or the host rock, resulting in coarse-grained (lapilli) to very fine-grained (ash) material. The products of phreatomagmatic explosions are classically described by their fragment size distribution, which commonly follows power laws of exponent D. Such descriptive approach, however, considers the final products only and do not provide information on the dynamics of fragmentation. The aim of this contribution is thus to address the following fundamental questions. What are the physics that govern fragmentation processes? How fragmentation occurs through time? What are the mechanisms that produce power law fragment size distributions? And what are the scaling laws that control the exponent D? To address these questions, we performed a quantitative experimental study. The setup consists of a Hele-Shaw cell filled with a layer of cohesive silica flour, at the base of which a pulse of pressurized air is injected, leading to fragmentation of the layer of flour. The fragmentation process is monitored through time using a high-speed camera. By varying systematically the air pressure (P) and the thickness of the flour layer (h) we observed two morphologies of fragmentation: "lift off" where the silica flour above the injection inlet is ejected upwards, and "channeling" where the air pierces through the layer along sub-vertical conduit. By building a phase diagram, we show that the morphology is controlled by P/dgh, where d is the density of the flour and g is the gravitational acceleration. To quantify the fragmentation process, we developed a Matlab image analysis program, which calculates the number and sizes of the fragments, and so the fragment size distribution, during the experiments. The fragment size distributions are in general described by power law distributions of

  2. Cue depreciation: when word fragment completion is undermined by prior exposure to lesser fragments.

    PubMed

    Peynircioğlu, Z F; Watkins, M J

    1986-07-01

    The ability to think of a previously studied item has often been shown to be impaired when, in one way or another, the extraitem context is changed from study to test. In a series of five experiments, such impairment is induced in a somewhat different way. A fragment (e.g. r-i--rop) of a just-studied word (raindrop) is shown to be less readily completed if it is presented bit by bit (r------p, r----r-p, r-i--r-p, r-i--rop) rather than all at once (Experiments 1, 3, 4, and 5). No such effect is found if the word has not been studied beforehand (Experiments 2, 3, 4, and 5). This pattern of results occurs even when fragments of studied and nonstudied words occur in the same test and under conditions in which subjects cannot tell whether a given fragment is of a studied or nonstudied word (Experiments 4 and 5). In addition, for words that have been studied beforehand, the impairment is shown to increase systematically with the number of steps involved in the presentation of the word fragment (Experiment 3) and also to persist when the time allowed for completion of the final version of the fragment is increased from 4 s to a full minute (Experiment 5).

  3. Longitudinal changes in the structure and inflammatory response of the intervertebral disc due to stab injury in a murine organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Adam C; Liu, Jennifer W; Tang, Simon Y

    2016-08-01

    Despite the significant public health impact of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and low back pain, it remains challenging to investigate the multifactorial molecular mechanisms that drive the degenerative cascade. Organ culture model systems offer the advantage of allowing cells to live and interact with their native extracellular matrix, while simultaneously reducing the amount of biological variation and complexity present at the organismal level. Murine organ cultures in particular also allow the use of widely available genetically modified animals with molecular level reporters that would reveal insights on the degenerative cascade. Here, we utilize an organ culture system of murine lumbar functional spinal units where we are able to maintain the cellular, metabolic, and structural, and mechanical stability of the whole organ over a 21-day period. Furthermore, we describe a novel approach in organ culture by using tissues from animals with an NF-κB-luc reporter in combination with a mechanical injury model, and are able to show that proinflammatory factors and cytokines such as NF-κB and IL-6 produced by IVD cells can be monitored longitudinally during culture in a stab injury model. Taken together, we utilize a murine organ culture system that maintains the cellular and tissue level behavior of the intervertebral disc and apply it to transgenic animals that allow the monitoring of the inflammatory profile of IVDs. This approach could provide important insights on the molecular and metabolic mediators that regulate the homeostasis of the IVD. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1431-1438, 2016. PMID:27273204

  4. Analysis of Peptidoglycan Fragment Release.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Ryan E; Lenz, Jonathan D; Dillard, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria break down a significant portion of their cell wall peptidoglycan during each round of growth and cell division. This process generates peptidoglycan fragments of various sizes that can either be imported back into the cytoplasm for recycling or released from the cell. Released fragments have been shown to act as microbe-associated molecular patterns for the initiation of immune responses, as triggers for the initiation of mutualistic host-microbe relationships, and as signals for cell-cell communication in bacteria. Characterizing these released peptidoglycan fragments can, therefore, be considered an important step in understanding how microbes communicate with other organisms in their environments. In this chapter, we describe methods for labeling cell wall peptidoglycan, calculating the rate at which peptidoglycan is turned over, and collecting released peptidoglycan to determine the abundance and species of released fragments. Methods are described for both the separation of peptidoglycan fragments by size-exclusion chromatography and further detailed analysis by HPLC.

  5. Fragment Screening and HIV Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Patel, Disha; Arnold, Eddy

    2013-01-01

    Fragment screening has proven to be a powerful alternative to traditional methods for drug discovery. Biophysical methods, such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance, are used to screen a diverse library of small molecule compounds. Although compounds identified via this approach have relatively weak affinity, they provide a good platform for lead development and are highly efficient binders with respect to their size. Fragment screening has been utilized for a wide-range of targets, including HIV-1 proteins. Here, we review the fragment screening studies targeting HIV-1 proteins using X-ray crystallography or surface plasmon resonance. These studies have successfully detected binding of novel fragments to either previously established or new sites on HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase. In addition, fragment screening against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been used as a tool to better understand the complex nature of ligand binding to a flexible target. PMID:21972022

  6. Fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Feyfant, Eric; Cross, Jason B; Paris, Kevin; Tsao, Désirée H H

    2011-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD), which is comprised of both fragment screening and the use of fragment hits to design leads, began more than 15 years ago and has been steadily gaining in popularity and utility. Its origin lies on the fact that the coverage of chemical space and the binding efficiency of hits are directly related to the size of the compounds screened. Nevertheless, FBDD still faces challenges, among them developing fragment screening libraries that ensure optimal coverage of chemical space, physical properties and chemical tractability. Fragment screening also requires sensitive assays, often biophysical in nature, to detect weak binders. In this chapter we will introduce the technologies used to address these challenges and outline the experimental advantages that make FBDD one of the most popular new hit-to-lead process. PMID:20981527

  7. Rock fragment movement in shallow rill flow - A laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Kerstin; Wirtz, Stefan; Seeger, Manuel; Gronz, Oliver; Remke, Alexander; Iserloh, Thomas; Brings, Christine; Casper, Markus; Ries, Johannes B.

    2014-05-01

    Studies concerning rill erosion mainly deal with the erosion and transport of fine material. The transport of rock fragments is examined mostly for mountain rivers. But there are important differences between the conditions and processes in rivers and in rills: (1) In most cases, the river cuts into a coarse substrate, where fine material is sparse, whereas rill erosion occurs on arable land. So the main part of the substrate is fine material and only single rock fragments influence the processes. (2) In rivers, the water depth is relatively high. There are a lot of studies about hydraulic parameters in such flows, but there is almost nothing known about hydraulic conditions in surface runoff events of a few centimeters. Additionally, little information exists about the rock fragment movement as a part of rill erosion processes on arable land. This knowledge should be increased because rock fragments cause non-stationary water turbulences in rills, which enhance the erosive force of flowing water. Field experiments can only show the fact that a certain rock fragment has moved: The starting point and the final position can be estimated. But the moving path and especially the initiation of the movement is not detectable under field conditions. Hence, we developed a laboratory setup to analyze the movement of rock fragments depending on rock fragment properties (size, form), slope gradient, flow velocity and surface roughness. By observing the rock fragments with cameras from two different angles we are able (1) to measure the rotation angles of a rock fragment during the experiment and (2) to deduce different rock fragment movement patterns. On this poster we want to present the experimental setup, developed within the scope of a master thesis, and the results of these experiments.

  8. Dynamic fragmentation of ferroelectric ceramics using the torsional Kolsky bar

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, L S; Grady, D E

    1983-10-01

    This paper studied the dynamic loading and subsequent fragmentation of four different load zirconate titanate (95/5 PZT) ferroelectric ceramics using a torsional Kolsky bar apparatus. Solid cylinders of the four materials were loaded in torsion at shear strain rates in the range 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 3/s/sup -1/. Using the strain gage recordings of the incident, reflected and transmitted pulses, the energy required to fragment the specimen was determined for each test. In addition, the fragments resulting from each test were collected and analyzed by various technciques to determine their mass and size distributions. Results show some differences in particle distributions between the different batches of material. However, there is a more significant and consistent difference between the dynamic strength (as measured by the maximum shear stress) and the fragment mass distributions of the virgin material and the pressure depoled material, despite the fact that no differences were detected in the energy of fragmentation. Using earlier analytical results which relate the local kinetic energy of a potential fragment to the surface energy required to create that fragment, a relationship between the distribution of fragments from a test and material properties was derived. Results of tests on PZT as well as other materials such as oil shale, graphite, uranium dioxide and glass indicate a good correlation between the fragment distribution parameter, n, and material properties as predicted by the theory. Finally, the results are analyzed to determine the potential effects of internal stresses on the dynamic strength of the material and its fragmentation characteristics.

  9. Fragmentation and densities of meteoroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babadzhanov, Pulat B.

    1992-01-01

    Photographic observations of meteors carried out in Dushanbe by the method of instantaneous exposure have shown clearly that meteoroids entering the Earth's atmosphere are subjected to different types of fragmentation. The quasi-continuous fragmentation of meteoroids is mostly widespread. Using the physical theory of meteors which takes into account the quasi-continuous fragmentation of meteoroids and on the basis of light curves of meteors the densities of meteoroids of different streams have been determined. The results enable us to conclude that the densities of meteoroids are over an order of magnitude higher than they have been assumed before. Moreover they are close to the densities of carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites.

  10. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Carmona, Belén Martínez; Martínez, Jose L. Muñoz

    2016-02-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramers-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  11. Considerations in producing preferentially reduced half-antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Makaraviciute, Asta; Jackson, Carolyn D; Millner, Paul A; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2016-02-01

    Half-antibody fragments are a promising reagent for biosensing, drug-delivery and labeling applications, since exposure of the free thiol group in the Fc hinge region allows oriented reaction. Despite the structural variations among the molecules of different IgG subclasses and those obtained from different hosts, only generalized preferential antibody reduction protocols are currently available. Preferential reduction of polyclonal sheep anti-digoxin, rabbit anti-Escherichia coli and anti-myoglobin class IgG antibodies to half-antibody fragments has been investigated. A mild reductant 2-mercaptoethylamine (2-MEA) and a slightly stronger reductant tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) were used and the fragments obtained were quantitatively determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. It has been shown that the yields of half-antibody fragments could be increased by lowering the pH of the reduction mixtures. However, antibody susceptibility to the reductants varied. At pH4.5 the highest yield of sheep anti-digoxin IgG half-antibody fragments was obtained with 1M 2-MEA. Conversely, rabbit IgG half-antibody fragments could only be obtained with the stronger reductant TCEP. Preferential reduction of rabbit anti-myoglobin IgG antibodies was optimized and the highest half-antibody yield was obtained with 35 mM TCEP. Finally, it has been demonstrated that produced anti-myoglobin half-IgG fragments retained their binding activity. PMID:26779832

  12. Fragment merger: an online tool to merge overlapping long sequence fragments.

    PubMed

    Bell, Trevor G; Kramvis, Anna

    2013-03-12

    While PCR amplicons extend to a few thousand bases, the length of sequences from direct Sanger sequencing is limited to 500-800 nucleotides. Therefore, several fragments may be required to cover an amplicon, a gene or an entire genome. These fragments are typically sequenced in an overlapping fashion and assembled by manually sliding and aligning the sequences visually. This is time-consuming, repetitive and error-prone, and further complicated by circular genomes. An online tool merging two to twelve long overlapping sequence fragments was developed. Either chromatograms or FASTA files are submitted to the tool, which trims poor quality ends of chromatograms according to user-specified parameters. Fragments are assembled into a single sequence by repeatedly calling the EMBOSS merger tool in a consecutive manner. Output includes the number of trimmed nucleotides, details of each merge, and an optional alignment to a reference sequence. The final merge sequence is displayed and can be downloaded in FASTA format. All output files can be downloaded as a ZIP archive. This tool allows for easy and automated assembly of overlapping sequences and is aimed at researchers without specialist computer skills. The tool is genome- and organism-agnostic and has been developed using hepatitis B virus sequence data.

  13. Fragmentation of drying paint layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Katinka; Dombi, András; Járai-Szabó, Ferenc; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-11-01

    Fragmentation of thin layers of drying granular materials on a frictional surface are studied both by experiments and computer simulations. Besides a qualitative description of the fragmentation phenomenon, the dependence of the average fragment size as a function of the layer thickness is thoroughly investigated. Experiments are done using a special nail polish, which forms characteristic crack structures during drying. In order to control the layer thickness, we diluted the nail polish in acetone and evaporated in a controlled manner different volumes of this solution on glass surfaces. During the evaporation process we managed to get an instable paint layer, which formed cracks as it dried out. In order to understand the obtained structures a previously developed spring-block model was implemented in a three-dimensional version. The experimental and simulation results proved to be in excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement. An earlier suggested scaling relation between the average fragment size and the layer thickness is reconfirmed.

  14. Calculus fragmentation in laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Welch, A J; Kang, H W; Lee, H; Teichman, J M H

    2004-03-01

    The intracorporeal treatment of urinary calculi with lasers is presented, which describes laser-calculus interactions associated with lithotripsy. Reliable fragmentation of calculi with diverse compositions and minimal collateral tissue damage are primarily contingent upon laser parameters (wavelength, pulse duration, and pulse energy) and physical properties of calculi (optical, mechanical, and chemical). The pulse duration governs the dominant mechanism in calculi fragmentation, which is either photothermal or photoacoustical/photomechanical. Lasers with long pulse durations (i.e. > tens of micros) induce a temperature rise in the laser-affected zone with minimal acoustic waves; material is removed by means of vaporization, melting, mechanical stress, and/or chemical decomposition. Short-pulsed laser ablation (i.e. < 10 micros), on the other hand, produces shock waves, and the resultant mechanical energy fragments calculi. Work continues throughout the world to evaluate the feasibility of advanced lasers in lithotripsy and to optimize laser parameters and light delivery systems pertinent to efficient fragmentation of calculi.

  15. QGP and Modified Jet Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-04-18

    Recent progresses in the study of jet modification in hotmedium and their consequences in high-energy heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. In particular, I will discuss energy loss for propagating heavy quarks and the resulting modified fragmentation function. Medium modification of the parton fragmentation function due to quark recombination are formulated within finite temperature field theory and their implication on the search for deconfined quark-gluon plasma is also discussed.

  16. Stabbing simulations and DNA transfer.

    PubMed

    Samie, Lydie; Hicks, Tacha; Castella, Vincent; Taroni, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Technical developments have made it possible to analyze very low amounts of DNA. This has many advantages, but the drawback of this technological progress is that interpretation of the results becomes increasingly complex: the number of mixed DNA profiles increased relatively to single source DNA profiles and stochastic effects in the DNA profile, such as drop-in and drop-out, are more frequently observed. Moreover, the relevance of low template DNA material regarding the activities alleged is not as straightforward as it was a few years ago, when for example large quantities of blood were recovered. The possibility of secondary and tertiary transfer is now becoming an issue. The purpose of this research is twofold: first, to study the transfer of DNA from the handler and secondly, to observe if handlers would transfer DNA from persons closely connected to them. We chose to mimic cases where the offender would attack a person with a knife. As a first approach, we envisaged that the defense would not give an alternative explanation for the origin of the DNA. In our transfer experiments (4 donors, 16 experiments each, 64 traces), 3% of the traces were single DNA profiles. Most of the time, the DNA profile of the person handling the knife was present as the major profile: in 83% of the traces the major contributor profile corresponded to the stabber's DNA profile (in single stains and mixtures). Mixture with no clear major/minor fraction (12%) were observed. 5% of the traces were considered of insufficient quality (more than 3 contributors, presence of a few minor peaks). In that case, we considered that the stabber's DNA was absent. In our experiments, no traces allowed excluding the stabber, however it must be noted that precautions were taken to minimize background DNA as knives were cleaned before the experiments. DNA profiles of the stabber's colleagues were not observed. We hope that this study will allow for a better understanding of the transfer mechanism and of how to assess and describe results given activity level propositions. In this preliminary research, we have focused on the transfer of DNA on the hand of the person. Besides, more research is needed to assign the probability of the results given an alternative activity proposed by the defense, for instance when the source of the DNA is not contested, but that the activities are. PMID:26875110

  17. Stabbing simulations and DNA transfer.

    PubMed

    Samie, Lydie; Hicks, Tacha; Castella, Vincent; Taroni, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Technical developments have made it possible to analyze very low amounts of DNA. This has many advantages, but the drawback of this technological progress is that interpretation of the results becomes increasingly complex: the number of mixed DNA profiles increased relatively to single source DNA profiles and stochastic effects in the DNA profile, such as drop-in and drop-out, are more frequently observed. Moreover, the relevance of low template DNA material regarding the activities alleged is not as straightforward as it was a few years ago, when for example large quantities of blood were recovered. The possibility of secondary and tertiary transfer is now becoming an issue. The purpose of this research is twofold: first, to study the transfer of DNA from the handler and secondly, to observe if handlers would transfer DNA from persons closely connected to them. We chose to mimic cases where the offender would attack a person with a knife. As a first approach, we envisaged that the defense would not give an alternative explanation for the origin of the DNA. In our transfer experiments (4 donors, 16 experiments each, 64 traces), 3% of the traces were single DNA profiles. Most of the time, the DNA profile of the person handling the knife was present as the major profile: in 83% of the traces the major contributor profile corresponded to the stabber's DNA profile (in single stains and mixtures). Mixture with no clear major/minor fraction (12%) were observed. 5% of the traces were considered of insufficient quality (more than 3 contributors, presence of a few minor peaks). In that case, we considered that the stabber's DNA was absent. In our experiments, no traces allowed excluding the stabber, however it must be noted that precautions were taken to minimize background DNA as knives were cleaned before the experiments. DNA profiles of the stabber's colleagues were not observed. We hope that this study will allow for a better understanding of the transfer mechanism and of how to assess and describe results given activity level propositions. In this preliminary research, we have focused on the transfer of DNA on the hand of the person. Besides, more research is needed to assign the probability of the results given an alternative activity proposed by the defense, for instance when the source of the DNA is not contested, but that the activities are.

  18. Fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides.

    PubMed

    Paizs, Béla; Suhai, Sándor

    2005-01-01

    The fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides are reviewed in the present paper paying special attention to classification of the known fragmentation channels into a simple hierarchy defined according to the chemistry involved. It is shown that the 'mobile proton' model of peptide fragmentation can be used to understand the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides only in a qualitative manner rationalizing differences observed for low-energy collision induced dissociation of peptide ions having or lacking a mobile proton. To overcome this limitation, a deeper understanding of the dissociation chemistry of protonated peptides is needed. To this end use of the 'pathways in competition' (PIC) model that involves a detailed energetic and kinetic characterization of the major peptide fragmentation pathways (PFPs) is proposed. The known PFPs are described in detail including all the pre-dissociation, dissociation, and post-dissociation events. It is our hope that studies to further extend PIC will lead to semi-quantative understanding of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides which could be used to develop refined bioinformatics algorithms for MS/MS based proteomics. Experimental and computational data on the fragmentation of protonated peptides are reevaluated from the point of view of the PIC model considering the mechanism, energetics, and kinetics of the major PFPs. Evidence proving semi-quantitative predictability of some of the ion intensity relationships (IIRs) of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides is presented. PMID:15389847

  19. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  20. Reconstruction of Banknote Fragments Based on Keypoint Matching Method.

    PubMed

    Gwo, Chih-Ying; Wei, Chia-Hung; Li, Yue; Chiu, Nan-Hsing

    2015-07-01

    Banknotes may be shredded by a scrap machine, ripped up by hand, or damaged in accidents. This study proposes an image registration method for reconstruction of multiple sheets of banknotes. The proposed method first constructs different scale spaces to identify keypoints in the underlying banknote fragments. Next, the features of those keypoints are extracted to represent their local patterns around keypoints. Then, similarity is computed to find the keypoint pairs between the fragment and the reference banknote. The banknote fragments can determine the coordinate and amend the orientation. Finally, an assembly strategy is proposed to piece multiple sheets of banknote fragments together. Experimental results show that the proposed method causes, on average, a deviation of 0.12457 ± 0.12810° for each fragment while the SIFT method deviates 1.16893 ± 2.35254° on average. The proposed method not only reconstructs the banknotes but also decreases the computing cost. Furthermore, the proposed method can estimate relatively precisely the orientation of the banknote fragments to assemble.

  1. Fragment-based ligand discovery.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marcus; Hubbard, Roderick E

    2009-02-01

    From home building and decor to mass production, modular design is a standard feature of the modern age. The concept also promises to define drug discovery efforts in the near future, as a wide range of methodologies, from NMR to X-ray crystallography, are being adapted to high-throughput platforms. In particular, "fragment-based ligand discovery" describes the laboratory-driven evolution of drugs from libraries of chemical building blocks. "Evolution" is an apt word for the process, as a wide array of methods are used to define how compound fragments can be best fit into the binding sites of medically relevant target biomolecules. A number of compounds that evolved from fragments have entered the clinic, and the approach is increasingly accepted as an additional route to identifying new hit compounds in pharmaceutical discovery and inhibitor design. PMID:19299661

  2. Use of thiophilic adsorption in the purification of biotinylated Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    Lutomski, D; Joubert-Caron, R; Bourin, P; Bladier, D; Caron, M

    1995-02-01

    A method for the purification and biotinylation of Fab fragments, using thiophilic adsorption (T-gel), is described. The T-gel was used to purify an IgG fraction directly in the buffer suitable for biotinylation, and to adsorb intact IgGs and papain after enzymatic digestion. For the final step, Fc fragments were removed with a protein A column.

  3. Biological restorations using tooth fragments.

    PubMed

    Busato, A L; Loguercio, A D; Barbosa, A N; Sanseverino, M do C; Macedo, R P; Baldissera, R A

    1998-02-01

    A "biological" restoration technique using dental fragments and adhesive materials is described. These fragments were obtained from extracted human teeth which had been previously sterilized and stored in a tooth bank. The advantages are: the use of extracted teeth as restorative material, esthetics, and treatment cost. The positive sensation of having back the missing tooth was the most mentioned comment among patients. The disadvantages are: the difficulty of obtaining teeth with the needed characteristics, problems of making an indirect restoration, matching the original color, and the non-acceptance by some patients who consider it strange to have other people's teeth placed in their mouths.

  4. Peculiarities of the Fragmentation of Benešov's Bolide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barri, N. G.; Stulov, V. P.

    2003-07-01

    One of the previously published models for the fragmentation of meteoroids (Baldwin and Sheaffer, 1971) is used to analyze the observed segment of the trajectory of Benešov's bolide (Benešov, EN 070591) of the European Fireball Network. An important element of these observations is the separation of luminous fragments from the main body at the final radiation stage of the bolide as a whole. The application of the least-squares method with the use of various models as trial functions shows that the model of a single body with ablation provides the best fit to the observed trajectory.

  5. WITHDRAWN: Fragmentation of charged aqueous nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiki, Kengo

    2005-11-01

    The whole evaporating process of charged aqueous nanodroplets is studied by systematic molecular dynamics simulations until most of the solvent molecules are evaporated. % The solvent evaporation makes the droplet smaller and smaller, and at a certain point the repulsive force among ions causes an instability, where typically single ion and 10 to 20 water molecules are disintegrated from the main droplet. % This ion fragmentation occurs around 70 to 80% of the charge predicted by the Rayleigh theory [Lord Rayleigh, Phil. Mag. 14, 184 (1882)]. % The numerical results are summarized in the function R(z) which is the fragmentation radius at the charge z. From the fitting by the power law Rz^β, we find that at lower temperature T=350 and 370 K the result is close to the Rayleigh theory β= 2/3, while at higher temperature T=400 and 450 K it is like β= 1/2. % Another fitting on R(z) by the extended ion evaporation mechanism [M. Gamero-Castaño and J. Fern'andez de la Mora, Anal. Chim. Acta 406, 67 (2000)] works well for both cases. % The final state of the evaporation process is typically a single ion with several water molecules. If we put an alanine dipeptide in zwitterionic form at the beginning, two charges remain in some cases.

  6. The Munich Accelerator for Fission Fragments MAFF

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Gross, M.; Assmann, W.; Beck, L.; Grossmann, R.; Maier, H.-J.; Schumann, M.; Sewtz, M.; Szerypo, J.; Thirolf, P.G.; Kruecken, R.; Faestermann, T.; Maier-Komor, P.; Nebel, F.; Zech, E.; Hartung, P.; Stoepler, R.; Juettner, Ph.; Tralmer, F.L.

    2005-11-21

    The layout and status of MAFF at the Munich high flux reactor FRM-II is described. At MAFF 1014 fissions/s will be induced by thermal neutrons in a target with approx. 1 g of 235U. The situation is compared to the SPIRAL2 facility where 1014 fissions/s are expected by fast neutron fission in a target containing 5100 g of 238U. A comparison of the yields of SPIRAL2 and MAFF is performed to show the complementarity of the two ISOL-facilities for fission fragments. MAFF has approximately five times the beam intensities of SPIRAL2 for short-lived fission isotopes with lifetimes shorter than 5 s and thus will focus on the most neutron-rich nuclei, while SPIRAL2 has better perspectives for the more intense, less neutron-rich post-accelerated beams.A problem that also deserves attention is the production of {alpha} emitters, in particular plutonium. Here MAFF has the advantage to contain the Pu-producing 238U only as impurity not as the main fissile system. If SPIRAL2 would use 235U instead of 238U this problematic issue could be avoided at the cost of a further reduction in intensity of very neutron-rich fission fragments by a factor of 10. Finally new physics close to the classically doubly-magic nuclei 78Ni and 132Sn is described.

  7. The Fragmentation of Outdoor Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cockrell, David

    Although outdoor leadership does not appear to be coalescing into a unified profession, there are potential solutions to this fragmentation. Six robust approaches to the professional provision of outdoor leadership are: (1) outfitting and guiding; (2) organized camping; (3) adventure education, such as Outward Bound; (4) the outdoor school; (5)…

  8. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  9. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting 230,232Th and 235,238U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for 230,232Th and 235,238U are around 0.7-0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  10. Fragments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    This performance autoethnography shows the author's struggle in finding his place, scholarship, voice, and body, into the academic setting. Mixing together memories of his lived experience with sugar cane workers, notes, and leftovers of different fieldworks, plus 6 years of life as grad student at the University of Illinois, the author looks for…

  11. Local Morphological Response of the Distal Femoral Articular–Epiphyseal Cartilage Complex of Young Foals to Surgical Stab Incision and Potential Relevance to Cartilage Injury and Repair in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Eli H.S.; Ekman, Stina; Carlson, Cathy S.; Dolvik, Nils I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Describe the local morphological response of the articular–epiphyseal cartilage complex to surgical stab incision in the distal femur of foals, with emphasis on the relationship between growth cartilage injury, enchondral ossification, and repair. Design: Nine foals were induced into general anesthesia at the age of 13 to 15 days. Four full-thickness stab incision defects were created in the cartilage on the lateral aspect of the lateral trochlear ridge of the left distal femur. Follow-up examination was carried out from 1 to 49 days postoperatively, including examination of intact bones, sawed slabs, and histological sections. Results: Incision defects filled with cells displaying fibroblast-, chondrocyte-, and osteoblast-like characteristics, potentially validating the rationale behind the drilling of stable juvenile osteochondritis dissecans lesions in children. Incisions induced necrosis within the cartilage on the margins at all depths of the defects. Sharp dissection may therefore be contraindicated in cartilage repair in young individuals. Incisions caused a focal delay in enchondral ossification in 2 foals, apparently related to the orientation of the incision defect relative to the direction of ossification. Defects became progressively surrounded by subchondral bone, in which granulation tissue containing clasts and foci of osteoblast-like cells was observed. Continued enchondral ossification was therefore likely to result in healing of uncomplicated defects to morphologically normal bone. Conclusions: Epiphyseal growth cartilage injury had the potential to exert a negative effect on enchondral ossification. Enchondral ossification exerted a beneficial effect on repair. This relationship warrants consideration in future studies of cartilage injury and repair within the articular–epiphyseal cartilage complex of all species. PMID:26069670

  12. Contribution of rock fragments to soil fertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korboulewsky, Nathalie; Besnault, Adeline; Tétégan, Marion; Cousin, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    other types. Indeed limestones, compared to chert and flint, contained 20 times higher exchangeable Ca (2.3 g Ca/kg for limestones compared to 0.08 and 0.03 g Ca/kg for chert and flint) and 7 to 10 times higher Mg (19.3g Mg/kg for limestones compared to 2.7 and 1.7 g Mg/kg for chert and flint). Potassium showed a completely different trend with the highest exchangeable K found for chert and marly limestone, intermediate levels for lithographic limestone and flint, and lowest levels for oolitic limestone. In addition, whatever the pebble origin, calcium was the element the most released. Limestones released more Mg than K, and chert and flint more K than Mg. Further, released exchangeable Ca and Mg were closely related to the dry mass of pebbles, but exchangeable K was not. As mentioned above, much more cations were extracted from limestones compared to chert and flint. Besides, chert released twice as much as flint for the three cations. Finally, the fertilisation potential of these pebbles and especially limestones is far to be negligible. For instance, the exchangeable Ca, Mg and K released from lithographic pebbles represent respectively about 50%, 20% and 10% of those released from the surrounding fine earth. These results confirm the potential contribution of rock fragments to soil fertility. Furthermore, important differences in exchangeable cations in relation to their origin were measured. Further analyses are being carried out on pebbles from other origins and on available phosphorus. We believe that this work is a first step towards a better understanding of the role of rock fragments in plant-soil relationships.

  13. Evolution of Particle Size Distributions in Fragmentation Over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new model of fragmentation based on a probabilistic calculation of the repeated fracture of a particle population. The resulting continuous solution, which is in closed form, gives the evolution of fragmentation products from an initial block, through a scale-invariant power-law relationship to a final comminuted powder. Models for the fragmentation of particles have been developed separately in mainly two different disciplines: the continuous integro-differential equations of batch mineral grinding (Reid, 1965) and the fractal analysis of geophysics (Turcotte, 1986) based on a discrete model with a single probability of fracture. The first gives a time-dependent development of the particle-size distribution, but has resisted a closed-form solution, while the latter leads to the scale-invariant power laws, but with no time dependence. Bird (2009) recently introduced a bridge between these two approaches with a step-wise iterative calculation of the fragmentation products. The development of the particle-size distribution occurs with discrete steps: during each fragmentation event, the particles will repeatedly fracture probabilistically, cascading down the length scales to a final size distribution reached after all particles have failed to further fragment. We have identified this process as the equivalent to a sequence of trials for each particle with a fixed probability of fragmentation. Although the resulting distribution is discrete, it can be reformulated as a continuous distribution in maturity over time and particle size. In our model, Turcotte's power-law distribution emerges at a unique maturation index that defines a regime boundary. Up to this index, the fragmentation is in an erosional regime with the initial particle size setting the scaling. Fragmentation beyond this index is in a regime of comminution with rebreakage of the particles down to the size limit of fracture. The maturation index can increment continuously, for example under

  14. Relativistic heavy ion fragmentation at HISS (Heavy Ion Spectrometer System)

    SciTech Connect

    Tull, C.E.

    1990-10-01

    An experiment was conducted at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to measure projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions. Charge identification was obtained by the use of a Cerenkov Hodoscope operating above the threshold for total internal reflection, while velocity measurement was performed by use of a second set of Cerenkov radiators operating at the threshold for total internal reflection. Charge and mass resolution for the system was {sigma}{sub Z} = 0.2 e and {sigma}{sub A} = 0.2 u. Measurements of the elemental and isotopic production cross sections for the fragmentation of {sup 40}Ar at 1.65{center dot}A GeV have been compared with an Abrasion-Ablation Model based on the evaporation computer code GEMINI. The model proves to be an accurate predictor of the cross sections for fragments between Chlorine and Boron. The measured cross section were reproduced using simple geometry with charge dispersions induced by zero-point vibrations of the giant dipole resonance for the prompt abrasion stage, and injecting an excitation energy spectrum based on a final state interaction with scaling factor E{sub fsi} = 38.8 MeV/c. Measurement of the longitudinal momentum distribution widths for projectile fragments are consistent with previous experiment and can be interpreted as reflecting the Fermi momentum distribution in the initial projectile nucleus. Measurement of the transverse momentum indicate an additional, unexplained dependence of the reduced momentum widths on fragment mass. This dependence has the same sign and similar slope to previously measured fragments of {sup 139}La, and to predictions based on phase-space constraints on the final state of the system.

  15. Detecting Fragmentation Extinction Thresholds for Forest Understory Plant Species in Peninsular Spain

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Marta; Moreno Saiz, Juan Carlos; Morales-Castilla, Ignacio; Albuquerque, Fabio S.; Ferrero, Mila; Rodríguez, Miguel Á.

    2015-01-01

    Ecological theory predicts that fragmentation aggravates the effects of habitat loss, yet empirical results show mixed evidences, which fail to support the theory instead reinforcing the primary importance of habitat loss. Fragmentation hypotheses have received much attention due to their potential implications for biodiversity conservation, however, animal studies have traditionally been their main focus. Here we assess variation in species sensitivity to forest amount and fragmentation and evaluate if fragmentation is related to extinction thresholds in forest understory herbs and ferns. Our expectation was that forest herbs would be more sensitive to fragmentation than ferns due to their lower dispersal capabilities. Using forest cover percentage and the proportion of this percentage occurring in the largest patch within UTM cells of 10-km resolution covering Peninsular Spain, we partitioned the effects of forest amount versus fragmentation and applied logistic regression to model occurrences of 16 species. For nine models showing robustness according to a set of quality criteria we subsequently defined two empirical fragmentation scenarios, minimum and maximum, and quantified species’ sensitivity to forest contraction with no fragmentation, and to fragmentation under constant forest cover. We finally assessed how the extinction threshold of each species (the habitat amount below which it cannot persist) varies under no and maximum fragmentation. Consistent with their preference for forest habitats probability occurrences of all species decreased as forest cover contracted. On average, herbs did not show significant sensitivity to fragmentation whereas ferns were favored. In line with theory, fragmentation yielded higher extinction thresholds for two species. For the remaining species, fragmentation had either positive or non-significant effects. We interpret these differences as reflecting species-specific traits and conclude that although forest amount is of

  16. Detecting fragmentation extinction thresholds for forest understory plant species in peninsular Spain.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Marta; Moreno Saiz, Juan Carlos; Morales-Castilla, Ignacio; Albuquerque, Fabio S; Ferrero, Mila; Rodríguez, Miguel Á

    2015-01-01

    Ecological theory predicts that fragmentation aggravates the effects of habitat loss, yet empirical results show mixed evidences, which fail to support the theory instead reinforcing the primary importance of habitat loss. Fragmentation hypotheses have received much attention due to their potential implications for biodiversity conservation, however, animal studies have traditionally been their main focus. Here we assess variation in species sensitivity to forest amount and fragmentation and evaluate if fragmentation is related to extinction thresholds in forest understory herbs and ferns. Our expectation was that forest herbs would be more sensitive to fragmentation than ferns due to their lower dispersal capabilities. Using forest cover percentage and the proportion of this percentage occurring in the largest patch within UTM cells of 10-km resolution covering Peninsular Spain, we partitioned the effects of forest amount versus fragmentation and applied logistic regression to model occurrences of 16 species. For nine models showing robustness according to a set of quality criteria we subsequently defined two empirical fragmentation scenarios, minimum and maximum, and quantified species' sensitivity to forest contraction with no fragmentation, and to fragmentation under constant forest cover. We finally assessed how the extinction threshold of each species (the habitat amount below which it cannot persist) varies under no and maximum fragmentation. Consistent with their preference for forest habitats probability occurrences of all species decreased as forest cover contracted. On average, herbs did not show significant sensitivity to fragmentation whereas ferns were favored. In line with theory, fragmentation yielded higher extinction thresholds for two species. For the remaining species, fragmentation had either positive or non-significant effects. We interpret these differences as reflecting species-specific traits and conclude that although forest amount is of

  17. Workflow Design Using Fragment Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, Sébastien; Blay-Fornarino, Mireille; France, Robert

    The Service-Oriented Architecture (Soa) paradigm supports the assembly of atomic services to create applications that implement complex business processes. Assembly can be accomplished by service orchestrations defined by Soa architects. The Adore method allows Soa architects to model complex orchestrations of services by composing models of smaller orchestrations called orchestration fragments. The Adore method can also be used to weave fragments that address new concerns into existing application models. In this paper we illustrate how the Adore method can be used to separate and compose process aspects in a Soa design of the Car Crash Crisis Management System. The paper also includes a discussion of the benefits and limitations of the Adore method.

  18. Fragmentation of suddenly heated liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Blink, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    Fragmentation of free liquids in Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors could determine the upper bound on reactor pulse rate. The x-ray ablated materials must cool and recondense to allow driver beam propagation. The increased surface area caused by fragmentation will enhance the cooling and condensation rates. Relaxation from the suddenly heated state will move a liquid into the negative pressure region under the liquid-vapor P-V dome. The lithium equation of state was used to demonstrate that neutron-induced vaporization uses only a minor fraction of the added heat, much less than would be required to drive the expansion. A 77% expansion of the lithium is required before the rapid vaporization process of spinodal decomposition could begin, and nucleation and growth are too slow to contribute to the expansion.

  19. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-01

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping Atotal fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of 197Au+27Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  20. Petrology of some lithic fragments from Luna 20

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1973-01-01

    Microscopic and electron microprobe studies were made of polished thin sections of part of a 30-mg sample of 250-500 ??m lunar soil returned by Luna 20 from a point between Mare Fecunditatis and Mare Crisium. Very fine-grained lithic (crystalline) rock fragments, composing about one fifth of the total sample, have mineralogical compositions equivalent to various types of gabbro, anorthositic gabbro, gabbroic anorthosite and troctolite, with minor basalt. The textures now observed in these fragments are in large part metamorphic. Twentyseven electron microprobe analyses of minerals from these fragments are presented, including olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, spinel, nickel-iron and a Zr-Ti-REE mineral possibly similar to 'phase B' of Lovering and Wark (1971). Analyses of seven melt inclusions and twenty-eight defocused beam analyses of lithic fragments are also given. Some of the fragments contain 'gas' inclusions which, along with the fine grain size, are believed to indicate final crystallization under low pressure near surface conditions. The almost complete absence of granophyric material in this sample raises the question of whether or not there are at least two distinct magmas for the plagioclase-rich terrae rocks from which this soil sample was derived in part. ?? 1973.

  1. Petrology of some lithic fragments from Luna 20.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Microscopic and electron microprobe studies were made of polished thin sections of part of a 30-mg sample of 250- to 500-micron lunar soil returned by Luna 20 from a point between Mare Fecunditatis and Mare Crisium. Very fine-grained lithic (crystalline) rock fragments, composing about one-fifth of the total sample, have mineralogical compositions equivalent to various types of gabbro, anorthositic gabbro, gabbroic anorthosite, and troctolite, with minor basalt. The textures now observed in these fragments are in large part metamorphic. Twenty-seven electron microprobe analyses of minerals from these fragments are presented, including olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, spinel, nickel-iron, and a Zr-Ti-REE mineral possibly similar to 'phase B' of Lovering and Wark (1971). Analyses of seven melt inclusions and 28 defocused beam analyses of lithic fragments are also given. Some of the fragments contain 'gas' inclusions which, along with the fine grain size, are believed to indicate final crystallization under low pressure near surface conditions.

  2. Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    While telomerase is expressed in ~90% of primary human tumors, most somatic tissue cells except transiently proliferating stem-like cells do not have detectable telomerase activity (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Telomeres progressively shorten with each cell division in normal cells, including proliferating stem-like cells, due to the end replication (lagging strand synthesis) problem and other causes such as oxidative damage, therefore all somatic cells have limited cell proliferation capacity (Hayflick limit) (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The progressive telomere shortening eventually leads to growth arrest in normal cells, which is known as replicative senescence (Shay et al., 1991). Once telomerase is activated in cancer cells, telomere length is stabilized by the addition of TTAGGG repeats to the end of chromosomes, thus enabling the limitless continuation of cell division (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Therefore, the link between aging and cancer can be partially explained by telomere biology. There are many rapid and convenient methods to study telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) (Mender and Shay, 2015b) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this protocol paper we describe Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) analysis to determine average telomeric length of cells. Telomeric length can be indirectly measured by a technique called Telomere Restriction Fragment analysis (TRF). This technique is a modified Southern blot, which measures the heterogeneous range of telomere lengths in a cell population using the length distribution of the terminal restriction fragments (Harley et al., 1990; Ouellette et al., 2000). This method can be used in eukaryotic cells. The description below focuses on the measurement of human cancer cells telomere length. The principle of this method relies on the lack of

  3. Fragmentation: Is the message clear?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bissonette, J.A.; Storch, Ilse

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we briefly discuss some of the fundamental problems arising from the inherent complexity of larger-scale ecological systems. We examine the tenuous assumption of a direct correspondence between ecological data and theory, we comment on a recent report that evaluated the efficacy of fragmentation experiments, and we briefly assess its implications for ecological research and conservation practice on the landscape scale. Copyright ?? 2002 by the author(s). Published here under licence by The Resilience Alliance.

  4. Modeling of Fragmentation of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Carlozzi, Alexander; Hart, Kenneth; Bryson, Katie; Sears, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand fragmentation and fracture of a given asteroid and mechanisms of break-up. The focus of the present work is to develop modeling techniques for stony asteroids in 10m-100m range to answer two questions: 1) What is the role of material makeup of an asteroid in the stress distribution? 2)How is stress distribution altered in the presence of pre-existing defects?

  5. Bimodal Behavior of the Heaviest Fragment Distribution in Projectile Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, E.; Borderie, B.; Rivet, M. F.; Dayras, R.; Gagnon-Moisan, F.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, P.; Parlog, M.; Rosato, E.; Vigilante, M.

    2009-08-14

    The charge distribution of the heaviest fragment detected in the decay of quasiprojectiles produced in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions has been observed to be bimodal. This feature is expected as a generic signal of phase transition in nonextensive systems. In this Letter, we present new analyses of experimental data from Au on Au collisions at 60, 80, and 100 MeV/nucleon showing that bimodality is largely independent of the data selection procedure and of entrance channel effects. An estimate of the latent heat of the transition is extracted.

  6. Fragmentation of cosmic-string loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    The fragmentation of cosmic string loops is discussed, and the results of a simulation of this process are presented. The simulation can evolve any of a large class of loops essentially exactly, including allowing fragments that collide to join together. Such reconnection enhances the production of small fragments, but not drastically. With or without reconnections, the fragmentation process produces a collection of nonself-intersecting loops whose typical length is on the order of the persistence length of the initial loop.

  7. Impact fragmentation of model flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Pearson W.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2014-04-01

    Predicting the bulk material properties of active matter is challenging since these materials are far from equilibrium and standard statistical-mechanics approaches may fail. We report a computational study of the surface properties of a well known active matter system: aggregations of self-propelled particles that are coupled via an orientational interaction and that resemble bird flocks. By simulating the impact of these models flocks on an impermeable surface, we find that they fragment into subflocks with power-law mass distributions, similar to shattering brittle solids but not to splashing liquid drops. Thus, we find that despite the interparticle interactions, these model flocks do not possess an emergent surface tension.

  8. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  9. Ternary fission of nuclei into comparable fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2015-07-15

    The problem of nuclear fission into three comparable fragments is considered. A mechanism of true ternary fission is proposed. In contrast to sequential fission, where the three fragments arise upon two sequential events of binary fission, the mechanism in question relies on a scenario that originally involves fission into three fragments. This mechanism is driven by a hexadecapole deformation of the fissioning nucleus, in contrast to binary fission associated with quadrupole vibrations of the nuclear surface. The fragment-mass ratios are estimated. The dynamics of formation of collinear fragments and their subsequent motion in opposite directions is traced. The calculated probability of true ternary fission complies with observed values.

  10. Polarization phenomena in projectile fragmentation process

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuta, K.; Ozawa, A.; Nojiri, Y.; Minamisono, T.; Fukuda, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Momota, S.; Ohtsubo, T.; Matsuo, Y.; Takechi, H.; Fukuda, S.; Minami, I.; Sugimoto, K.; Tanihata, I.; Omata, K.; Alonso, J.R.; Krebs, G.F.; Symons, T.J.M.

    1992-03-01

    The nuclear spin polarization of beta-emitting fragments {sup 37}K and {sup 39} Ca has been measured at around the grazing angle of the {sup 40}Ca + Au collision at 106 MeV/u. Momentum dependence of the observed fragment polarization supports the idea that the origin of the polarization is the orbital angular momentum held by the fragment part of the projectile before the collision takes place. The sizable polarization of about 5% that was observed for the fragments will be a powerful tool for NMR study of the fragments.

  11. Ternary fission of nuclei into comparable fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2015-07-01

    The problem of nuclear fission into three comparable fragments is considered. A mechanism of true ternary fission is proposed. In contrast to sequential fission, where the three fragments arise upon two sequential events of binary fission, the mechanism in question relies on a scenario that originally involves fission into three fragments. This mechanism is driven by a hexadecapole deformation of the fissioning nucleus, in contrast to binary fission associated with quadrupole vibrations of the nuclear surface. The fragment-mass ratios are estimated. The dynamics of formation of collinear fragments and their subsequent motion in opposite directions is traced. The calculated probability of true ternary fission complies with observed values.

  12. Fragmentation in filamentary molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Yanett; Garay, Guido; Rathborne, Jill M.; Sanhueza, Patricio

    2016-02-01

    Recent surveys of dust continuum emission at sub-mm wavelengths have shown that filamentary molecular clouds are ubiquitous along the Galactic plane. These structures are inhomogeneous, with overdensities that are sometimes associated with infrared emission and active of star formation. To investigate the connection between filaments and star formation, requires an understanding of the processes that lead to the fragmentation of filaments and a determination of the physical properties of the overdensities (clumps). In this paper, we present a multiwavelength study of five filamentary molecular clouds, containing several clumps in different evolutionary stages of star formation. We analyse the fragmentation of the filaments and derive the physical properties of their clumps. We find that the clumps in all filaments have a characteristic spacing consistent with the prediction of the `sausage' instability theory, regardless of the complex morphology of the filaments or their evolutionary stage. We also find that most clumps have sufficient mass and density to form high-mass stars, supporting the idea that high-mass stars and clusters form within filaments.

  13. Automated glass-fragmentation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Gaile G.

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes a novel automated inspection process for tempered safety glass. The system is geared toward the European Community (EC) import regulations which are based on fragment count and dimensions in a fractured glass sample. The automation of this test presents two key challenges: image acquisition, and robust particle segmentation. The image acquisition must perform well both for clear and opaque glass. Opaque regions of glass are common in the American auto industry due to painted styling or adhesives (e.g. defroster cables). The system presented uses a multiple light source, reflected light imaging technique, rather than transmitted light imaging which is often used in manual versions of this inspection test. Segmentation of the glass fragments in the resulting images must produce clean and completely connected crack lines in order to compute the correct particle count. Processing must therefore be robust with respect to noise in the imaging process such as dust and glint on the glass. The system presented takes advantage of mathematical morphology algorithms, in particular the watershed algorithm, to perform robust preprocessing and segmentation. Example images and image segmentation results are shown for tempered safety glass which has been painted on the outside edges for styling purposes.

  14. Heavy Ion Fragmentation Experiments at the Bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using the heavy-ion capability of the Bevatron were studied. The purpose was to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Attempts were also made to: (1) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (2) test the applicability of high-energy multi-particle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (3) apply the cross-section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (4) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross sections.

  15. Structures of endothiapepsin-fragment complexes from crystallographic fragment screening using a novel, diverse and affordable 96-compound fragment library.

    PubMed

    Huschmann, Franziska U; Linnik, Janina; Sparta, Karine; Ühlein, Monika; Wang, Xiaojie; Metz, Alexander; Schiebel, Johannes; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard; Weiss, Manfred S; Mueller, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    Crystallographic screening of the binding of small organic compounds (termed fragments) to proteins is increasingly important for medicinal chemistry-oriented drug discovery. To enable such experiments in a widespread manner, an affordable 96-compound library has been assembled for fragment screening in both academia and industry. The library is selected from already existing protein-ligand structures and is characterized by a broad ligand diversity, including buffer ingredients, carbohydrates, nucleotides, amino acids, peptide-like fragments and various drug-like organic compounds. When applied to the model protease endothiapepsin in a crystallographic screening experiment, a hit rate of nearly 10% was obtained. In comparison to other fragment libraries and considering that no pre-screening was performed, this hit rate is remarkably high. This demonstrates the general suitability of the selected compounds for an initial fragment-screening campaign. The library composition, experimental considerations and time requirements for a complete crystallographic fragment-screening campaign are discussed as well as the nine fully refined obtained endothiapepsin-fragment structures. While most of the fragments bind close to the catalytic centre of endothiapepsin in poses that have been observed previously, two fragments address new sites on the protein surface. ITC measurements show that the fragments bind to endothiapepsin with millimolar affinity. PMID:27139825

  16. Fragmentation and Coagulation in Supramolecular (Co)polymerization Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Markvoort, Albert J; Eikelder, Huub M M Ten; Hilbers, Peter A J; de Greef, Tom F A

    2016-04-27

    The self-assembly of molecular building blocks into one-dimensional supramolecular architectures has opened up new frontiers in materials science. Due to the noncovalent interactions between the monomeric units, these architectures are intrinsically dynamic, and understanding their kinetic driving forces is key to rationally programming their morphology and function. To understand the self-assembly dynamics of supramolecular polymerizations (SP), kinetic models based on aggregate growth by sequential monomer association and dissociation have been analyzed. However, fragmentation and coagulation events can also play a role, as evident from studies on peptide self-assembly and the fact that aggregations can be sensitive to mechanical agitations. Here, we analyze how fragmentation and coagulation events influence SP kinetics by theoretical analysis of self-assembling systems of increasing complexity. Our analysis starts with single-component systems in which aggregates are able to grow via an isodesmic or cooperative nucleation-elongation mechanism. Subsequently, equilibration dynamics in cooperative two-component supramolecular copolymerizations are investigated. In the final part, we reveal how aggregate growth in the presence of competing, kinetically controlled pathways is influenced by fragmentation and coagulation reactions and reveal how seed-induced growth can give rise to block copolymers. Our analysis shows how fragmentation and coagulation reactions are able to modulate SP kinetics in ways that are highly system dependent. PMID:27163054

  17. Fragmentation and Coagulation in Supramolecular (Co)polymerization Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of molecular building blocks into one-dimensional supramolecular architectures has opened up new frontiers in materials science. Due to the noncovalent interactions between the monomeric units, these architectures are intrinsically dynamic, and understanding their kinetic driving forces is key to rationally programming their morphology and function. To understand the self-assembly dynamics of supramolecular polymerizations (SP), kinetic models based on aggregate growth by sequential monomer association and dissociation have been analyzed. However, fragmentation and coagulation events can also play a role, as evident from studies on peptide self-assembly and the fact that aggregations can be sensitive to mechanical agitations. Here, we analyze how fragmentation and coagulation events influence SP kinetics by theoretical analysis of self-assembling systems of increasing complexity. Our analysis starts with single-component systems in which aggregates are able to grow via an isodesmic or cooperative nucleation–elongation mechanism. Subsequently, equilibration dynamics in cooperative two-component supramolecular copolymerizations are investigated. In the final part, we reveal how aggregate growth in the presence of competing, kinetically controlled pathways is influenced by fragmentation and coagulation reactions and reveal how seed-induced growth can give rise to block copolymers. Our analysis shows how fragmentation and coagulation reactions are able to modulate SP kinetics in ways that are highly system dependent. PMID:27163054

  18. Novel strategy for three-dimensional fragment-based lead discovery.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haoliang; Lu, Tao; Ran, Ting; Liu, Haichun; Lu, Shuai; Tai, Wenting; Leng, Ying; Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Jian; Chen, Yadong

    2011-04-25

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is considered a promising approach in lead discovery. However, for a practical application of this approach, problems remain to be solved. Hence, a novel practical strategy for three-dimensional lead discovery is presented in this work. Diverse fragments with spatial positions and orientations retained in separately adjacent regions were generated by deconstructing well-aligned known inhibitors in the same target active site. These three-dimensional fragments retained their original binding modes in the process of new molecule construction by fragment linking and merging. Root-mean-square deviation (rmsd) values were used to evaluate the conformational changes of the component fragments in the final compounds and to identify the potential leads as the main criteria. Furthermore, the successful validation of our strategy is presented on the basis of two relevant tumor targets (CDK2 and c-Met), demonstrating the potential of our strategy to facilitate lead discovery against some drug targets. PMID:21438547

  19. SPY: A new scission point model based on microscopic ingredients to predict fission fragments properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, J.-F.; Dubray, N.; Hilaire, S.; Panebianco, S.; Sida, J.-L.

    2013-12-01

    Our purpose is to determine fission fragments characteristics in a framework of a scission point model named SPY for Scission Point Yields. This approach can be considered as a theoretical laboratory to study fission mechanism since it gives access to the correlation between the fragments properties and their nuclear structure, such as shell correction, pairing, collective degrees of freedom, odd-even effects. Which ones are dominant in final state? What is the impact of compound nucleus structure? The SPY model consists in a statistical description of the fission process at the scission point where fragments are completely formed and well separated with fixed properties. The most important property of the model relies on the nuclear structure of the fragments which is derived from full quantum microscopic calculations. This approach allows computing the fission final state of extremely exotic nuclei which are inaccessible by most of the fission model available on the market.

  20. Fragmentation statistics from Eulerian hydrocode calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.; Grady, D.E.; McGlaun, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a procedure for computing discrete fragmentation information for terminal ballistics events from the continuum data that emerges from two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode simulations of these events. The present examples deal with the normal impact of lead cylinders on lead plates at velocities below 1600 m/s. In this regime, the resulting debris is almost exclusively solid lead fragments. We have experimental data of sufficient accuracy to evaluate the extraction of such fragmentation information from code simulations. The problem is interesting because the observed distribution of fragment size would require extreme subgrid resolution in the hydrocode if the statistics were computed directly. Our approach is different. We ask whether or not the general continuum description predicted by the code contains enough information to allow coupling of an analytic fragmentation theory that successfully predicts fragmentation statistics. We believe that this approach is valid, and discuss our current success in matching experimental data. 10 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Impact failure and fragmentation properties of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Kipp, M.E.

    1998-03-01

    In the present study we describe the development of an experimental fracture material property test method specific to dynamic fragmentation. Spherical test samples of the metals of interest are subjected to controlled impulsive stress loads by acceleration to high velocities with a light-gas launcher facility and subsequent normal impact on thin plates. Motion, deformation and fragmentation of the test samples are diagnosed with multiple flash radiography methods. The impact plate materials are selected to be transparent to the x-ray method so that only test metal material is imaged. Through a systematic series of such tests both strain-to-failure and fragmentation resistance properties are determined through this experimental method. Fragmentation property data for several steels, copper, aluminum, tantalum and titanium have been obtained to date. Aspects of the dynamic data have been analyzed with computational methods to achieve a better understanding of the processes leading to failure and fragmentation, and to test an existing computational fragmentation model.

  2. Filter for interpretation of fragmentation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-10-01

    Objects that fragment cascade and decelerate abruptly, producing short, bright, signatures which can be used to estimate object diameter and speed. Other objects can be incorporated into a generalized fragmentation filter. This note summarizes the results of previous reports on the prediction and inversion of signatures from objects that radiate, ablate, and fragment during entry and uses them to produce models for the parameters of entering objects.

  3. Effects of asymmetry in string fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, N.L. ); Csoergoe, T.; Lukacs, B.; Zimanyi, J. )

    1991-06-01

    The general solution of the one flavor integral equation for string fragmentation is presented and is approximated by a finite sum. The N pion phase space distribution is calculated for the emission points; thence the hadronic fragmentation function, the number density, and the energy density vs. rapidity are obtained. The authors discuss the effects of the left-right asymmetry embedded into the integral equation, and present numerical results based on the Lund fragmentation function.

  4. Complex fragment emission from hot compound nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    The experimental evidence for compound nucleus emission of complex fragments at low energies is used to interpret the emission of the same fragments at higher energies. The resulting experimental picture is that of highly excited compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion processes which decay statistically. In particular, complex fragments appear to be produced mostly through compound nucleus decay. In the appendix a geometric-kinematic theory for incomplete fusion and the associated momentum transfer is outlined. 10 refs., 19 figs.

  5. Influence of different liquid-drop-based bindings on lighter mass fragments and entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rohit; Shivani; Gautam, Sakshi

    2016-04-01

    We study the production of lighter fragments and associated phenomena within the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) model. The Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) method is used to identify the pre-clusters. The final stable fragments were identified by imposing binding energy criteria on the fragments formed using the MST method. The effect of different binding energy criteria was investigated by employing various liquid-drop-based binding energy formulae. Though light clusters show significant effect of different binding energies, their associated phenomenon, i.e. entropy production is insensitive towards different binding energy criteria.

  6. Saturation transfer difference NMR for fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Begley, Darren W; Moen, Spencer O; Pierce, Phillip G; Zartler, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    Fragment screening by saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) is a robust method for identifying small molecule binders and is well suited to a broad set of biological targets. STD-NMR is exquisitely sensitive for detecting weakly binding compounds (a common characteristic of fragments), which is a crucial step in finding promising compounds for a fragment-based drug discovery campaign. This protocol describes the development of a library suitable for STD-NMR fragment screening, as well as preparation of protein samples, optimization of experimental conditions, and procedures for data collection and analysis. PMID:24391096

  7. The dihadron fragmentation function and its evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, Abhijit; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2004-02-24

    Dihadron fragmentation functions and their evolution arestudied in the process of e+e- annihilation. Under the collinearfactorization approximation and facilitated by the cut-vertex technique,the two hadron inclusive cross section at leading order (LO) is shown tofactorize into a short distance parton cross section and a long distancedihadron fragmentation function. We provide the definition of such adihadron fragmentation function in terms of parton matrix elements andderive its DGLAP evolution equation at leading log. The evolutionequation for the non-singlet quark fragmentation function is solvednumerically with a simple ansatz for the initial condition and resultsare presented for cases of physical interest.

  8. Electron-impact-induced tryptophan molecule fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamuliene, Jelena; Romanova, Liudmila G.; Vukstich, Vasyl S.; Papp, Alexander V.; Snegursky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    The fragmentation of a gas-phase tryptophan molecule by a low-energy (<70 eV) electron impact was studied both experimentally and theoretically. Various positively charged fragments were observed and analyzed. A special attention was paid to the energy characteristics of the ionic fragment yield. The geometrical parameters of the initial molecule rearrangement were also analyzed. The fragmentation observed was due to either a simple bond cleavage or more complex reactions involving molecular rearrangements. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Elementary Processes with Atoms and Molecules in Isolated and Aggregated States", edited by Friedrich Aumayr, Bratislav Marinkovic, Stefan Matejcik, John Tanis and Kurt H. Becker.

  9. Fragment-Based Screen against HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Perryman, A. L.; Zhang, Q.; Soutter, H. H.; Rosenfeld, R.; McRee, D. E.; Olson, A. J.; Elder, J. E.; Stout, C. D.

    2009-01-01

    We have employed a fragment-based screen against wild-type (NL4-3) HIV protease (PR) using the Active Sight fragment library and X-ray crystallography. The experiments reveal two new binding sites for small molecules. PR was co-crystallized with fragments, or crystals were soaked in fragment solutions, using five crystal forms, and 378 data sets were collected to 2.3-1.3 Å resolution. Fragment binding induces a distinct conformation and specific crystal form of TL-3 inhibited PR during co-crystallization. One fragment, 2-methylcyclohexanol, binds in the ‘exo site’ adjacent to the Gly16Gly17Gln18 loop where the amide of Gly17 is a specific hydrogen bond donor, and hydrophobic contacts occur with the side chains of Lys14 and Leu63. Another fragment, indole-6-carboxylic acid, binds on the ‘outside/top of the flap’ via hydrophobic contacts with Trp42, Pro44, Met46, and Lys55, a hydrogen bond with Val56, and a salt-bridge with Arg57. 2-acetyl-benzothiophene also binds at this site. This study is the first fragment-based crystallographic screen against HIV PR, and the first time that fragments were screened against an inhibitor-bound drug target to search for compounds that both bind to novel sites and stabilize the inhibited conformation of the target. PMID:20659109

  10. Fragment-based screen against HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Alexander L; Zhang, Qing; Soutter, Holly H; Rosenfeld, Robin; McRee, Duncan E; Olson, Arthur J; Elder, John E; Stout, C David

    2010-03-01

    We have employed a fragment-based screen against wild-type (NL4-3) HIV protease (PR) using the Active Sight fragment library and X-ray crystallography. The experiments reveal two new binding sites for small molecules. PR was co-crystallized with fragments, or crystals were soaked in fragment solutions, using five crystal forms, and 378 data sets were collected to 2.3-1.3 A resolution. Fragment binding induces a distinct conformation and specific crystal form of TL-3 inhibited PR during co-crystallization. One fragment, 2-methylcyclohexanol, binds in the 'exo site' adjacent to the Gly(16)Gly(17)Gln(18)loop where the amide of Gly(17)is a specific hydrogen bond donor, and hydrophobic contacts occur with the side chains of Lys(14)and Leu(63). Another fragment, indole-6-carboxylic acid, binds on the 'outside/top of the flap' via hydrophobic contacts with Trp(42), Pro(44), Met(46), and Lys(55), a hydrogen bond with Val(56), and a salt-bridge with Arg(57). 2-acetyl-benzothiophene also binds at this site. This study is the first fragment-based crystallographic screen against HIV PR, and the first time that fragments were screened against an inhibitor-bound drug target to search for compounds that both bind to novel sites and stabilize the inhibited conformation of the target.

  11. Quantification of airway deposition of intact and fragmented pollens.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Alpár; Balásházy, Imre; Farkas, Arpád; Sárkány, Zoltán; Hofmann, Werner; Czitrovszky, Aladár; Dobos, Erik

    2011-12-01

    Although pollen is one of the most widespread agents that can cause allergy, its airway transport and deposition is far from being fully explored. The objective of this study was to characterize the airway deposition of pollens and to contribute to the debate related to the increasing number of asthma attacks registered after thunderstorms. For the quantification of the deposition of inhaled pollens in the airways computer simulations were performed. Our results demonstrated that smaller and fragmented pollens may penetrate into the thoracic airways and deposit there, supporting the theory that fragmented pollen particles are responsible for the increasing incidence of asthma attacks following thunderstorms. Pollen deposition results also suggest that children are the most exposed to the allergic effects of pollens. Finally, pollens between 0.5 and 20 μm deposit more efficiently in the lung of asthmatics than in the healthy lung, especially in the bronchial region. PMID:21563012

  12. Interferometric studies from p-p-fragment coincidences

    SciTech Connect

    Korolija, M. Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN ); Shapira, D.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Kim, H.J. ); Cindro, N. ); Teh, K. ); Shea, J.Y. (Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Researc

    1991-01-01

    Exclusive p-p correlations from the {sup 58}Ni + {sup 58}Ni reaction have been measured at an incident energy of 850 MeV. The enhancement in the p-p correlation function for small {Delta}p is satisfactorily explained by p-p final-state interaction effects. the observed enhancement is found to depend on the relative angle between the fragment and p-p c.m. velocities. The observed dependence of the p-p coincidence yield on the orientation of {Delta}p with respect to the plane spanned by the fragment and p-p c.m. velocities is attributed to angular momentum effects. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Gene prediction in metagenomic fragments based on the SVM algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metagenomic sequencing is becoming a powerful technology for exploring micro-ogranisms from various environments, such as human body, without isolation and cultivation. Accurately identifying genes from metagenomic fragments is one of the most fundamental issues. Results In this article, we present a novel gene prediction method named MetaGUN for metagenomic fragments based on a machine learning approach of SVM. It implements in a three-stage strategy to predict genes. Firstly, it classifies input fragments into phylogenetic groups by a k-mer based sequence binning method. Then, protein-coding sequences are identified for each group independently with SVM classifiers that integrate entropy density profiles (EDP) of codon usage, translation initiation site (TIS) scores and open reading frame (ORF) length as input patterns. Finally, the TISs are adjusted by employing a modified version of MetaTISA. To identify protein-coding sequences, MetaGun builds the universal module and the novel module. The former is based on a set of representative species, while the latter is designed to find potential functionary DNA sequences with conserved domains. Conclusions Comparisons on artificial shotgun fragments with multiple current metagenomic gene finders show that MetaGUN predicts better results on both 3' and 5' ends of genes with fragments of various lengths. Especially, it makes the most reliable predictions among these methods. As an application, MetaGUN was used to predict genes for two samples of human gut microbiome. It identifies thousands of additional genes with significant evidences. Further analysis indicates that MetaGUN tends to predict more potential novel genes than other current metagenomic gene finders. PMID:23735199

  14. The role of thermodynamics in disc fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatellos, Dimitris; Whitworth, Anthony P.

    2009-12-01

    Thermodynamics play an important role in determining the way a protostellar disc fragments to form planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We explore the effect that different treatments of radiative transfer have in simulations of fragmenting discs. Three prescriptions for the radiative transfer are used: (i) the diffusion approximation of Stamatellos et al.; (ii) the barotropic equation of state (EOS) of Goodwin et al. and (iii) the barotropic EOS of Bate et al. The barotropic approximations capture the general evolution of the density and temperature at the centre of each proto-fragment but (i) they do not make any adjustments for particular circumstances of a proto-fragment forming in the disc and (ii) they do not take into account thermal inertia effects that are important for fast-forming proto-fragments in the outer disc region. As a result, the number of fragments formed in the disc and their properties are different, when a barotropic EOS is used. This is important not only for disc studies but also for simulations of collapsing turbulent clouds, as in many cases in such simulations stars form with discs that subsequently fragment. We also examine the difference in the way proto-fragments condense out in the disc at different distances from the central star using the diffusion approximation and following the collapse of each proto-fragment until the formation of the second core (ρ ~= 10-3gcm-3). We find that proto-fragments forming closer to the central star tend to form earlier and evolve faster from the first to the second core than proto-fragments forming in the outer disc region. The former have a large pool of material in the inner disc region that they can accrete from and grow in mass. The latter accrete more slowly and they are hotter because they generally form in a quick abrupt event.

  15. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  16. Waves in fragmented geomaterials with impact attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Attenuation of waves in geomaterials, such as seismic waves is usually attributed to energy dissipation due to the presence of viscous fluid and/or viscous cement between the constituents. In fragmented geomaterials such as blocky rock mass there is another possible source of energy dissipation - impacting between the fragments. This can be characterised by the coefficient of restitution, which is the ratio between the rotational velocities after and before the impact. In particular, this manifests itself in the process of mutual rotations of the fragments/blocks, whereby in the process of oscillation different ends of the contacting faces of the fragments are impacting. During the rotational oscillations the energy dissipation is concentrated in the neutral position that is the one in which the relative rotation between two fragments is zero. We show that in a simple system of two fragments this dissipation is equivalent, in a long run, to the presence of viscous damper between the fragments (the Voigt model of visco-elasticity). Generalisation of this concept to the material consisting of many fragments leads to a Voigt model of wave propagation where the attenuation coefficient is proportional to the logarithm of restitution coefficient. The waves in such a medium show slight dispersion caused by damping and strong dependence of the attenuation on the wave frequency.

  17. Peptidoglycan fragment release from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Woodhams, Katelynn L; Chan, Jia Mun; Lenz, Jonathan D; Hackett, Kathleen T; Dillard, Joseph P

    2013-09-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (meningococcus) is a symbiont of the human nasopharynx. On occasion, meningococci disseminate from the nasopharynx to cause invasive disease. Previous work showed that purified meningococcal peptidoglycan (PG) stimulates human Nod1, which leads to activation of NF-κB and production of inflammatory cytokines. No studies have determined if meningococci release PG or activate Nod1 during infection. The closely related pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae releases PG fragments during normal growth. These fragments induce inflammatory cytokine production and ciliated cell death in human fallopian tubes. We determined that meningococci also release PG fragments during growth, including fragments known to induce inflammation. We found that N. meningitidis recycles PG fragments via the selective permease AmpG and that meningococcal PG recycling is more efficient than gonococcal PG recycling. Comparison of PG fragment release from N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae showed that meningococci release less of the proinflammatory PG monomers than gonococci and degrade PG to smaller fragments. The decreased release of PG monomers by N. meningitidis relative to N. gonorrhoeae is partly due to ampG, since replacement of gonococcal ampG with the meningococcal allele reduced PG monomer release. Released PG fragments in meningococcal supernatants induced significantly less Nod1-dependent NF-κB activity than released fragments in gonococcal supernatants and tended to induce less interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion in primary human fallopian tube explants. These results support a model in which efficient PG recycling and extensive degradation of PG fragments lessen inflammatory responses and may be advantageous for maintaining meningococcal carriage in the nasopharynx.

  18. In Situ X-Ray Observations of Dendritic Fragmentation During Directional Solidification of a Sn-Bi Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, John W.; Tourret, Damien; Gibbs, Paul J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Meghan Jane; Walker, Brandon A.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-09-25

    Dendrite fragmentation is an important phenomenon in microstructural development during solidification. For instance, it plays a key role in initiating the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). In this paper, we use x-ray radiography to study dendrite fragmentation rate in a Sn-39.5 wt.% Bi alloy during directional solidification. Experiments were performed in which solidification was parallel and anti-parallel to gravity, leading to significantly different fragmentation rates. We quantify the distribution of fragmentation rate as a function of distance from the solidification front, time in the mushy zone, and volume fraction of solid. Finally, while the observed fragmentation rate can be high, there is no evidence of a CET, illustrating that it requires more than just fragmentation to occur.

  19. In Situ X-Ray Observations of Dendritic Fragmentation During Directional Solidification of a Sn-Bi Alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gibbs, John W.; Tourret, Damien; Gibbs, Paul J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Meghan Jane; Walker, Brandon A.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-09-25

    Dendrite fragmentation is an important phenomenon in microstructural development during solidification. For instance, it plays a key role in initiating the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). In this paper, we use x-ray radiography to study dendrite fragmentation rate in a Sn-39.5 wt.% Bi alloy during directional solidification. Experiments were performed in which solidification was parallel and anti-parallel to gravity, leading to significantly different fragmentation rates. We quantify the distribution of fragmentation rate as a function of distance from the solidification front, time in the mushy zone, and volume fraction of solid. Finally, while the observed fragmentation rate can be high, there ismore » no evidence of a CET, illustrating that it requires more than just fragmentation to occur.« less

  20. Frozen Impacted Drop: From Fragmentation to Hierarchical Crack Patterns.

    PubMed

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Josserand, Christophe; Séon, Thomas

    2016-08-12

    We investigate experimentally the quenching of a liquid pancake, obtained through the impact of a water drop on a cold solid substrate (0 °C to -60 °C). We show that, below a certain substrate temperature, fractures appear on the frozen pancake and the crack patterns change from a 2D fragmentation regime to a hierarchical fracture regime as the thermal shock increases. The different regimes are discussed and the transition temperatures are estimated through classical fracture scaling arguments. Finally, a phase diagram presents how these regimes can be controlled by the drop impact parameters.

  1. Frozen Impacted Drop: From Fragmentation to Hierarchical Crack Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Josserand, Christophe; Séon, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We investigate experimentally the quenching of a liquid pancake, obtained through the impact of a water drop on a cold solid substrate (0 °C to -60 ° C ). We show that, below a certain substrate temperature, fractures appear on the frozen pancake and the crack patterns change from a 2D fragmentation regime to a hierarchical fracture regime as the thermal shock increases. The different regimes are discussed and the transition temperatures are estimated through classical fracture scaling arguments. Finally, a phase diagram presents how these regimes can be controlled by the drop impact parameters.

  2. Frozen Impacted Drop: From Fragmentation to Hierarchical Crack Patterns.

    PubMed

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Josserand, Christophe; Séon, Thomas

    2016-08-12

    We investigate experimentally the quenching of a liquid pancake, obtained through the impact of a water drop on a cold solid substrate (0 °C to -60 °C). We show that, below a certain substrate temperature, fractures appear on the frozen pancake and the crack patterns change from a 2D fragmentation regime to a hierarchical fracture regime as the thermal shock increases. The different regimes are discussed and the transition temperatures are estimated through classical fracture scaling arguments. Finally, a phase diagram presents how these regimes can be controlled by the drop impact parameters. PMID:27563968

  3. Aggregation-fragmentation model of robust concentration gradient formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Timothy E.

    2015-02-01

    Concentration gradients of signaling molecules are essential for patterning during development and they have been observed in both unicellular and multicellular systems. In subcellular systems, clustering of the signaling molecule has been observed. We develop a theoretical model of cluster-mediated concentration gradient formation based on the Becker-Döring equations of aggregation-fragmentation processes. We show that such a mechanism produces robust concentration gradients on realistic time and spatial scales so long as the process of clustering does not significantly stabilize the signaling molecule. Finally, we demonstrate that such a model is applicable to the pom1p subcellular gradient in fission yeast.

  4. Missing Fragments: Detecting Cooperative Binding in Fragment-Based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aim of fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is to identify molecular fragments that bind to alternate subsites within a given binding pocket leading to cooperative binding when linked. In this study, the binding of fragments to human phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase is used to illustrate how (a) current protocols may fail to detect fragments that bind cooperatively, (b) theoretical approaches can be used to validate potential hits, and (c) apparent false positives obtained when screening against cocktails of fragments may in fact indicate promising leads. PMID:24900472

  5. Missing fragments: detecting cooperative binding in fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pramod C; Malde, Alpeshkumar K; Drinkwater, Nyssa; Mark, Alan E

    2012-04-12

    The aim of fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is to identify molecular fragments that bind to alternate subsites within a given binding pocket leading to cooperative binding when linked. In this study, the binding of fragments to human phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase is used to illustrate how (a) current protocols may fail to detect fragments that bind cooperatively, (b) theoretical approaches can be used to validate potential hits, and (c) apparent false positives obtained when screening against cocktails of fragments may in fact indicate promising leads. PMID:24900472

  6. GUIDOS: tools for the assessment of pattern, connectivity, and fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Pattern, connectivity, and fragmentation can be considered as pillars for a quantitative analysis of digital landscape images. The free software toolbox GUIDOS (http://forest.jrc.ec.europa.eu/download/software/guidos) includes a variety of dedicated methodologies for the quantitative assessment of these features. Amongst others, Morphological Spatial Pattern Analysis (MSPA) is used for an intuitive description of image pattern structures and the automatic detection of connectivity pathways. GUIDOS includes tools for the detection and quantitative assessment of key nodes and links as well as to define connectedness in raster images and to setup appropriate input files for an enhanced network analysis using Conefor Sensinode. Finally, fragmentation is usually defined from a species point of view but a generic and quantifiable indicator is needed to measure fragmentation and its changes. Some preliminary results for different conceptual approaches will be shown for a sample dataset. Complemented by pre- and post-processing routines and a complete GIS environment the portable GUIDOS Toolbox may facilitate a holistic assessment in risk assessment studies, landscape planning, and conservation/restoration policies. Alternatively, individual analysis components may contribute to or enhance studies conducted with other software packages in landscape ecology.

  7. Coordination of dibensothiophenes and corannulenes to organometallic ruthenium (II) fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchi, Paul Anthony

    2005-05-01

    This dissertation contains five papers in the format required for journal publication which describe (in part) my research accomplishments as a graduate student at Iowa State University. This work can be broadly categorized as the binding of weakly-coordinating ligands to cationic organometallic ruthenium fragments, and consists of two main areas of study. Chapters 2-4 are investigations into factors that influence the binding of dibenzothiophenes to {l_brace}Cp'Ru(CO){sub 2}{r_brace}{sup +} fragments, where Cp' = {eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5} (Cp) and {eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 5} (Cp*). Chapters 5 and 6 present the synthesis and structural characterization of complexes containing corannulene buckybowls that are {eta}{sup 6}-coordinated to {l_brace}Cp*Ru{r_brace}{sup +} fragments. The first chapter contains a brief description of the difficulty in lowering sulfur levels in diesel fuel along with a review of corannulene derivatives and their metal complexes. After the final paper is a short summary of the work herein (Chapter 7). Each chapter is independent, and all equations, schemes, figures, tables, references, and appendices in this dissertation pertain only to the chapter in which they appear.

  8. Intravitreal Phacoemulsification Using Torsional Handpiece for Retained Lens Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Takkar, Brijesh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of intravitreal phacoemulsification with torsional hand piece in eyes with posteriorly dislocated lens fragments. Methods: In this prospective, interventional case series, 15 eyes with retained lens fragments following phacoemulsification were included. All patients underwent standard three-port pars plana vitrectomy and intravitreal phacoemulsification using sleeveless, torsional hand piece (OZiL™, Alcon's Infiniti Vision System). Patients were followed up for a minimum of six months to evaluate the visual outcomes and complications. Results: The preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from light perception to 0.3. No complications such as thermal burns of the scleral wound, retinal damage due to flying lens fragments, or difficult lens aspiration occurred during intravitreal phacoemulsification. Mean post-operative BCVA at the final follow-up was 0.5. Two eyes developed cystoid macular edema, which was managed medically. No retinal detachment was noted. Conclusion: Intravitreal phacoemulsification using torsional hand piece is a safe and effective alternative to conventional longitudinal phacofragmentation. PMID:27621783

  9. Intravitreal Phacoemulsification Using Torsional Handpiece for Retained Lens Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Takkar, Brijesh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of intravitreal phacoemulsification with torsional hand piece in eyes with posteriorly dislocated lens fragments. Methods: In this prospective, interventional case series, 15 eyes with retained lens fragments following phacoemulsification were included. All patients underwent standard three-port pars plana vitrectomy and intravitreal phacoemulsification using sleeveless, torsional hand piece (OZiL™, Alcon's Infiniti Vision System). Patients were followed up for a minimum of six months to evaluate the visual outcomes and complications. Results: The preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from light perception to 0.3. No complications such as thermal burns of the scleral wound, retinal damage due to flying lens fragments, or difficult lens aspiration occurred during intravitreal phacoemulsification. Mean post-operative BCVA at the final follow-up was 0.5. Two eyes developed cystoid macular edema, which was managed medically. No retinal detachment was noted. Conclusion: Intravitreal phacoemulsification using torsional hand piece is a safe and effective alternative to conventional longitudinal phacofragmentation.

  10. Method for the preparation of bispecific F(ab')2mu fragments from mouse monoclonal antibodies of the immunoglobulin M class and characterization of the fragments.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, K; Inouye, K

    1999-04-22

    Bispecific F(ab')2mu fragments (Bs F(ab')2mu) binding simultaneously both sialyl Lewis A antigen (SLA) and human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were prepared by disulfide bond exchange between F(ab')2mu fragments derived from IgM monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against SLA and CEA, and were purified to homogeneity in a one-step procedure of hydrophobic interaction HPLC. The final yield of Bs F(ab')2mu from F(ab')2mu fragments was 70-78%, and the purity was higher than 98%. The immunoreactivities of the Bs F(ab')2mu fragments against SLA and CEA were almost the same as those of the respective parental F(ab')2mu fragments. The dissociation constant (0.17 microM) of the Bs F(ab')2mu for CEA was in good agreement with that of the parental F(ab')2mu fragments. Although the number of applications of IgM mAbs is restricted because of the large molecular mass and low solubility, Bs F(ab')2mu might, nevertheless, be a useful tool for immunotherapy and immunodiagnosis.

  11. Target Neutron Skin Effect on Projectile Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforest, R.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Rowland, D. J.; Winchester, E.; Delafield, R.; Guzman, S. J.; Yennello, S.

    1998-04-01

    Several experimental observables have concluded that projectile fragmentation occurs as a two step process, excitation followed by the sequential decay of the quasi-projectile. However, recent measurements [1] have shown that neutron rich fragments are emitted with smaller velocities than what is expected from the decay of the projectile. A direct breakup mechanism for projectile fragmentation was suggested to explain the data. This direct breakup component depends on the number of neutrons at the zone of contact between the target and the projectile. Experimental data from the reactions of ^28Si on ^112,124Sn targets at 50A MeV were used to study the effect of the neutron skin of the target on projectile fragmentation and on energy dissipation in peripheral collisions. The FAUST forward array was used to detect fragments in the angular range between 1.6 to 33.6 degrees. It is composed of 68 high resolution Si-Csi(Tl) telescopes that allows for isotope identification. It is seen that the neutron rich target yields more neutron rich fragments and a lower fragment multiplicity. This confirms the importance of the direct breakup component. Proton kinetic energy spectra were also different for the two targets. This experimental information can shed some light on the isospin dependence of the equation of state. [1] R. Charity et al., Phys. Rev. C52 (1995) 1.

  12. Heavy ion fragmentation experiments at the bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    Collaborative research efforts to study the fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using heavy ion beams of the Bevatron/Bevalac are described. The goal of the program is to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Effects were also made to: (a) study processes of heavy nuclei in matter, (b) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (c) test the applicability of high energy multiparticle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (d) apply the cross section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (e) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross-sections.

  13. Introduction to fragment-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Erlanson, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has emerged in the past decade as a powerful tool for discovering drug leads. The approach first identifies starting points: very small molecules (fragments) that are about half the size of typical drugs. These fragments are then expanded or linked together to generate drug leads. Although the origins of the technique date back some 30 years, it was only in the mid-1990s that experimental techniques became sufficiently sensitive and rapid for the concept to be become practical. Since that time, the field has exploded: FBDD has played a role in discovery of at least 18 drugs that have entered the clinic, and practitioners of FBDD can be found throughout the world in both academia and industry. Literally dozens of reviews have been published on various aspects of FBDD or on the field as a whole, as have three books (Jahnke and Erlanson, Fragment-based approaches in drug discovery, 2006; Zartler and Shapiro, Fragment-based drug discovery: a practical approach, 2008; Kuo, Fragment based drug design: tools, practical approaches, and examples, 2011). However, this chapter will assume that the reader is approaching the field with little prior knowledge. It will introduce some of the key concepts, set the stage for the chapters to follow, and demonstrate how X-ray crystallography plays a central role in fragment identification and advancement. PMID:21695633

  14. DRAGON: Monte Carlo Generator of Particle Production from a Fragmented Fireball in Ultrarelativistic Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasik, Boris

    2010-11-01

    A Monte Carlo generator of the final state of hadrons emitted from an ultrarelativistic nuclear collision is introduced. An important feature of the generator is a possible fragmentation of the fireball and emission of the hadrons from fragments. Phase space distribution of the fragments is based on the blast wave model extended to azimuthally non-symmetric fireballs. Parameters of the model can be tuned and this allows to generate final states from various kinds of fireballs. A facultative output in the OSCAR1999A format allows for a comprehensive analysis of phase-space distributions and/or use as an input for an afterburner. DRAGON's purpose is to produce artificial data sets which resemble those coming from real nuclear collisions provided fragmentation occurs at hadronisation and hadrons are emitted from fragments without any further scattering. Its name, DRAGON, stands for DRoplet and hAdron GeneratOr for Nuclear collisions. In a way, the model is similar to THERMINATOR, with the crucial difference that emission from fragments is included.

  15. Bone fragments a body can make

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, S.D.; Ross, L.M. Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    Data obtained from various analytical techniques applied to a number of small bone fragments recovered from a crime scene were used to provide evidence for the occurrence of a fatality. Microscopic and histomorphometric analyses confirmed that the fragments were from a human skull. X-ray microanalysis of darkened areas on the bone fragments revealed a chemical signature that matched the chemical signature of a shotgun pellet recovered at the scene of the crime. The above findings supported the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fingerprint evidence which, along with other evidence, was used to convict a man for the murder of his wife, even though her body was never recovered.

  16. Simulation of collisional fragmentation with explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    For practical reasons, experimental studies of collisional fragmentation must at times rely on explosives to fragment a target body. For example, Housen et al., described experiments in which spheres were fragmented in a pressurized atmosphere. Explosives were used because impacts could not be performed in the pressure chamber. Explosives can also be used to study targets much larger than those which can be disrupted by conventional light-gas guns, thereby allowing size- and rate-effects to be investigated. The purpose of this study is to determine the charge burial depth required to simulate various aspects of collisions.

  17. DNA sequence from Cretaceous period bone fragments.

    PubMed

    Woodward, S R; Weyand, N J; Bunnell, M

    1994-11-18

    DNA was extracted from 80-million-year-old bone fragments found in strata of the Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation in the roof of an underground coal mine in eastern Utah. This DNA was used as the template in a polymerase chain reaction that amplified and sequenced a portion of the gene encoding mitochondrial cytochrome b. These sequences differ from all other cytochrome b sequences investigated, including those in the GenBank and European Molecular Biology Laboratory databases. DNA isolated from these bone fragments and the resulting gene sequences demonstrate that small fragments of DNA may survive in bone for millions of years.

  18. Fission Fragment Properties from a Microscopic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dubray, N.; Goutte, H.; Delaroche, J.-P.

    2008-04-17

    We calculate potential energy surfaces in the elongation-asymmetry plane, up to very large deformations, with the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method and the Gogny nucleon-nucleon effective interaction DIS, for the {sup 226}Th and {sup 256,258,260}Fm fissioning systems. We then define a criterion based on the nuclear density, in order to discriminate between pre- and post-scission configurations. Using this criterion, many scission configurations are identified, and are used for the calculation of several fragment properties, like fragment deformations, deformation energies, energy partitioning, neutron binding energies at scission, charge polarization, total fragment kinetic energies and neutron multiplicities.

  19. Using the speeded word fragment completion task to examine semantic priming.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Tom; De Deyne, Simon; Hutchison, Keith A; Storms, Gert

    2015-06-01

    The present research investigates semantic priming with an adapted version of the word fragment completion task. In this task, which we refer to as the speeded word fragment completion task, participants need to complete words such as lett_ce (lettuce), from which one letter was omitted, as quickly as possible. This paradigm has some interesting qualities in comparison with the traditionally used lexical decision task. That is, it requires no pseudowords, it is more engaging for participants, and most importantly, it allows for a more fine-grained investigation of semantic activation. In two studies, we found that words were completed faster when the preceding trial comprised a semantically related fragment such as tom_to (tomato) than when it comprised an unrelated fragment such as guit_r (guitar). A third experiment involved a lexical decision task, to compare both paradigms. The results showed that the magnitude of the priming effect was similar, but item-level priming effects were inconsistent over tasks. Crucially, the speeded word fragment completion task obtained strong priming effects for highly frequent, central words, such as work, money, and warm, whereas the lexical decision task did not. In a final experiment featuring only short, highly frequent words, the lexical decision task failed to find a priming effect, whereas the fragment completion task did obtain a robust effect. Taken together, these results suggest that the speeded word fragment completion task may prove a viable alternative for examining semantic priming.

  20. Simulated effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on a solitary, mustellid predator

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, Yetta; Carr, Eric A; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann

    2005-01-01

    Brine spills associated with petroleum extraction can reduce the amount of suitable habitat and increase habitat fragmentation for many terrestrial animals. We conducted a simulation study to quantify the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on a solitary mammal predator. To provide focus, we adopted biological attributes of the American badger (Taxidea taxus) and environmental attributes of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in Oklahoma. We simulated badger activities on landscapes with different degrees of habitat loss and fragmentation using a spatially explicit and individual-based population model. Both habitat loss and fragmentation increased the incidence of habitat-related mortality and decreased the proportion of eligible females that mated, which decreased final population sizes and the likelihood of persistence. Parameter exploration suggested that steep, threshold-like, responses to habitat loss occurred when animals included high-risk habitat in their territories. Badger populations showed a steeper decline with increasing habitat loss on landscapes fragmented by spills than on less fragmented landscapes. Habitat fragmentation made it difficult for badgers to form high-quality territories, and exposed individuals to higher risk while seeking to establish a territory. Our simulations also suggest that an inability to find mates (an Allee effect) becomes increasingly important for landscapes that support a sparse distribution of territories. Thus, the presence of unmated females with territories may foreshadow population decline in solitary species that do not normally tolerate marginal adults.

  1. Using the speeded word fragment completion task to examine semantic priming.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Tom; De Deyne, Simon; Hutchison, Keith A; Storms, Gert

    2015-06-01

    The present research investigates semantic priming with an adapted version of the word fragment completion task. In this task, which we refer to as the speeded word fragment completion task, participants need to complete words such as lett_ce (lettuce), from which one letter was omitted, as quickly as possible. This paradigm has some interesting qualities in comparison with the traditionally used lexical decision task. That is, it requires no pseudowords, it is more engaging for participants, and most importantly, it allows for a more fine-grained investigation of semantic activation. In two studies, we found that words were completed faster when the preceding trial comprised a semantically related fragment such as tom_to (tomato) than when it comprised an unrelated fragment such as guit_r (guitar). A third experiment involved a lexical decision task, to compare both paradigms. The results showed that the magnitude of the priming effect was similar, but item-level priming effects were inconsistent over tasks. Crucially, the speeded word fragment completion task obtained strong priming effects for highly frequent, central words, such as work, money, and warm, whereas the lexical decision task did not. In a final experiment featuring only short, highly frequent words, the lexical decision task failed to find a priming effect, whereas the fragment completion task did obtain a robust effect. Taken together, these results suggest that the speeded word fragment completion task may prove a viable alternative for examining semantic priming. PMID:24942248

  2. Centrifugal fragmentation of a dinuclear system in the process of its evolution toward a compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, V. V.

    2007-12-15

    The centrifugal fragmentation of a dinuclear system in the process of evolution toward a compound nucleus is examined. If the angular momentum in the collision of primary nuclei is quite high, centrifugal forces become dominant at the final stage of the evolution of the dinuclear system formed, causing the decay of this dinuclear system to two strongly asymmetric nuclear fragments. Experimental data in which this specific nuclear process manifests itself are presented. Centrifugal fragmentation makes it possible to reveal the cluster facet of the evolution of a dinuclear system toward a compound nucleus. The possibility of this fragmentation process is a logical consequence of the concept of a dinuclear system for the complete fusion of nuclei.

  3. Fragment fixation with a bone graft and dynamic staples for osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum.

    PubMed

    Harada, Mikio; Ogino, Toshihiko; Takahara, Masatoshi; Ishigaki, Daisuke; Kashiwa, Hideo; Kanauchi, Yumiko

    2002-01-01

    To attain bony union of the fragment in osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum, fragment fixation was performed with a bone graft and dynamic staples in 4 patients. The staples were inserted not from the articular surface but from the lateral aspect of the capitellum. All patients achieved bony union without complication, and 3 of them returned to playing competitive baseball. At final follow-up after surgery (mean, 7.5 years [range, 2.1-11 years]), 3 patients were able to throw a ball without pain and the remaining patient felt elbow dullness after he played recreational-level baseball as a pitcher. These results suggest that the procedure of fragment fixation with a bone graft and dynamic staples can provide satisfactory results for osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum with a large osteochondral fragment.

  4. Design of an experimental configuration for studying the dynamic fragmentation of ceramics under impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinszner, J.-L.; Forquin, P.; Rossiquet, G.

    2012-05-01

    To characterize the penetration resistance of a ceramic target during impact, it is necessary to take into consideration the mechanical behaviour of the fragmented ceramic. In the present work, a series of numerical simulations have been performed to design an experimental configuration named the "normal impact test". The aim of this configuration is to generate a strong fragmentation of the ceramic tile and to prevent any ejection of debris in order to analyse the fragmentation properties of the impacted ceramic. An anisotropic damage model has been used to perform these computations. The Weibull parameters that constitute input data of this model have been identified from four-point flexural tests performed on the so-called Hexoloy® silicon carbide. Finally, the numerical predictions are compared to the failure pattern of the fragmented ceramic.

  5. EJECTA KNOT FLICKERING, MASS ABLATION, AND FRAGMENTATION IN CASSIOPEIA A

    SciTech Connect

    Fesen, Robert A.; Zastrow, Jordan A.; Hammell, Molly C.; Shull, J. Michael; Silvia, Devin W.

    2011-08-01

    Ejecta knot flickering, ablation tails, and fragmentation are expected signatures associated with the gradual dissolution of high-velocity supernova (SN) ejecta caused by their passage through an inhomogeneous circumstellar medium or interstellar medium (ISM). Such phenomena mark the initial stages of the gradual merger of SN ejecta with and the enrichment of the surrounding ISM. Here we report on an investigation of this process through changes in the optical flux and morphology of several high-velocity ejecta knots located in the outskirts of the young core-collapse SN remnant Cassiopeia A using Hubble Space Telescope images. Examination of WFPC2 F675W and combined ACS F625W + F775W images taken between 1999 June and 2004 December of several dozen debris fragments in the remnant's northeast ejecta stream and along the remnant's eastern limb reveal substantial emission variations ('flickering') over timescales as short as nine months. Such widespread and rapid variability indicates knot scale lengths {approx_equal} 10{sup 15} cm and a highly inhomogeneous surrounding medium. We also identify a small percentage of ejecta knots located all around the remnant's outer periphery which show trailing emissions typically 0.''2-0.''7 in length aligned along the knot's direction of motion suggestive of knot ablation tails. We discuss the nature of these trailing emissions as they pertain to ablation cooling, knot disruption, and fragmentation, and draw comparisons to the emission 'strings' seen in {eta} Car. Finally, we identify several tight clusters of small ejecta knots which resemble models of shock-induced fragmentation of larger SN ejecta knots caused by a high-velocity interaction with a lower density ambient medium.

  6. Physics of ultrasonic surgery using tissue fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Bond, L J; Cimino, W W

    1996-06-01

    The ultrasonic surgical aspirator employs a vibrating metal tip to fragment tissue and then aspirates the debris through the hollow center of the tip. The mechanism of interaction has been stated to be poorly understood, most likely related to cavitation, possibly acting in concert with other mechanical actions. The role of stroke, suction, frequency, tissue type, and tip area have been examined with regard to tissue fragmentation rate. Suction is shown to make a significant contribution to the interaction. Photographic and acoustic data from experiments in water and on a range of fresh pig tissues are used to investigate the fragmentation effect. A model for the primary mechanism for tissue fragmentation is presented. This involves the horn-tip impact and other mechanical forces, operating in combination with hydrodynamic forces applied to the tissue on the forward stroke in each cycle. No evidence of cavitation in tissue was observed.

  7. The NJL Model for Quark Fragmentation Functions

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ito, W. Bentz, I. Cloet, A W Thomas, K. Yazaki

    2009-10-01

    A description of fragmentation functions which satisfy the momentum and isospin sum rules is presented in an effective quark theory. Concentrating on the pion fragmentation function, we first explain the reason why the elementary (lowest order) fragmentation process q → qπ is completely inadequate to describe the empirical data, although the “crossed” process π → qq describes the quark distribution functions in the pion reasonably well. Then, taking into account cascade-like processes in a modified jet-model approach, we show that the momentum and isospin sum rules can be satisfied naturally without introducing any ad-hoc parameters. We present numerical results for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the invariant mass regularization scheme, and compare the results with the empirical parametrizations. We argue that this NJL-jet model provides a very useful framework to calculate the fragmentation functions in an effective chiral quark theory.

  8. FOREST FRAGMENTATION AS AN ECONOMIC INDICATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite concern over the ecological consequences of conversion of land from natural cover to anthropogenic uses, there are few studies that show a quantitative relationship between fragmentation and economic factors. For the southside economic region of Virginia, we generated a ...

  9. The Fragmentation of the College Mathematics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper examines to what extent and asking reason the fragmentation of college mathematics have attained the present development in the course of looking at the history of mathematics education. (Contains 1 table.)

  10. Fusion, fragmentation, and fission of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, V Yu; Soukhomlinova, M Yu; Fais, D

    2003-08-01

    Individual mitochondria which form the chondriom of eucaryotic cells are highly dynamic systems capable of fusion and fragmentation. These two processes do not exclude one another and can occur concurrently. However, fragmentation and fusion of mitochondria regularly alternate in the cell cycle of some unicellular and multicellular organisms. Mitochondrial shapes are also described which are interpreted as intermediates of their "equational" division, or fission. Unlike the fragmentation, the division of mitochondria, especially synchronous division, is also accompanied by segregation of mitochondrial genomes and production of specific "dumbbell-shaped" intermediates. This review considers molecular components and possible mechanisms of fusion, fragmentation, and fission of mitochondria, and the biological significance of these processes is discussed. PMID:12948383

  11. History of on-orbit satellite fragmentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. L.; Gabbard, J. R.; Devere, G. T.; Johnson, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    The causes of on-orbit fragmentations are varied and may be intentional or accidental. The cause of many fragmentations remains unknown. While a few cases are currently under investigation as on-orbit collision candidates, man is directly responsible for the vast majority of artificial debris polluting the near-Earth space environment. It should be emphasized that the number of fragments listed with each event in this document represent only those debris officially cataloged by NORAD. Each known on-orbit satellite fragementation is described within this document in module format. Also listed are pertinent characteristics of each fragmentation event. Comments regarding the nature of the satellite and additional details of the events are given.

  12. Observations of Titan IIIC Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowardin, H.; Buckalew, B.; Barker, E.; Abercromby, K.; Seitzer, P.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-09-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan IIIC Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the U. S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6 m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper presents a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots are also shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) thought to be associated with the Titan Transtage break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9 m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN 25001, 33509, and 33510) and the parent rocket body (SSN 3432). Color index data are used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In order to better characterize the break-up fragments, spectral measurements were acquired on three Titan fragments (one fragment observed over two different time periods) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra of SSN 25000 (May 2012 and January 2013), SSN 38690, and SSN 38699 are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., aluminum and various paints) to determine the surface material.

  13. Hazards of amniocentesis: an unidentifiable fragment.

    PubMed

    Lieber, E; Shah, P; Hack, M

    1978-09-01

    A 38-year-old woman had amniocentesis performed for advanced maternal age. The karyotype of the cultured amniotic fluid cells showed a minute fragment in all cells analyzed, 47,XY+Fg. The fragment could not be identified. For medical reasons the pregnancy had to be terminated at 34 weeks. Both skin and blood cultures from the aborted fetus showed a 47,XY,21+ karyotype.

  14. Observations of Titan IIIC Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Buckalew, B.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan IIIC Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the U. S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper presents a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots are also shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) thought to be associated with the Titan Transtage break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9-m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN 25001, 33509, and 33510) and the parent rocket body (SSN 3432). Color index data are used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In order to better characterize the break-up fragments, spectral measurements were acquired on three Titan fragments (one fragment observed over two different time periods) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra of SSN 25000 (May 2012 and January 2013), SSN 38690, and SSN 38699 are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., aluminum and various paints) to determine the surface material.

  15. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Hunter R.; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C.; Daza, Riza; Gligorich, Keith M.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134–144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132–145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA. PMID:27428049

  16. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    DeTar, Carleton

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  17. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, Kevin R.

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  18. Microstructural characterization of pipe bomb fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Otto; Oxley, Jimmie; Smith, James; Platek, Michael; Ghonem, Hamouda; Bernier, Evan; Downey, Markus; Cumminskey, Christopher

    2010-03-15

    Recovered pipe bomb fragments, exploded under controlled conditions, have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and microhardness. Specifically, this paper examines the microstructural changes in plain carbon-steel fragments collected after the controlled explosion of galvanized, schedule 40, continuously welded, steel pipes filled with various smokeless powders. A number of microstructural changes were observed in the recovered pipe fragments: deformation of the soft alpha-ferrite grains, deformation of pearlite colonies, twin formation, bands of distorted pearlite colonies, slip bands, and cross-slip bands. These microstructural changes were correlated with the relative energy of the smokeless powder fillers. The energy of the smokeless powder was reflected in a reduction in thickness of the pipe fragments (due to plastic strain prior to fracture) and an increase in microhardness. Moreover, within fragments from a single pipe, there was a radial variation in microhardness, with the microhardness at the outer wall being greater than that at the inner wall. These findings were consistent with the premise that, with the high energy fillers, extensive plastic deformation and wall thinning occurred prior to pipe fracture. Ultimately, the information collected from this investigation will be used to develop a database, where the fragment microstructure and microhardness will be correlated with type of explosive filler and bomb design. Some analyses, specifically wall thinning and microhardness, may aid in field characterization of explosive devices.

  19. Fragmentation of metal particles during heterogeneous explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, R. C.; Donahue, L.; Zhang, F.

    2015-03-01

    Heterogeneous explosives contain a mixture of standard explosive material and reactive metal particles. The inclusion of metal particles alters the energy density and energy release timescales involved in the blast event. Available experimental evidence indicates that metal particles may be damaged or fragmented during heterogeneous blast, altering the distribution of particle sizes from their initial state. This paper discusses adaptation and application of fragmentation theory and physical models for particle damage during condensed matter detonation, aerodynamic breakup of molten particles, and particle impact fragmentation with nearby structures. The shock compression and impact fragmentation models are based on the energy methods for dynamic fragmentation by Grady and Kipp, while aerodynamic breakup is treated according to Weber number stability criteria for droplets. These particle fragmentation models are validated against fundamental test cases from the literature. The models are then applied to heterogeneous blast scenarios including free field and wall reflection in a semi-confined urban street. Comparison with experimental records of pressure shows good agreement despite challenges inherent in the complexity of heterogeneous blast measurement and multiphase simulation.

  20. Electroweak fragmentation functions for dark matter annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavasonza, Leila Ali; Krämer, Michael; Pellen, Mathieu

    2015-02-18

    Electroweak corrections can play a crucial role in dark matter annihilation. The emission of gauge bosons, in particular, leads to a secondary flux consisting of all Standard Model particles, and may be described by electroweak fragmentation functions. To assess the quality of the fragmentation function approximation to electroweak radiation in dark matter annihilation, we have calculated the flux of secondary particles from gauge-boson emission in models with Majorana fermion and vector dark matter, respectively. For both models, we have compared cross sections and energy spectra of positrons and antiprotons after propagation through the galactic halo in the fragmentation function approximation and in the full calculation. Fragmentation functions fail to describe the particle fluxes in the case of Majorana fermion annihilation into light fermions: the helicity suppression of the lowest-order cross section in such models cannot be lifted by the leading logarithmic contributions included in the fragmentation function approach. However, for other classes of models like vector dark matter, where the lowest-order cross section is not suppressed, electroweak fragmentation functions provide a simple, model-independent and accurate description of secondary particle fluxes.

  1. Large fragments of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Geisow, M J; Beaven, G H

    1977-03-01

    Large fragments of human serum albumin were produced by treatment of the native protein with pepsin at pH3.5. Published sequences of human albumin [Behrens, Spiekerman & Brown (1975) Fed. Proc. Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol. 34, 591; Meloun, Moravek & Kostka (1975) FEBSLett.58, 134-137]were used to locate the fragments in the primary structure. The fragments support both the sequence and proposed disulphide-linkage pattern (Behrens et al., 1975). As the pH of a solution of albumin is lowered from pH4 to pH3.5, the protein undergoes a reversible conformational change known as the N-F transition. The distribution of large fragments of human albumin digested with pepsin in the above pH region was critically dependent on pH. It appeared that this distribution was dependent on the conformation of the protein at low pH, rather than the activity of pepsin. The yields of the large fragments produced by peptic digestion at different values of pH suggested that the C-terminal region of albumin unfolds or separates from the rest of the molecule during the N-F transition. The similarity of peptic fragments of human and bovine albumin produced under identical conditions supports the proposed similar tertiary structure of these molecules.

  2. Fragment library design: using cheminformatics and expert chemists to fill gaps in existing fragment libraries.

    PubMed

    Kutchukian, Peter S; So, Sung-Sau; Fischer, Christian; Waller, Chris L

    2015-01-01

    Fragment based screening (FBS) has emerged as a mainstream lead discovery strategy in academia, biotechnology start-ups, and large pharma. As a prerequisite of FBS, a structurally diverse library of fragments is desirable in order to identify chemical matter that will interact with the range of diverse target classes that are prosecuted in contemporary screening campaigns. In addition, it is also desirable to offer synthetically amenable starting points to increase the probability of a successful fragment evolution through medicinal chemistry. Herein we describe a method to identify biologically relevant chemical substructures that are missing from an existing fragment library (chemical gaps), and organize these chemical gaps hierarchically so that medicinal chemists can efficiently navigate the prioritized chemical space and subsequently select purchasable fragments for inclusion in an enhanced fragment library.

  3. Shuttle data book: SRM fragment velocity model. Presented to the SRB Fragment Model Review Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the velocity of fragments generated by the range safety destruction (RSD) or random failure of a Space Transportation System (STS) Solid Rocket Motor (SRM). The specific requirement was to provide a fragment model for use in those Galileo and Ulysses RTG safety analyses concerned with possible fragment impact on the spacecraft radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS). Good agreement was obtained between predictions and observations for fragment velocity, velocity distributions, azimuths, and rotation rates. Based on this agreement with the entire data base, the model was used to predict the probable fragment environments which would occur in the event of an STS-SRM RSD or randon failure at 10, 74, 84 and 110 seconds. The results of these predictions are the basis of the fragment environments presented in the Shuttle Data Book (NSTS-08116). The information presented here is in viewgraph form.

  4. Hypervelocity Impact Test Fragment Modeling: Modifications to the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouge, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests on test satellites are performed by members of the orbital debris scientific community in order to understand and typify the on-orbit collision breakup process. By analysis of these test satellite fragments, the fragment size and mass distributions are derived and incorporated into various orbital debris models. These same fragments are currently being put to new use using emerging technologies. Digital models of these fragments are created using a laser scanner. A group of computer programs referred to as the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve code uses these digital representations in a multitude of ways that describe, measure, and model on-orbit fragments and fragment behavior. The Dynamic Rotation subroutine generates all of the possible reflected intensities from a scanned fragment as if it were observed to rotate dynamically while in orbit about the Earth. This calls an additional subroutine that graphically displays the intensities and the resulting frequency of those intensities as a range of solar phase angles in a Probability Density Function plot. This document reports the additions and modifications to the subset of the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve concerned with the Dynamic Rotation and Probability Density Function plotting subroutines.

  5. On the fragmentation of biomolecules: Fragmentation of alanine dipeptide along the polypeptide chain

    SciTech Connect

    Solov'yov, I. A. Yakubovich, A. V.; Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W.

    2006-09-15

    The interaction potential between amino acids in alanine dipeptide has been studied for the first time taking into account exact molecular geometry. Ab initio calculation has been performed in the framework of density functional theory taking into account all electrons in the system. The fragmentation of dipeptide along the polypeptide chain, as well as the interaction between alanines, has been considered. The energy of the system has been analyzed as a function of the distance between fragments for all possible dipeptide fragmentation channels. Analysis of the energy barriers makes it possible to estimate the characteristic fragmentation times and to determine the degree of applicability of classical electrodynamics for describing the system energy.

  6. History of on-orbit satellite fragmentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nauer, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Since the first serious satellite fragmentation occurred in Jun. 1961, and instantaneously increased the total Earth satellite population by more than 400 percent, the issue of space operations within the finite region of space around the Earth has been the subject of increasing interest and concern. The prolific satellite fragmentations of the 1970's and the marked increase in the number of fragmentations in the 1980's served to widen international research into the characteristics and consequences of such events. Plans for large, manned space stations in the next decade and beyond demand a better understanding of the hazards of the dynamic Earth satellite population. The contribution of satellite fragmentations to the growth of the Earth satellite population is complex and varied. The majority of detectable fragmentation debris have already fallen out of orbit, and the effects of 40 percent of all fragmentations have completely disappeared. In this volume, satellite fragmentations are categorized by their assessed nature and to a lesser degree by their effect on the near-Earth space environment. A satellite breakup is the usually destructive disassociation of an orbital payload, rocket body, or structure, often with a wide range of ejecta velocities. A satellite breakup may be accidental or the result of intentional actions, e.g., due to a propulsion system malfunction or a space weapons test, respectively. An anomalous event is the unplanned separation, usually at low velocity, of one or more detectable objects from a satellite which remains essentially intact. Anomalous events can be caused by material deterioration of items such as thermal blankets, protective shields, or solar panels. As a general rule, a satellite breakup will produce considerably more debris, both trackable and non-trackable, than an anomalous event. From one perspective, satellite breakups may be viewed as a measure of the effects of man's activity on the environment, while anomalous

  7. Fragmentation in Dusty Low-metallicity Star-forming Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meece, Gregory R.; Smith, Britton D.; O'Shea, Brian W.

    2014-03-01

    The first stars in the universe, termed Population III, are thought to have been very massive compared to the stars that form in the present epoch. As feedback from the first generation of stars altered the contents of the interstellar medium, the universe switched to a low-mass mode of star formation, which continues in the high-metallicity stars formed in the present era. Several studies have investigated the transition between metal-free and metal-enriched star formation, with tentative evidence being found for a metallicity threshold near 10-3.5 Z ⊙ due to atomic and molecular transitions and another threshold near 10-5.5 Z ⊙ due to dust. In this work, we simulate the fragmentation of cooling gas in idealized, low-metallicity halos using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo. We conduct several simulations of 106 M ⊙ and 107 M ⊙ halos at z = 20 in which the metal content, initial rotation, and degree of turbulence are varied in order to study the effect of these properties on gas fragmentation over a range of densities. We find tentative support for the idea of a critical metallicity, but the effect of varying metallicity on the gas we observe is not as dramatic as what has been reported in earlier studies. It is theorized that at lower redshifts with a lower cosmic microwave background temperature, variations in metallicity might have a larger effect on cooling and fragmentation. We find no clear relation between the initial spin or the initial level of turbulence in the halo and the final properties of the gas contained therein. Additionally, we find that the degree to which the Jeans length is refined, the initial density profile of the gas, and the inclusion of deuterium chemistry each have a significant effect on the evolution and fragmentation of the gas in the halo—in particular, we find that at least 64 grid cells are needed to cover the Jeans length in order to properly resolve the fragmentation.

  8. Fragmentation in dusty low-metallicity star-forming halos

    SciTech Connect

    Meece, Gregory R.; Smith, Britton D.; O'Shea, Brian W.

    2014-03-10

    The first stars in the universe, termed Population III, are thought to have been very massive compared to the stars that form in the present epoch. As feedback from the first generation of stars altered the contents of the interstellar medium, the universe switched to a low-mass mode of star formation, which continues in the high-metallicity stars formed in the present era. Several studies have investigated the transition between metal-free and metal-enriched star formation, with tentative evidence being found for a metallicity threshold near 10{sup –3.5} Z {sub ☉} due to atomic and molecular transitions and another threshold near 10{sup –5.5} Z {sub ☉} due to dust. In this work, we simulate the fragmentation of cooling gas in idealized, low-metallicity halos using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo. We conduct several simulations of 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} and 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} halos at z = 20 in which the metal content, initial rotation, and degree of turbulence are varied in order to study the effect of these properties on gas fragmentation over a range of densities. We find tentative support for the idea of a critical metallicity, but the effect of varying metallicity on the gas we observe is not as dramatic as what has been reported in earlier studies. It is theorized that at lower redshifts with a lower cosmic microwave background temperature, variations in metallicity might have a larger effect on cooling and fragmentation. We find no clear relation between the initial spin or the initial level of turbulence in the halo and the final properties of the gas contained therein. Additionally, we find that the degree to which the Jeans length is refined, the initial density profile of the gas, and the inclusion of deuterium chemistry each have a significant effect on the evolution and fragmentation of the gas in the halo—in particular, we find that at least 64 grid cells are needed to cover the Jeans length in order to properly resolve the

  9. Melone's Concept Revisited: 3D Quantification of Fragment Displacement.

    PubMed

    Teunis, Teun; Bosma, Niels H; Lubberts, Bart; Ter Meulen, Dirk P; Ring, David

    2016-04-01

    We applied quantitative 3D computed tomography to 50 complete articular AO type C fractures of the distal radius and tested the null hypothesis that fracture fragments can be divided according to Melone's concept (radial styloid and volar and dorsal lunate facet fragments) and that each fragment has similar (1) displacement and (2) articular surface area. Thirty-eight fractures fit the Melone distribution of fragments. Radial styloid fragments were most displaced, and volar lunate fragments were least displaced. Volar lunate fragments had the largest articular surface area. While these findings confirm Melone's concepts, the finding that volar lunate fragments are relatively large and dorsal lunate fragments relatively small suggests that alignment of the volar lunate fragment with the radial styloid may be the key element of treatment and the dorsal lunate fragment may not routinely benefit from specific reduction and fixation. PMID:27551165

  10. Analysis and interpretation of satellite fragmentation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Arjun

    1987-01-01

    The velocity perturbations of the fragments of a satellite can shed valuable information regarding the nature and intensity of the fragmentation. A feasibility study on calculating the velocity perturbations from existing equations was carried out by analyzing 23 major documented fragmentation events. It was found that whereas the calculated values of the radial components of the velocity change were often unusually high, those in the two other orthogonal directions were mostly reasonable. Since the uncertainties in the radial component necessarily translate into uncertainties in the total velocity change, it is suggested that alternative expressions for the radial component of velocity be sought for the purpose of determining the cause of the fragmentation from the total velocity change. The calculated variances in the velocity perturbations in the two directions orthogonal to the radial vector indicate that they have the smallest values for collision induced breakups and the largest values for low-intensity explosion induced breakups. The corresponding variances for high-intensity explosion induced breakups generally have values intermediate between those of the two extreme categories. A three-dimensional plot of the variances in the two orthogonal velocity perturbations and the plane change angle shows a clear separation between the three major types of breakups. This information is used to reclassify a number of satellite fragmentation events of unknown category.

  11. Dynamic fragmentation of powders in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, A. M.; Floyd, E.; Longbottom, A. W.; Taylor, P.

    2014-09-01

    Experimental evidence from a wide range of sources shows that the expanding cloud of explosively disseminated material comprises of "particles" or fragments which have different dimensions from those associated with the original material. Photographic evidence shows jets or fingers behind these expanding fragments. Powders and liquids have often been used to surround explosives to act as blast mitigants; this is the main driver for our research. Other examples of areas where these features are observed include fuel air explosives and enhanced blast explosives as well as quasi-static pressure mitigation systems. In this paper, we consider the processes occurring when an explosive interacts with a surrounding layer of powder in spherical geometry. Results from explosive experiments designed to investigate the effects of powder grain size and powder fill-to-burster charge mass ratio (/) are presented and compared with results from numerical modelling to explore what determines the primary fragment size distribution resulting from explosive dissemination of a layer of material and when this process begins. The evidence clearly shows that the process starts during the first wave transit period of the powder material and, despite the surrounding material initially being a loose powder, shows the characteristics of a brittle fracture mechanism. Later time video evidence shows the same number of jets or fingers as are identified by X-rays of the early, primary fragmentation process. The number of fragments is only a very weak function of the initial grain size of the powder.

  12. Simvastatin inhibits CD44 fragmentation in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Terabe, Kenya; Takahashi, Nobunori; Takemoto, Toki; Knudson, Warren; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-08-15

    In human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, the hyaluronan receptor CD44 undergoes proteolytic cleavage at the cell surface. CD44 cleavage is thought to require transit of CD44 into cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether statins exert a protective effect on articular chondrocytes due to diminution of cholesterol. Three model systems of chondrocytes were examined including human HCS-2/8 chondrosarcoma cells, human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and normal bovine articular chondrocytes. Treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M resulted in a substantial increase in CD44 fragmentation in each of the three chondrocyte models. Pre-incubation with simvastatin prior to treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M decreased the level of CD44 fragmentation, decreased the proportion of CD44 that transits into the lipid raft fractions, decreased ADAM10 activity and diminished the interaction between CD44 and ADAM10. In HCS-2/8 cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, fragmentation of CD44 was blocked by the knockdown of ADAM10. Inhibition of CD44 fragmentation by simvastatin also resulted in improved retention of pericellular matrix. Addition of cholesterol and farnesyl-pyrophosphate reversed the protective effects of simvastatin. Thus, the addition of simvastatin exerts positive effects on chondrocytes including reduced CD44 fragmentation and enhanced the retention of pericellular matrix.

  13. Global-scale patterns of forest fragmentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riitters, K.; Wickham, J.; O'Neill, R.; Jones, B.; Smith, E.

    2000-01-01

    We report an analysis of forest fragmentation based on 1-km resolution land-cover maps for the globe. Measurements in analysis windows from 81 km 2 (9 ?? 9 pixels, "small" scale) to 59,049 km 2 (243 ?? 243 pixels, "large" scale) were used to characterize the fragmentation around each forested pixel. We identified six categories of fragmentation (interior, perforated, edge, transitional, patch, and undetermined) from the amount of forest and its occurrence as adjacent forest pixels. Interior forest exists only at relatively small scales; at larger scales, forests are dominated by edge and patch conditions. At the smallest scale, there were significant differences in fragmentation among continents; within continents, there were significant differences among individual forest types. Tropical rain forest fragmentation was most severe in North America and least severe in Europe - Asia. Forest types with a high percentage of perforated conditions were mainly in North America (five types) and Europe - Asia (four types), in both temperate and subtropical regions. Transitional and patch conditions were most common in 11 forest types, of which only a few would be considered as "naturally patchy" (e.g., dry woodland). The five forest types with the highest percentage of interior conditions were in North America; in decreasing order, they were cool rain forest, coniferous, conifer boreal, cool mixed, and cool broadleaf. Copyright ?? 2000 by The Resilience Alliance.

  14. Observation of magnetic fragmentation in spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, S.; Lhotel, E.; Canals, B.; Ciomaga Hatnean, M.; Ollivier, J.; Mutka, H.; Ressouche, E.; Wildes, A. R.; Lees, M. R.; Balakrishnan, G.

    2016-08-01

    Fractionalized excitations that emerge from a many-body system have revealed rich physics and concepts, from composite fermions in two-dimensional electron systems, revealed through the fractional quantum Hall effect, to spinons in antiferromagnetic chains and, more recently, fractionalization of Dirac electrons in graphene and magnetic monopoles in spin ice. Even more surprising is the fragmentation of the degrees of freedom themselves, leading to coexisting and a priori independent ground states. This puzzling phenomenon was recently put forward in the context of spin ice, in which the magnetic moment field can fragment, resulting in a dual ground state consisting of a fluctuating spin liquid, a so-called Coulomb phase, on top of a magnetic monopole crystal. Here we show, by means of neutron scattering measurements, that such fragmentation occurs in the spin ice candidate Nd2Zr2O7. We observe the spectacular coexistence of an antiferromagnetic order induced by the monopole crystallization and a fluctuating state with ferromagnetic correlations. Experimentally, this fragmentation manifests itself through the superposition of magnetic Bragg peaks, characteristic of the ordered phase, and a pinch point pattern, characteristic of the Coulomb phase. These results highlight the relevance of the fragmentation concept to describe the physics of systems that are simultaneously ordered and fluctuating.

  15. Ultrafast ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane

    SciTech Connect

    Sayres, Scott G.; Ross, Matt W.; Castleman, A. W. Jr.

    2010-09-15

    The ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane is examined here with laser intensities ranging between 7x10{sup 12} and 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} at 624 nm. The ionization potential of silane determined using both multiphoton ionization (MPI) and tunneling ionization (TI) models agrees with the vertical ionization potential of the molecule. In addition, the application of the tunneling ionization model is extended here to the fragments of silane to determine their appearance potentials. MPI values for SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, SiH{sub 2}{sup +}, SiH{sup +}, Si{sup +}, as well as H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are consistent with vertical potentials, whereas the TI measurements are found to be in accord with adiabatic potentials. The tunneling appearance potentials observed for the fragments H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are lower than reported for other techniques. In fact, the appearance potential measurements for these species resulting from silane are lower than their ionization potentials. The fragmentation rate of silane is determined to be nearly 20 times larger than the ionization rate. The main precursor for producing amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films, SiH{sub 3}{sup +} is the dominant fragmentation product making up roughly a third of the total ion yield, a substantial increase from other techniques.

  16. Molten aluminum alloy fuel fragmentation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Cassulo, J.C.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    Experiments were conducted in which molten aluminum alloys were injected into a 1.2 m deep pool of water. The parameters varied were (i) injectant material (8001 aluminum alloy and 12.3 wt% U-87.7 wt% Al), (ii) melt superheat (O to 50 K), (iii) water temperature (313, 343 and 373 K) and (iv) size and geometry of the pour stream (5, 10 and 20 mm diameter circular and 57 mm annular). The pour stream fragmentation was dominated by surface tension with large particles ({approximately}30 mm) being formed from varicose wave breakup of the 10-mm circular pours and from the annular flow off a 57 mm diameter tube. The fragments produced by the 5 mm circular et were smaller ({approximately} mm), and the 20 mm jet which underwent sinuous wave breakup produced {approximately}100 mm fragments. The fragments froze to form solid particles in 313 K water, and when the water was {ge}343 K, the melt fragments did not freeze during their transit through 1.2 m of water.

  17. Molten aluminum alloy fuel fragmentation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Cassulo, J.C.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in which molten aluminum alloys were injected into a 1.2 m deep pool of water. The parameters varied were (i) injectant material (8001 aluminum alloy and 12.3 wt% U-87.7 wt% Al), (ii) melt superheat (O to 50 K), (iii) water temperature (313, 343 and 373 K) and (iv) size and geometry of the pour stream (5, 10 and 20 mm diameter circular and 57 mm annular). The pour stream fragmentation was dominated by surface tension with large particles ({approximately}30 mm) being formed from varicose wave breakup of the 10-mm circular pours and from the annular flow off a 57 mm diameter tube. The fragments produced by the 5 mm circular et were smaller ({approximately} mm), and the 20 mm jet which underwent sinuous wave breakup produced {approximately}100 mm fragments. The fragments froze to form solid particles in 313 K water, and when the water was {ge}343 K, the melt fragments did not freeze during their transit through 1.2 m of water.

  18. Projectile fragmentation of 40,48Ca and isotopic scaling in a transport approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailova, T. I.; Erdemchimeg, B.; Artukh, A. G.; Di Toro, M.; Wolter, H. H.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate theoretically projectile fragmentation in reactions of 40,48Ca on 9Be and 181Ta targets using a Boltzmann-type transport approach, which is supplemented by a statistical decay code to describe the de-excitation of the hot primary fragments. We determine the thermodynamical properties of the primary fragments and calculate the isotope distributions of the cold final fragments. These describe the data reasonably well. For the pairs of projectiles with different isotopic content we analyze the isotopic scaling (or isoscaling) of the final fragment distributions, which has been used to extract the symmetry energy of the primary source. The calculation exhibits isoscaling behavior for the total yields as do the experiments. We also perform an impact-parameter-dependent isoscaling analysis in view of the fact that the primary systems at different impact parameters have very different properties. Then the isoscaling behavior is less stringent, which we can attribute to specific structure effects of the 40,48Ca pair. The symmetry energy determined in this way depends on these structure effects.

  19. Final Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    This final chapter provides observations about institutional research in community colleges derived from the preceding chapters and the issue editors' own experiences. Taken as a whole, the chapters in this issue, as well as the editors' experiences, suggest several observations about institutional research in community colleges. These include the…

  20. Anti-fouling properties of Fab' fragments immobilized on silane-based adlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivianu-Gaita, Victor; Romaschin, Alexander; Thompson, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Biosensors require surfaces that are highly specific towards the target analyte and that are minimally fouling. However, surface tuning to minimize fouling is a difficult task. The last decade has seen an increase in the use of immobilized antigen-binding antibody fragments (Fab') in biosensors. One Fab' linker compound S-(11-trichlorosilyl-undecanyl)-benzothiosulfonate (TUBTS) and three spacers were used to create the silane-based adlayers. The ultra-high frequency electromagnetic piezoelectric acoustic sensor (EMPAS) was used to gauge the fouling properties of the various surfaces using bovine serum albumin (BSA), goat IgG, and mouse serum. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to characterize the surfaces. It was discovered that immobilized oriented Fab' fragments reduced the fouling levels of surfaces up to 80% compared to the surfaces without fragments. An explanation for this phenomenon is that the antibody fragments increase the hydration of the surfaces and aid in the formation of an anti-fouling water barrier. The anti-fouling effect of the Fab' fragments is at its maximum when there is an even distribution of fragments across the surfaces. Finally, using Fab'-covered surfaces, a cancer biomarker was detected from serum, showing the applicability of this work to the field of biodetection.

  1. Comparison of mitotic cell death by chromosome fragmentation to premature chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mitotic cell death is an important form of cell death, particularly in cancer. Chromosome fragmentation is a major form of mitotic cell death which is identifiable during common cytogenetic analysis by its unique phenotype of progressively degraded chromosomes. This morphology however, can appear similar to the morphology of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and thus, PCC has been at times confused with chromosome fragmentation. In this analysis the phenomena of chromosome fragmentation and PCC are reviewed and their similarities and differences are discussed in order to facilitate differentiation of the similar morphologies. Furthermore, chromosome pulverization, which has been used almost synonymously with PCC, is re-examined. Interestingly, many past reports of chromosome pulverization are identified here as chromosome fragmentation and not PCC. These reports describe broad ranging mechanisms of pulverization induction and agree with recent evidence showing chromosome fragmentation is a cellular response to stress. Finally, biological aspects of chromosome fragmentation are discussed, including its application as one form of non-clonal chromosome aberration (NCCA), the driving force of cancer evolution. PMID:20959006

  2. Yeast vacuoles fragment in an asymmetrical two-phase process with distinct protein requirements

    PubMed Central

    Zieger, Martin; Mayer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Yeast vacuoles fragment and fuse in response to environmental conditions, such as changes in osmotic conditions or nutrient availability. Here we analyze osmotically induced vacuole fragmentation by time-lapse microscopy. Small fragmentation products originate directly from the large central vacuole. This happens by asymmetrical scission rather than by consecutive equal divisions. Fragmentation occurs in two distinct phases. Initially, vacuoles shrink and generate deep invaginations that leave behind tubular structures in their vicinity. Already this invagination requires the dynamin-like GTPase Vps1p and the vacuolar proton gradient. Invaginations are stabilized by phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) produced by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase complex II. Subsequently, vesicles pinch off from the tips of the tubular structures in a polarized manner, directly generating fragmentation products of the final size. This phase depends on the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate and the Fab1 complex. It is accelerated by the PI(3)P- and phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate–binding protein Atg18p. Thus vacuoles fragment in two steps with distinct protein and lipid requirements. PMID:22787281

  3. On the effect of grain burnback on STS-SRM fragment velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera

    Concerns raised during the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Review (FSAR) process called the solid rocket motor (SRM) fragment velocity prediction model into question. The specific area of concern was that there was a section of the SRM casing which was exposed to SRM chamber pressure as the grain (fuel) was consumed. These questions centered on the velocity of fragments which originated from the field joint region given that failure occurred between 37 and 72 seconds mission elapsed time (MET). Two dimensional coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian calculations were performed to assess the hot gas flow field which resulted from SRM casing fragmentation. The fragment to gas interface-pressure time-history obtained from these analyses was reduced to a boundary condition algorithm which was applied to an explicit-time-integration, finite element, three dimensional shell model of the SRM casing and unburned fuel. The results of these calculations showed that the velocity of fragments originating in the field joint was adequately described by the range of velocities given in the Shuttle Data Book (1988). Based on these results, no further analyses were required, and approval was obtained from the Launch Abort Subpanel of the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel to use the SRM fragment velocity environments presented in the Ulysses FSAR (1990).

  4. On the effect of grain burnback on STS-SRM fragment velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera

    1991-01-01

    Concerns raised during the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Review (FSAR) process called the solid rocket motor (SRM) fragment velocity prediction model into question. The specific area of concern was that there was a section of the SRM casing which was exposed to SRM chamber pressure as the grain (fuel) was consumed. These questions centered on the velocity of fragments which originated from the field joint region given that failure occurred between 37 and 72 seconds mission elapsed time (MET). Two dimensional coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian calculations were performed to assess the hot gas flow field which resulted from SRM casing fragmentation. The fragment to gas interface-pressure time-history obtained from these analyses was reduced to a boundary condition algorithm which was applied to an explicit-time-integration, finite element, three dimensional shell model of the SRM casing and unburned fuel. The results of these calculations showed that the velocity of fragments originating in the field joint was adequately described by the range of velocities given in the Shuttle Data Book (1988). Based on these results, no further analyses were required, and approval was obtained from the Launch Abort Subpanel of the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel to use the SRM fragment velocity environments presented in the Ulysses FSAR (1990).

  5. Systematic investigation of projectile fragmentation using beams of unstable B and C isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thies, R.; Heinz, A.; Adachi, T.; Aksyutina, Y.; Alcantara-Núñes, J.; Altstadt, S.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ashwood, N.; Aumann, T.; Avdeichikov, V.; Barr, M.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Benlliure, J.; Bertulani, C. A.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Burgunder, G.; Camaño, M.; Caesar, C.; Casarejos, E.; Catford, W.; Cederkäll, J.; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, M.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Crespo, R.; Datta, U.; Díaz Fernández, P.; Dillmann, I.; Elekes, Z.; Enders, J.; Ershova, O.; Estradé, A.; Farinon, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Freer, M.; Freudenberger, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubev, P.; Gonzalez Diaz, D.; Hagdahl, J.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Heine, M.; Henriques, A.; Holl, M.; Ickert, G.; Ignatov, A.; Jakobsson, B.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Knöbel, R.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, N.; Labiche, M.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Lindberg, S.; Machado, J.; Marganiec, J.; Maroussov, V.; Mostazo, M.; Movsesyan, A.; Najafi, A.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Perea, A.; Petri, M.; Pietri, S.; Plag, R.; Prochazka, A.; Rahaman, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Reifarth, R.; Ribeiro, G.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Rigollet, C.; Riisager, K.; Röder, M.; Rossi, D.; Sanchez del Rio, J.; Savran, D.; Scheit, H.; Simon, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stoica, V.; Streicher, B.; Taylor, J. T.; Tengblad, O.; Terashima, S.; Togano, Y.; Uberseder, E.; Van de Walle, J.; Velho, P.; Volkov, V.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Wheldon, C.; Wilson, G.; Wimmer, C.; Winfield, J. S.; Woods, P.; Yakorev, D.; Zhukov, M. V.; Zilges, A.; Zuber, K.; R3B Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Background: Models describing nuclear fragmentation and fragmentation fission deliver important input for planning nuclear physics experiments and future radioactive ion beam facilities. These models are usually benchmarked against data from stable beam experiments. In the future, two-step fragmentation reactions with exotic nuclei as stepping stones are a promising tool for reaching the most neutron-rich nuclei, creating a need for models to describe also these reactions. Purpose: We want to extend the presently available data on fragmentation reactions towards the light exotic region on the nuclear chart. Furthermore, we want to improve the understanding of projectile fragmentation especially for unstable isotopes. Method: We have measured projectile fragments from 10,12 -18C and B-1510 isotopes colliding with a carbon target. These measurements were all performed within one experiment, which gives rise to a very consistent data set. We compare our data to model calculations. Results: One-proton removal cross sections with different final neutron numbers (1 p x n ) for relativistic 10,12 -18C and B-1510 isotopes impinging on a carbon target. Comparing model calculations to the data, we find that the epax code is not able to describe the data satisfactorily. Using abrabla07 on the other hand, we find that the average excitation energy per abraded nucleon needs to be decreased from 27 MeV to 8.1 MeV. With that decrease abrabla07 describes the data surprisingly well. Conclusions: Extending the available data towards light unstable nuclei with a consistent set of new data has allowed a systematic investigation of the role of the excitation energy induced in projectile fragmentation. Most striking is the apparent mass dependence of the average excitation energy per abraded nucleon. Nevertheless, this parameter, which has been related to final-state interactions, requires further study.

  6. Micromachined fragment capturer for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Soo; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2011-11-01

    Due to changes in modern diet, a form of heart disease called chronic total occlusion has become a serious disease to be treated as an emergency. In this study, we propose a micromachined capturer that is designed and fabricated to collect plaque fragments generated during surgery to remove the thrombus. The fragment capturer consists of a plastic body made by rapid prototyping, SU-8 mesh structures using MEMS techniques, and ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) actuators. An array of IPMC actuators combined with the SU-8 net structure was optimized to effectively collect plaque fragments. The evaporation of solvent through the actuator's surface was prevented using a coating of SU-8 and polydimethylsiloxane thin film on the actuator. This approach improved the available operating time of the IPMC, which primarily depends on solvent loss. Our preliminary results demonstrate the possibility of using the capturer for biomedical applications.

  7. Clinical considerations for reattachment of tooth fragments.

    PubMed

    Chu, F C; Yim, T M; Wei, S H

    2000-06-01

    Trauma to anterior teeth is relatively common among children and teenagers; it has been estimated that approximately one quarter of the population under the age of 18 years sustain traumatic injury in the form of anterior crown fracture. Reattachment of a fractured fragment to the remaining tooth can provide esthetically pleasing results provided that the fragment is available. In this report, a systematic clinical approach through evaluation of periodontal, endodontic, coronal, and occlusal aspects is presented to help dentists analyze the factors affecting selection of techniques and materials. In addition, use of adhesive materials for tooth fragment reattachment is illustrated. Modifications of the reattachment process, including placement of veneer and radicular post, are also discussed. PMID:11203954

  8. Experiences in fragment-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christopher W; Verdonk, Marcel L; Rees, David C

    2012-05-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become established in both industry and academia as an alternative approach to high-throughput screening for the generation of chemical leads for drug targets. In FBDD, specialised detection methods are used to identify small chemical compounds (fragments) that bind to the drug target, and structural biology is usually employed to establish their binding mode and to facilitate their optimisation. In this article, we present three recent and successful case histories in FBDD. We then re-examine the key concepts and challenges of FBDD with particular emphasis on recent literature and our own experience from a substantial number of FBDD applications. Our opinion is that careful application of FBDD is living up to its promise of delivering high quality leads with good physical properties and that in future many drug molecules will be derived from fragment-based approaches. PMID:22459076

  9. Crystallographic Fragment Based Drug Discovery: Use of a Brominated Fragment Library Targeting HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Tiefenbrunn, Theresa; Forli, Stefano; Happer, Meaghan; Gonzalez, Ana; Tsai, Yingssu; Soltis, Michael; Elder, John H.; Olson, Arthur J.; Stout, C. David

    2013-01-01

    A library of 68 brominated fragments was screened against a new crystal form of inhibited HIV-1 protease in order to probe surface sites in soaking experiments. Often fragments are weak binders with partial occupancy, resulting in weak, difficult-to-fit electron density. The use of a brominated fragment library addresses this challenge, as bromine can be located unequivocally via anomalous scattering. Data collection was carried out in an automated fashion using AutoDrug at SSRL. Novel hits were identified in the known surface sites: 3-bromo-2,6-dimethoxybenzoic acid (Br6) in the flap site, and 1-bromo-2-naphthoic acid (Br27) in the exosite, expanding the chemistry of known fragments for development of higher affinity potential allosteric inhibitors. At the same time, mapping the binding sites of a number of weaker binding Br-fragments provides further insight into the nature of these surface pockets. PMID:23998903

  10. Parton Propagation and Fragmentation in QCD Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alberto Accardi, Francois Arleo, William Brooks, David D'Enterria, Valeria Muccifora

    2009-12-01

    We review recent progress in the study of parton propagation, interaction and fragmentation in both cold and hot strongly interacting matter. Experimental highlights on high-energy hadron production in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering, proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions, as well as Drell-Yan processes in hadron-nucleus collisions are presented. The existing theoretical frameworks for describing the in-medium interaction of energetic partons and the space-time evolution of their fragmentation into hadrons are discussed and confronted to experimental data. We conclude with a list of theoretical and experimental open issues, and a brief description of future relevant experiments and facilities.

  11. Explosive fragmentation of orbiting propellant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, F. J.; Kays, R. L.; Bishop, C. V.; Eck, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    An examination is made of the in-orbit explosive characteristics of the Delta second stage and Ariane third stage, with a view to the vehicle breakups of the Ariane SPOT third-stage fuel tank in November, 1986, and of two Delta second stage tanks. Attention is given to the possible role of residual propellants in these breakups. After reviewing orbital data and comparing predicted fragment velocities with observed fragment velocities in debris patterns, a comparison has been made of total debris energy with total calculated explosion energy. Both physical and chemical explosions are deemed possible.

  12. Endoscopic removal of retained T- tube fragment.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Thoguluva Seshadri; Murugesh, Mallaiyappan; Radhakrishnan, Subbaiah; Sadagopan, Thiruvengadam; Hussain, Abdul Cadar Mohammed Hameed

    2009-01-01

    T-tube usage is common following common bile duct exploration for calculi and other complex biliary surgeries to ensure proper biliary diversion and healing. A 25-year-old woman was referred from a surgical unit with a history of open cholecystectomy and common bile duct exploration for cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis with T-tube placement in the common bile duct for postoperative biliary diversion. While retrieving the T-tube, it got fractured and the fragment remained in the bile duct. We report a rare case of retained T-tube fragment after T-tube removal that was retrieved endoscopically.

  13. Endoscopic removal of retained T- tube fragment

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Thoguluva Seshadri; Murugesh, Mallaiyappan; Radhakrishnan, Subbaiah; Sadagopan, Thiruvengadam; Hussain, Abdul cadar Mohammed Hameed

    2009-01-01

    T-tube usage is common following common bile duct exploration for calculi and other complex biliary surgeries to ensure proper biliary diversion and healing. A 25-year-old woman was referred from a surgical unit with a history of open cholecystectomy and common bile duct exploration for cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis with T-tube placement in the common bile duct for postoperative biliary diversion. While retrieving the T-tube, it got fractured and the fragment remained in the bile duct. We report a rare case of retained T-tube fragment after T-tube removal that was retrieved endoscopically. PMID:21686845

  14. Analytical pyrolysis of cells and cell fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Faix, O.; Bertelt, E.

    1995-12-01

    Wood of spruce, beech and birch was disintegrated without chemical pretreatment after 10 minutes of steaming at 110{degrees}C in a laboratory defibrator. Fibers, vessels, and fragments of secondary wall were separated by wet screening. A hydrocylon was used for separation of middle lamellae. By using analytical pyrolysis-GC/MS, parenchymatic cells were found to be richer in lignin than the other cells. The lignin content of middle lamellae was 35% (beech, spruce) and 39% (birch). In agreement with the literature, the S/G ratios of the vessels and middle lamellae was lower than those of the other cells and cell fragments.

  15. Computer Model Of Fragmentation Of Atomic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Norbury, John W.; KHAN FERDOUS; Badavi, Francis F.

    1995-01-01

    High Charge and Energy Semiempirical Nuclear Fragmentation Model (HZEFRG1) computer program developed to be computationally efficient, user-friendly, physics-based program for generating data bases on fragmentation of atomic nuclei. Data bases generated used in calculations pertaining to such radiation-transport applications as shielding against radiation in outer space, radiation dosimetry in outer space, cancer therapy in laboratories with beams of heavy ions, and simulation studies for designing detectors for experiments in nuclear physics. Provides cross sections for production of individual elements and isotopes in breakups of high-energy heavy ions by combined nuclear and Coulomb fields of interacting nuclei. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77.

  16. Impact Fragmentation: From the Laboratory to Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Eileen V.; Melosh, H. J.

    1998-05-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of target size on the fragmentation outcome of rock targets using a 2D numerical hydrocode. After comparing our hydrocode calculations to laboratory data (including explosive disruption experiments) to validate the results, we use the code to calculate how the critical specific energy (Q*) needed to catastrophically fracture a body varies with target size in the regimes not accessible to experiment. Impact velocity is generally kept constant at about 2.0 km s-1, although some higher velocity (∼5 km s-1) simulations were run to determine a velocity dependence for the fragmentation outcome. To reflect the asteroid population, target diameters range from 10 cm to 1000 km, spanning the regimes where strength and self-gravity (radially varying lithostatic stress) each dominate resistance to fragmentation. We find that there is a significant difference in fragmentation outcome when the lithostatic stress is included in the computations. As expected, surface layers fragment more easily, while the strength of the central regions is greatly enhanced. We derive theQ* versus size relationship for three materials, (basalt, strong-, and weak-cement mortar) each having different static compressive strengths and representing a range of asteroid materials. The hydrocode results showed thatQ* decreased with increasing target size in the strength regime, with slopes of 0.43, 0.59, and 0.6 for basalt, strong and weak mortar, respectively. This decrease is directly related to the decrease in strain rate as target size grows. In the gravity regime,Q* increases with increasing target size, with a slope equal to 2.6 for all three of the materials modeled. These values are much steeper than those previously derived from scaling theories. Ejecta velocity distributions as a function of target size are examined as well. For large bodies, resultant ejecta speeds tend to be well below escape velocity, implying that these asteroids are likely to be

  17. Endoscopic removal of retained T- tube fragment.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Thoguluva Seshadri; Murugesh, Mallaiyappan; Radhakrishnan, Subbaiah; Sadagopan, Thiruvengadam; Hussain, Abdul Cadar Mohammed Hameed

    2009-01-01

    T-tube usage is common following common bile duct exploration for calculi and other complex biliary surgeries to ensure proper biliary diversion and healing. A 25-year-old woman was referred from a surgical unit with a history of open cholecystectomy and common bile duct exploration for cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis with T-tube placement in the common bile duct for postoperative biliary diversion. While retrieving the T-tube, it got fractured and the fragment remained in the bile duct. We report a rare case of retained T-tube fragment after T-tube removal that was retrieved endoscopically. PMID:21686845

  18. De Novo Repeat Classification and Fragment Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Pevzner, Paul A.; Tang, Haixu; Tesler, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Repetitive sequences make up a significant fraction of almost any genome, and an important and still open question in bioinformatics is how to represent all repeats in DNA sequences. We propose a new approach to repeat classification that represents all repeats in a genome as a mosaic of sub-repeats. Our key algorithmic idea also leads to new approaches to multiple alignment and fragment assembly. In particular, we show that our FragmentGluer assembler improves on Phrap and ARACHNE in assembly of BACs and bacterial genomes. PMID:15342561

  19. Statistical fragmentation of small neutral carbon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Tendero, S.; Alcami, M.; Martin, F.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2005-03-01

    We present a statistical fragmentation study of the C{sub 5}, C{sub 7}, and C{sub 9} carbon clusters using the Metropolis Monte Carlo and Weisskopf methods. We show that inclusion of several isomeric forms as well as rotational effects is essential to reproduce the experimental observations. We have found that, for cluster excitation energies around 10 eV, several fragmentation channels are efficiently populated, but the dominant one always corresponds to C{sub n-3}/C{sub 3}. For high enough excitation energies, we observe first-order phase transitions corresponding to a complete breakup of the cluster.

  20. Inner valence-shell vacancy production and molecular fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenegro, E. C.; Tavares, A. C.; Luna, H.; Wolff, W.

    2015-09-01

    Fragmentation of complex molecules is studied linking the fragment-ions to the primary vacancies produced in their molecular orbitals. It is observed that a model based in such association describes well rather complex molecules. Deviations from this model are clear indications that inner valence-shells and double ionization plays a key role in the production of some fragments.

  1. Dynamical effects in the Coulomb expansion following nuclear fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.C.; Donangelo, R.; Schechter, H.

    1987-09-01

    The effects of the Coulomb expansion on the fragment kinetic energy spectrum for a fragmentating hot nuclear system is investigated. In particular, /sup 12/C-fragment spectra are calculated and compared with those predicted by the uniform expansion approximation. The results indicate that the energy spectra of fragments are quite sensitive to the details of the Coulomb expansion treatment.

  2. Importance of species traits for species distribution in fragmented landscapes.

    PubMed

    Tremlová, Katerina; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2007-04-01

    Knowledge of the relationship between species traits and species distribution in fragmented landscapes is important for understanding current distribution patterns and as background information for predictive models of the effect of future landscape changes. The existing studies on the topic suffer from several drawbacks. First, they usually consider only traits related to dispersal ability and not growth. Furthermore, they do not apply phylogenetic corrections, and we thus do not know how considerations of phylogenetic relationships can alter the conclusions. Finally, they usually apply only one technique to calculate habitat isolation, and we do not know how other isolation measures would change the results. We studied the issues using 30 species forming congeneric pairs occurring in fragmented dry grasslands. We measured traits related to dispersal, survival, and growth in the species and recorded distribution of the species in 215 grassland fragments. We show many strong relationships between species traits related to both dispersal and growth and species distribution in the landscape, such as the positive relationship between habitat occupancy and anemochory and negative relationships between habitat occupancy and seed dormancy. The directions of these relationships, however, often change after application of phylogenetic correction. For example, more isolated habitats host species with smaller seeds. After phylogenetic correction, however, they turn out to host species with larger seeds. The conclusions also partly change depending on how we calculate habitat isolation. Specifically, habitat isolation calculated from occupied habitats only has the highest predictive power. This indicates slow dynamics of the species. All the results support the expectation that species traits have a high potential to explain patterns of species distribution in the landscape and that they can be used to build predictive models of species distribution. The specific conclusions

  3. Identifying fragment vuv excitations with dissociation channels from the strong-field ionization of N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Coffee, Ryan N.; Gibson, George N.

    2005-07-15

    Along with attosecond pulses comes a growing need for broadband amplification in the extreme ultraviolet spectral regime. Ultrafast laser pulses interacting with high symmetry molecules produce electronic excitations that are approaching this energy regime. Although there is some theoretical work regarding such excitation, experimental progress had been hampered in a fundamental way. Ion time-of-flight spectroscopy measures dissociation pathways but provides no specific information regarding the final state of the fragments. Vacuum-ultraviolet spectroscopy provides complete information about excited fragments but says nothing of the dissociation channel. In this paper we measure the internal states of nitrogen ion fragments and we associate them with specific dissociation pathways.

  4. A decadal view of magma fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.

    2010-12-01

    Although the past decade has seen fundamental advances in studies of explosive volcanism, the disruption to air traffic caused by the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, highlights the need for improved understanding of magmatic fragmentation in general, and of fine ash generation in particular. To develop a theoretical basis for predicting the fine ash content of eruptive plumes, we need to understand not only fragmentation mechanisms but also the dependence of those mechanisms on conditions of magma ascent and degassing. Experimental and analytical approaches to this problem include experimental studies of vesiculation and permeability development in silicic melts, quantitative textural studies of pyroclasts to constrain conditions that reduce fragmentation efficiency (that is, allow vesicular clasts to be preserved), direct experiments on fragmentation in both natural and analog materials, and determination of total grain size distributions (TGSDs) of pyroclastic deposits. Experiments on silicic melts have demonstrated that very high supersaturations (overpressures ΔP) may be achieved in silicic melts prior to homogeneous bubble nucleation, and that the high bubble number densities of silicic pumice require not only homogeneous nucleation but also nucleation of a mixed H2O-CO2 gas phase. In most pumice and scoria clasts, resulting vesicle populations form power law size distributions; power law exponents >3 in silicic tephras indicate that small vesicles comprise most of the vesicle volume (consistent with rapid late-stage vesiculation at high ΔP), while exponents < 3 in mafic tephras show that larger bubbles are volumetrically dominant and may reflect extensive bubble coalescence prior to fragmentation. Modal vesicularites of pyroclasts are typically high (> 60-70%) and show no dependence on either melt composition or mass eruption rate; this suggests that melt porosity is more important than either decompression rate or magma rheology for clast

  5. The Zero-Degree Detector system for fragmentation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Christl, M. J.; Howell, L. W.; Kuznetsov, E.

    2007-08-01

    The measurement of nuclear fragmentation cross-sections requires the detection and identification of individual projectile fragments. If light and heavy fragments are recorded in the same detector, it may be impossible to distinguish the signal from the light fragment. To overcome this problem, we have developed the Zero-degree Detector System (ZDDS). The ZDDS enables the measurement of cross-sections for light fragment production by using pixelated detectors to separately measure the signals of each fragment. The system has been used to measure the fragmentation of beams as heavy as Fe at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan.

  6. DRAGON: Monte Carlo generator of particle production from a fragmented fireball in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomášik, Boris

    2009-09-01

    A Monte Carlo generator of the final state of hadrons emitted from an ultrarelativistic nuclear collision is introduced. An important feature of the generator is a possible fragmentation of the fireball and emission of the hadrons from fragments. Phase space distribution of the fragments is based on the blast wave model extended to azimuthally non-symmetric fireballs. Parameters of the model can be tuned and this allows to generate final states from various kinds of fireballs. A facultative output in the OSCAR1999A format allows for a comprehensive analysis of phase-space distributions and/or use as an input for an afterburner. Program summaryProgram title: DRAGON Catalogue identifier: AEDK_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDK_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6383 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 32 756 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: PC Pentium 4, though no particular tuning for this machine was performed Operating system: Linux; the program has been successfully run on Gentoo Linux 2.6, RedHat Linux 9, Debian Linux 4.0, all with g++ compiler. It also ran successfully on MS Windows under Microsoft Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition as well as under cygwin/g++ RAM: 100 Mbytes Supplementary material: Sample output files from the test run, provided in the distribution, are available. Classification: 11.2 Nature of problem: Deconfined matter produced in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions expands and cools down and eventually returns into the confined phase. If the expansion is fast, the fireball could fragment either due to spinodal decomposition or due to suddenly arising bulk viscous force. Particle abundances are reasonably well described with just a few parameters

  7. DNA fragment sizing and sorting by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Mark L.; Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Martin, John C.

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for sizing DNA fragments using high speed detection systems, such as flow cytometry to determine unique characteristics of DNA pieces from a sample. In one characterization the DNA piece is fragmented at preselected sites to produce a plurality of DNA fragments. The DNA piece or the resulting DNA fragments are treated with a dye effective to stain stoichiometrically the DNA piece or the DNA fragments. The fluorescence from the dye in the stained fragments is then examined to generate an output functionally related to the number of nucleotides in each one of the DNA fragments. In one embodiment, the intensity of the fluorescence emissions from each fragment is linearly related to the fragment length. The distribution of DNA fragment sizes forms a characterization of the DNA piece for use in forensic and research applications.

  8. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, Gary E.

    2013-04-23

    This is the final report of a two year project entitled "Governing Nanotechnology Risks and Benefits in the Transition to Regulation: Innovative Public and Private Approaches." This project examined the role of new governance or "soft law" mechanisms such as codes of conduct, voluntary programs and partnership agreements to manage the risks of emerging technologies such as nanotechnology. A series of published or in publication papers and book chapters are attached.

  9. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Paul Drake

    2001-11-30

    This final report describes work involving 22 investigators from 11 institutions to explore the dynamics present in supernova explosions by means of experiments on the Omega laser. The specific experiments emphasized involved the unstable expansion of a spherical capsule and the coupling of perturbations at a first interface to a second interface by means of a strong shock. Both effects are present in supernovae. The experiments were performed at Omega and the computer simulations were undertaken at several institutions. B139

  10. Viscoelastic Effects on Spraying and Fragmentation of Polymeric Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz, Bavand; McKinley, Gareth; Houze, Eric; Moore, John; Koerner, Michael; MIT, Mech., Eng., Dept. Team; Axalta Coating Systems Team

    2013-11-01

    The addition of small amounts of polymer to Newtonian fluids can inhibit the spray process, but the physical reasons behind these effects are still unclear. To explore this phenomenon, model viscoelastic fluids composed of very dilute solutions of polyethylene oxide are tested in a variety of fragmentation processes including air-assisted atomization, jet impact fragmentation, drop impact, and rotary atomization. Spray image analysis shows that when the fluid viscoelasticity is increased the average particle diameter and Sauter Mean Diameter both show a systematic increase before reaching an asymptotic plateau value. As observed for Newtonian fluids, the droplet size distributions are still well described by a Gamma distribution but the addition of viscoelasticity shifts the distribution to smaller values of n, corresponding to a broader size distribution. A linear stability analysis indicates that the effects of fluid viscoelasticity are more pronounced in the final stage of ligament formation than in the initial stages of atomization. The linear analysis can predict the observed trends in the mean droplet sizes; however, the shift in the size distributions seems to rise from the nonlinear dynamics of the stretched viscoelastic ligaments close to break up.

  11. First assembly times and equilibration in stochastic coagulation-fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D’Orsogna, Maria R.; Lei, Qi; Chou, Tom

    2015-07-07

    We develop a fully stochastic theory for coagulation and fragmentation (CF) in a finite system with a maximum cluster size constraint. The process is modeled using a high-dimensional master equation for the probabilities of cluster configurations. For certain realizations of total mass and maximum cluster sizes, we find exact analytical results for the expected equilibrium cluster distributions. If coagulation is fast relative to fragmentation and if the total system mass is indivisible by the mass of the largest allowed cluster, we find a mean cluster-size distribution that is strikingly broader than that predicted by the corresponding mass-action equations. Combinations of total mass and maximum cluster size under which equilibration is accelerated, eluding late-stage coarsening, are also delineated. Finally, we compute the mean time it takes particles to first assemble into a maximum-sized cluster. Through careful state-space enumeration, the scaling of mean assembly times is derived for all combinations of total mass and maximum cluster size. We find that CF accelerates assembly relative to monomer kinetic only in special cases. All of our results hold in the infinite system limit and can be only derived from a high-dimensional discrete stochastic model, highlighting how classical mass-action models of self-assembly can fail.

  12. Three-dimensional bonded-cell model for grain fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantor, D.; Azéma, E.; Sornay, P.; Radjai, F.

    2016-07-01

    We present a three-dimensional numerical method for the simulation of particle crushing in 3D. This model is capable of producing irregular angular fragments upon particle fragmentation while conserving the total volume. The particle is modeled as a cluster of rigid polyhedral cells generated by a Voronoi tessellation. The cells are bonded along their faces by a cohesive Tresca law with independent tensile and shear strengths and simulated by the contact dynamics method. Using this model, we analyze the mechanical response of a single particle subjected to diametral compression for varying number of cells, their degree of disorder, and intercell tensile and shear strength. In particular, we identify the functional dependence of particle strength on the intercell strengths. We find that two different regimes can be distinguished depending on whether intercell shear strength is below or above its tensile strength. In both regimes, we observe a power-law dependence of particle strength on both intercell strengths but with different exponents. The strong effect of intercell shear strength on the particle strength reflects an interlocking effect between cells. In fact, even at low tensile strength, the particle global strength can still considerably increase with intercell shear strength. We finally show that the Weibull statistics describes well the particle strength variability.

  13. Fragment-size prediction during dynamic fragmentation of shock-melted tin: recovery experiments and modeling issues

    SciTech Connect

    Signor, L.; Roy, G.; Llorca, F.; Resseguier, T. de; Dragon, A.

    2007-12-12

    We are interested in dynamic fragmentation of shock-melted metals. The present work is devoted to laser-shock experiments in tin samples including fragments recovery and post-test evaluation of the fragment-size distribution. These results are compared with theoretical predictions from hydrocode simulations coupled with a modified formulation of a fragmentation model from the literature.

  14. Fragment-Size Prediction during Dynamic Fragmentation of Shock-Melted Tin: Recovery Experiments and Modeling Issues.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signor, L.; de Rességuier, T.; Roy, G.; Dragon, A.; Llorca, F.

    2007-12-01

    We are interested in dynamic fragmentation of shock-melted metals. The present work is devoted to laser-shock experiments in tin samples including fragments recovery and post-test evaluation of the fragment-size distribution. These results are compared with theoretical predictions from hydrocode simulations coupled with a modified formulation of a fragmentation model from the literature.

  15. Fragmentation of parton jets at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, R.

    1985-08-01

    The parton fragmentation function is calculated in the region of small x in the doubly logarithmic approximation of QCD. For this, the method of separating the softest particle, which has hitherto been applied only in the Regge kinematic region, is developed. Simple arguments based on unitarity and gauge invariance are used to derive the well known condition of ordering of the emission angles.

  16. Vocabularies Clashing: "The Fragmented Generation" Describes Itself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    After reading Scott Seider and Howard Gardner's essay "The Fragmented Generation" (2009) in a college freshman writing class, students responded by providing their own labels for their generation. This article includes excerpts from their essays. Following these excerpts is the instructor's theoretical justification for this kind of classroom…

  17. RESPONSE TO "THE OPTIMAL FRAGMENTATION PRINCIPLE".

    EPA Science Inventory

    Response to "The Optimal Fragmentation Principle"

    To follow up on my comment to Dale Johnson and to respond to his entertaining and provocative letter, I confess to some frustration in seeing a show-and-tell of a sophisticated tool for data mining and exploration, without ...

  18. DNA fragmentation by charged particle tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenerlöw, B.; Höglund, E.; Carlsson, J.

    High-LET (linear energy transfer) charged particles induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in a non-random fashion in mammalian cells. The clustering of DSB, probably determined by track structure as well as chromatin conformation, results in an excess of small- and intermediate-sized DNA fragments. DNA fragmentation in normal human fibroblasts (GM5758) was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after irradiation with photons ( 60Co) or 125 keV/μm nitrogen ions. Compared to conventional DSB analysis, i.e. assays only measuring the fraction of DNA smaller than a single threshold, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for DSB induction increased with 100%. Further, the size distribution of DNA fragments showed a significant dependence on radiation quality, with an excess of fragments up to 1 Mbp. Irradiation of naked genomic DNA without histone proteins increased the DSB yields 25 and 13 times for photons and nitrogen ions, respectively. The results suggest possible roles of both track structure and chromatin organization in the distribution of DNA double-strand breaks along the chromosome.

  19. Fragmentation and hydration of tektites and microtektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, B.P.; Muenow, D.W.; Bohor, B.F.; Meeker, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    An examination of data collected over the last 30 years indicates that the percent of glass fragments vs. whole splash forms in the Cenozoic microtektite strewn fields increases towards the source crater (or source region). We propose that this is due to thermal stress produced when tektites and larger microtektites fall into water near the source crater while still relatively hot (>1150 ??C). We also find evidence (low major oxide totals, frothing when melted) for hydration of most of the North American tektite fragments and microtektites found in marine sediments. High-temperature mass spectrometry indicates that these tektite fragments and microtektites contain up to 3.8 wt% H2O. The H2O-release behavior during the high-temperature mass-spectrometric analysis, plus high Cl abundances (???0.05 wt%), indicate that the North. American tektite fragments and microtektites were hydrated in the marine environment (i.e., the H2O was not trapped solely on quenching from a melt). The younger Ivory Coast and Australasian microtektites do not exhibit much evidence of hydration (at least not in excess of 0.5 wt% H2O); this suggests that the degree of hydration increases with age. In addition, we find that some glass spherules (with 65 wt% SiO2 can undergo simple hydration in the marine environment, while impact glasses (with <65 wt% SiO2) can also undergo palagonitization.

  20. Water cluster fragmentation probed by pickup experiments.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuanfu; Kresin, Vitaly V; Pysanenko, Andriy; Fárník, Michal

    2016-09-14

    Electron ionization is a common tool for the mass spectrometry of atomic and molecular clusters. Any cluster can be ionized efficiently by sufficiently energetic electrons, but concomitant fragmentation can seriously obstruct the goal of size-resolved detection. We present a new general method to assess the original neutral population of the cluster beam. Clusters undergo a sticking collision with a molecule from a crossed beam, and the velocities of neat and doped cluster ion peaks are measured and compared. By making use of longitudinal momentum conservation, one can reconstruct the sizes of the neutral precursors. Here this method is applied to H2O and D2O clusters in the detected ion size range of 3-10. It is found that water clusters do fragment significantly upon electron impact: the deduced neutral precursor size is ∼3-5 times larger than the observed cluster ions. This conclusion agrees with beam size characterization by another experimental technique: photoionization after Na-doping. Abundant post-ionization fragmentation of water clusters must therefore be an important factor in the interpretation of experimental data; interestingly, there is at present no detailed microscopic understanding of the underlying fragmentation dynamics. PMID:27634257

  1. Water cluster fragmentation probed by pickup experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chuanfu; Kresin, Vitaly V.; Pysanenko, Andriy; Fárník, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Electron ionization is a common tool for the mass spectrometry of atomic and molecular clusters. Any cluster can be ionized efficiently by sufficiently energetic electrons, but concomitant fragmentation can seriously obstruct the goal of size-resolved detection. We present a new general method to assess the original neutral population of the cluster beam. Clusters undergo a sticking collision with a molecule from a crossed beam, and the velocities of neat and doped cluster ion peaks are measured and compared. By making use of longitudinal momentum conservation, one can reconstruct the sizes of the neutral precursors. Here this method is applied to H2O and D2O clusters in the detected ion size range of 3-10. It is found that water clusters do fragment significantly upon electron impact: the deduced neutral precursor size is ˜3-5 times larger than the observed cluster ions. This conclusion agrees with beam size characterization by another experimental technique: photoionization after Na-doping. Abundant post-ionization fragmentation of water clusters must therefore be an important factor in the interpretation of experimental data; interestingly, there is at present no detailed microscopic understanding of the underlying fragmentation dynamics.

  2. Experiments using the Argonne Fragment Mass Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.; Carpenter, M.P.; Henderson, D.J.; Henry, R.G.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.; Liang, Y.; Bindra, K. |; Chung, W. |; Soramel, F. |; Bearden, I.G.; Daly, P.J.; Fornal, B.; Grabowski, Z.W.; Mayer, R.H.; Nisius, D.; Broda, R. |; Ramayya, V.; Bingham, C.R.; Moltz, D.M.; Robertson, J.D.; Scarlassara, F.; Spolaore, P.; Toth, K.S.; Walters, W.B.

    1993-05-01

    The Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) at the ATLAS accelerator has been operational for about one year. During that period a number of test runs and experiments have been carried out. The test runs have verified that the ion optics of the FMA are essentially as calculated. A brief facility description is followed by recent experimental results.

  3. Experiments using the Argonne Fragment Mass Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.; Carpenter, M.P.; Henderson, D.J.; Henry, R.G.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.; Liang, Y. ); Bindra, K. Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN ); Chung, W. Notre Dame Univ., IN ); Soramel, F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (

    1993-01-01

    The Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) at the ATLAS accelerator has been operational for about one year. During that period a number of test runs and experiments have been carried out. The test runs have verified that the ion optics of the FMA are essentially as calculated. A brief facility description is followed by recent experimental results.

  4. Fragman: an R package for fragment analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of microsatellite lengths or other DNA fragment types is an important initial component of many genetic studies such as mutation detection, linkage and QTL mapping, genetic diversity, pedigree analysis, and detection of heterozygosity. A handful of commercial and freely available softw...

  5. Efficient clustering aggregation based on data fragments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ou; Hu, Weiming; Maybank, Stephen J; Zhu, Mingliang; Li, Bing

    2012-06-01

    Clustering aggregation, known as clustering ensembles, has emerged as a powerful technique for combining different clustering results to obtain a single better clustering. Existing clustering aggregation algorithms are applied directly to data points, in what is referred to as the point-based approach. The algorithms are inefficient if the number of data points is large. We define an efficient approach for clustering aggregation based on data fragments. In this fragment-based approach, a data fragment is any subset of the data that is not split by any of the clustering results. To establish the theoretical bases of the proposed approach, we prove that clustering aggregation can be performed directly on data fragments under two widely used goodness measures for clustering aggregation taken from the literature. Three new clustering aggregation algorithms are described. The experimental results obtained using several public data sets show that the new algorithms have lower computational complexity than three well-known existing point-based clustering aggregation algorithms (Agglomerative, Furthest, and LocalSearch); nevertheless, the new algorithms do not sacrifice the accuracy. PMID:22334025

  6. Enriching screening libraries with bioactive fragment space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Zhao, Hongtao

    2016-08-01

    By deconvoluting 238,073 bioactive molecules in the ChEMBL library into extended Murcko ring systems, we identified a set of 2245 ring systems present in at least 10 molecules. These ring systems belong to 2221 clusters by ECFP4 fingerprints with a minimum intracluster similarity of 0.8. Their overlap with ring systems in commercial libraries was further quantified. Our findings suggest that success of a small fragment library is driven by the convergence of effective coverage of bioactive ring systems (e.g., 10% coverage by 1000 fragments vs. 40% by 2million HTS compounds), high enrichment of bioactive ring systems, and low molecular complexity enhancing the probability of a match with the protein targets. Reconciling with the previous studies, bioactive ring systems are underrepresented in screening libraries. As such, we propose a library of virtual fragments with key functionalities via fragmentation of bioactive molecules. Its utility is exemplified by a prospective application on protein kinase CK2, resulting in the discovery of a series of novel inhibitors with the most potent compound having an IC50 of 0.5μM and a ligand efficiency of 0.41kcal/mol per heavy atom.

  7. Overview of nuclear fragmentation models and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    It has been known for some time that adequate assessment of spacecraft shield requirements and concomitant estimates of astronauts radiation exposures from galactic cosmic radiation requires accurate, quantitative methods for characterizing these radiation fields as they pass through thick absorbers. The main nuclear interaction processes involved are (1) nuclear elastic and inelastic collisions, and (2) nuclear breakup (fragmentation) and electromagnetic dissociation (EMD). Nuclear fragmentation and EMD are important because they alter the elemental and isotopic composition of the transported radiation fields. At present, there is no suitably accurate theory for predicting nuclear fragmentation cross sections for all collision pairs and energies of interest in space radiation protection. Typical cross-section differences between theory and experiment range from about 25 percent to a factor of two. The resulting errors in transported flux, for high linear energy transfer (LET) particles, are comparble to these cross-section errors. In this overview, theoretical models of heavy ion fragmentation currently used to generate input data bases for cosmic-ray transport and shielding codes are reviewed. Their shortcomings are discussed. Further actions needed to improve their accuracy and generality are presented.

  8. Accurate Position Calibrations for Charged Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Autumn; Finck, Joseph E.; Spyrou, Artemis; Thoennessen, Michael

    2009-10-01

    The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA), located at the National Superconducting Laboratory at Michigan State University, is used in conjunction with the MSU/FSU Sweeper Magnet to study the breakup of neutron-rich nuclei. Fragmentation reactions create particle-unstable nuclei near the neutron dripline which spontaneously break up by the decay of one or two neutrons with energies that reflect the nuclear structure of unbound excited and ground states. The neutrons continue forward into MoNA where their position and time of flight are recorded, and the charged fragments' position and energy are measured by an array of detectors following the Sweeper Magnet. In such experiments the identification of the fragment of interest is done through energy loss and time-of-flight measurements using plastic scintillators. The emitted angles of the fragments are determined with the use of CRDCs. The purpose of the present work was the calibration of the CRDCs in the X and Y axis (where Z is the beam axis) using specially designed masks. This calibration was also used for the correction of the signal of the plastic scintillators, which is position dependent. The results of this work are used for the determination of the ground state of the neutron-unbound ^24N.

  9. Searching Fragment Spaces with feature trees.

    PubMed

    Lessel, Uta; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Lilienthal, Markus; Claussen, Holger

    2009-02-01

    Virtual combinatorial chemistry easily produces billions of compounds, for which conventional virtual screening cannot be performed even with the fastest methods available. An efficient solution for such a scenario is the generation of Fragment Spaces, which encode huge numbers of virtual compounds by their fragments/reagents and rules of how to combine them. Similarity-based searches can be performed in such spaces without ever fully enumerating all virtual products. Here we describe the generation of a huge Fragment Space encoding about 5 * 10(11) compounds based on established in-house synthesis protocols for combinatorial libraries, i.e., we encode practically evaluated combinatorial chemistry protocols in a machine readable form, rendering them accessible to in silico search methods. We show how such searches in this Fragment Space can be integrated as a first step in an overall workflow. It reduces the extremely huge number of virtual products by several orders of magnitude so that the resulting list of molecules becomes more manageable for further more elaborated and time-consuming analysis steps. Results of a case study are presented and discussed, which lead to some general conclusions for an efficient expansion of the chemical space to be screened in pharmaceutical companies.

  10. Bullet on bullet fragmentation profile in soils.

    PubMed

    Martin, W Andy; Nestler, Catherine C; Wynter, Michelle; Larson, Steven L

    2014-12-15

    Lead-antimony alloy slugs encased in a brass jackets are common small arms caliber ammunition used for training and target practice. When small caliber ammunition is fired at testing and training ranges, these metals--some of which are toxic--are introduced into the environment. Research was conducted on the effects of bullet on bullet impacts and the resulting bullet fragmentation. The extent of bullet fragmentation, among other factors, affects the formation of mobile metal species from small arms firing ranges. Bullet on bullet impact can increase the surface area to mass ratio of the bullet metal alloys in the soil. The solubility of a metal is typically associated with the specific corrosion rate in the berm environment which is dependent on the surface area of the fragments. The purpose of the study was to analyze the bullet on bullet impact effects in six soil types. Changes in the metal distribution as a result of bullet impact was evaluated through sieve analysis and changes in the particle size distribution. The bullet on bullet impact observed in this study demonstrated a significant and observable shift in the fragmentation profiles for the lead, antimony, and copper in soils after shooting an average of 1050 tungsten-nylon bullets into the legacy lead soils. This study provides new information to assist with determining the potential environmental fate, transport, and environmental availability associated with constant bullet on bullet impact at testing and training ranges. PMID:25201767

  11. Ligament Mediated Fragmentation of Viscoelastic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz, Bavand; Houze, Eric C.; Moore, John R.; Koerner, Michael R.; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2016-10-01

    The breakup and atomization of complex fluids can be markedly different than the analogous processes in a simple Newtonian fluid. Atomization of paint, combustion of fuels containing antimisting agents, as well as physiological processes such as sneezing are common examples in which the atomized liquid contains synthetic or biological macromolecules that result in viscoelastic fluid characteristics. Here, we investigate the ligament-mediated fragmentation dynamics of viscoelastic fluids in three different canonical flows. The size distributions measured in each viscoelastic fragmentation process show a systematic broadening from the Newtonian solvent. In each case, the droplet sizes are well described by Gamma distributions which correspond to a fragmentation-coalescence scenario. We use a prototypical axial step strain experiment together with high-speed video imaging to show that this broadening results from the pronounced change in the corrugated shape of viscoelastic ligaments as they separate from the liquid core. These corrugations saturate in amplitude and the measured distributions for viscoelastic liquids in each process are given by a universal probability density function, corresponding to a Gamma distribution with nmin=4 . The breadth of this size distribution for viscoelastic filaments is shown to be constrained by a geometrical limit which can not be exceeded in ligament-mediated fragmentation phenomena.

  12. Modified Fragmentation Function from Quark Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Wang, Enke; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-07-26

    Within the framework of the constituent quark model, it isshown that the single hadron fragmentation function of a parton can beexpressed as a convolution of shower diquark or triquark distributionfunction and quark recombination probability, if the interference betweenamplitudes of quark recombination with different momenta is neglected.Therecombination probability is determined by the hadron's wavefunction inthe constituent quark model. The shower diquark or triquark distributionfunctions of a fragmenting jet are defined in terms of overlappingmatrices of constituent quarks and parton field operators. They aresimilar in form to dihadron or trihadron fragmentation functions in termsof parton operator and hadron states. Extending the formalism to thefield theory at finite temperature, we automatically derive contributionsto the effective single hadron fragmentation function from therecombination of shower and thermal constituent quarks. Suchcontributions involve single or diquark distribution functions which inturn can be related to diquark or triquark distribution functions via sumrules. We also derive QCD evolution equations for quark distributionfunctions that in turn determine the evolution of the effective jetfragmentation functions in a thermal medium.

  13. Enriching screening libraries with bioactive fragment space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Zhao, Hongtao

    2016-08-01

    By deconvoluting 238,073 bioactive molecules in the ChEMBL library into extended Murcko ring systems, we identified a set of 2245 ring systems present in at least 10 molecules. These ring systems belong to 2221 clusters by ECFP4 fingerprints with a minimum intracluster similarity of 0.8. Their overlap with ring systems in commercial libraries was further quantified. Our findings suggest that success of a small fragment library is driven by the convergence of effective coverage of bioactive ring systems (e.g., 10% coverage by 1000 fragments vs. 40% by 2million HTS compounds), high enrichment of bioactive ring systems, and low molecular complexity enhancing the probability of a match with the protein targets. Reconciling with the previous studies, bioactive ring systems are underrepresented in screening libraries. As such, we propose a library of virtual fragments with key functionalities via fragmentation of bioactive molecules. Its utility is exemplified by a prospective application on protein kinase CK2, resulting in the discovery of a series of novel inhibitors with the most potent compound having an IC50 of 0.5μM and a ligand efficiency of 0.41kcal/mol per heavy atom. PMID:27311891

  14. Fragment informatics and computational fragment-based drug design: an overview and update.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chunquan; Zhang, Wannian

    2013-05-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is a promising approach for the discovery and optimization of lead compounds. Despite its successes, FBDD also faces some internal limitations and challenges. FBDD requires a high quality of target protein and good solubility of fragments. Biophysical techniques for fragment screening necessitate expensive detection equipment and the strategies for evolving fragment hits to leads remain to be improved. Regardless, FBDD is necessary for investigating larger chemical space and can be applied to challenging biological targets. In this scenario, cheminformatics and computational chemistry can be used as alternative approaches that can significantly improve the efficiency and success rate of lead discovery and optimization. Cheminformatics and computational tools assist FBDD in a very flexible manner. Computational FBDD can be used independently or in parallel with experimental FBDD for efficiently generating and optimizing leads. Computational FBDD can also be integrated into each step of experimental FBDD and help to play a synergistic role by maximizing its performance. This review will provide critical analysis of the complementarity between computational and experimental FBDD and highlight recent advances in new algorithms and successful examples of their applications. In particular, fragment-based cheminformatics tools, high-throughput fragment docking, and fragment-based de novo drug design will provide the focus of this review. We will also discuss the advantages and limitations of different methods and the trends in new developments that should inspire future research.

  15. Fragment informatics and computational fragment-based drug design: an overview and update.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chunquan; Zhang, Wannian

    2013-05-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is a promising approach for the discovery and optimization of lead compounds. Despite its successes, FBDD also faces some internal limitations and challenges. FBDD requires a high quality of target protein and good solubility of fragments. Biophysical techniques for fragment screening necessitate expensive detection equipment and the strategies for evolving fragment hits to leads remain to be improved. Regardless, FBDD is necessary for investigating larger chemical space and can be applied to challenging biological targets. In this scenario, cheminformatics and computational chemistry can be used as alternative approaches that can significantly improve the efficiency and success rate of lead discovery and optimization. Cheminformatics and computational tools assist FBDD in a very flexible manner. Computational FBDD can be used independently or in parallel with experimental FBDD for efficiently generating and optimizing leads. Computational FBDD can also be integrated into each step of experimental FBDD and help to play a synergistic role by maximizing its performance. This review will provide critical analysis of the complementarity between computational and experimental FBDD and highlight recent advances in new algorithms and successful examples of their applications. In particular, fragment-based cheminformatics tools, high-throughput fragment docking, and fragment-based de novo drug design will provide the focus of this review. We will also discuss the advantages and limitations of different methods and the trends in new developments that should inspire future research. PMID:22430881

  16. Inflaton fragmentation and oscillon formation in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Easther, Richard; Finkel, Hal E-mail: richard.easther@yale.edu

    2010-12-01

    Analytical arguments suggest that a large class of scalar field potentials permit the existence of oscillons — pseudo-stable, non-topological solitons — in three spatial dimensions. In this paper we numerically explore oscillon solutions in three dimensions. We confirm the existence of these field configurations as solutions to the Klein-Gorden equation in an expanding background, and verify the predictions of Amin and Shirokoff [1] for the characteristics of individual oscillons for their model. Further, we demonstrate that significant numbers of oscillons can be generated via fragmentation of the inflaton condensate, consistent with the analysis of Amin [2]. These emergent oscillons can easily dominate the post-inflationary universe. Finally, both analytic and numerical results suggest that oscillons are stable on timescales longer than the post-inflationary Hubble time. Consequently, the post-inflationary universe can contain an effective matter-dominated phase, during which it is dominated by localized concentrations of scalar field matter.

  17. Analysis of Fragmentation and Resulting Shrapnel Penetration of Naturally Fragmenting Cylindrical Bombs

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S.E.

    2000-08-01

    Fragmentation of exploding cylinders and penetration mechanics of surrounding vessel walls were examined and a qualitative understanding was achieved. This understanding provided a basis for making simplifying approximations and assumptions that aided in creating a shrapnel penetration model. Several mathematical models were discussed, and results from 6 cylinder tests were analyzed in order to select a model that best represented the data. It was determined that the overall best mathematical model to predict shrapnel penetration uses the modified Gurney equation to calculate fragment velocity, the Mott equation to calculate largest fragment weight, and the Christman/Gehring equation to calculate penetration depth.

  18. The fragmentation of 510 MeV/nucleon iron-56 in polyethylene. I. Fragment fluence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Frankel, K.; Gong, W.; Schimmerling, W.

    1996-01-01

    The fragmentation of 510 MeV/nucleon iron ions in several thicknesses of polyethylene has been measured. Non-interacting primary beam particles and fragments have been identified and their LETs calculated by measuring ionization energy loss in a stack of silicon detectors. Fluences, normalized to the incident beam intensity and corrected for detector effects, are presented for each fragment charge and target. Histograms of fluence as a function of LET are also presented. Some implications of these data for measurements of the biological effects of heavy ions are discussed.

  19. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  20. A T-matrix theory of galactic heavy-ion fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Deutchman, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of galactic heavy ion fragmentation is furthered by incorporating a T matrix approach into the description of the three step process of abrasion, ablation, and final state interations. The connection between this T matrix and the interaction potential is derived. For resonant states, the substitution of complex energies for real energies in the transition rate is formerly justified for up to third order processes. The previously developed abrasion-ablation fragmentation theory is rederived from first principles and is shown to result from time ordering, classical probability, and zero width resonance approximations. Improvements in the accuracy of the total fragmentation cross sections require an alternative to the latter two approximations. A Lorentz invariant differential abrasion-ablation cross section is derived which explicitly includes the previously derived abrasion total cross sections. It is demonstrated that spectral and angular distributions can be obtained from the general Lorentz invariant form.

  1. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    PETER, GARY F.

    2014-07-16

    Excellent progress was made in standardizing three complementary methods: Magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray micro CT, and MALDI imaging linear ion trap mass spectroscopy to image biomass and chemical, anatomical and functional changes that occur during pretreatment and hydrolysis. Magnetic resonance microscopy provides excellent images with as low as 5 uM resolution with hydrated biomass samples. We visualized dramatic changes in signal associated with the hydrolysis of the carbohydrates by strong acids. Quantitative diffusion approaches were used to probe more subtle structural changes in biomass. Diffusion tensor calculations reflect diffusion anisotropy and fractional anisotropy maps clearly show the longer range diffusion within the vessels compared to within the fiber cells. The diffusion is increased along the cell walls of the vessels. Suggesting that further research with NMR imaging should be pursued. X-ray CT provides excellent images at as low as 3.5 uM resolution from dried biomass. Small increases in surface area, and decreases in local density have been quantified in with wood after mild pretreatments; these changes are expected to be underestimates of the hydrated wood, due to the ~12% shrinkage that occurs upon drying untreated wood. MALDI-MS spectra show high ion intensities at most mass to charge ratios in untreated and pretreated woody material. MALDI-MSn is required to improve specificity and reduce background for imaging. MALDI-TOF is not specific enough for carbohydrate identification. Using MALDI-LIT/MSn we can readily identify oligomeric glucans and xylans and their fragmentation patterns as well as those of the glucuronic acid side chains of birch 4-O-methyl glucuronxylan. Imaging of glucan and xylan oligomers show that many contain isobaric ions with different distributions, indicating again that MSn is needed for accurate imaging of lignocellulosic materials. We are now starting to integrate the three imaging methods by using the same set

  2. Modeling of dynamic fragmentation in brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Olga

    Fragmentation of brittle materials under high rates of loading is commonly encountered in materials processing and under impact loading conditions. Theoretical models intended to correlate the features of dynamic fragmentation have been suggested during the past few years with the goal of providing a rational basis for prediction of fragment sizes. In this thesis, a new model based on the dynamics of the process is developed. In this model, the spatial distribution and strength variation representative of flaws in real brittle materials are taken into account. The model captures the competition between rising mean stress in a brittle material due to an imposed high strain rate and falling mean stress due to loss of compliance. The model is studied computationally through an adaptation of a concept introduced by Xu and Needleman (1994). The deformable body is first divided into many small regions. Then, the mechanical behavior of the material is characterized by two constitutive relations, a volumetric constitutive relationship between stress and strain within the small continuous regions and a cohesive surface constitutive relationship between traction and displacement discontinuity across the cohesive surfaces between the small regions. These surfaces provide prospective fracture paths. Numerical experiments were conducted for a system with initial and boundary conditions similar to those invoked in the simple energy balance models, in order to provide a basis for comparison. It is found that, these models lead to estimates of fragment size which are an order of magnitude larger than those obtained by a more detailed calculation. The differences indicate that the simple analytical models, which deal with the onset of fragmentation but not its evolution, are inadequate as a basis for a complete description of a dynamic fragmentation process. The computational model is then adapted to interpret experimental observations on the increasing energy dissipation for

  3. o-Benzyne fragmentation and isomerization pathways: a CASPT2 study.

    PubMed

    Ghigo, Giovanni; Maranzana, Andrea; Tonachini, Glauco

    2014-11-21

    The mechanisms of the fragmentation and isomerization pathways of o-benzyne were studied at the multi-configurational second-order perturbative level [CAS(12,12)-PT2]. The direct fragmentation of o-benzyne to C2H2 + C4H2 follows two mechanisms: a concerted mechanism and a stepwise mechanism. Although the concerted mechanism is characterized by a single closed-shell transition structure, the stepwise pathway is more complex and structures with a strong diradical character are seen. A third diradicaloid fragmentation pathway of o-benzyne yields C6H2 as the final product. As an alternative to fragmentation, o-benzyne can also undergo rearrangement to its meta and para isomers and to the open chain cis and trans isomers of hexa-3-en-1,6-diyne (HED). These easily fragment to C2H2 + C4H2 or C6H2. Kinetic modelling at several different temperatures between 800 and 3000 K predicted that the thermal decomposition of o-benzyne should yield C2H2, C4H2 and C6H2 as the main products. Small amounts of the HED isomers accumulated at temperatures <1200 K, but they rapidly decompose at higher temperatures. Between 1000 and 1400 K, C2H2 + C4H2 are formed exclusively from the decomposition of trans-HED. At temperatures >1400 K, C2H2 + C4H2 also form from the direct fragmentation of o-benzyne. The formation of C2H2 + C4H2 prevails up to 1600 K but above this temperature the formation of C6H2 prevails. At temperatures >2400 K, the direct fragmentation of o-benzyne again leads to the formation of C2H2 + C4H2. The formation of hydrogen atoms is also explained by our proposed mechanisms. PMID:25283147

  4. o-Benzyne fragmentation and isomerization pathways: a CASPT2 study.

    PubMed

    Ghigo, Giovanni; Maranzana, Andrea; Tonachini, Glauco

    2014-11-21

    The mechanisms of the fragmentation and isomerization pathways of o-benzyne were studied at the multi-configurational second-order perturbative level [CAS(12,12)-PT2]. The direct fragmentation of o-benzyne to C2H2 + C4H2 follows two mechanisms: a concerted mechanism and a stepwise mechanism. Although the concerted mechanism is characterized by a single closed-shell transition structure, the stepwise pathway is more complex and structures with a strong diradical character are seen. A third diradicaloid fragmentation pathway of o-benzyne yields C6H2 as the final product. As an alternative to fragmentation, o-benzyne can also undergo rearrangement to its meta and para isomers and to the open chain cis and trans isomers of hexa-3-en-1,6-diyne (HED). These easily fragment to C2H2 + C4H2 or C6H2. Kinetic modelling at several different temperatures between 800 and 3000 K predicted that the thermal decomposition of o-benzyne should yield C2H2, C4H2 and C6H2 as the main products. Small amounts of the HED isomers accumulated at temperatures <1200 K, but they rapidly decompose at higher temperatures. Between 1000 and 1400 K, C2H2 + C4H2 are formed exclusively from the decomposition of trans-HED. At temperatures >1400 K, C2H2 + C4H2 also form from the direct fragmentation of o-benzyne. The formation of C2H2 + C4H2 prevails up to 1600 K but above this temperature the formation of C6H2 prevails. At temperatures >2400 K, the direct fragmentation of o-benzyne again leads to the formation of C2H2 + C4H2. The formation of hydrogen atoms is also explained by our proposed mechanisms.

  5. HZEFRG1 - SEMIEMPIRICAL NUCLEAR FRAGMENTATION MODEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    The high charge and energy (HZE), Semiempirical Nuclear Fragmentation Model, HZEFRG1, was developed to provide a computationally efficient, user-friendly, physics-based program package for generating nuclear fragmentation databases. These databases can then be used in radiation transport applications such as space radiation shielding and dosimetry, cancer therapy with laboratory heavy ion beams, and simulation studies of detector design in nuclear physics experiments. The program provides individual element and isotope production cross sections for the breakup of high energy heavy ions by the combined nuclear and Coulomb fields of the interacting nuclei. The nuclear breakup contributions are estimated using an energy-dependent abrasion-ablation model of heavy ion fragmentation. The abrasion step involves removal of nucleons by direct knockout in the overlap region of the colliding nuclei. The abrasions are treated on a geometric basis and uniform spherical nuclear density distributions are assumed. Actual experimental nuclear radii obtained from tabulations of electron scattering data are incorporated. Nuclear transparency effects are included by using an energy-dependent, impact-parameter-dependent average transmission factor for the projectile and target nuclei, which accounts for the finite mean free path of nucleons in nuclear matter. The ablation step, as implemented by Bowman, Swiatecki, and Tsang (LBL report no. LBL-2908, July 1973), was treated as a single-nucleon emission for every 10 MeV of excitation energy. Fragmentation contributions from electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) processes, arising from the interacting Coulomb fields, are estimated by using the Weiszacker-Williams theory, extended to include electric dipole and electric quadrupole contributions to one-nucleon removal cross sections. HZEFRG1 consists of a main program, seven function subprograms, and thirteen subroutines. Each is fully commented and begins with a brief description of its

  6. Gastric Perforation by Ingested Rabbit Bone Fragment.

    PubMed

    Gambaracci, Giulio; Mecarini, Eleonora; Franceschini, Maria Silvia; Scialpi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The majority of accidentally ingested foreign bodies is excreted from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract without any complications. Sometimes sharp foreign bodies - like chicken and fish bones - can lead to intestinal perforation and may present insidiously with a wide range of symptoms and, consequently, different diagnoses. We report the case of a 59-year-old woman presenting with fever and a 1-month history of vague abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) showed the presence of a hyperdense linear image close to the gastric antrum surrounded by a fluid collection and free peritoneal air. At laparotomy, a 4-cm rabbit bone fragment covered in inflamed tissue was detected next to a gastric wall perforation. Rabbit bone fragment ingestion, even if rarely reported, should not be underestimated as a possible cause of GI tract perforation.

  7. Fragment screening using X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Davies, Thomas G; Tickle, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    The fragment-based approach is now well established as an important component of modern drug discovery. A key part in establishing its position as a viable technique has been the development of a range of biophysical methodologies with sufficient sensitivity to detect the binding of very weakly binding molecules. X-ray crystallography was one of the first techniques demonstrated to be capable of detecting such weak binding, but historically its potential for screening was under-appreciated and impractical due to its relatively low throughput. In this chapter we discuss the various benefits associated with fragment-screening by X-ray crystallography, and describe the technical developments we have implemented to allow its routine use in drug discovery. We emphasize how this approach has allowed a much greater exploitation of crystallography than has traditionally been the case within the pharmaceutical industry, with the rapid and timely provision of structural information having maximum impact on project direction.

  8. Strange quark matter fragmentation in astrophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulucci, L.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-06-01

    The conjecture of Bodmer-Witten-Terazawa suggesting a form of quark matter (Strange Quark Matter) as the ground state of hadronic interactions has been studied in laboratory and astrophysical contexts by a large number of authors. If strange stars exist, some violent events involving these compact objects, such as mergers and even their formation process, might eject some strange matter into the interstellar medium that could be detected as a trace signal in the cosmic ray flux. To evaluate this possibility, it is necessary to understand how this matter in bulk would fragment in the form of strangelets (small lumps of strange quark matter in which finite effects become important). We calculate the mass distribution outcome using the statistical multifragmentation model and point out several caveats affecting it. In particular, the possibility that strangelets fragmentation will render a tiny fraction of contamination in the cosmic ray flux is discussed.

  9. BARNARD 59: NO EVIDENCE FOR FURTHER FRAGMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Zuniga, C. G.; Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Alves, Joao F.

    2012-03-10

    The dense molecular clump at the center of the Barnard 59 (B59) complex is the only region in the Pipe Nebula that has formed a small, stellar cluster. The previous analysis of a high-resolution near-IR dust extinction map revealed that the nuclear region in B59 is a massive, mostly quiescent clump of 18.9 M{sub Sun }. The clump shows a monolithic profile, possibly indicating that the clump is on the way to collapse, with no evident fragmentation that could lead to another group of star systems. In this paper, we present new analysis that compares the dust extinction map with a new dust emission radio-continuum map of higher spatial resolution. We confirm that the clump does not show any significant evidence for prestellar fragmentation at scales smaller than those probed previously.

  10. Near Earth asteroid orbit perturbation and fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Harris, Alan W.

    1992-01-01

    Collisions by near earth asteroids or the nuclei of comets pose varying levels of threat to man. A relatively small object, approximately 100 meter diameter, which might be found on an impact trajectory with a populated region of the Earth, could potentially be diverted from an Earth impacting trajectory by mass driver rocket systems. For larger bodies, such systems would appear to be beyond current technology. For any size object, nuclear explosions appear to be more efficient, using either the prompt blow-off from neutron radiation, the impulse from ejecta of near-surface explosion for deflection, or as a fragmenting charge. Practical deflections of bodies with diameters of 0.1, 1, and 10 km require interception, years to decades prior to earth encounter, with explosions a few kilotons, megatons, or gigatons, respectively, of equivalent TNT energy to achieve orbital velocity changes or destruction to a level where fragments are dispersed to harmless spatial densities.

  11. Recurrent Sleep Fragmentation Induces Insulin and Neuroprotective Mechanisms in Middle-Aged Flies

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael J.; Perland, Emelie; Eriksson, Mikaela M.; Carlsson, Josef; Erlandsson, Daniel; Laan, Loora; Mahebali, Tabusi; Potter, Ella; Frediksson, Robert; Benedict, Christian; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2016-01-01

    Lack of quality sleep increases central nervous system oxidative stress and impairs removal of neurotoxic soluble metabolites from brain parenchyma. During aging poor sleep quality, caused by sleep fragmentation, increases central nervous system cellular stress. Currently, it is not known how organisms offset age-related cytotoxic metabolite increases in order to safeguard neuronal survival. Furthermore, it is not understood how age and sleep fragmentation interact to affect oxidative stress protection pathways. We demonstrate sleep fragmentation increases systems that protect against oxidative damage and neuroprotective endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperones, as well as neuronal insulin and dopaminergic expression in middle-aged Drosophila males. Interestingly, even after sleep recovery the expression of these genes was still upregulated in middle-aged flies. Finally, sleep fragmentation generates higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in middle-aged flies and after sleep recovery these levels remain significantly higher than in young flies. The fact that neuroprotective pathways remain upregulated in middle-aged flies beyond sleep fragmentation suggests it might represent a strong stressor for the brain during later life. PMID:27531979

  12. Recurrent Sleep Fragmentation Induces Insulin and Neuroprotective Mechanisms in Middle-Aged Flies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael J; Perland, Emelie; Eriksson, Mikaela M; Carlsson, Josef; Erlandsson, Daniel; Laan, Loora; Mahebali, Tabusi; Potter, Ella; Frediksson, Robert; Benedict, Christian; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-01-01

    Lack of quality sleep increases central nervous system oxidative stress and impairs removal of neurotoxic soluble metabolites from brain parenchyma. During aging poor sleep quality, caused by sleep fragmentation, increases central nervous system cellular stress. Currently, it is not known how organisms offset age-related cytotoxic metabolite increases in order to safeguard neuronal survival. Furthermore, it is not understood how age and sleep fragmentation interact to affect oxidative stress protection pathways. We demonstrate sleep fragmentation increases systems that protect against oxidative damage and neuroprotective endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperones, as well as neuronal insulin and dopaminergic expression in middle-aged Drosophila males. Interestingly, even after sleep recovery the expression of these genes was still upregulated in middle-aged flies. Finally, sleep fragmentation generates higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in middle-aged flies and after sleep recovery these levels remain significantly higher than in young flies. The fact that neuroprotective pathways remain upregulated in middle-aged flies beyond sleep fragmentation suggests it might represent a strong stressor for the brain during later life. PMID:27531979

  13. Recurrent Sleep Fragmentation Induces Insulin and Neuroprotective Mechanisms in Middle-Aged Flies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael J; Perland, Emelie; Eriksson, Mikaela M; Carlsson, Josef; Erlandsson, Daniel; Laan, Loora; Mahebali, Tabusi; Potter, Ella; Frediksson, Robert; Benedict, Christian; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-01-01

    Lack of quality sleep increases central nervous system oxidative stress and impairs removal of neurotoxic soluble metabolites from brain parenchyma. During aging poor sleep quality, caused by sleep fragmentation, increases central nervous system cellular stress. Currently, it is not known how organisms offset age-related cytotoxic metabolite increases in order to safeguard neuronal survival. Furthermore, it is not understood how age and sleep fragmentation interact to affect oxidative stress protection pathways. We demonstrate sleep fragmentation increases systems that protect against oxidative damage and neuroprotective endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperones, as well as neuronal insulin and dopaminergic expression in middle-aged Drosophila males. Interestingly, even after sleep recovery the expression of these genes was still upregulated in middle-aged flies. Finally, sleep fragmentation generates higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in middle-aged flies and after sleep recovery these levels remain significantly higher than in young flies. The fact that neuroprotective pathways remain upregulated in middle-aged flies beyond sleep fragmentation suggests it might represent a strong stressor for the brain during later life.

  14. The fragmentation of sup 28 Si

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, H.J.; Engelage, J. ); Guzik, T.G.; Mitchell, J.W.; Pitts, J.J.; Wefel, J.P. ); Isbert, J. Siegen Univ. ); Lindstrom, P.J.; Schimmerling, W. ); Simon, M. (Germany, F.R

    1990-01-01

    The fragmentation of {sup 28}Si in targets of C, CH{sub 2}, Cu and Pb has been investigated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac. Total charge changing cross sections, {sigma}{sub {Delta}z}, for these targets and for H (CH{sub 2}-C subtraction) were measured at 375, 550 and 1050 MeV/nucleon. The results are compared to previous data, to model calculations and to values used in cosmic ray propagation calculations. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  15. A nuclear fragmentation energy deposition model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, D. M.; Wilson, J. W.; Fogarty, T. N.; Buck, W. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    A formalism for target fragment transport is presented with application to energy loss spectra in thin silicon devices. A nuclear data base is recommended that agrees well with the measurements of McNulty et al. using surface barrier detectors. High-energy events observed by McNulty et al., which are not predicted by intranuclear cascade models, are well represented by the present work.

  16. String Fragmentation Model in Space Radiation Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Alfred; Johnson, Eloise (Editor); Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    String fragmentation models such as the Lund Model fit experimental particle production cross sections very well in the high-energy limit. This paper gives an introduction of the massless relativistic string in the Lund Model and shows how it can be modified with a simple assumption to produce formulas for meson production cross sections for space radiation research. The results of the string model are compared with inclusive pion production data from proton-proton collision experiments.

  17. Large ejecta fragments from asteroids. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asphaug, E.

    1994-01-01

    The asteroid 4 Vesta, with its unique basaltic crust, remains a key mystery of planetary evolution. A localized olivine feature suggests excavation of subcrustal material in a crater or impact basin comparable in size to the planetary radius (R(sub vesta) is approximately = 280 km). Furthermore, a 'clan' of small asteroids associated with Vesta (by spectral and orbital similarities) may be ejecta from this impact 151 and direct parents of the basaltic achondrites. To escape, these smaller (about 4-7 km) asteroids had to be ejected at speeds greater than the escape velocity, v(sub esc) is approximately = 350 m/s. This evidence that large fragments were ejected at high speed from Vesta has not been reconciled with the present understanding of impact physics. Analytical spallation models predict that an impactor capable of ejecting these 'chips off Vesta' would be almost the size of Vesta! Such an impact would lead to the catastrophic disruption of both bodies. A simpler analysis is outlined, based on comparison with cratering on Mars, and it is shown that Vesta could survive an impact capable of ejecting kilometer-scale fragments at sufficient speed. To what extent does Vesta survive the formation of such a large crater? This is best addressed using a hydrocode such as SALE 2D with centroidal gravity to predict velocities subsequent to impact. The fragmentation outcome and velocity subsequent to the impact described to demonstrate that Vesta survives without large-scale disassembly or overturning of the crust. Vesta and its clan represent a valuable dataset for testing fragmentation hydrocodes such as SALE 2D and SPH 3D at planetary scales. Resolution required to directly model spallation 'chips' on a body 100 times as large is now marginally possible on modern workstations. These boundaries are important in near-surface ejection processes and in large-scale disruption leading to asteroid families and stripped cores.

  18. Space fragment in studies of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avanesov, G. A.; Ziman, Y. L.

    1982-01-01

    The fragment apparatus, mounted on board the artificial earth satellite Meteor, was created for the operational study of the natural resources of the Earth in the optical range of electromagnetic waves. The orbit of the satellite at an altitude of about 650 km makes it possible to observe the same sectors of the Earth's surface at the same time of day with a periodicity of 15 days.

  19. Nuclear fragmentation studies for microelectronic application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Duc M.; Wilson, John W.; Buck, Warren W.; Fogarty, Thomas N.

    1989-01-01

    A formalism for target fragment transport is presented with application to energy loss spectra in thin silicon devices. Predicted results are compared to experiments with the surface barrier detectors of McNulty et al. The intranuclear cascade nuclear reaction model does not predict the McNulty experimental data for the highest energy events. A semiempirical nuclear cross section gives an adequate explanation of McNulty's experiments. Application of the formalism to specific electronic devices is discussed.

  20. Measurement of the fragmentation of Carbon nuclei used in hadron-therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lellis, G.; Buontempo, S.; Di Capua, F.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Migliozzi, P.; Petukhov, Y.; Pistillo, C.; Russo, A.; Strolin, P.; Tioukov, V.; Durante, M.; Furusawa, Y.; Toshito, T.; Yasuda, N.; Ariga, A.; Naganawa, N.

    2011-03-01

    The increasing use of Carbon nuclei in cancer therapy centres is motivated by their potential advantages as a very precise high LET radiation. The knowledge of the fragmentation of Carbon nuclei when they interact with the human body is important to evaluate the spatial profile of their energy deposition in the tissues, hence the damage to the tissues neighbouring the tumour. We report here a study of the fragmentation with the nuclear emulsion experimental technique. We have designed, built and exposed to a Carbon nuclei beam a chamber made of Lexan plates alternated with nuclear emulsion films. Lexan plates acted as passive material simulating human body tissues while nuclear emulsion films were used as both tracking devices with micrometric accuracy and ionisation detectors. Such a detector allowed the detection of Carbon interactions produced along their path, the identification of the fragments produced and the measurement of their scattering angle. We have measured the Carbon ion survival probability and studied their interactions. We report on the secondary particle multiplicity and the electrical charge distribution. We give results of the scattering angle of final state fragments as well as the range for H and He. Finally we give the total and partial charge-changing cross-sections for Δz=1,2,3,4 which are compared with previous results when available. The present work aims at providing data required as input to Monte Carlo simulations of Carbon ion interactions in the human body and ultimately of their therapeutic effectiveness.

  1. Mitochondrial fragmentation in excitotoxicity requires ROCK activation.

    PubMed

    Martorell-Riera, Alejandro; Segarra-Mondejar, Marc; Reina, Manuel; Martínez-Estrada, Ofelia M; Soriano, Francesc X

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria morphology constantly changes through fission and fusion processes that regulate mitochondrial function, and it therefore plays a prominent role in cellular homeostasis. Cell death progression is associated with mitochondrial fission. Fission is mediated by the mainly cytoplasmic Drp1, which is activated by different post-translational modifications and recruited to mitochondria to perform its function. Our research and other studies have shown that in the early moments of excitotoxic insult Drp1 must be nitrosylated to mediate mitochondrial fragmentation in neurons. Nonetheless, mitochondrial fission is a multistep process in which filamentous actin assembly/disassembly and myosin-mediated mitochondrial constriction play prominent roles. Here we establish that in addition to nitric oxide production, excitotoxicity-induced mitochondrial fragmentation also requires activation of the actomyosin regulator ROCK. Although ROCK1 has been shown to phosphorylate and activate Drp1, experiments using phosphor-mutant forms of Drp1 in primary cortical neurons indicate that in excitotoxic conditions, ROCK does not act directly on Drp1 to mediate fission, but may act on the actomyosin complex. Thus, these data indicate that a wider range of signaling pathways than those that target Drp1 are amenable to be inhibited to prevent mitochondrial fragmentation as therapeutic option. PMID:25789413

  2. Fragment Screening of Human Aquaporin 1.

    PubMed

    To, Janet; Torres, Jaume

    2016-03-25

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane proteins that enable water transport across cellular plasma membranes in response to osmotic gradients. Phenotypic analyses have revealed important physiological roles for AQPs, and the potential for AQP water channel modulators in various disease states has been proposed. For example, AQP1 is overexpressed in tumor microvessels, and this correlates with higher metastatic potential and aggressiveness of the malignancy. Chemical modulators would help in identifying the precise contribution of water channel activity in these disease states. These inhibitors would also be important therapeutically, e.g., in anti-cancer treatment. This perceived importance contrasts with the lack of success of high-throughput screens (HTS) to identify effective and specific inhibitors of aquaporins. In this paper, we have screened a library of 1500 "fragments", i.e., smaller than molecules used in HTS, against human aquaporin (hAQP1) using a thermal shift assay and surface plasmon resonance. Although these fragments may not inhibit their protein target, they bound to and stabilized hAQP1 (sub mM binding affinities (KD), with an temperature of aggregation shift ΔTagg of +4 to +50 °C) in a concentration-dependent fashion. Chemically expanded versions of these fragments should follow the determination of their binding site on the aquaporin surface.

  3. Mitochondrial fragmentation in excitotoxicity requires ROCK activation.

    PubMed

    Martorell-Riera, Alejandro; Segarra-Mondejar, Marc; Reina, Manuel; Martínez-Estrada, Ofelia M; Soriano, Francesc X

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria morphology constantly changes through fission and fusion processes that regulate mitochondrial function, and it therefore plays a prominent role in cellular homeostasis. Cell death progression is associated with mitochondrial fission. Fission is mediated by the mainly cytoplasmic Drp1, which is activated by different post-translational modifications and recruited to mitochondria to perform its function. Our research and other studies have shown that in the early moments of excitotoxic insult Drp1 must be nitrosylated to mediate mitochondrial fragmentation in neurons. Nonetheless, mitochondrial fission is a multistep process in which filamentous actin assembly/disassembly and myosin-mediated mitochondrial constriction play prominent roles. Here we establish that in addition to nitric oxide production, excitotoxicity-induced mitochondrial fragmentation also requires activation of the actomyosin regulator ROCK. Although ROCK1 has been shown to phosphorylate and activate Drp1, experiments using phosphor-mutant forms of Drp1 in primary cortical neurons indicate that in excitotoxic conditions, ROCK does not act directly on Drp1 to mediate fission, but may act on the actomyosin complex. Thus, these data indicate that a wider range of signaling pathways than those that target Drp1 are amenable to be inhibited to prevent mitochondrial fragmentation as therapeutic option.

  4. Fragmentation of hypervelocity aluminum projectiles on fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Martin; Schäfer, Frank; Destefanis, Roberto; Faraud, Moreno; Lambert, Michel

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents work performed for a study investigating the ability of different flexible materials to induce fragmentation of a hypervelocity projectile. Samples were chosen to represent a wide range of industrially available types of flexible materials like ceramic, aramid and carbon fabrics as well as a thin metallic mesh. Impact conditions and areal density were kept constant for all targets. Betacloth and multi-layer insulation (B-MLI) are mounted onto the targets to account for thermal system engineering requirements. All tests were performed using the Space light-gas gun facility (SLGG) of the Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institut, EMI. Projectiles were aluminum spheres with 5 mm diameter impacting at approximately 6.3 km/s. Fragmentation was evaluated using a witness plate behind the target. An aramid and a ceramic fabric lead the ranking of fabrics with the best projectile fragmentation and debris cloud dispersion performance. A comparison with an equal-density rigid aluminum plate is presented. The work presented can be applied to optimize the micrometeoroid and space debris (MM/SD) shielding structure of inflatable modules.

  5. Fibril Fragmentation Enhances Amyloid Cytotoxicity*♦

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Hellewell, Andrew L.; Gosal, Walraj S.; Homans, Steve W.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrils associated with amyloid disease are molecular assemblies of key biological importance, yet how cells respond to the presence of amyloid remains unclear. Cellular responses may not only depend on the chemical composition or molecular properties of the amyloid fibrils, but their physical attributes such as length, width, or surface area may also play important roles. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effect of fragmentation on the structural and biological properties of amyloid fibrils. In addition to the expected relationship between fragmentation and the ability to seed, we show a striking finding that fibril length correlates with the ability to disrupt membranes and to reduce cell viability. Thus, despite otherwise unchanged molecular architecture, shorter fibrillar samples show enhanced cytotoxic potential than their longer counterparts. The results highlight the importance of fibril length in amyloid disease, with fragmentation not only providing a mechanism by which fibril load can be rapidly increased but also creating fibrillar species of different dimensions that can endow new or enhanced biological properties such as amyloid cytotoxicity. PMID:19808677

  6. The Evolution of Grain Size Distribution in Explosive Rock Fragmentation - Sequential Fragmentation Theory Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheu, B.; Fowler, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Fragmentation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many natural and engineering systems. It is the process by which an initially competent medium, solid or liquid, is broken up into a population of constituents. Examples occur in collisions and impacts of asteroids/meteorites, explosion driven fragmentation of munitions on a battlefield, as well as of magma in a volcanic conduit causing explosive volcanic eruptions and break-up of liquid drops. Besides the mechanism of fragmentation the resulting frequency-size distribution of the generated constituents is of central interest. Initially their distributions were fitted empirically using lognormal, Rosin-Rammler and Weibull distributions (e.g. Brown & Wohletz 1995). The sequential fragmentation theory (Brown 1989, Wohletz at al. 1989, Wohletz & Brown 1995) and the application of fractal theory to fragmentation products (Turcotte 1986, Perfect 1997, Perugini & Kueppers 2012) attempt to overcome this shortcoming by providing a more physical basis for the applied distribution. Both rely on an at least partially scale-invariant and thus self-similar random fragmentation process. Here we provide a stochastic model for the evolution of grain size distribution during the explosion process. Our model is based on laboratory experiments in which volcanic rock samples explode naturally when rapidly depressurized from initial pressures of several MPa to ambient conditions. The physics governing this fragmentation process has been successfully modelled and the observed fragmentation pattern could be numerically reproduced (Fowler et al. 2010). The fragmentation of these natural rocks leads to grain size distributions which vary depending on the experimental starting conditions. Our model provides a theoretical description of these different grain size distributions. Our model combines a sequential model of the type outlined by Turcotte (1986), but generalized to cater for the explosive process appropriate here, in particular by

  7. Different modes of fragmenting gallstones in extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, R; Schweinsberg, V; Klengel, H; Niedmann, P D; Fölsch, U R

    1993-03-01

    Forty radiolucent gallbladder stones from eight patients were fragmented in vitro by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, using the electromagnetic lithotripter Lithostar Plus (Siemens) at five different energy levels. The stones were characterized by size, computed tomography (CT) density, and cholesterol content. The largest residual fragment was measured after every 20 to 100 shock waves. As expected, fewer shock waves were required to achieve fragmentation at higher energy levels. When stones of the same size were compared, there were remarkable differences in the number of shock waves required for fragmentation. These differences must originate in other properties of the stones than size and number. Two different modes of fragmentation were observed: in one group of stones small, flat fragments were chipped off at the beginning of fragmentation ('chipping mode'). These stones initially lost about 25% of their weight as small fragments (< 1 mm) before breaking centrally into some large fragments. In the other group stones initially lost only about 10% of their weight as small fragments (< 1 mm) at the beginning of fragmentation and early broke centrally into some large fragments ('breaking mode'). Stones showing the chipping mode were almost pure cholesterol stones (> 97%) and required significantly less shock waves than stones of the same size showing the breaking mode (cholesterol content, 64-94%). This mode of fragmentation could not be predicted by CT density.

  8. Function of streptokinase fragments in plasminogen activation.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, G Y; Chang, B I; Chen, S M; Wu, D H; Wu, H L

    1994-01-01

    Several peptide fragments of streptokinase (SK) were prepared by incubating SK with immobilized human plasmin (hPlm) and purified by h.p.l.c. with a reverse-phase phenyl column. The N-terminal sequences, amino acid compositions and molecular masses of these peptide fragments were determined. The SK peptide fragment of 36 kDa consisting of Ser60-Lys387 (SK-p), was the only peptide fragment that could be tightly bound to immobilized hPlm. Another three large SK peptide fragments, SK-m, SK-n and SK-o, with molecular masses of 7 kDa, 18 kDa and 30 kDa, and consisting of Ile1-Lys59, Glu148-Lys333, Ser60-Lys333 respectively, were also obtained from the supernatant of the reaction mixture. The purified SK-p had high affinity with hPlm and could activate human plasminogen (hPlg) with a kPlg one-sixth that of the native SK. SK-o had low affinity with hPlm and could also activate hPlg, although the catalytic constant was less than 1% of the native SK. SK-n, as well as SK-m, which is the N-terminal 59 amino acid peptide of the native SK, had no activator activity. However, SK-m could enhance the activator activity of both SK-o and SK-p and increase their second-order rate constants by two- and six-fold respectively. It was concluded from these studies that (1) SK-o, the Ser60-Lys333 peptide of SK, was essential for minimal SK activator activity, (2) the C-terminal peptide of SK-p, Ala334-Lys387, was essential for high affinity with hPlm, and (3) the N-terminal 59-amino-acid peptide was important in maintaining the proper conformation of SK to have its full activator activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7998939

  9. Time reversal odd fragmentation functions in semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mulders, P.J.; Levelt, J.

    1994-04-01

    In semi-inclusive scattering of polarized leptons from unpolarized hadrons, one can measure a time reversal odd structure function. It shows up as a sin({phi}) asymmetry of the produced hadrons. This asymmetry can be expressed as the product of a twist-three {open_quotes}hadron {r_arrow} quark{close_quotes} profile function and a time reversal odd twist-two {open_quotes}quark {r_arrow} hadron{close_quotes} fragmentation function. This fragmentation function can only be measured for nonzero transverse momenta of the produced hadron. Its appearance is a consequence of final state interactions between the produced hadron and the rest of the final state.

  10. [The fragmentation of representational space in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Plagnol, A; Oïta, M; Montreuil, M; Granger, B; Lubart, T

    2003-01-01

    Existent neurocognitive models of schizophrenia converge towards a core of impairments involving working memory, context processing, action planning, controlled and intentional processing. However, the emergence of this core remains itself difficult to explain and more specific hypotheses do not explain the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. To overcome these limits, we propose a new paradigm based on representational theory from cognitive science. Some recent developments of this theory enable us to describe a subjective universe as a representational space which is displayed from memory. We outline a conceptual framework to construct such a representational space from analogical -representations that can be activated in working memory and are connected to a network of symbolic structures. These connections are notably made through an analytic process of the analogical fragments, which involves the attentional focus. This framework allows us to define rigorously some defense processes in response to traumatic tensions that are expressed on the representational space. The fragmentation of representational space is a consequence of a defensive denial based on an impairment of the analytic process. The fragmentation forms some parasitic areas in memory which are excluded from the main part of the representational space and disturb information processing. The key clinical concepts of paranoid syndromes can be defined in this conceptual framework: mental automatism, delusional intuition, acute destructuration, psychotic dissociation, and autistic withdrawal. We show that these syndromes imply each other, which in return increases the fragmentation of the representational space. Some new concepts emerge naturally in this framework, such as the concept of "suture" which is defined as a link between a parasitic area and the main representational space. Schizophrenia appears as a borderline case of fragmentation of the representational space. This conceptual framework is

  11. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Robert C.; Kamon, Teruki; Toback, David; Safonov, Alexei; Dutta, Bhaskar; Dimitri, Nanopoulos; Pope, Christopher; White, James

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  12. Apollo 14 Lunar glass fragment known as Genesis bean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A tiny green glass fragment taken from an Apollo 14 core tube sampling. Because of its scientific significance and shape, the fragment has been nicknamed the 'Genesis bean'. The main constituents are iron and magnesium.

  13. LOCALIZING NATIONAL FRAGMENTATION STATISTICS WITH FOREST TYPE MAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fragmmentation of forest types is an indicator of biodiversity in the Montreal Process, but the available national data permit assessment of only overall forestland fragmentation, not forest type fragmentation. Here we illustrate how to localize national statistics from the 2003...

  14. Fragmentation Point Detection of JPEG Images at DHT Using Validator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Kamaruddin Malik; Deris, Mustafa Mat

    File carving is an important, practical technique for data recovery in digital forensics investigation and is particularly useful when filesystem metadata is unavailable or damaged. The research on reassembly of JPEG files with RST markers, fragmented within the scan area have been done before. However, fragmentation within Define Huffman Table (DHT) segment is yet to be resolved. This paper analyzes the fragmentation within the DHT area and list out all the fragmentation possibilities. Two main contributions are made in this paper. Firstly, three fragmentation points within DHT area are listed. Secondly, few novel validators are proposed to detect these fragmentations. The result obtained from tests done on manually fragmented JPEG files, showed that all three fragmentation points within DHT are successfully detected using validators.

  15. FRAGMENTATION AND SPREADING OF A METEOR-LIKE OBJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chul; Brown, Jeffrey D.

    2012-12-01

    The phenomenon of fragmentation and spreading of a high-speed flying object resembling a meteorite is studied experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, a model made of graphite is launched in a ballistic range and is made to fragment and spread. The flow field produced by the cloud of the fragments is observed optically. The observed deceleration and spreading behavior is numerically reconstructed using computational-fluid-dynamic calculations, applying an improved meteoroid fragmentation theory. The existing meteoroid fragmentation theory is improved by introducing the hypothesis that the incubation process of the pressurized fluid permeating through the fragment precedes the splitting process. The incubation time is determined by the ratio of permeability of the fragment to the fluid's viscosity and is much longer than the time for splitting given by the existing theory. Agreement is obtained between the observed and calculated behavior of the fragment cloud by appropriately choosing this ratio.

  16. Alternative downstream processes for production of antibodies and antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ejima, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    Protein-A or Protein-L affinity chromatography and virus inactivation are key processes for the manufacturing of therapeutic antibodies and antibody fragments. These two processes often involve exposure of therapeutic proteins to denaturing low pH conditions. Antibodies have been shown to undergo conformational changes at low pH, which can lead to irreversible damages on the final product. Here, we review alternative downstream approaches that can reduce the degree of low pH exposure and consequently damaged product. We and others have been developing technologies that minimize or eliminate such low pH processes. We here cover facilitated elution of antibodies using arginine in Protein-A and Protein-G affinity chromatography, a more positively charged amidated Protein-A, two Protein-A mimetics (MEP and Mabsorbent), mixed-mode and steric exclusion chromatography, and finally enhanced virus inactivation by solvents containing arginine. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering of antibody. PMID:24859179

  17. Alzheimer's disease: identification and development of β-secretase (BACE-1) binding fragments and inhibitors by dynamic ligation screening (DLS).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bachiller, María Isabel; Horatscheck, André; Lisurek, Michael; Rademann, Jörg

    2013-07-01

    The application of dynamic ligation screening (DLS), a methodology for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD), to the aspartic protease β-secretase (BACE-1) is reported. For this purpose, three new fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) substrates were designed and synthesized. Their kinetic parameters (Vmax , KM , and kcat ) were determined and compared with a commercial substrate. Secondly, a peptide aldehyde was designed as a chemically reactive inhibitor (CRI) based on the Swedish mutation substrate sequence. Incubation of this CRI with the protease, a FRET substrate, and one amine per well taken from an amine library, which was assembled by a maximum common substructure (MCS) approach, revealed the fragment 3-(3-aminophenyl)-2H-chromen-2-one (1) to be a competitive BACE-1 inhibitor that enhanced the activity of the CRI. Irreversibly formed fragment combination products of 1 with the initial peptide sequence were active and confirmed the targeting of the active site through the ethane-1,2-diamine isostere. Finally, structure-assisted combination of fragment 1 with secondary fragments that target the S1 site in hit optimization yielded novel, entirely fragment-based BACE-1 inhibitors with up to 30-fold improved binding affinity. Interactions with the protein were explained by molecular modeling studies, which indicate that the new fragment combinations interact with the catalytic aspartic acid dyad, as well as with the adjacent binding sites required for potency. PMID:23757181

  18. Quantum-mechanical calculation of multiple electron removal and fragmentation cross sections in He+-H2O collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Kirchner, Tom; Horbatsch, Marko; Lüdde, Hans Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Electron removal and fragmentation cross sections are calculated for He+(1s)-H2O collisions at impact energies from 20 keV/amu to several MeV/amu by using the nonperturbative basis generator method for ion-molecule collisions. Previous work for proton impact is extended to deal with the dressed projectile in the present case. The effects from the active projectile electron are taken into account by applying the same single-particle Hamiltonian to all electrons and by using the inclusive-probability formalism in the final-state analysis. Fragment-ion yields are evaluated from the single-, double-, and triple-electron removal cross sections, and the results are compared with the available experimental data. Very reasonable agreement is obtained for fragmentation caused by direct ionization, while some discrepancies remain in the capture and loss data.

  19. Total synthesis of microcin B17 via a fragment condensation approach.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robert E; Jolliffe, Katrina A; Payne, Richard J

    2011-02-18

    The total synthesis of the 43 amino acid antibacterial peptide Microcin B17 (MccB17) is described. The natural product was synthesized via a convergent approach from a heterocycle-derived peptide and peptide thioester fragments prepared via Fmoc-strategy solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). Final assembly was achieved in an efficient manner using two Ag(I)-assisted peptide ligation reactions to afford MccB17 in excellent overall yield.

  20. Electron impact fragmentation of adenine: partial ionization cross sections for positive fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Burgt, Peter J. M.; Finnegan, Sinead; Eden, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    Using computer-controlled data acquisition we have measured mass spectra of positive ions for electron impact on adenine, with electron energies up to 100 eV. Ion yield curves for 50 ions have been obtained and normalized by comparing their sum to the average of calculated total ionization cross sections. Appearance energies have been determined for 37 ions; for 20 ions for the first time. All appearance energies are consistent with the fragmentation pathways identified in the literature. Second onset energies have been determined for 12 fragment ions (for 11 ions for the first time), indicating the occurrence of more than one fragmentation process e.g. for 39 u (C2HN+) and 70 u (C2H4N3+). Matching ion yield shapes (118-120 u, 107-108 u, 91-92 u, and 54-56 u) provide new evidence supporting closely related fragmentation pathways and are attributed to hydrogen rearrangement immediately preceding the fragmentation. We present the first measurement of the ion yield curve of the doubly charged parent ion (67.5 u), with an appearance energy of 23.5 ± 1.0 eV. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene Surdutovich.

  1. Systematic Fragmentation Method and the Effective Fragment Potential: An Efficient Method for Capturing Molecular Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Jonathan M.; Roskop, Luke B.; Pruitt, Spencer R.; Collins, Michael A.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2009-08-01

    The systematic fragmentation method fragments a large molecular system into smaller pieces, in such a way as to greatly reduce the computational cost while retaining nearly the accuracy of the parent ab initio electronic structure method. In order to attain the desired (sub-kcal/mol) accuracy, one must properly account for the nonbonded interactions between the separated fragments. Since, for a large molecular species, there can be a great many fragments and therefore a great many nonbonded interactions, computations of the nonbonded interactions can be very time-consuming. The present work explores the efficacy of employing the effective fragment potential (EFP) method to obtain the nonbonded interactions since the EFP method has been shown previously to capture nonbonded interactions with an accuracy that is often comparable to that of second-order perturbation theory. It is demonstrated that for nonbonded interactions that are not high on the repulsive wall (generally >2.7 Å), the EFP method appears to be a viable approach for evaluating the nonbonded interactions. The efficacy of the EFP method for this purpose is illustrated by comparing the method to ab initio methods for small water clusters, the ZOVGAS molecule, retinal, and the α-helix. Using SFM with EFP for nonbonded interactions yields an error of 0.2 kcal/mol for the retinal cis-trans isomerization and a mean error of 1.0 kcal/mol for the isomerization energies of five small (120-170 atoms) α-helices.

  2. Filament fragmentation in high-mass star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuther, H.; Ragan, S. E.; Johnston, K.; Henning, Th.; Hacar, A.; Kainulainen, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    be due to no significant gas flows along the filamentary axis, but it may also be partly caused by a low inclination angle of the filament with respect to the plane of the sky minimizing such a signature. Conclusions: The IRDC 18223 3.2 mm continuum data are consistent with thermal fragmentation of a gravitationally bound and compressible gas cylinder. However, the high mass-to-length ratio requires additional support - most likely turbulence and/or magnetic fields - against collapse. The N2H+ spectral line data indicate a kinematic origin of the filament, but we cannot conclusively differentiate whether it has formed out of (pre-existing) velocity-coherent subfilaments, whether magnetized converging gas flows, a larger-scale collapsing cloud, or even whether rotation played a significant role during filament formation. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).Final reduced data cubes (FITS) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A67

  3. Fragmentation fractions of and quarks into charmed hadrons at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladilin, L.

    2015-01-01

    The fragmentation fractions of and quarks into the weakly decaying charmed hadrons , , and , and into the charmed vector meson have been derived from the LEP measurements and averaged. The quark fragmentation fractions represent probabilities to hadronise as a given charmed hadron, while the quark fragmentation fractions are defined as sums of probabilities to produce a particular charmed hadron or its antiparticle.

  4. Characterization of chromosome fragmentation in two protozoans and identification of a candidate fragmentation sequence in Euplotes crassus.

    PubMed

    Baird, S E; Klobutcher, L A

    1989-05-01

    Following the sexual cycle, hypotrichous ciliated protozoans fragment a set of their micronuclear chromosomes to generate the thousands of short, linear DNA molecules present in the transcriptionally active macronucleus. We have used a hybrid selection procedure to examine macronuclear DNA molecules for subtelomeric length heterogeneity to determine whether chromosome fragmentation occurs at unique or multiple sites. The results suggest that multiple, but closely spaced, chromosome fragmentation sites are used by Oxytricha nova. In contrast, Euplotes crassus uses unique chromosome fragmentation sites in a reproducible manner to generate the ends of macronuclear DNA molecules. Additional studies compared DNA sequences in the vicinity of chromosome fragmentation sites in an attempt to define cis-acting sequences that direct the fragmentation process. A conserved sequence was found near chromosome fragmentation sites in E. crassus. The location of the conserved sequence suggests that chromosome fragmentation involves staggered cuts of the micronuclear DNA molecules.

  5. Negative Ion CID Fragmentation of O-linked Oligosaccharide Aldoses—Charge Induced and Charge Remote Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doohan, Roisin A.; Hayes, Catherine A.; Harhen, Brendan; Karlsson, Niclas Göran

    2011-06-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation was compared between reducing and reduced sulfated, sialylated, and neutral O-linked oligosaccharides. It was found that fragmentation of the [M - H]- ions of aldoses with acidic residues gave unique Z-fragmentation of the reducing end GalNAc containing the acidic C-6 branch, where the entire C-3 branch was lost. This fragmentation pathway, which is not seen in the alditols, showed that the process involved charge remote fragmentation catalyzed by a reducing end acidic anomeric proton. With structures containing sialic acid on both the C-3 and C-6 branch, the [M - H]- ions were dominated by the loss of sialic acid. This fragmentation pathway was also pronounced in the [M - 2H]2- ions revealing both the C-6 Z-fragment plus its complementary C-3 C-fragment in addition to glycosidic and cross ring fragmentation. This generation of the Z/C-fragment pairs from GalNAc showed that the charges were not participating in their generation. Fragmentation of neutral aldoses showed pronounced Z-fragmentation believed to be generated by proton migration from the C-6 branch to the negatively charged GalNAc residue followed by charge remote fragmentation similar to the acidic oligosaccharides. In addition, A-type fragments generated by charge induced fragmentation of neutral oligosaccharides were observed when the charge migrated from C-1 of the GalNAc to the GlcNAc residue followed by rearrangement to accommodate the 0,2A-fragmentation. LC-MS also showed that O-linked aldoses existed as interchangeable α/β pyranose anomers, in addition to a third isomer (25% of the total free aldose) believed to be the furanose form.

  6. Unimolecular thermal fragmentation of ortho-benzyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Maccarone, Alan T.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Kato, Shuji; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Ellison, G. Barney; Ruscic, Branko; Simmonett, Andrew C.; Allen, Wesley D.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    2007-01-01

    The ortho-benzyne diradical, o-C6H4 has been produced with a supersonic nozzle and its subsequent thermal decomposition has been studied. As the temperature of the nozzle is increased, the benzyne molecule fragments: o-C6H4+Δ → products. The thermal dissociation products were identified by three experimental methods: (i) time-of-flight photoionization mass spectrometry, (ii) matrix-isolation Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, and (iii) chemical ionization mass spectrometry. At the threshold dissociation temperature, o-benzyne cleanly decomposes into acetylene and diacetylene via an apparent retro-Diels-Alder process: o-C6H4+Δ →HCCH+HCC-CCH. The experimental ΔrxnH298(o-C6H4→HCCH+HCC-CCH) is found to be 57±3kcalmol-1. Further experiments with the substituted benzyne, 3,6-(CH3)2-o-C6H2, are consistent with a retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation. But at higher nozzle temperatures, the cracking pattern becomes more complicated. To interpret these experiments, the retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation of o-benzyne has been investigated by rigorous ab initio electronic structure computations. These calculations used basis sets as large as [C(7s6p5d4f3g2h1i)/H(6s5p4d3f2g1h)] (cc-pV6Z) and electron correlation treatments as extensive as full coupled cluster through triple excitations (CCSDT), in cases with a perturbative term for connected quadruples [CCSDT(Q)]. Focal point extrapolations of the computational data yield a 0K barrier for the concerted, C2v-symmetric decomposition of o-benzyne, Eb(o-C6H4→HCCH+HCC-CCH)=88.0±0.5kcalmol-1. A barrier of this magnitude is consistent with the experimental results. A careful assessment of the thermochemistry for the high temperature fragmentation of benzene is presented: C6H6→H+[C6H5]→H+[o-C6H4]→HCCH+HCC-CCH. Benzyne may be an important intermediate in the thermal decomposition of many alkylbenzenes (arenes). High engine temperatures above 1500K may crack these

  7. Unimolecular thermal fragmentation of ortho-benzyne.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Maccarone, Alan T; Nimlos, Mark R; Kato, Shuji; Bierbaum, Veronica M; Ellison, G Barney; Ruscic, Branko; Simmonett, Andrew C; Allen, Wesley D; Schaefer, Henry F

    2007-01-28

    The ortho-benzyne diradical, o-C(6)H(4) has been produced with a supersonic nozzle and its subsequent thermal decomposition has been studied. As the temperature of the nozzle is increased, the benzyne molecule fragments: o-C(6)H(4)+Delta--> products. The thermal dissociation products were identified by three experimental methods: (i) time-of-flight photoionization mass spectrometry, (ii) matrix-isolation Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, and (iii) chemical ionization mass spectrometry. At the threshold dissociation temperature, o-benzyne cleanly decomposes into acetylene and diacetylene via an apparent retro-Diels-Alder process: o-C(6)H(4)+Delta-->HC triple bond CH+HC triple bond C-C triple bond CH. The experimental Delta(rxn)H(298)(o-C(6)H(4)-->HC triple bond CH+HC triple bond C-C triple bond CH) is found to be 57+/-3 kcal mol(-1). Further experiments with the substituted benzyne, 3,6-(CH(3))(2)-o-C(6)H(2), are consistent with a retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation. But at higher nozzle temperatures, the cracking pattern becomes more complicated. To interpret these experiments, the retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation of o-benzyne has been investigated by rigorous ab initio electronic structure computations. These calculations used basis sets as large as [C(7s6p5d4f3g2h1i)H(6s5p4d3f2g1h)] (cc-pV6Z) and electron correlation treatments as extensive as full coupled cluster through triple excitations (CCSDT), in cases with a perturbative term for connected quadruples [CCSDT(Q)]. Focal point extrapolations of the computational data yield a 0 K barrier for the concerted, C(2v)-symmetric decomposition of o-benzyne, E(b)(o-C(6)H(4)-->HC triple bond CH+HC triple bond C-C triple bond CH)=88.0+/-0.5 kcal mol(-1). A barrier of this magnitude is consistent with the experimental results. A careful assessment of the thermochemistry for the high temperature fragmentation of benzene is presented: C(6)H(6)-->H+[C(6)H(5)]-->H+[o-C(6)H(4)]-->HC triple bond CH+HC triple bond C

  8. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc: Antibody Fragmentation for Molecular Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Victoria; García, María Fernanda; Alonso-Martínez, Luis Michel; Camachoc, Ximena; Goicochea, Enzo; Fernández, Marcelo; Castillo, Abmel Xiques; Díaz-Miqueli, Arlhee; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Montaña, René Leyva; Alonso, Omar; Gambini, Juan Pablo; Cabral, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Finally, fast blood clearance nimotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognise, with high specific affinity, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) which play an important role in the growth process associated with many solid tumors. In this work, the whole antibody was digested with papain in order to generate a Fab fragment, derivatized with NHS-HYNIC-Tfa and radiolabel with technetium-99m (99mTc) as a potential agent of molecular imaging of cancer. Both, whole and fragment radiolabels were in-vivo and in-vitro characterized. Radiolabeling conditions with Tricine as coligand and quality controls were assessed to confirm the integrity of the labeled fragment. Biodistribution and imaging studies in normal and spontaneous adenocarcinoma mice were performed at different times to determine the in-vivo characteristics of the radiolabel fragment. Tumor localization was visualized by conventional gamma camera imaging studies, and the results were compared with the whole antibody. Also, an immunoreactivity assay was carried out for both. The results showed clearly the integrity of the nimotuzumab fragment and the affinity by the receptor was verified. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC was obtained with high purity and a simple strategy of radiolabeling was performed. Finally, a fast blood clearance was observed in the biodistribution studies increasing the tumor uptake of Fab(nimotuzumab)- HYNIC-99mTc over time, with tumor/muscle ratios of 3.81 ± 0.50, 5.16 ± 1.97 and 6.32 ± 1.98 at 1 h, 4 h and 24 h post injection. Urinary excretion resulted in 32.89 ± 3.91 %ID eliminated at 24 h. Scintigraphy images showed uptake in the tumor and the activity in non-target organs was consistent with the biodistribution data at the same time points. Hence, these preliminary results showed important further characteristic of Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc as a molecular imaging agent of cancer. PMID:26961312

  9. Habitat fragmentation threatens wild populations of Carica papaya (Caricaceae) in a lowland rainforest.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Pesqueira, Mariana; Suárez-Montes, Pilar; Castillo, Guillermo; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2014-07-11

    • Premise of the study: Wild populations of domesticated species constitute a genetic reservoir and are fundamental to the evolutionary potential of species. Wild papaya (Carica papaya) is a rare, short-lived, gap-colonizing, dioecious tree that persists in the forest by continuous dispersal. Theoretically, these life-history characteristics render wild papaya highly susceptible to habitat fragmentation, with anticipated negative effects on its gene pool. Further, species dioecy may cause founder effects to generate local biases in sex ratio, decreasing effective population size.• Methods: We contrasted the genetic diversity and structure of C. papaya between wild populations from rainforest fragments and continuous forest at Los Tuxtlas, Mexico. We evaluated recent migration rates among populations as well as landscape resistance to gene flow. Finally, we calculated the sex ratio of the populations in both habitats.• Key results: Populations of wild papaya in rainforest fragments showed lower genetic diversity and higher population differentiation than populations in continuous rainforest. Estimates of recent migration rates showed a higher percentage of migrants moving from the continuous forest to the forest fragments than in the opposite direction. Agricultural land and cattle pasture were found to be the most resistant matrices to gene flow. Finally, biased sex ratios were seen to affect the effective population size in both habitats.• Conclusions: The mating system, rarity, and short life cycle of C. papaya are exacerbating the effects of rainforest fragmentation on its genetic diversity, threatening the persistence of its natural populations in the proposed place of origin as well as its genetic reservoir.

  10. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc: Antibody Fragmentation for Molecular Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Victoria; García, María Fernanda; Alonso-Martínez, Luis Michel; Camachoc, Ximena; Goicochea, Enzo; Fernández, Marcelo; Castillo, Abmel Xiques; Díaz-Miqueli, Arlhee; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando; Montaña, René Leyva; Alonso, Omar; Gambini, Juan Pablo; Cabral, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Finally, fast blood clearance nimotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognise, with high specific affinity, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) which play an important role in the growth process associated with many solid tumors. In this work, the whole antibody was digested with papain in order to generate a Fab fragment, derivatized with NHS-HYNIC-Tfa and radiolabel with technetium-99m (99mTc) as a potential agent of molecular imaging of cancer. Both, whole and fragment radiolabels were in-vivo and in-vitro characterized. Radiolabeling conditions with Tricine as coligand and quality controls were assessed to confirm the integrity of the labeled fragment. Biodistribution and imaging studies in normal and spontaneous adenocarcinoma mice were performed at different times to determine the in-vivo characteristics of the radiolabel fragment. Tumor localization was visualized by conventional gamma camera imaging studies, and the results were compared with the whole antibody. Also, an immunoreactivity assay was carried out for both. The results showed clearly the integrity of the nimotuzumab fragment and the affinity by the receptor was verified. Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC was obtained with high purity and a simple strategy of radiolabeling was performed. Finally, a fast blood clearance was observed in the biodistribution studies increasing the tumor uptake of Fab(nimotuzumab)- HYNIC-99mTc over time, with tumor/muscle ratios of 3.81 ± 0.50, 5.16 ± 1.97 and 6.32 ± 1.98 at 1 h, 4 h and 24 h post injection. Urinary excretion resulted in 32.89 ± 3.91 %ID eliminated at 24 h. Scintigraphy images showed uptake in the tumor and the activity in non-target organs was consistent with the biodistribution data at the same time points. Hence, these preliminary results showed important further characteristic of Fab(nimotuzumab)-HYNIC-99mTc as a molecular imaging agent of cancer.

  11. Efficient exploration of chemical space by fragment-based screening.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard J; Mortenson, Paul N; Murray, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    Screening methods seek to sample a vast chemical space in order to identify starting points for further chemical optimisation. Fragment based drug discovery exploits the superior sampling of chemical space that can be achieved when the molecular weight is restricted. Here we show that commercially available fragment space is still relatively poorly sampled and argue for highly sensitive screening methods to allow the detection of smaller fragments. We analyse the properties of our fragment library versus the properties of X-ray hits derived from the library. We particularly consider properties related to the degree of planarity of the fragments.

  12. High Explosive Deonation Threshold Sensitivity Due to Multiple Fragment Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Georgevich, V; Pincosy, P; Chase, J

    2004-01-07

    Fragments, bullets or projectiles can initiate a detonation in a high explosive (HE). For this to happen certain critical conditions need to be exceeded. For a given explosive, these critical conditions are the projectile velocity, the projectile size and shape, and the projectile material properties. A lot of work has been done in the area of metal shaped charge jets and individual fragments impacting the HE. One major gap in understanding initiation phenomena is the effect of multiple fragment impact. This study shows that multiple fragments can lower the fragment size and the kinetic energy thresholds.

  13. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Fred C.

    2003-01-15

    species of flagellates, Spumella sp. and Bodo sp. (identifications are tentative) were isolated from South Oyster sediments by repetitive serial dilution/extinction method. Protistan cells were cultured with Cereal leaf Prescott medium and pelleted by centrifugation. Protistan DNAs were extracted with a DNA extraction kit (Sigma Co.) and the sequencing of their SSrDNA is underway. Finally, to follow up on our collaboration of Dr. Bill Johnson (Univ. of Utah), one of the co-PIs under the same NABIR umbrella, we are pleased to report we have successfully tested antibody-ferrographic capture of protists (See previous year's report for more background). Polyclonal FITC-conjugated antibody specific for a flagellate, Spumella sp., was produced by Rockland Inc., and we now are able to enumerate that species using ferrographic capture. There are, however, some issues of non-specific staining that remain to be resolved.

  14. Native and exotic plants of fragments of sagebrush steppe produced by geomorphic processes versus land use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntly, N.; Bangert, R.; Hanser, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and invasion by exotic species are regarded as major threats to the biodiversity of many ecosystems. We surveyed the plant communities of two types of remnant sagebrush-steppe fragments from nearby areas on the Snake River Plain of southeastern Idaho, USA. One type resulted from land use (conversion to dryland agriculture; hereafter AG Islands) and the other from geomorphic processes (Holocene volcanism; hereafter kipukas). We assessed two predictions for the variation in native plant species richness of these fragments, using structural equation models (SEM). First, we predicted that the species richness of native plants would follow the MacArthur-Wilson (M-W) hypothesis of island biogeography, as often is expected for the communities of habitat fragments. Second, we predicted a negative relationship between native and exotic plants, as would be expected if exotic plants are decreasing the diversity of native plants. Finally, we assessed whether exotic species were more strongly associated with the fragments embedded in the agricultural landscape, as would be expected if agriculture had facilitated the introduction and naturalization of non-native species, and whether the communities of the two types of fragments were distinct. Species richness of native plants was not strongly correlated with M-W characteristics for either the AG Islands or the **kipukas. The AG Islands had more species and higher cover of exotics than the kipukas, and exotic plants were good predictors of native plant species richness. Our results support the hypothesis that proximity to agriculture can increase the diversity and abundance of exotic plants in native habitat. In combination with other information, the results also suggest that agriculture and exotic species have caused loss of native diversity and reorganization of the sagebrush-steppe plant community. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  15. DNA fragment sizing and sorting by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.; Hammond, M.L.; Keller, R.A.; Marrone, B.L.; Martin, J.C.

    1992-12-31

    A method is provided for obtaining DNA fingerprints using high speed detection systems, such as flow cytometry to determine unique characteristics of DNA pieces from a selected sample. In one characterization the DNA piece is fragmented at preselected sites to produce a plurality of DNA fragments. The DNA piece or the resulting DNA fragments are treated with a dye effective to stain stoichiometrically the DNA fragments. The fluorescence from the dye in the stained fragments is then examined to generate an output functionally related to the number of nucleotides in each one of the DNA fragments. In one embodiment, the intensity of the fluorescence emissions from each fragment is directly proportional to the fragment length. Additional dyes can be bound to the DNA piece and DNA fragments to provide information additional to length information. Oligonucleotide specific dyes and/or hybridization probes can be bound to the DNA fragments to provide information on oligonucleotide distribution or probe hybridization to DNA fragments of different sizes.

  16. SCEDS: protein fragments for molecular replacement in Phaser

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Airlie J.; Nicholls, Robert A.; Schneider, Thomas R.

    2013-11-01

    Protein fragments suitable for use in molecular replacement can be generated by normal-mode perturbation, analysis of the difference distance matrix of the original versus normal-mode perturbed structures, and SCEDS, a score that measures the sphericity, continuity, equality and density of the resulting fragments. A method is described for generating protein fragments suitable for use as molecular-replacement (MR) template models. The template model for a protein suspected to undergo a conformational change is perturbed along combinations of low-frequency normal modes of the elastic network model. The unperturbed structure is then compared with each perturbed structure in turn and the structurally invariant regions are identified by analysing the difference distance matrix. These fragments are scored with SCEDS, which is a combined measure of the sphericity of the fragments, the continuity of the fragments with respect to the polypeptide chain, the equality in number of atoms in the fragments and the density of C{sup α} atoms in the triaxial ellipsoid of the fragment extents. The fragment divisions with the highest SCEDS are then used as separate template models for MR. Test cases show that where the protein contains fragments that undergo a change in juxtaposition between template model and target, SCEDS can identify fragments that lead to a lower R factor after ten cycles of all-atom refinement with REFMAC5 than the original template structure. The method has been implemented in the software Phaser.

  17. Fission fragment rockets: A potential breakthrough

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.F.; Dickson, P.W.; Schnitzler, B.G.

    1988-01-01

    A new reactor concept which has the potential of enabling extremely energetic and ambitious space propulsion missions is described. Fission fragments are directly utilized as the propellant by guiding them out of a very low density core using magnetic fields. The very high fission fragment exhaust velocities yield specific impulses of approximately a million seconds while maintaining respectable thrust levels. Specific impulses of this magnitude allow acceleration of significant payload masses to several percent of the velocity of light and enable a variety of interesting missions, e.g., payloads to the nearest star, Alpha Centauri, in about a hundred years for very rapid solar system transport. The parameters reported in this paper are based on a very preliminary analysis. Considerable trade-off studies will be required to find the optimum system. We hope the optimum system proves to be as attractive as our preliminary analysis indicates, although we must admit that our limited effort is insufficient to guarantee any specific level of performance.

  18. On fragmentation of meteoroids in interplanetary space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porubčan, V.; Tóth, J.; Yano, H.

    2002-10-01

    A possible fragmentation of meteoroids in interplanetary space inferred from grouping of particles in meteor streams is discussed. There is a conviction maintained by many observers that meteors within the streams are observed to be clustered in pairs or larger groups more frequently than one could expect from random distribution. The rate of dispersive effects indicates that the lifetime of any such a group of meteoroids is very limited. Therefore, if real, the pairs or groups must be due to recent fragmentation of larger meteoroids. Analyses based on visual observations of meteor streams lead to contradictory results. More conclusive are analyses based on radio measurements, which present a negative result concerning the permanent meteor showers with the stream structures at their middle and late evolutionary stages, and an indication of a positive result for younger dense stream structures of recent origin. Analysis of the 1969 Leonid display obtained by the Springhill high-power radar shows that about 10% of the population around the shower maximum is associated in close groups, within a distance up to of about 10 km and confined to an effective stream width comparable to the diameter of the Earth. The recent Leonid returns with the storm in 1999 provided a possibility to verify a non-random grouping of particles within this young filament of the stream. The analysis and results based on TV observations of the storm are presented and discussed.

  19. Assessing subglacial processes from diatom fragmentation patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scherer, R.P.; Sjunneskog, C.M.; Iverson, N.R.; Hooyer, T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Reconstructing the size and glacial style of past ice-sheet advances requires interpreting complex glacial sedimentary facies. We use diatoms, a major component of Antarctic continental shelf deposits, to infer the physical conditions under which these deposits were emplaced. The degree of diatom fragmentation and the presence of diatoms of varying stratigraphic age in glacial sediments provide means to qualitatively gauge glacial mixing and transport. Here we report an experimentally calibrated index of diatom fragmentation that provides a simple but objective method of assessing the degree of subshearing imparted on marine glacial sedimentary deposits. By using a ring-shear device to subject diatomaceous sediment to stresses comparable to those beneath the Ross ice streams, we quantitatively assess patterns of diatom comminution resulting from compaction and from progressive shear stress. Elongate pennate diatoms are found to break disproportionately to discoid centric diatoms when subjected to shear stress; thus, a simple ratio of unbroken centric to pennate diatoms provides a reliable gauge of past shearing. Comparison of ring-shear results with a suite of previously analyzed sediments that represent a variety of glacial, glacial-marine, and hemipelagic settings of the Ross Sea and subglacial Ross Embayment demonstrates that this index can be employed for estimating relative subglacial stresses in this setting. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  20. Improvements to a model of projectile fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, S.; Chaudhuri, G.; Das Gupta, S.

    2011-11-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.83.044612 83, 044612 (2011)] we proposed a model for calculating cross sections of various reaction products which arise from disintegration of projectile-like fragments resulting from heavy-ion collisions at intermediate or higher energy. The model has three parts: (1) abrasion, (2) disintegration of the hot abraded projectile-like fragment (PLF) into nucleons and primary composites using a model of equilibrium statistical mechanics, and (3) possible evaporation of hot primary composites. It was assumed that the PLF resulting from abrasion has one temperature T. Data suggested that, while just one value of T seemed adequate for most cross-section calculations, a single value failed when dealing with very peripheral collisions. We have now introduced a variable T=T(b) where b is the impact parameter of the collision. We argue that there are data which not only show that T must be a function of b but, in addition, also point to an approximate value of T for a given b. We propose a very simple formula: T(b)=D0+D1[As(b)/A0] where As(b) is the mass of the abraded PLF and A0 is the mass of the projectile; D0 and D1 are constants. Using this model we compute cross sections for several collisions and compare with data.

  1. Fragment Screening of Human Aquaporin 1

    PubMed Central

    To, Janet; Torres, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane proteins that enable water transport across cellular plasma membranes in response to osmotic gradients. Phenotypic analyses have revealed important physiological roles for AQPs, and the potential for AQP water channel modulators in various disease states has been proposed. For example, AQP1 is overexpressed in tumor microvessels, and this correlates with higher metastatic potential and aggressiveness of the malignancy. Chemical modulators would help in identifying the precise contribution of water channel activity in these disease states. These inhibitors would also be important therapeutically, e.g., in anti-cancer treatment. This perceived importance contrasts with the lack of success of high-throughput screens (HTS) to identify effective and specific inhibitors of aquaporins. In this paper, we have screened a library of 1500 “fragments”, i.e., smaller than molecules used in HTS, against human aquaporin (hAQP1) using a thermal shift assay and surface plasmon resonance. Although these fragments may not inhibit their protein target, they bound to and stabilized hAQP1 (sub mM binding affinities (KD), with an temperature of aggregation shift ΔTagg of +4 to +50 °C) in a concentration-dependent fashion. Chemically expanded versions of these fragments should follow the determination of their binding site on the aquaporin surface. PMID:27023529

  2. A framework for integrating thermal biology into fragmentation research.

    PubMed

    Tuff, K T; Tuff, T; Davies, K F

    2016-04-01

    Habitat fragmentation changes thermal conditions in remnant patches, and thermal conditions strongly influence organism morphology, distribution, and activity patterns. However, few studies explore temperature as a mechanism driving ecological responses to fragmentation. Here we offer a conceptual framework that integrates thermal biology into fragmentation research to better understand individual, species, community, and ecosystem-level responses to fragmentation. Specifically, the framework addresses how fragmentation changes temperature and how the effects of those temperature changes spread through the ecosystem, from organism response via thermal sensitivity, to changes in species distribution and activity patterns, to shifts in community structure following species' responses, and ultimately to changes in ecosystem functions. We place a strong emphasis on future research directions by outlining "Critical gaps" for each step of the framework. Empirical efforts to apply and test this framework promise new understanding of fragmentation's ecological consequences and new strategies for conservation in an increasingly fragmented and warmer world. PMID:26892491

  3. MaRaCluster: A Fragment Rarity Metric for Clustering Fragment Spectra in Shotgun Proteomics.

    PubMed

    The, Matthew; Käll, Lukas

    2016-03-01

    Shotgun proteomics experiments generate large amounts of fragment spectra as primary data, normally with high redundancy between and within experiments. Here, we have devised a clustering technique to identify fragment spectra stemming from the same species of peptide. This is a powerful alternative method to traditional search engines for analyzing spectra, specifically useful for larger scale mass spectrometry studies. As an aid in this process, we propose a distance calculation relying on the rarity of experimental fragment peaks, following the intuition that peaks shared by only a few spectra offer more evidence than peaks shared by a large number of spectra. We used this distance calculation and a complete-linkage scheme to cluster data from a recent large-scale mass spectrometry-based study. The clusterings produced by our method have up to 40% more identified peptides for their consensus spectra compared to those produced by the previous state-of-the-art method. We see that our method would advance the construction of spectral libraries as well as serve as a tool for mining large sets of fragment spectra. The source code and Ubuntu binary packages are available at https://github.com/statisticalbiotechnology/maracluster (under an Apache 2.0 license).

  4. Radioactivities by light fragment (C, Ne, Mg) emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourani, E.; Hussonnois, M.; Poenaru, D. N.

    Recently, heavy nuclei known as ?-emitters like Ra and U isotopes have been found to present parallel emissions of 14C, 24Ne and 28Mg with very low branching ratios (< 10-9). Today, the spontaneous emission by heavy nuclei of fragments intermediate between 4He and fission fragments has become a well established field of research. The theory has been developed since 1980 and the first experimental discovery was published in 1984. Now, there are four known 14C emitters (222,223,224, 226Ra) and four 24Ne emitters (230Th, 231Pa, 232, 233U). Probably 25Ne is present in the results of 233U. Two kinds of radioactivity, 28Mg and Ne (probably 24Ne and 26Ne), have been measured from 234U, previously known for its cold fission. Some measurements gave upper limits in branching ratios ; in particular, an upper limit for the Si emission from 241 Am of ~ 10-15 relative to ? emission has been set. After a brief review of the theoretical models which have oriented the experimental discoveries, the experiments are described. They are grouped according to the technique used to identify the emitted fragment : 'E x E telescope in direct view of the source, magnetic spectrometers and solid state track detectors. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions. We present the systematics studies which have given evidence of odd-even effects in the parent nucleus, have analysed the nuclear deformation effects and have proposed a unified approach of α-decay, fragment emissions and cold fission. Finally, it is shown how these new radioactivities are being used to test and refine very elaborate models of α-decay and fission. Récemment, on a découvert que des noyaux lourds émetteurs α comme les isotopes du Ra et de l'U ont des émissions parallèles de 14C, 24Ne et 28Mg avec des rapports d'embranchement très faibles (< 10-9). Actuellement, I'émission spontanée par les noyaux lourds de fragments intermédiaires entre 1'4He et les fragments de la fission est

  5. Gastric Bezoar Treatment by Endoscopic Fragmentation in Combination with Pepsi-Cola® Administration

    PubMed Central

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Yunoki, Naoko; Tomoda, Jun; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 86 Final Diagnosis: Gastric bezoar Symptoms: — Medication: Cola Clinical Procedure: Endoscopic fragmentation after gastric lavage with Pepsi-Cola Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: Although bezoar dissolution by Coca-Cola® has been described in case reports and case series, to the best of our knowledge, the usefulness of other cola products such as Pepsi-Cola® has never been reported in the English literature. Case Report: An 86-year-old Taiwanese man was diagnosed with a gastric bezoar. Endoscopic fragmentation with a polypectomy snare was attempted twice but failed to remove the bezoar. Subsequently, 500 mL of Pepsi NEX Zero® was administered daily for 4 days via nasogastric tube. The bezoar was softened and successfully fragmented by the polypectomy snare and needle-knife devices on the third attempt. Conclusions: This report presents the first case of a gastric bezoar successfully treated by endoscopic fragmentation in combination with Pepsi-Cola® administration, suggesting the possible utility of cola beverages in bezoar treatment, regardless of product brands. PMID:26164451

  6. Conserved DNA sequences adjacent to chromosome fragmentation and telomere addition sites in Euplotes crassus.

    PubMed

    Klobutcher, L A; Gygax, S E; Podoloff, J D; Vermeesch, J R; Price, C M; Tebeau, C M; Jahn, C L

    1998-09-15

    During the formation of a new macronucleus in the ciliate Euplotes crassus, micronuclear chromosomes are reproducibly broken at approximately 10 000 sites. This chromosome fragmentation process is tightly coupled with de novo telomere synthesis by the telomerase ribonucleoprotein complex, generating short linear macronuclear DNA molecules. In this study, the sequences of 58 macronuclear DNA termini and eight regions of the micronuclear genome containing chromosome fragmentation/telomere addition sites were determined. Through a statistically based analysis of these data, along with previously published sequences, we have defined a 10 bp conserved sequence element (E-Cbs, 5'-HATTGAAaHH-3', H = A, C or T) near chromosome fragmentation sites. The E-Cbs typically resides within the DNA destined to form a macronuclear DNA molecule, but can also reside within flanking micronuclear DNA that is eliminated during macronuclear development. The location of the E-Cbs in macronuclear-destined versus flanking micronuclear DNA leads us to propose a model of chromosome fragmentation that involves a 6 bp staggered cut in the chromosome. The identification of adjacent macronuclear-destined sequences that overlap by 6 bp provides support for the model. Finally, our data provide evidence that telomerase is able to differentiate between newly generated ends that contain partial telomeric repeats and those that do not in vivo.

  7. Ionizations and fragmentations of benzene, methylbenzene, and chlorobenzene in strong IR and UV laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Feng; Lü, Hang; Zuo, Wan-Long; Xu, Hai-Feng; Jin, Ming-Xing; Ding, Da-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Ionizations and fragmentations of benzene, methylbenzene, and chlorobenzene are studied in linearly polarized 50-fs, 800-nm and 400-nm strong laser fields using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It is shown that at low laser intensity, the parent ions are dominant for any one of the molecules in an 800-nm strong laser field, while extensive fragmentation is observed in a 400-nm laser field, which can be understood by the resonant photon absorption of molecular cations. The ratio of the yield of the parent ion to the yield of the total ion for each molecule is measured as a function of laser intensity in a range from 1.0 × 1013 W/cm2 to 4.0 × 1014 W/cm2, in either the 800-nm or 400-nm laser field. The results show that the fragmentation of the aromatic molecules increases significantly as the laser intensity is increased. Possible mechanisms for fragmentation in strong laser fields are discussed. Finally, the saturation intensity of ionization of the titled molecules is also determined. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274140).

  8. The use of many-body expansions and geometry optimizations in fragment-based methods.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Dmitri G; Asada, Naoya; Nakanishi, Isao; Kitaura, Kazuo

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Chemists routinely work with complex molecular systems: solutions, biochemical molecules, and amorphous and composite materials provide some typical examples. The questions one often asks are what are the driving forces for a chemical phenomenon? How reasonable are our views of chemical systems in terms of subunits, such as functional groups and individual molecules? How can one quantify the difference in physicochemical properties of functional units found in a different chemical environment? Are various effects on functional units in molecular systems additive? Can they be represented by pairwise potentials? Are there effects that cannot be represented in a simple picture of pairwise interactions? How can we obtain quantitative values for these effects? Many of these questions can be formulated in the language of many-body effects. They quantify the properties of subunits (fragments), referred to as one-body properties, pairwise interactions (two-body properties), couplings of two-body interactions described by three-body properties, and so on. By introducing the notion of fragments in the framework of quantum chemistry, one obtains two immense benefits: (a) chemists can finally relate to quantum chemistry, which now speaks their language, by discussing chemically interesting subunits and their interactions and (b) calculations become much faster due to a reduced computational scaling. For instance, the somewhat academic sounding question of the importance of three-body effects in water clusters is actually another way of asking how two hydrogen bonds affect each other, when they involve three water molecules. One aspect of this is the many-body charge transfer (CT), because the charge transfers in the two hydrogen bonds are coupled to each other (not independent). In this work, we provide a generalized view on the use of many-body expansions in fragment-based methods, focusing on the general aspects of the property expansion and a contraction of a

  9. The asteroids - Accretion, differentiation, fragmentation, and irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkening, L. L.

    1979-01-01

    Various types of meteorites have experienced processes of condensation, accretion, metamorphism, differentiation, brecciation, irradiation and fragmentation. A typical view of meteorite formation has been that the processes following accretion take place in a few asteroidal-sized (approximately 100 km) objects. Discovery of decay products of now extinct Al-26 and Pd-107 in meteorites, discovery of isotopic heterogeneity among meteorite types, re-analysis of meteorite cooling rates, and continuing study of meteoritic compositions have led some meteoriticists to conclude that meteorites obtained their chemical, isotopic, and some textural characteristics in objects initially less than 10 km in diameter. Such a scenario, which is described in this paper, raises the possibility that some of these small planetesimals may have been 'condensation nuclei' for the formation of comets as well as the precursors of asteroids.

  10. Communication: Embedded fragment stochastic density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Roi; Rabani, Eran

    2014-07-28

    We develop a method in which the electronic densities of small fragments determined by Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) are embedded using stochastic DFT to form the exact density of the full system. The new method preserves the scaling and the simplicity of the stochastic DFT but cures the slow convergence that occurs when weakly coupled subsystems are treated. It overcomes the spurious charge fluctuations that impair the applications of the original stochastic DFT approach. We demonstrate the new approach on a fullerene dimer and on clusters of water molecules and show that the density of states and the total energy can be accurately described with a relatively small number of stochastic orbitals.

  11. [Shockwave lithotripsy: energy needed for fragmenting calculi].

    PubMed

    Drach, G W

    1989-01-01

    Based on the experience with the Dornier HM-3 lithotripter, the author analyzes herein the adverse effects caused by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Although admittedly empirical, an attempt is made to establish the number of shock waves and pressure required to achieve stone fragmentation without causing injury to the kidney. The effects of lung, stomach, colon, and skin or muscle contusions, hematoma, renal scarification, decreases in renal function, elevations in liver enzymes, and pancreatitis are reported, as well as systemic effects such as hemoglobinemia and hemoglobinuria, hearing change, and potential excessive radiation exposure, etc. The estimate of shock wave energy is discussed, highlighting the importance of the number of shock waves over the energy of the shock wave, and attention is focussed on the concept of stone fragility. Although we can nearly define the upper limits of energy related to safety, the author concludes that currently many questions remain unanswered.

  12. [Comparative characteristics of chromatin endonuclease fragments].

    PubMed

    Miul'berg, A A; Tishchenko, L I; Domkina, L K

    1977-05-01

    Soluble fragments of chromatin obtained by Ca, Mg-dependent endonuclease digest of rat liver nuclei, have been separated by gel chromatography on Sepharose 4B into three zones, containing oligomers, tetramers--dimers and monomers, respectively. The content of nonhistone proteins and particularly lysine-rich histones is decreased with a transition from theoligomers to monomers. The average protein/DNA ratio of the monomers is equal to 1.36 and that of histone/DNA ratio--to 0.82. The dependence of the degree of chromatin digest by endonuclease on its protein content and conditions of isolation and incubation of nuclei is discussed. The chromatin monomer formed appears to be made up of a nucleosome and short portions of spacer DNA bound to some part of histone HI and nonhistone proteins. PMID:889964

  13. Communication: Embedded fragment stochastic density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Roi; Rabani, Eran

    2014-07-01

    We develop a method in which the electronic densities of small fragments determined by Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) are embedded using stochastic DFT to form the exact density of the full system. The new method preserves the scaling and the simplicity of the stochastic DFT but cures the slow convergence that occurs when weakly coupled subsystems are treated. It overcomes the spurious charge fluctuations that impair the applications of the original stochastic DFT approach. We demonstrate the new approach on a fullerene dimer and on clusters of water molecules and show that the density of states and the total energy can be accurately described with a relatively small number of stochastic orbitals.

  14. Isolator fragmentation and explosive initiation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Peter; Rae, Philip John; Foley, Timothy J.; Novak, Alan M.; Armstrong, Christopher Lee; Baca, Eva V.; Gunderson, Jake Alfred

    2015-09-30

    Three tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of firing an isolator in proximity to a barrier or explosive charge. The tests with explosive were conducted without barrier, on the basis that since any barrier will reduce the shock transmitted to the explosive, bare explosive represents the worst-case from an inadvertent initiation perspective. No reaction was observed. The shock caused by the impact of a representative plastic material on both bare and cased PBX9501 is calculated in the worst-case, 1-D limit, and the known shock response of the HE is used to estimate minimum run-to-detonation lengths. The estimates demonstrate that even 1-D impacts would not be of concern and that, accordingly, the divergent shocks due to isolator fragment impact are of no concern as initiating stimuli.

  15. Unimolecular Thermal Fragmentation of Ortho-Benzyne

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Maccarone, A. T.; Nimlos, M. R.; Kato, S.; Bierbaum, V. M.; Ellison, G. B.; Ruscic, B.; Simmonett, A. C.; Allen, W. D.; Schaefer, H. F., III

    2007-01-01

    The ortho-benzyne diradical, o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4} has been produced with a supersonic nozzle and its subsequent thermal decomposition has been studied. As the temperature of the nozzle is increased, the benzyne molecule fragments: o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4} + {Delta} {yields} products. The thermal dissociation products were identified by three experimental methods: (i) time-of-flight photoionization mass spectrometry, (ii) matrix-isolation Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, and (iii) chemical ionization mass spectrometry. At the threshold dissociation temperature, o-benzyne cleanly decomposes into acetylene and diacetylene via an apparent retro-Diels-Alder process: o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4} + {Delta} {yields} HC {triple_bond} CH+HC {triple_bond} C-C {triple_bond} CH. The experimental {Delta}{sub rxn}H{sub 298}(o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4} {yields} HC {triple_bond} CH+HC {triple_bond} C-C {triple_bond} CH) is found to be 57 {+-} 3 kcal mol{sup -1}. Further experiments with the substituted benzyne, 3,6-(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}-o-C{sub 6}H{sub 2}, are consistent with a retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation. But at higher nozzle temperatures, the cracking pattern becomes more complicated. To interpret these experiments, the retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation of o-benzyne has been investigated by rigorous ab initio electronic structure computations. These calculations used basis sets as large as [C(7s6p5d4f3g2h1i)/H(6s5p4d3f2g1h)] (cc-pV6Z) and electron correlation treatments as extensive as full coupled cluster through triple excitations (CCSDT), in cases with a perturbative term for connected quadruples [CCSDT(Q)]. Focal point extrapolations of the computational data yield a 0 K barrier for the concerted, C{sub 2v}-symmetric decomposition of o-benzyne, E{sub b}(o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4} {yields} HC {triple_bond} CH+HC {triple_bond} C-C {triple_bond} CH) = 88.0 {+-} 0.5 kcal mol{sup -1}. A barrier of this magnitude is consistent with the experimental results. A careful assessment of the

  16. Unimolecular thermal fragmentation of ortho-benzene.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Maccarone, A. T.; Nimlos, M. R.; Kato, S.; Bierbaum, V. M.; Ellison, G. B.; Ruscic, B.; Simmonett, A. C.; Allen, W. D.; Schaefer, H. F.; Chemistry; Univ. of Colorado; NREL; Univ. of Georgia

    2007-01-01

    The ortho-benzyne diradical, o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4} has been produced with a supersonic nozzle and its subsequent thermal decomposition has been studied. As the temperature of the nozzle is increased, the benzyne molecule fragments o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}{sup +} {Delta} {yields} products. The thermal dissociation products were identified by three experimental methods: (i) time-of-flight photoionization mass spectrometry, (ii) matrix-isolation Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, and (iii) chemical ionization mass spectrometry. At the threshold dissociation temperature, o-benzyne cleanly decomposes into acetylene and diacetylene via an apparent retro-Diels-Alder process: o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}{sup +}{Delta}{yields} HC {triple_bond} CH+HC {triple_bond} C-C {triple_bond} CH. The experimental {Delta}{sub rxn}H{sub 298}(o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4} {yields} HC {triple_bond} CH+HC {triple_bond} C-C {triple_bond} CH) is found to be 57 {+-} 3 kcal mol{sup -1}. Further experiments with the substituted benzyne, 3,6-(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}-o-C{sub 6}H{sub 2}, are consistent with a retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation. But at higher nozzle temperatures, the cracking pattern becomes more complicated. To interpret these experiments, the retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation of o-benzyne has been investigated by rigorous ab initio electronic structure computations. These calculations used basis sets as large as [C(7s6p5d4f3g2h1i)/H(6s5p4d3f2g1h)] (cc-pV6Z) and electron correlation treatments as extensive as full coupled cluster through triple excitations (CCSDT), in cases with a perturbative term for connected quadruples [CCSDT(Q)]. Focal point extrapolations of the computational data yield a 0 K barrier for the concerted, C{sub 2v}-symmetric decomposition of o-benzyne, E{sub b}(o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4} {yields} HC {triple_bond} CH+HC {triple_bond} C-C {triple_bond} CH) = 88.0 {+-} 0.5 kcal mol{sup -1}. A barrier of this magnitude is consistent with the experimental results. A careful assessment of the

  17. Spin Effects in High Energy Fragmentation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zuo-Tang

    Recent measurements, in particular those on Λ polarization and spin alignment of vector mesons in e+e- annihilation at LEP, and those on the azimuthal asymmetry at HERA, have attracted much attention on the spin effects in high energy fragmentation processes. In this talk, we make a brief introduction to the different topics studied in this connection and a short summary of the available data. After that, we present a short summary of the main theoretical results that we obtained in studying these different topics. The talk was mainly based on the publications [5-9] which have been finished in collaboration with C.Boros, Liu Chun-xiu and Xu Qing-hua.

  18. Fragmentation and re-integration of experience.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J

    1992-03-01

    Secular and religious counselors require a model of psychotherapy that conceptualizes human beings as conscious, goal-seeking entities. Such a model, based on the construct "being in one's own world," is sketched in broad outline in this essay. The building blocks for the model are the "intentional modes" that lie at the heart of the self-world dialectic in which we live our lives. It is demonstrated how these "intentional modes" are organized into a gestalt-like whole referred to as the "existential gestalt." From the diagram of the existential gestalt the concepts of "intentional clarity" and "modal congruence" are derived. These concepts enable us to understand the processes of the fragmentation and re-integration of experience that lie at the heart of psychotherapy. Inclusiveness and purposefulness, two additional factors that are important for assessing the adequacy of the existential gestalt, are also briefly touched upon. PMID:24272825

  19. Forest fragmentation and its effects on birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.; Johnson, James E.

    1988-01-01

    Fragmentation of forest land, whether by suburban development, highways, transmission lines, or poorly planned cutting regimes, seriously affects reproduction by the large numbers of obligate forest interior birds. Many of our warblers, vireos, thrushes, tanagers, and flycatchers are highly migratory insectivorous birds that spend more than half the year in the neotropics, but migrate north to the United States and Canada to rear their young. These tropical visitors are especially vulnerable to predation and cowbird parasitism and are unable to maintain their populations within 100-200 m of forest edge. Habitats for these declining species can be provided by managing forest lands in large blocks so as to maintain at all times extensive contiguous areas of successional stages as well as of mature forest. Avoiding scattered small cuts will also help by reducing edge, road construction, and other disturbance.

  20. Assortative mating and fragmentation within dog breeds

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background There are around 400 internationally recognized dog breeds in the world today, with a remarkable diversity in size, shape, color and behavior. Breeds are considered to be uniform groups with similar physical characteristics, shaped by selection rooted in human preferences. This has led to a large genetic difference between breeds and a large extent of linkage disequilibrium within breeds. These characteristics are important for association mapping of candidate genes for diseases and therefore make dogs ideal models for gene mapping of human disorders. However, genetic uniformity within breeds may not always be the case. We studied patterns of genetic diversity within 164 poodles and compared it to 133 dogs from eight other breeds. Results Our analyses revealed strong population structure within poodles, with differences among some poodle groups as pronounced as those among other well-recognized breeds. Pedigree analysis going three generations back in time confirmed that subgroups within poodles result from assortative mating imposed by breed standards as well as breeder preferences. Matings have not taken place at random or within traditionally identified size classes in poodles. Instead, a novel set of five poodle groups was identified, defined by combinations of size and color, which is not officially recognized by the kennel clubs. Patterns of genetic diversity in other breeds suggest that assortative mating leading to fragmentation may be a common feature within many dog breeds. Conclusion The genetic structure observed in poodles is the result of local mating patterns, implying that breed fragmentation may be different in different countries. Such pronounced structuring within dog breeds can increase the power of association mapping studies, but also represents a serious problem if ignored. In dog breeding, individuals are selected on the basis of morphology, behaviour, working or show purposes, as well as geographic population structure. The same

  1. Effects of Neutron Emission on Fragment Mass and Kinetic Energy Distribution from Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission of {sup 235}U

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Saetone, E.

    2007-10-26

    The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U(n{sub th},f) have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening in the standard deviation of the kinetic energy at the final fragment mass number around m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125. These results are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. and other results on yield of mass. We conclude that the obtained results are a consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the sharp variation in the primary fragment kinetic energy and mass yield curves. We show that because neutron emission is hazardous to make any conclusion on primary quantities distribution of fragments from experimental results on final quantities distributions.

  2. Political Fragmentation and the Demand for Educational Services: An Economic Analysis. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Robert N.; And Others

    Major inequalities in the level of educational expenditures per student among school districts have been cited as an indication of the need for structural reform of the public educational system. The purpose of this research project was to see if market structure has any effect on the output of public educational services, and, if so, to see how…

  3. Final report: Accelerated beta decay for disposal of fission fragment wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, Howard R.

    2000-03-06

    The fundamental theory of the interaction of intense, low-frequency electromagnetic fields with certain radioactive nuclei has been fully formulated. The nuclei are of the type that exists in high-level radioactive wastes that are end products of the production of energy from nuclear fission. The basic physical mechanisms that underlie the coupling of the applied field to the nucleus have been identified. Both the basic theory and numerical predictions that stem from it support the conclusion that high-level radioactive wastes can be disposed of by substantially accelerating the rate of radioactive decay. Some old experiments on the acceleration of this type of radioactivity, with results that were not understood at the time, have been re-examined. Their interpretation is now clear, and the experiments are found to be in agreement with the theory.

  4. Pyrite thermochemistry, ash agglomeration, and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Akan-Etuk, A.; Diaz, R.; Niksa, S.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to introduce an experimental program that will eventually lead to time-resolved iron ash composition over the technological operating domain. The preceding literature survey suggests two important stipulations on any such experimental program. The first stipulation is that good control must be established over the operating conditions, to accurately quantify their effects. The other is that data must be obtained rapidly, to thoroughly cover the important operating domain. This work presents a series of studies that has characterized the desulfurization of pyrite during the early stages of combustion. An experimental system was established and used to monitor the effects of oxygen, temperature, and residence time on the evolution of condensed phase products of the combustion of pure pyrite. (VC)

  5. Biosensor-based fragment screening using FastStep injections.

    PubMed

    Rich, Rebecca L; Quinn, John G; Morton, Tom; Stepp, J David; Myszka, David G

    2010-12-15

    We have developed a novel analyte injection method for the SensíQ Pioneer surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor referred to as "FastStep." By merging buffer and sample streams immediately prior to the reaction flow cells, the instrument is capable of automatically generating a two- or threefold dilution series (of seven or five concentrations, respectively) from a single analyte sample. Using sucrose injections, we demonstrate that the production of each concentration within the step gradient is highly reproducible. For kinetic studies, we developed analysis software that utilizes the sucrose responses to automatically define the concentration of analyte at any point during the association phase. To validate this new approach, we compared the results of standard and FastStep injections for ADP binding to a target kinase and a panel of compounds binding to carbonic anhydrase II. Finally, we illustrate how FastStep can be used in a primary screening mode to obtain a full concentration series of each compound in a fragment library.

  6. Biosensor-based fragment screening using FastStep injections

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Rebecca L.; Quinn, John G.; Morton, Tom; Stepp, J. David; Myszka, David G.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a novel analyte injection method for the SensíQ Pioneer surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor referred to as ‘FastStep™’. By merging buffer and sample streams immediately prior to the reaction flow cells, the instrument is capable of automatically generating a two- or three-fold dilution series (of seven or five concentrations, respectively) from a single analyte sample. Using sucrose injections, we demonstrate that the production of each concentration within the step gradient is highly reproducible. For kinetic studies, we developed analysis software that utilizes the sucrose responses to automatically define the concentration of analyte at any point during the association phase. To validate this new approach, we compared the results of standard and FastStep injections for ADP binding to a target kinase and a panel of compounds binding to carbonic anhydrase II. Finally, we illustrate how FastStep can be used in a primary screening mode to obtain a full concentration series of each compound in a fragment library. PMID:20800052

  7. Vertebral burst fractures: CT analysis of the retropulsed fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra, J. Jr.; Garfin, S.R.; Resnick, D.

    1984-12-01

    Ten cases of retropulsed thoracolumbar vertebral body fragments that had been documented by CT were reviewed to define and characterize the nature, appearance, and position of the retropulsed fragment. All of the retropulsed fragments arose from the superior aspect of the vertebral body. Five of ten patients had a vertical fracture within the retropulsed fragment. Six of ten patients had an associated vertical or Y-shaped fracture originating from the region of the basivertebral foramen and passing into the inferior one-half of the vertebral body. The presence of a retropulsed fragment is nearly pathognomonic of an axial compression injury. Characteristics of this lesion that may hinder surgical reduction are the intra-fragment fracture, rotation, and craniocaudad movement.

  8. Magnetically regulated fragmentation of a massive, dense, and turbulent clump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontani, F.; Commerçon, B.; Giannetti, A.; Beltrán, M. T.; Sánchez-Monge, A.; Testi, L.; Brand, J.; Caselli, P.; Cesaroni, R.; Dodson, R.; Longmore, S.; Rioja, M.; Tan, J. C.; Walmsley, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    Massive stars, multiple stellar systems, and clusters are born of the gravitational collapse of massive, dense, gaseous clumps, and the way these systems form strongly depends on how the parent clump fragments into cores during collapse. Numerical simulations show that magnetic fields may be the key ingredient in regulating fragmentation. Here we present ALMA observations at ~ 0.25'' resolution of the thermal dust continuum emission at ~ 278 GHz towards a turbulent, dense, and massive clump, IRAS 16061-5048c1, in a very early evolutionary stage. The ALMA image shows that the clump has fragmented into many cores along a filamentary structure. We find that the number, the total mass, and the spatial distribution of the fragments are consistent with fragmentation dominated by a strong magnetic field. Our observations support the theoretical prediction that the magnetic field plays a dominant role in the fragmentation process of massive turbulent clumps.

  9. Fragmented local governance and water resource management outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hong; Keane, Timothy D; Bernard, Eric A

    2015-03-01

    Fragmented jurisdictions and decision making structures can result in destructive competition and/or a lack of systematic cooperation that can hamper effective resource management and environmental planning, although the value of local autonomy and stakeholder participations should not be underestimated. This study empirically examines if political fragmentation in local governance is a significant barrier to successful resource management. To test this hypothesis, the authors quantify the degree of political fragmentation at two different geographical scales - 1) site-level: 12-digit watersheds and 2) regional: metropolitan statistical areas or equivalent regions - and analyze how water resource management outcomes vary with the level of political fragmentation using nationwide land cover and stream gauge information in the U.S. Regression analysis shows water quality declines (or slower quality improvements), measured in terms of total suspended solids, are associated with both site-level and regional political fragmentation indicators, suggesting that political fragmentation can make resource management more challenging.

  10. Soft x-ray ionization induced fragmentation of glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Itälä, E.; Kooser, K.; Rachlew, E.; Huels, M. A.; Kukk, E.

    2014-06-21

    X-ray absorption commonly involves dissociative core ionization producing not only momentum correlated charged fragments but also low- and high-energy electrons capable of inducing damage in living tissue. This gives a natural motivation for studying the core ionization induced fragmentation processes in biologically important molecules such as amino acids. Here the fragmentation of amino acid glycine following carbon 1s core ionization has been studied. Using photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence technique, a detailed analysis on fragmentation of the sample molecule into pairs of momentum correlated cations has been carried out. The main characteristics of core ionization induced fragmentation of glycine were found to be the rupture of the C–C{sub α} bond and the presence of the CNH{sub 2}{sup +} fragment.

  11. Popping Balloons: A Case Study of Dynamical Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulinet, Sébastien; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the physics of fragmentation is important in a wide range of industrial and geophysical applications. Fragmentation processes involve large strain rates and short time scales that take place during crack nucleation and propagation. Using rubber membranes, we develop an experimental analysis that enables us to track the fragmentation process in situ in both time and space. We find that bursting a highly stretched membrane yields a treelike fragmentation network that originates at a single seed crack, followed by successive crack tip-splitting events. We show that a dynamic instability drives this branching mechanism. Fragmentation occurs when the crack tip speed attains a critical velocity for which tip splitting becomes the sole available mechanism of releasing the stored elastic energy. Given the general character of the fragmentation processes, this framework should be applicable to other crack networks in brittle materials.

  12. Sizing of single fluorescently stained DNA fragments by scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Laib, Stephan; Rankl, Michael; Ruckstuhl, Thomas; Seeger, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    We describe an approach to determine DNA fragment sizes based on the fluorescence detection of single adsorbed fragments on specifically coated glass cover slips. The brightness of single fragments stained with the DNA bisintercalation dye TOTO-1 is determined by scanning the surface with a confocal microscope. The brightness of adsorbed fragments is found to be proportional to the fragment length. The method needs only minute amount of DNA, beyond inexpensive and easily available surface coatings, like poly-l-lysine, 3-aminoproyltriethoxysilane and polyornithine, are utilizable. We performed DNA-sizing of fragment lengths between 2 and 14 kb. Further, we resolved the size distribution before and after an enzymatic restriction digest. At this a separation of buffers or enzymes was unnecessary. DNA sizes were determined within an uncertainty of 7–14%. The proposed method is straightforward and can be applied to standardized microtiter plates. PMID:14602931

  13. Fragmentation of mercury compounds under ultraviolet light irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, E.; Hautala, L.; Jänkälä, K.; Huttula, M.; Löytynoja, T.

    2015-08-21

    Ultraviolet light induced photofragmentation of mercury compounds is studied experimentally with electron energy resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques and theoretically with computational quantum chemical methods. A high resolution photoelectron spectrum using synchrotron radiation is presented. Fragmentation of the molecule is studied subsequent to ionization to the atomic-mercury-like d orbitals. State dependent fragmentation behaviour is presented and specific reactions for dissociation pathways are given. The fragmentation is found to differ distinctly in similar orbitals of different mercury compounds.

  14. Fragmentation of weak non-ablating objects during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-04-01

    Fragmentation of objects during entry can be treated with developed models of breakup, fragment cascade, separation, and deceleration. The results reduce to those derived earlier for strong objects. Model predictions are in agreement with the key features of numerical simulations. Model equations can be inverted analytically to infer object size, entry speed, and strength from measurements of peak power and altitude and fragmentation altitude or time.

  15. Gravitational fragmentation - A comparison with W49A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keto, Eric R.; Lattanzio, John C.; Monaghan, Joe J.

    1991-01-01

    The process of gravitational fragmentation of molecular clouds is investigated through a comparison of numerical and observational results. The expected millimeter wave molecular line emission from a model fragmenting cloud generated by a numerical hydrodynamic simulation is calculated and compared with observations of HCO(+) from the star-forming region W49A. This investigation suggests that the rotating ring of H II regions, the necklace in W49A, may have formed in the gravitational fragmentation of a flattened rotating molecular cloud.

  16. Tryptic y ++ Fragment Ion Distributions Are Guided by Coulombic Repulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irikura, Karl K.; Merle, John K.; Simón-Manso, Yamil

    2012-03-01

    Ideal tryptic peptides contain only a single basic residue, located at the C-terminus. Collisional fragmentation of their doubly- or triply-protonated ions generates doubly-charged y ++ fragment ions with modest intensities. The size distribution of the y ++ fragments, when averaged over many spectra, corresponds closely to the expectations from charge-directed backbone cleavage and a Coulomb-Boltzmann distribution of mobile protons. This observation should be helpful in developing mechanistic models for y ++ formation.

  17. Charge Prediction of Lipid Fragments in Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schrom, Brian T.; Kangas, Lars J.; Ginovska, Bojana; Metz, Thomas O.; Miller, John H.

    2011-12-18

    An artificial neural network is developed for predicting which fragment is charged and which fragment is neutral for lipid fragment pairs produced from a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry simulation process. This charge predictor is integrated into software developed at PNNL for in silico spectra generation and identification of metabolites known as Met ISIS. To test the effect of including charge prediction in Met ISIS, 46 lipids are used which show a reduction in false positive identifications when the charge predictor is utilized.

  18. [Perception of short musical fragments by hypomaniac patients].

    PubMed

    Al'tman, Ia A; Gromyko, D I; Golubev, A A; Varfolomeev, A L

    2006-01-01

    Emotional assessment of short fragments from pieces of chamber music was studied in patients in steady elated mood (hypomaniac). Six fragments, assessed by healthy subjects as emotionally positive, neutral or negative were used. The examined subjects were shown to be capable for an emotional assessment of the musical fragments. The most pronounced difference of the examined patients from healthy subjects and depressive patients examined earlier was the predominance of neutral assessments in hypomaniacs. PMID:16869266

  19. Stone fragmentation pattern of piezoelectric shockwave lithotripsy in vitro.

    PubMed

    Grenabo, L; Hedelin, H; Mohsenvand, C; Rodin, L; Wang, Y H; Pettersson, S

    1998-06-01

    Whole stones (N = 64; largest diameter 5-15 mm) were treated in vitro with piezoelectric shockwaves using the Edap LT-01 lithotripter with 2.5 Hz at either 100% or 54% power. The number of fragments larger than 2 mm was counted after every 30 seconds. The stones were defined as totally broken when all fragments were < 2 mm. Total fragmentation time was correlated with the energy level and the size of the stone. The number of large fragments did not correlate with the energy level but rather with the original size of the stone.

  20. Fragment-based approaches and computer-aided drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Rognan, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Fragment-based design has significantly modified drug discovery strategies and paradigms in the last decade. Besides technological advances and novel therapeutic avenues, one of the most significant changes brought by this new discipline has occurred in the minds of drug designers. Fragment-based approaches have markedly impacted rational computer-aided design both in method development and in applications. The present review illustrates the importance of molecular fragments in many aspects of rational ligand design, and discusses how thinking in "fragment space" has boosted computational biology and chemistry. PMID:21710380

  1. Life history strategy influences parasite responses to habitat fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Froeschke, Götz; van der Mescht, Luther; McGeoch, Melodie; Matthee, Sonja

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic habitat use is a major threat to biodiversity and is known to increase the abundance of generalist host species such as rodents, which are regarded as potential disease carriers. Parasites have an intimate relationship with their host and the surrounding environment and it is expected that habitat fragmentation will affect parasite infestation levels. We investigated the effect of habitat fragmentation on the ecto- and endoparasitic burdens of a broad niche small mammal, Rhabdomys pumilio, in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Our aim was to look at the effects of fragmentation on different parasite species with diverse life history characteristics and to determine whether general patterns can be found. Sampling took place within pristine lowland (Fynbos/Renosterveld) areas and at fragmented sites surrounded and isolated by agricultural activities. All arthropod ectoparasites and available gastrointestinal endoparasites were identified. We used conditional autoregressive models to investigate the effects of habitat fragmentation on parasite species richness and abundance of all recovered parasites. Host density and body size were larger in the fragments. Combined ecto- as well as combined endoparasite taxa showed higher parasite species richness in fragmented sites. Parasite abundance was generally higher in the case of R. pumilio individuals in fragmented habitats but it appears that parasites that are more permanently associated with the host's body and those that are host-specific show the opposite trend. Parasite life history is an important factor that needs to be considered when predicting the effects of habitat fragmentation on parasite and pathogen transmission.

  2. [Understanding mitochondrial genome fragmentation in parasitic lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera)].

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen-Ge; Guo, Xian-Guo; Jin, Dao-Chao; Xue, Shi-Peng; Qin, Feng; Simon, Song; Stephen, C Barker; Renfu, Shao

    2013-07-01

    Lice are obligate ectoparasites of mammals and birds. Extensive fragmentation of mitochondrial genomes has been found in some louse species in the families Pediculidae, Pthiridae, Philopteridae and Trichodectidae. For example, the mt genomes of human body louse (Pediculus humanus), head louse (Pediculus capitis), and public louse (Pthirus pubis) have 20, 20 and 14 mini-chromosomes, respectively. These mini-chromosomes might be the results of deletion and recombination of mt genes. The factors and mechanisms of mitochondrial genome fragmentation are currently unknown. The fragmentation might be the results of evolutionary selection or random genetic drift or it is probably related to the lack of mtSSB (mitochondrial single-strand DNA binding protein). Understanding the fragmentation of mitochondrial genomes is of significance for understanding the origin and evolution of mitochondria. This paper reviews the recent advances in the studies of mito-chondrial genome fragmentation in lice, including the phenomena of mitochondrial genome fragmentation, characteristics of fragmented mitochondrial genomes, and some factors and mechanisms possibly leading to the mitochondrial genome fragmentation of lice. Perspectives for future studies on fragmented mt genomes are also discussed. PMID:23853355

  3. Integration of DNA fragments by illegitimate recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Schiestl, R H; Petes, T D

    1991-01-01

    DNA fragments (generated by BamHI treatment) with no homology to the yeast genome were transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When the fragments were transformed in the presence of the BamHI enzyme, they integrated into genomic BamHI sites. When the fragments were transformed in the absence of the enzyme, they integrated into genomic G-A-T-C sites. Since the G-A-T-C sequence is present at the ends of BamHI fragments, this results indicates that four base pairs of homology are sufficient for some types of mitotic recombination. Images PMID:1881899

  4. [Understanding mitochondrial genome fragmentation in parasitic lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera)].

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen-Ge; Guo, Xian-Guo; Jin, Dao-Chao; Xue, Shi-Peng; Qin, Feng; Simon, Song; Stephen, C Barker; Renfu, Shao

    2013-07-01

    Lice are obligate ectoparasites of mammals and birds. Extensive fragmentation of mitochondrial genomes has been found in some louse species in the families Pediculidae, Pthiridae, Philopteridae and Trichodectidae. For example, the mt genomes of human body louse (Pediculus humanus), head louse (Pediculus capitis), and public louse (Pthirus pubis) have 20, 20 and 14 mini-chromosomes, respectively. These mini-chromosomes might be the results of deletion and recombination of mt genes. The factors and mechanisms of mitochondrial genome fragmentation are currently unknown. The fragmentation might be the results of evolutionary selection or random genetic drift or it is probably related to the lack of mtSSB (mitochondrial single-strand DNA binding protein). Understanding the fragmentation of mitochondrial genomes is of significance for understanding the origin and evolution of mitochondria. This paper reviews the recent advances in the studies of mito-chondrial genome fragmentation in lice, including the phenomena of mitochondrial genome fragmentation, characteristics of fragmented mitochondrial genomes, and some factors and mechanisms possibly leading to the mitochondrial genome fragmentation of lice. Perspectives for future studies on fragmented mt genomes are also discussed.

  5. Collision induced fragmentation of small ionic argon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barat, M.; Brenot, J. C.; Fayeton, J. A.; Picard, Y. J.

    2002-07-01

    The mechanisms of collision induced fragmentation of small Arn+ (n=2-9) clusters are investigated in the 100 eV center-of-mass energy range. The velocity vectors of the fragments are measured in a multicoincidence experiment for two- and three-body fragmentation. The relative role of the two basic dynamics, electronic transitions, and momentum transfer in binary collisions is evaluated. The structure of the clusters deeply influences the type of mechanism. This is clearly the case of Ar3+ for which a specific impulsive process called "diatom" mechanism plays an important part in the fragmentation of one isomer.

  6. Habitat fragmentation and its lasting impact on Earth's ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nick M; Brudvig, Lars A; Clobert, Jean; Davies, Kendi F; Gonzalez, Andrew; Holt, Robert D; Lovejoy, Thomas E; Sexton, Joseph O; Austin, Mike P; Collins, Cathy D; Cook, William M; Damschen, Ellen I; Ewers, Robert M; Foster, Bryan L; Jenkins, Clinton N; King, Andrew J; Laurance, William F; Levey, Douglas J; Margules, Chris R; Melbourne, Brett A; Nicholls, A O; Orrock, John L; Song, Dan-Xia; Townshend, John R

    2015-03-01

    We conducted an analysis of global forest cover to reveal that 70% of remaining forest is within 1 km of the forest's edge, subject to the degrading effects of fragmentation. A synthesis of fragmentation experiments spanning multiple biomes and scales, five continents, and 35 years demonstrates that habitat fragmentation reduces biodiversity by 13 to 75% and impairs key ecosystem functions by decreasing biomass and altering nutrient cycles. Effects are greatest in the smallest and most isolated fragments, and they magnify with the passage of time. These findings indicate an urgent need for conservation and restoration measures to improve landscape connectivity, which will reduce extinction rates and help maintain ecosystem services. PMID:26601154

  7. Biological and environmental conditionings for a sperm DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Bojar, Iwona; Witczak, Mariusz; Wdowiak, Artur

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the presented study was determination of the effect of selected agents on sperm DNA fragmentation--superoxide dismutase in seminal plasma, the patients' age, and burdening with the tobacco smoking habit. An attempt was also undertaken to evaluate the effect of DNA fragmentation on the effectiveness of infertility treatment. The study covered 186 men who received treatment due to infertility. The database and statistical analyses were performed using computer software STATISTICA 7.1. A relationship was observed between sperm DNA fragmentation and superoxide dismutase activity, the higher the SOD activity, the lower the percentage of sperm fragmentation (rs=-0.324; P=0.000; r = -0.2110). A statistical relationship was found between sperm DNA fragmentation and the percentage of pregnancies obtained during the first year of treatment--patients with the lower DFI more frequently became fathers during the first year of trying, compared to the remainder (t=2.51; P=0.013). A statistically significant relationship was confirmed (rs=-0.370; P=0.000) consisting in an increase in the DFI with respondents' age. No significant differences were noted between the DFI and the tobacco smoking habit (Chi2=0.29; P=0.926). The percentage of sperm DNA fragmentation was inversely proportional to superoxide dismutase activity in seminal plasma. DNA fragmentation becomes intensified with patients' age. Cigarette smoking has no effect on sperm DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation exerts an effect on the effectiveness of infertility treatment.

  8. The Case for the Median Fragment Size as a Better Fragment Size Descriptor than the Mean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchterlony, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Cunningham's use of x 50, the median fragment size, instead of the mean < x > in the main prediction equation of the Kuz-Ram model has several times been pointed out as a mistake. This paper analyses if this mistake is important using dimensional analysis and by reanalyzing the historical Soviet data behind Kuznetsov's original equation for the mean. The main findings in this paper are that: (1) Cunningham's mistake has no proven effect in practice and would only be relevant as long as he used Kuznetsov's equation for the rock factor A, i.e. till 1987. (2) Kuznetsov's equation has its roots in the characteristic size of the Rosin-Rammler (RR) functions fit to the sieving data as a way to determine the mean, not only in the mean itself. (3) The key data set behind Kuznetsov's equation just as easily provides a prediction equation for x 50 with the same goodness of fit as the equation for the mean. (4) Use of x 50 instead of the mean < x > in a dimensional analysis of fragmentation leads to considerable mathematical simplifications because the normalized mass passing at x 50 is a constant number. Non-dimensional ratios like x 50/ x max based on two percentile sizes also lead to such simplifications. The median x 50 as a fragment size descriptor thus has a sounder theoretical background than the mean < x >. It is normally less prone to measurement errors and it is not rejected by the original Soviet data. Thus, Cunningham's mistake has led the rock fragmentation community in the right direction.

  9. Carcinogenicity prediction of noncongeneric chemicals by augmented top priority fragment classification.

    PubMed

    Casalegno, Mosè; Sello, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Carcinogenicity prediction is an important process that can be performed to cut down experimental costs and save animal lives. The current reliability of the results is however disputed. Here, a blind exercise in carcinogenicity category assessment is performed using augmented top priority fragment classification. The procedure analyses the applicability domain of the dataset, allocates in clusters the compounds using a leading molecular fragment, and a similarity measure. The exercise is applied to three compound datasets derived from the Lois Gold Carcinogenic Database. The results, showing good agreement with experimental data, are compared with published ones. A final discussion on our viewpoint on the possibilities that the carcinogenicity modelling of chemical compounds offers is presented.

  10. Reconstruction of Traumatic Bone Defect With In Situ Implantation of Dropped Traumatic Segmental Bone Fragments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dasheng; Luo, Deqing; Lian, Kejian; Zhai, Wenliang; Ding, Zhenqi

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether in situ implantation of a dropped traumatic segmental bone fragment is safe and whether the authors' method would reduce the incidence of infectious and related complications. The authors retrospectively reviewed 16 patients with open fractures, including 11 with Gustilo-Anderson type IIIA fractures and 5 with Gustilo-Anderson type IIIB fractures who had a dropped traumatic segmental bone fragment between January 2002 and January 2012. Mean patient age was 35.4 years (range, 19-47 years). There were 10 femurs and 6 tibias. Average postoperative follow-up was 26.8 months (range, 12-60 months). The dropped traumatic segmental bone fragments were cleaned with 3% hydrogen peroxide, placed in separate sterile cups, and soaked in 1% iodophor for 30 minutes. Initial treatment included surgical debridement, wound irrigation, in situ implantation of the dropped traumatic segmental bone fragment, and temporary external fixation. Approximately 4 to 8 weeks later, after successful reconstruction of the soft tissue envelope, minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis was performed. Mean duration of treatment was 8 weeks (range, 6-14 weeks). All patients had fracture union at final follow-up. Mean healing time was 21.8 weeks (range, 14-48 weeks). One patient did not achieve primary union and required bone grafting. One patient with a Gustilo-Anderson type IIIB fracture had deep infection and removal of the dropped traumatic segmental bone fragment and bone grafting. According to the Klemm and Börner classification, 11 patients had excellent results, 3 had good results, and 2 had poor results. With adequate soft tissue coverage, this method was acceptable for the management of open fractures with bone defects. PMID:26709568

  11. Mass Spectrometric and Computational Investigation of the Protonated Carnosine-Carboplatin Complex Fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Ida; Sicilia, Emilia; Shoeib, Tamer; Korany, Mohamed; Russo, Nino

    2015-08-17

    Platinum(II)-based anticancer drugs are square-planar d(8) complexes that, activated by hydrolysis, cause cancer cell death by binding to nuclear DNA and distorting its structure. For that reason, interactions of platinum anticancer drugs with DNA have been extensively investigated, aiming at disentangling the mechanism of action and toxicity. Less attention, however, has been devoted to the formation of adducts between platinum drugs with biological ligands other than DNA. These adducts can cause the loss and deactivation of the drug before it arrives at the ultimate target and are also thought to contribute to the drug's toxicity. Here are reported the outcomes of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments and density functional theory (DFT) computations carried out to investigate the fragmentation pathways of the protonated carnosine-carboplatin complex, [Carnosine + CarbPt + H](+). DFT calculations at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level employed to probe fragmentation mechanisms account for all experimental data. Because of the relative rigidity of the structure of the most stable 1A conformer, stabilized by three strong hydrogen bonds, the first step of all of the examined fragmentation pathways is the interconversion of the 1A conformer into the less stable structure 1B. Formation of the [Carnosine + H](+) fragment from the precursor ion, [Carnosine + CarbPt + H](+), is calculated to be the lowest-energy process. At slightly higher energies, the loss of two amino groups is observed to produce the [Carnosine + (CarbPt - NH3) + H](+) and [Carnosine + (CarbPt - 2NH3) + H](+) ions. At significantly higher energies, the loss of CO2 occurs, yielding the final [Carnosine + (CarbPt - NH3) - CO2 + H](+) and [Carnosine + (CarbPt - 2NH3) - CO2 + H](+) products. Formation of the [CarbPt + H](+) fragment from [Carnosine + CarbPt + H](+), even if not hampered by a high activation barrier, is calculated to be very unfavorable from a thermodynamic point of view. PMID:26238420

  12. Mass Spectrometric and Computational Investigation of the Protonated Carnosine-Carboplatin Complex Fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Ida; Sicilia, Emilia; Shoeib, Tamer; Korany, Mohamed; Russo, Nino

    2015-08-17

    Platinum(II)-based anticancer drugs are square-planar d(8) complexes that, activated by hydrolysis, cause cancer cell death by binding to nuclear DNA and distorting its structure. For that reason, interactions of platinum anticancer drugs with DNA have been extensively investigated, aiming at disentangling the mechanism of action and toxicity. Less attention, however, has been devoted to the formation of adducts between platinum drugs with biological ligands other than DNA. These adducts can cause the loss and deactivation of the drug before it arrives at the ultimate target and are also thought to contribute to the drug's toxicity. Here are reported the outcomes of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments and density functional theory (DFT) computations carried out to investigate the fragmentation pathways of the protonated carnosine-carboplatin complex, [Carnosine + CarbPt + H](+). DFT calculations at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level employed to probe fragmentation mechanisms account for all experimental data. Because of the relative rigidity of the structure of the most stable 1A conformer, stabilized by three strong hydrogen bonds, the first step of all of the examined fragmentation pathways is the interconversion of the 1A conformer into the less stable structure 1B. Formation of the [Carnosine + H](+) fragment from the precursor ion, [Carnosine + CarbPt + H](+), is calculated to be the lowest-energy process. At slightly higher energies, the loss of two amino groups is observed to produce the [Carnosine + (CarbPt - NH3) + H](+) and [Carnosine + (CarbPt - 2NH3) + H](+) ions. At significantly higher energies, the loss of CO2 occurs, yielding the final [Carnosine + (CarbPt - NH3) - CO2 + H](+) and [Carnosine + (CarbPt - 2NH3) - CO2 + H](+) products. Formation of the [CarbPt + H](+) fragment from [Carnosine + CarbPt + H](+), even if not hampered by a high activation barrier, is calculated to be very unfavorable from a thermodynamic point of view.

  13. The Geology of Impact Fragmentation and Crater Controlled Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E.

    2007-12-01

    Overall, the study of planetary impact crater physics has made significant advances in the past two decades, thanks to modeling and observation. However, our understanding of the fragmentation network beyond a crater wall remains poorly understood. At the fundamental level, we do not yet understand where the transition takes place, and over what scale, between the so-called "strength regime" (where strength and other rheological properties dominate) and the "gravity regime" of impact crater scaling. The issue is muddled by the fact that numerical shock-hydrodynamical models (hydrocodes) have difficulty accurately evolving a stress tensor in a solid undergoing shock and hydrodynamic motion. Furthermore, the evolution of the stress tensor during the production of gravity-scaled craters is a subject of much debate, for if strength were truly negligible, there would be no final craters. Further still, and of subject here, only a few published efforts have made inroads into the topic of what damage occurs beyond the crater walls in a planetary impact. The latter subject is one of some importance, for it is speculated that large, deep-seated craters on Mars may dominate the subsequent regional hydrologic evolution. If so, then the same may be true, to a more limited extent given its other activity, of Earth's lithosphere. Radial fissures in crater systems, resulting primarily from hoop stresses and listric faults towards the crater interior, may set the stage for post-impact volatile evolution. On Europa, there is evidence that small secondary impact craters create fracture networks in an ice lithosphere a few km thick, and that these fractures accommodate the far-field stresses of impact rebound by connecting into long faults. One Enceladus, Dione, Ganymede and other icy bodies, the effect of impact cratering beyond the rim is observed in fault patterns. Here I present evidence for crater controlled fracture networks in planetary lithospheres, and provide an fundamental

  14. Aerodynamic characteristics and respiratory deposition of fungal fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seung-Hyun; Seo, Sung-Chul; Schmechel, Detlef; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Reponen, Tiina

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of fungal fragments and to estimate their respiratory deposition. Fragments and spores of three different fungal species ( Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium melinii, and Stachybotrys chartarum) were aerosolized by the fungal spore source strength tester (FSSST). An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) measured the size distribution in real-time and collected the aerosolized fungal particles simultaneously onto 12 impactor stages in the size range of 0.3-10 μm utilizing water-soluble ZEF-X10 coating of the impaction stages to prevent spore bounce. For S. chartarum, the average concentration of released fungal fragments was 380 particles cm -3, which was about 514 times higher than that of spores. A. versicolor was found to release comparable amount of spores and fragments. Microscopic analysis confirmed that S. chartarum and A. versicolor did not show any significant spore bounce, whereas the size distribution of P. melinii fragments was masked by spore bounce. Respiratory deposition was calculated using a computer-based model, LUDEP 2.07, for an adult male and a 3-month-old infant utilizing the database on the concentration and size distribution of S. chartarum and A. versicolor aerosols measured by the ELPI. Total deposition fractions for fragments and spores were 27-46% and 84-95%, respectively, showing slightly higher values in an infant than in an adult. For S. chartarum, fragments demonstrated 230-250 fold higher respiratory deposition than spores, while the number of deposited fragments and spores of A. versicolor were comparable. It was revealed that the deposition ratio (the number of deposited fragments divided by that of deposited spores) in the lower airways for an infant was 4-5 times higher than that for an adult. As fungal fragments have been shown to contain mycotoxins and antigens, further exposure assessment should include the measurement of fungal fragments for

  15. Optical selection and collection of DNA fragments

    DOEpatents

    Roslaniec, Mary C.; Martin, John C.; Jett, James H.; Cram, L. Scott

    1998-01-01

    Optical selection and collection of DNA fragments. The present invention includes the optical selection and collection of large (>.mu.g) quantities of clonable, chromosome-specific DNA from a sample of chromosomes. Chromosome selection is based on selective, irreversible photoinactivation of unwanted chromosomal DNA. Although more general procedures may be envisioned, the invention is demonstrated by processing chromosomes in a conventional flow cytometry apparatus, but where no droplets are generated. All chromosomes in the sample are first stained with at least one fluorescent analytic dye and bonded to a photochemically active species which can render chromosomal DNA unclonable if activated. After passing through analyzing light beam(s), unwanted chromosomes are irradiated using light which is absorbed by the photochemically active species, thereby causing photoinactivation. As desired chromosomes pass this photoinactivation point, the inactivating light source is deflected by an optical modulator; hence, desired chromosomes are not photoinactivated and remain clonable. The selection and photoinactivation processes take place on a microsecond timescale. By eliminating droplet formation, chromosome selection rates 50 times greater than those possible with conventional chromosome sorters may be obtained. Thus, usable quantities of clonable DNA from any source thereof may be collected.

  16. Detection of single lambda DNA fragments by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.; Goodwin, P.M.; Ambrose, W.P.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Keller, R.A. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated flow cytometric detection and sizing of single pieces of fluorescently stained lambda DNA (48.5 kb) and individual Kpn I restriction fragments of lambda DNA at 17.05 kb and 29.95 kb. DNA fragments were stained stoichiometrically with an intercalating dye such that the fluorescence from each fragment was directly proportional to fragment length. Laser powers range from 10 to 100 mW and transit times through the focused laser beam were several milliseconds. Measurements were made using time-resolved single photon counting of the detected fluorescence emission from individual stained DNA fragments. Samples were analyzed at rates of about 50 fragments per second. The measured fluorescence intensities are linearly correlated with DNA fragment length over the range measured. Detection sensitivity and resolution needed for analysis of small pieces of DNA are discussed and a comparison of single photon counting measurements of DNA fragments to measurements using more conventional flow cytometers is made. Applications of this methodology to DNA sizing and DNA fingerprinting are discussed.

  17. Term Fragment Analysis for Inversion of Large Files.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schipma, Peter B.

    Words and word fragments from the computer-readable data bases "Chemical Abstracts Condensates" and "Biological Abstracts Previews" were analyzed in terms of length, number, and frequency of appearance to determine some parameters upon which inversion of these data bases could be predicated. Types (unique words or fragments) and tokens (all…

  18. TEMPORAL CHANGE IN FRAGMENTATION OF CONTINENTAL US FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in forest ecosystem function and condition arise from changes in forest fragmentation. Previous studies estimated forest fragmentation for the continental United States (US). In this study, new temporal land-cover data from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) were us...

  19. The Progressive Fragmentation of 332P/Ikeya-Murakami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleyna, J. T.; Ye, Q.-Z.; Hui, M.-T.; Meech, K. J.; Wainscoat, R.; Micheli, M.; Keane, J. V.; Weaver, H. A.; Weryk, R.

    2016-08-01

    We describe 2016 January-April observations of the fragments of 332P/Ikeya-Murakami, a comet earlier observed in a 2010 October outburst. We present photometry of the fragments and perform simulations to infer the time of breakup. We argue that the eastern-most rapidly brightening fragment (F4) best corresponds to the original nucleus, rather than the initial bright fragment F1. We compute radial and tangential nongravitational parameters, A 1 = (1.5 ± 0.4) × 10-8 au day-2 and (7.2 ± 1.9) × 10-9 au day-2 both are consistent with zero at the 4σ level. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the fragments were emitted on the outbound journey well after the 2010 outburst, with bright fragment F1 splitting in early 2014 and the fainter fragments within months of the 2016 January recovery. Western fragment F7 is the oldest, dating from 2011. We suggest that the delayed onset of the splitting is consistent with a self-propagating crystallization of water ice.

  20. ACFIS: a web server for fragment-based drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Jiang, Wen; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Wu, Feng-Xu; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Guo, Feng-Biao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2016-01-01

    In order to foster innovation and improve the effectiveness of drug discovery, there is a considerable interest in exploring unknown ‘chemical space’ to identify new bioactive compounds with novel and diverse scaffolds. Hence, fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) was developed rapidly due to its advanced expansive search for ‘chemical space’, which can lead to a higher hit rate and ligand efficiency (LE). However, computational screening of fragments is always hampered by the promiscuous binding model. In this study, we developed a new web server Auto Core Fragment in silico Screening (ACFIS). It includes three computational modules, PARA_GEN, CORE_GEN and CAND_GEN. ACFIS can generate core fragment structure from the active molecule using fragment deconstruction analysis and perform in silico screening by growing fragments to the junction of core fragment structure. An integrated energy calculation rapidly identifies which fragments fit the binding site of a protein. We constructed a simple interface to enable users to view top-ranking molecules in 2D and the binding mode in 3D for further experimental exploration. This makes the ACFIS a highly valuable tool for drug discovery. The ACFIS web server is free and open to all users at http://chemyang.ccnu.edu.cn/ccb/server/ACFIS/. PMID:27150808

  1. Comparison of calculated and experimental results of fragmenting cylinder experiments

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON,L.T.; REEDAL,D.R.; KIPP,MARLIN E.; MARTINEZ,REINA R.; GRADY,D.E.

    2000-06-02

    The Grady-Kipp fragmentation model provides a physically based method for determining the fracture and breakup of materials under high loading rates. Recently, this model has been implemented into the CTH Shock Physics Code and has been used to simulate several published experiments. Materials studied in this paper are AerMet 100 steel and a 90% tungsten alloy. The experimental geometry consists of a right circular cylinder filled with an explosive main charge that is initiated at its center. The sudden expansion of the resulting detonation products causes fracture of the cylinder. Strain rates seen in the cylinder are on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. The average fragment sizes calculated with the Grady-Kipp fragmentation model successfully replicate the mean fragment size obtained from the experimental fragment distribution. When Poisson statistics are applied to the calculated local average fragment sizes, good correlation is also observed with the shape of the experimental cumulative fragment distribution. The experimental fragmentation results, CTH numerical simulations, and correlation of these numerical results with the experimental data are described.

  2. Organization of a Retrospective Document Retrieval System Based on Fragments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuegraf, Ernst J.

    A description of a retrospective document retrieval system is given in which equifrequent fragments are used as language elements for compression coding and retrieval. The critical parameters governing the system are identified, and restrictions imposed by the parameters on the selection of fragments are outlined. Changes necessary in the…

  3. Gluon fragmentation functions in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong-Jing; Li, Hsiang-nan

    2016-09-01

    We derive gluon fragmentation functions in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model by treating a gluon as a pair of color lines formed by a fictitious quark and antiquark (q q ¯). Gluon elementary fragmentation functions are obtained from the quark and antiquark elementary fragmentation functions for emitting specific mesons in the NJL model under the requirement that the q q ¯ pair maintains in the flavor-singlet state after meson emissions. An integral equation, which iterates the gluon elementary fragmentation functions to all orders, is then solved to yield the gluon fragmentation functions at a model scale. It is observed that these solutions are stable with respect to variation of relevant model parameters, especially after QCD evolution to a higher scale is implemented. We show that the inclusion of the gluon fragmentation functions into the theoretical predictions from only the quark fragmentation functions greatly improves the agreement with the SLD data for the pion and kaon productions in e+e- annihilation. Our proposal provides a plausible construct for the gluon fragmentation functions, which are supposed to be null in the NJL model.

  4. Long-term dynamics of a fragmented rainforest mammal assemblage.

    PubMed

    Laurance, William F; Laurance, Susan G; Hilbert, David W

    2008-10-01

    Habitat fragmentation is a severe threat to tropical biotas, but its long-term effects are poorly understood. We evaluated longer-term changes in the abundance of larger (>1 kg) mammals in fragmented and intact rainforest and in riparian "corridors" in tropical Queensland, with data from 190 spotlighting surveys conducted in 1986-1987 and 2006-2007. In 1986-1987 when most fragments were already 20-50 years old, mammal assemblages differed markedly between fragmented and intact forest. Most vulnerable were lemuroid ringtail possums (Hemibelideus lemuroides), followed by Lumholtz's tree-kangaroos (Dendrolagus lumholtzi) and Herbert River ringtail possums (Pseudocheirus herbertensis). Further changes were evident 20 years later. Mammal species richness fell significantly in fragments, and the abundances of 4 species, coppery brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula johnstoni), green ringtail possums (Pseudochirops archeri), red-legged pademelons (Thylogale stigmatica), and tree-kangaroos, declined significantly. The most surprising finding was that the lemuroid ringtail, a strict rainforest specialist, apparently recolonized one fragment, despite a 99.98% decrease in abundance in fragments and corridors. A combination of factors, including long-term fragmentation effects, shifts in the surrounding matrix vegetation, and recurring cyclone disturbances, appear to underlie these dynamic changes in mammal assemblages.

  5. Analysis of the fragmentation debris environment between 2005 and 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegel, Sven Kevin; Stabroth, Sebastian; Wiedemann, Carsten; Klinkrad, Heiner; Krag, Holger; Vörsmann, Peter

    Several fragmentation events have occurred in the years since the release of the ESA space debris model MASTER-2005 (Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference). During this period some notable events took place which resulted in an unusually large increase in the spatial debris density. A compilation of the fragmentation events between 2005 and 2008 is presented based on data gathered from the literature. Event parameters such as object type and location are discussed. The spatial object density is then simulated using the MASTER- 2005 population generation tool POEM (Program for Orbital Debris Environment Modelling). The NASA Breakup Model implemented in POEM is used to determine the properties of the initial cloud of fragments for each event. Propagating the orbital elements of all fragments yields the time dependent evolution of the object clouds. Spatial densities are then calculated from the distribution of the fragments. The results are discussed for all events in the detailed time frame. The changes in the orbital fragment environment since 2005 as a consequence of the presented events are of further interest. To this end, the overall density which is obtained from the simulations with POEM is compared to the predicted growth of the total spatial density. The prediction for the fragmentation debris is generated with MASTER-2005 on the basis of a business-as-usual scenario for the year 2005. Deviations between the resulting spatial density distributions are discussed in terms of fragmentation rates, breakup locations and breakup cause.

  6. ACFIS: a web server for fragment-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Jiang, Wen; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Wu, Feng-Xu; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Guo, Feng-Biao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2016-07-01

    In order to foster innovation and improve the effectiveness of drug discovery, there is a considerable interest in exploring unknown 'chemical space' to identify new bioactive compounds with novel and diverse scaffolds. Hence, fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) was developed rapidly due to its advanced expansive search for 'chemical space', which can lead to a higher hit rate and ligand efficiency (LE). However, computational screening of fragments is always hampered by the promiscuous binding model. In this study, we developed a new web server Auto Core Fragment in silico Screening (ACFIS). It includes three computational modules, PARA_GEN, CORE_GEN and CAND_GEN. ACFIS can generate core fragment structure from the active molecule using fragment deconstruction analysis and perform in silico screening by growing fragments to the junction of core fragment structure. An integrated energy calculation rapidly identifies which fragments fit the binding site of a protein. We constructed a simple interface to enable users to view top-ranking molecules in 2D and the binding mode in 3D for further experimental exploration. This makes the ACFIS a highly valuable tool for drug discovery. The ACFIS web server is free and open to all users at http://chemyang.ccnu.edu.cn/ccb/server/ACFIS/. PMID:27150808

  7. Complex fragment emission at low and high excitation energy

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1986-08-01

    Complex fragment emission has been certified as a compound nucleus process at low energies. An extension of the measurements to heavy ion reactions up to 50 MeV/u shows that most complex fragments are emitted by highly excited compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion reactions. 12 refs., 26 figs.

  8. Study of Shape Isomeric States in Fission Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Kamanin, D. V.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Kondtatyev, N. A.; Kuznetsova, , E. A.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Mkaza, N.

    2015-06-01

    For the first time the brake-up of the fission fragments crossing metal foil was observed. The effect takes place predominantly in front impacts. To treat the data we suppose the bulk of the fragments from the conventional binary fission to be borne in shape-isomer states which look like di-nuclear systems with magic cores.

  9. Fragment-based discovery of JAK-2 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Antonysamy, Stephen; Hirst, Gavin; Park, Frances; Sprengeler, Paul; Stappenbeck, Frank; Steensma, Ruo; Wilson, Mark; Wong, Melissa

    2009-07-22

    Fragment-based hit identification coupled with crystallographically enabled structure-based drug design was used to design potent inhibitors of JAK-2. After two iterations from fragment 1, we were able to increase potency by greater than 500-fold to provide sulfonamide 13, a 78-nM JAK-2 inhibitor.

  10. Experimental modelling of fragmentation applied to volcanic explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, Øystein Thordén; Galland, Olivier; Gisler, Galen R.

    2013-12-01

    Explosions during volcanic eruptions cause fragmentation of magma and host rock, resulting in fragments with sizes ranging from boulders to fine ash. The products can be described by fragment size distributions (FSD), which commonly follow power laws with exponent D. The processes that lead to power-law distributions and the physical parameters that control D remain unknown. We developed a quantitative experimental procedure to study the physics of the fragmentation process through time. The apparatus consists of a Hele-Shaw cell containing a layer of cohesive silica flour that is fragmented by a rapid injection of pressurized air. The evolving fragmentation of the flour is monitored with a high-speed camera, and the images are analysed to obtain the evolution of the number of fragments (N), their average size (A), and the FSD. Using the results from our image-analysis procedure, we find transient empirical laws for N, A and the exponent D of the power-law FSD as functions of the initial air pressure. We show that our experimental procedure is a promising tool for unravelling the complex physics of fragmentation during phreatomagmatic and phreatic eruptions.

  11. Ground and satellite observations of auroral fragmentation into patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiokawa, Kazuo; Nishi, Katsuki

    2016-07-01

    We review characteristic auroral fragmentation which is the process by which uniform aurora is broken into several fragments to form auroral patches, based on the all-sky camera observations at Tromsoe, Norway and THEMIS chain in Canada. The auroral fragmentation occurs as finger-like structures developing predominantly in meridional direction with speeds of several tens m/s and scale sizes of several tens kilometers without any shearing motion. These features suggest that pressure-driven instability in the balance between the earthward magnetic-tension force and the tailward pressure gradient force in the magnetosphere is the main driving force of the auroral fragmentation. Thus, these observations indicate that auroral fragmentation associated with pressure-driven instability is a process that creates auroral patches. Auroral fragmentation is seen from midnight to dawn local time and usually appears at the beginning of the substorm recovery phase, near the low latitude boundary of the auroral region. One example of plasma and magnetic field observations by the THEMIS satellite in the conjugate magnetosphere shows diamagnetic anti-phase variations of magnetic and plasma pressures with time scales of several to tens minutes associated with the auroral fragmentation. This observation also supports the idea of pressure-driven instability to cause the auroral fragmentation into patches.

  12. Analysis of Parathyroid Hormone and Its Fragments in Rat Tissues

    PubMed Central

    D'Amour, Pierre; Segre, Gino V.; Roth, Sanford I.; Potts, John T.

    1979-01-01

    After intravenous injection of [125I]-iodo-parathyroid hormone in the rat, uptake of the hormone was greatest in the liver and kidneys. Uptake was rapid, reaching a maximal concentration by 4 and 8 min, respectively. Extracts, prepared from both these organs at intervals soon after the injection of intact hormone, showed three main radioactive peaks when samples were subjected to gel filtration under protein-denaturing conditions. The first peak coeluted with intact hormone. The second eluted at a position corresponding to the carboxy-terminal fragments previously described in plasma, and the last eluted at the salt volume of the column. Microsequence analysis of the radioiodinated fragments, a method that has proved valuable for chemically defining the circulating fragments resulting from metabolism of injected hormone, showed that extracts of liver and kidney, prepared at 4 and 8 min after injection of the intact hormone, contained different fragments. The radioiodinated fragments in liver extracts were identical to those previously reported in the plasma of rats and dogs, fragments resulting principally from proteolysis between positions 33 and 34, and 36 and 37 of the intact hormone. Although the same fragments were also present in the kidneys, they constituted less than 15% of the amount present in the liver. More than 50% of the labeled renal fragments consisted of a peptide whose amino-terminal amino acid was position 39 of the intact hormone, a fragment not present in plasma. The rate of appearance of radioiodinated fragments that were chemically identical to those in plasma was more rapid in the liver than in plasma. Correlation of these chemical analyses with studies of the localization of 125I by autoradiography showed that at the times when the intact hormone and the carboxy-terminal fragments comprised nearly all of the 125I-labeled moieties in the tissues, the proximal convoluted tubules of the kidney and sinusoidal lining cells of the liver, which

  13. Phenocryst fragments in rhyolitic lavas and lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, S. R.; McPhie, J.

    2003-08-01

    Although rhyolitic lavas and lava domes are characterised by evenly porphyritic textures, not all the phenocrysts are whole euhedra. We undertook image analysis of 46 rhyolitic lava and lava dome samples to determine the abundance and shape of quartz and feldspar phenocryst fragments. Phenocryst fragments were identified in nearly all samples. On average, fragments amount to ˜5% of the total phenocryst population, or ˜0.5 modal%. The abundance of fragments in lavas and lava domes is not related to the groundmass texture (whether vesicular, flow banded, massive, glassy or crystalline), nor to distance from source. Fragments are, however, more abundant in samples with higher phenocryst contents. The phenocryst fragments in rhyolitic lavas and lava domes are mainly medium to large (0.5-3.5 mm), almost euhedral crystals with only a small portion removed, or chunky, equant, subhedral fragments, and occur in near-jigsaw-fit or clast-rotated pairs or groups. The fragments probably formed in response to decompression of large melt inclusions. Shear during laminar flow then dismembered the phenocrysts; continued laminar shear separated and rotated the fragments. Fractures probably formed preferentially along weaknesses in the phenocrysts, such as zones of melt inclusions, cleavage planes and twin composition planes. Rare splintery fragments are also present, especially within devitrified domains. Splinters are attributed to comminution of solid lava adjacent to fractures that were later healed. For comparison, we measured crystal abundance in a further 12 rhyolite samples that include block and ash flow deposits and ignimbrite. Phenocryst fragments within clasts in the block and ash flow samples showed similar shapes and abundances to those fragments within the lava and lava domes. Crystal fragments are much more abundant in ignimbrite (exceeding 67% of the crystal population) however, and dominated by small, equant, anhedral chunks or splinters. The larger crystals in

  14. Visualization of sneeze ejecta: steps of fluid fragmentation leading to respiratory droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfman, B. E.; Techet, A. H.; Bush, J. W. M.; Bourouiba, L.

    2016-02-01

    Coughs and sneezes feature turbulent, multiphase flows that may contain pathogen-bearing droplets of mucosalivary fluid. As such, they can contribute to the spread of numerous infectious diseases, including influenza and SARS. The range of contamination of the droplets is largely determined by their size. However, major uncertainties on the drop size distributions persist. Here, we report direct observation of the physical mechanisms of droplet formation at the exit of the mouth during sneezing. Specifically, we use high-speed imaging to directly examine the fluid fragmentation at the exit of the mouths of healthy subjects. We reveal for the first time that the breakup of the fluid into droplets continues to occur outside of the respiratory tract during violent exhalations. We show that such breakup involves a complex cascade of events from sheets, to bag bursts, to ligaments, which finally break into droplets. Finally, we reveal that the viscoelasticity of the mucosalivary fluid plays an important role in delaying fragmentation by causing the merger of the droplet precursors that form along stretched filaments; thereby affecting the final drop size distribution farther downstream.

  15. Metal and phosphide phases in Luna 24 soil fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axon, H. J.; Nasir, M. J.; Knowles, F.

    1980-06-01

    Soil fragments in the 106-150 and 150-250 micron size ranges were selected for metallographic and microprobe examination on the basis of their magnetic properties. Serial sections of the mounted fragments were examined. One fragment proved to be a compositionally zoned crystal of phosphide with no metal phase but partly embedded in glass. Another was a coarse-grained association of silica with ilmenite and fayalite with a 5-micron particle of metallic iron in troilite. One splinter of oxide contained a central spine of metallic iron. The remaining six fragments contained 10-micron particles of iron-nickel-cobalt alloy with compositions in either the 'meteoritic' or the low Ni-low Co sub-meteoritic composition ranges of Ni, Co content. In some fragments separate particles of alloy had different Ni, Co contents. No particles of high Co metal were encountered.

  16. Fragment-based activity space: smaller is better.

    PubMed

    Hesterkamp, Thomas; Whittaker, Mark

    2008-06-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery has the potential to supersede traditional high throughput screening based drug discovery for molecular targets amenable to structure determination. This is because the chemical diversity coverage is better accomplished by a fragment collection of reasonable size than by larger HTS collections. Furthermore, fragments have the potential to be efficient target binders with higher probability than more elaborated drug-like compounds. The selection of the fragment screening technique is driven by sensitivity and throughput considerations, and we advocate in the present article the use of high concentration bioassays in conjunction with NMR-based hit confirmation. Subsequent ligand X-ray structure determination of the fragment ligand in complex with the target protein by co-crystallisation or crystal soaking can focus on confirmed binders.

  17. A sampling approach for protein backbone fragment conformations.

    PubMed

    Yu, J Y; Zhang, W

    2013-01-01

    In protein structure prediction, backbone fragment bias information can narrow down the conformational space of the whole polypeptide chain significantly. Unlike existing methods that use fragments as building blocks, the paper presents a probabilistic sampling approach for protein backbone torsion angles by modelling angular correlation of (phi, psi) with a directional statistics distribution. Given a protein sequence and secondary structure information, this method samples backbone fragments conformations by using a backtrack sampling algorithm for the hidden Markov model with multiple inputs and a single output. The proposed approach is applied to a fragment library, and some well-known structural motifs are sampled very well on the optimal path. Computational results show that the method can help to obtain native-like backbone fragments conformations. PMID:23777175

  18. Nuclear fragmentation measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Blancato, A. A.; Cavallaro, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V.; Battistoni, G.; Bondi, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Nicolosi, D.; Raciti, G.; Tropea, S.; Giacoppo, F.; Morone, M. C.; Pandola, L.; Rapisarda, E.; Romano, F.; and others

    2013-04-19

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection, to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections has been measured and in particular, to our knowledge, no double differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in literature. We have measured the double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the {sup 12}C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been also used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before.

  19. Recombinant Kinase Production and Fragment Screening by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Byeonggu; Ahn, Hee-Chul

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has rapidly evolved and several drugs or drug candidates developed by FBDD approach are clinically in use or in clinical trials. For example, vemurafenib, a V600E mutated BRAF inhibitor, was developed by utilizing FBDD approach and approved by FDA in 2011. In FBDD, screening of fragments is the starting step for identification of hits and lead generation. Fragment screening usually relies on biophysical techniques by which the protein-bound small molecules can be detected. NMR spectroscopy has been extensively used to study the molecular interaction between the protein and the ligand, and has many advantages in fragment screening over other biophysical techniques. This chapter describes the practical aspects of fragment screening by saturation transfer difference NMR. PMID:26501900

  20. Colon centerline extraction in fragmented segmentations.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Karthik; Madrosiya, Akshay; Desai, Nasir

    2015-08-01

    In virtual colonoscopy, the clinical need is a smooth centered path from the rectum to the cecum, for interactive navigation along the colonic lumen. The primary challenge is breakages in the colon, due to fecal residue, abnormalities, poor insufflation and inadequate electronic cleansing. Here we propose a method, that is a modification of the classic energy minimized geodesic, that extracts centered paths through fragmented colons. To begin, we perform electronic cleansing, automatically localize 4 points: rectum, cecum, sphlenic and hepatic flexures; followed by region growing and heuristic approaches to generate the initial segmentation. This is followed by a daisy chaining procedure to link possibly large colon blobs that may have been missed as weaker candidate segmentations. We then perform a front propagation to extract a minimal energy path through the ordered set of points. This propagation is guided by multiple forces: (a) A strong force given by the distance to the colon segmentation surface (b) A weak force derived from the CT intensity (c) A weak force from the distance to the surface of weaker candidate colon segmentations (d) A geodesic repulsive force, where the other points exhibit an repelling force in their voronoi partition, the force proportional to the geodesic distance to the point. Our contribution is a path extraction method for the colon that is the energy minimized geodesic (a) favouring centeredness (b) punching through gaps, traversing in so far as possible through lower intensity regions and possibly centered within these gaps (c) ordered through the feature points. Results show improvements of the method over the standard minimal energy path approach. PMID:26736927

  1. Statistical study of auroral fragmentation into patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Ayumi; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Otsuka, Yuichi; Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Nozawa, Satonori; Hori, Tomoaki; Lester, Mark; Johnsen, Magnar Gullikstad

    2015-08-01

    The study of auroral dynamics is important when considering disturbances of the magnetosphere. Shiokawa et al. (2010, 2014) reported observations of finger-like auroral structures that cause auroral fragmentation. Those structures are probably produced by macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere, mainly of the Rayleigh-Taylor type. However, the statistical characteristics of these structures have not yet been investigated. Here based on observations by an all-sky imager at Tromsø (magnetic latitude = 67.1°N), Norway, over three winter seasons, we statistically analyzed the occurrence conditions of 14 large-scale finger-like structures that developed from large-scale auroral regions including arcs and 6 small-scale finger-like structures that developed in auroral patches. The large-scale structures were seen from midnight to dawn local time and usually appeared at the beginning of the substorm recovery phase, near the low-latitude boundary of the auroral region. The small-scale structures were primarily seen at dawn and mainly occurred in the late recovery phase of substorms. The sizes of these large- and small-scale structures mapped in the magnetospheric equatorial plane are usually larger than the gyroradius of 10 keV protons, indicating that the finger-like structures could be caused by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. However, the scale of small structures is only twice the gyroradius of 10 keV protons, suggesting that finite Larmor radius effects may contribute to the formation of small-scale structures. The eastward propagation velocities of the structures are -40 to +200 m/s and are comparable with those of plasma drift velocities measured by the colocating Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radar.

  2. Observations of Titan 3C-4 Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan 3C-4 Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper will present a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots will also be shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) believed to be associated with the Titan break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9-m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN# 25001, 33509, 33510) and the parent rocket body. Color index data will be used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In 2012, the SSN added 16 additional fragments to the catalogue. MODEST acquired magnitude data on ten Titan fragments in late 2012 and early 2013. The magnitude distribution of all the observed fragments are analyzed as a function of time. In order to better characterize the breakup fragments spectral measurements were acquired on the original rocket body and five Titan fragments using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., Aluminum and various paints) and categorized based on known absorption features for spacecraft materials.

  3. Dispersal depression with habitat fragmentation in the bog fritillary butterfly.

    PubMed

    Schtickzelle, Nicolas; Mennechez, Gwénaëlle; Baguette, Michel

    2006-04-01

    Habitat fragmentation is expected to impose strong selective pressures on dispersal rates. However, evolutionary responses of dispersal are not self-evident, since various selection pressures act in opposite directions. Here we disentangled the components of dispersal behavior in a metapopulation context using the Virtual Migration model, and we linked their variation to habitat fragmentation in the specialist butterfly Proclossiana eunomia. Our study provided a nearly unique opportunity to study how habitat fragmentation modifies dispersal at the landscape scale, as opposed to microlandscapes or simulation studies. Indeed, we studied the same species in four landscapes with various habitat fragmentation levels, in which large amounts of field data were collected and analyzed using similar methodologies. We showed the existence of quantitative variations in dispersal behavior correlated with increased fragmentation. Dispersal propensity from habitat patches (for a given patch size), and mortality during dispersal (for a given patch connectivity) were lower in more fragmented landscapes. We suggest that these were the consequences of two different evolutionary responses of dispersal behavior at the individual level: (1) when fragmentation increased, the reluctance of individuals to cross habitat patch boundaries also increased; (2) when individuals dispersed, they flew straighter in the matrix, which is the best strategy to improve dispersal success. Such evolutionary responses could generate complex nonlinear patterns of dispersal changes at the metapopulation level according to habitat fragmentation. Due to the small size and increased isolation of habitat patches in fragmented landscapes, overall emigration rate and mortality during dispersal remained high. As a consequence, successful dispersal at the metapopulation scale remained limited. Therefore, to what extent the selection of individuals with a lower dispersal propensity and a higher survival during

  4. A small nonrule of 3 compatible fragment library provides high hit rate of endothiapepsin crystal structures with various fragment chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Köster, Helene; Craan, Tobias; Brass, Sascha; Herhaus, Christian; Zentgraf, Matthias; Neumann, Lars; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2011-11-24

    Druglike molecules are defined by Lipinski's rule of 5, to characterize fragment thresholds, they have been reduced from 5 to 3 (Astex's rule of 3). They are applied to assemble fragment libraries, and providers use them to select fragments for commercial offer. We question whether these rules are too stringent to compose fragment libraries with candidates exhibiting sufficient room for chemical subsequent growing and merging modifications as appropriate functional groups for chemical transformations are required. Usually these groups exhibit properties as hydrogen bond donors/acceptors and provide entry points for optimization chemistry. We therefore designed a fragment library (364 entries) without strictly applying the rule of 3. For initial screening for endothiapepsin binding, we performed a biochemical cleavage assay of a fluorogenic substrate at 1 mM. "Hits" were defined to inhibit the enzyme by at least 40%. Fifty-five hits were suggested and subsequently soaked into endothiapepsin crystals. Eleven crystal structures could be determined covering fragments with diverse binding modes: (i) direct binding to the catalytic dyad aspartates, (ii) water-mediated binding to the aspartates, (iii) no direct interaction with the dyad. They occupy different specificity pockets. Only 4 of the 11 fragments are consistent with the rule of 3. Restriction to this rule would have limited the fragment hits to a strongly reduced variety of chemotypes. PMID:21972967

  5. Don't forget the fragment! An unusual case of occult fragment embolisation following penetrating neck injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, E M; Boylan, M; Hawker, J J; Banerjee, B

    2011-12-01

    Fragment embolisation following vascular injury is uncommon. The case of a 31 year old soldier, who sustained a penetrating fragment injury to the neck with distal arterial embolisation, is presented and the discussion illustrates both the importance of expedient assessment and management of cervical vascular injuries and of thorough correlation of clinical and radiological findings to avoid missed emboli.

  6. A small nonrule of 3 compatible fragment library provides high hit rate of endothiapepsin crystal structures with various fragment chemotypes.

    PubMed

    Köster, Helene; Craan, Tobias; Brass, Sascha; Herhaus, Christian; Zentgraf, Matthias; Neumann, Lars; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2011-11-24

    Druglike molecules are defined by Lipinski's rule of 5, to characterize fragment thresholds, they have been reduced from 5 to 3 (Astex's rule of 3). They are applied to assemble fragment libraries, and providers use them to select fragments for commercial offer. We question whether these rules are too stringent to compose fragment libraries with candidates exhibiting sufficient room for chemical subsequent growing and merging modifications as appropriate functional groups for chemical transformations are required. Usually these groups exhibit properties as hydrogen bond donors/acceptors and provide entry points for optimization chemistry. We therefore designed a fragment library (364 entries) without strictly applying the rule of 3. For initial screening for endothiapepsin binding, we performed a biochemical cleavage assay of a fluorogenic substrate at 1 mM. "Hits" were defined to inhibit the enzyme by at least 40%. Fifty-five hits were suggested and subsequently soaked into endothiapepsin crystals. Eleven crystal structures could be determined covering fragments with diverse binding modes: (i) direct binding to the catalytic dyad aspartates, (ii) water-mediated binding to the aspartates, (iii) no direct interaction with the dyad. They occupy different specificity pockets. Only 4 of the 11 fragments are consistent with the rule of 3. Restriction to this rule would have limited the fragment hits to a strongly reduced variety of chemotypes.

  7. Comparing Binding Modes of Analogous Fragments Using NMR in Fragment-Based Drug Design: Application to PRDX5

    PubMed Central

    Guichou, Jean-François; Cala, Olivier; Krimm, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design is one of the most promising approaches for discovering novel and potent inhibitors against therapeutic targets. The first step of the process consists of identifying fragments that bind the protein target. The determination of the fragment binding mode plays a major role in the selection of the fragment hits that will be processed into drug-like compounds. Comparing the binding modes of analogous fragments is a critical task, not only to identify specific interactions between the protein target and the fragment, but also to verify whether the binding mode is conserved or differs according to the fragment modification. While X-ray crystallography is the technique of choice, NMR methods are helpful when this fails. We show here how the ligand-observed saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment and the protein-observed 15N-HSQC experiment, two popular NMR screening experiments, can be used to compare the binding modes of analogous fragments. We discuss the application and limitations of these approaches based on STD-epitope mapping, chemical shift perturbation (CSP) calculation and comparative CSP sign analysis, using the human peroxiredoxin 5 as a protein model. PMID:25025339

  8. Nuclear fragmentation energy and momentum transfer distributions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Khan, Ferdous

    1989-01-01

    An optical model description of energy and momentum transfer in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. Transverse and longitudinal momentum transfers to the projectile are shown to arise from the real and absorptive part of the optical potential, respectively. Comparisons of fragment momentum distribution observables with experiments are made and trends outlined based on our knowledge of the underlying nucleon-nucleon interaction. Corrections to the above calculations are discussed. Finally, use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is indicated.

  9. High-resolution (e, 2e + ion) study of electron-impact ionization and fragmentation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xueguang Pflüger, Thomas; Weyland, Marvin; Baek, Woon Yong; Rabus, Hans; Ullrich, Joachim; Dorn, Alexander

    2015-05-07

    The ionization and fragmentation of methane induced by low-energy (E{sub 0} = 66 eV) electron-impact is investigated using a reaction microscope. The momentum vectors of all three charged final state particles, two outgoing electrons, and one fragment ion, are detected in coincidence. Compared to the earlier study [Xu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134307 (2013)], considerable improvements to the instrumental mass and energy resolutions have been achieved. The fragment products CH{sub 4}{sup +}, CH{sub 3}{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, CH{sup +}, and C{sup +} are clearly resolved. The binding energy resolution of ΔE = 2.0 eV is a factor of three better than in the earlier measurements. The fragmentation channels are investigated by measuring the ion kinetic energy distributions and the binding energy spectra. While being mostly in consistence with existing photoionization studies the results show differences including missing fragmentation channels and previously unseen channels.

  10. Effects of target fragmentation on evaluation of LET spectra from space radiations: implications for space radiation protection studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badavi, F. F.; Badhwar, G. D.

    1996-01-01

    We present calculations of linear energy transfer (LET) spectra in low earth orbit from galactic cosmic rays and trapped protons using the HZETRN/BRYNTRN computer code. The emphasis of our calculations is on the analysis of the effects of secondary nuclei produced through target fragmentation in the spacecraft shield or detectors. Recent improvements in the HZETRN/BRYNTRN radiation transport computer code are described. Calculations show that at large values of LET (> 100 keV/micrometer) the LET spectra seen in free space and low earth orbit (LEO) are dominated by target fragments and not the primary nuclei. Although the evaluation of microdosimetric spectra is not considered here, calculations of LET spectra support that the large lineal energy (y) events are dominated by the target fragments. Finally, we discuss the situation for interplanetary exposures to galactic cosmic rays and show that current radiation transport codes predict that in the region of high LET values the LET spectra at significant shield depths (> 10 g/cm2 of Al) is greatly modified by target fragments. These results suggest that studies of track structure and biological response of space radiation should place emphasis on short tracks of medium charge fragments produced in the human body by high energy protons and neutrons.

  11. Tropical forest fragmentation limits pollination of a keystone understory herb.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Adam S; Frey, Sarah J K; Robinson, W Douglas; Kress, W John; Betts, Matthew G

    2014-08-01

    Loss of native vegetation cover is thought to be a major driver of declines in pollination success worldwide. However, it is not well known whether reducing the fragmentation of remaining vegetation can ameliorate these negative effects. We tested the independent effects of composition vs. configuration on the reproductive success of a keystone tropical forest herb (Heliconia tortuosa). To do this we designed a large-scale mensurative experiment that independently varied connected forest-patch size (configuration) and surrounding amount of forest (composition). In each patch, we tested whether pollen tubes, fruit, and seed set were associated with these landscape variables. We also captured hummingbirds as an indication of pollinator availability in a subset of patches according to the same design. We found evidence for an effect of configuration on seed set of H. tortuosa, but not on other aspects of plant reproduction; proportion of seeds produced increased 40% across the gradient in patch size we observed (0.64 to > 1300 ha), independent of the amount of forest in the surrounding landscape at both local and landscape scales. We also found that the availability of pollinators was dependent upon forest configuration; hummingbird capture rates increased three and one-half times across the patch size gradient, independent of forest amount. Finally, pollinator availability was strongly positively correlated with seed set. We hypothesize that the effects of configuration on plant fitness that we observed are due to reduced pollen quality resulting from altered hummingbird availability and/or movement behavior. Our results suggest that prioritizing larger patches of tropical forest may be particularly important for conservation of this species.

  12. Tropical forest fragmentation limits pollination of a keystone understory herb.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Adam S; Frey, Sarah J K; Robinson, W Douglas; Kress, W John; Betts, Matthew G

    2014-08-01

    Loss of native vegetation cover is thought to be a major driver of declines in pollination success worldwide. However, it is not well known whether reducing the fragmentation of remaining vegetation can ameliorate these negative effects. We tested the independent effects of composition vs. configuration on the reproductive success of a keystone tropical forest herb (Heliconia tortuosa). To do this we designed a large-scale mensurative experiment that independently varied connected forest-patch size (configuration) and surrounding amount of forest (composition). In each patch, we tested whether pollen tubes, fruit, and seed set were associated with these landscape variables. We also captured hummingbirds as an indication of pollinator availability in a subset of patches according to the same design. We found evidence for an effect of configuration on seed set of H. tortuosa, but not on other aspects of plant reproduction; proportion of seeds produced increased 40% across the gradient in patch size we observed (0.64 to > 1300 ha), independent of the amount of forest in the surrounding landscape at both local and landscape scales. We also found that the availability of pollinators was dependent upon forest configuration; hummingbird capture rates increased three and one-half times across the patch size gradient, independent of forest amount. Finally, pollinator availability was strongly positively correlated with seed set. We hypothesize that the effects of configuration on plant fitness that we observed are due to reduced pollen quality resulting from altered hummingbird availability and/or movement behavior. Our results suggest that prioritizing larger patches of tropical forest may be particularly important for conservation of this species. PMID:25230471

  13. Verb-Final Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogihara, Saeko

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is a typological study of verb-final languages, the purpose of which is to examine various grammatical phenomena in verb-final languages to discover whether there are correlations between the final position of the verb and other aspects of grammar. It examines how finality of the verb interacts with argument coding in simple…

  14. Electron impact fragmentation of thymine: partial ionization cross sections for positive fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Burgt, Peter J. M.; Mahon, Francis; Barrett, Gerard; Gradziel, Marcin L.

    2014-06-01

    We have measured mass spectra for positive ions for low-energy electron impact on thymine using a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Using computer controlled data acquisition, mass spectra have been acquired for electron impact energies up to 100 eV in steps of 0.5 eV. Ion yield curves for most of the fragment ions have been determined by fitting groups of adjacent peaks in the mass spectra with sequences of normalized Gaussians. The ion yield curves have been normalized by comparing the sum of the ion yields to the average of calculated total ionization cross sections. Appearance energies have been determined. The nearly equal appearance energies of 83 u and 55 u observed in the present work strongly indicate that near threshold the 55 u ion is formed directly by the breakage of two bonds in the ring, rather than from a successive loss of HNCO and CO from the parent ion. Likewise 54 u is not formed by CO loss from 82 u. The appearance energies are in a number of cases consistent with the loss of one or more hydrogen atoms from a heavier fragment, but 70 u is not formed by hydrogen loss from 71 u.

  15. The potential effects of climate change on amphibian distribution, range fragmentation and turnover in China.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ren-Yan; Kong, Xiao-Quan; Huang, Min-Yi; Varela, Sara; Ji, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Many studies predict that climate change will cause species movement and turnover, but few have considered the effect of climate change on range fragmentation for current species and/or populations. We used MaxEnt to predict suitable habitat, fragmentation and turnover for 134 amphibian species in China under 40 future climate change scenarios spanning four pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6 and RCP8.5) and two time periods (the 2050s and 2070s). Our results show that climate change may cause a major shift in spatial patterns of amphibian diversity. Amphibians in China would lose 20% of their original ranges on average; the distribution outside current ranges would increase by 15%. Suitable habitats for over 90% of species will be located in the north of their current range, for over 95% of species in higher altitudes (from currently 137-4,124 m to 286-4,396 m in the 2050s or 314-4,448 m in the 2070s), and for over 75% of species in the west of their current range. Also, our results predict two different general responses to the climate change: some species contract their ranges while moving westwards, southwards and to higher altitudes, while others expand their ranges. Finally, our analyses indicate that range dynamics and fragmentation are related, which means that the effects of climate change on Chinese amphibians might be two-folded.

  16. The potential effects of climate change on amphibian distribution, range fragmentation and turnover in China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min-Yi; Varela, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Many studies predict that climate change will cause species movement and turnover, but few have considered the effect of climate change on range fragmentation for current species and/or populations. We used MaxEnt to predict suitable habitat, fragmentation and turnover for 134 amphibian species in China under 40 future climate change scenarios spanning four pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6 and RCP8.5) and two time periods (the 2050s and 2070s). Our results show that climate change may cause a major shift in spatial patterns of amphibian diversity. Amphibians in China would lose 20% of their original ranges on average; the distribution outside current ranges would increase by 15%. Suitable habitats for over 90% of species will be located in the north of their current range, for over 95% of species in higher altitudes (from currently 137–4,124 m to 286–4,396 m in the 2050s or 314–4,448 m in the 2070s), and for over 75% of species in the west of their current range. Also, our results predict two different general responses to the climate change: some species contract their ranges while moving westwards, southwards and to higher altitudes, while others expand their ranges. Finally, our analyses indicate that range dynamics and fragmentation are related, which means that the effects of climate change on Chinese amphibians might be two-folded. PMID:27547522

  17. Fragmentation of molecular adsorbates by electron and ion bombardment: methoxy chemistry on Al(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, P.; Chen, J.G.; Ng, L.; Colaianni, M.L.; Yates, J.T.

    1988-08-15

    High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HR)EELS has been used successfully to provide direct spectroscopic evidence regarding details of the molecular fragmentation of methoxy (CH3O) on Al(lll) caused by energetic electron and ion beams. Chemisorbed methoxy on Al(lll) is produced by heating of absorbed CH3OH. Irradiation of CH3O(a) by either energetic (approx 300 eV) electrons or Ar+ ions results in C-O and C-H bond scission with simultaneous formation of Al-O and Al-C bonds. During electron stimulated desorption the CH3O(a) species undergo sequential fragmentation first to CHx groups that are captured by the surface and in the final decay process to adsorbed carbon. C-O bonds in CH3O9a) are depleted preferentially compared to C-H bonds in CHx(a) species. The electron-induced sequential fragmentation of the patent CH3 group (from methoxy) to resultant CHx(a) occurs with an efficiency approx. 3 orders of magnitude greater than the subsequent process of CHx(a)=C(a). Cross sections for various bond scission processes in electron and ion bombardment have been estimated.

  18. Extraction of quark transversity distribution and Collins fragmentation functions with QCD evolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Prokudin, Alexei; Sun, Peng; Yuan, Feng

    2016-01-13

    In this paper, we study the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) evolution of the Collins azimuthal asymmetries in e+e- annihilations and semi-inclusive hadron production in deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) processes. All the relevant coefficients are calculated up to the next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL) order accuracy. By applying the TMD evolution at the approximate NLL order in the Collins- Soper-Sterman (CSS) formalism, we extract transversity distributions for u and d quarks and Collins fragmentation functions from current experimental data by a global analysis of the Collins asymmetries in back-to-back di-hadron productions in e+e- annihilations measured by BELLE and BABAR Collaborations and SIDIS datamore » from HERMES, COMPASS, and JLab HALL A experiments. The impact of the evolution effects and the relevant theoretical uncertainties are discussed. We further discuss the TMD interpretation for our results, and illustrate the unpolarized quark distribution, transversity distribution, unpolarized quark fragmentation and Collins fragmentation functions depending on the transverse momentum and the hard momentum scale. Finally, we give predictions and discuss impact of future experiments.« less

  19. The potential effects of climate change on amphibian distribution, range fragmentation and turnover in China.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ren-Yan; Kong, Xiao-Quan; Huang, Min-Yi; Varela, Sara; Ji, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Many studies predict that climate change will cause species movement and turnover, but few have considered the effect of climate change on range fragmentation for current species and/or populations. We used MaxEnt to predict suitable habitat, fragmentation and turnover for 134 amphibian species in China under 40 future climate change scenarios spanning four pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6 and RCP8.5) and two time periods (the 2050s and 2070s). Our results show that climate change may cause a major shift in spatial patterns of amphibian diversity. Amphibians in China would lose 20% of their original ranges on average; the distribution outside current ranges would increase by 15%. Suitable habitats for over 90% of species will be located in the north of their current range, for over 95% of species in higher altitudes (from currently 137-4,124 m to 286-4,396 m in the 2050s or 314-4,448 m in the 2070s), and for over 75% of species in the west of their current range. Also, our results predict two different general responses to the climate change: some species contract their ranges while moving westwards, southwards and to higher altitudes, while others expand their ranges. Finally, our analyses indicate that range dynamics and fragmentation are related, which means that the effects of climate change on Chinese amphibians might be two-folded. PMID:27547522

  20. Fragmentation transition in a coevolving network with link-state dynamics.

    PubMed

    Carro, A; Vazquez, F; Toral, R; San Miguel, M

    2014-06-01

    We study a network model that couples the dynamics of link states with the evolution of the network topology. The state of each link, either A or B, is updated according to the majority rule or zero-temperature Glauber dynamics, in which links adopt the state of the majority of their neighboring links in the network. Additionally, a link that is in a local minority is rewired to a randomly chosen node. While large systems evolving under the majority rule alone always fall into disordered topological traps composed by frustrated links, any amount of rewiring is able to drive the network to complete order, by relinking frustrated links and so releasing the system from traps. However, depending on the relative rate of the majority rule and the rewiring processes, the system evolves towards different ordered absorbing configurations: either a one-component network with all links in the same state or a network fragmented in two components with opposite states. For low rewiring rates and finite-size networks there is a domain of bistability between fragmented and nonfragmented final states. Finite-size scaling indicates that fragmentation is the only possible scenario for large systems and any nonzero rate of rewiring.

  1. PLANETARY CORE FORMATION WITH COLLISIONAL FRAGMENTATION AND ATMOSPHERE TO FORM GAS GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Krivov, Alexander V.; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2011-09-01

    Massive planetary cores ({approx}10 Earth masses) trigger rapid gas accretion to form gas giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. We investigate the core growth and the possibilities for cores to reach such a critical core mass. At the late stage, planetary cores grow through collisions with small planetesimals. Collisional fragmentation of planetesimals, which is induced by gravitational interaction with planetary cores, reduces the amount of planetesimals surrounding them, and thus the final core masses. Starting from small planetesimals that the fragmentation rapidly removes, less massive cores are formed. However, planetary cores acquire atmospheres that enlarge their collisional cross section before rapid gas accretion. Once planetary cores exceed about Mars mass, atmospheres significantly accelerate the growth of cores. We show that, taking into account the effects of fragmentation and atmosphere, initially large planetesimals enable formation of sufficiently massive cores. On the other hand, because the growth of cores is slow for large planetesimals, a massive disk is necessary for cores to grow enough within a disk lifetime. If the disk with 100 km sized initial planetesimals is 10 times as massive as the minimum mass solar nebula, planetary cores can exceed 10 Earth masses in the Jovian planet region (>5 AU).

  2. Bootstrap embedding: An internally consistent fragment-based method.

    PubMed

    Welborn, Matthew; Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-08-21

    Strong correlation poses a difficult problem for electronic structure theory, with computational cost scaling quickly with system size. Fragment embedding is an attractive approach to this problem. By dividing a large complicated system into smaller manageable fragments "embedded" in an approximate description of the rest of the system, we can hope to ameliorate the steep cost of correlated calculations. While appealing, these methods often converge slowly with fragment size because of small errors at the boundary between fragment and bath. We describe a new electronic embedding method, dubbed "Bootstrap Embedding," a self-consistent wavefunction-in-wavefunction embedding theory that uses overlapping fragments to improve the description of fragment edges. We apply this method to the one dimensional Hubbard model and a translationally asymmetric variant, and find that it performs very well for energies and populations. We find Bootstrap Embedding converges rapidly with embedded fragment size, overcoming the surface-area-to-volume-ratio error typical of many embedding methods. We anticipate that this method may lead to a low-scaling, high accuracy treatment of electron correlation in large molecular systems. PMID:27544082

  3. Explosive Containment Chamber Vulnerability to Chemical Munition Fragment Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Benham, R.A.; Fischer, S.H.; Kipp, M.E.; Martinez, R.R.

    1999-02-01

    Scenarios in which the explosive burster charge in a chemical munition accidentally detonates inside demilitarization containment chambers are analyzed. The vulnerability of an inner Auxiliary Pressure Vessel and the primary Explosive Containment Chamber to impact by fragments from the largest explosive charge expected to be placed in these chambers (M426, 8 inch, chemical, 7 lbs Comp B) is evaluated. Numerical (CTH) and empirical (ConWep) codes are used to characterize the munition fragments, and assess the consequences of their impact and penetration on the walls of these vessels. Both pristine and corroded configurations of the munition have been considered, with and without liquid agent fill. When the munition burster charge detonates, munition case fragments impact and perforate the Auxiliary Pressure Vessel wall, resulting in extensive breakup of this inner chamber and the formation of additional fragments. These residual munition case and Auxiliary Pressure Vessel fragments have sufficient mass and velocity to crater the Explosive Containment Chamber inner wall layer, with accompanying localized permanent deformation (bulging) of both the inner and outer chamber walls. The integrity of the Explosive Containment Chamber was retained under all of the APV / munition configurations considered in this study, with no evidence that primary (munition) or secondary (munition and Auxiliary Pressure Vessel) fragments will perforate the inner chamber wall. Limited analyses of munition detonation without the Auxiliary Pressure Vessel present indicate that some munition span fragments could form under those conditions that have sufficient mass and velocity to perforate the inner wall of the Explosive Containment Chamber.

  4. Molecule fragmentation at the Dresden EBIS-Aa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreller, M.; Zschornack, G.; Kentsch, U.; Heller, R.

    2008-02-01

    We report on molecule fragmentation measurements of propane in high dense electron beams of a room-temperature electron beam ion source, the so-called Dresden EBIS-A. After fragmentation of propane molecules in the electron beam the fragments were continuously extracted and q /A separated by a bifocal dipole magnet. Fragmentation spectra were measured at working gas pressures of 10-9mbar up to 10-8mbar, electron currents of 29mA up to 75mA, and electron energies of 11keV up to 15keV. Thereby all possible stoichiometric ratios of propane fragments were detected. At low electron beam currents the ion current output of the CHx+ (x =0-3) and the C2Hx+ (x=0-5) fragments is nearly identically. At higher electron currents the CHx+ (x =0-3) peaks dominate the spectra and the ratio between the C+ peak and CHx+ (x =0-3) peaks increases from 2:1 to 3:1. It was shown that the working gas pressure has no significant influence on the fragment distribution but on the total ion current.

  5. Clustering document fragments using background color and texture information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, Sukalpa; Franke, Katrin; Pal, Umapada

    2012-01-01

    Forensic analysis of questioned documents sometimes can be extensively data intensive. A forensic expert might need to analyze a heap of document fragments and in such cases to ensure reliability he/she should focus only on relevant evidences hidden in those document fragments. Relevant document retrieval needs finding of similar document fragments. One notion of obtaining such similar documents could be by using document fragment's physical characteristics like color, texture, etc. In this article we propose an automatic scheme to retrieve similar document fragments based on visual appearance of document paper and texture. Multispectral color characteristics using biologically inspired color differentiation techniques are implemented here. This is done by projecting document color characteristics to Lab color space. Gabor filter-based texture analysis is used to identify document texture. It is desired that document fragments from same source will have similar color and texture. For clustering similar document fragments of our test dataset we use a Self Organizing Map (SOM) of dimension 5×5, where the document color and texture information are used as features. We obtained an encouraging accuracy of 97.17% from 1063 test images.

  6. Bootstrap embedding: An internally consistent fragment-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welborn, Matthew; Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-08-01

    Strong correlation poses a difficult problem for electronic structure theory, with computational cost scaling quickly with system size. Fragment embedding is an attractive approach to this problem. By dividing a large complicated system into smaller manageable fragments "embedded" in an approximate description of the rest of the system, we can hope to ameliorate the steep cost of correlated calculations. While appealing, these methods often converge slowly with fragment size because of small errors at the boundary between fragment and bath. We describe a new electronic embedding method, dubbed "Bootstrap Embedding," a self-consistent wavefunction-in-wavefunction embedding theory that uses overlapping fragments to improve the description of fragment edges. We apply this method to the one dimensional Hubbard model and a translationally asymmetric variant, and find that it performs very well for energies and populations. We find Bootstrap Embedding converges rapidly with embedded fragment size, overcoming the surface-area-to-volume-ratio error typical of many embedding methods. We anticipate that this method may lead to a low-scaling, high accuracy treatment of electron correlation in large molecular systems.

  7. DNA fragmentation induced by ionizing radiation - Atomic Force Microscopy study .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Psonka, K.; Elsaesser, Th.; Brons, S.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    DNA as a carrier of genetic information is considered to be the critical target for radiation induced damage Especially severe are DNA double-strand breaks DSBs formed when breaks occur in both strands of the molecule The DSBs production is determined by the spatial distribution of ionization events dependent on the physical properties of the energy deposition and the chemical environment of the DNA According to theoretical predictions high LET charged particle radiation induces lesions in close proximity forming so called clustered damage in the DNA Atomic Force Microscopy AFM was newly established as a technique allowing the direct visualization of DNA fragments resulting from DSBs induced in small DNA molecules plasmids by ionizing radiation We have used AFM to visualize the DNA fragmentation induced by heavy ions high LET radiation and to compare it to the fragmentation pattern obtained after X-rays low LET radiation Plasmid supercoiled DNA was irradiated in vitro with X-rays and 3 9 MeV u Ni ions within a dose range 0 -- 3000 Gy Afterwards the samples were analyzed using AFM which allowed the detection and length measurement of individual fragments with a nanometer resolution Recording of the length of the induced fragments allowed to distinguish between molecules broken by a single DSB or by multiple DSBs The fragment length distributions were derived for different doses and different radiation qualities The first results of the measurement of radiation-induced DNA fragmentation show an influence of radiation quality on

  8. Global patterns of fragmentation and connectivity of mammalian carnivore habitat

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Kevin R.; Burdett, Christopher L.; Theobald, David M.; Rondinini, Carlo; Boitani, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Although mammalian carnivores are vulnerable to habitat fragmentation and require landscape connectivity, their global patterns of fragmentation and connectivity have not been examined. We use recently developed high-resolution habitat suitability models to conduct comparative analyses and to identify global hotspots of fragmentation and connectivity for the world's terrestrial carnivores. Species with less fragmentation (i.e. more interior high-quality habitat) had larger geographical ranges, a greater proportion of habitat within their range, greater habitat connectivity and a lower risk of extinction. Species with higher connectivity (i.e. less habitat isolation) also had a greater proportion of high-quality habitat, but had smaller, not larger, ranges, probably reflecting shorter distances between habitat patches for species with restricted distributions; such species were also more threatened, as would be expected given the negative relationship between range size and extinction risk. Fragmentation and connectivity did not differ among Carnivora families, and body mass was associated with connectivity but not fragmentation. On average, only 54.3 per cent of a species' geographical range comprised high-quality habitat, and more troubling, only 5.2 per cent of the range comprised such habitat within protected areas. Identification of global hotspots of fragmentation and connectivity will help guide strategic priorities for carnivore conservation. PMID:21844043

  9. The role of valence quarks in proton fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hove, L.

    1981-06-01

    Following earlier theoretical and experimental work (Kalinowski et al. [6], Bourquin et al. [7]), baryon production by fragmentation of incident protons in high energy hadron collisions is re-investigated in terms of a fragmentation-recombination mechanism similar to a model proposed by Fukuda and Iso [4]. The multiplicities n f (B) for the various types of baryons B produced in proton fragmentation are expressed in terms of the probabilities a i for i=0, ..., 3 valence quarks of the incident proton to emerge in the baryon B and 3- i to emerge in mesons (following [7] we suppose that antibaryon production is mostly due to baryon-antibaryon pair production by a mechanism of non-fragmentation type, and this is taken into account in deducing n f (B) from baryon and antibaryon multiplicity data). The positivity of the a i is found to impose remarkably narrow constraints on the n f (B) for (meta)stable B, and we find the data to satisfy these constraints. We show furthermore that the data are compatible with uncorrelated behaviour of the valence quarks of the incident proton, each of them having a probability ≃ 0.6 to emerge in the fragmentation baryon B, and a probability ≃ 0.4 to emerge in a meson. We also briefly discuss the relation of our analysis to previous work on the recombination model of proton fragmentation and its possible extension to meson fragmentation.

  10. Causes and consequences of habitat fragmentation in river networks.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Matthew R; Doyle, Martin W; Strayer, David L

    2015-10-01

    Increases in river fragmentation globally threaten freshwater biodiversity. Rivers are fragmented by many agents, both natural and anthropogenic. We review the distribution and frequency of these major agents, along with their effects on connectivity and habitat quality. Most fragmentation research has focused on terrestrial habitats, but theories and generalizations developed in terrestrial habitats do not always apply well to river networks. For example, terrestrial habitats are usually conceptualized as two-dimensional, whereas rivers often are conceptualized as one-dimensional or dendritic. In addition, river flow often leads to highly asymmetric effects of barriers on habitat and permeability. New approaches tailored to river networks can be applied to describe the network-wide effects of multiple barriers on both connectivity and habitat quality. The net effects of anthropogenic fragmentation on freshwater biodiversity are likely underestimated, because of time lags in effects and the difficulty of generating a single, simple signal of fragmentation that applies to all aquatic species. We conclude by presenting a decision tree for managing freshwater fragmentation, as well as some research horizons for evaluating fragmented riverscapes.

  11. DebriSat Fragment Characterization System and Processing Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivero, M.; Shiotani, B.; M. Carrasquilla; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J. C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2016-01-01

    The DebriSat project is a continuing effort sponsored by NASA and DoD to update existing break-up models using data obtained from hypervelocity impact tests performed to simulate on-orbit collisions. After the impact tests, a team at the University of Florida has been working to characterize the fragments in terms of their mass, size, shape, color and material content. The focus of the post-impact effort has been the collection of 2 mm and larger fragments resulting from the hypervelocity impact test. To date, in excess of 125K fragments have been recovered which is approximately 40K more than the 85K fragments predicted by the existing models. While the fragment collection activities continue, there has been a transition to the characterization of the recovered fragments. Since the start of the characterization effort, the focus has been on the use of automation to (i) expedite the fragment characterization process and (ii) minimize the effects of human subjectivity on the results; e.g., automated data entry processes were developed and implemented to minimize errors during transcription of the measurement data. At all steps of the process, however, there is human oversight to ensure the integrity of the data. Additionally, repeatability and reproducibility tests have been developed and implemented to ensure that the instrumentations used in the characterization process are accurate and properly calibrated.

  12. Bootstrap embedding: An internally consistent fragment-based method.

    PubMed

    Welborn, Matthew; Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-08-21

    Strong correlation poses a difficult problem for electronic structure theory, with computational cost scaling quickly with system size. Fragment embedding is an attractive approach to this problem. By dividing a large complicated system into smaller manageable fragments "embedded" in an approximate description of the rest of the system, we can hope to ameliorate the steep cost of correlated calculations. While appealing, these methods often converge slowly with fragment size because of small errors at the boundary between fragment and bath. We describe a new electronic embedding method, dubbed "Bootstrap Embedding," a self-consistent wavefunction-in-wavefunction embedding theory that uses overlapping fragments to improve the description of fragment edges. We apply this method to the one dimensional Hubbard model and a translationally asymmetric variant, and find that it performs very well for energies and populations. We find Bootstrap Embedding converges rapidly with embedded fragment size, overcoming the surface-area-to-volume-ratio error typical of many embedding methods. We anticipate that this method may lead to a low-scaling, high accuracy treatment of electron correlation in large molecular systems.

  13. Fragmentation mechanisms of cytosine, adenine and guanine ionized bases.

    PubMed

    Sadr-Arani, Leila; Mignon, Pierre; Chermette, Henry; Abdoul-Carime, Hassan; Farizon, Bernadette; Farizon, Michel

    2015-05-01

    The different fragmentation channels of cytosine, adenine and guanine have been studied through DFT calculations. The electronic structure of bases, their cations, and the fragments obtained by breaking bonds provides a good understanding of the fragmentation process that can complete the experimental approach. The calculations allow assigning various fragments to the given peaks. The comparison between the energy required for the formation of fragments and the peak intensity in the mass spectrum is used. For cytosine and guanine the elimination of the HNCO molecule is a major route of dissociation, while for adenine multiple loss of HCN or HNC can be followed up to small fragments. For cytosine, this corresponds to the initial bond cleavage of N3-C4/N1-C2, which represents the main dissociation route. For guanine the release of HNCO is obtained through the N1-C2/C5-C6 bond cleavage (reverse order also possible) leading to the largest peak of the spectrum. The corresponding energies of 3.5 and 3.9 eV are typically in the range available in the experiments. The loss of NH3 or HCN is also possible but requires more energy. For adenine, fragmentation consists of multiple loss of the HCN molecule and the main route corresponding to HC8N9 loss is followed by the release of HC2N1. PMID:25869111

  14. Causes and consequences of habitat fragmentation in river networks.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Matthew R; Doyle, Martin W; Strayer, David L

    2015-10-01

    Increases in river fragmentation globally threaten freshwater biodiversity. Rivers are fragmented by many agents, both natural and anthropogenic. We review the distribution and frequency of these major agents, along with their effects on connectivity and habitat quality. Most fragmentation research has focused on terrestrial habitats, but theories and generalizations developed in terrestrial habitats do not always apply well to river networks. For example, terrestrial habitats are usually conceptualized as two-dimensional, whereas rivers often are conceptualized as one-dimensional or dendritic. In addition, river flow often leads to highly asymmetric effects of barriers on habitat and permeability. New approaches tailored to river networks can be applied to describe the network-wide effects of multiple barriers on both connectivity and habitat quality. The net effects of anthropogenic fragmentation on freshwater biodiversity are likely underestimated, because of time lags in effects and the difficulty of generating a single, simple signal of fragmentation that applies to all aquatic species. We conclude by presenting a decision tree for managing freshwater fragmentation, as well as some research horizons for evaluating fragmented riverscapes. PMID:26267672

  15. Using landscape history to predict biodiversity patterns in fragmented landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Ewers, Robert M; Didham, Raphael K; Pearse, William D; Lefebvre, Véronique; Rosa, Isabel M D; Carreiras, João M B; Lucas, Richard M; Reuman, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Landscape ecology plays a vital role in understanding the impacts of land-use change on biodiversity, but it is not a predictive discipline, lacking theoretical models that quantitatively predict biodiversity patterns from first principles. Here, we draw heavily on ideas from phylogenetics to fill this gap, basing our approach on the insight that habitat fragments have a shared history. We develop a landscape ‘terrageny’, which represents the historical spatial separation of habitat fragments in the same way that a phylogeny represents evolutionary divergence among species. Combining a random sampling model with a terrageny generates numerical predictions about the expected proportion of species shared between any two fragments, the locations of locally endemic species, and the number of species that have been driven locally extinct. The model predicts that community similarity declines with terragenetic distance, and that local endemics are more likely to be found in terragenetically distinctive fragments than in large fragments. We derive equations to quantify the variance around predictions, and show that ignoring the spatial structure of fragmented landscapes leads to over-estimates of local extinction rates at the landscape scale. We argue that ignoring the shared history of habitat fragments limits our ability to understand biodiversity changes in human-modified landscapes. PMID:23931035

  16. Statistical mechanics of fragmentation processes of ice and rock bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirov, A. G.; Vityazev, A. V.

    1996-09-01

    It is a well-known experimental fact that impact fragmentation, specifically of ice and rock bodies, causes a two-step ("knee"-shaped) power distribution of fragment masses with exponent values within the limits -4 and -1.5 (here and henceforth the differential distribution is borne in mind). A new theoretical approach is proposed to determine the exponent values, a minimal fracture mass, and properties of the knee. As a basis for construction of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of condensed matter fragmentation the maximum-entropy variational principle is used. In contrast to the usual approach founded on the Boltzmann entropy the more general Tsallis entropy allowing stationary solutions not only in the exponential Boltzmann-Gibbs form but in the form of the power (fractal) law distribution as well is invoked. Relying on the analysis of a lot of published experiments a parameter β is introduced to describe an inhomogeneous distribution of the impact energy over the target. It varies from 0 (for an utterly inhomogeneous distribution of the impact energy) to 1 (for a homogeneous distribution). The lower limit of fragment masses is defined as a characteristic fragment mass for which the energy of fragment formation is minimal. This mass value depends crucially on the value of β. It is shown that for β≪1 only small fragments can be formed, and the maximal permitted fragment (of mass m1) is the upper boundary of the first stage of the fracture process and the point where the knee takes place. The second stage may be realized after a homogeneous redistribution of the remainder of the impact energy over the remainder of the target (when β→1). Here, the formation of great fragments is permitted only and the smallest of them (of mass m2) determines a lower boundary of the second stage. Different forms of the knee can be observed depending on relations between m1 and m2.

  17. Navigation by fragment fitting: a theory of hippocampal function.

    PubMed

    Worden, R

    1992-04-01

    This paper describes a computational theory of spatial learning and navigation and its possible realization in the hippocampus. In the theory, mammals store memories of their geographical environment as a large number of independent fragments. A typical fragment denotes a few prominent landmarks in some region, their geometric relations, and their nongeometric properties, such as smells and visual cues. Navigation involves piecing together current sense data and relevant fragments to form a local map of the animal's surroundings; this is like solving a jigsaw puzzle. This computational model has been implemented in a computer program, whose performance is broadly consistent with observed levels of animal performance, and laboratory results, in spatial learning. Possible realizations of the model in animal brains are discussed. Unlike some neural net models of spatial learning, the model is strongly geometric, and uses special neural structures to store and manipulate two-dimensional vectors and bearings. A possible neural architecture is described in which the hippocampus performs the geometric operations; this has a long-term memory for fragments (somewhere in the neocortex), which can associatively recall fragments into a number of parallel fragment fitters, in the dentate gyrus and CA3 regions. These vary the positions and orientations of their fragments, to optimize the fit of the fragments to each other and to the animal's recent sense data. A local map of the animal's surroundings is stored in CA1 and subicular regions, where matching of fragment positions and attributes takes place. Mismatches are passed back via the entorhinal cortex to improve the fit during the next hippocampal theta cycle. The model offers the potential for understanding current data on spatial learning, on the neuroanatomy of the hippocampus and on place cells in a coherent framework, as well as understanding the role of the hippocampus in nonpositional memory tasks. Comparisons with

  18. Optical model analyses of heavy ion fragmentation in hydrogen targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical optical-model methods for calculating cross sections for the fragmentation of high-energy heavy ions by hydrogen targets are presented. The cross sections are calculated with a knockout-ablation collision formalism which has no arbitrary fitting parameters. Predictions of elemental production cross sections from the fragmentation of 1.2A Ge(V(La-139) nuclei and of isotope production cross sections from the fragmentation of 400A MeV(S-32) nuclei are in good agreement with recently reported experimental measurements.

  19. Cloning, bacterial expression and crystallization of Fv antibody fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E´, Jean-Luc; Boulot, Ginette; Chitarra, V´ronique; Riottot, Marie-Madeleine; Souchon, H´le`ne; Houdusse, Anne; Bentley, Graham A.; Narayana Bhat, T.; Spinelli, Silvia; Poljak, Roberto J.

    1992-08-01

    The variable Fv fragments of antibodies, cloned in recombinant plasmids, can be expressed in bacteria as functional proteins having immunochemical properties which are very similar or identical with those of the corresponding parts of the parent eukaryotic antibodies. They offer new possibilities for the study of antibody-antigen interactions since the crystals of Fv fragments and of their complexes with antigen reported here diffract X-rays to a higher resolution that those obtained with the cognate Fab fragments. The Fv approach should facilitate the structural study of the combining site of antibodies and the further characterization of antigen-antibody interactions by site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

  20. To what extent does urbanisation affect fragmented grassland functioning?

    PubMed

    van der Walt, L; Cilliers, S S; Kellner, K; Du Toit, M J; Tongway, D

    2015-03-15

    Urbanisation creates altered environments characterised by increased human habitation, impermeable surfaces, artificial structures, landscape fragmentation, habitat loss, resulting in different resource loss pathways. The vulnerable Rand Highveld Grassland vegetation unit in the Tlokwe Municipal area, South Africa, has been extensively affected and transformed by urbanisation, agriculture, and mining. Grassland fragments in urban areas are often considered to be less species rich and less functional than in the more untransformed or "natural" exurban environments, and are therefore seldom a priority for conservation. Furthermore, urban grassland fragments are often being more intensely managed than exurban areas, such as consistent mowing in open urban areas. Four urbanisation measures acting as indicators for patterns and processes associated with urban areas were calculated for matrix areas surrounding each selected grassland fragment to quantify the position of each grassland remnant along an urbanisation gradient. The grassland fragments were objectively classified into two classes of urbanisation, namely "exurban" and "urban" based on the urbanisation measure values. Grazing was recorded in some exurban grasslands and mowing in some urban grassland fragments. Unmanaged grassland fragments were present in both urban and exurban areas. Fine-scale biophysical landscape function was determined by executing the Landscape Function Analysis (LFA) method. LFA assesses fine-scale landscape patchiness (entailing resource conserving potential and erosion resistance) and 11 soil surface indicators to produce three main LFA parameters (stability, infiltration, and nutrient cycling), which indicates how well a system is functioning in terms of fine-scale biophysical soil processes and characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of urbanisation and associated management practices on fine-scale biophysical landscape function of urban and exurban