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Sample records for frameshift mutations spotlight

  1. A gripping tale of ribosomal frameshifting: extragenic suppressors of frameshift mutations spotlight P-site realignment.

    PubMed

    Atkins, John F; Björk, Glenn R

    2009-03-01

    Mutants of translation components which compensate for both -1 and +1 frameshift mutations showed the first evidence for framing malleability. Those compensatory mutants isolated in bacteria and yeast with altered tRNA or protein factors are reviewed here and are considered to primarily cause altered P-site realignment and not altered translocation. Though the first sequenced tRNA mutant which suppressed a +1 frameshift mutation had an extra base in its anticodon loop and led to a textbook "yardstick" model in which the number of anticodon bases determines codon size, this model has long been discounted, although not by all. Accordingly, the reviewed data suggest that reading frame maintenance and translocation are two distinct features of the ribosome. None of the -1 tRNA suppressors have anticodon loops with fewer than the standard seven nucleotides. Many of the tRNA mutants potentially affect tRNA bending and/or stability and can be used for functional assays, and one has the conserved C74 of the 3' CCA substituted. The effect of tRNA modification deficiencies on framing has been particularly informative. The properties of some mutants suggest the use of alternative tRNA anticodon loop stack conformations by individual tRNAs in one translation cycle. The mutant proteins range from defective release factors with delayed decoding of A-site stop codons facilitating P-site frameshifting to altered EF-Tu/EF1alpha to mutant ribosomal large- and small-subunit proteins L9 and S9. Their study is revealing how mRNA slippage is restrained except where it is programmed to occur and be utilized.

  2. Two frameshift mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene

    PubMed Central

    Iannuzzi, Michael C.; Stern, Robert C.; Collins, Francis S.; Hon, Catherine Tom; Hidaka, Noriko; Strong, Theresa; Becker, Lisa; Drumm, Mitchell L.; White, Marga B.; Gerrard, Bernard; Dean, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. We have identified in exon 7 two frameshift mutations, one caused by a two-nucleotide insertion and the other caused by a one-nucleotide deletion; these mutations–CF1154insTC and CF1213delT, respectively, are predicted to shift the reading frame of the protein and to introduce UAA(ochre) termination codons at residues 369 and 368. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:1990834

  3. Adaptive Reversion of a Frameshift Mutation in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, J.; Foster, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    Mutation rates are generally thought not to be influenced by selective forces. This doctrine rests on the results of certain classical studies of the mutations that make bacteria resistant to phages and antibiotics. We have studied a strain of Escherichia coli which constitutively expresses a lacI-lacZ fusion containing a frameshift mutation that renders it Lac(-). Reversion to Lac(+) is a rare event during exponential growth but occurs in stationary cultures when lactose is the only source of energy. No revertants accumulate in the absence of lactose, or in the presence of lactose if there is another, unfulfilled requirement for growth. The mechanism for such mutation in stationary phase is not known, but it requires some function of RecA which is apparently not required for mutation during exponential growth. PMID:1916241

  4. Splice Site, Frameshift and Chimeric GFAP Mutations in Alexander Disease

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Daniel; Li, Rong; Webster, Lital S.; Naidu, Sakkubai; Kolodny, Edwin; Percy, Alan; van der Knaap, Marjo; Powers, James M.; Mantovani, John F.; Ekstein, Josef; Goldman, James E.; Messing, Albee; Brenner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is a usually fatal astrogliopathy primarily caused by mutations in the gene encoding GFAP, an intermediate filament protein expressed in astrocytes. We describe three patients with unique characteristics, and whose mutations have implications for AxD diagnosis and studies of intermediate filaments. Patient 1 is the first reported case with a non-coding mutation. The patient has a splice site change producing an in-frame deletion of exon 4 in about 10% of the transcripts. Patient 2 has an insertion and deletion at the extreme end of the coding region, resulting in a short frameshift. In addition, the mutation was found in buccal DNA but not in blood DNA, making this patient the first reported chimera. Patient 3 has a single base deletion near the C-terminal end of the protein, producing a short frameshift. These findings recommend inclusion of intronic splice site regions in genetic testing for AxD, indicate that alteration of only a small fraction of GFAP can produce disease, and provide caution against tagging intermediate filaments at their C-terminal end for cell biological investigations. PMID:22488673

  5. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  6. Mechanisms of Spontaneous and Induced Frameshift Mutation in Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Streisinger, George; Owen, Joyce Emrich

    1985-01-01

    Frequencies of spontaneous and proflavine-induced frameshift mutations increase dramatically as a function of the number of reiterated base pairs at each of two sites in the lysozyme gene of bacteriophage T4. At each site, proflavine induces addition mutations more frequently than deletion mutations. We confirm that the steroidal diamine, irehdiamine A, induces frameshift addition mutations. At sites of reiterated bases, we propose that base pairing is misaligned adjacent to a gap. The misaligned configuration is stabilized by the stacking of mutagen molecules around the extrahelical base, forming a sandwich. Proflavine induces addition mutations efficiently at a site without any reiterated bases. Mutagenesis at such sites may be due to mutagen-induced stuttering of the replication complex. PMID:3988038

  7. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Truong, Hoa T; Dudding, Tracy; Blanchard, Christopher L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-10-08

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC) in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other), resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57%) occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels) and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  8. A novel frameshift mutation of CHD7 in a Japanese patient with CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Shono, Miki; Naruto, Takuya; Watanabe, Miki; Suga, Ken-Ichi; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Kagami, Shoji; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant developmental disorder involving multiple organs. CHD7 is a major causative gene of CHARGE syndrome. We performed targeted-exome sequencing using a next-generation sequencer for molecular diagnosis of a 4-month-old male patient who was clinically suspected to have CHARGE syndrome, and report a novel monoallelic mutation in CHD7, NM_017780.3(CHD7_v001):c.2966del causing a reading frameshift [p.(Cys989Serfs*3)].

  9. A novel mitochondrial MTND5 frameshift mutation causing isolated complex I deficiency, renal failure and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Alston, Charlotte L; Morak, Monika; Reid, Christopher; Hargreaves, Iain P; Pope, Simon A S; Land, John M; Heales, Simon J; Horvath, Rita; Mundy, Helen; Taylor, Robert W

    2010-02-01

    Isolated complex I deficiency is the most commonly reported enzyme defect in paediatric mitochondrial disorders, and may arise due to mutations in nuclear-encoded structural or assembly genes, or the mitochondrial genome. We present the clinical, biochemical and molecular genetic data in a young girl whose clinical picture is dominated by chronic renal failure, myopathy and persistent lactic acidosis. An isolated complex I deficiency in muscle was identified due to a novel mutation (m.12425delA) in the MTND5 gene. This single nucleotide deletion is heteroplasmic and detectable in several tissues from the proband but not her mother, suggesting a de novo mutation event. The description of the first frameshift mutation in a mitochondrial complex I gene affirms mitochondrial DNA mutations as an important cause of isolated complex I deficiency in children and the importance of whole mitochondrial genome sequencing in the diagnostic work-up to elucidate the underlying molecular genetic abnormality and provide important genetic advice.

  10. A rapid and effective method for screening, sequencing and reporter verification of engineered frameshift mutations in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Steele, Shelby L; Razaghi, Babak; Berman, Jason N

    2017-06-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas-based adaptive immunity against pathogens in bacteria has been adapted for genome editing and applied in zebrafish (Danio rerio) to generate frameshift mutations in protein-coding genes. Although there are methods to detect, quantify and sequence CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations, identifying mutations in F1 heterozygous fish remains challenging. Additionally, sequencing a mutation and assuming that it causes a frameshift does not prove causality because of possible alternative translation start sites and potential effects of mutations on splicing. This problem is compounded by the relatively few antibodies available for zebrafish proteins, limiting validation at the protein level. To address these issues, we developed a detailed protocol to screen F1 mutation carriers, and clone and sequence identified mutations. In order to verify that mutations actually cause frameshifts, we created a fluorescent reporter system that can detect frameshift efficiency based on the cloning of wild-type and mutant cDNA fragments and their expression levels. As proof of principle, we applied this strategy to three CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations in pycr1a, chd7 and hace1 genes. An insertion of seven nucleotides in pycr1a resulted in the first reported observation of exon skipping by CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations in zebrafish. However, of these three mutant genes, the fluorescent reporter revealed effective frameshifting exclusively in the case of a two-nucleotide deletion in chd7, suggesting activity of alternative translation sites in the other two mutants even though pycr1a exon-skipping deletion is likely to be deleterious. This article provides a protocol for characterizing frameshift mutations in zebrafish, and highlights the importance of checking mutations at the mRNA level and verifying their effects on translation by fluorescent reporters when antibody detection of protein loss is not possible. © 2017. Published by

  11. Spontaneous frameshift mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: accumulation during DNA replication and removal by proofreading and mismatch repair activities.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, C N; Jinks-Robertson, S

    2001-01-01

    The accumulation of frameshift mutations during DNA synthesis is determined by the rate at which frameshift intermediates are generated during DNA polymerization and the efficiency with which frameshift intermediates are removed by DNA polymerase-associated exonucleolytic proofreading activity and/or the postreplicative mismatch repair machinery. To examine the relative contributions of these factors to replication fidelity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we determined the reversion rates and spectra of the lys2 Delta Bgl +1 frameshift allele. Wild-type and homozygous mutant diploid strains with all possible combinations of defects in the exonuclease activities of DNA polymerases delta and epsilon (conferred by the pol3-01 and pol2-4 alleles, respectively) and in mismatch repair (deletion of MSH2) were analyzed. Although there was no direct correlation between homopolymer run length and frameshift accumulation in the wild-type strain, such a correlation was evident in the triple mutant strain lacking all repair capacity. Furthermore, examination of strains defective in one or two repair activities revealed distinct biases in the removal of the corresponding frameshift intermediates by exonucleolytic proofreading and/or mismatch repair. Finally, these analyses suggest that the mismatch repair machinery may be important for generating some classes of frameshift mutations in yeast. PMID:11560887

  12. A novel fibrinogen B beta chain frameshift mutation causes congenital afibrinogenaemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Xiaojuan; Wang, Zhaoyue; Yu, Ziqiang; Cao, Lijuan; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Xia; Ruan, Changgeng

    2013-07-01

    Congenital afibrinogenaemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by various mutations within the fibrinogen genes FGA, FGB and FGG. Ins/del mutations in FGB are extremely rare. We report a patient with afibrinogenaemia who suffered from umbilical cord bleeding and repeated bleeding episodes. His plasma fibrinogen levels could not be detected using the Clauss method and immunological methods. Molecular analyses revealed homozygosity in a novel four bases insertion in codon 40 of FGB exon 2 (g. 2833_2834 ins GTTT), which resulted in a truncated 50-residue polypeptide that contained 11 exceptional abnormal residues. In the transient expression experiments, mutant fibrinogen could be detected at higher level than wild-type fibrinogen in COS-7 cell lysates but not in culture media. These results suggest that the homozygous mutation in FGB could be responsible for congenital afibrinogenaemia in this patient. This frameshift mutation could impair fibrinogen assembly and secretion without influencing the protein synthesis.

  13. A novel frameshift mutation of CHD7 in a Japanese patient with CHARGE syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Shono, Miki; Naruto, Takuya; Watanabe, Miki; Suga, Ken-ichi; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Kagami, Shoji; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant developmental disorder involving multiple organs. CHD7 is a major causative gene of CHARGE syndrome. We performed targeted-exome sequencing using a next-generation sequencer for molecular diagnosis of a 4-month-old male patient who was clinically suspected to have CHARGE syndrome, and report a novel monoallelic mutation in CHD7, NM_017780.3(CHD7_v001):c.2966del causing a reading frameshift [p.(Cys989Serfs*3)]. PMID:27081570

  14. Mutations in Elongation Factor Ef-1α Affect the Frequency of Frameshifting and Amino Acid Misincorporation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sandbaken, M. G.; Culbertson, M. R.

    1988-01-01

    A mutational analysis of the eukaryotic elongation factor EF-1α indicates that this protein functions to limit the frequency of errors during genetic code translation. We found that both amino acid misincorporation and reading frame errors are controlled by EF-1α. In order to examine the function of this protein, the TEF2 gene, which encodes EF-1α in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was mutagenized in vitro with hydroxylamine. Sixteen independent TEF2 alleles were isolated by their ability to suppress frameshift mutations. DNA sequence analysis identified eight different sites in the EF-1α protein that elevate the frequency of mistranslation when mutated. These sites are located in two different regions of the protein. Amino acid substitutions located in or near the GTP-binding and hydrolysis domain of the protein cause suppression of frameshift and nonsense mutations. These mutations may effect mistranslation by altering the binding or hydrolysis of GTP. Amino acid substitutions located adjacent to a putative aminoacyl-tRNA binding region also suppress frameshift and nonsense mutations. These mutations may alter the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA by EF-1α. The identification of frameshift and nonsense suppressor mutations in EF-1α indicates a role for this protein in limiting amino acid misincorporation and reading frame errors. We suggest that these types of errors are controlled by a common mechanism or closely related mechanisms. PMID:3066688

  15. Detection of coding microsatellite frameshift mutations in DNA mismatch repair-deficient mouse intestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Stefan M; Tosti, Elena; Yuan, Yan P; Kloor, Matthias; Bork, Peer; Edelmann, Winfried; Gebert, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Different DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient mouse strains have been developed as models for the inherited cancer predisposing Lynch syndrome. It is completely unresolved, whether coding mononucleotide repeat (cMNR) gene mutations in these mice can contribute to intestinal tumorigenesis and whether MMR-deficient mice are a suitable molecular model of human microsatellite instability (MSI)-associated intestinal tumorigenesis. A proof-of-principle study was performed to identify mouse cMNR-harboring genes affected by insertion/deletion mutations in MSI murine intestinal tumors. Bioinformatic algorithms were developed to establish a database of mouse cMNR-harboring genes. A panel of five mouse noncoding mononucleotide markers was used for MSI classification of intestinal matched normal/tumor tissues from MMR-deficient (Mlh1(-/-) , Msh2(-/-) , Msh2(LoxP/LoxP) ) mice. cMNR frameshift mutations of candidate genes were determined by DNA fragment analysis. Murine MSI intestinal tumors but not normal tissues from MMR-deficient mice showed cMNR frameshift mutations in six candidate genes (Elavl3, Tmem107, Glis2, Sdccag1, Senp6, Rfc3). cMNRs of mouse Rfc3 and Elavl3 are conserved in type and length in their human orthologs that are known to be mutated in human MSI colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancer. We provide evidence for the utility of a mononucleotide marker panel for detection of MSI in murine tumors, the existence of cMNR instability in MSI murine tumors, the utility of mouse subspecies DNA for identification of polymorphic repeats, and repeat conservation among some orthologous human/mouse genes, two of them showing instability in human and mouse MSI intestinal tumors. MMR-deficient mice hence are a useful molecular model system for analyzing MSI intestinal carcinogenesis.

  16. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Clendenning, M; Senter, L; Hampel, H; Robinson, K Lagerstedt; Sun, S; Buchanan, D; Walsh, M D; Nilbert, M; Green, J; Potter, J; Lindblom, A; de la Chapelle, A

    2015-01-01

    Background When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (<2% of all identified mutations), yet the immunohistochemical analysis of tumour samples indicates that approximately 5% of Lynch syndrome cases are caused by PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. Methods Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based on immunohistochemical analysis. Results We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n = 61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population frequency <0.05) at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in exon 11, and have been shown to possess a short common haplotype, allowing us to calculate that the mutation arose around 1625 years ago (65 generations; 95% confidence interval 22 to 120). Conclusion Ancestral analysis indicates that this mutation is enriched in individuals with British and Swedish ancestry. We estimate that there are >10 000 carriers of this mutation in the USA alone. The identification of both the mutation and the common haplotype in one Swedish control sample (n = 225), along with evidence that Lynch syndrome associated cancers are rarer than expected in the probands’ families, would suggest that this is a prevalent mutation with reduced penetrance. PMID:18178629

  17. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Clendenning, M; Senter, L; Hampel, H; Robinson, K Lagerstedt; Sun, S; Buchanan, D; Walsh, M D; Nilbert, M; Green, J; Potter, J; Lindblom, A; de la Chapelle, A

    2008-06-01

    When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (<2% of all identified mutations), yet the immunohistochemical analysis of tumour samples indicates that approximately 5% of Lynch syndrome cases are caused by PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based on immunohistochemical analysis. We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n = 61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population frequency <0.05) at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in exon 11, and have been shown to possess a short common haplotype, allowing us to calculate that the mutation arose around 1625 years ago (65 generations; 95% confidence interval 22 to 120). Ancestral analysis indicates that this mutation is enriched in individuals with British and Swedish ancestry. We estimate that there are >10 000 carriers of this mutation in the USA alone. The identification of both the mutation and the common haplotype in one Swedish control sample (n = 225), along with evidence that Lynch syndrome associated cancers are rarer than expected in the probands' families, would suggest that this is a prevalent mutation with reduced penetrance.

  18. A novel frameshift mutation in PMP22 accounts for hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Young, P; Wiebusch, H; Stögbauer, F; Ringelstein, B; Assmann, G; Funke, H

    1997-02-01

    Peripheral myelin protein PMP22 deficiency is associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Most HNPP cases are caused by a 1.5-megabase deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12, a region that contains the PMP22 gene, whereas point mutations leading to HNPP are extremely rare. We have identified a family with clinical and electrophysiologic features of HNPP,in which all affected members are heterozygous carriers of a single base insertion in codon 94. This mutation is predicted to alter the reading frame and to result in a delayed termination signal. We conclude that the functional consequences of the frameshift are equivalent to those of the PMP22 deletion allele.

  19. A Frameshift Mutation in KIT is Associated with White Spotting in the Arabian Camel

    PubMed Central

    Holl, Heather; Isaza, Ramiro; Mohamoud, Yasmin; Ahmed, Ayeda; Almathen, Faisal; Youcef, Cherifi; Gaouar, Semir; Antczak, Douglas F.; Brooks, Samantha

    2017-01-01

    While the typical Arabian camel is characterized by a single colored coat, there are rare populations with white spotting patterns. White spotting coat patterns are found in virtually all domesticated species, but are rare in wild species. Theories suggest that white spotting is linked to the domestication process, and is occasionally associated with health disorders. Though mutations have been found in a diverse array of species, fewer than 30 genes have been associated with spotting patterns, thus providing a key set of candidate genes for the Arabian camel. We obtained 26 spotted camels and 24 solid controls for candidate gene analysis. One spotted and eight solid camels were whole genome sequenced as part of a separate project. The spotted camel was heterozygous for a frameshift deletion in KIT (c.1842delG, named KITW1 for White spotting 1), whereas all other camels were wild-type (KIT+/KIT+). No additional mutations unique to the spotted camel were detected in the EDNRB, EDN3, SOX10, KITLG, PDGFRA, MITF, and PAX3 candidate white spotting genes. Sanger sequencing of the study population identified an additional five KITW1/KIT+ spotted camels. The frameshift results in a premature stop codon five amino acids downstream, thus terminating KIT at the tyrosine kinase domain. An additional 13 spotted camels tested KIT+/KIT+, but due to phenotypic differences when compared to the KITW1/KIT+ camels, they likely represent an independent mutation. Our study suggests that there are at least two causes of white spotting in the Arabian camel, the newly described KITW1 allele and an uncharacterized mutation. PMID:28282952

  20. Suppression of a -1 frameshift mutation by a recessive tRNA suppressor which causes doublet decoding.

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, D J; Hughes, D; Thompson, S; Atkins, J F

    1989-01-01

    sufS was found to suppress the only known suppressible-1 frameshift mutation, trpE91, at a site identified as GGA and mapped within the single gene of the only tRNA that can decode GGA in Escherichia coli. It mapped to the same gene in Salmonella typhimurium. sufS alleles were recessive, and dominant alleles could not be isolated. This is in contrast to all other tRNA structural gene mutations identified thus far that cause frameshift suppression. The recessiveness implies that all sufS alleles are poor competitors against their wild-type tRNA(Gly2) counterparts. The base G immediately 5' of the GGA suppression site influenced the level but was not critical for suppression by sufS601. From this result, it is inferred that sufS601 causes frameshifting by doublet decoding. PMID:2472379

  1. A novel frameshift mutation of DDHD1 in a Japanese patient with autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shiroh; Morikawa, Takuya; Fujioka, Ryuta; Kosaka, Kengo; Yamada, Kohei; Hattori, Gohsuke; Motomura, Manabu; Taniwaki, Takayuki; Shibata, Hiroki

    2016-08-01

    Spastic paraplegia (SPG) type 28 is an autosomal recessive SPG caused by mutations in the DDHD1 gene. We examined a Japanese 54-years-old male patient with autosomal recessive SPG. His parents were consanguineous. He needed a wheelchair for transfer due to spastic paraplegia. There was a history of operations for bilateral hallux valgus, thoracic ossification of the yellow ligament, bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, bilateral ankle contracture, and lumbar spinal canal stenosis. He noticed gait disturbance at age 14. He used a cane for walking in his 40s. On neurological examination, he showed hyperreflexia, spasticity, and weakness in the lower extremities and bilateral Babinski reflexes. Urinary dysfunctions and impaired vibration sense in the lower limbs were observed. By exome sequencing analysis using Agilent SureSelect and Illumina MiSeq, we identified 17,248 homozygous nucleotide variants in the patient. Through the examination of 48 candidate genes known to be responsible for autosomal recessive SPG, we identified a novel homozygous 4-bp deletion, c.914_917delGTAA, p.Ser305Ilefs*2 in exon2 of the DDHD1 gene encoding phosphatidic acid-preferring phospholipase A1 (PA-PLA1). The mutation is expected to cause a frameshift generating a premature stop codon 3-bp downstream from the deletion. In consequence, the DDHD domain that is known to be critical for PLA1 activity is completely depleted in the mutated DDHD1 protein, predicted to be a functionally null mutation of the DDHD1 gene. By Sanger sequencing, we confirmed that both parents are heterozygous for the mutation. This variation was not detected in 474 Japanese control subjects as well as the data of the 1,000G Project. We conclude that the novel mutation in DDHD1 is the causative variant for the SPG28 patient that is the first record of the disease in Japanese population.

  2. Novel frame-shift mutations of GLI3 gene in non-syndromic postaxial polydactyly patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Li, Yuchan; Geng, Juan; Fu, Qihua; Xu, Yunlan; Shen, Yiping

    2014-06-10

    Polydactyly is a common congenital limb deformity. This anomaly may occur in isolation (non-syndromic) or as part of a syndrome. The glioma-associated oncogene family zinc finger 3 (GLI3) is known to be associated with both syndromic and non-syndromic polydactyly. GLI3 plays a predominant role in the pathogenesis of syndromic polydactyly: mutations have been identified in 68% of patients with Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome and 91% of patients with Pallister-Hall syndrome. The knowledge regarding the contribution of GLI3 in non-syndromic polydactyly is currently very limited. In this study, we assembled a cohort of individuals of Chinese ethnicity with non-syndromic postaxial polydactyly. We presented the clinical features and molecular evaluations of 19 probands. GLI3 mutations were identified in 15.8% of probands (3/19) including two novel frame-shift mutations c.3855dupC (p.Met1286HisfsTer18) and c.4141delA (p.Arg1381GlyfsTer38) detected in sporadic cases and one previously reported nonsense mutation (c.1927C>T/p.Arg643Ter) in a familial case. Of note, GLI3 mutations were exclusively detected in patients with bilateral polydactyly affecting both hands and feet. Three out of five (60%) probands with bilateral polydactyly on both hands and feet carried pathogenic mutations in GLI3. Our study demonstrated the role of GLI3 in a significant fraction of patients with non-syndromic bilateral polydactyly affecting both hands and feet.

  3. Heterozygous frameshift mutation in keratin 5 in a family with Galli-Galli disease.

    PubMed

    Reisenauer, A K; Wordingham, S V; York, J; Kokkonen, E W J; Mclean, W H I; Wilson, N J; Smith, F J D

    2014-06-01

    Reticulate pigmentary disorders include the rare autosomal dominant Galli-Galli disease (GGD) and Dowling-Degos disease (DDD). Clinical diagnosis between some of the subtypes can be difficult due to a degree of overlap between clinical features, therefore analysis at the molecular level may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis. To identify the underlying genetic defect in a 48-year-old Asian-American woman with a clinical diagnosis of GGD. Histological analysis was performed on a skin biopsy using haematoxylin-eosin staining. KRT5 (the gene encoding keratin 5) was amplified from genomic DNA and directly sequenced. The patient had a history of pruritus and hyperpigmented erythematous macules and thin papules along the flexor surfaces of her arms, her upper back and neck, axillae and inframammary areas. Hypopigmented macules were seen among the hyperpigmentation. A heterozygous 1-bp insertion mutation in KRT5 (c.38dupG; p.Ser14GlnfsTer3) was identified in the proband. This mutation occurs within the head domain of the keratin 5 protein leading to a frameshift and premature stop codon. From the histological findings and mutation analysis the individual was identified as having GGD due to haploinsufficiency of keratin 5. © 2013 The Authors British Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

  4. Novel SMC1A frameshift mutations in children with developmental delay and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jessica H R; Tim-Aroon, Thipwimol; Shieh, Joseph; Merrill, Michelle; Deeb, Kristin K; Zhang, Shulin; Bass, Nancy E; Bedoyan, Jirair K

    2015-10-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare dominantly inherited genetic multisystem developmental condition with considerable phenotypic and allelic heterogeneity. Missense and in-frame deletions within the SMC1A gene can be associated with epilepsy and milder craniofacial features. We report two females who presented with developmental delay and developed isolated medically refractory seizures with unrevealing initial laboratory, imaging and genetic evaluations. Whole exome sequencing (WES) analyses were performed and were instrumental in uncovering the genetic etiology for their conditions. WES identified two novel de novo heterozygous frameshift mutations in the SMC1A gene [c.2853_2856delTCAG (p.Ser951Argfs*12) and c.3549_3552dupGGCC (p.Ile1185Glyfs*23)]. We also observed marked skewing of X-inactivation in one patient. The individual with the p.Ser951Argfs*12 mutation represents an extreme on the CdLS phenotypic spectrum, with prominent neurological involvement of severe developmental delay and refractory epilepsy, with mild craniofacial features. Both individuals eventually had incomplete clinical responses to therapy with valproic acid. We review previous reports of SMC1A mutations with epilepsy. SMC1A should be included in clinical gene panels for early infantile and early childhood epileptic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Spectra of spontaneous frameshift mutations at the hisD3052 allele of Salmonella typhimurium in four DNA repair backgrounds.

    PubMed Central

    DeMarini, D M; Shelton, M L; Abu-Shakra, A; Szakmary, A; Levine, J G

    1998-01-01

    To characterize the hisD3052 -1 frameshift allele of Salmonella typhimurium, we analyzed approximately 6000 spontaneous revertants (rev) for a 2-base deletion hotspot within the sequence (CG)4, and we sequenced approximately 500 nonhotspot rev. The reversion target is a minimum of 76 bases (nucleotides 843-918) that code for amino acids within a nonconserved region of the histidinol dehydrogenase protein. Only 0.4-3.9% were true rev. Of the following classes, 182 unique second-site mutations were identified: hotspot, complex frameshifts requiring DeltauvrB + pKM101 (TA98-specific) or not (concerted), 1-base insertions, duplications, and nonhotspot deletions. The percentages of hotspot mutations were 13.8% in TA1978 (wild type), 24.5% in UTH8413 (pKM101), 31.6% in TA1538 (DeltauvrB), and 41.0% in TA98 (DeltauvrB, pKM101). The DeltauvrB allele decreased by three times the mutant frequency (MF, rev/10(8) survivors) of duplications and increased by about two times the MF of deletions. Separately, the DeltauvrB allele or pKM101 plasmid increased by two to three times the MF of hotspot mutations; combined, they increased this MF by five times. The percentage of 1-base insertions was not influenced by either DeltauvrB or pKM101. Hotspot deletions and TA98-specific complex frameshifts are inducible by some mutagens; concerted complex frameshifts and 1-base insertions are not; and there is little evidence for mutagen-induced duplications and nonhotspot deletions. Except for the base substitutions in TA98-specific complex frameshifts, all spontaneous mutations of the hisD3052 allele are likely templated. The mechanisms may involve (1) the potential of direct and inverted repeats to undergo slippage and misalignment and to form quasi-palindromes and (2) the interaction of these sequences with DNA replication and repair proteins. PMID:9584083

  6. Clinical and neurocognitive characterization of a family with a novel MED12 gene frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Lesca, Gaetan; Moizard, Marie-Pierre; Bussy, Gerald; Boggio, Dominique; Hu, Hao; Haas, Stefan A; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Des Portes, Vincent; Labalme, Audrey; Sanlaville, Damien; Edery, Patrick; Raynaud, Martine; Lespinasse, James

    2013-12-01

    FG syndrome, Lujan syndrome, and Ohdo syndrome, the Maat-Kievit-Brunner type, have been described as distinct syndromes with overlapping non-specific features and different missense mutations of the MED12 gene have been reported in all of them. We report a family including 10 males and 1 female affected with profound non-specific intellectual disability (ID) which was linked to a 30-cM region extending from Xp11.21 (ALAS2) to Xq22.3 (COL4A5). Parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons identified a frameshift mutation (c.5898dupC) of MED12. Mutated mRNA was not affected by non-sense mediated RNA decay and induced an additional abnormal isoform due to activation of cryptic splice-sites in exon 41. Dysmorphic features common to most affected males were long narrow face, high forehead, flat malar area, high nasal bridge, and short philtrum. Language was absent or very limited. Most patients had a friendly personality. Cognitive impairment, varying from borderline to profound ID was similarly observed in seven heterozygous females. There was no correlation between cognitive function and X-chromosome inactivation profiles in blood cells. The severe degree of ID in male patients, as well as variable cognitive impairment in heterozygous females suggests that the duplication observed in the present family may have a more severe effect on MED12 function than missense mutations. In a cognitively impaired male from this family, who also presented with tall stature and dysmorphism and did not have the MED12 mutation, a 600-kb duplication at 17p13.3 including the YWHAE gene, was found in a mosaic state. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. DVL1 frameshift mutations clustering in the penultimate exon cause autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Gambin, Tomasz; Alcino, Michele Calijorne; Penney, Samantha; Saraiva, Jorge M; Hove, Hanne; Skovby, Flemming; Kayserili, Hülya; Estrella, Elicia; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Steehouwer, Marloes; Muzny, Donna M; Sutton, V Reid; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Brunner, Han G; van Bon, Bregje W M; Carvalho, Claudia M B

    2015-04-02

    Robinow syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features and for which both autosomal-recessive and autosomal-dominant inheritance patterns have been described. Causative variants in the non-canonical signaling gene WNT5A underlie a subset of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome (DRS) cases, but most individuals with DRS remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated DRS-affected individuals without coding mutations in WNT5A and found heterozygous DVL1 exon 14 mutations in three of them. Targeted Sanger sequencing in additional subjects with DRS uncovered DVL1 exon 14 mutations in five individuals, including a pair of monozygotic twins. In total, six distinct frameshift mutations were found in eight subjects, and all were heterozygous truncating variants within the penultimate exon of DVL1. In five families in which samples from unaffected parents were available, the variants were demonstrated to represent de novo mutations. All variant alleles are predicted to result in a premature termination codon within the last exon, escape nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), and most likely generate a C-terminally truncated protein with a distinct -1 reading-frame terminus. Study of the transcripts extracted from affected subjects' leukocytes confirmed expression of both wild-type and variant alleles, supporting the hypothesis that mutant mRNA escapes NMD. Genomic variants identified in our study suggest that truncation of the C-terminal domain of DVL1, a protein hypothesized to have a downstream role in the Wnt-5a non-canonical pathway, is a common cause of DRS. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [A new rice dwarf1 mutant caused by a frame-shift mutation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua-Xia; Zhou, Cheng-Bo; Xing, Yong-Zhong

    2011-04-01

    A dwarf mutant C6PS, which has the similar phenotype as the recessive mutant Dwarf1 (d1), was produced from tissue-cultured plants of Zhonghua 11. In its progeny (T2), the ratio of tall to dwarf plants was in agreement with the expected segregation ratio (3:1) of a single Mendelian inheritance gene, which indicated that the variation of plant height is caused by a single gene. To locate the mutation, C6PS was crossed with Zhenshan 97 and Mudanjiang 8 for producing two F2 populations of F2 (CM) and F2 (CZ), respectively. The plant height in each F2 population also showed the same segregation pattern as that in T2 generation. SSR marker RM430 closely linked to Dwarf1 was preferentially used to genotype the F2 (CZ) population because C6PS showed the similar phenotype to d1 mutant. RM430 was significantly associated with plant height, which indicated that the mutant gene might be D1. Comparative sequencing of D1 between C6PS and Zhonghua 11 showed a 6 bp deletion occurred in the splice site of its ninth exon. The marker C6PS-D1L/R designed on the 6 bp deletion was co-segregated with plant height in T2 generation. The results indicated that C6PS was a new mutant of D1. This mutation led to a 26 bp deletion of the transcript and resulted in a frame-shift mutation and a premature stop codon in C6PS, which could not translate the functional Gα protein. C6PS was weakly sensitive to Brassinolide based on the leaf inclination angle test.

  9. Reading-frame restoration with an apolipoprotein B gene frameshift mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Linton, M F; Pierotti, V; Young, S G

    1992-01-01

    We examined a mutant human apolipoprotein B (apoB) allele that causes hypobetalipoproteinemia and has a single cytosine deletion in exon 26. This frameshift mutation was associated with the synthesis of a truncated apoB protein of the predicted size; however, studies in human subjects and minigene expression studies in cultured cells indicated that the mutant allele also yielded a full-length apoB protein. The 1-base-pair deletion in the mutant apoB allele created a stretch of eight consecutive adenines. To understand the mechanism whereby the mutant apoB allele yielded a full-length apoB protein, the cDNA from cells transfected with the mutant apoB minigene expression vector was examined. Splicing of the mRNA was normal; however, 11% of the cDNA clones had an additional adenine within the stretch of eight adenines, yielding nine consecutive adenines. The insertion of the extra adenine, presumably during apoB gene transcription, is predicted to restore the correct apoB reading frame, thereby permitting the synthesis of a full-length apoB protein. Images PMID:1454832

  10. Frameshift Mutation Confers Function as Virulence Factor to Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein from Acidovorax avenae

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Machiko; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Takehito; Yoshida, Yuki; Suzuki, Aika; Kawaguchi, Takemasa; Che, Fang-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Many plant pathogens inject type III (T3SS) effectors into host cells to suppress host immunity and promote successful infection. The bacterial pathogen Acidovorax avenae causes brown stripe symptom in many species of monocotyledonous plants; however, individual strains of each pathogen infect only one host species. T3SS-deleted mutants of A. avenae K1 (virulent to rice) or N1141 (virulent to finger millet) caused no symptom in each host plant, suggesting that T3SS effectors are involved in the symptom formation. To identify T3SS effectors as virulence factors, we performed whole-genome and predictive analyses. Although the nucleotide sequence of the novel leucine-rich repeat protein (Lrp) gene of N1141 had high sequence identity with K1 Lrp, the amino acid sequences of the encoded proteins were quite different due to a 1-bp insertion within the K1 Lrp gene. An Lrp-deleted K1 strain (KΔLrp) did not cause brown stripe symptom in rice (host plant for K1); by contrast, the analogous mutation in N1141 (NΔLrp) did not interfere with infection of finger millet. In addition, NΔLrp retained the ability to induce effector-triggered immunity (ETI), including hypersensitive response cell death and expression of ETI-related genes. These data indicated that K1 Lrp functions as a virulence factor in rice, whereas N1141 Lrp does not play a similar role in finger millet. Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that K1 Lrp interacts with oryzain α, a pathogenesis-related protein of the cysteine protease family, whereas N1141 Lrp, which contains LRR domains, does not. This specific interaction between K1 Lrp and oryzain α was confirmed by Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in rice cells. Thus, K1 Lrp protein may have acquired its function as virulence factor in rice due to a frameshift mutation. PMID:28101092

  11. A frameshift mutation in GON4L is associated with proportionate dwarfism in Fleckvieh cattle.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbacher, Hermann; Wurmser, Christine; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Misurova, Lubica; Jung, Simone; Langenmayer, Martin C; Schnieke, Angelika; Knubben-Schweizer, Gabriela; Fries, Ruedi; Pausch, Hubert

    2016-03-31

    Low birth weight and postnatal growth restriction are the most evident symptoms of dwarfism. Accompanying skeletal aberrations may compromise the general condition and locomotion of affected individuals. Several paternal half-sibs with a low birth weight and a small size were born in 2013 in the Fleckvieh cattle population. Affected calves were strikingly underweight at birth in spite of a normal gestation length and had craniofacial abnormalities such as elongated narrow heads and brachygnathia inferior. In spite of a normal general condition, their growth remained restricted during rearing. We genotyped 27 affected and 10,454 unaffected animals at 44,672 single nucleotide polymorphisms and performed association tests followed by homozygosity mapping, which allowed us to map the locus responsible for growth failure to a 1.85-Mb segment on bovine chromosome 3. Analysis of whole-genome re-sequencing data from one affected and 289 unaffected animals revealed a 1-bp deletion (g.15079217delC, rs723240647) in the coding region of the GON4L gene that segregated with the dwarfism-associated haplotype. We showed that the deletion induces intron retention and premature termination of translation, which can lead to a severely truncated protein that lacks domains that are likely essential to normal protein function. The widespread use of an undetected carrier bull for artificial insemination has resulted in a tenfold increase in the frequency of the deleterious allele in the female population. A frameshift mutation in GON4L is associated with autosomal recessive proportionate dwarfism in Fleckvieh cattle. The mutation has segregated in the population for more than 50 years without being recognized as a genetic disorder. However, the widespread use of an undetected carrier bull for artificial insemination caused a sudden accumulation of homozygous calves with dwarfism. Our findings provide the basis for genome-based mating strategies to avoid the inadvertent mating of carrier

  12. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology.

  13. Novel Mutation of Cleidocranial Dysplasia-related Frameshift Runt-related Transcription Factor 2 in a Sporadic Chinese Case

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xue-Yan; Jia, Pei-Zeng; Zhao, Hua-Xiang; Li, Wei-Ran; Chen, Feng; Lin, Jiu-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease that affects the skeletal system. Common symptoms of CCD include hypoplasia or aplasia of the clavicles, delayed or even absent closure of the fontanels, midface hypoplasia, short stature, and delayed eruption of permanent and supernumerary teeth. Previous studies reported a connection between CCD and the haploinsufficiency of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). Here, we report a sporadic Chinese case presenting typical symptoms of CCD. Methods: We made genetic testing on this sporadic Chinese case and identified a novel RUNX2 frameshift mutation: c.1111dupT. In situ immunofluorescence microscopy and osteocalcin promoter luciferase assay were performed to compare the functions of the RUNX2 mutation with those of wild-type RUNX2. Results: RUNX2 mutation was observed in the perinuclear region, cytoplasm, and nuclei. In contrast, wild-type RUNX2 was confined in the nuclei, which indicated that the subcellular compartmentalization of RUNX2 mutation was partially perturbed. The transactivation function on osteocalcin promoter of the RUNX2 mutation was obviously abrogated. Conclusions: We identified a sporadic CCD patient carrying a novel insertion/frameshift mutation of RUNX2. This finding expanded our understanding of CCD-related phenotypes. PMID:28091408

  14. Caspase-8 gene is frequently inactivated by the frameshift somatic mutation 1225_1226delTG in hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Lee, Jong Woo; Kim, Su Young; Sung, Yong Jik; Park, Won Sang; Nam, Suk Woo; Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Jung Young; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2005-01-06

    Evidence exists that alterations of the genes encoding apoptosis-related proteins contribute to either development or progression of human cancers. Caspase-8 plays a crucial role in the initiation phase of apoptosis. To explore the possibility that the genetic alteration of caspase-8 gene is involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), we have analysed the entire coding region of human caspase-8 gene for the detection of somatic mutations by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism in 69 HCCs with low-grade dysplastic nodule (LGDN, n=2) or high-grade dysplastic nodule (HGDN, n=2) or without any dysplastic nodules (n=65). Overall, we detected a total of nine somatic mutations in 69 HCCs (13.0%). Interestingly, all of the nine mutations were an identical frameshift mutation with two base-pair deletion (1225_1226delTG), which would result in a premature termination of amino-acid synthesis in the p10 protease subunit. In a patient sample, we detected the 1225_1226delTG mutation both in HCC and LDGN lesions, suggesting that caspase-8 mutation could be involved in the early stage of HCC carcinogenesis. We expressed the tumor-derived caspase-8 mutant in the cells and found that the mutant abolished cell death activity of caspase-8. Our data indicate that caspase-8 gene is frequently mutated in HCC and the majority of the mutations may be the frameshift mutation 1225_1226delTG. Also, the data suggest that caspase-8 gene mutation might lead to the loss of its cell death function and contribute to the pathogenesis of HCC.

  15. Esophageal cancer in a family with hamartomatous tumors and germline PTEN frameshift and SMAD7 missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Scott K; Maxwell, Jessica E; Qian, Qining; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Braun, Terry A; Iannettoni, Mark D; Darbro, Benjamin W; Howe, James R

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in the PTEN tumor-suppressor gene cause autosomal-dominant conditions such as Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndromes with variable presentations, including hamartomatous gastrointestinal tumors, dermatologic abnormalities, neurologic symptoms, and elevated cancer risk. We describe a father and son with extensive hamartomatous gastrointestinal polyposis who both developed early-onset esophageal cancer. Exome sequencing identified a novel germline PTEN frameshift mutation (c.568_569insC, p.V191Sfs*11). In addition, a missense mutation of SMAD7 (c.115G>A, p.G39R) with an allele frequency of 0.3% in the Exome Variant Server was detected in both affected individuals. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for PTEN in the resected esophageal cancer specimen demonstrated no PTEN copy loss in malignant cells; however, results of an immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated a loss of PTEN protein expression. While the risks of many cancers are elevated in the PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes, association between esophageal adenocarcinoma and these syndromes has not been previously reported. Esophageal adenocarcinoma and extensive polyposis/ganglioneuromatosis could represent less common features of these syndromes, potentially correlating with this novel PTEN frameshift and early protein termination genotype. Alternatively, because simultaneous disruption of both the PTEN and TGF-β/SMAD4 pathways is associated with development of esophageal cancer in a mouse model and because SMAD4 mutations cause gastrointestinal hamartomas in juvenile polyposis syndrome, the SMAD7 mutation may represent an additional modifier of these individuals' PTEN-mutant phenotype.

  16. Esophageal cancer in a family with hamartomatous tumors and germline PTEN frameshift and SMAD7 missense mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Scott K.; Maxwell, Jessica E.; Qian, Qining; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Braun, Terry A.; Iannettoni, Mark D.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Howe, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations in the PTEN tumor-suppressor gene cause autosomal-dominant conditions such as Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndromes with variable presentations, including hamartomatous gastrointestinal tumors, dermatologic abnormalities, neurologic symptoms, and elevated cancer risk. We describe a father and son with extensive hamartomatous gastrointestinal polyposis who both developed early-onset esophageal cancer. Exome sequencing identified a novel germline PTEN frameshift mutation (c.568_569insC, p.V191S_fs*11). In addition, a missense mutation of SMAD7 (c.115G>A, p.G39R) with an allele frequency of 0.3% in the Exome Variant Server was detected in both affected individuals. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization for PTEN in the resected esophageal cancer specimen demonstrated no PTEN copy loss in malignant cells, however, immunohistochemistry demonstrated loss of PTEN protein expression. While the risks of many cancers are elevated in the PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes, esophageal adenocarcinoma has not been previously reported. Esophageal adenocarcinoma and extensive polyposis/ganglioneuromatosis could represent less-common features of these syndromes, potentially correlating with this novel PTEN frameshift and early protein termination genotype. Alternatively, because simultaneous disruption of both the PTEN and TGF-β/SMAD4 pathways is associated with development of esophageal cancer in a mouse model, and SMAD4 mutations cause gastrointestinal hamartomas in Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome, the SMAD7 mutation may represent an additional modifier of these individuals’ PTEN-mutant phenotype. PMID:25554686

  17. A novel frameshift mutation in FGA (c.1846 del A) leading to congenital afibrinogenemia in a consanguineous Syrian family.

    PubMed

    Levrat, Emmanuel; Aboukhamis, Imad; de Moerloose, Philippe; Farho, Jaafar; Chamaa, Sahar; Reber, Guido; Fort, Alexandre; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2011-03-01

    Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare autosomal recessive coagulation disorder characterized essentially by bleeding symptoms, but miscarriages and, paradoxically, thromboembolic events can also occur. Most reported mutations leading to congenital afibrinogenemia are located in FGA encoding the fibrinogen A α-chain. In this study, we analysed 12 individuals from a consanguineous Syrian family with reduced or absent fibrinogen levels: those with fibrinogen levels around 1 g/l (n = 7) were found to be heterozygous for a novel frameshift mutation in FGA exon 5 (c.1846 del A) and those with undetectable fibrinogen levels (n = 5) were homozygous for the same mutation. This novel frameshift mutation is the most C-terminal causative FGA mutation identified to date in afibrinogenemic patients. The resulting aberrant Aα-chain (p.Thr616HisfsX32) is most likely synthesized, but is less efficiently assembled and/or secreted into the circulation given the phenotype of asymptomatic hypofibrinogenemia in heterozygous individuals and bleeding diathesis in homozygous individuals.

  18. Identification of a frameshift mutation responsible for the silent phenotype of human serum cholinesterase, Gly 117 (GGT----GGAG).

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, C P; McGuire, M C; Graeser, C; Bartels, C F; Arpagaus, M; Van der Spek, A F; Lightstone, H; Lockridge, O; La Du, B N

    1990-01-01

    A frameshift mutation that causes a silent phenotype for human serum cholinesterase was identified in the DNA of seven individuals of two unrelated families. The mutation, identified using the polymerase chain reaction, causes a shift in the reading frame from Gly 117, where GGT (Gly)----GGAG (Gly+ 1 base) to a new stop codon created at position 129. This alteration is upstream of the active site (Ser 198), and, if any protein were made, it would represent only 22% of the mature enzyme found in normal serum. Results of analysis of the enzymatic activities in serum agreed with the genotypes inferred from the nucleotide sequence. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis using alpha-naphthyl acetate to detect enzymatic activity showed an absence of cross-reactive material, as expected. One additional individual with a silent phenotype did not show the same frameshift mutation. This was not unexpected, since there must be considerable molecular heterogeneity involved in causes for the silent cholinesterase phenotype. This is the first report of a molecular mechanism underlying the silent phenotype for serum cholinesterase. The analytical approach used was similar to the one we recently employed to identify the mutation that causes the atypical cholinesterase variant. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2339692

  19. Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia caused by a frame-shift mutation in the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Anastasios; Fountzoula, Ioanna; Tzortzatou, Georgia; Bose, Himangshu S

    2003-01-01

    We present a female patient who, at the age of 35 days, presented with adrenal insufficiency with salt loss. Clinical and endocrinological investigation (low to normal levels of all adrenal steroids and raised ACTH) and imaging studies suggested congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis that showed a frame-shift mutation 947/InsA/948 in exon 7 of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene. The patient is thriving under glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy. She is now 10.5 years old and has not presented any signs of puberty.

  20. Whole-exome sequencing reveals a novel frameshift mutation in the FAM161A gene causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in the Indian population.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Saikia, Bibhuti B; Jiang, Zhilin; Zhu, Xiong; Liu, Yuqing; Huang, Lulin; Kim, Ramasamy; Yang, Yin; Qu, Chao; Hao, Fang; Gong, Bo; Tai, Zhengfu; Niu, Lihong; Yang, Zhenglin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Zhu, Xianjun

    2015-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogenous group of inherited retinal degenerations caused by mutations in at least 50 genes. To identify genetic mutations underlying autosomal recessive RP (arRP), we performed whole-exome sequencing study on two consanguineous marriage Indian families (RP-252 and RP-182) and 100 sporadic RP patients. Here we reported novel mutation in FAM161A in RP-252 and RP-182 with two patients affected with RP in each family. The FAM161A gene was identified as the causative gene for RP28, an autosomal recessive form of RP. By whole-exome sequencing we identified several homozygous genomic regions, one of which included the recently identified FAM161A gene mutated in RP28-linked arRP. Sequencing analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous frameshift mutation p.R592FsX2 in both patients of family RP-252 and family RP-182. In 100 sporadic Indian RP patients, this novel homozygous frameshift mutation p.R592FsX2 was identified in one sporadic patient ARRP-S-I-46 by whole-exome sequencing and validated by Sanger sequencing. Meanwhile, this homozygous frameshift mutation was absent in 1000 ethnicity-matched control samples screened by direct Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, we identified a novel homozygous frameshift mutations of RP28-linked RP gene FAM161A in Indian population.

  1. Functional analysis of a promoter variant identified in the CFTR gene in cis of a frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Viart, Victoria; Des Georges, Marie; Claustres, Mireille; Taulan, Magali

    2012-02-01

    In monogenic diseases, the presence of several sequence variations in the same allele may complicate our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships. We described new alterations identified in a cystic fibrosis (CF) patient harboring a 48C>G promoter sequence variation associated in cis of a 3532AC>GTA mutation and in trans with the F508del mutation. Functional analyses including in vitro experiments confirmed the deleterious effect of the 3532GTA frameshift mutation through the creation of a premature termination codon. The analyses also revealed that the 48G promoter variant has a negative effect on both transcription and mRNA level, thus demonstrating the importance of analyzing all mutations or sequence variations with potential impact on CF transmembrane conductance regulator processing, even when the two known disease-causing mutations have already been detected. Our results emphasize the need to perform, wherever possible, functional studies that may greatly assist the interpretation of the disease-causing potential of rare mutation-associated sequence variations.

  2. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-07-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients.

  3. Successful hepatorenal transplantation in hereditary amyloidosis caused by a frame-shift mutation in fibrinogen Aalpha-chain gene.

    PubMed

    Mousson, C; Heyd, B; Justrabo, E; Rebibou, J-M; Tanter, Y; Miguet, J-P; Rifle, G

    2006-03-01

    Hereditary systemic amyloidosis comprises several autosomal dominant diseases caused by mutations in a number of plasma proteins, including the fibrinogen Aalpha-chain. Four mutations in the fibrinogen Aalpha-chain that are able to induce amyloidosis have been identified so far, the most common being the Glu526Val mutation. We have observed a family in which the father and his son reached end-stage renal failure because of renal amyloidosis induced by a frame-shift mutation in the fibrinogen Aalpha-chain gene producing a novel amyloid protein. Two kidney transplantations in the father and one in the son resulted in fast graft loss caused by recurrence of amyloid deposition. We then performed hepatorenal transplantation in the son. Three years later, liver and kidney functions are normal without recurrence of amyloid deposition. This case, together with three others with the Glu526Val mutation in the extensive literature, suggests that liver transplantation can cure hereditary fibrinogen amyloidosis, whatever the mutation may be.

  4. In-depth analysis of hyaline fibromatosis syndrome frameshift mutations at the same site reveal the necessity of personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shixu E; Lemmin, Thomas; Salvi, Suzanne; Lausch, Ekkehart; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Rokicki, Dariusz; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2013-07-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in ANTXR2, a gene involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis. Sixty percent of patients carry frameshift mutations at a mutational hotspot in exon 13. We show in patient cells that these mutations lead to low ANTXR2 mRNA and undetectable protein levels. Ectopic expression of the proteins encoded by the mutated genes reveals that a two base insertion leads to the synthesis of a protein that is rapidly targeted to the ER-associated degradation pathway due to the modified structure of the cytosolic tail, which instead of being hydrophilic and highly disordered as in wild type ANTXR2, is folded and exposes hydrophobic patches. In contrast, one base insertion leads to a truncated protein that properly localizes to the plasma membrane and retains partial function. We next show that targeting the nonsense mediated mRNA decay pathway in patient cells leads to a rescue of ANTXR2 protein in patients carrying one base insertion but not in those carrying two base insertions. This study highlights the importance of in-depth analysis of the molecular consequences of specific patient mutations, which even when they occur at the same site can have drastically different consequences. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  5. Frameshift mutations in the v-src gene of avian sarcoma virus act in cis to specifically reduce v-src mRNA levels.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, S B; Stoltzfus, C M

    1994-01-01

    A portion of the avian sarcoma virus (ASV) primary RNA transcripts is alternatively spliced in chicken embryo fibroblast cells to two different messages, the src and env mRNAs. Frameshift mutations of the viral genome causing premature translation termination within the src gene result in a decreased steady-state level of the src mRNA. In marked contrast, frameshift mutations at various positions of the env gene do not decrease the level of the env mRNA. We show that the src gene product is not required in trans for splicing and accumulation of src mRNA. Conversely, the truncated Src proteins do not act negatively in trans to decrease specifically the levels of src mRNA. Taken together, these results indicate that the frameshift mutations act in cis to reduce src mRNA levels. A double mutant with a lesion in the src initiator AUG and a frameshift within the src gene demonstrated wild-type RNA levels, indicating that the src mRNA must be recognized as a translatable mRNA for the effect on src mRNA levels to occur. Our results indicate that the reduced levels do not result from decreased cytoplasmic stability of the mature src mRNA. We also show that the src gene frameshift mutations affect src mRNA levels when expressed from intronless src cDNA clones. We conclude that the reduction of src mRNA levels triggered by the presence of frameshift mutations within the src gene occurs while it is associated with the nucleus. Our data also strongly suggest that this occurs at a step of RNA processing or transport independent of RNA splicing. Images PMID:8114716

  6. Identification of a novel frameshift mutation in the ILDR1 gene in a UAE family, mutations review and phenotype genotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Tlili, Abdelaziz; Fahd Al Mutery, Abdullah; Mahfood, Mona; Kamal Eddine Ahmad Mohamed, Walaa; Bajou, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss is one of the most common monogenic diseases. It is characterized by high allelic and locus heterogeneities that make a precise diagnosis difficult. In this study, whole-exome sequencing was performed for an affected patient allowing us to identify a new frameshift mutation (c.804delG) in the Immunoglobulin-Like Domain containing Receptor-1 (ILDR1) gene. Direct Sanger sequencing and segregation analysis were performed for the family pedigree. The mutation was homozygous in all affected siblings but heterozygous in the normal consanguineous parents. The present study reports a first ILDR1 gene mutation in the UAE population and confirms that the whole-exome sequencing approach is a robust tool for the diagnosis of monogenic diseases with high levels of allelic and locus heterogeneity. In addition, by reviewing all reported ILDR1 mutations, we attempt to establish a genotype phenotype correlation to explain the phenotypic variability observed at low frequencies.

  7. Novel frameshifting mutations of the ZMPSTE24 gene in two siblings affected with restrictive dermopathy and review of the mutations described in the literature.

    PubMed

    Smigiel, Robert; Jakubiak, Aleksandra; Esteves-Vieira, Vera; Szela, Katarzyna; Halon, Agnieszka; Jurek, Tomasz; Lévy, Nicolas; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2010-02-01

    Restrictive dermopathy (RD) is a rare, severe, lethal genodermatosis in which tautness of the skin causes fetal akinesia or hypokinesia deformation sequence. To date, about 60 cases of RD were described. The signs of the disease are very characteristic and include intrauterine growth retardation, thin, tightly adherent translucent skin, superficial vessels, typical facial dysmorphism as well as generalized joint contractures. The syndrome is caused in most cases by ZMPSTE24 autosomal recessive mutations, or, less frequently, by LMNA autosomal dominant mutations. We report on two brothers affected with RD, who died in the neonatal period. Molecular analyses were performed in the second child, for whom biological material was available, and both parents. Compound heterozygous frameshifting mutations were identified in exon 1 (c.50delA) and exon 5 (c.584_585delAT) of the ZMPSTE24 gene. The autosomal recessive inheritance was confirmed by the parents' genomic analysis. Besides, a review of the mutations causing RD is made.

  8. Coding Microsatellite Frameshift Mutations Accumulate in Atherosclerotic Carotid Artery Lesions: Evaluation of 26 Cases and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Carolin; Hakimi, Maani; Kloor, Matthias; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Gross-Weissmann, Marie-Luise; Böckler, Dittmar; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Dihlmann, Susanne

    2015-06-09

    Somatic DNA alterations are known to occur in atherosclerotic carotid artery lesions; however, their significance is unknown. The accumulation of microsatellite mutations in coding DNA regions may reflect a deficiency of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. Alternatively, accumulation of these coding microsatellite mutations may indicate that they contribute to the pathology. To discriminate between these two possibilities, we compared the mutation frequencies in coding microsatellites (likely functionally relevant) with those in noncoding microsatellites (likely neutral). Genomic DNA was isolated from carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens of 26 patients undergoing carotid surgery and from 15 nonatherosclerotic control arteries. Samples were analyzed by DNA fragment analysis for instability at three noncoding (BAT25, BAT26, CAT25) and five coding (AIM2, ACVR2, BAX, CASP5, TGFBR2) microsatellite loci, with proven validity for detection of microsatellite instability in neoplasms. We found an increased frequency of coding microsatellite mutations in CEA specimens compared with control specimens (34.6 versus 0%; p = 0.0013). Five CEA specimens exhibited more than one frameshift mutation, and ACVR2 and CASP5 were affected most frequently (5/26 and 6/26). Moreover, the rate of coding microsatellite alterations (15/130) differed significantly from that of noncoding alterations (0/78) in CEA specimens (p = 0.0013). In control arteries, no microsatellite alterations were observed, neither in coding nor in noncoding microsatellite loci. In conclusion, the specific accumulation of coding mutations suggests that these mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic carotid lesions, since the absence of mutations in noncoding microsatellites argues against general microsatellite instability, reflecting MMR deficiency.

  9. De Novo Frameshift Mutation in COUP-TFII (NR2F2) in Human Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    High, Frances A.; Bhayani, Pooja; Wilson, Jay M.; Bult, Carol J.; Donahoe, Patricia K.; Longoni, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    COUP-TFII (NR2F2) is mapped to the 15q26 deletion hotspot associated with the common and highly morbid congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Conditional homozygous deletions of COUP-TFII in mice result in diaphragmatic defects analogous to the human Bochdalek-type hernia phenotype. Despite evidence from animal models however, mutations in the coding sequence of COUP-TFII have not been reported in patients, prompting the speculation that additional coding or non-coding sequences in the 15q26 locus are necessary for diaphragmatic hernias to develop. In this report, we describe a case of a patient with a heterozygous de novo COUP-TFII frameshift mutation, presenting with CDH and an atrial septal defect. The p.Pro33AlafsTer77 mutation specifically disrupts protein isoform 1 which contains the DNA binding domain. In addition, we review other COUP-TFII sequence variations and deletions that have been described in cases of CDH. We conclude that COUP-TFII mutations can cause diaphragmatic hernias, and should be included in the differential diagnosis of CDH patients, particularly those with comorbid congenital heart defects. PMID:27363585

  10. NorA plasmid resistance to fluoroquinolones: role of copy number and norA frameshift mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, L; Sreedharan, S; Plummer, K; Fisher, L M

    1996-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus NorA protein is a transmembrane multidrug efflux pump that confers low-level resistance to hydrophilic fluoroquinolones. The norA gene promoter is active in Escherichia coli HB101. We have examined the genetic basis of norA-mediated resistance in E. coli by introducing a wild-type norA gene into HB101 in plasmid pCL1921, pBR322, or pUC18 exhibiting copy numbers that spanned a 22-fold range. Increased ciprofloxacin resistance correlated with norA transcript levels seen by Northern (RNA) analysis. Thus, contrary to some reports, a wild-type norA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli in a copy-number-dependent fashion and does not require mutational activation. Interestingly, a multicopy pUC19norA derivative gave transformants exhibiting a range of resistance phenotypes. The norA gene of one transformant carried a single base deletion (ATACAAT to AACAAT; the deleted base is underlined) in the putative--10 Pribnow box resulting in a promoter down-regulatory mutation; a second plasmid had acquired a frameshift producing a null mutation at codon 112. These mutations override the dual resistance-growth-inhibitory phenotype of high-copy-number norA plasmids. The results have implications for using the standard E. coli HB101 system to assess NorA function and potentially for plasmid-borne transmission of norA-mediated drug resistance. PMID:8807059

  11. A novel GJB1 frameshift mutation produces a transient CNS symptom of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hideya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Miura, Akiko; Hirahara, Tomoo; Kimura, En; Maeda, Yasushi; Terasaki, Tadashi; Hirano, Teruyuki; Uchino, Makoto

    2011-02-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common variant of CMT and is caused by mutations in the GJB1 gene encoding connexin 32. Some CMT1X patients with GJB1 missense mutations have shown transient central nervous system (CNS) symptoms with abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Herein we report the first case with a novel GJB1 frameshift mutation that associates with a transient CNS symptom. The patient noticed high-arched feet and limited ankle dorsiflexion in early childhood; he transiently developed numbness and paresis of left face and arm, and dysphagia, with abnormal brain MRI. Although the CNS symptoms recovered within several hours without treatment, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy ameliorated progressing symptoms such as those of toe extensor muscles. His mother had been diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and repetitive IVIg treatments had relieved the symptoms. Therefore, inflammation might be involved in the pathophysiology of CMT1X with the GJB1 mutation, while molecular analysis revealed that the mutant GJB1 was more rapidly degraded by the proteasome pathway known as endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation.

  12. A new Frameshift mutation on the α2-globin gene causing α⁺-thalassemia: codon 43 (TTC>-TC or TTC>T-C).

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Barro, Claire; Francina, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We report a new mutation on the α2-globin gene causing α(+)-thalassemia (α(+)-thal) with a deletion of a single nucleotide (T) at amino acid residue 43 [HBA2:c.130delT or HBA2:c.131delT]. This frameshift deletion gives rise to a premature termination codon at codon 47.

  13. A Novel Homozygous Frameshift Mutation in Exon 2 of LEP Gene Associated with Severe Obesity: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Altawil, Ashwaq Shukri; Mawlawi, Horia Ahmad; Alghamdi, Khalid Ateeq; Almijmaj, Faten Fohaid

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Monogenic obesity is a rare type of obesity caused by a mutation in a single gene. Patients with monogenic obesity may develop early onset of obesity and severe metabolic abnormalities. CASE PRESENTATION A two-and-half-year-old girl was presented to our clinic because of excessive weight gain and hyperphagia. She was born at full term, by normal vaginal delivery with birth weight of 2.82 kg and no complications during pregnancy. The patient was the second child of two healthy, non-obese Saudis with known consanguinity. She gained weight rapidly leading to obesity at the age of three months. METHODS The demographic data and clinical features were recorded. Blood samples were collected and tested for endocrine and metabolic characteristics and genetic studies. Mutations of the LEP gene were screened. The coding exons 2 and 3 and the corresponding exon–intron boundaries were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using specific primers, analyzed by direct sequencing using an ABI sequencer 3500 xL GA (Applied Biosystems), and evaluated using the JSI SeqPilot software. The resulting sequence data were compared with the reference MM_0002302. CONCLUSION We report a novel homozygous frameshift mutation c.144delin TAC (G1n49Thrfs*23) in exon 2 of the LEP gene associated with extreme obesity. PMID:27980447

  14. A clinical variant of neurofibromatosis type 1: familial spinal neurofibromatosis with a frameshift mutation in the NF1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ars, E; Kruyer, H; Gaona, A; Casquero, P; Rosell, J; Volpini, V; Serra, E; Lázaro, C; Estivill, X

    1998-01-01

    Spinal neurofibromatosis (SNF) has been considered to be an alternative form of neurofibromatosis in which spinal cord tumors are the main clinical characteristic. Familial SNF has been reported, elsewhere, in three families-two linked to markers within the gene for neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and the other not linked to NF1-but no molecular alterations have been described in these families. We describe a three-generation family that includes five members affected by SNF. All the affected members presented multiple spinal neurofibromas and café au lait spots, one member had cutaneous neurofibromas, and some members had other signs of NF1. Genetic analysis, performed with markers within and flanking the NF1 gene, showed segregation with the NF1 locus. Mutation analysis, performed with the protein-truncation test and SSCP/heteroduplex analysis of the whole coding region of the NF1 gene, identified a frameshift mutation (8042insA) in exon 46, which should result in a truncated NF1 protein. The 8042insA mutation was detected in all five family members with the SNF/NF1 phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a mutation in the NF1 gene has been associated with SNF. The clinical homogeneity in the severity of the disease among the affected members of the family, which is unusual in NF1, suggests that a particular property of the NF1 mutation described here, a gene closely linked to NF1, or posttranscriptional events are involved in this severe neurological phenotype. PMID:9529361

  15. A frameshift mutation in the melanophilin gene causes the dilute coat colour in rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) breeds.

    PubMed

    Fontanesi, L; Scotti, E; Allain, D; Dall'olio, S

    2014-04-01

    In rabbit, the dilute locus is determined by a recessive mutated allele (d) that causes the dilution of both eumelanic and pheomelanic pigmentations. In mice, similar phenotypes are determined by mutations in the myosin VA, Rab27a and melanophilin (MLPH) genes. In this study, we investigated the rabbit MLPH gene and showed that a mutation in this gene appears responsible for the dilute coat colour in this species. Checkered Giant F1 families segregating for black and grey (diluted or blue) coat colour were first genotyped for a complex indel in intron 1 of the MLPH gene that was completely associated with the coat colour phenotype (θ = 0.00; LOD = 4.82). Then, we sequenced 6357 bp of the MLPH gene in 18 rabbits of different coat colours, including blue animals. A total of 165 polymorphisms were identified: 137 were in non-coding regions and 28 were in coding exons. One of them was a frameshift deletion in exon 5. Genotyping the half-sib families confirmed the complete cosegregation of this mutation with the blue coat colour. The mutation was analysed in 198 rabbits of 23 breeds. All Blue Vienna and all other blue/grey/ash rabbits in other breeds (Californian, Castor Rex, Checkered Giant, English Spot, Fairy Marburg and Fairy Pearly) were homozygous for this deletion. The identification of MLPH as the responsible gene for the dilute locus in rabbit provides a natural animal model for human Griscelli syndrome type 3 and a new mutant to study the role of this gene on pigmentation. © 2013 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  16. Identification of a Frameshift Mutation in Osterix in a Patient with Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lapunzina, Pablo; Aglan, Mona; Temtamy, Samia; Caparrós-Martín, José A.; Valencia, Maria; Letón, Rocío; Martínez-Glez, Victor; Elhossini, Rasha; Amr, Khalda; Vilaboa, Nuria; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L.

    2010-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, or “brittle bone disease,” is a type I collagen-related condition associated with osteoporosis and increased risk of bone fractures. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping and candidate gene approach, we have identified a homozygous single base pair deletion (c.1052delA) in SP7/Osterix (OSX) in an Egyptian child with recessive osteogenesis imperfecta. The clinical findings from this patient include recurrent fractures, mild bone deformities, delayed tooth eruption, normal hearing, and white sclera. OSX encodes a transcription factor containing three Cys2-His2 zinc-finger DNA-binding domains at its C terminus, which, in mice, has been shown to be essential for bone formation. The frameshift caused by the c.1052delA deletion removes the last 81 amino acids of the protein, including the third zinc-finger motif. This finding adds another locus to the spectrum of genes associated with osteogenesis imperfecta and reveals that SP7/OSX also plays a key role in human bone development. PMID:20579626

  17. A novel frameshift mutation in FGA accounting for congenital afibrinogenemia predicted to encode an aberrant peptide terminating 158 amino acids downstream.

    PubMed

    Robert-Ebadi, H; de Moerloose, P; El Khorassani, M; El Khattab, M; Neerman-Arbez, M

    2009-07-01

    Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by complete absence of detectable fibrinogen and bleeding symptoms. Many causative mutations have been described to date in all three fibrinogen genes, most of them in the fibrinogen A alpha-chain gene (FGA), but also in the fibrinogen B beta-chain gene (FGB) and the fibrinogen gamma-chain gene (FGG). We report here a novel frameshift mutation (p.Glu262AspfsX158) in FGA exon 5 predicted to lead to a truncated polypeptide with an exceptionally long stretch of abnormal residues identified in homozygosity in a patient with congenital afibrinogenemia. Interestingly, five other frameshift mutations predicted to truncate at the same stop codon have already been described in FGA exon 5.

  18. Yeast frameshift suppressor mutations in the genes coding for transcription factor Mbf1p and ribosomal protein S3: evidence for autoregulation of S3 synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, J L; Wilson, P G; Edelman, I I; Sandbaken, M G; Ursic, D; Culbertson, M R

    2001-01-01

    The SUF13 and SUF14 genes were identified among extragenic suppressors of +1 frameshift mutations. SUF13 is synonymous with MBF1, a single-copy nonessential gene coding for a POLII transcription factor. The suf13-1 mutation is a two-nucleotide deletion in the SUF13/MBF1 coding region. A suf13::TRP1 null mutant suppresses +1 frameshift mutations, indicating that suppression is caused by loss of SUF13 function. The suf13-1 suppressor alters sensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics and reduces the accumulation of his4-713 mRNA, suggesting that suppression is mediated at the translational level. The SUF14 gene is synonymous with RPS3, a single-copy essential gene that codes for the ribosomal protein S3. The suf14-1 mutation is a missense substitution in the coding region. Increased expression of S3 limits the accumulation of SUF14 mRNA, suggesting that expression is autoregulated. A frameshift mutation in SUF14 that prevents full-length translation eliminated regulation, indicating that S3 is required for regulation. Using CUP1-SUF14 and SUF14-lacZ fusions, run-on transcription assays, and estimates of mRNA half-life, our results show that transcription plays a minor role if any in regulation and that the 5'-UTR is necessary but not sufficient for regulation. A change in mRNA decay rate may be the primary mechanism for regulation. PMID:11238400

  19. Association of the congenital neuromuscular form of glycogen storage disease type IV with a large deletion and recurrent frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Li, Sing-Chung; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Lin, Ju-Li; Bali, Deeksha S; Yang, Chen; Chu, Shih-Ming; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Chou, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Yi; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun; Tsao, Po-Nien; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Lee, Ni-Chung

    2012-02-01

    Anderson disease, also known as glycogen storage disease type IV (MIM 232500), is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of glycogen branching enzyme. Glycogen storage disease type IV has a broad clinical spectrum ranging from a perinatal lethal form to a nonprogressive later-onset disease in adults. Here, we report 2 unrelated infants who were born small for their gestational age and who had profound hypotonia at birth and thus needed mechanical ventilation. Both of these patients shared the same frameshift mutation (c.288delA, pGly97GlufsX46) in the GBE1 gene. In addition, both of these patients were found to have 2 different large deletions in the GBE1 gene; exon 7 and exons 2 to 7, respectively, on the other alleles. This case report also highlights the need for a more comprehensive search for large deletion mutations associated with glycogen storage disease type IV, especially if routine GBE1 gene sequencing results are equivocal.

  20. An exon 53 frameshift mutation in CUBN abrogates cubam function and causes Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, John C; Hemker, Shelby L; Venta, Patrick J; Fitzgerald, Caitlin A; Outerbridge, Catherine A; Myers, Sherry L; Giger, Urs

    2013-08-01

    Cobalamin malabsorption accompanied by selective proteinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder known as Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome in humans and was previously described in dogs due to amnionless (AMN) mutations. The resultant vitamin B12 deficiency causes dyshematopoiesis, lethargy, failure to thrive, and life-threatening metabolic disruption in the juvenile period. We studied 3 kindreds of border collies with cobalamin malabsorption and mapped the disease locus in affected dogs to a 2.9Mb region of homozygosity on canine chromosome 2. The region included CUBN, the locus encoding cubilin, a peripheral membrane protein that in concert with AMN forms the functional intrinsic factor-cobalamin receptor expressed in ileum and a multi-ligand receptor in renal proximal tubules. Cobalamin malabsorption and proteinuria comprising CUBN ligands were demonstrated by radiolabeled cobalamin uptake studies and SDS-PAGE, respectively. CUBN mRNA and protein expression were reduced ~10 fold and ~20 fold, respectively, in both ileum and kidney of affected dogs. DNA sequencing demonstrated a single base deletion in exon 53 predicting a translational frameshift and early termination codon likely triggering nonsense mediated mRNA decay. The mutant allele segregated with the disease in the border collie kindred. The border collie disorder indicates that a CUBN mutation far C-terminal from the intrinsic factor-cobalamin binding site can abrogate receptor expression and cause Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome.

  1. An exon 53 frameshift mutation in CUBN abrogates cubam function and causes Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, John C.; Hemker, Shelby L.; Venta, Patrick J.; Fitzgerald, Caitlin A.; Outerbridge, Catherine A.; Myers, Sherry L.; Giger, Urs

    2013-01-01

    Cobalamin malabsorption accompanied by selective proteinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder known as Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome in humans and was previously described in dogs due to amnionless (AMN) mutations. The resultant vitamin B12 deficiency causes dyshematopoiesis, lethargy, failure to thrive, and life-threatening metabolic disruption in the juvenile period. We studied 3 kindreds of border collies with cobalamin malabsorption and mapped the disease locus in affected dogs to a 2.9 Mb region of homozygosity on canine chromosome 2. The region included CUBN, the locus encoding cubilin, a peripheral membrane protein that in concert with AMN forms the functional intrinsic factor-cobalamin receptor expressed in ileum and a multi-ligand receptor in renal proximal tubules. Cobalamin malabsorption and proteinuria comprising CUBN ligands were demonstrated by radiolabeled cobalamin uptake studies and SDS-PAGE, respectively. CUBN mRNA and protein expression were reduced ~10 fold and ~20 fold, respectively, in both ileum and kidney of affected dogs. DNA sequencing demonstrated a single base deletion in exon 53 predicting a translational frameshift and early termination codon likely triggering nonsense mediated mRNA decay. The mutant allele segregated with disease in the border collie kindred. The border collie disorder indicates that a CUBN mutation far C-terminal from the intrinsic factor-cobalamin binding site can abrogate receptor expression and cause Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome. PMID:23746554

  2. Bernard-Soulier syndrome in a patient doubly heterozygous for two frameshift mutations in the glycoprotein ib alpha gene.

    PubMed

    Afshar-Kharghan, V; Craig, F E; López, J A

    2000-09-01

    We report here the genetic basis of Bernard-Soulier syndrome in a compound heterozygote for two mutant glycoprotein (GP) Ib alpha alleles. One allele contained a novel four base-pair deletion (TGAG) that eliminated the last base of the codon for Ser39 (AGT) and the entire codon for Glu40 (GAG), causing a reading frame shift that yielded a stretch of 51 amino acids before a premature stop codon. The other allele also contained a frame-shift mutation, caused by deletion of the last two bases of the codon for Tyr492 (TAT). This allele produced a truncated glycoprotein Ib alpha that, although not expressed on the surface of the patient's platelets, was detectable in the plasma. The second allele has been identified previously by our group and other investigators as the cause of Bernard-Soulier syndrome in patients of northern European ancestry. This allele carried a haplotype identical to those of the previously reported cases, with the following polymorphic markers: two tandem repeats in the VNTR region, C at nucleotide -5 from the ATG start codon and a substitution of G for A in the third base for codon Arg342. These findings suggest that this particular Bernard-Soulier mutation occurred once on the background of a rare haplotype and has spread throughout the northern European population.

  3. Evidence that selected amplification of a bacterial lac frameshift allele stimulates Lac(+) reversion (adaptive mutation) with or without general hypermutability.

    PubMed Central

    Slechta, E Susan; Liu, Jing; Andersson, Dan I; Roth, John R

    2002-01-01

    In the genetic system of Cairns and Foster, a nongrowing population of an E. coli lac frameshift mutant appears to specifically accumulate Lac(+) revertants when starved on medium including lactose (adaptive mutation). This behavior has been attributed to stress-induced general mutagenesis in a subpopulation of starved cells (the hypermutable state model). We have suggested that, on the contrary, stress has no direct effect on mutability but favors only growth of cells that amplify their leaky mutant lac region (the amplification mutagenesis model). Selection enhances reversion primarily by increasing the mutant lac copy number within each developing clone on the selection plate. The observed general mutagenesis is attributed to a side effect of growth with an amplification-induction of SOS by DNA fragments released from a tandem array of lac copies. Here we show that the S. enterica version of the Cairns system shows SOS-dependent general mutagenesis and behaves in every way like the original E. coli system. In both systems, lac revertants are mutagenized during selection. Eliminating the 35-fold increase in mutation rate reduces revertant number only 2- to 4-fold. This discrepancy is due to continued growth of amplification cells until some clones manage to revert without mutagenesis solely by increasing their lac copy number. Reversion in the absence of mutagenesis is still dependent on RecA function, as expected if it depends on lac amplification (a recombination-dependent process). These observations support the amplification mutagenesis model. PMID:12136002

  4. A frame-shift mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes complete androgen insensitivity in the testicular-feminized mouse.

    PubMed Central

    He, W W; Kumar, M V; Tindall, D J

    1991-01-01

    The testicular feminized (Tfm) mouse lacks completely androgen responsiveness; and therefore, is unique for studying the role of androgenic steroids in different biological processes. In order to understand the molecular basis of this mutation, 2.8 kilobases of cDNA encoding the Tfm mouse androgen receptor (AR) were amplified with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. No large deletion in the coding region of the Tfm mouse AR was detected. However, sequence analysis revealed a single base deletion in the coding region of the Tfm AR mRNA. This mutation, which is located in the amino-terminus domain of the receptor, is predicted to cause a frame-shift in translation resulting in a premature termination of AR synthesis at amino acid 412. In vitro translation studies of the recombinant wild type and Tfm AR's demonstrated that the Tfm AR cDNA failed to produce a full-length receptor. Furthermore, the Tfm AR was demonstrated to lack transcriptional activation capability by cotransfection experiments using the Tfm AR with a reporter plasmid of mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. These studies provide evidence of the molecular defect which causes androgen insensitivity in the Tfm mouse. Images PMID:2041777

  5. A newly described bovine type 2 scurs syndrome segregates with a frame-shift mutation in TWIST1.

    PubMed

    Capitan, Aurélien; Grohs, Cécile; Weiss, Bernard; Rossignol, Marie-Noëlle; Reversé, Patrick; Eggen, André

    2011-01-01

    The developmental pathways involved in horn development are complex and still poorly understood. Here we report the description of a new dominant inherited syndrome in the bovine Charolais breed that we have named type 2 scurs. Clinical examination revealed that, despite a strong phenotypic variability, all affected individuals show both horn abnormalities similar to classical scurs phenotype and skull interfrontal suture synostosis. Based on a genome-wide linkage analysis using Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip genotyping data from 57 half-sib and full-sib progeny, this locus was mapped to a 1.7 Mb interval on bovine chromosome 4. Within this region, the TWIST1 gene encoding a transcription factor was considered as a strong candidate gene since its haploinsufficiency is responsible for the human Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, characterized by skull coronal suture synostosis. Sequencing of the TWIST1 gene identified a c.148_157dup (p.A56RfsX87) frame-shift mutation predicted to completely inactivate this gene. Genotyping 17 scurred and 20 horned founders of our pedigree as well as 48 unrelated horned controls revealed a perfect association between this mutation and the type 2 scurs phenotype. Subsequent genotyping of 32 individuals born from heterozygous parents showed that homozygous mutated progeny are completely absent, which is consistent with the embryonic lethality reported in Drosophila and mouse suffering from TWIST1 complete insufficiency. Finally, data from previous studies on model species and a fine description of type 2 scurs symptoms allowed us to propose different mechanisms to explain the features of this syndrome. In conclusion, this first report on the identification of a potential causal mutation affecting horn development in cattle offers a unique opportunity to better understand horn ontogenesis.

  6. A Newly Described Bovine Type 2 Scurs Syndrome Segregates with a Frame-Shift Mutation in TWIST1

    PubMed Central

    Capitan, Aurélien; Grohs, Cécile; Weiss, Bernard; Rossignol, Marie-Noëlle; Reversé, Patrick; Eggen, André

    2011-01-01

    The developmental pathways involved in horn development are complex and still poorly understood. Here we report the description of a new dominant inherited syndrome in the bovine Charolais breed that we have named type 2 scurs. Clinical examination revealed that, despite a strong phenotypic variability, all affected individuals show both horn abnormalities similar to classical scurs phenotype and skull interfrontal suture synostosis. Based on a genome-wide linkage analysis using Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip genotyping data from 57 half-sib and full-sib progeny, this locus was mapped to a 1.7 Mb interval on bovine chromosome 4. Within this region, the TWIST1 gene encoding a transcription factor was considered as a strong candidate gene since its haploinsufficiency is responsible for the human Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, characterized by skull coronal suture synostosis. Sequencing of the TWIST1 gene identified a c.148_157dup (p.A56RfsX87) frame-shift mutation predicted to completely inactivate this gene. Genotyping 17 scurred and 20 horned founders of our pedigree as well as 48 unrelated horned controls revealed a perfect association between this mutation and the type 2 scurs phenotype. Subsequent genotyping of 32 individuals born from heterozygous parents showed that homozygous mutated progeny are completely absent, which is consistent with the embryonic lethality reported in Drosophila and mouse suffering from TWIST1 complete insufficiency. Finally, data from previous studies on model species and a fine description of type 2 scurs symptoms allowed us to propose different mechanisms to explain the features of this syndrome. In conclusion, this first report on the identification of a potential causal mutation affecting horn development in cattle offers a unique opportunity to better understand horn ontogenesis. PMID:21814570

  7. A Frame-Shift Mutation in CAV1 Is Associated with a Severe Neonatal Progeroid and Lipodystrophy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Siniard, Ashley L; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Corneveaux, Jason J; Malenica, Ivana; Richholt, Ryan; Van Camp, Guy; De Both, Matt; Swaminathan, Shanker; Turk, Mari; Ramsey, Keri; Craig, David W; Narayanan, Vinodh; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    A 3-year-old female patient presenting with an unknown syndrome of a neonatal progeroid appearance, lipodystrophy, pulmonary hypertension, cutis marmorata, feeding disorder and failure to thrive was investigated by whole-genome sequencing. This revealed a de novo, heterozygous, frame-shift mutation in the Caveolin1 gene (CAV1) (p.Phe160X). Mutations in CAV1, encoding the main component of the caveolae in plasma membranes, cause Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy type 3 (BSCL). Although BSCL is recessive, heterozygous carriers either show a reduced phenotype of partial lipodystrophy, pulmonary hypertension, or no phenotype. To investigate the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this syndrome in more depth, we performed next generation RNA sequencing of peripheral blood, which showed several dysregulated pathways in the patient that might be related to the phenotypic progeroid features (apoptosis, DNA repair/replication, mitochondrial). Secondly, we found a significant down-regulation of known Cav1 interaction partners, verifying the dysfunction of CAV1. Other known progeroid genes and lipodystrophy genes were also dysregulated. Next, western blotting of lysates of cultured fibroblasts showed that the patient shows a significantly decreased expression of wild-type CAV1 protein, demonstrating a loss-of-function mutation, though her phenotype is more severe that other heterozygotes with similar mutations. This phenotypic variety could be explained by differences in genetic background. Indications for this are supported by additional rare variants we found in AGPAT2 and LPIN1 lipodystrophy genes. CAV1, AGPAT2 and LPIN1 all play an important role in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in adipose tissue, and the defective function in different parts of this pathway, though not all to the same extend, could contribute to a more severe lipoatrophic phenotype in this patient. In conclusion, we report, for the first time, an association of CAV1 dysfunction with a syndrome

  8. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-05-14

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient's HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM.

  9. Whole-exome sequencing identifies a novel homozygous frameshift mutation in the PROM1 gene as a causative mutation in two patients with sporadic retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    LIU, SANMEI; XIE, LAN; YUE, JUN; MA, TAO; PENG, CHUNYAN; QIU, BIYUAN; YANG, ZHENGLIN; YANG, JIYUN

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal diseases caused by the loss of photoreceptors. The present study aimed to identify the gene mutations responsible for RP in two patients diagnosed with sporadic RP using next-generation sequencing technology. For this purpose, two patients with sporadic RP and family members (namely parents and siblings) were recruited into this study and underwent a complete ophthalmological assessment. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on genomic DNA samples isolated from peripheral leukocytes which had been obtained from the two patients diagnosed with sporadic RP. WES data were annotated and filtered against four public databases and one in-house database. Subsequently, Sanger sequencing was performed in order to determine whether any of the candidate variants co-segregated with the disease phenotype in the families. A homozygous frameshift mutation, c.1445dupT (p.F482fs) in exon 12 of the PROM1 gene (MIM: 604365), satisfied a recessive inheritance model and showed complete co-segregation of the mutation with the disease phenotype in the families. The same mutation was not detected in the 200 ethnically-matched control samples by Sanger sequencing. The novel homozygous mutation c.1445dupT (p.F482fs) in the PROM1 gene was identified as a causative mutation for RP. Thus, the identification of this mutation has further expanded the existing spectrum of PROM1 mutations in patients with RP, thereby assisting in the molecular diagnosis of RP and enhancing our understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations in order to provide effective genetic counseling. PMID:27082927

  10. Molecular phenotype and bleeding risks of an inherited platelet disorder in a family with a RUNX1 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Badin, M S; Iyer, J K; Chong, M; Graf, L; Rivard, G E; Waye, J S; Paterson, A D; Pare, G; Hayward, C P M

    2017-05-01

    Inherited defects in RUNX1 are important causes of platelet function disorders. Our goals were to evaluate RUNX1-related platelet disorders among individuals evaluated for uncharacterized, inherited platelet function disorders and test a proof of concept that bleeding risks could be quantitatively estimated for typical families with an inherited platelet function disorder. Index cases with an uncharacterized inherited platelet function disorder were subjected to exome sequencing with confirmation of RUNX1 mutations by Sanger sequencing. Laboratory findings were obtained from medical records and persistence of platelet non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIB (MYH10), a biomarker of RUNX1 defects, was assessed by Western blotting. Bleeding histories were assessed using standardized assessment tools. Bleeding risks were estimated as odds ratios (OR) using questionnaire data for affected individuals compared to controls. Among 12 index cases who had their exomes sequenced, one individual from a family with eight study participants had a c.583dup in RUNX1 that segregated with the disease and was predicted to cause a frameshift and RUNX1 haploinsufficiency. Unlike unaffected family members (n = 2), affected family members (n = 6) had increased bleeding scores and abnormal platelet aggregation and dense granule release responses to agonists but only some had thrombocytopenia and/or dense granule deficiency. This family's mutation was associated with persistence of MYH10 in platelets and increased risks (OR 11-440) for wound healing problems and mild bleeding symptoms, including bleeding interfering with lifestyle in women. Inherited platelet dysfunction due to a RUNX1 haploinsufficiency mutation significantly increases bleeding risks. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A novel fibrinogen Bbeta chain frameshift mutation in a patient with severe congenital hypofibrinogenaemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiucai; Wu, Jingsheng; Zhai, Zhimin; Zhou, Rongfu; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Hongli; Ding, Kaiyang; Sun, Zimin; Ni, Heyu

    2006-06-01

    Congenital afibrinogenemia and severe hypofibrinogenemia are severe bleeding disorders characterized by either undetectable or very low levels of fibrinogen in patients' plasma and platelets. A majority of the reported cases are caused by mutations in the fibrinogen Aalpha chain. In this study, we identified a genetic defect in the fibrinogen Bbeta-chain (FGB) underlying severe hypofibrinogenemia. The propositus frequently displayed bleeding episodes with a prolonged blood-clotting time (thrombin time > 180 s, activated partial thromboplastin time > 300 s, prothrombin time > 120 s) and had a very low level of plasma fibrinogen (1.7-1.8 mg/dl). His parents had a consanguineous marriage, and their functional and immunological fibrinogen was approximately half of the normal level. The platelet fibrinogen level of the propositus could not be detected by western blotting, and his platelet aggregation was severely impaired. DNA screening of the whole fibrinogen gene revealed a homozygous GGGG-->GGG mutation at nucleotide 7,969-7,972 in his FGB gene. The propositus' parents are both heterozygous for this mutation. This mutation contributes to Gly419-->Val, and the 419-434 codons are frame shifted, and a stop codon is formed at codon 435. The predicted truncated Bbeta-chain is 27 amino acids shorter than the normal Bbeta-chain and a central beta-strand in the globular betaC domain is absent, which may lead to destabilization of the entire beta-domain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such a mutation which is associated with severe hypofibrinogenemia.

  12. A frameshift mutation in the cubilin gene (CUBN) in Beagles with Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (selective cobalamin malabsorption).

    PubMed

    Drögemüller, Michaela; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Howard, Judith; Bruggmann, Rémy; Drögemüller, Cord; Ruetten, Maja; Leeb, Tosso; Kook, Peter H

    2014-02-01

    Mammals are unable to synthesize cobalamin or vitamin B12 and rely on the uptake of dietary cobalamin. The cubam receptor expressed on the intestinal endothelium is required for the uptake of cobalamin from the gut. Cubam is composed of two protein subunits, amnionless and cubilin, which are encoded by the AMN and CUBN genes respectively. Loss-of-function mutations in either the AMN or the CUBN gene lead to hereditary selective cobalamin malabsorption or Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS). We investigated Beagles with IGS and resequenced the whole genome of one affected Beagle at 15× coverage. The analysis of the AMN and CUBN candidate genes revealed a homozygous deletion of a single cytosine in exon 8 of the CUBN gene (c.786delC). This deletion leads to a frameshift and early premature stop codon (p.Asp262Glufs*47) and is, thus, predicted to represent a complete loss-of-function allele. We tested three IGS-affected and 89 control Beagles and found perfect association between the IGS phenotype and the CUBN:c.786delC variant. Given the known role of cubilin in cobalamin transport, which has been firmly established in humans and dogs, our data strongly suggest that the CUBN:c.786delC variant is causing IGS in the investigated Beagles.

  13. NF1 frameshift mutation (c.6520_6523delGAGA) association with nervous system tumors and bone abnormalities in a Chinese patient with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Su, S Y; Zhou, X; Pang, X M; Chen, C Y; Li, S H; Liu, J L

    2016-04-07

    Neurofibromatosis type 1, also known as NF1 or von Recklinghausen's disease, is a common neurocutaneous syndrome that presents with multiple café-au-lait patches, skinfold freckling, dermatofibromas, neurofibromas, and Lisch nodules. The mutations of the gene NF1, encoding the protein neurofibromin, have been identified as the cause of this disease. Here, we report a clinical and molecular study of a Chinese patient with multiple café-au-lait skin freckles, dermatofibroma, central and peripheral nervous system tumors, and bone abnormalities attributed to NF1. The patient showed >6 café-au-lait spots on the body and multiple dermatofibromas. A brain glioma and multiple nerve sheath tumors inside and outside the vertebral canal were identified by magnetic resonance imaging, which also showed multiple intercostal nerve schwannomas and hydrocephalies above the cerebellar tentorium. Talipes equinus was also apparent. A mutation analysis of the NF1 gene revealed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 43, consisting of a heterozygous deletion of four nucleotides (GAGA) between positions 6520 and 6523. No NF1 mutations were detected in the patient's parents or younger brother. These results extend the list of known mutations in this gene. The absence of the NF1 mutation in the healthy family members suggests that it is responsible for the NF1 phenotype. To our knowledge, this frameshift mutation represents a novel NF1 case, and may be associated with nervous system tumors and bone abnormalities.

  14. A de novo frameshift mutation in chromodomain helicase DNA-binding domain 8 (CHD8): A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Merner, Nancy; Forgeot d'Arc, Baudouin; Bell, Scott C; Maussion, Gilles; Peng, Huashan; Gauthier, Julie; Crapper, Liam; Hamdan, Fadi F; Michaud, Jacques L; Mottron, Laurent; Rouleau, Guy A; Ernst, Carl

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in chromodomain helicase DNA-binding domain 8 (CHD8) have been identified in independent genotyping studies of autism spectrum disorder. To better understand the phenotype associated with CHD8 mutations, we genotyped all CHD8 exons in carefully assessed cohorts of autism (n = 142), schizophrenia (SCZ; n = 143), and intellectual disability (ID; n = 94). We identified one frameshift mutation, seven non-synonymous variants, and six synonymous variants. The frameshift mutation, p.Asn2092Lysfs*2, which creates a premature stop codon leading to the loss of 212 amino acids of the protein, was from an autism case on whom we present multiple clinical assessments and pharmacological treatments spanning more than 10 years. RNA and protein analysis support a model where the transcript generated from the mutant allele results in haploinsufficiency of CHD8. This case report supports the association of CHD8 mutations with classical autism, macrocephaly, infantile hypotonia, speech delay, lack of major ID, and psychopathology in late adolescence caused by insufficient dosage of CHD8. Review of 16 other CHD8 mutation cases suggests that clinical features and their severity vary considerably across individuals; however, these data support a CHD8 mutation syndrome, further highlighting the importance of genomic medicine to guide clinical assessment and treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Identification of a novel COL1A1 frameshift mutation, c.700delG, in a Chinese osteogenesis imperfecta family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiran; Pei, Yu; Dou, Jingtao; Lu, Juming; Li, Jian; Lv, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a family of genetic disorders associated with bone loss and fragility. Mutations associated with OI have been found in genes encoding the type I collagen chains. People with OI type I often produce insufficient α1-chain type I collagen because of frameshift, nonsense, or splice site mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2. This report is of a Chinese daughter and mother who had both experienced two bone fractures. Because skeletal fragility is predominantly inherited, we focused on identifying mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. A novel mutation in COL1A1, c.700delG, was detected by genomic DNA sequencing in the mother and daughter, but not in their relatives. The identification of this mutation led to the conclusion that they were affected by mild OI type I. Open reading frame analysis indicated that this frameshift mutation would truncate α1-chain type I collagen at residue p263 (p.E234KfsX264), while the wild-type protein would contain 1,464 residues. The clinical data were consistent with the patients’ diagnosis of mild OI type I caused by haploinsufficiency of α1-chain type I collagen. Combined with previous reports, identification of the novel mutation COL1A1-c.700delG in these patients suggests that additional genetic and environmental factors may influence the severity of OI. PMID:25983617

  16. Homozygous frameshift mutation in TMCO1 causes a syndrome with craniofacial dysmorphism, skeletal anomalies, and mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Baozhong; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Turben, Susan; Tan, Haiyan; Zhou, Aimin; Wang, Heng

    2009-01-01

    We identified an autosomal recessive condition in 11 individuals in the Old Order Amish of northeastern Ohio. The syndrome was characterized by distinctive craniofacial dysmorphism, skeletal anomalies, and mental retardation. The typical craniofacial dysmorphism included brachycephaly, highly arched bushy eyebrows, synophrys, long eyelashes, low-set ears, microdontism of primary teeth, and generalized gingival hyperplasia, whereas Sprengel deformity of scapula, fusion of spine, rib abnormities, pectus excavatum, and pes planus represented skeletal anomalies. The genome-wide homozygosity mapping using six affected individuals localized the disease gene to a 3.3-Mb region on chromosome 1q23.3-q24.1. Candidate gene sequencing identified a homozygous frameshift mutation, c.139_140delAG, in the transmembrane and coiled-coil domains 1 (TMCO1) gene, as the pathogenic change in all affected members of the extended pedigree. This mutation is predicted to result in a severely truncated protein (p.Ser47Ter) of only one-fourth the original length. The TMCO1 gene product is a member of DUF841 superfamily of several eukaryotic proteins with unknown function. The gene has highly conserved amino acid sequence and is universally expressed in all human tissues examined. The high degree of conservation and the ubiquitous expression pattern in human adult and fetal tissues suggest a critical role for TMCO1. This report shows a TMCO1 sequence variant being associated with a genetic disorder in human. We propose “TMCO1 defect syndrome” as the name of this condition. PMID:20018682

  17. Postmortem diagnosis of Marfan syndrome in a case of sudden death due to aortic rupture: Detection of a novel FBN1 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunyun; Chen, Shu; Wang, Rongshuai; Huang, Sizhe; Yang, Mingzhen; Liu, Liang; Liu, Qian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the sudden death of a 36-year-old Chinese man, a medicolegal autopsy was performed, combining forensic pathological examinations and genetic sequencing analysis to diagnose the cause of death. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from blood and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. Major findings included a dilated aortic root with a ruptured and dissected aorta and consequent tamponade of the pericardial sac. Moreover, arachnodactyly and other skeletal deformities were noted. By sequencing the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1), five genetic variations were found, including four previously known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a novel frameshift mutation, leading to the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. The frameshift mutation (c.4921delG, p.glu1641llysFsX9) detected in exon 40 led to a stop codon after the next 8 amino acids. The four SNPs included a splice site mutation (c.3464-5 G>A, rs11853943), a synonymous mutation (p.Asn625Asn, rs25458), and two missense mutations (p.Pro1148Ala, rs140598; p.Cys472Tyr, rs4775765). Genetic screening was recommended for the relatives as it was reported that the father and brother of the deceased had died at the ages of 40 and 25, respectively, from sudden cardiac failure. The son of the deceased lacked the relevant mutations. This report emphasizes the important contribution of medicolegal postmortem analysis on the molecular pathogenesis study of Marfan syndrome and early diagnosis of at-risk relatives.

  18. A CHRNB1 frameshift mutation is associated with familial arthrogryposis multiplex congenita in Red dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; McEvoy, Fintan J; Menzi, Fiona; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord

    2016-06-30

    Bovine arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a syndromic term for a congenital condition characterized by multiple joint contractures. Rare inherited forms of bovine AMC have been reported in different breeds. For AMC in Angus cattle a causative genomic deletion encompassing the agrin (AGRN) gene, encoding an essential neural regulator that induces the aggregation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), is known. In 2015, three genetically related cases of generalized AMC affecting Red dairy calves were diagnosed in Denmark. The family history of three affected calves suggested an autosomal recessive inheritance. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping showed a single genomic region of extended homozygosity of 21.5 Mb on chromosome 19. Linkage analysis revealed a maximal parametric LOD score of 1.8 at this region. By whole genome re-sequencing of the three cases, two private homozygous non-synonymous variants were detected in the critical interval. Both variants, located in the myosin phosphatase Rho interacting protein (MPRIP) and the cholinergic receptor nicotinic beta 1 subunit gene (CHRNB1), were perfectly associated with the AMC phenotype. Previously described CHRNB1 variants in humans lead to a congenital myasthenic syndrome with impaired neuromuscular transmission. The cattle variant represents a single base deletion in the first exon of CHRNB1 (c.55delG) introducing a premature stop codon (p.Ala19Profs47*) in the second exon, truncating 96 % of the protein. This study provides the first phenotypically and genetically characterized example of a bovine AMC phenotype that represents an inherited neuromuscular disorder corresponding to human congenital myasthenic syndrome. The identified CHRNB1 loss of function variant is predicted to have a deleterious effect on fetal AChR function, which could explain the lethal phenotype reported in this study. The identification of this candidate causative mutation thus widens the known phenotypic spectrum of

  19. A large deletion/insertion-induced frameshift mutation of the androgen receptor gene in a family with a familial complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cong, Peikuan; Ye, Yinghui; Wang, Yue; Lu, Lingping; Yong, Jing; Yu, Ping; Joseph, Kimani Kagunda; Jin, Fan; Qi, Ming

    2012-06-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder with a normal 46, XY karyotype caused by abnormality of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. One Chinese family consisting of the proband and 5 other members with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) was investigated. Mutation analysis by DNA sequencing on all 8 exons and flanking intron regions of the AR gene revealed a unique large deletion/insertion mutation in the family. A 287 bp deletion and 77 bp insertion (c.933_1219delins77) mutation at codon 312 resulted in a frameshift which caused a premature stop (p.Phe312Aspfs*7) of polypeptide formation. The proband's mother and grandmother were heterozygous for the mutant allele. The proband's father, uncle and grandfather have the normal allele. From the pedigree constructed from mutational analysis of the family, it is revealed that the probably pathogenic mutation comes from the maternal side.

  20. Novel NTRK1 Frameshift Mutation in Congenital Insensitivity to Pain With Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sen; Wu, Nan; Liu, Jiaqi; Ming, Xuan; Chen, Jun; Pavelec, Derek; Su, Xinlin; Qiu, Guixing; Tian, Ye; Giampietro, Philip; Wu, Zhihong

    2015-09-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. It has been reported that the defect in the NTRK1 gene encoding tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) can cause congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis. Nerve growth factor (NGF), the product of NGFB, mediates biological effects by binding to and activating tropomyosin-related kinase A. In addition, necdin (encoded by NDN) is also essential in nerve growth factor-tropomyosin-related kinase A pathway. We performed mutation analysis in NTRK1, NGFB, and NDN genes in a Chinese Han 17-year-old female patient with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis and her healthy family members. As a result, the patient was found to have a novel insertion in exon 7 (c.727insT) of NTRK1, which causes premature termination, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs2192206 G>A) in NDN. Our findings imply that the genetic variations of the nerve growth factor-tropomyosin-related kinase A pathway play an important role in congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

  1. A Frameshift Mutation in the Cubilin Gene (CUBN) in Border Collies with Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (Selective Cobalamin Malabsorption)

    PubMed Central

    Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord; Lutz, Sabina; Glanemann, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS) or selective cobalamin malabsorption has been described in humans and dogs. IGS occurs in Border Collies and is inherited as a monogenic autosomal recessive trait in this breed. Using 7 IGS cases and 7 non-affected controls we mapped the causative mutation by genome-wide association and homozygosity mapping to a 3.53 Mb interval on chromosome 2. We re-sequenced the genome of one affected dog at ∼10× coverage and detected 17 non-synonymous variants in the critical interval. Two of these non-synonymous variants were in the cubilin gene (CUBN), which is known to play an essential role in cobalamin uptake from the ileum. We tested these two CUBN variants for association with IGS in larger cohorts of dogs and found that only one of them was perfectly associated with the phenotype. This variant, a single base pair deletion (c.8392delC), is predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon in the CUBN gene. The resulting mutant open reading frame is 821 codons shorter than the wildtype open reading frame (p.Q2798Rfs*3). Interestingly, we observed an additional nonsense mutation in the MRC1 gene encoding the mannose receptor, C type 1, which was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the CUBN frameshift mutation. Based on our genetic data and the known role of CUBN for cobalamin uptake we conclude that the identified CUBN frameshift mutation is most likely causative for IGS in Border Collies. PMID:23613799

  2. A frameshift mutation in the cubilin gene (CUBN) in Border Collies with Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (selective cobalamin malabsorption).

    PubMed

    Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord; Lutz, Sabina; Glanemann, Barbara; Leeb, Tosso; Kook, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS) or selective cobalamin malabsorption has been described in humans and dogs. IGS occurs in Border Collies and is inherited as a monogenic autosomal recessive trait in this breed. Using 7 IGS cases and 7 non-affected controls we mapped the causative mutation by genome-wide association and homozygosity mapping to a 3.53 Mb interval on chromosome 2. We re-sequenced the genome of one affected dog at ∼10× coverage and detected 17 non-synonymous variants in the critical interval. Two of these non-synonymous variants were in the cubilin gene (CUBN), which is known to play an essential role in cobalamin uptake from the ileum. We tested these two CUBN variants for association with IGS in larger cohorts of dogs and found that only one of them was perfectly associated with the phenotype. This variant, a single base pair deletion (c.8392delC), is predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon in the CUBN gene. The resulting mutant open reading frame is 821 codons shorter than the wildtype open reading frame (p.Q2798Rfs*3). Interestingly, we observed an additional nonsense mutation in the MRC1 gene encoding the mannose receptor, C type 1, which was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the CUBN frameshift mutation. Based on our genetic data and the known role of CUBN for cobalamin uptake we conclude that the identified CUBN frameshift mutation is most likely causative for IGS in Border Collies.

  3. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN): molecular confirmation of a Turkish patient with a rare frameshift mutation in the coding region of the PANK2 gene.

    PubMed

    Cangül, Hakan; Ozdemir, Ozlem; Yakut, Tahsin; Okan, Mehmet; Morgan, Neil V; Baytan, Birol; Kurian, Manju A; Spiegel, Ronald; Maher, Eamonn R

    2009-01-01

    Here we report the clinical, neuroimaging, and molecular findings of a classic pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) patient of Turkish origin. Our patient is the first reported case of PKAN in Turkey with molecular genetic confirmation of the diagnosis. The frameshift mutation c.821_822delCT of the PANK2 gene detected in our patient has only been described in such classic patients to date, and our case provides further evidence of the association of this mutation with the classic PKAN phenotype. Since this mutation is a rare disease-causing mutation in other populations, further studies of more Turkish PKAN patients will show if it is the result of a founder effect in this population. In our case, molecular diagnosis allowed accurate prenatal genetic testing and counseling for this family. This case report highlights the importance of magnetic resonance imaging and molecular investigation in children who have progressive neurodegenerative symptoms of parkinsonism, dystonia, pyramidal features, and dementia.

  4. A disease-associated frameshift mutation in caveolin-1 disrupts caveolae formation and function through introduction of a de novo ER retention signal.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Courtney A; Han, Bing; Tiwari, Ajit; Austin, Eric D; Loyd, James E; West, James D; Kenworthy, Anne K

    2017-09-13

    Caveolin-1 (CAV1) is an essential component of caveolae and is implicated in numerous physiological processes. Recent studies have identified heterozygous mutations in the CAV1 gene in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the mechanisms by which these mutations impact caveolae assembly and contribute to disease remain unclear. To address this question, we examined the consequences of a familial PAH-associated frameshift mutation in CAV1, P158PfsX22, on caveolae assembly and function. We show that C-terminus of the CAV1 P158 protein contains a functional ER-retention signal that inhibits ER exit and caveolae formation and accelerates CAV1 turnover in Cav1(-/-) MEFs. Moreover, when co-expressed with WT CAV1 in Cav1(-/-) MEFs, CAV1-P158 functions as a dominant negative by partially disrupting WT CAV1 trafficking. In patient skin fibroblasts, CAV1 and caveolar accessory protein levels are reduced, fewer caveolae are observed, and CAV1 complexes exhibit biochemical abnormalities. Patient fibroblasts also exhibit decreased resistance to a hypo-osmotic challenge, suggesting the function of caveolae as membrane reservoir is compromised. We conclude that the P158PfsX22 frameshift introduces a gain of function that gives rise to a dominant negative form of CAV1, defining a new mechanism by which disease-associated mutations in CAV1 impair caveolae assembly. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  5. A novel NF1 frame-shift mutation (c.702_703delGT) in a Chinese family with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, S P; Fan, N; Chen, J; Xia, Z L; Wang, Y; Zhou, X M; Yin, Y; Wen, T L; Xia, Q J; Liu, X Y; Wang, H Y

    2014-07-24

    This study aimed to characterize the clinical features of a Chinese pedigree with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and to identify mutations in the NF1 gene. In this three-generation family containing 8 members, 5 had been diagnosed with NF1 and the others were asymptomatic. All members of the family underwent complete medical examinations. Molecular genetic analyses were performed on all subjects included in the study. All exons of NF1 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced, and compared with a reference database. Possible changes in function of the protein induced by amino acid variants were predicted by bioinformatic analysis. In this family, the 5 patients presented different clinical phenotypes, but all manifested typical café-au-lait macules. One novel frame-shift mutation, c.702_703delGT, in exon 7 of NF1 was identified in all affected family members, but not in the unaffected family members or in 102 normal controls. This mutation generates a premature stop codon at amino acid position 720. Additionally, a synonymous mutation c.702 G>A was found in 3 family members, including 2 affected and 1 normal individuals. In conclusion, our study suggests that a novel c.702_703delGT frame-shift mutation in NF1 is likely to be responsible for the pathogenesis of NF1 in this family. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that a c.702_703delGT mutation has been identified in a family with neurofibromatosis type 1.

  6. A simplified explanation for the frameshift mutation that created a novel C-terminal motif in the APETALA3 gene lineage

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Elena M; Su, Huei-Jiun; Wu, Cheng-Chiang; Hu, Jer-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Background The evolution of type II MADS box genes has been extensively studied in angiosperms. One of the best-understood subfamilies is that of the Arabidopsis gene APETALA3 (AP3). Previous work has demonstrated that the ancestral paleoAP3 lineage was duplicated at some point within the basal eudicots to give rise to the paralogous TM6 and euAP3 lineages. This event was followed in euAP3 orthologs by the replacement of the C-terminal paleoAP3 motif with the derived euAP3 motif. It has been suggested that the new motif was created by an eight-nucleotide insertion that produced a translational frameshift. Results The addition of 25 eudicot AP3 homologs to the existing dataset has allowed us to clarify the process by which the euAP3 motif evolved. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the euAP3/TM6 duplication maps very close to the base of the core eudicots, associated with the families Trochodendraceae and Buxaceae. We demonstrate that although the transformation of paleoAP3 into euAP3 was due to a frameshift mutation, this was the result of a single nucleotide deletion. The use of ancestral character state reconstructions has allowed us to demonstrate that the frameshift was accompanied by few other nucleotide changes. We further confirm that the sequence is evolving as coding region. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the simplest of genetic changes can result in the remodeling of protein sequence to produce a kind of molecular 'hopeful monster.' Moreover, such a novel protein motif can become conserved almost immediately on the basis of what appears to be a rapidly generated new function. Given that the existing data on the function of such C-terminal motifs are somewhat disparate and contradictory, we have sought to synthesize previous findings within the context of the current analysis and thereby highlight specific hypotheses that require further investigation before the significance of the euAP3 frameshift event can be fully understood. PMID:16563166

  7. An exon-based comparative variant analysis pipeline to study the scale and role of frameshift and nonsense mutation in the human-chimpanzee divergence.

    PubMed

    Yu, GongXin

    2009-01-01

    Chimpanzees and humans are closely related but differ in many deadly human diseases and other characteristics in physiology, anatomy, and pathology. In spite of decades of extensive research, crucial questions about the molecular mechanisms behind the differences are yet to be understood. Here I report ExonVar, a novel computational pipeline for Exon-based human-chimpanzee comparative Variant analysis. The objective is to comparatively analyze mutations specifically those that caused the frameshift and nonsense mutations and to assess their scale and potential impacts on human-chimpanzee divergence. Genomewide analysis of human and chimpanzee exons with ExonVar identified a number of species-specific, exon-disrupting mutations in chimpanzees but much fewer in humans. Many were found on genes involved in important biological processes such as T cell lineage development, the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, and antigen induced cell death. A "less-is-more" model was previously established to illustrate the role of the gene inactivation and disruptions during human evolution. Here this analysis suggested a different model where the chimpanzee-specific exon-disrupting mutations may act as additional evolutionary force that drove the human-chimpanzee divergence. Finally, the analysis revealed a number of sequencing errors in the chimpanzee and human genome sequences and further illustrated that they could be corrected without resequencing.

  8. A novel frameshift mutation in the first exon of the 21-OH gene found in homozygosity in an apparently nonconsanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Ezquieta, B; Oyarzábal, M; Jariego, C M; Varela, J M; Chueca, M

    1999-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is most frequently due to steroid 21-hydroxylase (21-OH) deficiency. Due to the existence of a pseudogene in tandem duplicated with the 21-OH gene, asymmetric recombination causes the majority of the molecular defects underlying this deficiency: gene conversions and deletions of the functional gene. Screening for a small array of mutations, those existing in the pseudogene together with deletions, allows the characterization of most mutated alleles, 91% in the Spanish population. We report the case of a boy from a nonconsanguineous family, diagnosed during the neonatal period of a salt-wasting form of the deficiency, in which this screening did not allow the characterization of the paternal or the maternal allele. This infrequent finding in a nonconsanguineous family was further investigated. Single-strand conformation polymorphism screening for new mutations revealed an abnormally migrating pattern when polymerase chain reaction fragments from 21-OH gene exon 1 of the patient and relatives were analyzed. Upon direct sequencing, the insertion of a T at position 64 (64insT, frameshift generating a stop codon at exon 2) was found in homozygosity in the patient. Microsatellite typing in the HLA region revealed the patient to be homozygous for five markers (heterozygosities 0.62 to 0.74). Apparently this new mutation was generated several generations ago and has been preserved for years. Consanguinity had been discarded for several generations, although both families could be traced back to a small rural area in Navarra (Spain).

  9. Whole-exome sequencing of a patient with severe and complex hemostatic abnormalities reveals a possible contributing frameshift mutation in C3AR1

    PubMed Central

    Leinøe, Eva; Nielsen, Ove Juul; Jønson, Lars; Rossing, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of genome-wide analysis has made it possible to rapidly sequence the exome of patients with undiagnosed or unresolved medical conditions. Here, we present the case of a 64-yr-old male patient with schistocytes in the peripheral blood smear and a complex and life-threatening coagulation disorder causing recurrent venous thromboembolic events, severe thrombocytopenia, and subdural hematomas. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a frameshift mutation (C3AR1 c.355-356dup, p.Asp119Alafs*19) resulting in a premature stop codon in C3AR1 (Complement Component 3a Receptor 1). Based on this finding, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome was suspected because of a genetic predisposition, and a targeted treatment regime with eculizumab was initiated. Life-threatening hemostatic abnormalities would most likely have persisted had it not been for the implementation of whole-exome sequencing in this particular clinical setting. PMID:27551680

  10. A Novel Frameshift Mutation of the ALDOB Gene in a Korean Girl Presenting with Recurrent Hepatitis Diagnosed as Hereditary Fructose Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hae-Won; Lee, Yeoun Joo; Oh, Seak Hee; Kim, Kyung Mo; Ryu, Jeong-Min; Lee, Beom Hee; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is an autosomal recessive disorder that is caused by a deficiency in fructose-1-phosphate aldolase (Aldolase B). Children can present with hypoglycemia, jaundice, elevated liver enzymes and hepatomegaly after intake of dietary fructose. Long-term intake of fructose in undiagnosed patients can result in hepatic failure or renal failure. We experienced a case of hereditary fructose intolerance presenting as recurrent hepatitis-like episodes. Detailed evaluation of her dietary habits revealed her avoidance of sweetened foods and fruits. Genetic analysis of ALDOB revealed that she is a homozygote for a novel frameshifting mutation c[758_759insT]+[758_759insT] (p.[val25 3fsX24]+[val253fsX24]). This report is the first of a Korean patient diagnosed with hereditary fructose intolerance using only molecular testing without undergoing intravenous fructose tolerance test or enzyme assay.

  11. A novel COL4A1 frameshift mutation in familial kidney disease: the importance of the C-terminal NC1 domain of type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Gale, Daniel P; Oygar, D Deren; Lin, Fujun; Oygar, P Derin; Khan, Nadia; Connor, Thomas M F; Lapsley, Marta; Maxwell, Patrick H; Neild, Guy H

    2016-11-01

    Hereditary microscopic haematuria often segregates with mutations of COL4A3, COL4A4 or COL4A5 but in half of families a gene is not identified. We investigated a Cypriot family with autosomal dominant microscopic haematuria with renal failure and kidney cysts. We used genome-wide linkage analysis, whole exome sequencing and cosegregation analyses. We identified a novel frameshift mutation, c.4611_4612insG:p.T1537fs, in exon 49 of COL4A1. This mutation predicts truncation of the protein with disruption of the C-terminal part of the NC1 domain. We confirmed its presence in 20 family members, 17 with confirmed haematuria, 5 of whom also had stage 4 or 5 chronic kidney disease. Eleven family members exhibited kidney cysts (55% of those with the mutation), but muscle cramps or cerebral aneurysms were not observed and serum creatine kinase was normal in all individuals tested. Missense mutations of COL4A1 that encode the CB3 [IV] segment of the triple helical domain (exons 24 and 25) are associated with HANAC syndrome (hereditary angiopathy, nephropathy, aneurysms and cramps). Missense mutations of COL4A1 that disrupt the NC1 domain are associated with antenatal cerebral haemorrhage and porencephaly, but not kidney disease. Our findings extend the spectrum of COL4A1 mutations linked with renal disease and demonstrate that the highly conserved C-terminal part of the NC1 domain of the α1 chain of type IV collagen is important in the integrity of glomerular basement membrane in humans. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  12. Characterization of a novel open reading frame, urf a, in the mitochondrial genome of fission yeast: correlation of urf a mutations with a mitochondrial mutator phenotype and a possible role of frameshifting in urf a expression.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, M; Krabusch, M; Wolf, K

    1991-02-01

    Between the genes for tRNA(gin) and tRNA(ile) an open reading frame of 227 amino acids has been identified which is unique among known mitochondrial genomes and which has been termed urf a (Lang et al. 1983; Kornrumpf et al. 1984). It uses the "mitochondrial" genetic code, i.e., it contains a TGA codon, whereas all other protein-encoding genes, and all but one intronic open reading frame, use the "standard" genetic code (UGG for tryptophan). A previous paper has demonstrated that "mutator" strains show an increased formation of mitochondrial drug-resistant and respiration-deficient mutants (including deletions). In this paper we show that the mutator activity is correlated with mutations in urf a. A detailed analysis of one urf a mutant is presented (anar-6), where the deletion of an A residue leads to a frameshift mutation and consequently to premature termination of the putative protein. The phenotype of colonies originating from a single mutant clone varies from no growth up to full growth on non-fermentable substrate. This phenomenon of phenotypic segregation can be explained by the ability of the cell to perform translational frameshifting. A detailed analysis of the DNA sequence and the putative urf a protein will be presented and a possible function of the protein will be discussed.

  13. Stability of HIV Frameshift Site RNA Correlates with Frameshift Efficiency and Decreased Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Miranda, Pablo; Becker, Jordan T.; Benner, Bayleigh E.; Blume, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication is strongly dependent upon a programmed ribosomal frameshift. Here we investigate the relationships between the thermodynamic stability of the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RNA frameshift site stem-loop, frameshift efficiency, and infectivity, using pseudotyped HIV-1 and HEK293T cells. The data reveal a strong correlation between frameshift efficiency and local, but not overall, RNA thermodynamic stability. Mutations that modestly increase the local stability of the frameshift site RNA stem-loop structure increase frameshift efficiency 2-fold to 3-fold in cells. Thus, frameshift efficiency is determined by the strength of the thermodynamic barrier encountered by the ribosome. These data agree with previous in vitro measurements, suggesting that there are no virus- or host-specific factors that modulate frameshifting. The data also indicate that there are no sequence-specific requirements for the frameshift site stem-loop. A linear correlation between Gag-polymerase (Gag-Pol) levels in cells and levels in virions supports the idea of a stochastic virion assembly mechanism. We further demonstrate that the surrounding genomic RNA secondary structure influences frameshift efficiency and that a mutation that commonly arises in response to protease inhibitor therapy creates a functional but inefficient secondary slippery site. Finally, HIV-1 mutants with enhanced frameshift efficiencies are significantly less infectious, suggesting that compounds that increase frameshift efficiency by as little as 2-fold may be effective at suppressing HIV-1 replication. IMPORTANCE HIV, like many retroviruses, utilizes a −1 programmed ribosomal frameshift to generate viral enzymes in the form of a Gag-Pol polyprotein precursor. Thus, frameshifting is essential for viral replication. Here, we utilized a panel of mutant HIV strains to demonstrate that in cells, frameshifting efficiency is correlated with the stability of the local

  14. Early Progressive Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Family with Becker Muscular Dystrophy Related to a Novel Frameshift Mutation in the Dystrophin Gene Exon 27

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Takeshi; Fitzgerald, Kristi; Scavena, Mena; Gidding, Samuel; Cox, Mary O.; Marks, Harold; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Moore, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a family in which two male siblings with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) developed severe dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and progressive heart failure (HF) at age 11; one died at age 14 years while awaiting heart transplant and the other underwent left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation at the same age. Genetic analysis of one sibling showed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 27 of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene (c.3779_3785delCTTTGGAins GG), in which 7 base pairs are deleted and two are inserted. While this predicts an amino acid substitution and premature termination (p.Thr1260Argfs*8), muscle biopsy dystrophin immunostaining instead indicates that the mutation is more likely to alter splicing. Despite relatively preserved skeletal muscular performance, both siblings developed progressive heart failure secondary to early onset DCM. In addition, their 7 year old nephew with delayed gross motor development, mild proximal muscle weakness, and markedly elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) level (> 13,000 IU/L) at 16 months was recently demonstrated to have the familial DMD mutation. Here we report a novel genotype of BMD with early onset DCM and progressive lethal heart failure during early adolescence. PMID:25537791

  15. Early-progressive dilated cardiomyopathy in a family with Becker muscular dystrophy related to a novel frameshift mutation in the dystrophin gene exon 27.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Takeshi; Fitzgerald, Kristi; Scavena, Mena; Gidding, Samuel; Cox, Mary O; Marks, Harold; Flanigan, Kevin M; Moore, Steven A

    2015-03-01

    We report a family in which two male siblings with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) developed severe dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and progressive heart failure (HF) at age 11 years; one died at age 14 years while awaiting heart transplant and the other underwent left ventricular assist device implantation at the same age. Genetic analysis of one sibling showed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 27 of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene (c.3779_3785delCTTTGGAinsGG), in which seven base pairs are deleted and two are inserted. Although this predicts an amino-acid substitution and premature termination (p.Thr1260Argfs*8), muscle biopsy dystrophin immunostaining instead indicates that the mutation is more likely to alter splicing. Despite relatively preserved skeletal muscular performance, both the siblings developed progressive HF secondary to early-onset DCM. In addition, their 7-year-old nephew with delayed gross motor development, mild proximal muscle weakness and markedly elevated serum creatine kinase level (>13 000 IU l(-1)) at 16 months was recently demonstrated to have the familial DMD mutation. Here, we report a novel genotype of BMD with early-onset DCM and progressive lethal HF during early adolescence.

  16. Escherichia coli strains (ndk) lacking nucleoside diphosphate kinase are powerful mutators for base substitutions and frameshifts in mismatch-repair-deficient strains.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeffrey H; Funchain, Pauline; Clendenin, Wendy; Huang, Tiffany; Nguyen, Anh; Wolff, Erika; Yeung, Annie; Chiang, Ju-Huei; Garibyan, Lilit; Slupska, Malgorzata M; Yang, Hanjing

    2002-09-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase is one of the enzymes that maintains triphosphate pools. Escherichia coli strains (ndk) lacking this enzyme have been shown to be modest base substitution mutators, and two members of the human family of NDP kinases act as tumor suppressors. We show here that in E. coli strains lacking NDP kinase high levels of mispairs are generated, but most of these are corrected by the mismatch-repair system. Double mutants that are ndk mutS, lacking both the NDP kinase and mismatch repair, have levels of base substitutions 15-fold higher and levels of certain frameshifts up to 10-fold higher than those of the respective mutations in mutS strains that are NDP kinase proficient. A sequence analysis of the specificity of base substitution mutations generated in ndk and ndk mutS backgrounds as well as other experiments suggests that NDP kinase deficiency stimulates polymerase errors that lead to A:T --> G:C transitions and that the editing capacity of cells may be affected, leading to additional uncorrected mispairs and to A:T --> T:A transversions.

  17. Novel nonsense and frameshift NTRK1 gene mutations in Chinese patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Liang, J Y; Sun, Z H; Zhang, H; Yao, Z R

    2012-08-13

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA; MIM 256800) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by absence of reaction to noxious stimuli, recurrent episodes of fever, anhidrosis, and mental retardation. It is caused by mutations in the gene coding for neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 (NTRK1; MIM# 191315). We screened two Chinese CIPA cases for mutations in the NTRK1 gene and examined their phenotype. Two novel mutations of the NTRK1 gene and two known mutations were identified. Including our two novel mutations, there are now 62 different NTRK1 gene mutations reported in patients with CIPA. We find that a combination of two null alleles usually leads to the severe phenotype, while the mild form of the CIPA disease is associated with at least one mild allele. Thirty-four among the 62 mutations (55%) are located within the tyrosine kinase domain of the NTRK1 protein. We concluded that the tyrosine kinase domain is a hot spot for mutations.

  18. Identification of a novel SBF2 frameshift mutation in charcot-marie-tooth disease type 4B2 using whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meiyan; Wu, Jing; Liang, Ning; Tang, Lihui; Chen, Yanhua; Chen, Huishuang; Wei, Wei; Wei, Tianying; Huang, Hui; Yi, Xin; Qi, Ming

    2014-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4B2 with early-onset glaucoma (CMT4B2, OMIM 604563) is a genetically-heterogeneous childhood-onset neuromuscular disorder. Here, we report the case of a 15-year-old male adolescent with lower extremity weakness, gait abnormalities, foot deformities and early-onset glaucoma. Since clinical diagnosis alone was insufficient for providing pathogenetic evidence to indicate that the condition belonged to a consanguineous family, we applied whole-exome sequencing to samples from the patient, his parents and his younger brother, assuming that the patient's condition is transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A frame-shift mutation, c.4571delG (P.Gly1524Glufs∗42), was revealed in the CMT4B2-related gene SBF2 (also known as MTMR13, MIM 607697), and this mutation was found to be homozygous in the proband and heterozygous in his parents and younger brother. Together with the results of clinical diagnosis, this case was diagnosed as CMT4B2. Our finding further demonstrates the use of whole-exome sequencing in the diagnosis and treatment of rare diseases.

  19. A novel frameshift mutation in the EYA1 gene in a Korean family with branchio-oto-renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Dae; Kim, Shi-Chan; Koh, Yoon Woo; Lee, Hye-Jin; Choi, Soo-Young; Kim, Un-Kyung

    2009-01-01

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by branchial cleft fistulae or cysts, preauricular pits, ear malformations, hearing loss, and renal anomalies. Mutations in the human homologue of the Drosophilia eyes absent gene (EYA1) are the most common cause of BOR syndrome. In this study, we found a Korean family showing clinical features of the disease. Mutation analysis of the EYA1 gene revealed a novel one-base-pair deletion resulting in truncated protein (c.321delT; p.Ala107fs). This is the first report of BOR syndrome caused by deletion mutation of the EYA1 gene in Korea.

  20. A novel frameshift mutation of POU4F3 gene associated with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee Keun; Park, Hong-Joon; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Park, Rekil; Kim, Un-Kyung

    2010-06-04

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the transcription factor POU4F3 gene are associated with non-syndromic hearing loss in humans; however, there have been few reports of mutations in this gene worldwide. We performed a mutation analysis of the POU4F3 gene in 42 unrelated Koreans with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss, identifying a novel 14-bp deletion mutation in exon 2 (c.662del14) in one patient. Audiometric examination revealed severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in this patient. The novel mutation led to a truncated protein that lacked both functional POU domains. We further investigated the functional distinction between wild-type and mutant POU4F3 proteins using in vitro assays. The wild-type protein was completely localized in the nucleus, while the truncation of protein seriously affected its nuclear localization. In addition, the mutant failed to activate reporter gene expression. This is the first report of a POU4F3 mutation in Asia, and moreover our data suggest that further investigation will need to delineate ethnicity-specific genetic background for autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss within Asian populations.

  1. Spotlight Topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A Spotlight Topic consists of a set of two or more review articles focused on a specific subject in surface science. The topics are recommended by the Board of Editors. A topic may be chosen because it is particularly new or fast-breaking, thus deserving introduction to the general readership. Or, it may be because a topic is especially controversial or confusing, requiring clarification by experts. Each review will give a critical assessment rather than an encyclopedic report. While our editors always will insist on fairness and accuracy, any review which forwards an opinion is bound to be somewhat subjective. Therefore, it is the editors' wish that the set of reviews written by different authors on the same subject matter will provide a broad and balanced viewpoint. It is often the case that an author who is an expert in a technique or method may be especially enthusiastic or critical about this technique or method. A companion review in the set may provide a different viewpoint. We are hopeful that the reader, after studying these reviews and checking some of the key references, will obtain an informed opinion of the subject. We think the set of reviews in a spotlight area will considerably shorten the ``learning time'' that a nonexpert would otherwise need to become knowledgeable about a subject. In this issue, we feature a spotlight topic on oxide surfaces. The set contains an overview article by Jacques Jupille, and four articles written by G. Pacchioni, F. Cosandey and T. E. Madey, B. G. Daniels, R. Lindsay and G. Thornton, and C. Noguera respectively. Of these, the article by Pacchioni has already appeared in SRL 7, 277 (2000). The other three articles appear in this issue. A reader who wishes to suggest a spotlight topic or recommend authors to write such reviews should contact the Editor-in-Chief. We would like to hear from you.

  2. Frameshift alignment: statistics and post-genomic applications

    PubMed Central

    Frith, Martin C.; Spouge, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The alignment of DNA sequences to proteins, allowing for frameshifts, is a classic method in sequence analysis. It can help identify pseudogenes (which accumulate mutations), analyze raw DNA and RNA sequence data (which may have frameshift sequencing errors), investigate ribosomal frameshifts, etc. Often, however, only ad hoc approximations or simulations are available to provide the statistical significance of a frameshift alignment score. Results: We describe a method to estimate statistical significance of frameshift alignments, similar to classic BLAST statistics. (BLAST presently does not permit its alignments to include frameshifts.) We also illustrate the continuing usefulness of frameshift alignment with two ‘post-genomic’ applications: (i) when finding pseudogenes within the human genome, frameshift alignments show that most anciently conserved non-coding human elements are recent pseudogenes with conserved ancestral genes; and (ii) when analyzing metagenomic DNA reads from polluted soil, frameshift alignments show that most alignable metagenomic reads contain frameshifts, suggesting that metagenomic analysis needs to use frameshift alignment to derive accurate results. Availability and implementation: The statistical calculation is available in FALP (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Spouge/html_ncbi/html/index/software.html), and giga-scale frameshift alignment is available in LAST (http://last.cbrc.jp/falp). Contact: spouge@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov or martin@cbrc.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25172925

  3. Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by a frame-shift mutation in the acceptor splice site of intron 26.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Mirella; Maciotta, Simona; Angeloni, Valentina; Torrente, Yvan

    2016-08-11

    The dystrophin gene is the one of the largest described in human beings and mutations associated to this gene are responsible for Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophies. Here we describe a nucleotide substitution in the acceptor splice site of intron 26 (c.3604-1G > C) carried by a 6-year-old boy who presented with a history of progressive proximal muscle weakness and elevated serum creatine kinase levels. RNA analysis showed that the first two nucleotides of the mutated intron 26 (AC) were not recognized by the splicing machinery and a new splicing site was created within exon 27, generating a premature stop codon and avoiding protein translation. The evaluation of the pathogenic effect of the mutation by mRNA analysis will be useful in the optics of an antisense oligonucleotides (AON)-based therapy.

  4. Whole-exome analysis of foetal autopsy tissue reveals a frameshift mutation in OBSL1, consistent with a diagnosis of 3-M Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background We report a consanguineous couple that has experienced three consecutive pregnancy losses following the foetal ultrasound finding of short limbs. Post-termination examination revealed no skeletal dysplasia, but some subtle proximal limb shortening in two foetuses, and a spectrum of mildly dysmorphic features. Karyotype was normal in all three foetuses (46, XX) and comparative genomic hybridization microarray analysis detected no pathogenic copy number variants. Results Whole-exome sequencing and genome-wide homozygosity mapping revealed a previously reported frameshift mutation in the OBSL1 gene (c.1273insA p.T425nfsX40), consistent with a diagnosis of 3-M Syndrome 2 (OMIM #612921), which had not been anticipated from the clinical findings. Conclusions Our study provides novel insight into the early clinical manifestations of this form of 3-M syndrome, and demonstrates the utility of whole exome sequencing as a tool for prenatal diagnosis in particular when there is a family history suggestive of a recurrent set of clinical symptoms. PMID:25923536

  5. Homozygosity for Frameshift Mutations in XYLT2 Result in a Spondylo-Ocular Syndrome with Bone Fragility, Cataracts, and Hearing Defects

    PubMed Central

    Munns, Craig F.; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Poudel, Nabin; Munteanu, Maria Cristina; Majewski, Jacek; Sillence, David O.; Metcalf, Jordan P.; Biggin, Andrew; Glorieux, Francis; Fassier, François; Rauch, Frank; Hinsdale, Myron E.

    2015-01-01

    Heparan and chondroitin/dermatan sulfated proteoglycans have a wide range of roles in cellular and tissue homeostasis including growth factor function, morphogen gradient formation, and co-receptor activity. Proteoglycan assembly initiates with a xylose monosaccharide covalently attached by either xylosyltransferase I or II. Three individuals from two families were found that exhibited similar phenotypes. The index case subjects were two brothers, individuals 1 and 2, who presented with osteoporosis, cataracts, sensorineural hearing loss, and mild learning defects. Whole exome sequence analyses showed that both individuals had a homozygous c.692dup mutation (GenBank: NM_022167.3) in the xylosyltransferase II locus (XYLT2) (MIM: 608125), causing reduced XYLT2 mRNA and low circulating xylosyltransferase (XylT) activity. In an unrelated boy (individual 3) from the second family, we noted low serum XylT activity. Sanger sequencing of XYLT2 in this individual revealed a c.520del mutation in exon 2 that resulted in a frameshift and premature stop codon (p.Ala174Profs∗35). Fibroblasts from individuals 1 and 2 showed a range of defects including reduced XylT activity, GAG incorporation of 35SO4, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan assembly. These studies demonstrate that human XylT2 deficiency results in vertebral compression fractures, sensorineural hearing loss, eye defects, and heart defects, a phenotype that is similar to the autosomal-recessive disorder spondylo-ocular syndrome of unknown cause. This phenotype is different from what has been reported in individuals with other linker enzyme deficiencies. These studies illustrate that the cells of the lens, retina, heart muscle, inner ear, and bone are dependent on XylT2 for proteoglycan assembly in humans. PMID:26027496

  6. Homozygosity for frameshift mutations in XYLT2 result in a spondylo-ocular syndrome with bone fragility, cataracts, and hearing defects.

    PubMed

    Munns, Craig F; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Poudel, Nabin; Munteanu, Maria Cristina; Majewski, Jacek; Sillence, David O; Metcalf, Jordan P; Biggin, Andrew; Glorieux, Francis; Fassier, François; Rauch, Frank; Hinsdale, Myron E

    2015-06-04

    Heparan and chondroitin/dermatan sulfated proteoglycans have a wide range of roles in cellular and tissue homeostasis including growth factor function, morphogen gradient formation, and co-receptor activity. Proteoglycan assembly initiates with a xylose monosaccharide covalently attached by either xylosyltransferase I or II. Three individuals from two families were found that exhibited similar phenotypes. The index case subjects were two brothers, individuals 1 and 2, who presented with osteoporosis, cataracts, sensorineural hearing loss, and mild learning defects. Whole exome sequence analyses showed that both individuals had a homozygous c.692dup mutation (GenBank: NM_022167.3) in the xylosyltransferase II locus (XYLT2) (MIM: 608125), causing reduced XYLT2 mRNA and low circulating xylosyltransferase (XylT) activity. In an unrelated boy (individual 3) from the second family, we noted low serum XylT activity. Sanger sequencing of XYLT2 in this individual revealed a c.520del mutation in exon 2 that resulted in a frameshift and premature stop codon (p.Ala174Profs(∗)35). Fibroblasts from individuals 1 and 2 showed a range of defects including reduced XylT activity, GAG incorporation of (35)SO4, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan assembly. These studies demonstrate that human XylT2 deficiency results in vertebral compression fractures, sensorineural hearing loss, eye defects, and heart defects, a phenotype that is similar to the autosomal-recessive disorder spondylo-ocular syndrome of unknown cause. This phenotype is different from what has been reported in individuals with other linker enzyme deficiencies. These studies illustrate that the cells of the lens, retina, heart muscle, inner ear, and bone are dependent on XylT2 for proteoglycan assembly in humans.

  7. A complex phenotype in a child with familial HDL deficiency due to a novel frameshift mutation in APOA1 gene (apoA-IGuastalla).

    PubMed

    Pisciotta, Livia; Vitali, Cecilia; Favari, Elda; Fossa, Paola; Adorni, Maria Pia; Leone, Daniela; Artom, Nathan; Fresa, Raffaele; Calabresi, Laura; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We describe a kindred with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) deficiency due to APOA1 gene mutation in which comorbidities affected the phenotypic expression of the disorder. An overweight boy with hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) and HDL deficiency (HDL cholesterol 0.39 mmol/L, apoA-I 40 mg/dL) was investigated. We sequenced the candidate genes for HTG (LPL, APOC2, APOA5, GPIHBP1, LMF1) and HDL deficiency (LCAT, ABCA1 and APOA1), analyzed HDL subpopulations, measured cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) of sera and constructed a model of the mutant apoA-I. No mutations in HTG-related genes, ABCA1 and LCAT were found. APOA1 sequence showed that the proband, his mother and maternal grandfather were heterozygous of a novel frameshift mutation (c.546_547delGC), which generated a truncated protein (p.[L159Afs*20]) containing 177 amino acids with an abnormal C-terminal tail of 19 amino acids. Trace amounts of this protein were detectable in plasma. Mutation carriers had reduced levels of LpA-I, preβ-HDL and large HDL and no detectable HDL-2 in their plasma; their sera had a reduced CEC specifically the ABCA1-mediated CEC. Metabolic syndrome in the proband explains the extremely low HDL cholesterol level (0.31 mmol/L), which was half of that found in the other carriers. The proband's mother and grandfather, both presenting low plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, were carriers of the β-thalassemic trait, a condition known to be associated with a reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a reduced prevalence of cardiovascular disease. This trait might have delayed the development of atherosclerosis related to HDL deficiency. In these heterozygotes for apoA-I truncation, the metabolic syndrome has deleterious effect on HDL system, whereas β-thalassemia trait may delay the onset of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel frame-shift mutation in Slc5a2 encoding SGLT2 in a strain of senescence-accelerated mouse SAMP10.

    PubMed

    Unno, Keiko; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Toda, Masateru; Hagiwara, Shiori; Iguchi, Kazuaki; Hoshino, Minoru; Takabayashi, Fumiyo; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae; Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Hosokawa, Masanori; Higuchi, Keiichi; Mori, Masayuki

    2014-11-07

    The senescence-accelerated mouse prone10 (SAMP10) strain, a model of aging, exhibits cognitive impairments and cerebral atrophy. We noticed that SAMP10/TaSlc mice, a SAMP10 substrain, have developed persistent glucosuria over the past few years. In the present study, we characterized SAMP10/TaSlc mice and further identified a spontaneous mutation in the Slc5a2 gene encoding sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT) 2. The mean concentration of urine glucose was high in SAMP10/TaSlc mice and increased further with advancing age, whereas other strains of senescence-accelerated mice, including SAMP1/SkuSlc, SAMP6/TaSlc and SAMP8/TaSlc or normal aging control SAMR1/TaSlc mice, exhibited no detectable glucose in urine. SAMP10/TaSlc mice consumed increasing amounts of food and water compared to SAMR1/TaSlc mice, suggesting the compensation of polyuria and the loss of glucose. Oral glucose tolerance tests showed decreased glucose reabsorption in the kidney of SAMP10/TaSlc mice. In addition, blood glucose levels decreased in an age-dependent fashion. The kidney was innately larger than that of control mice with no histological alterations. We examined the expression levels of glucose transporters in the kidney. Among SGLT1, SGLT2, glucose transporter (GLUT) 1 and GLUT2, we found a significant decrease only in the level of SGLT2. DNA sequencing of SGLT2 in SAMP10/TaSlc mice revealed a single nucleotide deletion of guanine at 1236, which resulted in a frameshift mutation that produced a truncated protein. We designate this strain as SAMP10/TaSlc-Slc5a2(slc) (SAMP10-ΔSglt2). Recently, SGLT2 inhibitors have been demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). SAMP10-ΔSglt2 mice may serve as a unique preclinical model to study the link between aging-related neurodegenerative disorders and T2D. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Classification of a frameshift/extended and a stop mutation in WT1 as gain-of-function mutations that activate cell cycle genes and promote Wilms tumour cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Busch, Maike; Schwindt, Heinrich; Brandt, Artur; Beier, Manfred; Görldt, Nicole; Romaniuk, Paul; Toska, Eneda; Roberts, Stefan; Royer, Hans-Dieter; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2014-08-01

    The WT1 gene encodes a zinc finger transcription factor important for normal kidney development. WT1 is a suppressor for Wilms tumour development and an oncogene for diverse malignant tumours. We recently established cell lines from primary Wilms tumours with different WT1 mutations. To investigate the function of mutant WT1 proteins, we performed WT1 knockdown experiments in cell lines with a frameshift/extension (p.V432fsX87 = Wilms3) and a stop mutation (p.P362X = Wilms2) of WT1, followed by genome-wide gene expression analysis. We also expressed wild-type and mutant WT1 proteins in human mesenchymal stem cells and established gene expression profiles. A detailed analysis of gene expression data enabled us to classify the WT1 mutations as gain-of-function mutations. The mutant WT1(Wilms2) and WT1(Wilms3) proteins acquired an ability to modulate the expression of a highly significant number of genes from the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, and WT1 knockdown experiments showed that they are required for Wilms tumour cell proliferation. p53 negatively regulates the activity of a large number of these genes that are also part of a core proliferation cluster in diverse human cancers. Our data strongly suggest that mutant WT1 proteins facilitate expression of these cell cycle genes by antagonizing transcriptional repression mediated by p53. We show that mutant WT1 can physically interact with p53. Together the findings show for the first time that mutant WT1 proteins have a gain-of-function and act as oncogenes for Wilms tumour development by regulating Wilms tumour cell proliferation.

  10. A stochastic model of translation with -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brenae L.; Visscher, Koen; Watkins, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Many viruses produce multiple proteins from a single mRNA sequence by encoding overlapping genes. One mechanism to decode both genes, which reside in alternate reading frames, is -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting. Although recognized for over 25 years, the molecular and physical mechanism of -1 frameshifting remains poorly understood. We have developed a mathematical model that treats mRNA translation and associated -1 frameshifting as a stochastic process in which the transition probabilities are based on the energetics of local molecular interactions. The model predicts both the location and efficiency of -1 frameshift events in HIV-1. Moreover, we compute -1 frameshift efficiencies upon mutations in the viral mRNA sequence and variations in relative tRNA abundances, predictions that are directly testable in experiment.

  11. A frameshift mutation in the HuP2 paired domain of the probable human homolog of murine Pax-3 is responsible for Waardenburg syndrome type 1 in an Indonesian family.

    PubMed

    Morell, R; Friedman, T B; Moeljopawiro, S; Hartono; Soewito; Asher, J H

    1992-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by deafness, dystopia canthorum, heterochromia iridis, white forelock, and premature greying. A similar phenotype is caused in the mouse by mutations in the Pax-3 gene. This observation, together with comparisons of conserved syntenies in the murine and human genetic maps, suggested that at least some WS1 mutations should occur in HuP2, the probable human homolog of Pax-3. Two mutations in the HuP2 sequence of individuals with WS1 have been reported recently. Both of them occur in the highly conserved paired box region of the gene, which encodes a DNA binding domain. The functional consequences of these mutations are at present speculative. We report here a 14 bp deletion in the paired domain encoded by exon 2 of HuP2 in an Indonesian family segregating for WS1. This frameshift mutation results in a premature termination codon in exon 3. The HuP2 product is a truncated protein lacking most of the paired domain and all of the predicted homeo domain. We propose that the WS1 phenotype in this family is due to loss of function of HuP2 and discuss two mechanisms for the dominant effect of this mutation.

  12. A Stochastic Model of RNA Translation with Frameshifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brenae

    2011-10-01

    Many viruses can produce different proteins from the same RNA sequence by encoding them in overlapping genes. One mechanism that causes the ribosomes of infected cells to decode both genes is called programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF). Although PRF has been recognized for 25 years, the mechanism is not well understood. We have developed a model that treats RNA translation as a stochastic process in which the transition probabilities are based on the free energies of local molecular interactions. The model reproduces observed translation rates and frameshift efficiencies, and can be used to predict the effects of mutations in the viral RNA sequence on both the mean translation rate and the frameshift efficiency.

  13. Balancing selection of a frame-shift mutation in the MRC2 gene accounts for the outbreak of the Crooked Tail Syndrome in Belgian Blue Cattle.

    PubMed

    Fasquelle, Corinne; Sartelet, Arnaud; Li, Wanbo; Dive, Marc; Tamma, Nico; Michaux, Charles; Druet, Tom; Huijbers, Ivo J; Isacke, Clare M; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Charlier, Carole

    2009-09-01

    We herein describe the positional identification of a 2-bp deletion in the open reading frame of the MRC2 receptor causing the recessive Crooked Tail Syndrome in cattle. The resulting frame-shift reveals a premature stop codon that causes nonsense-mediated decay of the mutant messenger RNA, and the virtual absence of functional Endo180 protein in affected animals. Cases exhibit skeletal anomalies thought to result from impaired extracellular matrix remodeling during ossification, and as of yet unexplained muscular symptoms. We demonstrate that carrier status is very significantly associated with desired characteristics in the general population, including enhanced muscular development, and that the resulting heterozygote advantage caused a selective sweep which explains the unexpectedly high frequency (25%) of carriers in the Belgian Blue Cattle Breed.

  14. Altering SARS coronavirus frameshift efficiency affects genomic and subgenomic RNA production.

    PubMed

    Plant, Ewan P; Sims, Amy C; Baric, Ralph S; Dinman, Jonathan D; Taylor, Deborah R

    2013-01-18

    In previous studies, differences in the amount of genomic and subgenomic RNA produced by coronaviruses with mutations in the programmed ribosomal frameshift signal of ORF1a/b were observed. It was not clear if these differences were due to changes in genomic sequence, the protein sequence or the frequency of frameshifting. Here, viruses with synonymous codon changes are shown to produce different ratios of genomic and subgenomic RNA. These findings demonstrate that the protein sequence is not the primary cause of altered genomic and subgenomic RNA production. The synonymous codon changes affect both the structure of the frameshift signal and frameshifting efficiency. Small differences in frameshifting efficiency result in dramatic differences in genomic RNA production and TCID50 suggesting that the frameshifting frequency must stay above a certain threshold for optimal virus production. The data suggest that either the RNA sequence or the ratio of viral proteins resulting from different levels of frameshifting affects viral replication.

  15. A Novel Frameshift Mutation of SLC26A4 in a Korean Family With Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss and Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct

    PubMed Central

    Sagong, Borum; Baek, Jeong-In; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Kim, Un-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to identify the causative mutation for siblings in a Korean family with nonsyndromic hearing loss (HL) and enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA). The siblings were a 19-year-old female with bilateral profound HL and an 11-year-old male with bilateral moderately severe HL. Methods We extracted genomic DNA from blood samples of the siblings with HL, their parents, and 100 controls. We performed mutation analysis for SLC26A4 using direct sequencing. Results The two siblings were compound heterozygotes with the novel mutation p.I713LfsX8 and the previously described mutation p.H723R. Their parents had heterozygous mono-allelic mutations. Father had p.I713LfsX8 mutation as heterozygous, and mother had p.H723R mutation as heterozygous. However, novel mutation p.I713LfsX8 was not detected in 100 unrelated controls. Conclusion Both mutations identified in this study were located in the sulfate transporter and anti-sigma factor antagonist domain, the core region for membrane targeting of SulP/SLC26 anion transporters, which strongly suggests that failure in membrane trafficking by SLC26A4 is a direct cause of HL in this family. Our study could therefore provide a foundation for further investigations elucidating the SLC26A4-related mechanisms of HL. PMID:27384033

  16. A frameshift mutation in the LYST gene is responsible for the Aleutian color and the associated Chédiak-Higashi syndrome in American mink.

    PubMed

    Anistoroaei, R; Krogh, A K; Christensen, K

    2013-04-01

    One of the colors of mink is Aleutian (aa)-a specific gun-metal gray pigmentation of the fur-commonly used in combination with other color loci to generate popular colors such as Violet (aammpp) and Sapphire (aapp). The Aleutian color allele is a manifestation of mink Chédiak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), which has been described in humans and several other species. As with forms of CHS in other species, we report that the mink CHS is linked to the lysosomal trafficking regulator ( LYST ) gene. Furthermore, we have identified a base deletion (c.9468delC) in exon 40 of LYST, which causes a frameshift and virtually terminates the LYST product prematurely (p.Leu3156Phefs*37). We investigated the blood parameters of three wild-type mink and three CHS mink. No difference in the platelet number between the two groups was observed, but an accumulation of platelets between the groups appears different when collagen is used as a coagulant. Microscopic analysis of peripheral blood indicates giant inclusions in the neutrophils of the Aleutian mink types. Molecular findings at the LYST locus enable the development of genetic tests for analyzing the color selection in American mink.

  17. Novel frameshift mutation in the p16/INK4A tumor suppressor gene in canine breast cancer alters expression from the p16/INK4A/p14ARF locus.

    PubMed

    Lutful Kabir, Farruk M; Agarwal, Payal; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Zaman, Jishan; Bird, Allison Church; Bird, R Curtis

    2013-01-01

    The INK4 family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKI) encode important cell cycle regulators that tightly control cell cycle during G1 to S phase. These related genes are considered tumor suppressors as loss of function contributes to the malignant phenotype. Expression of CKIs p16, p14ARF, or p15 were defective in six different canine mammary tumor (CMT) cell lines compared to normal thoracic canine fibroblasts. This suggests CKI defects are frequently responsible for neoplastic transformation in canine mammary carcinomas. p16 and p14ARF are two alternatively spliced products derived from the canine p16/INK4A/p14ARF gene locus. Despite omissions in the published p16 transcript and canine genome and the presence of GC-rich repeats, we determined the complete coding sequence of canine p16 revealing a deletion and frameshift mutation in p16 exon 1α in CMT28 cells. In addition, we determined canine p14ARF mRNA and protein sequences. Mapping of these mutations uncovered important aspects of p16 and p14ARF expression and defects in CMT28 cells shifting the p16 reading frame into p14ARF making a fusion protein that was predicted to be truncated, unstable and devoid of structural and functional integrity. This data describes an important neoplastic mechanism in the p16/INK4A/p14ARF locus in a spontaneous canine model of breast cancer. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3{beta}-HSD gene causes salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Sakkal-Alkaddour, S.; Chang, Ying T.; Yang, Xiaojiang; Songya Pang

    1996-01-01

    We report a new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{Beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3{beta}-HSD) gene in a Pakistanian female child with the salt-wasting form of 3{Beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The etiology for her congenital adrenal hyperplasia was not defined. Although the family history suggested possible 3{beta}-HSd deficiency disorder, suppressed adrenal function caused by excess glucocorticoid therapy in this child at 7 yr of age did not allow hormonal diagnosis. To confirm 3{beta}-HSD deficiency, we sequenced the type II 3{beta}-HSD gene in the patient, her family, and the parents of her deceased paternal cousins. The type II 3{beta}-HSD gene region of a putative promotor, exons I, II, III, and IV, and exon-intron boundaries were amplified by PCR and sequenced in all subjects. The DNA sequence of the child revealed a single nucleotide deletion at codon 318 [ACA(Thr){r_arrow}AA] in exon IV in one allele, and two nucleotide deletions at codon 273 [AAA(Lys){r_arrow}A] in exon IV in the other allele. The remaining gene sequences were normal. The codon 318 mutation was found in one allele from the father, brother, and parents of the deceased paternal cousins. The codon 273 mutation was found in one allele of the mother and a sister. These findings confirmed inherited 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the child caused by the compound heterozygous type II 3{beta}-HSD gene mutation. Both codons at codons 279 and 367, respectively, are predicted to result in an altered and truncated type II 3{beta}-HSD protein, thereby causing salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the patient. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. One Novel Frameshift Mutation on Exon 64 of COL7A1 Gene in an Iranian Individual Suffering Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Khaniani, Mahmoud Shekari; Sohrabi, Nasrin; Derakhshan, Neda Mansoori; Derakhshan, Sima Mansoori

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an extremely rare subtype of bullous dermatosis caused by the COL7A1 gene mutation. After genomic DNA extraction from the peripheral blood sample of all subjects (3 pedigree members and 3 unrelated control individuals), COL7A1 gene screening was performed by PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing of all of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions. Genetic analysis of the COL7A1 gene in an affected individual revealed a novel mutation: c.5493delG (p.K1831Nfs*10) in exon 64 of the COL7A1 gene in homozygous state. This mutation was not discovered in 3 unrelated Iranian control individuals. These data suggest that c.5493delG may influence the phenotype of RDEB. The result of this case report contributes to the expanding database on COL7A1 mutations.

  20. A frameshift mutation in the coding region of the myostatin gene (MSTN) affects carcass conformation and fatness in Norwegian White Sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Boman, I A; Klemetsdal, G; Blichfeldt, T; Nafstad, O; Våge, D I

    2009-08-01

    Mutations in the coding region of the myostatin gene (MSTN) are known to cause an increased muscle mass (IMM) phenotype in several mammals, including mice, dogs, cattle and humans. In sheep, a mutation in the 3'-UTR region introducing a microRNA target site has been reported to cause an IMM-like phenotype because of downregulation of translation. Here we report a novel single base deletion in the coding region of the myostatin gene causing an IMM phenotype in Norwegian White Sheep, characterized by a high carcass conformation class and low fat class (EUROP classification system). The deletion disrupts the reading frame from amino acid (aa) position 320, ending in a premature stop codon in aa position 359. In our material, these MSTN mutations segregated in a pattern showing that they reside in two different haplotypes. The phenotypic effect of the single base deletion is more profound than that of the 3'-UTR mutation.

  1. Familial cerebral cavernous angiomas: clinical and genetic features in a Chinese family with a frame-shift mutation in the CCM1 gene (krit1).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Guo, Yingjie; Feng, Xuemin; Zhang, Rensheng; Zhou, Chunkui; Li, Guibo; Liu, Jingyao

    2014-12-01

    A few cases of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) have been reported in Chinese families with different mutations during the past decade. Herein, we report a case of CCM in a proband in a Chinese family, for whom the mutation type of the CCM remains to be identified. The proband of the family presented a range of clinical symptoms and features that included paralysis, aphasia, multiple lesions in the brain, and cutaneous capillary-venous malformations. PCR was performed to amplify all of the coding exons of the three CCM genes (CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3) in the proband and revealed a heterozygous T deletion in exon 15 (c.1542delT) of CCM1 gene. Targeted mutation analysis in family members demonstrated that this mutation segregated with the disease in the family. This is the first report of a heterozygous CCM1 deletion mutation. Our findings provide a new CCM gene mutation profile in a Chinese family which will be of significance in genetic counseling for CCM.

  2. Characterization of Ribosomal Frameshifting in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus.

    PubMed

    Finch, Leanne K; Ling, Roger; Napthine, Sawsan; Olspert, Allan; Michiels, Thomas; Lardinois, Cécile; Bell, Susanne; Loughran, Gary; Brierley, Ian; Firth, Andew E

    2015-08-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is a member of the genus Cardiovirus in the Picornaviridae, a family of positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Previously, we demonstrated that in the related cardiovirus, Encephalomyocarditis virus, a programmed-1 ribosomal frameshift (1 PRF) occurs at a conserved G_GUU_UUU sequence within the 2B-encoding region of the polyprotein open reading frame (ORF). Here we show that-1 PRF occurs at a similar site during translation of the TMEV genome. In addition, we demonstrate that a predicted 3= RNA stem-loop structure at a noncanonical spacing downstream of the shift site is required for efficient frameshifting in TMEV and that frameshifting also requires virus infection. Mutating the G_GUU_UUU shift site to inhibit frameshifting results in an attenuated virus with reduced growth kinetics and a small-plaque phenotype. Frameshifting in the virus context was found to be extremely efficient at 74 to 82%, which, to our knowledge, is the highest frameshifting efficiency recorded to date for any virus. We propose that highly efficient-1 PRF in TMEV provides a mechanism to escape the confines of equimolar expression normally inherent in the single-polyprotein expression strategy of picornaviruses.

  3. Computer-Controlled Movable Spotlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volpe, Richard; Mcaffee, Douglas

    1995-01-01

    Spotlight simulates reduced solar illumination at changing angles of incidence. Different from typical solar simulators in that light source mobile, controlled, and calibrated, while illuminated environment stationary. Computer-controlled movable spotlight resembles ordinary spotlight, but translated, tilted, and focused (brightness controlled) by computerized control system to obtain effect of sunlight with reduced but constant intensity, with slowly varying angles of incidence.

  4. A frame-shift mutation in the type I parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptor causing Blomstrand lethal osteochondrodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Karperien, M; van der Harten, H J; van Schooten, R; Farih-Sips, H; den Hollander, N S; Kneppers, S L; Nijweide, P; Papapoulos, S E; Löwik, C W

    1999-10-01

    Blomstrand osteochondrodysplasia (BOCD) is a rare lethal skeletal dysplasia characterized by accelerated endochondral and intramembranous ossification. Comparison of the characteristics of BOCD with type I PTH/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) receptor-ablated mice reveals striking similarities that are most prominent in the growth plate. In both cases, the growth plate is reduced in size due to a strongly diminished zone of resting cartilage and the near absence of columnar arrangement of proliferating chondrocytes. This overall similarity suggested that an inactivating mutation of the PTH/PTHrP receptor might be the underlying genetic defect causing BOCD. Indeed, inactivating mutations of the PTH/PTHrP receptor have been recently identified in two cases of BOCD. We describe here a novel inactivating mutation in the PTH/PTHrP receptor. Sequence analysis of all coding exons of the type I PTH/ PTHrP receptor gene and complementary DNA of a case with BOCD identified a homozygous point mutation in exon EL2 in which one nucleotide (G at position 1122) was absent. The mutation was inherited from both parents, supporting the autosomal recessive nature of the disease. The missense mutation resulted in a shift in the open reading frame, leading to a truncated protein that completely diverged from the wild-type sequence after amino acid 364. The mutant receptor, therefore, lacked transmembrane domains 5, 6, and 7; the connecting intra- and extracellular loops; and the cytoplasmic tail. Functional analysis of the mutant receptor in COS-7 cells and of dermal fibroblasts obtained from the case proved that the mutation was indeed inactivating. Neither the transiently transfected COS-7 cells nor the dermal fibroblasts responded to a challenge with PTH or PTHrP with a rise in intracellular cAMP levels, in sharp contrast to control cells. Our results provide further evidence that BOCD is caused by inactivating mutations of the type I PTH/PTHrP receptor and underscore the importance of

  5. A frameshift mutation of the chloroplast matK coding region is associated with chlorophyll deficiency in the Cryptomeria japonica virescent mutant Wogon-Sugi.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Tomonori; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kurita, Manabu; Kondo, Teiji; Takata, Katsuhiko

    2009-06-01

    Wogon-Sugi has been reported as a cytoplasmically inherited virescent mutant selected from a horticultural variety of Cryptomeria japonica. Although previous studies of plastid structure and inheritance indicated that at least some mutations are encoded by the chloroplast genome, the causative gene responsible for the primary chlorophyll deficiency in Wogon-Sugi, has not been identified. In this study, we identified this gene by genomic sequencing of chloroplast DNA and genetic analysis. Chloroplast DNA sequencing of 16 wild-type and 16 Wogon-Sugi plants showed a 19-bp insertional sequence in the matK coding region in the Wogon-Sugi. This insertion disrupted the matK reading frame. Although an indel mutation in the ycf1 and ycf2 coding region was detected in Wogon-Sugi, sequence variations similar to that of Wogon-Sugi were also detected in several wild-type lines, and they maintained the reading frame. Genetic analysis of the 19 bp insertional mutation in the matK coding region showed that it was found only in the chlorophyll-deficient sector of 125 full-sibling seedlings. Therefore, the 19-bp insertion in the matK coding region is the most likely candidate at present for a mutation underlying the Wogon-Sugi phenotype.

  6. A frame-shift mutation in the SLC34A2 gene in three patients with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in an inbred family.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Omer Tamer; Ozsahin, Sefa Levent; Gul, Eylem; Arslan, Sulhattin; Koksal, Binnur; Berk, Serdar; Ozdemir, Ozturk; Akkurt, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterized by the presence of small calculi in the alveolar space. The SLC34A2 is thought to be responsible for the disease. We encountered three siblings of an inbred family who have PAM. We examined the family of the proband who was admitted with dyspnea on exertion and cough, and eventually was diagnosed with PAM. Genetic analysis revealed that both parents (a consanguineous marriage) of the proband were carriers with heterozygous mutation of SLC34A2 gene, and three of their children were diagnosed with PAM with homozygous mutation in the SLC34A2 gene. These findings suggest that impaired activity of the SLC34A2 gene may be responsible for familial PAM.

  7. An AP4B1 frameshift mutation in siblings with intellectual disability and spastic tetraplegia further delineates the AP-4 deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdollahpour, Hengameh; Alawi, Malik; Kortüm, Fanny; Beckstette, Michael; Seemanova, Eva; Komárek, Vladimír; Rosenberger, Georg; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-02-01

    The recently proposed adaptor protein 4 (AP-4) deficiency syndrome comprises a group of congenital neurological disorders characterized by severe intellectual disability (ID), delayed or absent speech, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and growth retardation. AP-4 is a heterotetrameric protein complex with important functions in vesicle trafficking. Mutations in genes affecting different subunits of AP-4, including AP4B1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4M1, have been reported in patients with the AP-4 deficiency phenotype. We describe two siblings from a non-consanguineous couple who presented with severe ID, absent speech, microcephaly, growth retardation, and progressive spastic tetraplegia. Whole-exome sequencing in the two patients identified the novel homozygous 2-bp deletion c.1160_1161delCA (p.(Thr387Argfs*30)) in AP4B1. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the siblings and revealed it in the heterozygous state in both parents. The AP4B1-associated phenotype has previously been assigned to spastic paraplegia-47. Identification of a novel AP4B1 alteration in two patients with clinical manifestations highly similar to other individuals with mutations affecting one of the four AP-4 subunits further supports the observation that loss of AP-4 assembly or functionality underlies the common clinical features in these patients and underscores the existence of the clinically recognizable AP-4 deficiency syndrome.

  8. Spotlight on Teaching Orchestra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This publication provides orchestra teachers with techniques for conducting, choosing repertoire, program development, recruiting, playing styles, and preparing for competitions. It is the latest in MENC's popular Spotlight series, comprising articles that have appeared in state MEA journals. It is made up of 9 sections, and has a total of 53…

  9. Spotlight on Teaching Orchestra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This publication provides orchestra teachers with techniques for conducting, choosing repertoire, program development, recruiting, playing styles, and preparing for competitions. It is the latest in MENC's popular Spotlight series, comprising articles that have appeared in state MEA journals. It is made up of 9 sections, and has a total of 53…

  10. Parent Group Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parenting for High Potential, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This issue's "Parent Group Spotlight" features Deborah Simon, president of West Sound Gifted, Talented & Twice-Exceptional (WSGT2e), who started a parent group in Washington in 2013. In just one year, this small, but mighty group has held community forums, attended school board meetings, and helped influence local gifted programming.…

  11. Parent Group Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parenting for High Potential, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This issue's "Parent Group Spotlight" features Deborah Simon, president of West Sound Gifted, Talented & Twice-Exceptional (WSGT2e), who started a parent group in Washington in 2013. In just one year, this small, but mighty group has held community forums, attended school board meetings, and helped influence local gifted programming.…

  12. Characterization of Ribosomal Frameshifting in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Leanne K.; Ling, Roger; Napthine, Sawsan; Olspert, Allan; Michiels, Thomas; Lardinois, Cécile; Bell, Susanne; Loughran, Gary; Brierley, Ian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is a member of the genus Cardiovirus in the Picornaviridae, a family of positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Previously, we demonstrated that in the related cardiovirus, Encephalomyocarditis virus, a programmed −1 ribosomal frameshift (−1 PRF) occurs at a conserved G_GUU_UUU sequence within the 2B-encoding region of the polyprotein open reading frame (ORF). Here we show that −1 PRF occurs at a similar site during translation of the TMEV genome. In addition, we demonstrate that a predicted 3′ RNA stem-loop structure at a noncanonical spacing downstream of the shift site is required for efficient frameshifting in TMEV and that frameshifting also requires virus infection. Mutating the G_GUU_UUU shift site to inhibit frameshifting results in an attenuated virus with reduced growth kinetics and a small-plaque phenotype. Frameshifting in the virus context was found to be extremely efficient at 74 to 82%, which, to our knowledge, is the highest frameshifting efficiency recorded to date for any virus. We propose that highly efficient −1 PRF in TMEV provides a mechanism to escape the confines of equimolar expression normally inherent in the single-polyprotein expression strategy of picornaviruses. IMPORTANCE Many viruses utilize programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting (−1 PRF) to produce different protein products at a defined ratio, or to translate overlapping ORFs to increase coding capacity. With few exceptions, −1 PRF occurs on specific “slippery” heptanucleotide sequences and is stimulated by RNA structure beginning 5 to 9 nucleotides (nt) downstream of the slippery site. Here we describe an unusual case of −1 PRF in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) that is extraordinarily efficient (74 to 82% of ribosomes shift into the alternative reading frame) and, in stark contrast to other examples of −1 PRF, is dependent upon a stem-loop structure beginning 14 nt downstream of

  13. A case of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis mimicking the clinical phenotype of mitochondrial disease with a novel frame-shift mutation (c. 43_44 delGG) in CYP27A1 gene exon 1.

    PubMed

    Koge, Junpei; Hayashi, Shintaro; Yamaguchi, Hiroo; Tateishi, Takahisa; Murai, Hiroyuki; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2016-10-28

    A 37-old-male with a history of early childhood mental retardation was admitted to our hospital. He experienced recurrent syncopes at 23 years old, and at age 35 gait disturbance and hearing impairment developed gradually and worsened over time. His grandparents were in a consanguineous marriage. He was of short stature and absent of tendon xanthomas. Neurological examinations revealed scanning speech, dysphagia, right sensorineural hearing loss, spasticity in both upper and lower extremities, and spastic gait. Tendon reflexes were brisk throughout, and Babinski and Chaddock reflexes were both positive bilaterally. Laboratory tests revealed elevated lactate and pyruvate concentrations in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging showed high intensity lesions in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres, pyramidal tracts in the brainstem, and internal capsules symmetrically. Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements revealed an elevated lactate/creatine plus phosphocreatine ratio and a decreased N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine plus phosphocreatine ratio in the cerebellum. At this point, mitochondrial diseases, particularly myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), to be the most likely cause. We performed a biopsy of his left biceps brachii muscle, showing variations in fiber size with occasional central nuclei and very few ragged-red fibers. Blood mitochondrial respiratory enzyme assays showed normal values with elevated citrate synthase activity, and mitochondrial DNA analyses for MERRF revealed no pathogenic mutations. We then explored other possibilities and detected an elevated serum cholestanol concentration of 20.4 μg/ml (reference value <4.0) and genetic analysis by direct sequencing method disclosed a novel frame-shift mutation (c. 43_44delGG) in CYP27A1 gene exon1, leading to a diagnosis of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX). This case emphasizes importance of awareness of CTX as a

  14. Codon recognition during frameshift suppression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Gaber, R F; Culbertson, M R

    1984-01-01

    A genetic approach has been used to establish the molecular basis of 4-base codon recognition by frameshift suppressor tRNA containing an extra nucleotide in the anticodon. We have isolated all possible base substitution mutations at the position 4 (N) in the 3'-CCCN-5' anticodon of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae frameshift suppressor glycine tRNA encoded by the SUF16 gene. Base substitutions at +1 frameshift sites in the his4 gene have also been obtained such that all possible 4-base 5'-GGGN-3' codons have been identified. By testing for suppression in different strains that collectively represent all 16 possible combinations of position 4 nucleotides, we show that frameshift suppression does not require position 4 base pairing. Nonetheless, position 4 interactions influence the efficiency of suppression. Our results suggest a model in which 4-base translocation of mRNA on the ribosome is directed primarily by the number of nucleotides in the anticodon loop, whereas the resulting efficiency of suppression is dependent on the nature of position 4 nucleotides. Images PMID:6390183

  15. The osteopetrotic mutation toothless (tl) is a loss-of-function frameshift mutation in the rat Csf1 gene: Evidence of a crucial role for CSF-1 in osteoclastogenesis and endochondral ossification

    PubMed Central

    Van Wesenbeeck, Liesbeth; Odgren, Paul R.; MacKay, Carole A.; D'Angelo, Marina; Safadi, Fayez F.; Popoff, Steven N.; Van Hul, Wim; Marks, Sandy C.

    2002-01-01

    The toothless (tl) mutation in the rat is a naturally occurring, autosomal recessive mutation resulting in a profound deficiency of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and peritoneal macrophages. The failure to resorb bone produces severe, unrelenting osteopetrosis, with a highly sclerotic skeleton, lack of marrow spaces, failure of tooth eruption, and other pathologies. Injections of CSF-1 improve some, but not all, of these. In this report we have used polymorphism mapping, sequencing, and expression studies to identify the genetic lesion in the tl rat. We found a 10-base insertion near the beginning of the open reading of the Csf1 gene that yields a truncated, nonfunctional protein and an early stop codon, thus rendering the tl rat CSF-1null. All mutants were homozygous for the mutation and all carriers were heterozygous. No CSF-1 transcripts were identified in rat mRNA that would avoid the mutation via alternative splicing. The biology and actions of CSF-1 have been elucidated by many studies that use another naturally occurring mutation, the op mouse, in which a single base insertion also disrupts the reading frame. The op mouse has milder osteoclastopenia and osteopetrosis than the tl rat and recovers spontaneously over the first few months of life. Thus, the tl rat provides a second model in which the functions of CSF-1 can be studied. Understanding the similarities and differences in the phenotypes of these two models will be important to advancing our knowledge of the many actions of CSF-1. PMID:12379742

  16. Four-base codons ACCA, ACCU and ACCC are recognized by frameshift suppressor sufJ.

    PubMed

    Bossi, L; Roth, J R

    1981-08-01

    The frameshift suppressor sufJ acts to correct a set of +1 frameshift mutations having very different sequences at their mutant sites. This suppressor acts by reading a 4 base codon located near, but not at, the site of each suppressible mutation. Suppression thus necessitates out-of-phase translation of the short stretch of mRNA between the site of action of the suppressor tRNA and the site of the frameshift mutation. We have identified the site read by sufJ by mutationally creating a series of such sites in the neighborhood of a previously nonsuppressible frameshift mutation. Each of the newly generated sites was formed by base substitution. Four independently generated sites were analyzed by DNA sequencing. At each site the quadruplet codon ACCX was generated (where X is A, U or C). Thus sufJ is able to read a 4 base codon in which any of three bases is acceptable in the fourth position. This is the first frameshift suppressor that does not read a run of three repeated bases in the first three positions of its codon.

  17. Spotlight-8 Image Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimek, Robert; Wright, Ted

    2006-01-01

    Spotlight is a cross-platform GUI-based software package designed to perform image analysis on sequences of images generated by combustion and fluid physics experiments run in a microgravity environment. Spotlight can perform analysis on a single image in an interactive mode or perform analysis on a sequence of images in an automated fashion. Image processing operations can be employed to enhance the image before various statistics and measurement operations are performed. An arbitrarily large number of objects can be analyzed simultaneously with independent areas of interest. Spotlight saves results in a text file that can be imported into other programs for graphing or further analysis. Spotlight can be run on Microsoft Windows, Linux, and Apple OS X platforms.

  18. In the Spotlight: Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, May Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    During 2012, next generation sequencing (NGS) has attracted great attention in the biomedical research community, especially for personalized medicine. Also, third generation sequencing has become available. Therefore, state-of-art sequencing technology and analysis are reviewed in this Bioinformatics spotlight on 2012. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is high-throughput nucleic acid sequencing technology with wide dynamic range and single base resolution. The full promise of NGS depends on the optimization of NGS platforms, sequence alignment and assembly algorithms, data analytics, novel algorithms for integrating NGS data with existing genomic, proteomic, or metabolomic data, and quantitative assessment of NGS technology in comparing to more established technologies such as microarrays. NGS technology has been predicated to become a cornerstone of personalized medicine. It is argued that NGS is a promising field for motivated young researchers who are looking for opportunities in bioinformatics. PMID:23192635

  19. Stem-loop structures can effectively substitute for an RNA pseudoknot in -1 ribosomal frameshifting.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Hung; Noteborn, Mathieu H; Pleij, Cornelis W A; Olsthoorn, René C L

    2011-11-01

    -1 Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) in synthesizing the gag-pro precursor polyprotein of Simian retrovirus type-1 (SRV-1) is stimulated by a classical H-type pseudoknot which forms an extended triple helix involving base-base and base-sugar interactions between loop and stem nucleotides. Recently, we showed that mutation of bases involved in triple helix formation affected frameshifting, again emphasizing the role of the triple helix in -1 PRF. Here, we investigated the efficiency of hairpins of similar base pair composition as the SRV-1 gag-pro pseudoknot. Although not capable of triple helix formation they proved worthy stimulators of frameshifting. Subsequent investigation of ∼30 different hairpin constructs revealed that next to thermodynamic stability, loop size and composition and stem irregularities can influence frameshifting. Interestingly, hairpins carrying the stable GAAA tetraloop were significantly less shifty than other hairpins, including those with a UUCG motif. The data are discussed in relation to natural shifty hairpins.

  20. Slip into something more functional: selection maintains ancient frameshifts in homopolymeric sequences.

    PubMed

    Wernegreen, Jennifer J; Kauppinen, Seth N; Degnan, Patrick H

    2010-04-01

    Mutational hotspots offer significant sources of genetic variability upon which selection can act. However, with a few notable exceptions, we know little about the dynamics and fitness consequences of mutations in these regions. Here, we explore evolutionary forces shaping homopolymeric tracts that are especially vulnerable to slippage errors during replication and transcription. Such tracts are typically eliminated by selection from most bacterial sequences, yet persist in genomes of endosymbionts with small effective population sizes (N(e)) and biased base compositions. Focusing on Blochmannia, a bacterial endosymbiont of ants, we track the divergence of genes that contain frameshift mutations within long (9-11 bp) polyA or polyT tracts. Earlier experimental work documented that transcriptional slippage restores the reading frame in a fraction of messenger RNA molecules and thereby rescues the function of frameshifted genes. In this study, we demonstrate a surprising persistence of these frameshifts and associated tracts for millions of years. Across the genome of this ant mutualist, rates of indel mutation within homopolymeric tracts far exceed the synonymous mutation rate, indicating that long-term conservation of frameshifts within these tracts is inconsistent with neutrality. In addition, the homopolymeric tracts themselves are more conserved than expected by chance, given extensive neutral substitutions that occur elsewhere in the genes sampled. These data suggest an unexpected role for slippage-prone DNA tracts and highlight a new mechanism for their persistence. That is, when such tracts contain a frameshift, transcriptional slippage plays a critical role in rescuing gene function. In such cases, selection will purge nucleotide changes interrupting the slippery tract so that otherwise volatile sequences become frozen in evolutionary time. Although the advantage of the frameshift itself is less clear, it may offer a mechanism to lower effective gene

  1. A mutant RNA pseudoknot that promotes ribosomal frameshifting in mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Kang, H; Tinoco, I

    1997-05-15

    A single A-->G mutation that changes a potential A.U base pair to a G.U pair at the junction of the stems and loops of a non-frameshifting pseudoknot dramatically increases its frameshifting efficiency in mouse mammary tumor virus. The structure of the non-frameshifting pseudoknot APK has been found to be very different from that of pseudoknots that cause efficient frameshifting [Kang,H., Hines,J.V. and Tinoco,I. (1995) J. Mol. Biol. , 259, 135-147]. The 3-dimensional structure of the mutant pseudoknot was determined by restrained molecular dynamics based on NMR-derived interproton distance and torsion angle constraints. One striking feature of the mutant pseudoknot compared with the parent pseudoknot is that a G.U base pair forms at the top of stem 2, thus leaving only 1 nt at the junction of the two stems. The conformation is very different from that of the previously determined non-frameshifting parent pseudoknot, which lacks the A.U base pair at the top of the stem and has 2 nt between the stems. However, the conformation is quite similar to that of efficient frameshifting pseudoknots whose structures were previously determined by NMR. A single adenylate residue intervenes between the two stems and interrupts their coaxial stacking. This unpaired nucleotide produces a bent structure. The structural similarity among the efficient frameshifting pseudoknots indicates that a specific conformation is required for ribosomal frameshifting, further implying a specific interaction of the pseudoknot with the ribosome.

  2. ETS Research Spotlight: Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeff, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    In four articles adapted from the Educational Testing Service (ETS) Research Report Series, Issue 2 of ETS Research Spotlight provides a small taste of the range of assessment-related research capabilities of the ETS Research and Development Division. Those articles cover assessment-related research aimed at developing models of student learning,…

  3. Child Care Licensing. NCEDL Spotlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Early Development & Learning, Chapel Hill, NC.

    Noting that child care licensing is the first line of protection for children in out-of-home child care settings in the United States, this issue of NCEDL Spotlights summarizes research findings relating various program characteristics to program quality and provides recommendations for state licensing requirements and funding policies. The issue…

  4. Mutagenesis in PMS2- and MSH2-deficient mice indicates differential protection from transversions and frameshifts.

    PubMed

    Andrew, S E; Xu, X S; Baross-Francis, A; Narayanan, L; Milhausen, K; Liskay, R M; Jirik, F R; Glazer, P M

    2000-07-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency leads to an increased mutation frequency and a predisposition to neoplasia. 'Knockout' mice deficient in the MMR proteins Msh2 and Pms2 crossed with mutation detection reporter (supF, lacI and cII) transgenic mice have been used to facilitate a comparison of the changes in mutation frequency and spectra. We find that the mutation frequency was consistently higher in Msh2-deficient mice than Pms2-deficient mice. The lacI target gene, which is highly sensitive to point mutations, demonstrated that both Msh2- and Pms2-deficient mice accumulate transition mutations as the predominant mutation. However, when compared with Msh2(-/-) mice, lacI and cII mutants from Pms2-deficient mice revealed an increased proportion of +/-1 bp frameshift mutations and a corresponding decrease in transversion mutations. The supF target gene, which is sensitive to frameshift mutations, and the cII target gene revealed a strong tendency for -1 bp deletions over +1 bp insertions in Msh2(-/-) compared with Pms2(-/-) mice. These data indicate that Msh2 and Pms2 deficiency have subtle but differing effects on mutation avoidance which may contribute to the differences in tumor spectra observed in the two 'knockout' mouse models. These variances in mutation accumulation may also play a role, in part, in the differences seen in prevalence of MSH2 and PMS2 germline mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer patients.

  5. Spotlight on 'xeroderma pigmentosum'.

    PubMed

    Fassihi, Hiva

    2013-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of DNA repair characterised by photosensitivity, progressive pigmentary change, and an increased incidence of ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin and mucous membrane cancers. Approximately 25% of XP patients also have progressive neurological degeneration. There are eight XP complementation groups (XP-A through to XP-G, and XP variant (XP-V)), corresponding to the affected DNA repair gene. Seven of these genes, XPA to XPG, are involved in nucleotide excision repair, removing UV-induced damage from DNA. The eighth gene, XPV (or POLH), encodes for DNA polymerase η, which is required for the replication of DNA containing unrepaired UV-induced damage. There is wide variability in clinical features both between and within XP complementation groups. The diagnosis is made clinically and confirmed by cellular tests for defective DNA repair. This is followed by identification of the defective gene (complementation analysis) and causative mutation(s). Although there is no cure, sun avoidance and regular follow-up to assess and treat any skin cancers increase life expectancy. The neurological abnormalities are progressive and result in a shortened lifespan. The study of patients with XP has highlighted the importance of nucleotide excision repair in the aetiology of skin cancers and neurological degeneration, and has solidified the link between UV exposure, DNA damage, somatic mutations and skin cancer.

  6. Structure and Function of the Ribosomal Frameshifting Pseudoknot RNA from Beet Western Yellow Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, M.; Sarkhel, S.; Minasov, G.; Rich, A.

    2010-03-05

    Many viruses reprogram ribosomes to produce two different proteins from two different reading frames. So-called -1 frameshifting often involves pairwise alignment of two adjacent tRNAs at a 'slippery' sequence in the ribosomal A and P sites such that an overlapping codon is shifted upstream by one base relative to the zero frame. In the majority of cases, an RNA pseudoknot located downstream stimulates this type of frameshift. Crystal structures of the frameshifting RNA pseudoknot from Beet Western Yellow Virus (BWYV) have provided a detailed picture of the tertiary interactions stabilizing this folding motif, including a minor-groove triplex and quadruple-base interactions. The structure determined at atomic resolution revealed the locations of several magnesium ions and provided insights into the role of structured water stabilizing the RNA. Systematic in vitro and in vivo mutational analyses based on the structural results revealed specific tertiary interactions and regions in the pseudoknot that drastically change frameshifting efficiency. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of pseudoknot-mediated ribosomal frameshifting on the basis of the insights gained from structural and functional studies of the RNA pseudoknot from BWYV.

  7. Multiple Cis-acting elements modulate programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Pea enation mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Simon, Anne E

    2016-01-29

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is used by many positive-strand RNA viruses for translation of required products. Despite extensive studies, it remains unresolved how cis-elements just downstream of the recoding site promote a precise level of frameshifting. The Umbravirus Pea enation mosaic virus RNA2 expresses its RNA polymerase by -1 PRF of the 5'-proximal ORF (p33). Three hairpins located in the vicinity of the recoding site are phylogenetically conserved among Umbraviruses. The central Recoding Stimulatory Element (RSE), located downstream of the p33 termination codon, is a large hairpin with two asymmetric internal loops. Mutational analyses revealed that sequences throughout the RSE and the RSE lower stem (LS) structure are important for frameshifting. SHAPE probing of mutants indicated the presence of higher order structure, and sequences in the LS may also adapt an alternative conformation. Long-distance pairing between the RSE and a 3' terminal hairpin was less critical when the LS structure was stabilized. A basal level of frameshifting occurring in the absence of the RSE increases to 72% of wild-type when a hairpin upstream of the slippery site is also deleted. These results suggest that suppression of frameshifting may be needed in the absence of an active RSE conformation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Multiple Cis-acting elements modulate programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Pea enation mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Simon, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is used by many positive-strand RNA viruses for translation of required products. Despite extensive studies, it remains unresolved how cis-elements just downstream of the recoding site promote a precise level of frameshifting. The Umbravirus Pea enation mosaic virus RNA2 expresses its RNA polymerase by -1 PRF of the 5′-proximal ORF (p33). Three hairpins located in the vicinity of the recoding site are phylogenetically conserved among Umbraviruses. The central Recoding Stimulatory Element (RSE), located downstream of the p33 termination codon, is a large hairpin with two asymmetric internal loops. Mutational analyses revealed that sequences throughout the RSE and the RSE lower stem (LS) structure are important for frameshifting. SHAPE probing of mutants indicated the presence of higher order structure, and sequences in the LS may also adapt an alternative conformation. Long-distance pairing between the RSE and a 3′ terminal hairpin was less critical when the LS structure was stabilized. A basal level of frameshifting occurring in the absence of the RSE increases to 72% of wild-type when a hairpin upstream of the slippery site is also deleted. These results suggest that suppression of frameshifting may be needed in the absence of an active RSE conformation. PMID:26578603

  9. Reading two bases twice: mammalian antizyme frameshifting in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Matsufuji, S; Matsufuji, T; Wills, N M; Gesteland, R F; Atkins, J F

    1996-01-01

    Programmed translational frameshifting is essential for the expression of mammalian ornithine decarboxylase antizyme, a protein involved in the regulation of intracellular polyamines. A cassette containing antizyme frameshift signals is found to direct high-level (16%) frameshifting in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to +1 frameshifting in the mammalian system, in yeast the same frame is reached by -2 frameshifting. Two bases are read twice. The -2 frameshifting is likely to be mediated by slippage of mRNA and re-pairing with the tRNA in the P-site. The downstream pseudoknot stimulates frameshifting by 30-fold compared with 2.5-fold in reticulocyte lysates. When the length of the spacer between the shift site and the pseudoknot is extended by three nucleotides, +1 and -2 frameshifting become equal. Images PMID:8635469

  10. Dynamic pathways of -1 translational frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin; Petrov, Alexey; Johansson, Magnus; Tsai, Albert; O’Leary, Seán E.; Puglisi, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous changes in the reading frame of translation are rare (frequency of 10−3 – 10−4 per codon)1, but can be induced by specific features in the messenger RNA (mRNA). In the presence of mRNA secondary structures, a heptanucleotide “slippery sequence” usually defined by the motif X XXY YYZ, and (in some prokaryotic cases) mRNA sequences that base pair with the 3′ end of the 16S ribosomal rRNA (internal Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences), there is an increased probability that a specific programmed change of frame occurs, wherein the ribosome shifts one nucleotide backwards into an overlapping reading frame (−1 frame) and continues by translating a new sequence of amino acids2,3. Despite extensive biochemical and genetic studies, there is no clear mechanistic description for frameshifting. Here, we apply single-molecule fluorescence to track the compositional and conformational dynamics of the individual ribosomes at each codon during translation of a frameshift-inducing mRNA from the dnaX gene in Escherichia coli. Ribosomes that frameshift into the −1 frame are characterized by a 10-fold longer pause in elongation compared to non-frameshifted ribosomes, which translate through unperturbed. During the pause, interactions of the ribosome with the mRNA stimulatory elements uncouple EF-G catalyzed translocation from normal ribosomal subunit reverse-rotation, leaving the ribosome in a non-canonical intersubunit rotated state with an exposed codon in the aminoacyl-tRNA site (A site). tRNALys sampling and accommodation to the empty A site either lead to the slippage of the tRNAs into the −1 frame or maintain the ribosome into the 0 frame. Our results provide a general mechanistic and conformational framework for −1 frameshifting, highlighting multiple kinetic branchpoints during elongation. PMID:24919156

  11. About Fourier techniques in Spotlight SAR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendal, Didier

    A description is given of Fourier reconstruction techniques in the Spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR) domain. The particular disposition of the Fourier data in this scanning mode does not make straightforward the fast Fourier processing and raises some fundamental interrogations. Other specific aspects are also treated, such as the consequences of a frequency shift or mixing in the Fourier plane. A Fourier data extrapolation attempt is discussed. Besides the processing descriptions and theoretic discussions, Spotlight scanning properties are emphasized by the many simulation results obtained from the convolution back-projection algorithm, adapted to the Spotlight context in harmony with the tomographic analogy of radar principles.

  12. Role of the pks15/1 gene in the biosynthesis of phenolglycolipids in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Evidence that all strains synthesize glycosylated p-hydroxybenzoic methyl esters and that strains devoid of phenolglycolipids harbor a frameshift mutation in the pks15/1 gene.

    PubMed

    Constant, Patricia; Perez, Esther; Malaga, Wladimir; Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Saurel, Olivier; Daffé, Mamadou; Guilhot, Christophe

    2002-10-11

    Diesters of phthiocerol and phenolphthiocerol are important virulence factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, the two main mycobacterial pathogens in humans. They are both long-chain beta-diols, and their biosynthetic pathway is beginning to be elucidated. Although the two classes of molecules share a common lipid core, phthiocerol diesters have been found in all the strains of the M. tuberculosis complex examined although phenolphthiocerol diesters are produced by only a few groups of strains. To address the question of the origin of this diversity 8 reference strains and 10 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis were analyzed. We report the presence of glycosylated p-hydroxybenzoic acid methyl esters, structurally related to the type-specific phenolphthiocerol glycolipids, in the culture media of all reference strains of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that the strains devoid of phenolphthiocerol derivatives are unable to elongate the putative p-hydroxybenzoic acid precursor. We also show that all the strains of M. tuberculosis examined and deficient in the production of phenolphthiocerol derivatives are natural mutants with a frameshift mutation in pks15/1 whereas a single open reading frame for pks15/1 is found in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, M. leprae, and strains of M. tuberculosis that produce phenolphthiocerol derivatives. Complementation of the H37Rv strain of M. tuberculosis, which is devoid of phenolphthiocerol derivatives, with the fused pks15/1 gene from M. bovis BCG restored phenolphthiocerol glycolipids production. Conversely, disruption of the pks15/1 gene in M. bovis BCG led to the abolition of the synthesis of type-specific phenolphthiocerol glycolipid. These data indicate that Pks15/1 is involved in the elongation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid to give p-hydroxyphenylalkanoates, which in turn are converted, presumably by the PpsA-E synthase, to phenolphthiocerol derivatives.

  13. Frameshifting in alphaviruses: a diversity of 3' stimulatory structures.

    PubMed

    Chung, Betty Y-W; Firth, Andrew E; Atkins, John F

    2010-03-26

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting allows the synthesis of alternative, N-terminally coincident, C-terminally distinct proteins from the same RNA. Many viruses utilize frameshifting to optimize the coding potential of compact genomes, to circumvent the host cell's canonical rule of one functional protein per mRNA, or to express alternative proteins in a fixed ratio. Programmed frameshifting is also used in the decoding of a small number of cellular genes. Recently, specific ribosomal -1 frameshifting was discovered at a conserved U_UUU_UUA motif within the sequence encoding the alphavirus 6K protein. In this case, frameshifting results in the synthesis of an additional protein, termed TF (TransFrame). This new case of frameshifting is unusual in that the -1 frame ORF is very short and completely embedded within the sequence encoding the overlapping polyprotein. The present work shows that there is remarkable diversity in the 3' sequences that are functionally important for efficient frameshifting at the U_UUU_UUA motif. While many alphavirus species utilize a 3' RNA structure such as a hairpin or pseudoknot, some species (such as Semliki Forest virus) apparently lack any intra-mRNA stimulatory structure, yet just 20 nt 3'-adjacent to the shift site stimulates up to 10% frameshifting. The analysis, both experimental and bioinformatic, significantly expands the known repertoire of -1 frameshifting stimulators in mammalian and insect systems.

  14. Analyses of frameshifting at UUU-pyrimidine sites.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R; Curran, J F

    1997-05-15

    Others have recently shown that the UUU phenylalanine codon is highly frameshift-prone in the 3'(rightward) direction at pyrimidine 3'contexts. Here, several approaches are used to analyze frameshifting at such sites. The four permutations of the UUU/C (phenylalanine) and CGG/U (arginine) codon pairs were examined because they vary greatly in their expected frameshifting tendencies. Furthermore, these synonymous sites allow direct tests of the idea that codon usage can control frameshifting. Frameshifting was measured for these dicodons embedded within each of two broader contexts: the Escherichia coli prfB (RF2 gene) programmed frameshift site and a 'normal' message site. The principal difference between these contexts is that the programmed frameshift contains a purine-rich sequence upstream of the slippery site that can base pair with the 3'end of 16 S rRNA (the anti-Shine-Dalgarno) to enhance frameshifting. In both contexts frameshift frequencies are highest if the slippery tRNAPhe is capable of stable base pairing in the shifted reading frame. This requirement is less stringent in the RF2 context, as if the Shine-Dalgarno interaction can help stabilize a quasi-stable rephased tRNA:message complex. It was previously shown that frameshifting in RF2 occurs more frequently if the codon 3'to the slippery site is read by a rare tRNA. Consistent with that earlier work, in the RF2 context frameshifting occurs substantially more frequently if the arginine codon is CGG, which is read by a rare tRNA. In contrast, in the 'normal' context frameshifting is only slightly greater at CGG than at CGU. It is suggested that the Shine-Dalgarno-like interaction elevates frameshifting specifically during the pause prior to translation of the second codon, which makes frameshifting exquisitely sensitive to the rate of translation of that codon. In both contexts frameshifting increases in a mutant strain that fails to modify tRNA base A37, which is 3'of the anticodon. Thus, those base

  15. Analyses of frameshifting at UUU-pyrimidine sites.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, R; Curran, J F

    1997-01-01

    Others have recently shown that the UUU phenylalanine codon is highly frameshift-prone in the 3'(rightward) direction at pyrimidine 3'contexts. Here, several approaches are used to analyze frameshifting at such sites. The four permutations of the UUU/C (phenylalanine) and CGG/U (arginine) codon pairs were examined because they vary greatly in their expected frameshifting tendencies. Furthermore, these synonymous sites allow direct tests of the idea that codon usage can control frameshifting. Frameshifting was measured for these dicodons embedded within each of two broader contexts: the Escherichia coli prfB (RF2 gene) programmed frameshift site and a 'normal' message site. The principal difference between these contexts is that the programmed frameshift contains a purine-rich sequence upstream of the slippery site that can base pair with the 3'end of 16 S rRNA (the anti-Shine-Dalgarno) to enhance frameshifting. In both contexts frameshift frequencies are highest if the slippery tRNAPhe is capable of stable base pairing in the shifted reading frame. This requirement is less stringent in the RF2 context, as if the Shine-Dalgarno interaction can help stabilize a quasi-stable rephased tRNA:message complex. It was previously shown that frameshifting in RF2 occurs more frequently if the codon 3'to the slippery site is read by a rare tRNA. Consistent with that earlier work, in the RF2 context frameshifting occurs substantially more frequently if the arginine codon is CGG, which is read by a rare tRNA. In contrast, in the 'normal' context frameshifting is only slightly greater at CGG than at CGU. It is suggested that the Shine-Dalgarno-like interaction elevates frameshifting specifically during the pause prior to translation of the second codon, which makes frameshifting exquisitely sensitive to the rate of translation of that codon. In both contexts frameshifting increases in a mutant strain that fails to modify tRNA base A37, which is 3'of the anticodon. Thus, those base

  16. Levels of the Vsr Endonuclease Do Not Regulate Stationary-Phase Reversion of a Lac− Frameshift Allele in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Patricia L.; Rosche, William A.

    1998-01-01

    Vsr endonuclease, which initiates very short patch repair, has been hypothesized to regulate mutation in stationary-phase cells. Overexpression of Vsr does dramatically increase the stationary-phase reversion of a Lac− frameshift allele, but the absence of Vsr has no effect. Thus, at least in this case, Vsr has no regulatory role in stationary-phase mutation, and the effects of Vsr overproduction are likely to be artifactual. PMID:9537396

  17. Levels of the Vsr endonuclease do not regulate stationary-phase reversion of a Lac- frameshift allele in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Foster, P L; Rosche, W A

    1998-04-01

    Vsr endonuclease, which initiates very short patch repair, has been hypothesized to regulate mutation in stationary-phase cells. Overexpression of Vsr does dramatically increase the stationary-phase reversion of a Lac- frameshift allele, but the absence of Vsr has no effect. Thus, at least in this case, Vsr has no regulatory role in stationary-phase mutation, and the effects of Vsr overproduction are likely to be artifactual.

  18. Programmed translational frameshift in the bacteriophage P2 FETUD tail gene operon.

    PubMed

    Christie, Gail E; Temple, Louise M; Bartlett, Becky A; Goodwin, Tina S

    2002-12-01

    The major structural components of the P2 contractile tail are encoded in the FETUD tail gene operon. The sequences of genes F(I) and F(II), encoding the major tail sheath and tail tube proteins, have been reported previously (L. M. Temple, S. L. Forsburg, R. Calendar, and G. E. Christie, Virology 181:353-358, 1991). Sequence analysis of the remainder of this operon and the locations of amber mutations Eam30, Tam5, Tam64, Tam215, Uam25, Uam77, Uam92, and Dam6 and missense mutation Ets55 identified the coding regions for genes E, T, U, and D, completing the sequence determination of the P2 genome. Inspection of the DNA sequence revealed a new open reading frame overlapping the end of the essential tail gene E. Lack of an apparent translation initiation site and identification of a putative sequence for a programmed translational frameshift within the E gene suggested that this new reading frame (E') might be translated as an extension of gene E, following a -1 translational frameshift. Complementation analysis demonstrated that E' was essential for P2 lytic growth. Analysis of fusion polypeptides verified that this reading frame was translated as a -1 frameshift extension of gpE, with a frequency of approximately 10%. The arrangement of these two genes within the tail gene cluster of phage P2 and their coupling via a translational frameshift appears to be conserved among P2-related phages. This arrangement shows a striking parallel to the organization in the tail gene cluster of phage lambda, despite a lack of amino acid sequence similarity between the tail gene products of these phage families.

  19. Spotlight failure effect in exogenous orienting.

    PubMed

    Milán, E G; Tornay, F J

    2001-12-01

    Many experimental results about spatial attention have been explained by assuming the existence of an attentional "spotlight" which can move from one location in visual space to another. Such an account has been recently challenged by findings which show the influence of nonspatial factors in spatial attention. In particular, the so-called "spotlight failure" effect refers to the influence of the probability of occurrence of different stimuli. However, such an effect has only been reported in the case of endogenous (or central) orientation, rather than on exogenous (or peripheral) orienting. We present evidence showing that the spotlight failure effect can be obtained with exogenous orienting, even at a short SOA (100 ms). Besides, experimental instructions can modulate the effect, which agrees with theoretical accounts proposing that top-down factors can influence attentional capture.

  20. Protein-directed ribosomal frameshifting temporally regulates gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Napthine, Sawsan; Ling, Roger; Finch, Leanne K.; Jones, Joshua D.; Bell, Susanne; Brierley, Ian; Firth, Andrew E.

    2017-01-01

    Programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting is a mechanism of gene expression, whereby specific signals within messenger RNAs direct a proportion of translating ribosomes to shift −1 nt and continue translating in the new reading frame. Such frameshifting normally occurs at a set ratio and is utilized in the expression of many viral genes and a number of cellular genes. An open question is whether proteins might function as trans-acting switches to turn frameshifting on or off in response to cellular conditions. Here we show that frameshifting in a model RNA virus, encephalomyocarditis virus, is trans-activated by viral protein 2A. As a result, the frameshifting efficiency increases from 0 to 70% (one of the highest known in a mammalian system) over the course of infection, temporally regulating the expression levels of the viral structural and enzymatic proteins. PMID:28593994

  1. The phenotype of many independently isolated +1 frameshift suppressor mutants supports a pivotal role of the P-site in reading frame maintenance.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Gunilla; Nilsson, Kristina; Björk, Glenn R

    2013-01-01

    The main features of translation are similar in all organisms on this planet and one important feature of it is the way the ribosome maintain the reading frame. We have earlier characterized several bacterial mutants defective in tRNA maturation and found that some of them correct a +1 frameshift mutation; i.e. such mutants possess an error in reading frame maintenance. Based on the analysis of the frameshifting phenotype of such mutants we proposed a pivotal role of the ribosomal grip of the peptidyl-tRNA to maintain the correct reading frame. To test the model in an unbiased way we first isolated many (467) independent mutants able to correct a +1 frameshift mutation and thereafter tested whether or not their frameshifting phenotypes were consistent with the model. These 467+1 frameshift suppressor mutants had alterations in 16 different loci of which 15 induced a defective tRNA by hypo- or hypermodifications or altering its primary sequence. All these alterations of tRNAs induce a frameshift error in the P-site to correct a +1 frameshift mutation consistent with the proposed model. Modifications next to and 3' of the anticodon (position 37), like 1-methylguanosine, are important for proper reading frame maintenance due to their interactions with components of the ribosomal P-site. Interestingly, two mutants had a defect in a locus (rpsI), which encodes ribosomal protein S9. The C-terminal of this protein contacts position 32-34 of the peptidyl-tRNA and is thus part of the P-site environment. The two rpsI mutants had a C-terminal truncated ribosomal protein S9 that destroys its interaction with the peptidyl-tRNA resulting in +1 shift in the reading frame. The isolation and characterization of the S9 mutants gave strong support of our model that the ribosomal grip of the peptidyl-tRNA is pivotal for the reading frame maintenance.

  2. Spotlight on Transition to Teaching Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MENC: The National Association for Music Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The latest title in the popular Spotlight series, this timely book focuses on issues involving recruitment and retention of music teachers, a crucial issue in these days of budget constraints. Arranged chronologically, it features a collection of articles from state journals focusing on issues such as mentoring, teacher shortages, burnout, and…

  3. Spotlight on Making Music with Special Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The newest publication in the Spotlight series, this book gathers articles from state music educators association journals that give music teachers ideas on how to include special needs students, discuss why special learners benefit from music education, offer suggestions for dealing with specific types of special needs students, and address…

  4. Spotlight on Service: Where the Jobs Are.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Anne; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Three articles spotlight three groups of service-producing industries. "Health: Crossroads over the Horizon?" (Kahl and Clark) examines health occupations, patient care, paying for health care, and the impact of these changes on occupations. Hecker and Murphy look at "Retail Trade" with special attention to part-time and temporary jobs. Levine…

  5. Spotlight on Making Music with Special Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The newest publication in the Spotlight series, this book gathers articles from state music educators association journals that give music teachers ideas on how to include special needs students, discuss why special learners benefit from music education, offer suggestions for dealing with specific types of special needs students, and address…

  6. Spotlight on Transition to Teaching Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MENC: The National Association for Music Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The latest title in the popular Spotlight series, this timely book focuses on issues involving recruitment and retention of music teachers, a crucial issue in these days of budget constraints. Arranged chronologically, it features a collection of articles from state journals focusing on issues such as mentoring, teacher shortages, burnout, and…

  7. Efficient -2 frameshifting by mammalian ribosomes to synthesize an additional arterivirus protein.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ying; Treffers, Emmely E; Li, Yanhua; Tas, Ali; Sun, Zhi; van der Meer, Yvonne; de Ru, Arnoud H; van Veelen, Peter A; Atkins, John F; Snijder, Eric J; Firth, Andrew E

    2012-10-23

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is a gene-expression mechanism used to express many viral and some cellular genes. In contrast, efficient natural utilization of -2 PRF has not been demonstrated previously in eukaryotic systems. Like all nidoviruses, members of the Arteriviridae (a family of positive-stranded RNA viruses) express their replicase polyproteins pp1a and pp1ab from two long ORFs (1a and 1b), where synthesis of pp1ab depends on -1 PRF. These polyproteins are posttranslationally cleaved into at least 13 functional nonstructural proteins. Here we report that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and apparently most other arteriviruses, use an additional PRF mechanism to access a conserved alternative ORF that overlaps the nsp2-encoding region of ORF1a in the +1 frame. We show here that this ORF is translated via -2 PRF at a conserved G_GUU_UUU sequence (underscores separate ORF1a codons) at an estimated efficiency of around 20%, yielding a transframe fusion (nsp2TF) with the N-terminal two thirds of nsp2. Expression of nsp2TF in PRRSV-infected cells was verified using specific Abs, and the site and direction of frameshifting were determined via mass spectrometric analysis of nsp2TF. Further, mutagenesis showed that the frameshift site and an unusual frameshift-stimulatory element (a conserved CCCANCUCC motif 11 nucleotides downstream) are required to direct efficient -2 PRF. Mutations preventing nsp2TF expression impair PRRSV replication and produce a small-plaque phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that -2 PRF is a functional gene-expression mechanism in eukaryotes and add another layer to the complexity of arterivirus genome expression.

  8. DVL3 Alleles Resulting in a -1 Frameshift of the Last Exon Mediate Autosomal-Dominant Robinow Syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, Janson J; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander; Bayram, Yavuz; Withers, Marjorie; Gezdirici, Alper; Kimonis, Virginia; Steehouwer, Marloes; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; van Bon, Bregje W M; Sutton, V Reid; Lupski, James R; Brunner, Han G; Carvalho, Claudia M B

    2016-03-03

    Robinow syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features. Recent reports have identified, in individuals with dominant Robinow syndrome, a specific type of variant characterized by being uniformly located in the penultimate exon of DVL1 and resulting in a -1 frameshift allele with a premature termination codon that escapes nonsense-mediated decay. Here, we studied a cohort of individuals who had been clinically diagnosed with Robinow syndrome but who had not received a molecular diagnosis from variant studies of DVL1, WNT5A, and ROR2. Because of the uniform location of frameshift variants in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome and the functional redundancy of DVL1, DVL2, and DVL3, we elected to pursue direct Sanger sequencing of the penultimate exon of DVL1 and its paralogs DVL2 and DVL3 to search for potential disease-associated variants. Remarkably, targeted sequencing identified five unrelated individuals harboring heterozygous, de novo frameshift variants in DVL3, including two splice acceptor mutations and three 1 bp deletions. Similar to the variants observed in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome, all variants in DVL3 result in a -1 frameshift, indicating that these highly specific alterations might be a common cause of dominant Robinow syndrome. Here, we review the current knowledge of these peculiar variant alleles in DVL1- and DVL3-mediated Robinow syndrome and further elucidate the phenotypic features present in subjects with DVL1 and DVL3 frameshift mutations. Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. DVL3 Alleles Resulting in a −1 Frameshift of the Last Exon Mediate Autosomal-Dominant Robinow Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    White, Janson J.; Mazzeu, Juliana F.; Hoischen, Alexander; Bayram, Yavuz; Withers, Marjorie; Gezdirici, Alper; Kimonis, Virginia; Steehouwer, Marloes; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Sutton, V. Reid; Lupski, James R.; Brunner, Han G.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Robinow syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features. Recent reports have identified, in individuals with dominant Robinow syndrome, a specific type of variant characterized by being uniformly located in the penultimate exon of DVL1 and resulting in a −1 frameshift allele with a premature termination codon that escapes nonsense-mediated decay. Here, we studied a cohort of individuals who had been clinically diagnosed with Robinow syndrome but who had not received a molecular diagnosis from variant studies of DVL1, WNT5A, and ROR2. Because of the uniform location of frameshift variants in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome and the functional redundancy of DVL1, DVL2, and DVL3, we elected to pursue direct Sanger sequencing of the penultimate exon of DVL1 and its paralogs DVL2 and DVL3 to search for potential disease-associated variants. Remarkably, targeted sequencing identified five unrelated individuals harboring heterozygous, de novo frameshift variants in DVL3, including two splice acceptor mutations and three 1 bp deletions. Similar to the variants observed in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome, all variants in DVL3 result in a −1 frameshift, indicating that these highly specific alterations might be a common cause of dominant Robinow syndrome. Here, we review the current knowledge of these peculiar variant alleles in DVL1- and DVL3-mediated Robinow syndrome and further elucidate the phenotypic features present in subjects with DVL1 and DVL3 frameshift mutations. PMID:26924530

  10. Sequence composition and context effects on the generation and repair of frameshift intermediates in mononucleotide runs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Harfe, B D; Jinks-Robertson, S

    2000-01-01

    DNA polymerase slippage occurs frequently in tracts of a tandemly repeated nucleotide, and such slippage events can be genetically detected as frameshift mutations. In long mononucleotide runs, most frameshift intermediates are repaired by the postreplicative mismatch repair (MMR) machinery, rather than by the exonucleolytic proofreading activity of DNA polymerase. Although mononucleotide runs are hotspots for polymerase slippage events, it is not known whether the composition of a run and the surrounding context affect the frequency of slippage or the efficiency of MMR. To address these issues, 10-nucleotide (10N) runs were inserted into the yeast LYS2 gene to create +1 frameshift alleles. Slippage events within these runs were detected as Lys(+) revertants. 10G or 10C runs were found to be more unstable than 10A or 10T runs, but neither the frequency of polymerase slippage nor the overall efficiency of MMR was greatly influenced by sequence context. Although complete elimination of MMR activity (msh2 mutants) affected all runs similarly, analyses of reversion rates in msh3 and msh6 mutants revealed distinct specificities of the yeast Msh2p-Msh3p and Msh2p-Msh6p mismatch binding complexes in the repair of frameshift intermediates in different sequence contexts. PMID:11014807

  11. Mechanisms and Implications of Programmed Translational Frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    While ribosomes must maintain translational reading frame in order to translate primary genetic information into polypeptides, cis-acting signals located on mRNAs represent higher order information content that can be used to fine tune gene expression. Classes of signals have been identified that direct a fraction of elongating ribosomes to shift reading frame by one base in the 5′ (−1) or 3′ (+1) direction. This is called programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF). Although mechanisms of PRF differ, a common feature is induction of ribosome pausing, which alters kinetic partitioning rates between in-frame and out-of-frame codons at specific “slippery” sequences. Many viruses use PRF to ensure synthesis of the correct ratios of virus-encoded proteins required for proper viral particle assembly and maturation, thus identifying PRF as an attractive target for antiviral therapeutics. In contrast, recent studies indicate that PRF signals may primarily function as mRNA destabilizing elements in cellular mRNAs. These studies suggest that PRF may be used to fine-tune gene expression through mRNA decay pathways. The possible regulation of PRF by non-coding RNAs is also discussed. PMID:22715123

  12. Frameshift-derived neoantigens constitute immunotherapeutic targets for patients with microsatellite-instable haematological malignancies: frameshift peptides for treating MSI+ blood cancers.

    PubMed

    Maletzki, Claudia; Schmidt, Fabian; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Schmitt, Michael; Linnebacher, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) resulting from loss of functional DNA mismatch repair was recently found in various haematological disorders. In coding sequences, MSI leads to frameshift mutations (FSMs) and the production of C-terminally altered proteins which are foreign to the immune system. Here, we wondered whether these frame-shifted peptide (FSP) sequences represent tumour-specific antigens also for MSI(+) leukaemia and lymphomas (L/L). A total of 33 coding region microsatellites were examined in MSI(+) L/L cell lines for the presence of FSMs. Thereafter, recognition of MSI(+) cells by established FSP-specific CD8(+) T cell lines was quantified using interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assays. In each experiment, MSI(+) L/L cell lines and T2 targets exogenously loaded with the cognate peptide (=internal control) were employed. Supplementary, lytic activity towards tumour cells was analysed by standard chromium release assay ((51)Cr). Mutational profiling of 33 coding microsatellite loci in nine MSI(+) L/L cell lines revealed instability in at least nine microsatellites. In each cell line, a distinct mutational profile was observed. Only three of the 33 loci were stable. FSP-specific and human leukocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2)-restricted T cells specifically recognised MSI(+) L/L cells endogenously expressing TGFβRII(-1), Caspase 5 (-1) and MSH3 (-1) in ELISpot assays. Moreover, specific killing of Caspase 5 (-1) and MSH3 (-1) expressing L/L cell lines was achieved in functional cytotoxicity assays. Data presented here expand the importance of FSPs as shared and general tumour-specific antigens. Consequently, they open new avenues for specific immunotherapies not only for solid but also for MSI(+) haematological malignancies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Two cis-acting signals control ribosomal frameshift between human T-cell leukemia virus type II gag and pro genes.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, H; Mador, N; Udi, R; Panet, A; Honigman, A

    1993-01-01

    The open reading frame of the human T-cell leukemia virus type II pro gene is arranged at a -1 position relative to the gag gene. Synthesis of the Gag-Pro fusion polyprotein is facilitated by ribosomal frameshift into the reading frame of the pro gene. Cloning of a synthetic 41-bp oligonucleotide corresponding to the gag-pro junction within a heterologous gene (nef of human immunodeficiency virus type I) and mutation analysis revealed that two cis-acting signals, an adenosine residue stretch and a dyad symmetry sequence, flanking the UAA termination codon, are required for efficient ribosomal frameshifting between gag and pro. The stability of the stem-loop structure is crucial for frameshifting. Images PMID:8371359

  14. Detecting swift fox: Smoked-plate scent stations versus spotlighting

    Treesearch

    Daniel W. Uresk; Kieth E. Severson; Jody Javersak

    2003-01-01

    We compared two methods of detecting presence of swift fox: smoked-plate scent stations and spotlight counts. Tracks were counted on ten 1-mile (1.6-km) transects with bait/tracking plate stations every 0.1 mile (0.16 km). Vehicle spotlight counts were conducted on the same transects. Methods were compared with Spearman's rank order correlation. Repeated measures...

  15. The Learning Management System Evolution. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach learning management systems (LMSs). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the Core Data Service, which contains several questions regarding information systems and applications.…

  16. The Learning Management System Evolution. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach learning management systems (LMSs). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the Core Data Service, which contains several questions regarding information systems and applications.…

  17. Ribosomal frameshifting efficiency and gag/gag-pol ratio are critical for yeast M1 double-stranded RNA virus propagation.

    PubMed Central

    Dinman, J D; Wickner, R B

    1992-01-01

    About 1.9% of ribosomes translating the gag open reading frame of the yeast L-A double-stranded RNA virus positive strand undergo a -1 frameshift and continue translating in the pol open reading frame to make a 170-kDa gag-pol fusion protein. The importance of frameshifting efficiency for viral propagation was tested in a system where the M1 (killer toxin-encoding) satellite RNA is supported by a full-length L-A cDNA clone. Either increasing or decreasing the frameshift efficiency more than twofold by alterations in the slippery site disrupted viral propagation. A threefold increase caused by a chromosomal mutation, hsh1 (high shifter), had the same effect. Substituting a +1 ribosomal frameshift site from Ty1 with the correct efficiency also allowed support of M1 propagation. The normal -1 frameshift efficiency is similar to the observed molar ratio in viral particles of the 170-kDa gag-pol protein to the 70-kDa gag gene product, the major coat protein. The results are interpreted in terms of a packaging model for L-A. Images PMID:1583726

  18. An RNA pseudoknot and an optimal heptameric shift site are required for highly efficient ribosomal frameshifting on a retroviral messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, M; Parkin, N; Varmus, H E

    1992-01-01

    Synthesis of the pol gene products of most retroviruses requires ribosomes to shift frame once or twice in the -1 direction while translating gag-pol mRNA. The viral signals for frameshifting include a heptanucleotide sequence on which the shift occurs and higher-order RNA structure just downstream of the shift site. We have made site-directed mutations in two stems (S1 and S2) of a putative RNA pseudoknot that begins 7 nucleotides 3' of the previously identified shift site (A AAA AAC) in the gag-pro region of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) RNA. The mutants confirm the predicted structure, show that loss of either S1 or S2 impairs frameshifting, and exclude alternative RNA structures as significant for frameshifting. The importance of the MMTV pseudoknot has been further demonstrated by showing that shift sites from two other retroviruses function more efficiently in the position of the MMTV site than in their native contexts. However, the MMTV pseudoknot cannot promote detectable frameshifting in the absence of a recognizable upstream shift site. In addition, the species of tRNA that reads the second codon in the shift site appears to be a critical determinant, since changing the 7th nucleotide in the MMTV gag-pro shift site from C to A, U, or G severely impairs frameshifting. Images PMID:1309954

  19. High frequencies of short frameshifts in poly-CA/TG tandem repeats borne by bacteriophage M13 in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, G; Gutman, G A

    1987-01-01

    Slipped-strand mispairing (SSM) may play an major role in repetitive DNA sequence evolution by generating large numbers of short frameshift mutations within simple tandem repeats. Here we examine the frequency and size spectrum of frameshifts generated within poly-CA/TG sequences inserted into bacteriophage M13 in Escherichia coli hosts. The frequency of detectable frameshifts within a 40 bp tract of poly-CA/TG is greater than one percent and increases more than linearly with length, being lower by a factor of four in a 22 bp target sequence. The frequency increases more than 13-fold in mutL and mutS host cells, suggesting that a high proportion of frameshift events are normally repaired by methyl-directed mismatch repair. Of the 87 sequenced frameshifts in this study, 96% result from deletion or insertion of only or two 2 bp repeat units. The most frequent events are 2 bp deletions, 2 bp insertions, and 4 bp deletions, the relative frequencies of these events being about 18:6:1. PMID:3299269

  20. Spotlight on Student Engagement, Motivation, and Achievement. No. 5 in the Harvard Education Letter Spotlight Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.; Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Only when students feel engaged both socially and academically can schools and teachers lay the groundwork to motivate achievement. This volume, the fifth in the "Harvard Education Letter" Spotlight series, brings together fifteen seminal articles that examine research and practice on these complex and interrelated issues. Contributors include:…

  1. Spotlight on High-Stakes Testing. No. 1 in the Harvard Education Letter Spotlight Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Education Press, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This inaugural volume of our Spotlight Series features recent "Harvard Education Letter" articles on testing and new reports never before published on this important topic. Contributors address such issues as how educators can manage the "avalanche" of tests; whether the benefits of high-stakes tests justify the risks to…

  2. Spotlight on Technology in Education. No. 7 in the Harvard Education Letter Spotlight Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This edited volume covers the range of critical trends in the use of computers and other devices for classroom teaching, online learning, professional development, school improvement, and student assessment. "Spotlight on Technology in Education" draws on expert sources including teacher-leaders, librarians, researchers, and trainers who…

  3. Spotlight on Technology in Education. No. 7 in the Harvard Education Letter Spotlight Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This edited volume covers the range of critical trends in the use of computers and other devices for classroom teaching, online learning, professional development, school improvement, and student assessment. "Spotlight on Technology in Education" draws on expert sources including teacher-leaders, librarians, researchers, and trainers who…

  4. Spotlight on Student Engagement, Motivation, and Achievement. No. 5 in the Harvard Education Letter Spotlight Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.; Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Only when students feel engaged both socially and academically can schools and teachers lay the groundwork to motivate achievement. This volume, the fifth in the "Harvard Education Letter" Spotlight series, brings together fifteen seminal articles that examine research and practice on these complex and interrelated issues. Contributors include:…

  5. Spotlight on High-Stakes Testing. No. 1 in the Harvard Education Letter Spotlight Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Education Press, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This inaugural volume of our Spotlight Series features recent "Harvard Education Letter" articles on testing and new reports never before published on this important topic. Contributors address such issues as how educators can manage the "avalanche" of tests; whether the benefits of high-stakes tests justify the risks to…

  6. A nucleotide insertion and frameshift cause analbuminemia in an Italian family

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, S.; Madison, J.; Putnam, F.W.; Galliano, M.; Minchiotti, L.

    1994-03-15

    In analbuminemia, a very rare inherited syndrome, subjects produce little or no albumin (1/100th to 1/1000th normal), presumably because of a mutation in the albumin gene; yet, they have only moderate edema and few related symptoms owing to a compensatory increase in other plasma proteins. Because of the virtual absence of albumin the defect must be identified at the DNA level. In this study the mutation causing analbuminemia in an Italian family was investigated by analysis of DNA from a mother and her daughter. The mother was homozygous for the trait and had a serum albumin value. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of DNA from both mother and daughter showed that the mutation is caused by a nucleotide insertion in exon 8; this produces a frameshift leading to a premature stop, seven codons downstream. The methods of heteroduplex hybridization and single-strand conformation polymorphism were used to compare the DNA of the mother and daughter to the DNA of two unrelated analbumineimic inidivuduals (one italian and one American). This showed that all three analbuminemic individuals had different mutations; these also differed from the mutation in the only human case previously studied at the DNA level, which was a splicing defect affecting the ligation of the 6-exon y sequences. Thus, analbuminemia may result from a variety of mutations and is genetically heterogeneous. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Spotlight COSMO-SkyMed DEM generation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, N.; Lorusso, R.; Milillo, G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper focuses on the generation of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) with COSMO SkyMed Spotlight data in providing DEMs. In particular, the peculiarity of Spotlight data (affected from Doppler centroid drift) is investigated, and the use of the processing chain included in the Delft Object-oriented Radar Interferometric Software (DORIS [1]). The effects of not correctly handled Doppler drift is shown. The standard interferometric processing, without Doppler drift handling, has been applied to Spotlight image pairs, resulting in interferometric coherence loss in interferograms as we move away from scene center. So, the standard processing chain has been modified to take in account the Doppler centroid drift affecting Spotlight data and very high resolution and accuracy DEMs have been obtained. Some Spotlight image pairs have been processed and the obtained DEMs have been shown and analyzed proving the high details and product accuracy.

  8. The highly conserved codon following the slippery sequence supports -1 frameshift efficiency at the HIV-1 frameshift site.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Suneeth F; Crowe-McAuliffe, Caillan; Graves, Ryan; Cardno, Tony S; McKinney, Cushla; Poole, Elizabeth S; Tate, Warren P

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 utilises -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting to translate structural and enzymatic domains in a defined proportion required for replication. A slippery sequence, U UUU UUA, and a stem-loop are well-defined RNA features modulating -1 frameshifting in HIV-1. The GGG glycine codon immediately following the slippery sequence (the 'intercodon') contributes structurally to the start of the stem-loop but has no defined role in current models of the frameshift mechanism, as slippage is inferred to occur before the intercodon has reached the ribosomal decoding site. This GGG codon is highly conserved in natural isolates of HIV. When the natural intercodon was replaced with a stop codon two different decoding molecules-eRF1 protein or a cognate suppressor tRNA-were able to access and decode the intercodon prior to -1 frameshifting. This implies significant slippage occurs when the intercodon is in the (perhaps distorted) ribosomal A site. We accommodate the influence of the intercodon in a model of frame maintenance versus frameshifting in HIV-1.

  9. Transactivation of programmed ribosomal frameshifting by a viral protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhua; Treffers, Emmely E.; Napthine, Sawsan; Tas, Ali; Zhu, Longchao; Sun, Zhi; Bell, Susanne; Mark, Brian L.; van Veelen, Peter A.; van Hemert, Martijn J.; Firth, Andrew E.; Brierley, Ian; Snijder, Eric J.; Fang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting (−1 PRF) is a widely used translational mechanism facilitating the expression of two polypeptides from a single mRNA. Commonly, the ribosome interacts with an mRNA secondary structure that promotes −1 frameshifting on a homopolymeric slippery sequence. Recently, we described an unusual −2 frameshifting (−2 PRF) signal directing efficient expression of a transframe protein [nonstructural protein 2TF (nsp2TF)] of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) from an alternative reading frame overlapping the viral replicase gene. Unusually, this arterivirus PRF signal lacks an obvious stimulatory RNA secondary structure, but as confirmed here, can also direct the occurrence of −1 PRF, yielding a third, truncated nsp2 variant named “nsp2N.” Remarkably, we now show that both −2 and −1 PRF are transactivated by a protein factor, specifically a PRRSV replicase subunit (nsp1β). Embedded in nsp1β’s papain-like autoproteinase domain, we identified a highly conserved, putative RNA-binding motif that is critical for PRF transactivation. The minimal RNA sequence required for PRF was mapped within a 34-nt region that includes the slippery sequence and a downstream conserved CCCANCUCC motif. Interaction of nsp1β with the PRF signal was demonstrated in pull-down assays. These studies demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that a protein can function as a transactivator of ribosomal frameshifting. The newly identified frameshifting determinants provide potential antiviral targets for arterivirus disease control and prevention. Moreover, protein-induced transactivation of frameshifting may be a widely used mechanism, potentially including previously undiscovered viral strategies to regulate viral gene expression and/or modulate host cell translation upon infection. PMID:24825891

  10. RNA dimerization plays a role in ribosomal frameshifting of the SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Daniella; Plant, Ewan P; Sims, Amy C; Yount, Boyd L; Roth, Braden M; Eldho, Nadukkudy V; Pérez-Alvarado, Gabriela C; Armbruster, David W; Baric, Ralph S; Dinman, Jonathan D; Taylor, Deborah R; Hennig, Mirko

    2013-02-01

    Messenger RNA encoded signals that are involved in programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) are typically two-stemmed hairpin (H)-type pseudoknots (pks). We previously described an unusual three-stemmed pseudoknot from the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV) that stimulated -1 PRF. The conserved existence of a third stem-loop suggested an important hitherto unknown function. Here we present new information describing structure and function of the third stem of the SARS pseudoknot. We uncovered RNA dimerization through a palindromic sequence embedded in the SARS-CoV Stem 3. Further in vitro analysis revealed that SARS-CoV RNA dimers assemble through 'kissing' loop-loop interactions. We also show that loop-loop kissing complex formation becomes more efficient at physiological temperature and in the presence of magnesium. When the palindromic sequence was mutated, in vitro RNA dimerization was abolished, and frameshifting was reduced from 15 to 5.7%. Furthermore, the inability to dimerize caused by the silent codon change in Stem 3 of SARS-CoV changed the viral growth kinetics and affected the levels of genomic and subgenomic RNA in infected cells. These results suggest that the homodimeric RNA complex formed by the SARS pseudoknot occurs in the cellular environment and that loop-loop kissing interactions involving Stem 3 modulate -1 PRF and play a role in subgenomic and full-length RNA synthesis.

  11. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

    2014-04-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel • A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension • Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR • New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel • Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions • Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and • An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  12. Alignments of DNA and protein sequences containing frameshift errors.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; Uberbacher, E C

    1996-02-01

    Molecular sequences, like all experimental data, are subject to error. Many current DNA sequencing protocols have very significant error rates and often generate artefactual insertions and deletions of bases (indels) which corrupt the translation of sequences and compromise the detection of protein homologies. The impact of these errors on the utility of molecular sequence data is dependent on the analytic technique used to interpret the data. In the presence of frameshift errors, standard algorithms using six-frame translation can miss important homologies because only subfragments of the correct translation are available in any given frame. We present a new algorithm which can detect and correct frameshift errors in DNA sequences during comparison of translated sequences with protein sequences in the databases. This algorithm can recognize homologous proteins sharing 30% identity even in the presence of a 7% frameshift error rate. Our algorithm uses dynamic programming, producing a guaranteed optimal alignment in the presence of frameshifts, and has a sensitivity equivalent to Smith-Waterman. The computational efficiency of the algorithm is O(nm) where n and m are the sizes of two sequences being compared. The algorithm does not rely on prior knowledge or heuristic rules and performs significantly better than any previously reported method.

  13. The Phenotype of Many Independently Isolated +1 Frameshift Suppressor Mutants Supports a Pivotal Role of the P-Site in Reading Frame Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Gunilla; Nilsson, Kristina; Björk, Glenn R.

    2013-01-01

    The main features of translation are similar in all organisms on this planet and one important feature of it is the way the ribosome maintain the reading frame. We have earlier characterized several bacterial mutants defective in tRNA maturation and found that some of them correct a +1 frameshift mutation; i.e. such mutants possess an error in reading frame maintenance. Based on the analysis of the frameshifting phenotype of such mutants we proposed a pivotal role of the ribosomal grip of the peptidyl-tRNA to maintain the correct reading frame. To test the model in an unbiased way we first isolated many (467) independent mutants able to correct a +1 frameshift mutation and thereafter tested whether or not their frameshifting phenotypes were consistent with the model. These 467+1 frameshift suppressor mutants had alterations in 16 different loci of which 15 induced a defective tRNA by hypo- or hypermodifications or altering its primary sequence. All these alterations of tRNAs induce a frameshift error in the P-site to correct a +1 frameshift mutation consistent with the proposed model. Modifications next to and 3′ of the anticodon (position 37), like 1-methylguanosine, are important for proper reading frame maintenance due to their interactions with components of the ribosomal P-site. Interestingly, two mutants had a defect in a locus (rpsI), which encodes ribosomal protein S9. The C-terminal of this protein contacts position 32–34 of the peptidyl-tRNA and is thus part of the P-site environment. The two rpsI mutants had a C-terminal truncated ribosomal protein S9 that destroys its interaction with the peptidyl-tRNA resulting in +1 shift in the reading frame. The isolation and characterization of the S9 mutants gave strong support of our model that the ribosomal grip of the peptidyl-tRNA is pivotal for the reading frame maintenance. PMID:23593181

  14. A cryptic melibiose transporter gene possessing a frameshift from Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, T; Shimamoto, T; Xu, X J; Okazaki, N; Kawakami, H; Tsuchiya, T

    2001-04-01

    Wild-type Citrobacter freundii cannot grow on melibiose as a sole source of carbon. The melibiose transporter gene melB was cloned from a C. freundii mutant M4 that could utilize melibiose as a sole carbon source. Although the cloned melB gene is closely similar to the melB genes of other bacteria, it is cryptic because of a frameshift mutation. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to construct a functional melB gene by deleting one nucleotide, resulting in the production of an active melibiose transporter. The active MelB transporter could utilize Na(+) and H(+) as coupling cations to melibiose transport. The amino acid sequence of the C. freundii MelB was found to be most similar to those of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli MelB. These facts are consistent with the phylogenetic relationship of bacteria and the cation coupling properties of the melibiose transporters.

  15. Deficient nucleotide excision repair increases base-pair substitutions but decreases TGGC frameshifts induced by methylglyoxal in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Murata-Kamiya, N; Kaji, H; Kasai, H

    1999-06-07

    To investigate the mutation spectrum of a well-known mutagen, methylglyoxal, and the influence of nucleotide excision repair (NER) on methylglyoxal-induced mutations, we treated wild-type and NER-deficient (uvrA or uvrC) Escherichia coli strains with methylglyoxal, and analyzed mutations in the chromosomal lacI gene. In the three strains, the cell death and the mutation frequency increased according to the dose of methylglyoxal added to the culture medium. The frequencies of methylglyoxal-induced base-pair substitutions were higher in the NER-deficient strains than in the wild-type strain, in the presence and absence of mucAB gene. Paradoxically, the frequency of methylglyoxal-induced TGGC frameshifts was higher in the wild-type strain than in the NER-deficient strains. When the methylglyoxal-induced mutation spectra in the presence and absence of mucAB gene are compared, the ratios of base-pair substitutions to frameshifts were increased by the effects of mucAB gene. In the three strains, more than 75% of the base-pair substitutions occurred at G:C sites, independent of the mucAB gene. When the mucAB gene was present, G:C-->T:A transversions were predominant, followed by G:C-->A:T transitions. When the mucAB gene was absent, the predominant mutations differed in the three strains: in the wild-type and uvrC strains, G:C-->A:T transitions were predominant, followed by G:C-->T:A transversions, while in the uvrA strains, G:C-->T:A transversions were predominant, followed by G:C-->A:T transitions. These results suggest that NER may be involved in both the repair and the fixation of methylglyoxal-induced mutations.

  16. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, David Andrew

    2016-10-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • Evaluation and modeling of light water reactor accident tolerant fuel concepts • Status and results of recent TRISO-coated particle fuel irradiations, post-irradiation examinations, high-temperature safety testing to demonstrate the accident performance of this fuel system, and advanced microscopy to improve the understanding of fission product transport in this fuel system. • Improvements in and applications of meso and engineering scale modeling of light water reactor fuel behavior under a range of operating conditions and postulated accidents (e.g., power ramping, loss of coolant accident, and reactivity initiated accidents) using the MARMOT and BISON codes. • Novel measurements of the properties of nuclear (actinide) materials under extreme conditions, (e.g. high pressure, low/high temperatures, high magnetic field) to improve the scientific understanding of these materials. • Modeling reactor pressure vessel behavior using the GRIZZLY code. • New methods using sound to sense temperature inside a reactor core. • Improved experimental capabilities to study the response of fusion reactor materials to a tritium plasma. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at Idaho National Laboratory, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  17. The nucleic acid-binding zinc finger protein of potato virus M is translated by internal initiation as well as by ribosomal frameshifting involving a shifty stop codon and a novel mechanism of P-site slippage.

    PubMed

    Gramstat, A; Prüfer, D; Rohde, W

    1994-09-25

    The genes for the capsid protein CP and the nucleic acid-binding 12K protein (pr12) of potato virus M (PVM) constitute the 3' terminal gene cluster of the PVM RNA genome. Both proteins are presumably translated from a single subgenomic RNA. We have identified two translational strategies operating in pr12 gene expression. Internal initiation at the first and the second AUG codon of the pr12 coding sequence results in the synthesis of the 12K protein. In addition the protein is produced as a CP/12K transframe protein by ribosomal frameshifting. For these studies parts of the CP and pr12 coding sequences including the putative frameshift region were introduced into an internal position of the beta-glucuronidase gene. Mutational analyses in conjunction with in vitro translation experiments identified a homopolymeric string of four adenosine nucleotides which together with a 3' flanking UGA stop codon were required for efficient frameshifting. The signal AAAAUGA is the first frameshift signal with a shifty stop codon to be analyzed in the eukaryotic system. Substitution of the four consecutive adenosine nucleotides by UUUU increased the efficiency of frameshifting, while substitution by GGGG or CCCC dramatically reduced the synthesis of the transframe protein. Also, UAA and UAG could replace the opal stop codon without effect on the frameshifting event, but mutation of UGA to the sense codon UGG inhibited transframe protein formation. These findings suggest that the mechanism of ribosomal frameshifting at the PVM signal is different from the one described by the 'simultaneous slippage' model in that only the string of four adenosine nucleotides represents the slippery sequence involved in a -1 P-site slippage.

  18. An Expanded CAG Repeat in Huntingtin Causes +1 Frameshifting.

    PubMed

    Saffert, Paul; Adamla, Frauke; Schieweck, Rico; Atkins, John F; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-08-26

    Maintenance of triplet decoding is crucial for the expression of functional protein because deviations either into the -1 or +1 reading frames are often non-functional. We report here that expression of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 with expanded CAG repeats, implicated in Huntington pathology, undergoes a sporadic +1 frameshift to generate from the CAG repeat a trans-frame AGC repeat-encoded product. This +1 recoding is exclusively detected in pathological Htt variants, i.e. those with expanded repeats with more than 35 consecutive CAG codons. An atypical +1 shift site, UUC C at the 5' end of CAG repeats, which has some resemblance to the influenza A virus shift site, triggers the +1 frameshifting and is enhanced by the increased propensity of the expanded CAG repeats to form a stem-loop structure. The +1 trans-frame-encoded product can directly influence the aggregation of the parental Htt exon 1.

  19. A nucleotide deletion and frame-shift cause analbuminemia in a Turkish family

    PubMed Central

    Caridi, Gianluca; Gulec, Elif Yilmaz; Campagnoli, Monica; Lugani, Francesca; Onal, Hasan; Kilic, Duzgun; Galliano, Monica; Minchiotti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital analbuminemia is an autosomal recessive disorder, in which albumin, the major blood protein, is present only in a minute amount. The condition is a rare allelic heterogeneous defect, only about seventy cases have been reported worldwide. To date, more than twenty different mutations within the albumin gene have been found to cause the trait. In our continuing study of the molecular genetics of congenital analbuminemia, we report here the clinical and biochemical findings and the mutation analysis of the gene in two Turkish infants. For the molecular analysis, we used our strategy, based on the screening of the gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism, heteroduplex analysis and direct DNA sequencing. The results showed that both patients are homozygous for the deletion of a cytosine residue in exon 5, in a stretch of four cytosines starting from nucleotide position 524 and ending at position 527 (NM_000477.5(ALB):c.527delC). The subsequent frame-shift inserts a stop codon in position 215, markedly reducing the size of the predicted protein product. The parents are both heterozygous for the same mutation, for which we propose the name Erzurum from the city of origin of the family. In conclusion, our results show that in this family congenital analbuminemia is caused by a novel frame-shift/deletion defect, confirm the inheritance of the trait, and contribute to advance our understanding of the molecular basis underlying this condition. PMID:27346974

  20. Position-dependent termination and widespread obligatory frameshifting in Euplotes translation

    SciTech Connect

    Lobanov, Alexei V.; Heaphy, Stephen M.; Turanov, Anton A.; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Pucciarelli, Sandra; Devaraj, Raghul R.; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Klobutcher, Lawrence A.; Atkins, John F.; Miceli, Cristina; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Baranov, Pavel V.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-11-21

    The ribosome can change its reading frame during translation in a process known as programmed ribosomal frameshifting. These rare events are supported by complex mRNA signals. However, we found that the ciliates Euplotes crassus and Euplotes focardii exhibit widespread frameshifting at stop codons. 47 different codons preceding stop signals resulted in either +1 or +2 frameshifts, and +1 frameshifting at AAA was the most frequent. The frameshifts showed unusual plasticity and rapid evolution, and had little influence on translation rates. The proximity of a stop codon to the 3' mRNA end, rather than its occurrence or sequence context, appeared to designate termination. Thus, a ‘stop codon’ is not a sufficient signal for translation termination, and the default function of stop codons in Euplotes is frameshifting, whereas termination is specific to certain mRNA positions and probably requires additional factors.

  1. A Frameshift in CSF2RB Predominant Among Ashkenazi Jews Increases Risk for Crohn's Disease and Reduces Monocyte Signaling via GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ling-Shiang; Villaverde, Nicole; Hui, Ken Y; Mortha, Arthur; Rahman, Adeeb; Levine, Adam P; Haritunians, Talin; Evelyn Ng, Sok Meng; Zhang, Wei; Hsu, Nai-Yun; Facey, Jody-Ann; Luong, Tramy; Fernandez-Hernandez, Heriberto; Li, Dalin; Rivas, Manuel; Schiff, Elena R; Gusev, Alexander; Schumm, L Phillip; Bowen, Beatrice M; Sharma, Yashoda; Ning, Kaida; Remark, Romain; Gnjatic, Sacha; Legnani, Peter; George, James; Sands, Bruce E; Stempak, Joanne M; Datta, Lisa W; Lipka, Seth; Katz, Seymour; Cheifetz, Adam S; Barzilai, Nir; Pontikos, Nikolas; Abraham, Clara; Dubinsky, Marla J; Targan, Stephan; Taylor, Kent; Rotter, Jerome I; Scherl, Ellen J; Desnick, Robert J; Abreu, Maria T; Zhao, Hongyu; Atzmon, Gil; Pe'er, Itsik; Kugathasan, Subra; Hakonarson, Hakon; McCauley, Jacob L; Lencz, Todd; Darvasi, Ariel; Plagnol, Vincent; Silverberg, Mark S; Muise, Aleixo M; Brant, Steven R; Daly, Mark J; Segal, Anthony W; Duerr, Richard H; Merad, Miriam; McGovern, Dermot P B; Peter, Inga; Cho, Judy H

    2016-10-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) has the highest prevalence in Ashkenazi Jewish populations. We sought to identify rare, CD-associated frameshift variants of high functional and statistical effects. We performed exome sequencing and array-based genotype analyses of 1477 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with CD and 2614 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals without CD (controls). To validate our findings, we performed genotype analyses of an additional 1515 CD cases and 7052 controls for frameshift mutations in the colony-stimulating factor 2-receptor β common subunit gene (CSF2RB). Intestinal tissues and blood samples were collected from patients with CD; lamina propria leukocytes were isolated and expression of CSF2RB and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-responsive cells were defined by adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) time-of-flight mass cytometry (CyTOF analysis). Variants of CSF2RB were transfected into HEK293 cells and the expression and functions of gene products were compared. In the discovery cohort, we associated CD with a frameshift mutation in CSF2RB (P = 8.52 × 10(-4)); the finding was validated in the replication cohort (combined P = 3.42 × 10(-6)). Incubation of intestinal lamina propria leukocytes with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor resulted in high levels of phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT5) and lesser increases in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AK straining transforming (AKT). Cells co-transfected with full-length and mutant forms of CSF2RB had reduced pSTAT5 after stimulation with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, compared with cells transfected with control CSF2RB, indicating a dominant-negative effect of the mutant gene. Monocytes from patients with CD who were heterozygous for the frameshift mutation (6% of CD cases analyzed) had reduced responses to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and markedly decreased activity of

  2. Role of a tRNA base modification and its precursors in frameshifting in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Waas, William F; Druzina, Zhanna; Hanan, Melanie; Schimmel, Paul

    2007-09-07

    Little is known about the role of specific base modifications of transfer RNAs. Wyosine bases are tRNA(Phe)-specific modifications that are distinguished by differentiated, lateral side chains and base methylations appended to the core ring structure of a universally conserved G37, adjacent to the anticodon of Phe tRNAs. Based on previous data, we hypothesized that this modification was needed for -1 frameshifting. Using a reporter system incorporating a SCV-LA yeast virus slippery site for detecting -1 frameshifts in vivo, yeast strains were created that enabled chemical-genetic dissection of the role of different functional groups of wyebutosine that are added in a three-step post-transcriptional set of reactions. With this system, hypomodification increased Phe-specific frameshifting, with incremental changes in frameshift efficiency after specific intermediates in the progression of wyebutosine synthesis. These data combined with investigations of wild-type and hypomodified tRNA binding to ribosomes suggest that frameshift efficiency is kinetically and not thermodynamically controlled. The progressive nature of frameshift efficiency with the stage of modification is consistent with a stepwise evolution and tuning of frameshift potential. The stepwise tuning of frameshift efficiency could explain why tRNA(Phe) in some eukaryotes is not fully modified but, rather, hypomodified to capture a specific frameshift potential.

  3. Ribosomal frameshifting and dual-target antiactivation restrict quorum-sensing-activated transfer of a mobile genetic element.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Joshua P; Tester, Laura G L; Major, Anthony S; Sullivan, John T; Edgar, Christina D; Kleffmann, Torsten; Patterson-House, Jackson R; Hall, Drew A; Tate, Warren P; Hynes, Michael F; Ronson, Clive W

    2015-03-31

    Symbiosis islands are integrative and conjugative mobile genetic elements that convert nonsymbiotic rhizobia into nitrogen-fixing symbionts of leguminous plants. Excision of the Mesorhizobium loti symbiosis island ICEMlSym(R7A) is indirectly activated by quorum sensing through TraR-dependent activation of the excisionase gene rdfS. Here we show that a +1 programmed ribosomal frameshift (PRF) fuses the coding sequences of two TraR-activated genes, msi172 and msi171, producing an activator of rdfS expression named Frameshifted excision activator (FseA). Mass-spectrometry and mutational analyses indicated that the PRF occurred through +1 slippage of the tRNA(phe) from UUU to UUC within a conserved msi172-encoded motif. FseA activated rdfS expression in the absence of ICEMlSym(R7A), suggesting that it directly activated rdfS transcription, despite being unrelated to any characterized DNA-binding proteins. Bacterial two-hybrid and gene-reporter assays demonstrated that FseA was also bound and inhibited by the ICEMlSym(R7A)-encoded quorum-sensing antiactivator QseM. Thus, activation of ICEMlSym(R7A) excision is counteracted by TraR antiactivation, ribosomal frameshifting, and FseA antiactivation. This robust suppression likely dampens the inherent biological noise present in the quorum-sensing autoinduction circuit and ensures that ICEMlSym(R7A) transfer only occurs in a subpopulation of cells in which both qseM expression is repressed and FseA is translated. The architecture of the ICEMlSym(R7A) transfer regulatory system provides an example of how a set of modular components have assembled through evolution to form a robust genetic toggle that regulates gene transcription and translation at both single-cell and cell-population levels.

  4. Ribosomal frameshifting and dual-target antiactivation restrict quorum-sensing–activated transfer of a mobile genetic element

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Joshua P.; Tester, Laura G. L.; Major, Anthony S.; Sullivan, John T.; Edgar, Christina D.; Kleffmann, Torsten; Patterson-House, Jackson R.; Hall, Drew A.; Tate, Warren P.; Hynes, Michael F.; Ronson, Clive W.

    2015-01-01

    Symbiosis islands are integrative and conjugative mobile genetic elements that convert nonsymbiotic rhizobia into nitrogen-fixing symbionts of leguminous plants. Excision of the Mesorhizobium loti symbiosis island ICEMlSymR7A is indirectly activated by quorum sensing through TraR-dependent activation of the excisionase gene rdfS. Here we show that a +1 programmed ribosomal frameshift (PRF) fuses the coding sequences of two TraR-activated genes, msi172 and msi171, producing an activator of rdfS expression named Frameshifted excision activator (FseA). Mass-spectrometry and mutational analyses indicated that the PRF occurred through +1 slippage of the tRNAphe from UUU to UUC within a conserved msi172-encoded motif. FseA activated rdfS expression in the absence of ICEMlSymR7A, suggesting that it directly activated rdfS transcription, despite being unrelated to any characterized DNA-binding proteins. Bacterial two-hybrid and gene-reporter assays demonstrated that FseA was also bound and inhibited by the ICEMlSymR7A-encoded quorum-sensing antiactivator QseM. Thus, activation of ICEMlSymR7A excision is counteracted by TraR antiactivation, ribosomal frameshifting, and FseA antiactivation. This robust suppression likely dampens the inherent biological noise present in the quorum-sensing autoinduction circuit and ensures that ICEMlSymR7A transfer only occurs in a subpopulation of cells in which both qseM expression is repressed and FseA is translated. The architecture of the ICEMlSymR7A transfer regulatory system provides an example of how a set of modular components have assembled through evolution to form a robust genetic toggle that regulates gene transcription and translation at both single-cell and cell-population levels. PMID:25787256

  5. KRIT1 mutations in three Japanese pedigrees with hereditary cavernous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Kengo; Akagawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Asami; Oka, Hideki; Hino, Akihiko; Mitsuyama, Tetsuryu; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Onda, Hideaki; Kawamata, Takakazu; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation is a neurovascular abnormality that can cause seizures, focal neurological deficits and intracerebral hemorrhage. Familial forms of this condition are characterized by de novo formation of multiple lesions and are autosomal-dominantly inherited via CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10 mutations. We identified three truncating mutations in KRIT1 from three Japanese families with CCMs: a novel frameshift mutation, a known frameshift mutation and a known splice-site mutation that had not been previously analyzed for aberrant splicing. PMID:27766163

  6. KRIT1 mutations in three Japanese pedigrees with hereditary cavernous malformation.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kengo; Akagawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Asami; Oka, Hideki; Hino, Akihiko; Mitsuyama, Tetsuryu; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Onda, Hideaki; Kawamata, Takakazu; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation is a neurovascular abnormality that can cause seizures, focal neurological deficits and intracerebral hemorrhage. Familial forms of this condition are characterized by de novo formation of multiple lesions and are autosomal-dominantly inherited via CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10 mutations. We identified three truncating mutations in KRIT1 from three Japanese families with CCMs: a novel frameshift mutation, a known frameshift mutation and a known splice-site mutation that had not been previously analyzed for aberrant splicing.

  7. Dystrophin in frameshift deletion patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, S.B.; Ray, P.N.; Worton, R.G.; Sherratt, T.G.; Heckmatt, J.Z.; Dubowitz, V.; Strong, P.N.; Miller, G. ); Shokeir, M. )

    1992-09-01

    In a previous study the authors identified 14 cases with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or its milder variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), with a deletion of exons 3-7, a deletion that would be expected to shift the translational reading frame of the mRNA and give a severe phenotype. They have examined dystrophin and its mRNA from muscle biopsies of seven cases with either mild or intermediate phenotypes. In all cases they detected slightly lower-molecular-weight dystrophin in 12%-15% abundance relative to the normal. By sequencing amplified mRNA they have found that exon 2 is spliced to exon 8, a splice that produces a frameshifted mRNA, and have found no evidence for alternate splicing that might be involved in restoration of dystrophin mRNA reading frame in the patients with a mild phenotype. Other transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms such as cryptic promoter, ribosomal frameshifting, and reinitiation are suggested that might play some role in restoring the reading frame. 34 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  8. Fluorescent T7 display phages obtained by translational frameshift

    PubMed Central

    Slootweg, Erik J.; Keller, Hans J.H.G.; Hink, Mark A.; Borst, Jan Willem; Bakker, Jaap; Schots, Arjen

    2006-01-01

    Lytic phages form a powerful platform for the display of large cDNA libraries and offer the possibility to screen for interactions with almost any substrate. To visualize these interactions directly by fluorescence microscopy, we constructed fluorescent T7 phages by exploiting the flexibility of phages to incorporate modified versions of its capsid protein. By applying translational frameshift sequences, helper plasmids were constructed that expressed a fixed ratio of both wild-type capsid protein (gp10) and capsid protein fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP). The frameshift sequences were inserted between the 3′ end of the capsid gene and the sequence encoding EYFP. Fluorescent fusion proteins are only formed when the ribosome makes a −1 shift in reading frame during translation. Using standard fluorescence microscopy, we could sensitively monitor the enrichment of specific binders in a cDNA library displayed on fluorescent T7 phages. The perspectives of fluorescent display phages in the fast emerging field of single molecule detection and sorting technologies are discussed. PMID:17040895

  9. A frameshift error detection algorithm for DNA sequencing projects.

    PubMed Central

    Fichant, G A; Quentin, Y

    1995-01-01

    During the determination of DNA sequences, frameshift errors are not the most frequent but they are the most bothersome as they corrupt the amino acid sequence over several residues. Detection of such errors by sequence alignment is only possible when related sequences are found in the databases. To avoid this limitation, we have developed a new tool based on the distribution of non-overlapping 3-tuples or 6-tuples in the three frames of an ORF. The method relies upon the result of a correspondence analysis. It has been extensively tested on Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae sequences and has also been examined with human sequences. The results indicate that it can detect frameshift errors affecting as few as 20 bp with a low rate of false positives (no more than 1.0/1000 bp scanned). The proposed algorithm can be used to scan a large collection of data, but it is mainly intended for laboratory practice as a tool for checking the quality of the sequences produced during a sequencing project. PMID:7659513

  10. Identification of programmed translational -1 frameshifting sites in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bekaert, Michaël; Richard, Hugues; Prum, Bernard; Rousset, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Frameshifting is a recoding event that allows the expression of two polypeptides from the same mRNA molecule. Most recoding events described so far are used by viruses and transposons to express their replicase protein. The very few number of cellular proteins known to be expressed by a -1 ribosomal frameshifting has been identified by chance. The goal of the present work was to set up a systematic strategy, based on complementary bioinformatics, molecular biology, and functional approaches, without a priori knowledge of the mechanism involved. Two independent methods were devised. The first looks for genomic regions in which two ORFs, each carrying a protein pattern, are in a frameshifted arrangement. The second uses Hidden Markov Models and likelihood in a two-step approach. When this strategy was applied to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, 189 candidate regions were found, of which 58 were further functionally investigated. Twenty-eight of them expressed a full-length mRNA covering the two ORFs, and 11 showed a -1 frameshift efficiency varying from 5% to 13% (50-fold higher than background), some of which corresponds to genes with known functions. From other ascomycetes, four frameshifted ORFs are found fully conserved. Strikingly, most of the candidates do not display a classical viral-like frameshift signal and would have escaped a search based on current models of frameshifting. These results strongly suggest that -1 frameshifting might be more widely distributed than previously thought. PMID:16204194

  11. Identification of programmed translational -1 frameshifting sites in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bekaert, Michaël; Richard, Hugues; Prum, Bernard; Rousset, Jean-Pierre

    2005-10-01

    Frameshifting is a recoding event that allows the expression of two polypeptides from the same mRNA molecule. Most recoding events described so far are used by viruses and transposons to express their replicase protein. The very few number of cellular proteins known to be expressed by a -1 ribosomal frameshifting has been identified by chance. The goal of the present work was to set up a systematic strategy, based on complementary bioinformatics, molecular biology, and functional approaches, without a priori knowledge of the mechanism involved. Two independent methods were devised. The first looks for genomic regions in which two ORFs, each carrying a protein pattern, are in a frameshifted arrangement. The second uses Hidden Markov Models and likelihood in a two-step approach. When this strategy was applied to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, 189 candidate regions were found, of which 58 were further functionally investigated. Twenty-eight of them expressed a full-length mRNA covering the two ORFs, and 11 showed a -1 frameshift efficiency varying from 5% to 13% (50-fold higher than background), some of which corresponds to genes with known functions. From other ascomycetes, four frameshifted ORFs are found fully conserved. Strikingly, most of the candidates do not display a classical viral-like frameshift signal and would have escaped a search based on current models of frameshifting. These results strongly suggest that -1 frameshifting might be more widely distributed than previously thought.

  12. An analysis by metabolic labelling of the encephalomyocarditis virus ribosomal frameshifting efficiency and stimulators.

    PubMed

    Ling, Roger; Firth, Andrew E

    2017-08-01

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting is a mechanism of gene expression whereby specific signals within messenger RNAs direct a proportion of ribosomes to shift -1 nt and continue translating in the new reading frame. Such frameshifting normally depends on an RNA structure stimulator 3'-adjacent to a 'slippery' heptanucleotide shift site sequence. Recently we identified an unusual frameshifting mechanism in encephalomyocarditis virus, where the stimulator involves a trans-acting virus protein. Thus, in contrast to other examples of -1 frameshifting, the efficiency of frameshifting in encephalomyocarditis virus is best studied in the context of virus infection. Here we use metabolic labelling to analyse the frameshifting efficiency of wild-type and mutant viruses. Confirming previous results, frameshifting depends on a G_GUU_UUU shift site sequence and a 3'-adjacent stem-loop structure, but is not appreciably affected by the 'StopGo' sequence present ~30 nt upstream. At late timepoints, frameshifting was estimated to be 46-76 % efficient.

  13. Sequencing of Random Euplotes crassus Macronuclear Genes Supports a High Frequency of +1 Translational Frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Klobutcher, Lawrence A.

    2005-01-01

    Programmed translational frameshifts have been identified in genes from a broad range of organisms, but typically only a very few genes in a given organism require a frameshift for expression. In contrast, a recent analysis of gene sequences available in GenBank from ciliates in the genus Euplotes indicated that >5% required one or more +1 translational frameshifts to produce their predicted protein products. However, this sample of genes was nonrandom, biased, and derived from multiple Euplotes species. To test whether there truly is an abundance of frameshift genes in Euplotes, and to more accurately assess their frequency, we sequenced a random sample of 25 cloned genes/macronuclear DNA molecules from Euplotes crassus. Three new candidate +1 frameshift genes were identified in the sample that encode a membrane occupation and recognition nexus (MORN) repeat protein, a C2H2-type zinc finger protein, and a Ser/Thr protein kinase. Reverse transcription-PCR analyses indicate that all three genes are expressed in vegetatively proliferating cells and that the mRNAs retain the requirement of a frameshift. Although the sample of sequenced genes is relatively small, the results indicate that the frequency of genes requiring frameshifts in E. crassus is between 3.7% and 31.7% (at a 95% confidence interval). The current and past data also indicate that frameshift sites are found predominantly in genes that likely encode nonabundant proteins in the cell. PMID:16339727

  14. Chaperonopathies: Spotlight on Hereditary Motor Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Vincenzo; Aguado, Carmen; Knecht, Erwin; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN) are a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by an atrophy that affects peroneal muscles in the absence of sensory symptoms. To date, 23 genes are thought to be responsible for dHMN, four of which encode chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family; and HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8, encoding three members of the small heat shock protein family. While around 30 different mutations in HSPB1 have been identified, the remaining three genes are altered in many fewer cases. Indeed, a mutation of HSPB3 has only been described in one case, whereas a few cases have been reported carrying mutations in DNAJB2 and HSPB8, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the K141 residue in the HSPB8 chaperone. Hence, their rare occurrence makes it difficult to understand the pathological mechanisms driven by such mutations in this neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble into multi-chaperone complexes that form an integrated chaperone network within the cell. Such complexes fulfill relevant roles in a variety of processes, such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, in which chaperones escort them to precise cellular locations, and as a response to protein misfolding, which includes the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite this range of functions, mutations in some of these chaperones lead to diseases with a similar clinical profile, suggesting common pathways. This review provides an overview of the genetics of those dHMNs that share a common disease mechanism and that are caused by mutations in four genes encoding chaperones: DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8. PMID:28018906

  15. Chaperonopathies: Spotlight on Hereditary Motor Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Vincenzo; Aguado, Carmen; Knecht, Erwin; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN) are a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by an atrophy that affects peroneal muscles in the absence of sensory symptoms. To date, 23 genes are thought to be responsible for dHMN, four of which encode chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family; and HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8, encoding three members of the small heat shock protein family. While around 30 different mutations in HSPB1 have been identified, the remaining three genes are altered in many fewer cases. Indeed, a mutation of HSPB3 has only been described in one case, whereas a few cases have been reported carrying mutations in DNAJB2 and HSPB8, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the K141 residue in the HSPB8 chaperone. Hence, their rare occurrence makes it difficult to understand the pathological mechanisms driven by such mutations in this neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble into multi-chaperone complexes that form an integrated chaperone network within the cell. Such complexes fulfill relevant roles in a variety of processes, such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, in which chaperones escort them to precise cellular locations, and as a response to protein misfolding, which includes the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite this range of functions, mutations in some of these chaperones lead to diseases with a similar clinical profile, suggesting common pathways. This review provides an overview of the genetics of those dHMNs that share a common disease mechanism and that are caused by mutations in four genes encoding chaperones: DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8.

  16. New England after 3 PM: Spotlight on Connecticut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Spotlight on Connecticut" is the second installment in "New England After 3 PM". The first release in May 2006 took a look at afterschool across the region with a special focus on Massachusetts. Additional reports focusing on other states in the region will follow. For this report, the Afterschool Alliance worked with the…

  17. Spotlight on General Music: Teaching Toward the Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    General music teachers at all levels--elementary, middle school, and high school--will find ideas, suggestions, and lesson plans for teaching to the National Standards in this new addition to the popular Spotlight series. It includes sections on teaching each of the nine standards, as well as chapters about secondary general music, assessment, and…

  18. Early Childhood Teacher Institutions Listed. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Early Development & Learning, Chapel Hill, NC.

    This issue of the NCEDL Spotlights series announces the availability of a national directory of institutions offering programs for early childhood teachers, "The National Directory of Early Childhood Teacher Preparation Institutions," published by NCEDL and the Council for Professional Recognition. The directory contains listings for…

  19. Early Childhood Support Structure Is Proposed. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Early Development & Learning, Chapel Hill, NC.

    Noting that young children under age five are still without comprehensive public policies to protect or enhance their status, this issue of the NCEDL Spotlights excerpts an article proposing a quality support system for early childhood education programs. The components of a quality support system are highlighted: (1) personnel preparation; (2)…

  20. Spotlight on General Music: Teaching Toward the Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    General music teachers at all levels--elementary, middle school, and high school--will find ideas, suggestions, and lesson plans for teaching to the National Standards in this new addition to the popular Spotlight series. It includes sections on teaching each of the nine standards, as well as chapters about secondary general music, assessment, and…

  1. Ribosomal frameshifting in plants: a novel signal directs the -1 frameshift in the synthesis of the putative viral replicase of potato leafroll luteovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Prüfer, D; Tacke, E; Schmitz, J; Kull, B; Kaufmann, A; Rohde, W

    1992-01-01

    The 5.8 kb RNA genome of potato leafroll luteovirus (PLRV) contains two overlapping open reading frames, ORF2a and ORF2b, which are characterized by helicase and RNA polymerase motifs, respectively, and possibly represent the viral replicase. Within the overlap, ORF2b lacks an AUG translational start codon and is therefore presumably translated by -1 ribosomal frameshifting as a transframe protein with ORF2a. This hypothesis was studied by introducing the putative frameshift region into an internal position of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene and testing for the occurrence of frameshifting in vivo by transient expression of GUS activity in potato protoplasts as well as in vitro by translation in the reticulocyte system. Both experimental approaches demonstrate that a -1 frameshift occurs at a frequency of approximately 1%. Site-directed mutagenesis identified the frameshift region and the involvement of the novel heptanucleotide motif UUUAAAU in conjunction with an adjacent stem-loop structure. Part of this stem-loop encodes a basic region in the ORF2b moiety of the transframe protein which was shown by binding experiments with PLRV RNA to represent a nucleic acid-binding domain. These data support a possible biological significance of the frameshift to occur at this position of the large overlap by including the putative RNA template-binding site of the PLRV replicase in the ORF2a/ORF2b transframe protein. Images PMID:1547775

  2. Activity Suppression Behavior Phenotype in SULT4A1 Frameshift Mutant Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Frank; Thomas, Holly R.; Parant, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Since its identification in 2000, sulfotransferase (SULT) 4A1 has presented an enigma to the field of cytosolic SULT biology. SULT4A1 is exclusively expressed in neural tissue, is highly conserved, and has been identified in every vertebrate studied to date. Despite this singular level of conservation, no substrate or function for SULT4A1 has been identified. Previous studies demonstrated that SULT4A1 does not bind the obligate sulfate donor, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, yet SULT4A1 is classified as a SULT superfamily member based on sequence and structural similarities to the other SULTs. In this study, transcription activator-like effector nucleases were used to generate heritable mutations in the SULT4A1 gene of zebrafish. The mutation (SULT4A1Δ8) consists of an 8-nucleotide deletion within the second exon of the gene, resulting in a frameshift mutation and premature stop codon after 132 AA. During early adulthood, casual observations were made that mutant zebrafish were exhibiting excessively sedentary behavior during the day. These observations were inconsistent with published reports on activity in zebrafish that are largely diurnal organisms and are highly active during the day. Thus, a decrease in activity during the day represents an abnormal behavior and warranted further systematic analysis. EthoVision video tracking software was used to monitor activity levels in wild-type (WT) and SULT4A1Δ8/Δ8 fish over 48 hours of a normal light/dark cycle. SULT4A1Δ8/Δ8 fish were shown to exhibit increased inactivity bout length and frequency as well as a general decrease in daytime activity levels when compared with their WT counterparts. PMID:25934576

  3. Mechanism for N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene-induced frameshift mutagenesis by Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment).

    PubMed

    Gill, Joshua P; Romano, Louis J

    2005-11-22

    N-Acetyl-2-aminofluorene (AAF) is a chemical carcinogen that reacts with guanines at the C8 position in DNA to form a structure that interferes with DNA replication. In bacteria, the NarI restriction enzyme recognition sequence (G1G2CG3CC) is a very strong mutational hot spot when an AAF adduct is positioned at G3 of this sequence, causing predominantly a -2 frameshift GC dinucleotide deletion mutation. In this study, templates were constructed that contained an AAF adduct at this position, and primers of different lengths were prepared such that the primer ended one nucleotide before or opposite or one nucleotide after the adduct site. Primer extension and gel shift binding assays were used to study the mechanism of bypass by the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) in the presence of these templates. Primer extension in the presence of all four dNTPs produced a fully extended product using the unmodified template, while with the AAF-modified template synthesis initially stalled at the adduct site and subsequent synthesis resulted in a product that contained the GC dinucleotide deletion. Extension product and gel shift binding analyses were consistent with the formation of a two-nucleotide bulge structure upstream of the active site of the polymerase after a nucleotide is incorporated across from the adduct. These data support a model in which the AAF adduct in the NarI sequence specifically induces a structure upstream of the polymerase active site that leads to the GC frameshift mutation and that it is this structure that allows synthesis past the adduct to occur.

  4. High frequency strand slippage mutations in CTCF in MSI-positive endometrial cancers.

    PubMed

    Zighelboim, Israel; Mutch, David G; Knapp, Amy; Ding, Li; Xie, Mingchao; Cohn, David E; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Tumors with defective mismatch repair acquire large numbers of strand slippage mutations including frameshifts in coding sequence repeats. We identified a mutational hotspot, p.T204fs, in the insulator-binding protein (CTCF) in MSI-positive endometrial cancers. Although CTCF was described as a significantly mutated gene by the endometrial cancer TCGA, the A₇ track variants leading to T204 frameshifts were not reported. Reanalysis of TCGA data using Pindel revealed frequent T204fs mutations, confirming CTCF is an MSI target gene and revealed the same frameshifts in tumors with intact mismatch repair. We show that T204fs transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay and as such, T204fs mutations are unlikely to act as dominant negatives. The spectrum and pattern of mutations observed is consistent with CTCF acting as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor.

  5. Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by a Novel Frameshift in the BAG3 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo-Arlandi, Javier; Allegue, Catarina; Iglesias, Anna; Mangas, Alipio; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy, a major cause of chronic heart failure and cardiac transplantation, is characterized by left ventricular or biventricular heart dilatation. In nearly 50% of cases the pathology is inherited, and more than 60 genes have been reported as disease-causing. However, in 30% of familial cases the mutation remains unidentified even after comprehensive genetic analysis. This study clinically and genetically assessed a large Spanish family affected by dilated cardiomyopathy to search for novel variations. Methods and Results Our study included a total of 100 family members. Clinical assessment was performed in alive, and genetic analysis was also performed in alive and 1 deceased relative. Genetic screening included resequencing of 55 genes associated with sudden cardiac death, and Sanger sequencing of main disease-associated genes. Genetic analysis identified a frame-shift variation in BAG3 (p.H243Tfr*64) in 32 patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation identified substantial heterogeneity in disease expression. Of 32 genetic carriers (one deceased), 21 relatives were clinically affected, and 10 were asymptomatic. Seventeen of the symptomatic genetic carriers exhibited proto-diastolic septal knock by echocardiographic assessment. Conclusions We report p.H243Tfr*64_BAG3 as a novel pathogenic variation responsible for familial dilated cardiomyopathy. This variation correlates with a more severe phenotype of the disease, mainly in younger individuals. Genetic analysis in families, even asymptomatic individuals, enables early identification of individuals at risk and allows implementation of preventive measures. PMID:27391596

  6. Crystal Structure of a Luteoviral RNA Pseudoknot and Model for a Minimal Ribosomal Frameshifting Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; Marshall, William S.; Harp, Joel; Jewett III, Frederic C.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Brown II, Bernard A.; Rich, Alexander; Egli, Martin

    2010-03-08

    To understand the role of structural elements of RNA pseudoknots in controlling the extent of -1-type ribosomal frameshifting, we determined the crystal structure of a high-efficiency frameshifting mutant of the pseudoknot from potato leaf roll virus (PLRV). Correlations of the structure with available in vitro frameshifting data for PLRV pseudoknot mutants implicate sequence and length of a stem-loop linker as modulators of frameshifting efficiency. Although the sequences and overall structures of the RNA pseudoknots from PLRV and beet western yellow virus (BWYV) are similar, nucleotide deletions in the linker and adjacent minor groove loop abolish frameshifting only with the latter. Conversely, mutant PLRV pseudoknots with up to four nucleotides deleted in this region exhibit nearly wild-type frameshifting efficiencies. The crystal structure helps rationalize the different tolerances for deletions in the PLRV and BWYV RNAs, and we have used it to build a three-dimensional model of the PRLV pseudoknot with a four-nucleotide deletion. The resulting structure defines a minimal RNA pseudoknot motif composed of 22 nucleotides capable of stimulating -1-type ribosomal frameshifts.

  7. Mutational spectrum of ICR-191 at the hprt locus in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Taft, S A; Liber, H L; Skopek, T R

    1994-01-01

    Human TK6 lymphoblasts were treated with the acridine derivative ICR-191, and mutants at the hprt locus were isolated. Mutant hprt cDNA was reverse-transcribed from mRNA, amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and sequenced. Additions of single G:C base pairs (+1 frameshift mutations) in repetitive G:C sequences were found in 82% (32/39) of the mutants. Sixteen of the +1 frameshifts analyzed were located in a single sequence of six consecutive guanine bases in exon 3. The remaining +1 frameshifts occurred at six different GGG sequences (14 mutants) and a single GGGG sequence (2 mutants) in other hprt exons. The repetitive guanine sequences that underwent frameshift mutagenesis were located in both the transcribed and nontranscribed strands of hprt. No single base deletions (-1 frameshift mutations) were observed. Base substitutions were observed in 13% (5/39) of the clones analyzed and occurred at both G:C and A:T bases. Loss of exon 4 from the cDNA was also observed in 5% (2/39) of the mutants. Hprt mutants containing seven consecutive guanines (produced from a +1 frameshift in a GGGGGG sequence) were treated with ICR-191 and wild-type revertants selected in CHAT medium. Revertants were recovered at a frequency of approximately 10(-7) and contained the wild-type sequence (GGGGGG) in all clones analyzed. The observed frequency of ICR-191-induced-1 frameshift reversion in the GGGGGGG sequence was approximately 500-fold lower than the estimated frequency of +1 frameshifts observed in the wild-type GGGGGG sequence following the same ICR-191 treatment. These results suggest that ICR-191 produces predominantly +1 frameshift mutations at the hprt locus in human cells.

  8. A Mild Form of SLC29A3 Disorder: A Frameshift Deletion Leads to the Paradoxical Translation of an Otherwise Noncoding mRNA Splice Variant

    PubMed Central

    Bolze, Alexandre; Abhyankar, Avinash; Grant, Audrey V.; Patel, Bhavi; Yadav, Ruchi; Byun, Minji; Caillez, Daniel; Emile, Jean-Francois; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Abel, Laurent; Puel, Anne; Govindarajan, Rajgopal; de Pontual, Loic; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    We investigated two siblings with granulomatous histiocytosis prominent in the nasal area, mimicking rhinoscleroma and Rosai-Dorfman syndrome. Genome-wide linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous frameshift deletion in SLC29A3, which encodes human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-3 (hENT3). Germline mutations in SLC29A3 have been reported in rare patients with a wide range of overlapping clinical features and inherited disorders including H syndrome, pigmented hypertrichosis with insulin-dependent diabetes, and Faisalabad histiocytosis. With the exception of insulin-dependent diabetes and mild finger and toe contractures in one sibling, the two patients with nasal granulomatous histiocytosis studied here displayed none of the many SLC29A3-associated phenotypes. This mild clinical phenotype probably results from a remarkable genetic mechanism. The SLC29A3 frameshift deletion prevents the expression of the normally coding transcripts. It instead leads to the translation, expression, and function of an otherwise noncoding, out-of-frame mRNA splice variant lacking exon 3 that is eliminated by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in healthy individuals. The mutated isoform differs from the wild-type hENT3 by the modification of 20 residues in exon 2 and the removal of another 28 amino acids in exon 3, which include the second transmembrane domain. As a result, this new isoform displays some functional activity. This mechanism probably accounts for the narrow and mild clinical phenotype of the patients. This study highlights the ‘rescue’ role played by a normally noncoding mRNA splice variant of SLC29A3, uncovering a new mechanism by which frameshift mutations can be hypomorphic. PMID:22238637

  9. Characterization of six novel mutations in CYBA: the gene causing autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Teimourian, Shahram; Zomorodian, Elham; Badalzadeh, Mohsen; Pouya, Alireza; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Mansouri, Davood; Cheraghi, Taher; Parvaneh, Nima

    2008-06-01

    One of the rarest forms of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is caused by mutations in CYBA, which encodes the p22-phox subunit of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase, leading to defective intracellular killing. This study investigated eight patients (six males and two females) from seven consanguineous, unrelated families with clinical CGD, positive family history and p22-phox deficiency. Mutation analysis of CYBA showed six different novel mutations: deletion of exons 3, 4 and 5; a missense mutation in exon 6 (c.373G>A); a splice site mutation in intron 5 (c.369+1G>A); a frameshift in exon 6 (c.385delGAGC); a frameshift in exon 3 (c.174delG); and a frameshift in exon 4 (c.223delC).

  10. Generalized energy-aperture product limit for multi-beam and spotlight SARs

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, T.J.

    1995-12-21

    The SAR energy-aperture product limit is extended to multi-beam SARS, Spotlight and moving spotlight SARS. This fundamental limit bounds the tradeoff between energy and antenna size. The kinematic relations between design variables such as platform speed, pulse repetition frequency, beam width and area rate are analyzed in a unified framework applicable to a wide variety of SARs including strip maps, spotlights, vermer arrays and multi-beam SARS, both scanning and swept-beam. Then the energy-aperture product limit is derived from the signal-to noise requirement and the kinematic constraints. The derivation clarifies impact of multiple beams and spotlighting on SAR performance.

  11. Spotlight-mode incoherently synthetic aperture imaging ladar: fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liren

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, a concept of spotlight-mode incoherently-synthetic aperture imaging ladar (SAIL) is proposed on the basis of computer tomography (CT). This incoherent SAIL has three operations of conventional, inverse and CT spotlight-modes with two sensing techniques of range and Doppler resolutions, and supplies a variety of dimensional transformations for 2-D range- and Doppler-resolved imaging of 2-D objects and for 3-D range-resolved imaging or in the depth compressed 2-D range- and Doppler-resolved imaging of 3-D objects. Due to the simplification in both the construction and the algorithm the difficulties in the signal collection and data processing are importantly relaxed. The incoherent SAIL provides a great potential for applications in the extensive fields. The paper gives the detailed analysis.

  12. Rate allocation for spotlight SAR phase history data compression.

    PubMed

    Owens, J W; Marcellin, M W

    1999-01-01

    Complex phase history data in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems require extensive processing before useful images can be obtained. In spotlight mode SAR systems, useful images can be obtained by applying aperture weighting and inverse Fourier transform operations to SAR phase history data. In this paper, we are concerned with the compression of the complex phase history data obtained by a spotlight SAR system. We exploit knowledge of the aperture weighting function along with Fourier transform processing to attach a "gain" factor to each complex phase history data sample. This gain factor is then used to efficiently allocate bits to the phase history data during quantization. Performance evaluations are presented for this compression system relative to other existing SAR phase history data compression systems.

  13. HIV-1 and Human PEG10 Frameshift Elements Are Functionally Distinct and Distinguished by Novel Small Molecule Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Sleebs, Brad E.; Lackovic, Kurt; Parisot, John P.; Moss, Rebecca M.; Crowe-McAuliffe, Caillan; Mathew, Suneeth F.; Edgar, Christina D.; Kleffmann, Torsten; Tate, Warren P.

    2015-01-01

    Frameshifting during translation of viral or in rare cases cellular mRNA results in the synthesis of proteins from two overlapping reading frames within the same mRNA. In HIV-1 the protease, reverse transcriptase, and integrase enzymes are in a second reading frame relative to the structural group-specific antigen (gag), and their synthesis is dependent upon frameshifting. This ensures that a strictly regulated ratio of structural proteins and enzymes, which is critical for HIV-1 replication and viral infectivity, is maintained during protein synthesis. The frameshift element in HIV-1 RNA is an attractive target for the development of a new class of anti HIV-1 drugs. However, a number of examples are now emerging of human genes using −1 frameshifting, such as PEG10 and CCR5. In this study we have compared the HIV-1 and PEG10 frameshift elements and shown they have distinct functional characteristics. Frameshifting occurs at several points within each element. Moreover, frameshift modulators that were isolated by high-throughput screening of a library of 114,000 lead-like compounds behaved differently with the PEG10 frameshift element. The most effective compounds affecting the HIV-1 element enhanced frameshifting by 2.5-fold at 10 μM in two different frameshift reporter assay systems. HIV-1 protease:gag protein ratio was affected by a similar amount in a specific assay of virally-infected cultured cell, but the modulation of frameshifting of the first-iteration compounds was not sufficient to show significant effects on viral infectivity. Importantly, two compounds did not affect frameshifting with the human PEG10 element, while one modestly inhibited rather than enhanced frameshifting at the human element. These studies indicate that frameshift elements have unique characteristics that may allow targeting of HIV-1 and of other viruses specifically for development of antiviral therapeutic molecules without effect on human genes like PEG10 that use the same

  14. Millimeter-wave spotlight imager using dynamic holographic metasurface antennas.

    PubMed

    Yurduseven, Okan; Marks, Daniel L; Fromenteze, Thomas; Gollub, Jonah N; Smith, David R

    2017-07-24

    Computational imaging systems leverage generalized measurements to produce high-fidelity images, enabling novel and often lower cost hardware platforms at the expense of increased processing. However, obtaining full resolution images across a large field-of-view (FOV) can lead to slow reconstruction times, limiting system performance where faster frame rates are desired. In many imaging scenarios, the highest resolution is needed only in smaller subdomains of interest within a scene, suggesting an aperture supporting multiple modalities of image capture with different resolutions can provide a path to system optimization. We explore this concept in the context of millimeter-wave imaging, presenting the design and simulation of a single frequency (75 GHz), multistatic, holographic spotlight aperture integrated into a K-band (17.5-26.5 GHz), frequency-diverse imager. The spotlight aperture - synthesized using an array of dynamically tuned, holographic, metasurface antennas - illuminates a constrained region-of-interest (ROI) identified from a low-resolution image, extracting a high-fidelity image of the constrained-ROI with a minimum number of measurement modes. The designs of both the static, frequency-diverse sub-aperture and the integrated dynamic spotlight aperture are evaluated using simulation techniques developed for large-scale synthetic apertures.

  15. A +1 ribosomal frameshifting motif prevalent among plant amalgaviruses.

    PubMed

    Nibert, Max L; Pyle, Jesse D; Firth, Andrew E

    2016-11-01

    Sequence accessions attributable to novel plant amalgaviruses have been found in the Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly database. Sixteen accessions, derived from 12 different plant species, appear to encompass the complete protein-coding regions of the proposed amalgaviruses, which would substantially expand the size of genus Amalgavirus from 4 current species. Other findings include evidence for UUU_CGN as a +1 ribosomal frameshifting motif prevalent among plant amalgaviruses; for a variant version of this motif found thus far in only two amalgaviruses from solanaceous plants; for a region of α-helical coiled coil propensity conserved in a central region of the ORF1 translation product of plant amalgaviruses; and for conserved sequences in a C-terminal region of the ORF2 translation product (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase) of plant amalgaviruses, seemingly beyond the region of conserved polymerase motifs. These results additionally illustrate the value of mining the TSA database and others for novel viral sequences for comparative analyses. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ribosomal frameshifting and transcriptional slippage: From genetic steganography and cryptography to adventitious use.

    PubMed

    Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary; Bhatt, Pramod R; Firth, Andrew E; Baranov, Pavel V

    2016-09-06

    Genetic decoding is not 'frozen' as was earlier thought, but dynamic. One facet of this is frameshifting that often results in synthesis of a C-terminal region encoded by a new frame. Ribosomal frameshifting is utilized for the synthesis of additional products, for regulatory purposes and for translational 'correction' of problem or 'savior' indels. Utilization for synthesis of additional products occurs prominently in the decoding of mobile chromosomal element and viral genomes. One class of regulatory frameshifting of stable chromosomal genes governs cellular polyamine levels from yeasts to humans. In many cases of productively utilized frameshifting, the proportion of ribosomes that frameshift at a shift-prone site is enhanced by specific nascent peptide or mRNA context features. Such mRNA signals, which can be 5' or 3' of the shift site or both, can act by pairing with ribosomal RNA or as stem loops or pseudoknots even with one component being 4 kb 3' from the shift site. Transcriptional realignment at slippage-prone sequences also generates productively utilized products encoded trans-frame with respect to the genomic sequence. This too can be enhanced by nucleic acid structure. Together with dynamic codon redefinition, frameshifting is one of the forms of recoding that enriches gene expression. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Analysis of tetra- and hepta-nucleotides motifs promoting -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Virag; Prère, Marie-Françoise; Canal, Isabelle; Firth, Andrew E.; Atkins, John F.; Baranov, Pavel V.; Fayet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Programmed ribosomal -1 frameshifting is a non-standard decoding process occurring when ribosomes encounter a signal embedded in the mRNA of certain eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes. This signal has a mandatory component, the frameshift motif: it is either a Z_ZZN tetramer or a X_XXZ_ZZN heptamer (where ZZZ and XXX are three identical nucleotides) allowing cognate or near-cognate repairing to the -1 frame of the A site or A and P sites tRNAs. Depending on the signal, the frameshifting frequency can vary over a wide range, from less than 1% to more than 50%. The present study combines experimental and bioinformatics approaches to carry out (i) a systematic analysis of the frameshift propensity of all possible motifs (16 Z_ZZN tetramers and 64 X_XXZ_ZZN heptamers) in Escherichia coli and (ii) the identification of genes potentially using this mode of expression amongst 36 Enterobacteriaceae genomes. While motif efficiency varies widely, a major distinctive rule of bacterial -1 frameshifting is that the most efficient motifs are those allowing cognate re-pairing of the A site tRNA from ZZN to ZZZ. The outcome of the genomic search is a set of 69 gene clusters, 59 of which constitute new candidates for functional utilization of -1 frameshifting. PMID:24875478

  18. An analysis of sequences stimulating frameshifting in the decoding of gene 10 of bacteriophage T7.

    PubMed Central

    Condron, B G; Gesteland, R F; Atkins, J F

    1991-01-01

    The signals necessary for the translational frameshift in the gene 10 message of bacteriophage T7 include the previously identified frameshift site and the 3' non-coding region, over 200 bases downstream. The functional components of the frameshift site are identified in this study and show that the site most probably operates by the retroviral type two site mechanism. However, the base pairing requirements for the first tRNA are much more relaxed after the slip than is seen in other examples. The element at the 3' end of the gene, also necessary for frameshifting, is examined but only the extreme 5' side of the transcriptional terminator stem-loop structure in the 3' non-coding region seems to be required. No simple secondary structural model can explain the involvement of this sequence. The T7 frameshift site can be replaced with either a T3 site or a E. coli dnaX site. Both show higher levels of frameshifting than with the T7 site. Images PMID:1945837

  19. Ribosomal frameshifting and transcriptional slippage: From genetic steganography and cryptography to adventitious use

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, John F.; Loughran, Gary; Bhatt, Pramod R.; Firth, Andrew E.; Baranov, Pavel V.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic decoding is not ‘frozen’ as was earlier thought, but dynamic. One facet of this is frameshifting that often results in synthesis of a C-terminal region encoded by a new frame. Ribosomal frameshifting is utilized for the synthesis of additional products, for regulatory purposes and for translational ‘correction’ of problem or ‘savior’ indels. Utilization for synthesis of additional products occurs prominently in the decoding of mobile chromosomal element and viral genomes. One class of regulatory frameshifting of stable chromosomal genes governs cellular polyamine levels from yeasts to humans. In many cases of productively utilized frameshifting, the proportion of ribosomes that frameshift at a shift-prone site is enhanced by specific nascent peptide or mRNA context features. Such mRNA signals, which can be 5′ or 3′ of the shift site or both, can act by pairing with ribosomal RNA or as stem loops or pseudoknots even with one component being 4 kb 3′ from the shift site. Transcriptional realignment at slippage-prone sequences also generates productively utilized products encoded trans-frame with respect to the genomic sequence. This too can be enhanced by nucleic acid structure. Together with dynamic codon redefinition, frameshifting is one of the forms of recoding that enriches gene expression. PMID:27436286

  20. The Financial Management System: A Pivotal Tool for Fiscal Viability. CDS Spotlight. ECAR Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 CDS to better understand how higher education institutions approach financial management systems. Information provided for this spotlight was derived from Module 8 of Core Data Service (CDS), which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications. Responses from 525 institutions…

  1. Maximize Institutional Relationships with CRMs. CDS Spotlight Report. ECAR Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach customer relationship management (CRM) systems. Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the Core Data survey, which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications.…

  2. The Financial Management System: A Pivotal Tool for Fiscal Viability. CDS Spotlight. ECAR Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 CDS to better understand how higher education institutions approach financial management systems. Information provided for this spotlight was derived from Module 8 of Core Data Service (CDS), which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications. Responses from 525 institutions…

  3. BI Reporting, Data Warehouse Systems, and Beyond. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service [CDS] to better understand how higher education institutions approach business intelligence (BI) reporting and data warehouse systems (see the Sidebar for definitions). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of CDS, which contains several questions regarding…

  4. Maximize Institutional Relationships with CRMs. CDS Spotlight Report. ECAR Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach customer relationship management (CRM) systems. Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the Core Data survey, which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications.…

  5. BI Reporting, Data Warehouse Systems, and Beyond. CDS Spotlight Report. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service [CDS] to better understand how higher education institutions approach business intelligence (BI) reporting and data warehouse systems (see the Sidebar for definitions). Information provided for this Spotlight was derived from Module 8 of CDS, which contains several questions regarding…

  6. Detection of mutations in the ALD gene (ABCD1) in seven Italian families: description of four novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Lira, M G; Mottes, M; Pignatti, P F; Medica, I; Uziel, G; Cappa, M; Bertini, E; Rizzuto, N; Salviati, A

    2000-09-01

    The study describes the mutations causing adrenoleukodystrophy in seven Italian families. Four missense mutations leading to amino acid substitutions, two frameshift mutations leading to a premature termination signal, and a splicing mutation were identified. Mutations 2014C>T (P543L), 2053A>G (Q556A), 673-674insCC, and 1874+1G>A are described for the first time in this report. Mutations 1638C>T (R418W), 1588G>A(R401Q), and 1801-1802delAG are already known to be link to ALD.

  7. Flanking sequence specificity determines coding microsatellite heteroduplex and mutation rates with defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR).

    PubMed

    Chung, H; Lopez, C G; Young, D J; Lai, J F; Holmstrom, J; Ream-Robinson, D; Cabrera, B L; Carethers, J M

    2010-04-15

    The activin type II receptor (ACVR2) contains two identical microsatellites in exons 3 and 10, but only the exon 10 microsatellite is frameshifted in mismatch repair (MMR)-defective colonic tumors. The reason for this selectivity is not known. We hypothesized that ACVR2 frameshifts were influenced by DNA sequences surrounding the microsatellite. We constructed plasmids in which exons 3 or 10 of ACVR2 were cloned +1 bp out of frame of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), allowing -1 bp frameshift to express EGFP. Plasmids were stably transfected into MMR-deficient cells, and subsequent non-fluorescent cells were sorted, cultured and harvested for mutation analysis. We swapped DNA sequences flanking the exon 3 and 10 microsatellites to test our hypothesis. Native ACVR2 exon 3 and 10 microsatellites underwent heteroduplex formation (A(7)/T(8)) in hMLH1(-/-) cells, but only exon 10 microsatellites fully mutated (A(7)/T(7)) in both hMLH1(-/-) and hMSH6(-/-) backgrounds, showing selectivity for exon 10 frameshifts and inability of exon 3 heteroduplexes to fully mutate. Substituting nucleotides flanking the exon 3 microsatellite for nucleotides flanking the exon 10 microsatellite significantly reduced heteroduplex and full mutation in hMLH1(-/-) cells. When the exon 3 microsatellite was flanked by nucleotides normally surrounding the exon 10 microsatellite, fully mutant exon 3 frameshifts appeared. Mutation selectivity for ACVR2 lies partly with flanking nucleotides surrounding each microsatellite.

  8. Analysis of a set of missense, frameshift, and in-frame deletion variants of BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Marcelo; Pino, Maria A.; Karchin, Rachel; Beddor, Jennifer; Godinho-Netto, Martha; Mesquita, Rafael D.; Rodarte, Renato S.; Vaz, Danielle C.; Monteiro, Viviane A.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Colombo, Mara; Ripamonti, Carla B.; Rosenquist, Richard; Suthers, Graeme; Borg, Ake; Radice, Paolo; Grist, Scott A.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Billack, Blase

    2009-01-01

    Germline mutations that inactivate BRCA1 are responsible for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility. One possible outcome of genetic testing for BRCA1 is the finding of a genetic variant of uncertain significance for which there is no information regarding its cancer association. This outcome leads to problems in risk assessment, counseling and preventive care. The purpose of the present study was to functionally evaluate seven unclassified variants of BRCA1 including a genomic deletion that leads to the in-frame loss of exons 16/17 (Δ exons 16/17) in the mRNA, an insertion that leads to a frameshift and an extended carboxy-terminus (5673insC), and five missense variants (K1487R, S1613C, M1652I, Q1826H and V1833M). We analyzed the variants using a functional assay based on the transcription activation property of BRCA1 combined with supervised learning computational models. Functional analysis indicated that variants S1613C, Q1826H, and M1652I are likely to be neutral, whereas variants V1833M, Δ exons 16/17, and 5673insC are likely to represent deleterious variants. In agreement with the functional analysis, the results of the computational analysis also indicated that the latter three variants are likely to be deleterious. Taken together, a combined approach of functional and bioinformatics analysis, plus structural modeling, can be utilized to obtain valuable information pertaining to the effect of a rare variant on the structure and function of BRCA1. Such information can, in turn, aid in the classification of BRCA1 variants for which there is a lack of genetic information needed to provide reliable risk assessment. PMID:18992264

  9. ABCA7 frameshift deletion associated with Alzheimer disease in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Cukier, Holly N.; Kunkle, Brian W.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Rolati, Sophie; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Kohli, Martin A.; Whitehead, Patrice L.; Dombroski, Beth A.; Van Booven, Derek; Lang, Rosalyn; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Gilbert, John R.; Beecham, Gary W.; Martin, Eden R.; Carney, Regina M.; Mayeux, Richard; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Byrd, Goldie S.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify a causative variant(s) that may contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) in African Americans (AA) in the ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A (ABC1), member 7 (ABCA7) gene, a known risk factor for late-onset AD. Methods: Custom capture sequencing was performed on ∼150 kb encompassing ABCA7 in 40 AA cases and 37 AA controls carrying the AA risk allele (rs115550680). Association testing was performed for an ABCA7 deletion identified in large AA data sets (discovery n = 1,068; replication n = 1,749) and whole exome sequencing of Caribbean Hispanic (CH) AD families. Results: A 44-base pair deletion (rs142076058) was identified in all 77 risk genotype carriers, which shows that the deletion is in high linkage disequilibrium with the risk allele. The deletion was assessed in a large data set (531 cases and 527 controls) and, after adjustments for age, sex, and APOE status, was significantly associated with disease (p = 0.0002, odds ratio [OR] = 2.13 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.42–3.20]). An independent data set replicated the association (447 cases and 880 controls, p = 0.0117, OR = 1.65 [95% CI: 1.12–2.44]), and joint analysis increased the significance (p = 1.414 × 10−5, OR = 1.81 [95% CI: 1.38–2.37]). The deletion is common in AA cases (15.2%) and AA controls (9.74%), but in only 0.12% of our non-Hispanic white cohort. Whole exome sequencing of multiplex, CH families identified the deletion cosegregating with disease in a large sibship. The deleted allele produces a stable, detectable RNA strand and is predicted to result in a frameshift mutation (p.Arg578Alafs) that could interfere with protein function. Conclusions: This common ABCA7 deletion could represent an ethnic-specific pathogenic alteration in AD. PMID:27231719

  10. ABCA7 frameshift deletion associated with Alzheimer disease in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Cukier, Holly N; Kunkle, Brian W; Vardarajan, Badri N; Rolati, Sophie; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L; Kohli, Martin A; Whitehead, Patrice L; Dombroski, Beth A; Van Booven, Derek; Lang, Rosalyn; Dykxhoorn, Derek M; Farrer, Lindsay A; Cuccaro, Michael L; Vance, Jeffery M; Gilbert, John R; Beecham, Gary W; Martin, Eden R; Carney, Regina M; Mayeux, Richard; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Byrd, Goldie S; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A

    2016-06-01

    To identify a causative variant(s) that may contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) in African Americans (AA) in the ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A (ABC1), member 7 (ABCA7) gene, a known risk factor for late-onset AD. Custom capture sequencing was performed on ∼150 kb encompassing ABCA7 in 40 AA cases and 37 AA controls carrying the AA risk allele (rs115550680). Association testing was performed for an ABCA7 deletion identified in large AA data sets (discovery n = 1,068; replication n = 1,749) and whole exome sequencing of Caribbean Hispanic (CH) AD families. A 44-base pair deletion (rs142076058) was identified in all 77 risk genotype carriers, which shows that the deletion is in high linkage disequilibrium with the risk allele. The deletion was assessed in a large data set (531 cases and 527 controls) and, after adjustments for age, sex, and APOE status, was significantly associated with disease (p = 0.0002, odds ratio [OR] = 2.13 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.42-3.20]). An independent data set replicated the association (447 cases and 880 controls, p = 0.0117, OR = 1.65 [95% CI: 1.12-2.44]), and joint analysis increased the significance (p = 1.414 × 10(-5), OR = 1.81 [95% CI: 1.38-2.37]). The deletion is common in AA cases (15.2%) and AA controls (9.74%), but in only 0.12% of our non-Hispanic white cohort. Whole exome sequencing of multiplex, CH families identified the deletion cosegregating with disease in a large sibship. The deleted allele produces a stable, detectable RNA strand and is predicted to result in a frameshift mutation (p.Arg578Alafs) that could interfere with protein function. This common ABCA7 deletion could represent an ethnic-specific pathogenic alteration in AD.

  11. Dynamic Motions of the HIV-1 Frameshift Site RNA

    PubMed Central

    Mouzakis, Kathryn D.; Dethoff, Elizabeth A.; Tonelli, Marco; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Butcher, Samuel E.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 frameshift site (FS) plays a critical role in viral replication. During translation, the HIV-1 FS transitions from a 3-helix to a 2-helix junction RNA secondary structure. The 2-helix junction structure contains a GGA bulge, and purine-rich bulges are common motifs in RNA secondary structure. Here, we investigate the dynamics of the HIV-1 FS 2-helix junction RNA. Interhelical motions were studied under different ionic conditions using NMR order tensor analysis of residual dipolar couplings. In 150 mM potassium, the RNA adopts a 43°(±4°) interhelical bend angle (β) and displays large amplitude, anisotropic interhelical motions characterized by a 0.52(±0.04) internal generalized degree of order (GDOint) and distinct order tensor asymmetries for its two helices (η = 0.26(±0.04) and 0.5(±0.1)). These motions are effectively quenched by addition of 2 mM magnesium (GDOint = 0.87(±0.06)), which promotes a near-coaxial conformation (β = 15°(±6°)) of the two helices. Base stacking in the bulge was investigated using the fluorescent purine analog 2-aminopurine. These results indicate that magnesium stabilizes extrahelical conformations of the bulge nucleotides, thereby promoting coaxial stacking of helices. These results are highly similar to previous studies of the HIV transactivation response RNA, despite a complete lack of sequence similarity between the two RNAs. Thus, the conformational space of these RNAs is largely determined by the topology of their interhelical junctions. PMID:25650931

  12. Independent suppression of ribosomal +1 frameshifts by different tRNA anticodon loop modifications.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Roland; Bruch, Alexander; Schaffrath, Raffael

    2016-12-12

    Recently, a role for the anticodon wobble uridine modification 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm(5)s(2)U) has been revealed in the suppression of translational +1 frameshifts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Loss of either the mcm(5)U or s(2)U parts of the modification elevated +1 frameshift rates and results obtained with reporters involving a tRNA(Lys)UUU dependent frameshift site suggested these effects are caused by reduced ribosomal A-site binding of the hypomodified tRNA. Combined loss of mcm(5)U and s(2)U leads to increased ribosome pausing at tRNA(Lys)UUU dependent codons and synergistic growth defects but effects on +1 frameshift rates remained undefined to this end. We show in here that simultaneous removal of mcm(5)U and s(2)U results in synergistically increased +1 frameshift rates that are suppressible by extra copies of tRNA(Lys)UUU. Thus, two distinct chemical modifications of the same wobble base independently contribute to reading frame maintenance, loss of which may cause or contribute to observed growth defects. Since the thiolation pathway is sensitive to moderately elevated temperatures in yeast, we observe a heat-induced increase of +1 frameshift rates in wild type cells that depends on the sulfur transfer protein Urm1. Furthermore, we find that temperature-induced frameshifting is kept in check by the dehydration of N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t(6)A) to its cyclic derivative (ct(6)A) at the anticodon adjacent position 37. Since loss of ct(6)A in elp3 or urm1 mutant cells is detrimental for temperature stress resistance we assume that conversion of t(6)A to ct(6)A serves to limit deleterious effects on translational fidelity caused by hypomodified states of wobble uridine bases.

  13. Homopolymer mutational hot spots mediate herpes simplex virus resistance to acyclovir.

    PubMed Central

    Sasadeusz, J J; Tufaro, F; Safrin, S; Schubert, K; Hubinette, M M; Cheung, P K; Sacks, S L

    1997-01-01

    In the majority of cases, the mechanism underlying the resistance to acyclovir (ACV) of herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) is thymidine kinase (TK) deficiency. Plaque isolates from eight ACV-resistant (ACVr) clinical isolates from AIDS patients, of which five reactivated, were sequenced to determine the genetic lesion within the tk gene conferring resistance and whether this may have correlated with reactivation potential. Mutations were clustered within two homopolymer nucleotide stretches. Three plaque isolates (1737-14, 90-150-3, and 89-650-5) had insertion mutations within a stretch of 7 guanosines, while two isolates (89-063-1 and 89-353-1) had frameshift mutations within a stretch of 6 cytosines (a deletion and an insertion, respectively). Mutations resulted in premature termination codons, and the predicted 28- and 32-kDa truncated TK products were detected by Western blot analysis of virus-infected cell extracts. The repair of one homopolymer frameshift mutation (in isolate 1737-14) restored TK activity, demonstrating that this mutation is the basis of TK deficiency. Of the five reactivated isolates, four were TK deficient and contained frameshift mutations while the fifth retained TK activity because of its altered-TK or Pol- phenotype. These data demonstrate that the majority of ACVr clinical isolates contain frameshift mutations within two long homopolymer nucleotide stretches which function as hot spots within the HSV tk gene and produce nonfunctional, truncated TK proteins. PMID:9094663

  14. Strip mode processing of spotlight aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Cenzo, Alan

    1988-05-01

    The author shows how to process deramped (e.g., typical spotlight mode) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) data using mode processors, with no restrictions on antenna pointing. The basis of the approach is that although the deramped data does not contain a spatially invariant two-dimensional response to a point target, the range-compressed deramped data does. Range compression of the deramped data is performed simply by Fourier transforming each range line. The method greatly increases the flexibility of current strip mode processors by extending their domain to a previously unsuitable class of data.

  15. 40 CFR 79.68 - Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the site of the original mutation or at a second site in the chromosome. Frameshift mutagen is an... researcher shall justify the use of the selected bacterial tester strains. (ii) Preparation and storage of bacterial tester strains. Recognized methods of stock culture preparation and storage shall be used. The...

  16. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Martina M; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E; Sachs, Matthew S; Atkins, John F

    2015-07-17

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3' end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5' and 3' of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5' of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5' part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3' part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3' of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting.

  17. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  18. Local structural and environmental factors define the efficiency of an RNA pseudoknot involved in programmed ribosomal frameshift process.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asmita; Bansal, Manju

    2014-10-16

    In programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift, an RNA pseudoknot stalls the ribosome at specific sequence and restarts translation in a new reading frame. A precise understanding of structural characteristics of these pseudoknots and their PRF inducing ability has not been clear to date. To investigate this phenomenon, we have studied various structural aspects of a -1 PRF inducing RNA pseudoknot from BWYV using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. A set of functional and poorly functional forms, for which previous mutational data were available, were chosen for analysis. These structures differ from each other by either single base substitutions or base-pair replacements from the native structure. We have rationalized how certain mutations in RNA pseudoknot affect its function; e.g., a specific base substitution in loop 2 stabilizes the junction geometry by forming multiple noncanonical hydrogen bonds, leading to a highly rigid structure that could effectively resist ribosome-induced unfolding, thereby increasing efficiency. While, a CG to AU pair substitution in stem 1 leads to loss of noncanonical hydrogen bonds between stems and loop, resulting in a less stable structure and reduced PRF inducing ability, inversion of a pair in stem 2 alters specific base-pair geometry that might be required in ribosomal recognition of nucleobase groups, negatively affecting pseudoknot functioning. These observations illustrate that the ability of an RNA pseudoknot to induce -1 PRF with an optimal rate depends on several independent factors that contribute to either the local conformational variability or geometry.

  19. A novel founder MYO15A frameshift duplication is the major cause of genetic hearing loss in Oman.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Flavia; Al-Wardy, Nadia; Ruscone, Guido Alberto Gnecchi; Oppo, Manuela; Kindi, Mohammed Nasser Al; Angius, Andrea; Al Lamki, Khalsa; Girotto, Giorgia; Giangregorio, Tania; Benelli, Matteo; Magi, Alberto; Seri, Marco; Gasparini, Paolo; Cucca, Francesco; Sazzini, Marco; Al Khabori, Mazin; Pippucci, Tommaso; Romeo, Giovanni

    2017-02-01

    The increased risk for autosomal recessive disorders is one of the most well-known medical implications of consanguinity. In the Sultanate of Oman, a country characterized by one of the highest rates of consanguineous marriages worldwide, prevalence of genetic hearing loss (GHL) is estimated to be 6/10 000. Families of GHL patients have higher consanguinity rates than the general Omani population, indicating a major role for recessive forms. Mutations in GJB2, the most commonly mutated GHL gene, have been sporadically described. We collected 97 DNA samples of GHL probands, affected/unaffected siblings and parents from 26 Omani consanguineous families. Analyzing a first family by whole-exome sequencing, we identified a novel homozygous frameshift duplication (c.1171_1177dupGCCATCT) in MYO15A, the gene linked to the deafness locus DFNB3. This duplication was then found in a total of 8/26 (28%) families, within a 849 kb founder haplotype. Reconstruction of haplotype structure at MYO15A surrounding genomic regions indicated that the founder haplotype branched out in the past two to three centuries from a haplotype present worldwide. The MYO15A duplication emerges as the major cause of GHL in Oman. These findings have major implications for the design of GHL diagnosis and prevention policies in Oman.

  20. A novel frameshift mutation of Chediak-Higashi syndrome and treatment in the accelerated phase.

    PubMed

    Wu, X L; Zhao, X Q; Zhang, B X; Xuan, F; Guo, H M; Ma, F T

    2017-03-23

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency disease characterized by frequent infections, hypopigmentation, progressive neurologic deterioration and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), known as the accelerated phase. There is little experience in the accelerated phase of CHS treatment worldwide. Here, we present a case of a 9-month-old boy with continuous high fever, hypopigmentation of the skin, enlarged lymph nodes, hepatosplenomegaly and lung infection. He was diagnosed with CHS by gene sequencing, and had entered the accelerated phase. After 8 weeks of therapy, the boy had remission and was prepared for allogenic stem cell transplantation.

  1. Transcriptional Profile Analysis of RPGRORF15 Frameshift Mutation Identifies Novel Genes Associated with Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Genini, Sem; Zangerl, Barbara; Slavik, Julianna; Acland, Gregory M.; Beltran, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To identify genes and molecular mechanisms associated with photoreceptor degeneration in a canine model of XLRP caused by an RPGR exon ORF15 microdeletion. Methods. Expression profiles of mutant and normal retinas were compared by using canine retinal custom cDNA microarrays. qRT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were applied to selected genes, to confirm and expand the microarray results. Results. At 7 and 16 weeks, respectively, 56 and 18 transcripts were downregulated in the mutant retinas, but none were differentially expressed (DE) at both ages, suggesting the involvement of temporally distinct pathways. Downregulated genes included the known retina-relevant genes PAX6, CHML, and RDH11 at 7 weeks and CRX and SAG at 16 weeks. Genes directly or indirectly active in apoptotic processes were altered at 7 weeks (CAMK2G, NTRK2, PRKCB, RALA, RBBP6, RNF41, SMYD3, SPP1, and TUBB2C) and 16 weeks (SLC25A5 and NKAP). Furthermore, the DE genes at 7 weeks (ELOVL6, GLOD4, NDUFS4, and REEP1) and 16 weeks (SLC25A5 and TARS2) are related to mitochondrial functions. qRT-PCR of 18 genes confirmed the microarray results and showed DE of additional genes not on the array. Only GFAP was DE at 3 weeks of age. Western blot and IHC analyses also confirmed the high reliability of the transcriptomic data. Conclusions. Several DE genes were identified in mutant retinas. At 7 weeks, a combination of nonclassic anti- and proapoptosis genes appear to be involved in photoreceptor degeneration, whereas at both 7 and 16 weeks, the expression of mitochondria-related genes indicates that they may play a relevant role in the disease process. PMID:20574030

  2. A novel AMER1 frameshift mutation in a girl with osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Yumi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Harada, Noriaki; Aida, Noriko; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2017-10-09

    Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OSCS) (MIM #300373) is a rare X-linked dominant bone dysplasia characterized by cranial sclerosis and linear striations in the long bones of females, and fetal or neonatal lethality in affected males. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Expanded ATXN3 frameshifting events are toxic in Drosophila and mammalian neuron models.

    PubMed

    Stochmanski, Shawn J; Therrien, Martine; Laganière, Janet; Rochefort, Daniel; Laurent, Sandra; Karemera, Liliane; Gaudet, Rebecca; Vyboh, Kishanda; Van Meyel, Don J; Di Cristo, Graziella; Dion, Patrick A; Gaspar, Claudia; Rouleau, Guy A

    2012-05-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 is caused by the expansion of the coding CAG repeat in the ATXN3 gene. Interestingly, a -1 bp frameshift occurring within an (exp)CAG repeat would henceforth lead to translation from a GCA frame, generating polyalanine stretches instead of polyglutamine. Our results show that transgenic expression of (exp)CAG ATXN3 led to -1 frameshifting events, which have deleterious effects in Drosophila and mammalian neurons. Conversely, transgenic expression of polyglutamine-encoding (exp)CAA ATXN3 was not toxic. Furthermore, (exp)CAG ATXN3 mRNA does not contribute per se to the toxicity observed in our models. Our observations indicate that expanded polyglutamine tracts in Drosophila and mouse neurons are insufficient for the development of a phenotype. Hence, we propose that -1 ribosomal frameshifting contributes to the toxicity associated with (exp)CAG repeats.

  4. −1 Frameshifting at a CGA AAG Hexanucleotide Site Is Required for Transposition of Insertion Sequence IS1222

    PubMed Central

    Mejlhede, Nina; Licznar, Patricia; Prère, Marie-Françoise; Wills, Norma M.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Atkins, John F.; Fayet, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of programmed −1 frameshifting at the hexanucleotide shift site CGA_AAG, in addition to the classical X_XXY_YYZ heptanucleotide shift sequences, prompted a search for instances among eubacterial insertion sequence elements. IS1222 has a CGA_AAG shift site. A genetic analysis revealed that frameshifting at this site is required for transposition. PMID:15126494

  5. Asc1, homolog of human RACK1, prevents frameshifting in yeast by ribosomes stalled at CGA codon repeats

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Andrew S.; Grayhack, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Quality control systems monitor and stop translation at some ribosomal stalls, but it is unknown if halting translation at such stalls actually prevents synthesis of abnormal polypeptides. In yeast, ribosome stalling occurs at Arg CGA codon repeats, with even two consecutive CGA codons able to reduce translation by up to 50%. The conserved eukaryotic Asc1 protein limits translation through internal Arg CGA codon repeats. We show that, in the absence of Asc1 protein, ribosomes continue translating at CGA codons, but undergo substantial frameshifting with dramatically higher levels of frameshifting occurring with additional repeats of CGA codons. Frameshifting depends upon the slow or inefficient decoding of these codons, since frameshifting is suppressed by increased expression of the native tRNAArg(ICG) that decodes CGA codons by wobble decoding. Moreover, the extent of frameshifting is modulated by the position of the CGA codon repeat relative to the translation start site. Thus, translation fidelity depends upon Asc1-mediated quality control. PMID:25792604

  6. Decreased peptidyltransferase activity correlates with increased programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting and viral maintenance defects in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    MESKAUSKAS, ARTURAS; HARGER, JASON W.; MULDOON JACOBS, KRISTI L.; DINMAN, JONATHAN D.

    2003-01-01

    Increased efficiencies of programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting in yeast cells expressing mutant forms of ribosomal protein L3 are unable to maintain the dsRNA “Killer” virus. Here we demonstrate that changes in frameshifting and virus maintenance in these mutants correlates with decreased peptidyltransferase activities. The mutants did not affect Ty1-directed programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting or nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Independent experiments demonstrate similar programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting specific defects in cells lacking ribosomal protein L41, which has previously been shown to result in peptidyltransferase defects in yeast. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that decreased peptidyltransferase activity should result in longer ribosome pause times after the accommodation step of the elongation cycle, allowing more time for ribosomal slippage at programmed −1 ribosomal frameshift signals. PMID:12869709

  7. COSMO-SkyMed Spotlight interometry over rural areas: the Slumgullion landslide in Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milillo, Pietro; Fielding, Eric J.; Schulz, William H.; Delbridge, Brent; Burgmann, Roland

    2014-01-01

    In the last 7 years, spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data with resolution of better than a meter acquired by satellites in spotlight mode offered an unprecedented improvement in SAR interferometry (InSAR). Most attention has been focused on monitoring urban areas and man-made infrastructure exploiting geometric accuracy, stability, and phase fidelity of the spotlight mode. In this paper, we explore the potential application of the COSMO-SkyMed® Spotlight mode to rural areas where decorrelation is substantial and rapidly increases with time. We focus on the rapid repeat times of as short as one day possible with the COSMO-SkyMed® constellation. We further present a qualitative analysis of spotlight interferometry over the Slumgullion landslide in southwest Colorado, which moves at rates of more than 1 cm/day.

  8. Analysis and Simulation for a Spotlight-Mode Aircraft SAR in Circular Flight Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Michael Y.; Chen, Ming

    1993-01-01

    A wide azimuth beam SAR can offer higher resolution or wider azimuth viewing angle; two factors that help better characterize the backscattering property of targets for various science applications. One disadvantage of wide beam SAR is that a much higher pulse repetition frequency (PRF) is usually required since PRF is proportional to the radar beam angle. This problem can be resolved using a spotlight-mode concept: steering a narrow beam SAR to a fixed spot on the ground. The drawback of a spotlight-mode SAR is its limited coverage. A conventional spotlight-mode SAR operates along a straight line path as shown in Figure 1. It can be shown that spotlight-mode SAR that follows a straight line path has difficulty in achieving the ultimate resolution of lambda/4. It also cannot utilize the full 180 degree of azimuth viewing angle that can be attained only when the synthetic aperture length approaches infinity.

  9. Spotlight on Indus River Diplomacy: India, Pakistan, and the Baglihar Dam Dispute

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    permanent partitioning of the Indus River system—India winning unfettered ownership of the waters of the three eastern rivers (Ravi, Beas, Sutlej ), and...SPOTLIGHT ON INDUS RIVER DIPLOMACY: INDIA, PAKISTAN, AND THE BAGLIHAR DAM DISPUTE Robert G. Wirsing and Christopher Jasparro Asia...DATES COVERED 00-05-2006 to 00-05-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Spotlight on Indus River Diplomacy: India, Pakistan, and the Baglihar Dam Dispute 5a

  10. Ribosome excursions during mRNA translocation mediate broad branching of frameshift pathways.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shannon; Wen, Jin-Der; Bustamante, Carlos; Tinoco, Ignacio

    2015-02-26

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting produces alternative proteins from a single transcript. -1 frameshifting occurs on Escherichia coli's dnaX mRNA containing a slippery sequence AAAAAAG and peripheral mRNA structural barriers. Here, we reveal hidden aspects of the frameshifting process, including its exact location on the mRNA and its timing within the translation cycle. Mass spectrometry of translated products shows that ribosomes enter the -1 frame from not one specific codon but various codons along the slippery sequence and slip by not just -1 but also -4 or +2 nucleotides. Single-ribosome translation trajectories detect distinctive codon-scale fluctuations in ribosome-mRNA displacement across the slippery sequence, representing multiple ribosomal translocation attempts during frameshifting. Flanking mRNA structural barriers mechanically stimulate the ribosome to undergo back-and-forth translocation excursions, broadly exploring reading frames. Both experiments reveal aborted translation around mutant slippery sequences, indicating that subsequent fidelity checks on newly adopted codon position base pairings lead to either resumed translation or early termination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ribosomal −1 Frameshifting during Decoding of Bacillus subtilis cdd Occurs at the Sequence CGA AAG

    PubMed Central

    Mejlhede, Nina; Atkins, John F.; Neuhard, Jan

    1999-01-01

    During translation of the Bacillus subtilis cdd gene, encoding cytidine deaminase (CDA), a ribosomal −1 frameshift occurs near the stop codon, resulting in a CDA subunit extended by 13 amino acids. The frequency of the frameshift is approximately 16%, and it occurs both when the cdd gene is expressed from a multicopy plasmid in Escherichia coli and when it is expressed from the chromosomal copy in B. subtilis. As a result, heterotetrameric forms of the enzyme are formed in vivo along with the dominant homotetrameric species. The different forms have approximately the same specific activity. The cdd gene was cloned in pUC19 such that the lacZ′ gene of the vector followed the cdd gene in the −1 reading frame immediately after the cdd stop codon. By using site-directed mutagenesis of the cdd-lacZ′ fusion, it was shown that frameshifting occurred at the sequence CGA AAG, 9 bp upstream of the in-frame cdd stop codon, and that it was stimulated by a Shine-Dalgarno-like sequence located 14 bp upstream of the shift site. The possible function of this frameshift in gene expression is discussed. PMID:10217788

  12. A general strategy to inhibiting viral −1 frameshifting based on upstream attenuation duplex formation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao-Teng; Cho, Che-Pei; Lin, Ya-Hui; Chang, Kung-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Viral −1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) as a potential antiviral target has attracted interest because many human viral pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and coronaviruses, rely on −1 PRF for optimal propagation. Efficient eukaryotic −1 PRF requires an optimally placed stimulator structure downstream of the frameshifting site and different strategies targeting viral −1 PRF stimulators have been developed. However, accessing particular −1 PRF stimulator information represents a bottle-neck in combating the emerging epidemic viral pathogens such as Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Recently, an RNA hairpin upstream of frameshifting site was shown to act as a cis-element to attenuate −1 PRF with mechanism unknown. Here, we show that an upstream duplex formed in-trans, by annealing an antisense to its complementary mRNA sequence upstream of frameshifting site, can replace an upstream hairpin to attenuate −1 PRF efficiently. This finding indicates that the formation of a proximal upstream duplex is the main determining factor responsible for −1 PRF attenuation and provides mechanistic insight. Additionally, the antisense-mediated upstream duplex approach downregulates −1 PRF stimulated by distinct −1 PRF stimulators, including those of MERS-CoV, suggesting its general application potential as a robust means to evaluating viral −1 PRF inhibition as soon as the sequence information of an emerging human coronavirus is available. PMID:26612863

  13. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  14. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: novel FLCN frameshift deletion in daughter and father with renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Näf, Ernst; Laubscher, Dominik; Hopfer, Helmut; Streit, Markus; Matyas, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutation of the FLCN gene causes Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD), a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal tumours. We identified a hitherto unreported pathogenic FLCN frameshift deletion c.563delT (p.Phe188Serfs*35) in a family of a 46-year-old woman presented with macrohematuria due to bilateral chromophobe renal carcinomas. A heritable renal cancer was suspected due to the bilaterality of the tumour and as the father of this woman had suffered from renal cancer. Initially, however, BHD was overlooked by the medical team despite the highly suggestive clinical presentation. We assume that BHD is underdiagnosed, at least partially, due to low awareness of this variable condition and to insufficient use of appropriate genetic testing. Our study indicates that BHD and FLCN testing should be routinely considered in patients with positive family or personal history of renal tumours. In addition, we demonstrate how patients and their families can play a driving role in initiating genetic diagnosis, presymptomatic testing of at-risk relatives, targeted disease management, and genetic counselling of rare diseases such as BHD.

  15. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA*

    PubMed Central

    Yordanova, Martina M.; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Sachs, Matthew S.; Atkins, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3′ end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5′ and 3′ of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5′ of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5′ part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3′ part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3′ of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting. PMID:25998126

  16. Astute Clinician Report: A Novel 10 bp Frameshift Deletion in Exon 2 of ICOS Causes a Combined Immunodeficiency Associated with an Enteritis and Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Nic; Engelhardt, Karin R; Morgan, Neil V; Barge, Dawn; Cant, Andrew J; Hughes, Stephen M; Abinun, Mario; Xu, Yaobo; Koref, Mauro Santibanez; Arkwright, Peter D; Hambleton, Sophie

    2015-10-01

    ICOS encodes the Inducible T-cell Co-Stimulator (ICOS). Deficiency of this receptor in humans causes a common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) characterised by an absence of class-switched memory B cells and hypogammaglobulinemia. Three pathogenic mutations in ICOS have been described to date in a total of 13 cases. Here we report a novel homozygous 10 base pair frameshift deletion in exon 2 discovered by whole exome sequencing of two siblings from a family of Pakistani origin. Both patients presented in early childhood with diarrhea, colitis and transaminitis and one showed defective handling of human herpesvirus 6. Activated patient CD3(+)CD4(+) T lymphocytes demonstrated a complete absence of ICOS expression and, consistent with previous reports, we detected a reduction in circulating T follicular helper cells. Findings in this kindred emphasise the phenotypic variability of ICOS deficiency and, in particular, the variably impaired antiviral immunity that is a poorly understood facet of this rare disorder.

  17. Increased transversions in a novel mutator colon cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Eshleman, J R; Donover, P S; Littman, S J; Swinler, S E; Li, G M; Lutterbaugh, J D; Willson, J K; Modrich, P; Sedwick, W D; Markowitz, S D; Veigl, M L

    1998-03-05

    We describe a novel mutator phenotype in the Vaco411 colon cancer cell line which increases the spontaneous mutation rate 10-100-fold over background. This mutator results primarily in transversion base substitutions which are found infrequently in repair competent cells. Of the four possible types of transversions, only three were principally recovered. Spontaneous mutations recovered also included transitions and large deletions, but very few frameshifts were recovered. When compared to known mismatch repair defective colon cancer mutators, the distribution of mutations in Vaco411 is significantly different. Consistent with this difference, Vaco411 extracts are proficient in assays of mismatch repair. The Vaco411 mutator appears to be novel, and is not an obvious human homologue of any of the previously characterized bacterial or yeast transversion phenotypes. Several hypotheses by which this mutator may produce transversions are presented.

  18. Genetically-directed Sparse Neuronal Labeling in BAC Transgenic Mice through Mononucleotide Repeat Frameshift

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiao-Hong; Yang, X. William

    2017-01-01

    Mosaicism with Repeat Frameshift (MORF) allows a single Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) transgene to direct sparse labeling of genetically-defined neuronal populations in mice. The BAC transgene drives cell-type-specific transcription of an out-of-frame mononucleotide repeat that is placed between a translational start codon and a membrane-bound fluorescent protein lacking its start codon. The stochastic frameshift of the unstable repeat DNA in a subset of BAC-expressing neurons results in the in-frame translation of the reporter protein hence the sparse neuronal labeling. As a proof-of-concept, we generated D1-dopamine receptor (D1) BAC MORF mice that label about 1% striatal D1-expressing medium spiny neurons and allow visualization of their dendrites. These mice enable the study of D1-MSN dendrite development in wildtype mice, and its degeneration in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease. PMID:28272512

  19. Minor groove RNA triplex in the crystal structure of a ribosomal frameshifting viral pseudoknot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, L.; Chen, L.; Egli, M.; Berger, J. M.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Many viruses regulate translation of polycistronic mRNA using a -1 ribosomal frameshift induced by an RNA pseudoknot. A pseudoknot has two stems that form a quasi-continuous helix and two connecting loops. A 1.6 A crystal structure of the beet western yellow virus (BWYV) pseudoknot reveals rotation and a bend at the junction of the two stems. A loop base is inserted in the major groove of one stem with quadruple-base interactions. The second loop forms a new minor-groove triplex motif with the other stem, involving 2'-OH and triple-base interactions, as well as sodium ion coordination. Overall, the number of hydrogen bonds stabilizing the tertiary interactions exceeds the number involved in Watson-Crick base pairs. This structure will aid mechanistic analyses of ribosomal frameshifting.

  20. Minor groove RNA triplex in the crystal structure of a ribosomal frameshifting viral pseudoknot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, L.; Chen, L.; Egli, M.; Berger, J. M.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Many viruses regulate translation of polycistronic mRNA using a -1 ribosomal frameshift induced by an RNA pseudoknot. A pseudoknot has two stems that form a quasi-continuous helix and two connecting loops. A 1.6 A crystal structure of the beet western yellow virus (BWYV) pseudoknot reveals rotation and a bend at the junction of the two stems. A loop base is inserted in the major groove of one stem with quadruple-base interactions. The second loop forms a new minor-groove triplex motif with the other stem, involving 2'-OH and triple-base interactions, as well as sodium ion coordination. Overall, the number of hydrogen bonds stabilizing the tertiary interactions exceeds the number involved in Watson-Crick base pairs. This structure will aid mechanistic analyses of ribosomal frameshifting.

  1. Different RPGR exon ORF15 mutations in Canids provide insights into photoreceptor cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Acland, Gregory M; Wu, Wen X; Johnson, Jennifer L; Pearce-Kelling, Sue; Tulloch, Brian; Vervoort, Raf; Wright, Alan F; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2002-05-01

    The canine disease, X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA), is similar to human RP3, an X-linked form of retinitis pigmentosa, and maps to the same region in the X chromosome. Analysis of the physical map of the XLPRA and RP3 intervals shows a high degree of conservation in terms of genes and their order. We have found different mutations in exon ORF15 of the RPGR gene in two distinct mutant dog strains (XLPRA1, XLPRA2). Microdeletions resulting in a premature stop or a frameshift mutation result in very different retinal phenotypes, which are allele-specific and consistent for each mutation. The phenotype associated with the frameshift mutation in XLPRA2 is very severe and manifests during retinal development; the phenotype resulting from the XLPRA1 nonsense mutation is expressed only after normal photoreceptor morphogenesis. Splicing of RPGR mRNA transcripts in retina is complex, and either exon ORF15 or exon 19 can be a terminal exon. The retina-predominant transcript contains ORF15 as a terminal exon, and is expressed in normal and mutant retinas. The frameshift mutation dramatically alters the deduced amino acid sequence, and the protein aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum of transfected cells. The cellular and molecular results in the two canine RPGR exon ORF15 mutations have implications for understanding the phenotypic variability found in human RP3 families that carry similar mutations.

  2. A comparison of spotlight synthetic aperture radar image formation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Knittle, C.D.; Doren, N.E.; Jakowatz, C.V.

    1996-10-01

    Spotlight synthetic aperture radar images can be formed from the complex phase history data using two main techniques: (1) polar-to-cartesian interpolation followed by two-dimensional inverse Fourier transform (2DFFT), and (2) convolution backprojection (CBP). CBP has been widely used to reconstruct medical images in computer aided tomography, and only recently has been applied to form synthetic aperture radar imagery. It is alleged that CBP yields higher quality images because (1) all the Fourier data are used and (2) the polar formatted data is used directly to form a 2D Cartesian image and therefore 2D interpolation is not required. This report compares the quality of images formed by CBP and several modified versions of the 2DFFT method. We show from an image quality point of view that CBP is equivalent to first windowing the phase history data and then interpolating to an exscribed rectangle. From a mathematical perspective, we should expect this conclusion since the same Fourier data are used to form the SAR image. We next address the issue of parallel implementation of each algorithm. We dispute previous claims that CBP is more readily parallelizable than the 2DFFT method. Our conclusions are supported by comparing execution times between massively parallel implementations of both algorithms, showing that both experience similar decreases in computation time, but that CBP takes significantly longer to form an image.

  3. Motion compensation requirements for a high resolution spotlight SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepburn, J. S. A.; Haslam, G. E.; Liang, D. F.; Widnall, W. S.

    1986-07-01

    The Canadian Department of National Defence is developing a high resolution airborne spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR). To attain the high contrast, high resolution and low geometric distortion objectives of the project, it is essential that very accurate motion compensation be applied to the radar returns to minimize the effects on SAR image quality of spurious antenna phase center motion. The motion compensation system being developed for the project includes a gimballed master inertial navigation system (INS) located near the center of gravity of the host aircraft, a strapdown inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising gyroscope and accelerometer triads mounted on the radar antenna, as well as Doppler velocity and barometric altitude sensors for damping the inertial systems. The role of the master INS is to enable high accuracy alignment of the strapdown IMU. The raw sensor data are integrated using a U-D factorized Kalman filter to obtain optimal estimates of the motion of the radar antenna phase center while the SAR window is open. The data are used to adjust both the radar pulse repetition frequency and the phase and displacement of the radar returns. An analysis of the motion compensation requirements was carried out, leading to the specification of the motion compensation sensor configuration and accuracy. The performance of the motion compensation system has been evaluated by detailed computer simulation. This evaluation accounted for all major system error sources, including errors associated with sensors, transfer alignment and computation, with the system operating in a moderately turbulent environment.

  4. Adapting the Established SIS to Meet Higher Education's Increasingly Dynamic Needs. CDS Spotlight Report. ECAR Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach student information systems (SISs). Information provided for this spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the CDS survey, which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications. Responses from…

  5. Adapting the Established SIS to Meet Higher Education's Increasingly Dynamic Needs. CDS Spotlight Report. ECAR Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Leah; Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Spotlight focuses on data from the 2013 Core Data Service (CDS) to better understand how higher education institutions approach student information systems (SISs). Information provided for this spotlight was derived from Module 8 of the CDS survey, which asked several questions regarding information systems and applications. Responses from…

  6. Germ-line mutations in the neurofibromatosis 2 gene: Correlations with disease severity and retinal abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, D.M.; Kaiser-Kupfer, M.; Eldridge, R.

    1996-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) features bilateral vestibular schwannomas, other benign neural tumors, and cataracts. Patients in some families develop many tumors at an early age and have rapid clinical progression, whereas in other families, patients may not have symptoms until much later and vestibular schwannomas may be the only tumors. The NF2 gene has been cloned from chromosome 22q; most identified germ-line mutations result in a truncated protein and severe NF2. To look for additional mutations and clinical correlations, we used SSCP analysis to screen DNA from 32 unrelated patients. We identified 20 different mutations in 21 patients (66%): 10 nonsense mutations, 2 frameshifts, 7 splice-site mutations, and 1 large in-frame deletion. Clinical information on 47 patients from the 21 families included ages at onset and at diagnosis, numbers of meningiomas, spinal and skin tumors, and presence of cataracts and retinal abnormalities. We compared clinical findings in patients with nonsense or frameshift mutations to those with splice-site mutations. When each patient was considered as an independent random event, the two groups differed (P {le} .05) for nearly every variable. Patients with nonsense or frameshift mutations were younger at onset and at diagnosis and had a higher frequency and mean number of tumors, supporting the correlation between nonsense and frameshift mutations and severe NF2. When each family was considered as an independent random event, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed only for mean ages at onset and at diagnosis. A larger data set is needed to resolve these discrepancies. We observed retinal hamartomas and/or epiretinal membranes in nine patients from five families with four different nonsense mutations. This finding, which may represent a new genotype-phenotype correlation, merits further study. 58 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Characterization of mutations in ATP8B1 associated with hereditary cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Klomp, Leo W J; Vargas, Julie C; van Mil, Saskia W C; Pawlikowska, Ludmila; Strautnieks, Sandra S; van Eijk, Michiel J T; Juijn, Jenneke A; Pabón-Peña, Carlos; Smith, Lauren B; DeYoung, Joseph A; Byrne, Jane A; Gombert, Justijn; van der Brugge, Gerda; Berger, Ruud; Jankowska, Irena; Pawlowska, Joanna; Villa, Erica; Knisely, A S; Thompson, Richard J; Freimer, Nelson B; Houwen, Roderick H J; Bull, Laura N

    2004-07-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) and benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC) are clinically distinct hereditary disorders. PFIC patients suffer from chronic cholestasis and develop liver fibrosis. BRIC patients experience intermittent attacks of cholestasis that resolve spontaneously. Mutations in ATP8B1 (previously FIC1) may result in PFIC or BRIC. We report the genomic organization of ATP8B1 and mutation analyses of 180 families with PFIC or BRIC that identified 54 distinct disease mutations, including 10 mutations predicted to disrupt splicing, 6 nonsense mutations, 11 small insertion or deletion mutations predicted to induce frameshifts, 1 large genomic deletion, 2 small inframe deletions, and 24 missense mutations. Most mutations are rare, occurring in 1-3 families, or are limited to specific populations. Many patients are compound heterozygous for 2 mutations. Mutation type or location correlates overall with clinical severity: missense mutations are more common in BRIC (58% vs. 38% in PFIC), while nonsense, frameshifting, and large deletion mutations are more common in PFIC (41% vs. 16% in BRIC). Some mutations, however, lead to a wide range of phenotypes, from PFIC to BRIC or even no clinical disease. ATP8B1 mutations were detected in 30% and 41%, respectively, of the PFIC and BRIC patients screened.

  8. Mutational analysis of paediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex in Korea: genotype and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Sook; Lim, Byung Chan; Chae, Jong-Hee; Hwang, Yong Seung; Seong, Moon-Woo; Park, Sung Sup; Kim, Ki Joong

    2014-12-01

    To date, only a few studies have reported that, in tuberous sclerosis, TSC2 mutations are more frequently associated with infantile spasms and cognitive impairment compared to TSC1 mutations. We analyzed the mutational spectrum of patients with tuberous sclerosis in Korea and attempted to explore the associations between genotype and seizure type/outcome. We performed mutational analyses on 70 unrelated patients with clinically confirmed tuberous sclerosis by using direct DNA sequencing and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. The patients' medical records, including epilepsy type and outcome, were reviewed retrospectively. We identified pathogenic mutations in 55 patients (79%), 25 of which were novel. There were 12 TSC1 mutations and 43 TSC2 mutations. TSC1 mutations included 8 frameshift and 4 nonsense mutations. TSC2 mutations included 12 frameshift, 10 nonsense, 6 splicing, and 6 missense mutations, as well as 4 in-frame deletions and 5 large deletions. Fifty-eight patients had epilepsy (83%), including 19 patients with a history of infantile spasms. Compared to patients with TSC1 mutations, individuals with TSC2 mutations had a significantly higher frequency of epilepsy (p<0.05) and tended to have a higher frequency of infantile spasms (37% vs 17%; p<0.3). Most of the patients with TSC2 mutations who developed infantile spasms exhibited subsequent epilepsy (13/14; 93%). However, the presence/absence of infantile spasms did not influence seizure remission or cognitive outcome.

  9. Depletion of cognate charged transfer RNA causes translational frameshifting within the expanded CAG stretch in huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Girstmair, Hannah; Saffert, Paul; Rode, Sascha; Czech, Andreas; Holland, Gudrun; Bannert, Norbert; Ignatova, Zoya

    2013-01-31

    Huntington disease (HD), a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG-encoded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat in huntingtin (Htt), displays a highly heterogeneous etiopathology and disease onset. Here, we show that the translation of expanded CAG repeats in mutant Htt exon 1 leads to a depletion of charged glutaminyl-transfer RNA (tRNA)(Gln-CUG) that pairs exclusively to the CAG codon. This results in translational frameshifting and the generation of various transframe-encoded species that differently modulate the conformational switch to nucleate fibrillization of the parental polyQ protein. Intriguingly, the frameshifting frequency varies strongly among different cell lines and is higher in cells with intrinsically lower concentrations of tRNA(Gln-CUG). The concentration of tRNA(Gln-CUG) also differs among different brain areas in the mouse. We propose that translational frameshifting may act as a significant disease modifier that contributes to the cell-selective neurotoxicity and disease course heterogeneity of HD on both cellular and individual levels.

  10. A novel role for poly(C) binding proteins in programmed ribosomal frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Napthine, Sawsan; Treffers, Emmely E.; Bell, Susanne; Goodfellow, Ian; Fang, Ying; Firth, Andrew E.; Snijder, Eric J.; Brierley, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Translational control through programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) is exploited widely by viruses and increasingly documented in cellular genes. Frameshifting is induced by mRNA secondary structures that compromise ribosome fidelity during decoding of a heptanucleotide ‘slippery’ sequence. The nsp2 PRF signal of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus is distinctive in directing both −2 and −1 PRF and in its requirement for a trans-acting protein factor, the viral replicase subunit nsp1β. Here we show that the the trans-activation of frameshifting is carried out by a protein complex composed of nsp1β and a cellular poly(C) binding protein (PCBP). From the results of in vitro translation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrate that a PCBP/nsp1β complex binds to a C-rich sequence downstream of the slippery sequence and here mimics the activity of a structured mRNA stimulator of PRF. This is the first description of a role for a trans-acting cellular protein in PRF. The discovery broadens the repertoire of activities associated with poly(C) binding proteins and prototypes a new class of virus–host interactions. PMID:27257056

  11. Spotlight on the relevance of mtDNA in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bermúdez, A; Vicente-Blanco, R J; Gonzalez-Vioque, E; Provencio, M; Fernández-Moreno, M Á; Garesse, R

    2017-04-01

    The potential role of the mitochondrial genome has recently attracted interest because of its high mutation frequency in tumors. Different aspects of mtDNA make it relevant for cancer's biology, such as it encodes a limited but essential number of genes for OXPHOS biogenesis, it is particularly susceptible to mutations, and its copy number can vary. Moreover, most ROS in mitochondria are produced by the electron transport chain. These characteristics place the mtDNA in the center of multiple signaling pathways, known as mitochondrial retrograde signaling, which modifies numerous key processes in cancer. Cybrid studies support that mtDNA mutations are relevant and exert their effect through a modification of OXPHOS function and ROS production. However, there is still much controversy regarding the clinical relevance of mtDNA mutations. New studies should focus more on OXPHOS dysfunction associated with a specific mutational signature rather than the presence of mutations in the mtDNA.

  12. Identification of novel PIKFYVE gene mutations associated with Fleck corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Jessica A.; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Chung, Duk-Won D.; Tangmonkongvoragul, Chulaluck; Le, Derek J.; Wang, Cynthia; Han, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the identification of a novel frameshift mutation and copy number variation (CNV) in PIKFYVE in two probands with fleck corneal dystrophy (FCD). Methods Slit-lamp examination was performed to identify characteristic features of FCD. After genomic DNA was collected, PCR amplification and automated sequencing of all 41 exons of PIKFYVE was performed. Using genomic DNA, quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to detect CNVs within PIKFYVE. Results In the first FCD proband, numerous panstromal punctate opacities were observed in each of the proband’s corneas, consistent with the diagnosis of FCD. Screening of PIKFYVE demonstrated a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation in exon 19, c.3151dupA, which is predicted to encode for a truncated PIKFYVE protein, p.(Asp1052Argfs*18). This variant was identified in an affected sister but not in the proband’s unaffected mother or brother or 200 control chromosomes. The second FCD proband presented with bilateral, discrete, punctate, grayish-white stromal opacities. Exonic screening of PIKFYVE revealed no causative variant. However, CNV analysis demonstrated the hemizygous deletion of exons 15 and 16. Conclusions We report a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation (c.3151dupA) and a CNV in PIKFYVE, representing the first CNV and the fifth frameshift mutation associated with FCD. PMID:26396486

  13. 40 CFR 798.5265 - The salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the original mutation or at a second site in the chromosome. (3) Frameshift mutagens are agents which... established in the laboratory by historical control values. (iii) Bacterial growth. Fresh cultures of bacteria... without metabolic activation, test chemica1 and 0.1 m1 of a fresh bacterial culture should be added to 2.0...

  14. The genetic basis of asymptomatic codon 8 frame-shift (HBB:c25_26delAA) β(0) -thalassaemia homozygotes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihua; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Huang, Shengwen; Farrell, John J; Davis, Lance; Théberge, Roger; Benson, Katherine A; Riolueang, Suchada; Viprakasit, Vip; Al-Allawi, Nasir A S; Ünal, Sule; Gümrük, Fatma; Akar, Nejat; Başak, A Nazli; Osorio, Leonor; Badens, Catherine; Pissard, Serge; Joly, Philippe; Campbell, Andrew D; Gallagher, Patrick G; Steinberg, Martin H; Forget, Bernard G; Chui, David H K

    2016-03-01

    Two 21-year old dizygotic twin men of Iraqi descent were homozygous for HBB codon 8, deletion of two nucleotides (-AA) frame-shift β(0) -thalassaemia mutation (FSC8; HBB:c25_26delAA). Both were clinically well, had splenomegaly, and were never transfused. They had mild microcytic anaemia (Hb 120-130 g/l) and 98% of their haemoglobin was fetal haemoglobin (HbF). Both were carriers of Hph α-thalassaemia mutation. On the three major HbF quantitative trait loci (QTL), the twins were homozygous for G>A HBG2 Xmn1 site at single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7482144, homozygous for 3-bp deletion HBS1L-MYB intergenic polymorphism (HMIP) at rs66650371, and heterozygous for the A>C BCL11A intron 2 polymorphism at rs766432. These findings were compared with those found in 22 other FSC8 homozygote patients: four presented with thalassaemia intermedia phenotype, and 18 were transfusion dependent. The inheritance of homozygosity for HMIP 3-bp deletion at rs66650371 and heterozygosity for Hph α-thalassaemia mutation was found in the twins and not found in any of the other 22 patients. Further studies are needed to uncover likely additional genetic variants that could contribute to the exceptionally high HbF levels and mild phenotype in these twins. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Recessive black is allelic to the yellow plumage locus in Japanese quail and associated with a frameshift deletion in the ASIP gene.

    PubMed

    Hiragaki, Takahiro; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Miwa, Mitsuru; Fujiwara, Akira; Mizutani, Makoto; Minvielle, Francis; Ito, Shin'ichi

    2008-02-01

    The recessive black plumage mutation in the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) is controlled by an autosomal recessive gene (rb) and displays a blackish-brown phenotype in the recessive homozygous state (rb/rb). A similar black coat color phenotype in nonagouti mice is caused by an autosomal recessive mutation at the agouti locus. An allelism test showed that wild type and mutations for yellow, fawn-2, and recessive black in Japanese quail were multiple alleles (*N, *Y, *F2, and *RB) at the same locus Y and that the dominance relationship was Y*F2 > Y*Y > Y*N > Y*RB. A deletion of 8 bases was found in the ASIP gene in the Y*RB allele, causing a frameshift that changed the last six amino acids, including a cysteine residue, and removed the normal stop codon. Since the cysteine residues at the C terminus are important for disulphide bond formation and tertiary structure of the agouti signaling protein, the deletion is expected to cause a dysfunction of ASIP as an antagonist of alpha-MSH in the Y*RB allele. This is the first evidence that the ASIP gene, known to be involved in coat color variation in mammals, is functional and has a similar effect on plumage color in birds.

  16. Eight new mtDNA sequences of glass sponges reveal an extensive usage of +1 frameshifting in mitochondrial translation.

    PubMed

    Haen, Karri M; Pett, Walker; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2014-02-10

    Three previously studied mitochondrial genomes of glass sponges (phylum Porifera, class Hexactinellida) contained single nucleotide insertions in protein coding genes inferred as sites of +1 translational frameshifting. To investigate the distribution and evolution of these sites and to help elucidate the mechanism of frameshifting, we determined eight new complete or nearly complete mtDNA sequences from glass sponges and examined individual mitochondrial genes from three others. We found nine new instances of single nucleotide insertions in these sequences and analyzed them both comparatively and phylogenetically. The base insertions appear to have been gained and lost repeatedly in hexactinellid mt protein genes, suggesting no functional significance for the frameshifting sites. A high degree of sequence conservation, the presence of unusual tRNAs, and a distinct pattern of codon usage suggest the "out-of-frame pairing" model of translational frameshifting. Additionally, we provide evidence that relaxed selection pressure on glass sponge mtDNA - possibly a result of their low growth rates and deep-water lifestyle - has allowed frameshift insertions to be tolerated for hundreds of millions of years. Our study provides the first example of a phylogenetically diverse and extensive usage of translational frameshifting in animal mitochondrial coding sequences.

  17. Detection of C1 inhibitor (SERPING1/C1NH) mutations in exon 8 in patients with hereditary angioedema: evidence for 10 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Blanch, Alvaro; Roche, Olga; López-Granados, Eduardo; Fontán, Gumersindo; López-Trascasa, Margarita

    2002-11-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is caused by mutations in the C1 inhibitor gene (SERPING1, C1NH) and the result is C1 inhibitor deficiency, either in levels or function. We have searched exon 8 for mutations by direct sequencing and analyzed the rest of the exons by SSCP in 87 Spanish families affected by HAE. Out of 87 screened families, we have detected exon 8 mutations in 26. Among these, 17 different mutations were identified: 14 point mutations and 3 frameshift. Seven of the point mutations and the three frameshift were not previously reported. Mutations were: S438P; R444P; V451G; W460X; V468D; G471E; X479R; S417fsX427; I440fsX450; E429fsX450. The rest of the families presented previously reported mutations, 5 missense and two nonsense. In none of the 26 families was an additional change identified in the rest of the exons by SSCP, and, in 20 out of the 22 families with point mutation, we verified that the mutation did not affect a healthy relative. Seven of these families had no history of the disease, and in five of them we were able to verify that the progenitors did not have the mutation. Therefore, they were de novo mutations. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Beta thalassaemia mutations in Sardinians: implications for prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosatelli, C; Leoni, G B; Tuveri, T; Scalas, M T; Di Tucci, A; Cao, A

    1987-01-01

    In this study we have characterised by oligonucleotide hybridisation and direct restriction endonuclease analysis the beta thalassaemia mutation in 494 Sardinian beta thalassaemia heterozygotes. The most prevalent mutation, accounting for 95.4% of the cases, was the nonsense mutation at codon 39. The remainder, in decreasing order of frequency, were a frameshift at codon 6 (2.2%), beta + IVS-1, nt 110 (0.4%), and beta + IVS-2, nt 745 (0.4%). This information allows prenatal diagnosis by DNA analysis to be made in the great majority of Sardinian couples at risk for beta thalassaemia. Images PMID:3031299

  19. Oncogenic mutations of thyroid hormone receptor β

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Won; Zhao, Li; Willingham, Mark; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    The C-terminal frame-shift mutant of the thyroid hormone receptor TRβ1, PV, functions as an oncogene. An important question is whether the oncogenic activity of mutated TRβ1 is uniquely dependent on the PV mutated sequence. Using four C-terminal frame-shift mutants—PV, Mkar, Mdbs, and AM—we examined that region in the oncogenic actions of TRβ1 mutants. Remarkably, these C-terminal mutants induced similar growth of tumors in mouse xenograft models. Molecular analyses showed that they physically interacted with the p85α regulatory subunit of PI3K similarly in cells. In vitro GST-binding assay showed that they bound to the C-terminal Src-homology 2 (CSH2) of p85α with markedly higher avidity. The sustained association of mutants with p85α led to activation of the common PI3K-AKT-ERK/STAT3 signaling to promote cell proliferation and invasion and to inhibit apoptosis. Thus, these results argue against the oncogenic activity of PV being uniquely dependent on the PV mutated sequence. Rather, these four mutants could favor a C-terminal conformation that interacted with the CSH2 domain of p85α to initiate activation of PI3K to relay downstream signaling to promote tumorigenesis. Thus, we propose that the mutated C-terminal region of TRβ1 could function as an “onco-domain” and TRβ1 is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25924236

  20. Analysis and Simulation for a Spotlight-Mode Aircraft SAR in Circular Flight Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, M.; Chen, M.

    1993-01-01

    A spotlight aircraft SAR in a circular flight path can efficiently obtain an image with very high azimuth resolution or a wider azimuth viewing angle. An analysis on the spotlight SAR is made regarding the required PRF, the predicted resolution, and the computation complexity as a function of the aircraft altitude and the distance between a target and the center of the flight path projection. An efficient processing algorithm based on the exact wide beam spectrum is presented. The results of simulation indicate that the impulse responses meet the predicted resolution performance.

  1. Programmed Ribosomal Frameshift Alters Expression of West Nile Virus Genes and Facilitates Virus Replication in Birds and Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fangyao; Owens, Nick; Bosco-Lauth, Angela M.; Nagasaki, Tomoko; Rudd, Stephen; Brault, Aaron C.; Bowen, Richard A.; Hall, Roy A.; van den Hurk, Andrew F.; Khromykh, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a human pathogen of significant medical importance with close to 40,000 cases of encephalitis and more than 1,600 deaths reported in the US alone since its first emergence in New York in 1999. Previous studies identified a motif in the beginning of non-structural gene NS2A of encephalitic flaviviruses including WNV which induces programmed −1 ribosomal frameshift (PRF) resulting in production of an additional NS protein NS1′. We have previously demonstrated that mutant WNV with abolished PRF was attenuated in mice. Here we have extended our previous observations by showing that PRF does not appear to have a significant role in virus replication, virion formation, and viral spread in several cell lines in vitro. However, we have also shown that PRF induces an over production of structural proteins over non-structural proteins in virus-infected cells and that mutation abolishing PRF is present in ∼11% of the wild type virus population. In vivo experiments in house sparrows using wild type and PRF mutant of New York 99 strain of WNV viruses showed some attenuation for the PRF mutant virus. Moreover, PRF mutant of Kunjin strain of WNV showed significant decrease compared to wild type virus infection in dissemination of the virus from the midgut through the haemocoel, and ultimately the capacity of infected mosquitoes to transmit virus. Thus our results demonstrate an important role for PRF in regulating expression of viral genes and consequently virus replication in avian and mosquito hosts. PMID:25375107

  2. Contribution of the intercalated adenosine at the helical junction to the stability of the gag-pro frameshifting pseudoknot from mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Theimer, C A; Giedroc, D P

    2000-03-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) gag-pro frameshifting pseudoknot is an H-type RNA pseudoknot that contains an unpaired adenosine (A14) at the junction of the two helical stems required for efficient frameshifting activity. The thermodynamics of folding of the MMTV vpk pseudoknot have been compared with a structurally homologous mutant RNA containing a G x U to G-C substitution at the helical junction (U13C RNA), and an A14 deletion mutation in that context (U13CdeltaA14 RNA). Dual wavelength optical melting and differential scanning calorimetry reveal that the unpaired adenosine contributes 0.7 (+/-0.2) kcal mol(-1) at low salt and 1.4 (+/-0.2) kcal mol(-1) to the stability (deltaG(0)37) at 1 M NaCl. This stability increment derives from a favorable enthalpy contribution to the stability deltadeltaH = 6.6 (+/-2.1) kcal mol(-1) with deltadeltaG(0)37 comparable to that predicted for the stacking of a dangling 3' unpaired adenosine on a G-C or G x U base pair. Group 1A monovalent ions, NH4+, Mg2+, and Co(NH3)6(3+) ions stabilize the A14 and deltaA14 pseudoknots to largely identical extents, revealing that the observed differences in stability in these molecules do not derive from a differential or specific accumulation of ions in the A14 versus deltaA14 pseudoknots. Knowledge of this free energy contribution may facilitate the prediction of RNA pseudoknot formation from primary nucleotide sequence (Gultyaev et al., 1999, RNA 5:609-617).

  3. Functional analysis of a frame-shift mutant of the dihydropyridine receptor pore subunit (alpha1S) expressing two complementary protein fragments.

    PubMed

    Ahern, C A; Vallejo, P; Mortenson, L; Coronado, R

    2001-01-01

    The L-type Ca2+ channel formed by the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) of skeletal muscle senses the membrane voltage and opens the ryanodine receptor (RyR1). This channel-to-channel coupling is essential for Ca2+ signaling but poorly understood. We characterized a single-base frame-shift mutant of alpha1S, the pore subunit of the DHPR, that has the unusual ability to function voltage sensor for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling by virtue of expressing two complementary hemi-Ca2+ channel fragments. Functional analysis of cDNA transfected dysgenic myotubes lacking alpha1S were carried out using voltage-clamp, confocal Ca2+ indicator fluoresence, epitope immunofluorescence and immunoblots of expressed proteins. The frame-shift mutant (fs-alpha1S) expressed the N-terminal half of alpha1S (M1 to L670) and the C-terminal half starting at M701 separately. The C-terminal fragment was generated by an unexpected restart of translation of the fs-alpha1S message at M701 and was eliminated by a M701I mutation. Protein-protein complementation between the two fragments produced recovery of skeletal-type EC coupling but not L-type Ca2+ current. A premature stop codon in the II-III loop may not necessarily cause a loss of DHPR function due to a restart of translation within the II-III loop, presumably by a mechanism involving leaky ribosomal scanning. In these cases, function is recovered by expression of complementary protein fragments from the same cDNA. DHPR-RyR1 interactions can be achieved via protein-protein complementation between hemi-Ca2+ channel proteins, hence an intact II-III loop is not essential for coupling the DHPR voltage sensor to the opening of RyR1 channel.

  4. Mitotic Recombination in Patients with Ichthyosis Causes Reversion of Dominant Mutations in KRT10

    PubMed Central

    Choate, Keith A.; Lu, Yin; Zhou, Jing; Choi, Murim; Elias, Peter M.; Farhi, Anita; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Crumrine, Debra; Williams, Mary L.; Nopper, Amy J.; Bree, Alanna; Milstone, Leonard M.; Lifton, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Somatic loss of wild-type alleles can produce disease traits such as neoplasia. Conversely, somatic loss of disease-causing mutations can revert phenotypes, however these events are infrequently observed. We demonstrate that ichthyosis with confetti, a severe, sporadic skin disease, is associated with thousands of revertant clones of normal skin that arise from loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 17q via mitotic recombination. This enabled mapping and identification of disease-causing mutations in keratin 10 (KRT10); all result in frameshifts into the same alternative reading frame, producing an arginine-rich C-terminal peptide that redirects keratin 10 from the cytokeratin filament network to the nucleolus. The general rarity of spontaneous reversion and the specific absence of reversion of other dominant mutations in KRT10 implicate the frameshift peptide in the appearance of revertants. These results may have ramifications for reversion of other mutations. PMID:20798280

  5. Personalized exon skipping strategies to address clustered non-deletion dystrophin mutations.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Sarah; Meloni, Penny L; Muntoni, Francesco; Kim, Jihee; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D

    2010-12-01

    Antisense oligomer induced exon skipping is showing promise as a therapy to reduce the severity of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To date, the focus has been on excluding single exons flanking frame-shifting deletions in the dystrophin gene. However, a third of all Duchenne muscular dystrophy causing mutations are more subtle DNA changes. Thirty nine dystrophin exons are potentially frame-shifting and mutations in these will require the targeted removal of exon blocks to generate in-frame transcripts. We report that clustered non-deletion mutations in the dystrophin gene respond differently to different antisense oligomer preparations targeting the same dual exon block, the removal of which bypasses the mutation and restores the open reading-frame. The personalized nature of the responses to antisense oligomer application presents additional challenges to the induction of multi-exon skipping with a single oligomer preparation.

  6. [Gene mutation analysis of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets].

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Ma, Hong-Wei; Li, Fang; Hu, Man; Ren, Shuang; Yu, Ya-Fen; Zhao, Gui-Jie

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the frequency and type of PHEX gene mutations in children with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), the possible presence of mutational hot spots, and the relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Clinical data of 10 children with XLH was retrospectively reviewed. The relationship between gene mutation type and severity of XLH was evaluated. PHEX gene mutations were detected in all 10 children with XLH, including 6 cases of missense mutation, 2 cases of splice site mutation, 1 case of frameshift mutation, and 1 case of nonsense mutation. Two new mutations, c.2048T>C and IVS14+1delAG, were found. The type of PHEX gene mutation was not associated with the degree of short stature and leg deformity (P=0.571 and 0.467), and the mutation site was also not associated with the degree of short stature and leg deformity (P=0.400 and 1.000). Missense mutation is the most common type of PHEX gene mutation in children with XLH, and c.2048T>C and IVS14+1delAG are two new PHEX gene mutations. The type and site of PHEX gene mutation are not associated with the severity of XLH.

  7. Probing the sequence effects on NarI-induced -2 frameshift mutagenesis by dynamic 19F NMR, UV and CD spectroscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nidhi; Li, Yuyuan; Zhang, Li; Meneni, Srinivasa; Cho, Bongsup

    2012-01-01

    The NarI recognition sequence (5′-G1G2CG3CN-3′) is the most vulnerable hot spot for frameshift mutagenesis induced by the carcinogen 2-aminofluorene and its analogs in Escherichia coli. Lesioning of the guanine in the G3 position induces an especially high frequency of -2 deletion mutations; vulnerability to these mutations is modulated by the nature of nucleotide in the N position (C ~ A > G ≫ T). The objective of the present study was to probe the structural basis of this N-mediated influence on the propensity of the G3-lesion to form a slipped mutagenic intermediate (SMI) during translesion synthesis. We studied NarI-based fully paired [(5′-CTCG1G2CG3*CNATC-3′)(5′-GATNCGGCCGAG-3′), N = dC or dT] and -2 deletion [(5′-CTCG1G2CG3*CNATC-3′)(5′-GATNGCCGAG-3′), N = dC or dT] duplexes, in which G* was either AF [N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene] or the 19F probe FAF [N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-7-fluoro-2-aminofluorene]. The latter sequences mimic the bulged SMI for -2 deletion mutations. Dynamic 19F NMR, circular dichroism, and UV-melting results indicated that the NarI-dC/-2 deletion duplex adopts exclusively an intercalated conformer, whereas the NarI-dT/-2 deletion duplex exists as multiple conformers. The data support the presence of a putative equilibrium between a carcinogen-intercalated and a carcinogen-exposed SMI for the dT/-2 duplex. A similar dT-induced conformational heterogeneity was observed for the fully-paired duplexes in which all three guanines were individually modified by AF or FAF. The frequency of the carcinogen stacked S-conformation was found to be highest (69~75 %) at the G3 hot spot in NarI-dC duplexes. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the conformational stability of the SMI is a critical determinant for the efficacy of -2 frameshift mutagenesis in the NarI sequence. We also provide evidence for AF/FAF conformational compatibility in the NarI sequences. PMID:17960913

  8. A novel PCCB mutation in a Thai patient with propionic acidemia identified by exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2015-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an inborn error of metabolism, caused by mutations in either the PCCA or PCCB gene, leading to mitochondrial accumulation of propionyl-CoA and its by-products. Here we report a 6-year-old Thai boy with PA who was born to consanguineous parents. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous frameshift insertion (c.379_380insA; p.T127NfsX160) in the PCCB gene, expanding its mutational spectrum.

  9. GNAS Mutations in Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type 1a and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Manuel C; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) is characterized by hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphatemia due to parathyroid hormone resistance, in association with the features of Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). PHP1a is caused by maternally inherited inactivating mutations of Gs-alpha, which is encoded by a complex imprinted locus termed GNAS. Paternally inherited mutations can lead either to pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP) characterized by AHO alone, or to progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH), characterized by severe heterotopic ossification. The clinical aspects and molecular genetics of PHP1a and its related disorders are reviewed together with the 343 kindreds with Gs-alpha germline mutations reported so far in the literature. These 343 (176 different) mutations are scattered throughout the 13 exons that encode Gs-alpha and consist of 44.9% frameshift, 28.0% missense, 14.0% nonsense, and 9.0% splice-site mutations, 3.2% in-frame deletions or insertions, and 0.9% whole or partial gene deletions. Frameshift and other highly disruptive mutations were more frequent in the reported 37 POH kindreds than in PHP1a/PPHP kindreds (97.3% vs. 68.7%, P < 0.0001). This mutation update and respective genotype–phenotype data may be of use for diagnostic and research purposes and contribute to a better understanding of these complex disorders. PMID:25219572

  10. Structural insights into translational recoding by frameshift suppressor tRNASufJ

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, Crystal E.; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Dunkle, Jack A.; Miles, Stacey J.; Dunham, Christine M.

    2014-10-28

    The three-nucleotide mRNA reading frame is tightly regulated during translation to ensure accurate protein expression. Translation errors that lead to aberrant protein production can result from the uncoupled movement of the tRNA in either the 5' or 3' direction on mRNA. Here, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of +1 frameshift suppressor tRNASufJ, a tRNA known to decode four, instead of three, nucleotides. Frameshift suppressor tRNASufJ contains an insertion 5' to its anticodon, expanding the anticodon loop from seven to eight nucleotides. Our results indicate that the expansion of the anticodon loop of either ASLSufJ or tRNASufJ does not affect its affinity for the A site of the ribosome. Structural analyses of both ASLSufJ and ASLThr bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome demonstrate both ASLs decode in the zero frame. Although the anticodon loop residues 34–37 are superimposable with canonical seven-nucleotide ASLs, the single C31.5 insertion between nucleotides 31 and 32 in ASLSufJ imposes a conformational change of the anticodon stem, that repositions and tilts the ASL toward the back of the A site. Further modeling analyses reveal that this tilting would cause a distortion in full-length A-site tRNASufJ during tRNA selection and possibly impede gripping of the anticodon stem by 16S rRNA nucleotides in the P site. Together, these data implicate tRNA distortion as a major driver of noncanonical translation events such as frameshifting.

  11. Structural insights into translational recoding by frameshift suppressor tRNASufJ

    DOE PAGES

    Fagan, Crystal E.; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Dunkle, Jack A.; ...

    2014-10-28

    The three-nucleotide mRNA reading frame is tightly regulated during translation to ensure accurate protein expression. Translation errors that lead to aberrant protein production can result from the uncoupled movement of the tRNA in either the 5' or 3' direction on mRNA. Here, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of +1 frameshift suppressor tRNASufJ, a tRNA known to decode four, instead of three, nucleotides. Frameshift suppressor tRNASufJ contains an insertion 5' to its anticodon, expanding the anticodon loop from seven to eight nucleotides. Our results indicate that the expansion of the anticodon loop of either ASLSufJ or tRNASufJ does notmore » affect its affinity for the A site of the ribosome. Structural analyses of both ASLSufJ and ASLThr bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome demonstrate both ASLs decode in the zero frame. Although the anticodon loop residues 34–37 are superimposable with canonical seven-nucleotide ASLs, the single C31.5 insertion between nucleotides 31 and 32 in ASLSufJ imposes a conformational change of the anticodon stem, that repositions and tilts the ASL toward the back of the A site. Further modeling analyses reveal that this tilting would cause a distortion in full-length A-site tRNASufJ during tRNA selection and possibly impede gripping of the anticodon stem by 16S rRNA nucleotides in the P site. Together, these data implicate tRNA distortion as a major driver of noncanonical translation events such as frameshifting.« less

  12. Tools and Equipment in Nontraditional Spaces: Safety and Liability Issues. Safety Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken R.

    2017-01-01

    "Safety Spotlight" encourages the submission of questions from Technology and Engineering (T&E) Educators, and this month's question involves the risks of placing hazardous equipment (e.g., 3D printer, laser cutter, CNC router, etc.) in a non-technology & engineering lab under the supervision of teachers not certified to teach…

  13. Diarrhea & Child Care: Controlling Diarrhea in Out-of-Home Child Care. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Robin B.; Pickering, Larry K.

    This report, the fourth in the National Center for Early Development and Learning's (NCEDL) "Spotlights" series, is based on excerpts from a paper presented during a "Research into Practice in Infant/Toddler Care" synthesis conference in fall 1997. The report addresses controlling diarrhea in out-of-home child care. The report…

  14. The Ever-Present Demand for Public Computing Resources. CDS Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Core Data Service (CDS) Spotlight focuses on public computing resources, including lab/cluster workstations in buildings, virtual lab/cluster workstations, kiosks, laptop and tablet checkout programs, and workstation access in unscheduled classrooms. The findings are derived from 758 CDS 2012 participating institutions. A dataset of 529…

  15. New Book Examines Out-of-Home Care. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Early Development & Learning, Chapel Hill, NC.

    Noting that one of the biggest challenges in the United States today is the increasing number of infants and toddlers younger than age 3 who are cared for by someone other than their parents during work hours, this issue of NCEDL Spotlights announces the publication of a book examining out-of-home care for infants and toddlers. The book is an…

  16. "Libel Tourism" Puts British and American Defamation Standards in the Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the College Art Association's decision to settle with a scholar who felt defamed by an article in one of its scholarly journals which shines a spotlight on so-called "libel tourism." When the College Art Association decided recently to settle rather than fight a possible libel action in Britain over a book review…

  17. Respiratory Infections: Respiratory Infections Challenge Child Care Centers. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Albert M.; Henderson, Frederick W.

    This report, the fifth in the National Center for Early Development & Learning's (NCEDL) "Spotlight" series, is based on excerpts from a paper presented during the "Research into Practice in Infant/Toddler Care" synthesis conference in fall 1997. The report addresses preventing respiratory infections in child care centers.…

  18. Assessing Readiness: How Should We Define Readiness? NCEDL Spotlights, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisels, Samuel J.

    This report, the third in the National Center for Early Development & Learning's (NCEDL) "Spotlight" series, is based on excerpts from a paper presented during a "Kindergarten Transitions" synthesis conference in early 1998. The report addresses defining readiness for school and assessing a child's readiness for school. The report notes that…

  19. Spotlight on Speech Codes 2007: The State of Free Speech on Our Nation's Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    Last year, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) conducted its first-ever comprehensive study of restrictions on speech at America's colleges and universities, "Spotlight on Speech Codes 2006: The State of Free Speech on our Nation's Campuses." In light of the essentiality of free expression to a truly liberal…

  20. The Ever-Present Demand for Public Computing Resources. CDS Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirani, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    This Core Data Service (CDS) Spotlight focuses on public computing resources, including lab/cluster workstations in buildings, virtual lab/cluster workstations, kiosks, laptop and tablet checkout programs, and workstation access in unscheduled classrooms. The findings are derived from 758 CDS 2012 participating institutions. A dataset of 529…

  1. Putting the Learner in the Spotlight--Future Directions for English Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, Anne P. A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper asserts that English teachers' understanding of their professionalism enables them to "put the learner in the spotlight" through their highly-developed awareness of local contexts of English use. Changing attitudes to English language teacher identity include a revaluation of the "native-non-native speaker" dichotomy…

  2. "Libel Tourism" Puts British and American Defamation Standards in the Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the College Art Association's decision to settle with a scholar who felt defamed by an article in one of its scholarly journals which shines a spotlight on so-called "libel tourism." When the College Art Association decided recently to settle rather than fight a possible libel action in Britain over a book review…

  3. An imaging algorithm based on keystone transform for one-stationary bistatic SAR of spotlight mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xiaolan; Behner, Florian; Reuter, Simon; Nies, Holger; Loffeld, Otmar; Huang, Lijia; Hu, Donghui; Ding, Chibiao

    2012-12-01

    This article proposes an imaging algorithm based on Keystone Transform for bistatic SAR with a stationary receiver. It can efficiently be applied to high-resolution spotlight mode, and can directly be process the bistatic SAR data which have been ranged compressed by the synchronization reference pulses. Both simulation and experimental results validate the good performance of this algorithm.

  4. Translational recoding as a feedback controller: systems approaches reveal polyamine-specific effects on the antizyme ribosomal frameshift

    PubMed Central

    Rato, Claudia; Amirova, Svetlana R.; Bates, Declan G.; Stansfield, Ian; Wallace, Heather M.

    2011-01-01

    The antizyme protein, Oaz1, regulates synthesis of the polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine by controlling stability of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme, ornithine decarboxylase. Antizyme mRNA translation depends upon a polyamine-stimulated +1 ribosomal frameshift, forming a complex negative feedback system in which the translational frameshifting event may be viewed in engineering terms as a feedback controller for intracellular polyamine concentrations. In this article, we present the first systems level study of the characteristics of this feedback controller, using an integrated experimental and modeling approach. Quantitative analysis of mutant yeast strains in which polyamine synthesis and interconversion were blocked revealed marked variations in frameshift responses to the different polyamines. Putrescine and spermine, but not spermidine, showed evidence of co-operative stimulation of frameshifting and the existence of multiple ribosome binding sites. Combinatorial polyamine treatments showed polyamines compete for binding to common ribosome sites. Using concepts from enzyme kinetics and control engineering, a mathematical model of the translational controller was developed to describe these complex ribosomal responses to combinatorial polyamine effects. Each one of a range of model predictions was successfully validated against experimental frameshift frequencies measured in S-adenosylmethionine-decarboxylase and antizyme mutants, as well as in the wild-type genetic background. PMID:21303766

  5. Sporadic Kindler Syndrome with a novel mutation*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira; Heckler, Gláucia Thomas; Fong, Kenneth; Lai-Cheong, Joey; McGrath, John

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old woman with Kindler syndrome, a rare form of epidermolysis bullosa. Clinically, since childhood, she had widespread pigmentary changes in her skin as well as photosensitivity and fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. The mucosal involvement led to an erosive stomatitis as well as esophageal, anal and vaginal stenoses, requiring surgical intervention. The diagnosis of Kindler syndrome was confirmed by DNA sequencing with compound heterozygosity for a nonsense/frameshift combination of mutations (p.Arg110X; p.Ala289GlyfsX7) in the FERMT1 gene. PMID:24346923

  6. Spotlight on DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib Vaccine (Infanrix hexa).

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Sohita

    2010-10-01

    Infanrix hexa, administered intramuscularly, is a diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis, hepatitis B (HBV), inactivated poliomyelitis and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine, indicated for primary and booster vaccination of infants. Infanrix hexa should be administered as a two- or three-dose primary vaccination course in infants aged < or =6 months, followed by booster vaccination between 11 and 18 months of age, with an interval of at least 6 months between the last dose of primary vaccination and the booster dose. This spotlight reviews the immunogenicity and protective effectiveness, as well as the reactogenicity and safety of Infanrix hexa. Infanrix hexa as primary and booster vaccination was safe and highly immunogenic for all its component toxoids/antigens in infants aged <2 years, regardless of vaccination schedules. Its immunogenicity and safety profiles were generally similar to those of currently available vaccines, the diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis-based pentavalent vaccines plus monovalent HBV or Hib vaccines. In large clinical studies, Infanrix hexa elicited a strong immune response against vaccine toxoids/antigens, as indicated by high seroprotection/seropositivity/vaccine response rates and geometric mean titers. Moreover, antibodies against vaccine toxoids/antigens persisted for up to a mean of approximately 6 years after booster vaccination, and the vaccine induced long-term immune memory against hepatitis B surface antigen and Hib antigen. A strong immune response against Infanrix hexa toxoids/antigens after primary vaccination was also induced in infants who had received a dose of HBV vaccine at birth and in pre-term infants, although the response in the latter group was somewhat lower than that in full-term infants. In addition, when coadministered with other childhood vaccines, the immunogenicity of Infanrix hexa or that of the concomitantly administered vaccine was generally not altered. Hexavalent vaccines

  7. APC germline mutations in families with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    De Queiroz Rossanese, Lillian Barbosa; De Lima Marson, Fernando Augusto; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Coy, Claudio Saddy Rodrigues; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2013-11-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) germline mutations are responsible for the occurrence of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Somatic mutations lead to malignant transformation of adenomas. In this context, considering the significance of APC germline mutations in FAP, we aimed to identify APC germline mutations. In the present study, 20 FAP patients were enrolled. The determination of APC germline mutations was performed using sequencing, and the mutations were compared with clinical markers (gender, age at diagnosis, smoking habits, TNM stage, Astler‑Coller stage, degree of differentiation of adenocarcinoma). The data were compared using the SPSS program, with the Fisher's exact test and χ2 test, considering α=0.05. According to the main results in our sample, 16 alleles with deleterious mutations (80% of the patients) were identified while 7 (35%) patients had no deleterious mutations. There was a predominance of nonsense (45% of the patients) and frameshift (20% of the patients) mutations. There was no statistical significance between the APC germline mutations identified and the clinical variables considered in our study. Only TNM stage was associated with the presence of deleterious mutations. Patients with deleterious mutations had an OR, 0.086 (IC=0.001-0.984); TNM stage I+II in comparison with III+IV, when compared with the patients with no deleterious mutations identified. In this context, as a conclusion, we demonstrated the molecular heterogeneity of APC germline mutations in FAP and the difficulty to perform molecular diagnostics in a Brazilian population, considering the admixed population analyzed.

  8. TP53 Mutational Spectrum in Endometrioid and Serous Endometrial Cancers.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Anne M; Martelotto, Luciano G; De Filippo, Maria R; Piscuglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Hussein, Yaser R; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Soslow, Robert A; Weigelt, Britta

    2016-07-01

    Endometrial carcinomas (ECs) are heterogeneous at the genetic level. Although TP53 mutations are highly recurrent in serous endometrial carcinomas (SECs), these are also present in a subset of endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (EECs). Here, we sought to define the frequency, pattern, distribution, and type of TP53 somatic mutations in ECs by performing a reanalysis of the publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). A total of 228 EECs (n=186) and SECs (n=42) from the TCGA data set, for which an integrated genomic characterization was performed, were interrogated for the presence and type of TP53 mutations, and for mutations in genes frequently mutated in ECs. TP53 mutations were found in 15% of EECs and 88% of SECs, and in 91% of copy-number-high and 35% of polymerase (DNA directed), epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) integrative genomic subtypes. In addition to differences in prevalence, variations in the type and pattern of TP53 mutations were observed between histologic types and between integrative genomic subtypes. TP53 hotspot mutations were significantly more frequently found in SECs (46%) than in EECs (15%). TP53-mutant EECs significantly more frequently harbored a co-occurring PTEN mutation than TP53-mutant SECs. Finally, a subset of TP53-mutant ECs (22%) was found to harbor frameshift or nonsense mutations. Given that nonsense and frameshift TP53 mutations result in distinct p53 immunohistochemical results that require careful interpretation, and that EECs and SECs display different patterns, types, and distributions of TP53 mutations, the use of the TP53/p53 status alone for the differential diagnosis of EECs and SECs may not be sufficient.

  9. Stimulation of -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting by a metabolite-responsive RNA pseudoknot.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ming-Yuan; Lin, Szu-Chieh; Chang, Kung-Yao

    2010-06-01

    Specific recognition of metabolites by functional RNA motifs within mRNAs has emerged as a crucial regulatory strategy for feedback control of biochemical reactions. Such riboswitches have been demonstrated to regulate different gene expression processes, including transcriptional termination and translational initiation in prokaryotic cells, as well as splicing in eukaryotic cells. The regulatory process is usually mediated by modulating the accessibility of specific sequence information of the expression platforms via metabolite-induced RNA conformational rearrangement. In eukaryotic systems, viral and the more limited number of cellular decoding -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) are commonly promoted by a 3' mRNA pseudoknot. In addition, such -1 PRF is generally constitutive rather than being regulatory, and usually results in a fixed ratio of products. We report here an RNA pseudoknot capable of stimulating -1 PRF whose efficiency can be tuned in response to the concentration of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and the improvement of its frameshifting efficiency by RNA engineering. In addition to providing an alternative approach for small-molecule regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells, such a metabolite-responsive pseudoknot suggests a plausible mechanism for metabolite-driven translational regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic systems.

  10. Orsay virus utilizes ribosomal frameshifting to express a novel protein that is incorporated into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hongbing; Franz, Carl J.; Wu, Guang; Renshaw, Hilary; Zhao, Guoyan; Firth, Andrew E.; Wang, David

    2014-02-15

    Orsay virus is the first identified virus that is capable of naturally infecting Caenorhabditis elegans. Although it is most closely related to nodaviruses, Orsay virus differs from nodaviruses in its genome organization. In particular, the Orsay virus RNA2 segment encodes a putative novel protein of unknown function, termed delta, which is absent from all known nodaviruses. Here we present evidence that Orsay virus utilizes a ribosomal frameshifting strategy to express a novel fusion protein from the viral capsid (alpha) and delta ORFs. Moreover, the fusion protein was detected in purified virus fractions, demonstrating that it is most likely incorporated into Orsay virions. Furthermore, N-terminal sequencing of both the fusion protein and the capsid protein demonstrated that these proteins must be translated from a non-canonical initiation site. While the function of the alpha–delta fusion remains cryptic, these studies provide novel insights into the fundamental properties of this new clade of viruses. - Highlights: • Orsay virus encodes a novel fusion protein by a ribosomal frameshifting mechanism. • Orsay capsid and fusion protein is translated from a non-canonical initiation site. • The fusion protein is likely incorporated into Orsay virions.

  11. MACSE: Multiple Alignment of Coding SEquences accounting for frameshifts and stop codons.

    PubMed

    Ranwez, Vincent; Harispe, Sébastien; Delsuc, Frédéric; Douzery, Emmanuel J P

    2011-01-01

    Until now the most efficient solution to align nucleotide sequences containing open reading frames was to use indirect procedures that align amino acid translation before reporting the inferred gap positions at the codon level. There are two important pitfalls with this approach. Firstly, any premature stop codon impedes using such a strategy. Secondly, each sequence is translated with the same reading frame from beginning to end, so that the presence of a single additional nucleotide leads to both aberrant translation and alignment.We present an algorithm that has the same space and time complexity as the classical Needleman-Wunsch algorithm while accommodating sequencing errors and other biological deviations from the coding frame. The resulting pairwise coding sequence alignment method was extended to a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) algorithm implemented in a program called MACSE (Multiple Alignment of Coding SEquences accounting for frameshifts and stop codons). MACSE is the first automatic solution to align protein-coding gene datasets containing non-functional sequences (pseudogenes) without disrupting the underlying codon structure. It has also proved useful in detecting undocumented frameshifts in public database sequences and in aligning next-generation sequencing reads/contigs against a reference coding sequence.MACSE is distributed as an open-source java file executable with freely available source code and can be used via a web interface at: http://mbb.univ-montp2.fr/macse.

  12. Anti-frameshifting ligand reduces the conformational plasticity of the SARS virus pseudoknot.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Dustin B; Soong, Jingchyuan; Sikkema, William K A; Woodside, Michael T

    2014-02-12

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) stimulated by mRNA pseudoknots regulates gene expression in many viruses, making pseudoknots potential targets for anti-viral drugs. The mechanism by which pseudoknots trigger -1 PRF, however, remains controversial, with several competing models. Recent work showed that high -1 PRF efficiency was linked to high pseudoknot conformational plasticity via the formation of alternate conformers. We tested whether pseudoknots bound with an anti-frameshifting ligand exhibited a similar correlation between conformational plasticity and -1 PRF efficiency by measuring the effects of a ligand that was found to inhibit -1 PRF in the SARS coronavirus on the conformational dynamics of the SARS pseudoknot. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy to unfold pseudoknots mechanically, we found that the ligand binding effectively abolished the formation of alternate conformers. This result extends the connection between -1 PRF and conformational dynamics and, moreover, suggests that targeting the conformational dynamics of pseudoknots may be an effective strategy for anti-viral drug design.

  13. Programmed ribosomal frameshifting in the expression of the regulator of intestinal stem cell proliferation, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)

    PubMed Central

    Barriscale, Kathy A; Firth, Andrew E; Jud, Molly C; Letsou, Anthea; Manning, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    A programmed ribosomal frameshift (PRF) in the decoding of APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) mRNA has been identified and characterized in caenorhabditis worms, Drosophila and mosquitoes. The frameshift product lacks the C-terminal approximately one-third of the product of standard decoding and instead has a short sequence encoded by the -1 frame which is just 13 residues in C. elegans, but is 125 in D. melanogaster. The frameshift site is A AAA AAC in Caenorhabditids, fruit flies and the mosquitoes studied while a variant A AAA AAA is found in some other nematodes. The predicted secondary RNA structure of the downstream stimulators varies considerably in the species studied. In the twelve sequenced Drosophila genomes, it is a long stem with a four-way junction in its loop. In the five sequenced Caenorhabditis species, it is a short RNA pseudoknot with an additional stem in loop 1. The efficiency of frameshifting varies significantly, depending on the particular stimulator within the frameshift cassette, when tested with reporter constructs in rabbit reticulocyte lysates. Phylogenetic analysis of the distribution of APC programmed ribosomal frameshifting cassettes suggests it has an ancient origin and raises questions about the possibility of synthesis of alternative protein products during expression of APC in other organisms such as humans. The origin of APC as a PRF candidate emerged from a prior study of evolutionary signatures derived from comparative analysis of the 12 fly genomes. Three other proposed PRF candidates (Xbp1, CG32736, CG14047) with switches in conservation of reading frames are likely explained by mechanisms other than PRF. PMID:21593603

  14. The evolution of cellular deficiency in GATA2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Rachel E.; Milne, Paul; Jardine, Laura; Zandi, Sasan; Swierczek, Sabina I.; McGovern, Naomi; Cookson, Sharon; Ferozepurwalla, Zaveyna; Langridge, Alexander; Pagan, Sarah; Gennery, Andrew; Heiskanen-Kosma, Tarja; Hämäläinen, Sari; Seppänen, Mikko; Helbert, Matthew; Tholouli, Eleni; Gambineri, Eleonora; Reykdal, Sigrún; Gottfreðsson, Magnús; Thaventhiran, James E.; Morris, Emma; Hirschfield, Gideon; Richter, Alex G.; Jolles, Stephen; Bacon, Chris M.; Hambleton, Sophie; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Bryceson, Yenan; Allen, Carl; Prchal, Josef T.; Dick, John E.; Bigley, Venetia

    2014-01-01

    Constitutive heterozygous GATA2 mutation is associated with deafness, lymphedema, mononuclear cytopenias, infection, myelodysplasia (MDS), and acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, we describe a cross-sectional analysis of 24 patients and 6 relatives with 14 different frameshift or substitution mutations of GATA2. A pattern of dendritic cell, monocyte, B, and natural killer (NK) lymphoid deficiency (DCML deficiency) with elevated Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) was observed in all 20 patients phenotyped, including patients with Emberger syndrome, monocytopenia with Mycobacterium avium complex (MonoMAC), and MDS. Four unaffected relatives had a normal phenotype indicating that cellular deficiency may evolve over time or is incompletely penetrant, while 2 developed subclinical cytopenias or elevated Flt3L. Patients with GATA2 mutation maintained higher hemoglobin, neutrophils, and platelets and were younger than controls with acquired MDS and wild-type GATA2. Frameshift mutations were associated with earlier age of clinical presentation than substitution mutations. Elevated Flt3L, loss of bone marrow progenitors, and clonal myelopoiesis were early signs of disease evolution. Clinical progression was associated with increasingly elevated Flt3L, depletion of transitional B cells, CD56bright NK cells, naïve T cells, and accumulation of terminally differentiated NK and CD8+ memory T cells. These studies provide a framework for clinical and laboratory monitoring of patients with GATA2 mutation and may inform therapeutic decision-making. PMID:24345756

  15. Novel autosomal recessive gene mutations in aquaporin-2 in two Chinese congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Jing; Nie, Min; Duan, Lian; Gu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has linked novel mutations in the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2) and aquaporin-2 gene (AQP2) present in Southeast Asian populations to congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). To investigate mutations in 2 distinct Chinese pedigrees with NDI patients, clinical data, laboratory findings, and genomic DNA sequences from peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed in two 5.5- and 8-year-old boys (proband 1 and 2, respectively) and their first-degree relatives. Water intake, urinary volume, body weight and medication use were recorded. Mutations in coding regions and intron-exon borders of both AQP2 and AVPR2 gene were sequenced. Three mutations in AQP2 were detected, including previously reported heterozygous frameshift mutation (c.127_128delCA, p.Gln43Aspfs ×63) inherited from the mother, a novel frameshift mutation (c.501_502insC, p.Val168Argfs ×30, inherited from the father) in proband 1 and a novel missense mutation (c. 643G>A, p. G215S), inherited from both parents in proband 2. In family 2 both parents and one sister were heterozygous carriers of the novel missense mutation. Neither pedigree exhibited mutation in the AVPR2 gene. The patient with truncated AQP2 may present with much more severe NDI manifestations. Identification of these novel AQP2 gene mutations expands the AQP2 genotypic spectrum and may contribute to etiological diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:26064258

  16. Novel autosomal recessive gene mutations in aquaporin-2 in two Chinese congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Cen, Jing; Nie, Min; Duan, Lian; Gu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has linked novel mutations in the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2) and aquaporin-2 gene (AQP2) present in Southeast Asian populations to congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). To investigate mutations in 2 distinct Chinese pedigrees with NDI patients, clinical data, laboratory findings, and genomic DNA sequences from peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed in two 5.5- and 8-year-old boys (proband 1 and 2, respectively) and their first-degree relatives. Water intake, urinary volume, body weight and medication use were recorded. Mutations in coding regions and intron-exon borders of both AQP2 and AVPR2 gene were sequenced. Three mutations in AQP2 were detected, including previously reported heterozygous frameshift mutation (c.127_128delCA, p.Gln43Aspfs ×63) inherited from the mother, a novel frameshift mutation (c.501_502insC, p.Val168Argfs ×30, inherited from the father) in proband 1 and a novel missense mutation (c. 643G>A, p. G215S), inherited from both parents in proband 2. In family 2 both parents and one sister were heterozygous carriers of the novel missense mutation. Neither pedigree exhibited mutation in the AVPR2 gene. The patient with truncated AQP2 may present with much more severe NDI manifestations. Identification of these novel AQP2 gene mutations expands the AQP2 genotypic spectrum and may contribute to etiological diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  17. Effect of endogenous carotenoids on “adaptive” mutation in Escherichia coli FC40

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Bryn A.; Foster, Patricia L.; Timms, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    The appearance over many days of Lac+ frameshift mutations in Escherichia coli strain FC40 incubated on lactose selection plates is a classic example of apparent “adaptive” mutation in an episomal gene. We show that endogenously overproduced carotenoids reduce adaptive mutation under selective conditions by a factor of around two. Carotenoids are known to scavenge singlet oxygen suggesting that the accumulation of oxidative base damage may be an integral part of the adaptive mutation phenomenon. If so, the lesion cannot be 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine since adaptive mutation in FC40 is unaffected by mutM and mutY mutations. If active oxygen species such as singlet oxygen are involved in adaptive mutation then they should also induce frameshift mutations in FC40 under non-selective conditions. We show that such mutations can be induced under non-selective conditions by protoporphyrin photosensitisation and that this photodynamic induction is reduced by a factor of just over two when endogenous carotenoids are present. We argue that the involvement of oxidative damage would in no way be inconsistent with current understanding of the mechanism of adaptive mutation and the role of DNA polymerases. PMID:11166030

  18. Mutations in SOX9, the gene responsible for campomelic dysplasia and autosomal sex reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.; Weller, P.A.; Guioli, S.

    1995-11-01

    Campomelic dysplasia (CD) is a skeletal malformation syndrome frequently accompanied by 46,XY sex reversal. A mutation-screening strategy using SSCP was employed to identify mutations in SOX9, the chromosome 17q24 gene responsible for CD and autosomal sex reversal in man. We have screened seven CD patients with no cytologically detectable chromosomal aberrations and two CD patients with chromosome 17 rearrangements for mutations in the entire open reading frame of SOX9. Five different mutations have been identified in six CD patients: two missense mutations in the SOX9 putative DNA binding domain (high mobility group, or HMG, box); three frameshift mutations and a splice-acceptor mutation. An identical frameshift mutation is found in two unrelated 46,XY patients, one exhibiting a male phenotype and the other displaying a female phenotype (XY sex reversal). All mutations found affect a single allele, which is consistent with a dominant mode of inheritance. No mutations were found in the SOX9 open reading frame of two patients with chromosome 17q rearrangements, suggesting that the translocations affect SOX9 expression. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that CD results from haploinsufficiency of SOX9. 27 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Error propagation for geopositioning from airborne spotlight synthetic aperture radar using the stereo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyana, Ade Komara

    The stereo SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) technique computes three-dimensional coordinates of ground objects by making use of two quantities that can be derived from a SAR image: range and doppler angle. Due to the flexibility in the image collection requirements, this is an attractive alternative to interferometric SAR. Applying stereo SAR to stripmap SAR images, however, is known to produce coordinates with only modest accuracy. Another mode of SAR, the spotlight mode, produces SAR images with a superior resolution (at the expense of smaller coverage). Together with the more advanced navigation systems available today, this makes applying the stereo technique to airborne spotlight SAR images an interesting topic of study. An error model for stereo spotlight SAR in the form of the precision for the observations is developed. The precision of the navigation data is derived directly from the performance description of available navigation systems. The error in the range and doppler angle is derived from the analysis of the image formation process applied to real spotlight SAR data, including the autofocus process. An error analysis for stereo SAR is performed based on a covariance analysis study. The impact of navigation data quality, different flight trajectories, and different distances to the scene, on the precision of the computed ground coordinates are evaluated. The analysis is done using simulated spotlight SAR images of discrete point objects. Ground coordinates with Circular (Horizontal) Error at 0.9 probability (CE90) on the order of 1--2 m and Linear (Vertical) Error at 0.9 probability (LE90) of 1 m are possible to achieve from a medium distance of about 6 km. From a longer distance of about 50 km, CE90 of about 6 m is obtained from a reasonable flight configuration. The results also reveal the necessity to determine the direction of the velocity vector precisely. Each component of the velocity vector must be determined to better than 10 cm/sec. These

  20. An infectious RNA with a hepta-adenosine stretch responsible for programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift derived from a full-length cDNA clone of Hibiscus latent Singapore virus.

    PubMed

    Niu, Shengniao; Cao, Shishu; Wong, Sek-Man

    2014-01-20

    Hibiscus latent Singapore virus (HLSV) is a member of Tobamovirus and its full-length cDNA clones were constructed. The in vitro transcripts from two HLSV full-length cDNA clones, which contain a hepta-adenosine stretch (pHLSV-7A) and an octo-adenosine stretch (pHLSV-8A), are both infectious. The replication level of HLSV-7A in Nicotiana benthamiana protoplasts was 5-fold lower, as compared to that of HLSV-8A. The replicase proteins of HLSV-7A were produced through programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift (-1 PRF) and the 7A stretch was a slippery sequence for -1 PRF. Mutations to the downstream pseudoknot of 7A stretch showed that the pseudoknot was not required for the frameshift in vitro. The stretch was found to be extended to 8A after subsequent replication cycles in vivo. It is envisaged that HLSV employs the monotonous runs of A and -1 PRF to convert its 7A to 8A to reach higher replication for its survival in plants.

  1. Somatic mutations of calreticulin in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Klampfl, Thorsten; Gisslinger, Heinz; Harutyunyan, Ashot S; Nivarthi, Harini; Rumi, Elisa; Milosevic, Jelena D; Them, Nicole C C; Berg, Tiina; Gisslinger, Bettina; Pietra, Daniela; Chen, Doris; Vladimer, Gregory I; Bagienski, Klaudia; Milanesi, Chiara; Casetti, Ilaria Carola; Sant'Antonio, Emanuela; Ferretti, Virginia; Elena, Chiara; Schischlik, Fiorella; Cleary, Ciara; Six, Melanie; Schalling, Martin; Schönegger, Andreas; Bock, Christoph; Malcovati, Luca; Pascutto, Cristiana; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Cazzola, Mario; Kralovics, Robert

    2013-12-19

    Approximately 50 to 60% of patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis carry a mutation in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2), and an additional 5 to 10% have activating mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor gene (MPL). So far, no specific molecular marker has been identified in the remaining 30 to 45% of patients. We performed whole-exome sequencing to identify somatically acquired mutations in six patients who had primary myelofibrosis without mutations in JAK2 or MPL. Resequencing of CALR, encoding calreticulin, was then performed in cohorts of patients with myeloid neoplasms. Somatic insertions or deletions in exon 9 of CALR were detected in all patients who underwent whole-exome sequencing. Resequencing in 1107 samples from patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms showed that CALR mutations were absent in polycythemia vera. In essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, CALR mutations and JAK2 and MPL mutations were mutually exclusive. Among patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis with nonmutated JAK2 or MPL, CALR mutations were detected in 67% of those with essential thrombocythemia and 88% of those with primary myelofibrosis. A total of 36 types of insertions or deletions were identified that all cause a frameshift to the same alternative reading frame and generate a novel C-terminal peptide in the mutant calreticulin. Overexpression of the most frequent CALR deletion caused cytokine-independent growth in vitro owing to the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) by means of an unknown mechanism. Patients with mutated CALR had a lower risk of thrombosis and longer overall survival than patients with mutated JAK2. Most patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis that was not associated with a JAK2 or MPL alteration carried a somatic mutation in CALR. The clinical course in these patients was more indolent than that in patients with the JAK2 V617F

  2. Using Exome Data to Identify Malignant Hyperthermia Susceptibility Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalves, Stephen G.; Ng, David; Johnston, Jennifer J.; Teer, Jamie K.; Stenson, Peter D.; Cooper, David N.; Mullikin, James C.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a life-threatening, inherited disorder of muscle calcium metabolism, triggered by anesthetics and depolarizing muscle relaxants. An unselected cohort was screened for MHS mutations using exome sequencing. Our aim was to pilot a strategy for the RYR1 and CACNA1S genes. Methods Exome sequencing was performed on 870 volunteers not ascertained for MHS. Variants in RYR1 and CACNA1S were annotated using an algorithm that filtered results based on mutation type, frequency, and information in mutation databases. Variants were scored on a six-point pathogenicity scale. Medical histories and pedigrees were reviewed for malignant hyperthermia and related disorders. Results We identified 70 RYR1 and 53 CACNA1S variants among 870 exomes. Sixty-three RYR1 and 41 CACNA1S variants passed the quality and frequency metrics but we excluded synonymous variants. In RYR1, we identified 65 missense mutations, one nonsense, two that affected splicing, and one non frameshift indel. In CACNA1S, 48 missense, one frameshift deletion, one splicing and one non frameshift indel were identified. RYR1 variants predicted to be pathogenic for MHS were found in three participants without medical or family histories of MHS. Numerous variants, previously described as pathogenic in mutation databases, were reclassified by us to be of unknown pathogenicity. Conclusions Exome sequencing can identify asymptomatic patients at risk for MHS, although the interpretation of exome variants can be challenging. The use of exome sequencing in unselected cohorts is an important tool to understand the prevalence and penetrance of MHS, a critical challenge for the field. PMID:24195946

  3. Evidence for ribosomal frameshifting and a novel overlapping gene in the genomes of insect-specific flaviviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Firth, Andrew E.; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Wills, Norma M.; Miller, Cathy L.; Atkins, John F.

    2010-03-30

    Flaviviruses have a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of approx11 kb, encoding a large polyprotein that is cleaved to produce approx10 mature proteins. Cell fusing agent virus, Kamiti River virus, Culex flavivirus and several recently discovered flaviviruses have no known vertebrate host and apparently infect only insects. We present compelling bioinformatic evidence for a 253-295 codon overlapping gene (designated fifo) conserved throughout these insect-specific flaviviruses and immunofluorescent detection of its product. Fifo overlaps the NS2A/NS2B coding sequence in the - 1/+ 2 reading frame and is most likely expressed as a trans-frame fusion protein via ribosomal frameshifting at a conserved GGAUUUY slippery heptanucleotide with 3'-adjacent RNA secondary structure (which stimulates efficient frameshifting in vitro). The discovery bears striking parallels to the recently discovered ribosomal frameshifting site in the NS2A coding sequence of the Japanese encephalitis serogroup of flaviviruses and suggests that programmed ribosomal frameshifting may be more widespread in flaviviruses than currently realized.

  4. Solenopsis invicta virus 3: mapping of structural proteins, ribosomal frameshifting, and similarities to Acyrthosiphon pisum virus and kelp fly virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We show that the second open reading frame (ORF) of the dicistronic genome is expressed via a frameshifting mechanism and that the sequences encoding the stru...

  5. Evidence for ribosomal frameshifting and a novel overlapping gene in the genomes of insect-specific flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Andrew E; Blitvich, Bradley J; Wills, Norma M; Miller, Cathy L; Atkins, John F

    2010-01-01

    Flaviviruses have a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of ∼11 kb, encoding a large polyprotein that is cleaved to produce ∼10 mature proteins. Cell fusing agent virus, Kamiti River virus, Culex flavivirus and several recently discovered flaviviruses have no known vertebrate host and apparently infect only insects. We present compelling bioinformatic evidence for a 253-295 codon overlapping gene (designated fifo) conserved throughout these insect-specific flaviviruses, and immunofluorescent detection of its product. Fifo overlaps the NS2A/NS2B coding sequence in the -1/+2 reading frame and is most likely expressed as a trans-frame fusion protein via ribosomal frameshifting at a conserved GGAUUUY slippery heptanucleotide with 3′-adjacent RNA secondary structure (which stimulates efficient frameshifting in vitro). The discovery bears striking parallels to the recently discovered ribosomal frameshifting site in the NS2A coding sequence of the Japanese encephalitis serogroup of flaviviruses, and suggests that programmed ribosomal frameshifting may be more widespread in flaviviruses than currently realized. PMID:20097399

  6. Evidence for ribosomal frameshifting and a novel overlapping gene in the genomes of insect-specific flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Firth, Andrew E; Blitvich, Bradley J; Wills, Norma M; Miller, Cathy L; Atkins, John F

    2010-03-30

    Flaviviruses have a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of approximately 11 kb, encoding a large polyprotein that is cleaved to produce approximately 10 mature proteins. Cell fusing agent virus, Kamiti River virus, Culex flavivirus and several recently discovered flaviviruses have no known vertebrate host and apparently infect only insects. We present compelling bioinformatic evidence for a 253-295 codon overlapping gene (designated fifo) conserved throughout these insect-specific flaviviruses and immunofluorescent detection of its product. Fifo overlaps the NS2A/NS2B coding sequence in the -1/+2 reading frame and is most likely expressed as a trans-frame fusion protein via ribosomal frameshifting at a conserved GGAUUUY slippery heptanucleotide with 3'-adjacent RNA secondary structure (which stimulates efficient frameshifting in vitro). The discovery bears striking parallels to the recently discovered ribosomal frameshifting site in the NS2A coding sequence of the Japanese encephalitis serogroup of flaviviruses and suggests that programmed ribosomal frameshifting may be more widespread in flaviviruses than currently realized.

  7. Periodontal disease and FAM20A mutations.

    PubMed

    Kantaputra, Piranit Nik; Bongkochwilawan, Chotika; Lubinsky, Mark; Pata, Supansa; Kaewgahya, Massupa; Tong, Huei Jinn; Ketudat Cairns, James R; Guven, Yeliz; Chaisrisookumporn, Nipon

    2017-03-16

    Enamel-renal-gingival syndrome (ERGS; OMIM #204690), a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in FAM20A, is characterized by nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, amelogenesis imperfecta, hypoplastic type, gingival fibromatosis and other dental abnormalities, including hypodontia and unerupted teeth with large dental follicles. We report three patients and their families with findings suggestive of ERGS. Mutation analysis of FAM20A was performed in all patients and their family members. Patients with homozygous frameshift and compound heterozygous mutations in FAM20A had typical clinical findings along with periodontitis. The other had a novel homozygous missense mutation in exon 10, mild gingival fibromatosis and renal calcifications. The periodontitis in our patients may be a syndrome component, and similar findings in previous reports suggest more than coincidence. Fam20a is an allosteric activator that increases Fam20c kinase activity. It is hypothesized that lack of FAM20A activation of FAM20C in our patients with FAM20A mutations might have caused amelogenesis imperfecta, abnormal bone remodeling and periodontitis. Nephrocalcinosis appears not to be a consistent finding of the syndrome and the missense mutation may correlate with mild gingival fibromatosis. Here we report three patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in FAM20A and findings that extend the phenotypic spectrum of this disorder, showing that protein truncation is associated with greater clinical severity.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 16 March 2017; doi:10.1038/jhg.2017.26.

  8. Direct Geolocation of TerraSAR-X Spotlight Mode Image and Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiao; Zeng, Qiming; Jiao, Jian; Zhang, Jingfa; Gong, Lixia

    2013-01-01

    The GERMAN TerraSAR-X mission was launched in June 2007, operating a versatile new-generation SAR sensor in X-band. Its Spotlight mode providing SAR images at very high resolution of about 1m. The product’s specified 3-D geolocation accuracy is tightened to 1m according to the official technical report. However, this accuracy is able to be achieved relies on not only robust mathematical basis of SAR geolocation, but also well knowledge of error sources and their correction. The research focuses on geolocation of TerraSAR-X spotlight image. Mathematical model and resolving algorithms have been analyzed. Several error sources have been researched and corrected especially. The effectiveness and accuracy of the research was verified by the experiment results.

  9. Spotlight-Mode Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing for High-Resolution Lunar Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harcke, Leif; Weintraub, Lawrence; Yun, Sang-Ho; Dickinson, Richard; Gurrola, Eric; Hensley, Scott; Marechal, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    During the 2008-2009 year, the Goldstone Solar System Radar was upgraded to support radar mapping of the lunar poles at 4 m resolution. The finer resolution of the new system and the accompanying migration through resolution cells called for spotlight, rather than delay-Doppler, imaging techniques. A new pre-processing system supports fast-time Doppler removal and motion compensation to a point. Two spotlight imaging techniques which compensate for phase errors due to i) out of focus-plane motion of the radar and ii) local topography, have been implemented and tested. One is based on the polar format algorithm followed by a unique autofocus technique, the other is a full bistatic time-domain backprojection technique. The processing system yields imagery of the specified resolution. Products enabled by this new system include topographic mapping through radar interferometry, and change detection techniques (amplitude and coherent change) for geolocation of the NASA LCROSS mission impact site.

  10. Reprogramming the genetic code: the emerging role of ribosomal frameshifting in regulating cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Vivek M.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Reading frame maintenance is a critical property of ribosomes. However, a number of genetic elements have been described that can induce ribosomes to shift on mRNAs, the most well understood of which are a class that directs ribosomal slippage by one base in 5′ (-1) direction. This is referred to as programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF). Recently, a new -1 PRF promoting element was serendipitously discovered in a study examining the effects of stretches of adenosines in the coding sequences of mRNAs. Here, we discuss this finding, recent studies describing how -1 PRF is used to control gene expression in eukaryotes, and how -1 PRF is itself regulated. The implications of dysregulation of -1 PRF on human health are examined, as are possible new areas in which novel -1 PRF promoting elements might be discovered. PMID:26661048

  11. Improve homology search sensitivity of PacBio data by correcting frameshifts.

    PubMed

    Du, Nan; Sun, Yanni

    2016-09-01

    Single-molecule, real-time sequencing (SMRT) developed by Pacific BioSciences produces longer reads than secondary generation sequencing technologies such as Illumina. The long read length enables PacBio sequencing to close gaps in genome assembly, reveal structural variations, and identify gene isoforms with higher accuracy in transcriptomic sequencing. However, PacBio data has high sequencing error rate and most of the errors are insertion or deletion errors. During alignment-based homology search, insertion or deletion errors in genes will cause frameshifts and may only lead to marginal alignment scores and short alignments. As a result, it is hard to distinguish true alignments from random alignments and the ambiguity will incur errors in structural and functional annotation. Existing frameshift correction tools are designed for data with much lower error rate and are not optimized for PacBio data. As an increasing number of groups are using SMRT, there is an urgent need for dedicated homology search tools for PacBio data. In this work, we introduce Frame-Pro, a profile homology search tool for PacBio reads. Our tool corrects sequencing errors and also outputs the profile alignments of the corrected sequences against characterized protein families. We applied our tool to both simulated and real PacBio data. The results showed that our method enables more sensitive homology search, especially for PacBio data sets of low sequencing coverage. In addition, we can correct more errors when comparing with a popular error correction tool that does not rely on hybrid sequencing. The source code is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/frame-pro/ yannisun@msu.edu. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. General stress response regulator RpoS in adaptive mutation and amplification in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Mary-Jane; Aponyi, Ildiko; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2004-01-01

    Microbial cells under growth-limiting stress can generate mutations by mechanisms distinct from those in rapidly growing cells. These mechanisms might be specific stress responses that increase mutation rates, potentially altering rates of evolution, or might reflect non-stress-specific processes in rare growing cells. In an Escherichia coli model system, both frameshift reversion mutations and gene amplifications occur as apparent starvation-induced mutations. Whereas frameshift reversion ("point mutation") requires recombination proteins, the SOS response, and error-prone DNA polymerase IV (DinB), amplification requires neither SOS nor pol IV. We report that both point mutation and amplification require the stationary-phase and general stress response transcription factor RpoS (sigmaS). Growth-dependent mutation does not. Alternative interpretations are excluded. The results imply, first, that point mutation and amplification are stress responses that occur in differentiated stationary-phase (not rare growing) cells and, second, that transient genetic instability, producing both point mutation and genome rearrangement, may be a previously unrecognized component of the RpoS-dependent general stress response. PMID:15020458

  13. Frameshift mutagenesis: the roles of primer-template misalignment and the nonhomologous end-joining pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Kevin; Mudrak, Sarah V; Minesinger, Brenda K; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2012-02-01

    Small insertions or deletions that alter the reading frame of a gene typically occur in simple repeats such as mononucleotide runs and are thought to reflect spontaneous primer-template misalignment during DNA replication. The resulting extrahelical repeat is efficiently recognized by the mismatch repair machinery, which specifically replaces the newly replicated strand to restore the original sequence. Frameshift mutagenesis is most easily studied using reversion assays, and previous studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggested that the length threshold for polymerase slippage in mononucleotide runs is 4N. Because the probability of slippage is strongly correlated with run length, however, it was not clear whether shorter runs were unable to support slippage or whether the resulting frameshifts were obscured by the presence of longer runs. To address this issue, we removed all mononucleotide runs >3N from the yeast lys2ΔBgl and lys2ΔA746 frameshift reversion assays, which detect net 1-bp deletions and insertions, respectively. Analyses demonstrate that 2N and 3N runs can support primer-template misalignment, but there is striking run-specific variation in the frequency of slippage, in the accumulation of +1 vs. -1 frameshifts and in the apparent efficiency of mismatch repair. We suggest that some of this variation reflects the role of flanking sequence in initiating primer-template misalignment and that some reflects replication-independent frameshifts generated by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Finally, we demonstrate that nonhomologous end joining is uniquely required for the de novo creation of tandem duplications from noniterated sequence.

  14. Generalized Chirp Scaling Combined with Baseband Azimuth Scaling Algorithm for Large Bandwidth Sliding Spotlight SAR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tianzhu; He, Zhihua; He, Feng; Dong, Zhen; Wu, Manqing

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient and precise imaging algorithm for the large bandwidth sliding spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The existing sub-aperture processing method based on the baseband azimuth scaling (BAS) algorithm cannot cope with the high order phase coupling along the range and azimuth dimensions. This coupling problem causes defocusing along the range and azimuth dimensions. This paper proposes a generalized chirp scaling (GCS)-BAS processing algorithm, which is based on the GCS algorithm. It successfully mitigates the deep focus along the range dimension of a sub-aperture of the large bandwidth sliding spotlight SAR, as well as high order phase coupling along the range and azimuth dimensions. Additionally, the azimuth focusing can be achieved by this azimuth scaling method. Simulation results demonstrate the ability of the GCS-BAS algorithm to process the large bandwidth sliding spotlight SAR data. It is proven that great improvements of the focus depth and imaging accuracy are obtained via the GCS-BAS algorithm. PMID:28555057

  15. A conserved predicted pseudoknot in the NS2A-encoding sequence of West Nile and Japanese encephalitis flaviviruses suggests NS1' may derive from ribosomal frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Andrew E; Atkins, John F

    2009-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, Usutu and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses form a tight subgroup within the larger Flavivirus genus. These viruses utilize a single-polyprotein expression strategy, resulting in ~10 mature proteins. Plotting the conservation at synonymous sites along the polyprotein coding sequence reveals strong conservation peaks at the very 5' end of the coding sequence, and also at the 5' end of the sequence encoding the NS2A protein. Such peaks are generally indicative of functionally important non-coding sequence elements. The second peak corresponds to a predicted stable pseudoknot structure whose biological importance is supported by compensatory mutations that preserve the structure. The pseudoknot is preceded by a conserved slippery heptanucleotide (Y CCU UUU), thus forming a classical stimulatory motif for -1 ribosomal frameshifting. We hypothesize, therefore, that the functional importance of the pseudoknot is to stimulate a portion of ribosomes to shift -1 nt into a short (45 codon), conserved, overlapping open reading frame, termed foo. Since cleavage at the NS1-NS2A boundary is known to require synthesis of NS2A in cis, the resulting transframe fusion protein is predicted to be NS1-NS2AN-term-FOO. We hypothesize that this may explain the origin of the previously identified NS1 'extension' protein in JEV-group flaviviruses, known as NS1'. PMID:19196463

  16. The Immature Fiber Mutant Phenotype of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Is Linked to a 22-bp Frame-Shift Deletion in a Mitochondria Targeted Pentatricopeptide Repeat Gene

    PubMed Central

    Thyssen, Gregory N.; Fang, David D.; Zeng, Linghe; Song, Xianliang; Delhom, Christopher D.; Condon, Tracy L.; Li, Ping; Kim, Hee Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cotton seed trichomes are the most important source of natural fibers globally. The major fiber thickness properties influence the price of the raw material, and the quality of the finished product. The recessive immature fiber (im) gene reduces the degree of fiber cell wall thickening by a process that was previously shown to involve mitochondrial function in allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum. Here, we present the fine genetic mapping of the im locus, gene expression analysis of annotated proteins near the locus, and association analysis of the linked markers. Mapping-by-sequencing identified a 22-bp deletion in a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) gene that is completely linked to the immature fiber phenotype in 2837 F2 plants, and is absent from all 163 cultivated varieties tested, although other closely linked marker polymorphisms are prevalent in the diversity panel. This frame-shift mutation results in a transcript with two long open reading frames: one containing the N-terminal transit peptide that targets mitochondria, the other containing only the RNA-binding PPR domains, suggesting that a functional PPR protein cannot be targeted to mitochondria in the im mutant. Taken together, these results suggest that PPR gene Gh_A03G0489 is involved in the cotton fiber wall thickening process, and is a promising candidate gene at the im locus. Our findings expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that modulate cotton fiber fineness and maturity, and may facilitate the development of cotton varieties with superior fiber attributes. PMID:27172184

  17. Analysis of mutations of MDR3 exons 9 and 23 in infants with parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    YANG, XIU-FANG; LIU, GUO-SHENG; LI, MIN-XU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate mutations of multidrug resistance 3 (MDR3) exons 9 and 23 in infants with parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (PNAC). A total of 41 infants with PNAC were enrolled in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral venous blood leukocytes of each patient and MDR3 exons 9 and 23 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction. One patient was identified who carried a frameshift mutation in MDR3 exon 23 (C.2793) that was caused by the insertion of a single adenine residue, while mutations were not found in MDR3 exon 23 in the other 40 patients. The clinical features of the patient with the MDR3 exon 23 frameshift mutation included high serum γ-glutamyl transferase levels, the absence of biliary dilatation and deformity in magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and abnormal electrical capacitance tomography imaging of the liver. No mutations in MDR3 exon 9 were identified in any of the patients. All 41 PNAC patients recovered following oral ursodeoxycholic acid treatment. The C.2793 frameshift mutation in MDR3 exon 23 is potentially associated with the development of PNAC in infants. PMID:26668642

  18. Genetic subgroup of small ruminant lentiviruses that infects sheep homozygous for TMEM154 frameshift deletion mutation A4delta53

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small Ruminant Lentivirus (SRLV) infections of sheep are influenced by genetics on both the host and pathogen sides. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane 154 (TMEM154) gene associates with infection susceptibility, and distinct SRLV genetic subtypes infect sheep in association with their TM...

  19. GNAS1 mutational analysis in pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S F; Dixon, P H; Bonthron, D T; Stirling, H F; Barr, D G; Kelnar, C J; Thakker, R V

    1998-10-01

    Mutations of the GNAS1 gene, which is located on chromosome 20q13.11 and encodes the alpha-subunit of the stimulatory GTP-binding protein, have been identified in patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHPIa) and pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). We have undertaken studies to determine the prevalence of GNAS1 mutations and to explore methods for their more rapid detection. Thirteen unrelated families (8 with PHPIa and PPHP patients, and 5 with PPHP patients only) were investigated for GNAS1 mutations in the 1050 base-pair (bp) region spanning exons 2-13 by single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequence analysis. GNAS1 mutations were detected in 4 of the 8 families with PHPIa patients. These consisted of: two novel de novo missense mutations (Pro115Ser and Glu259Val) in two families and an identical 4 bp deletion of codons 189 and 190 resulting in a frame-shift in two unrelated families. These results expand the spectrum of GNAS1 mutations associated with this disorder and confirm the presence of a mutational hot-spot involving codons 189 and 190. SSCP analysis was found to be a specific and sensitive method that detected all 4 mutations. GNAS1 mutations were not detected in any of the PPHP only families. The pseudohypoparathyroid disorders appear to represent a heterogeneous group with GNAS1 mutations forming the molecular aetiology in approximately 50% of pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia families. Such mutations can be reliably identified by single-stranded conformational polymorphism and this will help to supplement the clinical evaluation of some patients and their families, particularly as the disease may not be fully penetrant.

  20. Identification of new mutations in Israeli patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Topper, A; Mandel, H; Shapira, I; Golan, O; Gazit, E; Loewenthal, R

    2001-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a peroxisomal disorder characterized by impaired peroxisomal betaoxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). This is probably due to reduced activation of the VLCFAs and results in demyelination of the nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency. The ALD gene is localized on Xq28, has 10 exons and encodes a protein of 745 amino acids with significant homology to the membrane peroxisomal protein PMP70. Characterizing the disease causing mutations is of importance in prenatal diagnosis because 12-20% of women who are obligatory carriers show false-negative results when tested for VLCFA in plasma. We have analyzed DNA from blood samples of 7 Jewish (5 Sephardi and 2 Ashkenazi) and 3 Arab Israeli families suffering from ALD. Five missense-type mutations were identified: R104H, Y174C, L229P, R401Q, and G512C. A single mutation, R464X, was nonsense, and two, Y171 frameshift and E471 frameshift, were frameshift. Interestingly, a single mutation was identified in three families of Moroccan Jewish descent, probably due to a founder effect.

  1. GJB2 gene mutations in childhood deafness.

    PubMed

    Angeli, S; Utrera, R; Dib, S; Chiossone, E; Naranjo, C; Henríquez, O; Porta, M

    2000-03-01

    The frequency of childhood deafness is estimated at 1:1,000 and at least half of these cases are genetic. Recently, mutations in the GJB2 gene have been found in a great number of familial and sporadic cases of congenital deafness in Caucasians. The most common mutation (70%) is the frameshift mutation of a single guanine in position 35 (35delG). More than 20 mutations in the GJB2 gene are associated with DFNB1, a prevalent type of autosomal recessive non-syndromic neurosensory deafness. Last year we initiated a systematic screening programme to evaluate the causes of deafness in the population of prelingually deaf children who are referred to our cochlear implant programme. All of the deaf children and their parents undergo a comprehensive medical review, directed to identify causes of acquired deafness and manifestations of syndromic hearing impairment. DNA is extracted from the blood of all of the children. The technique AS-PCR (allele-specific polymerase chain reaction) is used for the identification of the mutation 35delG. Screening for other GJB2 gene mutations is carried out by single-strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP). Our results on the identification of DFNB1 will be presented, as well as a discussion on the implications of an aetiological diagnosis in cochlear implantation.

  2. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Bum; Seronello, Scott; Mayer, Wasima; Ojcius, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) actively evades host interferon (IFN) responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP) from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and poly(IC). The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain) were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity. PMID:27404108

  3. A novel mutation in the FRAS1 gene in a patient with Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozemri Sag, S; Gorukmez, O; Gorukmez, O; Ture, M; Sahinturk, S; Topak, A; Gulten, T; Schanze, D; Yakut, T; Zenker, M

    2015-01-01

    Fraser Syndrome (FS) is a rare disease with autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by cryptophthalmus, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal and urogenital anomalies. Mutations in the genes FRAS1 and FREM2 encoding components of a protein complex of the extracellular matrix, and recently also mutations in GRIP1 have been found to be causative for FS. We present here molecular and clinical findings of a patient with FS who was found to have a novel homozygous frameshift mutation c.9739delA, p.(T3247Pfs*44) in exon 63 of FRAS1 gene. Further testing confirmed the heterozygous carrier status of parents.

  4. Mutation in the AP4B1 gene cause hereditary spastic paraplegia type 47 (SPG47) .

    PubMed

    Bauer, Peter; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Blumkin, Lubov; Schlipf, Nina; Schröder, Christopher; Schicks, Julia; Lev, Dorit; Riess, Olaf; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Schöls, Ludger

    2012-02-01

    We recently identified a new locus for spastic paraplegia type 47 (SPG47) in a consanguineous Arabic family with two affected siblings with progressive spastic paraparesis,intellectual disability, seizures, periventricular white matter changes and thin corpus callosum. Using exome sequencing, we now identified a novel AP4B1 frameshift mutation (c.664delC) in this family. This mutation was homozygous in both affected siblings and heterozygous in both parents. The mutant allele was absent in 316 Caucasian and 200 ethnically matched control chromosomes. We propose that AP4B1 mutations cause SPG47 and should be considered in early onset spastic paraplegia with intellectual disability.

  5. Mutator Activity of Petite Strains of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Flury, Fred; von Borstel, R. C.; Williamson, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Petite strains in Saccharomyces exhibit enhanced spontaneous mutation rates of nuclear genes regardless of whether they are cytoplasmically or nuclearly inherited, or whether or not the cytoplasmic petite strains have mitochondrial DNA. In petite strains, the mutation rate for the nonsense allele lys1-1 is enhanced by a factor of 3-6 and for the missense allele his1-7 by a factor of 2 as compared with their grande counterparts. The reversion of a third allele, the putative frameshift mutation, hom3-10 , is not enhanced in a petite background. The results indicate that the spontaneous mutation rate of an organism can be altered by indirect intracellular influences. PMID:786779

  6. Mutator activity of petite strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Flury, F; von Borstel, R C; Williamson, D H

    1976-08-01

    Petite strains in Saccharomyces exhibit enhanced spontaneous mutation rates of nuclear genes regardless of whether they are cytoplasmically or nuclearly inherited, or whether or not the cytoplasmic petite strains have mitochondrial DNA. In petite strains, the mutation rate for the nonsense allele lys1-1 is enhanced by a factor of 3-6 and for the missense allele his1-7 by a factor of 2 as compared with their grande counterparts. The reversion of a third allele, the putative frameshift mutation, hom3-10, is not enhanced in a petite background. The results indicate that the spontaneous mutation rate of an organism can be altered by indirect intracellular influences.

  7. Common and recurrent HPGD mutations in Caucasian individuals with primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Diggle, Christine P; Carr, Ian M; Zitt, Emanuel; Wusik, Katie; Hopkin, Robert J; Prada, Carlos E; Calabrese, Olga; Rittinger, Olaf; Punaro, Marilynn G; Markham, Alexander F; Bonthron, David T

    2010-06-01

    Homozygous recessive germline mutations of the 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) gene, encoding 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, result in persistent elevation of circulating PGE(2) levels, causing the syndrome of primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO). Homozygous HPGD mutations have so far been reported in 10 families, all but one displaying parental consanguinity. Only two of these families were of European origin. We wished to determine the role of HPGD in causing PHO in non-consanguineous European families. Five previously unreported families of Caucasian European origin, with one or more individuals affected with typical PHO, were characterized clinically and by complete sequencing of the HPGD coding exons. Biallelic HPGD mutations were identified in affected individuals in all the five families, confirming a very specific association of this phenotype with HPGD mutations. The previously described c.175_176delCT frameshift mutation was observed in association with two different alleles of an adjacent single nucleotide polymorphism. Biallelic HPGD mutations are found in the majority of patients with typical PHO, and sequencing of the HPGD gene is a highly specific first-line investigation for patients presenting in this way, particularly during childhood. The c.175_176delCT frameshift mutation appears to be recurrent and to be the commonest HPGD mutation in Caucasian families.

  8. Mechanism of mutation by thymine starvation in Escherichia coli: clues from mutagenic specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, B A; Glickman, B W

    1985-01-01

    To probe the mechanisms of mutagenesis induced by thymine starvation, we examined the mutational specificity of this treatment in strains of Escherichia coli that are wild type (Ung+) or deficient in uracil-DNA-glycosylase (Ung-). An analysis of Ung+ his-4 (ochre) revertants revealed that the majority of induced DNA base substitution events were A:T----G:C transitions. However, characterization of lacI nonsense mutations induced by thymine starvation demonstrated that G:C----A:T transitions and all four possible transversions also occurred. In addition, thymineless episodes led to reversion of the trpE9777 frameshift allele. Although the defect in uracil-DNA-glycosylase did not appear to affect the frequency of total mutations induced in lacI by thymine deprivation, the frequency of nonsense mutations was reduced by 30%, and the spectrum of nonsense mutations was altered. Furthermore, the reversion of trpE9777 was decreased by 90% in the Ung- strain. These findings demonstrate that in E. coli, thymine starvation can induce frameshift mutations and all types of base substitutions. The analysis of mutational specificity indicates that more than a single mechanism is involved in the induction of mutation by thymine depletion. We suggest that deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate pool imbalances, the removal of uracil incorporated into DNA during thymine starvation, and the induction of recA-dependent DNA repair functions all may play a role in thymineless mutagenesis. PMID:3888966

  9. Novel mutations in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein gene causing abetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, K; Ishibashi, S; Osuga, J; Tozawa, R; Harada, K; Yahagi, N; Shionoiri, F; Iizuka, Y; Tamura, Y; Nagai, R; Illingworth, D R; Gotoda, T; Yamada, N

    2000-08-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) is an inherited disease characterized by the virtual absence of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins from plasma. Only limited numbers of families have been screened for mutations in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) gene. To clarify the genetic basis of clinical diversity of ABL, mutations of the MTP gene have been screened in 4 unrelated patients with ABL. Three novel mutations have been identified: a frameshift mutation caused by a single adenine deletion at position 1389 of the cDNA, and a missense mutation, Asn780Tyr, each in homozygous forms; and a splice site mutation, 2218-2A-->G, in a compound heterozygous form. The frameshift and splice site mutations are predicted to encode truncated forms of MTP. When transiently expressed in Cos-1 cells, the Asn780Tyr mutant MTP bound protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) but displayed negligible MTP activity. It is of interest that the patient having the Asn780Tyr mutation, a 27-year-old male, has none of the manifestations characteristic of classic ABL even though his plasma apoB and vitamin E were virtually undetectable. These results indicated that defects of the MTP gene are the proximal cause of ABL.

  10. Congenital long QT syndrome with compound mutations in the KCNH2 gene.

    PubMed

    Bando, Sachiko; Soeki, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomomi; Niki, Toshiyuki; Ise, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Koji; Taketani, Yoshio; Iwase, Takashi; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Akaike, Masashi; Aiba, Takeshi; Shimizu, Wataru; Sata, Masataka

    2014-07-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome is a genetic disorder encompassing a family of mutations that can lead to aberrant ventricular electrical activity. We report on two brothers with long QT syndrome caused by compound mutations in the KCNH2 gene inherited from parents who had no prolonged QT interval on electrocardiography. The proband had syncope, and his elder brother suffered from ventricular fibrillation. Genetic testing revealed that both brothers had multiple mutations in the KCNH2 gene, including a missense mutation of C1474T (exon 6) as well as a frameshift/nonsense mutation, resulting from the insertion of 25 nucleotides, which caused an altered amino acid sequence beginning at codon 302 and a premature termination codon (i.e., TAG) at codon 339 (exon 4). Family genetic screening found that their father had the same frameshift mutation, and their mother and sister had the same missense mutation, in the KCNH2 gene. However, these other family members were asymptomatic, with normal QT intervals on electrocardiography. These results suggest that compound mutations in the KCNH2 gene inherited independently from the parents made the phenotypes of their sons more severe.

  11. Identification of nine novel arylsulfatase a (ARSA) gene mutations in patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD).

    PubMed

    Eng, Barry; Nakamura, Lisa N; O'Reilly, Natasha; Schokman, Natasha; Nowaczyk, Magorzata M J; Krivit, William; Waye, John S

    2003-11-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the arylsulfatase A (ARSA) gene. We have investigated more than fifty MLD patients using allele-specific PCR assays to detect the pseudodeficiency (PD) allele and several common MLD mutations, followed by comprehensive nucleotide sequencing of the ARSA gene to detect rare or private mutations. Here we report the identification of nine novel microlesions in the ARSA gene: five missense mutations (c.464C>T, c.542T>A, c.916T>C, c.973G>A, c.1286A>C), three frameshift mutations (c.205_206delTG, c.489_495del, c.1483_1486dup), and one splice donor site mutation (c.973+1G>A). Comprehensive mutation detection has facilitated carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis for several at-risk MLD families.

  12. Scientist Spotlight Homework Assignments Shift Students' Stereotypes of Scientists and Enhance Science Identity in a Diverse Introductory Science Class.

    PubMed

    Schinske, Jeffrey N; Perkins, Heather; Snyder, Amanda; Wyer, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Research into science identity, stereotype threat, and possible selves suggests a lack of diverse representations of scientists could impede traditionally underserved students from persisting and succeeding in science. We evaluated a series of metacognitive homework assignments ("Scientist Spotlights") that featured counterstereotypical examples of scientists in an introductory biology class at a diverse community college. Scientist Spotlights additionally served as tools for content coverage, as scientists were selected to match topics covered each week. We analyzed beginning- and end-of-course essays completed by students during each of five courses with Scientist Spotlights and two courses with equivalent homework assignments that lacked connections to the stories of diverse scientists. Students completing Scientist Spotlights shifted toward counterstereotypical descriptions of scientists and conveyed an enhanced ability to personally relate to scientists following the intervention. Longitudinal data suggested these shifts were maintained 6 months after the completion of the course. Analyses further uncovered correlations between these shifts, interest in science, and course grades. As Scientist Spotlights require very little class time and complement existing curricula, they represent a promising tool for enhancing science identity, shifting stereotypes, and connecting content to issues of equity and diversity in a broad range of STEM classrooms.

  13. Ablation of Programmed −1 Ribosomal Frameshifting in Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Results in Attenuated Neuropathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kendra, Joseph A.; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Brahms, Ashwini; Woodson, Caitlin; Bell, Todd M.; Chen, Bin; Khan, Yousuf A.; Jacobs, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), and western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) are arthropod-borne positive-strand RNA viruses that are capable of causing acute and fatal encephalitis in many mammals, including humans. VEEV was weaponized during the Cold War and is recognized as a select agent. Currently, there are no FDA-approved vaccines or therapeutics for these viruses. The spread of VEEV and other members of this family due to climate change-mediated vector range expansion underscores the need for research aimed at developing medical countermeasures. These viruses utilize programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting (−1 PRF) to synthesize the viral trans-frame (TF) protein, which has previously been shown to be important for neuropathogenesis in the related Sindbis virus. Here, the alphavirus −1 PRF signals were characterized, revealing novel −1 PRF stimulatory structures. −1 PRF attenuation mildly affected the kinetics of VEEV accumulation in cultured cells but strongly inhibited its pathogenesis in an aerosol infection mouse model. Importantly, the decreased viral titers in the brains of mice infected with the mutant virus suggest that the alphavirus TF protein is important for passage through the blood-brain barrier and/or for neuroinvasiveness. These findings suggest a novel approach to the development of safe and effective live attenuated vaccines directed against VEEV and perhaps other closely related −1 PRF-utilizing viruses. IMPORTANCE Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a select agent that has been weaponized. This arthropod-borne positive-strand RNA virus causes acute and fatal encephalitis in many mammals, including humans. There is no vaccine or other approved therapeutic. VEEV and related alphaviruses utilize programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting (−1 PRF) to synthesize the viral trans-frame (TF) protein, which is important for neuropathogenesis. −1

  14. Mutations of the KIT (Mast/Stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene account for a continuous range of phenotypes in human piebaldism

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Holmes, S.A. ); Ramesar, R.; Greenberg, J.; Beighton, P.; Curtis, D.

    1992-11-01

    Piebaldism is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of pigmentation, characterized by congenital patches of white skin and hair from which melanocytes are absent. The authors have previously shown that piebaldism can result from missense and frameshift mutations of the KIT proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular receptor tyrosine kinase for the mast/stem cell growth factor. Here, the authors report two novel KIT mutations associated with human piebaldism. A proximal frameshift is associated with a mild piebald phenotype, and a splice-junction mutation is associated with a highly variable piebald phenotype. They discuss the apparent relationship between the predicted impact of specific KIT mutations on total KIT-dependent signal transduction and the severity of the resultant piebald phenotypes. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Identification and characterization of a -1 reading frameshift in the heavy chain constant region of an IgG1 recombinant monoclonal antibody produced in CHO cells

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Zhirui; Wu, Qindong; Wang, Tongtong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Frameshifts lead to complete alteration of the intended amino acid sequences, and therefore may affect the biological activities of protein therapeutics and pose potential immunogenicity risks. We report here the identification and characterization of a novel -1 frameshift variant in a recombinant IgG1 therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells during the cell line selection studies. The variant was initially observed as an atypical post-monomer fragment peak in size exclusion chromatography. Characterization of the fragment peak using intact and reduced liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses determined that the fragment consisted of a normal light chain disulfide-linked to an aberrant 26 kDa fragment that could not be assigned to any HC fragment even after considering common modifications. Further analysis using LC-MS/MS peptide mapping revealed that the aberrant fragment contained the expected HC amino acid sequence (1-232) followed by a 20-mer novel sequence corresponding to expression of heavy chain DNA sequence in the -1 reading frame. Examination of the DNA sequence around the frameshift initiation site revealed that a mononucleotide repeat GGGGGG located in the IgG1 HC constant region was most likely the structural root cause of the frameshift. Rapid identification of the frameshift allowed us to avoid use of a problematic cell line containing the frameshift as the production cell line. The frameshift reported here may be observed in other mAb products and the hypothesis-driven analytical approaches employed here may be valuable for rapid identification and characterization of frameshift variants in other recombinant proteins. PMID:26652198

  16. BRCC3 mutations in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dayong; Nagata, Yasunobu; Grossmann, Vera; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Okuno, Yusuke; Nagae, Genta; Hosono, Naoko; Schnittger, Susanne; Sanada, Masashi; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Kon, Ayana; Polprasert, Chantana; Shen, Wenyi; Clemente, Michael J.; Phillips, James G.; Alpermann, Tamara; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Oakley, Kevin; Nguyen, Nhu; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Dugas, Martin; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Du, Yang; Ogawa, Seishi; Makishima, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have provided insights into the molecular heterogeneity of various myeloid neoplasms, revealing previously unknown somatic genetic events. In our cohort of 1444 cases analyzed by next generation sequencing, somatic mutations in the gene BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex 3 (BRCC3) were identified in 28 cases (1.9%). BRCC3 is a member of the JAMM/MPN+ family of zinc metalloproteases capable of cleaving Lys-63 linked polyubiquitin chains, and is implicated in DNA repair. The mutations were located throughout its coding region. The average variant allelic frequency of BRCC3 mutations was 30.1%, and by a serial sample analysis at two different time points a BRCC3 mutation was already identified in the initial stage of a myelodysplastic syndrome. BRCC3 mutations commonly occurred in nonsense (n=12), frameshift (n=4), and splice site (n=5) configurations. Due to the marginal male dominance (odds ratio; 2.00, 0.84–4.73) of BRCC3 mutations, the majority of mutations (n=23; 82%) were hemizygous. Phenotypically, BRCC3 mutations were frequently observed in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and associated with -Y abnormality (odds ratio; 3.70, 1.25–11.0). Clinically, BRCC3 mutations were also related to higher age (P=0.01), although prognosis was not affected. Knockdown of Brcc3 gene expression in murine bone marrow lineage negative, Sca1 positive, c-kit positive cells resulted in 2-fold more colony formation and modest differentiation defect. Thus, BRCC3 likely plays a role as tumor-associated gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:26001790

  17. A genome-wide analysis of RNA pseudoknots that stimulate efficient -1 ribosomal frameshifting or readthrough in animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaolan; Cheng, Qiang; Du, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) and stop codon readthrough are two translational recoding mechanisms utilized by some RNA viruses to express their structural and enzymatic proteins at a defined ratio. Efficient recoding usually requires an RNA pseudoknot located several nucleotides downstream from the recoding site. To assess the strategic importance of the recoding pseudoknots, we have carried out a large scale genome-wide analysis in which we used an in-house developed program to detect all possible H-type pseudoknots within the genomic mRNAs of 81 animal viruses. Pseudoknots are detected downstream from ~85% of the recoding sites, including many previously unknown pseudoknots. ~78% of the recoding pseudoknots are the most stable pseudoknot within the viral genomes. However, they are not as strong as some designed pseudoknots that exhibit roadblocking effect on the translating ribosome. Strong roadblocking pseudoknots are not detected within the viral genomes. These results indicate that the decoding pseudoknots have evolved to possess optimal stability for efficient recoding. We also found that the sequence at the gag-pol frameshift junction of HIV1 harbors potential elaborated pseudoknots encompassing the frameshift site. A novel mechanism is proposed for possible involvement of the elaborated pseudoknots in the HIV1 PRF event.

  18. An efficient ribosomal frame-shifting signal in the polymerase-encoding region of the coronavirus IBV.

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, I; Boursnell, M E; Binns, M M; Bilimoria, B; Blok, V C; Brown, T D; Inglis, S C

    1987-01-01

    The polymerase-encoding region of the genomic RNA of the coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) contains two very large, briefly overlapping open reading frames (ORF), F1 and F2, and it has been suggested on the basis of sequence analysis that expression of the downstream ORF, F2, might be mediated through ribosomal frame-shifting. To examine this possibility a cDNA fragment containing the F1/F2 overlap region was cloned within a marker gene and placed under the control of the bacteriophage SP6 promoter in a recombinant plasmid. Messenger RNA transcribed from this plasmid, when translated in cell-free systems, specified the synthesis of polypeptides whose size was entirely consistent with the products predicted by an efficient ribosomal frame-shifting event within the overlap region. The nature of the products was confirmed by their reactivity with antisera raised against defined portions of the flanking marker gene. This is the first non-retroviral example of ribosomal frame-shifting in higher eukaryotes. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:3428275

  19. De novo nonsense and frameshift variants of TCF20 in individuals with intellectual disability and postnatal overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Schäfgen, Johanna; Cremer, Kirsten; Becker, Jessica; Wieland, Thomas; Zink, Alexander M; Kim, Sarah; Windheuser, Isabelle C; Kreiß, Martina; Aretz, Stefan; Strom, Tim M; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Engels, Hartmut

    2016-12-01

    Recently, germline variants of the transcriptional co-regulator gene TCF20 have been implicated in the aetiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the knowledge about the associated clinical picture remains fragmentary. In this study, two individuals with de novo TCF20 sequence variants were identified in a cohort of 313 individuals with intellectual disability of unknown aetiology, which was analysed by whole exome sequencing using a child-parent trio design. Both detected variants - one nonsense and one frameshift variant - were truncating. A comprehensive clinical characterisation of the patients yielded mild intellectual disability, postnatal tall stature and macrocephaly, obesity and muscular hypotonia as common clinical signs while ASD was only present in one proband. The present report begins to establish the clinical picture of individuals with de novo nonsense and frameshift variants of TCF20 which includes features such as proportionate overgrowth and muscular hypotonia. Furthermore, intellectual disability/developmental delay seems to be fully penetrant amongst known individuals with de novo nonsense and frameshift variants of TCF20, whereas ASD is shown to be incompletely penetrant. The transcriptional co-regulator gene TCF20 is hereby added to the growing number of genes implicated in the aetiology of both ASD and intellectual disability. Furthermore, such de novo variants of TCF20 may represent a novel differential diagnosis in the overgrowth syndrome spectrum.

  20. Exon skipping and translation in patients with frameshift deletions in the dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sherratt, T.G.; Dubowitz, V.; Sewry, C.A.; Strong, P.N. ); Vulliamy, T. )

    1993-11-01

    Although many Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have a deletion in the dystrophin gene which disrupts the translational reading frame, they express dystrophin in a small proportion of skeletal muscle fibers ([open quotes]revertant fibers[close quotes]). Antibody studies have shown, indirectly, that dystrophin synthesis in revertant fibers is facilitated by a frame-restoring mechanism; in the present study, the feasibility of mRNA splicing was investigated. Dystrophin transcripts were analyzed in skeletal muscle from individuals possessing revertant fibers and a frameshift deletion in the dystrophin gene. In each case a minor in-frame transcript was detected, in which exons adjacent to those deleted from the genome had been skipped. There appeared to be some correlation between the levels of in-frame transcripts and the predicted translation products. Low levels of alternatively spliced transcripts were also present in normal muscle. The results provide further evidence of exon skipping in the dystrophin gene and indicate that this may be involved in the synthesis of dystrophin by revertant fibers. 44 refs., 12 figs.

  1. A Negative Feedback Modulator of Antigen Processing Evolved from a Frameshift in the Cowpox Virus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiacheng; Eggensperger, Sabine; Hank, Susanne; Wycisk, Agnes I.; Wieneke, Ralph; Mayerhofer, Peter U.; Tampé, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Coevolution of viruses and their hosts represents a dynamic molecular battle between the immune system and viral factors that mediate immune evasion. After the abandonment of smallpox vaccination, cowpox virus infections are an emerging zoonotic health threat, especially for immunocompromised patients. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis of how cowpox viral CPXV012 interferes with MHC class I antigen processing. This type II membrane protein inhibits the coreTAP complex at the step after peptide binding and peptide-induced conformational change, in blocking ATP binding and hydrolysis. Distinct from other immune evasion mechanisms, TAP inhibition is mediated by a short ER-lumenal fragment of CPXV012, which results from a frameshift in the cowpox virus genome. Tethered to the ER membrane, this fragment mimics a high ER-lumenal peptide concentration, thus provoking a trans-inhibition of antigen translocation as supply for MHC I loading. These findings illuminate the evolution of viral immune modulators and the basis of a fine-balanced regulation of antigen processing. PMID:25503639

  2. Ablation of Programmed -1 Ribosomal Frameshifting in Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Results in Attenuated Neuropathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Kendra, Joseph A; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Brahms, Ashwini; Woodson, Caitlin; Bell, Todd M; Chen, Bin; Khan, Yousuf A; Jacobs, Jonathan L; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2017-02-01

    The alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), and western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) are arthropod-borne positive-strand RNA viruses that are capable of causing acute and fatal encephalitis in many mammals, including humans. VEEV was weaponized during the Cold War and is recognized as a select agent. Currently, there are no FDA-approved vaccines or therapeutics for these viruses. The spread of VEEV and other members of this family due to climate change-mediated vector range expansion underscores the need for research aimed at developing medical countermeasures. These viruses utilize programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) to synthesize the viral trans-frame (TF) protein, which has previously been shown to be important for neuropathogenesis in the related Sindbis virus. Here, the alphavirus -1 PRF signals were characterized, revealing novel -1 PRF stimulatory structures. -1 PRF attenuation mildly affected the kinetics of VEEV accumulation in cultured cells but strongly inhibited its pathogenesis in an aerosol infection mouse model. Importantly, the decreased viral titers in the brains of mice infected with the mutant virus suggest that the alphavirus TF protein is important for passage through the blood-brain barrier and/or for neuroinvasiveness. These findings suggest a novel approach to the development of safe and effective live attenuated vaccines directed against VEEV and perhaps other closely related -1 PRF-utilizing viruses.

  3. A negative feedback modulator of antigen processing evolved from a frameshift in the cowpox virus genome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiacheng; Eggensperger, Sabine; Hank, Susanne; Wycisk, Agnes I; Wieneke, Ralph; Mayerhofer, Peter U; Tampé, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Coevolution of viruses and their hosts represents a dynamic molecular battle between the immune system and viral factors that mediate immune evasion. After the abandonment of smallpox vaccination, cowpox virus infections are an emerging zoonotic health threat, especially for immunocompromised patients. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis of how cowpox viral CPXV012 interferes with MHC class I antigen processing. This type II membrane protein inhibits the coreTAP complex at the step after peptide binding and peptide-induced conformational change, in blocking ATP binding and hydrolysis. Distinct from other immune evasion mechanisms, TAP inhibition is mediated by a short ER-lumenal fragment of CPXV012, which results from a frameshift in the cowpox virus genome. Tethered to the ER membrane, this fragment mimics a high ER-lumenal peptide concentration, thus provoking a trans-inhibition of antigen translocation as supply for MHC I loading. These findings illuminate the evolution of viral immune modulators and the basis of a fine-balanced regulation of antigen processing.

  4. Frameshift proteins in autosomal dominant forms of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, F W; van Tijn, P; Sonnemans, M A F; Hobo, B; Mann, D M A; Van Broeckhoven, C; Kumar-Singh, S; Cras, P; Leuba, G; Savioz, A; Maat-Schieman, M L C; Yamaguchi, H; Kros, J M; Kamphorst, W; Hol, E M; de Vos, R A I; Fischer, D F

    2006-01-24

    Frameshift (+1) proteins such as APP(+1) and UBB(+1) accumulate in sporadic cases of Alzheimer disease (AD) and in older subjects with Down syndrome (DS). We investigated whether these proteins also accumulate at an early stage of neuropathogenesis in young DS individuals without neuropathology and in early-onset familial forms of AD (FAD), as well as in other tauopathies, such as Pick disease (PiD) or progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). APP(+1) is present in many neurons and beaded neurites in very young cases of DS, which suggests that it is axonally transported. In older DS patients (>37 years), a mixed pattern of APP(+1) immunoreactivity was observed in healthy looking neurons and neurites, dystrophic neurites, in association with neuritic plaques, as well as neurofibrillary tangles. UBB(+1) immunoreactivity was exclusively present in AD type of neuropathology. A similar pattern of APP(+1) and UBB(+1) immunoreactivity was also observed for FAD and much less explicit in nondemented controls after the age of 51 years. Furthermore, we observed accumulation of +1 proteins in other types of tauopathies, such as PiD, frontotemporal dementia, PSP and argyrophylic grain disease. These data suggest that accumulation of +1 proteins contributes to the early stages of dementia and plays a pathogenic role in a number of diseases that involve the accumulation of tau.

  5. Importance of lunar and temporal conditions for spotlight surveys of adult black-footed ferrets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eads, David A.; Jachowski, David S.; Millspaugh, Joshua J.; Biggins, Dean E.

    2012-01-01

    Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) spend most daylight hours underground in prairie dog (Cynomys) burrows and exhibit aboveground movements primarily at night. Moonlight can influence the activity patterns of ferrets and, consequently, might influence the efficiency of spotlight surveys used by biologists to monitor ferret populations. We related detection of adult ferrets during postbreeding spotlight surveys to lunar and temporal conditions. We most frequently located ferrets during surveys in which the moon breached the horizon. The data suggested intersexual differences in response to moonlight. We located male ferrets most frequently during nights with greater moon illumination, but we did not detect a correlation between moon illumination and spotlight detection of female ferrets. In general, moonlight could facilitate aboveground navigation by ferrets. However, it seems activity under bright moonlight could be costly for female ferrets while they raise young. Detection of ferrets also varied among months. We detected female ferrets most frequently in August–September, when mothers increase hunting efforts to acquire prey for growing offspring (kits). Detection of adult female ferrets declined in October, when kits were likely independent of their mother. We located male ferrets most frequently in September–October, when males might increase activity to monitor female ferrets and male competitors. Consideration of lunar and temporal influences and standardization of postbreeding surveys could enhance site-specific assessment of reintroduction success and across-site assessment of species recoveiy progress. We suggest that postbreeding surveys for ferrets should be enhanced by concentrating efforts in August–September during moonlit nights when the moon is above the horizon.

  6. Two novel NIPBL gene mutations in Chinese patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mei, Libin; Liang, Desheng; Huang, Yanru; Pan, Qian; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-01-25

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominantly inherited developmental disorder characterized by distinctive facial features, mental retardation, and upper limb defects, with the involvement of multiple organs and systems. To date, mutations have been identified in five genes responsible for CdLS: NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and HDAC8. Here, we present a clinical and molecular characterization of five unrelated Chinese patients whose clinical presentation is consistent with that of CdLS. There were no chromosomal abnormalities in the five children. In three patients, DNA sequencing revealed a previously reported frameshift mutation c.2479delA (p.Arg827GlyfsX20), and two novel mutations including a heterozygous mutation c.6272 G>T (p.Cys2091Phe) and a frameshift mutation c.1672delA (p.Thr558LeufsX7) in NIPBL. For the remaining patients, large deletions and/or duplications within the NIPBL gene were excluded as playing a role in the pathogenesis, by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. These findings broaden the mutation spectrum of NIPBL and further our understanding of the diverse and variable effects of NIPBL mutations on CdLS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular and Clinical Analyses of Greig Cephalopolysyndactyly and Pallister-Hall Syndromes: Robust Phenotype Prediction from the Type and Position of GLI3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Olivos-Glander, Isabelle; Killoran, Christina; Elson, Emma; Turner, Joyce T.; Peters, Kathryn F.; Abbott, Margaret H.; Aughton, David J.; Aylsworth, Arthur S.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Booth, Carol; Curry, Cynthia J.; David, Albert; Dinulos, Mary Beth; Flannery, David B.; Fox, Michelle A.; Graham, John M.; Grange, Dorothy K.; Guttmacher, Alan E.; Hannibal, Mark C.; Henn, Wolfram; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Holmes, Lewis B.; Hoyme, H. Eugene; Leppig, Kathleen A.; Lin, Angela E.; MacLeod, Patrick; Manchester, David K.; Marcelis, Carlo; Mazzanti, Laura; McCann, Emma; McDonald, Marie T.; Mendelsohn, Nancy J.; Moeschler, John B.; Moghaddam, Billur; Neri, Giovanni; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Pagon, Roberta A.; Phillips, John A.; Sadler, Laurie S.; Stoler, Joan M.; Tilstra, David; Walsh Vockley, Catherine M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Zadeh, Touran M.; Brueton, Louise; Black, Graeme Charles M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the GLI3 zinc-finger transcription factor gene cause Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) and Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS), which are variable but distinct clinical entities. We hypothesized that GLI3 mutations that predict a truncated functional repressor protein cause PHS and that functional haploinsufficiency of GLI3 causes GCPS. To test these hypotheses, we screened patients with PHS and GCPS for GLI3 mutations. The patient group consisted of 135 individuals: 89 patients with GCPS and 46 patients with PHS. We detected 47 pathological mutations (among 60 probands); when these were combined with previously published mutations, two genotype-phenotype correlations were evident. First, GCPS was caused by many types of alterations, including translocations, large deletions, exonic deletions and duplications, small in-frame deletions, and missense, frameshift/nonsense, and splicing mutations. In contrast, PHS was caused only by frameshift/nonsense and splicing mutations. Second, among the frameshift/nonsense mutations, there was a clear genotype-phenotype correlation. Mutations in the first third of the gene (from open reading frame [ORF] nucleotides [nt] 1–1997) caused GCPS, and mutations in the second third of the gene (from ORF nt 1998–3481) caused primarily PHS. Surprisingly, there were 12 mutations in patients with GCPS in the 3′ third of the gene (after ORF nt 3481), and no patients with PHS had mutations in this region. These results demonstrate a robust correlation of genotype and phenotype for GLI3 mutations and strongly support the hypothesis that these two allelic disorders have distinct modes of pathogenesis. PMID:15739154

  8. Cherry Featured in NCI’s Spotlight on Scientists Video Series | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    James Cherry, Ph.D., learned at an early age that education is crucial to success. He credits his mentors, some of whom include his grandmother, Shepherd University professor Burton Lidgerding, Ph.D., David Munroe, Ph.D., Frederick National Lab, and Robert J. Hohman, Ph.D., National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for guiding him to the career he has today. Cherry, scientific program director, Office of Scientific Operations (OSO), NCI at Frederick, is one of the scientists featured in NCI’s Spotlight on Scientists video series.

  9. Cherry Featured in NCI’s Spotlight on Scientists Video Series | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    James Cherry, Ph.D., learned at an early age that education is crucial to success. He credits his mentors, some of whom include his grandmother, Shepherd University professor Burton Lidgerding, Ph.D., David Munroe, Ph.D., Frederick National Lab, and Robert J. Hohman, Ph.D., National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for guiding him to the career he has today. Cherry, scientific program director, Office of Scientific Operations (OSO), NCI at Frederick, is one of the scientists featured in NCI’s Spotlight on Scientists video series.

  10. Metagenomic DNA fragments that affect Escherichia coli mutational pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hanjing; To, Kam H; Aguila, Sharon J; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2006-08-01

    A multicopy cloning approach was used to search for metagenomic DNA fragments that affect Escherichia coli mutational pathways. Soil metagenomic expression libraries were constructed with DNA samples prepared directly from soil samples collected from the UCLA Botanical Garden. Using frameshift mutator screening, we obtained a total of 26 unique metagenomic fragments that stimulate frameshift rates in an E. coli wild-type host. Mutational enhancer strains such as an ndk-deficient strain and a temperature sensitive mutS strain (mutS60) were used to further verify the mutator phenotype. We found that the presence of multiple copies of certain types of metagenomic DNA sequence repeats cause general genome instability in the wild-type E. coli host and the effect can be suppressed by overproducing a DNA mismatch component MutL. In addition, we identified nine metagenomic mutator genes (designated as smu genes) that encode proteins that have not been linked to mutator phenotypes prior to this study including a putative RNA methyltransferase Smu10A. The strain overproducing Smu10A displays one prominent base substitution hotspot in the rpoB gene, which coincides with the base substitution hotspot we have observed in cells that are partially deficient in the proofreading function carried out by the DNA polymerase III epsilon subunit. Based on the structural conservation of DNA replication/recombination/repair machineries among microorganisms, this approach would allow us to both identify new mutational pathways in E. coli and to find genes involved in DNA replication, recombination or DNA repair from vast unculturable microbes.

  11. Novel and recurrent BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in early onset and familial breast and ovarian cancer detected in the Program of Genetic Counseling in Cancer of Valencian Community (eastern Spain). Relationship of family phenotypes with mutation prevalence.

    PubMed

    de Juan Jiménez, Inmaculada; García Casado, Zaida; Palanca Suela, Sarai; Esteban Cardeñosa, Eva; López Guerrero, José Antonio; Segura Huerta, Ángel; Chirivella González, Isabel; Sánchez Heras, Ana Beatriz; Juan Fita, Ma José; Tena García, Isabel; Guillen Ponce, Carmen; Martínez de Dueñas, Eduardo; Romero Noguera, Ignacio; Salas Trejo, Dolores; Goicoechea Sáez, Mercedes; Bolufer Gilabert, Pascual

    2013-12-01

    During the first 6 years of the Program of Genetic Counselling in Cancer of Valencia (eastern Spain), 310 mutations (155 in BRCA1 and 155 in BRCA2) in 1,763 hereditary breast (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) families were identified. Of the mutations found 105 were distinct (53 in BRCA1 and 52 in BRCA2), eight new and 37 recurrent. Two of the novel mutations were frame-shift placed in exons 2 and 11 of BRCA1 and the remaining six were placed in BRCA2; four frame-shift (three in exon 11 and one in exon 23), one deletion of the entire exon 19 and one in the intervening sequence of exon 22. The BRCA1 mutations with higher recurrence were c.66_68delAG, c.5123C > A, c.1961delA, c.3770_3771delAG and c.5152+5G > A that covered 45.2% of mutations of this gene. The age of onset of BCs of c.68_69delAG mutation carriers occurs later than for the other recurrent mutations of this gene (45 vs. 37 years; p = 0.008). The BRCA2 mutations with higher recurrence were c.9026_9030delATCAT, c.3264insT and c.8978_8991del14 which represented 43.2% of all mutations in this gene, being the most recurrent mutation by far c.9026_9030delATCAT that represents 21.3% of BRCA2 mutations and 10.6% of all mutations. Probands with family histories of BC and OC, or OC and/or BC in at least two first degree relatives, were the more likely to have BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations (35.2% of the total mutations). And that most BRCA1mutations (73.19% mutations) occurred in probands with early-onset BC or with family history of OC.

  12. Mutation analysis of the gene involved in adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Oost, B.A. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Kemp, S.; Bolhuis, P.A.

    1994-09-01

    A gene responsible for the X-linked genetic disorder adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) that is characterized by demyelination of the nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency has been identified by positional cloning. The gene encodes an ATP-binding transporter which is located in the peroxisomal membrane. Deficiency of the gene leads to accumulation of unsaturated very long chain fatty acids due to impaired peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation. A systematic analysis of the open reading frame of the ALD gene unraveled the mutations in 28 different families using reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by direct sequencing. No entire gene deletions or drastic promoter mutations have been detected. Only in one family did the mutation involved multiple exons. The remaining mutations were subtle alterations leading to missense (about 50%) or nonsense mutations, frameshifts or splice acceptor site defects. In one patient a single codon was missing. Mutations affecting a single amino acid were concentrated in the region between the third and fourth putative membrane spanning fragments and in the ATP-binding domain. This overview of mutations aids in the determination of structural and functional important regions and facilitates the screening for mutations in other ALD patients. The detection of mutations in virtually all ALD families tested indicates that the isolated gene is the only gene responsible for ALD located in Xq28.

  13. Twelve novel Atm mutations identified in Chinese ataxia telangiectasia patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Yang, Lu; Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Fan; Xiao, Ying; Xia, Rongjun; Yuan, Xianhou; Yan, Mingshan

    2013-09-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized mainly by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, and immunodeficiency. This disease is caused by mutations of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) gene. More than 500 Atm mutations that are responsible for A-T have been identified so far. However, there have been very few A-T cases reported in China, and only two Chinese A-T patients have undergone Atm gene analysis. In order to systemically investigate A-T in China and map their Atm mutation spectrum, we recruited eight Chinese A-T patients from six unrelated families nationwide. Using direct sequencing of genomic DNA and the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, we identified twelve pathogenic Atm mutations, including one missense, four nonsense, five frameshift, one splicing, and one large genomic deletion. All the Atm mutations we identified were novel, and no homozygous mutation and founder-effect mutation were found. These results suggest that Atm mutations in Chinese populations are diverse and distinct largely from those in other ethnic areas.

  14. Detection of eight BRCA1 mutations in 10 breast/ovarian cancer families, including 1 family with male breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sruewing, J.P.; Brody, L.C.; Erdos, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    Genetic epidemiological evidence suggests that mutations in BRCA1 may be responsible for approximately one half of early onset familial breast cancer and the majority of familial breast/ovarian cancer. The recent cloning of BRCA1 allows for the direct detection of mutations, but the feasibility of presymptomatic screening for cancer susceptibility is unknown. We analyzed genomic DNA from one affected individual from each of 24 families with at least three cases of ovarian or breast cancer, using SSCP assays. Variant SSCP bands were subcloned and sequenced. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization was used to verify sequence changes and to screen DNA from control individuals. Six frameshift and two missense mutations were detected in 10 different families. A frameshift mutation was detected in a male proband affected with both breast and prostate cancer. A 40-bp deletion was detected in a patient who developed intra-abdominal carcinomatosis 1 year after prophylactic oophorectomy. Mutations were detected throughout the gene, and only one was detected in more than a single family. These results provide further evidence that inherited breast and ovarian cancer can occur as a consequence of a wide array of BRCA1 mutations. These results suggests that development of a screening test for BRCA1 mutations will be technically challenging. The finding of a mutation in a family with male breast cancer, not previously thought to be related to BRCA1, also illustrates the potential difficulties of genetic counseling for individuals known to carry mutations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Identification of novel FBN1 and TGFBR2 mutations in 65 probands with Marfan syndrome or Marfan-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Brian Hon-Yin; Lam, Stephen Tak-Sum; Tong, Tony Ming-For; Li, Susanna Yuk-Han; Lun, Kin-Shing; Chan, Daniel Hon-Chuen; Fok, Susanna Fung-Shan; Or, June Siu-Fong; Smith, David Keith; Yang, Wanling; Lau, Yu-Lung

    2009-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder, and mutations in the FBN1 and TGFBR2 genes have been identified in probands with MFS and related phenotypes. Using DHPLC and sequencing, we studied the mutation spectrum in 65 probands with Marfan syndrome and related phenotypes. A total of 24 mutations in FBN1 were identified, of which 19 (nine missense, six frameshift, two nonsense and two affecting splice junctions) were novel. In the remaining 41 probands, six were identified to have novel TGFBR2 mutations (one frameshift and five missense mutations). All novel mutations found in this study were confirmed to be absent in 50 unrelated normal individuals of the same ethnic background. In probands who fulfilled the Ghent criteria (n = 16), mutations in FBN1 were found in 81% of cases. None of those with TGFBR2 mutations fulfilled the Ghent criteria. Novel missense mutations of unknown significance were classified according to the latest ACMG guidelines and their likelihood to be causative was evaluated.

  16. New SLC12A3 disease causative mutation of Gitelman’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Grillone, Teresa; Menniti, Miranda; Bombardiere, Francesco; Vismara, Marco Flavio Michele; Belviso, Stefania; Fabiani, Fernanda; Perrotti, Nicola; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Colao, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Gitelman’s syndrome (GS) is a salt-losing tubulopathy with an autosomal recessive inheritance caused by mutations of SLC12A3, which encodes for the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter. In this study we report a new mutation of SLC12A3 found in two brothers affected by GS. Hypokalemia, hypocalciuria and hyper-reninemia were present in both patients while hypomagnesemia was detected only in one. Both patients are compound heterozygotes carrying one well known GS associated mutation (c.2581 C > T) and a new one (c.283delC) in SLC12A3 gene. The new mutation results in a possible frame-shift with a premature stop-codon (pGln95ArgfsX19). The parents of the patients, heterozygous carriers of the mutations found in SLC12A3, have no disease associated phenotype. Therefore, the new mutation is causative of GS. PMID:27872838

  17. Mutation analysis in Norwegian families with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: founder mutations in ACVRL1.

    PubMed

    Heimdal, K; Dalhus, B; Rødningen, O K; Kroken, M; Eiklid, K; Dheyauldeen, S; Røysland, T; Andersen, R; Kulseth, M A

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, Osler-Weber-Rendu disease) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease defined by the presence of epistaxis and mucocutaneous telangiectasias and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in internal organs. In most families (~85%), HHT is caused by mutations in the ENG (HHT1) or the ACVRL1 (HHT2) genes. Here, we report the results of genetic testing of 113 Norwegian families with suspected or definite HHT. Variants in ENG and ACVRL1 were found in 105 families (42 ENG, 63 ACVRL1), including six novel variants of uncertain pathogenic significance. Mutation types were similar to previous reports with more missense variants in ACVRL1 and more nonsense, frameshift and splice-site mutations in ENG. Thirty-two variants were novel in this study. The preponderance of ACVRL1 mutations was due to founder mutations, specifically, c.830C>A (p.Thr277Lys), which was found in 24 families from the same geographical area of Norway. We discuss the importance of founder mutations and present a thorough evaluation of missense and splice-site variants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Mutation analysis of the FRAS1 gene demonstrates new mutations in a propositus with Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, A; Li, C; Sherr, E H; Chudley, A E

    2006-09-15

    Fraser syndrome (OMIM 219000) is a rare, autosomal recessive condition with classical features of cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, ambiguous genitalia, laryngeal, and genitourinary malformations, oral clefting and mental retardation. Mutations causing loss of function of the FRAS1 gene have been demonstrated in five patients with Fraser syndrome. However, no phenotype-genotype correlation was established and there was evidence for genetic heterogeneity. Fraser syndrome is rare and the FRAS1 gene has 75 exons, complicating mutation screening in affected patients. We have screened two patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for Fraser syndrome and three patients with related phenotypes (two patients with Manitoba oculotrichoanal syndrome and one patient with unilateral cryptophthalmos and labial fusion) for mutations in FRAS1 to increase the molecular genetic data in patients with Fraser syndrome and related conditions. We report two new mutations in a patient with Fraser syndrome, a frameshift mutation and a deletion of two amino acids that we consider pathogenic as both alter the NG2-like domain of the protein. Although we are still unable to clarify a phenotype-genotype relationship in Fraser syndrome, our data add to the list of mutations associated with this syndrome.

  19. Mutational analysis of GNAS1 in patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism: identification of two novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, G; Romoli, R; Weber, G; Brunelli, V; De Menis, E; Beccio, S; Beck-Peccoz, P; Spada, A

    2000-11-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) refers to two major variants that generally coexist in the same family, PHP type Ia (PHP Ia), in which both PTH resistance and a constellation of physical features, termed Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO), are present, and pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP), in which AHO occurs without PTH resistance. Most patients with PHP Ia show a partial deficiency (50%) of Gs activity, due to loss of function mutations in Gsalpha gene (GNAS1). The present study reports clinical, biochemical, and molecular data of 8 unrelated families with PHP Ia and PPHP. The 13 exons of GNAS1 were screened for mutations by PCR and direct sequencing of the amplified products. We detected heterozygous mutations in the affected members of the 4 families in which PHP Ia was present. In 2 families 2 previously reported deletions in exons 5 and 7 were found, whereas in the other 2 families, 2 novel frameshift deletions were identified in exons 1 and 11, causing a premature stop codon in the mutant allele. No mutation was detected in the families in which PPHP was the only clinical manifestation. In conclusion, we report the first mutational analysis of Italian patients with PHP Ia and PPHP, and we describe two novel deletions in GNAS1. Furthermore, we confirm that these mutations cannot be detected in families with isolated PPHP, suggesting that these forms of AHO are genetically distinct from PHP Ia.

  20. Mutation detection and prenatal diagnosis of XLHED pedigree

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Background The phenotypic characters of X -linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia (XLHED) are the dysplasia of epithelial- and mesenchymal-derived organs. Ectodysplasin (EDA) is the causative gene of XLHED. Methods The current study reported a large Chinese XLHED pedigree. The genomic DNA of adult and fetus was extracted from peripheral blood and shed chorion cell respectively. The nucleotide variation in EDA gene was screened through direct sequencing the coding sequence. The methylation state of EDA gene’s promoter was evaluated by pyrosequencing. Results This Chinese XLHED family had two male patients and three carriers. All of them were with a novel EDA frameshift mutation. The mutation, c.172-173insGG, which leads to an immediate premature stop codon in exon one caused severe structural changes of EDA. Prenatal diagnosis suggested that the fetus was a female carrier. The follow-up observation of this child indicated that she had mild hypodontia of deciduous teeth at age six. The methylation level of EDA gene’s promoter was not related to carriers’ phenotype changes in this family. Discussion We reported a new frameshift mutation of EDA gene in a Chinese family. Prenatal diagnosis can help to predict the disease status of the fetus. PMID:28875069

  1. Progenitor genotyping reveals a complex clonal architecture in a subset of CALR-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sarah; Wright, Casey M; Scott, Linda M

    2017-04-01

    The identification of acquired CALR mutations in patients with essential thrombocythaemia (ET) or myelofibrosis (MF) has meant that disease-initiating mutations can now be detected in about 90% of all patients with a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Here, we show that only those CALR mutations that cause a +1 frameshift, thereby altering the carboxy-terminus of calreticulin, promote cytokine independence in vitro; in-frame deletions were not functional, and are unlikely to be the pathogenetic mutation underlying some MPN cases. Expression of the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, was also necessary for factor-independence. Although the CALR mutations are considered to occur only in JAK2 V617F-negative cases and in a heterozygous state, progenitor genotyping revealed that this is not always true. Notably, CALR mutation-positive MPNs can be polyclonal: in one case, two distinct CALR mutation-positive subpopulations could be identified; in another, separate populations of JAK2 V617F-positive and CALR-mutated cells were present. Mitotic recombination involving chromosome 19 in a third instance resulted in the emergence of a CALR mutation-homozygous subclone. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that occasional patients with CALR mutation-positive ET or MF carry other MPN-initiating genetic mutations (including JAK2 V617F), acquire "secondary mutations" before or after the CALR mutation, or evolve over time to being CALR mutation-homozygous.

  2. Hybridization alters spontaneous mutation rates in a parent-of-origin-dependent fashion in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Tufail; Sailer, Christian; Gerber, Florian; Loganathan, Nitin; Bhoopalan, Hemadev; Eichenberger, Christof; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2014-05-01

    Over 70 years ago, increased spontaneous mutation rates were observed in Drosophila spp. hybrids, but the genetic basis of this phenomenon is not well understood. The model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) offers unique opportunities to study the types of mutations induced upon hybridization and the frequency of their occurrence. Understanding the mutational effects of hybridization is important, as many crop plants are grown as hybrids. Besides, hybridization is important for speciation and its effects on genome integrity could be critical, as chromosomal rearrangements can lead to reproductive isolation. We examined the rates of hybridization-induced point and frameshift mutations as well as homologous recombination events in intraspecific Arabidopsis hybrids using a set of transgenic mutation detector lines that carry mutated or truncated versions of a reporter gene. We found that hybridization alters the frequency of different kinds of mutations. In general, Columbia (Col)×Cape Verde Islands and Col×C24 hybrid progeny had decreased T→G and T→A transversion rates but an increased C→T transition rate. Significant changes in frameshift mutation rates were also observed in some hybrids. In Col×C24 hybrids, there is a trend for increased homologous recombination rates, except for the hybrids from one line, while in Col×Cape Verde Islands hybrids, this rate is decreased. The overall genetic distance of the parents had no influence on mutation rates in the progeny, as closely related accessions on occasion displayed higher mutation rates than accessions that are separated farther apart. However, reciprocal hybrids had significantly different mutation rates, suggesting parent-of-origin-dependent effects on the mutation frequency.

  3. Compound heterozygosity of two novel truncation mutations in RP1 causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li Jia; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Tam, Pancy O S; Chiang, Sylvia W Y; Zhang, Xin; Lam, Shi; Lai, Ricky Y K; Lam, Dennis S C; Pang, Chi Pui

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the phenotypic effects of two novel frameshift mutations in the RP1 gene in a Chinese pedigree of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP). Methods. Family members of a proband with ARRP were screened for RP1, RHO, NR2E3, and NRL mutations by direct sequencing. Detected RP1 mutations were genotyped in 225 control subjects. Since one family member with the RP1 deletion mutation in exon 2 was found to have age-related macular degeneration (AMD) but not RP, exons 2 and 3 of RP1 were screened in 120 patients with exudative AMD. Major AMD-associated SNPs in the HTRA1 and CFH genes were also investigated. Results. Two novel frameshift mutations in RP1, c.5_6delGT and c.4941_4942insT, were identified in the pedigree. They were absent in 225 control subjects. Family members who were compound heterozygous for the nonsense mutations had early-onset and severe RP, whereas those with only one mutation did not have RP. No mutations in RHO, NR2E3, and NRL were identified in the pedigree. Subject I:2 with AMD carried both at-risk genotypes at HTRA1 rs11200638 and CFH rs800292. No mutation in RP1 exons 2 and 3 was identified in 120 AMD patients. Conclusions. This report is the first to associate ARRP with compound heterozygous nonsense mutations in RP1. Identification of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD)-sensitive mutation c.5_6delGT provided further genetic evidence that haploinsufficiency of RP1 is not responsible for RP. The authors propose four classes of truncation mutations in the RP1 gene with different effects on the etiology of RP.

  4. Mutations of ESPN cause autosomal recessive deafness and vestibular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Naz, S; Griffith, A; Riazuddin, S; Hampton, L; Battey, J; Khan, S; Riazuddin, S; Wilcox, E; Friedman, T

    2004-01-01

    We mapped a human deafness locus DFNB36 to chromosome 1p36.3 in two consanguineous families segregating recessively inherited deafness and vestibular areflexia. This phenotype co-segregates with either of two frameshift mutations, 1988delAGAG and 2469delGTCA, in ESPN, which encodes a calcium-insensitive actin-bundling protein called espin. A recessive mutation of ESPN is known to cause hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction in the jerker mouse. Our results establish espin as an essential protein for hearing and vestibular function in humans. The abnormal vestibular phenotype associated with ESPN mutations will be a useful clinical marker for refining the differential diagnosis of non-syndromic deafness. PMID:15286153

  5. Haematopoietic and immune defects associated with GATA2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Matthew; Dickinson, Rachel; Bigley, Venetia

    2015-01-01

    Heterozygous familial or sporadic GATA2 mutations cause a multifaceted disorder, encompassing susceptibility to infection, pulmonary dysfunction, autoimmunity, lymphoedema and malignancy. Although often healthy in childhood, carriers of defective GATA2 alleles develop progressive loss of mononuclear cells (dendritic cells, monocytes, B and Natural Killer lymphocytes), elevated FLT3 ligand, and a 90% risk of clinical complications, including progression to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) by 60 years of age. Premature death may occur from childhood due to infection, pulmonary dysfunction, solid malignancy and MDS/acute myeloid leukaemia. GATA2 mutations include frameshifts, amino acid substitutions, insertions and deletions scattered throughout the gene but concentrated in the region encoding the two zinc finger domains. Mutations appear to cause haplo-insufficiency, which is known to impair haematopoietic stem cell survival in animal models. Management includes genetic counselling, prevention of infection, cancer surveillance, haematopoietic monitoring and, ultimately, stem cell transplantation upon the development of MDS or another life-threatening complication. PMID:25707267

  6. Targeted mutation of zebrafish fga models human congenital afibrinogenemia

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Richard J.; Di Sanza, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human fibrinogen genes can lead to the absence of circulating fibrinogen and cause congenital afibrinogenemia. This rare bleeding disorder is associated with a variable phenotype, which may be influenced by environment and genotype. Here, we present a zebrafish model of afibrinogenemia. We introduced targeted mutations into the zebrafish fga gene using zinc finger nuclease technology. Animals carrying 3 distinct frameshift mutations in fga were raised and bred to produce homozygous mutants. Using a panel of anti-zebrafish fibrinogen antibodies, fibrinogen was undetectable in plasma preparations from homozygous mutant fish. We observed hemorrhaging in fga mutants and reduced survival compared with control animals. This model will now serve in the search for afibrinogenemia modifying genes or agents and, to our knowledge, is the first transmissible zebrafish model of a defined human bleeding disorder. PMID:24553182

  7. Targeted mutation of zebrafish fga models human congenital afibrinogenemia.

    PubMed

    Fish, Richard J; Di Sanza, Corinne; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2014-04-03

    Mutations in the human fibrinogen genes can lead to the absence of circulating fibrinogen and cause congenital afibrinogenemia. This rare bleeding disorder is associated with a variable phenotype, which may be influenced by environment and genotype. Here, we present a zebrafish model of afibrinogenemia. We introduced targeted mutations into the zebrafish fga gene using zinc finger nuclease technology. Animals carrying 3 distinct frameshift mutations in fga were raised and bred to produce homozygous mutants. Using a panel of anti-zebrafish fibrinogen antibodies, fibrinogen was undetectable in plasma preparations from homozygous mutant fish. We observed hemorrhaging in fga mutants and reduced survival compared with control animals. This model will now serve in the search for afibrinogenemia modifying genes or agents and, to our knowledge, is the first transmissible zebrafish model of a defined human bleeding disorder.

  8. [Fibrinogen beta chain gene mutation contributes to one congenital afibrinogenemia].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiu-cai; Zhou, Rong-fu; Wu, Jing-sheng; Fang, Yi; Wang, Xue-feng; Zhai, Zhi-min; Wang, Hong-li

    2005-03-01

    To identify the fibrinogen (Fg) gene mutations in a Chinese pedigree of congenital afibrinogenemia. The plasma Fg activity and protein of the proband and his family members were detected. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells. All the exons and exon-intron boundaries of fibrinogen gene were amplified by PCR and sequenced thereafter. Two mutations, 7972 del G in FGB and T2543A in FGG, were found in the proband. FGG2543 is a polymorphism site, which lead to the polymorphism of gamma144 I/K. The G deletion at base 7972 of FGB contributes to the frameshift mutation after amino acid 419, resulting in the truncated beta chain without the terminal 27 amino acids. The latter may contributes to the pathogenetic mechanisms in Chinese congenital afibrinogenemia patients. The G deletion at base 7972 of FGB is identified for the first time.

  9. SpotLight Proteomics: uncovering the hidden blood proteome improves diagnostic power of proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Susanna L.; Zhang, Bo; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Aarsland, Dag; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2017-01-01

    The human blood proteome is frequently assessed by protein abundance profiling using a combination of liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In traditional sequence database search, many good-quality MS/MS data remain unassigned. Here we uncover the hidden part of the blood proteome via novel SpotLight approach. This method combines de novo MS/MS sequencing of enriched antibodies and co-extracted proteins with subsequent label-free quantification of new and known peptides in both enriched and unfractionated samples. In a pilot study on differentiating early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) from Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), on peptide level the hidden proteome contributed almost as much information to patient stratification as the apparent proteome. Intriguingly, many of the new peptide sequences are attributable to antibody variable regions, and are potentially indicative of disease etiology. When the hidden and apparent proteomes are combined, the accuracy of differentiating AD (n = 97) and DLB (n = 47) increased from ≈85% to ≈95%. The low added burden of SpotLight proteome analysis makes it attractive for use in clinical settings. PMID:28167817

  10. Efficient imaging approach for spaceborne sliding spotlight synthetic aperture radar with a small squint angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Chen, Yanmei; Sun, Weifeng; Wan, Yong; Dai, Yongshou

    2015-01-01

    Several existing algorithms for squinted sliding spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR) suffer from low efficiency, despite their good focusing abilities. Their low speeds are primarily due to the use of wave-number domain (Omega-K) processing after spectrum unfolding in the azimuth frequency domain. Omega-K processing is chosen in these algorithms due to its focusing ability at large squint angles. However, in most scenarios, spaceborne SARs operate with small squint angles that are generally not greater than 5 deg. In these scenarios, Omega-K processing is not necessary and is not preferred due to its computational burden. Thus, in this study, we extend a classic, two-step algorithm based on the chirp z-transformation for the efficient processing of SAR data acquired in spaceborne sliding spotlight mode at a small squint angle. The modified azimuth-filtering and focusing processing is used to compensate for the additional Doppler bandwidth caused by the antenna squinting and is described in detail. The simulation results show the good focusing ability of the proposed algorithm and validate the improvement in computational efficiency.

  11. The UGG Isoacceptor of tRNAPro Is Naturally Prone to Frameshifts.

    PubMed

    Gamper, Howard B; Masuda, Isao; Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2015-07-01

    Native tRNAs often contain post-transcriptional modifications to the wobble position to expand the capacity of reading the genetic code. Some of these modifications, due to the ability to confer imperfect codon-anticodon pairing at the wobble position, can induce a high propensity for tRNA to shift into alternative reading frames. An example is the native UGG isoacceptor of E. coli tRNAPro whose wobble nucleotide U34 is post-transcriptionally modified to cmo5U34 to read all four proline codons (5'-CCA, 5'-CCC, 5'-CCG, and 5'-CCU). Because the pairing of the modified anticodon to CCC codon is particularly weak relative to CCA and CCG codons, this tRNA can readily shift into both the +1 and +2-frame on the slippery mRNA sequence CCC-CG. We show that the shift to the +2-frame is more dominant, driven by the higher stability of the codon-anticodon pairing at the wobble position. Kinetic analysis suggests that both types of shifts can occur during stalling of the tRNA in a post-translocation complex or during translocation from the A to the P-site. Importantly, while the +1-frame post complex is active for peptidyl transfer, the +2-frame complex is a poor peptidyl donor. Together with our recent work, we draw a mechanistic distinction between +1 and +2-frameshifts, showing that while the +1-shifts are suppressed by the additional post-transcriptionally modified m1G37 nucleotide in the anticodon loop, the +2-shifts are suppressed by the ribosome, supporting a role of the ribosome in the overall quality control of reading-frame maintenance.

  12. Tyrosinemia type II: Mutation update, 11 novel mutations and description of 5 independent subjects with a novel founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Peña-Quintana, L; Scherer, G; Curbelo-Estévez, M L; Jiménez-Acosta, F; Hartmann, B; La Roche, F; Meavilla-Olivas, S; Pérez-Cerdá, C; García-Segarra, N; Giguère, Y; Huppke, P; Mitchell, G A; Mönch, E; Trump, D; Vianey-Saban, C; Trimble, E R; Vitoria-Miñana, I; Reyes-Suárez, D; Ramírez-Lorenzo, T; Tugores, A

    2017-09-01

    Tyrosinemia type II, also known as Richner-Hanhart Syndrome, is an extremely rare autosomal recessive disorder, caused by mutations in the gene encoding hepatic cytosolic tyrosine aminotransferase, leading to the accumulation of tyrosine and its metabolites which cause ocular and skin lesions, that may be accompanied by neurological manifestations, mostly intellectual disability. To update disease-causing mutations and current clinical knowledge of the disease. Genetic and clinical information were obtained from a collection of both unreported and previously reported cases. We report 106 families, represented by 143 individuals, carrying a total of 36 genetic variants, 11 of them not previously known to be associated with the disease. Variants include 3 large deletions, 21 non-synonymous and 5 nonsense amino-acid changes, 5 frameshifts and 2 splice variants. We also report 5 patients from Gran Canaria, representing the largest known group of unrelated families sharing the same P406L mutation. Data analysis did not reveal a genotype-phenotype correlation, but stressed the need of early diagnosis: All patients improved the oculocutaneous lesions after dietary treatment but neurological symptoms prevailed. The discovery of founder mutations in isolated populations, and the benefits of early intervention, should increase diagnostic awareness in newborns. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Scientist Spotlight Homework Assignments Shift Students' Stereotypes of Scientists and Enhance Science Identity in a Diverse Introductory Science Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schinske, Jeffrey N.; Perkins, Heather; Snyder, Amanda; Wyer, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Research into science identity, stereotype threat, and possible selves suggests a lack of diverse representations of scientists could impede traditionally underserved students from persisting and succeeding in science. We evaluated a series of metacognitive homework assignments ("Scientist Spotlights") that featured counterstereotypical…

  14. Scientist Spotlight Homework Assignments Shift Students’ Stereotypes of Scientists and Enhance Science Identity in a Diverse Introductory Science Class

    PubMed Central

    Schinske, Jeffrey N.; Perkins, Heather; Snyder, Amanda; Wyer, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Research into science identity, stereotype threat, and possible selves suggests a lack of diverse representations of scientists could impede traditionally underserved students from persisting and succeeding in science. We evaluated a series of metacognitive homework assignments (“Scientist Spotlights”) that featured counterstereotypical examples of scientists in an introductory biology class at a diverse community college. Scientist Spotlights additionally served as tools for content coverage, as scientists were selected to match topics covered each week. We analyzed beginning- and end-of-course essays completed by students during each of five courses with Scientist Spotlights and two courses with equivalent homework assignments that lacked connections to the stories of diverse scientists. Students completing Scientist Spotlights shifted toward counterstereotypical descriptions of scientists and conveyed an enhanced ability to personally relate to scientists following the intervention. Longitudinal data suggested these shifts were maintained 6 months after the completion of the course. Analyses further uncovered correlations between these shifts, interest in science, and course grades. As Scientist Spotlights require very little class time and complement existing curricula, they represent a promising tool for enhancing science identity, shifting stereotypes, and connecting content to issues of equity and diversity in a broad range of STEM classrooms. PMID:27587856

  15. Alaska: Improving Referrals of Victims of Maltreatment to the IDEA Part C Program. State Spotlight: Data Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrington, Taletha; Peters, Mary Louise; Mauzy, Denise; Ruggiero, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This 2015 state spotlight document describes how Alaska Part C improved the referral of children from Child Welfare to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part C Program by an automated transfer of data from Child Welfare to Part C for substantiated cases of child maltreatment (i.e., child abuse and/or neglect).

  16. Alaska: Improving Referrals of Victims of Maltreatment to the IDEA Part C Program. State Spotlight: Data Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrington, Taletha; Peters, Mary Louise; Mauzy, Denise; Ruggiero, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This 2015 state spotlight document describes how Alaska Part C improved the referral of children from Child Welfare to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part C Program by an automated transfer of data from Child Welfare to Part C for substantiated cases of child maltreatment (i.e., child abuse and/or neglect).

  17. Scientist Spotlight Homework Assignments Shift Students' Stereotypes of Scientists and Enhance Science Identity in a Diverse Introductory Science Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schinske, Jeffrey N.; Perkins, Heather; Snyder, Amanda; Wyer, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Research into science identity, stereotype threat, and possible selves suggests a lack of diverse representations of scientists could impede traditionally underserved students from persisting and succeeding in science. We evaluated a series of metacognitive homework assignments ("Scientist Spotlights") that featured counterstereotypical…

  18. Accumulation of Deleterious Mutations on the Neo-Y Chromosome of Japan Sea Stickleback (Gasterosteus nipponicus).

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kohta; Makino, Takashi; Kitano, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Degeneration of Y chromosomes is a common evolutionary path of XY sex chromosome systems. Recent genomic studies in flies and plants have revealed that even young neo-sex chromosomes with the age of a few million years show signs of Y degeneration, such as the accumulation of nonsense and frameshift mutations. However, it remains unclear whether neo-Y chromosomes also show rapid degeneration in fishes, which often have homomorphic sex chromosomes. Here, we investigated whether a neo-Y chromosome of Japan Sea stickleback (Gasterosteus nipponicus), which was formed by a Y-autosome fusion within the last 2 million years, accumulates deleterious mutations. Our previous genomic analyses did not detect excess nonsense and frameshift mutations on the Japan Sea stickleback neo-Y. In the present study, we found that the nonrecombining region of the neo-Y near the fusion end has accumulated nonsynonymous mutations altering amino acids of evolutionarily highly conserved residues. Enrichment of gene ontology terms related to protein phosphorylation and cellular protein modification process was found in the genes with potentially deleterious mutations on the neo-Y. These results suggest that the neo-Y of the Japan Sea stickleback has already accumulated mutations that may impair protein functions.

  19. Novel Patched 1 mutations in patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome – case report

    PubMed Central

    Škodrić-Trifunović, Vesna; Stjepanović, Mihailo; Savić, Živorad; Ilić, Miroslav; Kavečan, Ivana; Jovanović Privrodski, Jadranka; Spasovski, Vesna; Stojiljković, Maja; Pavlović, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by numerous basal cell carcinomas, keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaws, and diverse developmental defects. This disorder is associated with mutations in tumor suppressor gene Patched 1 (PTCH1). We present two patients with Gorlin syndrome, one sporadic and one familial. Clinical examination, radiological, and CT imaging, and mutation screening of PTCH1 gene were performed. Family members, as well as eleven healthy controls were included in the study. Both patients fulfilled the specific criteria for diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome. Molecular analysis of the first patient showed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 6 of PTCH1gene (c.903delT). Additionally, a somatic frameshift mutation in exon 21 (c.3524delT) along with germline mutation in exon 6 was detected in tumor-derived tissue sample of this patient. Analysis of the second patient, as well as two affected family members, revealed a novel nonsense germline mutation in exon 8 (c.1148 C>A). PMID:25727044

  20. Novel patched 1 mutations in patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome--case report.

    PubMed

    Škodrić-Trifunović, Vesna; Stjepanović, Mihailo; Savić, Živorad; Ilić, Miroslav; Kavečan, Ivana; Jovanović Privrodski, Jadranka; Spasovski, Vesna; Stojiljković, Maja; Pavlović, Sonja

    2015-02-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by numerous basal cell carcinomas, keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaws, and diverse developmental defects. This disorder is associated with mutations in tumor suppressor gene Patched 1 (PTCH1). We present two patients with Gorlin syndrome, one sporadic and one familial. Clinical examination, radiological and CT imaging, and mutation screening of PTCH1 gene were performed. Family members, as well as eleven healthy controls were included in the study. Both patients fulfilled the specific criteria for diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome. Molecular analysis of the first patient showed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 6 of PTCH1gene (c.903delT). Additionally, a somatic frameshift mutation in exon 21 (c.3524delT) along with germline mutation in exon 6 was detected in tumor-derived tissue sample of this patient. Analysis of the second patient, as well as two affected family members, revealed a novel nonsense germline mutation in exon 8 (c.1148 C>A).

  1. Mutations in DVL1 Cause an Osteosclerotic Form of Robinow Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bunn, Kieran J.; Daniel, Phil; Rösken, Heleen S.; O’Neill, Adam C.; Cameron-Christie, Sophia R.; Morgan, Tim; Brunner, Han G.; Lai, Angeline; Kunst, Henricus P.M.; Markie, David M.; Robertson, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Robinow syndrome (RS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous condition that can be caused by mutations in genes encoding components of the non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In contrast, germline mutations that act to increase canonical Wnt signaling lead to distinctive osteosclerotic phenotypes. Here, we identified de novo frameshift mutations in DVL1, a mediator of both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling, as the cause of RS-OS, an RS subtype involving osteosclerosis, in three unrelated individuals. The mutations all delete the DVL1 C terminus and replace it, in each instance, with a novel, highly basic sequence. We showed the presence of mutant transcript in fibroblasts from one individual with RS-OS and demonstrated unimpaired protein stability with transfected GFP-tagged constructs bearing a frameshift mutation. In vitro TOPFlash assays, in apparent contradiction to the osteosclerotic phenotype, revealed that the mutant allele was less active than the wild-type allele in the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. However, when the mutant and wild-type alleles were co-expressed, canonical Wnt activity was 2-fold higher than that in the wild-type construct alone. This work establishes that DVL1 mutations cause a specific RS subtype, RS-OS, and that the osteosclerosis associated with this subtype might be the result of an interaction between the wild-type and mutant alleles and thus lead to elevated canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:25817014

  2. Identification of a novel mutation in the human growth hormone receptor gene (GHR) in a patient with Laron syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gennero, Isabelle; Edouard, Thomas; Rashad, Mona; Bieth, Eric; Conte-Aurio, Françoise; Marin, Françoise; Tauber, Maithé; Salles, Jean Pierre; El Kholy, Mohamed

    2007-07-01

    Deletions and mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene are the underlying etiology of Laron syndrome (LS) or growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome (GHIS), an autosomal recessive disease. Most patients are distributed in or originate from Mediterranean and Middle-Eastern countries. Sixty mutations have been described so far. We report a novel mutation in the GHR gene in a patient with LS. Genomic DNA sequencing of exon 5 revealed a TT insertion at nucleotide 422 after codon 122. The insertion resulted in a frameshift introducing a premature termination codon that led to a truncated receptor. We present clinical, biochemical and molecular evidence of LS as the result of this homozygous insertion.

  3. Mutations in Splicing Factor Genes Are a Major Cause of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa in Belgian Families

    PubMed Central

    Coppieters, Frauke; Roels, Dimitri; De Jaegere, Sarah; Flipts, Helena; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Walraedt, Sophie; Claes, Charlotte; Fransen, Erik; Van Camp, Guy; Depasse, Fanny; Casteels, Ingele; de Ravel, Thomy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) is characterized by an extensive genetic heterogeneity, implicating 27 genes, which account for 50 to 70% of cases. Here 86 Belgian probands with possible adRP underwent genetic testing to unravel the molecular basis and to assess the contribution of the genes underlying their condition. Methods Mutation detection methods evolved over the past ten years, including mutation specific methods (APEX chip analysis), linkage analysis, gene panel analysis (Sanger sequencing, targeted next-generation sequencing or whole exome sequencing), high-resolution copy number screening (customized microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization). Identified variants were classified following American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommendations. Results Molecular genetic screening revealed mutations in 48/86 cases (56%). In total, 17 novel pathogenic mutations were identified: four missense mutations in RHO, five frameshift mutations in RP1, six mutations in genes encoding spliceosome components (SNRNP200, PRPF8, and PRPF31), one frameshift mutation in PRPH2, and one frameshift mutation in TOPORS. The proportion of RHO mutations in our cohort (14%) is higher than reported in a French adRP population (10.3%), but lower than reported elsewhere (16.5–30%). The prevalence of RP1 mutations (10.5%) is comparable to other populations (3.5%-10%). The mutation frequency in genes encoding splicing factors is unexpectedly high (altogether 19.8%), with PRPF31 the second most prevalent mutated gene (10.5%). PRPH2 mutations were found in 4.7% of the Belgian cohort. Two families (2.3%) have the recurrent NR2E3 mutation p.(Gly56Arg). The prevalence of the recurrent PROM1 mutation p.(Arg373Cys) was higher than anticipated (3.5%). Conclusions Overall, we identified mutations in 48 of 86 Belgian adRP cases (56%), with the highest prevalence in RHO (14%), RP1 (10.5%) and PRPF31 (10.5%). Finally, we expanded the molecular

  4. Pancreatic adenocarcinomas frequently show p53 gene mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, A.; Capelli, P.; Mukai, K.; Zamboni, G.; Oda, T.; Iacono, C.; Hirohashi, S.

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-four pancreatic adenocarcinomas were studied for the presence of p53 gene mutations by the single-strand conformation polymorphism method and by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. p53 protein expression was immunohistochemically evaluated using monoclonal PAb1801 and polyclonal CM1 antibodies. Mutations were detected in 14 cases. The transitions were six G to A and two A to G; the transversions were one C to G and two A to C; the remaining three were frameshift mutations. Immunostaining results were identical with both antibodies. Nuclear immunohistochemical p53-positive cells were found in nine p53 mutated cases and in 12 cases in which no mutation was detected. In most of these latter cases only a minority of cancer cells showed immunohistochemical positivity. Twenty-nine cases, including all p53 mutated cancers, were known to contain codon 12 Ki-ras gene mutations. Also in the light of the demonstrated cooperation of ras and p53 gene alterations in the transformation of cultured cells, our data suggest that p53 mutation is one of the genetic defects that may have a role in the pathogenesis of a proportion of pancreatic cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8494051

  5. A Novel Mutation of the HNF1B Gene Associated With Hypoplastic Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease and Neonatal Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvelos, Maria Inês; Rodrigues, Magda; Lobo, Luísa; Medeira, Ana; Sousa, Ana Berta; Simão, Carla; Lemos, Manuel Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 beta (HNF1B) plays an important role in embryonic development, namely in the kidney, pancreas, liver, genital tract, and gut. Heterozygous germline mutations of HNF1B are associated with the renal cysts and diabetes syndrome (RCAD). Affected individuals may present a variety of renal developmental abnormalities and/or maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). A Portuguese 19-month-old male infant was evaluated due to hypoplastic glomerulocystic kidney disease and renal dysfunction diagnosed in the neonatal period that progressed to stage 5 chronic renal disease during the first year of life. His mother was diagnosed with a solitary hypoplastic microcystic left kidney at age 20, with stage 2 chronic renal disease established at age 35, and presented bicornuate uterus, pancreatic atrophy, and gestational diabetes. DNA sequence analysis of HNF1B revealed a novel germline frameshift insertion (c.110_111insC or c.110dupC) in both the child and the mother. A review of the literature revealed a total of 106 different HNF1B mutations, in 236 mutation-positive families, comprising gross deletions (34%), missense mutations (31%), frameshift deletions or insertions (15%), nonsense mutations (11%), and splice-site mutations (8%). The study of this family with an unusual presentation of hypoplastic glomerulocystic kidney disease with neonatal renal dysfunction identified a previously unreported mutation of the HNF1B gene, thereby expanding the spectrum of known mutations associated with renal developmental disorders. PMID:25700310

  6. Correlation between connexin 32 gene mutations and clinical phenotype in X-linked dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Ionasescu, V.; Ionasescu, R.; Searby, C.

    1996-06-14

    We studied the relationship between the genotype and clinical phenotype in 27 families with dominant X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMTX1) neuropathy. Twenty-two families showed mutations in the coding region of the connexin32 (cx32) gene. The mutations include four nonsense mutations, eight missense mutations, two medium size deletions, and one insertion. Most missense mutations showed a mild clinical phenotype (five out of eight), whereas all nonsense mutations, the larger of the two deletions, and the insertion that produced frameshifts showed severe phenotypes. Five CMTX1 families with mild clinical phenotype showed no point mutations of the cx32 gene coding region. Three of these families showed positive genetic linkage with the markers of the Xq13.1 region. The genetic linkage of the remaining two families could not be evaluated because of their small size. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Somatic CALR Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with Nonmutated JAK2

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Van Loo, P.; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O’Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.-Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.P.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.P.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. RESULTS Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. CONCLUSIONS Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with

  8. Aldolase B mutations and prevalence of hereditary fructose intolerance in a Polish population.

    PubMed

    Gruchota, Jakub; Pronicka, Ewa; Korniszewski, Lech; Stolarski, Bartosz; Pollak, Agnieszka; Rogaszewska, Małgorzata; Płoski, Rafał

    2006-04-01

    We studied 28 Polish hereditary fructose intolerant (HFI) patients (26 unrelated) by direct sequencing of the ALDOB coding region/splice sites. Eight different mutations were found including two novel ones (each found in two unrelated individuals): c.250delC (frameshift) and c.522 C > G (p.Y174X). The most frequent mutation c.448 G > C (p.A150P, 67% of chromosomes) was screened for in a group of 1049 randomly selected unrelated individuals. Eight (1:131) carriers were found allowing to estimate the HFI prevalence in Poland as 1:31,000.

  9. A novel PCCB mutation in a Thai patient with propionic acidemia identified by exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2015-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an inborn error of metabolism, caused by mutations in either the PCCA or PCCB gene, leading to mitochondrial accumulation of propionyl-CoA and its by-products. Here we report a 6-year-old Thai boy with PA who was born to consanguineous parents. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous frameshift insertion (c.379_380insA; p.T127NfsX160) in the PCCB gene, expanding its mutational spectrum. PMID:27081542

  10. A Rare Trna-Arg(ccu) That Regulates Ty1 Element Ribosomal Frameshifting Is Essential for Ty1 Retrotransposition in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, K.; Pande, S.; Faiola, B.; Moore, D. P.; Boeke, J. D.; Farabaugh, P. J.; Strathern, J. N.; Nakamura, Y.; Garfinkel, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Translation of the yeast retrotransposon Ty1 TYA1(gag)-TYB1(pol) gene occurs by a +1 ribosomal frameshifting event at the sequence CUU AGG C. Because overexpression of a low abundance tRNA-Arg(CCU) encoded by the HSX1 gene resulted in a reduction in Ty1 frameshifting, it was suggested that a translational pause at the AGG-Arg codon is required for optimum frameshifting. The present work shows that the absence of tRNA-Arg(CCU) affects Ty1 transposition, translational frameshifting, and accumulation of mature TYB1 proteins. Transposition of genetically tagged Ty1 elements decreases at least 50-fold and translational frameshifting increases 3-17-fold in cells lacking tRNA-Arg(CCU). Accumulation of Ty1-integrase and Ty1-reverse transcriptase/ribonuclease H is defective in an hsx1 mutant. The defect in Ty1 transposition is complemented by the wild-type HSX1 gene or a mutant tRNA-Arg(UCU) gene containing a C for T substitution in the first position of the anticodon. Overexpression of TYA1 stimulates Ty1 transposition 50-fold above wild-type levels when the level of transposition is compared in isogenic hsx1 and HSX1 strains. Thus, the HSX1 gene determines the ratio of the TYA1 to TYA1-TYB1 precursors required for protein processing or stability, and keeps expression of TYB1 a rate-limiting step in the retrotransposition cycle. PMID:8243996

  11. Mechanical unfolding kinetics of the SRV-1 gag-pro mRNA pseudoknot: possible implications for −1 ribosomal frameshifting stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhensheng; Yang, Lixia; Zhang, Haiping; Shi, Jiahao; Vandana, J. Jeya; Lam, Do Thuy Uyen Ha; Olsthoorn, René C. L.; Lu, Lanyuan; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Minus-one ribosomal frameshifting is a translational recoding mechanism widely utilized by many RNA viruses to generate accurate ratios of structural and catalytic proteins. An RNA pseudoknot structure located in the overlapping region of the gag and pro genes of Simian Retrovirus type 1 (SRV-1) stimulates frameshifting. However, the experimental characterization of SRV-1 pseudoknot (un)folding dynamics and the effect of the base triple formation is lacking. Here, we report the results of our single-molecule nanomanipulation using optical tweezers and theoretical simulation by steered molecular dynamics. Our results directly reveal that the energetic coupling between loop 2 and stem 1 via minor-groove base triple formation enhances the mechanical stability. The terminal base pair in stem 1 (directly in contact with a translating ribosome at the slippery site) also affects the mechanical stability of the pseudoknot. The −1 frameshifting efficiency is positively correlated with the cooperative one-step unfolding force and inversely correlated with the one-step mechanical unfolding rate at zero force. A significantly improved correlation was observed between −1 frameshifting efficiency and unfolding rate at forces of 15–35 pN, consistent with the fact that the ribosome is a force-generating molecular motor with helicase activity. No correlation was observed between thermal stability and −1 frameshifting efficiency. PMID:28000744

  12. Pulling the ribosome out of frame by +1 at a programmed frameshift site by cognate binding of aminoacyl-tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Pande, S; Vimaladithan, A; Zhao, H; Farabaugh, P J

    1995-01-01

    Programmed translational frameshifts efficiently alter a translational reading frame by shifting the reading frame during translation. A +1 frameshift has two simultaneous requirements: a translational pause which occurs when either an inefficiently recognized sense or termination codon occupies the A site, and the presence of a special peptidyl-tRNA occupying the P site during the pause. The special nature of the peptidyl-tRNA reflects its ability to slip +1 on the mRNA or to facilitate binding of an incoming aminoacyl-tRNA out of frame in the A site. This second mechanism suggested that in some cases the first +1 frame tRNA could have an active role in frameshifting. We found that overproducing this tRNA can drive frameshifting, surprisingly regardless of whether frameshifting occurs by peptidyl-tRNA slippage or out-of-frame binding of aminoacyl-tRNA. This finding suggests that in both cases, the shift in reading frame occurs coincident with formation of a cognate codon-anticodon interaction in the shifted frame. PMID:7799937

  13. Mechanical unfolding kinetics of the SRV-1 gag-pro mRNA pseudoknot: possible implications for -1 ribosomal frameshifting stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhensheng; Yang, Lixia; Zhang, Haiping; Shi, Jiahao; Vandana, J. Jeya; Lam, Do Thuy Uyen Ha; Olsthoorn, René C. L.; Lu, Lanyuan; Chen, Gang

    2016-12-01

    Minus-one ribosomal frameshifting is a translational recoding mechanism widely utilized by many RNA viruses to generate accurate ratios of structural and catalytic proteins. An RNA pseudoknot structure located in the overlapping region of the gag and pro genes of Simian Retrovirus type 1 (SRV-1) stimulates frameshifting. However, the experimental characterization of SRV-1 pseudoknot (un)folding dynamics and the effect of the base triple formation is lacking. Here, we report the results of our single-molecule nanomanipulation using optical tweezers and theoretical simulation by steered molecular dynamics. Our results directly reveal that the energetic coupling between loop 2 and stem 1 via minor-groove base triple formation enhances the mechanical stability. The terminal base pair in stem 1 (directly in contact with a translating ribosome at the slippery site) also affects the mechanical stability of the pseudoknot. The -1 frameshifting efficiency is positively correlated with the cooperative one-step unfolding force and inversely correlated with the one-step mechanical unfolding rate at zero force. A significantly improved correlation was observed between -1 frameshifting efficiency and unfolding rate at forces of 15-35 pN, consistent with the fact that the ribosome is a force-generating molecular motor with helicase activity. No correlation was observed between thermal stability and -1 frameshifting efficiency.

  14. New developmental evidence supports a homeotic frameshift of digit identity in the evolution of the bird wing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The homology of the digits in the bird wing is a high-profile controversy in developmental and evolutionary biology. The embryonic position of the digits cartilages with respect to the primary axis (ulnare and ulna) corresponds to 2, 3, 4, but comparative-evolutionary morphology supports 1, 2, 3. A homeotic frameshift of digit identity in evolution could explain how cells in embryonic positions 2, 3, 4 began developing morphologies 1, 2, 3. Another alternative is that no re-patterning of cell fates occurred, and the primary axis shifted its position by some other mechanism. In the wing, only the anterior digit lacks expression of HoxD10 and HoxD12, resembling digit 1 of other limbs, as predicted by 1, 2, 3. However, upon loss of digit 1 in evolution, the most anterior digit 2 could have lost their expression, deceitfully resembling a digit 1. To test this notion, we observed HoxD10 and HoxD12 in a limb where digit 2 is the most anterior digit: The rabbit foot. We also explored whether early inhibition of Shh signalling in the embryonic wing bud induces an experimental homeotic frameshift, or an experimental axis shift. We tested these hypotheses using DiI injections to study the fate of cells in these experimental wings. Results We found strong transcription of HoxD10 and HoxD12 was present in the most anterior digit 2 of the rabbit foot. Thus, we found no evidence to question the use of HoxD expression as support for 1, 2, 3. When Shh signalling in early wing buds is inhibited, our fate maps demonstrate that an experimental homeotic frameshift is induced. Conclusion Along with comparative morphology, HoxD expression provides strong support for 1, 2, 3 identity of wing digits. As an explanation for the offset 2, 3, 4 embryological position, the homeotic frameshift hypothesis is consistent with known mechanisms of limb development, and further proven to be experimentally possible. In contrast, the underlying mechanisms and experimental plausibility of an

  15. A first missense mutation in the delta sarcoglycan gene associated with a severe phenotype and frequency of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2F (LGMD2F) in Brazilian sarcoglycanopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, E S; Vainzof, M; Marie, S K; Nigro, V; Zatz, M; Passos-Bueno, M R

    1998-01-01

    Among the heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (AR LGMDs), the sarcoglycanopathies (LGMD2C-2F) represent a subgroup characterised by defects in the gamma, alpha, beta, and delta sarcoglycan genes, respectively. Genotype-phenotype correlations in these forms of AR LGMD are important to enhance our understanding of protein function. Regarding LGMD2F, only two homozygous frameshift mutations have been reported to date in patients with a severe phenotype. In the present report, through screening 23 unrelated AR LGMD patients, we identified three subjects with LGMD2F, two with a previously reported frameshift mutation and the other homozygous for a new missense mutation in the delta sarcoglycan gene. Interestingly, this new mutation is also associated with a severe clinical course. In addition, our results suggest that this form of severe AR LGMD is not very rare in our population. Images PMID:9832045

  16. Mutations in the SLC3A1 transporter gene in cystinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Pras, E.; Raben, N.; Aksentijevich, I.

    1995-06-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the development of kidney stones. Guided by the identification of the SLC3A1 amino acid-transport gene on chromosome 2, we recently established genetic linkage of cystinuria to chromosome 2p in 17 families, without evidence for locus heterogeneity. Other authors have independently identified missense mutations in SLC3A1 in cystinuria patients. In this report we describe four additional cystinuria-associated mutations in this gene: a frameshift, a deletion, a transversion inducing a critical amino acid change, and a nonsense mutation. The latter stop codon was found in all of eight Ashkenazi Jewish carrier chromosomes examined. This report brings the number of disease-associated mutations in this gene to 10. We also assess the frequency of these mutations in our 17 cystinuria families. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Molecular definition of an allelic series of mutations disrupting the mouse Lmx1a (dreher) gene.

    PubMed

    Chizhikov, Victor; Steshina, Ekaterina; Roberts, Richard; Ilkin, Yesim; Washburn, Linda; Millen, Kathleen J

    2006-10-01

    Mice homozygous for the dreher (dr) mutation are characterized by pigmentation and skeletal abnormalities and striking behavioral phenotypes, including ataxia, vestibular deficits, and hyperactivity. The ataxia is associated with a cerebellar malformation that is remarkably similar to human Dandy-Walker malformation. Previously, positional cloning identified mutations in LIM homeobox transcription factor 1 alpha gene (Lmx1a) in three dr alleles. Two of these alleles, however, are extinct and unavailable for further analysis. In this article we report a new spontaneous dr allele and describe the Lmx1a mutations in this and six additional dr alleles. Strikingly, deletion null, missense, and frameshift mutations in these alleles all cause similar cerebellar malformations, suggesting that all dr mutations analyzed to date are null alleles.

  18. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy caused by a mutation in the GATOR1 complex gene NPRL3.

    PubMed

    Korenke, Georg-Christoph; Eggert, Marlene; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in NPRL3, one of three genes that encode proteins of the mTORC1-regulating GATOR1 complex, have recently been reported to cause cortical dysplasia with focal epilepsy. We have now analyzed a multiplex epilepsy family by whole exome sequencing and identified a frameshift mutation (NM_001077350.2; c.1522delG; p.E508Rfs*46) within exon 13 of NPRL3. This truncating mutation causes an epilepsy phenotype characterized by early childhood onset of mainly nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The penetrance in our family was low (three affected out of six mutation carriers), compared to families with either ion channel- or DEPDC5-associated familial nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The absence of apparent structural brain abnormalities suggests that mutations in NPRL3 are not necessarily associated with focal cortical dysplasia but might be able to cause epilepsy by different, yet unknown pathomechanisms. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. Characterization of six mutations in Exon 37 of neurofibromatosis type 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, M.; Osborn, M.; Maynard, J.; Harper, P.

    1996-07-26

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common inherited disorders, with an incidence of 1 in 3,000. We screened a total of 320 unrelated NF1 patients for mutations in exon 37 of the NF1 gene. Six independent mutations were identified, of which three are novel, and these include a recurrent nonsense mutation identified in 2 unrelated patients at codon 2281 (G2281X), a 1-bp insertion (6791 ins A) resulting in a change of TAG (tyrosine) to a TAA (stop codon), and a 3-bp deletion (6839 del TAC) which generated a frameshift. Another recurrent nonsense mutation, Y2264X, which was detected in 2 unrelated patients in this study, was also previously reported in 2 NF1 individuals. All the mutations were identified within a contiguous 49-bp sequence. Further studies are warranted to support the notion that this region of the gene contains highly mutable sequences. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Sustainable prevention of obesity through integrated strategies: The SPOTLIGHT project's conceptual framework and design.

    PubMed

    Lakerveld, Jeroen; Brug, Johannes; Bot, Sandra; Teixeira, Pedro J; Rutter, Harry; Woodward, Euan; Samdal, Oddrun; Stockley, Lynn; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; van Assema, Patricia; Robertson, Aileen; Lobstein, Tim; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Adány, Róza; Nijpels, Giel

    2012-09-17

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity in Europe is high. It is a major cause of the overall rates of many of the main chronic (or non communicable) diseases in this region and is characterized by an unequal socio-economic distribution within the population. Obesity is largely determined by modifiable lifestyle behaviours such as low physical activity levels, sedentary behaviour and consumption of energy dense diets. It is increasingly being recognised that effective responses must go beyond interventions that only focus on a specific individual, social or environmental level and instead embrace system-based multi-level intervention approaches that address both the individual and environment. The EU-funded project "sustainable prevention of obesity through integrated strategies" (SPOTLIGHT) aims to increase and combine knowledge on the wide range of determinants of obesity in a systematic way, and to identify multi-level intervention approaches that are strong in terms of Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM). SPOTLIGHT comprises a series of systematic reviews on: individual-level predictors of success in behaviour change obesity interventions; social and physical environmental determinants of obesity; and on the RE-AIM of multi-level interventions. An interactive web-atlas of currently running multi-level interventions will be developed, and enhancing and impeding factors for implementation will be described. At the neighbourhood level, these elements will inform the development of methods to assess obesogenicity of diverse environments, using remote imaging techniques linked to geographic information systems. The validity of these methods will be evaluated using data from surveys of health and lifestyles of adults residing in the neighbourhoods surveyed. At both the micro- and macro-levels (national and international) the different physical, economical, political and socio-cultural elements will be assessed. SPOTLIGHT offers the

  1. Geolocation with error analysis using imagery from an experimental spotlight SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonnacott, William Mark

    This dissertation covers the development of a geometry-based sensor model for a specific monostatic spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system---referred to as the ExSAR (for experimental SAR). This sensor model facilitates single- and multiple-image geopositioning with error analysis. It allows for the use of known ground control points in refining the collection geometry parameters (a process called image resection) and for the subsequent geopositioning of other points using the resected image. Theoretically, the model also allows for the potential recovery of bias-like, persistent errors common across multiple images. The model also includes multi-image correspondence equations to aid in the cross-image identification of conjugate points. The sensor model development begins with a generic, theoretical approach to the modeling of spotlight SAR. A closed-form solution to the range and range-rate condition equations and the corresponding error propagation equation are presented. (The SAR condition equations have traditionally been solved iteratively.) The application of the closed-form solution in the image-to-ground and ground-to-image transformations is documented. The theoretical work also includes a preliminary error sensitivity analysis and a treatment of the spotlight SAR resection process. The ExSAR-specific model is established and assessed with an extensive set of images collected using the experimental radar over arrays of ground control points. Using this set, the imagery metadata elements are assessed, and the optimal element set for geopositioning is determined. The ExSAR imagery is shown to be transformed to the ground plane in only one dimension. The eventual ExSAR sensor model is used with known elevations and single-image geopositioning to show a horizontal accuracy of 8.23 m (rms). With resection using five ground-surveyed control points per image, the horizontal accuracy of reserved check points is 0.45 m (rms). Resections using the same

  2. Sustainable prevention of obesity through integrated strategies: The SPOTLIGHT project’s conceptual framework and design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of overweight and obesity in Europe is high. It is a major cause of the overall rates of many of the main chronic (or non communicable) diseases in this region and is characterized by an unequal socio-economic distribution within the population. Obesity is largely determined by modifiable lifestyle behaviours such as low physical activity levels, sedentary behaviour and consumption of energy dense diets. It is increasingly being recognised that effective responses must go beyond interventions that only focus on a specific individual, social or environmental level and instead embrace system-based multi-level intervention approaches that address both the individual and environment. The EU-funded project “sustainable prevention of obesity through integrated strategies” (SPOTLIGHT) aims to increase and combine knowledge on the wide range of determinants of obesity in a systematic way, and to identify multi-level intervention approaches that are strong in terms of Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM). Methods/Design SPOTLIGHT comprises a series of systematic reviews on: individual-level predictors of success in behaviour change obesity interventions; social and physical environmental determinants of obesity; and on the RE-AIM of multi-level interventions. An interactive web-atlas of currently running multi-level interventions will be developed, and enhancing and impeding factors for implementation will be described. At the neighbourhood level, these elements will inform the development of methods to assess obesogenicity of diverse environments, using remote imaging techniques linked to geographic information systems. The validity of these methods will be evaluated using data from surveys of health and lifestyles of adults residing in the neighbourhoods surveyed. At both the micro- and macro-levels (national and international) the different physical, economical, political and socio-cultural elements will be

  3. SERPINB11 Frameshift Variant Associated with Novel Hoof Specific Phenotype in Connemara Ponies

    PubMed Central

    Young, Amy; Affolter, Verena; Joshi, Nikhil A.; Ramsay, Sheila; Bannasch, Danika L.

    2015-01-01

    Horses belong to the order Perissodactyla and bear the majority of their weight on their third toe; therefore, tremendous force is applied to each hoof. An inherited disease characterized by a phenotype restricted to the dorsal hoof wall was identified in the Connemara pony. Hoof wall separation disease (HWSD) manifests clinically as separation of the dorsal hoof wall along the weight-bearing surface of the hoof during the first year of life. Parents of affected ponies appeared clinically normal, suggesting an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A case-control allelic genome wide association analysis was performed (ncases = 15, ncontrols = 24). Population stratification (λ = 1.48) was successfully improved by removing outliers (ncontrols = 7) identified on a multidimensional scaling plot. A genome-wide significant association was detected on chromosome 8 (praw = 1.37x10-10, pgenome = 1.92x10-5). A homozygous region identified in affected ponies spanned from 79,936,024-81,676,900 bp and contained a family of 13 annotated SERPINB genes. Whole genome next-generation sequencing at 6x coverage of two cases and two controls revealed 9,758 SNVs and 1,230 indels within the ~1.7-Mb haplotype, of which 17 and 5, respectively, segregated with the disease and were located within or adjacent to genes. Additional genotyping of these 22 putative functional variants in 369 Connemara ponies (ncases = 23, ncontrols = 346) and 169 horses of other breeds revealed segregation of three putative variants adjacent or within four SERPIN genes. Two of the variants were non-coding and one was an insertion within SERPINB11 that introduced a frameshift resulting in a premature stop codon. Evaluation of mRNA levels at the proximal hoof capsule (ncases = 4, ncontrols = 4) revealed that SERPINB11 expression was significantly reduced in affected ponies (p<0.001). Carrier frequency was estimated at 14.8%. This study describes the first genetic variant associated with a hoof wall specific

  4. Identification of novel PKD1 and PKD2 mutations in a Chinese population with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei; Chen, Song-Chang; Yang, Yan-Mei; Yan, Kai; Qian, Ye-Qing; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Hu, Yu-Ting; Dong, Min-Yue; Jin, Fan; Huang, He-Feng; Xu, Chen-Ming

    2015-12-03

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most frequently inherited renal diseases caused by mutations in PKD1 and PKD2. We performed mutational analyses of PKD genes in 49 unrelated patients using direct PCR-sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for PKD1 and PKD2. RT-PCR analysis was also performed in a family with a novel PKD2 splicing mutation. Disease-causing mutations were identified in 44 (89.8%) of the patients: 42 (95.5%) of the patients showed mutations in PKD1, and 2 (4.5%) showed mutations in PKD2. Ten nonsense, 17 frameshift, 4 splicing and one in-frame mutation were found in 32 of the patients. Large rearrangements were found in 3 patients, and missense mutations were found in 9 patients. Approximately 61.4% (27/44) of the mutations are first reported with a known mutation rate of 38.6%. RNA analysis of a novel PKD2 mutation (c.595_595 + 14delGGTAAGAGCGCGCGA) suggested monoallelic expression of the wild-type allele. Furthermore, patients with PKD1-truncating mutations reached end-stage renal disease (ESRD) earlier than patients with non-truncating mutations (47 ± 3.522 years vs. 59 ± 11.687 years, P = 0.016). The mutation screening of PKD genes in Chinese ADPKD patients will enrich our mutation database and significantly contribute to improve genetic counselling for ADPKD patients.

  5. Disruptive mitochondrial DNA mutations in complex I subunits are markers of oncocytic phenotype in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Bonora, Elena; Pennisi, Lucia Fiammetta; Toller, Matteo; Iommarini, Luisa; Ghelli, Anna; Moretti, Massimo; Betts, Christine M; Martinelli, Giuseppe Nicola; Ceroni, Alberto Rinaldi; Curcio, Francesco; Carelli, Valerio; Rugolo, Michela; Tallini, Giovanni; Romeo, Giovanni

    2007-05-22

    Oncocytic tumors are a distinctive class of proliferative lesions composed of cells with a striking degree of mitochondrial hyperplasia that are particularly frequent in the thyroid gland. To understand whether specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are associated with the accumulation of mitochondria, we sequenced the entire mtDNA in 50 oncocytic lesions (45 thyroid tumors of epithelial cell derivation and 5 mitochondrion-rich breast tumors) and 52 control cases (21 nononcocytic thyroid tumors, 15 breast carcinomas, and 16 gliomas) by using recently developed technology that allows specific and reliable amplification of the whole mtDNA with quick mutation scanning. Thirteen oncocytic lesions (26%) presented disruptive mutations (nonsense or frameshift), whereas only two samples (3.8%) presented such mutations in the nononcocytic control group. In one case with multiple thyroid nodules analyzed separately, a disruptive mutation was found in the only nodule with oncocytic features. In one of the five mitochondrion-rich breast tumors, a disruptive mutation was identified. All disruptive mutations were found in complex I subunit genes, and the association between these mutations and the oncocytic phenotype was statistically significant (P=0.001). To study the pathogenicity of these mitochondrial mutations, primary cultures from oncocytic tumors and corresponding normal tissues were established. Electron microscopy and biochemical and molecular analyses showed that primary cultures derived from tumors bearing disruptive mutations failed to maintain the mutations and the oncocytic phenotype. We conclude that disruptive mutations in complex I subunits are markers of thyroid oncocytic tumors.

  6. Detection of C1 inhibitor mutations in patients with hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Zuraw, B L; Herschbach, J

    2000-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) results from a deficiency in the functional level of C1 inhibitor caused by mutations in the C1 inhibitor gene. The mutations responsible for HAE have been shown to be heterogeneous. Because the identification of C1 inhibitor mutations may depend, in part, on the technique used to screen for mutations, we screened the entire C1 inhibitor coding region to identify mutations in a cohort of patients with HAE. By using single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis, 24 subjects with HAE from 16 different kindreds were screened for C1 inhibitor polymorphisms. C1 inhibitor mutations were identified by sequencing the exons containing identified polymorphisms. All 24 subjects with HAE had identifiable polymorphisms, involving exons 2, 3, 4, 5, or 8. Fourteen different C1 inhibitor mutations were identified: 8 missense, 1 nonsense, 4 frameshift, and 1 small deletion mutations. No large deletions or duplications were found. Nine of the 14 mutations represent newly recognized C1 inhibitor mutations, 6 of which involve exon 4. Single-stranded conformational polymorphism is an effective approach for identifying new mutations in HAE. Elucidation of the range of C1 inhibitor mutations causing HAE is important for both defining which residues are required for C1 inhibitor secretion or function and providing the basis for future studies to define the relationship between the C1 inhibitor genotype and disease severity.

  7. Functional analysis reveals that RBM10 mutations contribute to lung adenocarcinoma pathogenesis by deregulating splicing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiawei; Sun, Yue; Huang, Yin; Song, Fan; Huang, Zengshu; Bao, Yufang; Zuo, Ji; Saffen, David; Shao, Zhen; Liu, Wen; Wang, Yongbo

    2017-01-01

    RBM10 is an RNA splicing regulator that is frequently mutated in lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) and has recently been proposed to be a cancer gene. How RBM10 mutations observed in LUAD affect its normal functions, however, remains largely unknown. Here integrative analysis of RBM10 mutation and RNA expression data revealed that LUAD-associated RBM10 mutations exhibit a mutational spectrum similar to that of tumor suppressor genes. In addition, this analysis showed that RBM10 mutations identified in LUAD patients lacking canonical oncogenes are associated with significantly reduced RBM10 expression. To systematically investigate RBM10 mutations, we developed an experimental pipeline for elucidating their functional effects. Among six representative LUAD-associated RBM10 mutations, one nonsense and one frameshift mutation caused loss-of-function as expected, whereas four missense mutations differentially affected RBM10-mediated splicing. Importantly, changes in proliferation rates of LUAD-derived cells caused by these RBM10 missense mutants correlated with alterations in RNA splicing of RBM10 target genes. Together, our data implies that RBM10 mutations contribute to LUAD pathogenesis, at least in large part, by deregulating splicing. The methods described in this study should be useful for analyzing mutations in additional cancer-associated RNA splicing regulators. PMID:28091594

  8. Specific Podocin Mutations Correlate with Age of Onset in Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hinkes, Bernward; Vlangos, Christopher; Heeringa, Saskia; Mucha, Bettina; Gbadegesin, Rasheed; Liu, Jinhong; Hasselbacher, Katrin; Ozaltin, Fatih; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding podocin (NPHS2) cause autosomal recessive steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). For addressing the possibility of a genotype–phenotype correlation between podocin mutations and age of onset, a worldwide cohort of 430 patients from 404 different families with SRNS were screened by direct sequencing. Recessive podocin mutations were present in 18.1% (73 of 404) of families with SRNS, and 69.9% of these mutations were nonsense, frameshift, or homozygous R138Q. Patients with these mutations manifested symptoms at a significantly earlier age (mean onset <1.75 years) than any other patient group, with or without podocin mutations, in this study (mean onset >4.17 yr). All but one patient affected by truncating or homozygous R138Q mutations developed SRNS before 6 yr of age. Patient groups with other recessive podocin mutations, with single heterozygous podocin mutations, with sequence variants, and with no podocin changes could not be distinguished from each other on the basis of age of onset. In conclusion, nephrotic syndrome in children with truncating or homozygous R138Q mutations manifests predominantly before 6 yr of life, and the onset of disease is significantly earlier than for any other podocin mutations. Because the age of onset can vary by several years among those with identical mutations, additional factors may modify the phenotype. PMID:18216321

  9. Novel GABRG2 mutations cause familial febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Morin-Brureau, Mélanie; Picard, Fabienne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lambrecq, Virginie; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Iacomino, Michele; Ishida, Saeko; An-Gourfinkel, Isabelle; Daniau, Mailys; Hardies, Katia; Baulac, Michel; Dulac, Olivier; Leguern, Eric; Nabbout, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in a large family with febrile seizures (FS) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and subsequently search for additional mutations in a cohort of 107 families with FS, with or without epilepsy. Methods: The cohort consisted of 1 large family with FS and TLE, 64 smaller French families recruited through a national French campaign, and 43 Italian families. Molecular analyses consisted of whole-exome sequencing and mutational screening. Results: Exome sequencing revealed a p.Glu402fs*3 mutation in the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor gene (GABRG2) in the large family with FS and TLE. Three additional nonsense and frameshift GABRG2 mutations (p.Arg136*, p.Val462fs*33, and p.Pro59fs*12), 1 missense mutation (p.Met199Val), and 1 exonic deletion were subsequently identified in 5 families of the follow-up cohort. Conclusions: We report GABRG2 mutations in 5.6% (6/108) of families with FS, with or without associated epilepsy. This study provides evidence that GABRG2 mutations are linked to the FS phenotype, rather than epilepsy, and that loss-of-function of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit is the probable underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:27066572

  10. Mutational spectrum of Xeroderma pigmentosum group A in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Amr, Khalda; Messaoud, Olfa; El Darouti, Mohamad; Abdelhak, Sonia; El-Kamah, Ghada

    2014-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease characterized by hyperphotosensitivity, DNA repair defects and a predisposition to skin cancers. The most frequently occurring type worldwide is the XP group A (XPA). There is a close relationship between the clinical features that ranged from severe to mild form and the mutational site in XPA gene. The aim of this study is to carry out the mutational analysis in Egyptian patients with XP-A. This study was carried out on four unrelated Egyptian XP-A families. Clinical features were examined and direct sequencing of the coding region of XPA gene was performed in patients and their parents. Direct sequencing of the whole coding region of the XPA gene revealed the identification of two homozygous nonsense mutations: (c.553C >T; p.(Gln185)) and (c.331G>T; p.(Glu111)), which create premature, stop codon and a homodeletion (c.374delC: p.Thr125Ilefs 15) that leads to frameshift and premature translation termination. We report the identification of one novel XPA gene mutation and two known mutations in four unrelated Egyptian families with Xermoderma pigmentosum. All explored patients presented severe neurological abnormalities and have mutations located in the DNA binding domain. This report gives insight on the mutation spectrum of XP-A in Egypt. This would provide a valuable tool for early diagnosis of this severe disease.

  11. Intronic splicing mutations in PTCH1 cause Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bholah, Zaynab; Smith, Miriam J; Byers, Helen J; Miles, Emma K; Evans, D Gareth; Newman, William G

    2014-09-01

    Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple early-onset basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal abnormalities. It is caused by heterozygous mutations in the tumour suppressor PTCH1. Routine clinical genetic testing, by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome, identifies a mutation in 60-90 % of cases. We undertook RNA analysis on lymphocytes from ten individuals diagnosed with Gorlin syndrome, but without known PTCH1 mutations by exonic sequencing or MLPA. Two altered PTCH1 transcripts were identified. Genomic DNA sequence analysis identified an intron 7 mutation c.1068-10T>A, which created a strong cryptic splice acceptor site, leading to an intronic insertion of eight bases; this is predicted to create a frameshift p.(His358Alafs*12). Secondly, a deep intronic mutation c.2561-2057A>G caused an inframe insertion of 78 intronic bases in the cDNA transcript, leading to a premature stop codon p.(Gly854fs*3). The mutations are predicted to cause loss of function of PTCH1, consistent with its tumour suppressor function. The findings indicate the importance of RNA analysis to detect intronic mutations in PTCH1 not identified by routine screening techniques.

  12. Compound heterozygous mutations in the SRD5A2 gene exon 4 in a male pseudohermaphrodite patient of Chinese origin.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Nistal, Manuel; Gracia, Ricardo; Molina, M Antonia; Tovar, Juan Antonio; Esteban, Cristina; Carrascosa, Antonio; Audí, Laura

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study was to perform 5-alpha-reductase type 2 gene (SRD5A2) analysis in a male pseudohermaphrodite (MPH) patient with normal testosterone (T) production and normal androgen receptor (AR) gene coding sequences. A patient of Chinese origin with ambiguous genitalia at 14 months, a 46,XY karyotype, and normal T secretion under human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation underwent a gonadectomy at 20 months. Exons 1-8 of the AR gene and exons 1-5 of the SRD5A2 gene were sequenced from peripheral blood DNA. AR gene coding sequences were normal. SRD5A2 gene analysis revealed 2 consecutive mutations in exon 4, each located in a different allele: 1) a T nucleotide deletion, which predicts a frameshift mutation from codon 219, and 2) a missense mutation at codon 227, where the substitution of guanine (CGA) by adenine (CAA) predicts a glutamine replacement of arginine (R227Q). Testes located in the inguinal canal showed a normal morphology for age. The patient was a compound heterozygote for SRD5A2 mutations, carrying 2 mutations in exon 4. The patient showed an R227Q mutation that has been described in an Asian population and MPH patients, along with a novel frameshift mutation, Tdel219. Testis morphology showed that, during early infancy, the 5-alpha-reductase enzyme deficiency may not have affected interstitial or tubular development.

  13. FOXC2 disease-mutations identified in lymphedema-distichiasis patients cause both loss and gain of protein function

    PubMed Central

    Tavian, Daniela; Missaglia, Sara; Maltese, Paolo E.; Michelini, Sandro; Fiorentino, Alessandro; Ricci, Maurizio; Serrani, Roberta; Walter, Michael A.; Bertelli, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the FOXC2 gene cause a form of lymphedema primarily of the limbs that usually develops at or after puberty. In 90-95% of patients, lymphedema is accompanied by distichiasis. FOXC2 is a member of the forkhead/winged-helix family of transcription factors and plays essential roles in different developmental pathways and physiological processes. We previously described six unrelated families with primary lymphedema-distichiasis in which patients showed different FOXC2 mutations located outside of the forkhead domain. Of those, four were missense mutations, one a frameshift mutation, and the last a stop mutation. To assess their pathogenic potential, we have now examined the subcellular localization and the transactivation activity of the mutated FOXC2 proteins. All six FOXC2 mutant proteins were able to localize into the nucleus; however, the frameshift truncated protein appeared to be sequestered into nuclear aggregates. A reduction in the ability to activate FOXC1/FOXC2 response elements was detected in 50% of mutations, while the remaining ones caused an increase of protein transactivation activity. Our data reveal that either a complete loss or a significant gain of FOXC2 function can cause a perturbation of lymphatic vessel formation leading to lymphedema. PMID:27276711

  14. FOXC2 disease-mutations identified in lymphedema-distichiasis patients cause both loss and gain of protein function.

    PubMed

    Tavian, Daniela; Missaglia, Sara; Maltese, Paolo E; Michelini, Sandro; Fiorentino, Alessandro; Ricci, Maurizio; Serrani, Roberta; Walter, Michael A; Bertelli, Matteo

    2016-08-23

    Dominant mutations in the FOXC2 gene cause a form of lymphedema primarily of the limbs that usually develops at or after puberty. In 90-95% of patients, lymphedema is accompanied by distichiasis. FOXC2 is a member of the forkhead/winged-helix family of transcription factors and plays essential roles in different developmental pathways and physiological processes. We previously described six unrelated families with primary lymphedema-distichiasis in which patients showed different FOXC2 mutations located outside of the forkhead domain. Of those, four were missense mutations, one a frameshift mutation, and the last a stop mutation. To assess their pathogenic potential, we have now examined the subcellular localization and the transactivation activity of the mutated FOXC2 proteins. All six FOXC2 mutant proteins were able to localize into the nucleus; however, the frameshift truncated protein appeared to be sequestered into nuclear aggregates. A reduction in the ability to activate FOXC1/FOXC2 response elements was detected in 50% of mutations, while the remaining ones caused an increase of protein transactivation activity. Our data reveal that either a complete loss or a significant gain of FOXC2 function can cause a perturbation of lymphatic vessel formation leading to lymphedema.

  15. Lake Urmia Bridge Stability Assessment: Results from Terrasar-X Spotlight Mode Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, F.; Motagh, M.; Vajedian, S.; Sharifi, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we investigate stability of Lake Urmia bridge, locally also known as Shahid Kalantari's highway bridge, in northwest of Iran using high-resolution satellite radar imagery. The radar dataset includes 22 SAR images acquired in SpotLight mode from 2014 to 2015 in an ascending orbit by TerraSAR-X satellite. A high-resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the area was constructed from a pair of TanDEM-X bi-static data on June 2012 to remove the effect of topography from interferometry observations. The analysis of X-band interferograms shows high number of displacement fringes, which are interpreted as being caused by thermal dilation due to temperature differences in the imaged area between two SAR acquisitions. This effect, which can often be observed in single interferograms, have important impact on time-series products and should be considered for deformation analysis of bridge structures.

  16. Acousto-optic time- and space-integrating spotlight-mode SAR processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Michael W.; Levy, James J.; Michael, Robert R., Jr.

    1993-09-01

    The technical approach and recent experimental results for the acousto-optic time- and space- integrating real-time SAR image formation processor program are reported. The concept overcomes the size and power consumption limitations of electronic approaches by using compact, rugged, and low-power analog optical signal processing techniques for the most computationally taxing portions of the SAR imaging problem. Flexibility and performance are maintained by the use of digital electronics for the critical low-complexity filter generation and output image processing functions. The results include a demonstration of the processor's ability to perform high-resolution spotlight-mode SAR imaging by simultaneously compensating for range migration and range/azimuth coupling in the analog optical domain, thereby avoiding a highly power-consuming digital interpolation or reformatting operation usually required in all-electronic approaches.

  17. Mutational analysis of caspase 1, 4, and 5 genes in common human cancers.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Jeong, Eun Goo; Ahn, Chang Hyeok; Kim, Sung Soo; Song, Sang Yong; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2008-06-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that deregulation of apoptosis is involved in the mechanisms of cancer development. Mutations of genes encoding caspases, the executioners of apoptosis, have been detected in human cancers, indicating inactivation of apoptosis by the mutations of caspase is an important mechanism in cancer development. The aim of this study was to see whether genes encoding human caspases 1, 4, and 5 are mutated in human cancers. We analyzed the entire coding region and all splice sites of human caspase 1, 4, and 5 genes for the detection of somatic mutations in 337 human cancers, including 103 colorectal, 54 gastric, 60 breast, 60 hepatocellular, and 60 lung carcinomas by a single-strand conformation polymorphism assay. We detected 2 (0.6%) caspase-1, 2 (0.6%) caspase-4, and 15 (4.4%) caspase-5 mutations in the 343 cancers. The mutations were detected in 11 gastric carcinomas (2 caspase-1 and 9 caspase-5 mutations), 6 colorectal carcinomas (2 caspase-4 and 4 caspase-5 mutations), 1 breast carcinoma (1 caspase-5 mutation), and 1 lung carcinoma (1 caspase-5 mutation). The mutations consisted of 11 mutations in exons and 8 mutations in noncoding sequences. The 11 mutations in the exons consisted of 3 missense, 1 silent, and 7 frameshift mutation(s). Of note, most (6/9) of the caspase-5 mutations in the coding sequences were detected in microsatellite instability (MSI)-positive cancers. These data indicate that somatic mutations of caspase-1 and caspase-4 genes are rare in common solid cancers. In addition, the data indicate that caspase-5 gene is commonly mutated in the MSI-positive cancers, and suggest that inactivation of caspase-5 may play a role in the tumorigenesis of MSI-positive cancers.

  18. Ribosomal frameshifting in decoding antizyme mRNAs from yeast and protists to humans: close to 300 cases reveal remarkable diversity despite underlying conservation

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P.; Atkins, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of intracellular polyamine levels. Ribosomes synthesizing antizyme start in one ORF and at the codon 5′ adjacent to its stop codon, shift +1 to a second and partially overlapping ORF which encodes most of the protein. The ribosomal frameshifting is a sensor and effector of an autoregulatory circuit which is conserved in animals, fungi and protists. Stimulatory signals encoded 5′ and 3′ of the shift site act to program the frameshifting. Despite overall conservation, many individual branches have evolved specific features surrounding the frameshift site. Among these are RNA pseudoknots, RNA stem-loops, conserved primary RNA sequences, nascent peptide sequences and branch-specific ‘shifty’ codons. PMID:17332016

  19. A Patient with an Extra-adrenal Pheochromocytoma and Germ-line SDHB Mutation Accompanied by an Atypical Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Shiwa, Tsuguka; Oki, Kenji; Yoneda, Masayasu; Arihiro, Koji; Ohno, Haruya; Kishimoto, Rui; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2015-01-01

    The gene succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) encodes a protein comprising part of the mitochondrial complex II, which links the Krebs cycle and the electron-transport chain. Heterozygous germ-line SDHB mutations causes familial pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma syndrome and has also been linked to gastrointestinal stromal tumors, as well as renal cell carcinomas. We herein report a patient with a germ-line SDHB mutation who presented with an atypical meningioma that was identified as originating from a somatic SDHB mutation. The 41-year-old man, who had a surgical history of extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma at 23 years of age, recently developed gait disorder and hypertension. At the radiological examination, a tumor was detected in the cervical spinal cord at the C6-7 intervertebral level. The pathological findings of the isolated tumor were atypical meningioma assessed as grade II according to the World Health Organization criteria. Inherited neoplasia syndrome was suspected because of the patient's history of early-onset extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma and the development of meningioma. We therefore performed molecular genetic analyses. A direct sequence analysis revealed a heterozygous germ-line frameshift mutation in SDHB, specifically an 11-nucleotide deletion, c.305-315delCAATGAACATC, in exon 4, resulting in a frameshift p.A102EfsX12. Additionally, the sequence analysis of the tumor DNA revealed only a mutated allele with a frameshift mutation in the germ-line SDHB. Our findings suggest that SDHB plays an important role in the pathogenesis of meningiomas as well as pheochromocytomas. Therefore, a differential diagnosis for metastatic pheochromocytoma and other new onset tumors, including meningioma, particularly in patients with germ-line SDHB mutations and a previous history of pheochromocytoma should be carefully made.

  20. One novel Dravet syndrome causing mutation and one recurrent MAE causing mutation in SCN1A gene.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Iglika; Todorov, Tihomir; Dimova, Petia; Hristova, Dimitrina; Tincheva, Radka; Litvinenko, Ivan; Yotovska, Olga; Kremensky, Ivo; Todorova, Albena

    2011-04-25

    Mutations in SCN1A gene, encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel α1-subunit, are found to be associated with severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy or Dravet syndrome (DS), but only rarely with the myoclonic astatic epilepsy (MAE, or Doose syndrome). We report on two patients with SCN1A mutations and severe epilepsy within the spectrum of generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus syndrome (GEFS+), the phenotypes being consistent with DS and MAE, respectively. Analysis of SCN1A revealed a heterozygous de novo frameshift mutation (c.4205_4208delGAAA) in the patient with DS, and a recurrent missense mutation (c.3521C>G) in that suffering from MAE. The missense mutation has been reported in patients with neurological diseases of various manifestations, which suggests that this variability is likely to result from the modifying effects of other genetic or environmental factors. DS phenotype has been mainly found associated with truncation mutations, while predominantly missense mutations and very few prematurely terminating substitutions have been reported in GEFS+ patients.

  1. Two novel RAD21 mutations in patients with mild Cornelia de Lange syndrome-like presentation and report of the first familial case.

    PubMed

    Minor, Agata; Shinawi, Marwan; Hogue, Jacob S; Vineyard, Marisa; Hamlin, Damara R; Tan, Christopher; Donato, Kirsten; Wysinger, Latrice; Botes, Shaun; Das, Soma; Del Gaudio, Daniela

    2014-03-10

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a developmental disorder characterized by limb reduction defects, characteristic facial features and impaired cognitive development. Mutations in the NIPBL gene predominate; however, mutations in other cohesin complex genes have also been implicated, particularly in atypical and mild CdLS cases. Missense mutations and whole gene deletions in RAD21 have been identified in children with growth retardation, minor skeletal anomalies and facial features that overlap findings in individuals with CdLS. We report the first intragenic deletion and frameshift mutations identified in RAD21 in two patients presenting with atypical CdLS. One patient had an in-frame deletion of exon 13, while the second patient had a c.592_593dup frameshift mutation. The first patient presented with developmental delay, hypospadias, inguinal hernia and dysmorphic features while, the second patient presented with developmental delay, characteristic facial features, hirsutism, and hand and feet anomalies, with the first patient being milder than the second. The in-frame deletion mutation was found to be inherited from the mother who had a history of melanoma and other unspecified medical problems. This study expands the spectrum of RAD21 mutations and emphasizes the clinical utility of performing RAD21 mutation analysis in patients presenting with atypical forms of CdLS. Moreover, the variability of clinical presentation within families and low penetrance of mutations as well as the significance of performing molecular genetic testing in mildly affected patients are discussed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Spotlight: Mongolia.

    PubMed

    1998-11-01

    As of mid-1998, Mongolia had a population of 2.4 million people residing in a land area of 604,826 sq. miles. There were 24 births and 7 deaths per 1000 population, as well as 49 infant deaths for every 1000 live births, and a population growing in size at 1.6% annually. Mongolia has the highest birth rate in East Asia, and is one of the few developing countries which promotes population growth. A large number of young women will enter their childbearing years in the near future. The average Mongolian woman has 3.1 births during her reproductive lifetime and life expectancy is 57 years overall; no data are available for separate male and female rates. After Western Sahara, Mongolia has the world's lowest population density, at approximately 4 people per sq. mile. More than 25% of Mongolia's population lives in the capital city of Ulan Bator, of whom half live in tents, with minimal supplies of water and electricity. Live animals and animal products account for half of Mongolia's output and almost 90% of its exports. As Mongolia begins to exploit its rich supply of coal and oil reserves, mining and industrial pressures upon water resources and wilderness are beginning to be acknowledged. In addition, the country's grasslands are vulnerable to overgrazing by a growing number of livestock. The United Nations Development Program's Mongolia Biodiversity Project is a multifaceted approach to help Mongolia conserve its ecological wealth. The US is also helping Mongolia manage its resource problems through funding and the deployment of 58 US Peace Corps volunteers to important protected areas.

  3. Spotlight: Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Felt, J C

    1988-05-01

    Afghanistan is a landlocked country approximately the size of Texas with an estimated population of 14.5 million. The fertility level (6.7 children per women) is estimated to be very high, as is the mortality rate (183 infant deaths/1,000 live births). Demographic data sources are scarce, and current estimates are based on a 1972-1974 series of surveys and a 1979 census which enumerated only 55-60% of the population. The government of Afghanistan, a Marxist state, has asked for international aid to improve data collection and analysis. Compounding the problems of accurate data collection is the state of civil war that has existed in Afghanistan since the Marxist coup in in 1978 and Soviet occupation in 1979. The war impelled the emigration of 5 million refugees, who live in camps in neighboring Pakistan and Iran. Although the population decline that resulted from this emigration is significant, the repatriation of the refugees will play a role in determining the population dynamics for the next decade, as will the withdrawal of Soviet troops -- expected in 1990. Because of Afghanistan's central-Asia location, there is a unique ethnic and linguistic mixture of tribes. The largest group is the Pushtus, who make up 40% of the population. Afghan Persian and Pushtu are the dominant languages, and 98% of all Afghans are Moslem. The economy is largely agricultural and half the cultivated land must be irrigated. 85% of the population live in rural areas and another 2.5 million are nomads. The low status of women and female children, low levels of health care, and high fertility contribute to the lower life expectancy of females over males. Although the government supports contraceptive services, such services are inadequate, and sterilization is illegal. The withdrawal of Soviet troops and the possible end to civil war between the Kabul government and the rebel factions, and the effects of repatriation of refugees will determine the direction of Afghanistan's future development.

  4. Spotlight: Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, W

    1988-03-01

    Focus is on Malaysia -- its population and land area, its total fertility rate and mortality rate, economic development, contraceptive usage, and population policy. In 1987 Malaysia's population was estimated to be 16.1 million with births 31/1000 population and deaths 7/1000 population. The rate of natural increase is 2.4%, the total fertility rate 3.9 children/woman, and the infant mortality rate 30/1000 live births. Ethnically, Malaysia is made up of several distinct groups. Indigenous Malays are the most numerous -- about 50% of the population. Their unique characteristics include that they are Moslem, rural, and usually of lower economic status. Chinese make up the 2nd largest group of Malaysians, nearly 1/3 of the population. This group is active in trade, business, and finance and possesses considerable economic power. About 10% of the population is of Indian descent. Malaysia has experienced much economic growth. Traditional exports grew in volume and value during the 1970; the petroleum sector expanded so rapidly it accounts for 1/4 of all exports. One reason for Malaysia's rapid economic growth is the government's promotion of industrialization and foreign investment. According to the 1982 contraceptive prevalence survey, 42% of currently married women 15-44 years were using contraception. The government considers the current rate of national increase to be satisfactory, but in 1984 it adopted a population policy to more than quadruple its population in 2100 to 70 million. It intends to accomplish this by instituting pronatalist incentives to help the fall in the national growth rate. The government's rationale for more population growth is that a larger domestic population could better support industrial growth that otherwise might be stymied by "protectionist policies practiced by developed countries." Incentives to encourage fertility include income-tax deductions and maternity benefits for women who have up to 5 children.

  5. Nigeria. Spotlight.

    PubMed

    Lecky, M

    1984-12-01

    Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, currently has no official population policy; however, recent news releases from the Federal Ministry of Information indicate that efforts to deal with rapid population growth may be forthcouming. Adequate census materials are lacking. In 1984 population size was estimated to be 88 million, and in 1983 the estimated crude birth rate was 48-51/1000, the estimated crude death rate was 16-18/1000, and the population growth rate was approximately 3.0%-3.5%. Other estimates for 1983 placed the infant mortality rate at 134 and life expectancy at 49 years. The total fertility rate observed in a 1981 World Fertility Study was 5.4, but this rate was questioned by investigators, who believe it is too low. World Bank projections, based on the assumption that fertility declines will begin soon, indicate that the population will reach 618 million before stabilizing toward the end of the 21st century. At the present time, only 6% of Nigeria's women of reproductive age use contraception, and most of these women contracept only for spacing purposes. Nigeria, which obtained independence in 1960, is plagued by internal strife between different ethnic groups. The northern region, populated by the Hausa is less developed economically than the southern region. The Ibo, who play a major role in the nation's commerical and government sectors, predominated in the the southeastern region, and the Yoruba are the most populous group in the southwestern region. 1/2 of the population if Muslim, 40% is Christian, and the remaining proportion practices traditional religions. During the 1960s, Nigeria derived 2/3 of it gross national product from agriculture, and especially from the export of cocoa, groundnuts, and palm oil. During the 1970s the economy changed markedly as the country began to exploit its oil reserves. By 1983, agriculture accounted for only 20% of the gross national product, and 98% of the country's total exports of US$11.3 billion were derived from oil. Oil reserves are expected to be exhausted in 15 years. To compensate for this expected loss, an effort was initiated in 1980 to revive the country's deteriorating agricultural sector. In addition, the government instituted educational programs aimed at increasing the supply of skilled labor for industrial development.

  6. Iran: spotlight.

    PubMed

    Roudi, N

    1987-09-01

    Given its location between Asia and Asia Minor, Iran has been a country of strategic political importance throughout history. More than 98% of Iran's population is Moslem. During the early 20th century, as Iran gradually gained independence from the USSR and Turkey, a modernization process was begun. However, this modernization process was forced to yield to Islamic traditionalism after the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Women have been most affected by this change. The implementation of Islamic traditions has meant low job opportunity or motivation for continuing education among women. Although fertility remains high, the present government is satisfied with the current rate of population growth. Family planning is allowed if implemented within the framework of Islamic law, but abortion is illegal. Mortality fell substantially after World War II, but has not continued to decline. At present, both males and females have the same life expectancy at birth. Iran's population is growing at a rate of 4%/year, and can be expected to double in another 21 years. It has been projected that Iran, currently the 21st largest country in the world with a population of 50 million, will become the 15th largest with a population of 97 million by the year 2025. Tehran, the 20th largest city in 1985, is projected to be the 9th largest by the year 2000, with a population of 13.6 million.

  7. Spotlight: Ecuador.

    PubMed

    1998-04-01

    This article describes the vital statistics and population growth in Ecuador as of mid-1997. Mid-1997 population numbered about 12 million. Fertility was 3.6 births/woman; deaths were 6/1000 population; and births were 29/1000 population. Ecuador was primarily an agricultural country, until oil was discovered in the early 1970s. The country has worked to increase per capita income and confront environmental consequences. The capital city of Quito is situated in a valley between two mountains and has very high air pollution levels due to cars and factories. In contrast, indigenous populations live in the Andean mountains and farm small plots. Land shortages have pushed these farmers onto higher slopes and more marginal land that is becoming eroded. 22% of Ecuador's forests were cleared for farming during 1980-90. The city of Guayaquil, on the Pacific coast, has serious water pollution problems, sewage problems, and industrial pollution. Shrimp farming relies on high levels of fertilizer, which is damaging coastlines. Oil exploration in the interior of Ecuador, has resulted in disruption of indigenous population, loss of forests, and pollution of rivers. Texaco Oil is accused of spilling about 17 million gallons of crude oil, or 50 times more than the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska. Texaco argues that it met government environmental standards and agreed to a cleanup, which only partially meets the standards of its critics. Oil resources have funded improvements in education and health. About 90% of Ecuador's adult population is literate. Fertility has declined, but the population is still largely young and will be entering their reproductive years by 2025.

  8. Pakistan. Spotlight.

    PubMed

    Greene, M

    1985-01-01

    Focus in this discussion of Pakistan is on demographic factors, the issue of ethnic versus national solidarity, and economic and social development. The population was estimated at 99.2 million in 1985. The birthrate was 43/1000 in 1984 and the deaths were 15/1000. The infant mortality rate is 105 infant deaths/1000 live births, and life expectancy at birth is 51 years. In 1983 the gross national product per capita was US$390. The population of Pakistan is concentrated around Karachi on the Arabian Sea and in the crescent formed by Lahore, Rawalpindi, and Peshawar. Pakistan was a British colony, part of the Indian subcontinent until partition in 1947, when Britain gave Pakistan and India their freedom. Pakistan is not a theocracy, but the military government turns to traditional Islam for affirmation of its authority. Its martial law regime, established in 1977, is headed by President Ziaul Haq. The issue of ethnic versus national solidarity has been a problem since independence. Bengali-speaking East Pakistanis felt they did not have equal power in their country whose official language was Urdu and whose capital was in West Pakistan. East and West Pakistan ended up in armed conflict with the formation of Bangladesh in 1971 as the result. Regional and ethnic conflict is exacerbated by the low rate of literacy and the low status of certain ethnic groups in Pakistan. In addition, Pakistan suffers problems typical of many developing nations: a low per capita income, a large and growing population, and a highly stratified traditional society. In 1981 doctors, engineers, and craftsmen were in short supply, but there was a surplus of 300,000 agricultural workers. Agriculture makes up 30% of the GNP and employs 55% of the work force. In Pakistan's 6th Five Year Plan, initiated in July 1983, the government acknowledged for the 1st time the extremely poor conditions for women as indicated by literacy, health, and fertility. The total fertility rate is 6.4 average births/woman. Although the government is ostensibly trying to help women, funding for women's programs during the Five Year Plan was cut. Economic growth has been good in recent years, but agricultural growth is a result of increased acreage rather than yield per acre.

  9. Burma. Spotlight.

    PubMed

    Perry, S

    1985-04-01

    Current demographic, economic, and political conditions in Burma are briefly described. In 1962 the military overthrew the democratic government of Burma, established a socialist state, and adopted isolationist policies. Recently the government sought to renew, on a limited basis, contact with the outside world. Information derived from a 1983 national census indicates that the population size, as estimated for 1985, is 37 million, and population density is 51 persons/square mile. 2/3 of the population lives in the central plateau and the delta region of the Irrawaddy River. The annual population growth rate is 2.2% (1983), and 24% of the population is urban. The birth rate is 37, the death rate is 15, and the infant mortality rate is 94. The gross national product is US$180 (1983). 68% of the population is Burmese, and the remainder is composed of numerous minorities. The 2 million Karen and Shan members of the population, as well as members of the outlawed Burmese Communist party, are engaged in armed resistance to the government. 63% of the labor force is engaged in agriculture. Farming is done primarily by traditional methods on small, individually owned landholdings, and the major crops are rice, sugar cane, jute, pulses, and groundnuts. Agricultural production was serious disrupted during World War II, and yields did not reach pre-war levels again until 1964. Current yields are still well below those achieved in most other Asian countries. Despite the availability of additional land suitable for cultivation, the proportion of land under cultivation (15%) did not increase in recent years. Due to population growth, the amount of cultivated land/person actually decreased from 1.39 acres to 0.77 acres between 1940-78. The country experienced only minimal industrial growth in recent years. Although urban growth is slow, the cities of Mandaly and Rangoon are surrounded by slums. The government is promoting the residtribution of the slum inhabitants to a number of small planned cities. Many individuals migrated from the remote mountain regions to the central agricultural plateau in recent years, partly to avoid being involved in the armed conflict between insurgents and the govenment. The government is satisfied with the country's current rate of population growth and does not provide the population with family planning services or supplies.

  10. Argentina: spotlight.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, W

    1987-10-01

    In 1987 Argentina had a population of 31.5 million, with an annual rate of increase of 1.6%. The total fertility rate was 3.3, and the birth rate was 24/1000 population. Mortality stood at 8/1000 population, and the infant mortality rate was 35.3/1000 live births. Life expectancy at birth is 70 years. 84% of the population lives in Argentina's urban areas. Current government policies call for regional development to maintain and increase population in rural areas and control growth in urban centers. 90% of the population is of European descent, largely as a result of high rates of immigration during the 1880s-1930s from countries such as Spain and Italy. In 1985 the gross national product per capita was US$2130. Argentina is rich in resources and almost self-sufficient in terms of basic foodstuffs, power supply, and advanced communication networks. On the other hand, political conflicts and economic crises have hindered the realization of both human and natural resource potential. 80% of the value of export products is the amount due in interest on foreign debts.

  11. Spotlight: Vietnam.

    PubMed

    1984-02-01

    Vietnam, with 57 million people, ranks as the world's 13th most populous country with much of the population concentrated in the rice producing areas of the coastal lowlands and the Mekong and Red River valleys. Since reunification, economic recovery has been difficult. Following the failure of the 1976-80 5-Year Plan, the 1981-85 Plan calls for increased food production and the attainment of self sufficiency. Part of this policy is the reduction of the population growth rate. Vietnam's labor force is about 70% agricultural, with women making up about 2/3 of the farm work force. Most heavy industry is in the North and, although badly damaged in the war, has regained much of its capacity. Coal continues to be Vietnam's leading export. The country's extensive forests also provide great potential for the lumber industry and Vietnam has recently begun offshore oil production. Yet, recovery has been elusive. Foreign aid now comes from the Soviet Union, China, Eastern Europe, and France. In recent years the foreign trade balance has improved, but there have been some setbacks in food production. Efforts to raise food production by encouraging private development of unused land have not been very successful, partly because of the continuing shortage of fertilizers, farm machinery, and insecticides. It is also likely that economic progress has been retarded by large military expenditures necessitated by the wars with Cambodia and China. 1 of the government's major efforts has been a large scale population redistribution from urban areas to the less densely inhabited provinces. New Economic Zones have been established in these areas in the hope that new residents will become self sufficient as soon as possible. As part of its national policy, the government has set a goal to reduce the rate of population growth to 1.5% by 1981 through the National Family Planning Program. Officially reported crude birthrates reflect a decline in fertility from about 40/1000 population in 1976 to about 29 in 1980.

  12. Botswana: spotlight.

    PubMed

    Davis, C

    1987-01-01

    Botswana's 1987 population was estimated at 1.2 million, with a 3.4% rate of natural increase. There were 48 births/1000 population and 14 deaths/1000 population (70 infant deaths/1000 live births). Life expectancy at birth stands at 58 years. The majority of the population lives along the more fertile eastern border of the country. The population is dominated by 8 Bantu tribal groups, each represented in the government's House of Chiefs. Although Botswana's population remains small relative to its land area of 231,804 square miles, rapid population growth is creating development and environmental problems. The population is projected to exceed 1.8 million by the year 2000, having almost doubled in 20 years. The capital city of Gaborone, with a population of 95,000, is one of the fastest-growing cities in Africa and faces problems with housing, water, sanitation, health, and educational services. Agriculture employs about 60% of the labor force, but crop production has not been able to meet local demand, in large part because of drought. The gross national product per capita was US$840 in 1985. Excess labor has traditionally been exported to South Africa, providing remittance income; however, this employment alternative has declined since the mid-1970s, increasing the need for domestic employment. According to the 1984 Family Health Survey, only 19% of women of reproductive age in union use a modern contraceptive method. The government appears to be moving toward better coordination of population growth and economic development.

  13. Spotlight: Eritrea.

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    With a mid-1997 population of 3.6 million living in a land area of 39,000 sq. miles, Eritrea is Africa's most recent country, becoming independent from Ethiopia in 1993 after a 30-year civil war. Eritrea's newly achieved statehood leaves Ethiopia landlocked and dependent upon Eritrea's ports for foreign trade. 95% of the population earns its livelihood through subsistence agriculture. While rain has been plentiful, Eritrea suffers from deforestation, soil erosion, and the remaining land mines from the civil war. Relative to men, women in Eritrea have lower status and power. The Eritrean National Statistics Office recently released findings from the nation's first demographic and health survey which indicate that child survival is improving. Under-5 child mortality fell from 185 deaths/1000 live births during 1981-85 to 136/1000 during 1991-95. Vaccination coverage has expanded in recent years, almost 40% of children under age 3 years are chronically malnourished, about 41% of recent mothers showed signs of chronic energy deficiency, and few Eritrean women receive adequate maternity care. The government recently launched a 3-year safe motherhood action plan designed to prevent maternal mortality by improving access to reproductive health services. Nationwide, the rate of total fertility in Eritrea is 6.1 births/woman, life expectancy is 48 years for men and 51 years for women, and total population size is growing annually through natural increase at the rate of 2.9%.

  14. Spotlight: Haiti.

    PubMed

    May, J F

    1989-12-01

    Haiti has a population of 5.9 million, their land area is 10.714 square miles, and their population density is 551/square mile. Their birth rate is 47/1000, their death rate is 16/1000 and their yearly growth is 3.1%. Most Caribbean countries have life expectancy of 70 years but Haiti has only 55 years. In the last few years the average lifetime fertility has increased from 5.5-6.7 children/woman. Less than 50% of children attend primary school and birth control is practiced by less than 10% of the people, and has been this way for over 20 years. Agriculture is the country's largest industry, but with low production and deforestation as major problems, it can no longer support the increasing rural population. This has caused large emigration in the 1980's to other countries such as the US, Canada, and the Dominican Republic. Family planning programs have not been successful because of opposition of certain groups. It is estimated that the population could reach 9.5-15.5 million by the year 2025 and life expectancy could increase to 67 years. The full effects of the HIV virus are unknown at this time but it is spreading at a rapid rate. The government is trying to develop a population policy and to make family planning available to all couples. Since there is more uncontrolled Haitian emigration than ever before, this could be a regional problem that the neighboring countries will have to address.

  15. Spotlight: Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    1984-06-01

    Bangladesh, formally known as East Pakistan and a country that achieved independence in 1971, is the most densely populated nation (1800/sq mile) in the world (excluding small city states and islands). The population is about 85% Muslim with the balance chiefly Hindu. About 90% of the population depends either directly of indirectly upon agriculture for subsistence. About 3/4 of the cultivated land is used for rice production and much of the remainder for jute. Jute, used for carpet backings and sacks is Bangladesh's most important means of raising export capital. There has been a decline in world demand for jute. Fertile soil holds promise of future increases in food production, but very serious shortages persist. The agricultural situation will only improve when a rural network of fertilizer distribution facilities, extension services, dikes, and irrigation can be established. Such a program would require large capital outlays which are not likely to be available. At this time about 60% of the country's import requirements must be funded by foreign aid. Much of this aid is provided to help fill existing food gaps. Another problem is that about half of the rural population is landless. This means that a large number of persons must attempt to subsist by such activities as selling water or firewood. Population growth, identified as an urgent national priority, has been an important factor in Five Year Plans since the early 1960s. A major policy goal is to extend family planning services to the rural areas more effectively. Several fertility surveys, conducted since 1975, indicate a low, although rising, level of contraceptive use. In 1975, 5% of married women were using a modern contraceptive method and another 3% a traditional method. A 1981 government survey shows that 11% were using an efficient method and 8% traditional methods. A total fertility rate of about 7 was estimated based upon a 1979 survey. World Bank projections show an eventual population exceeding 400 million if fertility falls to the 2 child family norm by 2035.

  16. Spotlight: Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Lutz, W

    1997-11-01

    Mauritius is an island nation of 780 sq. miles, with land area just 10 times the size of Washington, DC. Following malaria eradication in the late 1940s, Mauritius experienced one of the world's highest population growth rates. In 1957, the Mauritius Family Planning Association was founded and, in 1962, the Roman Catholic Church began promoting natural family planning. Between 1963 and 1972, the total fertility rate in the country fell from 6.2 children/woman to 3.2. The population's understanding that land space is limited appears to have contributed to the rapid fertility decline. Economic growth followed the rapid fertility decline, with the well-educated female population providing the labor for the country's textile factories and per capita income rising to $3380. Mauritius' population as of mid-1997 was 1.1 million, or 1450 people per square mile. Birth and death rates are 18 and 7 per 1000 population, respectively, there are 19.7 infant deaths per 1000 live births, the population is growing through natural increase at the annual rate of 1.2%, the total fertility rate is 2.1 births/woman, and the male and female life expectancies are 66 and 74 years, respectively. About half of all married women use modern contraception.

  17. Libya: spotlight.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Libya's population at 3.7 million is small but growing so rapidly that it should double by 2000. At this time 90% of the population live in less than 25% of the land area, and 40% live in 1 of the 2 major cities, Tripoli and Benghazi. Since oil was discovered in the 1950s, Libya's economy has been almost totally dependent upon petroleum exports. Prices have dropped sharply since 1980 because of the world oil glut, but oil still provides a rich income. The government has used the substantial oil revenues for ambitious construction projects, expansion of educational and health facilities, and creation of a modern defense establishment to foster economic development and political strength. Libya has enjoyed remarkable improvements in living standards and school enrollment over the past 30 years. Literacy increased from 23% for men and 2% for women to 73% for men and 40% for women since the 1950s. Prior to 1950, Libya's population grew at less than 2% annually, but since then declining mortality, high birthrates, and increasing immigration have caused growth rates to soar above 4%. Consistent with Arab tradition, Libyans favor large families. Women marry at around age 17 and bear an average of 7 children. The Moslem culture disapproves of women working outside the home, and only about 5% do so. The government encourages the high birthrates to increase the small native population. Importation of modern contraceptive is illegal, and family planning does not receive government support although maternal and child health projects do. The increases in education and labor force participation of women may lead to lower fertility in the future. The average Libyan's life expectancy was 43 during the 1950s and about 190 of every 1000 babies died before their 1st birthday. In the 1980s life expectancy is up to about 65, and infant mortality down to 90/1000 births. The mortality decline can be directly attributed to vaccination campaigns carried out during the late 1950s and the expansion of health care financed by petroleum exports. The decline in mortality coupled with the continuation of high birthrates have produced an annual rate of natural increase of 3.3%, but the most marked changes in the population are from international migration. Since 1965, hundreds of thousands of foreign laborers have been attracted to Libya by the promise of high wages and generous social services. Libya faces several problems in the near future. 47% of the population are under age 15, and the communities of aliens, viewed suspiciously by the native Libyans, appear to be permanent additions to the society.

  18. Spotlight: Panama.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, W

    1988-09-01

    In 1988, the population of Panama stood at 2.3 million, with a 2.2% rate of natural increase. There were 27 births and 5 deaths/1000 population (infant mortality rate, 25/1000), and a total fertility rate of 3.3. Migration to urban areas has been continuous since World War II, and about half the country's population is now based in cities. While those who live in urban areas and are employed in trade and Canal-related services have a relatively high stan