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Sample records for fraser valley system

  1. THE ADOPTION OR REJECTION OF INNOVATIONS BY DAIRY FARM OPERATORS IN THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GUBBELS, PETER M.; VERNER, COOLIE

    SOCIOECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS, RESPONSES TO INNOVATIONS, AND USE OF INFORMATION SOURCES WERE CORRELATED FOR 100 RANDOMLY CHOSEN DAIRY FARMERS IN THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. TEN DAIRYING INNOVATIONS WERE DIVIDED INTO TWO GROUPS ACCORDING TO COMPLEXITY. ADOPTION SCORES WERE USED TO CLASSIFY THE FARMERS AND STAGES OF ADOPTION…

  2. The Adoption and Rejection of Innovations by Strawberry Growers in the Lower Fraser Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alleyne, E. Patrick; Verner, Coolie

    The study investigated the adoption behavior of 100 strawberry growers (including 32 Mennonites and 23 Japanese) in the lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia. Adoption of six selected practices was examined in relation to socioeconomic characteristics and ethnicity. Findings included the following: (1) ethnic groups differed significantly on…

  3. Authentic Research Experience for University of the Fraser Valley Undergraduate Students through the Global Rivers Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, S. J.; Gillies, S. L.; Ehrenbrink, B. P. E.; Voss, B.; Janmaat, A.; Yakemchuk, A.; Smith, S.; Faber, A.; Luymes, R.; Epp, A.; Bennett, M. C.; Fanslau, J.; Downey, B.; Wiebe, B.; VanKoughnett, H.; Macklam-Harron, G.; Herbert, J.

    2014-12-01

    The University of the Fraser Valley has undertaken the time series sampling of water chemistry of the Fraser River at Fort Langley, British Columbia, Canada as a member of the Global Rivers Observatory (GRO, www.globalrivers.org) which is organized by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Woods Hole Research Center. In addition, we have been afforded the opportunity to undertake a time series sampling of Fraser Valley tributaries of the Fraser River. These small salmon bearing streams are being threatened by increased urbanization within their watersheds and runoff from agricultural activity. Students in upper level courses and individual research students have had the opportunity to become involved in GRO research projects. These students have been instructed in the sampling protocol and techniques and have become more aware of the threats to both local streams and the Fraser River watershed. Additionally, individual research students have been able to develop their own research projects within the larger project and present their findings at academic conferences. They have also been involved in peer-reviewed publications as co-authors of research papers.

  4. Preliminary Results from VOC measurements in the Lower Fraser Valley in July/Aug 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, C. L.; Jones, K.; Vingarzan, R.; Leaitch, R.; Macdonald, A.; Osthoff, H. D.; Reid, K.

    2012-12-01

    In July/August 2012, a pilot study looking at the effect of ClNO2 production on the ozone concentrations in the lower Fraser valley near Abbotsford, BC was conducted. The lower Fraser valley in British Columbia Canada has some of the highest ozone concentrations and visibility issues in Canada. Abbotsford is located approximately 80 kms east of Vancouver, BC and approximately 30 kms from the ocean. The site was located in a largely agricultural area with fruit farms (raspberries and blueberries) and poultry barns predominating. During the study biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs were measured in situ using a GCMS/FID with hourly samples. Particle composition was measured using an ACSM and size distribution using an SMPS. Preliminary results from the study will be discussed.

  5. Measurement of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions from vegetation in the Lower Fraser Valley, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewitt, G. B.; Curren, K.; Steyn, D. G.; Gillespie, T. J.; Niki, H.

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) participate in many chemical reactions in the atmosphere and in some cases, adversely affect air quality through increased production of photochemical ozone near urban sources of nitrogen oxides. In order to implement an effective control strategy, the relative role of these biogenic hydrocarbon emissions in producing ground-level ozone must be known. During the summers of 1995 and 1996, a field study was undertaken to determine fluxes of biogenic VOCs from both natural and agricultural surfaces in the Lower Fraser Valley located in southwestern British Columbia. Emissions from agricultural surfaces were measured using a flux gradient approach while emissions from the dominant tree species in the region were measured with a branch enclosure system. Results show very little biogenic VOC production from many agricultural crops such as pasture, Potatoes or Blueberries. Cranberries showed very high emissions during the summer of 1994 but failed to show similar results during the summer of 1995. Emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from native tree species such as Western Red Cedar, Douglas Fir and Coastal Hemlock were quite low. Cottonwood trees on the other hand had fairly low emissions of monoterpenes but extremely high emissions of isoprene. Measurements provided here will be useful for improving our database of hydrocarbon emissions rates from vegetation for future emission inventories and model testing.

  6. Emission of biogenic VOCs from trees in the Lower Fraser Valley, B.C.

    SciTech Connect

    Drewitt, G.; Styen, D.G.; Gillespie, T.; Curren, K.

    1996-12-31

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) are known to participate in the formation of ground level ozone. It is possible that in the areas with high emission rates from local vegetation, biogenic hydrocarbons can be of comparable importance to anthropogenic hydrocarbons in the production of this secondary air pollutant. In order to implement an effective abatement strategy, the relative importance of these biogenic emissions to the atmospheric chemistry of an area must be known. The Lower Fraser Valley located in the southwestern corner of British Columbia experiences episodes of elevated ground level ozone concentrations during the summer under the influence of a stationary high pressure system and characterized by lush coastal rain forest vegetation and extensive agriculture surfaces. During the summer of 1995 a field campaign to determine the emission rate from natural sources in the region was conducted. The emission rate from natural sources in the region was conducted. The mission rate of biogenic hydrocarbons from four tree species, Western Red Cedar (Thuja Plicata), Cottonwood (Populus Balsemifera), Douglass Fir (Pseudotsuga Menziesii) and Hemlock (Tsuga Heterophylla) was measured in the field. It was found that Cottonwood trees emit isoprene at a rate approaching 100 times greater than any of the other three species.

  7. A High Density Ground-Level Ozone Sensor Network in the Lower Fraser Valley, BC, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bart, M.; Ainslie, B.; Alavi, M.; Henshaw, G.; McKendry, I.; Reid, K.; Salmond, J. A.; Steyn, D.; Williams, D.

    2012-12-01

    Ozone can have a detrimental effect on human health, agricultural crops and the environment. To quantify these impacts, tropospheric chemistry models are often employed, which are continually increasing in complexity and resolution. In order to validate these sophisticated models and provide good quality parameterisation and initialisation data, complementary measurements are often made. However, these measurements can often be difficult to perform, expensive and time consuming to make. A low cost sensor network can overcome some of these limitations, by making spatially dense measurements for a fraction of the cost of traditional measurements. Since the mid-1980s, when reliable observations from the fixed monitoring network began, high ozone concentrations have been a health concern in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV), BC, Canada and numerous studies have been carried out in the LFV previously [1-4]. In the summer of 2012 we embarked on a programme to advance these studies by deploying the world's first ultra-dense fully automated ozone measurement network. The network consisted of approximately 60 high quality tungsten oxide semi-conductor ozone sensors integrated with low-cost cellular telephone modems and GPS receivers, returning data to a webserver in real-time at 1 minute temporal resolution. This ultra-dense network of sensors has enabled us to perform a detailed study of ozone formation and dispersal in the LFV and associated tributary valleys. Peak ozone production areas have been mapped out, particularly in the surrounding region where ozone is not routinely monitored. This has provided a detailed understanding of small scale variability and ozone transport phenomena, with particular emphasis placed on the previously unknown role of tributary valleys to the south of the LFV, Howe Sound, and Hope. Data quality was routinely checked by co-locating sensors with the local authority, MetroVancouver, reference ozone analysers. A statistical method to check data

  8. Modeling of Future-Year Emissions Control Scenarios for the Lower Fraser Valley: Impacts of Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle Technologies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedley, M.; Jiang, W.; McLaren, R.; Singleton, D. L.

    1998-10-01

    The MC2-CALGRID photochemical modeling system is used to simulate the impact of two fuel substitution scenarios on ozone levels for a future year in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada. The relative impacts of selected natural gas and propane vehicle technologies are compared for the year 2005. The chosen natural gas technology imposes large reductions in nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions with moderate reductions in nitrogen oxide emissions, while the propane technology greatly lowers nitrogen oxide emissions with only small changes to nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions.The model results showed that replacing the entire light-duty gasoline car and truck fleet with the selected natural gas vehicle technology in the year 2005 in the Canadian portion of the Lower Fraser Valley yielded significant benefits in terms of reducing potential exposures to elevated ozone levels in suburban and rural areas. Sites closer to the urban core were less affected. For the propane fuel substitution, benefits were realized in terms of lowering ozone concentrations and ozone exposures in the rural areas. Within the urban and suburban areas, ozone exposures tended to increase. The exposures to peroxyacetyl nitrate were universally smaller in the alternative fuel scenarios.The nature of an effective control strategy for the Lower Fraser Valley is discussed, and it is suggested that in addition to the propane fuel substitution, moderate controls on the primary NOx sources in conjunction with moderate nonmethane hydrocarbon controls could be the preferred route to lower ozone exposures.

  9. Characterization of vehicle emissions in Vancouver BC during the 1993 Lower Fraser Valley Oxidants Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertler, Alan W.; Wittorff, David N.; McLaren, Robert; Belzer, Wayne; Dann, Tom

    As part of the 1993 Lower Fraser Valley Oxidants Study, measurements of mobile source emission factors were performed in the Cassiar Tunnel on the Trans-Canada Highway to measure the on-road contribution to the ozone-forming precursors (NO x and speciated hydrocarbons) along with CO. Observed emission factors were compared to the Canadian versions of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's MOBILE models, MOBILE4.1C and MOBILE5C, to assess uncertainty in the predicted mobile source contributions to the Vancouver emissions inventory. A total of 16 1-h runs were made. The timing of the individual runs was designed to encompass different traffic volumes, driving conditions, and times of day. A total of 24,513 vehicles traversed the tunnel during the study, with approximately 91% light-duty vehicles, 4% heavy-duty spark ignition vehicles, and 5% heavy-duty diesel vehicles. MOBILE5C overpredicted the observed value of CO by ˜2%, NMHC by 24%, and NO x by 13%, while MOBILE4.1C underpredicted the observed values by 36, 29, and 23% for CO, NMHC, and NO x respectively.

  10. Vertical nitrogen dioxide and ozone concentrations measured from a tethered balloon in the Lower Fraser Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, J. T.; McKendry, I.; Steyn, D. G.; Hastie, D. R.

    A series of vertical profiles of temperature, relative humidity, NO 2 and O 3 were determined in the Lower Fraser Valley, British Columbia, as part of the PACIFIC '93 field study. Data from one day show very structured vertical distributions of all parameters in the morning, as expected from the limited vertical mixing under the nocturnal inversion. NO 2 concentrations of 20 ppbv were observed 300m above the surface, while the surface concentrations were ˜ 2 ppbv. Ozone and nitrogen oxide chemistry were observed at all altitudes throughout the PBL. Titration of O 3 by NO to produce NO 2 was observed in layers above the ground, under the influence of the NBL. An increase in odd oxygen throughout the PBL, during the morning and early afternoon, shows "smog chemistry" is occurring even though the ground-based O 3 measurements suggest this day was not particularly chemically active. However, once the NBL has dissipated, the ground-based measurements seem representative of the entire PBL.

  11. Daytime and nighttime aircraft lidar measurements showing evidence of particulate matter transport into the Northeastern valleys of the Lower Fraser Valley, BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, K. B.; Snyder, B. J.

    2004-11-01

    As part of the Pacific 2001 Air Quality Field Study a simultaneous upward/downward airborne lidar system called AERIAL (AERosol Imaging Airborne Lidar) operating at the fundamental Nd:YAG wavelength, 1064 nm, was flown aboard the National Research Council of Canada Convair 580 (CV580). The primary task of this platform was to establish a regional picture of particulate matter (PM) concentrations in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV). The high temporal and spatial resolution of the lidar, provided images of PM stratification and boundary layer structure along predetermined flight lines. The flight lines were divided into a series of north-south and east-west lines to provide a snapshot of the LFV as well as provide aerial support for three main ground sites. The airborne lidar system also included a cross-polarization channel that is sensitive to particle shape (non-sphericity), for example smoke plumes from forest fires. There were nine flights flown over a 3-week period including two night flights. Comparing AERIAL results on the 26 and 29 August, between the afternoon and nighttime, showed increased PM concentrations in the Northeastern tributary valleys during the night flights due to a persistent sea breeze signal on both days. The complexity of the LFV airshed was further evidenced by the re-circulation of pollutants through upslope advection. The spatial and temporal variation of the planetary boundary layer height was also shown to play an important role in the air quality of the region.

  12. Airborne and scanning lidar results obtained during Pacific 2001 in lhe Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, Kevin B.

    2004-02-01

    Two different lidar platforms were employed in the Pacific 2001 field study. A simultaneous upward/downward airborne lidar system called AERIAL (AERosol Imaging Airborne Lidar) was flown aboard the National Research Council of Canada Convair 580(CV580). The primary task of this platform was to establish a regional picture of particulate matter (PM) concentrations in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV). The high temporal and spatial resolution of the lidar provided images of PM stratification and boundary layer structure along predetermined flight lines. The flight lines were divided into a series of north-south and east-west lines to provide a snapshot of the LFV as well as provide aerial support for four ground sites. The airborne lidar system also including a cross-polarization channel that is sensitive to particle shape (non-sphericity), for example smoke plumes from forest fires. There were 9 flights flown over a 3 week period including 2 night flights. The primary purpose of the night flights was to map PM transport in the lake valleys along the north range of the LFV. A scanning lidar facility called RASCAL (Rapid Acquisition SCanning Aerosol Lidar) was part of a suite of instruments making longer term measurements at the Langley Lochiel ground site. The lidar system was programmed to take three elevation scans (west, north and east) of the troposphere from the horizon to near zenith. Measurements were conducting for approximately 16 hours per day except longer during aircraft night flights. Results from both the airborne and scanning lidar facilities will be presented.

  13. Acidic herbicides in surface waters of Lower Fraser Valley, British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Woudneh, Million B; Sekela, Mark; Tuominen, Taina; Gledhill, Melissa

    2007-01-12

    In the period 2003-2005 a study was conducted to determine the occurrence, spatial and temporal distribution of five acidic herbicides in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV) region of British Columbia, Canada. A high-resolution gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) method capable of detecting analytes at the sub ng/L level was developed for this study. Samples were collected and analyzed from two references, five agricultural, two urban and five agricultural and urban mixed sites. Only (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid and triclopyr were detected at the reference sites. The highest concentration of herbicide detected at the reference sites was 0.109ng/L for (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid. Varying levels of all of the herbicides monitored were detected at the urban, agricultural and the mixed sites. For the urban sites the highest concentration of herbicide detected was 66.6ng/L for 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)propanoic acid. For the agricultural sites the highest concentration of herbicide detected was 345ng/L for (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D). For the mixed sites the highest concentration of herbicide detected was 1230ng/L for 2,4-D. Overall the mixed sites showed highest concentrations and detection frequencies followed by the agricultural and urban sites. With few exceptions higher concentrations of herbicides were observed for samples collected during spring than for samples collected during fall. The detected concentrations of herbicides were evaluated against established water quality criteria. Herbicide data presented in this study provide reference levels for future pesticide monitoring programs in the region.

  14. Investigation into seasonal water chemistry variations in the Clayburn Creek watershed, British Columbia: An opportunity for authentic research experience for University of the Fraser Valley undergraduate students.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, S. J.; Gillies, S. L.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Janmaat, A.; Faber, A.; Clemence, E.; Yakemchuk, A.; McCabe, M.; Toner, A.; Dhaliwal, H.; Gaultier, M.; Kanda, S.; Leffers, R.; Mahil, G.; Paulson, D.; Puri, K.; Sekhton, J.; Sidhu, B.; Sidhu, D.; Turner, S.; Strangway, A.

    2015-12-01

    Faculty and students from the University of the Fraser Valley participate in the time series sampling of the Fraser River and Fraser River tributaries as part of the Global Rivers Observatory (GRO, www.globalrivers.org) which is coordinated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Woods Hole Research Center. Clayburn and Willband Creeks in Abbotsford, British Columbia are part of this project and are being threatened by increasing anthropogenic activity (agricultural, industrial and residential development) within the watershed. Undergraduate students from the Geography and Biology departments have been instructed in the sampling protocols and the collection of thw water chemistry data. Each student that has been involved in this sampling project will gain a greater understanding of the seasonal variation of the water chemistry of the Clayburn watershed. Through this involvement in this portion of the Global Rivers Observatory our students become more aware of the threats to our streams and the methods utilized to monitor water chemistry.

  15. Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalpana Kumari, M K; Kamath, Sulata; Mysorekar, Vijaya V; Nandini, G

    2008-01-01

    Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by major features such as cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and abnormal genitalia. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be made on clinical examination and perinatal autopsy. We present the autopsy findings of a rare case of Fraser syndrome in a male infant.

  16. Fraser Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Adnan Aslam; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani

    2015-10-01

    Fraser's Syndrome (FS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with a spectrum of malformations. The most consistent features are Cryptophthalmos (CO), syndactyly, genitourinary tract abnormalities, laryngeal and tracheal anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphism, malformations of the ear and nose, orofacial clefting and musculoskeletal defects. FS is genetically heterogeneous; so far mutations in FRAS1, FREM2 and GRIP1 genes have been linked to FS. FS can be diagnosed on clinical examination, pre-natal ultrasound or perinatal autopsy. We present a case of a 3 months old child born to consanguineous healthy parents with bilateral complete CO, unilateral microphthalmia, hypertelorism, syndactyly (hands and feet bilaterally), ambiguous genitalia with cryptorchidism and an umbilical hernia. We also present the criteria for diagnosing FS and the significant features on pre-natal ultrasonography. Around 200 case reports of patients with FS and CO have been published. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of FS in Pakistan.

  17. Molecular and Stable Carbon Isotope Composition of Organic Compounds from Particles Sampled from the Lower Fraser Valley, BC Urban and Regional Air Shed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiticar, M. J.; Gray, S. L.

    2001-12-01

    This study examines the character of specific non-volatile organic compounds (N-VOCs) extracted from total suspended particulates. Aerosols are collected on filters by HiVol samplers on monthly intervals, at well-characterized meteorological sites throughout the Lower Fraser Valley. Filters are solvent-extracted , then separated into different compound classes by Silica-gel Chromatography. Selected fractions are analysed for their individual compound molecular compositions by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) and by Continuous Flow-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (CF-IRMS) for their stable carbon isotope ratio. The purpose is to identify spatial and temporal variations in N-VOCs, with the long-term goal of understanding their sources, transport processes and atmospheric chemistry. This Health Canada, Toxic Substance Research Initiative offers insights into the levels and signatures of N-VOCs exposed to humans in congested urban settings. The program is also part of the Pacific 2001 field study. This paper presents the initial year's results on our N-VOCs, including alkanes, organic acids, in comparison with bulk isotope analyses.

  18. Grizzly Valley fault system, Sierra Valley, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Ryan; Stephenson, William; Odum, Jack; Briggs, Rich; Crone, Anthony; Angster, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Grizzly Valley fault system (GVFS) strikes northwestward across Sierra Valley, California and is part of a network of active, dextral strike-slip faults in the northern Walker Lane (Figure 1). To investigate Quaternary motion across the GVFS, we analyzed high-resolution (0.25 m) airborne LiDAR data (Figure 2) in combination with six, high-resolution, P-wave, seismic-reflection profiles [Gold and others, 2012]. The 0.5- to 2.0-km-long seismic-reflection profiles were sited orthogonal to suspected tectonic lineaments identified from previous mapping and our analysis of airborne LiDAR data. To image the upper 400–700 m of subsurface stratigraphy of Sierra Valley (Figure 3), we used a 230-kg accelerated weight drop source. Geophone spacing ranged from 2 to 5 m and shots were co-located with the geophones. The profiles reveal a highly reflective, deformed basal marker that we interpret to be the top of Tertiary volcanic rocks, overlain by a 120- to 300-m-thick suite of subhorizontal reflectors we interpret as Plio-Pleistocene lacustrine deposits. Three profiles image the principle active trace of the GVFS, which is a steeply dipping fault zone that offsets the volcanic rocks and the basin fill (Figures 4 & 5).

  19. Differentiation of Natural and Anthropogenic Organic Compounds on Atmospheric Particles by Molecular and Stable Isotope Composition - Pacific 2001, Lower Fraser Valley Air Shed Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiticar, M. J.; Press, R.; Gray, S. L.

    2002-12-01

    This component of the CFCAS Pacific 2001 study examined the character of specific non-volatile organic compounds (nVOCs) extracted from filtered total suspended particulates at the Pacific 2001 sites in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV), Vancouver, BC region. The objective is to identify or fingerprint spatial and temporal variations in both molecular and stable isotope composition of these organic compounds with the goal of understanding their sources or to provide insights into transport and/or atmospheric chemistry processes. This will provide critical information to help assess the potential type and magnitude of exposure that humans receive from nVOCs in such urban settings, and the associated health risks. Aerosol samples were collected over 24hr to 7-day period on HiVol filters in the LFV at Slocan Park, Golden Ears Park, Langley HS, Sumas Mt., and Cassiar Tunnel (2hr). nVOCs s were solvent-extracted from filters, then separated into different compound classes by silica-gel chromatography. Selected fractions are analysed for their individual compound molecular compositions by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) and by Continuous Flow-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (CF-IRMS) for their stable carbon ratio. Significant variations in nVOC composition are observed for the 5 LFV sites. These are related to a combination of natural and anthropogenic urban activities. The most striking discovery is the strong odd-even carbon number predominance (OEP) observed for BOTH molecular and carbon isotope data. Recent natural release of hydrocarbons from plants have a clear predominance for the odd-carbon numbered n-alkanes. These C23 - C31 compounds are also systematically depleted in 13-C. The carbon isotope range between the odd and even compounds is up to 10 permil for the plant signatures. Anthropogenic and "aged" hydrocarbons have substantially lower molecular and isotope OEPs. This novel biogeochemical approach has good potential for estimating broad source

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Fraser syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Fraser syndrome Fraser syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Fraser syndrome is a rare disorder that affects development starting ...

  1. On the Mayne-Fraser Smoothing Formula and Stochastic Realization Theory for Nonstationary Linear Stochastic Systems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    France. March-April, 1976. 38. F. Germain, Algoritmes de calcul de rialisations sta- 18..J.S. Meditch , A survey of data smoothing for linear...AO-AIA 5 ETCYUI EIGONDP FMTEAISFG1/ ON THE MAYNE-FRASER SMOOTHING FORMULA AND STOCHASTIC REALIZATIO-KETC(UI 1979 F BADAWI, A LINDQUIST. M PAVON AFOSR...work reported here is aimed at providing a theory of smoothing in the contex DD I j AN 73 1473 EO01O OF I NOV 61 IS OBSOLETE UNCLAS.SIFIED .I PAR FF * t

  2. [Fraser syndrome: case report].

    PubMed

    Saraceno, Janaína; Lopes, Tâmara; Pinheiro, Regina Helena Rathsam; Lima, Humberto Castro; Chaves, Alessandra Pinheiro

    2008-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a systemic condition characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and abnormal genitalia, which may be associated with urinary tract, ear, nose, larynx and skeletal abnormalities. Cryptophthalmos can be an isolated finding (that has been reported as an autosomal dominant trait) or associated with other congenital anomalies (reported as an autosomal recessive disorder). RMSA, female, 3 m.o., evaluated in the general clinic of the Instituto Brasileiro de Oftalmologia e Prevenção à Cegueira. Child of consanguineous parents. The same finding was observed in an uncle and one of her brothers. Her physical examination showed total unilateral cryptophthalmos (right side), depressed nasal bridge, low set ears, atresia of the external auditory canal, enlarged clitoris, prominent labia majora and syndactyly of the fingers and toes. Ultrasonography of the abdomen showed renal agenesis (left side). Ocular ultrasonography showed a reduced anterior-posterior ocular diameter, anterior segment disorganization, absence of the lens and total retinal detachment in the right eye. The pathogenesis of cryptophthalmia has not as yet been determined, but consanguinity has been reported by many authors as a very important factor. Doctors should be attentive to the clinical findings and the correct diagnosis in order to offer these patients a thorough follow-up and realistic genetic counseling to their parents.

  3. Fraser syndrome in a 96-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Impallomeni, Mario; Subramanian, Deepak; Mahmood, Nazim; Illes, Joseph; Joseph, Illes

    2006-11-01

    Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the life expectancy is <1 year. The main features are cryptophthalmos, ear, nose and skeletal malformations, syndactyly, laryngeal stenosis and malformation of the uro-genital system, lungs, liver and central nervous system (CNS). We report the clinical, laboratory and post-mortem findings of this condition in an elderly woman aged 96 years. She is the oldest known patient with Fraser syndrome.

  4. Intrafamilial variability in Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prasun, Pankaj; Pradhan, Mandakini; Goel, Himanshu

    2007-08-01

    Fraser syndrome (OMIM 219000) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutanaeous syndactyly, malformations of the larynx and genitourinary tract, craniofacial dysmorphism, orofacial clefting, mental retardation and musculoskeletal anomalies. There is marked interfamilial clinical heterogeneity. However, there is strong phenotypic similarity and concordance of the degree of severity of the disease within a family. We report a family with two cases of Fraser syndrome with marked clinical heterogeneity. One case had lethal phenotype with bilateral renal agenesis, while the other had mild phenotype with normal kidneys. It has not been reported before and highlights the importance of careful screening of pregnancies in families with Fraser syndrome.

  5. Cotton Valley depositional systems of Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.

    1983-09-01

    The Jurassic Cotton Valley Group in Mississippi is considered generally to be one formation, roughly equivalent to the Schuler Formation of Louisiana. Gross changes in lithology and electric log characteristics are observed across the state of Mississippi. These lateral variations are best discussed in terms of the depositional systems operant during Cotton Valley sedimentation. Through use of sand percentage and sand isolith maps, various depositional systems can be discerned. Two delta systems existed in Mississippi: a constructive delta in the west-central part of the state, and a destructive delta in the east-central part. An interdeltaic system in central Mississippi, between the two delta systems, was bounded possibly on the south by a barrier-bar system. Elevation above wave base, caused by positive influence of the Wiggins arch and Hancock County high, resulted in development of a strand-plain system in southeast Mississippi. Lack of well control precludes a definitive statement about depositional environment in the southwest part of the state. By geographic relationship to the other depositional systems, a shelf system is inferred. Recognition of the Cotton Valley depositional systems in Mississippi aids in identifying potentially productive trends which have yet to be adequately explored.

  6. Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope System Theory of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, George R.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this learning module is to enable learners to describe how the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) system functions in support of Apple Valley Science and Technology Center's (AVSTC) client schools' radio astronomy activities.

  7. Fraser syndrome: recurrence in a family.

    PubMed

    Singh, Renu; Tandon, Indu; Deo, Sujata

    2007-12-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive condition with classical features of cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, ambiguous genitalia, genitourinary mal-formations and mental retardation. We report a family with affected child where the pregnant woman was referred at 24 weeks of gestation for termination of pregnancy. The aborted fetus showed typical findings suggestive of Fraser syndrome.

  8. A new component of the Fraser complex.

    PubMed

    Hiroyasu, Sho; Jones, Jonathan C R

    2014-05-01

    In embryos, the Fraser complex (FC) mediates epithelial-connective tissue interactions. Loss of expression of FC components leads to Fraser syndrome (FS), in which cohesion of epithelial tissues and stroma is perturbed. Using zebrafish, Richardson et al. (this issue) identified the protein AMACO in the FC. We discuss the utility of zebrafish in determining FC functions and identifying FS targets.

  9. The Lower Tagus Valley (LTV) Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besana-Ostman, G. M.; Fereira, H.; Pinheiro, A.; Falcao Flor, A. P.; Nemser, E.; Villanova, S. P.; Fonseca, J. D.

    2010-05-01

    , aerial photographs, and river systems together with other remotely-sensed data. Active fault-related features that were identified include fault scarps, pressure ridges, pull-apart basin, saddles, and linear valleys. Limited ocular investigation has also been undertaken to verify modifications that post-date the aerial photos, quantify both elevation differences across the fault, and possibly evaluate the cumulative lateral displacements. Thus, the newly-identified traces of an active fault in the LTV corresponds with a left-lateral fault along the Lower Tagus floodplains striking parallel to the principal structural trend (NNE-SSW) in the region. This trace clearly indicates continued tectonic movement along the LTV fault during the Holocene. Taking into account the newly-mapped location and length of the active trace, trenching work is being planned to determine recurrence intervals along the LTV fault while further mapping of its possible extension and other related active structures are underway. Moreover, new estimates of slip rate along this structure will result from this study and can be used for an improved seismic hazard assessment for the region.

  10. West Valley waste removal system study

    SciTech Connect

    Janicek, G P

    1981-04-01

    This study addresses the specific task of removing high-level wastes from underground tanks at Western New York Nuclear Center and delivering them to an onsite waste solidification plant. It begins with a review of the design and construction features of the waste storage tanks pertinent to the waste removal task with particular emphasis on the unique and complex tank internals which severely complicate the task of removal. It follows with a review of tank cleaning techniques used and under study at both Hanford and Savannah River and previous studies proposing the use of these techniques at West Valley. It concludes from these reviews that existing techniques are not directly transferable to West Valley and that a new approach is required utilizing selected feature and attributes from existing methodology. The study also concludes, from an investigation of the constraints imposed by the processing facility, that waste removal will be intermittent, requiring batch transfer over the anticipated 3 years of processing operations. Based on these reviews and conclusions, the study proposes that the acid waste be processed first and that one of the 15,000-gallon acid tanks then be used for batch feeding the neutralized waste. The proposed system would employ commercially available pumping equipment to transfer the wastes from the batch tank to processing via existing process piping. A commercially available mixed-flow pump and eight turbine pumps would homogenize the neutralized waste in conjunction with eight custom-fabricated sluicers for periodic transfer to the batch tank.

  11. [Fraser syndrome. A case report].

    PubMed

    Allali, B; Hamdani, M; Lamari, H; Rais, L; Benhaddou, M; Kettani, A; Lahbil, D; Amraoui, A; Zaghloul, K

    2006-02-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder; the most consistent features are cryptophthalmos, syndactyly of fingers and toes, laryngeal stenosis, and urogenital abnormalities. We report a newborn case at day 1 of life who had multiple abnormalities, born from a consanguineous marriage. Clinically, the newborn had an ankyloblepharon on the left side, a cryptophthalmos on the right side, a syndactyly, anorectal abnormalities with ambiguous genitalia, laryngeal stenosis, and ear malformations. TDM of the cranium and orbits and the transfontanel ultrasound were normal. The abdominal ultrasound showed renal abnormalities. Right eye surgery showed a reduced cornea to an opaque thin plate clinging to the iris without an anterior chamber and a nonindividualized eyeball. The authors discuss the morphological abnormalities, the clinical and paraclinical aspects of this syndrome, its multispecialized clinical management, and the importance of prenatal diagnosis.

  12. Fraser-cryptophthalmos syndrome with colonic atresia.

    PubMed

    Narang, Manish; Kumar, Manish; Shah, Dheeraj

    2008-02-01

    Fraser cryptophthalmos syndrome is a severe genetic disorder comprising of cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and genitourinary abnormalities. Gastrointestinal malformations are also increasingly being described. We describe a neonate with this syndrome having colonic atresia leading to cecal rupture and pneumoperitoneum.

  13. Evaluating the Fraser Health Balanced Scorecard--a formative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Barnardo, Catherine; Jivanni, Amin

    2009-01-01

    Fraser Health (FH), a large, Canadian, integrated health care network, adopted the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) approach to monitor organizational performance in 2006. This paper reports on the results of a formative evaluation, conducted in April, 2008, to assess the usefulness of the BSC as a performance-reporting system and a performance management tool. Results indicated that the BSC has proven to be useful for reporting performance but is not currently used for performance management in a substantial way.

  14. Prenatal death in Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Jessica M; Putnam, Angelica R; Opitz, John M; Pysher, Theodor J; Szakacs, Juliana

    2005-01-01

    Cryptophthalmos may be partial or complete, unilateral or bilateral, apparently nonsyndromal or syndromal. A recent study of 2 stillborn infants at the University of Utah prompted an analysis of the developmental aspects of the syndromal form (Fraser syndrome). We conclude that, per se, cryptophthalmos is a developmental field defect on the basis of heterogeneity (autosomal dominant and recessive forms) and phylogeneity (occurrence also in the pheasant, rabbit, pigeon, dog, and mouse). In humans this autosomal recessive disorder maps to 4q21, is homologous to the bleb (bl/bl) mouse, and is due to mutations in the FRAS1 gene that codes for a 4007 amino acid protein 85% identical to the Fras1 gene of the bleb mouse. Commonest anomalies in humans are cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly of digits, abnormal ears and genitalia, renal agenesis, and congenital heart defects. Almost half of affected infants are stillborn or die in infancy, and mental retardation is common. The pathogenesis evidently involves abnormal epithelial integrity during prenatal life. Older (mostly German) publications, some dating to the 19th century, provide a fascinating historical insight into the process of syndrome delineation.

  15. Pleistocene entrenched valley/canyon systems, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Steffens, G.S.

    1986-09-01

    The Mississippi Submarine Canyon is the seaward extension of the late Wisconsin entrenched alluvial valley. Geophysical and geologic data provide evidence for the continuity of the Mississippi entrenched valley, the Timbalier channel, and the submarine canyon. The Mississippi entrenched valley/canyon system is one of several systems recognized in the Pleistocene section of offshore Louisiana. Most of these systems were produced by the ancestral Mississippi River. They typically exhibit a three-gradient profile with their maximum erosional relief at the preexisting shelf margin. The canyons extend onto the pre-existing shelf for 20 to 50 mi, with erosion commonly exceeding 1000 ft. All of these systems delivered large quantities of sediment to the Pleistocene slope and abyssal plain. The fan deposits are the products of sediment passing through and being removed from the entrenched valley/canyon systems.

  16. The hydrothermal system in southern Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Alan H.; Sorey, M.L.; Olmsted, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    Southern Grass Valley is typical extensional basin in the Basin and Range province. Leach Hot Springs, in the southern part of the valley, represents the discharge end of an active hydrothermal flow system with an estimated deep aquifer temperature of 163-173C. This report discusses results of geologic, hydrologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations used in an attempt to construct an internally consistent model of the system. (USGS)

  17. Hydrothermal system in Southern Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, A.H.; Sorey, M.L.; Olmsted, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    Southern Grass Valley is a fairly typical extensional basin in the Basin and Range province. Leach Hot Springs, in the southern part of the valley, represents the discharge end of an active hydrothermal flow system with an estimated deep aquifer temperature of 163 to 176/sup 0/C. Results of geologic, hydrologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations are discussed in an attempt to construct an internally consistent model of the system.

  18. Vulnerability of Fraser River sockeye salmon to climate change: a life cycle perspective using expert judgments.

    PubMed

    McDaniels, Tim; Wilmot, Sarah; Healey, Michael; Hinch, Scott

    2010-12-01

    Fraser River sockeye salmon have been the basis for a major commercial fishery shared by Canada and the United States, and an important cultural foundation for many aboriginal groups; they are also of huge ecological significance throughout the Fraser Basin. The potential for altered aquatic habitat and temperature regimes due to climate change is an important concern for Fraser River sockeye salmon. This paper characterizes the vulnerability of Fraser River sockeye salmon to future climate change using an approach that is novel on three counts. First, previous efforts to assess the vulnerability of salmon to climate change have largely focused on only part of the life cycle, whereas we consider climate vulnerability at all stages in the life cycle. Second, we use the available scientific literature to provide a basis for structuring and eliciting judgments from fisheries science and management experts who research and manage these systems. Third, we consider prospects for mitigating the effects of climate change on sockeye salmon. Tests showed that participants' judgments differentiated in statistically significant ways among questions that varied in terms of life stages, spawning regions and climate scenarios. The consensus among participants was that Fraser River sockeye are most vulnerable to climate change during the egg and returning adult stages of the life cycle. A high temperature scenario was seen as imposing the greatest risk on sockeye stocks, particularly those that migrate to the upper reaches of the Fraser River system and spawn earlier in the summer. The inability to alter water temperature and the highly constrained nature of sockeye management, with competing gear types and sequential fisheries over a long distance, suggest the potential to mitigate adverse effects is limited. Fraser River sockeye already demonstrate a great deal of adaptive capacity in utilizing heterogeneous habitats in different river sub-basins. This adaptability points to the

  19. 77 FR 60631 - Fraser River Sockeye Salmon Fisheries; Inseason Orders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 300 RIN 0648-XC222 Fraser River Sockeye Salmon... publishes Fraser River salmon inseason orders to regulate treaty and non-treaty (all citizen) commercial salmon fisheries in U.S. waters. The orders were issued by the Fraser River Panel (Panel) of the...

  20. The Impact of Climate Change on the Fraser River may Result in Increased Algal Blooms in the Strait of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, S. L.; Grant, E.; VanKoughnett, H.; Marsh, S. J.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Fanslau, J.; Voss, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Fraser River is one of British Columbia's most diverse and valuable ecosystems. Water levels and temperatures along the Fraser are seasonally variable, with high flow during the spring freshet and low flow during winter months. The Fraser River is affected by urbanization and agriculture in the Fraser Valley, and mountain pine beetle and logging in other areas. Biological oxygen demand (BOD) is an indicator of water quality in freshwater environments as it measures the amount of oxygen consumed by bacteria during the decomposition of organic matter, relative to the total available dissolved oxygen (DO). We found BOD of the Fraser River at Fort Langley was higher in the summer than winter, but no relationship between BOD and nutrient concentration (NH4, NO2+NO3, PO4). There did appear to be a positive correlation between BOD and turbidity. There is increased agricultural input into the river in the summer: increasing dissolved organic matter (DOM) and coarse and fine particulate organic matter, as well, turbidity increases during the spring freshet. The Fraser River plume contributes to Strait of Georgia algal blooms. These blooms can occur as early as March and end as late as September. The algal bloom in the Georgia Strait does not correlate to nutrient levels in the river, but is more closely related to river turbidity and dissolved organic matter (DOM). It is predicted this algal bloom will become more prominent as the sediment and DOM levels increase in the Fraser River due to the loss of forests in the watershed from the Mountain pine beetle.

  1. Secure Wireless Networking at Simon Fraser University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Worth

    2003-01-01

    Describes the wireless local area network (WLAN) at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, Canada. Originally conceived to address computing capacity and reduce university computer space demands, the WLAN has provided a seamless computing environment for students and solved a number of other campus problems as well. (SLD)

  2. Fraser syndrome in three consecutive siblings.

    PubMed

    Kalaniti, Kaarthigeyan; Sandhya, V

    2011-05-01

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is a rare disorder characterized by a combination of acrofacial and urogenital malformations with or without cryptophthalmos. We report a newborn and its two elder siblings who had multiple congenital anomalies and clinico-radiological features consistent with FS.

  3. Geologic map of the Fraser 7.5-minute quadrangle, Grand County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shroba, Ralph R.; Bryant, Bruce; Kellogg, Karl S.; Theobald, Paul K.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2010-01-01

    The geologic map of the Fraser quadrangle, Grand County, Colo., portrays the geology along the western boundary of the Front Range and the eastern part of the Fraser basin near the towns of Fraser and Winter Park. The oldest rocks in the quadrangle include gneiss, schist, and plutonic rocks of Paleoproterozoic age that are intruded by younger plutonic rocks of Mesoproterozoic age. These basement rocks are exposed along the southern, eastern, and northern margins of the quadrangle. Fluvial claystone, mudstone, and sandstone of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, and fluvial sandstone and conglomeratic sandstone of the Lower Cretaceous Dakota Group, overlie Proterozoic rocks in a small area near the southwest corner of the quadrangle. Oligocene rhyolite tuff is preserved in deep paleovalleys cut into Proterozoic rocks near the southeast corner of the quadrangle. Generally, weakly consolidated siltstone and minor unconsolidated sediments of the upper Oligocene to upper Miocene Troublesome Formation are preserved in the post-Laramide Fraser basin. Massive bedding and abundant silt suggest that loess or loess-rich alluvium is a major component of the siltstone in the Troublesome Formation. A small unnamed fault about one kilometer northeast of the town of Winter Park has the youngest known displacement in the quadrangle, displacing beds of the Troublesome Formation. Surficial deposits of Pleistocene and Holocene age are widespread in the Fraser quadrangle, particularly in major valleys and on slopes underlain by the Troublesome Formation. Deposits include glacial outwash and alluvium of non-glacial origin; mass-movement deposits transported by creep, debris flow, landsliding, and rockfall; pediment deposits; tills deposited during the Pinedale and Bull Lake glaciations; and sparse diamictons that may be pre-Bull Lake till or debris-flow deposits. Some of the oldest surficial deposits may be as old as Pliocene.

  4. Tunable Valley Polarization and Valley Orbital Magnetic Moment Hall Effect in Honeycomb Systems with Broken Inversion Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhigang; Quhe, Ruge; Liu, Shunquan; Li, Yan; Feng, Ji; Yang, Yingchang; Lu, Jing; Yang, Jinbo

    2015-09-11

    In this Letter, a tunable valley polarization is investigated for honeycomb systems with broken inversion symmetry such as transition-metal dichalcogenide MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se) monolayers through elliptical pumping. Compared to circular pumping, elliptical pumping is a more universal and effective method to create coherent valley polarization. When two valleys of MX2 monolayers are doped or polarized, a novel anomalous Hall effect (called valley orbital magnetic moment Hall effect) is predicted. Valley orbital magnetic moment Hall effect can generate an orbital magnetic moment current without the accompaniment of a charge current, which opens a new avenue for exploration of valleytronics and orbitronics. Valley orbital magnetic moment Hall effect is expected to overshadow spin Hall effect and is tunable under elliptical pumping.

  5. Tunable Valley Polarization and Valley Orbital Magnetic Moment Hall Effect in Honeycomb Systems with Broken Inversion Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhigang; Quhe, Ruge; Liu, Shunquan; Li, Yan; Feng, Ji; Yang, Yingchang; Lu, Jing; Yang, Jinbo

    2015-01-01

    In this Letter, a tunable valley polarization is investigated for honeycomb systems with broken inversion symmetry such as transition-metal dichalcogenide MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se) monolayers through elliptical pumping. Compared to circular pumping, elliptical pumping is a more universal and effective method to create coherent valley polarization. When two valleys of MX2 monolayers are doped or polarized, a novel anomalous Hall effect (called valley orbital magnetic moment Hall effect) is predicted. Valley orbital magnetic moment Hall effect can generate an orbital magnetic moment current without the accompaniment of a charge current, which opens a new avenue for exploration of valleytronics and orbitronics. Valley orbital magnetic moment Hall effect is expected to overshadow spin Hall effect and is tunable under elliptical pumping. PMID:26358835

  6. Sir Ian Fraser 1901-1999

    PubMed Central

    Froggatt, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Ian Fraser died at his residence, 19 Upper Malone Road, on 11th May in his ninety-ninth year. He had been a significant force in Ulster surgery, indeed the entire Ulster medical scene, almost from his appointment as an ‘honorary attending surgeon in charge of the out-patient department’ at the then Belfast Hospital for Sick Children (in Queen Street) in 1927 until late in life; and he was to receive wide national and international recognition. An acute sense of history was not the least of his gifts and all writers on local medical history owe much to his perceptive sketches of predecessors and earlier contemporaries. A memorial service was held in Fisherwick Church on 2nd July. The family honoured me in their invitation to give a Tribute - which is reproduced below. I have added some notes which with standard reference sources, Ian's own autobiographical sketches, the Fraser Archive in the Archivist's office at RVH and other material preserved by his son, will I hope, provide sufficient background information to tempt the future biographer whom Fraser's life so richly deserves.

  7. West Valley transfer cart control system design description

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.C.; Crutcher, R.I.; Halliwell, J.W.; Hileman, M.S.; Moore, M.R.; Nodine, R.N.; Ruppel, F.R.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1993-01-01

    Detail design of the control system for the West Valley Nuclear Services Vitrification Facility transfer cart has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report documents the requirements and describes the detail design of that equipment and control software. Copies of significant design documents including analysis and testing reports and design drawings are included in the Appendixes.

  8. Instructional Television Transmission System for the Genesee Valley Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown Associates, Rochester, NY.

    In the entire Genessee Valley area of New York, only two channels are available to educators. Therefore, a study was made of the feasibility of constructing a multi-channel system for the transmission of television and data signals to schools in the area. Field strength measurements were taken of the local educational broadcast signal WXXI-TV to…

  9. Geophysical setting of the Wabash Valley fault system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildenbrand, T.G.; Ravat, D.

    1997-01-01

    Interpretation of existing regional magnetic and gravity data and new local high-resolution aeromagnetic data provides new insights on the tectonic history and structural development of the Wabash Valley Fault System in Illinois and Indiana. Enhancement of short-wavelength magnetic anomalies reveal numerous NW- to NNE-trending ultramafic dikes and six intrusive complexes (including those at Hicks Dome and Omaha Dome). Inversion models indicate that the interpreted dikes are narrow (???3 m), lie at shallow depths (500 km long and generally >50 km wide) and with deep basins (locally >3 km thick), the ancestral Wabash Valley faults express, in comparison, minor tectonic structures and probably do not represent a failed rift arm. There is a lack of any obvious relation between the Wabash Valley Fault System and the epicenters of historic and prehistoric earthquakes. Five prehistoric earthquakes lie conspicuously near structures associated with the Commerce geophysical lineament, a NE-trending magnetic and gravity lineament lying oblique to the Wabash Valley Fault System and possibly extending over 600 km from NE Arkansas to central Indiana.

  10. Seasonal variation in biological oxygen demand levels in the main stem of the Fraser River, British Columbia and an agriculturally impacted tributary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, S. L.; Fraser, H.; Marsh, S. J.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Voss, B. M.; Marcotte, D.; Fanslau, J.; Epp, A.; Bennett, M.; Hanson-Carson, J.; Luymes, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Fraser River basin is one of British Columbia's most diverse and valuable ecosystems. Water levels and temperatures along the Fraser are seasonally variable, with high flow during the spring freshet and low flow during winter months. In the Fraser River, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations impact many aquatic species. Biological oxygen demand (BOD) measures the amount of oxygen consumed by bacteria during the decomposition of organic matter and is an indicator of water quality in freshwater environments. We compared BOD, DO, and pH during winter (November 2011) and summer (July 2012) in the main stem of the Fraser River at Fort Langley and a tributary in an agricultural area of the Fraser Valley, Nathan Creek. In November the BOD of the main stem of the Fraser River was 2.36 mg/L, pH 7.26, and DO 9.13 mg/L. BOD and DO of Nathan Creek was not significantly lower at 1.68 mg/L and DO 8.28 mg/L, however, the pH was significantly lower (p=0.001) at 6.75. In July, the Fraser River had significantly higher BOD levels than in winter at 4.43 mg/L, but no significant change in pH and DO. Nathan Creek BOD was significantly higher than it was in winter and higher than the main stem at 7.34 mg/L, with no significant change in pH and DO. There were strong seasonal differences in BOD in the Fraser River and Nathan Creek, with the highest levels seen in July. The higher BOD seen in Nathan Creek in July may be an indication of agricultural impact. Although all BOD values fell in the range of 1-8 mg/L and are considered to be relatively unpolluted.

  11. Aquatic ecosystem condition: The Fraser River Action Plan approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tuominen, T.; Raymond, B.; Sekela, M.; Reynoldson, T.

    1995-12-31

    A major goal of the Canadian government`s Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP) is to clean up existing pollution problems in the Fraser River Basin. In support of this goal, the Environmental Quality Assessment Program is assessing the quality of the aquatic environment, particularly with respect to contaminants. The program, conducted from 1993 to 1998, is to establish a baseline condition for the aquatic ecosystem against which the success of clean up efforts can be measured. The FRAP approach is to use a combination of contaminant exposure or stressor indicators and organism ``effects`` indicators. The focus is on three components of the aquatic ecosystem: (1) bed sediment, (2) resident fish and (3) benthos. A priority for the program is integration of the three components, wherever possible. Bed sediments, as indicators of contaminant stress, are sampled at fourteen reaches in the river and major tributaries. Two species of resident fish are sampled and analyzed for condition factors, enzyme induction, histopathology and contaminant content at each of nine sites in the basin. The resident fish data are providing a measure of contaminant exposure and effect. Organism community effects will be assessed by a study which is classifying approximately 200 tributary and mainstem sites based on benthos community structure. For the first time in a large river system in Canada, this benthos study uses a multivariate approach which relates a suite of chemical and physical characteristics to benthos community structure.

  12. Summertime wind climate in Yerevan: valley wind systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, Artur

    2017-03-01

    1992-2014 wind climatology analysis in Yerevan is presented with particular focus given to the summertime thermally induced valley wind systems. Persistence high winds are observed in Yerevan during July-August months when the study region is strongly affected by a heat-driven plain-plateau circulation. The local valley winds arrive in Yerevan in the evening hours, generally, from 1500 to 1800 UTC, leading to rapid enhancement of wind speeds and dramatic changes in wind direction. Valley-winds significantly impact the local climate of Yerevan, which is a densely populated city. These winds moderate evening temperatures after hot and dry weather conditions observed during summertime afternoons. On the other hand, valley winds result in significantly higher nocturnal temperatures and more frequent occurrence of warm nights (tn90p) in Yerevan due to stronger turbulent mixing of boundary layer preventing strong surface cooling and temperature drop in nighttime and morning hours. The applied WRF-ARW limited area model is able to simulate the key features of the observed spatial pattern of surface winds in Armenia associated with significant terrain channeling, wind curls, etc. By contrast, ECMWF EPS global model fails to capture mesoscale and local wind systems over Armenia. However, the results of statistical verification of surface winds in Yerevan showed that substantial biases are present in WRF 18-h wind forecasts, as well as, the temporal variability of observed surface winds is not reproduced adequately in WRF-ARW model.

  13. The West Valley Demonstration Project's vitrification system operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, J.M.; Barnes, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    A full-sized, integrated vitrification system is being tested at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) to establish its operational characteristics that will allow a quality, high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass product to be consistently produced. Recently, this nonradioactive verification testing has emphasized (a) ensuring flow sheet and feed makeup chemistry that enables well-balanced melter performance, (b) achieving design basis melter throughput rates at steady-state operating conditions, and (c) demonstrating that the release limit of NO{sub x} is met by the vitrification off-gas system. The West Valley vitrification process testing is rapidly converging to demonstrate that the acceptance specification in the glass product and the environmental requirements on the off-gas will indeed be met, thereby providing the basis for approval to begin radioactive operations in 1992.

  14. Fraser syndrome with partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Rajoo; Bhattacharya, Arunaloke

    2008-06-01

    Fraser syndrome is characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, malformations of the larynx and genitourinary tract, craniofacial dysmorphism, orofacial clefting, mental retardation, and musculoskeletal anomalies. We report a case of a two day old neonate who presented with features suggestive of the diagnosis of Fraser syndrome. This child also had partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection and congenital hypo-thyroidism.

  15. Preliminary evaluation of the hydrogeologic system in Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danskin, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary, two-layer, steady-state, groundwater flow model was used to evaluate present data and hydrologic concepts of Owens Valley, California. Simulations of the groundwater system indicate that areas where water levels are most affected by changes in recharge and discharge are near toes of alluvial fans and along the edge of permeable volcanic deposits. Sensitivity analysis for each model parameter shows that steady state simulations are most sensitive to uncertainties in evapotranspiration rates. Tungsten Hills, Poverty Hills, and Alabama Hills were found to act as virtually impermeable barriers to groundwater flow. Accurate simulation of the groundwater system between Bishop and Lone Pine appears to be possible without simulating the groundwater system in Round Valley, near Owens Lake, or in aquifer materials more than 1,000 ft below land surface. Although vast amounts of geologic and hydrologic data have been collected for Owens Valley, many parts of the hydrogeologic system have not been defined with sufficient detail to answer present water management questions. Location and extent of geologic materials that impede the vertical movement of water are poorly documented. The likely range of aquifer characteristics, except vertical hydraulic conductivity, is well known, but spatial distribution of these characteristics is not well documented. A set of consistent water budgets is needed, including one for surface water, groundwater, and the entire valley. The largest component of previous water budgets (evapotranspiration) is largely unverified. More definitive estimates of local gains and losses for Owens River are needed. Although groundwater pumpage from each well is measured, the quantity of withdrawal from different zones of permeable material has not been defined. (USGS)

  16. An rf communications system for the West Valley transfer cart

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, R.I.; Moore, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype radio frequency communications system for digital data was designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in controlling the vitrification facility transfer cart at the West Valley Nuclear Services facility in New York. The communications system provides bidirectional wireless data transfer between the operator control station and the material transfer cart. The system was designed to operate in radiation fields of 10[sup 4] R/h while withstanding a total integrated dose of 10[sup 7] R of gamma radiation. Implementation of antenna spatial diversity, automatic gain control, and spectral processing improves operation in the reflective environment of the metal-lined reprocessing cells.

  17. An rf communications system for the West Valley transfer cart

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, R.I.; Moore, M.R.

    1993-05-01

    A prototype radio frequency communications system for digital data was designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in controlling the vitrification facility transfer cart at the West Valley Nuclear Services facility in New York. The communications system provides bidirectional wireless data transfer between the operator control station and the material transfer cart. The system was designed to operate in radiation fields of 10{sup 4} R/h while withstanding a total integrated dose of 10{sup 7} R of gamma radiation. Implementation of antenna spatial diversity, automatic gain control, and spectral processing improves operation in the reflective environment of the metal-lined reprocessing cells.

  18. West Valley Support Program evacuated canister system design

    SciTech Connect

    Ketner, G.L.; Berger, D.N. ); Liu, K.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has prepared a preliminary design of the evacuated canister system for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The function of the evacuated canister is to remove molten radioactive glass from the WVDP melter cavity during a planned melter shutdown. The proposed evacuated canister system consists of an L-shaped, 4-in.-diam Type 304L stainless steel schedule-40 pipe sealed with an aluminum plug at one end and attached to a canister at the other. While it is lifted, the canister is positioned and held above the melter by two cranes at [approximately] 15 deg from horizontal.

  19. 75 FR 27767 - Application To Rescind Presidential Permit; Joint Application for Presidential Permit; Fraser...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... Presidential Permit; Joint Application for Presidential Permit; Fraser Papers Inc. and Twin Rivers Paper... application. SUMMARY: Fraser Papers Inc. (Fraser) and Twin Rivers Paper Company Inc. (Twin Rivers) filed a...-phase 138-kV transmission line operated at 69-kV. These lines connect Fraser's paper making facility...

  20. Fraser syndrome: a new case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Eskander, Bishoy S; Shehata, Bahig M

    2008-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos and cutaneous syndactyly. We present a case of Fraser syndrome with bilateral cryptophthalmos and other common features of Fraser syndrome including syndactyly (hands and feet bilaterally), ambiguous genitalia with clitoromegaly, vaginal atresia, and unilateral renal agenesis. We also present the major and minor diagnostic criteria for Fraser syndrome and the frequency of associated malformations.

  1. Impossible laryngeal intubation in an infant with Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Suzanne; Westbrook, Andrew; Bourke, Margaret; Lyons, Barry; Russell, John

    2004-03-01

    Congenital webbing of the vocal cords is rare, and is usually incompatible with life. We report a case of an infant with Fraser syndrome who required a surgical airway because of a severe stenosis of her airway secondary to a glottic web. The decision process leading to tracheostomy in this neonate is described. The pertinent features of Fraser syndrome in relation to airway management are discussed.

  2. Numeric Modeling of Valley Networks and Drainage Systems on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, A.

    2006-12-01

    Valley networks observed on Mars are often invoked to support the historical presence of water on the surface of Mars. There is a need for quantification of these networks and the drainage processes associated with them. Numerical modeling of these streams and drainage basins within a GIS environment allows for rapid assessment of hydrologic surface processes. In this study, several areas of valley networks which had been previously mapped visually using Viking, MOC, and MOLA datasets were re-examined using numeric processes and tools available in ArcGIS. Specifically, stream length and drainage density were quantified using the MOLA gridded DEM and ArcGIS tools. This process is significantly faster than the visual identification and delineation techniques used in the past. The project sought to test whether or not computer-assisted techniques were comparable in accuracy and precision to previous studies using visual techniques. To do this, two quadrangles previously visually mapped by Carr (1995) and Hynek and Phillips (2003) were analyzed. Total valley network length at the first site was found to be 18,300 km, compared to previous estimates of 1,308 km (Carr) and 11,100 km (Hynek and Phillips). Drainage density was calculated to be 0.0605/km, compared to previous estimates of 0.0076/km (Carr) and 0.065/km (Hynek and Phillips). The highest stream order found was 5th, compared to 3rd (Carr) and 6th (Hynek and Phillips). In the second quadrangle, total valley network length was measured at 4,010 km, compared to 453 km and 3,496 km. The drainage density was calculated to be 0.068/km, compared to 0.011/km and 0.082/km. The highest stream order found was 4th, compared to 2nd and 5th. Results were very similar to those using visual interpretation of MOC shaded relief by Hynek and Phillips. A difference in stream order, however, suggests that the computer-aided technique may not connect systems that visually have been connected. Still, automated results offer an

  3. West Valley operation of an integrated radwaste treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, P.J.; Cwynar, J.C.; Gessner, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is charged with the solidification of high-level liquid waste remaining from nuclear fuel reprocessing activities, which were conducted at West Valley, New York, between 1966 and 1972. One important aspect of the project's fully integrated waste program is the management of low-level wastes (LLWs) that result from treating high-level waste. At the West Valley Demonstration Project, {approximately}650,000 gal of high-level radioactive waste is stored in an underground tank. The waste has separated into two phases, i.e., a liquid or supernatant that comprises 90% of this 650,000 gal and a 10% layer of sludge on the bottom of the tank. Estimates based on radiochemical analysis show that the supernatant contains {approximately}7.4 million Ci of predominantly {sup 137}Cs. The purpose of the integrated radwaste treatment system (IRTS) is to remove as much {sup 137}Cs as possible from the supernatant by utilizing an ion exchange technique and to solidify the remaining liquid into a certifiable class C cement LLW form that meets the waste form criteria specified in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) 10CFR61. Waste is to be solidified in 71-gal square drums and remotely handled and stored on-site until determination of final disposition. This paper describes the very successful experiences gained in the treatment and solidification of the LLW stream produced as well as the processes and controls employed on the cemented waste.

  4. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    PubMed Central

    Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Conclusion Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients. PMID:24648834

  5. The hydrothermal system of Long Valley Caldera, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, M.L.; Lewis, Robert Edward; Olmsted, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    Long Valley caldera, an elliptical depression covering 450 km 2 on the eastern front of the Sierra Nevada in east-central California, contains a hot-water convection system with numerous hot springs and measured and estimated aquifer temperatures at depths of 180?C to 280?C. In this study we have synthesized the results of previous geologic, geophysical, geochemical, and hydrologic investigations of the Long Valley area to develop a generalized conceptual and mathematical model which describes the gross features of heat and fluid flow in the hydrothermal system. Cenozoic volcanism in the Long Valley region began about 3.2 m.y. (million years) ago and has continued intermittently until the present time. The major event that resulted in the formation of the Long Valley caldera took place about 0.7 m.y. ago with the eruption of 600 km 3 or more of Bishop Tuff of Pleistocene age, a rhyolitic ash flow, and subsequent collapse of the roof of the magma chamber along one or more steeply inclined ring fractures. Subsequent intracaldera volcanism and uplift of the west-central part of the caldera floor formed a subcircular resurgent dome about 10 km in diameter surrounded by a moat containing rhyolitic, rhyodacitic, and basaltic rocks ranging in age from 0.5 to 0.05 m.y. On the basis of gravity and seismic studies, we estimate an aver- age thickness of fill of 2.4 km above the precaldera granitic and metamorphic basement rocks. A continuous layer of densely welded Bishop Tuff overlies the basement rocks, with an average thickness of 1.4 km; the fill above the welded Bishop Tuff consists of intercalated volcanic flows and tuffs and fluvial and lacustrine deposits. Assuming the average grain density of the fill is between 2.45 and 2.65 g/cm 3 , we calculate the average bulk porosity of the total fill as from 0.11 to 0.21. Comparison of published values of porosity of the welded Bishop Tuff exposed southeast of the caldera with calculated values indicates average bulk porosity

  6. Roberts Bank: Ecological crucible of the Fraser River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Terri F.; Elner, Robert W.; O'Neill, Jennifer D.

    2013-08-01

    Roberts Bank, part of the Fraser River delta system on Canada's Pacific coast, is a dynamic estuarine environment supporting important fisheries as well as internationally significant populations of migratory shorebirds. The 8000 ha bank environment comprises a complex of riparian boundaries, intertidal marshes, mud and sand flats, eelgrass meadows, macroalgae and biofilms. Anthropogenic developments (a ferry causeway in 1961 and a port causeway in 1969) have been responsible for changes in tidal flow patterns, tidal elevation, sediment transport and the net expansion of eelgrass beds. The goals of the present study were to (1) directly compare geotechnical properties spanning each side of the coalport causeway, and (2) enhance our understanding of the intercauseway ecosystem under a high-resolution sampling design. Sediment properties (grain size, porosity, organic content, and chlorophyll) and biological communities (eelgrass, macrofauna (0.5-1.0 mm) and meiofauna (0.063-0.5 mm)) were surveyed in 1997 at three stations outside the intercauseway area and three lateral transects spanning the intercauseway tidal flat at tidal heights representing three different habitats: biofilm, Zostera japonica, and Zostera marina. A fine-silt organic-rich porous deposit was observed on the shoreward north side of the coalport causeway relative to the south counterpart, suggesting that consolidation and erosion processes could likely not keep pace with the deposition of Fraser River silt. High chlorophyll levels were found in the protected shoreward northern border of the ferry causeway where fine sands dominate and higher water transparency exists, owing to the redirection of the silt-laden river plume by the coalport causeway. Principle Components Analysis revealed a positive relationship between these porous, organic-rich sediments and cumacean abundance in all regions where eelgrass was absent, including the north side of the coalport causeway. Further, a positive

  7. Basic Education in the Lower Rio Grande Valley: Human Capital Development or a Colonial System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Patrick D.

    This report describes economic, social, and political characteristics of the lower Rio Grande Valley with implications for the educational system, and presents preliminary findings on how south Texas schools are integrating new immigrant Mexican students. The lower Rio Grande Valley comprises four Texas counties and northern Tamaulipas, Mexico.…

  8. Structural evolution of the east Sierra Valley system (Owens Valley and vicinity), California: a geologic and geophysical synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Calvin H.; Stone, Paul; Blakely, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    The tectonically active East Sierra Valley System (ESVS), which comprises the westernmost part of the Walker Lane-Eastern California Shear Zone, marks the boundary between the highly extended Basin and Range Province and the largely coherent Sierra Nevada-Great Valley microplate (SN-GVm), which is moving relatively NW. The recent history of the ESVS is characterized by oblique extension partitioned between NNW-striking normal and strike-slip faults oriented at an angle to the more northwesterly relative motion of the SN-GVm. Spatially variable extension and right-lateral shear have resulted in a longitudinally segmented valley system composed of diverse geomorphic and structural elements, including a discontinuous series of deep basins detected through analysis of isostatic gravity anomalies. Extension in the ESVS probably began in the middle Miocene in response to initial westward movement of the SN-GVm relative to the Colorado Plateau. At ca. 3-3.5 Ma, the SN-GVm became structurally separated from blocks directly to the east, resulting in significant basin-forming deformation in the ESVS. We propose a structural model that links high-angle normal faulting in the ESVS with coeval low-angle detachment faulting in adjacent areas to the east.

  9. Correlation of laboratory testing and actual operations for the West Valley supernatant treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D E; Bray, L A; Ross, W A; Ploetz, D K

    1989-04-01

    An ion exchange process which removes Cs-137 from the supernatant liquid associated with neutralized PUREX high-level waste at the West Valley Demonstration Project was developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. West Valley has now achieved initial operation of the supernatant treatment system, and results have confirmed the laboratory studies. This paper addresses the development of the predictions of system operations and the initial results of the system. 2 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Town of Chino Valley Municipal Water System Improvement Project FONSI and EA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Region 9 has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) describing the potential environmental impacts associated with, and the alternatives to, the proposed Water System Improvement Project in the town of China Valley, Arizona. This Finding of No Signi

  11. Fraser syndrome: affected siblings born to nonconsanguineous parents and diagnosed at autopsy.

    PubMed

    De Jong, Ann; Warren, Miranda; Rehrauer, William; Harter, Josephine; Baraboo, Melissa; Chandra, Sunita; Pauli, Richard M; Singer, Don B; Fritsch, Michael K

    2008-01-01

    Fraser syndrome (MIM 219000) is a rare genetic disorder with major features including cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and genital anomalies. We report 2 independently autopsied children of the same nonconsanguineous parents. The siblings exhibit similar clinical features, all of which are consistent with a diagnosis of Fraser syndrome. The gross and microscopic findings provide insight into the highly variable clinical presentation of Fraser syndrome. Molecular diagnostic studies of the index case failed to identify one of the known gene mutations in the FRAS1 and FREM2 genes associated with Fraser syndrome. This raises the possibility that other genes or undetected mutations in the FRAS1/FREM2 genes may cause Fraser syndrome.

  12. Ending the Reign of the Fraser Institute's School Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raptis, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The Fraser Institute "Report Card" of school rankings has won the hearts of parents and the press. For over a decade, the rankings have been particularly burdensome for low-ranking (usually low socio-economic status, high-poverty) schools when parents of high-achieving children move them to higher-ranking schools. In February 2010, after…

  13. Professor Barry Fraser's Contributions to Science Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Jill M.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I endeavour to convey the depth of Barry Fraser's contributions to science education research, including his tireless endeavours to promote and advance research, especially the field of learning environments, the realisation of his vision to create one of the largest doctoral programs in science and mathematics education in the…

  14. Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

    2003-08-14

    Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

  15. Modeling the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Agnese, F. A.; Faunt, C.C.; Hill, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    The development of a regional ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region in the southwestern United States is discussed in the context of the fourteen guidelines of Hill (1998). This application of the guidelines demonstrates how they may be used for model calibration and evaluation, and to direct further model development and data collection. Copyright ASCE 2004.

  16. Data network, collection, and analysis in the Diamond Valley flow system, central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knochenmus, Lari A.; Berger, David L.; Moreo, Michael T.; Smith, J. LaRue

    2011-01-01

    Future groundwater development and its effect on future municipal, irrigation, and alternative energy uses in the Diamond Valley flow system are of concern for officials in Eureka County, Nevada. To provide a better understanding of the groundwater resources, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Eureka County, commenced a multi-phase study of the Diamond Valley flow system in 2005. Groundwater development primarily in southern Diamond Valley has resulted in water-level declines since the 1960s ranging from less than 5 to 100 feet. Groundwater resources in the Diamond Valley flow system outside of southern Diamond Valley have been relatively undeveloped. Data collected during phase 2 of the study (2006-09) included micrometeorological data at 4 evapotranspiration stations, 3 located in natural vegetation and 1 located in an agricultural field; groundwater levels in 95 wells; water-quality constituents in aquifers and springs at 21 locations; lithologic information from 7 recently drilled wells; and geophysical logs from 3 well sites. This report describes what was accomplished during phase 2 of the study, provides the data collected, and presents the approaches to strengthen relations between evapotranspiration rates measured at micrometeorological stations and spatially distributed groundwater discharge. This report also presents the approach to improve delineation of areas of groundwater discharge and describes the current methodology used to improve the accuracy of spatially distributed groundwater discharge rates in the Diamond Valley flow system.

  17. Geothermal systems of the Mono Basin-Long Valley region, eastern California and western Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.T.; Flynn, T.; Chapman, R.H.; Trexler, D.T.; Chase, G.R.; Bacon, C.F.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The region that includes Mono Basin, Long Valley, the Bridgeport-Bodie Hills area, and Aurora, in eastern California and western Nevada was studied to determine the possible causes and interactions of the geothermal anomalies in the Mono Basin-Long Valley region as a whole. A special goal of the study was to locate possible shallow bodies of magma and to determine their influence on the hydrothermal systems in the region. (ACR)

  18. Glacial geomorphology of the Victoria Valley System, Ross Sea Region, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockheim, James G.; McLeod, Malcolm

    2013-07-01

    During the 2011-2012 austral summer, we had the opportunity to verify a surficial geology map prepared nearly 50 years ago for the Victoria Valley system (VVS), the largest of the McMurdo Dry Valleys. We used high-resolution landsat images and a digital elevation model to identify landforms and prepare detailed maps of each of the five valleys in the VVS, including lateral and end moraines, rock glaciers, gelifluction sheets, gravel ripples, and hummocky and ice-cored drifts. Our mapping suggests that the Bull drift is less extensive than previously thought, attains a maximum elevation of ~ 750 m in Balham and Barwick Valleys and the upper Bull Pass region, and does not occur in McKelvey Valley. We found Insel drift to 850 m elevation in eastern McKelvey Valley and upper Bull Pass and were able to trace Insel drift down Bull Pass where it becomes Peleus drift in Wright Valley. The Victoria Lower Glacier likely responded to grounding of ice in the Ross Embayment and was out-of-phase with alpine glaciers elsewhere in the VVS. We amplified and quantified Calkin's relative chronology and provide here our multiple-parameter relative chronology for the McMurdo Dry Valleys that is based on surface-boulder weathering, soil weathering, salt stage, degree of development of the desert pavement, and form of patterned ground. Except for Victoria Lower Valley, we correlate Packard drift with Taylor II drift (ca., 120 ka), Vida drift with Taylor III drift (ca., 300 ka), Bull drift with Taylor IVb drift (2.7-3.5 Ma, and Insel drift with Peleus drift (> 3.7 Ma, < 5.4 Ma). The lack of a strong correlation between soil salt stage and depth of visible salts with elevation leads us to question whether a high-level lake (ca., 200 m deep) existed in the VVS during the early Holocene.

  19. Evaluation of the hydrologic system and selected water-management alternatives in the Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danskin, Wesley R.

    1998-01-01

    The Owens Valley, a long, narrow valley along the east side of the Sierra Nevada in eastcentral California, is the main source of water for the city of Los Angeles. The city diverts most of the surface water in the valley into the Owens River?Los Angeles Aqueduct system, which transports the water more than 200 miles south to areas of distribution and use. Additionally, ground water is pumped or flows from wells to supplement the surface-water diversions to the river? aqueduct system. Pumpage from wells needed to supplement water export has increased since 1970, when a second aqueduct was put into service, and local residents have expressed concerns that the increased pumping may have a detrimental effect on the environment and the native vegetation (indigenous alkaline scrub and meadow plant communities) in the valley. Native vegetation on the valley floor depends on soil moisture derived from precipitation and from the unconfined part of a multilayered ground-water system. This report, which describes the evaluation of the hydrologic system and selected water-management alternatives, is one in a series designed to identify the effects that ground-water pumping has on native vegetation and evaluate alternative strategies to mitigate any adverse effects caused by pumping. The hydrologic system of the Owens Valley can be conceptualized as having three parts: (1) an unsaturated zone affected by precipitation and evapotranspiration; (2) a surface-water system composed of the Owens River, the Los Angeles Aqueduct, tributary streams, canals, ditches, and ponds; and (3) a saturated ground-water system contained in the valley fill. Analysis of the hydrologic system was aided by development of a ground-water flow model of the ?aquifer system,? which is defined as the most active part of the ground-water system and which includes nearly all of the Owens Valley except for the area surrounding the Owens Lake. The model was calibrated and verified for water years 1963?88 and

  20. Reconstruction of Unilateral Incomplete Cryptophthalmos in Fraser Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ann Q; Lee, Bradford W; Alameddine, Ramzi M; Korn, Bobby S; Kikkawa, Don O

    2015-03-25

    A full-term baby girl with Fraser syndrome was born with right incomplete cryptophthalmos. On examination, the globe was completely covered with skin with partially formed eyelids laterally. At 3 years of age, she underwent an evisceration with orbital implant and reconstruction of the eyelids and fornices using the pre-existing scleral remnant. Custom ocular prosthetic fitting was performed 5 weeks postoperatively. At 4 years follow up, she continued to successfully retain an ocular prosthesis.

  1. Fraser syndrome-oral manifestations and a dental care protocol.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Talita Lopes; de Sant'Anna, Giselle Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare genetic malformation with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance and an incidence of consanguinity ranging from 15% to 25%. A 5-year-old male patient who is a carrier of Fraser syndrome initiated treatment in the pediatric dentistry sector. The patient was fed parenterally since birth, experienced recurring bouts of chronic lung disease, and was referred to the pediatric dentistry sector by the medical team. Radiographic examination revealed the presence of all permanent teeth. Supragingival dental calculus, halitosis, and gingival inflammation were also observed. Dental calculus was removed by manual scraping, and chemotherapeutic agents were used, chlorhexidine 0,12%, chlorhexidine gel 2%, and PVP-I, to control the bacterial flora. The patient is still being monitored after an 8-year follow-up period, the complications associated with periodontal disease decreased, and since the initiation of treatment, the patient has not needed to be hospitalized because of chronic lung disease. This study reports the case of a patient diagnosed with Fraser syndrome and describes the clinical manifestations (general and oral).

  2. Fraser Syndrome-Oral Manifestations and a Dental Care Protocol

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Talita Lopes; de Sant'Anna, Giselle Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare genetic malformation with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance and an incidence of consanguinity ranging from 15% to 25%. A 5-year-old male patient who is a carrier of Fraser syndrome initiated treatment in the pediatric dentistry sector. The patient was fed parenterally since birth, experienced recurring bouts of chronic lung disease, and was referred to the pediatric dentistry sector by the medical team. Radiographic examination revealed the presence of all permanent teeth. Supragingival dental calculus, halitosis, and gingival inflammation were also observed. Dental calculus was removed by manual scraping, and chemotherapeutic agents were used, chlorhexidine 0,12%, chlorhexidine gel 2%, and PVP-I, to control the bacterial flora. The patient is still being monitored after an 8-year follow-up period, the complications associated with periodontal disease decreased, and since the initiation of treatment, the patient has not needed to be hospitalized because of chronic lung disease. This study reports the case of a patient diagnosed with Fraser syndrome and describes the clinical manifestations (general and oral). PMID:25587460

  3. Hydrogeologic Framework and Ground Water in Basin-Fill Deposits of the Diamond Valley Flow System, Central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tumbusch, Mary L.; Plume, Russell W.

    2006-01-01

    The Diamond Valley flow system, an area of about 3,120 square miles in central Nevada, consists of five hydrographic areas: Monitor, Antelope, Kobeh, and Diamond Valleys and Stevens Basin. Although these five areas are in a remote part of Nevada, local government officials and citizens are concerned that the water resources of the flow system eventually could be further developed for irrigation or mining purposes or potentially for municipal use outside the study area. In order to better understand the flow system, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with Eureka, Lander, and Nye Counties and the Nevada Division of Water Resources, is conducting a multi-phase study of the flow system. The principal aquifers of the Diamond Valley flow system are in basin-fill deposits that occupy structural basins comprised of carbonate rocks, siliciclastic sedimentary rocks, igneous intrusive rocks, and volcanic rocks. Carbonate rocks also function as aquifers, but their extent and interconnections with basin-fill aquifers are poorly understood. Ground-water flow in southern Monitor Valley is from the valley margins toward the valley axis and then northward to a large area of discharge by evapotranspiration (ET) that is formed south of a group of unnamed hills near the center of the valley. Ground-water flow from northern Monitor Valley, Antelope Valley, and northern and western parts of Kobeh Valley converges to an area of ground-water discharge by ET in central and eastern Kobeh Valley. Prior to irrigation development in the 1960s, ground-water flow in Diamond Valley was from valley margins toward the valley axis and then northward to a large discharge area at the north end of the valley. Stevens Basin is a small upland basin with internal drainage and is not connected with other parts of the flow system. After 40 years of irrigation pumping, a large area of ground-water decline has developed in southern Diamond Valley around the irrigated area. In this part of Diamond

  4. Variable presentation of Fraser syndrome in two fetuses and a novel mutation in FRAS1.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Shalini S; Salian, Smrithi; Shukla, Anju; Mathew, Mary; Girisha, Katta M

    2016-09-14

    We report on a consanguineous family with three pregnancies affected with Fraser syndrome. We note severe brachydactyly is a manifestation of Fraser syndrome and found a novel homozygous splice site variation c.3293-2A > T in FRAS1. We would like to highlight variable manifestations of Fraser syndrome and presence of oligohydramnios in the antenatal period often makes prenatal diagnosis clinically challenging.

  5. Alteration mineralogy of the Dixie Valley geothermal system, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N.; Benoit, D.

    1996-12-31

    Petrographic studies along the Stillwater fault zone in Dixie Valley, Nevada document a variety of overlapping alteration assemblages that represent different physical and chemical conditions. At depth in the northern portion of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, wairakite, illite-smectite, and chalcedonic quartz are present in the hanging wall where measured, static and flowing temperatures are close to 248{degrees}C. Although the presence of wairakite is consistent with the observed temperatures, both the illite-smectite and chalcedonic quartz suggest lower temperature conditions. In outcrop, samples from the footwall of the Stillwater fault contain quartz, kaolin, smectite, dolomite, biotite, and epidote. Crosscutting relationships indicate that quartz and kaolin postdate formation of older biotite and epidote veins. The superposition of lower temperature assemblages (kaolin, dolomite, smectite) upon higher temperature minerals (biotite, epidote) characterizes the alteration in the footwall, whereas, the superposition of higher temperature minerals (wairakite) upon lower temperature phases (chalcedonic quartz, illite-smectite) is characteristic of the alteration in the geothermal reservoir within the hanging wall. This retrograde and prograde progression of alteration should be expected along this active normal fault as the footwall is uplifted and exhumed through time, and simultaneously, the hanging wall is down dropped.

  6. Late quaternary faulting along the Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system, California and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Brogan, G.E.; Kellogg, K.S.; Terhune, C.L.; Slemmons, D.B.

    1991-12-31

    The Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system, in California and Nevada, has a variety of impressive late Quaternary neotectonic features that record a long history of recurrent earthquake-induced faulting. Although no neotectonic features of unequivocal historical age are known, paleoseismic features from multiple late Quaternary events of surface faulting are well developed throughout the length of the system. Comparison of scarp heights to amount of horizontal offset of stream channels and the relationships of both scarps and channels to the ages of different geomorphic surfaces demonstrate that Quaternary faulting along the northwest-trending Furnace Creek fault zone is predominantly right lateral, whereas that along the north-trending Death Valley fault zone is predominantly normal. These observations are compatible with tectonic models of Death Valley as a northwest- trending pull-apart basin.

  7. Global Positioning System measurements of strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley, California - 1986-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in southern California from 1986 to 1989 indicate considerable strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley. Displacements are computed at 29 stations in and near the valley from 1986 to 1988, and at 11 sites from 1988 to 1989. The earlier measurements indicate 5.9 =/- 1.0 cm/yr right-lateral differential velocity across the valley, although the data are heavily influenced by the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Some measurements, especially the east-trending displacements, are suspects for large errors. The 1988 to 1989 GPS displacements are best modeled by 5.2 =/- 0.9 cm/yr of valley crossing deformation, but rates calculated from conventional geodetic measurements (3.4 to 4.3 cm/yr) fit the data nearly as well. There is evidence from GPS and Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations that the present slip rate along the southern San Andreas fault is smaller than the long-term geologic estimate, suggesting a lower earthquake potential than is currently assumed. Correspondingly, a higher earthquake potential is indicated for the San Jacinto fault. The Imperial Valley GPS sites form part of a 183 station network in southern California and northern Baja California, which spans a cross-section of the North American-Pacific plate boundary.

  8. Water-quality characteristics and ground water quantity of the Fraser River Watershed, Grand County, Colorado, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauch, Nancy J.; Bails, Jeffrey B.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Grand County Board of County Commissioners, conducted a 4-year study to assess ground- and surface-water-quality conditions and ground-water quantity in the 302-square-mile Fraser River watershed in north-central Colorado. The Fraser River flows north about 28 miles from the headwaters near the Continental Divide, through the towns of Winter Park, Fraser, Tabernash, and Granby, and is one of the major tributaries to the Upper Colorado River. Increasing urban development, as well as the seasonal influx of tourists, is placing more demands on the water resources in the Fraser River watershed. A ground-water sampling network of 11 wells was established to represent different aquifer systems (alluvial, Troublesome Formation, Precambrian granite), land uses (urban, nonurban), and areas with or without individual septic disposal system use. The well network was sampled for ground-water quality on a semiannual basis from August 1998 through September 2001. The sampling included field properties and the collection of water samples for analysis of major ions, trace elements, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, bacteria, methylene blue active substances, and radon-222. One surface-water site, on the Fraser River just downstream from the town of Tabernash, Colorado, was sampled bimonthly from August 1998 through September 2001 to assess the cumulative effects of natural and human processes on water quality in the upper part of the Fraser River watershed. Surface-water-quality sampling included field properties and the collection of water-quality samples for analysis of major ions, trace elements, nutrients, organic carbon, and bacteria. Ground water was a calcium-bicarbonate type water and is suitable as a drinking-water, domestic, municipal, industrial, and irrigation source. In general, no widespread ground-water-quality problems were indicated. All pH values and concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, fluoride

  9. A 10-year plan to study the aquifer system of Indian Wells Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipinski, Paul; Knochenmus, Darwin D.

    1981-01-01

    Water needs of the population of Indian Wells Valley, Calif., must be met through further development of ground-water resources. Studies show that annual ground-water pumpage there has increased since 1945 and has exceeded mean annual recharge since 1966. Continued and increased stress on the aquifer system of the valley is expected because population in the valley is predicted to double by 1998 and triple by 2020, based on 1977 population figures. The U.S. Geological Survey proposes a 10-year program to develop a data base to aid in evaluation of future water-management alternatives. A study plan has been developed that describes present and potential problems and objectives of the program, and outlines work items to be undertaken in the study area. (USGS)

  10. Chemical and isotopic prediction of aquifer temperatures in the geothermal system at Long Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Sorey, M.L.; Mariner, R.H.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1979-01-01

    Temperatures of aquifers feeding thermal springs and wells in Long Valley, California, estimated using silica and Na-K-Ca geothermometers and warm spring mixing models, range from 160/dg to about 220??C. This information was used to construct a diagram showing enthalpy-chloride relations for the various thermal waters in the Long Valley region. The enthalpy-chloride information suggests that a 282 ?? 10??C aquifer with water containing about 375 mg chloride per kilogram of water is present somewhere deep in the system. That deep water would be related to ??? 220??C Casa Diablo water by mixing with cold water, and to Hot Creek water by first boiling with steam loss and then mixing with cold water. Oxygen and deuterium isotopic data are consistent with that interpretation. An aquifer at 282??C with 375 mg/kg chloride implies a convective heat flow in Long Valley of 6.6 ?? 107 cal/s. ?? 1979.

  11. Global positioning system surveying to monitor land subsidence in Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ikehara, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    A subsidence research program began in 1985 to document the extent and magnitude of land subsidence in Sacramento Valley, California, an area of about 15 600 km2m, using Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying. In addition to periodic conventional spirit levelling, an examination was made of the changes in GPS-derived ellipsoidal height differences (summary differences) between pairs of adjacent bench marks in central Sacramento Valley from 1986 to 1989. The average rates of land subsidence in the southern Sacramento Valley for the past several decades were determined by comparing GPS-derived orthometric heights with historic published elevations. A maximum average rate of 0.053 m year-1 (0.90 m in 17 years) of subsidence has been measured. -Author

  12. Hydrogeologic framework of the Wood River Valley aquifer system, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.; Adkins, Candice B.

    2012-01-01

    The Wood River Valley contains most of the population of Blaine County and the cities of Sun Valley, Ketchum, Hailey, and Bellevue. This mountain valley is underlain by the alluvial Wood River Valley aquifer system, which consists primarily of a single unconfined aquifer that underlies the entire valley, an underlying confined aquifer that is present only in the southernmost valley, and the confining unit that separates them. The entire population of the area depends on groundwater for domestic supply, either from domestic or municipal-supply wells, and rapid population growth since the 1970s has caused concern about the long-term sustainability of the groundwater resource. As part of an ongoing U.S. Geological Survey effort to characterize the groundwater resources of the Wood River Valley, this report describes the hydrogeologic framework of the Wood River Valley aquifer system. Although most of the Wood River Valley aquifer system is composed of Quaternary-age sediments and basalts of the Wood River Valley and its tributaries, older igneous, sedimentary, or metamorphic rocks that underlie these Quaternary deposits also are used for water supply. It is unclear to what extent these rocks are hydraulically connected to the main part of Wood River Valley aquifer system and thus whether they constitute separate aquifers. Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in and near the study area that produce water to wells and springs are the Phi Kappa and Trail Creek Formations (Ordovician and Silurian), the Milligen Formation (Devonian), and the Sun Valley Group including the Wood River Formation (Pennsylvanian-Permian) and the Dollarhide Formation (Permian). These sedimentary rocks are intruded by granitic rocks of the Late Cretaceous Idaho batholith. Eocene Challis Volcanic Group rocks overlie all of the older rocks (except where removed by erosion). Miocene Idavada Volcanics are found in the southern part of the study area. Most of these rocks have been folded, faulted, and

  13. Potential for a significant deep basin geothermal system in Tintic Valley, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwick, C.; Kirby, S.

    2014-12-01

    The combination of regionally high heat flow, deep basins, and permeable reservoir rocks in the eastern Great Basin may yield substantial new geothermal resources. We explore a deep sedimentary basin geothermal prospect beneath Tintic Valley in central Utah using new 2D and 3D models coupled with existing estimates of heat flow, geothermometry, and shallow hydrologic data. Tintic Valley is a sediment-filled basin bounded to the east and west by bedrock mountain ranges where heat-flow values vary from 85 to over 240 mW/m2. Based on modeling of new and existing gravity data, a prominent 30 mGal low indicates basin fill thickness may exceed 2 km. The insulating effect of relatively low thermal conductivity basin fill in Tintic Valley, combined with typical Great Basin heat flow, predict temperatures greater than 150 °C at 3 km depth. The potential reservoir beneath the basin fill is comprised of Paleozoic carbonate and clastic rocks. The hydrology of the Tintic Valley is characterized by a shallow, cool groundwater system that recharges along the upper reaches of the basin and discharges along the valley axis and to a series of wells. The east mountain block is warm and dry, with groundwater levels just above the basin floor and temperatures >50 °C at depth. The west mountain block contains a shallow, cool meteoric groundwater system. Fluid temperatures over 50 °C are sufficient for direct-use applications, such as greenhouses and aquaculture, while temperatures exceeding 140°C are suitable for binary geothermal power plants. The geologic setting and regionally high heat flow in Tintic Valley suggest a geothermal resource capable of supporting direct-use geothermal applications and binary power production could be present.

  14. Fraser syndrome: epidemiological study in a European population.

    PubMed

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria; Garne, Ester; Wellesley, Diana; Calzolari, Elisa; Dolk, Helen; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Bergman, Jorieke; Bianca, Sebastiano; Boyd, Patricia A; Draper, Elizabeth S; Gatt, Miriam; Haeusler, Martin; Khoshnood, Babak; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; McDonnell, Bob; Pierini, Anna; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Stone, David; Tenconi, Romano

    2013-05-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network of birth defect registries. Between January 1990 and December 2008, we identified 26 cases of Fraser syndrome in the monitored population of 12,886,464 births (minimal estimated prevalence of 0.20 per 100,000 or 1:495,633 births). Most cases (18/26; 69%) were registered in the western part of Europe, where the mean prevalence is 1 in 230,695 births, compared to the prevalence 1 in 1,091,175 for the rest of Europe (P = 0.0003). Consanguinity was present in 7/26 (27%) families. Ten (38%) cases were liveborn, 14 (54%) pregnancies were terminated following prenatal detection of a serious anomaly, and 2 (8%) were stillborn. Eye anomalies were found in 20/24 (83%), syndactyly in 14/24 (58%), and laryngeal anomalies in 5/24 (21%) patients. Ambiguous genitalia were observed in 3/24 (13%) cases. Bilateral renal agenesis was present in 12/24 (50%) and unilateral in 4/24 (17%) cases. The frequency of anorectal anomalies was particularly high (42%). Most cases of Fraser syndrome (85%) are suspected prenatally, often due to the presence of the association of renal agenesis and cryptophthalmos. In the European population, a high proportion (82%) of pregnancies is terminated, thus reducing the live birth prevalence to a third of the total prevalence rate.

  15. Geochemical and Isotopic Interpretations of Groundwater Flow in the Oasis Valley Flow System, Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Thomas; F.C. Benedict, Jr.; T.P. Rose; R.L. Hershey; J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman; I.M. Farnham; K.H. Johannesson; A.K. Singh; K.J. Stetzenbach; G.B. Hudson; J.M. Kenneally; G.F. Eaton; D.K. Smith

    2003-01-08

    This report summarizes the findings of a geochemical investigation of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater flow system in southwestern Nevada. It is intended to provide geochemical data and interpretations in support of flow and contaminant transport modeling for the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

  16. Conejo Valley Unified School District Master Plan for an Educational Results Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Dorothy

    The Conejo Valley (CA) Unified School District Educational Results Information System (ERIS), a generalized District master program assessment plan to obtain results information for decision-makers at all levels, has been developed. This plan establishes guidelines, evaluates the current status of the use of educational results information and…

  17. West Valley transfer cart control system design description. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.C.; Crutcher, R.I.; Halliwell, J.W.; Hileman, M.S.; Moore, M.R.; Nodine, R.N.; Ruppel, F.R.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1993-01-01

    Detail design of the control system for the West Valley Nuclear Services Vitrification Facility transfer cart has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report documents the requirements and describes the detail design of that equipment and control software. Copies of significant design documents including analysis and testing reports and design drawings are included in the Appendixes.

  18. Cataloging Before and After OCLC. Illinois Valley Library System OCLC Experimental Project. Report No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bills, Linda G.

    A project was conducted from 1980 to 1982 to determine the costs and benefits of OCLC use in 29 small and medium-sized member libraries of the Illinois Valley Library System (IVLS). Academic, school, public, and special libraries participated by recording the time and staffing levels used for and the cost of OCLC and pre-OCLC cataloging (by…

  19. 76 FR 70062 - Fraser River Sockeye and Pink Salmon Fisheries; Inseason Orders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... Pink Salmon Fisheries; Inseason Orders AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... orders of the Commission's Fraser River Panel for U.S. sockeye and pink salmon fisheries in the Fraser... and pink salmon Tribal and non-Tribal commercial fishing unless opened by Panel orders that are...

  20. Fused pulmonary lobes is a rat model of human Fraser syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyozumi, Daiji; Nakano, Itsuko; Takahashi, Ken L.; Hojo, Hitoshi; Aoyama, Hiroaki; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Fused pulmonary lobes (fpl) mutant rats exhibit similar phenotypes to Fraser syndrome. {yields} The fpl gene harbors a nonsense mutation in Fraser syndrome-associated gene Frem2. {yields} Fpl mutant is defined as a first model of human Fraser syndrome in rats. -- Abstract: Fused pulmonary lobes (fpl) is a mutant gene that is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and causes various developmental defects, including fusion of pulmonary lobes, and eyelid and digit anomalies in rats. Since these developmental defects closely resemble those observed in patients with Fraser syndrome, a recessive multiorgan disorder, and its model animals, we investigated whether the abnormal phenotypes observed in fpl/fpl mutant rats are attributable to a genetic disorder similar to Fraser syndrome. At the epidermal basement membrane in fpl/fpl mutant neonates, the expression of QBRICK, a basement membrane protein whose expression is attenuated in Fraser syndrome model mice, was greatly diminished compared with control littermates. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses of Fraser syndrome-related genes revealed that Frem2 transcripts were markedly diminished in QBRICK-negative embryos. Genomic DNA sequencing of the fpl/fpl mutant identified a nonsense mutation that introduced a stop codon at serine 2005 in Frem2. These findings indicate that the fpl mutant is a rat model of human Fraser syndrome.

  1. Holocene hillslope development in glacially formed valley systems in Nordfjord, western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laute, Katja; Beylich, Achim A.

    2013-04-01

    Large areas of the Norwegian fjord landscapes are covered by hillslopes that reflect the influence of glacial inheritance from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The focus of this paper is two-fold: (1) analyze the spatio-temporal variability of relevant denudational slope processes and process intensities over the Holocene; and (2) detect Holocene modification of the glacial valley morphometry. Research was performed on hillslope systems within two steep, parabolic-shaped and glacier-fed tributary valleys, Erdalen and Bødalen located on the western side of the Jostedalsbreen ice cap in western Norway. Orthophoto delineation, high resolution mapping (TLS), detailed geomorphological information and spatial data analysis were combined with dating techniques and geophysical investigations. Calculated Holocene rockwall retreat rates at selected slope test sites range from 0.38 to 0.67 mm yr- 1, with a mean value of 0.53 mm yr- 1. Slightly higher values were found in Erdalen, with a mean rockwall retreat rate of 0.57 mm yr- 1 compared to 0.50 mm yr- 1 in Bødalen. Valley-wide Holocene rockwall retreat rates of 0.38-0.50 mm yr- 1 are consistent with other estimates of Holocene rockwall retreat rates in cold mountain environments. It is shown that the glacial inheritance of topography is the most important factor controlling valley development since the LGM and that sediment storage capacity is primarily conditioned by valley morphometry. Compared to contemporary rates, the results indicate enhanced denudation activity and intensity immediately following deglaciation and during the 'Little Ice Age'. The overall tendency of landscape development is postglacial widening of the parabolic-shaped valley morphometry through rockwall retreat with associated debris accumulation beneath rockwalls. As a result, the glacially sculpted topography has not yet adapted to denudational processes acting under Holocene environmental conditions.

  2. Clinical manifestations and oral findings in Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Michele Baffi; Lima, Luciana Monti; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; de Paula, Andréia Bolzan; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    This article is the first known case report of Fraser syndrome in the dental literature. Its purpose was to present the clinical manifestations, oral findings, and dental treatment of a 14-year, 10-month-old female patient. Fraser syndrome is a rare recessive autosomal genetic disorder characterized by multisystemic malformation, usually comprising cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and renal defects. The child presented with: (1) hydrocephaly; (2) face asymmetry; (3) low-inserted ears; (4) flat nose bridge; (5) cryptophthalmos; (6) bilateral absence of eyeballs; (7) hypertelorism; (8) syndactyly on the left fingers and toes; (9) skeletal defects; and (10) lower limb asymmetry. The intraoral examination revealed: (1) complete primary denture; (2) malocclusion; (3) tooth crowding; (4) ogival palate; (5) normal labial frena; (6) absence of lingual frenum (not compromising the tongue movements); (7) parched lips; (8) supragingival calculus adhered to all tooth surfaces; and (9) moderate gingivitis. The dental treatment consisted of periodic monitoring of the patient's oral health status and supragingival scaling associated with topical applications of 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate gel at 2-week intervals to reduce gingivitis.

  3. Testing of the West Valley Vitrification Facility transfer cart control system

    SciTech Connect

    Halliwell, J.W.; Bradley, E.C.

    1995-02-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has designed and tested the control system for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Facility transfer cart. The transfer cart will transfer canisters of vitrified high-level waste remotely within the Vitrification Facility. The control system operates the cart under battery power by wireless control. The equipment includes cart-mounted control electronics, battery charger, control pendants, engineer`s console, and facility antennas. Testing was performed in several phases of development: (1) prototype equipment was built and tested during design, (2) board-level testing was then performed at ORNL during fabrication, and (3) system-level testing was then performed by ORNL at the fabrication subcontractor`s facility for the completed cart system. These tests verified (1) the performance of the cart relative to design requirements and (2) operation of various built-in cart features. The final phase of testing is planned to be conducted during installation at the West Valley Vitrification Facility.

  4. Overview of the West Valley Vitrification Facility transfer cart control system

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.C.; Rupple, F.R.

    1993-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has designed the control system for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Facility transfer cart. The transfer cart will transfer canisters of vitrified high-level waste remotely within the Vitrification Facility. The control system will operate the cart under battery power by wireless control. The equipment includes cart mounted control electronics, battery charger, control pendants, engineer's console, and facility antennas.

  5. Overview of the West Valley Vitrification Facility transfer cart control system

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.C.; Rupple, F.R.

    1993-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has designed the control system for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Facility transfer cart. The transfer cart will transfer canisters of vitrified high-level waste remotely within the Vitrification Facility. The control system will operate the cart under battery power by wireless control. The equipment includes cart mounted control electronics, battery charger, control pendants, engineer`s console, and facility antennas.

  6. The Martain drainage system and the origin of valley networks and fretted channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Michael H.

    1995-04-01

    Outflow channels provide strong evidence for abundant water near the Martian surface and an extensive groundwater system. Collapse of the surface into some channels suggests massive subsurface erosion and/or solution in addition to erosion by flow across the surface. Flat floors, steep walls, longitudinal striae and ridges, downstream deflection of striae from channel walls, and lack of river channels suggest that fretted channels form dominantly by mass wasting. A two-stage process is proposed. In the first stage, extension of valleys heads is favored by seepage of groundwater into debris shed from slopes. The debris moves downstream, aided by interstitial groundwater at the base of the debris, possibly with high pore pressures. In the second stage, because of climate change or a lower heat flow, groundwater can no longer seep into the debris flows in the valleys, their movement almost stops, and more viscous ice-lubricated debris aprons form. Almost all uplands at elevations greater than +1 km are dissected by valley networks, although the drainage densities are orders of magnitude less than is typical for the Earth. The valley networks resemble terrestrial river systems in planimetric shape, but U-shaped and rectangular-shaped cross sections, levee- like peripheral ridges, median ridges, patterns of branching and rejoining, and flat floors without river channels suggest that the networks may not be true analogs to terrestrial river valleys. It is proposed that they, like the fretted channels, formed mainly by mass wasting, aided by groundwater seepage into the mass-wasted debris. Movements of only millimeters to centimeters per year are needed to explain the channel lengths. Most valley formation ceased early at low latitudes because of progressive dehydration of the near surface, the result of sublimation of water and/or drainage of groundwater to regions of lower elevations. Valley formation persisted to later dates where aided by steep slopes, as on crater

  7. Hydrogeology of the Helena Valley-fill aquifer system, west-central Montana. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Briar, D.W.; Madison, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The report, which presents the study results, describes the hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer system. Specific objectives were to: describe the geometry and the hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer system; define the potentiometric surface and the direction of ground-water flow; locate and quantify sources of ground-water recharge and discharge including surface- and ground-water interactions; and characterize the water quality in terms of susceptibility of the aquifer system to contamination and in terms of concentrations, distribution, and sources of major ions, trace elements, and organic compounds. The results of the study will be useful to the development of a comprehensive management program for the use and protection of the ground-water resources of the Helena Valley.

  8. The Nature of Extension on the Western Edge of the Basin and Range: Evolution of the Surprise Valley Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surpless, B.; Egger, A. E.

    2006-12-01

    The Warner Range is a major west-tilted fault block in northeastern California bound on its eastern side by the Surprise Valley normal fault system, which has accommodated a minimum of 3 km of uplift. The fault system separates the northeastern Basin and Range Province on the east, which has undergone 10-15% extension since the Miocene, from the Modoc Plateau to the west, a relatively unextended region with a thick sequence of flat-lying Pliocene and younger volcanic rocks. Although no major earthquakes have occurred along the fault system in historic times, significant Quaternary fault scarps, ~3 Ma U-Th/He ages, and trenching suggest that the system is still active, and recently published GPS data suggest ongoing extension and right- lateral deformation across the region. Thus, the Surprise Valley fault system is ideally located to gain insight into extensional processes at the edge of the Basin and Range province and to reveal potential seismic hazard. Dip-slip displacement along the Surprise Valley fault system decreases toward the system's north and south terminations. The northern termination is complicated by the Fandango Valley, a northwest-trending, graben- like structure that cuts across the Warner Range at an oblique angle. South of the Fandango Valley, Eocene to Miocene volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks in the range dip ~25 degrees to the west, and the east- dipping Surprise Valley fault system bounds the east side of the range. North of the valley, Miocene age volcanic rocks in the range dip gently to the east, and the dominant normal fault system is west-dipping and bounds the west side of the range. These two significant normal fault systems overlap at the latitude of the Fandango Valley, suggesting that the structure is an antithetic accommodation zone, but the Valley's northwest-trending orientation is orthogonal to that expected for an accommodation zone controlled exclusively by the propagation of oppositely-dipping normal faults. It is possible

  9. Resistivity structure and geochemistry of the Jigokudani Valley hydrothermal system, Mt. Tateyama, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kaori; Kanda, Wataru; Tanbo, Toshiya; Ohba, Takeshi; Ogawa, Yasuo; Takakura, Shinichi; Nogami, Kenji; Ushioda, Masashi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Saito, Zenshiro; Matsunaga, Yasuo

    2016-10-01

    This study clarifies the hydrothermal system of Jigokudani Valley near Mt. Tateyama volcano in Japan by using a combination of audio-frequency magnetotelluric (AMT) survey and hot-spring water analysis in order to assess the potential of future phreatic eruptions in the area. Repeated phreatic eruptions in the area about 40,000 years ago produced the current valley morphology, which is now an active solfatara field dotted with hot springs and fumaroles indicative of a well-developed hydrothermal system. The three-dimensional (3D) resistivity structure of the hydrothermal system was modeled by using the results of an AMT survey conducted at 25 locations across the valley in 2013-2014. The model suggests the presence of a near-surface highly conductive layer of < 50 m in thickness across the entire valley, which is interpreted as a cap rock layer. Immediately below the cap rock is a relatively resistive body interpreted as a gas reservoir. Field measurements of temperature, pH, and electrical conductivity (EC) were taken at various hot springs across the valley, and 12 samples of hot-spring waters were analyzed for major ion chemistry and H2O isotopic ratios. All hot-spring waters had low pH and could be categorized into three types on the basis of the Cl-/SO 42 - concentration ratio, with all falling largely on a mixing line between magmatic fluids and local meteoric water (LMW). The geochemical analysis suggests that the hydrothermal system includes a two-phase zone of vapor-liquid. A comparison of the resistivity structure and the geochemically inferred structure suggests that a hydrothermal reservoir is present at a depth of approximately 500 m, from which hot-spring water differentiates into the three observed types. The two-phase zone appears to be located immediately beneath the cap rock structure. These findings suggest that the hydrothermal system of Jigokudani Valley exhibits a number of factors that could trigger a future phreatic eruption.

  10. Mutation analysis of the FRAS1 gene demonstrates new mutations in a propositus with Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, A; Li, C; Sherr, E H; Chudley, A E

    2006-09-15

    Fraser syndrome (OMIM 219000) is a rare, autosomal recessive condition with classical features of cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, ambiguous genitalia, laryngeal, and genitourinary malformations, oral clefting and mental retardation. Mutations causing loss of function of the FRAS1 gene have been demonstrated in five patients with Fraser syndrome. However, no phenotype-genotype correlation was established and there was evidence for genetic heterogeneity. Fraser syndrome is rare and the FRAS1 gene has 75 exons, complicating mutation screening in affected patients. We have screened two patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for Fraser syndrome and three patients with related phenotypes (two patients with Manitoba oculotrichoanal syndrome and one patient with unilateral cryptophthalmos and labial fusion) for mutations in FRAS1 to increase the molecular genetic data in patients with Fraser syndrome and related conditions. We report two new mutations in a patient with Fraser syndrome, a frameshift mutation and a deletion of two amino acids that we consider pathogenic as both alter the NG2-like domain of the protein. Although we are still unable to clarify a phenotype-genotype relationship in Fraser syndrome, our data add to the list of mutations associated with this syndrome.

  11. Ground-water hydrology of Ogden Valley and surrounding area, eastern Weber County, UT, and simulation of ground-water flow in the Valley-fill aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Avery, Charles

    1994-01-01

    The ground-water resources in Ogden Valley, eastern Weber County, Utah, were the subject of a study to provide a better understanding of the hydrologic system in the valley and to estimate the hydrologic effects of future ground-water development. The study area included the drainage basin of the Ogden River upstream from Pineview Reservoir dam and the drainage basin of Wheeler Creek. Ogden Valley and the surrounding area are underlain by rocks that range in age from Precambrian to Quaternary.The consolidated rocks that transmit and yield the most water in the area surrounding Ogden Valley are the Paleozoic carbonate rocks and the Wasatch Formation of Tertiary age. Much of the recharge to the consolidated rocks is from snowmelt that infiltrates the Wasatch Formation, which underlies a large part of the study area. Discharge from the consolidated rocks is by streams, evapotranspiration, springs, subsurface outflow, and pumping from wells. Water in the consolidated rocks is a calcium bicarbonate type and has a dissolved-solids concentration of less than 250 milligrams per liter.

  12. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer

    Joe Iovenitti

    2013-05-15

    The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodlogy calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal systems in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. This Baseline Conceptual Model report summarizes the results of the first three project tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data, (2) design and populate a GIS database, and (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km. It presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  13. In vitro propagation of fraser photinia using Azospirillum-mediated root development.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Berta E; Larraburu, Ezequiel E

    2013-01-01

    Fraser photinia (Photinia × fraseri Dress.) is a woody plant of high ornamental value. The traditional propagation system for photinia is by rooting apical cuttings using highly concentrated auxin treatments. However, photinia micropropagation is an effective alternative to traditional in vivo propagation which is affected by the seasonal supply of cuttings, the long time required to obtain new plants, and the difficulties in rooting some clones.A protocol for in vitro propagation of fraser photinia using the plant growth-promoting ability of some rhizobacteria is described here. Bacterial inoculation is a new tool in micropropagation protocols that improves plant development in in vitro culture. Shoots culture on a medium containing MS macro- and microelements, Gamborg's vitamins (BM), N (6)-benzyladenine (BA, 11.1 μM), and gibberellic acid (1.3 μM) produce well-established explants. Proliferation on BM medium supplemented with 4.4 μM BA results in four times the number of shoots per initial shoot that develops monthly. Consequently, there is a continuous supply of plant material since shoot production is independent of season. Azospirillum brasilense inoculation, after 49.2 μM indole-3-butyric acid pulse treatment, stimulates early rooting of photinia shoots and produces significant increase in root fresh and dry weights, root surface area, and shoot fresh and dry weights in comparison with controls. Furthermore, inoculated in vitro photinia plants show anatomical and morphological changes that might lead to better adaptation in ex vitro conditions after transplanting, compared with the control plants.

  14. The integrated melter off-gas treatment systems at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, R.F.

    1991-12-01

    The West Valley Demonstration project was established by an act of Congress in 1980 to solidify the high level radioactive liquid wastes produced from operation of the Western New York Nuclear Services Center from 1966 to 1972. The waste will be solidified as borosilicate glass. This report describes the functions, the controlling design criteria, and the resulting design of the melter off-gas treatment systems.

  15. Fraser syndrome with laryngeal webs: Report of two cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Farzad; Ahmadi, Aslan; Zobairy, Hosna; Bakhti, Sepideh; Hirbod, Hengameh; Safdarian, Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and laryngeal atresia. Although laryngeal webs occur uncommonly, they are the main cause of death in the first week of life in these patients. In this paper, we report two cases of Fraser syndrome with laryngeal webs. One of them was a twelve-year-old girl, primarily diagnosed with a supraglottic laryngeal web. In the course of treatment, a second web was also identified at the level of vocal cords, which is to our knowledge the first case of Fraser syndrome with two laryngeal webs in different levels.

  16. Professor Barry Fraser's contributions to science education research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, Jill M.

    2011-09-01

    In this article, I endeavour to convey the depth of Barry Fraser's contributions to science education research, including his tireless endeavours to promote and advance research, especially the field of learning environments, the realisation of his vision to create one of the largest doctoral programs in science and mathematics education in the world, his leadership capacity in terms of guiding and leading an internationally renowned centre and large-scale cross-national and cross-cultural studies, his dedication towards human capacity building in Africa, Asia and elsewhere, his capacity as a mentor and editor that have seen the publication of numerous journal articles and books and the ongoing success of science education research journals.

  17. The genetics of Fraser syndrome and the blebs mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Ian; Scambler, Peter

    2005-10-15

    Fraser syndrome is a recessive multisystem disorder characterized by embryonic epidermal blistering, cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, renal defects and a range of other developmental abnormalities. More than 17 years ago, the family of four mapped mouse blebs mutants was proposed as models of this disorder, given their striking phenotypic overlaps. In the last few years, these loci have been cloned, uncovering a family of three large extracellular matrix proteins and an intracellular adapter protein which are required for normal epidermal adhesion early in development. The proteins have also been shown to play a crucial role in the development and homeostasis of the kidney. We review the cloning and characterization of these genes and explore the consequences of their loss.

  18. Measured performance results: low-cost solar water heating systems in the San Luis Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher, J.

    1983-01-01

    The measured performance of seven low-cost solar water heating systems in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado is summarized. During the summer and fall of 1981, SERI monitored a variety of low-cost solar water heating system designs and components. Five systems had site-built collectors, and four included low-cost tank-in-jacket heat exchanger/storage tank components. Two were air-to-water systems. The five liquid-based systems included a drain-down design, a propylene glycol-charged thermosiphon system, and three pumped-glycol systems. The pumped-liquid systems performed the best, with system efficiencies greater than 20% and solar fractions between 40% and 70%. Tjhe air-to-water systems did not perform as well because of leakage in the collectors and heat exchangers. The thermosiphon system performed at lower efficiency because the collector flows were low.

  19. Impacts of a Rapidly Declining Mountain Snowpack on Streamflow Timing in Canada's Fraser River Basin.

    PubMed

    Kang, Do Hyuk; Gao, Huilin; Shi, Xiaogang; Islam, Siraj Ul; Déry, Stephen J

    2016-01-27

    With its headwaters in the water towers of the western Cordillera of North America, the Fraser River is one of the continent's mightiest rivers by annual flows, supplies vital freshwater resources to populous downstream locations, and sustains the world's largest stocks of sockeye salmon along with four other salmon species. Here we show the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model's ability to reproduce accurately observed trends in daily streamflow for the Fraser River's main stem and six of its major tributaries over 1949-2006 when air temperatures rose by 1.4 °C while annual precipitation amounts remained stable. Rapidly declining mountain snowpacks and earlier melt onsets result in a 10-day advance of the Fraser River's spring freshet with subsequent reductions in summer flows when up-river salmon migrations occur. Identification of the sub-basins driving the Fraser River's most significant changes provides a measure of seasonal predictability of future floods or droughts in a changing climate.

  20. Shallow Sub-Permafrost Groundwater Systems In A Buried Fjord: Taylor Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, N.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Auken, E.; Mikucki, J.

    2014-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV), Antarctica, represent a unique geologic setting where permanent lakes, ephemeral streams, and subglacial waters influence surface hydrology in a cold polar desert. Past research suggested that the MDV are underlain by several hundreds of meters of permafrost. Here, we present data collected from an Airborne EM (AEM) resistivity sensor flown over the MDV during the 2011-12 austral summer. A focus of our survey was over the Taylor Glacier where saline, iron-rich subglacial fluid releases at the glacier snout at a feature known as Blood Falls, and over Taylor Valley, where a series of isolated lakes lie between Taylor Glacier and the Ross Sea. Our data show that in Taylor Valley there are extensive areas of low resistivity, interpreted as hypersaline brines, beneath a relatively thin layer of high resistivity material, interpreted as dry- or ice-cemented permafrost. These hypersaline brines remain liquid at temperatures well below 0°C due to their salinity. They appear to be contained within the sedimentary fill deposited in Taylor Valley when it was still a fjord. This brine system continues up valley and has a subglacial extension beneath Taylor Glacier, where it may provide the source that feeds Blood Falls. By categorizing the resistivity measurements according to surficial land cover, we are able to distinguish between ice, permafrost, lake water, and seawater based on characteristic resistivity distributions. Furthermore, this technique shows that areas of surface permafrost become increasingly conductive (brine-filled) with depth, whereas the large lakes exhibit taliks that extend through the entire thickness of the permafrost. The subsurface brines represent a large, unstudied and potentially connected hydrogeologic system, in which subsurface flows may help transfer water and nutrients between lakes in the MDV and into the Ross Sea. Such a system is a potential habitat for extremophile life, similar to that already detected in

  1. Fish vs. power: Remaking salmon, science and society on the Fraser River, 1900--1960

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenden, Matthew Dominic

    Overlapping resource demands made the Fraser River a contested site of development politics in twentieth century British Columbia. Since the turn of the century, power interests surveyed the river's flow, sited dams and promoted development schemes. Fisheries interests, on the other hand, sought to maintain the river as salmon spawning habitat. They questioned the necessity of dams, supported fisheries research and rehabilitation and organized anti-development coalitions. Before the mid-1950s a number of dam projects proceeded on Fraser tributaries and major landslides at Hells Gate modeled the dangers of main stem development. Because of the concerted political lobbying of fisheries groups, the skeptical appraisal of fisheries scientists to development proposals and the legal and political authority of the federal Department of Fisheries and the International Pacific Salmon Fisheries Commission, major dam projects were defeated on the Fraser in the late 1950s. Delayed development on the Fraser helped to spur hydroelectric projects on other rivers in the province; the fish-power problem on the Fraser altered the province's spatial economy of power. Once development began on the Columbia and Peace Rivers, the Fraser was protected by implication. The study combines approaches from environmental history, the history of science and political economy to demonstrate the intersections and interactions between nature, knowledge and society. Research was conducted at eleven archives in Canada and the United States in the papers of organizations, corporations, government departments, politicians, scientists and individuals.

  2. Interactions Between the Nighttime Valley-Wind System and a Developing Cold-Air Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arduini, Gabriele; Staquet, Chantal; Chemel, Charles

    2016-10-01

    The Weather Research and Forecast numerical model is used to characterize the influence of a thermally-driven down-valley flow on a developing cold-air pool in an idealized alpine valley decoupled from the atmosphere above. Results for a three-dimensional (3D) valley, which allows for the formation of a down-valley flow, and for a two-dimensional (2D) valley, where the formation of a down-valley flow is inhibited, are analyzed and compared. A key result is that advection leads to a net cooling in the 2D valley and to a warming in the 3D valley, once the down-valley flow is fully developed. This difference stems from the suppression of the slope-flow induced upward motions over the valley centre in the 3D valley. As a result, the downslope flows develop a cross-valley circulation within the cold-air pool, the growth of the cold-air pool is reduced and the valley atmosphere is generally warmer than in the 2D valley. A quasi-steady state is reached for which the divergence of the down-valley flow along the valley is balanced by the convergence of the downslope flows at the top of the cold-air pool, with no net contribution of subsiding motions far from the slope layer. More precisely, the inflow of air at the top of the cold-air pool is found to be driven by an interplay between the return flow from the plain region and subsidence over the plateaux. Finally, the mechanisms that control the structure of the cold-air pool and its evolution are found to be independent of the valley length as soon as the quasi-steady state is reached and the down-valley flow is fully developed.

  3. Imaging the magmatic and hydrothermal systems of Long Valley Caldera, California with magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J.; Mangan, M.; McPhee, D.; Ponce, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Long Valley Caldera (LVC) in Eastern California contains active hydrothermal systems, areas of episodic seismicity, and areas of elevated gas emissions, all of which are related to a deeper magmatic system that is not well characterized. To better image the Long Valley magmatic system, 60 full-tensor broadband magnetotelluric (MT) stations were collected in LVC and modeled in three-dimensions to constrain the subsurface electrical resistivity structure down to 30 km. Three conductive zones are imaged in the preferred resistivity model. The most prominent conductive zone (<7 Ohm-m) is located 5 km beneath the resurgent dome (near the center of Long Valley Caldera), where it elongates in a north-south direction, and has westward connection to the surface close to well 44-16 near Deer Mountan. This conductive zone is interpreted to be an accumulation zone of hydrothermal fluids originating from a deeper magmatic source. The shape of the conductive body suggests that the fluids pool under the resurgent dome and migrate westward, upwelling just south of well 44-16 to feed the near surface geothermal system. A second conductive zone (<10 Ohm-m) is 4 km southeast of the resurgent dome and 5 km deep and coincident with the seismic swarm of 2014. This is another zone of fluid accumulation, where the source could be the fluid accumulation zone to the west or an independent deeper source. The third conductive anomaly (<10 Ohm-m) is a few kilometers south of the resurgent dome below a depth of 15 km, and collocated with a low p- and s-wave velocity zone, and directly beneath a GPS inflation area, all of which advocate for a magma mush zone of as much as 30% interstitial melt. The preferred resistivity model suggests an accumulation of hydrothermal fluids 5 km below the resurgent dome that originates from a deeper magmatic source at 15 km depth.

  4. Evolution of the knowledge system for agricultural development in the Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Ellen B; Matson, Pamela A

    2016-04-26

    Knowledge systems-networks of linked actors, organizations, and objects that perform a number of knowledge-related functions that link knowledge and know how with action-have played a key role in fostering agricultural development over the last 50 years. We examine the evolution of the knowledge system of the Yaqui Valley, Mexico, a region often described as the home of the green revolution for wheat, tracing changes in the functions of critical knowledge system participants, information flows, and research priorities. Most of the knowledge system's key players have been in place for many decades, although their roles have changed in response to exogenous and endogenous shocks and trends (e.g., drought, policy shifts, and price trends). The system has been agile and able to respond to challenges, in part because of the diversity of players (evolving roles of actors spanning research-decision maker boundaries) and also because of the strong and consistent role of innovative farmers. Although the agricultural research agenda in the Valley is primarily controlled from within the agricultural sector, outside voices have become an important influence in broadening development- and production-oriented perspectives to sustainability perspectives.

  5. A plan to study the aquifer system of the Central Valley of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bertoldi, Gilbert L.

    1979-01-01

    Unconsolidated Quaternary alluvial deposits comprise a large complex aquifer system in the Central Valley of California. Millions of acre-feet of water is pumped from the system annually to support a large and expanding agribusiness industry. Since the 1950's, water levels have been steadily declining in many areas of the valley and concern has been expressed about the ability of the entire ground-water system to support agribusiness at current levels, not to mention its ability to function at projected expansion levels. At current levels of ground-water use, an estimated 1.5 to 2 million acre-feet is withdrawn from storage each year; that is, 1.5 to 2 million acre-feet of water is pumped annually in excess of annual replenishment. The U.S. Geological Survey has initiated a 4-year study to develop geologic, hydrologic, and hydraulic information and to establish a valleywide ground-water data base that will be used to build computer models of the ground-water flow system. Subsequently, these models may be used to evaluate the system response to various ground-water management alternatives. This report describes current problems, objectives of the study, and outlines the general work to be accomplished in the study area. A bibliography of about 600 references is included. (Kosco-USGS)

  6. Statistical methods to monitor the West Valley off-gas system

    SciTech Connect

    Eggett, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    The off-gas system for the ceramic melter operated at the West Valley Demonstration Project at West Valley, NY, is monitored during melter operation. A one-at-a-time method of monitoring the parameters of the off-gas system is not statistically sound. Therefore, multivariate statistical methods appropriate for the monitoring of many correlated parameters will be used. Monitoring a large number of parameters increases the probability of a false out-of-control signal. If the parameters being monitored are statistically independent, the control limits can be easily adjusted to obtain the desired probability of a false out-of-control signal. However, a high degree of correlation generally exists among the parameters being monitored in the off-gas system. This makes it very difficult to control the probability of false calls (saying the system is out-of-control when it is in-control or saying the system is in-control when it is actually out-of-control). The interpretation of the individual control charts is difficult in the presence of correlation among the variables. When a high degree of correlation exists, variable reduction techniques can be used to reduce the number of parameters. Principal components have been used as a variable reduction technique. The principal component (PC) scores have desirable statistical properties when the original variables are distributed as multivariate normals. Two statistics derived from the PC scores and used to form multivariate control charts are outlined and their distributional properties reviewed. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Valley View)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    The solar hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., Days Inn Motel (120 rooms), I-35/2276 Valley View Lane, Dallas, Texas is described. The solar system was designed by ILI Incorporated to provide 65 percent of the total domestic hot water (DHW) demand. The Solar Energy Products, model CU-30WW liquid (water) flat plate collector (1000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1000 gallon steel storage tank when the solar pump is not running. This system is one of eleven systems planned. Heat is transferred from the DHW tanks through a shell and tube heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature controllers. The operation of this system was begun March 11, 1980. The solar components were partly funded ($15,000 of 30,000 cost) by a Department of Energy grant.

  8. Evolution of the knowledge system for agricultural development in the Yaqui Valley, Sonora, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Ellen B.; Matson, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge systems—networks of linked actors, organizations, and objects that perform a number of knowledge-related functions that link knowledge and know how with action—have played a key role in fostering agricultural development over the last 50 years. We examine the evolution of the knowledge system of the Yaqui Valley, Mexico, a region often described as the home of the green revolution for wheat, tracing changes in the functions of critical knowledge system participants, information flows, and research priorities. Most of the knowledge system's key players have been in place for many decades, although their roles have changed in response to exogenous and endogenous shocks and trends (e.g., drought, policy shifts, and price trends). The system has been agile and able to respond to challenges, in part because of the diversity of players (evolving roles of actors spanning research–decision maker boundaries) and also because of the strong and consistent role of innovative farmers. Although the agricultural research agenda in the Valley is primarily controlled from within the agricultural sector, outside voices have become an important influence in broadening development- and production-oriented perspectives to sustainability perspectives. PMID:21606365

  9. Slurry feed variability in West Valley's melter feed tank and sampling system

    SciTech Connect

    Fow, C.L.; Kurath, D.E.; Pulsipher, B.A.; Bauer, B.P.

    1989-04-01

    The present plan for disposal of high-level wastes at West Valley is to vitrify the wastes for disposal in deep geologic repository. The vitrification process involves mixing the high-level wastes with glass-forming chemicals and feeding the resulting slurry to a liquid-fed ceramic melter. Maintaining the quality of the glass product and proficient melter operation depends on the ability of the melter feed system to produce and maintain a homogeneous mixture of waste and glass-former materials. To investigate the mixing properties of the melter feed preparation system at West Valley, a statistically designed experiment was conducted using synthetic melter feed slurry over a range of concentrations. On the basis of the statistical data analysis, it was found that (1) a homogeneous slurry is produced in the melter feed tank, (2) the liquid-sampling system provides slurry samples that are statistically different from the slurry in the tank, and (3) analytical measurements are the major source of variability. A statistical quality control program for the analytical laboratory and a characterization test of the actual sampling system is recommended. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of thermal fluids in the Long Valley caldera lateral flow system, California

    SciTech Connect

    Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Grigsby, C.O.; Janik, C.J.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic data of thermal waters in Long Valley caldera have been used to identify both the origins and characteristics of the fluids and to evaluate mixing and boiling processes occurring within the lateral flow system of the caldera. Recharge to the Long Valley geothermal system occurs in the western part of the caldera with the water being heated at depth and flowing laterally eastward in the subsurface. The lateral flow system was recently intersected by the Shady Rest Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) corehole at 335 m (1100 ft) with fluids in this 202/sup 0/C zone being more concentrated than non-boiled fluids to the east. As the Na-K-HCO/sub 3/-Cl thermal fluids flow eastward, they are increasingly mixed with isotopically depleted, dilute groundwaters similar to cold waters east of Lake Crowley. Near surface boiling of Casa Diablo well fluids at 100/sup 0/C forms waters with the compositions of Colton and Casa Diablo hot springs. Waters to the east of the Casa Diablo area are mixtures of meteoric water and boiled thermal fluids with a composition close to that of Colton Hot Spring. There is no correlation between /sup 3/H and /sup 36/Cl in thermal fluids or between these components and conservative species, and it appears that cold fluids involved in mixing must be relatively old waters, low in both meteoric /sup 3/H and /sup 36/Cl.

  11. Volcanological perspectives on Long Valley, Mammoth Mountain, and Mono Craters: Several contiguous but discrete systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, W.

    2004-01-01

    The volcanic history of the Long Valley region is examined within a framework of six successive (spatially discrete) foci of silicic magmatism, each driven by locally concentrated basaltic intrusion of the deep crust in response to extensional unloading and decompression melting of the upper mantle. A precaldera dacite field (3.5-2.5 Ma) northwest of the later site of Long Valley and the Glass Mountain locus of >60 high-silica rhyolite vents (2.2-0.79 Ma) northeast of it were spatially and temporally independent magmatic foci, both cold in postcaldera time. Shortly before the 760-ka caldera-forming eruption, the mantle-driven focus of crustal melting shifted ???20 km westward, abandoning its long-stable position under Glass Mountain and energizing instead the central Long Valley system that released 600 km3 of compositionally zoned rhyolitic Bishop Tuff (760 ka), followed by ???100 km3 of crystal-poor Early Rhyolite (760-650 ka) on the resurgent dome and later by three separate 5-unit clusters of varied Moat Rhyolites of small volume (527-101 ka). West of the caldera ring-fault zone, a fourth focus started up ???160 ka, producing a 10??20-km array of at least 35 mafic vents that surround the trachydacite/alkalic rhyodacite Mammoth Mountain dome complex at its core. This young 70-vent system lies west of the structural caldera and (though it may have locally re-energized the western margin of the mushy moribund Long Valley reservoir) represents a thermally and compositionally independent focus. A fifth major discrete focus started up by ???50 ka, 25-30 km north of Mammoth Mountain, beneath the center of what has become the Mono Craters chain. In the Holocene, this system advanced both north and south, producing ???30 dike-fed domes of crystal-poor high-silica rhyolite, some as young as 650 years. The nearby chain of mid-to-late Holocene Inyo domes is a fault-influenced zone of mixing where magmas of at least four kinds are confluent. The sixth and youngest focus is

  12. Anomalous seafloor mounds in the northern Natal Valley, southwest Indian Ocean: Implications for the East African Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiles, Errol; Green, Andrew; Watkeys, Mike; Jokat, Wilfried; Krocker, Ralph

    2014-09-01

    The Natal Valley (southwest Indian Ocean) has a complicated and protracted opening history, as has the surrounding southwest Indian Ocean. Recently collected multibeam swath bathymetry and 3.5 kHz seismic data from the Natal Valley reveal anomalous seafloor mounds in the northern Natal Valley. The significance, of these domes, as recorders of the geological history of the Natal Valley and SE African Margin has been overlooked with little attempt made to identify their origin, evolution or tectonic significance. This paper aims to describe these features from a morphological perspective and to use their occurrence as a means to better understand the geological and oceanographic evolution of this basin. The seafloor mounds are distinct in both shallow seismic and morphological character from the surrounding seafloor of the Natal Valley. Between 25 km and 31 km long, and 16 km and 18 km wide, these features rise some 400 m above the sedimentary deposits that have filled in the Natal Valley. Such macro-scale features have not previously been described from the Natal Valley or from other passive margins globally. They are not the result of bottom water circulation, salt tectonics; rather, igneous activity is favoured as the origin for these anomalous seafloor features. We propose a hypothesis that the anomalous seafloor mounds observed in the Natal Valley are related to igneous activity associated with the EARS. The complicated opening history and antecedent geology, coupled with the southward propagation of the East African Rift System creates a unique setting where continental rift associated features have been developed in a marine setting.

  13. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-06-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  14. Central and South West Services (CSWS) transmission system studies: (Rio Grande Valley FACTS studies). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Arabi, S.; Hamadanizadeh, H.

    1998-12-01

    Stability limitations impose constraints on power imports into the Rio Grande Valley, the southern region of Central Power and Light`s (CPL) system. CPL`s parent company, Central and South West Services, sought to identify viable plans for eliminating these constraints to enable power transfers via two 345-kV transmission lines. This project conducted assessment studies of the CPL system, using applications from EPRI`s Power System Analysis Package, and identified two scenarios as the most likely remedial measures required. These consisted of the addition of generating units and the use of series compensation of the two transmission lines, in conjunction with shunt compensation. While Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) devices were not indicated in this study phase, the researchers indicated a Thyristor Controlled Series Compensation device could be considered to address a potential subsynchronous resonance issue.

  15. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars: Hydrology, Drainage, and Valley Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) Analysis of Orientation Dependence of Martian Gullies; 2) A Preliminary Relationship between the Depth of Martian Gullies and the Abundance of Hydrogen on Near-Surface Mars; 3) Water Indicators in Sirenum Terra and around the Argyre Impact Basin, Mars; 4) The Distribution of Gullies and Tounge-shaped Ridges and Their Role in the Degradation of Martian Craters; 5) A Critical Evaluation of Crater Lake Systems in Memnonia Quadrangle, Mars; 6) Impact-generated Hydrothermal Activity at Gusev Crater: Implications for the Spirit Mission; 7) Characterization of the Distributary Fan in Holden NE Crater using Stereo Analysis; 8) Computational Analysis of Drainage Basins on Mars: Appraising the Drainage Density; 9) Hypsometric Analyses of Martian Basins: A Comparison to Terrestrial, Lunar, and Venusian Hypsometry; 10) Morphologic Development of Harmakhis Vallis, Mars; 11) Mangala Valles, Mars: Investigations of the source of Flood Water and Early Stages of Flooding; 12) The Formation of Aromatum Chaos and the Water Discharge Rate at Ravi Vallis; 13) Inferring Hydraulics from Geomorphology for Athabasca Valles, Mars; 14) The Origin and Evolution of Dao Vallis: Formation and Modification of Martian Channels by Structural Collapse and Glaciation; 15) Snowmelt and the Formation of Valley Networks on Martian Volcanoes; 16) Extent of Floating Ice in an Ancient Echus Chasma/Kasei Valley System, Mars.

  16. Fused pulmonary lobes is a rat model of human Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kiyozumi, Daiji; Nakano, Itsuko; Takahashi, Ken L; Hojo, Hitoshi; Aoyama, Hiroaki; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2011-07-29

    Fused pulmonary lobes (fpl) is a mutant gene that is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and causes various developmental defects, including fusion of pulmonary lobes, and eyelid and digit anomalies in rats. Since these developmental defects closely resemble those observed in patients with Fraser syndrome, a recessive multiorgan disorder, and its model animals, we investigated whether the abnormal phenotypes observed in fpl/fpl mutant rats are attributable to a genetic disorder similar to Fraser syndrome. At the epidermal basement membrane in fpl/fpl mutant neonates, the expression of QBRICK, a basement membrane protein whose expression is attenuated in Fraser syndrome model mice, was greatly diminished compared with control littermates. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses of Fraser syndrome-related genes revealed that Frem2 transcripts were markedly diminished in QBRICK-negative embryos. Genomic DNA sequencing of the fpl/fpl mutant identified a nonsense mutation that introduced a stop codon at serine 2005 in Frem2. These findings indicate that the fpl mutant is a rat model of human Fraser syndrome.

  17. What explains the sulfur isotope fractionation observed in the aquifer system of Puebla Valley, Mexico?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez-Oliman, G.; Perry, E. C.; Leal-Bautista, R. M.; Lenczewski, M. E.

    2003-12-01

    Puebla Valley, Mexico is located in the central part of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt and is surrounded by 3 large volcanoes: Popocatepetl (active since 1994), Iztaccihuatl (extinct), and Malinche (dormant). The aquifer system of the Valley contains at least two productive units: an unconfined aquifer formed mainly of alluvial and volcanic deposits and a second, confined aquifer, which has chemically distinct water that is sulfur-rich, high in CO2, and high in alkalinity. There is a current debate about the origin of the sulfur-rich water, which is being used, after treatment, to lessen the deficit of water supply to the city of Puebla (with a population of approximately 1.5 million). Sulfate and sulfide species in water from the confined aquifer have an average sulfur isotope fractionation difference of 24.6 %. This fractionation is, at least in part, the result of bacterial sulfate reduction as evidenced by testing for bacteria with BART kits. Molecular analysis to identify the specific bacteria is underway. However, analysis of carbon isotopes of dissolved CO2 (with average delta 13C of 4.4%) and 3He/4He with average ratios of 2.1 for specific wells, located in the upper aquifer and characterized by having low sulfate but also rich in CO2 and alkalinity, suggest a possible magmatic component. The carbon and helium isotope analysis of water from the confined aquifer is currently underway.

  18. Geobotanical characterization of a geothermal system using hyperspectral imagery: Long Valley Caldera, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M R; Cochran, S A; Martini, B A; Pickles, W L; Potts, D C; Priest, R E; Silver, E A; Wayne, B A; White, W T

    1998-12-01

    We have analyzed hyperspectral Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging System (AVIRIS) imagery taken in September of 1992 in Long Valley Caldera, CA, a geothermally active region expressed surficially by hot springs and fumaroles. Geological and vegetation mapping are attempted through spectral classification of imagery. Particular hot spring areas in the caldera are targeted for analysis. The data is analyzed for unique geobotanical patterns in the vicinity of hot springs as well as gross identification of dominant plant and mineral species. Spectra used for the classifications come from a vegetation spectral library created for plant species found to be associated with geothermal processes. This library takes into account the seasonality of vegetation by including spectra for species on a monthly basis. Geological spectra are taken from JPL and USGS mineral libraries. Preliminary classifications of hot spring areas indicate some success in mineral identification and less successful vegetation species identification. The small spatial extent of individual plants demands either sub-pixel analysis or increased spatial resolution of imagery. Future work will also include preliminary analysis of a hyperspectral thermal imagery dataset and a multitemporal air photo dataset. The combination of these remotely sensed datasets for Long Valley will yield a valuable product for geothermal exploration efforts in other regions.

  19. Analysis of relay based valley coil system of K-130 Cyclotron and an approach to computer controlled system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoor, B.

    2016-09-01

    To overcome the first harmonic field imperfection in sector focused cyclotron, a set of coils placed in valleys are used to produce an opposite first harmonic effect. Usually, at the time of beam tuning the phase of the first harmonic is varied using a relay system. It can be shown analytically that magnitude of it changes simultaneously, when phase is changed. This is not desirable at the time of beam tuning. Moreover phase changes in long steps, which hampers accuracy of beam tuning. To overcome this, a computer controlled system is suggested where amplitude remains constant at the time of phase change. Moreover, phase can be changed continuously which gives better tuning accuracy.

  20. Guidelines for model calibration and application to flow simulation in the Death Valley regional groundwater system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, M.C.; D'Agnese, F. A.; Faunt, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    Fourteen guidelines are described which are intended to produce calibrated groundwater models likely to represent the associated real systems more accurately than typically used methods. The 14 guidelines are discussed in the context of the calibration of a regional groundwater flow model of the Death Valley region in the southwestern United States. This groundwater flow system contains two sites of national significance from which the subsurface transport of contaminants could be or is of concern: Yucca Mountain, which is the potential site of the United States high-level nuclear-waste disposal; and the Nevada Test Site, which contains a number of underground nuclear-testing locations. This application of the guidelines demonstrates how they may be used for model calibration and evaluation, and also to direct further model development and data collection.Fourteen guidelines are described which are intended to produce calibrated groundwater models likely to represent the associated real systems more accurately than typically used methods. The 14 guidelines are discussed in the context of the calibration of a regional groundwater flow model of the Death Valley region in the southwestern United States. This groundwater flow system contains two sites of national significance from which the subsurface transport of contaminants could be or is of concern: Yucca Mountain, which is the potential site of the United States high-level nuclear-waste disposal; and the Nevada Test Site, which contains a number of underground nuclear-testing locations. This application of the guidelines demonstrates how they may be used for model calibration and evaluation, and also to direct further model development and data collection.

  1. Weak and strong publics: drawing on Nancy Fraser to explore parental participation in neonatal networks

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Andrew J.; Lewando‐Hundt, Gillian; Blaxter, Loraine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims  We draw on the work of Nancy Fraser, and in particular her concepts of weak and strong publics, to analyze the process of parental involvement in managed neonatal network boards. Background  Public involvement has moved beyond the individual level to include greater involvement of both patients and the public in governance. However, there is relatively little literature that explores the nature and outcomes of long‐term patient involvement initiatives or has attempted to theorize, particularly at the level of corporate decision making, the process of patient and public involvement. Methods  A repeated survey of all neonatal network managers in England was carried out in 2006–07 to capture developments and changes in parental representation over this time period. This elicited information about the current status of parent representation on neonatal network boards. Four networks were also selected as case studies. This involved interviews with key members of each network board, interviews with parent representatives, observation of meetings and access to board minutes. Results  Data collected show that a wide range of approaches to involving parents has been adopted. These range from decisions not to involve parents at this level to relatively well‐developed systems designed to link parent representatives on network boards to parents in neonatal units. Conclusion  Despite these variations, we suggest that parental participation within neonatal services remains an example of a weak public because the parent representatives had limited participation with little influence on decision making. PMID:22040481

  2. Stratigraphy of the Mississippi-Alabama shelf and the Mobile River incised-valley system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Balson, Peter S.; Flocks, James G.; Dalrymple, Robert W.; Boyd, Ron; Zaitlin, Brian A.

    1994-01-01

    The Holocene incised-valley fill (estuarine facies) underlying Mobile Buy fit well into the conceptual facies model of a microtidal wave-dominated estuary. The model does not fit as well, however, with the rapidly transgressed shelf portion of the incised valley. The down dip section does not contain a clearly identifiable (from seismic profiles) estuarine facies; the valley fill is primarily fluvial and is overlain by marine shoals. In the Mobile River incised valley, the distal portion of the valley was rapidly drowned, allowing the thin estuarine facies to be reworked. The proximal portion was drowned more slowly, leaving the estuarine facies intact. Thus, the single incised valley contains two very different types of fill.

  3. Submarine Landslide Morphology of Box Slides Present on the Continental Slope Offshore Fraser Island, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, M. J. A.; Hubble, T.; Clarke, S. L.; Airey, D.; Yu, P. W. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Fraser Island slide complex is located on eastern Australia's continental slope. Two potentially tsunamigenic submarine landslides identified here as the 'North Fraser Island Upper Slope Slide' (25km2 in area, 100m thick) and the 'Middle Fraser Island Middle Slope Slide' (12km2 in area, 50m thick) are described. Morphologic, sedimentologic and geomechanical properties for these slides are compared to data reported for existing submarine landslides located to the south in New South Wales (NSW). The two Fraser Island slides are translational, box-shaped, slab slides. We suspect that the slabs remained intact during downslope transport. The upper slope slide is situated at a water depth of approximately 750m at the northern end of the Fraser Canyon complex. The head of this slide has apparently detached from a structural surface comprised of a Miocene reef complex located beneath the continental shelf edge. The middle slope slide is situated on a large plateau to the south of the Fraser Canyon complex in 1500m of water. Cores taken in the continental slope within both slides are long and present hemipelagic muds. Cores taken adjacent to both slides are short and terminate in stiff muds of suspected Miocene or Pliocene age. Additionally, the core adjacent to the upper slope slide presents a near surface layer of upper-fining of coarse to fine shelly sand which we interpret to be a turbidite deposit. This layer was deposited above hemipelagic muds which are ubiquitously present on the upper eastern Australian continental slope in NSW and Southern Queensland.

  4. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer

    Iovenitti, Joe

    2014-01-02

    The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodology calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal system in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. The overall project area is 2500km2 with the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) being about 170km2. The project was subdivided into five tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data; (2) design and populate a GIS database; (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area at 0.5km intervals to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km; (4) collect new geophysical and geochemical data, and (5) repeat Task 3 for the enhanced (baseline + new ) data. Favorability maps were based on the integrated assessment of the three critical EGS exploration parameters of interest: rock type, temperature and stress. A complimentary trust map was generated to compliment the favorability maps to graphically illustrate the cumulative confidence in the data used in the favorability mapping. The Final Scientific Report (FSR) is submitted in two parts with Part I describing the results of project Tasks 1 through 3 and Part II covering the results of project Tasks 4 through 5 plus answering nine questions posed in the proposal for the overall project. FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4

  5. Public perceptions regarding water quality and attitudes toward water conservation in the Lower Fraser Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaniels, Timothy L.; Axelrod, Lawrence J.; Cavanagh, Nigel

    1998-05-01

    This paper concerns public judgments regarding water quality, public attitudes about water conservation, and related issues in the Lower Fraser Basin of southwest British Columbia, Canada. A written survey was administered to 183 lay subjects in four communities within the Lower Fraser Basin. The results show that subjects generally perceive water quality in specific water bodies as worse than indicated in technical studies of those water bodies. Respondents also indicated a high willingness to engage in water conservation activities. Discussion and conclusions complete the paper.

  6. Bilateral orbito-palpebral cysts in a case of cryptophthalmos associated with Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mocan, Mehmet C; Ozgen, Burce; Irkec, Murat

    2008-04-01

    A 15-month-old girl was referred for evaluation of congenital absence of both eyelids. Clinical evaluation revealed bilateral total cryptophthalmos and enlarged globes in addition to genitourinary anomalies, umbilical hernia, renal agenesis, and facial anomalies. The clinical findings were consistent with Fraser syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging of the orbits revealed dysplastic globes that were characterized by cystic expansions that extended laterally anterior to the lateral orbital rim. Bilateral orbito-palpebral cysts that communicate with a dysplastic globe and extend beyond the orbital cavity may be a rare presenting feature of Fraser syndrome.

  7. Simulation of an urban ground-water-flow system in the Menomonee Valley, Milwaukee, Wisconsin using analytic element modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunning, C.P.; Feinstein, D.T.

    2004-01-01

    A single-layer, steady-state analytic element model was constructed to simulate shallow ground-water flow in the Menomonee Valley, an old industrial center southwest of downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Project objectives were to develop an understanding of the shallow ground-water flow system and identify primary receptors of recharge to the valley. The analytic element model simulates flow in a 18.3 m (60 ft) thick layer of estuarine and alluvial sediments and man-made fill that comprises the shallow aquifer across the valley. The thin, laterally extensive nature of the shallow aquifer suggests horizontal-flow predominates, thus the system can appropriately be modeled with the Dupuit-Forchheimer approximation in an analytic element model. The model was calibrated to the measured baseflow increase between two USGS gages on the Menomonee River, 90 head measurements taken in and around the valley during December 1999, and vertical gradients measured at five locations under the river and estuary in the valley. Recent construction of the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewer District Inline Storage System (ISS) in the Silurian dolomite under the Menomonee Valley has locally lowered heads in the dolomite appreciably, below levels caused by historic pumping. The ISS is a regional hydraulic sink which removes water from the bedrock even during dry weather. The potential effect on flow directions in the shallow aquifer of dry-weather infiltration to the ISS was evaluated by adjusting the resistance of the line-sink strings representing the ISS in the model to allow infiltration from 0 to 100% of the reported 9,500 m3/d. The best fit to calibration targets was found between 60% (5,700 m3/d) and 80% (7,600 m3/d) of the reported dry-weather infiltration. At 60% infiltration, 65% of the recharge falling on the valley terminates at the ISS and 35% at the Menomonee River and estuary. At 80% infiltration, 73% of the recharge terminates at the ISS, and 27% at the river and estuary. Model

  8. A core hole into the hydrothermal system of the Long Valley caldera

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, H.; White, A.; Flexser, S.; Sorey, M.; Farrar, C.

    1987-03-01

    To investigate the present-day hydrothermal system, the ''Shady Rest'' hole was continuously cored 715m into the southwestern moat of the Long Valley caldera. The hole intersected 100m of glacial till and 300m of postcaldera rhyolite before entering the welded Bishop Tuff and bottoming in that unit. A sharp temperature rise over the upper 350m, and near-isothermal conditions below reflect the presence of approx.200/sup 0/C water moving through open, calcite-lined fractures in silicified Early Rhyolite and Bishop Tuff. The depth to the Bishop is the shallowest encountered in holes in the caldera, and the temperatures measured are among the hottest observed in wells drilled within the caldera.

  9. Multidisciplinary investigations on coupled rockwall-talus-systems (Turtmann valley, Swiss Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenzehl, Karoline; Draebing, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Talus slopes covering the base of steep, unstable rockwalls are characteristic periglacial landforms and major sediment storages in mountain systems. In the Turtmann valley (Swiss Alps), rockfall deposits account for 1/8 of the debris volume stored in the hanging valleys. To evaluate the spatio-temporal efficiency of rockfalls for long-term talus evolution, geophysical measurements on rockwalls and talus slopes are increasingly applied during the last decades. However, the correct interpretation of the geophysical data is still a difficult task due to the landforms' specific material properties. Moreover, no comprehensive geophysical study exists investigating the coupled rockwall-talus-system. Here, we studied two rockwalls and corresponding talus slopes in a tributary of the Turtmann valley. The active rockfall source areas dominate on rockwalls, for which a high permafrost probability was modelled (Nyenhuis et al. 2005). Rockwalls were selected based on their contrasting lithology, activity degree and valley location. By combining geophysical, geotechnical and geomorphological methods, we investigated (i) the rockwalls' mechanical characteristics as well as (ii) the material properties of the talus slopes in order to (iii) gain a further process understanding of the coupled rockwall-talus system. (i) At the rockwalls, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Seismic Refraction Tomography (SRT) were applied along 40-50m transects with an electrode/geophone spacing of 1-1.25m. In addition, detailed geotechnical surveys of the rock mass and its discontinuity properties were performed. The combined results reveal that high resistivity (>10'000kΩm) and high p-wave velocities (>3'000m/s) correlate with dried bedrock consisting of amphibolites with large joint spacing (52cm) and long persistences (> 220cm). In contrast, the small joint spacing (17cm) and short persistences (<48cm) of the paragneiss are linked to a lower resistivity (<5000kΩm) and low p

  10. Modelling Rift Valley fever (RVF) disease vector habitats using active and passive remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrosia, Vincent G.; Linthicum, K. G.; Bailey, C. L.; Sebesta, P.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Ames Ecosystem Science and Technology Branch and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases are conducting research to detect Rift Valley fever (RVF) vector habitats in eastern Africa using active and passive remote-sensing. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) calculated from Landsat TM and SPOT data is used to characterize the vegetation common to the Aedes mosquito. Relationships have been found between the highest NDVI and the 'dambo' habitat areas near Riuru, Kenya on both wet and dry data. High NDVI values, when combined with the vegetation classifications, are clearly related to the areas of vector habitats. SAR data have been proposed for use during the rainy season when optical systems are of minimal use and the short frequency and duration of the optimum RVF mosquito habitat conditions necessitate rapid evaluation of the vegetation/moisture conditions; only then can disease potential be stemmed and eradication efforts initiated.

  11. An update of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system transient model, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belcher, Wayne R.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Faunt, Claudia C.; Pavelko, Michael T.; Hill, Mary C.

    2017-01-19

    Since the original publication of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) numerical model in 2004, more information on the regional groundwater flow system in the form of new data and interpretations has been compiled. Cooperators such as the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Department of Energy, and Nye County, Nevada, recognized a need to update the existing regional numerical model to maintain its viability as a groundwater management tool for regional stakeholders. The existing DVRFS numerical flow model was converted to MODFLOW-2005, updated with the latest available data, and recalibrated. Five main data sets were revised: (1) recharge from precipitation varying in time and space, (2) pumping data, (3) water-level observations, (4) an updated regional potentiometric map, and (5) a revision to the digital hydrogeologic framework model.The resulting DVRFS version 2.0 (v. 2.0) numerical flow model simulates groundwater flow conditions for the Death Valley region from 1913 to 2003 to correspond to the time frame for the most recently published (2008) water-use data. The DVRFS v 2.0 model was calibrated by using the Tikhonov regularization functionality in the parameter estimation and predictive uncertainty software PEST. In order to assess the accuracy of the numerical flow model in simulating regional flow, the fit of simulated to target values (consisting of hydraulic heads and flows, including evapotranspiration and spring discharge, flow across the model boundary, and interbasin flow; the regional water budget; values of parameter estimates; and sensitivities) was evaluated. This evaluation showed that DVRFS v. 2.0 simulates conditions similar to DVRFS v. 1.0. Comparisons of the target values with simulated values also indicate that they match reasonably well and in some cases (boundary flows and discharge) significantly better than in DVRFS v. 1.0.

  12. Trench logs from a strand of the Rock Valley Fault System, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Yount, J.C.; Shroba, R.R.; McMasters, C.R.; Huckins, H.E.; Rodriguez, E.A.

    1987-12-31

    The Rock Valley fault system trends northeasterly through the southeast corner of the Nevada Test Site. The system records left-lateral offset of Paleozoic and Tertiary rocks, although total offset amounts to only a few kilometers. Distinct scarps in alluvial deposits of Quaternary age and a concentration of seismicity, particularly at its north end, suggest that the Rock Valley fault system may be active. Two trenches were excavated by backhoe in 1978 across a 0.5-m-high scarp produced by a strand of the Rock Valley fault system. A detailed logging of the two Rock Valley fault trenches was undertaken during the spring of 1984. This report presents: (1) logs of both walls of the two trenches, (2) a general description of the lithologic units and the soils formed in these units that are exposed in and near the fault trenches, (3) observations of the clast fabric of unfaulted and faulted deposits exposed in the trench walls, and (4) a map of the surficial deposits in the vicinity of the trenches.

  13. Attitudes about OCLC in Small and Medium-Sized Libraries. Illinois Valley Library System OCLC Experimental Project. Report No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bills, Linda G.; Wilford, Valerie

    A project was conducted from 1980 to 1982 to determine the costs and benefits of OCLC use in 29 small and medium-sized member libraries of the Illinois Valley Library System (IVLS). Academic, school, public, and special libraries participated in the project. Based on written attitude surveys of and interviews with library directors, staff,…

  14. Hydrogeology of, and ground-water flow in, a valley-fill and carbonate-rock aquifer system near Long Valley in the New Jersey Highlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholson, R.S.; McAuley, S.D.; Barringer, J.L.; Gordon, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    The hydrogeology of and ground-water flow in a valley-fill and carbonate-rock aquifer system were evaluated by using numerical-modeling techniques and geochemical interpretations to address concerns about the adequacy of the aquifer system to meet increasing demand for water. The study was conducted during 1987-90 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy. The effects of recent and anticipated ground-water withdrawals on water levels, stream base flows, and water budgets were estimated. Simulation results indicate that recent withdrawals of 4.7 million gallons per day have resulted in water-level declines of up to 35 feet. Under conditions of increases in withdrawals of 121 percent, water levels would decline up to an additional 28 feet. The magnitude of predicted average base-flow depletion, when compared with historic low flows, indicates that projected increases in withdrawals may substantially deplete seasonal low flow of Drakes Brook and South Branch Raritan River. Results of a water-budget analysis indicate that the sources of water to additional supply wells would include leakage from the overlying valley-fill aquifer and induced leakage of surface water into the aquifer system. Results of water-quality analyses indicate that human activities are affecting the quality of the ground water. With the exception of an elevated iron concentration in water from one well, concentrations of inorganic constituents in water from 75 wells did not exceed New Jersey primary or secondary drinking-water regulations. Volatile organic compounds were detected in water from several wells; in two samples, concentrations of specific compounds exceeded drinking-water regulations.

  15. TARZAN: A REMOTE TOOL DEPLOYMENT SYSTEM FOR THE WEST VALLEY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce R. Thompson; James Veri

    1999-09-30

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. undertook a development project to build Tarzan, a Remote Tool Delivery system to work inside nuclear waste storage tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The removal of waste deposits from large storage tanks poses significant challenges during tank operations and closure. Limited access, the presence of chemical, radiological, and /or explosive hazards, and the need to deliver retrieval equipment to all regions of the tank exceed the capabilities of most conventional methods and equipment. Remotely operated devices for mobilizing and retrieving waste materials are needed. Some recent developments have been made in this area. However, none of these developments completely and cost-effectively address tanks that are congested with internal structures (e.g., support columns, cooling coils, fixed piping, etc.). The Tarzan system consists of the following parts: Locomotor which is deployed in the tank for inspection and cleanup; Hydraulic power unit providing system power for the locomotor and deployment unit; and Control system providing the man machine interface to control, coordinate and monitor the system. This document presents the final report on the Tarzan project.

  16. A western thalweg of the Princeton Valley submarine canyon system as a reservoir and a trap near Willows, California

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R.G. ); Bainer, R.W.

    1990-05-01

    The Princeton Valley submarine canyon system has long been an important reservoir and trapping mechanism in the northern Sacramento Valley, California. Recently a western thalweg of the system, identified north of Willows, California, has proven to be a significant trapping mechanism for gas in truncated Kione Formation sandstones. Both Upper Cretaceous Kione Formation and Paleocene Princeton Valley sandstones are exploratory objectives in the area and are productive in existing wells. The Kione Formation, a sand-rich deltaic sequence approximately 2,000 ft thick, has been truncated to the west by the Princeton Valley submarine canyon system. The canyon (gorge) has been subsequently filed with primarily impermeable shales, providing a trap for migrating gases in the truncated sands. The trend was discovered in 1977 by Shell Oil Company based on seismic and was the first substantiated evidence of a western thalweg of the Princeton Gorge in the Willows area. To date, four wells have been completed along the trend and current exploratory efforts are attempting to follow the gorge trend.

  17. Testing of the Prototype Mars Drill and Sample Acquisition System in the Mars Analog Site of the Antarctica's Dry Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, K.; Paulsen, G.; McKay, C.; Glass, B. J.; Marinova, M.; Davila, A. F.; Pollard, W. H.; Jackson, A.

    2011-12-01

    We report on the testing of the one meter class prototype Mars drill and cuttings sampling system, called the IceBreaker in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica. The drill consists of a rotary-percussive drill head, a sampling auger with a bit at the end having an integrated temperature sensor, a Z-stage for advancing the auger into the ground, and a sampling station for moving the augered ice shavings or soil cuttings into a sample cup. In November/December of 2010, the IceBreaker drill was tested in the Uni-versity Valley (within the Beacon Valley region of the Antarctic Dry Valleys). University Valley is a good analog to the Northern Polar Regions of Mars because a layer of dry soil lies on top of either ice-cemeted ground or massive ice (depending on the location within the valley). That is exactly what the 2007 Phoenix mission discovered on Mars. The drill demonstrated drilling in ice-cemented ground and in massive ice at the 1-1-100-100 level; that is the drill reached 1 meter in 1 hour with 100 Watts of power and 100 Newton Weight on Bit. This corresponds to an average energy of 100 Whr. At the same time, the bit temperature measured by the bit thermocouple did not exceed more than 10 °C above the formation temperature. The temperature also never exceeded freezing, which minimizes chances of getting stuck and also of altering the materials that are being sampled and analyzed. The samples in the forms of cuttings were acquired every 10 cm intervals into sterile bags. These tests have shown that drilling on Mars, in ice cemented ground with limited power, energy and Weight on Bit, and collecting samples in discrete depth intervals is possible within the given mass, power, and energy levels of a Phoenix-size lander and within the duration of a Phoenix-like mission.

  18. Interpretive geologic cross sections for the Death Valley regional flow system and surrounding areas, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, D.S.; Dickerson, R.P.; Blakely, R.J.; Denning, P.D.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents a network of 28 geologic cross sections that portray subsurface geologic relations within the Death Valley regional ground-water system, a ground-water basin that encompasses a 3? x 3? area (approximately 70,000 km2) in southern Nevada and eastern California. The cross sections transect that part of the southern Great Basin that includes Death Valley, the Nevada Test Site, and the potential high-level nuclear waste underground repository at Yucca Mountain. The specific geometric relationships portrayed on the cross sections are discussed in the context of four general sub-regions that have stratigraphic similarities and general consistency of structural style: (1) the Nevada Test Site vicinity; (2) the Spring Mountains, Pahrump Valley and Amargosa Desert region; (3) the Death Valley region; and (4) the area east of the Nevada Test Site. The subsurface geologic interpretations portrayed on the cross sections are based on an integration of existing geologic maps, measured stratigraphic sections, published cross sections, well data, and geophysical data and interpretations. The estimated top of pre-Cenozoic rocks in the cross sections is based on inversion of gravity data, but the deeper parts of the sections are based on geologic conceptual models and are more speculative. The region transected by the cross sections includes part of the southern Basin and Range Province, the northwest-trending Walker Lane belt, the Death Valley region, and the northern Mojave Desert. The region is structurally complex, where a locally thick Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary section unconformably overlies previously deformed Proterozoic through Paleozoic rocks. All of these rocks have been deformed by complex Neogene ex-tensional normal and strike-slip faults. These cross sections form a three-dimensional network that portrays the interpreted stratigraphic and structural relations in the region; the sections form part of the geologic framework that will be

  19. Detrital zircon provenance analysis of the Great Valley Group, California: Evolution of an arc-forearc system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeGraaff-Surpless, K.; Graham, S.A.; Wooden, J.L.; McWilliams, M.O.

    2002-01-01

    The improved resolution of sediment provenance from detrital zircon analysis of Great Valley stratigraphy enables recognition of previously undocumented arc magmatism and the evolution of regional drainage systems within the Cretaceous arc-forearc system related to uplift, magmatism, and structure in the arc. Great Valley detrital zircon age data confirm previous studies that indicate that the locus of the sediment source in the southern Sierra Nevada arc migrated east with the active volcanic front and suggest rapid rates of uplift and unroofing of the southern arc. Sacramento Valley detrital zircon age data indicate a more complex history of drainage in the northern Klamath-Sierran arc than previously documented. Detrital zircon age distributions from the Cache Creek section of the Great Valley Group broaden through time from nearly unimodal age distributions to signatures with multiple age peaks. This transition to more broadly distributed detrital zircon age spectra likely results from a combination of (1) expanding subaerial drainage systems from highly localized to more broadly distributed catchments; (2) changing shelf and submarine-canyon morphology with rising sea level and/or basin subsidence; (3) increased degree of dissection of the Klamath-Sierran arc; and (4) potential drainage capture and redirection within the arc. Sacramento Valley detrital zircon age data also record a pulse of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous magmatism in the northwestern Sierra Nevada arc, an age of Cordilleran magmatism and deformation represented by limited exposure in the modern Sierra Nevada. These results offer significant new insights into the evolution of a well-studied arc-forearc system.

  20. Description of the final-instar larva of Heliogomphus selysi Fraser (Odonata: Gomphidae).

    PubMed

    Boonsoong, Boonsatien; Chainthong, Damrong

    2014-02-12

    The final instar larva of Heliogomphus selysi Fraser, 1925, is described and illustrated for the first time based on specimens collected in Ratchaburi province, Thailand. Antennae, legs and paraprocts are similar morphologically to H. kelantanensis and H. scorpio but with a unique combination of dorsal hooks and lateral spines.

  1. Contaminants in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) from the upper Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, D.D.; Ikonomou, M.G.; Rantalaine, A.L.; Rogers, I.H.; Sutherland, D.; Oostdam, J. Van

    1997-03-01

    Four white sturgeon were collected from the upper Fraser River near Prince George, British Columbia, Canada, in the fall of 199a and 1992. Two additional fish were taken from the Fraser River near Williams Lake, some 250 km downstream of Prince George. Samples of white muscle, red muscle, liver, and roe were analyzed for metals, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), non-ortho and mono-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorophenols to determine whether the tissues of this species were acceptable for human consumption. The concentrations of mercury in the white muscle and liver of several fish from the upper Fraser River exceeded the provincial tissue residue criteria for people who consumed low quantities of fish. The concentrations of PCDDs, PCDFs, and coplanar PCBs (expressed as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents) in red muscle and liver of these fish exceeded the Health Canada working guidelines for the protection of human health. By comparison, white sturgeon collected in the lower Fraser River had much lower concentrations of metals and organic contaminants. The differences in contaminant burdens in fish from the two widely separated reaches of the river reflect their proximity to or distance from known contaminant sources.

  2. Paleomagnetism of the 1210 Ma Gnowangerup-Fraser dyke swarm, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarevsky, S. A.; Li, Z. X.; Wingate, M. T. D.; Tohver, E.

    2012-04-01

    The Gnowangerup-Fraser mafic dyke swarm is part of the Marnda Moorn LIP and subparallel to the southern and southeastern margins of the Yilgarn Craton. Some dykes become progressively recrystallized towards the craton margin and others are strongly deformed within the orogen, implying that at least some dykes were emplaced prior to the youngest deformation in the Albany-Fraser Orogen. Five dykes have previously yielded U-Pb ages between 1203 and 1218 Ma, and the primary nature of the magnetic directions in a 1212 Ma Fraser dyke is supported by a positive baked-contact test. We collected paleomagnetism samples from 19 dykes, along the Phillips and Fitzgerald Rivers, and near Ravensthorpe. AF demagnetisation revealed a stable bipolar remanence in 13 dykes. The mean paleomagnetic pole is almost identical to the VGP of the 1212 Ma Fraser dyke. The combined robust paleopole places the West Australian Craton in a near-polar position at 1210 Ma. Comparison with coeval Laurentian paleopoles indicates that Laurentia and Australia were widely separated at that time.

  3. Chlorine-bearing amphiboles from the Fraser mine, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada: Description and crystal chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, K.A.; McDonald, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Three chemically distinct populations of Cl-bearing amphibole have been recognized in association with contact Ni-Cu ore deposits in Footwall Breccia at the Fraser mine, Sudbury, Ontario. The first population, defined as halogen-poor (700 ppm) and F (2500 ppm). These rocks thus may have been a significant contributor to the fluids.

  4. Civic Fragmentation or Voluntary Association? Habermas, Fraser, and Charter School Segregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Terri S.

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, Terri Wilson puts the argument developed by Kathleen Knight Abowitz that charter schools could be considered as counterpublic spaces into interaction with empirical research that explores patterns of voluntary self-segregation in charter schools. Wilson returns to the theoretical tension between Jurgen Habermas and Nancy Fraser over…

  5. Congenital High Airway Obstruction Syndrome (CHAOS) as part of Fraser syndrome: ultrasound and autopsy findings.

    PubMed

    Mesens, T; Witters, I; Van Robaeys, J; Peeters, H; Fryns, J P

    2013-01-01

    Congenital High Airway Obstruction Syndrome (CHAOS) is a potential lethal condition. We describe a case report of CHAOS, with additional malformations diagnosed at 20 weeks. Autopsy findings are suggestive for Fraser syndrome (cryptophthalmos-syndactyly syndrome; OMIM 219000). The diagnosis was confirmed by mutation analysis of FRAS1.

  6. Expanding the mutation spectrum for Fraser syndrome: identification of a novel heterozygous deletion in FRAS1.

    PubMed

    Hoefele, Julia; Wilhelm, Christian; Schiesser, Monika; Mack, Reinhold; Heinrich, Uwe; Weber, Lutz T; Biskup, Saskia; Daumer-Haas, Cornelia; Klein, Hanns-Georg; Rost, Imma

    2013-05-15

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is a rare autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, laryngeal defects and oral clefting, mental retardation, syndactyly, and urogenital defects. To date, 250 patients have been described in the literature. Mutations in the FRAS1 gene on chromosome 4 have been identified in patients with Fraser syndrome. So far, 26 mutations have been identified, most of them are truncating mutations. The mutational spectrum includes nucleotide substitutions, splicing defects, a large insertion, and small deletions/insertions. Moreover, single heterozygous missense mutations in FRAS1 seem to be responsible for non-syndromic unilateral renal agenesis. Here we report the first case of a family with two patients affected by Fraser syndrome due to a deletion of 64 kb (deletion 4q21.21) and an additional novel frameshift mutation in exon 66 of the FRAS1 gene. To date, large deletions of the FRAS1 gene have not yet been described. Large deletions seem to be a rare cause for Fraser syndrome, but should be considered in patients with a single heterozygous mutation.

  7. Prenatal detection of Fraser syndrome without cryptophthalmos: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Berg, C; Geipel, A; Germer, U; Pertersen-Hansen, A; Koch-Dörfler, M; Gembruch, U

    2001-07-01

    Fraser syndrome (cryptophthalmos-syndactyly syndrome) is an autosomal recessive multiple malformation syndrome whose major manifestations are cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, laryngeal atresia and urogenital defects. Enlarged hyperechogenic lungs contrasted by oligohydramnios, non-visualization of the kidneys and microphthalmia were sonographic markers leading to the prenatal detection of this rare autosomal recessive disorder in earlier reports. We report a case of Fraser syndrome diagnosed at 16 weeks' gestational age in a woman whose previous pregnancy was terminated because of multiple fetal malformations. Abnormal sonographic findings included bilateral agenesis of the kidneys, dilated trachea and main bronchi (suggestive of high airway obstruction), hyperechogenic lungs, syndactyly of the fingers, hepatomegaly, oligohydramnios and hydrops placentae. Face and cerebral structures appeared normal. These findings together with those of the previously affected child led to the diagnosis of Fraser syndrome. The parents elected to terminate the pregnancy. Autopsy results were confirmatory. In conclusion, prenatal diagnosis of Fraser syndrome is possible in the hands of an expert, but due to the great variety of possible malformations the diagnosis will remain doubtful in most cases in which no previous child is affected.

  8. AMACO is a component of the basement membrane-associated Fraser complex.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Rebecca J; Gebauer, Jan M; Zhang, Jin-Li; Kobbe, Birgit; Keene, Douglas R; Karlsen, Kristina Røkenes; Richetti, Stefânia; Wohl, Alexander P; Sengle, Gerhard; Neiss, Wolfram F; Paulsson, Mats; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Wagener, Raimund

    2014-05-01

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is a phenotypically variable, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmus, cutaneous syndactyly, and other malformations resulting from mutations in FRAS1, FREM2, and GRIP1. Transient embryonic epidermal blistering causes the characteristic defects of the disorder. Fras1, Frem1, and Frem2 form the extracellular Fraser complex, which is believed to stabilize the basement membrane. However, several cases of FS could not be attributed to mutations in FRAS1, FREM2, or GRIP1, and FS displays high clinical variability, suggesting that there is an additional genetic, possibly modifying contribution to this disorder. An extracellular matrix protein containing VWA-like domains related to those in matrilins and collagens (AMACO), encoded by the VWA2 gene, has a very similar tissue distribution to the Fraser complex proteins in both mouse and zebrafish. Here, we show that AMACO deposition is lost in Fras1-deficient zebrafish and mice and that Fras1 and AMACO interact directly via their chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and P2 domains. Knockdown of vwa2, which alone causes no phenotype, enhances the phenotype of hypomorphic Fras1 mutant zebrafish. Together, our data suggest that AMACO represents a member of the Fraser complex.

  9. Fraser and the Cheerleader: Values and the Boundaries of Student Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrensal, Patricia A. L.

    2012-01-01

    Student speech has and continues to be a contested issue in schools. The Supreme Court ruled in "Tinker" that students do not shed their rights at the schoolhouse gate; in the "Kuhlmeier" and "Fraser" decisions, however, the Court gave school officials greater latitude in regulating student speech, especially when it…

  10. "Authentic Childhood: Experiencing Reggio Emilia in the Classroom," by Sue Fraser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2001-01-01

    Reviews Fraser's book, which relates the author's work at Douglas College, New Westminster, British Columbia, and three child care settings to interpret the Reggio Emilia approach for Canadian settings. Notes that the book reminds readers that what is missing from prescribed curricula is the relationship of learners to the material; in this book,…

  11. Controls of Holocene to contemporary sedimentary source-to-sink fluxes in valley-fjord systems in western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.; Laute, Katja; Liermann, Susan

    2014-05-01

    The presented research has been carried out since 2004 in two selected valley-fjord systems (Erdalen and Bødalen) in Nordfjord, western Norway. The focus of the work has been on Holocene to contemporary sedimentary fluxes and budgets, with particular interest in (i) Analyzing in which way glacial isostatic adjustment and surface denudational processes have been interacting over the Holocene, (ii) Analyzing how the inheritance of the landscape due to the influence of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has affected surface process rates over time, (iii) Documenting changes in surface process rates over different timescales by combining knowledge on Holocene surface process rates with data on subrecent and contemporary surface process rates. Detailed and longer-term monitoring of relevant denudational surface processes in the Erdalen and Bødalen drainage basin systems has provided high-resolution data for analyzing and quantifying contemporary solute and sedimentary fluxes as well as sediment sources, denudation rates, and meteorological and topographical / landscape morphometric controls of denudational surface processes. Proglacial lakes are functioning as significant sediment traps (with trap efficiencies reaching up to 85%) within both drainage basins and the volume and composition of lake sediments have been studied by using echo-sounder, georadar and different sediment coring techniques. Investigations on volumes and architecture of storage elements (talus cones, valley infills, deltas at the outlets of Erdalen and Bødalen) using different geophysical methods like georadar and seismic refraction surveys have been carried out to get quantitative knowledge on Holocene process rates and sedimentary budgets. Detailed geomorphological mapping has been conducted and interpreted in combination with slope and valley morphometric analyses and digital elevation models and data. It is found that the U-shaped valley morphometry is the main control of the spatial organization

  12. Geohydrology and mathematical simulation of the Pajaro Valley aquifer system, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.J.; Londquist, C.J.; Laudon, Julie; Mitten, H.T.

    1988-01-01

    Groundwater development has resulted in lowered water levels and seawater intrusion in the Pajaro Valley, California. An investigation was undertaken to describe the geohydrology of the groundwater flow system and to evaluate the response of the system to pumping stresses by using a mathematical model. The aquifer system consists of three aquifers. The lower aquifer is in fluvial sequences of Quaternary Aromas Sand below interbedded clay layers. The middle aquifer is in upper fluvial and lower eolian sequence of Aromas Sand, and in overlying basal gravels in terrace deposits and alluvium. Weathered soil zones in the Aromas Sand, and clay layers in the terrace deposits and alluvium overlie the middle aquifer. The upper aquifer is actually many discontinuous water bearing zones in the Aromas Sand, terrace deposits, alluvium, and dune sand. The three aquifers are represented in the mathematical model by three model layers separated by two confining layers. Model-generated water budgets for the 11-year simulation period show that storage decreased by 23,000 acre-ft, mostly during the 1976-77 drought. The calibrated model can simulate, with acceptable accuracy, both semiannual and long-term trends of potentiometric heads in parts of the lower and middle layers. (USGS)

  13. Geohydrology and Water Quality of the Valley-Fill Aquifer System in the Upper Sixmile Creek and West Branch Owego Creek Valleys in the Town of Caroline, Tompkins County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Todd S.

    2009-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Town of Caroline and Tompkins County Planning Department, began a study of the valley-fill aquifer system in upper Sixmile Creek and headwaters of West Branch Owego Creek valleys in the Town of Caroline, NY. The purpose of the study is to provide geohydrologic data to county and town planners as they develop a strategy to manage and protect their water resources. The first aquifer reach investigated in this series is in the Town of Caroline and includes the upper Sixmile Creek valley and part of West Branch Owego Creek valley. The portions of the valley-fill aquifer system that are comprised of saturated coarse-grained sediments including medium to coarse sand and sandy gravel form the major aquifers. Confined sand and gravel units form the major aquifers in the western and central portions of the upper Sixmile Creek valley, and an unconfined sand and gravel unit forms the major aquifer in the eastern portion of the upper Sixmile Creek valley and in the headwaters of the West Branch Owego Creek valley. The valley-fill deposits are thinnest near the edges of the valley where they pinch out along the till-mantled bedrock valley walls. The thickness of the valley fill in the deepest part of the valley, at the western end of the study area, is about 100 feet (ft); the thickness is greater than 165 ft on top of the Valley Heads Moraine in the central part of the valley. An estimated 750 people live over and rely on groundwater from the valley-fill aquifers in upper Sixmile Creek and West Branch Owego Creek valleys. Most groundwater withdrawn from the valley-fill aquifers is pumped from wells with open-ended 6-inch diameter casings; the remaining withdrawals are from shallow dug wells or cisterns that collect groundwater that discharges to springs (especially in the Brooktondale area). The valley-fill aquifers are the sources of water for about 200 households, several apartment complexes, two mobile home parks

  14. Interpretive geologic cross sections for the Death Valley regional flow system and surrounding areas, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Sweetkind; R.P. Dickerson; R.J. Blakely; P.D. Denning

    2001-11-09

    This report presents a network of 28 geologic cross sections that portray subsurface geologic relations within the Death Valley regional ground-water system, a ground-water basin that encompasses a 3 degree x 3 degree area (approximately 70,000 square kilometers) in southern Nevada and eastern California. The cross sections transect that part of the southern Great Basin that includes Death Valley, the Nevada Test Site, and the potential high-level nuclear waste underground repository at Yucca Mountain. The specific geometric relationships portrayed on the cross sections are discussed in the context of four general sub-regions that have stratigraphic similarities and general consistency of structural style: (1) the Nevada Test Site vicinity; (2) the Spring Mountains, Pahrump Valley and Amargosa Desert region; (3) the Death Valley region; and (4) the area east of the Nevada Test Site. The subsurface geologic interpretations portrayed on the cross sections are based on an integration of existing geologic maps, measured stratigraphic sections, published cross sections, well data, and geophysical data and interpretations. The estimated top of pre-Cenozoic rocks in the cross sections is based on inversion of gravity data, but the deeper parts of the sections are based on geologic conceptual models and are more speculative.

  15. Glacial isostatic adjustment and Holocene to contemporary source-to-sink fluxes in valley-fjord systems in western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.; Laute, Katja; Liermann, Susan

    2013-04-01

    The focus of this Norwegian Research Council (NFR) funded Norwegian Individual Project (http://www.ngu.no/sedymont) within the European Science Foundation (ESF) SedyMONT (as part of EUROCORES TOPO-EUROPE) Programme (http://www.esf.org/topoeurope) is on Holocene, subrecent and contemporary sedimentary fluxes and budgets in selected valley-fjord systems (Erdalen and Bødalen) in Nordfjord, western Norway. The following main aims can be pointed out: - Analyse in which way glacial isostatic adjustment and surface denudational processes have been interacting over the Holocene - Analyse how the inheritance of the landscape due to the influence of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has affected surface process rates over time - Document changes in surface process rates over different timescales by combining knowledge on Holocene surface process rates with data on subrecent and contemporary surface process rates High-resolution monitoring of denudational surface processes in the Erdalen and Bødalen drainage basin systems, in combination with repeated analyses of surface water chemistry, atmospheric solute inputs and granulometric as well as shape analyses of suspended sediments provide high-resolution data to analyse and quantify present-day sedimentary and solute fluxes as well as sediment sources, denudation rates, and meteorological and topographical / landscape morphometric controls of denudational surface processes. In addition to standard methods for monitoring bedload transport, innovative techniques like impact sensors and biofilm analysis are applied in combination with advanced flume experiments (for calibration of field data) to analyse channel stability / mobility and to estimate bedload transport rates in both drainage basin systems. Lakes are functioning as significant sediment traps within both drainage basins and the volume and composition of lake sediments are studied using echo-sounder, georadar and different coring techniques. Investigations on volumes and

  16. Aquifer-System Characterization by Integrating Data from the Subsurface and from Space, San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneed, M.; Brandt, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Extensive groundwater pumping from the aquifer system in the San Joaquin Valley, California, between 1926 and 1970 caused widespread aquifer-system compaction and resultant land subsidence that locally exceeded 8 m. The importation of surface water in the early 1970s resulted in decreased pumping, recovery of water levels, and a reduced rate of subsidence in some areas. Recently, land-use changes and reductions in surface-water availability have caused pumping to increase, water levels to decline, and subsidence to recur. Reduced freeboard and flow capacity of several Federal, State, and local canals have resulted from this subsidence. Vertical land-surface changes during 2005-14 in the San Joaquin Valley were determined by using space-based [Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS)] and subsurface (extensometer) data; groundwater-level and lithologic data were used to understand and estimate properties that partly control the stress/strain response of the aquifer system. Results of the InSAR analysis indicate that two areas covering about 7,200 km2 subsided 20-540 mm during 2008-10; GPS data indicate that these rates continued through 2014. Groundwater levels (stress) and vertical land-surface changes (strain) were used to estimate preconsolidation head and aquifer system storage coefficients. Integrating lithology into the analysis indicates that in some parts of the valley, the compaction occurred primarily within quickly-equilibrating fine-grained deposits in deeper parts of the aquifer system. In other parts of the valley, anomalously fine-grained alluvial-fan deposits underlie one of the most rapidly subsiding areas, indicating the shallow sediments may also contribute to total subsidence. This information helps improve hydrologic and aquifer-system compaction models, which in turn can be used to consider land subsidence as a constraint in evaluating water-resource management options.

  17. Hydrostructural maps of the Death Valley regional flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, C.J.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Dickerson, R.P.; Killgore, M.L.

    2002-03-15

    The locations of principal faults and structural zones that may influence ground-water flow were compiled in support of a three-dimensional ground-water model for the Death Valley regional flow system, which covers 80,000 km2 in southwestern Nevada and southeastern California. Faults include Neogene extensional and strike-slip faults and pre-Tertiary thrust faults. Emphasis was given to characteristics of faults and deformed zones that may have a high potential for influencing hydraulic conductivity. These include: (1) faulting that results in the juxtaposition of stratigraphic units with contrasting hydrologic properties, which may cause ground-water discharge and other perturbations in the flow system; (2) special physical characteristics of the fault zones, such as brecciation and fracturing, that may cause specific parts of the zone to act either as conduits or as barriers to fluid flow; (3) the presence of a variety of lithologies whose physical and deformational characteristics m ay serve to impede or enhance flow in fault zones; (4) orientation of a fault with respect to the present-day stress field, possibly influencing hydraulic conductivity along the fault zone; and (5) faults that have been active in late Pleistocene or Holocene time and areas of contemporary seismicity, which may be associated with enhanced permeabilities.

  18. CO{sub 2} flux measurements across portions of the Dixie Valley geothermal system, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F.; Janik, C.J.; Johnson, S.D.

    1998-12-31

    A map of the CO{sub 2} flux across a newly formed area of plant kill in the NW part of the Dixie Valley geothermal system was constructed to monitor potential growth of a fumarole field. Flux measurements were recorded using a LI-COR infrared analyzer. Sample locations were restricted to areas within and near the dead zone. The data delineate two areas of high CO{sub 2} flux in different topographic settings. Older fumaroles along the Stillwater range front produce large volumes of CO{sub 2} at high temperatures. High CO{sub 2} flux values were also recorded at sites along a series of recently formed ground fractures at the base of the dead zone. The two areas are connected by a zone of partial plant kill and moderate flux on an alluvial fan. Results from this study indicate a close association between the range front fumaroles and the dead zone fractures. The goals of this study are to characterize recharge to the geothermal system, provide geochemical monitoring of reservoir fluids and to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of the CO{sub 2} flux in the dead zone. This paper reports the results of the initial CO{sub 2} flux measurements taken in October, 1997.

  19. High-level-waste treatment at West Valley: integrated radwaste treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.N. )

    1992-01-01

    The West Valley Site was the location of the only operating nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in the United States. A private firm operated the facility from 1966 to 1972, processing 640 tonnes of commercial and defense fuels using the plutonium uranium reduction extraction (Purex) process. Approximately 2.1 million liters of liquid reprocessing waste resulted from this operation. These wastes were stored in an underground storage tank. The integrated radwaste treatment system (IRTS) began operation in May 1988. This is a liquid waste pretreatment system designated to decontaminate the high-level liquid waste (HLLW), forming a low-level liquid waste (LLLW). The LLLW is encapsulated in cement, poured into 71-gal square drums and stored in a remotely operated shielded retrievable storage location. From May 1988 through November 1990, the IRTS decontaminated 450,000 gal of HLLW, encapsulating the resulting concentrates into 10,393, 71-gal square drums. All of the technical difficulties encountered during 2 1/2 yr of processing were resolved using available technology without compromising safety or product quality. There was no abnormal or unacceptable personnel exposure during this processing period.

  20. Changes in Vegetation Reflect Changes in the Mammoth Mountain and Long Valley Caldera Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, F.; Diefenbach, A. K.; Evans, W.; Hurwitz, S.

    2013-12-01

    We examined aerial photographs of the area near Mammoth Lakes, CA taken from 1951 to the present, with the goal of determining if visible changes in vegetation might reflect changes in the upflow of gas or heat through the soil zone. Such changes could be related to magmatic intrusion, the development of geothermal resources, groundwater pumping, earthquakes, or to natural changes in the hydrothermal flow system. We examined the area near Horseshoe Lake at the southern base of Mammoth Mountain where diffuse emissions of carbon dioxide created extensive tree-kill in the 1990s. Analysis of photographs acquired in 1951 suggests that tree density in this area was lower than its surroundings at the time. Whether the low-density tree cover identified in the photographs indicates some lasting effects of a previous episode of tree mortality needs further investigation. We also examine possible effects of geothermal energy production at Casa Diablo that began operation in 1985 on vegetation along the western part of the resurgent dome of Long Valley Caldera. Previous studies have correlated tree-kill in this area with increased steam upflow from the hydrothermal system.

  1. New Geomorphic map of SW Fraser Lowland, NW Washington, Shows Multiple Post-LGM Moraines, Fossil Shorelines, Outburst Flood and Glacial Outwash Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easterbrook, D. J.; Kovanen, D. J.; Haugerud, R. A.

    2008-12-01

    channel gradient, absence of incised valley walls west of Everson, and some archaeologic data suggests that the Nooksack formerly drained north from the town of Everson, via Sumas, into the Fraser River. Human activity: Modified land surfaces include river levees, highways, railways, and sea walls. Confinement of the modern Nooksack River has reduced depositional compensation for ongoing subsidence and led to net loss of surface elevation.

  2. Seismic interpretation of the deep structure of the Wabash Valley Fault System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bear, G.W.; Rupp, J.A.; Rudman, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    Interpretations of newly available seismic reflection profiles near the center of the Illinois Basin indicate that the Wabash Valley Fault System is rooted in a series of basement-penetrating faults. The fault system is composed predominantly of north-northeast-trending high-angle normal faults. The largest faults in the system bound the 22-km wide 40-km long Grayville Graben. Structure contour maps drawn on the base of the Mount Simon Sandstone (Cambrian System) and a deeper pre-Mount Simon horizon show dip-slip displacements totaling at least 600 meters across the New Harmony fault. In contrast to previous interpretations, the N-S extent of significant fault offsets is restricted to a region north of 38?? latitude and south of 38.35?? latitude. This suggests that the graben is not a NE extension of the structural complex composed of the Rough Creek Fault System and the Reelfoot Rift as previously interpreted. Structural complexity on the graben floor also decreases to the south. Structural trends north of 38?? latitude are offset laterally across several large faults, indicating strike-slip motions of 2 to 4 km. Some of the major faults are interpreted to penetrate to depths of 7 km or more. Correlation of these faults with steep potential field gradients suggests that the fault positions are controlled by major lithologic contacts within the basement and that the faults may extend into the depth range where earthquakes are generated, revealing a potential link between specific faults and recently observed low-level seismicity in the area.

  3. DoD-GEIS Rift Valley Fever Monitoring and Prediction System as a Tool for Defense and US Diplomacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyamba, Assaf; Tucker, Compton J.; Linthicum, Kenneth J.; Witt, Clara J.; Gaydos, Joel C.; Russell, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center's Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (GEIS) partnering with NASA'S Goddard Space Flight Center and USDA's USDA-Center for Medical, Agricultural & Veterinary Entomology established and have operated the Rift Valley fever Monitoring and Prediction System to monitor, predict and assess the risk of Rift Valley fever outbreaks and other vector-borne diseases over Africa and the Middle East. This system is built on legacy DoD basic research conducted by Walter Reed Army Institute of Research overseas laboratory (US Army Medical Research Unit-Kenya) and the operational satellite environmental monitoring by NASA GSFC. Over the last 10 years of operation the system has predicted outbreaks of Rift Valley fever in the Horn of Africa, Sudan, South Africa and Mauritania. The ability to predict an outbreak several months before it occurs provides early warning to protect deployed forces, enhance public health in concerned countries and is a valuable tool use.d by the State Department in US Diplomacy. At the international level the system has been used by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAD) and the World Health Organization (WHO) to support their monitoring, surveillance and response programs in the livestock sector and human health. This project is a successful testament of leveraging resources of different federal agencies to achieve objectives of force health protection, health and diplomacy.

  4. Reconstructing late Pliocene to middle Pleistocene Death Valley lakes and river systems as a test of pupfish (Cyprinodontidae) dispersal hypotheses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, J.R.; Machette, M.N.; Klinger, R.E.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Liddicoat, J.C.; Tinsley, J. C.; David, B.T.; Ebbs, V.M.

    2008-01-01

    Nevada by such a connection is not supported. Beyond the biologically predicted time frame, however, sparse and disputed data suggest that a fluvial system connected Panamint (Owens River), Death, and Amargosa Valleys, which could account for the dispersal and isolation before 3 Ma. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  5. Sub-glacial Origin of the Hot Springs Bay Valley hydrothermal System, Akutan, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelling, P. L.; Tobin, B.; Knapp, P.

    2015-12-01

    Exploration for geothermal energy in Hot Springs Bay Valley (HSBV) on Akutan Island, Alaska, has revealed a rich hydrothermal history, including what appears to be a stage of peak activity during a significant glacial period. Alteration mineralogy observed in 754 m of drill core recovered from the outflow zone is dominated by chlorite and includes minor smectite clays, a suite of zeolite species and several moderately high-temperature hydrothermal minerals (epidote/clinozoisite, prehnite, adularia and wairakite). The latter minerals each have minimum formation temperatures exceeding 200 oC, and fluid inclusion results in related calcite crystals indicate temperatures of formation to be as high as 275 oC, some 100 oC hotter than the modern boiling point with depth (BPD) curve at that depth (>62 m). In order to maintain liquid temperatures this high, the pressure during mineralization must have been substantially greater (~680 bar), a pressure change equivalent to erosion of ~280 m of rock (ρ=2.5 g/cm3). Although glacial erosion rates are too low (0.034 mm/yr; Bekele et al., 2003) for this amount of erosion to occur in a single glaciation, glacial melting and ablation are substantially more rapid (~100 mm/yr; Bekele et al., 2003; Person et al., 2012). Thus, a more probable scenario than pure erosion is that peak hydrothermal conditions occurred during a large glacial event, with the added pressure from the overlying ice allowing the high temperature minerals to form closer to the ground surface. Subsequent melting of the ice eroded upper tributary valleys and upper levels of the originally smectite-rich alteration assemblage, explaining the paucity of swelling clays in the region. We present mineralogical, fluid inclusion and geochronologic evidence to support these conclusions, and discuss the general implications of sub-glacial hydrothermal system formation and geothermal resource potential. References: Bekele, E., Rostron, B. and Person, M. (2003) Fluid pressure

  6. An application of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system to landslide susceptibility mapping (Klang valley, Malaysia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, Ebru; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Gokceoglu, Candan

    2010-05-01

    Landslides are one of the recurrent natural hazard problems throughout most of Malaysia. Recently, the Klang Valley area of Selangor state has faced numerous landslide and mudflow events and much damage occurred in these areas. However, only little effort has been made to assess or predict these events which resulted in serious damages. Through scientific analyses of these landslides, one can assess and predict landslide-susceptible areas and even the events as such, and thus reduce landslide damages through proper preparation and/or mitigation. For this reason , the purpose of the present paper is to produce landslide susceptibility maps of a part of the Klang Valley areas in Malaysia by employing the results of the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) analyses. Landslide locations in the study area were identified by interpreting aerial photographs and satellite images, supported by extensive field surveys. Landsat TM satellite imagery was used to map vegetation index. Maps of topography, lineaments and NDVI were constructed from the spatial datasets. Seven landslide conditioning factors such as altitude, slope angle, plan curvature, distance from drainage, soil type, distance from faults and NDVI were extracted from the spatial database. These factors were analyzed using an ANFIS to construct the landslide susceptibility maps. During the model development works, total 5 landslide susceptibility models were obtained by using ANFIS results. For verification, the results of the analyses were then compared with the field-verified landslide locations. Additionally, the ROC curves for all landslide susceptibility models were drawn and the area under curve values was calculated. Landslide locations were used to validate results of the landslide susceptibility map and the verification results showed 98% accuracy for the model 5 employing all parameters produced in the present study as the landslide conditioning factors. The validation results showed sufficient

  7. West Valley Demonstration Project vitrification process equipment Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, D.E.; Paul, J.; Foran, J.M.; Brooks, R.

    1990-09-30

    The Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass for disposal in a federal repository. The Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) program was conducted from 1984 to 1989. During this time new equipment and processes were developed, installed, and implemented. Thirty-seven FACTS tests were conducted, and approximately 150,000 kg of glass were made by using nonradioactive materials to simulate the radioactive waste. By contrast, the planned radioactive operation is expected to produce approximately 500,000 kg of glass. The FACTS program demonstrated the effectiveness of equipment and procedures in the vitrification system, and the ability of the VF to produce quality glass on schedule. FACTS testing also provided data to validate the WVNS waste glass qualification method and verify that the product glass would meet federal repository acceptance requirements. The system was built and performed to standards which would have enabled it to be used in radioactive service. As a result, much of the VF tested, such as the civil construction, feed mixing and holding vessels, and the off-gas scrubber, will be converted for radioactive operation. The melter was still in good condition after being at temperature for fifty-eight of the sixty months of FACTS. However, the melter exceeded its recommended design life and will be replaced with a similar melter. Components that were not designed for remote operation and maintenance will be replaced with remote-use items. The FACTS testing was accomplished with no significant worker injury or environmental releases. During the last FACTS run, the VF processes approximated the remote-handling system that will be used in radioactive operations. Following this run the VF was disassembled for conversion to a radioactive process. Functional and checkout testing of new components will be performed prior to radioactive operation.

  8. Hydrogeology of, and simulation of ground-water flow in a mantled carbonate-rock system, Cumberland Valley, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chichester, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in a highly productive and complex regolith-mantled carbonate valley in the northeastern part of the Cumberland Valley, Pa., as part of its Appalachian Valleys and Piedmont Regional Aquifer-system Analysis program. The study was designed to quantify the hydrogeologic characteristics and understand the ground-water flow system of a highly productive and complex thickly mantled carbonate valley. The Cumberland Valley is characterized by complexly folded and faulted carbonate bedrock in the valley bottom, by shale and graywacke to the north, and by red-sedimentary and diabase rocks in the east-southeast. Near the southern valley hillslope, the carbonate rock is overlain by wedge-shaped deposit of regolith, up to 450 feet thick, that is composed of residual material, alluvium, and colluvium. Locally, saturated regolith is greater than 200 feet thick. Seepage-run data indicate that stream reaches, near valley walls, are losing water from the stream, through the regolith, to the ground-water system. Results of hydrograph-separation analyses indicate that base flow in stream basins dominated by regolith-mantled carbonate rock, carbonate rock, and carbonate rock and shale are 81.6, 93.0, and 67.7 percent of total streamflow, respectively. The relative high percentage for the regolith-mantled carbonate-rock basin indicates that the regolith stores precipitation and slowly, steadily releases this water to the carbonate-rock aquifer and to streams as base flow. Anomalies in water-table gradients and configuration are a result of topography and differences in the character and distribution of overburden material, permeability, rock type, and geologic structure. Most ground-water flow is local, and ground water discharges to nearby springs and streams. Regional flow is northeastward to the Susquehanna River. Average-annual water budgets were calculated for the period of record from two continuous streamflow-gaging stations. Average

  9. Hydraulic and mechanical properties affecting ground-water flow and aquifer-system compaction, San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes hydraulic and mechanical properties affecting ground-water flow and aquifer-system compaction in the San Joaquin Valley, a broad alluviated intermontane structural trough that constitutes the southern two-thirds of the Central Valley of California. These values will be used to constrain a coupled ground-water flow and aquifer-system compaction model of the western San Joaquin Valley called WESTSIM. A main objective of the WESTSIM model is to evaluate potential future land subsidence that might occur under conditions in which deliveries of imported surface water for agricultural use are reduced and ground-water pumping is increased. Storage values generally are components of the total aquifer-system storage and include inelastic and elastic skeletal storage values of the aquifers and the aquitards that primarily govern the potential amount of land subsidence. Vertical hydraulic conductivity values generally are for discrete thicknesses of sediments, usually aquitards, that primarily govern the rate of land subsidence. The data were compiled from published sources and include results of aquifer tests, stress-strain analyses of borehole extensometer observations, laboratory consolidation tests, and calibrated models of aquifer-system compaction.

  10. Modelling a real-world buried valley system with vertical non-stationarity using multiple-point statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiulan; Sonnenborg, Torben O.; Jørgensen, Flemming; Jensen, Karsten H.

    2017-03-01

    Stationarity has traditionally been a requirement of geostatistical simulations. A common way to deal with non-stationarity is to divide the system into stationary sub-regions and subsequently merge the realizations for each region. Recently, the so-called partition approach that has the flexibility to model non-stationary systems directly was developed for multiple-point statistics simulation (MPS). The objective of this study is to apply the MPS partition method with conventional borehole logs and high-resolution airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data, for simulation of a real-world non-stationary geological system characterized by a network of connected buried valleys that incise deeply into layered Miocene sediments (case study in Denmark). The results show that, based on fragmented information of the formation boundaries, the MPS partition method is able to simulate a non-stationary system including valley structures embedded in a layered Miocene sequence in a single run. Besides, statistical information retrieved from the AEM data improved the simulation of the geology significantly, especially for the deep-seated buried valley sediments where borehole information is sparse.

  11. Deep borehole measurements for characterizing the magma/hydrothermal system at Long Valley Caldera, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Magma Energy Program of the Geothermal Technology Division is scheduled to begin drilling a deep (6 km) exploration well in long Valley Caldera, California in 1989. The drilling site is near the center of the caldera which is associated with numerous shallow (5-7 km) geophysical anomalies. This deep well will present an unparalleled opportunity to test and validate geophysical techniques for locating magma as well as a test of the theory that magma is still present at drillable depths within the central portion of the caldera. If, indeed, drilling indicates magma, the geothermal community will then be afforded the unique possibility of examining the coupling between magmatic and hydrothermal regimes in a major volcanic system. Goals of planned seismic experiments that involve the well include the investigation of local crystal structure down to depths of 10 km as well as the determination of mechanisms for local seismicity and deformation. Borehole electrical and electromagnetic surveys will increase the volume and depth of rock investigated by the well through consideration of the conductive structure of the hydrothermal and underlying regimes. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity model of the hydrothermal system in Long Valley Caldera, California, from magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J. R.; Mangan, M. T.; McPhee, D.; Wannamaker, P. E.

    2016-08-01

    Though shallow flow of hydrothermal fluids in Long Valley Caldera, California, has been well studied, neither the hydrothermal source reservoir nor heat source has been well characterized. Here a grid of magnetotelluric data were collected around the Long Valley volcanic system and modeled in 3-D. The preferred electrical resistivity model suggests that the source reservoir is a narrow east-west elongated body 4 km below the west moat. The heat source could be a zone of 2-5% partial melt 8 km below Deer Mountain. Additionally, a collection of hypersaline fluids, not connected to the shallow hydrothermal system, is found 3 km below the medial graben, which could originate from a zone of 5-10% partial melt 8 km below the south moat. Below Mammoth Mountain is a 3 km thick isolated body containing fluids and gases originating from an 8 km deep zone of 5-10% basaltic partial melt.

  13. Bottom-up, decision support system development : a wetlandsalinity management application in California's San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-05-10

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin ofCalifornia's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratorywildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during theannual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetland contain saltwhich, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdownperiod, negatively impacts downstream agricultural riparian waterdiverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinityto the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-pointsources, now addresses return flows from seasonally managed wetlands.Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means ofmatching wetland return flows to the assimilative capacity of the SanJoaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring anddecision support systems to implement this concept have failed forreasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed inthe context of more general challenges facing the successfulimplementation of environmental monitoring, modelling and decisionsupport systems. The paper then provides details of a current researchand development project which will ultimately provide wetland managerswith the means of matching salt exports with the available assimilativecapacity of the San Joaquin River, when fully implemented. Manipulationof the traditional wetland drawdown comes at a potential cost to thesustainability of optimal wetland moist soil plant habitat in thesewetlands - hence the project provides appropriate data and a feedback andresponse mechanism for wetland managers to balance improvements to SanJoaquin River quality with internally-generated information on the healthof the wetland resource. The author concludes the paper by arguing thatthe architecture of the current project decision support system, whencoupled with recent advances in environmental data acquisition, dataprocessing and information dissemination technology, holds significantpromise

  14. Electric dipole spin resonance in systems with a valley-dependent g factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rančić, Marko J.; Burkard, Guido

    2016-05-01

    In this theoretical study we qualitatively and quantitatively investigate the electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR) in a single Si/SiGe quantum dot in the presence of a magnetic field gradient, e.g., produced by a ferromagnet. We model a situation in which the control of electron spin states is achieved by applying an oscillatory electric field, inducing real-space oscillations of the electron inside the quantum dot. One of the goals of our study is to present a microscopic theory of valley-dependent g factors in Si/SiGe quantum dots and investigate how valley relaxation combined with a valley-dependent g factor leads to a novel electron spin dephasing mechanism. Furthermore, we discuss the interplay of spin and valley relaxations in Si/SiGe quantum dots. Our findings suggest that the electron spin dephases due to valley relaxation, and are in agreement with recent experimental studies [Nat. Nanotechnol. 9, 666 (2014), 10.1038/nnano.2014.153].

  15. wrv: An R Package for Groundwater Flow Model Construction, Wood River Valley Aquifer System, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater models are one of the main tools used in the hydrogeological sciences to assess resources and to simulate possible effects from future water demands and changes in climate. The hydrological inputs to groundwater models can be numerous and can vary in both time and space. Difficulties associated with model construction are often related to extensive datasets and cumbersome data processing tasks. To mitigate these difficulties, a graphical user interface (GUI) is often employed to aid the input of data for creating models. Unfortunately, GUI software presents an obstacle to reproducibility, a cornerstone of research. The considerable effort required to document processing steps in a GUI program, and the rapid obsoleteness of these steps with subsequent versions of the software, has prompted modelers to explicitly write down processing steps as source code to make them 'easily' reproducible. This research describes the R package wrv, a collection of datasets and functions for pre- and post-processing the numerical groundwater flow model of the Wood River Valley aquifer system, south-central Idaho. R largely facilitates reproducible modeling with the package vignette; a document that is a combination of content and source code. The code is run when the vignette is built, and all data analysis output (such as figures and tables) is created on the fly and inserted into the final document. The wrv package includes two vignettes that explain and run steps that (1) create package datasets from raw data files located on a publicly accessible repository, and (2) create and run the groundwater flow model. MODFLOW-USG, the numerical groundwater model used in this study, is executed from the vignette, and model output is returned for exploratory analyses. The ability of R to perform all processing steps in a single workflow is attributed to its comprehensive list of features; that include geographic information system and time series functionality.

  16. Deep Borehole Measurements for Characterizing the Magma/Hydrothermal System at Long Valley Caldera, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Carrrigan, Charles R.

    1989-03-21

    The Magma Energy Program of the Geothermal Technology Division is scheduled to begin drilling a deep (6 km) exploration well in Long Valley Caldera, California in 1989. The drilling site is near the center of the caldera which is associated with numerous shallow (5-7 km) geophysical anomalies. This deep well will present an unparalleled opportunity to test and validate geophysical techniques for locating magma as well as a test of the theory that magma is still present at drillable depths within the central portion of the caldera. If, indeed, drilling indicates magma, the geothermal community will then be afforded the unique possibility of examining the coupling between magmatic and hydrothermal regimes in a major volcanic system. Goals of planned seismic experiments that involve the well include the investigation of local crustal structure down to depths of 10 km as well as the determination of mechanisms for local seismicity and deformation. Borehole electrical and electromagnetic surveys will increase the volume and depth of rock investigated by the well through consideration of the conductive structure of the hydrothermal and underlying regimes. Currently active processes involving magma injection will be studied through observation of changes in pore pressure and strain. Measurements of in situ stress from recovered cores and hydraulic fracture tests will be used in conjunction with uplift data to determine those models for magmatic injection and inflation that are most applicable. Finally, studies of the thermal regime will be directed toward elucidating the coupling between the magmatic source region and the more shallow hydrothermal system in the caldera fill. To achieve this will require careful logging of borehole fluid temperature and chemistry. In addition, studies of rock/fluid interactions through core and fluid samples will allow physical characterization of the transition zone between hydrothermal and magmatic regimes.

  17. Budgets and chemical characterization of groundwater for the Diamond Valley flow system, central Nevada, 2011–12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, David L.; Mayers, C. Justin; Garcia, C. Amanda; Buto, Susan G.; Huntington, Jena M.

    2016-07-29

    The pre-development, steady state, groundwater budget for the Diamond Valley flow system was estimated at about 70,000 acre-ft/yr of inflow and outflow. During years 2011–12, inflow components of groundwater recharge from precipitation and subsurface inflow from adjacent basins totaled 70,000 acre-ft/yr for the DVFS, whereas outflow components included 64,000 acre-ft/yr of groundwater evapotranspiration and 69,000 acre-ft/yr of net groundwater withdrawals, or net pumpage. Spring discharge in northern Diamond Valley declined about 6,000 acre-ft/yr between pre-development time and years 2011–12. Assuming net groundwater withdrawals minus spring flow decline is equivalent to the storage change, the 2011–12 summation of inflow and storage change was balanced with outflow at about 133,000 acre-ft/yr.

  18. System of gigantic valleys northwest of Tharsis, Mars: Latent catastrophic flooding, northwest watershed, and implications for northern plains ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, J.M.; Anderson, R.C.; Baker, V.R.; Ferris, J.C.; Hare, T.M.; Strom, R.G.; Rudd, L.P.; Rice, J. W.; Casavant, R.R.; Scott, D.H.

    2000-01-01

    Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) reveals a system of gigantic valleys to the northwest of the huge martian shield volcano, Arsia Mons, in the western hemisphere of Mars. These newly identified northwestern slope valleys (NSVs) potentially signify previously undocumented martian catastrophic floods and may corroborate the northern ocean hypotheses. These features, which generally correspond spatially to gravity lows, were previously obscurred in Mariner and Viking Orbiter imagery by veneers of materials, including volcanic lava flows and air fall deposits. Geologic investigations of the Tharsis region suggest that the NSVs were mainly carved prior to the construction of Arsia Mons and its associated Late Hesperian and Amazonian age lava flows, concurrent with the early development of the outflow channels that debouch into Chryse Planitia.

  19. Geological setting of chemosynthetic communities in the Monterey Fan Valley system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Embley, R.W.; Eittreim, S.L.; McHugh, C.H.; Normark, W.R.; Rau, G.H.; Hecker, Barbara; DeBevoise, A.E.; Greene, H. Gary; Ryan, William B. F.; Harrold, C.; Baxter, C.

    1990-01-01

    Alvin dives and camera tows within the "meander area" of the Monterey and Ascension Fan Valleys have located nine chemosynthetic communities over depths ranging from 3000 to 3600 m over a distance of 55 km. Most of the observed communities consist largely of Calyptogena phaseoliformis, but Solemya (species unknown) and a pogonophoran (genus Polybrachia), have also been identified. The ??13C values (-35.0 to -33.6 per mil) and the presence of APS reductase and ATP sulfurylase in the C. phaseoliformis tissue is consistent with sulfur chemoautotrophy. Two reduced organic matter sources for the H2S are proposed: (1) older beds exposed by the deep erosion (up to 400 m) of the fan valleys and (2) concentrations of anaerobically decomposd organic matter buried in the valley floor. ?? 1990.

  20. Pyrite origin in argillites of Bobrikovskian horizon from incised-valley system zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minibaev, N.; Maiorov, I.

    2012-04-01

    Pyrite is the important reductive condition indicator in sedimentary rocks. These conditions may be a consequence of existed oil pools and may serve as a reconnaissance sign. In this project the objects of research were pyritized argillites of Bobrikovskian horizon from well cut (well #4021 east side of Melekess cavity, South Rzhavetskiy oilfield). Observed sediments are spaced inside Visean incised-valley system. Sedimentary history of Visean incised-valley system is characterized by a combination of superposed rock forming, and syngenetic and epigene processes. This includes the processes under the influence of hydrocarbons. Methods of primary and secondary pyrite recognizing are urgent problems, especially when using pyrite anomalies while searching for characteristic of oil deposits. In the frames of this project we observe basic methods of this sedimentary pyrite research including measurements of magnetic susceptibility and X ray-structural method. After processing and interpreting the data of the measurements the following facts, patterns, relationships came to light: appropriate growth of magnetic susceptibility is observed for each pattern heated to 400° and under 500° pyrite turns into magnetite. The main indicator of pyrite dispersibility is difference in magnetic susceptibility values measured under low (LF) and high (HF) frequency in magnetic fields. We use a self-relative difference indicator of magnetic susceptibility calculated with the following equation: (LF-HF)/LF. This indicator is related to the content of super-paramagnetic particles in rocks. The higher the values of an indicator mean that the rock contains the higher quantity of dispersed pyrite, i.e. "quick" pyrite. High values are recognized in the lower section of argillite layer (max on 1141, 8m in depth). Thus, lower section of argillite (1141, 6-1142 m) originated in strong reductive conditions, but upper section was in relatively weak reductive conditions where microcrystalline

  1. Hydrogeology of the Susquehanna River valley-fill aquifer system and adjacent areas in eastern Broome and southeastern Chenango Counties, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisig, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the valley-fill aquifer system along a 32-mile reach of the Susquehanna River valley and adjacent areas was evaluated in eastern Broome and southeastern Chenango Counties, New York. The surficial geology, inferred ice-marginal positions, and distribution of stratified-drift aquifers were mapped from existing data. Ice-marginal positions, which represent pauses in the retreat of glacial ice from the region, favored the accumulation of coarse-grained deposits whereas more steady or rapid ice retreat between these positions favored deposition of fine-grained lacustrine deposits with limited coarse-grained deposits at depth. Unconfined aquifers with thick saturated coarse-grained deposits are the most favorable settings for water-resource development, and three several-mile-long sections of valley were identified (mostly in Broome County) as potentially favorable: (1) the southernmost valley section, which extends from the New York–Pennsylvania border to about 1 mile north of South Windsor, (2) the valley section that rounds the west side of the umlaufberg (an isolated bedrock hill within a valley) north of Windsor, and (3) the east–west valley section at the Broome County–Chenango County border from Nineveh to East of Bettsburg (including the lower reach of the Cornell Brook valley). Fine-grained lacustrine deposits form extensive confining units between the unconfined areas, and the water-resource potential of confined aquifers is largely untested. Recharge, or replenishment, of these aquifers is dependent not only on infiltration of precipitation directly on unconfined aquifers, but perhaps more so from precipitation that falls in adjacent upland areas. Surface runoff and shallow groundwater from the valley walls flow downslope and recharge valley aquifers. Tributary streams that drain upland areas lose flow as they enter main valleys on permeable alluvial fans. This infiltrating water also recharges valley aquifers. Current (2012) use of

  2. Estimated Ground-water Withdrawals From the Death Valley Regional Flow System, Nevada and California, 1913-98

    SciTech Connect

    M.T. Moreo; K.J. Halford; R.J. LaCamera; and R.J. Laczniak

    2003-09-30

    Ground-water withdrawals from 1913 through 1998 from the Death Valley regional flow system have been compiled to support a regional,three-dimensional, transient ground-water flow model. Withdrawal locations and depths of production intervals were estimated and associated errors were reported for 9,300 wells. Withdrawals were grouped into three categories: mining, public-supply, and commercial water use; domestic water use; and irrigation water use. In this report, groupings were based on the method used to estimate pumpage. Cumulative ground-water withdrawals from 1913 through 1998 totaled 3 million acre-feet, most of which was used to irrigate alfalfa. Annual withdrawal for irrigation ranged from 80 to almost 100 percent of the total pumpage. About 75,000 acre-feet was withdrawn for irrigation in 1998. Annual irrigation withdrawals generally were estimated as the product of irrigated acreage and application rate. About 320 fields totaling 11,000 acres were identified in six hydrographic areas. Annual application rates for high water-use crops ranged from 5 feet in Penoyer Valley to 9 feet in Pahrump Valley. The uncertainty in the estimates of ground-water withdrawals was attributed primarily to the uncertainty of application rate estimates. Annual ground-water withdrawal was estimated at about 90,000 acre-feet in 1998 with an assigned uncertainty bounded by 60,000 to 130,000 acre-feet.

  3. Estimated Ground-Water Withdrawals from the Death Valley Regional Flow System, Nevada and California, 1913-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moreo, Michael T.; Halford, Keith J.; La Camera, Richard J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2003-01-01

    Ground-water withdrawals from 1913 through 1998 from the Death Valley regional flow system have been compiled to support a regional, three-dimensional, transient ground-water flow model. Withdrawal locations and depths of production intervals were estimated and associated errors were reported for 9,300 wells. Withdrawals were grouped into three categories: mining, public-supply, and commercial water use; domestic water use; and irrigation water use. In this report, groupings were based on the method used to estimate pumpage. Cumulative ground-water withdrawals from 1913 through 1998 totaled 3 million acre-feet, most of which was used to irrigate alfalfa. Annual withdrawal for irrigation ranged from 80 to almost 100 percent of the total pumpage. About 75,000 acre-feet was withdrawn for irrigation in 1998. Annual irrigation withdrawals generally were estimated as the product of irrigated acreage and application rate. About 320 fields totaling 11,000 acres were identified in six hydrographic areas. Annual application rates for high water-use crops ranged from 5 feet in Penoyer Valley to 9 feet in Pahrump Valley. The uncertainty in the estimates of ground-water withdrawals was attributed primarily to the uncertainty of application rate estimates. Annual ground-water withdrawal was estimated at about 90,000 acre-feet in 1998 with an assigned uncertainty bounded by 60,000 to 130,000 acre-feet.

  4. Catastrophic flooding origin of shelf valley systems in the English Channel.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Collier, Jenny S; Palmer-Felgate, Andy; Potter, Graeme

    2007-07-19

    Megaflood events involving sudden discharges of exceptionally large volumes of water are rare, but can significantly affect landscape evolution, continental-scale drainage patterns and climate change. It has been proposed that a significant flood event eroded a network of large ancient valleys on the floor of the English Channel-the narrow seaway between England and France. This hypothesis has remained untested through lack of direct evidence, and alternative non-catastrophist ideas have been entertained for valley formation. Here we analyse a new regional bathymetric map of part of the English Channel derived from high-resolution sonar data, which shows the morphology of the valley in unprecedented detail. We observe a large bedrock-floored valley that contains a distinct assemblage of landforms, including streamlined islands and longitudinal erosional grooves, which are indicative of large-scale subaerial erosion by high-magnitude water discharges. Our observations support the megaflood model, in which breaching of a rock dam at the Dover Strait instigated catastrophic drainage of a large pro-glacial lake in the southern North Sea basin. We suggest that megaflooding provides an explanation for the permanent isolation of Britain from mainland Europe during interglacial high-sea-level stands, and consequently for patterns of early human colonisation of Britain together with the large-scale reorganization of palaeodrainage in northwest Europe.

  5. Farming Systems and Rural Out-Migration in Nang Rong, Thailand, and Chitwan Valley, Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Martin; Ghimire, Dirgha; Rindfuss, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Using data from two postfrontier rural settings, Nang Rong, Thailand (N = 2,538), and Chitwan Valley, Nepal (N = 876), this article examines agricultural push factors determining the out-migration of young people age 15 to 19. We focus on different dimensions of migration, including distance and duration. Our study examines a wide array of…

  6. Systemic Inflammatory Load in Young and Old Ringdoves Is Modulated by Consumption of a Jerte Valley Cherry-Based Product

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Jonathan; Terrón, María del Pilar; Garrido, María; Barriga, Carmen; Paredes, Sergio Damián; Espino, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A chronic subclinical inflammatory status that coexists with immune dysfunction is commonly found in the elderly population. Consumption of foods rich in antioxidants (e.g., cherries) is an attractive strategy to reduce risk from chronic diseases. Based on previous studies showing the antioxidant effect of a Jerte Valley cherry derivative product in humans, the objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of the intake of a Jerte Valley cherry-based beverage on inflammatory load in both young and old ringdoves (Streptopelia risoria). To this purpose, circulating levels of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as serum levels of different acute-phase proteins were measured before and after a 10-day treatment with the Jerte Valley cherry-based beverage. Thus, the 10-day treatment with the cherry-based beverage modulated the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in both young and old ringdoves by down-regulating the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ) and up-regulating the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-2, and IL-10). Moreover, the 10-day treatment with the Jerte Valley cherry-based product reduced the levels of several proteins involved in acute-phase responses, such as C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, α2-macroglobulin, and serum amyloid P component. On the other hand, old birds showed imbalanced levels of inflammatory markers toward a pro-inflammatory status, thereby underlining the fact that aging is usually accompanied by systemic inflammation and inflammation-related chronic diseases. To sum up, the data suggest a potential health benefit by consuming the cherry-based beverage, especially in aged populations, through their anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:22846077

  7. Wine Valley Inn: A mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. Geothermal-energy-system conceptual design and economic feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-26

    The purpose of this study is to determine the engineering and economic feasibility for utilizing geothermal energy for air conditioning and service water heating at the Wine Valley Inn, a mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. The study evaluates heating, ventilating, air conditioning and water heating systems suitable for direct heat geothermal application. Due to the excellent geothermal temperatures available at this site, the mechanics and economics of a geothermally powered chilled water cooling system are evaluated. The Wine Valley Inn has the resource potential to have one of the few totally geothermal powered air conditioning and water heating systems in the world. This total concept is completely developed. A water plan was prepared to determine the quantity of water required for fresh water well development based on the special requirements of the project. An economic evaluation of the system is included to justify the added capital investment needed to build the geothermally powered mineral spa. Energy payback calculations are presented. A thermal cascade system is proposed to direct the geothermal water through the energy system to first power the chiller, then the space heating system, domestic hot water, the two spas and finally to heat the swimming pool. The Energy Management strategy required to automatically control this cascade process using industrial quality micro-processor equipment is described. Energy Management controls are selected to keep equipment sizing at a minimum, pump only the amount of geothermal water needed and be self balancing.

  8. Road systems, land use, and related patterns of valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) populations, seedling recruitment, and herbivory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Bill Ahlering

    This research investigates the interactions of road systems and land use on the population dynamics and recruitment of a long-lived tree in Mediterranean climate California. In the case of Valley oak (Quercus lobata), habitat conversion and limited recruitment of new individuals has resulted in widespread declines throughout Santa Barbara County and California. This pattern contrasts with high recruitment rates along roadsides, offering a unique opportunity to examine the effects of roads on the population dynamics of a native species. The pattern of roadside recruits is described, mapped, and a complete survey of the biophysical environment along 109 kilometers of road was conducted. The biophysical factors of the road and road system were of four types: (1) the general roadside environment; (2) the acorn supply; (3) a measure of ungulate deterrence; and, (4) roadside management. Seven individual or aggregate factors were then related to the pattern of seedling and sapling densities along roads. Univariate analysis and regression trees determined that acorn supply and total woody cover within the roadside plots explained 49% of the variation in Valley oak seedling densities. These results support the conclusion that the recruitment pattern is due to the roadsides serving as refugia from browsers (cattle and deer). The change in Valley oak populations within roadsides, croplands, rangelands, and urban/suburban lands over a 59 year period is examined using georeferenced aerial photos from 1938 and 1997. While population per capita growth rates were less than one (declining) within both rangelands and croplands, rates were greater than one (increasing) in urban/suburban populations. While roadside growth rates were even higher than those in urban/suburban areas, high variance resulted in a rate neither positive nor negative. Finally, seedlings were planted along roadsides and within adjacent grazed and ungrazed uplands to test browsing pressure. Seedlings within

  9. Interaction of various flow systems in small alpine catchments: conceptual model of the upper Gurk Valley aquifer, Carinthia, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilberg, Sylke; Riepler, Franz

    2016-08-01

    Small alpine valleys usually show a heterogeneous hydraulic situation. Recurring landslides create temporal barriers for the surface runoff. As a result of these postglacial processes, temporal lakes form, and thus lacustrine fine-grained sedimentation intercalates with alluvial coarse-grained layers. A sequence of alluvial sediments (confined and thus well protected aquifers) and lacustrine sediments (aquitards) is characteristic for such an environment. The hydrogeological situation of fractured hard-rock aquifers in the framing mountain ranges is characterized by superficially high hydraulic conductivities as the result of tectonic processes, deglaciation and postglacial weathering. Fracture permeability and high hydraulic gradients in small-scaled alpine catchments result in the interaction of various flow systems in various kinds of aquifers. Spatial restrictions and conflicts between the current land use and the requirements of drinking-water protection represent a special challenge for water resource management in usually densely populated small alpine valleys. The presented case study describes hydrogeological investigations within the small alpine valley of the upper Gurktal (Upper Carinthia, Austria) and the adjacent Höllenberg Massif (1,772 m above sea level). Hydrogeological mapping, drilling, and hydrochemical and stable isotope analyses of springs and groundwater were conducted to identify a sustainable drinking-water supply for approximately 1,500 inhabitants. The results contribute to a conceptual hydrogeological model with three interacting flow systems. The local and the intermediate flow systems are assigned to the catchment of the Höllenberg Massif, whereas the regional flow system refers to the bordering Gurktal Alps to the north and provides an appropriate drinking water reservoir.

  10. Ground-Water Budgets for the Wood River Valley Aquifer System, South-Central Idaho, 1995-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The Wood River Valley contains most of the population of Blaine County and the cities of Sun Valley, Ketchum, Haley, and Bellevue. This mountain valley is underlain by the alluvial Wood River Valley aquifer system which consists of a single unconfined aquifer that underlies the entire valley, an underlying confined aquifer that is present only in the southernmost valley, and the confining unit that separates them. The entire population of the area depends on ground water for domestic supply, either from domestic or municipal-supply wells, and rapid population growth since the 1970s has caused concern about the long-term sustainability of the ground-water resource. To help address these concerns this report describes a ground-water budget developed for the Wood River Valley aquifer system for three selected time periods: average conditions for the 10-year period 1995-2004, and the single years of 1995 and 2001. The 10-year period 1995-2004 represents a range of conditions in the recent past for which measured data exist. Water years 1995 and 2001 represent the wettest and driest years, respectively, within the 10-year period based on precipitation at the Ketchum Ranger Station. Recharge or inflow to the Wood River Valley aquifer system occurs through seven main sources (from largest to smallest): infiltration from tributary canyons, streamflow loss from the Big Wood River, areal recharge from precipitation and applied irrigation water, seepage from canals and recharge pits, leakage from municipal pipes, percolation from septic systems, and subsurface inflow beneath the Big Wood River in the northern end of the valley. Total estimated mean annual inflow or recharge to the aquifer system for 1995-2004 is 270,000 acre-ft/yr (370 ft3/s). Total recharge for the wet year 1995 and the dry year 2001 is estimated to be 270,000 acre-ft/yr (370 ft3/s) and 220,000 acre-ft/yr (300 ft3/s), respectively. Discharge or outflow from the Wood River Valley aquifer system occurs through

  11. A combined road weather forecast system to prevent road ice formation in the Adige Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Napoli, Claudia; Piazza, Andrea; Antonacci, Gianluca; Todeschini, Ilaria; Apolloni, Roberto; Pretto, Ilaria

    2016-04-01

    Road ice is a dangerous meteorological hazard to a nation's transportation system and economy. By reducing the pavement friction with vehicle tyres, ice formation on pavements increases accident risk and delays travelling times thus posing a serious threat to road users' safety and the running of economic activities. Keeping roads clear and open is therefore essential, especially in mountainous areas where ice is likely to form during the winter period. Winter road maintenance helps to restore road efficiency and security, and its benefits are up to 8 times the costs sustained for anti-icing strategies [1]. However, the optimization of maintenance costs and the reduction of the environmental damage from over-salting demand further improvements. These can be achieved by reliable road weather forecasts, and in particular by the prediction of road surface temperatures (RSTs). RST is one of the most important parameters in determining road surface conditions. It is well known from literature that ice forms on pavements in high-humidity conditions when RSTs are below 0°C. We have therefore implemented an automatic forecast system to predict critical RSTs on a test route along the Adige Valley complex terrain, in the Italian Alps. The system considers two physical models, each computing heat and energy fluxes between the road and the atmosphere. One is Reuter's radiative cooling model, which predicts RSTs at sunrise as a function of surface temperatures at sunset and the time passed since then [2]. One is METRo (Model of the Environment and Temperature of Roads), a road weather forecast software which also considers heat conduction through road material [3]. We have applied the forecast system to a network of road weather stations (road weather information system, RWIS) installed on the test route [4]. Road and atmospheric observations from RWIS have been used as initial conditions for both METRo and Reuter's model. In METRo observations have also been coupled to

  12. Siphateles (Gila) sp. and Catostomus sp. from the Pleistocene OIS-6 Lake Gale, Panamint Valley, Owens River system, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayko, A. S.; Forester, R. M.; Smith, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Panamint Valley lies within the Owens River system which linked southeastern Sierra Nevada basins between Mono Lake and Death Valley during glacial-pluvial times. Previous work indicates that late Pleistocene glacial-pluvial Lake Gale, Panamint Valley was an open system during OIS-6, a closed ground water supported shallow lake during OIS-4, and the terminal lake basin for the Owens River system during OIS-2. We here report the first occurrence of fossil fish from the Plio-Pleistocene Panamint basin. Fish remains are present in late Pleistocene OIS-6 nearshore deposits associated with a highstand that was spillway limited at Wingate Wash. The deposits contain small minnow-sized remains from both Siphateles or Gila sp. (chubs) and Catostomus sp. (suckers) from at least four locations widely dispersed in the basin. Siphateles or Gila sp. and Catostomus are indigenous to the Pleistocene and modern Owens River system, in particular to the historic Owens Lake area. Cyprinodon (pupfish) and Rhinichthys (dace) are known from the modern Amargosa River and from Plio-Pleistocene deposits in Death Valley to the east. The late Pleistocene OIS-6 to OIS-2 lacustrine and paleohydrologic record in Panamint basin is interpreted from ostracod assemblages, relative abundance of Artemia sp. pellets, shallow water indicators including tufa fragments, ruppia sp. fragments and the relative abundance of charophyte gyrogonites obtained from archived core, as well as faunal assemblages from paleoshoreline and nearshore deposits. The OIS-4 groundwater supported shallow saline lake had sufficiently low ratios of alkalinity to calcium (alk/Ca) to support the occurrence of exotic Elphidium sp. (?) foraminfera which are not observed in either OIS-2 or OIS-6 lacustrine deposits. The arrival of Owens River surface water into Panamint Basin during OIS-2 is recorded by the first appearance of the ostracod Limnocythere sappaensis at ~27 m depth in an ~100 m archived core (Smith and Pratt, 1957) which

  13. Design and operating features of the high-level waste vitrification system for the West Valley demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, D.H.; Beary, M.M.; Barnes, S.M.; Berger, D.N.; Brouns, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Jones, R.M.; Peters, R.D.; Peterson, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    A liquid-fed joule-heated ceramic melter system is the reference process for immobilization of the high-level liquid waste in the US and several foreign countries. This system has been under development for over ten years at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and other national laboratories operated for the US Department of Energy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory contributed to this research through its Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and used applicable data to design and test melters and related systems using remote handling of simulated radioactive wastes. This report describes the equipment designed in support of the high-level waste vitrification program at West Valley, New York. Pacific Northwest Laboratory worked closely with West Valley Nuclear Services Company to design a liquid-fed ceramic melter, a liquid waste preparation and feed tank and pump, an off-gas treatment scrubber, and an enclosed turntable for positioning the waste canisters. Details of these designs are presented including the rationale for the design features and the alternatives considered.

  14. Impacts of Mountain Pine Beetle on Peak Flow in the Fraser Basin in British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffler, C.; Rosin, K.; Weiler, M.

    2008-12-01

    Increasing winter temperature in combination with forest management practices are the main drivers for the Mountain Pine Beetle (MPB) epidemic in British Columbia (BC). The infestation of MPB has now turned into a major threat to the natural habitat of the province. The Fraser basin, the largest watershed in BC, is the most affected watershed with an infested forest area of 7.7 million hectares (88% of the watershed) [Redding and Pike 2007]. Forest cover is a key modifier of the watershed's peak flow regime. The peak flow generally increases when forest cover is reduced. Major parts of the Fraser basin have only a limited number of gauging stations (or are even ungauged). The goal of the project was to develop a hydrological model that can predict peak flow increases but does not rely on complex data inputs for its validation and calibration procedures. The model consists of two major components: climate input and runoff. The climate input component determines the mean annual snowmelt as well as the maximum rainfall based on long term climatic averages. This information is then used to determine the time and the capacity of the peak flow for every 3rd order watershed. The runoff component delineates hydrologic processes such as Hortonain Overland Flow, Saturation Overland Flow and Shallow Surface Flow. The model combines the two components and computes a map of peak flow contribution. A peak flow analysis has been carried out to validate the model results using available gauging stations in subcatchments. The validated model has been then applied to the entire watershed to analyze the impacts of MPB on peak flow in the Fraser basin. The presentation will show the conceptual presentation of the hydrological model. It will highlight the results of the peak flow analysis and show initial results of the application of the model. Cited Literature: Redding, T. and Pike, R (2007). Mountain Pine Beetle and Watershed Hydrology Workshop Summary, Streamline Watershed

  15. Hydrostructural maps of the Death Valley regional flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Potter, C.J.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Dickerson, R.P.; Killgore, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    The locations of principal faults and structural zones that may influence ground-water flow were compiled in support of a three-dimensional ground-water model for the Death Valley regional flow system (DVRFS), which covers 80,000 square km in southwestern Nevada and southeastern California. Faults include Neogene extensional and strike-slip faults and pre-Tertiary thrust faults. Emphasis was given to characteristics of faults and deformed zones that may have a high potential for influencing hydraulic conductivity. These include: (1) faulting that results in the juxtaposition of stratigraphic units with contrasting hydrologic properties, which may cause ground-water discharge and other perturbations in the flow system; (2) special physical characteristics of the fault zones, such as brecciation and fracturing, that may cause specific parts of the zone to act either as conduits or as barriers to fluid flow; (3) the presence of a variety of lithologies whose physical and deformational characteristics may serve to impede or enhance flow in fault zones; (4) orientation of a fault with respect to the present-day stress field, possibly influencing hydraulic conductivity along the fault zone; and (5) faults that have been active in late Pleistocene or Holocene time and areas of contemporary seismicity, which may be associated with enhanced permeabilities. The faults shown on maps A and B are largely from Workman and others (in press), and fit one or more of the following criteria: (1) faults that are more than 10 km in map length; (2) faults with more than 500 m of displacement; and (3) faults in sets that define a significant structural fabric that characterizes a particular domain of the DVRFS. The following fault types are shown: Neogene normal, Neogene strike-slip, Neogene low-angle normal, pre-Tertiary thrust, and structural boundaries of Miocene calderas. We have highlighted faults that have late Pleistocene to Holocene displacement (Piety, 1996). Areas of thick

  16. A novel mutation in the FRAS1 gene in a patient with Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozemri Sag, S; Gorukmez, O; Gorukmez, O; Ture, M; Sahinturk, S; Topak, A; Gulten, T; Schanze, D; Yakut, T; Zenker, M

    2015-01-01

    Fraser Syndrome (FS) is a rare disease with autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by cryptophthalmus, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal and urogenital anomalies. Mutations in the genes FRAS1 and FREM2 encoding components of a protein complex of the extracellular matrix, and recently also mutations in GRIP1 have been found to be causative for FS. We present here molecular and clinical findings of a patient with FS who was found to have a novel homozygous frameshift mutation c.9739delA, p.(T3247Pfs*44) in exon 63 of FRAS1 gene. Further testing confirmed the heterozygous carrier status of parents.

  17. Water quality assessment and objectives for the Fraser River from Hope to Sturgeon and Roberts Banks: First update, technical appendix

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the water quality within the Fraser River from Hope to the river mouth, using data collected from 1985 to June 1994. Introductory sections review Fraser River water quality objectives, watershed characteristics, sources of contaminants, hydrology, and water uses in the watershed. Section 4 details permitted waste discharges, by source, divided into six sections of the river. Section 5 examines non-point source discharges from such sectors as forestry, agriculture, urban runoff, sewage, dredging, and shipping. Section 6 presents ambient water quality data and proposed water quality objectives, arranged by section of the river. Information is given on water and sediment chemistry, and on analyses of benthic invertebrates and fish. Appendices include a glossary and a summary of comments received in a Fraser River water quality and recreational use survey.

  18. Systems dynamic model to forecast salinity load to the Colorado River due to urbanization within the Las Vegas Valley.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Arjun K; Ahmad, Sajjad; Johnson, Walter; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluates the impact of urban growth in the Las Vegas Valley (LVV), Nevada, USA on salinity of the Colorado River. In the past thirty eight years the LVV population has grown from 273,288 (1970) to 1,986,146 (2008). The wastewater effluents and runoff from the valley are diverted back to the Colorado River through the Las Vegas Wash (LVW). With the growth of the valley, the salinity released from urban areas has increased the level of TDS in the wastewater effluents, ultimately increasing the TDS in the Colorado River. The increased usage of water softeners in residential and commercial locations is a major contributor of TDS in the wastewater effluents. Controlling TDS release to the Colorado River is important because of the 1944 Treaty signed between the USA and Mexico. In addition, the agriculture salinity damage cost for the Colorado River has been estimated to be more than $306 a million per year using 2004 salinity levels. With the expected growth of LVV in coming years the TDS release into Lake Mead will increase over time. For this purpose, it is important to investigate future TDS release into the Colorado in anticipation of potential TDS reducing measures to be adopted. In this research, a dynamic simulation model was developed using system dynamics modeling to carry out water and TDS mass balances over the entire LVV. The dynamic model output agreed with historic data with an average error of 2%. Forecasts revealed that conservation efforts can reduce TDS load by 16% in the year 2035 when compared to the current trend. If total population using water softeners can be limited to 10% in the year 2035, from the current 30% usage, TDS load in the LVW can be reduced by 7%.

  19. Structure and regional significance of the Late Permian(?) Sierra Nevada - Death Valley thrust system, east-central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, C.H.; Stone, P.

    2005-01-01

    An imbricate system of north-trending, east-directed thrust faults of late Early Permian to middle Early Triassic (most likely Late Permian) age forms a belt in east-central California extending from the Mount Morrison roof pendant in the eastern Sierra Nevada to Death Valley. Six major thrust faults typically with a spacing of 15-20 km, original dips probably of 25-35??, and stratigraphic throws of 2-5 km compose this structural belt, which we call the Sierra Nevada-Death Valley thrust system. These thrusts presumably merge into a de??collement at depth, perhaps at the contact with crystalline basement, the position of which is unknown. We interpret the deformation that produced these thrusts to have been related to the initiation of convergent plate motion along a southeast-trending continental margin segment probably formed by Pennsylvanian transform truncation. This deformation apparently represents a period of tectonic transition to full-scale convergence and arc magmatism along the continental margin beginning in the Late Triassic in central California. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Beaver Valley, Units 1 and 2 nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.C.; Vehec, T.A.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Rossbach, L.W.; Sena, P.P. III

    1993-02-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Beaver Valley Units 1 and 2 were selected as two of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at Beaver Valley Units 1 and 2.

  1. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity model of the hydrothermal system in Long Valley Caldera, California, from magnetotellurics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peacock, Jared R.; Mangan, Margaret T.; McPhee, Darcy K.; Wannamaker, Phil E.

    2016-01-01

    Though shallow flow of hydrothermal fluids in Long Valley Caldera, California, has been well studied, neither the hydrothermal source reservoir nor heat source has been well characterized. Here a grid of magnetotelluric data were collected around the Long Valley volcanic system and modeled in 3-D. The preferred electrical resistivity model suggests that the source reservoir is a narrow east-west elongated body 4 km below the west moat. The heat source could be a zone of 2–5% partial melt 8 km below Deer Mountain. Additionally, a collection of hypersaline fluids, not connected to the shallow hydrothermal system, is found 3 km below the medial graben, which could originate from a zone of 5–10% partial melt 8 km below the south moat. Below Mammoth Mountain is a 3 km thick isolated body containing fluids and gases originating from an 8 km deep zone of 5–10% basaltic partial melt.

  2. Multilevel Methodology for Simulation of Spatio-Temporal Systems with Heterogeneous Activity; Application to Spread of Valley Fever Fungus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jammalamadaka, Rajanikanth

    2009-01-01

    This report consists of a dissertation submitted to the faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Graduate College, The University of Arizona, 2008. Spatio-temporal systems with heterogeneity in their structure and behavior have two major problems associated with them. The first one is that such complex real world systems extend over very large spatial and temporal domains and consume so many computational resources to simulate that they are infeasible to study with current computational platforms. The second one is that the data available for understanding such systems is limited because they are spread over space and time making it hard to obtain micro and macro measurements. This also makes it difficult to get the data for validation of their constituent processes while simultaneously considering their global behavior. For example, the valley fever fungus considered in this dissertation is spread over a large spatial grid in the arid Southwest and typically needs to be simulated over several decades of time to obtain useful information. It is also hard to get the temperature and moisture data (which are two critical factors on which the survival of the valley fever fungus depends) at every grid point of the spatial domain over the region of study. In order to address the first problem, we develop a method based on the discrete event system specification which exploits the heterogeneity in the activity of the spatio-temporal system and which has been shown to be effective in solving relatively simple partial differential equation systems. The benefit of addressing the first problem is that it now makes it feasible to address the second problem. We address the second problem by making use of a multilevel methodology based on modeling and simulation and systems theory. This methodology helps us in the construction of models with different resolutions (base and

  3. Fraser syndrome and cryptophthalmos: review of the diagnostic criteria and evidence for phenotypic modules in complex malformation syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Slavotinek, A; Tifft, C

    2002-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is characterised by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, malformations of the larynx and genitourinary tract, craniofacial dysmorphism, orofacial clefting, mental retardation, and musculoskeletal anomalies. The inheritance is autosomal recessive. No diagnostic cytogenetic abnormalities have been documented in affected patients, and no molecular genetic studies have been reported. We have reviewed 117 cases diagnosed as Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos published since the comprehensive review of Thomas et al in 1986 in order to validate the published diagnostic criteria and to delineate the phenotype associated with this syndrome. Our series showed more females (57/117) than males and consanguinity was present in 29/119 (24.8%). Eighty-eight patients satisfied the diagnostic criteria for Fraser syndrome (75%). Cryptophthalmos was present in 103/117 (88%), syndactyly in 72/117 (61.5%), and ambiguous genitalia in 20/117 (17.1%). Ear malformations were recorded in 69/117 (59%), and renal agenesis in 53/117 (45.3%). Use of the published diagnostic criteria excluded several patients with cryptophthalmos and one or more physical feature(s) consistent with Fraser syndrome. The frequency of additional anomalies in our series was also higher than previously reported (for example, imperforate anus or anal stenosis were found in 34/117 (29%) compared with 2/124 (2%) in the series of Thomas et al (1986) and choanal stenosis or atresia was present in 7/117 (6%) compared to 0/124. These findings emphasise the clinical variability associated with Fraser syndrome and support genetic heterogeneity of the syndrome. We also noted patterns of anomalies (for example, bicornuate uterus with imperforate anus or anal stenosis and renal malformations) that are found in other syndromes and associations without cryptophthalmos, suggesting that common modifier genes may explain some of the phenotypic variation in Fraser syndrome. PMID:12205104

  4. Fraser syndrome and cryptophthalmos: review of the diagnostic criteria and evidence for phenotypic modules in complex malformation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, A M; Tifft, C J

    2002-09-01

    Fraser syndrome is characterised by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, malformations of the larynx and genitourinary tract, craniofacial dysmorphism, orofacial clefting, mental retardation, and musculoskeletal anomalies. The inheritance is autosomal recessive. No diagnostic cytogenetic abnormalities have been documented in affected patients, and no molecular genetic studies have been reported. We have reviewed 117 cases diagnosed as Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos published since the comprehensive review of Thomas et al in 1986 in order to validate the published diagnostic criteria and to delineate the phenotype associated with this syndrome. Our series showed more females (57/117) than males and consanguinity was present in 29/119 (24.8%). Eighty-eight patients satisfied the diagnostic criteria for Fraser syndrome (75%). Cryptophthalmos was present in 103/117 (88%), syndactyly in 72/117 (61.5%), and ambiguous genitalia in 20/117 (17.1%). Ear malformations were recorded in 69/117 (59%), and renal agenesis in 53/117 (45.3%). Use of the published diagnostic criteria excluded several patients with cryptophthalmos and one or more physical feature(s) consistent with Fraser syndrome. The frequency of additional anomalies in our series was also higher than previously reported (for example, imperforate anus or anal stenosis were found in 34/117 (29%) compared with 2/124 (2%) in the series of Thomas et al (1986) and choanal stenosis or atresia was present in 7/117 (6%) compared to 0/124. These findings emphasise the clinical variability associated with Fraser syndrome and support genetic heterogeneity of the syndrome. We also noted patterns of anomalies (for example, bicornuate uterus with imperforate anus or anal stenosis and renal malformations) that are found in other syndromes and associations without cryptophthalmos, suggesting that common modifier genes may explain some of the phenotypic variation in Fraser syndrome.

  5. Noble-metal testing results for the West Valley vitrification system

    SciTech Connect

    Bowan, B.W.; Jain, V.

    1989-01-01

    At the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), the slurry-fed ceramic melter (SFCM) has been in test operation since December 1984 to vitrify simulated waste slurries. Over 4 yr, a moderate range of glass formulations, some containing RuO{sub 2}, have been processed. Since these noble-metal oxides not only have a limited solubility in the melt, and are also electrically conductive, their accumulation in large amounts on the floor of the SFCM poses a potential electrical hazard to the joule-heated SFCM. The design of the WVDP melter cavity and electrode configuration is specifically intended to allow modest noble-metal accumulation without compromise to melter life or performance. In this study, an attempt has been made to estimate the amount of RuO{sub 2} that has accumulated on the floor of the SFCM since initiation of the WVDP vitrification test program. The total amount of RuO{sub 2} that has been processed in the SFCM to date is shown. This preliminary study indicates that the West Valley SFCM displays a good capability for sweeping insoluble noble metals through and for tolerating the remaining fraction on the floor without compromising melter life or performance over the course of the WVDP radioactive vitrification campaign.

  6. A Cost-Effective Analysis and Follow Up Study on a Multi-Level Mathematics Instruction System at Antelope Valley College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Frank C.

    Between the spring of 1970 and the summer of 1974, 1,747 students enrolled in Math X, a multilevel PSI (Personalized System of Instruction) type of open-ended mathematics instruction system at Antelope Valley College. Results of a study designed to evaluate the course by comparing it with the more conventional mathematics lecture course indicated…

  7. A guide for using the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blainey, Joan B.; Faunt, Claudia C.; Hill, Mary C.

    2006-01-01

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  8. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  9. Simulation of the ground-water flow system and proposed withdrawals in the northern part of Vekol Valley, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollett, K.J.; Marie, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Pursuant to the Ak-Chin Indian Community Water Rights Settlement Act (Public Law 95-328-enacted on July 28, 1978) a study was undertaken to assess the effect of proposed groundwater withdrawal from Federal lands near the reservation. The first area to be evaluated was the northern part of the Vekol Valley. The evaluation was made using a numerical model based on detailed geohydrologic concepts developed during the study. The numerical model, which was calibrated to steady-state and transient groundwater conditions in the northern part of Vekol Valley, adequately duplicated the conceptual model and was used to estimate the effect of withdrawing approximately 174,000 acre-ft from the system during a 25-yr period. At the end of the 25-yr period, the water level was drawn down an average of about 95 ft, and about 150,5000 acre-ft of water was removed from storage. The 150,500 acre-ft of water represents 43% of the estimated recoverable groundwater in storage. (Author 's abstract)

  10. Echoes of Spring Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyken, J. Clarine J.

    Designed to preserve the rich heritage of the rural school system which passed from the education scene in the 1930's and 1940's, this narrative, part history and part nostalgia, describes the author's own elementary education and the secure community life centered in the one room Spring Valley School in Hamilton County, Iowa, in the early decades…

  11. Character and evolution of the ground-water flow system in the central part of the western San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belitz, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    The occurrence of selenium in agricultural drain water derived from the western San Joaquin Valley, California, has focused concern on the groundwater flow system of the western valley. Previous work and recently collected texture and water level data were used to evaluate the character and evolution of the regional groundwater flow system in the central part of the western valley, with particular emphasis on the deposits overlying the Corcoran Clay Member of the Tulane Formation. The Corcoran Clay Member, where present, divides the flow system into an upper semiconfined zone and a lower confined zone. Above the Corcoran, three geohydrologic units can be recognized: Coast Range alluvium, Sierran sand, and flood-basin deposits. These units differ in texture, hydrologic properties, and oxidation state. The development of irrigated agriculture in the central part of the western valley has significantly altered the flow system. Percolation of irrigation water past crop roots has caused a rise in the altitude of the water table in mid-fan and distal-fan areas. Pumpage of groundwater from wells has caused a lowering of the water table beneath parts of the fanheads and a lowering of the potentiometric surface of the confined zone over much of the western valley. The combination of percolation and pumpage has resulted in development of a large downward hydraulic head gradient in the semi-confined zone and has created a groundwater divide along the western margin of the valley. Surface water deliveries from the California Aqueduct have allowed a decrease in pumpage and a consequent recovery in hydraulic head throughout the system. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Unusual folding and rolling of Glacio-Lacustrine sediments, Upper Fraser Canyon, British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, S.

    1987-05-01

    Folding and rolling of graded but unconsolidated sediments by at least 720/sup 0/ produced a structure resembling a large Swiss roll about 6 ft wide and 4 ft high. The sediments were initially horizontal and well sorted, grading from coarse sands to fine silts. About 50 ft away, at the same level, the sediments include irregular layers of poorly sorted, ice-rafted pebbles and boulders. The sequence is unconformably overlain by till. The axis of folding appears to be parallel to the eastern wall of the Fraser Canyon. The outcrop is in the Stevens Pit (sand and gravel) immediately east of the Trans-Canada Highway, 2 mi south of Lytton, B.C., at an elevation of 1000 ft, approximately 600 ft above the present level of the Fraser River. The sands and silts accumulated in a lake adjacent to the east margin of a stagnant and relatively small glacier occupying the upper part of the Frazer Canyon. Partial or complete melting of small icebergs caused deposition of coarser material. A subsequent cooling trend led to an advance of the glacier, an advance which at this location caused some of the adjacent and by now frozen sediments to be rolled up like an old carpet. Further advance of the glacier caused it to override and thus preserve the deformed sequence.

  13. MFO activity and contaminant analysis of overwintering juvenile chinook salmon in the Fraser River

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.; Glickman, B.; Addison, R.; Gordon, R.; Martens, D.

    1995-12-31

    Various organic contaminants, including some PAHs, PCBs and chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans, induce liver cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP 1A1) and its associated enzyme activity (ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase; EROD). In this study, analysis of carcasses for dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans and PCBs were compared to liver MFO activity. Juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were sampled in March, 1994 at a reference site on the Nechako River free from the influence of industrial activity and at sites near Prince George, Stoner, Longbar and Soda Creek on the Fraser River, and on the Thompson River. Fish from the Nechako site had the lowest MFO activities, accompanied by the lowest whole body dioxin and furan concentrations. Fish from Longbar, Soda Creek and the Thompson River had the highest MFO activities. Fish from Prince George contained the highest dioxin concentrations, but furans and mono-ortho substituted PCBs were highest at the Soda Creek and Thompson sites. MFO activity correlated most strongly with PCB concentrations. The results of this study suggest that liver MFO activity in O. tshawytscha could be employed as one biological index of environmental quality in the Fraser River.

  14. Generation of mice with a conditional null Fraser syndrome 1 (Fras1) allele.

    PubMed

    Pitera, Jolanta E; Turmaine, Mark; Woolf, Adrian S; Scambler, Peter J

    2012-12-01

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by skin lesions and kidney and upper airway malformations. Fraser syndrome 1 (FRAS1) is an extracellular matrix protein, and FRAS1 homozygous mutations occur in some FS individuals. FRAS1 is expressed at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface in embryonic skin and kidney. blebbed mice have a null Fras1 mutation and phenocopy human FS. Like humans with FS, they exhibit a high fetal and neonatal mortality, precluding studies of FRAS1 functions in later life. We generated conditional Fras1 null allele mice. Cre-mediated generalized deletion of this allele generated embryonic skin blisters and renal agenesis characteristic of blebbed mice and human FS. Targeted deletion of Fras1 in kidney podocytes circumvented skin blistering, renal agenesis, and early death. FRAS1 expression was downregulated in maturing glomeruli which then became sclerotic. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that locally produced FRAS1 has roles in glomerular maturation and integrity. This conditional allele will facilitate study of possible role for FRAS1 in other tissues such as the skin.

  15. Sprouty1 haploinsufficiency prevents renal agenesis in a model of Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pitera, Jolanta E; Woolf, Adrian S; Basson, M Albert; Scambler, Peter J

    2012-11-01

    Deficiency of the extracellular matrix molecule FRAS1, normally expressed by the ureteric bud, leads to bilateral renal agenesis in humans with Fraser syndrome and blebbed (Fras1(bl/bl)) mice. The metanephric mesenchyme of these mutants fails to express sufficient Gdnf, which activates receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling, contributing to the phenotype. To determine whether modulating RTK signalling may overcome the abnormal nephrogenesis characteristic of Fraser syndrome, we introduced a single null Sprouty1 allele into Fras1(bl/bl) mice, thereby reducing the ureteric bud's expression of this anti-branching molecule and antagonist of RTK signalling. This prevented renal agenesis in Fras1(bl/bl) mice, permitting kidney development and postnatal survival. We found that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling contributed to this genetic rescue, and exogenous FGF10 rescued defects in Fras1(bl/bl) rudiments in vitro. Whereas wild-type metanephroi expressed FRAS1 and the related proteins FREM1 and FREM2, FRAS1 was absent and the other proteins were downregulated in rescued kidneys, consistent with a reciprocally stabilized FRAS1/FREM1/FREM2 complex. In addition to contributing to knowledge regarding events during nephrogenesis, the demonstrated rescue of renal agenesis in a model of a human genetic disease raises the possibility that enhancing growth factor signaling might be a therapeutic approach to ameliorate this devastating malformation.

  16. Morphology of large valleys on Hawaii - Evidence for groundwater sapping and comparisons with Martian valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochel, R. Craig; Piper, Jonathan F.

    1986-01-01

    Morphometric data on the runoff and sapping valleys on the slopes of Hawaii and Molokai in Hawaii are analyzed. The analysis reveals a clear distinction between the runoff valleys and sapping valleys. The Hawaiian sapping valleys are characterized by: (1) steep valley walls and flat floors, (2) amphitheater heads, (3) low drainage density, (4) paucity of downstream tributaries, (5) low frequency of up-dip tributaries, and (6) structural and stratigraphic control on valley patterns. The characteristics of the Hawaiian sapping valleys are compared to Martian valleys and experimental systems, and good correlation between the data is detected. Flume experiments were also conducted to study the evolution of sapping valleys in response to variable structure and stratigraphy.

  17. Occurrence of anthropogenic organic compounds in ground water and finished water of community water systems in Eagle and Spanish Springs Valleys, Nevada, 2002-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosen, Michael R.; Shaefer, Donald H.; Toccalino, Patricia A.; Delzer, Gregory C.

    2006-01-01

    As a part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program, an effort to characterize the quality of major rivers and aquifers used as a source of supply to some of the largest community water systems (CWSs) in the United States has been initiated. These studies, termed Source Water-Quality Assessments (SWQAs), consist of two sampling phases. Phase 1 was designed to determine the frequency of detection and concentrations of about 260 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides and pesticide degradates, and other anthropogenic organic compounds in source water of 15 CWS wells in each study. Phase 2 monitors concentrations in the source water and also the associated finished water of CWSs for compounds most frequently detected during phase 1. One SWQA was completed in the Nevada Basin and Range area in Nevada. Ten CWS wells in Eagle Valley and five CWS wells in Spanish Springs Valley were sampled. For phase 2, two wells were resampled in Eagle Valley. Samples were collected during 2002-2004 for both phases. Water use in Eagle Valley is primarily for domestic purposes and is supplied through CWSs. Ground-water sources provide about 55 percent of the public-water supply, and surface-water sources supply about 45 percent. Lesser amounts of water are provided by domestic wells. Very little water is used for agriculture or manufacturing. Spanish Springs Valley has water-use characteristics similar to those in Eagle Valley, although there is more agricultural water use in Spanish Springs Valley than in Eagle Valley. Maximum contaminant concentrations were compared to two human-health benchmarks, if available, to describe the water-quality data in a human-health context for these findings. Measured concentrations of regulated contaminants were compared to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Nevada Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) values. Measured concentrations of unregulated contaminants were compared to Health-Based Screening Levels, which

  18. Geomorphic Expression and Neotectonic Evaluation of a Diffuse Fault System from Airborne Laser Swath Mapping, Pahrump Valley, California and Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, N.; Guest, B.; Wernicke, B.

    2005-12-01

    The eastern boundary of the Eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) is defined by the Stateline-Amargosa Valley fault zone (SAVFZ), a NW striking zone of dextral faulting that extends 150 km along the CA-NV border in Clark and Nye counties. This fault system has accumulated ~ 30 km of slip since 12.5 Ma, yielding a long-term slip rate of ~ 2 mm/yr. This rate is twice the modern rate, as estimated from GPS data in the region (Wernicke et al., 2004, JGR). A comparison of modern and long-term slip rates on the SAVFZ with Quaternary slip rates is desirable, both to understand the evolution of the ECSZ, and to assess the risk of the SAVFZ to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, but is hampered by a lack of well-defined Quaternary offsets. Both the position of the SAVFZ relative to adjacent mountain ranges and the nature of faulting within the SAVFZ contribute to this problem. Rather than being located at the boundary between ranges and basins, the SAVFZ runs axially through four basins. Instead of cutting alluvial deposits that uphold a fault scarp, the SAVFZ tends to be developed within incompetent lacustrine units. The SAVFZ is composed of a series of discontinuous, en echelon fault strands, rather than being a discrete fault surface. This fault system, therefore, has a subtle geomorphic expression, a factor which has been interpreted as a lack of neotectonic activity. To remedy this problem, ALSM data were collected along the SAVFZ in Pahrump Valley. Data collected parallel to the SAVFZ reveal a large number of previously unrecognized geomorphic offsets and the complex, anastamosing nature of the fault zone, many of which are difficult or impossible to identify via field surveys alone. Channels in southern Stewart Valley observed in the ALSM data are offset 30 to 70 m, presumably since early Holocene time (dePolo et al., 2003, NBMG OFR 03-11), yielding slip rates of 5 to 10 mm/yr. These rates are difficult to reconcile with the modern slip

  19. Farming Systems and Rural Out-Migration in Nang Rong, Thailand and Chitwan Valley, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Martin; Ghimire, Dirgha; Rindfuss, Ronald R

    2013-03-01

    Using data from two post-frontier rural settings, Nang Rong, Thailand (N=2,538) and Chitwan Valley, Nepal (N=876), this paper examines agricultural push factors determining the outmigration of young people age 15 to 19. We focus on different dimensions of migration, including distance and duration. Our study examines a wide array of agricultural determinants, each with its own potential effect on migration. These determinants include land tenure, crop portfolios, animal husbandry activities, and use of farm inputs. We link these proximal causes to two underlying mechanisms: risk and amenities. We examine these determinants using separate models across settings. Our results indicate that agricultural factors are significant determinants of migration in both contexts. However, different factors operate in different settings, indicating the importance of contextual variation in explaining the manner in which risks and amenities influence agricultural determinants of migration.

  20. Developing a Satellite Based Automatic System for Crop Monitoring: Kenya's Great Rift Valley, A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucciani, Roberto; Laneve, Giovanni; Jahjah, Munzer; Mito, Collins

    2016-08-01

    The crop growth stage represents essential information for agricultural areas management. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a tool based on remotely sensed satellite (Landsat 8) imagery, capable of automatically classify crop fields and how much resolution enhancement based on pan-sharpening techniques and phenological information extraction, useful to create decision rules that allow to identify semantic class to assign to an object, can effectively support the classification process. Moreover we investigate the opportunity to extract vegetation health status information from remotely sensed assessment of the equivalent water thickness (EWT). Our case study is the Kenya's Great Rift valley, in this area a ground truth campaign was conducted during August 2015 in order to collect crop fields GPS measurements, leaf area index (LAI) and chlorophyll samples.

  1. Farming Systems and Rural Out-Migration in Nang Rong, Thailand and Chitwan Valley, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowski, Martin; Ghimire, Dirgha; Rindfuss, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from two post-frontier rural settings, Nang Rong, Thailand (N=2,538) and Chitwan Valley, Nepal (N=876), this paper examines agricultural push factors determining the outmigration of young people age 15 to 19. We focus on different dimensions of migration, including distance and duration. Our study examines a wide array of agricultural determinants, each with its own potential effect on migration. These determinants include land tenure, crop portfolios, animal husbandry activities, and use of farm inputs. We link these proximal causes to two underlying mechanisms: risk and amenities. We examine these determinants using separate models across settings. Our results indicate that agricultural factors are significant determinants of migration in both contexts. However, different factors operate in different settings, indicating the importance of contextual variation in explaining the manner in which risks and amenities influence agricultural determinants of migration. PMID:24672139

  2. Effects of past and future groundwater development on the hydrologic system of Verde Valley, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garner, Bradley D.; Pool, D.R.

    2013-01-01

    Communities in central Arizona’s Verde Valley must manage limited water supplies in the face of rapidly growing populations. Developing groundwater resources to meet human needs has raised questions about the effects of groundwater withdrawals by pumping on the area’s rivers and streams, particularly the Verde River. U.S. Geological Survey hydrologists used a regional groundwater flow model to simulate the effects of groundwater pumping on streamflow in the Verde River. The study found that streamflow in the Verde River between 1910 and 2005 had been reduced as the result of streamflow depletion by groundwater pumping, also known as capture. Additionally, using three hypothetical scenarios for a period from 2005 to 2110, the study’s findings suggest that streamflow reductions will continue and may increase in the future.

  3. Controls on Martian Hydrothermal Systems: Application to Valley Network and Magnetic Anomaly Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Keith P.; Grimm, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    Models of hydrothermal groundwater circulation can quantify limits to the role of hydrothermal activity in Martian crustal processes. We present here the results of numerical simulations of convection in a porous medium due to the presence of a hot intruded magma chamber. The parameter space includes magma chamber depth, volume, aspect ratio, and host rock permeability and porosity. A primary goal of the models is the computation of surface discharge. Discharge increases approximately linearly with chamber volume, decreases weakly with depth (at low geothermal gradients), and is maximized for equant-shaped chambers. Discharge increases linearly with permeability until limited by the energy available from the intrusion. Changes in the average porosity are balanced by changes in flow velocity and therefore have little effect. Water/rock ratios of approximately 0.1, obtained by other workers from models based on the mineralogy of the Shergotty meteorite, imply minimum permeabilities of 10(exp -16) sq m2 during hydrothermal alteration. If substantial vapor volumes are required for soil alteration, the permeability must exceed 10(exp -15) sq m. The principal application of our model is to test the viability of hydrothermal circulation as the primary process responsible for the broad spatial correlation of Martian valley networks with magnetic anomalies. For host rock permeabilities as low as 10(exp -17) sq m and intrusion volumes as low as 50 cu km, the total discharge due to intrusions building that part of the southern highlands crust associated with magnetic anomalies spans a comparable range as the inferred discharge from the overlying valley networks.

  4. Seismic velocity structure and earthquake relocation for the magmatic system beneath Long Valley Caldera, eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing

    2015-04-01

    A new three-dimensional (3-D) seismic velocity model and high-precision location catalog for earthquakes between 1984 and 2014 are presented for Long Valley Caldera and its adjacent fault zones in eastern California. The simul2000 tomography algorithm is applied to derive the 3-D Vp and Vp/Vs models using first-arrivals of 1004 composite earthquakes obtained from the original seismic data at the Northern California Earthquake Data Center. The resulting Vp model reflects geological structures and agrees with previous local tomographic studies. The simultaneously resolved Vp/Vs model is a major contribution of this study providing an important complement to the Vp model for the interpretation of structural heterogeneities and physical properties in the study area. The caldera is dominated by low Vp anomalies at shallow depths due to postcaldera fill. High Vp and low Vp/Vs values are resolved from the surface to ~ 3.4 km depth beneath the center of the caldera, corresponding to the structural uplift of the Resurgent Dome. An aseismic body with low Vp and high Vp/Vs anomalies at 4.2-6.2 km depth below the surface is consistent with the location of partial melt suggested by previous studies based on Vp models only and the inflation source locations based on geodetic modeling. The Sierran crystalline rocks outside the caldera are generally characterized with high Vp and low Vp/Vs values. The newly resolved velocity model improves absolute location accuracy for the seismicity in the study area and ultimately provides the basis for a high-precision earthquake catalog based on similar-event cluster analysis and waveform cross-correlation data. The fine-scale velocity structure and precise earthquake relocations are useful for investigating magma sources, seismicity and stress interaction and other seismological studies in Long Valley.

  5. Structural controls on the Surprise Valley fault system, northwestern margin of the Basin and Range, based on combined geologic, potential-field, and seismic reflection modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, A. E.; Glen, J. M.; Ponce, D. A.; Lerch, D. W.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    Surprise Valley of northeastern California is a major high-angle fault-bounded basin that marks the northwestern margin of the Basin and Range province. On the western margin of the valley, the east-dipping Surprise Valley Fault separates the valley from the Warner Range and accommodates at least 7 km of normal slip. On the eastern margin, a west-dipping normal fault has exhumed the Hays Canyon Range, but offset along this fault decreases significantly to the north. In between these two major faults, numerous Holocene fault scarps and hot springs suggest that the area is still actively extending. Previous workers have mapped several NW-SE-trending structures cutting across the valley that control the geothermal system, but the role of these structures in basin evolution and their relationship to the range-bounding faults is poorly understood. The Surprise Valley fault system is of particular interest given its location at the margin of the Basin and Range, its relative isolation from other major normal fault systems, and the recent offset along the faults. Our focus is on identifying and characterizing intra-basin and basin-bounding faults and structures and constraining the basin geometry through a combination of geological mapping, potential field modeling and seismic reflection modeling. We have collected nearly 800 new gravity stations, ~75 line-kilometers of truck-towed magnetometer data, and ~17 km of foot-traversed gradient magnetometer data within and surrounding Surprise Valley for potential field modeling. These data, combined with new 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping and a ~16 km vibrator-source reflection survey collected in the summer of 2004, confirm the importance of the NW-trending structures not only in the distribution of hot springs, but also the location and orientation of accommodation zones between N-S trending, antithetic normal fault systems. The NW trend of these structures, including the Lake City Fault Zone and Fandango Valley, parallels a

  6. Using remote sensing, ecological niche modeling, and Geographic Information Systems for Rift Valley fever risk assessment in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedrow, Christine Atkins

    The primary goal in this study was to explore remote sensing, ecological niche modeling, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as aids in predicting candidate Rift Valley fever (RVF) competent vector abundance and distribution in Virginia, and as means of estimating where risk of establishment in mosquitoes and risk of transmission to human populations would be greatest in Virginia. A second goal in this study was to determine whether the remotely-sensed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) can be used as a proxy variable of local conditions for the development of mosquitoes to predict mosquito species distribution and abundance in Virginia. As part of this study, a mosquito surveillance database was compiled to archive the historical patterns of mosquito species abundance in Virginia. In addition, linkages between mosquito density and local environmental and climatic patterns were spatially and temporally examined. The present study affirms the potential role of remote sensing imagery for species distribution prediction, and it demonstrates that ecological niche modeling is a valuable predictive tool to analyze the distributions of populations. The MaxEnt ecological niche modeling program was used to model predicted ranges for potential RVF competent vectors in Virginia. The MaxEnt model was shown to be robust, and the candidate RVF competent vector predicted distribution map is presented. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was found to be the most useful environmental-climatic variable to predict mosquito species distribution and abundance in Virginia. However, these results indicate that a more robust prediction is obtained by including other environmental-climatic factors correlated to mosquito densities (e.g., temperature, precipitation, elevation) with NDVI. The present study demonstrates that remote sensing and GIS can be used with ecological niche and risk modeling methods to estimate risk of virus establishment in mosquitoes and

  7. Impacts of a Rapidly Declining Mountain Snowpack on Streamflow Timing in Canada’s Fraser River Basin

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Do Hyuk; Gao, Huilin; Shi, Xiaogang; Islam, Siraj ul; Déry, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    With its headwaters in the water towers of the western Cordillera of North America, the Fraser River is one of the continent’s mightiest rivers by annual flows, supplies vital freshwater resources to populous downstream locations, and sustains the world’s largest stocks of sockeye salmon along with four other salmon species. Here we show the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model’s ability to reproduce accurately observed trends in daily streamflow for the Fraser River’s main stem and six of its major tributaries over 1949-2006 when air temperatures rose by 1.4 °C while annual precipitation amounts remained stable. Rapidly declining mountain snowpacks and earlier melt onsets result in a 10-day advance of the Fraser River’s spring freshet with subsequent reductions in summer flows when up-river salmon migrations occur. Identification of the sub-basins driving the Fraser River’s most significant changes provides a measure of seasonal predictability of future floods or droughts in a changing climate. PMID:26813797

  8. Insects for breakfast and whales for dinner: the diet and body condition of dingoes on Fraser Island (K'gari).

    PubMed

    Behrendorff, Linda; Leung, Luke K-P; McKinnon, Allan; Hanger, Jon; Belonje, Grant; Tapply, Jenna; Jones, Darryl; Allen, Benjamin L

    2016-03-24

    Top-predators play stabilising roles in island food webs, including Fraser Island, Australia. Subsidising generalist predators with human-sourced food could disrupt this balance, but has been proposed to improve the overall health of the island's dingo (Canis lupus dingo) population, which is allegedly 'starving' or in 'poor condition'. We assess this hypothesis by describing the diet and health of dingoes on Fraser Island from datasets collected between 2001 and 2015. Medium-sized mammals (such as bandicoots) and fish were the most common food items detected in dingo scat records. Stomach contents records revealed additional information on diet, such as the occurrence of human-sourced foods. Trail camera records highlighted dingo utilisation of stranded marine fauna, particularly turtles and whales. Mean adult body weights were higher than the national average, body condition scores and abundant-excessive fat reserves indicated a generally ideal-heavy physical condition, and parasite loads were low and comparable to other dingo populations. These data do not support hypotheses that Fraser Island dingoes have restricted diets or are in poor physical condition. Rather, they indicate that dingoes on Fraser Island are capable of exploiting a diverse array of food sources which contributes to the vast majority of dingoes being of good-excellent physical condition.

  9. Insects for breakfast and whales for dinner: the diet and body condition of dingoes on Fraser Island (K’gari)

    PubMed Central

    Behrendorff, Linda; Leung, Luke K.-P.; McKinnon, Allan; Hanger, Jon; Belonje, Grant; Tapply, Jenna; Jones, Darryl; Allen, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    Top-predators play stabilising roles in island food webs, including Fraser Island, Australia. Subsidising generalist predators with human-sourced food could disrupt this balance, but has been proposed to improve the overall health of the island’s dingo (Canis lupus dingo) population, which is allegedly ‘starving’ or in ‘poor condition’. We assess this hypothesis by describing the diet and health of dingoes on Fraser Island from datasets collected between 2001 and 2015. Medium-sized mammals (such as bandicoots) and fish were the most common food items detected in dingo scat records. Stomach contents records revealed additional information on diet, such as the occurrence of human-sourced foods. Trail camera records highlighted dingo utilisation of stranded marine fauna, particularly turtles and whales. Mean adult body weights were higher than the national average, body condition scores and abundant-excessive fat reserves indicated a generally ideal-heavy physical condition, and parasite loads were low and comparable to other dingo populations. These data do not support hypotheses that Fraser Island dingoes have restricted diets or are in poor physical condition. Rather, they indicate that dingoes on Fraser Island are capable of exploiting a diverse array of food sources which contributes to the vast majority of dingoes being of good-excellent physical condition. PMID:27009879

  10. Streamwater quality at selected sites in the Fraser River basin, Grand County, Colorado, water years 1991-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bails, Jeffrey B.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the effect of population growth on streamwater quality in the Fraser River Basin, the U.S. Geological Survey did a study in cooperation with the Grand County Commissioners and the East Grand County Water Quality Board. During water years 1991 through 2000, the study determined that concentrations of un-ionized ammonia and nitrite plus nitrate in the streamwater of the basin are within Colorado State streamwater?quality standards. The study also found that concentrations of chloride are largest at the headwaters and decrease downstream; however, chloride loading in the stream has the opposite relation. Most nutrient loading to the Fraser River happens January through May. Concentrations of ammonia at Fraser River downstream from Vasquez Creek at Winter Park had a downward trend through the period of the study. Nitrite plus nitrate had upward and downward trends at different sites and over different time spans. Orthophosphorus concentrations had upward trends at two sites. In general, the streamwater quality in the Fraser River Basin is good and is not out of compliance with State standards.

  11. Impacts of a Rapidly Declining Mountain Snowpack on Streamflow Timing in Canada’s Fraser River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Do Hyuk; Gao, Huilin; Shi, Xiaogang; Islam, Siraj Ul; Déry, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    With its headwaters in the water towers of the western Cordillera of North America, the Fraser River is one of the continent’s mightiest rivers by annual flows, supplies vital freshwater resources to populous downstream locations, and sustains the world’s largest stocks of sockeye salmon along with four other salmon species. Here we show the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model’s ability to reproduce accurately observed trends in daily streamflow for the Fraser River’s main stem and six of its major tributaries over 1949-2006 when air temperatures rose by 1.4 °C while annual precipitation amounts remained stable. Rapidly declining mountain snowpacks and earlier melt onsets result in a 10-day advance of the Fraser River’s spring freshet with subsequent reductions in summer flows when up-river salmon migrations occur. Identification of the sub-basins driving the Fraser River’s most significant changes provides a measure of seasonal predictability of future floods or droughts in a changing climate.

  12. Analysis of surveillance systems in place in European Mediterranean countries for West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley fever (RVF).

    PubMed

    Cito, F; Narcisi, V; Danzetta, M L; Iannetti, S; Sabatino, D D; Bruno, R; Carvelli, A; Atzeni, M; Sauro, F; Calistri, P

    2013-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) represent an important group of viral agents responsible for vector-borne zoonotic diseases constituting an emerging sanitary threat for the Mediterranean Basin and the neighbouring countries. WNV infection is present in several Mediterranean countries, whereas RVF has never been introduced into Europe, but it is considered a major threat for North African countries. Being vector-borne diseases, they cannot be prevented only through an animal trade control policy. Several approaches are used for the surveillance of WNV and RVFV. With the aim of assessing the surveillance systems in place in Mediterranean countries, two disease-specific questionnaires (WNV, RVFV) have been prepared and submitted to Public Health and Veterinary Authorities of six EU countries. This study presents the information gathered through the questionnaires and describes some critical points in the prevention and surveillance of these diseases as emerged by the answers received.

  13. Water-level database update for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, Nevada and California, 1907-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavelko, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    The water-level database for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system in Nevada and California was updated. The database includes more than 54,000 water levels collected from 1907 to 2007, from more than 1,800 wells. Water levels were assigned a primary flag and multiple secondary flags that describe hydrologic conditions and trends at the time of the measurement and identify pertinent information about the well or water-level measurement. The flags provide a subjective measure of the relative accuracy of the measurements and are used to identify which water levels are appropriate for calculating head observations in a regional transient groundwater flow model. Included in the report appendix are all water-level data and their flags, selected well data, and an interactive spreadsheet for viewing hydrographs and well locations.

  14. Biodiveristy and Stability of Aboriginal Salmon Fisheries in the Fraser River Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesbitt, H. K.; Moore, J.

    2015-12-01

    Natural watersheds are hierarchical networks that may confer stability to ecosystem functions through integration of upstream biodiversity, whereby upstream asset diversification stabilizes the aggregate downstream through the portfolio effect. Here we show that riverine structure and its associated diversity confer stability of salmon catch and lengthened fishing seasons for Aboriginal fisheries on the Fraser River (1370km) in BC, Canada, the second longest dam-free salmon migration route in North America. In Canada, Aboriginal people have rights to fish for food, social, and ceremonial (FSC) purposes. FSC fisheries are located throughout the Fraser watershed and have access to varying levels of salmon diversity based on their location. For instance, fisheries at the mouth of the river have access to all of the salmon that spawn throughout the entire watershed, thus integrating across the complete diversity profile of the entire river. In contrast, fisheries in the headwaters have access to fewer salmon species and populations and thus fish from a much less diverse portfolio. These spatial gradients of diversity within watersheds provide a natural contrast for quantifying the effects of different types of diversity on interannual resource stability and seasonal availability. We acquired weekly and yearly catch totals from 1983 to 2012 (30 years) for Chinook, chum, coho, pink, and sockeye salmon for 21 FSC fishing sites throughout the Fraser River watershed from Fisheries and Oceans Canada. We examined how both population- and species-level diversity affects catch stability and season length at each site by quantifying year-to-year variability and within-year season length respectively. Salmon species diversity made fisheries up to 28% more stable in their catch than predicted with 3.7 more weeks to fish on average. Fisheries with access to high population diversity had up to 3.8 times more stable catch and 3 times longer seasons than less diverse fisheries. We

  15. Hydrogeologic evaluation and numerical simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.; Hill, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the ground-water system. The study area covers approximately 100,000 square kilometers between lat 35{degrees}N., long 115{degrees}W and lat 38{degrees}N., long 118{degrees}W and encompasses the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Hydrology in the region is a result of both the and climatic conditions and the complex described as dominated by interbasinal flow and may be conceptualized as having two main components: a series of relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper regional flow paths. A significant component of the regional ground-water flow is through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence. Throughout the regional flow system, ground-water flow is probably controlled by extensive and prevalent structural features that result from regional faulting and fracturing. Hydrogeologic investigations over a large and hydrogeologically complex area impose severe demands on data management. This study utilized geographic information systems and geoscientific information systems to develop, store, manipulate, and analyze regional hydrogeologic data sets describing various components of the ground-water flow system.

  16. Ground-water discharge determined from estimates of evapotranspiration, Death Valley regional flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laczniak, Randell J.; Smith, J. LaRue; Elliott, Peggy E.; DeMeo, Guy A.; Chatigny, Melissa A.; Roemer, Gaius J.

    2001-01-01

    The Death Valley regional flow system (DVRFS) is one of the larger ground-water flow systems in the southwestern United States and includes much of southern Nevada and the Death Valley region of eastern California. Centrally located within the ground-water flow system is the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS, a large tract covering about 1,375 square miles, historically has been used for testing nuclear devices and currently is being studied as a potential repository for the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste generated in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as mandated by Federal and State regulators, is evaluating the risk associated with contaminants that have been or may be introduced into the subsurface as a consequence of any past or future activities at the NTS. Because subsurface contaminants can be transported away from the NTS by ground water, components of the ground-water budget are of great interest. One such component is regional ground-water discharge. Most of the ground water leaving the DVRFS is limited to local areas where geologic and hydrologic conditions force ground water upward toward the surface to discharge at springs and seeps. Available estimates of ground-water discharge are based primarily on early work done as part of regional reconnaissance studies. These early efforts covered large, geologically complex areas and often applied substantially different techniques to estimate ground-water discharge. This report describes the results of a study that provides more consistent, accurate, and scientifically defensible measures of regional ground-water losses from each of the major discharge areas of the DVRFS. Estimates of ground-water discharge presented in this report are based on a rigorous quantification of local evapotranspiration (ET). The study identifies areas of ongoing ground-water ET, delineates different ET areas based on similarities in vegetation and soil-moisture conditions, and determines an ET rate for

  17. Ground-water discharge determined from estimates of evapotranspiration, Death Valley regional flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Laczniak; J. LaRue Smith; P.E. Elliott; G.A. DeMeo; M.A. Chatigny; G.J. Roemer

    2001-12-31

    The Death Valley regional flow system (DVRFS) is one of the larger ground-water flow systems in the southwestern United States and includes much of southern Nevada and the Death Valley region of eastern California. Centrally located within the ground-water flow system is the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS, a large tract covering about 1,375 square miles, historically has been used for testing nuclear devices and currently is being studied as a potential repository for the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste generated in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as mandated by Federal and State regulators, is evaluating the risk associated with contaminants that have been or may be introduced into the subsurface as a consequence of any past or future activities at the NTS. Because subsurface contaminants can be transported away from the NTS by ground water, components of the ground-water budget are of great interest. One such component is regional ground-water discharge. Most of the ground water leaving the DVRFS is limited to local areas where geologic and hydrologic conditions force ground water upward toward the surface to discharge at springs and seeps. Available estimates of ground-water discharge are based primarily on early work done as part of regional reconnaissance studies. These early efforts covered large, geologically complex areas and often applied substantially different techniques to estimate ground-water discharge. This report describes the results of a study that provides more consistent, accurate, and scientifically defensible measures of regional ground-water losses from each of the major discharge areas of the DVRFS. Estimates of ground-water discharge presented in this report are based on a rigorous quantification of local evapotranspiration (ET). The study identifies areas of ongoing ground-water ET, delineates different ET areas based on similarities in vegetation and soil-moisture conditions, and determines an ET rate f or

  18. A Feasibility Study of Sustainable Distributed Generation Technologies to Improve the electrical System on the Duck Valley Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Herman Atkins, Shoshone-Paiute; Mark Hannifan, New West Technologies

    2005-06-30

    A range of sustainable energy options were assessed for feasibility in addressing chronic electric grid reliability problems at Duck Valley IR. Wind power and building energy efficiency were determined to have the most merit, with the Duck Valley Tribes now well positioned to pursue large scale wind power development for on- and off-reservation sales.

  19. Drought resilience of the California Central Valley surface-groundwater-conveyance system

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.; Dale, L.L.; Brush, C.; Vicuna, S.; Kadir, T.N.; Dogrul, E.C.; Chung, F.I.

    2009-05-15

    A series of drought simulations were performed for the California Central Valley using computer applications developed by the California Department of Water Resources and historical datasets representing a range of droughts from mild to severe for time periods lasting up to 60 years. Land use, agricultural cropping patterns, and water demand were held fixed at the 2003 level and water supply was decreased by amounts ranging between 25 and 50%, representing light to severe drought types. Impacts were examined for four hydrologic subbasins, the Sacramento Basin, the San Joaquin Basin, the Tulare Basin, and the Eastside Drainage. Results suggest the greatest impacts are in the San Joaquin and Tulare Basins, regions that are heavily irrigated and are presently overdrafted in most years. Regional surface water diversions decrease by as much as 70%. Stream-to-aquifer flows and aquifer storage declines were proportional to drought severity. Most significant was the decline in ground water head for the severe drought cases, where results suggest that under these scenarios the water table is unlikely to recover within the 30-year model-simulated future. However, the overall response to such droughts is not as severe as anticipated and the Sacramento Basin may act as ground-water insurance to sustain California during extended dry periods.

  20. TEK and biodiversity management in agroforestry systems of different socio-ecological contexts of the Tehuacán Valley.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Ramos, Mariana; Moreno-Calles, Ana I; Casas, Alejandro

    2016-07-22

    Transformation of natural ecosystems into intensive agriculture is a main factor causing biodiversity loss worldwide. Agroforestry systems (AFS) may maintain biodiversity, ecosystem benefits and human wellbeing, they have therefore high potential for concealing production and conservation. However, promotion of intensive agriculture and disparagement of TEK endanger their permanence. A high diversity of AFS still exist in the world and their potentialities vary with the socio-ecological contexts. We analysed AFS in tropical, temperate, and arid environments, of the Tehuacan Valley, Mexico, to investigate how their capacity varies to conserve biodiversity and role of TEK influencing differences in those contexts. We hypothesized that biodiversity in AFS is related to that of forests types associated and the vigour of TEK and management. We conducted studies in a matrix of environments and human cultures in the Tehuacán Valley. In addition, we reviewed, systematized and compared information from other regions of Mexico and the world with comparable socio-ecological contexts in order to explore possible general patterns. Our study found from 26 % to nearly 90 % of wild plants species richness conserved in AFS, the decreasing proportion mainly associated to pressures for intensifying agricultural production and abandoning traditional techniques. Native species richness preserved in AFS is influenced by richness existing in the associated forests, but the main driver is how people preserve benefits of components and functions of ecosystems. Elements of modern agricultural production may coexist with traditional management patterns, but imposition of modern models may break possible balances. TEK influences decisions on what and how modern techniques may be advantageous for preserving biodiversity, ecosystem integrity in AFS and people's wellbeing. TEK, agroecology and other sciences may interact for maintaining and improving traditional AFS to increase biodiversity

  1. Turritopsis fascicularis Fraser, 1943 (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa): redescription and discussion of its phylogenetic position within the genus.

    PubMed

    Miglietta, Maria Pia

    2016-03-31

    Turritopsis fascicularis Fraser, 1943 was first described off Alligator Reef, Florida, USA, at a depth of 216 m. Presumably a deep-sea species, its validity has often been questioned due to the scarcity of available records. In this paper, T. fascicularis is re-described from some mature colonies from the upper slope of the Gulf of Mexico. Furthermore, new pictures of the colony, polyps, and medusa buds, are provided. A ~600bp sequence of the large ribosomal subunit of the mitochondrial RNA (lsu-rRNA, 16S), also known as the Hydrozoan barcoding molecule, is used for the first time to confirm the validity of T. fascicularis as a species, and analyze its phylogenetic position within the genus Turritopsis.

  2. [Microphthalmos and hypertelorism as diagnostic index in ultrasound diagnosis of Fraser syndrome].

    PubMed

    Leśniewicz, Ryszard; Sulik, Marian; Midro, Alina T

    2005-02-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare genetic syndrome with abnormalities of the head, lungs, kidneys, and limbs. A prenatal diagnosis of FS can be done in families with risk, using foetal ultrasonography. However, a wide qualitative and quantitative variability of possible abnormalities makes the diagnosis in utero notably questionable. We present the results of foetal ultrasonography in a tertigravida, had delivered two children with FS. Signs of foetal hypertelorism and microphthalmia, both traits typical for FS, were detected based on outer and inner orbital diameters and ocular diameters in 28 and 32 weeks of pregnancy. The clinical and pathological examinations after birth confirmed the diagnosis of FS. Our observation suggests that eye anomalies may prompt the diagnosis of FS even if characteristic lung and kidney abnormalities are absent. Therefore, we propose to regularly assess eye dimensions and distance, when performing any foetal ultrasonography in families with of FS.

  3. Fraser syndrome: a clinical study of 59 cases and evaluation of diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    van Haelst, Mieke M; Scambler, Peter J; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2007-12-15

    Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive congenital malformation syndrome characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and urogenital defects. We studied the clinical features in 59 affected individuals from 40 families (25 consanguineous), and compared our findings to data from previous reviews. We found a higher frequency of abnormalities of the skull, larynx, umbilicus, urinary tract, and anus in our series of patients, and mental retardation and cleft lip with or without cleft palate were observed less frequently than previously reported. Clinical features in probands and sibs were remarkably similar. As can be expected prenatally diagnosed patients had more manifestations that gave rise to a pathological amount of amniotic fluid. Otherwise patients diagnosed before and after birth had similar frequencies of symptoms. Based on the present results we suggest an adaptation of diagnostic criteria for FS, including adding airway tract and urinary tract anomalies as major criteria. The specificity of the proposed diagnostic criteria was evaluated using the London Medical Database as a search tool.

  4. Holocene to contemporary fluvial sediment fluxes and budgets of two glacier-fed valley-fjord systems in the Nordfjord area, western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liermann, S.; Beylich, A. A.; Hansen, L.

    2012-04-01

    This PhD project is part of the NFR funded Norwegian Individual Project within the ESF SedyMONT (Timescales of sediment dynamics, climate and topographic change in mountain landscapes) TOPO-EUROPE program. Two neighboring glacier-fed valley-fjord systems (Erdalen & Bødalen) with a different topographic inheritance from Pleistocene glaciations are compared. It is of special interest how the different valley morphometries have influenced Holocene to contemporary sediment fluxes and budgets. To understand the spatial and temporal sediment flux variability during the Holocene the main focus lays on i) quantification and analysis of storage element volumes for estimation of Holocene sedimentation rates and sediment yields, ii) analysis of the spatial and temporal sediment flux variability, iii) analysis of the linkages between sediment transfer and storage, iv) analysis of controlling factors for postglacial, sub-recent and contemporary sediment fluxes and v) construction of Holocene to contemporary sediment budgets for Erdalen and Bødalen. The analysis of sedimentary fluxes and budgets as well as their controls at different timescales (Holocene to contemporary) is a basis for the assessment of complex landscape responses of Holocene to recent changes in temperature, precipitation and runoff. For constructing sediment budgets at a small-catchment scale (50-100 km2) it is necessary to integrate the temporal and spatial variations of supply of material from sediment sources, sediment transport and storage and to identify, how far the different system components are coupled to each other. Both valleys are instrumented with a year-round monitoring system (runoff, suspended and solute transport) for analyzing fluvial sediment fluxes. The results enable to link sediment transport and runoff (events) and the spatial and temporal variability of sediment transport processes. In addition, glacier sediment supply and its spatial variability in Erdalen and Bødalen is monitored

  5. Small Glaciofluvial Valleys on Amazonian Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassett, C.; Dickson, J.; Head, J. W.; Levy, J. S.; Marchant, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    We present new observations of small valleys associated with glacial features in the Martian mid-latitudes, based on a survey of images from the Context Camera (CTX) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. These valleys are small (~50-400 m wide) and short (<~10 km in length); indeed, the small-scale of these valleys appears to have hindered earlier recognition. The valleys usually are adjacent to probable glacial landforms (lobate debris aprons, lineated valley fill, concentric crater fill and viscous flow features); the mechanism most likely to explain their origin is top-down melting of these cold-based glaciers. Some valleys have associated sedimentary deposits (small fans) (e.g., Fig. 1). Both stratigraphic relations and crater counting constrain most such valleys to the Amazonian period. The observed glaciofluvial valleys are typically on slopes of <<10°, which makes them morphologically distinct from young Mars gullies, which form only on steep slopes (~15-30°). These features are also qualitatively different from valley networks that date from the Noachian/Early Hesperian, as these larger valley systems were integrated into networks that were up to hundreds or thousands of kilometers in extent. Thus, we interpret these small glaciofluvial valleys as representing a distinct class of fluvial features on Mars. Their presence shows that the hydrology of Amazonian Mars is more diverse than previously thought. Figure 1. A small valley emanating from concentric crater fill (interpreted as glacial / ice-rich) inside a 70-km crater (352.5°E, 41.5°S; CTX image P16_007256_1383). The valley begins in a small alcove, where remnant glacial materials are now ~1 km from the valley head. The valley is ~5.5 km long, has an average slope of 5°, and terminates in an elongate fan.

  6. Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS III) Process Development and Laboratory Tests at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    V. Jain; S. M. Barnes; B. G. Bindi; R. A. Palmer

    2000-04-30

    At the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP),the Vitrification Facility (VF)is designed to convert the high-level radioactive waste (HLW)stored on the site to a stable glass for disposal at a Department of Energy (DOE)-specified federal repository. The Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS-III)verification tests were conducted between February 1995 and August 1995 as a supplemental means to support the vitrification process flowsheet, but at only one seventh the scale.During these tests,the process flowsheet was refined and optimized. The SVS-III test series was conducted with a focus on confirming the applicability of the Redox Forecasting Model, which was based on the Index of Feed Oxidation (IFO)developed during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS)and SVS-I tests. Additional goals were to investigate the prototypical feed preparation cycle and test the new target glass composition. Included in this report are the basis and current designs of the major components of the Scale Vitrification System and the results of the SVS-III tests.The major subsystems described are the feed preparation and delivery, melter, and off-gas treatment systems. In addition,the correlation between the melter's operation and its various parameters;which included feed rate,cold cap coverage,oxygen reduction (redox)state of the glass,melter power,plenum temperature,and airlift analysis;were developed.

  7. Epidemiology of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep managed under traditional husbandry system in Kashmir valley.

    PubMed

    Tariq, K A; Chishti, M Z; Ahmad, F; Shawl, A S

    2008-11-25

    The present study was conducted with the objective to investigate the seasonal epidemiological prevalence of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) nematodes in different age groups, sexes and breeds (genotypes) of sheep through necropsy and faecal analysis over a period of 2 years in Kashmir valley, India. A total of 1533 sheep were examined [faecal examination: 1035 (year 1: 561, year 2: 474); necropsy: 498 (year 1: 232, year 2: 266)]. Out of these, 945 (61.64%) were found infected [faecal examination: 697 (67.34%, year 1: 390 (69.51%), year 2: 307 (46.99%); necropsy: 248 (49.79%, year 1: 123 (53.01%), year 2: 125 (64.69%)] with GIT nematodes. The over all prevalence of GIT nematodes in sheep in year 1 was 64.76 and 58.37% in year 2 (P=0.04). The parasites in decreasing order of prevalence (%) in sheep were Haemonchus contortus (59.6); Ostertagia circumcincta (38.0); Bunostomum trigonocephalum (37.7); Chabertia ovina (37.7); Trichostrongylus spp. (33.9); Nematodirus spathiger (29.4); Oesophagostomum columbianum (28.4); Trichuris ovis (23.5) and Marshallagia marshalli (22.1). Season, sex, age, and genotype were the factors that influenced the epidemiological prevalence of GIT nematodes in sheep in the present study. The maximum nematode infection was observed in summer season and lowest in winter (P=0.0005). Local Kashmiri breed was less infected as compared to other genotypes (P>0.05). Lower age groups were more infected than adult animals (P>/=0.05). Prevalence was higher in rams (males) than eves (females) (P>0.05). The present study will initially be of great significance to add to the existing knowledge of the epidemiology of GIT nematodes of small ruminants and the findings will be quite helpful to devise the appropriate control and prophylactic strategies for GIT nematodiasis of sheep reared under the temperate agro-climatic conditions.

  8. Evidence of rift valley fever seroprevalence in the Sahrawi semi-nomadic pastoralist system, Western Sahara

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing global importance of Rift Valley fever (RVF) is clearly demonstrated by its geographical expansion. The presence of a wide range of host and vector species, and the epidemiological characteristics of RVF, have led to concerns that epidemics will continue to occur in previously unaffected regions of Africa. The proximity of the Sahrawi territories of Western Sahara to endemic countries, such as Mauritania, Senegal, and Mali with periodic isolation of virus and serological evidence of RVF, and the intensive livestock trade in the region results in a serious risk of RVF spread in the Sahrawi territories, and potentially from there to the Maghreb and beyond. A sero-epidemiological survey was conducted in the Saharawi territories between March and April 2008 to investigate the possible presence of the RVF virus (RVFV) and associated risk factors. A two-stage cluster sampling design was used, incorporating 23 sampling sites. Results A total of 982 serum samples was collected from 461 sheep, 463 goats and 58 camels. Eleven samples (0.97%) tested positive for IgG against the RVFV. There were clusters of high seroprevalence located mostly in the Tifariti (7.69%) and Mehaires (7.14%) regions, with the Tifariti event having been found in one single flock (4/26 positive animals). Goats and older animals were at a significantly increased risk being seropositive (p = 0.007 and p = 0.007, respectively). Conclusion The results suggest potential RVF activity in the study area, where intense livestock movement and trade with neighbouring countries might be considered as a primary determinant in the spread of the disease. The importance of a continuous field investigation is reinforced, in light of the risk of RVF expansion to historically unaffected regions of Africa. PMID:24758592

  9. Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, Nevada and California-Hydrogeologic framework and transient groundwater flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Belcher, Wayne R.; Sweetkind, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient groundwater flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the groundwater flow system and previous less extensive groundwater flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect groundwater flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the groundwater flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural groundwater discharge occurring through evapotranspiration (ET) and spring flow; the history of groundwater pumping from 1913 through 1998; groundwater recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were provided

  10. Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California -- hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Belcher, Wayne R.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the ground-water flow system and previous less extensive ground-water flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect ground-water flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the ground-water flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural ground-water discharge occurring through evapotranspiration and spring flow; the history of ground-water pumping from 1913 through 1998; ground-water recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were

  11. East African Rift Valley, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This rare, cloud free view of the East African Rift Valley, Kenya (1.5N, 35.5E) shows a clear view of the Turkwell River Valley, an offshoot of the African REift System. The East African Rift is part of a vast plate fracture which extends from southern Turkey, through the Red Sea, East Africa and into Mozambique. Dark green patches of forests are seen along the rift margin and tea plantations occupy the cooler higher ground.

  12. Detection of aquifer system compaction and land subsidence using interferometric synthetic aperture radar, Antelope Valley, Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, D.L.; Hudnut, K.W.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Phillips, S.P.; Peltzer, G.; Rogez, F.; Rosen, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has great potential to detect and quantify land subsidence caused by aquifer system compaction. InSAR maps with high spatial detail and resolution of range displacement (??10 mm in change of land surface elevation) were developed for a groundwater basin (~103 km2) in Antelope Valley, California, using radar data collected from the ERS-1 satellite. These data allow comprehensive comparison between recent (1993-1995) subsidence patterns and those detected historically (1926-1992) by more traditional methods. The changed subsidence patterns are generally compatible with recent shifts in land and water use. The InSAR-detected patterns are generally consistent with predictions based on a coupled model of groundwater flow and aquifer system compaction. The minor inconsistencies may reflect our imperfect knowledge of the distribution and properties of compressible sediments. When used in conjunction with coincident measurements of groundwater levels and other geologic information, InSAR data may be useful for constraining parameter estimates in simulations of aquifer system compaction.

  13. Quaternary history of Red Mountain Creek Valley and its relation to the Rio Grande glacier system near Creede, CO

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchens, S. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Interactions between the Rio Grande glacier system and the Red Mountain Creek glacier are more complex than previously believed. Although both glaciers were fed by the same ice cap along the continental divide, the timing and number of advances are different. Analysis of air photos and field relationships reveal a series of end moraines at the mouth of Red Mountain Creek. The presence of these moraines disproves the hypothesis of Atwood and Mather (1932) that the two were confluent during the last phase of glaciation. The degree of weathering rind development on mafic cobbles was used together with the degree of clay mineral development in the soils to determine relative ages and the number of advances in each system. The less than 2[mu]m material for X-ray diffraction analysis was separated from soil samples collected from pits excavated on the tops of end moraines. Both smectite and kaolinite were found within the soil profile thus indicating weathering of minerals in tills derived from the local biotite-sanadine-hornblende tuffs. The amount of post glacial weathering was estimated based on the relative intensity of the 17[angstrom] smectite peak after ethylene glycol solvation. Both the X-ray and weathering rind analysis show two separate glacial events in Red Mountain Creek valley. However, in the Rio Grande system the weathering rind data suggests two glacial events while the clay mineralogy suggests only one.

  14. Simulated effects of climate change on the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    D`Agnese, F.A.; O`Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; San Juan, C.A.

    1999-04-01

    The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the Death Valley regional flow system as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. As part of the hydrologic investigation, regional, three-dimensional conceptual and numerical ground-water-flow models have been developed to assess the potential effects of past and future climates on the regional flow system. A simulation that is based on climatic conditions 21,000 years ago was evaluated by comparing the simulated results to observation of paleodischarge sites. Following acceptable simulation of a past climate, a possible future ground-water-flow system, with climatic conditions that represent a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, was simulated. The steady-state simulations were based on the present-day, steady-state, regional ground-water-flow model. The finite-difference model consisted of 163 rows, 153 columns, and 3 layers and was simulated using MODFLOWP. Climate changes were implemented in the regional ground-water-flow model by changing the distribution of ground-water recharge. Global-scale, average-annual, simulated precipitation for both past- and future-climate conditions developed elsewhere were resampled to the model-grid resolution. A polynomial function that represents the Maxey-Eakin method for estimating recharge from precipitation was used to develop recharge distributions for simulation.

  15. Comparison of seismic and infrasonic avalanche detection systems: first results from the Dischma valley above Davos, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Herwijnen, Alec; Schweizer, Jürg; Marchetti, Emanuele; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    The reliable detection of snow avalanches is of crucial importance to better understand triggering mechanisms, identify possible precursors, or improve avalanche forecasting. An avalanche flowing down a mountain is a moving source well coupled with the ground and the atmosphere, which generates seismic and infrasonic waves. Seismic signals are produced by the impact of the dense flowing snow mass on the ground or on obstacles. Infrasonic signals are generated by rapidly accelerating snow particles in the turbulent snow-air flow (powder cloud) of the avalanche. Seismic and infrasound are therefore used as monitoring systems for the remote detection of snow avalanches. However, while it is well known that large avalanches can be detected by both systems over considerable distances, for smaller avalanches the threshold in terms of detection resolution is still unclear. During the winter of 2015-2016 we therefore installed a seismic and an infrasound array in the Dischma valley above Davos, Switzerland. Both arrays were deployed within a distance of 500 m to each other. Several automatic cameras were also installed to provide additional information on the location, type (dry or wet) and size of the avalanches released. The overall goal is to assess the limits of both monitoring systems in terms of avalanche type and size and to assess their resolution to locate avalanches in real-time. We present preliminary results that allow us to define detection capabilities of both methods depending on source-receiver distance as well as the type of the avalanche.

  16. Human effects on the hydrologic system of the Verde Valley, central Arizona, 1910–2005 and 2005–2110, using a regional groundwater flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garner, Bradley D.; Pool, D.R.; Tillman, Fred D; Forbes, Brandon T.

    2013-01-01

    Water budgets were developed for the Verde Valley of central Arizona in order to evaluate the degree to which human stresses have affected the hydrologic system and might affect it in the future. The Verde Valley is a portion of central Arizona wherein concerns have been raised about water availability, particularly perennial base flow of the Verde River. The Northern Arizona Regional Groundwater Flow Model (NARGFM) was used to generate the water budgets and was run in several configurations for the 1910–2005 and 2005–2110 time periods. The resultant water budgets were subtracted from one another in order to quantify the relative changes that were attributable solely to human stresses; human stresses included groundwater withdrawals and incidental and artificial recharge but did not include, for example, human effects on the global climate. Three hypothetical and varied conditions of human stresses were developed and applied to the model for the 2005–2110 period. On the basis of this analysis, human stresses during 1910–2005 were found to have already affected the hydrologic system of the Verde Valley, and human stresses will continue to affect the hydrologic system during 2005–2110. Riparian evapotranspiration decreased and underflow into the Verde Valley increased because of human stresses, and net groundwater discharge to the Verde River in the Verde Valley decreased for the 1910–2005 model runs. The model also showed that base flow at the upstream end of the study area, as of 2005, was about 4,900 acre-feet per year less than it would have been in the absence of human stresses. At the downstream end of the Verde Valley, base flow had been reduced by about 10,000 acre-feet per year by the year 2005 because of human stresses. For the 2005–2110 period, the model showed that base flow at the downstream end of the Verde Valley may decrease by an additional 5,400 to 8,600 acre-feet per year because of past, ongoing, and hypothetical future human

  17. Late quaternary slip-rate variations along the Warm Springs Valley fault system, northern Walker Lane, California-Nevada border

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Ryan; dePolo, Craig; Briggs, Richard W.; Crone, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which faults exhibit temporally varying slip rates has important consequences for models of fault mechanics and probabilistic seismic hazard. Here, we explore the temporal behavior of the dextral‐slip Warm Springs Valley fault system, which is part of a network of closely spaced (10–20 km) faults in the northern Walker Lane (California–Nevada border). We develop a late Quaternary slip record for the fault using Quaternary mapping and high‐resolution topographic data from airborne Light Distance and Ranging (LiDAR). The faulted Fort Sage alluvial fan (40.06° N, 119.99° W) is dextrally displaced 98+42/-43 m, and we estimate the age of the alluvial fan to be 41.4+10.0/-4.8 to 55.7±9.2  ka, based on a terrestrial cosmogenic 10Be depth profile and 36Cl analyses on basalt boulders, respectively. The displacement and age constraints for the fan yield a slip rate of 1.8 +0.8/-0.8 mm/yr to 2.4 +1.2/-1.1 mm/yr (2σ) along the northern Warm Springs Valley fault system for the past 41.4–55.7 ka. In contrast to this longer‐term slip rate, shorelines associated with the Sehoo highstand of Lake Lahontan (~15.8  ka) adjacent to the Fort Sage fan are dextrally faulted at most 3 m, which limits a maximum post‐15.8 ka slip rate to 0.2  mm/yr. These relations indicate that the post‐Lahontan slip rate on the fault is only about one‐tenth the longer‐term (41–56 ka) average slip rate. This apparent slip‐rate variation may be related to co‐dependent interaction with the nearby Honey Lake fault system, which shows evidence of an accelerated period of mid‐Holocene earthquakes.

  18. Cultural Resources Reconnaissance Study of the Black Warrior-Tombigbee System Corridor, Alabama. Volume 2. Ethnohistory. A Documentary Study of Native American Life in the Lower Tombigbee Valley.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    CULTURAL RESOURCES RECONNAISSANCE STUDY OF THE do BLACK WARRIOR-TOMBIGBEE SYSTEM RIO, **416ALABAMA * VOLUME II ETHNOHISTORY - --- A Documentary Study of...WARRIOR-TOMBIGBEE SYSTEM CORRIDOR, ALABAMA VOLUME II ETHNOHISTORY A Documentary Study of Native American Life in the Lower Tombigbee Valley by George E...potential melting pot were the French themselves, in forts and riverfront plantations. Most of the documentary information about the tribes of the area

  19. Geomorphic (de-) coupling of hillslope and channel systems within headwater catchments in two subarctic tributary valleys, Nordfjord, Western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laute, Katja; Beylich, Achim A.

    2010-05-01

    Hillslopes occupy large areas of the earth surface. Studying the characteristics, development and interaction of hillslopes as components of the geomorphic hillslope-channel coupling process-response system will improve the understanding of the complex response of mountain landscape formation. The rates of hillslope processes are exceptionally varied and affected by many influences of varying intensity. Hillslope-channel coupling and sediment storage within slopes are important factors that influence sediment delivery through catchments, especially in steep environments. Within sediment transfers from sources to sinks in drainage basins, hillslopes function as a key element concerning sediment storage, both for short term periods as between rainstorms as well as for longer periods in colluvial deposits. This PhD project is part of the NFR funded SedyMONT-Norway project within the ESF TOPO-EUROPE SedyMONT (Timescales of sediment dynamics, climate and topographic change in mountain landscapes) programme. The focus of this study is on geomorphic hillslope-channel coupling or de-coupling and sediment transport within four distinct headwater areas of the Erdalen and Bødalen catchments in the Nordfjord valley-fjord system (inner Nordfjord, Western Norway). Both catchments can be described as steep, U-shaped and glacier-fed, subarctic tributary valleys. Approximately 14% of the 49 km2 large headwater area of Erdalen is occupied by hillslope deposits; in Bødalen hillslope deposits occupy 12% of the 42 km2 large headwater area. The main aims of the study are to present preliminary findings on (i) the identification of possible sediment sources and delivery pathways within the headwater areas of the catchments, (ii) to analyze the development of hillslope-channel coupling / de-coupling from postglacial to contemporary timescales as well as (iii) to investigate the current degree of geomorphic hillslope-channel coupling within the different headwater catchments and (iv) to

  20. Hydraulic-property estimates for use with a transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belcher, Wayne R.; Elliott, Peggy E.; Geldon, Arthur L.

    2001-01-01

    The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system encompasses an area of about 43,500 square kilometers in southeastern California and southern Nevada, between latitudes 35? and 38?15' north and longitudes 115? and 117?45' west. The study area is underlain by Quaternary to Tertiary basin-fill sediments and mafic-lava flows; Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and sedimentary rocks; Tertiary to Jurassic granitic rocks; Triassic to Middle Proterozoic carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks; and Early Proterozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. The rock assemblage in the Death Valley region is extensively faulted as a result of several episodes of tectonic activity. This study is comprised of published and unpublished estimates of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, and anisotropy ratios for hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley region study area. Hydrogeologic units previously proposed for the Death Valley regional transient ground-water flow model were recognized for the purpose of studying the distribution of hydraulic properties. Analyses of regression and covariance were used to assess if a relation existed between hydraulic conductivity and depth for most hydrogeologic units. Those analyses showed a weak, quantitatively indeterminate, relation between hydraulic conductivity and depth.

  1. Hydraulic-property estimates for use with a transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Belcher; P.E. Elliott; A.L. Geldon

    2001-12-31

    The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system encompasses an area of about 43,500 square kilometers in southeastern California and southern Nevada. The study area is underlain by Quaternary to Tertiary basin-fill sediments and mafic-lava flows; Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and sedimentary rocks; Tertiary to Jurassic granitic rocks; Triassic to Middle Proterozoic carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks; and Early Proterozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. The rock assemblage in the Death Valley region is extensively faulted as a result of several episodes of tectonic activity. This study is comprised of published and unpublished estimates of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, and anisotropy ratios for hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley region study area. Hydrogeologic units previously proposed for the Death Valley regional transient ground-water flow model, were recognized for the purpose of studying the distribution of hydraulic properties. Analyses of regression and covariance were used to assess if a relation existed between hydraulic conductivity and depth for most hydrogeologic units. Those analyses showed a weak, quantitatively indeterminate, relation between hydraulic conductivity and depth.

  2. Speleothems in the desert: Glimpses of the Pleistocene history of the Death Valley Regional Groundwater Flow System, Nevada and California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spötl, Christoph; Dublyansky, Yuri; Moseley, Gina; Wendt, Kathleen; Edwards, Larry; Scholger, Robert; Woodhead, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Death Valley in eastern California holds North Americás record for the deepest, hottest and driest place. Despite these unfavourable boundary conditions speleothems are present in this hyperarid depression and the surrounding deserts and provide unique insights into long-term regional climate change and landscape evolution of this tectonically and geomorphologically highly active region. Most of the speleothems are inactive and exposed due to tectonic uplift and erosion. They differ from common speleothems, because the majority formed under phreatic conditions as part of a regional groundwater flow system that is still active today. Data from three sites will be discussed illustrating the spectrum of speleothem deposits and their modes of formation. At Devils Hole, the thermal aquifer and the associated subaqueous and water-table speleothems can be directly accessed and provide a record reaching back about 1 million years. At Travertine Point, close to modern discharge points of this large groundwater flow system, phreatic speleothems form near-vertical veins up to about 2 m wide showing evidence of high flow rates along these fractures, which are connected to fossil spring tufa deposits. Finally, outcrops along Titus Canyon expose several generations of speleothems documenting the progressive lowering of the regional groundwater table. The youngest calcite generation records the transition towards vadose conditions 500-400 ka ago.

  3. Accurate dating of fluvial deposits in the Lateglacial Niers Valley system (Germany) using a multiple dating strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, W. Z.; Kasse, C.; Peeters, J.; Wallinga, J.

    2009-04-01

    The River Rhine occupied the Niers Valley (Germany) from the Saalian Glaciation (MIS 6) until the Early Holocene (Kasse et al., Journal of Quaternary Science 2005). The fluvial landscape of the time of abandonment has been exceptionally well preserved, leaving a series of cut-off meanders and residual channels. This unique preservation provides the possibility to investigate Late Weichselian fluvial dynamics of the River Rhine. We combined several dating techniques to accurately determine the age of the deposits. We developed a sampling strategy based on detailed field survey and cross sectioning. 1) The geomorphological relationships of the cut-off meanders gave a relative age for the successive stages of meandering. 2) The occurrence of Laacher See Pumice in the point bar deposits gave a maximum age for these deposits. 3) Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL)-dating on sandy point bar and channel-fill deposits yielded absolute ages for active meandering and channel abandonment. 4) AMS-14C dates on terrestrial macrofossils from the basal fills of the residual channels yielded minimum ages for abandonment. 5) Biostratigraphy of the organic channel fills using palynology gave a relative chronology, which could be linked to the well-dated regional biostratigraphy of the nearby Netherlands and is cross-checked by additional AMS-14C dates. By combining these dating techniques we obtained a firm chronological framework that allows linkage to climate records and above the cross-validation of the different dating techniques. All techniques gave consistent ages that confirm the Lateglacial age and Early Holocene abandonment of the Niers Valley by the River Rhine. Palynology and 14C-dating on the channels fills supported the relative chronology indicated by the cross-cut relationships. The presence of the Laacher See Pumice in the point bar deposits, which has an unambiguous age of 12.9 ka cal. BP concurs with the organic channel fill ages. Because OSL signals in some

  4. Assessment of Cropping System Diversity in the Fergana Valley Through Image Fusion of Landsat 8 and SENTINEL-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimov, D.; Kuhn, J.; Conrad, C.

    2016-06-01

    In the transitioning agricultural societies of the world, food security is an essential element of livelihood and economic development with the agricultural sector very often being the major employment factor and income source. Rapid population growth, urbanization, pollution, desertification, soil degradation and climate change pose a variety of threats to a sustainable agricultural development and can be expressed as agricultural vulnerability components. Diverse cropping patterns may help to adapt the agricultural systems to those hazards in terms of increasing the potential yield and resilience to water scarcity. Thus, the quantification of crop diversity using indices like the Simpson Index of Diversity (SID) e.g. through freely available remote sensing data becomes a very important issue. This however requires accurate land use classifications. In this study, the focus is set on the cropping system diversity of garden plots, summer crop fields and orchard plots which are the prevalent agricultural systems in the test area of the Fergana Valley in Uzbekistan. In order to improve the accuracy of land use classification algorithms with low or medium resolution data, a novel processing chain through the hitherto unique fusion of optical and SAR data from the Landsat 8 and Sentinel-1 platforms is proposed. The combination of both sensors is intended to enhance the object's textural and spectral signature rather than just to enhance the spatial context through pansharpening. It could be concluded that the Ehlers fusion algorithm gave the most suitable results. Based on the derived image fusion different object-based image classification algorithms such as SVM, Naïve Bayesian and Random Forest were evaluated whereby the latter one achieved the highest classification accuracy. Subsequently, the SID was applied to measure the diversification of the three main cropping systems.

  5. The Dry Valley Lakes, Antarctica: from sulfur stains on Earth to sulfur stains in the Jovian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chela-Flores, Julian; Seckbach, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    Most organisms dwell in what we consider to be "normal" environments, while others, which are called extremophiles, may thrive in harsher conditions. These living organisms are mainly of unicellular (both prokaryotes and, to a lesser extent, there are some eukaryotes) But the extremophiles also include multicellular organisms, including worms, insects and crustaceans. In the present work we survey specific extremophiles in some detail. Astrobiology is concerned with all of these extremophiles, as they may be models for extant life in similar environments elsewhere in the universe. In the more restricted search for life through exploration of the Solar System, the main focus is on the preparation of suites of experiments that may attempt to discover the habitability of planets and their satellites. In this context we ask ourselves: What biosignatures can facilitate life detection, both unicellular and multicellular, in extreme environments? The environments that are within reach of present and future space missions include the Jupiter satellite Europa. The icecovered lakes of Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys have long been of interest to astrobiology. These environments harbor unique microbial ecosystems that could orient us how to plan our experiments on Europa.

  6. A Platform Across the Valley of Death: Tech Transition Via Open Enterprise Information System Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    From an information systems engineering perspective, the gene pool for enterprise evolution is the Information Technology (IT) marketplace...Web, after all, is the mother of all OEIS! Following this argument, successful system evolution is equivalent to “Technology Transition...adoption of demonstrated capabilities. In these cases, commercial industry’s innovative technology adoption, and follow on standards evolution , has

  7. Streamwater Chemistry and Nutrient Export During Five Years of Bark Beetle Infestation of Subalpine Watersheds at the Fraser Experimental Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoades, C.; Elder, K.; Hubbard, R.; Porth, L.

    2008-12-01

    Forested watersheds of western North America are currently undergoing rapid and extensive canopy mortality caused by a variety of insect species. The mountain pine bark beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) began to attack lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) at the USFS Fraser Experimental Forest in central Colorado in 2002. By 2007, bark beetles had killed 78% of the overstory pine in Fraser research watersheds on average. The hydrologic, climatic, biogeochemical and vegetation records at the Fraser Experimental Forest provide a unique opportunity to quantify the impacts of this widespread, but poorly understood forest disturbance relative to a multi-decade pre-disturbance period. Here we compare seasonal streamwater chemistry and annual nutrient export for the five years since the bark beetle outbreak began with the pre- attack record. Patterns in post-outbreak streamwater biogeochemistry are compared to changes is species composition and proportional loss of overstory basal area for four basins. The influence of the outbreak will depend upon an aggregate of short (i.e. halted overstory water and nutrient use) and longer-term (i.e. altered canopy interception, windthrow, and understory growth) processes, so the hydrologic and biogeochemical implications of current beetle activity will not be fully realized for decades.

  8. Modeling The Evolution Of A Regional Aquifer System With The California Central Valley Groundwater-Surface Water Simulation Model (C2VSIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, C. F.; Dogrul, E. C.; Kadir, T. N.; Moncrief, M. R.; Shultz, S.; Tonkin, M.; Wendell, D.

    2006-12-01

    The finite element application IWFM has been used to develop an integrated groundwater-surface water model for California's Central Valley, an area of ~50,000 km2, to simulate the evolution of the groundwater flow system and historical groundwater-surface water interactions on a monthly time step from October 1921 to September 2003. The Central Valley's hydrologic system changed significantly during this period. Prior to 1920, most surface water flowed unimpeded from source areas in the mountains surrounding the Central Valley through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to the Pacific Ocean, and groundwater largely flowed from recharge areas on the valley rim to discharge as evapotransipration in extensive marshes along the valley's axis. Rapid agricultural development led to increases in groundwater pumping from ~0.5 km3/yr in the early 1920's to 13-18 km3/yr in the 1940's to 1970's, resulting in strong vertical head gradients, significant head declines throughout the valley, and subsidence of >0.3 m over an area of 13,000 km2. Construction of numerous dams and development of an extensive surface water delivery network after 1950 altered the surface water flow regime and reduced groundwater pumping to the current ~10 km3/yr, increasing net recharge and leading to local head gradient reversals and water level recoveries. A model calibrated to the range of historical flow regimes in the Central Valley will provide robust estimations of stream-groundwater interactions for a range of projected future scenarios. C2VSIM uses the IWFM application to simulate a 3-D finite element groundwater flow process dynamically coupled with 1-D land surface, stream flow, lake and unsaturated zone processes. The groundwater flow system is represented with three layers each having 1393 elements. Land surface processes are simulated using 21 subregions corresponding to California DWR water-supply planning areas. The surface-water network is simulated using 431 stream nodes representing 72

  9. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    2. Map showing simulated discharge areas, major recharge areas, constant-head boundary flows, and steady-state stress period hydraulic head in the...Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and...1998 (Faunt and others, 2004b). Recharge is constant at average annual values for the entire period of simulation; however, the simulated recharge

  10. Modelling photochemistry in alpine valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brulfert, G.; Chemel, C.; Chaxel, E.; Chollet, J. P.

    2005-03-01

    Road traffic is a serious problem in the Chamonix Valley, France: traffic, noise and above all air pollution worry the inhabitants. The big fire in the Mont-Blanc tunnel made it possible, in the framework of the POVA project (POllution in Alpine Valleys), to undertake measurement campaigns with and without heavy-vehicle traffic through the valley, towards Italy (before and after the tunnel re-opening). Modelling in POVA should make it possible to explain the processes leading to episodes of atmospheric pollution, both in summer and in winter. Atmospheric prediction model ARPS 4.5.2 (Advanced Regional Prediction System), developed at the CAPS (Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms) of the University of Oklahoma, enables to resolve the dynamics above a complex terrain. This model is coupled to the TAPOM 1.5.2 atmospheric chemistry (Transport and Air POllution Model) code developed at the Air and Soil Pollution Laboratory of the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. The numerical codes MM5 and CHIMERE are used to compute large scale boundary forcing. Using 300-m grid cells to calculate the dynamics and the reactive chemistry makes possible to accurately represent the dynamics in the valley (slope and valley winds) and to process chemistry at fine scale. Validation of campaign days allows to study chemistry indicators in the valley. NOy according to O3 reduction demonstrates a VOC controlled regime, different from the NOx controlled regime expected and observed in the nearby city of Grenoble.

  11. On Using CO2 Concentration Measurements at Mountain top and Valley Locations in Regional Flux Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wekker, S. F.; Song, G.; Stephens, B. B.

    2007-12-01

    Data from the Regional Atmospheric Continuous CO2 Network in the Rocky Mountains (Rocky RACCOON) are used to investigate atmospheric controls on temporal and spatial variability of CO2 in mountainous terrain and the usefulness of mountain top and valley measurement for the estimation of regional CO2 fluxes. Rocky RACCOON consists of four sites installed in fall of 2005 and spring of 2006: Niwot Ridge, near Ward, Colorado; Storm Peak Laboratory near Steamboat Springs, Colorado; Fraser Experimental Forest, near Fraser Colorado; and Hidden Peak, near Snowbird, Utah. The network uses the NCAR-developed Autonomous Inexpensive Robust CO2 Analyzer. These units measure CO2 concentrations at three levels on a tower, producing individual measurements every 2.5 minutes precise to 0.1 ppm CO2 and closely tied to the WMO CO2 scale. Three of the sites are located on a mountain top while one site is located in a valley. Initial analyses show interesting relationships between CO2 concentration and atmospheric parameters, such as wind speed and direction, temperature, and incoming solar radiation. The nature of these relationships is further investigated with an atmospheric mesoscale model. Idealized and realistic simulations are able to capture the observed behavior of spatial and temporal CO2 variability and reveal the responsible physical processes. The implications of the results and the value of the measurements for providing information on local to regional scale respiration and photosynthesis rates in the Rockies are discussed.

  12. EFFECTIVE MODEL CALIBRATION OF THE GEOLOGICALLY COMPLEX DEATH VALLEY REGIONAL GROUND-WATER FLOW SYSTEM, NEVADA AND CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect

    G.M. O'Brien; F.A. D'Agnese; C.C. Faunt; W.R. Belcher

    2000-10-19

    A numerical ground-water flow model is being constructed for the Death Valley regional ground-water system, an area that encompasses approximately 80,000 km{sup 2} in southern Nevada and southeastern California. Effective construction and calibration of the regional-scale steady-state flow model, developed using MODFLOW-2000, is dependent upon integration of hydrogeologic data and parameter-estimation techniques. A three-dimensional hydrogeologic-framework model of the region was initially constructed to provide a conceptual model of the geometry, composition, and hydraulic properties of the materials that control the regional ground-water flow system. This framework was resampled at the scale of the flow model to define the hydrogeologic units present in each of the 15 flow-model layers. In addition, there are non-traditional types of geologic data in the hydrogeologic-framework model that are used during flow-model calibration. For each hydrogeologic unit, the spatial distribution of geologic features important to the hydrologic system is defined. The volumetric cells can be populated by various hydrogeologic data such as the hydrogeologic unit, lithology, hydraulic conductivity, faulting, tectonic features, stratigraphic or lithologic facies, porosity, and derivative data calculated from these attributes. The approach for using this arsenal of geologic data is dependent on utilizing parameter-estimation techniques available within MODFLOW-2000. The principle of parsimony is used throughout the flow-modeling process so that a simple conceptual model is methodically made more complex. Initially, the most basic conceptual model that could reasonably define the flow system was constructed and geologic units were grouped into four major hydrogeologic units. Only major geologic structures were included; there was little structural or stratigraphic differentiation, and a minimum number of parameters were used. As the calibration process progresses, additional

  13. Saline Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Figure 2

    These images of the Saline Valley area, California, were acquired March 30, 2000 and cover a full ASTER scene (60 by 60 km). Each image displays data from a different spectral region, and illustrates the complementary nature of surface compositional information available as a function of wavelength. This image displays visible and near infrared bands 3, 2, and 1 in red, green, and blue (RGB). Vegetation appears red, snow and dry salt lakes are white, and exposed rocks are brown, gray, yellow and blue. Rock colors mainly reflect the presence of iron minerals, and variations in albedo. Figure 1 displays short wavelength infrared bands 4, 6, and 8 as RGB. In this wavelength region, clay, carbonate, and sulfate minerals have diagnostic absorption features, resulting in distinct colors on the image. For example, limestones are yellow-green, and purple areas are kaolinite-rich. Figure 2 displays thermal infrared bands 13, 12 and 10 as RGB. In this wavelength region, variations in quartz content appear as more or less red; carbonate rocks are green, and mafic volcanic rocks are purple. The image is located at 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  14. Origin of the Valley Networks On Mars: A Hydrological Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.

    2000-01-01

    The geomorphology of the Martian valley networks is examined from a hydrological perspective for their compatibility with an origin by rainfall, globally higher heat flow, and localized hydrothermal systems. Comparison of morphology and spatial distribution of valleys on geologic surfaces with terrestrial fluvial valleys suggests that most Martian valleys are probably not indicative of a rainfall origin, nor are they indicative of formation by an early global uniformly higher heat flow. In general, valleys are not uniformly distributed within geologic surface units as are terrestrial fluvial valleys. Valleys tend to form either as isolated systems or in clusters on a geologic surface unit leaving large expanses of the unit virtually untouched by erosion. With the exception of fluvial valleys on some volcanoes, most Martian valleys exhibit a sapping morphology and do not appear to have formed along with those that exhibit a runoff morphology. In contrast, terrestrial sapping valleys form from and along with runoff valleys. The isolated or clustered distribution of valleys suggests localized water sources were important in drainage development. Persistent ground-water outflow driven by localized, but vigorous hydrothermal circulation associated with magmatism, volcanism, impacts, or tectonism is, however, consistent with valley morphology and distribution. Snowfall from sublimating ice-covered lakes or seas may have provided an atmospheric water source for the formation of some valleys in regions where the surface is easily eroded and where localized geothermal/hydrothermal activity is sufficient to melt accumulated snowpacks.

  15. Inductively coupled plasma -- Atomic emission spectroscopy glove box assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-12-17

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ``cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  16. Detection and Measurement of Land Subsidence Using Global Positioning System and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, Coachella Valley, California, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Stork, Sylvia V.; Ikehara, Marti E.

    2002-01-01

    Land subsidence associated with ground-water-level declines has been recognized as a potential problem in Coachella Valley, California. Since the early 1920s, ground water has been a major source of agricultural, municipal, and domestic supply in the valley. Pumping of ground water resulted in water-level declines as large as 15 meters (50 feet) through the late 1940s. In 1949, the importation of Colorado River water to the lower Coachella Valley began, resulting in a reduction in ground-water pumping and a recovery of water levels during the 1950s through the 1970s. Since the late 1970s, demand for water in the valley has exceeded deliveries of imported surface water, resulting in increased pumping and associated ground-water-level declines and, consequently, an increase in the potential for land subsidence caused by aquifer-system compaction. The location, extent, and magnitude of the vertical land-surface changes in Coachella Valley between 1998 and 2000 were determined using Global Positioning System (GPS) and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) methods. GPS measurements made at 15 geodetic monuments in the lower Coachella Valley indicate that -34 to +60 millimeters ? 45 millimeters (-0.11 to +0.20 foot ? 0.15 foot) of vertical change in the land surface occurred during the 2-year period. Changes at three of the monuments exceeded the maximum uncertainty of ? 45 millimeters (? 0.15 foot) at the 95-percent confidence level, which indicates that small amounts of uplift occurred at these monuments between October 1998 and August 2000. Water-level measurements made at wells near the three uplifted monuments during this 2-year period indicate that the water levels fluctuate seasonally; water-level measurements made at these wells in September 1998 and September 2000 indicate that the water levels rose slightly near two monuments and declined slightly near the third. The relation between the seasonally fluctuating, but fairly stable, water levels between

  17. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Valley View)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total domestic hot water (DHW) demand. A liquid (water) flat plate collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank when the solar pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the DHW tanks through a shell and tube heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature controllers.

  18. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Valley View)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total domestic hot water (DHW) demand. A liquid (water) flat plate collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank when the solar pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the DHW tanks through a shell and tube heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature controllers.

  19. Calibration of a texture-based model of a ground-water flow system, western San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Steven P.; Belitz, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    The occurrence of selenium in agricultural drain water from the western San Joaquin Valley, California, has focused concern on the semiconfined ground-water flow system, which is underlain by the Corcoran Clay Member of the Tulare Formation. A two-step procedure is used to calibrate a preliminary model of the system for the purpose of determining the steady-state hydraulic properties. Horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities are modeled as functions of the percentage of coarse sediment, hydraulic conductivities of coarse-textured (Kcoarse) and fine-textured (Kfine) end members, and averaging methods used to calculate equivalent hydraulic conductivities. The vertical conductivity of the Corcoran (Kcorc) is an additional parameter to be evaluated. In the first step of the calibration procedure, the model is run by systematically varying the following variables: (1) Kcoarse/Kfine, (2) Kcoarse/Kcorc, and (3) choice of averaging methods in the horizontal and vertical directions. Root mean square error and bias values calculated from the model results are functions of these variables. These measures of error provide a means for evaluating model sensitivity and for selecting values of Kcoarse, Kfine, and Kcorc for use in the second step of the calibration procedure. In the second step, recharge rates are evaluated as functions of Kcoarse, Kcorc, and a combination of averaging methods. The associated Kfine values are selected so that the root mean square error is minimized on the basis of the results from the first step. The results of the two-step procedure indicate that the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity that best produces the measured hydraulic head distribution is created through the use of arithmetic averaging in the horizontal direction and either geometric or harmonic averaging in the vertical direction. The equivalent hydraulic conductivities resulting from either combination of averaging methods compare favorably to field- and laboratory

  20. The role of active and ancient geothermal systems in evolution of Grant Canyon oil field, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hulen, J.B. ); Bereskin, S.R. ); Bortz, L.C.

    1991-06-01

    Since discovery in 1983, the Grant Canyon field has been among the most prolific oil producers (on a per-well basis) in the US. Production through June 1990 was 12,935,630 bbl of oil, principally from two wells which in tandem have consistently yielded more than 6,000 bbl of oil per day. The field is hosted by highly porous Devonian dolomite breccia loosely cemented with hydrothermal quartz. Results of fluid-inclusion and petrographic research in progress at Grant Canyon suggest that paleogeothermal and perhaps currently circulating geothermal systems may have played a major role in oil-reservoir evolution. For example, as previously reported, the breccia-cementing quartz hosts primary aqueous, aqueous/oil, and oil fluid inclusions which were trapped at about 120C (average homogenization temperature) and document initial oil migration and entrapment as droplets or globules dispersed in dilute (< 2.2 wt.% equivalent NaCl) aqueous solutions. Additional evidence of geothermal connection is that the horst-block trap at Grant Canyon is top and side sealed by valley-fill clastic and volcanic rocks which are locally hydrothermally altered and calcite flooded. These secondary seals are enhanced by disseminated, solid asphaltic residues locally accounting for 23% (volume) of the rock. Current reservoir temperatures at Grant Canyon (120C) and the adjacent Bacon Flat field (171C) attest to vigorous contemporary geothermal activity. Based on results of the authors' Grant Canyon work to date, they suggest that active and paleohydrothermal systems could be viable petroleum exploration targets in otherwise favorable terrain elsewhere in the Basin and Range.

  1. Hydrogeochemistry of the Fraser River, British Columbia: seasonal variation in major and minor components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Eion M.

    1996-07-01

    For several years Environment Canada (EC) has carried out a program of water sampling at four stations along the Fraser River and at one station on each of its two principal tributaries, the Thompson and the Nechako. Samples collected at bi-weekly intervals have been analyzed by EC for major and some trace components. Seasonal variation in water composition mainly relates to changes in discharge, this being low during winter and high during early summer snowmelt. Dissolved constituents, Mg, Si, K, Ca, Sr, HCO 3, SO 4 and (NO 3 + NO 2), show moderate variation, being least concentrated during maximum discharge, reflecting dilution of groundwater by melting snow. Factor analysis shows secondary seasonal variation for SO 4, that is related to the importance of deep groundwater as a source, and for (NO 3 + NO 2), precipitated with snow and released during snowmelt. Large amounts of Na and Cl are added in pulp mill effluent. A uniform flux of this effluent, superimposed on a highly variable river discharge, gives rise to greater seasonal variation for Na and Cl than other dissolved constituents. The trace constituents, Fe, Mn, Al, P and Sr, were analyzed by EC in unfiltered water samples by methods that extract the elements from suspended material. Except for Sr, these elements have a high partition factor in favor of suspended over dissolved phases; their results reflect seasonal changes in quantities of suspended material, which can vary by two orders of magnitude.

  2. Molecular study of 33 families with Fraser syndrome new data and mutation review.

    PubMed

    van Haelst, M M; Maiburg, M; Baujat, G; Jadeja, S; Monti, E; Bland, E; Pearce, K; Hennekam, R C; Scambler, P J

    2008-09-01

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is an autosomal recessive malformation disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and abnormalities of the respiratory and urogenital tract. FS is considered to be the human equivalent of the murine blebbing mutants: in the mouse mutations at five loci cause a phenotype that is comparable to FS in humans, and thus far mutations in two syntenic human genes, FRAS1 and FREM2, have been identified to cause FS. Here we present the molecular analysis of 48 FS patients from 18 consanguineous and 15 nonconsanguineous families. Linkage analysis in consanguineous families indicated possible linkage to FRAS1 and FREM2 in 60% of the cases. Mutation analysis identified 11 new mutations in FRAS1 and one FREM2 mutation. Manifestations of these patients and previously reported cases with an FRAS1 mutation were compared to cases without detectable FRAS1 mutations to study genotype-phenotype correlations. Although our data suggest that patients with an FRAS1 mutation have more frequently skull ossification defects and low insertion of the umbilical cord, these differences are not statistically significant. Mutations were identified in only 43% of the cases suggesting that other genes syntenic to murine genes causing blebbing may be responsible for FS as well.

  3. Eastern Australia's submarine landslides: implications for tsunami hazard between Jervis Bay and Fraser Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. L.; Hubble, T.; Airey, D. W.; Ward, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    A hazard assessment of submarine landslide generated tsunami for the east Australian continental slope is presented between Jervis Bay and Fraser Island. Submarine landslides are present in water depths of ~400 to 3500 m along the entire length of continental margin, but are increasingly prevalent northward of Coffs Harbour without clustering at any particular water depth. Two hundred and fifty individual submarine landslide scars greater than one kilometre in width are identified. Of these, thirty-six are calculated to produce a tsunami flow depth equal to or greater than 5 m at the coastline for an assumed landslide downslope velocity of 20 ms-1. Some landslides are both thick (>100 m) and wide (>5 km) and these have the greatest potential to generate the largest coastal flow depths (>10 m). Water depth of the landslides centre of mass strongly influences the onshore height of the tsunami's surge with the larger events generated in shallower water depths between ~500 -1500 m. Maximum flow depth at the coastline is larger for thicker (50-250+ m) canyon landslides which occur on steeper slopes (>4°), compared to thinner (<50 m) plateau landslides which generally produce smaller tsunami. Maximum inundation distances and run-up heights of 1.6 km and 22 m respectively are calculated for landslide velocities of 20 ms-1. These values vary significantly depending on local coastal topography. There is no evidence for a submarine landslide large enough and young enough to have generated a Holocene megatsunami for the east coast of Australia.

  4. Age constraints for the present fault configuration in the Imperial Valley, California - Evidence for northwestward propagation of the Gulf of California rift system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Releveling and other geophysical data for the Imperial Valley of southern California suggest the northern section of the Imperial-Brawley fault system, which includes the Mesquite Basin and Brawley Seismic Zone, is much younger than the 4 to 5 million year age of the valley itself. A minimum age of 3000 years is calculated for the northern segment of the Imperial fault from correlations between surface topography and geodetically observed seismic/interseismic vertical movements. Calculations of a maximum age of 80,000 years is based upon displacements in the crystalline basement along the Imperial fault, inferred from seismic refraction surveys. This young age supports recent interpretations of heat flow measurements, which also suggest that the current patterns of seismicity and faults in the Imperial Valley are not long lived. The current fault geometry and basement morphology suggest northwestward growth of the Imperial fault and migration of the Brawley Seismic Zone. It is suggested that this migration is a manifestation of the propagation of the Gulf of California rift system into the North American continent.

  5. Age constraints for the present fault configuration in the Imperial Valley, California: Evidence for northwestward propagation of the Gulf of California rift system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Releveling and other geophysical data for the Imperial Valley of southern California suggest the northern section of the Imperial-Brawley fault system, which includes the Mesquite Basin and Brawley Seismic Zone, is much younger than the 4 to 5 million year age of the valley itself. A minimum age of 3000 years is calculated for the northern segment of the Imperial fault from correlations between surface topography and geodetically observed seismic/interseismic vertical movements. Calculations of a maximum age of 80,000 years is based upon displacements in the crystalline basement along the Imperial fault, inferred from seismic refraction surveys. This young age supports recent interpretations of heat flow measurements, which also suggest that the current patterns of seismicity and faults in the Imperial Valley are not long lived. The current fault geometry and basement morphology suggest northwestward growth of the Imperial fault and migration of the Brawley Seismic Zone. It is suggested that this migration is a manifestation of the propagation of the Gulf of California rift system into the North American continent.

  6. Geophysical, geochemical, and geological investigations of the Dunes geothermal system, Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elders, W. A.; Combs, J.; Coplen, T. B.; Kolesar, P.; Bird, D. K.

    1974-01-01

    The Dunes anomaly is a water-dominated geothermal system in the alluvium of the Salton Trough, lacking any surface expression. It was discovered by shallow-temperature gradient measurements. A 612-meter-deep test well encountered several temperature-gradient reversals, with a maximum of 105 C at 114 meters. The program involves surface geophysics, including electrical, gravity, and seismic methods, down-hole geophysics and petrophysics of core samples, isotopic and chemical studies of water samples, and petrological and geochemical studies of the cores and cuttings. The aim is (1) to determine the source and temperature history of the brines, (2) to understand the interaction between the brines and rocks, and (3) to determine the areal extent, nature, origin, and history of the geothermal system. These studies are designed to provide better definition of exploration targets for hidden geothermal anomalies and to contribute to improved techniques of exploration and resource assessment.

  7. Evaluating observations in the context of predictions for the death valley regional groundwater system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ely, D.M.; Hill, M.C.; Tiedeman, C.R.; O'Brien, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    When a model is calibrated by nonlinear regression, calculated diagnostic and inferential statistics provide a wealth of information about many aspects of the system. This work uses linear inferential statistics that are measures of prediction uncertainty to investigate the likely importance of continued monitoring of hydraulic head to the accuracy of model predictions. The measurements evaluated are hydraulic heads; the predictions of interest are subsurface transport from 15 locations. The advective component of transport is considered because it is the component most affected by the system dynamics represented by the regional-scale model being used. The problem is addressed using the capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey computer program MODFLOW-2000, with its Advective Travel Observation (ADV) Package. Copyright ASCE 2004.

  8. Active deformation in the Northern Walker Lane: a detailed geodetic study of the Mohawk Valley and Honey Lake/Warm Springs fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, J. M.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C. W.; Blewitt, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Mohawk Valley and Honey Lake/Warm Springs faults are parallel, northwest striking, dextral fault systems separated by ~50 km in the westernmost part of the Northern Walker Lane. These two faults work as a cooperative pair to accommodate 3-5 mm/yr of the total 8 mm/yr of right-lateral deformation geodetically observed across the Northern Walker Lane, however it is unclear with fault is dominant. Geologic studies of the faults result in right-lateral slip rates of 1-2.5 mm/yr on the Honey Lake fault and a minimum of 0.3 mm/yr on the Mohawk Valley fault. In contrast, previous geodetic studies estimate slip rates of ~1 mm/yr on the Honey Lake fault and ~3 mm/yr on the Mohawk Valley fault. To reconcile the discrepancy between the distribution of slip on the faults and the differences between sums of the geologically and geodetically estimated slip rates, we use new GPS data to constrain an elastic block model developed specifically to study the Mohawk Valley and Honey Lake/Warm Springs fault systems. We present a dense GPS velocity solution (~10 km average station spacing) that incorporates new data from the semi-continuous Mobile Array of GPS for Nevada Transtension network (MAGNET, http://geodesy.unr.edu/networks) operated by the University of Nevada, Reno with continuous data from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory and other networks. Data collected during the summer of 2012 bring many MAGNET GPS time series in the Northern Walker Lane to near 5 years in duration. The density of our velocity field and recent advances in data processing give us unprecedented precision in the measurement of contemporary deformation in the Northern Walker Lane. We use the velocity solution to solve for slip rates on the companion fault systems and explore the effects of block model geometry assumptions and tradeoffs. Our model predicts slip rates of 2.2±0.3 mm/yr for the Mohawk Valley fault and 1.1±0.2 mm/yr for the Honey Lake fault. Block model slip rate estimates are

  9. Enhanced Geothermal System Development of the AmeriCulture Leasehold in the Animas Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, David V; Seawright, Gary L; Sewright, Damon E; Brown, Don; Witcher, James c.; Nichols, Kenneth E.

    2001-03-02

    Working under the grant with AmeriCulture, Inc., and its team of geothermal experts, assembled a plan to apply enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) techniques to increase both the temperature and flow rate of the geothermal waters on its leasehold. AmeriCulture operates a commercial aquaculture facility that will benefit from the larger quantities of thermal energy and low cost electric power that EGS technology can provide. The project brought together a team of specialists that, as a group, provided the full range of expertise required to successfully develop and implement the project.

  10. Groundwater flow system in the valley of Toluca, Mexico: an assay of natural radionuclide specific activities.

    PubMed

    Segovia, N; Tamez, E; Peña, P; Carrillo, J; Acosta, E; Armienta, M A; Iturbe, J L

    1999-03-01

    Natural radionuclides and physicochemical parameters have been evaluated in groundwater samples from boreholes belonging to the drinking water supply system of the Toluca City, Mexico. The results obtained for radon and radium, together with the physicochemical parameters of the studied samples, indicate a fast and efficient recharge pattern. The presence of a local and a regional groundwater flows was also observed. The local flow belongs to shallower water, recognized by its low radon content and dissolved ions, as compared with the regional, deeper groundwater flow with a longer residence time.

  11. The Villeta-Caballos( ) petroleum system of the Neiva Area, upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, J. )

    1993-02-01

    The Villeta-Caballos( ) petroleum system of the Neiva area covers 5120 km[sup 2] and includes 18 fields with ultimate recoverable reserves of 83.8[times]10*6 m[sup 3] (527 million bbl) of oil and 5.7[times]10*9 m[sup 3] (201 billion ft[sup 3]) of gas. Sedimentary rocks range in age from Aptian through Holocene, and were deposited in rift, margin-sag, and foreland basins. The hydrocarbons were sourced mainly from two intervals within the Albian-Santonian Villeta Formation and migrated from the footwall of the Chusma fault and the center of the Neiva syncline beginning at the end of the Oligocene to the present. The two main reservoirs are Cretaceous sandstones of the Caballos and Monserrate formations. Secondary reservoirs of significance are the Miocene fluvial sandstones of the Honda Group. The traps are mainly structures associated with the formation of a fold and thrust belt which began in the Oligocene and is still active. The system extends in time from the Aptian (-110 Ma) to the present. The first event was the deposition of the lower Caballos reservoir. The source rock was deposited a few million years later and reached maturity in synchronism with the formation of structural traps during the last 25 m.y. Destruction of some of the accumulations, by uplift and erosion in the fold belt, started in the Miocene. The volume of the hydrocarbons generated by the system was calculated using an average TOC content of 2.1 wt% for 235 m of total source interval in two intervals, and an area of mature source of 1650 km[sup 2]. A hydrocarbon generation of 325 mgHC/gTOC was used based on the Hydrogen Index measurements of immature Villeta source rock and a hydrocarbon generation algorithm. The efficiency of the system and the percentage of hydrocarbons generated that are present in discovered traps was determined to be about 10%.

  12. TerraSAR-X high-resolution radar remote sensing: an operational warning system for Rift Valley fever risk.

    PubMed

    Vignolles, Cécile; Tourre, Yves M; Mora, Oscar; Imanache, Laurent; Lafaye, Murielle

    2010-11-01

    In the vicinity of the Barkedji village (in the Ferlo region of Senegal), the abundance and aggressiveness of the vector mosquitoes for Rift Valley fever (RVF) are strongly linked to rainfall events and associated ponds dynamics. Initially, these results were obtained from spectral analysis of high-resolution (~10 m) Spot-5 images, but, as a part of the French AdaptFVR project, identification of the free water dynamics within ponds was made with the new high-resolution (down to 3-meter pixels), Synthetic Aperture Radar satellite (TerraSAR-X) produced by Infoterra GmbH, Friedrichshafen/Potsdam, Germany. During summer 2008, within a 30 x 50 km radar image, it was found that identified free water fell well within the footprints of ponds localized by optical data (i.e. Spot-5 images), which increased the confidence in this new and complementary remote sensing technique. Moreover, by using near real-time rainfall data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), NASA/JAXA joint mission, the filling-up and flushing-out rates of the ponds can be accurately determined. The latter allows for a precise, spatio-temporal mapping of the zones potentially occupied by mosquitoes capable of revealing the variability of pond surfaces. The risk for RVF infection of gathered bovines and small ruminants (~1 park/km(2)) can thus be assessed. This new operational approach (which is independent of weather conditions) is an important development in the mapping of risk components (i.e. hazards plus vulnerability) related to RVF transmission during the summer monsoon, thus contributing to a RVF early warning system.

  13. Chapter 2. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources--Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley group, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation carbonates and calcareous shales and (2) Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group organic-rich shales. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes four conventional Cotton Valley assessment units: Cotton Valley Blanket Sandstone Gas (AU 50490201), Cotton Valley Massive Sandstone Gas (AU 50490202), Cotton Valley Updip Oil and Gas (AU 50490203), and Cotton Valley Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490204). Together, these four assessment units are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29.81 million barrels of oil, 605.03 billion cubic feet of gas, and 19.00 million barrels of natural gas liquids. The Cotton Valley Group represents the first major influx of clastic sediment into the ancestral Gulf of Mexico. Major depocenters were located in south-central Mississippi, along the Louisiana-Mississippi border, and in northeast Texas. Reservoir properties and production characteristics were used to identify two Cotton Valley Group sandstone trends across northern Louisiana and east Texas: a high-permeability blanket-sandstone trend and a downdip, low-permeability massive-sandstone trend. Pressure gradients throughout most of both trends are normal, which is characteristic of conventional rather than continuous basin-center gas accumulations. Indications that accumulations in this trend are conventional rather than continuous include (1) gas-water contacts in at least seven fields across the blanket-sandstone trend, (2) relatively high reservoir permeabilities, and (3) high gas-production rates without fracture stimulation. Permeability is sufficiently low in the massive-sandstone trend that gas-water transition zones are vertically extensive and gas-water contacts are poorly defined. The interpreted presence of gas-water contacts within the Cotton Valley

  14. Evaluation of the mixing system for the West Valley melter feed hold tank

    SciTech Connect

    Fow, C.L.; Kurath, D.E.; Pulsipher, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    High-level radioactive liquid wastes are currently stored in underground tanks at several Department of Energy facilities. The current plan for management of these wastes is to convert them to a durable borosilicate glass, then isolate the glass in a deep geologic repository. The process for converting the wastes to glass involves mixing the high-level wastes with glass-forming chemicals, then transforming the resulting slurry into glass using a high-temperature furnace known as a slurry-fed ceramic melter. Maintaining the quality of the glass product and proficient melter operation depends on the ability of the waste slurry preparation and feed systems to produce and maintain a homogeneous mixture of waste and glass-former materials. This document reviews current technology. 11 refs., 18 figs., 15 tabs.

  15. A multi-dimensional analysis of the upper Rio Grande-San Luis Valley social-ecological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mix, Ken

    The Upper Rio Grande (URG), located in the San Luis Valley (SLV) of southern Colorado, is the primary contributor to streamflow to the Rio Grande Basin, upstream of the confluence of the Rio Conchos at Presidio, TX. The URG-SLV includes a complex irrigation-dependent agricultural social-ecological system (SES), which began development in 1852, and today generates more than 30% of the SLV revenue. The diversions of Rio Grande water for irrigation in the SLV have had a disproportionate impact on the downstream portion of the river. These diversions caused the flow to cease at Ciudad Juarez, Mexico in the late 1880s, creating international conflict. Similarly, low flows in New Mexico and Texas led to interstate conflict. Understanding changes in the URG-SLV that led to this event and the interactions among various drivers of change in the URG-SLV is a difficult task. One reason is that complex social-ecological systems are adaptive, contain feedbacks, emergent properties, cross-scale linkages, large-scale dynamics and non-linearities. Further, most analyses of SES to date have been qualitative, utilizing conceptual models to understand driver interactions. This study utilizes both qualitative and quantitative techniques to develop an innovative approach for analyzing driver interactions in the URG-SLV. Five drivers were identified for the URG-SLV social-ecological system: water (streamflow), water rights, climate, agriculture, and internal and external water policy. The drivers contained several longitudes (data aspect) relevant to the system, except water policy, for which only discreet events were present. Change point and statistical analyses were applied to the longitudes to identify quantifiable changes, to allow detection of cross-scale linkages between drivers, and presence of feedback cycles. Agricultural was identified as the driver signal. Change points for agricultural expansion defined four distinct periods: 1852--1923, 1924--1948, 1949--1978 and 1979

  16. Contemporary hillslope processes sediment budgets in two parabolic-shaped and glacier-fed valley systems in western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laute, Katja; Beylich, Achim A.

    2013-04-01

    Hillslopes within defined drainage basin systems function as key elements for sediment production, storage and transfers from sources to sinks, both for short-term and longer-term periods. Rates of hillslope processes are exceptionally varied and affected by numerous influences of varying intensity, especially in sensitive cold climate environments. This research has been conducted over four years (since 2009) as part of a doctoral thesis, which is integrated in the Norwegian Research Council (NFR) funded SedyMONT-Norway project within the ESF TOPO-EUROPE SedyMONT (Timescales of sediment dynamics, climate and topographic change in mountain landscapes) Programme. Focus of this study is on (i) contemporary geomorphic process rates and sedimentary mass transfers within the drainage basins Erdalen (79.5 km2) and Bødalen (60.1 km2) in western Norway, (ii) the absolute and relative importance of the identified relevant denudational processes and (iii) the importance of sediment delivery from slope systems for the drainage basin sedimentary budgets. Identified relevant contemporary denudational processes in both valley systems include rock and boulder falls, snow avalanches, slush flows, debris flows, creep processes, wash- and chemical denudation and fluvial transport of solutes, suspended sediments and bedload. These processes are analysed by combining geomorphologic mapping, geophysical subsurface investigations, terrestrial laser scanning and spatial data analysis with process monitoring. For monitoring contemporary surface processes a designed program has been applied at selected hillslope test sites including e.g. installed nets for collecting freshly accumulated rockfall debris, remote cameras for monitoring rapid mass movement events (avalanches, slush- and debris flows), stone tracer lines for measuring surface movements as well as temperature loggers both in rock walls and talus slopes for analysing rock temperatures and mechanical weathering. Slope wash traps

  17. Constraining Age and Locations of Active and Paleofluid Flow Systems in Dixie Valley, Nevada, with Apatite (U-Th)/He Thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNamee, A.; Stockli, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first constraints on transient fluid flow using the novel application of apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry (AHe) in the geothermally active Dixie Valley area of central Nevada, western United States. The valley is bound to the west by a high angle normal fault, along which the adjacent Stillwater Range has been recently exhumed in the footwall. Zones of elevated shallow geothermal gradients (geothermal anomalies) occur in dilational corners along the range front and therefore make Dixie Valley an ideal site to test the sensitivity of the AHe thermochonometer to fluid flow in the shallow crust. Apatites yield (U-Th)/He ages ca. 0.2-16 Ma and three elevation transects record advective cooling of the footwall during exhumation commencing at 3-5 Ma. Many AHe ages are significantly younger (<4 Ma) and do not overlap exhumational cooling ages within error. Consequently, the younger AHe ages are distinguishable as hydrothermally reset and demonstrate the ability of this method to resolve conductive cooling ages from overprinted, fluid-reheated cooling ages. Interpolation of AHe ages shows that the youngest ages correspond with remarkable accuracy to the spatial extents of previously mapped geothermal anomalies. The capability of the AHe thermochronometer to constrain the timing and location of paleofluid flow recommends this technique as a powerful and cost-effective tool in geothermal exploration and petroleum systems evaluations.

  18. Sources and fractionation processes influencing the isotopic distribution of H, O and C in the Long Valley hydrothermal system, California, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.; Wollenberg, H.; Flexser, S.

    1990-01-01

    The isotopic ratios of H, O and C in water within the Long Valley caldera, California reflect input from sources external to the hydrothermal reservoir. A decrease in ??D in precipitation of 0.5??? km-1, from west to east across Long Valley, is caused by the introduction of less fractionated marine moisture through a low elevation embayment in the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. Relative to seasonal fluctuations in precipitation (-158 to -35??.), ??D ranges in hot and cold surface and groundwaters are much less variable (-135 to -105??.). Only winter and spring moisture, reflecting higher precipitation rates with lighter isotopic signatures, recharge the hydrological system. The hydrothermal fluids are mixtures of isotopically heavy recharge (??D = - 115???, ??18O = - 15???) derived from the Mammoth embayment, and isotopically lighter cold water (??D = -135???, ??18O = -18???). This cold water is not representative of current local recharge. The ??13C values for dissolved carbon in hot water are significantly heavier (- 7 to - 3???) than in cold water (-18 to -10???) denoting a separate hydrothermal origin. These ??13C values overlie the range generally attributed to magmatic degassing of CO2. However, ??13C values of metamorphosed Paleozoic basement carbonates surrounding Long Valley fall in a similar range, indicating that hydrothermal decarbonization reactions are a probable source of CO2. The ??13C and ??18O values of secondary travertime and vein calcite indicate respective fractionation with CO2 and H2O at temperatures approximating current hydrothermal conditions. ?? 1990.

  19. Determination of land subsidence related to ground-water-level declines using Global Positioning System and leveling surveys in Antelope Valley, Los Angeles and Kern counties, California, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ikehara, M.E.; Phillips, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    A large-scale, land-subsidence monitoring network for Antelope Valley, California, was established, and positions and elevations for 85 stations were measured using Global Positioning System geodetic surveying in spring 1992. The 95-percent confidence (2@) level of accuracy for the elevations calculated for a multiple-constraint adjustment generally ranged from +0.010 meter (0.032 foot) to +0.024 meter (0.078 foot). The magnitudes and rates of land subsidence as of 1992 were calculated for several periods for 218 bench marks throughout Antelope Valley. The maximum measured magnitude of land subsidence that occurred between 1926 and 1992 was 6.0 feet (1.83 meters) at BM 474 near Avenue I and Sierra Highway. Measured or estimated subsidence of 2-7 feet (.61-2.l3 meters) had occurred in a 210- square-mile (542-square-kilometer) area of Antelope Valley, generally bounded by Avenue K, Avenue A, 90th Street West, and 120th Street East, during the same period. Land subsidence in Antelope Valley is caused by aquifer-system compaction, which is related to ground-water-level declines and the presence of fine-grained, compressible sediments. Comparison of potentiomethric-surface, water-level decline, and subsidence-rate maps for several periods indicated a general correlation between water-level declines and the distribution and rate of subsidence in the Lancaster ground-water subbasin. A conservative estimate of the amount of the reduction in storage capacity of the aquifer system in the Lancaster subbasin is about 50,000 acre-feet in the area that has been affected by more than one foot (.30 meters) of subsidence as of 1992. Information on the history of ground-water levels and the distribution and thickness of fine-grained compressible sediments can be used to mitigate continued land subsidence. Future monitoring of ground-water levels and land-surface elevations in subsidence-sensitive regions of Antelope Valley may be an effective means to manage land subsidence.

  20. Nature of the Lowstand Surface on the Gulf of Cádiz Shelf and the Guadiana Incised-Valley System: Preliminary Results from the LASEA 2013 Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, F.; Lebreiro, S.; Antón, L.; Delivet, S.; Espinosa, S.; Fernández-Puga, M. C.; García, M.; Ibáñez, J.; Luján, M.; Mendes, I.; Reguera, M. I.; Sevillano, P.; Sinde, C.; Van Rooij, D.; Zarandona, P.

    2014-12-01

    The LASEA 2013 cruise was executed in August 2013 in the northern margin of the Gulf of Cádiz, with the main goal of collecting data from the Guadiana River-influenced shelf, in order to: (1) study changes affecting the entire drainage basin; (2) correlate shelf unit sequences with the upper slope sedimentary record, composed dominantly of contourite deposits in specific stretches of the margin. As a first approach, attention is paid to the most obvious sedimentary manifestation of the influence of the river on the shelf domain, represented by the Guadiana incised-valley system. The database comprises both geophysical and sedimentological records. Geophysical data include multibeam bathymetry, TOPAS profiles and single-channel Sparker seismic profiles. Sedimentological data include sediment cores collected with gravity- and vibro-corer devices. The lowstand erosional surface was mapped across the shelf. The lowstand surface exhibits two clearly contrasting patterns. In the outer shelf the surface isrepresented by an erosional truncation that can be planar or irregular. The lowstand surface is much more difficult to follow in the inner shelf, due to the amalgamation of erosional surfaces and the frequent stacking of coarse-grained deposits. Incised valleys are recognized at shallow waters (20-30 m) the most significant of them is at least 1.5 km wide in the most proximal (recognized) section, decreasing seawards in width. The internal architecture of the valley exhibits the intercalation of laterally prograding sediment bodies and high-amplitude, subparallel configurations laterally related to valley margin prograding wedges. The internal facies architecture suggests a transition from relatively high-energy fluvial to proximal estuarine environment to a lower-energy estuarine depositional environment. Thus, the study of the valley extension into the shelf is expected to provide clues for the recent reorganization of the entire fluvial system, during the course of

  1. Greenhouse gas fluxes and budget for an annual cropping system in the Red River Valley, Manitoba, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Aaron James

    Agriculture contributes significantly to national and global greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories but there is considerable control over management decisions and changes in production methods could lead to a significant reduction and possible mitigation of emissions from the sector. For example, conservation tillage practices have been suggested as a method of sequestering atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), however, many questions remain unanswered regarding the short-term efficacy of the production method and knowledge gaps exist regarding possible interactions with essential nutrient cycles, and the production of non-CO2 GHGs, such as nitrous oxide (N2O). Between autumn 2005 and 2009, a micrometeorological flux system was used to determine net CO2 and (N2O exchange from an annual cropping system situated on clay soil in the Red River Valley of southern Manitoba. Four plots (4-ha each) were independently evaluated and planted to corn in 2006 and faba bean in 2007; in 2008, two spring wheat plots were monitored. As well, during the non-growing season in 2006-2007 following corn harvest, a second micrometeorological flux system capable of simultaneously measuring stable C isotopologue (12CO2 and 13CO 2) fluxes was operated at the site. Tillage intensity and crop management practices were examined for their influence on GHG emissions. Significant inter-annual variability in CO2 and (N2O fluxes as a function of crop and related management activities was observed. Tillage intensity did not affect GHG emissions from the site. After accounting for harvest removals, the net ecosystem C budgets were 510 (source), 3140 (source) and -480 (sink) kg C/ha/year for the three respective crop years, summing to a three-year loss of 3170 kg C/ha. Stable C isotope flux measurements during the non-growing season following corn harvest indicated that approximately 70 % and 20 -- 30 % of the total respiration flux originated from crop residue C during the fall of 2006 and spring of 2007

  2. Breakdown of the reciprocal stabilization of QBRICK/Frem1, Fras1, and Frem2 at the basement membrane provokes Fraser syndrome-like defects.

    PubMed

    Kiyozumi, Daiji; Sugimoto, Nagisa; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2006-08-08

    An emerging family of extracellular matrix proteins characterized by 12 consecutive CSPG repeats and the presence of Calx-beta motif(s) includes Fras1, QBRICK/Frem1, and Frem2. Mutations in the genes encoding these proteins have been associated with mouse models of Fraser syndrome, which is characterized by subepidermal blistering, cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and renal dysmorphogenesis. Here, we report that all of these proteins are localized to the basement membrane, and that their basement membrane localization is simultaneously impaired in Fraser syndrome model mice. In Frem2 mutant mice, not only Frem2 but Fras1 and QBRICK/Frem1 were depleted from the basement membrane zone. This coordinated reduction in basement membrane deposition was also observed in another Fraser syndrome model mouse, in which GRIP1, a Fras1- and Frem2-interacting adaptor protein, is primarily affected. Targeted disruption of Qbrick/Frem1 also resulted in diminished expression of Fras1 and Frem2 at the epidermal basement membrane, confirming the reciprocal stabilization of QBRICK/Frem1, Fras1, and Frem2 in this location. When expressed and secreted by transfected cells, these proteins formed a ternary complex, raising the possibility that their reciprocal stabilization at the basement membrane is due to complex formation. Given the close association of Fraser syndrome phenotypes with defective epidermal-dermal interactions, the coordinated assembly of three Fraser syndrome-associated proteins at the basement membrane appears to be instrumental in epidermal-dermal interactions during morphogenetic processes.

  3. Flow Along Valley Floors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 9 May 2003

    Lines indicative of flow in a valley floor (east to west) cut across similar lines in a slightly smaller valley (southeast to northwest), indicating both that material flowed along the valley floor (as opposed to across it) and that relative flow ages may be determined from crosscutting relationships.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 39.6, Longitude 31.1East (328.9). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Regional Impacts of Climate Change in the Caribou Chilcotin Region, Fraser River Basin, BC, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, K. E.; Werner, A. T.; Salathé, E. P.; Schnorbus, M.; Nelitz, M.; David, R. R.

    2009-05-01

    The terrain and climate of British Columbia (BC) is some of the most complex in the country, and is likely going to face unprecedented changes in hydrology due to the impacts of climate change. The Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium (PCIC) was formed in 2005 to produce tools to determine how water resources in BC and its surrounding provinces, territories and states are being affected by climate change. PCIC's first large-scale watershed modelling project implemented, in collaboration with the River Forecast Centre and the University of Washington, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model in several major BC watersheds. Future scenarios were developed to analyse the impacts of climate change on snowpack, streamflow and soil moisture in these basins. The current study focuses on the methods to develop future scenarios and the results of the hydrologic modelling. Six different GCM emissions scenarios were selected for BC from the AR4 scenarios. A modified bias correction and statistical downscaling (BCSD) technique created at the University of Washington was used to downscale GCM results to the scale of gridded historical forcings data to generate transient-daily time step, regional-scale projections of future climate change. These forcings were then used to drive the VIC macro-scale hydrologic model. A comparison of forcings for the historical period (1961-1990) from the downscaled GCM data to the forcings created from the observed records on the monthly-timescale demonstrated that the downscaled data captured the range of variability present in the 1961-1990 period in large and medium sized basins quite well. Accurately downscaling data for application in small basins was more difficult. Daily results created with the original BCSD technique were unrealistic in places and problematic for application in hydrologic models, such as VIC that depend on an accurate daily temperature range to model evaporation and snowpack. Results for the Fraser Basin study include

  5. Three-thrust fault system at the plate suture of arc-continent collision in the southernmost Longitudinal Valley, eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Chen, H.; Hsu, Y.; Yu, S.

    2013-12-01

    Active faults developed into a rather complex three-thrust fault system at the southern end of the narrow Longitudinal Valley in eastern Taiwan, a present-day on-land plate suture between the Philippine Sea plate and Eurasia. Based on more than ten years long geodetic data (including GPS and levelling), field geological investigation, seismological data, and regional tomography, this paper aims at elucidating the architecture of this three-thrust system and the associated surface deformation, as well as providing insights on fault kinematics, slip behaviors and implications of regional tectonics. Combining the results of interseismic (secular) horizontal and vertical velocities, we are able to map the surface traces of the three active faults in the Taitung area. The west-verging Longitudinal Valley Fault (LVF), along which the Coastal Range of the northern Luzon arc is thrusting over the Central Range of the Chinese continental margin, braches into two active strands bounding both sides of an uplifted, folded Quaternary fluvial deposits (Peinanshan massif) within the valley: the Lichi fault to the east and the Luyeh fault to the west. Both faults are creeping, to some extent, in the shallow surface level. However, while the Luyeh fault shows nearly pure thrust type, the Lichi fault reveals transpression regime in the north and transtension in the south end of the LVF in the Taitung plain. The results suggest that the deformation in the southern end of the Longitudinal Valley corresponds to a transition zone from present arc-collision to pre-collision zone in the offshore SE Taiwan. Concerning the Central Range, the third major fault in the area, the secular velocities indicate that the fault is mostly locked during the interseismic period and the accumulated strain would be able to produce a moderate earthquake, such as the example of the 2006 M6.1 Peinan earthquake, expressed by an oblique thrust (verging toward east) with significant left-lateral strike slip

  6. 78 FR 3026 - Establishment of Swan Valley Conservation Area, Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Establishment of Swan Valley Conservation Area, Montana AGENCY: Fish and... Wildlife Service (Service) has established the Swan Valley Conservation Area as a unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System. The Service established the Swan Valley Conservation Area on August 6, 2012,...

  7. 36 CFR 7.26 - Death Valley National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Death Valley National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.26 Death Valley National Monument. (a) Mining. Mining in Death Valley National Monument is subject to the following regulations, which...

  8. 36 CFR 7.26 - Death Valley National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Death Valley National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.26 Death Valley National Monument. (a) Mining. Mining in Death Valley National Monument is subject to the following regulations, which...

  9. 36 CFR 7.26 - Death Valley National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Death Valley National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.26 Death Valley National Monument. (a) Mining. Mining in Death Valley National Monument is subject to the following regulations, which...

  10. 36 CFR 7.26 - Death Valley National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Death Valley National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.26 Death Valley National Monument. (a) Mining. Mining in Death Valley National Monument is subject to the following regulations, which...

  11. 36 CFR 7.26 - Death Valley National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Death Valley National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.26 Death Valley National Monument. (a) Mining. Mining in Death Valley National Monument is subject to the following regulations, which...

  12. Processes regulating watershed chemical export during snowmelt, fraser experimental forest, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stottlemyer, R.

    2001-01-01

    In the Central Rocky Mountains, snowfall dominates precipitation. Airborne contaminants retained in the snowpack can affect high elevation surface water chemistry during snowmelt. At the Fraser Experimental Forest (FEF), located west of the Continental Divide in Central Colorado, snowmelt dominates the annual hydrograph, and accounts for >95% of annual stream water discharge. During the winters of 1989-1993, we measured precipitation inputs, snowpack water equivalent (SWE) and ion content, and stream water chemistry every 7-10 days along a 3150-3500 m elevation gradient in the subalpine and alpine Lexen Creek watershed. The study objectives were to (1) quantify the distribution of SWE and snowpack chemical content with elevation and aspect, (2) quantify snowmelt rates, temperature of soil, snowpack, and air with elevation and aspect, and (3) use change in upstream-downstream water chemistry during snowmelt to better define alpine and subalpine flowpaths. The SWE increased with elevation (P - 3??C) temperatures throughout winter which resulted in significant snowpack ion loss. By snowpack PWE in mid May, the snowpack had lost almost half the cumulative precipitation H+, NH4+, and SO42- inputs and a third of the NO3- input. Windborne soil particulate inputs late in winter increased snowpack base cation content. Variation in subalpine SWE and snowpack ion content with elevation and aspect, and wind redistribution of snowfall in the alpine resulted in large year-to-year differences in the timing and magnitude of SWE, PWE, and snowpack ion content. The alpine stream water ion concentrations changed little during snowmelt indicating meltwater passed quickly through surface porous soils and was well mixed before entering the stream. Conversely, subalpine stream water chemistry was diluted during snowmelt suggesting much melt water moved to the stream as shallow subsurface lateral flow. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Effect of canopy removal on snowpack quantity and quality, fraser experimental forest, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stottlemyer, R.; Troendle, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Snowpack peak water equivalent (PWE), ion concentration, content, and spatial distribution of ion load data from spring 1987-1996 in a 1 ha clearcut and adjacent forested plots vegetated by mature Picea engelmannii and Abies lasiocarpa in the Fraser experimental forest (FEF), Colorado are presented. Our objectives were: (1) to see if a forest opening might redistribute snowfall, snowpack moisture, and snowpack chemical content, and (2) to examine the importance of canopy interception on snowpack quantity and chemistry. On an average, the canopy intercepted 36% of snowfall. Interception was correlated with snowfall amount, snowpack PWE beneath the canopy, and air temperature. Canopy removal increased snowpack PWE to >90% cumulative snowfall inputs. Snowpack K-, H-, and NH4+ concentrations on the clearcut were lower and NO3- higher than in the snowpack beneath the forested plots. Cu mulative snowfall K+ input was less than in the clearcut snowpack; H+ inputs were greater in snowfall than in the snowpack of any plot; and inorganic N (NO3- and NH4+) inputs from snowfall to the clearcut were greater than to the forested plots. Processes accounting for the differences between snowfall inputs and snowpack ion content were leaching of organic debris in the snowpack, differential elution of the snowpack, and canopy retention. There were significant trends by year in snowpack ion content at PWE without similar trends in snowfall inputs. This finding coupled with snowpack ion elution bring into question the use of snowpack chemistry as an indicator of winter atmospheric inputs in short-term studies. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  14. Ground-water flow directions and estimation of aquifer hydraulic properties in the lower Great Miami River Buried Valley aquifer system, Hamilton Area, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, Rodney A.; Bossenbroek, Karen E.

    2005-01-01

    The Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System is one of the most productive sources of potable water in the Midwest, yielding as much as 3,000 gallons per minute to wells. Many water-supply wells tapping this aquifer system are purposely placed near rivers to take advantage of induced infiltration from the rivers. The City of Hamilton's North Well Field consists of 10 wells near the Great Miami River, all completed in the lower Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System. A well-drilling program and a multiple-well aquifer test were done to investigate ground-water flow directions and to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties in the lower part of the Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System. Descriptions of lithology from 10 well borings indicate varying amounts and thickness of clay or till, and therefore, varying levels of potential aquifer confinement. Borings also indicate that the aquifer properties can change dramatically over relatively short distances. Grain-size analyses indicate an average bulk hydraulic conductivity value of aquifer materials of 240 feet per day; the geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity values of aquifer material was 89 feet per day. Median grain sizes of aquifer material and clay units were 1.3 millimeters and 0.1 millimeters, respectively. Water levels in the Hamilton North Well Field are affected by stream stage in the Great Miami River and barometric pressure. Bank storage in response to stream stage is evident. Results from a multiple-well aquifer test at the well field indicate, as do the lithologic descriptions, that the aquifer is semiconfined in some areas and unconfined in others. Transmissivity and storage coefficient of the semiconfined part of the aquifer were 50,000 feet squared per day and 5x10-4, respectively. The average hydraulic conductivity (450 feet per day) based on the aquifer test is reasonable for glacial outwash but is higher than calculated from grain-size analyses, implying a scale effect

  15. A three-dimensional numerical model of predevelopment conditions in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    D'Agnese, F.A.; O'Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; Belcher, W.R.; San Juan, Carma

    2002-11-22

    In the early 1990's, two numerical models of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. In general, the two models were based on the same basic hydrogeologic data set. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey develop and maintain a ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region in support of U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of developing this ''second-generation'' regional model was to enhance the knowledge and understanding of the ground-water flow system as new information and tools are developed. The U.S. Geological Survey also was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Energy to cooperate to the fullest extent with other Federal, State, and local entities in the region to take advantage of the benefits of their knowledge and expertise. The short-term objective of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system project was to develop a steady-stat e representation of the predevelopment conditions of the ground-water flow system utilizing the two geologic interpretations used to develop the previous numerical models. The long-term objective of this project was to construct and calibrate a transient model that simulates the ground-water conditions of the study area over the historical record that utilizes a newly interpreted hydrogeologic conceptual model. This report describes the result of the predevelopment steady-state model construction and calibration.

  16. Dark Valley in Newton Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-418, 11 July 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) high resolution image shows part of a dark-floored valley system in northern Newton Crater. The valley might have been originally formed by liquid water; the dark material is probably sand that has blown into the valley in more recent times. The picture was acquired earlier this week on July 6, 2003, and is located near 39.2oS, 157.9oW. The picture covers an area 2.3 km (1.4 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  17. Genetic analysis of fin development in zebrafish identifies furin and hemicentin1 as potential novel fraser syndrome disease genes.

    PubMed

    Carney, Thomas J; Feitosa, Natália Martins; Sonntag, Carmen; Slanchev, Krasimir; Kluger, Johannes; Kiyozumi, Daiji; Gebauer, Jan M; Coffin Talbot, Jared; Kimmel, Charles B; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Wagener, Raimund; Schwarz, Heinz; Ingham, Phillip W; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2010-04-15

    Using forward genetics, we have identified the genes mutated in two classes of zebrafish fin mutants. The mutants of the first class are characterized by defects in embryonic fin morphogenesis, which are due to mutations in a Laminin subunit or an Integrin alpha receptor, respectively. The mutants of the second class display characteristic blistering underneath the basement membrane of the fin epidermis. Three of them are due to mutations in zebrafish orthologues of FRAS1, FREM1, or FREM2, large basement membrane protein encoding genes that are mutated in mouse bleb mutants and in human patients suffering from Fraser Syndrome, a rare congenital condition characterized by syndactyly and cryptophthalmos. Fin blistering in a fourth group of zebrafish mutants is caused by mutations in Hemicentin1 (Hmcn1), another large extracellular matrix protein the function of which in vertebrates was hitherto unknown. Our mutant and dose-dependent interaction data suggest a potential involvement of Hmcn1 in Fraser complex-dependent basement membrane anchorage. Furthermore, we present biochemical and genetic data suggesting a role for the proprotein convertase FurinA in zebrafish fin development and cell surface shedding of Fras1 and Frem2, thereby allowing proper localization of the proteins within the basement membrane of forming fins. Finally, we identify the extracellular matrix protein Fibrillin2 as an indispensable interaction partner of Hmcn1. Thus we have defined a series of zebrafish mutants modelling Fraser Syndrome and have identified several implicated novel genes that might help to further elucidate the mechanisms of basement membrane anchorage and of the disease's aetiology. In addition, the novel genes might prove helpful to unravel the molecular nature of thus far unresolved cases of the human disease.

  18. 3D architecture and structural characterization of the Lima Valley low-angle fault system (Northern Apennines, Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemenzi, L.; Molli, G.; Botti, F.; Ungari, A.; Storti, F.

    2012-04-01

    The nappe pile of the northern Apennines is characterized, from bottom to top, by metamorphic units (Apuane and Massa), overlain by the anchimetamorphic cover unit (Tuscan Nappe), in turn overlain by remnants of former intraoceanic accretionary wedge (Subligurian and Ligurian units) and by the Epiligurian wedge-top sediments. The upper part of the structural edifice, in several areas, is dismembered and thinned by low-angle extensional fault systems, such as those described in southern Tuscany (Carmignani et al., 1994) and in southernmost Liguria (e.g. Tellaro detachment, Storti, 1995). Here we present another example of such low-angle fault systems, exposed in the Lima valley (northern Tuscany). It consists of a well developed bedding-parallel fault system which appears to be, in turn, affected by superimposed folds and late-stage normal faults (Botti et al., 2010). The original geometry of the low-angle fault system has been reconstructed and superimposed deformations have been restored. The fault system is composed by two first order segments, both of them showing bedding-parallel attitude and top-to-NE kinematics. The uppermost segment causes the tectonic repetition of the pelagic sediments of Scaglia fm. (Upper Cretaceous - Oligocene) and the sandstone of Macigno fm. (Oligocene - Miocene); the lowermost one causes the direct contact of the Macigno fm. on the pelagic carbonate of the Maiolica fm. (Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous), via the elision of the Scaglia fm.. In the central part of the study area, other formations are elided by the lowermost fault segment, giving the direct contact of the Macigno fm. with the Calcare selcifero di Limano fm. (Lower Jurassic). The damage zone of the two main tectonic contacts has been studied in detail to investigate the role of the different lithologies involved. In the Macigno sandstone, a foliated cataclasite developed in the proximity of the fault core, intercalated with smaller lithons of less deformed rock

  19. Using a Three-Dimensional Hydrogeologic Framework to Investigate Potential Sources of Water Springs in the Death Valley Regional Groundwater Flow System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M. C.; Belcher, W. R.; Sweetkind, D. S.; Faunt, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Death Valley regional groundwater flow system encompasses a proposed site for a high-level nuclear waste repository of the United States of America, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), where nuclear weapons were tested, and National Park and BLM properties, and provides water for local communities. The model was constructed using a three-dimensional hydrogeologic framework and has been used as a resource planning mechanism by the many stakeholders involved, including four United States (U.S) federal agencies (U.S. Department of Energy, National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) and local counties, towns, and residents. One of the issues in recent model development is simulation of insufficient water to regional discharge areas which form springs in valleys near the center of the system. Given what seems to be likely rock characteristics and geometries at depth, insufficient water is simulated to reach the discharge areas. This "surprise" thus challenges preconceived notions about the system. Here we use the hydrogeologic model to hypothesize alternatives able to produce the observed flow and use the groundwater simulation to test the hypotheses with other available data. Results suggest that the transmissivity measurements need to be used carefully because wells in this system are never fully penetrating, that multiple alternatives are able to produce the springflow, and that one most likely alternative cannot be identified given available data. Consequences of the alternatives are discussed.

  20. Hydrogeology of the Ramapo River-Woodbury Creek valley-fill aquifer system and adjacent areas in eastern Orange County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisig, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Valley-fill aquifers are modest resources within the area, as indicated by the common practice of completing supply wells in the underlying bedrock rather than the overlying glacial deposits. Groundwater turbidity problems curtail use of the resource. However, additional groundwater resources have been identified by test drilling, and there are remaining untested areas. New groundwater supplies that stress localized aquifer areas will alter the groundwater flow system. Considerations include potential water-quality degradation from nearby land use(s) and, where withdrawals induce infiltration of surface-water, balancing withdrawals with flow requirements for downstream users or for maintenance of stream ecological health.

  1. Fine-scale heat flow, shallow heat sources, and decoupled circulation systems at two sea-floor hydrothermal sites, Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.S.; Fisher, A.T.; Langseth, M.; Jin, W.; Iturrino, G.; Davis, E.

    1998-12-01

    Fine-scale heat-flow patterns at two areas of active venting in Middle Valley, a sedimented rift on the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, provide thermal evidence of shallow hydrothermal reservoirs beneath the vent fields. The extreme variability of heat flow is explained by conductive heating immediately adjacent to vents and shallow circulation within sediments above the reservoir. This secondary circulation is hydrologically separated from the deeper system feeding the vents by a shallow conductive lid within the sediments. A similar separation of shallow and deep circulation may also occur at sediment-free ridge-crest hydrothermal environments.

  2. Use of Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) in the analysis of historical landslide occurred in 1885 in the Rječina River Valley, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugonjić Jovančević, Sanja; Peranić, Josip; Ružić, Igor; Arbanas, Željko; Kalajžić, Duje; Benac, Čedomir

    2016-04-01

    Numerous instability phenomena have been recorded in the Rječina River Valley, near the City of Rijeka, in the past 250 years. Large landslides triggered by rainfall and floods, were registered on both sides of the Valley. Landslide inventory in the Valley was established based on recorded historical events and LiDAR imagery. The Rječina River is a typical karstic river 18.7km long, originating from the Gorski Kotar Mountains. The central part of the Valley, belongs to the dominant morphostructural unit that strikes in the northwest-southeast direction along the Rječina River. Karstified limestone rock mass is visible on the top of the slopes, while the flysch rock mass is present on the lower slopes and at the bottom of the Valley. Different types of movements can be distinguished in the area, such as the sliding of slope deposits over the flysch bedrock, rockfalls from limestone cliffs, sliding of huge rocky blocks, and active landslide on the north-eastern slope. The paper presents investigation of the dormant landslide located on the south-western slope of the Valley, which was recorded in 1870 in numerous historical descriptions. Due to intense and long-term rainfall, the landslide was reactivated in 1885, destroying and damaging houses in the eastern part of the Grohovo Village. To predict possible reactivation of the dormant landslide on the south-western side of the Valley, 2D stability back analyses were performed on the basis of landslide features, in order to approximate the position of sliding surface and landslide dimensions. The landslide topography is very steep, and the slope is covered by unstable debris material, so therefore hard to perform any terrestrial geodetic survey. Consumer-grade DJI Phantom 2 Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) was used to provide the data about the present slope topography. The landslide 3D point cloud was derived from approximately 200 photographs taken with RPAS, using structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry

  3. A three-dimensional numerical model of predevelopment conditions in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Agnese, Frank A.; O'Brien, G. M.; Faunt, C.C.; Belcher, W.R.; San Juan, C.

    2002-01-01

    In the early 1990's, two numerical models of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. In general, the two models were based on the same basic hydrogeologic data set. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey develop and maintain a ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region in support of U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of developing this 'second-generation' regional model was to enhance the knowledge an understanding of the ground-water flow system as new information and tools are developed. The U.S. Geological Survey also was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Energy to cooperate to the fullest extent with other Federal, State, and local entities in the region to take advantage of the benefits of their knowledge and expertise. The short-term objective of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system project was to develop a steady-state representation of the predevelopment conditions of the ground-water flow system utilizing the two geologic interpretations used to develop the previous numerical models. The long-term objective of this project was to construct and calibrate a transient model that simulates the ground-water conditions of the study area over the historical record that utilizes a newly interpreted hydrogeologic conceptual model. This report describes the result of the predevelopment steady-state model construction and calibration. The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system is situated within the southern Great Basin, a subprovince of the Basin and Range physiographic province, bounded by latitudes 35 degrees north and 38 degrees 15 minutes north and by longitudes 115 and 118 degrees west. Hydrology in the region is a result of both the arid climatic conditions and the complex geology. Ground-water flow generally can be described as dominated by interbasinal flow and may be conceptualized as

  4. Valley evolution by meandering rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Ajay Brian Sanjay

    Fluvial systems form landscapes and sedimentary deposits with a rich hierarchy of structures that extend from grain- to valley scale. Large-scale pattern formation in fluvial systems is commonly attributed to forcing by external factors, including climate change, tectonic uplift, and sea-level change. Yet over geologic timescales, rivers may also develop large-scale erosional and depositional patterns that do not bear on environmental history. This dissertation uses a combination of numerical modeling and topographic analysis to identify and quantify patterns in river valleys that form as a consequence of river meandering alone, under constant external forcing. Chapter 2 identifies a numerical artifact in existing, grid-based models that represent the co-evolution of river channel migration and bank strength over geologic timescales. A new, vector-based technique for bank-material tracking is shown to improve predictions for the evolution of meander belts, floodplains, sedimentary deposits formed by aggrading channels, and bedrock river valleys, particularly when spatial contrasts in bank strength are strong. Chapters 3 and 4 apply this numerical technique to establishing valley topography formed by a vertically incising, meandering river subject to constant external forcing---which should serve as the null hypothesis for valley evolution. In Chapter 3, this scenario is shown to explain a variety of common bedrock river valley types and smaller-scale features within them---including entrenched channels, long-wavelength, arcuate scars in valley walls, and bedrock-cored river terraces. Chapter 4 describes the age and geometric statistics of river terraces formed by meandering with constant external forcing, and compares them to terraces in natural river valleys. The frequency of intrinsic terrace formation by meandering is shown to reflect a characteristic relief-generation timescale, and terrace length is identified as a key criterion for distinguishing these

  5. Modelling photochemistry in alpine valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brulfert, G.; Chemel, C.; Chaxel, E.; Chollet, J. P.

    2005-09-01

    Road traffic is a serious problem in the Chamonix Valley, France: traffic, noise and above all air pollution worry the inhabitants. The big fire in the Mont-Blanc tunnel made it possible, in the framework of the POVA project (POllution in Alpine Valleys), to undertake measurement campaigns with and without heavy-vehicle traffic through the Chamonix and Maurienne valleys, towards Italy (before and after the tunnel re-opening). Modelling is one of the aspects of POVA and should make it possible to explain the processes leading to episodes of atmospheric pollution, both in summer and in winter. Atmospheric prediction model ARPS 4.5.2 (Advanced Regional Prediction System), developed at the CAPS (Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms) of the University of Oklahoma, enables to resolve the dynamics above a complex terrain. This model is coupled to the TAPOM 1.5.2 atmospheric chemistry (Transport and Air POllution Model) code developed at the Air and Soil Pollution Laboratory of the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. The numerical codes MM5 and CHIMERE are used to compute large scale boundary forcing.

    This paper focuses on modelling Chamonix valley using 300-m grid cells to calculate the dynamics and the reactive chemistry which makes possible to accurately represent the dynamics in the Chamonix valley (slope and valley winds) and to process chemistry at fine scale. The summer 2003 intensive campaign was used to validate the model and to study chemistry. NOy according to O3 reduction demonstrates a VOC controlled regime, different from the NOx controlled regime expected and observed in the nearby city of Grenoble.

  6. Application of the Evacuated Canister System for Removing Residual Molten Glass From the West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Waste Melter

    SciTech Connect

    May, Joseph J.; Dombrowski, David J.; Valenti, Paul J.; Houston, Helene M.

    2003-02-27

    The principal mission of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is to meet a series of objectives defined in the West Valley Demonstration Project Act (Public Law 96-368). Chief among these is the objective to solidify liquid high-level waste (HLW) at the WVDP site into a form suitable for disposal in a federal geologic repository. In 1982, the Secretary of Energy formally selected vitrification as the technology to be used to solidify HLW at the WVDP. One of the first steps in meeting the HLW solidification objective involved designing, constructing and operating the Vitrification (Vit) Facility, the WVDP facility that houses the systems and subsystems used to process HLW into stainless steel canisters of borosilicate waste-glass that satisfy waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for disposal in a federal geologic repository. HLW processing and canister production began in 1996. The final step in meeting the HLW solidification objective involved ending Vit system operations and shut ting down the Vit Facility. This was accomplished by conducting a discrete series of activities to remove as much residual material as practical from the primary process vessels, components, and associated piping used in HLW canister production before declaring a formal end to Vit system operations. Flushing was the primary method used to remove residual radioactive material from the vitrification system. The inventory of radioactivity contained within the entire primary processing system diminished by conducting the flushing activities. At the completion of flushing activities, the composition of residual molten material remaining in the melter (the primary system component used in glass production) consisted of a small quantity of radioactive material and large quantities of glass former materials needed to produce borosilicate waste-glass. A special system developed during the pre-operational and testing phase of Vit Facility operation, the Evacuated Canister System (ECS), was

  7. Pilot evaluation of electricity-reliability and power-quality monitoring in California's Silicon Valley with the I-Grid(R) system

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Joseph; Divan, Deepak; Brumsickle, William

    2004-02-01

    Power-quality events are of increasing concern for the economy because today's equipment, particularly computers and automated manufacturing devices, is susceptible to these imperceptible voltage changes. A small variation in voltage can cause this equipment to shut down for long periods, resulting in significant business losses. Tiny variations in power quality are difficult to detect except with expensive monitoring equipment used by trained technicians, so many electricity customers are unaware of the role of power-quality events in equipment malfunctioning. This report describes the findings from a pilot study coordinated through the Silicon Valley Manufacturers Group in California to explore the capabilities of I-Grid(R), a new power-quality monitoring system. This system is designed to improve the accessibility of power-quality in formation and to increase understanding of the growing importance of electricity reliability and power quality to the economy. The study used data collected by I-Grid sensors at seven Silicon Valley firms to investigate the impacts of power quality on individual study participants as well as to explore the capabilities of the I-Grid system to detect events on the larger electricity grid by means of correlation of data from the sensors at the different sites. In addition, study participants were interviewed about the value they place on power quality, and their efforts to address electricity-reliability and power-quality problems. Issues were identified that should be taken into consideration in developing a larger, potentially nationwide, network of power-quality sensors.

  8. A method for evaluating the importance of system state observations to model predictions, with application to the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Ely, D.M.; Hill, M.C.; O'Brien, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    We develop a new observation-prediction (OPR) statistic for evaluating the importance of system state observations to model predictions. The OPR statistic measures the change in prediction uncertainty produced when an observation is added to or removed from an existing monitoring network, and it can be used to guide refinement and enhancement of the network. Prediction uncertainty is approximated using a first-order second-moment method. We apply the OPR statistic to a model of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) to evaluate the importance of existing and potential hydraulic head observations to predicted advective transport paths in the saturated zone underlying Yucca Mountain and underground testing areas on the Nevada Test Site. Important existing observations tend to be far from the predicted paths, and many unimportant observations are in areas of high observation density. These results can be used to select locations at which increased observation accuracy would be beneficial and locations that could be removed from the network. Important potential observations are mostly in areas of high hydraulic gradient far from the paths. Results for both existing and potential observations are related to the flow system dynamics and coarse parameter zonation in the DVRFS model. If system properties in different locations are as similar as the zonation assumes, then the OPR results illustrate a data collection opportunity whereby observations in distant, high-gradient areas can provide information about properties in flatter-gradient areas near the paths. If this similarity is suspect, then the analysis produces a different type of data collection opportunity involving testing of model assumptions critical to the OPR results.

  9. Coherent Flow Structures and Suspension Events over Low-angle Dunes: Fraser River, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, R. W.; Venditti, J. G.; Kostaschuk, R. A.; Hendershot, M. L.; Allison, M. A.; Church, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Increasing observations show that dunes with low-angle lee-sides (< 30°) and symmetrical shapes are the most common bedform morphology in large sand-bedded alluvial channels. Flume studies have revealed much about flow and sediment dynamics over high-angle (~30°) asymmetric dunes, however much less is known about low-angle dune dynamics. This study examines mean flow, coherent flow structures and suspension events over low-angle dunes in the unsteady flow of the estuarine reach of the Fraser River, Canada. Dune field topography was mapped using a multibeam echo sounder (MBES) while an acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp) simultaneously provided flow and suspended sediment measurements over a range of flows through tidal cycles. At high tide, river flow nearly ceases and a salt wedge enters the channel, forcing plumes of salt water towards the surface into the downstream moving fresh water above as the wedge moves upstream over the dunes. The salt wedge persists in the channel causing stratification in water column and one-sided instabilities along the saline-fresh water interface until the late in the falling tide. At low tide, mean velocities peak and force the saline water out of the channel. Flow over the low-angle dunes displays topographically induced flow patterns similar to previously observed over high-angle dunes, but permanent flow separation is notably absent. Sediment-laden kolks emerge as important suspended sediment transport agents during low tide but become more coherent, yet less frequent, structures as the tide begins to rise. Kolks appear to form downstream of dune crests along the shear layer that is likely formed by intermittent flow separation. Kolks also form at the reattachment point and grow over the stoss slope of the dunes. This is consistent with the generation of hairpin vortices formed near the bed that lift into the flow and grow to the surface through an 'autogeneration' mechanism. Persistent downwelling and periodic sweeps at

  10. The Stability of Fine-grained Sediments from the Fraser River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, C. L.; Feeney, T.; Sutherland, T. F.; Luternauer, J. L.

    1997-10-01

    The stability and erodibility of benthic fine-grained sediments on the foreshore and upper foreslope of the Fraser River delta were measured using the in situbenthic flume—Sea Carousel. The erosion threshold [τ c(0)], which varied between 0·11 and 0·50 Pa, was inversely related to erosion rate. It was also proportional to sediment wet bulk density (ρ b) in the form: τ c(0)=7×10 -4 ρ b-0·47. This trend agreed with those obtained from four other sites across Canada that encompassed a wide range in sediment densities: 1000<ρ b<2000 kg m -3. Erosion threshold Shields parameter (θ c) was positively related to grain Reynolds number over the silt-clay size range (0·01< Re<5): θ c=2·86 Re0·58. This was similar to earlier findings for water-saturated sediment. This trend is also in continuity with published threshold values measured in biostabilized sand (5< Re<50). Copyright 1997 Academic Press Limited Three erosion types were observed: Type IA erosion was a surface phenomenon caused by the presence of a thin organic ' fluff ' layer. It occurred at current speeds less than 0·3 m s -1. Type 1B erosion (asymptotically decaying with time) characterized the mid-portions of each erosion time series, and occurred at current speeds of 0·3-0·9 m s -1. Type I/II erosion (transitional) was largely found on the foreslope, and occurred at current speeds in excess of 0·8 m s -1. The erosion process began in all cases under turbulent transitional flows. The change from Type I to Type II erosion corresponded to the onset of turbulent rough flows (60< Re<70). This is supported by video observations, which showed Type I erosion to be largely the result of entrainment of small aggregates and flocs, whereas Type II erosion was the result of enlargement of surface irregularities, and subsequent undercutting and release of large aggregates. Mean erosion rate ( Em) was independent of either azimuthal current speed or bed shear stress. It was largely constant throughout each

  11. Detection and measurement of land subsidence using Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar, Coachella Valley, California, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Ikehara, Marti E.; Galloway, D.L.; Amelung, Falk

    2001-01-01

    Land subsidence associated with ground-water-level declines has been recognized as a potential problem in Coachella Valley, California. Since the early 1920s, ground water has been a major source of agricultural, municipal, and domestic supply in the valley, resulting in water-level declines as large as 15 meters (50 feet) through the late 1940s. In 1949, the importation of Colorado River water to the lower Coachella Valley began, resulting in a reduction in ground-water pumping and a recovery of water levels from the 1950s through the 1970s. Since the late 1970s, the demand for water in the valley has exceeded the deliveries of imported surface water, again resulting in increased pumping and ground-water-level declines. The magnitude and temporal occurrence of land subsidence in the lower Coachella Valley are not well known; data are sparse and accuracy varies. Also, the area is tectonically active and has subsided during the past several million years, which further complicates interpretations of the data. Land-surface-elevation data have been collected by many agencies using various methods and different geographic scales; because of this, the -150 millimeters (-0.5 foot) of subsidence determined for the southern parts of the valley for 1930-96 may have a possible error of plus or minus (?)90 millimeters (?0.3 foot). The location, extent, and magnitude of vertical land-surface changes from 1996 to 1998 were determined using Global Positioning System (GPS) and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) methods. GPS measurements for 14 monuments in the lower Coachella Valley indicate that the vertical land-surface changes from 1996 to 1998 ranged from -13 to -67 millimeters ? 40 millimeters (-0.04 to -0.22 foot ?0.13 foot). Changes at seven of the monuments exceeded the measurement error of ?40 millimeters (?0.13 foot), which indicates that small amounts of land subsidence occurred at these monuments between 1996 and 1998. Some of the water levels measured

  12. Mild recessive mutations in six Fraser syndrome-related genes cause isolated congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Stefan; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Hilger, Alina C; Saisawat, Pawaree; Vivante, Asaf; Stajic, Natasa; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Reutter, Heiko M; Kehinde, Elijah O; Tasic, Velibor; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for approximately 40% of children with ESRD in the United States. Hitherto, mutations in 23 genes have been described as causing autosomal dominant isolated CAKUT in humans. However, >90% of cases of isolated CAKUT still remain without a molecular diagnosis. Here, we hypothesized that genes mutated in recessive mouse models with the specific CAKUT phenotype of unilateral renal agenesis may also be mutated in humans with isolated CAKUT. We applied next-generation sequencing technology for targeted exon sequencing of 12 recessive murine candidate genes in 574 individuals with isolated CAKUT from 590 families. In 15 of 590 families, we identified recessive mutations in the genes FRAS1, FREM2, GRIP1, FREM1, ITGA8, and GREM1, all of which function in the interaction of the ureteric bud and the metanephric mesenchyme. We show that isolated CAKUT may be caused partially by mutations in recessive genes. Our results also indicate that biallelic missense mutations in the Fraser/MOTA/BNAR spectrum genes cause isolated CAKUT, whereas truncating mutations are found in the multiorgan form of Fraser syndrome. The newly identified recessive biallelic mutations in these six genes represent the molecular cause of isolated CAKUT in 2.5% of the 590 affected families in this study.

  13. Basement membrane assembly of the integrin α8β1 ligand nephronectin requires Fraser syndrome-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Kiyozumi, Daiji; Takeichi, Makiko; Nakano, Itsuko; Sato, Yuya; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2012-05-28

    Dysfunction of the basement membrane protein QBRICK provokes Fraser syndrome, which results in renal dysmorphogenesis, cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa through unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that integrin α8β1 binding to basement membranes was significantly impaired in Qbrick-null mice. This impaired integrin α8β1 binding was not a direct consequence of the loss of QBRICK, which itself is a ligand of integrin α8β1, because knock-in mice with a mutation in the integrin-binding site of QBRICK developed normally and do not exhibit any defects in integrin α8β1 binding. Instead, the loss of QBRICK significantly diminished the expression of nephronectin, an integrin α8β1 ligand necessary for renal development. In vivo, nephronectin associated with QBRICK and localized at the sublamina densa region, where QBRICK was also located. Collectively, these findings indicate that QBRICK facilitates the integrin α8β1-dependent interactions of cells with basement membranes by regulating the basement membrane assembly of nephronectin and explain why renal defects occur in Fraser syndrome.

  14. Survey, Representation and Analysis of a War i Complex System of Surface and Underground Fortifications in the Gresta Valley, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, I.; Vitti, A.

    2011-09-01

    This work is part of a research on the use of terrestrial laser scanner, integrated with total station and GPS, for the documentation and comprehension of complex architectures in up-land sites. The research is performed in the framework of the project "Ambiente e Paesaggi dei siti di Altura Trentini" - APSAT (Environment and landscape of hill-top sites in Trentino), a multidisciplinary project focused on the evolution of hill-top anthropic system in the Trentino region, Italy. The study area is located in the Gresta Valley and this work concerns on the Nagià Grom site, fortified by the Austria-Hungarian Army during the World War I. The site has been interested by a significant restore operation of a large series of entrenches paths and fortifications in the last decade. The survey herein described has involved an area once interested by military barracks with Officers' Mess, water provision and by one of the biggest field kitchens discovered in the Trentino region. A second survey involved the tunnel connecting the ammunition depot to the artillery stations. The nature of such complex architectures, characterized by an irregular and composite 3D span leads, in general, to necessary simple surveys and representations and somehow to simplified studies too. The 3D point cloud, once filtered by the massive presence of dense vegetation, eventually constitutes a rich data set for further analyses on the spatial, geological, architectural and historical properties of the site. The analysis has been carried out on two different scales. At the architectural-scale, the comparison to historic photos has allowed to understand how the original structure of the barracks was made and to find building characters that now are lost. The on-site observation of the underground stratigraphic splices and their analysis in the 3D point cloud, e.g., spatial extension and slope, have permitted the understanding of the special excavation process guided by the practical advantage of

  15. Fraser River watershed, Colorado : assessment of available water-quantity and water-quality data through water year 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, Lori Estelle; Bails, Jeffrey B.

    1999-01-01

    The water-quantity and water-quality data for the Fraser River watershed through water year 1997 were compiled for ground-water and surface-water sites. In order to assess the water-quality data, the data were related to land use/land cover in the watershed. Data from 81 water-quantity and water-quality sites, which consisted of 9 ground-water sites and 72 surface-water sites, were available for analysis. However, the data were limited and frequently contained only one or two water-quality analyses per site.The Fraser River flows about 28 miles from its headwaters at the Continental Divide to the confluence with the Colorado River. Ground-water resources in the watershed are used for residential and municipal drinking-water supplies. Surface water is available for use, but water diversions in the upper parts of the watershed reduce the flow in the river. Land use/land cover in the watershed is predominantly forested land, but increasing urban development has the potential to affect the quantity and quality of the water resources.Analysis of the limited ground-water data in the watershed indicates that changes in the land use/land cover affect the shallow ground-water quality. Water-quality data from eight shallow monitoring wells in the alluvial aquifer show that iron and manganese concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant level. Radon concentrations from these monitoring wells exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed maximum contaminant level. The proposed radon contaminant level is currently being revised. The presence of volatile organic compounds at two monitoring wells in the watershed indicates that land use affects the shallow ground water. In addition, bacteria detected in three samples are at concentrations that would be a concern for public health if the water was to be used as a drinking supply. Methylene blue active substances were detected in the ground water at some sites and are a

  16. Hydrogeologic Framework Development for Integrated Hydrologic Modeling of Mountain Block Alluvial Systems in Lake Tahoe and Martis Valley, Nevada and California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, M.; Huntington, J. L.; Niswonger, R. G.; Reeves, M.; Pohll, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Interior has identified the Truckee River basin as highly likely for potential water supply crises and conflict in the next 15 years. A critical water supply to the Truckee River is outflow from Lake Tahoe and watershed contributions from Martis Valley. This project utilizes an integrated surface and groundwater model, GSFLOW, in the Lake Tahoe and Martis Valley basins to assess the effects of climate on surface and groundwater interactions and to identify hydrologic mechanisms responsible for changes in groundwater levels, summer baseflows, spring flows, soil moisture, and lake levels. Maintaining a balance between hydrostratigraphic resolution and grid discretization is a key objective in developing realistic and computationally efficient integrated surface and groundwater models. This is particularly difficult in mountainous regions with complex topography where low permeability mountain block is overlain by thin, higher permeability alluvium and glacial deposits near stream channels. In this work, we outline a novel approach used to develop grid-based hydrogeologic conceptualizations of the Lake Tahoe and Martis Valley hydrologic basins. This approach employs deductive reasoning and a combination of data-driven automated and manual interpolation conditioned to observe lithologies, cross sectional and surficial geologic maps, and geophysical surveys. This conceptual-hydrogeological framework model, which merges data-driven hydrostratigraphic interpolation with conceptual understanding of the sub-surface system, is essential for constructing integrated models in data limited mountain block regions. Particular emphasis is placed on how maintaining continuity between mountain block, alluvial, and basin fill units through layer configuration and assignment of permeability contrasts markedly improves model performance and efficiency.

  17. Simulation of ground-water flow, surface-water flow, and a deep sewer tunnel system in the Menomonee Valley, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunning, C.P.; Feinstein, D.T.; Hunt, R.J.; Krohelski, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    Numerical models were constructed for simulation of ground-water flow in the Menomonee Valley Brownfield, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. An understanding of ground-water flow is necessary to develop an efficient program to sample ground water for contaminants. Models were constructed in a stepwise fashion, beginning with a regional, single-layer, analytic-element model (GFLOW code) that provided boundary conditions for a local, eight layer, finite-difference model (MODFLOW code) centered on the Menomonee Valley Brownfield. The primary source of ground water to the models is recharge over the model domains; primary sinks for ground water within the models are surface-water features and the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District Inline Storage System (ISS). Calibration targets were hydraulic heads, surface-water fluxes, vertical gradients, and ground-water infiltration to the ISS. Simulation of ground-water flow by use of the MODFLOW model indicates that about 73 percent of recharge within the MODFLOW domain circulates to the ISS and 27 percent discharges to gaining surface-water bodies. In addition, infiltration to the ISS comes from the following sources: 36 percent from recharge within the model domain, 45 percent from lateral flow into the domain, 15 percent from Lake Michigan, and 4 percent from other surface-water bodies. Particle tracking reveals that the median traveltime from the recharge point to surface-water features is 8 years; the median time to the ISS is 255 years. The traveltimes to the ISS are least over the northern part of the valley, where dolomite is near the land surface. The distribution of traveltimes in the MODFLOW simulation is greatly influenced by the effective porosity values assigned to the various lithologies.

  18. Update to the Ground-Water Withdrawals Database for the Death Valley REgional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California, 1913-2003

    SciTech Connect

    Michael T. Moreo; and Leigh Justet

    2008-07-02

    Ground-water withdrawal estimates from 1913 through 2003 for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system are compiled in an electronic database to support a regional, three-dimensional, transient ground-water flow model. This database updates a previously published database that compiled estimates of ground-water withdrawals for 1913–1998. The same methodology is used to construct each database. Primary differences between the 2 databases are an additional 5 years of ground-water withdrawal data, well locations in the updated database are restricted to Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model boundary, and application rates are from 0 to 1.5 feet per year lower than original estimates. The lower application rates result from revised estimates of crop consumptive use, which are based on updated estimates of potential evapotranspiration. In 2003, about 55,700 acre-feet of ground water was pumped in the DVRFS, of which 69 percent was used for irrigation, 13 percent for domestic, and 18 percent for public supply, commercial, and mining activities.

  19. An information system for the utility of the ephemeral tributaries west of the Nile Valley in Sudan. Based on remote sensing and geological techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Al Biely, A.I.; Mohamed, A.H.A.; Khidir, S.O.

    1996-08-01

    Interpretation of landsat MSS and TM satellite and NOAA-AVHRR images, climatological data and conventional geological methods were integrated in this study to arrive at a rigorous scientific geoinformation system that could assist the on-going endeavours to rehabilitate areas west of the Nile Valley. The study area, which repetitively suffered severe spells of drought, extends between latitudes 12{degrees}N-18{degrees}N and longitudes 27{degrees}E-32{degrees}E. The area considered abodes four major ephemeral tributaries of the River Nile, they are Wadi Howar, Wadi El Milk, Wadi El Mugaddam and Khor Abu Habil. Visual interpretation of remotely sensed data coupled with geological investigations revealed that these ephemeral tributaries are structurally controlled and their lower courses are buried under extensive sand sheets, that block their channels from reaching the Nile Valley. Sites where those tributaries disappear could constitute huge reservoirs of groundwater that could be utilized to harness desert encroachment and to plan rehabilitation projects. It is envisaged that, surface and subsurface hydrological engineering constructions in favourable sites, across those tributaries may lead to permanent surface water ponding. The performed study demonstrated the possibility of combating the environmental degradation on the area under consideration through carefully designed rehabilitation and development projects based on the integration of available data in a geoinformation system.

  20. Update to the Ground-Water Withdrawals Database for the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California, 1913-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moreo, Michael T.; Justet, Leigh

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water withdrawal estimates from 1913 through 2003 for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system are compiled in an electronic database to support a regional, three-dimensional, transient ground-water flow model. This database updates a previously published database that compiled estimates of ground-water withdrawals for 1913-1998. The same methodology is used to construct each database. Primary differences between the 2 databases are an additional 5 years of ground-water withdrawal data, well locations in the updated database are restricted to Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model boundary, and application rates are from 0 to 1.5 feet per year lower than original estimates. The lower application rates result from revised estimates of crop consumptive use, which are based on updated estimates of potential evapotranspiration. In 2003, about 55,700 acre-feet of ground water was pumped in the DVRFS, of which 69 percent was used for irrigation, 13 percent for domestic, and 18 percent for public supply, commercial, and mining activities.

  1. Estuarine fluvial floodplain formation in the Holocene Lower Tagus valley (Central Portugal) and implications for Quaternary fluvial system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schriek, Tim; Passmore, David G.; Rolão, Jose; Stevenson, Anthony C.

    2007-11-01

    We present a brief synthesis of the Quaternary fluvial record in the Lower Tagus Basin (central Portugal), concentrating on factors controlling infill and incision. The Holocene part of the record forms the focus of this paper and guides the questioning of the basic assumptions of the established Quaternary fluvial evolution model, in particular the link between sea-level change and fluvial incision-deposition. We suggest that several incision-aggradation phases may have occurred during glacial periods. Major aggradation events may overlap with cold episodes, while incision appears to concentrate on the warming limb of climate transitions. The complex stratigraphy of the Quaternary record in the Lower Tagus valley is influenced by repeated base-level and climate changes. This paper submits the first chronostratigraphic framework for valley fill deposits in the Lower Tagus area. Sea-level rise forced aggradation and controlled deposition of the fine-grained sedimentary wedge underlying the low-gradient Lower Tagus floodplain. Investigations have focused on the lower Muge tributary, where rapidly aggrading estuarine and fluvial environments were abruptly established (∼8150 cal BP) as sea level rose. Base level at the valley mouth controlled the upstream extent of the fine-grained backfill. Tidal environments disappeared abruptly (∼5800 cal BP) when the open estuary at the Muge confluence was infilled by the Tagus River. The decrease and final still stand of sea-level rise led to floodplain stabilisation with peat (∼6400-5200 cal BP) and soil formation (∼5200-2200 cal BP). Localised renewed sedimentation (∼2200-200 cal BP) is linked to human activity.

  2. Effect of subalpine canopy removal on snowpack, soil solution, and nutrient export, Fraser Experimental Forest, CO

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stottlemyer, R.; Troendle, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    Research on the effects of vegetation manipulation on snowpack, soil water, and streamwater chemistry and flux has been underway at the Fraser Experimental Forest (FEF), CO, since 1982. Greater than 95% of FEF snowmelt passes through watersheds as subsurface flow where soil processes significantly alter meltwater chemistry. To better understand the mechanisms accounting for annual variation in watershed streamwater ion concentration and flux with snowmelt, we studied subsurface water flow, its ion concentration, and flux in conterminous forested and clear cut plots. Repetitive patterns in subsurface flow and chemistry were apparent. Control plot subsurface flow chemistry had the highest ion concentrations in late winter and fall. When shallow subsurface flow occurred, its Ca2+, SO42-, and HCO3- concentrations were lower and K+ higher than deep flow. The percentage of Ca2+, NO3-, SO42-, and HCO3- flux in shallow depths was less and K+ slightly greater than the percentage of total flow. Canopy removal increased precipitation reaching the forest floor by about 40%, increased peak snowpack water equivalent (SWE) > 35%, increased the average snowpack Ca2+, NO3-, and NH4+ content, reduced the snowpack K+ content, and increased the runoff four-fold. Clear cutting doubled the percentage of subsurface flow at shallow depths, and increased K+ concentration in shallow subsurface flow and NO3- concentrations in both shallow and deep flow. The percentage change in total Ca2+, SO42-, and HCO3- flux in shallow depths was less than the change in water flux, while that of K+ and NO3- flux was greater. Relative to the control, in the clear cut the percentage of total Ca2+ flux at shallow depths increased from 5 to 12%, SO42- 5.4 to 12%, HCO3- from 5.6 to 8.7%, K+ from 6 to 35%, and NO3- from 2.7 to 17%. The increases in Ca2+ and SO42- flux were proportional to the increase in water flux, the flux of HCO3- increased proportionally less than water flux, and NO3- and K+ were

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-62) - Rocky Reach - Maple Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Mark A.

    2002-04-16

    Vegetation Management along the Rocky Reach – Maple Valley No. 1 Transmission Line ROW from structure 98/2 to structure 110/1. The transmission line is a 500 kV line. BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation along access roads and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation management along existing access road and around structure landings for the purpose of maintaining access to structures site. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards.

  4. Assessing the Vulnerability of Public-Supply Wells to Contamination: Central Valley Aquifer System near Modesto, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Burow, Karen R.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Modesto, California. The well selected for study pumps on average about 1,600 gallons per minute from the Central Valley aquifer system during peak summer demand. Water samples were collected at the public-supply well and at monitoring wells installed in the Modesto vicinity. Samples from the public-supply wellhead contained the undesirable constituents uranium, nitrate, arsenic, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and pesticides, although none were present at concentrations exceeding drinking-water standards. Of these contaminants, uranium and nitrate pose the most significant water-quality risk to the public-supply well because human activities have caused concentrations in groundwater to increase over time. Overall, study findings point to four primary factors that affect the movement and (or) fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Modesto: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer); (2) irrigation and agricultural and municipal pumping that drives contaminants downward into the primary production zone of the aquifer; (3) short-circuiting of contaminated water down the public-supply well during the low-pumping season; and (4) natural geochemical conditions of the aquifer. A local-scale computer model of groundwater flow and transport to the public-supply well was constructed to simulate long-term nitrate and uranium concentrations reaching the well. With regard to nitrate, two conflicting processes influence concentrations in the area contributing recharge to the well: (1) Beneath land that is being farmed or has recently been farmed (within the last 10 to 20 years), downward-moving irrigation waters contain elevated nitrate concentrations; yet (2) the proportion of agricultural land has decreased and the proportion of urban land has increased since 1960. Urban land use is associated with low nitrate

  5. Long Valley Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Hill, David

    2008-01-01

    The ~300-year-old lava on Paoha Island in Mono Lake was produced by the most recent eruption in the Long Valley Caldera area in east-central California. The Long Valley Caldera was formed by a massive volcanic eruption 760,000 years ago. The region is monitored by the Long Valley Observatory (LVO), one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about the Long Valley Caldera region and LVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/lvo.

  6. Long Valley Coring Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John; Finger, John; McConnel, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    In December 1997, the California Energy Commission (CEC) agreed to provide funding for Phase III continued drilling of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) near Mammoth Lakes, CA, from its present depth. The CEC contribution of $1 million completes a funding package of $2 million from a variety of sources, which will allow the well to be cored continuously to a depth of between 11,500 and 12,500 feet. The core recovered from Phase III will be crucial to understanding the origin and history of the hydrothermal systems responsible for the filling of fractures in the basement rock. The borehole may penetrate the metamorphic roof of the large magmatic complex that has fed the volcanism responsible for the caldera and subsequent activity.

  7. Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of Death Valley, California, centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude, 117.069 degrees west longitude. The image shows Furnace Creek alluvial fan and Furnace Creek Ranch at the far right, and the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells at the center. The dark fork-shaped feature between Furnace Creek fan and the dunes is a smooth flood-plain which encloses Cottonball Basin. The bright dots near the center of the image are corner refectors that have been set-up to calibrate the radar as the Shuttle passes overhead with the SIR-C/X-SAR system. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43883.

  8. A new species of mole cricket (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae: Gryllotalpinae) from Bukit Fraser, Malay Peninsula, with taxa notes on another similar mole cricket.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming Kai; Kamaruddin, Khairul Nizam

    2013-01-01

    One new species of Gryllotalpa from Bukit Fraser, Pahang of Malay Peninsula is described: Gryllotalpafraser sp. n. Pho tographs of Gryllotalpa hirsuta Burmeister, 1838 were examined and some remarks are made here, including a compari son with Gryllotalpafraser sp. n. and Gyllotalpa nymphicus Tan, 2012.

  9. Extraction of Maltol from Fraser Fir: A Comparison of Microwave-Assisted Extraction and Conventional Heating Protocols for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Andrew S.; Chimento, Clio A.; Berg, Allison N.; Mughal, Farah D.; Spencer, Jean-Paul; Hovland, Douglas E.; Mbadugha, Bessie; Hovland, Allan K.; Eller, Leah R.

    2015-01-01

    Two methods for the extraction of maltol from Fraser fir needles are performed and compared in this two-week experiment. A traditional benchtop extraction using dichloromethane is compared to a microwave-assisted extraction using aqueous ethanol. Students perform both procedures and weigh the merits of each technique. In doing so, students see a…

  10. Spatial Analysis of Phytophthora infestans Genotypes and Late Blight Severity on Tomato and Potato in the Del Fuerte Valley Using Geostatistics and Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Garcia, R; Orum, T V; Felix-Gastelum, R; Trinidad-Correa, R; Vanetten, H D; Nelson, M R

    2001-12-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic structure of Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of potato and tomato late blight, was analyzed spatially in a mixed potato and tomato production area in the Del Fuerte Valley, Sinaloa, Mexico. Isolates of P. infestans were characterized by mating type, allozyme analysis at the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and peptidase loci, restriction fragment length polymorphism with probe RG57, metalaxyl sensitivity, and aggressiveness to tomato and potato. Spatial patterns of P. infestans genotypes were analyzed by geographical information systems and geo-statistics during the seasons of 1994-95, 1995-96, and 1996-97. Spatial analysis of the genetic structure of P. infestans indicates that geographic substructuring of this pathogen occurs in this area. Maps displaying the probabilities of occurrence of mating types and genotypes of P. infestans, and of disease severity at a regional scale, were presented. Some genotypes that exhibited differences in epidemiologically important features such as metalaxyl sensitivity and aggressiveness to tomato and potato had a restricted spread and were localized in isolated areas. Analysis of late blight severity showed recurring patterns, such as the earliest onset of the disease in the area where both potato and tomato were growing, strengthening the hypothesis that infected potato tubers are the main source of primary inoculum. The information that geostatistical analysis provides might help improve management programs for late blight in the Del Fuerte Valley.

  11. Monitoring the hydrologic system for potential effects of geothermal and ground-water development in the Long Valley caldera, Mono County, California, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, C.D.; Lyster, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    In the early 1980's, renewed interest in the geothermal potential of the Long Valley caldera, California, highlighted the need to balance the benefits of energy development with the established recreational activities of the area. The Long Valley Hydrologic Advisory Committee, formed in 1987, instituted a monitoring program to collect data during the early stages of resource utilization to evaluate potential effects on the hydrologic system. Early data show declines in streamflow, spring flow, and ground-water levels caused by 6 years of below-average precipitation. Springs in the Hot Creek State Fish Hatchery area discharge water that is a mixture of nonthermal and hydrothermal components. Possible sources of nonthermal water have been identified by comparing deuterium concentrations in streams and springs. The equivalent amount of undiluted thermal water discharged from the springs was calculated on the basis of boron and chloride concentrations. Quantifying the thermal and nonthermal fractions of the total flow may allow researchers to assess changes in flow volume or temperature of the springs caused by groundwater or geothermal development.

  12. Detection and Measurement of Land Subsidence Using Global Positioning System Surveying and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, Coachella Valley, California, 1996-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Brandt, Justin T.

    2007-01-01

    Land subsidence associated with ground-water-level declines has been investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Coachella Valley, California, since 1996. Ground water has been a major source of agricultural, municipal, and domestic supply in the valley since the early 1920s. Pumping of ground water resulted in water-level declines as large as 15 meters (50 feet) through the late 1940s. In 1949, the importation of Colorado River water to the southern Coachella Valley began, resulting in a reduction in ground-water pumping and a recovery of water levels during the 1950s through the 1970s. Since the late 1970s, demand for water in the valley has exceeded deliveries of imported surface water, resulting in increased pumping and associated ground-water-level declines and, consequently, an increase in the potential for land subsidence caused by aquifer-system compaction. Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) methods were used to determine the location, extent, and magnitude of the vertical land-surface changes in the southern Coachella Valley. GPS measurements made at 13 geodetic monuments in 1996 and in 2005 in the southern Coachella Valley indicate that the elevation of the land surface had a net decline of 333 to 22 millimeters ?58 millimeters (1.1 to 0.07 foot ?0.19 foot) during the 9-year period. Changes at 10 of the 13 monuments exceeded the maximum uncertainty of ?58 millimeters (?0.19 foot) at the 95-percent confidence level, indicating that subsidence occurred at these monuments between June 1996 and August 2005. GPS measurements made at 20 geodetic monuments in 2000 and in 2005 indicate that the elevation of the land surface changed -312 to +25 millimeters ?42 millimeters (-1.0 to +0.08 foot ?0.14 foot) during the 5-year period. Changes at 14 of the 20 monuments exceeded the maximum uncertainty of ?42 millimeters (?0.14 foot) at the 95-percent confidence level, indicating that subsidence occurred at

  13. The Central Valley Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faunt, C.; Belitz, K.; Hanson, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Historically, California’s Central Valley has been one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. The Central Valley also is rapidly becoming an important area for California’s expanding urban population. In response to this competition for water, a number of water-related issues have gained prominence: conjunctive use, artificial recharge, hydrologic implications of land-use change, subsidence, and effects of climate variability. To provide information to stakeholders addressing these issues, the USGS made a detailed assessment of the Central Valley aquifer system that includes the present status of water resources and how these resources have changed over time. The principal product of this assessment is a tool, referred to as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM), that simulates surface-water flows, groundwater flows, and land subsidence in response to stresses from human uses and from climate variability throughout the entire Central Valley. The CVHM utilizes MODFLOW combined with a new tool called “Farm Process” to simulate groundwater and surface-water flow, irrigated agriculture, land subsidence, and other key processes in the Central Valley on a monthly basis. This model was discretized horizontally into 20,000 1-mi2 cells and vertically into 10 layers ranging in thickness from 50 feet at the land surface to 750 feet at depth. A texture model constructed by using data from more than 8,500 drillers’ logs was used to estimate hydraulic properties. Unmetered pumpage and surface-water deliveries for 21 water-balance regions were simulated with the Farm Process. Model results indicate that human activities, predominately surface-water deliveries and groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture, have dramatically influenced the hydrology of the Central Valley. These human activities have increased flow though the aquifer system by about a factor of six compared to pre-development conditions. The simulated hydrology reflects spatial

  14. A reconnaissance for signs of a Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc mineralizing system on the eastern flank of the Rutbah Uplift, Anbar Province, Iraq

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Timothy S.; Mustafa, Mazin; Bennet, Thair

    2014-01-01

    Reconnaissance field visits and rock sampling were conducted at eight geologically selected locations within Mesozoic rocks on the eastern flank of the Rutbah Uplift, Anbar Province, western Iraq, in an attempt to determine if these rocks have been affected by a Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT) lead-zinc mineralizing system. Samples subsequently were studied by carbonate mineral staining, transmitted and reflected light petrology, and scanning electron microscopy with semi-quantitative energy dispersive elemental analyses. Single samples were studied by each, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analyses of trace elements and fluid inclusion microthermometry. Permissive evidence indicates that there has been a MVT system present, but none of the evidence is considered definitive.

  15. Contemporary subsidence of the Fraser River delta inferred from SqueeSAR™ type InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertolahti, L.; Clague, J. J.; Falorni, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Fraser River delta in southwestern British Columbia formed over the past 10 000 years and currently supports a population of about 250,000 people. Dyking, which began in the early 1900s, has prevented flooding and sediment deposition, with the result that the delta plain is subsiding at an average rate of 1-2 mm/yr due to the slow, natural consolidation of thick Holocene sediment. Localized higher rates of subsidence stem from anthropogenic sources, notably the application of loads in construction. Subsidence is a structural and engineering concern and is also important in the context of long-term sea-level rise, as much of the Fraser delta plain is at or below mean sea level. Holocene sediments underlying the delta are water-saturated, porous, Holocene fine sand, silty sand, and silt. They are compressible to considerable depth and can experience significant settlement when subjected to structural loads, dewatering, or seismic shaking. This research focuses on the urbanized and rapidly expanding Richmond area of the Fraser delta. We relate load induced settlement to the geology and to the spatial and temporal pattern of urbanization using InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) data, including ERS 1 and 2 data from 1992 to 1999, and RADARSAT-1 data from 2001 to 2008. Time series of deformation were obtained with the multi-image SqueeSAR algorithm, an advanced form of InSAR processing, for test sites with known subsurface geology based on Geological Survey of Canada boreholes and published site engineering reports. In most cases the boreholes do not penetrate to the base of the Holocene sequence. We compared the rates of change in SqueeSAR data to sediment lithologies in boreholes with cut-off depths of 20 m, 50 m, 75 m, and 100 m. as well as the base of those boreholes deeper than 100 m. Previous InSAR studies of the delta were limited to data acquired prior to 1999. For most sites that we have investigated, the average yearly rate of settlement has

  16. Small Martian valleys - Pristine and degraded morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V. R.; Partridge, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    This study is concerned with a more detailed investigation of the small valley networks on Mars. The dual nature of many valley systems is pointed out, taking into account a relatively fresh-appearing network portion versus an apparent larger, less distinct network system. These separate network characteristics are referred to as pristine and degraded. The valley networks included in this study are all located in the equatorial zone of heavily cratered uplands, between latitudes 30 deg N and 40 deg S. Aspects of network morphology are examined, taking into account drainage density, network dissection ratio, and valley length parameters. Age relationships are also discussed, giving attention to crater age, counting problems, a conservative method, and a crater-fraction method.

  17. The chemistry of river-lake systems in the context of permafrost occurrence (Mongolia, Valley of the Lakes) Part II. Spatial trends and possible sources of organic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopińska, Małgorzata; Dymerski, Tomasz; Polkowska, Żaneta; Szumińska, Danuta; Wolska, Lidia

    2016-07-01

    The chemistry of river-lake systems located in Central Mongolia near the southern border of permafrost occurrence has not been well studied. The main aim of this paper is to summarize patterns in water chemistry in supply springs, rivers and lakes in relation to permafrost occurrence, as well as other natural and anthropogenic impacts. The analyses involved water samples taken from two river-lake systems: the Baydrag River-Böön Tsagaan Lake system and the Shargalyuut/Tuyn Rivers-Orog Lake system. Total organic carbon (TOC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected and quantified. Other organic compounds, such as organic halogen compounds, phthalates, and higher alkanes were also noted. The main factors which influence differences in TOC concentrations in the water bodies involve permafrost occurrence, mainly because compounds are released during active layer degradation (in the upper reach of the Tuyn river), and by intensive livestock farming in river valleys and in the vicinity of lakes. In relation to the concentrations of PAHs, high variability between samples (> 300 ng L- 1), indicates the influence of thermal water and local geology structures (e.g., volcanic and sedimentary deposits), as well as accumulation of suspended matter in lakes transported during rapid surface runoff events. The monitoring of TOC as well as individual PAHs is particularly important to future environmental studies, as they may potentially reflect the degradation of the environment. Therefore, monitoring in the Valley of the Lakes should be continued, particularly in the light of the anticipated permafrost degradation in the 21st century, in order to collect more data and be able to anticipate the response of river-lake water chemistry to changes in permafrost occurrence.

  18. The Valley Networks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, V. C.

    2002-12-01

    Despite three decades of exploration, the valley networks on Mars still seem to raise more questions than they answer. Valley systems have formed in the southern highlands, along some regions of the dichotomy boundary and the south rim of Valles Marineris, around the rim of some impact craters, and on the flanks of some volcanoes. They are found on some of the oldest and youngest terrains as well as on intermediate aged surfaces. There is surprisingly little consensus as to the formation and the paleoclimatic implications of the valley networks. Did the valleys require a persistent solar-driven atmospheric hydrological cycle involving precipitation, surface runoff, infiltration and groundwater outflow as they typically do on Earth? Or are they the result of magmatic or impact-driven thermal cycling of ground water involving persistent outflow and subsequent runoff? Are they the result of some other process(es)? Ground-water sapping, surface-water runoff, debris flows, wind erosion, and formation mechanisms involving other fluids have been proposed. Until such basic questions as these are definitively answered, their significance for understanding paleoclimatic change on Mars remains cloudy. I will review what is known about valley networks using data from both past and current missions. I will discuss what we have learned about their morphology, environments in which they formed, their spatial and temporal associations, possible formation mechanisms, relation to outflow channel and gully formation, as well as the possible implications for past climate change on Mars. Finally I will discuss how future, meter to submeter scale imaging and other remote sensing observations may shed new light on the debate over the origin of these enigmatic features.

  19. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K.

    2011-08-01

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  20. California: San Joaquin Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Fog and Haze in California's San Joaquin Valley   ... is noted for its hazy overcasts and a low, thick ground fog known as the Tule. Owing to the effects of the atmosphere on reflected ... as the angle of view changes. An area of thick, white fog in the San Joaquin Valley is visible in all three of the images. However, ...

  1. Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus or arbovirus that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In the last decade, Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have resulted in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily a...

  2. Down in the Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Linda Graef

    1999-01-01

    Describes the partnerships formed by West Valley Mission Community College District (California) with its surrounding Silicon Valley business community in an effort to benefit workforce development. Asserts that community colleges are uniquely positioned to provide a lifelong education that will yield a skilled workforce to meet the needs of…

  3. Inferences on the hydrothermal system beneath the resurgent dome in Long Valley Caldera, east-central California, USA, from recent pumping tests and geochemical sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, C.D.; Sorey, M.L.; Roeloffs, E.; Galloway, D.L.; Howle, J.F.; Jacobson, R.

    2003-01-01

    Quaternary volcanic unrest has provided heat for episodic hydrothermal circulation in the Long Valley caldera, including the present-day hydrothermal system, which has been active over the past 40 kyr. The most recent period of crustal unrest in this region of east-central California began around 1980 and has included periods of intense seismicity and ground deformation. Uplift totaling more than 0.7 m has been centered on the caldera's resurgent dome, and is best modeled by a near-vertical ellipsoidal source centered at depths of 6-7 km. Modeling of both deformation and microgravity data now suggests that (1) there are two inflation sources beneath the caldera, a shallower source 7-10 km beneath the resurgent dome and a deeper source ???15 km beneath the caldera's south moat and (2) the shallower source may contain components of magmatic brine and gas. The Long Valley Exploration Well (LVEW), completed in 1998 on the resurgent dome, penetrates to a depth of 3 km directly above this shallower source, but bottoms in a zone of 100??C fluid with zero vertical thermal gradient. Although these results preclude extrapolations of temperatures at depths below 3 km, other information obtained from flow tests and fluid sampling at this well indicates the presence of magmatic volatiles and fault-related permeability within the metamorphic basement rocks underlying the volcanic fill. In this paper, we present recently acquired data from LVEW and compare them with information from other drill holes and thermal springs in Long Valley to delineate the likely flow paths and fluid system properties under the resurgent dome. Additional information from mineralogical assemblages in core obtained from fracture zones in LVEW documents a previous period of more vigorous and energetic fluid circulation beneath the resurgent dome. Although this system apparently died off as a result of mineral deposition and cooling (and/or deepening) of magmatic heat sources, flow testing and tidal

  4. Geologic mapping in Death Valley, California/Nevada using NASA/JPL airborne systems (AVIRIS, TIMS, and AIRSAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Fred A.; Dietz, John B.; Kiereinyoung, Kathryn S.

    1991-01-01

    A multi-sensor aircraft campaign called the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) conducted during 1989 resulted in acquisition of high quality multispectral images in the visible, near infrared, shortwave infrared, thermal infrared, and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The airborne data sets include the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), and the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Ancillary data include Landsat Thematic Mapper, laboratory and field spectral measurements, and traditional geologic mapping. The GRSFE data for a site in the northern Death Valley, (California and Nevada) region were calibrated to physical units and geometrically registered to a map base. Various aspects of this experiment are briefly discussed.

  5. Laboratory and field ecophysiological studies on the impact of air pollution on red spruce and Fraser fir

    SciTech Connect

    Tyszko, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    In the first study, red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) and Fraser fir (Abies fraseri (Pursh.) Poir.) seedlings were submitted to long-term multiple growing cycle intermittent ozone fumigations. No effect of ozone exposure on growth and gas exchange of the seedlings was found. Net photosynthesis at saturating light intensity was reduced in both species and the light compensation point was shifted upwards in spruce when exposed to ozone. Fraser fir seedlings showed inconsistent responses of CO{sub 2} curve parameters to ozone exposure. In the second study, the impact of summer exposure to ambient pollutants on winter hardiness in red spruce seedlings was examined. The seedlings were subjected to the following summertime treatments while kept in exclusion chambers on the top of Whitetop Mountain (Virginia): ambient air and clouds, ambient air with clouds excluded, charcoal filtered air, and chamberless control treatment. During the following winter the seedlings were placed in Blacksburg (Virginia), in two locations: in the open and in a shadehouse. A number of conducted tests indicated that there were significant differences in winter damage between the chamber treatments and chamberless control, as well as between the winter exposure locations. Among the summer chamber exposure regimes, the treatment excluding clouds seemed to perform the best. In the third study, the physiology of red spruce trees of various sizes growing on two sites on the top of Whitetop Mtn., was compared and related to ambient ozone concentration. Some seedlings were treated with an antioxidant EDU, to help evaluate the impact of ozone on their physiology.

  6. Expert system-based mineral mapping in northern Death Valley, California/Nevada, using the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, F. A.; Lefkoff, A. B.; Dietz, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Integrated analysis of imaging spectrometer data and field spectral measurements were used in conjunction with conventional geologic field mapping to characterize bedrock and surficial geology at the northern end of Death Valley, California and Nevada. A knowledge-based expert system was used to automatically produce image maps showing the principal surface mineralogy from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data. Linear spectral unmixing of the AVIRIS data allowed further determination of relative mineral, abundances and identification of mineral assemblages and mixtures. The imaging spectrometer data show the spatial distribution of spectrally distinct minerals occurring both as primary rockforming minerals and as alteration and weathering products. Field spectral measurements were used to verify the mineral maps and field mapping was used to extend the remote sensing results. Geographically referenced image maps produced from these data form new base maps from which to develop improved understanding of the processes of deposition and erosion affecting the present land surface.

  7. AIRS Impact on Analysis and Forecast of an Extreme Rainfall Event (Indus River Valley 2010) with a Global Data Assimilation and Forecast System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, O.; Lau, W. K.; Susskind, J.; Rosenberg, R.

    2011-01-01

    A set of data assimilation and forecast experiments are performed with the NASA Global data assimilation and forecast system GEOS-5, to compare the impact of different approaches towards assimilation of Advanced Infrared Spectrometer (AIRS) data on the precipitation analysis and forecast skill. The event chosen is an extreme rainfall episode which occurred in late July 11 2010 in Pakistan, causing massive floods along the Indus River Valley. Results show that the assimilation of quality-controlled AIRS temperature retrievals obtained under partly cloudy conditions produce better precipitation analyses, and substantially better 7-day forecasts, than assimilation of clear-sky radiances. The improvement of precipitation forecast skill up to 7 day is very significant in the tropics, and is caused by an improved representation, attributed to cloudy retrieval assimilation, of two contributing mechanisms: the low-level moisture advection, and the concentration of moisture over the area in the days preceding the precipitation peak.

  8. Genesis of an esker-like ridge over the southern Fraser Plateau, British Columbia: Implications for paleo-ice sheet reconstruction based on geomorphic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Andrew J.; Brennand, Tracy A.; Burke, Matthew J.

    2013-05-01

    Robust interpretations of meltwater systems operating during ice sheet decay are integral to reconstructing deglacial patterns and style. Yet over reliance on meltwater landform morphology with limited attention to morpho-sedimentary relationships, and basin-scale geomorphic and stratigraphic context can lead to unreliable geomorphic inversion-based paleo-ice sheet reconstructions. This problem is illustrated by the evolution of Young Lake esker-like ridge (YLER) formed in the Young Lake basin (YLB) on BC's southern Fraser Plateau during decay of the last Cordilleran Ice Sheet (CIS). We integrate data from digital elevation models, aerial photographs, sedimentary outcrops, water wells and shallow geophysics (ground-penetrating radar, electrical resistivity tomography). Previous interpretations of YLER as both an esker and an ice-contact, poorly-sorted, stratified deposit emplaced by westerly flowing meltwater, imply an eastward retreating ice margin. Geophysical data from a flat-topped component of YLER reveal slipface and planar-bedded sand and gravel overlying lacustrine sediments, characteristic of a Hjulstrom delta. Eastward-dipping foresets in a Gilbert delta exist at the eastern terminus. Contextually our observations suggest, despite esker-like morphology, YLER was not deposited within a subglacial ice tunnel. Instead, it formed through deposition of subaerial outwash between and/or on dead ice in front of a regionally backwasting ice margin. The complex deglacial evolution of YLB, including a drainage reversal and formation of two glacial lakes, supports northwestward backwasting of the CIS and dead ice within YLB. We conclude that accurate geomorphic inversion of meltwater landforms for deglacial paleo-ice sheet reconstruction requires knowledge of landform-scale morpho-sedimentary relationships and basin-scale geomorphic and stratigraphic context.

  9. Individual variation in migration speed of upriver-migrating sockeye salmon in the Fraser River in relation to their physiological and energetic status at marine approach.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Kyle C; Cooke, Steven J; Hinch, Scott G; Crossin, Glenn T; Patterson, David A; English, Karl K; Donaldson, Michael R; Shrimpton, J Mark; Van Der Kraak, Glen; Farrell, Anthony P

    2008-01-01

    Little research has examined individual variation in migration speeds of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in natural river systems or attempted to link migratory behavior with physiological and energetic status on a large spatial scale in the wild. As a model, we used three stocks of summer-run sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from the Fraser River watershed, British Columbia, to test the hypothesis that individual variation in migration speed is determined by a combination of environmental factors (i.e., water temperature), intrinsic biological differences (sex and population), and physiological and energetic condition. Before the freshwater portion of the migration, sockeye salmon (Quesnel, Chilcotin, and Nechako stock complexes) were captured in Johnstone Strait ( approximately 215 km from river entry), gastrically implanted with radio transmitters, and sampled for blood, gill tissue, and energetic status before release. Analyses focused solely on individuals that successfully reached natal subwatersheds. Migration speeds were assessed by an extensive radiotelemetry array. Individuals from the stock complex that migrated the longest distance (Nechako) traveled at speeds slower than those of other stock complexes. Females traveled slower than males. An elevated energetic status of fish in the ocean was negatively correlated with migration speed in most river segments. During the transition from the ocean to the river, migration speed was negatively correlated with mean maximum water temperature; however, for the majority of river segments, it was positively correlated with migration speed. Physiological status measured in the ocean did not explain among-individual variability in river migration speeds. Collectively, these findings suggest that there could be extensive variation in migration behavior among individuals, sexes, and populations and that physiological condition in the ocean explained little of this variation relative to in-river environmental

  10. Airborne Dust Models in Valley Fever Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, W. A.; Galgiani, J. N.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Vukovic, A. J.; Prasad, A. K.; Djurdjevic, V.; Nickovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    Dust storms (haboobs) struck Phoenix, Arizona, in 2011 on July 5th and again on July 18th. One potential consequence: an estimated 3,600 new cases of Valley Fever in Maricopa County from the first storm alone. The fungi, Coccidioides immitis, the cause of the respiratory infection, Valley Fever, lives in the dry desert soils of the American southwest and southward through Mexico, Central America and South America. The fungi become part of the dust storm and, a few weeks after inhalation, symptoms of Valley Fever may appear, including pneumonia-like illness, rashes, and severe fatigue. Some fatalities occur. Our airborne dust forecast system predicted the timing and extent of the storm, as it has done with other, often different, dust events. Atmosphere/land surface models can be part of public health services to reduce risk of Valley Fever and exacerbation of other respiratory and cardiovascular illness.

  11. Facies analysis of Late Proterozoic through Lower Cambrian rocks of the Death Valley regional ground-water system and surrounding areas, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Sweetkind, D.S.; White, D.K.

    2002-03-15

    Late Proterozoic through Lower Cambrian rocks in the southern Great Basin form a westward-thickening wedge of predominantly clastic deposits that record deposition on the early western shelf edge of western North America (Stewart and Poole, 1974; Poole and others, 1992). Regional analyses of geologic controls on ground-water flow in the southern Great Basin typically combined lithostratigraphic units into more general hydrogeologic units that have considerable lateral extent and distinct hydrologic properties. The Late Proterozoic through Lower Cambrian rocks have been treated as a single hydrogeologic unit, named the lower clastic aquitard (Winograd and Thordarson, 1975) or the quartzite confining unit (Laczniak and others, 1996), that serves as the hydrologic basement to the flow system. Although accurate in a general sense, this classification ignores well-established facies relations within these rocks that might increase bedrock permeability and locally influence ground-water flow . This report presents a facies analysis of Late Proterozoic through Lower Cambrian rocks (hereafter called the study interval) in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system - that portion of the southern Great Basin that includes Death Valley, the Nevada Test Site, and the potential high-level nuclear waste underground repository at Yucca Mountain (fig. 1). The region discussed in this report, hereafter called the study area, covers approximately 100,000 km2 (lat 35 degrees-38 degrees 15'N., long 115 degrees-118 degrees W.). The purpose of this analysis is to provide a general documentation of facies transitions within the Late Proterozoic through Lower Cambrian rocks in order to provide an estimate of material properties (via rock type, grain size, and bedding characteristics) for specific hydrogeologic units to be included in a regional ground-water flow model.

  12. Using remote sensing and GIS techniques to estimate discharge and recharge fluxes for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Agnese, F. A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.; ,

    1996-01-01

    The recharge and discharge components of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system were defined by techniques that integrated disparate data types to develop a spatially complex representation of near-surface hydrological processes. Image classification methods were applied to multispectral satellite data to produce a vegetation map. The vegetation map was combined with ancillary data in a GIS to delineate different types of wetlands, phreatophytes and wet playa areas. Existing evapotranspiration-rate estimates were used to calculate discharge volumes for these area. An empirical method of groundwater recharge estimation was modified to incorporate data describing soil-moisture conditions, and a recharge potential map was produced. These discharge and recharge maps were readily converted to data arrays for numerical modelling codes. Inverse parameter estimation techniques also used these data to evaluate the reliability and sensitivity of estimated values.The recharge and discharge components of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system were defined by remote sensing and GIS techniques that integrated disparate data types to develop a spatially complex representation of near-surface hydrological processes. Image classification methods were applied to multispectral satellite data to produce a vegetation map. This map provided a basis for subsequent evapotranspiration and infiltration estimations. The vegetation map was combined with ancillary data in a GIS to delineate different types of wetlands, phreatophytes and wet playa areas. Existing evapotranspiration-rate estimates were then used to calculate discharge volumes for these areas. A previously used empirical method of groundwater recharge estimation was modified by GIS methods to incorporate data describing soil-moisture conditions, and a recharge potential map was produced. These discharge and recharge maps were readily converted to data arrays for numerical modelling codes. Inverse parameter

  13. Massive sulfide deposition and trace element remobilization in the Middle Valley sediment-hosted hydrothermal system, northern Juan de Fuca Rdge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houghton, J.L.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Seyfried, W.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Bent Hill massive sulfide deposit and ODP Mound deposit in Middle Valley at the northernmost end of the Juan de Fuca Ridge are two of the largest modern seafloor hydrothermal deposits yet explored. Trace metal concentrations of sulfide minerals, determined by laser-ablation ICP-MS, were used in conjunction with mineral paragenetic studies and thermodynamic calculations to deduce the history of fluid-mineral reactions during sulfide deposition. Detailed analyses of the distribution of metals in sulfides indicate significant shifts in the physical and chemical conditions responsible for the trace element variability observed in these sulfide deposits. Trace elements (Mn, Co, Ni, As, Se, Ag, Cd, Sb, Pb, and Bi) analyzed in a representative suite of 10 thin sections from these deposits suggest differences in conditions and processes of hydrothermal alteration resulting in mass transfer of metals from the center of the deposits to the margins. Enrichments of some trace metals (Pb, Sb, Cd, Ag) in sphalerite at the margins of the deposits are best explained by dissolution/reprecipitation processes consistent with secondary remineralization. Results of reaction-path models clarify mechanisms of mass transfer during remineralization of sulfide deposits due to mixing of hydrothermal fluids with seawater. Model results are consistent with patterns of observed mineral paragenesis and help to identify conditions (pH, redox, temperature) that may be responsible for variations in trace metal concentrations in primary and secondary minerals. Differences in trace metal distributions throughout a single deposit and between nearby deposits at Middle Valley can be linked to the history of metal mobilization within this active hydrothermal system that may have broad implications for sulfide ore formation in other sedimented and unsedimented ridge systems. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Influences of the Little Ice Age glacier advance on hillslope morphometry and development in paraglacial valley systems around the Jostedalsbreen ice cap in Western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laute, Katja; Beylich, Achim A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper focuses on the influence of the "Little Ice Age" (LIA) glacier advance on hillslope morphometry and development in selected U-shaped and (para)glacial tributary valleys, which are still occupied in their upper parts by outlet glaciers of the Jostedalsbreen ice cap in Western Norway. Especially the morphometric influences and geomorphic consequences of the LIA glacier advance on the development of the valley-side hillslope systems and associated denudative processes are assessed by comparing hillslope systems located inside and outside of the LIA glacier maximum extent. The process-based approach applied includes orthophoto- and topographical map interpretation as well as hillslope profile surveying in field for morphometric analyses and detailed geomorphological mapping for process analyses. In addition GIS and DEM computing as well as geophysical measurements (georadar) for storage analyses are performed. It is found that hillslopes inside the LIA glacier limit have steepened lower hillslope segments due to a negative sediment net balance of removal and deposition of material by the advancing LIA glacier front. There are significant differences in the present-day slope debris thickness and composition between hillslopes inside or outside the LIA glacier limit. Slope debris from hillslopes inside the glacier maximum extent are clearly less thick and display a different internal structure originating from a combination of debris from gravitational processes and reworked modern glacial deposits. Compared to that slope debris covers on hillslopes outside the LIA glacier limit are in general noticeable thicker and less influenced by glacial deposits. The combined effects of modified slope morphometry and altered composition of material covering lower hillslope segments have generated a higher intensity of post-LIA denudative hillslope processes.

  15. West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Under the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Public Law 96-368, liquid high-level radioactive waste stored at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center in West Valley, New York, is to be solidified (vitrified) in borosilicate glass and transported to a federal repository for geologic disposal. This waste material resulted from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing operations conducted between 1966 and 1972. Project costs are shared by the US Department of Energy (90 percent) and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (10 percent). The site on which the Project is located is owned by New York State. This report is an overview of West Valley's plans and accomplishments.

  16. MX Siting Investigation. Geotechnical Evaluation. Aggregate Resources Studies, Dry Lake Valley, Muleshoe Valley, Delamar Valley, Pahroc Valley, Nevada.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-06

    Cretaceous to Pliocene in age and consist predominantly of welded and nonwelded pyro- w clastics (air falls, ash flows, ignimbrites ) of rhyolitic and...Vu Ignimbrite Valley 53 DLCDP-A53 Delamar Vu Rhyolite Valley 54 DLCDP-A54 Delamar Vu Andesite Valley 55 DLCDP-A55 Delamar Vu Rhyolitic Tuff Valley 56

  17. Little and Large: Implications for Preservation of Radiogenic-Pb in Titanite. An example from the Albany-Fraser Orogen, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkland, C.

    2015-12-01

    Titanite typically contains more non-radiogenic Pb than zircon, nonetheless it can preserve useful age information that complements geochronology from other datable phases. Titanite is more reactive than zircon and it interacts more readily with other major phases. As a result titanite dates frequently indicate the time of cooling below a blocking temperature (in reality an interval). The role of titanite grain size is important as it has a bearing on the extent to which titanite U-Pb ages reflect diffusive Pb loss or pristine formation ages. We demonstrate that titanite collected through the Albany-Fraser Orogen, across an uplifted refractory lower crustal block, can record thermal overprints apparently lacking in the zircon record. Two zones of the Albany-Fraser Orogen are the Biranup and Fraser Zones, each with a distinctive Proterozoic history but unequivocally part of the reworked margin of the Archean Yilgarn Craton. A dichotomy exists in the zircon geochronology record of this area, in that within the older Biranup Zone, Stage II overprinting (1225-1140 Ma) is widespread whereas in the younger Fraser Zone, Stage I (1345-1260 Ma) is dominant, with Stage II apparently absent. Although, most metamorphic titanite in the Fraser Zone records an age of 1307 ± 17 Ma, reflecting closure to radiogenic-Pb mobility after Stage I metamorphism, small titanite grains reveal Stage II overprinting with a mean reset age of 1205 ± 16 Ma. In contrast, titanite from metasediments within the Biranup Zone principally record ages of 1203 ± 6 Ma and 1153 ± 27 Ma reflecting cooling after prolonged Stage II metamorphism. Thermochronological modelling indicates that small titanite grains in the Fraser Zone would be reset during Stage II overprinting at temperatures of 695-725°C. Larger titanite crystals would not be reset by this thermal overprint. This result is similar to phase equilibrium modelling from the Biranup Zone that indicates temperatures of 670-680 °C during Stage II

  18. Land cover changes and forest landscape evolution (1985-2009) in a typical Mediterranean agroforestry system (High Agri Valley)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, T.; Coluzzi, R.; Imbrenda, V.; Lanfredi, M.

    2014-08-01

    The present study focuses on the transformations of a typical Mediterranean agroforestry landscape of southern Italy (High Agri Valley - Basilicata region) occurred during 24 years. In this period, the valuable agricultural and natural areas that compose such a landscape were subjected to intensive industry-related activities linked to the exploitation of the largest European on-shore oil reservoir. Landsat imagery acquired in 1985 and 2009 were used to detect changes in forest areas and major land use trajectories. Landscape metrics indicators were adopted to characterize landscape structure and evolution of both the complex ecomosaic (14 land cover classes) and the Forest/Non Forest arrangement. Our results indicate a net increase of 11% of forest areas between 1985 and 2009. The major changes concern: increase of all forest covers at the expense of pastures and grasses, enlargement of riparian vegetation, expansion of artificial areas. The observed expansion of forests was accompanied by a decrease of the fragmentation levels likely due to the reduction of small glades that break forest homogeneity and to the recolonization of herbaceous areas. Overall, we observe an evolution towards a more stable configuration depicting a satisfactory picture of vegetation health.

  19. Land cover changes and forest landscape evolution (1985-2009) in a typical Mediterranean agroforestry system (high Agri Valley)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, T.; Coluzzi, R.; Imbrenda, V.; Lanfredi, M.

    2015-06-01

    The present study focuses on the transformations of a typical Mediterranean agroforestry landscape of southern Italy (high Agri Valley - Basilicata region) that occurred over 24 years. In this period, the valuable agricultural and natural areas that compose such a landscape were subjected to intensive industry-related activities linked to the exploitation of the largest European onshore oil reservoir. Landsat imagery acquired in 1985 and 2009 were used to detect changes in forest areas and major land use trajectories. Landscape metrics indicators were adopted to characterize landscape structure and evolution of both the complex ecomosaic (14 land cover classes) and the forest/non-forest arrangement. Our results indicate a net increase of 11% of forest areas between 1985 and 2009. The major changes concern increase of all forest covers at the expense of pastures and grasses, enlargement of riparian vegetation, and expansion of artificial areas. The observed expansion of forests was accompanied by a decrease of the fragmentation levels likely due to the reduction of small glades that break forest homogeneity and to the recolonization of herbaceous areas. Overall, we observe an evolution towards a more stable configuration depicting a satisfactory picture of vegetation health.

  20. Evidence for the contemporary magmatic system beneath Long Valley Caldera from local earthquake tomography and receiver function analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seccia, D.; Chiarabba, C.; De Gori, P.; Bianchi, I.; Hill, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new P wave and S wave velocity model for the upper crust beneath Long Valley Caldera obtained using local earthquake tomography and receiver function analysis. We computed the tomographic model using both a graded inversion scheme and a traditional approach. We complement the tomographic I/P model with a teleseismic receiver function model based on data from broadband seismic stations (MLAC and MKV) located on the SE and SW margins of the resurgent dome inside the caldera. The inversions resolve (1) a shallow, high-velocity P wave anomaly associated with the structural uplift of a resurgent dome; (2) an elongated, WNW striking low-velocity anomaly (8%–10 % reduction in I/P) at a depth of 6 km (4 km below mean sea level) beneath the southern section of the resurgent dome; and (3) a broad, low-velocity volume (–5% reduction in I/P and as much as 40% reduction in I/S) in the depth interval 8–14 km (6–12 km below mean sea level) beneath the central section of the caldera. The two low-velocity volumes partially overlap the geodetically inferred inflation sources that drove uplift of the resurgent dome associated with caldera unrest between 1980 and 2000, and they likely reflect the ascent path for magma or magmatic fluids into the upper crust beneath the caldera.

  1. Evidence for the contemporary magmatic system beneath Long Valley Caldera from local earthquake tomography and receiver function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seccia, D.; Chiarabba, C.; de Gori, P.; Bianchi, I.; Hill, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new P wave and S wave velocity model for the upper crust beneath Long Valley Caldera obtained using local earthquake tomography and receiver function analysis. We computed the tomographic model using both a graded inversion scheme and a traditional approach. We complement the tomographic Vp model with a teleseismic receiver function model based on data from broadband seismic stations (MLAC and MKV) located on the SE and SW margins of the resurgent dome inside the caldera. The inversions resolve (1) a shallow, high-velocity P wave anomaly associated with the structural uplift of a resurgent dome; (2) an elongated, WNW striking low-velocity anomaly (8%-10 % reduction in Vp) at a depth of 6 km (4 km below mean sea level) beneath the southern section of the resurgent dome; and (3) a broad, low-velocity volume (˜5% reduction in Vp and as much as 40% reduction in Vs) in the depth interval 8-14 km (6-12 km below mean sea level) beneath the central section of the caldera. The two low-velocity volumes partially overlap the geodetically inferred inflation sources that drove uplift of the resurgent dome associated with caldera unrest between 1980 and 2000, and they likely reflect the ascent path for magma or magmatic fluids into the upper crust beneath the caldera.

  2. Seismic stratigraphy in the South Cretan fault valley system: A comparison with the upper Quaternary gravitative sedimentation of the region

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasakis, G.; Kelling, G.

    1988-08-01

    A synthesis of the sedimentation processes as deduced from the seismic stratigraphy and the deduced facies associations suggests the following. Small fans developed along the northern major fault line of the SCFVS and contains sediment fed directly from Crete through a series of small canyons, most of which trend perpendicular to the coast. However, the main east-west-trending valley transects the mid- and lower fan sectors and contains several intravalley basinal areas, converging toward the main Messara basin. Thus much of the suprafan sediment is reworked and longitudinally transported into the deeper basins. In these deeper intrabasinal and main basinal areas the thickness of the post-Messinian sediments generally exceeds 800 m and in places exceeds 1,500 m. Toward the south the SCFVS receives additional sediment from the Ptolemy Mountains and the Gavdos rise. Cores recovered along the SCFVS contain a remarkable association of sedimentary sequences which are interpreted as deposits transported largely by gravity-induced mass-flow processes. Calculated Holocene sedimentation rates in these cores range from 6 to more than 40 cm/1,000 years, while late Pleistocene rates were greater than 9 cm/1,000 yr. Good agreement exists between the sedimentation rates calculated from cores and observed on the seismic profiles of the Pliocene-Quaternary sediments. This is a strong indication that the depositional mechanisms affecting the nature of the upper Quaternary sediments could be representative of the upper Cenozoic column.

  3. Development of a coupled Thermo-Hydro model and study of the evolution of a river-valley-talik system in the context of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, Damien; Grenier, Christophe; Davy, Philippe; Benabderrahmane, Hakim

    2010-05-01

    Boreal regions have been subject to recent and intensive studies within the field of the impact of climate change. A vast number of the modeling approaches correspond to large scale modeling firstly oriented to thermal field and permafrost evolution. We consider the evolution of smaller scale units of the landscape, in particular here the river-valley unit. In cold environments, we know that some rivers have at their bottoms a talik or a non frozen zone. Such systems have been poorly studied until now should it be as such or in relation with their surroundings, as major thermal conductors potentially impacting a larger portion of a region. The present work is part of a more global study implying the Lena river (Siberia) evolution under climate change in collaboration with the IDES laboratory (Interaction et Dynamique des Environnements de Surface at Orsay University, see e.g. Costard and Gautier, 2007) where the study of the system involves a threefold approach including in situ field work (near Yakutsk), experimental modeling (in a cold room at Orsay University) and numerical modeling. The river-valley system is a case where thermal evolution is coupled with water flow (hydrology and hydrogeology in the talik). The thermal field is impacted by and modifies the water flow conditions when freezing. We first present the development of our numerical simulation procedure. A novel 2D-3D simulation approach was developed in the Cast3M code (www-cast3m.cea.fr/cast3m) with a mixed hybrid finite element approach. It couples Darcy equations for flow (permeability depending on temperature) with heat transfer equations (conductive, advective and phase change process) with a Picard iterations algorithm for coupling. Then we present the validation of the code against 1D analytical solutions (Stefan problem) and 2D cases issued from the literature (McKenzie et al. 2007, Bense et al. 2009). We finally study by means of numeric simulations the installation of permafrost in an

  4. Deep reaching versus vertically restricted Quaternary normal faults: Implications on seismic potential assessment in tectonically active regions: Lessons from the middle Aterno valley fault system, central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcucci, E.; Gori, S.; Moro, M.; Fubelli, G.; Saroli, M.; Chiarabba, C.; Galadini, F.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the Middle Aterno Valley fault system (MAVF), a poorly investigated seismic gap in the central Apennines, adjacent to the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake epicentral area. Geological and paleoseismological analyses revealed that the MAVF evolved through hanging wall splay nucleation, its main segment moving at 0.23-0.34 mm/year since the Middle Pleistocene; the penultimate activation event occurred between 5388-5310 B.C. and 1934-1744 B.C., the last event after 2036-1768 B.C. and just before 1st-2nd century AD. These data define hard linkage (sensu Walsh and Watterson, 1991; Peacock et al., 2000; Walsh et al., 2003, and references therein) with the contiguous Subequana Valley fault segment, able to rupture in large magnitude earthquakes (up to 6.8), that did not rupture since about two millennia. By the joint analysis of geological observations and seismological data acquired during to the 2009 seismic sequence, we derive a picture of the complex structural framework of the area comprised between the MAVF, the Paganica fault (the 2009 earthquake causative fault) and the Gran Sasso Range. This sector is affected by a dense array of few-km long, closely and regularly spaced Quaternary normal fault strands, that are considered as branches of the MAVF northern segment. Our analysis reveals that these structures are downdip confined by a decollement represented by to the presently inactive thrust sheet above the Gran Sasso front limiting their seismogenic potential. Our study highlights the advantage of combining Quaternary geological field analysis with high resolution seismological data to fully unravel the structural setting of regions where subsequent tectonic phases took place and where structural interference plays a key role in influencing the seismotectonic context; this has also inevitably implications for accurately assessing seismic hazard of such structurally complex regions.

  5. A geographical information system-based multicriteria evaluation to map areas at risk for Rift Valley fever vector-borne transmission in Italy.

    PubMed

    Tran, A; Ippoliti, C; Balenghien, T; Conte, A; Gely, M; Calistri, P; Goffredo, M; Baldet, T; Chevalier, V

    2013-11-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a severe mosquito-borne disease that is caused by a Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae) and affects domestic ruminants and humans. Recently, its distribution widened, threatening Europe. The probability of the introduction and large-scale spread of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in Europe is low, but localized RVF outbreaks may occur in areas where populations of ruminants and potential vectors are present. In this study, we assumed the introduction of the virus into Italy and focused on the risk of vector-borne transmission of RVFV to three main European potential hosts (cattle, sheep and goats). Five main potential mosquito vectors belonging to the Culex and Aedes genera that are present in Italy were identified in a literature review. We first modelled the geographical distribution of these five species based on expert knowledge and using land cover as a proxy of mosquito presence. The mosquito distribution maps were compared with field mosquito collections from Italy to validate the model. Next, the risk of RVFV transmission was modelled using a multicriteria evaluation (MCE) approach, integrating expert knowledge and the results of a literature review on host sensitivity and vector competence, feeding behaviour and abundance. A sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the robustness of the results with respect to expert choices. The resulting maps include (i) five maps of the vector distribution, (ii) a map of suitable areas for vector-borne transmission of RVFV and (iii) a map of the risk of RVFV vector-borne transmission to sensitive hosts given a viral introduction. Good agreement was found between the modelled presence probability and the observed presence or absence of each vector species. The resulting RVF risk map highlighted strong spatial heterogeneity and could be used to target surveillance. In conclusion, the geographical information system (GIS)-based MCE served as a valuable framework and a flexible tool for mapping the

  6. Railroad Valley, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Information from images of Railroad Valley, Nevada captured on August 17,2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer(ASTER) may provide a powerful tool for monitoring crop health and maintenance procedures.

    These images cover an area of north central Nevada. The top image shows irrigated fields, with healthy vegetation in red. The middle image highlights the amount of vegetation. The color code shows highest vegetation content in red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple and the lowest in black. The final image is a thermal infrared channel, with warmer temperatures in white and colder in black.

    In the thermal image, the northernmost and westernmost fields are markedly colder on their northwest areas, even though no differences are seen in the visible image or the second, Vegetation Index image. This can be attributed to the presence of excess water, which can lead to crop damage.

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER)is an imaging instrument that is flying on Terra, a satellite launched in December 1999 as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). The instrument is being used to obtain detailed maps of land surface temperature, emissivity, reflectance and elevation. The Earth Observing System (EOS) platforms are part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, whose goal is to obtain a better understanding of the interactions between the biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and atmosphere.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.

  7. Purge at West Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Warren

    1977-01-01

    Tells how the adviser of the student newspaper at West Valley College (Saratoga, California) was dismissed after the newspaper published stories based on investigations into alleged wrongdoings by administration members. (GW)

  8. Cuyama Valley, California hydrologic study: an assessment of water availability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Randall T.; Sweetkind, Donald S.

    2014-01-01

    Water resources are under pressure throughout California, particularly in agriculturally dominated valleys. Since 1949, the Cuyama Valley’s irrigated acreage has increased from 13 to 35 percent of the valley. Increased agriculture has contributed to the demand for water beyond natural recharge. The tools and information developed for this study can be used to help understand the Cuyama Valley aquifer system, an important resource of Santa Barbara County.

  9. NV PFA - Steptoe Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Faulds

    2015-10-29

    All datasets and products specific to the Steptoe Valley model area. Includes a packed ArcMap project (.mpk), individually zipped shapefiles, and a file geodatabase for the northern Steptoe Valley area; a GeoSoft Oasis montaj project containing GM-SYS 2D gravity profiles along the trace of our seismic reflection lines; a 3D model in EarthVision; spreadsheet of links to published maps; and spreadsheets of well data.

  10. Methods for using groundwater model predictions to guide hydrogeologic data collection, with application to the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Hill, M.C.; D'Agnese, F. A.; Faunt, C.C.

    2003-01-01

    Calibrated models of groundwater systems can provide substantial information for guiding data collection. This work considers using such models to guide hydrogeologic data collection for improving model predictions by identifying model parameters that are most important to the predictions. Identification of these important parameters can help guide collection of field data about parameter values and associated flow system features and can lead to improved predictions. Methods for identifying parameters important to predictions include prediction scaled sensitivities (PSS), which account for uncertainty on individual parameters as well as prediction sensitivity to parameters, and a new "value of improved information" (VOII) method presented here, which includes the effects of parameter correlation in addition to individual parameter uncertainty and prediction sensitivity. In this work, the PSS and VOII methods are demonstrated and evaluated using a model of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system. The predictions of interest are advective transport paths originating at sites of past underground nuclear testing. Results show that for two paths evaluated the most important parameters include a subset of five or six of the 23 defined model parameters. Some of the parameters identified as most important are associated with flow system attributes that do not lie in the immediate vicinity of the paths. Results also indicate that the PSS and VOII methods can identify different important parameters. Because the methods emphasize somewhat different criteria for parameter importance, it is suggested that parameters identified by both methods be carefully considered in subsequent data collection efforts aimed at improving model predictions.

  11. Methods for Using Ground-Water Model Predictions to Guide Hydrogeologic Data Collection, with Applications to the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System

    SciTech Connect

    Claire R. Tiedeman; M.C. Hill; F.A. D'Agnese; C.C. Faunt

    2001-07-31

    Calibrated models of ground-water systems can provide substantial information for guiding data collection. This work considers using such models to guide hydrogeologic data collection for improving model predictions, by identifying model parameters that are most important to the predictions. Identification of these important parameters can help guide collection of field data about parameter values and associated flow-system features that can lead to improved predictions. Methods for identifying parameters important to predictions include prediction scaled sensitivities (PSS), which account for uncertainty on individual parameters as well as prediction sensitivity to parameters, and a new ''value of improved information'' (VOII) method, which includes the effects of parameter correlation in addition to individual parameter uncertainty and prediction sensitivity. The PSS and VOII methods are demonstrated using a model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. The predictions of interest are advective-transport paths originating at sites of past underground nuclear testing. Results show that for two paths evaluated, the most important parameters include a subset of five or six of the 23 defined model parameters. Some of the parameters identified as most important are associated with flow-system attributes that do not lie in the immediate vicinity of the paths. Results also indicate that the PSS and VOII methods can identify different important parameters. Because the methods emphasize somewhat different criteria for parameter importance, it is suggested that parameters identified by both methods be carefully considered in subsequent data collection efforts aimed at improving model predictions.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of the importance of existing hydraulic-head observation locations to advective-transport predictions, Death Valley regional flow system, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, Mary C.; Ely, D. Matthew; Tiedeman, Claire R.; O'Brien, Grady M.; D'Agnese, Frank A.; Faunt, Claudia C.

    2001-01-01

    When a model is calibrated by nonlinear regression, calculated diagnostic statistics and measures of uncertainty provide a wealth of information about many aspects of the system. This report presents a method of ranking the likely importance of existing observation locations using measures of prediction uncertainty. It is suggested that continued monitoring is warranted at more important locations, and unwarranted or less warranted at less important locations. The report develops the methodology and then demonstrates it using the hydraulic-head observation locations of a three-layer model of the Death Valley regional flow system. The predictions of interest are subsurface transport from beneath Yucca Mountain and 14 Underground Test Areas. The advective component of transport is considered because it is the component most affected by the system dynamics represented by the scale model being used. The problem is addressed using the capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey computer program MODFLOW-2000, with its ADVective-Travel Observation (ADV) Package, and an additional computer program developed for this work. The methods presented in this report are used in three ways. (1) The ratings for individual observations are obtained by manipulating the measures of prediction uncertainty, and do not involve recalibrating the model. In this analysis, observation locations are each omitted individually and the resulting increase in uncertainty in the predictions is calculated. The uncertainty is quantified as standard deviations on the simulated advective transport. The increase in uncertainty is quantified as the percent increase in the standard deviations caused by omitting the one observation location from the calculation of standard deviations. In general, observation locations associated with larger increases are rated as more important. (2) Ratings for largely geographically based groups are obtained using a straightforward extension of the method used for

  13. Poisoning of bald eagles and red-tailed hawks by carbofuran and fensulfothion in the Fraser Delta of British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J E; Langelier, K M; Mineau, P; Wilson, L K

    1996-07-01

    During the winter of 1990 in the Fraser Delta of British Columbia, Canada, nine birds of prey were found with symptoms of anticholinesterase poisoning. Immediate surgical removal of crop contents of three birds decreased mortality and recovery time. Chemical analysis was conducted on crop contents, which contained mainly duck parts. A bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) contained 200 micrograms/g and a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) 2.2 micrograms/g carbofuran, while the crop of another red-tailed hawk contained 30 micrograms/g fensulfothion. There was evidence that granular carbofuran and fensulfothion persisted long enough in the wet, low pH conditions of the Fraser Delta to kill waterfowl and cause secondary poisoning of raptors several months after application of the pesticides.

  14. Alternative models of climatic effects on sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) productivity in Bristol Bay, Alaska, and the Fraser River, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adkison, M.; Peterman, R.; Lapointe, M.; Gillis, D.; Korman, J.

    1996-01-01

    We compare alternative models of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) productivity (returns per spawner) using more than 30 years of catch and escapement data for Bristol Bay, Alaska, and the Fraser River, British Columbia. The models examined include several alternative forms of models that incorporate climatic influences as well as models not based on climate. For most stocks, a stationary stock-recruitment relationship explains very little of the interannual variation in productivity. In Bristol Bay, productivity co-varies among stocks and appears to be strongly related to fluctuations in climate. The best model for Bristol Bay sockeye involved a change in the 1970s in the parameters of the Ricker stock-recruitment curve; the stocks generally became more productive. In contrast, none of the models of Fraser River stocks that we examined explained much of the variability in their productivity.

  15. Preliminary evaluation of the importance of existing hydraulic-head observation locations to advective-transport predictions, Death Valley regional flow system, California and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Ely, D.M.; Tiedeman, C.R.; O'Brien, G.M.; D'Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.

    2001-08-01

    When a model is calibrated by nonlinear regression, calculated diagnostic statistics and measures of uncertainty provide a wealth of information about many aspects of the system. This report presents a method of ranking the likely importance of existing observation locations using measures of prediction uncertainty. It is suggested that continued monitoring is warranted at more important locations, and unwarranted or less warranted at less important locations. The report develops the methodology and then demonstrates it using the hydraulic-head observation locations of a three-layer model of the Death Valley regional flow system (DVRFS). The predictions of interest are subsurface transport from beneath Yucca Mountain and 14 underground Test Area (UGTA) sites. The advective component of transport is considered because it is the component most affected by the system dynamics represented by the regional-scale model being used. The problem is addressed using the capabilities of the U.S. Geological Survey computer program MODFLOW-2000, with its ADVective-Travel Observation (ADV) Package, and an additional computer program developed for this work.

  16. Hot springs on Mars: origins and paleoenvironmental significance of small Martian valleys

    SciTech Connect

    Brakenridge, G.R.; Newsom, H.E.; Baker, V.R.

    1985-01-01

    At least five classes of small valley networks can be distinguished on Viking imagery of Mars. The different valley types may have had different origins. Many subparallel slope ravines, v-shaped branching valleys, and flat-floored branching valleys are related to impact structures and may have originated through the action of hot springs located along the permeable fringes of slowly-cooling impact melts. These valleys grew by a combination of headward sapping and down-valley water and ice fluid flow. Cessation of formation of these valley types at the terminus of the heavy bombardment period (about 3.8 billion years ago) implies a temporal association between valley formation and cratering. The probable widespread operation of impact-related hydrothermal spring systems early in Mars history indicates that it is not necessary to infer atmospheric changes to explain valley formation.

  17. Differential Extension, Displacement Transfer, and the South to North Decrease in Displacement on the Furnace Creek - Fish Lake Valley Fault System, Western Great Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katopody, D. T.; Oldow, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The northwest-striking Furnace Creek - Fish Lake Valley (FC-FLV) fault system stretches for >250 km from southeastern California to western Nevada, forms the eastern boundary of the northern segment of the Eastern California Shear Zone, and has contemporary displacement. The FC-FLV fault system initiated in the mid-Miocene (10-12 Ma) and shows a south to north decrease in displacement from a maximum of 75-100 km to less than 10 km. Coeval elongation by extension on north-northeast striking faults within the adjoining blocks to the FC-FLV fault both supply and remove cumulative displacement measured at the northern end of the transcurrent fault system. Elongation and displacement transfer in the eastern block, constituting the southern Walker Lane of western Nevada, exceeds that of the western block and results in the net south to north decrease in displacement on the FC-FLV fault system. Elongation in the eastern block is accommodated by late Miocene to Pliocene detachment faulting followed by extension on superposed, east-northeast striking, high-angle structures. Displacement transfer from the FC-FLV fault system to the northwest-trending faults of the central Walker Lane to the north is accomplished by motion on a series of west-northwest striking transcurrent faults, named the Oriental Wash, Sylvania Mountain, and Palmetto Mountain fault systems. The west-northwest striking transcurrent faults cross-cut earlier detachment structures and are kinematically linked to east-northeast high-angle extensional faults. The transcurrent faults are mapped along strike for 60 km to the east, where they merge with north-northwest faults forming the eastern boundary of the southern Walker Lane. The west-northwest trending transcurrent faults have 30-35 km of cumulative left-lateral displacement and are a major contributor to the decrease in right-lateral displacement on the FC-FLV fault system.

  18. Evaluation of undiscovered natural gas in the Upper Cretaceous Ferron Coal/Wasatch Plateau Total Petroleum System, Wasatch Plateau and Castle Valley, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, M.E.; Finn, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Total Petroleum System approach was used to estimate undiscovered gas potential of the Wasatch Plateau and Castle Valley, central Utah. The Ferron Coal/Wasatch Plateau Total Petroleum System was geologically defined and subdivided into seven assessment units, six of which were formally evaluated. Geologic data considered in defining the assessment unit boundaries included thermal maturity, coal presence and thickness, overburden thickness, and faulting intensity. Historical production data were also used to estimate volumes of gas from undrilled areas. The one conventional assessment unit includes almost the entire area of the petroleum system and is characterized by known accumulations that occur in structural or combination traps in sandstone reservoirs. The estimated undiscovered conventional producible gas that may be added to reserves of this unit ranges from a low (F95) of 14.8 billion cubic feet (BCFG) [419 million cubic meters (Mm3)] of gas to a high (F5) of 82 BCFG [2321 Mm3] and a mean value of 39.9 BCFG [1130 Mm3]. Continuous gas accumulations are those in which the entire assessment unit is considered to be gas-charged. Within these assessment units, there may be wells drilled that are not economic successes but all are expected to contain gas. Coalbed gas is in this continuous category. Mean estimates of undiscovered gas for the five continuous assessment units are: (1) Northern Coal Fairway/Drunkards Wash-752.3 BCFG [21,323 Mm3]; (2) Central Coal Fairway/Buzzard Bench-536.7 BCFG [15,194 Mm3]; (3) Southern Coal Fairway-152.6 BCFG [4320 Mm3]; (4) Deep (6000 feet plus) Coal and Sandstone-59.1 BCFG [1673 Mm3]; (5) Southern Coal Outcrop-10.6 BCFG [300 Mm3]; and Joes Valley and Musinia Grabens-not assessed.The mean estimate of undiscovered gas for the entire TPS is 1551.2 BCFG [43,914 Mm3]. There is a 95% chance that at least 855.7 BCFG [24,225 Mm3] and a 5% chance that at least 2504 BCFG [70,888 Mm3] of undiscovered producible gas remain in the TPS

  19. Evaluation of reduction of Fraser incubation by 24h in the EN ISO 11290-1 standard on detection and diversity of Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Gnanou Besse, Nathalie; Favret, Sandra; Desreumaux, Jennifer; Decourseulles Brasseur, Emilie; Kalmokoff, Martin

    2016-05-02

    The EN ISO 11290-1 method for the isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from food is carried out using a double enrichment in Fraser broths. While the method is effective it is also quite long requiring 4-7 days to process a contaminated food, and may be adversely affected by inter-strain and/or inter-species competition in samples containing mixed Listeria populations. Currently, we have little information on the impact of competition on food testing under routine conditions. Food samples (n=130) were analyzed using the standard method and the evolution of Listeria populations in 89 naturally contaminated samples followed over the entire enrichment process. In most instances, maximum increase in L. monocytogenes population occurred over the first 24h following sub-culture in Full Fraser broth and strain recovery was similar at both 24 and 48 h, indicating that the second enrichment step can be reduced by 24h without impacting the recovery of L. monocytogenes or affecting the sensitivity of the method. In approximately 6% of naturally contaminated samples the presence of competing Listeria species adversely impacted L. monocytogenes population levels. Moreover, these effects were more pronounced during the latter 24h of the Fraser enrichment, and potentially could affect or complicate the isolation of these strains.

  20. Geology and water resources of Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollett, Kenneth J.; Danskin, Wesley R.; McCaffrey, William F.; Walti, Caryl L.

    1991-01-01

    Owens Valley, a long, narrow valley located along the east flank of the Sierra Nevada in east-central California, is the main source of water for the city of Los Angeles. The city diverts most of the surface water in the valley into the Owens River-Los Angeles Aqueduct system, which transports the water more than 200 miles south to areas of distribution and use. Additionally, ground water is pumped or flows from wells to supplement the surface-water diversions to the river-aqueduct system. Pumpage from wells needed to supplement water export has increased since 1970, when a second aqueduct was put into service, and local concerns have been expressed that the increased pumpage may have had a detrimental effect on the environment and the indigenous alkaline scrub and meadow plant communities in the valley. The scrub and meadow communities depend on soil moisture derived from precipitation and the unconfined part of a multilayered aquifer system. This report, which describes the hydrogeology of the aquifer system and the water resources of the valley, is one in a series designed to (1) evaluate the effects that groundwater pumping has on scrub and meadow communities and (2) appraise alternative strategies to mitigate any adverse effects caused by, pumping. Two principal topographic features are the surface expression of the geologic framework--the high, prominent mountains on the east and west sides of the valley and the long, narrow intermountain valley floor. The mountains are composed of sedimentary, granitic, and metamorphic rocks, mantled in part by volcanic rocks as well as by glacial, talus, and fluvial deposits. The valley floor is underlain by valley fill that consists of unconsolidated to moderately consolidated alluvial fan, transition-zone, glacial and talus, and fluvial and lacustrine deposits. The valley fill also includes interlayered recent volcanic flows and pyroclastic rocks. The bedrock surface beneath the valley fill is a narrow, steep-sided graben

  1. Fretted Terrain Valley in Coloe Fossae Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Click on image for larger version

    The image in figure 1 shows lineated valley fill in one of a series of enclosed, intersecting troughs known as Coloe (Choloe) Fossae. Lineated valley fill consists of rows of material in valley centers that are parallel to the valley walls. It is probably made of ice-rich material and boulders that are left behind when the ice-rich material sublimates. Very distinct rows can be seen near the south (bottom) wall of the valley. Lineated valley fill is thought to result from mass wasting (downslope movement) of ice-rich material from valley walls towards their centers. It is commonly found in valleys near the crustal dichotomy that separates the two hemispheres of Mars. The valley shown here joins four other valleys with lineated fill near the top left corner of this image. Their juncture is a topographic low, suggesting that the lineated valley fill from the different valleys may be flowing or creeping towards the low area (movement towards the upper left of the image). The valley walls appear smooth at first glance but are seen to be speckled with small craters several meters in diameter at HiRISE resolution (see contrast-enhanced subimage). This indicates that at least some of the wall material has been stable to mass wasting for some period of time. Also seen on the valley wall are elongated features shaped like teardrops. These are most likely slightly older craters that have been degraded due to potentially recent downhill creep. It is unknown whether the valley walls are shedding material today. The subimage is approximately 140 x 400 m (450 x 1280 ft).

    Image PSP_001372_2160 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 11, 2006. The complete image is centered at 35.5 degrees latitude, 56.8 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 290.3 km (181

  2. An estimated potentiometric surface of the Death Valley region, Nevada and California, developed using geographic information system and automated interpolation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.

    1998-07-01

    An estimated potentiometric surface was constructed for the Death Valley region, Nevada and California, from numerous, disparate data sets. The potentiometric surface was required for conceptualization of the ground-water flow system and for construction of a numerical model to aid in the regional characterization for the Yucca Mountain repository. Because accurate, manual extrapolation of potentiometric levels over large distances is difficult, a geographic-information-system method was developed to incorporate available data and apply hydrogeologic rules during contour construction. Altitudes of lakes, springs, and wetlands, interpreted as areas where the potentiometric surface intercepts the land surface, were combined with water levels from well data. Because interpreted ground-water recharge and discharge areas commonly coincide with groundwater basin boundaries, these areas also were used to constrain a gridding algorithm and to appropriately place local maxima and minima in the potentiometric-surface map. The resulting initial potentiometric surface was examined to define areas where the algorithm incorrectly extrapolated the potentiometric surface above the land surface. A map of low-permeability rocks overlaid on the potentiometric surface also indicated areas that required editing based on hydrogeologic reasoning. An interactive editor was used to adjust generated contours to better represent the natural water table conditions, such as large hydraulic gradients and troughs, or ``vees``. The resulting estimated potentiometric-surface map agreed well with previously constructed maps. Potentiometric-surface characteristics including potentiometric-surface mounds and depressions, surface troughs, and large hydraulic gradients were described.

  3. A system of regional agricultural land use mapping tested against small scale Apollo 9 color infrared photography of the Imperial Valley (California)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Claude W.; Browden, Leonard W.; Pease, Robert W.

    1969-01-01

    Interpretation results of the small scale ClR photography of the Imperial Valley (California) taken on March 12, 1969 by the Apollo 9 earth orbiting satellite have shown that world wide agricultural land use mapping can be accomplished from satellite ClR imagery if sufficient a priori information is available for the region being mapped. Correlation of results with actual data is encouraging although the accuracy of identification of specific crops from the single image is poor. The poor results can be partly attributed to only one image taken during mid-season when the three major crops were reflecting approximately the same and their ClR image appears to indicate the same crop type. However, some incapacity can be attributed to lack of understanding of the subtle variations of visual and infrared color reflectance of vegetation and surrounding environment. Analysis of integrated color variations of the vegetation and background environment recorded on ClR imagery is discussed. Problems associated with the color variations may be overcome by development of a semi-automatic processing system which considers individual field units or cells. Design criteria for semi-automatic processing system are outlined.

  4. Geomorphic influences of the Little Ice Age glacial advance on selected hillslope systems in Nordfjord, Western Norway (Erdalen and Bødalen valleys)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laute, Katja; Beylich, Achim A.

    2010-05-01

    Hillslopes in glacially formed landscapes are typically characterized by talus cones developed beneath free rock faces. Studying hillslopes as sedimentary source, storage and transfer zones as well as surface processes acting on hillslopes since the end of the deglaciation is of importance in order to gain a better understanding of the complex sedimentary source-to-sink fluxes in cold climate environments. Hillslopes function as a key component within the geomorphic process response system. Large areas of the Norwegian fjord landscapes are covered by hillslopes and are characterized by the influences of the glacial inheritance. This PhD project is part of the NFR funded SedyMONT-Norway project within the ESF TOPO-EUROPE SedyMONT (Timescales of sediment dynamics, climate and topographic change in mountain landscapes) programme. The focus of this study is on geomorphic influences of the Little Ice Age glacial advance on postglacial hillslope systems in four distinct headwater areas of the Erdalen and Bødalen valleys in the Nordfjord valley-fjord system (inner Nordfjord, Western Norway). Both valleys can be described as steep, U-shaped and glacier-fed, subarctic tributary valleys. Approximately 14% of the 49 km2 large headwater areas of Erdalen are occupied by hillslope deposits and 41% by rock surfaces; in Bødalen hillslope deposits occupy 12% and rock surfaces occupy 38% of the 42 km2 large headwater areas. The main aims of this study are (i) to analyze and compare the morphometric characteristics as well as the composition of hillslope systems inside and outside of the Little Ice Age glacial limit, (ii) to detect possible changes within the mass balances of these hillslope systems, (iii) to identify the type and intensity of currently acting hillslope processes as well as (iv) to determine possible sediment sources and delivery pathways within the headwater areas of the catchments. The process-based approach includes orthophoto- and topographical map

  5. New evidence on the hydrothermal system in Long Valley caldera, California, from wells, fluid sampling, electrical geophysics, and age determinations of hot-spring deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, M.L.; Suemnicht, G.A.; Sturchio, N.C.; Nordquist, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Data collected since 1985 from test drilling, fluid sampling, and geologic and geophysical investigations provide a clearer definition of the hydrothermal system in Long Valley caldera than was previously available. This information confirms the existence of high-temperature (> 200??C) reservoirs within the volcanic fill in parts of the west moat. These reservoirs contain fluids which are chemically similar to thermal fluids encountered in the central and eastern parts of the caldera. The roots of the present-day hydrothermal system (the source reservoir, principal zones of upflow, and the magmatic heat source) most likely occur within metamorphic basement rocks beneath the western part of the caldera. Geothermometer-temperature estimates for the source reservoir range from 214 to 248??C. Zones of upflow of hot water could exist beneath the plateau of moat rhyolite located west of the resurgent dome or beneath Mammoth Mountain. Lateral flow of thermal water away from such upflow zones through reservoirs in the Bishop Tuff and early rhyolite accounts for temperature reversals encountered in most existing wells. Dating of hot-spring deposits from active and inactive thermal areas confirms previous interpretations of the evolution of hydrothermal activity that suggest two periods of extensive hot-spring discharge, one peaking about 300 ka and another extending from about 40 ka to the present. The onset of hydrothermal activity around 40 ka coincides with the initiation of rhyolitic volcanism along the Mono-Inyo Craters volcanic chain that extends beneath the caldera's west moat. ?? 1991.

  6. Groundwater quality in the Santa Clara River Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Carmen A.; Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Santa Clara River Valley (SCRV) study unit is located in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California, and is bounded by the Santa Monica, San Gabriel, Topatopa, and Santa Ynez Mountains, and the Pacific Ocean. The 460-square-mile study unit includes eight groundwater basins: Ojai Valley, Upper Ojai Valley, Ventura River Valley, Santa Clara River Valley, Pleasant Valley, Arroyo Santa Rosa Valley, Las Posas Valley, and Simi Valley (California Department of Water Resources, 2003; Montrella and Belitz, 2009). The SCRV study unit has hot, dry summers and cool, moist winters. Average annual rainfall ranges from 12 to 28 inches. The study unit is drained by the Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers, and Calleguas Creek. The primary aquifer system in the Ventura River Valley, Ojai Valley, Upper Ojai Valley, and Simi Valley basins is largely unconfined alluvium. The primary aquifer system in the remaining groundwater basins mainly consists of unconfined sands and gravels in the upper portion and partially confined marine and nonmarine deposits in the lower portion. The primary aquifer system in the SCRV study unit is defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. Public-supply wells typically are completed in the primary aquifer system to depths of 200 to 1,100 feet below land surface (bls). The wells contain solid casing reaching from the land surface to a depth of about 60-700 feet, and are perforated below the solid casing to allow water into the well. Water quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the water in the shallower and deeper parts of the aquifer. Land use in the study unit is approximately 40 percent (%) natural (primarily shrubs, grassland, and wetlands), 37% agricultural, and 23% urban. The primary crops are citrus, avocados, alfalfa, pasture, strawberries, and dry beans. The largest urban areas in the study unit are the cities of

  7. 22. VIEW EAST TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF PIPELINE ALONG PALI. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW EAST TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF PIPELINE ALONG PALI. EYE BOLTS IN ROCK FACE AT RIGHT WERE USED BRIEFLY IN PLACE OF PIERS TO SUSPEND PIPE BY CHAIN BECAUSE THE CONCRETE PIERS WERE SUSCEPTIBLE TO HEAVY WAVE ACTION IN THIS AREA. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  8. 21. VIEW EAST ALONG PALI TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF ELEVATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW EAST ALONG PALI TOWARDS WAIKOLU VALLEY OF ELEVATED PIPELINE ON CONCRETE PIERS. PIPE IS BURIED AT THIS POINT. NOTE REMAINS OF WOOD FRAMEWORK FOR CATWALK (DESTROYED). - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  9. Three-dimensional reconstruction from multiple reflected views within a realist painting: an application to Scott Fraser's "Three way vanitas"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Brandon M.; Stork, David G.; Zhang, Li

    2009-01-01

    The problem of reconstructing a three-dimensional scene from single or multiple views has been thoroughly studied in the computer vision literature, and recently has been applied to problems in the history of art. Criminisi pioneered the application of single-view metrology to reconstructing the fictive spaces in Renaissance paintings, such as the vault in Masaccio's Trinità and the plaza in Piero della Francesca's Flagellazione. While the vast majority of realist paintings provide but a single view, some provide multiple views, through mirrors depicted within their tableaus. The contemporary American realist Scott Fraser's Three way vanitas is a highly realistic still-life containing three mirrors; each mirror provides a new view of the objects in the tableau. We applied multiple-view reconstruction methods to the direct image and the images reflected by these mirrors to reconstruct the three-dimensional tableau. Our methods estimate virtual viewpoints for each view using the geometric constraints provided by the direct view of the mirror frames, along with the reflected images themselves. Moreover, our methods automatically discover inconsistencies between the different views, including ones that might elude careful scrutiny by eye, for example the fact that the height of the water in the glass differs between the direct view and that in the mirror at the right. We believe our work provides the first application of multiple-view reconstruction to a single painting and will have application to other paintings and questions in the history of art.

  10. Cryopreservation of Fraser photinia (Photinia x fraseri Dress.) via vitrification-based one-step freezing techniques.

    PubMed

    Tokatli, Y O; Akdemir, H

    2010-01-01

    An efficient vitrification-based cryopreservation procedure was developed for Fraser photinia shoot apices by assessing the influences of various vitrification solutions (PVS1, PVS2, PVS3 and VSL) and different vitrification methods (cryovial vitrification, droplet vitrification and droplet freezing) on shoot regrowth. Moreover, influences of cold-hardening period (0 to 8 weeks), preculture medium (with sucrose and proline) and regrowth medium (QL plus 4.4, 8.8 and 17.6 micromolar BA) were also evaluated. Among the different procedures tested, best shoot regrowth (40.3 percent) was achieved by using a droplet vitrification technique in which cold-hardened and precultured shoot apices were vitrified for 120 min at 0 degree C in droplets, rapidly cooled, thawed and then cultured on 17.6 micromolar BA-containing QL medium. Overall results indicated the importance of not only the composition of vitrification solution, and preculture and regrowth media, but also the application of an appropriate vitrification technique to achieve optimum recovery post-cryopreservation.

  11. Potential effects of dams on migratory fish in the Mekong River: lessons from salmon in the Fraser and Columbia Rivers.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, John W; Healey, Michael; Dugan, Patrick; Barlow, Chris

    2011-01-01

    We compared the effects of water resource development on migratory fish in two North American rivers using a descriptive approach based on four high-level indicators: (1) trends in abundance of Pacific salmon, (2) reliance on artificial production to maintain fisheries, (3) proportion of adult salmon that are wild- versus hatchery-origin, and (4) number of salmon populations needing federal protection to avoid extinction. The two rivers had similar biological and physical features but radically different levels of water resource development: the Fraser River has few dams and all are located in tributaries, whereas the Columbia River has more than 130 large mainstem and tributary dams. Not surprisingly, we found substantial effects of development on salmon in the Columbia River. We related the results to potential effects on migratory fish in the Mekong River where nearly 200 mainstem and tributary dams are installed, under construction, or planned and could have profound effects on its 135 migratory fish species. Impacts will vary with dam location due to differential fish production within the basin, with overall effects likely being greatest from 11 proposed mainstem dams. Minimizing impacts will require decades to design specialized fish passage facilities, dam operations, and artificial production, and is complicated by the Mekong's high diversity and productivity. Prompt action is needed by governments and fisheries managers to plan Mekong water resource development wisely to prevent impacts to the world's most productive inland fisheries, and food security and employment opportunities for millions of people in the region.

  12. Fretted Terrain Valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    30 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows shallow tributary valleys in the Ismenius Lacus fretted terrain region of northern Arabia Terra. These valleys exhibit a variety of typical fretted terrain valley wall and floor textures, including a lineated, pitted material somewhat reminiscent of the surface of a brain. Origins for these features are still being debated within the Mars science community; there are no clear analogs to these landforms on Earth. This image is located near 39.9oN, 332.1oW. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  13. Extraction of Martian valley networks from digital topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Collier, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a novel method for delineating valley networks on Mars. The valleys are inferred from digital topography by an autonomous computer algorithm as drainage networks, instead of being manually mapped from images. Individual drainage basins are precisely defined and reconstructed to restore flow continuity disrupted by craters. Drainage networks are extracted from their underlying basins using the contributing area threshold method. We demonstrate that such drainage networks coincide with mapped valley networks verifying that valley networks are indeed drainage systems. Our procedure is capable of delineating and analyzing valley networks with unparalleled speed and consistency. We have applied this method to 28 Noachian locations on Mars exhibiting prominent valley networks. All extracted networks have a planar morphology similar to that of terrestrial river networks. They are characterized by a drainage density of approx.0.1/km, low in comparison to the drainage density of terrestrial river networks. Slopes of "streams" in Martian valley networks decrease downstream at a slower rate than slopes of streams in terrestrial river networks. This analysis, based on a sizable data set of valley networks, reveals that although valley networks have some features pointing to their origin by precipitation-fed runoff erosion, their quantitative characteristics suggest that precipitation intensity and/or longevity of past pluvial climate were inadequate to develop mature drainage basins on Mars.

  14. Scaling relationships and concavity of small valley networks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penido, Julita C.; Fassett, Caleb I.; Som, Sanjoy M.

    2013-01-01

    Valley networks are widely interpreted as the preserved erosional record of water flowing across the martian surface. The manner in which valley morphometric properties scale with drainage area has been widely examined on Earth. Earlier studies assessing these properties on Mars have suggested that martian valleys are morphometrically distinct from those on Earth. However, these earlier measurements were generally made on large valley systems because of the limited topographic data available. In this study, we determine the scaling properties of valley networks at smaller scales than have been previously assessed, using digital elevation models from the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC). We find a Hack's law exponent of 0.74, larger than on Earth, and our measurements also reveal that individual small valleys have concave up, concave down, and quasi-linear longitudinal profiles, consistent with earlier studies of dissected terrain on Mars. However, for many valleys, widths are observed to increase downstream similarly to how they scale in terrestrial channels. The similarities and differences between valley networks on Mars and Earth are consistent with the idea that valleys on Mars are comparatively immature, and precipitation was a likely mechanism for delivering water to these networks.

  15. Rift Valley fever vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Makino, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which belongs to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, is a negative-stranded RNA virus carrying a tripartite RNA genome. RVFV is transmitted by mosquitoes and causes large outbreaks among ruminants and humans in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Human patients develop an acute febrile illness, followed by a fatal hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis or ocular diseases, whereas ruminants experience abortions during outbreak. Effective vaccination of both humans and ruminants is the best approach to control Rift Valley fever. This article summarizes the development of inactivated RVFV vaccine, live attenuated vaccine, and other new generation vaccines. PMID:19837291

  16. Fluvial dynamics of the Meuse-Rhine system at the SW-border of the Roer Valley Graben (Belgium-Netherlands) during the Early to Middle Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beerten, Koen; Westerhoff, Wim E.; Menkovic, Armin

    2015-04-01

    . Deposition of Rhine sediments was interrupted when the Meuse prograded deeper into the graben, as can be inferred from gravel petrology and grain size. The sequence ends with another episode of deposition by the Rhine, after which the graben area evolves into a local sedimentation system (Boxtel Formation). The pollen spectra suggest that sedimentation took place during stadials and interstadials, while interglacial sediments are not preserved. We conclude that the poor development of Cromerian Meuse sediments in the Roer Valley Graben is probably due to a drastic decrease of river competence and capacity when it leaves the Campine block and enters the flat graben floor. There, the competence of the sand-dominated Rhine is insufficient to transport the (very) coarse gravels of the Meuse.

  17. Session: Long Valley Exploratory Well

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Finger, John T.; Eichelberger, John C.; Hickox, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Long Valley Exploratory Well - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations'' by John T. Finger; ''Geologic results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well'' by John C. Eichelberger; and ''A Model for Large-Scale Thermal Convection in the Long Valley Geothermal Region'' by Charles E. Hickox.

  18. Turnover and release of P-, N-, Si-nutrients in the Mexicali Valley (Mexico): interactions between the lower Colorado River and adjacent ground- and surface water systems.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Durán, A; Daesslé, L W; Camacho-Ibar, V F; Ortiz-Campos, E; Barth, J A C

    2015-04-15

    A study on dissolved nitrate, ammonium, phosphate and silicate concentrations was carried out in various water compartments (rivers, drains, channels, springs, wetland, groundwater, tidal floodplains and ocean water) in the Mexicali Valley and the Colorado River delta between 2012 and 2013, to assess modern potential nutrient sources into the marine system after river damming. While nitrate and silicate appear to have a significant input into the coastal ocean, phosphate is rapidly transformed into a particulate phase. Nitrate is, in general, rapidly bio-consumed in the surface waters rich in micro algae, but its excess (up to 2.02 mg L(-1) of N from NO3 in winter) in the Santa Clara Wetland represents a potential average annual source to the coast of 59.4×10(3)kg N-NO3. Despite such localized inputs, continuous regional groundwater flow does not appear to be a source of nitrate to the estuary and coastal ocean. Silicate is associated with groundwaters that are also geothermally influenced. A silicate receiving agricultural drain adjacent to the tidal floodplain had maximum silicate concentrations of 16.1 mg L(-1) Si-SiO2. Seepage of drain water and/or mixing with seawater during high spring tides represents a potential source of dissolved silicate and nitrate into the Gulf of California.

  19. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for the hydrogeologic units of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Belcher, W.R.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Elliott, P.E.

    2002-11-19

    The use of geologic information such as lithology and rock properties is important to constrain conceptual and numerical hydrogeologic models. This geologic information is difficult to apply explicitly to numerical modeling and analyses because it tends to be qualitative rather than quantitative. This study uses a compilation of hydraulic-conductivity measurements to derive estimates of the probability distributions for several hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, a geologically and hydrologicaly complex region underlain by basin-fill sediments, volcanic, intrusive, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for general rock types have been studied previously; however, this study provides more detailed definition of hydrogeologic units based on lithostratigraphy, lithology, alteration, and fracturing and compares the probability distributions to the aquifer test data. Results suggest that these probability distributions can be used for studies involving, for example, numerical flow modeling, recharge, evapotranspiration, and rainfall runoff. These probability distributions can be used for such studies involving the hydrogeologic units in the region, as well as for similar rock types elsewhere. Within the study area, fracturing appears to have the greatest influence on the hydraulic conductivity of carbonate bedrock hydrogeologic units. Similar to earlier studies, we find that alteration and welding in the Tertiary volcanic rocks greatly influence conductivity. As alteration increases, hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease. Increasing degrees of welding appears to increase hydraulic conductivity because welding increases the brittleness of the volcanic rocks, thus increasing the amount of fracturing.

  20. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for the hydrogeologic units of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belcher, Wayne R.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Elliott, Peggy E.

    2002-01-01

    The use of geologic information such as lithology and rock properties is important to constrain conceptual and numerical hydrogeologic models. This geologic information is difficult to apply explicitly to numerical modeling and analyses because it tends to be qualitative rather than quantitative. This study uses a compilation of hydraulic-conductivity measurements to derive estimates of the probability distributions for several hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, a geologically and hydrologically complex region underlain by basin-fill sediments, volcanic, intrusive, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for general rock types have been studied previously; however, this study provides more detailed definition of hydrogeologic units based on lithostratigraphy, lithology, alteration, and fracturing and compares the probability distributions to the aquifer test data. Results suggest that these probability distributions can be used for studies involving, for example, numerical flow modeling, recharge, evapotranspiration, and rainfall runoff. These probability distributions can be used for such studies involving the hydrogeologic units in the region, as well as for similar rock types elsewhere. Within the study area, fracturing appears to have the greatest influence on the hydraulic conductivity of carbonate bedrock hydrogeologic units. Similar to earlier studies, we find that alteration and welding in the Tertiary volcanic rocks greatly influence hydraulic conductivity. As alteration increases, hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease. Increasing degrees of welding appears to increase hydraulic conductivity because welding increases the brittleness of the volcanic rocks, thus increasing the amount of fracturing.

  1. What is the Safest Way to Cross the Valley of Death: Wisdom gained from Making a Satellite based Flood Forecasting System Operational and Owned by Stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, F.

    2013-12-01

    More than a decade ago, the National Research Council report popularized the term 'Valley of Death' to describe the region where research on Weather Satellites had struggled to survive before reaching maturity for societal applications. For example, the space vantage of earth observing satellites can solve some of the world's otherwise fundamentally intractable operational problems on water resources. However, recent experiences show that many of the potential beneficiaries, who are not as familiar with water cycle remote sensing missions or anthropogenic climate studies, referred here as the ';non-traditional consumers,' may have a more skeptical view based on their current practices. This talk will focus on one such non-traditional consumer group: the water resources managers/staff in developing nations of South Asia. Using real-world examples on applications and hands-on-training to make a satellite based flood forecasting system operational, the talk will dissect the view that is shared by many water managers of Bangladesh on satellite remote sensing for day to day decision making. The talk will share the experience and wisdom generated in the successful capacity building of emerging satellite technology for water management. It will end with an overview of initiatives for more effective promotion of the value of planned water cycle satellite missions for water resources management community in the developing world.

  2. One-year follow-up study of performance of radon mitigation systems installed in Tennessee Valley houses

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; Saultz, R.J.; Matthews, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    Subbarrier depressurization systems were installed for radon mitigation in two basement ranchers in Oak Ridge, TN, and in two ranchers with partial basements in Huntsville, AL. System performance parameters, including pressure field extension, subslab permeability, and indoor radon concentrations were followed in each house for a year or longer. 9 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Under the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Public Law 96-368, liquid high-level radioactive waste stored at the Western New York Nuclear Services Center, West Valley, New York, that resulted from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing operations conducted between 1966 and 1972, is to be solidified in borosilicate glass and transported to a federal repository for geologic disposal. A major milestone was reached in May 1988 when the Project began reducing the volume of the liquid high-level waste. By the end of 1988, approximately 15 percent of the initial inventory had been processed into two waste streams. The decontaminated low-level liquid waste is being solidified in cement. The high-level waste stream is being stored in an underground tank pending its incorporation into borosilicate glass. Four tests of the waste glass melter system were completed. These tests confirmed equipment operability, control system reliability, and provided samples of waste glass for durability testing. In mid-1988, the Department validated an integrated cost and schedule plan for activities required to complete the production of the waste borosilicate glass. Design of the radioactive Vitrification Facility continued.

  4. Compressed Air System Upgrade Improves Production at a Steel Mill (The U.S. Steel Mon Valley Works)

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    This case study is one in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. This case study documents the activities, savings, and lessons learned on the steel mill project.

  5. Refurbished extensometer sites improve the quality and frequency of aquifer-system compaction and groundwater-level measurements, San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneed, M.; Brandt, J.; Solt, M.

    2012-12-01

    Extensive groundwater withdrawal from unconsolidated deposits in the San Joaquin Valley caused widespread aquifer-system compaction and land subsidence locally exceeding 8 meters (m) between 1926 and 1970. To identify the extent of subsidence, a network of 31 extensometers was installed in the 1960s. Importation of surface water in the early 1970s resulted in decreased groundwater pumping, a steady water-level recovery, and a reduced rate of compaction; consequently, data collection was sharply reduced. However, reduced surface-water availability during 1976-77, 1987-92, and 2007-09 caused increased groundwater pumping, lowered water levels, and renewed compaction. The resulting land subsidence has reduced freeboard and flow capacity of the Delta-Mendota Canal (DMC), the California Aqueduct (AQ), and other canals. Four deep (>300-m) cable-type extensometers from the old network, located along the DMC and AQ, were refurbished to identify existing and future subsidence, and to improve the quality and frequency of compaction measurements. Measurement quality was improved at three of these sites by replacing the existing reference tables, which sit atop concrete pads, with new reference tables cemented in 5.5-m boreholes and decoupled from the concrete pads to minimize the measurement of near-surface deformation. A new reference table could not be constructed at the fourth site due to restrictive drill-rig access. Insulated metal shelters were constructed to protect the equipment against environmental exposure at all sites. The frequencies of compaction and water-level measurements at the extensometer sites were improved by instrumenting each with a linear potentiometer and one or more submersible pressure transducers, respectively. An analog dial gauge was installed on each extensometer to provide data continuity in cases of electronic data interruption and to provide verification of potentiometer data. Aquifer-system compaction data from all four sites show

  6. Boyne Valley Tombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prendergast, Frank

    The passage tombs of the Boyne Valley exhibit the greatest level of development of the megalithic tomb building tradition in Ireland in terms of their morphology, embellishment, burial tradition, grave goods, clustering, and landscape siting. This section examines these characteristics and gives a summary archaeoastronomical appraisal of their orientation and detected astronomical alignment.

  7. DESOLATION VALLEY WILDERNESS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, F.C.W.; Fillo, P.V.

    1984-01-01

    The Desolation Valley Wilderness covers an area of 101 sq mi in El Dorado County, California, near the southwestern shore of Lake Tahoe. A mineral survey disclosed the presence of a small mineralized area with demonstrated gold resources. Exploratory drilling is necessary before the resource potential of gold-bearing rocks can be assessed.

  8. Smart Valley Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maule, R. William

    1994-01-01

    Discusses prototype information infrastructure projects in northern California's Silicon Valley. The strategies of the public and private telecommunications carriers vying for backbone services and industries developing end-user infrastructure technologies via office networks, set-top box networks, Internet multimedia, and "smart homes"…

  9. California: Diamond Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... water storage capacity. In addition to routine water management, Diamond Valley Lake is designed to provide protection against ... 20, 2001 (Terra orbit 7564), is a false-color view combining data from the instrument's 26-degree forward view (displayed as blue) with data ...

  10. Integrated model of the shallow and deep hydrothermal systems in the East Mesa area, Imperial Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riney, T. David; Pritchett, J.W.; Rice, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    Geological, geophysical, thermal, petrophysical and hydrological data available for the East Mesa hydrothermal system that are pertinent to the construction of a computer model of the natural flow of heat and fluid mass within the system are assembled and correlated. A conceptual model of the full system is developed and a subregion selected for quantitative modeling. By invoking the .Boussinesq approximation, valid for describing the natural flow of heat and mass in a liquid hydrothermal system, it is found practical to carry computer simulations far enough in time to ensure that steady-state conditions are obtained. Initial calculations for an axisymmetric model approximating the system demonstrate that the vertical formation permeability of the deep East Mesa system must be very low (kv ~ 0.25 to 0.5 md). Since subsurface temperature and surface heat flow data exhibit major deviations from the axisymmetric approximation, exploratory three-dimensional calculations are performed to assess the effects of various mechanisms which might operate to produce such observed asymmetries. A three-dimensional model evolves from this iterative data synthesis and computer analysis which includes a hot fluid convective source distributed along a leaky fault radiating northward from the center of the hot spot and realistic variations in the reservoir formation properties.

  11. Integrated model of the shallow and deep hydrothermal systems in the East Mesa area, Imperial Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Riney, T.D.; Pritchett, J.W.; Rice, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    Geological, geophysical, thermal, petrophysical and hydrological data available for the East Mesa hydrothermal system that are pertinent to the construction of a computer model of the natural flow of heat and fluid mass within the system are assembled and correlated. A conceptual model of the full system is developed and a subregion selected for quantitative modeling. By invoking the Boussinesq approximation, valid for describing the natural flow of heat and mass in a liquid hydrothermal system, it is found practical to carry computer simulations far enough in time to ensure that steady-state conditions are obtained. Initial calculations for an axisymmetric model approximating the system demonstrate that the vertical formation permeability of the deep East Mesa system must be very low (k/sub v/ approx. 0.25 to 0.5 md). Since subsurface temperature and surface heat flow data exhibit major deviations from the axisymmetric approximation, exploratory three-dimensional calculations are performed to assess the effects of various mechanisms which might operate to produce such observed asymmetries. A three-dimensional model evolves from this iterative data synthesis and computer analysis which includes a hot fluid convective source distributed along a leaky fault radiating northward from the center of the hot spot and realistic variations in the reservoir formation properties.

  12. Valley depolarization in monolayer WSe2

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tengfei; Qiao, Xiaofen; Tan, Pingheng; Zhang, Xinhui

    2015-01-01

    We have systematically examined the circular polarization of monolayer WSe2 at different temperature, excitation energy and exciton density. The valley depolarization in WSe2 is experimentally confirmed to be governed by the intervalley electron-hole exchange interaction. More importantly, a non-monotonic dependence of valley circular polarization on the excitation power density has been observed, providing the experimental evidence for the non-monotonic dependence of exciton intervalley scattering rate on the excited exciton density. The physical origination of our experimental observations has been proposed to be in analogy to the D′yakonov-Perel′ mechanism that is operative in conventional GaAs quantum well systems. Our experimental results are fundamentally important for well understanding the valley pseudospin relaxation in atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides. PMID:26490157

  13. Valley photonic crystals for control of spin and topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jian-Wen; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Zhu, Hanyu; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-11-01

    Photonic crystals offer unprecedented opportunity for light manipulation and applications in optical communication and sensing. Exploration of topology in photonic crystals and metamaterials with non-zero gauge field has inspired a number of intriguing optical phenomena such as one-way transport and Weyl points. Recently, a new degree of freedom, valley, has been demonstrated in two-dimensional materials. Here, we propose a concept of valley photonic crystals with electromagnetic duality symmetry but broken inversion symmetry. We observe photonic valley Hall effect originating from valley-dependent spin-split bulk bands, even in topologically trivial photonic crystals. Valley-spin locking behaviour results in selective net spin flow inside bulk valley photonic crystals. We also show the independent control of valley and topology in a single system that has been long pursued in electronic systems, resulting in topologically-protected flat edge states. Valley photonic crystals not only offer a route towards the observation of non-trivial states, but also open the way for device applications in integrated photonics and information processing using spin-dependent transportation.

  14. Holocene to contemporary source-to-sink fluxes in a valley-fjord system in western Norway: Erdalen and Bødalen site project (SedyMONT - IP Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, A. A.; Laute, K.; Liermann, S.

    2012-04-01

    The focus of this Norwegian Research Council (NFR) funded Norwegian Individual Project (IP) (http://www.ngu.no/sedymont) within the European Science Foundation (ESF) SedyMONT (http://www.sedymont.eu) (EUROCORES TOPO-EUROPE) Programme (http://www.esf.org/topoeurope) is on Holocene, subrecent and contemporary sedimentary fluxes and budgets in the Erdalen and Bødalen valley systems in Nordfjord, western Norway. The innovative approach of this international research project is the integrated quantitative study of longer-term (Holocene), subrecent and contemporary source-to-sink fluxes and geomorphic process rates in selected representative valley-fjord systems using a novel combination of advanced methods and techniques. With respect to the main aims and objectives of ESF SedyMONT, the following main aims of the Erdalen and Bødalen site project can be stressed: - Analyse how the inheritance of the landscape due to the influence of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has affected process rates over time (paraglacial system), - Document changes in process rates over different timescales by combining quantitative knowledge on Holocene process rates with newly generated data on subrecent and contemporary process rates. High-resolution monitoring of denudative surface processes in Erdalen and Bødalen, in combination with repeated analyses of surface water chemistry, atmospheric solute inputs and granulometric as well as shape analyses of suspended sediments provide high-resolution data to analyse and quantify present-day sedimentary and solute fluxes as well as sediment sources, denudation rates, and meteorological and topographical / landscape morphometric controls of denudative processes. In addition to standard methods for monitoring bedload transport, innovative techniques like horizontally installed impact sensors and biofilm analysis are applied in combination with advanced flume experiments (for calibration of field data) to analyse channel stability / mobility and to

  15. Impacts of future changes on groundwater recharge and flow in highly-connected river-aquifer systems: A case study of the Spokane Valley-Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Baxter, H.; Barber, M. E.; Hossain, A.; Orr, C. H.; Adam, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Spokane, Washington-Coeur d'Alene, Idaho Corridor is well-known for its Spokane Valley-Rathdrum Prairie (SVRP) Aquifer which is a sole source of drinking water for more than 500,000 people. The aquifer is highly connected to the Spokane River and responds very fast to natural and human perturbations, making it relatively vulnerable to climate and anthropogenic changes in future decades. Recent studies have indicated a decline in minimum daily flow in the Spokane River in the last 100 years, while projecting an increase in cool-season precipitation into the future. We investigated the potential impacts of these projected future climate-driven hydrologic changes on groundwater recharge and flow in the SVRP. A distributed, physically-based hydrological model, the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), was coupled with an existing Modular three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water model (MODFLOW) to have better estimates of recharge into the SVRP as well as the interaction of surface water and groundwater. The couple model was calibrated and validated at a daily time-step within the Model-Independent Parameter Estimation (PEST) framework using 16 years of both observed streamflow and observed well data (1990 - 2005). To assess future climate change impacts, statistically downscaled climate projections of temperature and precipitation between 2010 and 2050 from four general circulation models were used. The results from the coupled model provide insight on the interplay between snowmelt, streamflow, groundwater recharge and discharge in such a highly-connected system. Moreover, the relative sensitivities of groundwater recharge and flow with respect to changes in climate and land cover are also examined. These results can be used as good references for long term water resources management and planning in the region.

  16. Valley splitting in the transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayer via atom adsorption.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofang; Zhong, Liangshuai; Li, Xiao; Qi, Jingshan

    2017-02-09

    In this letter we study the valley degeneracy splitting of the transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayer by first-principles calculations. The local magnetic moments are introduced into the system when the transition-metal atoms are adsorbed on the monolayer surface. The Zeeman effect arising from the local magnetic moment at transition-metal atom sites lifts the valley degeneracy. Anomalous charge, spin and valley Hall effects can be accessed due to valley splitting when we can only excite carriers of one valley. The valley splitting depends on the direction of magnetization and thus can be tuned continuously by an external magnetic field. This tunable valley splitting offers a practical avenue for exploring device paradigms based on the spin and valley degrees of freedom.

  17. Silicon Valley's Processing Needs versus San Jose State University's Manufacturing Systems Processing Component: Implications for Industrial Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obi, Samuel C.

    2004-01-01

    Manufacturing professionals within universities tend to view manufacturing systems from a global perspective. This perspective tends to assume that manufacturing processes are employed equally in every manufacturing enterprise, irrespective of the geography and the needs of the people in those diverse regions. But in reality local and societal…

  18. Peaks, Cliffs, and Valleys: The Peculiar Incentives in Teacher Retirement Systems and Their Consequences for School Staffing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costrell, Robert M.; Podgursky, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the pattern of incentives for work versus retirement in six state teacher pension systems. We do this by examining the annual accrual of pension wealth from an additional year of work over a teacher's career. Accrual of wealth is highly nonlinear and heavily loaded at arbitrary years that would normally be considered…

  19. GIS Early-Warning System for Vectors of Rift Valley Fever: Anomaly Analysis of Climate-Population Associations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A critical component of predicting the risk of transmission of mosquito-borne viruses is knowing the status of vector populations. Mosquito control agencies have good systems for measuring mosquito populations at county or district levels, but these data are not synthesized to regional or national ...

  20. [Nitrate storage and transport within a typical karst aquifer system in the paralleled ridge-valley of east Sichuan].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping-Heng; Yuan, Dao-Xian; Ren, You-Rong; Xie, Shi-You; He, Qiu-Fang; Hu, Xiao-Feng

    2012-09-01

    In order to investigate the nitrate storage and transport in the karst aquifer system, the hydrochemical dynamics of Qingmuguan underground river system was monitored online by achieving high-resolution data during storm events and monthly data in normal weather. The principal component analysis was employed to analyze the karst water geochemistry. Results showed that nitrate in Jiangjia spring did not share the same source with soluble iron, manganese and aluminum, and exhibited different geochemical behaviors. Nitrate was derived from land surface and infiltrated together with soil water, which was mainly stored in fissure, pore and solution crack of karst unsaturated zone, whereas soluble iron, manganese and aluminum were derived from soil erosion and directly recharged the underground river through sinkholes and shafts. Nitrate transport in the karst aquifer system could be ideally divided into three phases, including input storage, fast output and re-inputting storage. Under similar external conditions, the karstification intensity of vadose zone was the key factor to determine the dynamics of nitrate concentrations in the groundwater during storm events. Nitrate stored in the karst vadose zone was easily released, which would impair the aquatic ecosystem and pose seriously threats to the local health. Thus, to strengthen the management of ecological system, changing the land-use patterns and scientifically applying fertilizer could effectively make a contribution to controlling mass nutrient input from the surface.

  1. Topological Domain Wall and Valley Hall Effect in Charge Ordered Phase of Molecular Dirac Fermion System α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, Genki; Omori, Yukiko; Eguchi, Takaaki; Kobayashi, Akito

    2016-09-01

    The topological domain wall and valley Hall effect are theoretically investigated in the molecular conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3. By using the mean-field theory in an extended Hubbard model, it is demonstrated under a cylinder boundary condition that a domain wall emerges in the charge ordered phase, and exhibits a topological nature near the phase transition to the massless Dirac Fermion phase. The topological nature is well characterized by the Berry curvature, which has opposite signs in two charge ordered phases divided by the domain wall, and gives rise to the valley Hall conductivity with opposite signs, enabling these phases to be distinguished. It is also found that the valley Hall conductivity in the tilted Dirac cones exhibits a characteristic double-peak structure as a function of chemical potential using the semi classical formalism.

  2. Earthquake analyses for structural definition and material characteristics of the Mono Craters and Long Valley magma systems. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the results of research undertaken to increase understanding of the tectonic and magmatic processes occurring in the Long Valley and Mono Craters regions of California. The studies performed were of four different types. The first were based on a seismic data collection effort carried out at Long Valley. Both reflected and screened arrivals were searched for with essentially negative results. The second category of investigations carried out were intensive studies of important large earthquakes that have occurred in the Long Valley region. Some evidence indicates that, rather than being caused by slip on a fault plane, they were caused by magma injection. The third types of studies involved statistical analyses of seismicity data. The final studies involved the development of some important new theoretical methods for modeling the effects of screening bodies, such as magma bodies, on three dimensional wave fields.

  3. Modelling the Future Hydroclimatology of the Lower Fraser River and its Impacts on the Spawning Migration Survival of Sockeye Salmon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, M. J.; Ferrari, M. R.; Miller, J. R.; Patterson, D. A.; Russell, G. L.; Farrell, A.P.; Hinch, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    Short episodic high temperature events can be lethal for migrating adult Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.). We downscaled temperatures for the Fraser River, British Columbia to evaluate the impact of climate warming on the frequency of exceeding thermal thresholds associated with salmon migratory success. Alarmingly, a modest 1.0 C increase in average summer water temperature over 100 years (1981-2000 to 2081-2100) tripled the number of days per year exceeding critical salmonid thermal thresholds (i.e. 19.0 C). Refined thresholds for two populations (Gates Creek and Weaver Creek) of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) were defined using physiological constraint models based on aerobic scope. While extreme temperatures leading to complete aerobic collapse remained unlikely under our warming scenario, both populations were increasingly forced to migrate upriver at reduced levels of aerobic performance (e.g. in 80% of future simulations, => 90% of salmon encountered temperatures exceeding population specific thermal optima for maximum aerobic scope; T(sub opt)) = 16.3 C for Gates Creek and T(sub sopt)=14.5 C for Weaver Creek). Assuming recent changes to river entry timing persist, we also predicted dramatic increases in the probability of freshwater mortality for Weaver Creek salmon due to reductions in aerobic, and general physiological, performance (e.g. in 42% of future simulations =>50% of Weaver Creek fish exceeded temperature thresholds associated with 0 - 60% of maximum aerobic scope). Potential for adaptation via directional selection on run-timing was more evident for the Weaver Creek population. Early entry Weaver Creek fish experienced 25% (range: 15 - 31%) more suboptimal temperatures than late entrants, compared with an 8% difference (range: 0 - 17%) between early and late Gates Creek fish. Our results emphasize the need to consider daily temperature variability in association with population-specific differences in behaviour and physiological

  4. Time to Evolve? Potential Evolutionary Responses of Fraser River Sockeye Salmon to Climate Change and Effects on Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Thomas E.; Schindler, Daniel E.; Hague, Merran J.; Patterson, David A.; Meir, Eli; Waples, Robin S.; Hinch, Scott G.

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary adaptation affects demographic resilience to climate change but few studies have attempted to project changes in selective pressures or quantify impacts of trait responses on population dynamics and extinction risk. We used a novel individual-based model to explore potential evolutionary changes in migration timing and the consequences for population persistence in sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka in the Fraser River, Canada, under scenarios of future climate warming. Adult sockeye salmon are highly sensitive to increases in water temperature during their arduous upriver migration, raising concerns about the fate of these ecologically, culturally, and commercially important fish in a warmer future. Our results suggest that evolution of upriver migration timing could allow these salmon to avoid increasingly frequent stressful temperatures, with the odds of population persistence increasing in proportion to the trait heritability and phenotypic variance. With a simulated 2°C increase in average summer river temperatures by 2100, adult migration timing from the ocean to the river advanced by ∼10 days when the heritability was 0.5, while the risk of quasi-extinction was only 17% of that faced by populations with zero evolutionary potential (i.e., heritability fixed at zero). The rates of evolution required to maintain persistence under simulated scenarios of moderate to rapid warming are plausible based on estimated heritabilities and rates of microevolution of timing traits in salmon and related species, although further empirical work is required to assess potential genetic and ecophysiological constraints on phenological adaptation. These results highlight the benefits to salmon management of maintaining evolutionary potential within populations, in addition to conserving key habitats and minimizing additional stressors where possible, as a means to build resilience to ongoing climate change. More generally, they demonstrate the importance and

  5. Long-term Effects of Clearcutting on N Availability and Soil Solution Chemistry in the Fraser Experimental Forest, CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, B.; Stottlemyer, R.; Elder, K.; Rhoades, C.

    2004-12-01

    The effects of timber harvest on soil water ion chemistry and flux have been studied for more than two decades at the Fraser Experimental Forest in central Colorado. We examined the long-term effects of a clearcutting experiment, 18 years after harvesting of a high-elevation mixed conifer forest (2900 m). Early effects of harvesting included elevated concentrations and flux of NO3-N in soil water, and these increases continued through 18 years. In 2003, total N loss from the harvested plot (2.0 kg ha-1 yr-1) was four times greater than the control (0.5 kg ha-1 yr-1). The most pronounced differences in subsurface chemistry and flux were found for nitrate (NO3-N). The proportion of total N in subsurface discharge as NO3-N increased from < 1% in the control to greater than 50% in the clearcut. The annual loss of NO3-N equaled 1.2 kg ha-1 in the clearcut, about one-sixth the loss rate for the first 8 years after harvest. Total post harvest leaching losses of inorganic N were about 67 kg/ha. Nitrate losses from the control forest were negligible (< 0.001 kg ha-1 yr-1) for all periods. On an annual basis net N mineralization showed no effect of harvest after 18 years, but resin bags collected more N in the clearcut site than in the control. High current losses of nitrogen from the clearcut may result from the biological factors of lower plant uptake and increased microbial nitrification, and the physical factors of greater snow accumulation and snowmelt discharge.

  6. Population divergence in plasticity of the AVT system and its association with aggressive behaviors in a Death Valley pupfish.

    PubMed

    Lema, Sean C

    2006-08-01

    Behavioral differences can evolve rapidly in allopatry, but little is known about the neural bases of such changes. Allopatric populations of Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis) vary in aggression and courtship behaviors in the wild. Two of these wild populations were recently found to differ in brain expression of arginine vasotocin (AVT)--a peptide hormone shown previously to modulate aggression in pupfish. These populations have been isolated for less than 4000 years, so it remained unclear whether the differences in behavior and neural AVT phenotype were evolved changes or plastic responses to ecologically dissimilar habitats. Here, I tested whether these population differences have a genetic basis by examining how aggressive behavior and neural AVT phenotype responded to ecologically relevant variation in salinity (0.4 ppt or 3 ppt) and temperature (stable or daily fluctuating). Pupfish from Big Spring were more aggressive than pupfish from the Amargosa River when bred and reared under common laboratory conditions. Morphometric analysis of preoptic AVT immunoreactivity showed that the populations differed in how the AVT system responded to salinity and temperature conditions, and revealed that this plasticity differed between parvocellular and magnocellular AVT neuron groups. Both populations also showed relationships between neural AVT phenotype and aggression in the rearing environment, although populations differed in how aggression related to variation in magnocellular AVT neuron size. Together, these results demonstrate that the pupfish populations have diverged in how physical and social conditions affect the AVT system, and provide evidence that the AVT system can evolve quickly to ecologically dissimilar environments.

  7. Water quality modeling in the systems impact assessment model for the Klamath River basin - Keno, Oregon to Seiad Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanna, R. Blair; Campbell, Sharon G.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the water quality model developed for the Klamath River System Impact Assessment Model (SIAM). The Klamath River SIAM is a decision support system developed by the authors and other US Geological Survey (USGS), Midcontinent Ecological Science Center staff to study the effects of basin-wide water management decisions on anadromous fish in the Klamath River. The Army Corps of Engineersa?? HEC5Q water quality modeling software was used to simulate water temperature, dissolved oxygen and conductivity in 100 miles of the Klamath River Basin in Oregon and California. The water quality model simulated three reservoirs and the mainstem Klamath River influenced by the Shasta and Scott River tributaries. Model development, calibration and two validation exercises are described as well as the integration of the water quality model into the SIAM decision support system software. Within SIAM, data are exchanged between the water quantity model (MODSIM), the water quality model (HEC5Q), the salmon population model (SALMOD) and methods for evaluating ecosystem health. The overall predictive ability of the water quality model is described in the context of calibration and validation error statistics. Applications of SIAM and the water quality model are described.

  8. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-60) - Rocky Reach - Maple Valley No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Mark A.

    2002-04-15

    Vegetation Management along the Rocky Reach – Maple Valley No. 1 Transmission Line ROW from structure 110/1 to the Maple Valley Substation. The transmission line is a 500 kV line. BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation along access roads and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation management along existing access road and around structure landings for the purpose of maintaining access to structures site. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards.

  9. Valleytronics. The valley Hall effect in MoS₂ transistors.

    PubMed

    Mak, K F; McGill, K L; Park, J; McEuen, P L

    2014-06-27

    Electrons in two-dimensional crystals with a honeycomb lattice structure possess a valley degree of freedom (DOF) in addition to charge and spin. These systems are predicted to exhibit an anomalous Hall effect whose sign depends on the valley index. Here, we report the observation of this so-called valley Hall effect (VHE). Monolayer MoS2 transistors are illuminated with circularly polarized light, which preferentially excites electrons into a specific valley, causing a finite anomalous Hall voltage whose sign is controlled by the helicity of the light. No anomalous Hall effect is observed in bilayer devices, which have crystal inversion symmetry. Our observation of the VHE opens up new possibilities for using the valley DOF as an information carrier in next-generation electronics and optoelectronics.

  10. Geohydrology, water quality, and simulation of groundwater flow in the stratified-drift aquifer system in Virgil Creek and Dryden Lake Valleys, Town of Dryden, Tompkins County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Todd S.; Bugliosi, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tompkins County Planning Department and the Town of Dryden, New York, began a study of the stratified-drift aquifer system in the Virgil Creek and Dryden Lake Valleys in the Town of Dryden, Tompkins County. The study provided geohydrologic data needed by the town and county to develop a strategy to manage and protect their water resources. In this study area, three extensive confined sand and gravel aquifers (the upper, middle, and lower confined aquifers) compose the stratified-drift aquifer system. The Dryden Lake Valley is a glaciated valley oriented parallel to the direction of ice movement. Erosion by ice extensively widened and deepened the valley, truncated bedrock hillsides, and formed a nearly straight, U-shaped bedrock trough. The maximum thickness of the valley fill in the central part of the valley is about 400 feet (ft). The Virgil Creek Valley in the east part of the study area underwent less severe erosion by ice than the Dryden Lake Valley, and hence, it has a bedrock floor that is several hundred feet higher in altitude than that in the Dryden Lake Valley. The sources and amounts of recharge were difficult to identify in most areas because the confined aquifers are overlain by confining units. However, in the vicinity of the Virgil Creek Dam, the upper confined aquifer crops out at land surface in the floodplain of a gorge eroded by Virgil Creek, and this is where the aquifer receives large amounts of recharge from precipitation that directly falls over the aquifer and from seepage losses from Virgil Creek. The results of streamflow measurements made in Virgil Creek where it flows through the gorge indicated that the stream lost 1.2 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) or 0.78 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water in the reach extending from 220 ft downstream from the dam to 1,200 ft upstream from the dam. In the southern part of the study area, large amounts of recharge also replenish the

  11. Groundwater quality in Coachella Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Coachella Valley is one of the study areas being evaluated. The Coachella study area is approximately 820 square miles (2,124 square kilometers) and includes the Coachella Valley groundwater basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). Coachella Valley has an arid climate, with average annual rainfall of about 6 inches (15 centimeters). The runoff from the surrounding mountains drains to rivers that flow east and south out of the study area to the Salton Sea. Land use in the study area is approximately 67 percent (%) natural, 21% agricultural, and 12% urban. The primary natural land cover is shrubland. The largest urban areas are the cities of Indio and Palm Springs (2010 populations of 76,000 and 44,000, respectively). Groundwater in this basin is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay derived from surrounding mountains. The primary aquifers in Coachella Valley are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells in Coachella Valley are completed to depths between 490 and 900 feet (149 to 274 meters), consist of solid casing from the land surface to a depth of 260 to 510 feet (79 to 155 meters), and are screened or perforated below the solid casing. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the surrounding mountains, and by direct infiltration of irrigation. The primary sources of discharge are pumping wells, evapotranspiration, and underflow to

  12. Weather and Management Effects over Nine Years of Net Ecosystem Direct Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a Cropping System in the Red River Valley, Manitoba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenuta, M.; Amiro, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Variation in weather and crop management practices strongly determines direct greenhouse gas emissions (CO2 and N2O) from agricultural crop land. Thus a long-term study was established to relate weather and management variations to direct emissions in the Northern Great Plains of Canada. Continuously emission determinations of CO2 and N2O were established at the Trace Gas Manitoba (TGAS-MAN) Long Term Greenhouse Gas Monitoring Site at Glenlea, Manitoba, using the flux gradient micrometeorlogical technique with a tunable diode laser analyzer. The soil is poorly drained clay in the Red River Valley. The field experiment consisted of four 4-hectare plots planted to corn in 2006 and faba bean in 2007. In 2008, grass-alfalfa forage was introduced to two plots (annual - perennial) and grown until 2011 whereas the other two plots (annual) were planted to annual crops: spring wheat, rapeseed, barley and spring wheat in 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011, respectively. In late September of 2011 the grass-alfalfa forage was killed and in 2012, 2013 and 2014 all four plots were planted with corn, soybean and spring wheat, respectively. Management decisions increased emissions such as fertilizer N addition, and hay, straw and silage crop removal greatly increased emissions while choosing legume grain and perennial crops reduced emissions. Weather variation affecting seasonal and daily soil moisture, length of spring freeze-thaw period, and crop yield served to increase or decrease emissions. The variation in management and weather will be discussed in regards to impact on net emissions over the nine year study and answer if development of greenhouse gas neutral cropping systems is possible.

  13. Superposition of basement involved structures and a detached thrust system: A model for existing and potential production in the San Emigdio Mountains, San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Medwedeff, D.A. ); Lin, Joseph, T.C.; Carr, T.R.; Stafford, J.M. )

    1993-02-01

    Seven balanced cross sections document the structural fabric of the San Emigdio Mountains and the adjacent San Joaquin Valley. Major tectonic elements are (1) the Los Lobos normal fault (LLF), (2) the White Wolf reverse fault (WWF), and (3) the Pleito fold-and-thrust belt (PTFB). The Oligo-Miocene LLF system created the distinction between the San Joaquin basin to the north and the Tejon platform to the south. Superposed on the LLF is the younger WWF which has further uplifted the Tejon platform. Along strike, the WWF alternately rotates, truncates, and overrides the LU. The even younger low-angle PTFB is primarily developed on the Tejon platform, but locally interferes both the LLF and WWf. Super position of these structures control the hydrocarbon traps. Wheeler Ridge field (73+MMBOE) is created by the superposition of the PFTB atop of pre-existing basement structures. The field produces from Eocene to late Miocene sands. Some sands are structurally controlled. Due to the complex structural setting, this 1922 field has been extended by discovery of additional reservoirs including a 1989 gas and condensate find in the Oligocene section. This success triggered our comprehensive structural reevaluation. Other fields along and south of the WWF trend are North Tejon (basement involved anticline; 56 MMBOE), Tejon (stratigraphic trap; 36 MMBOE) and Pleito (fault trap; 12 MMBOE) fields. The new structural model suggests two play types for exploration potential: (1) additional fault traps along the WWF trend; and (2) subthrust plays beneath the Pleito thrust. The prolific production history of the WWF trend and large structures mapped beneath the Pleito thrust bode well for future exploration in the San Emigdio Mountains area.

  14. Beaver assisted river valley formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westbrook, C.J.; Cooper, D.J.; Baker, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined how beaver dams affect key ecosystem processes, including pattern and process of sediment deposition, the composition and spatial pattern of vegetation, and nutrient loading and processing. We provide new evidence for the formation of heterogeneous beaver meadows on riverine system floodplains and terraces where dynamic flows are capable of breaching in-channel beaver dams. Our data show a 1.7-m high beaver dam triggered overbank flooding that drowned vegetation in areas deeply flooded, deposited nutrient-rich sediment in a spatially heterogeneous pattern on the floodplain and terrace, and scoured soils in other areas. The site quickly de-watered following the dam breach by high stream flows, protecting the deposited sediment from future re-mobilization by overbank floods. Bare sediment either exposed by scouring or deposited by the beaver flood was quickly colonized by a spatially heterogeneous plant community, forming a beaver meadow. Many willow and some aspen seedlings established in the more heavily disturbed areas, suggesting the site may succeed to a willow carr plant community suitable for future beaver re-occupation. We expand existing theory beyond the beaver pond to include terraces within valleys. This more fully explains how beavers can help drive the formation of alluvial valleys and their complex vegetation patterns as was first postulated by Ruedemann and Schoonmaker in 1938. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system installed at Kaw Valley State Bank and Trust Company, Topeka, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The building has approximately 5600 square feet of conditioned space. Solar energy was used for space heating, space cooling, and preheating domestic hot water (DHW). The solar energy system had an array of evacuated tube-type collectors with an area of 1068 square feet. A 50/50 solution of ethylene glycol and water was the transfer medium that delivered solar energy to a tube-in-shell heat exchanger that in turn delivered solar heated water to a 1100 gallon pressurized hot water storage tank. When solar energy was insufficient to satisfy the space heating and/or cooling demand, a natural gas-fired boiler provided auxiliary energy to the fan coil loops and/or the absorption chillers. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, and installation, operation and maintenance instructions are presented.

  16. Description of the final stadium larva of Heliocypha perforata perforata (Percheron), with discussion of the taxonomic characters of the larvae of the genus Heliocypha Fraser (Odonata: Zygoptera: Chlorocyphidae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi-Han

    2015-03-04

    The final stadium larva of Heliocypha perforata perforata is described and illustrated for the first time. It is characterized by having a row of filiform setae present laterally on distal half of prementum, 6-7 setae on the outer side of palpal lobe, very long lateral gills and distinct abdominal color pattern. The taxonomic characters of the larvae of the genus Heliocypha Fraser are discussed and summarized. Heliocypha larvae share a high similarity with Rhinocypha in general appearance and cannot be clearly distinguished from the latter in structure.

  17. [Rift valley fever].

    PubMed

    Markin, V A; Pantiukhov, V B; Markov, V I; Bondarev, V P

    2012-01-01

    In the last quarter of century virus of Rift valley fever (RVF) sharply extended its distribution by moving from Africa to Asia and evolving from low- to high pathogenic for humans causing severe hemorrhagic disease, practically equaling in this respect with some members ofa group of extremely dangerous pathogens. Morbidity and epidemics of RVF are analyzed. Evolution of epidemic development of the infection is examined. Necessity of development of means and methods for diagnostics, prophylaxis and therapy of RVF is underlined.

  18. Utilizing geophysical methods for asessment and characterization of canal seepage in El Paso's lower valley irrigation delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegon, Amanda Brooke

    El Paso County Water Improvement District No. 1 (EPCWID No.1) delivers the Rio Grande water for agricultural production and urban uses through numerous networked irrigation canals. Of the nearly 86 billion gallons of water released annually for irrigation uses in Texas, billions are lost due to evaporation and seepage in unlined canals with 56 million gallons of the billions are lost in Franklin Canal annually due to improper lining and sediment variation of the canals. To characterize seepage patterns and identify areas of high seepage, Electrical Resistivity, Ground Truthing via soil sample analysis were used along three, half-mile long sectioned canals during irrigation and non-irrigation seasons. The data lines acquired were processed in EARTHIMAGER 2D to create 2D vertical resistivity inversion profiles to locate potential areas of high seepage/high resistivity. The research results will help El Paso County Water Improvement District No. 1 to develop management strategies to conserve water and improve the delivery efficiency systems which leads to economic growth in the Rio Grande Basin.

  19. Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing Rift Valley fever virus antigens: Mice exhibit systemic immune responses as the result of oral administration of the transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Kalbina, Irina; Lagerqvist, Nina; Moiane, Bélisario; Ahlm, Clas; Andersson, Sören; Strid, Åke; Falk, Kerstin I

    2016-11-01

    The zoonotic Rift Valley fever virus affects livestock and humans in Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula. The economic impact of this pathogen due to livestock losses, as well as its relevance to public health, underscores the importance of developing effective and easily distributed vaccines. Vaccines that can be delivered orally are of particular interest. Here, we report the expression in transformed plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) of Rift Valley fever virus antigens. The antigens used in this study were the N protein and a deletion mutant of the Gn glycoprotein. Transformed lines were analysed for specific mRNA and protein content by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Furthermore, the plant-expressed antigens were evaluated for their immunogenicity in mice fed the transgenic plants. After oral intake of fresh transgenic plant material, a proportion of the mice elicited specific IgG antibody responses, as compared to the control animals that were fed wild-type plants and of which none sero-converted. Thus, we show that transgenic plants can be readily used to express and produce Rift Valley Fever virus proteins, and that the plants are immunogenic when given orally to mice. These are promising findings and provide a basis for further studies on edible plant vaccines against the Rift Valley fever virus.

  20. Common host-derived chemicals increase catches of disease-transmitting mosquitoes and can improve early warning systems for rift valley fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever (RVF), a mosquito-borne zoonosis, is a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. The emergence and re-emergence of the disease in the last 20 years especially in East Africa, poses a looming health threat which is likely to spread to beyond Africa. This threat is exacerbat...

  1. Impacts of small built infrastructure in inland valleys in Burkina Faso and Mali: Rationale for a systems approach that thinks beyond rice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katic, Pamela; Lautze, Jonathan; Namara, Regassa E.

    The potential to increase agricultural production in inland valleys in West Africa has received a good degree of attention in both national development strategies and academic literature, and improving agriculture productivity in inland valleys has been an active area of donor engagement. Despite this attention, documentation of the degree to which benefits are enhanced through construction of built water storage infrastructure in such sites is somewhat scant. This paper examines evidence from eight inland valley sites with recently-built water retention infrastructure (4 in southwest Burkina Faso, 4 in southeast Mali) to determine how economic returns derived from agricultural production have changed through built infrastructure construction. Farmer interviews were undertaken at each site to identify costs and benefits of agricultural production before and after small built infrastructure construction. Overall results indicate that net present value increased substantially after built infrastructure was constructed. The results nonetheless highlight substantial variation in economic impacts across sites. A central variable explaining such variation appears to be the degree to which water retention is exploited for groundwater-based offseason cultivation. These findings will help development planners to better predict the degree and nature of change engendered by water storage projects in inland valley sites, and help to ground-truth grand statements about the development potential of this piece of natural infrastructure.

  2. Groundwater Availability of the Central Valley Aquifer, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faunt, Claudia C.

    2009-01-01

    California's Central Valley covers about 20,000 square miles and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. More than 250 different crops are grown in the Central Valley with an estimated value of $17 billion per year. This irrigated agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage. Approximately one-sixth of the Nation's irrigated land is in the Central Valley, and about one-fifth of the Nation's groundwater demand is supplied from its aquifers. The Central Valley also is rapidly becoming an important area for California's expanding urban population. Since 1980, the population of the Central Valley has nearly doubled from 2 million to 3.8 million people. The Census Bureau projects that the Central Valley's population will increase to 6 million people by 2020. This surge in population has increased the competition for water resources within the Central Valley and statewide, which likely will be exacerbated by anticipated reductions in deliveries of Colorado River water to southern California. In response to this competition for water, a number of water-related issues have gained prominence: conservation of agricultural land, conjunctive use, artificial recharge, hydrologic implications of land-use change, and effects of climate variability. To provide information to stakeholders addressing these issues, the USGS Groundwater Resources Program made a detailed assessment of groundwater availability of the Central Valley aquifer system, that includes: (1) the present status of groundwater resources; (2) how these resources have changed over time; and (3) tools to assess system responses to stresses from future human uses and climate variability and change. This effort builds on previous investigations, such as the USGS Central Valley Regional Aquifer System and Analysis (CV-RASA) project and several other groundwater studies in the Valley completed by Federal, State and local agencies at differing scales. The

  3. 15. CLOSEUP OF THE SWITCHGEAR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Wyoming Valley ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CLOSEUP OF THE SWITCHGEAR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  4. Microscopic identification of prokaryotes in modern and ancient halite, Saline Valley and Death Valley, California.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Brian A; Lowenstein, Tim K; Timofeeff, Michael N

    2009-06-01

    Primary fluid inclusions in halite crystallized in Saline Valley, California, in 1980, 2004-2005, and 2007, contain rod- and coccoid-shaped microparticles the same size and morphology as archaea and bacteria living in modern brines. Primary fluid inclusions from a well-dated (0-100,000 years), 90 m long salt core from Badwater Basin, Death Valley, California, also contain microparticles, here interpreted as halophilic and halotolerant prokaryotes. Prokaryotes are distinguished from crystals on the basis of morphology, optical properties (birefringence), and uniformity of size. Electron micrographs of microparticles from filtered modern brine (Saline Valley), dissolved modern halite crystals (Saline Valley), and dissolved ancient halite crystals (Death Valley) support in situ microscopic observations that prokaryotes are present in fluid inclusions in ancient halite. In the Death Valley salt core, prokaryotes in fluid inclusions occur almost exclusively in halite precipitated in perennial saline lakes 10,000 to 35,000 years ago. This suggests that trapping and preservation of prokaryotes in fluid inclusions is influenced by the surface environment in which the halite originally precipitated. In all cases, prokaryotes in fluid inclusions in halite from the Death Valley salt core are miniaturized (<1 microm diameter cocci, <2.5 microm long, very rare rod shapes), which supports interpretations that the prokaryotes are indigenous to the halite and starvation survival may be the normal response of some prokaryotes to entrapment in fluid inclusions for millennia. These results reinforce the view that fluid inclusions in halite and possibly other evaporites are important repositories of microbial life and should be carefully examined in the search for ancient microorganisms on Earth, Mars, and elsewhere in the Solar System.

  5. On the interaction between the Lower Jordan River and the shallow aquifer system of the Jordan Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavit, U.; Polak, A.; Lipetz, A.; Gavrieli, I.; Marei, A.; Farber, E.; Vengosh, A.

    2004-12-01

    chloride concentration found in the other two fields, have only little effect on the river concentration since no significant convection influx exists and most of the processes are diffusive and slow. The sulfate concentration increases in the river from 380 mg/L to 450 mg/L. Except for one piezometer located in the middle field, all water samples that were pumped from the piezometers show higher sulfate concentration then those in the river. This significant result supports the hypothesis that the river sulfate increases due to its interaction with the surrounding groundwater system.

  6. Fluvial valleys and Martian palaeoclimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Baker, Victor R.

    1989-10-01

    Theoretical models of early Martian atmospheric evolution describe the maintenance of a dense CO2 atmosphere and a warm, wet climate until the end of the heavy-bombardment phase of impacting. However, the presence of very young, earthlike fluvial valleys on the northern flank of Alba Patera conflicts with this scenario. Whereas the widespread ancient Martian valleys generally have morphologies indicative of sapping erosion by the slow outflow of subsurface water, the local Alba valleys were probably formed by surface-runoff processes. Because subsurface water flow might be maintained by hydrothermal energy inputs and because surface-runoff valleys developed late in Martian history, it is not necessary to invoke drastically different planet-wide climatic conditions to explain valley development on Mars. The Alba fluvial valleys can be explained by hydrothermal activity or outflow-channel discharges that locally modified the atmosphere, including precipitation and local overland flow on low-permeability volcanic ash.

  7. Aquifer-System Compaction and Land Subsidence: Measurements, Analyses, and Simulations-the Holly Site, Edwards Air Force Base, Antelope Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Galloway, Devin L.

    2000-01-01

    Land subsidence resulting from ground-water-level declines has long been recognized as a problem in Antelope Valley, California. At Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), ground-water extractions have caused more than 150 feet of water-level decline, resulting in nearly 4 feet of subsidence. Differential land subsidence has caused sinklike depressions and earth fissures and has accelerated erosion of the playa lakebed surface of Rogers Lake at EAFB, adversely affecting the runways on the lakebed which are used for landing aircraft such as the space shuttles. Since 1990, about 0.4 foot of aquifer-system compaction has been measured at a deep (840 feet) borehole extensometer (Holly site) at EAFB. More than 7 years of paired ground-water-level and aquifer-system compaction measurements made at the Holly site were analyzed for this study. Annually, seasonal water-level fluctuations correspond to steplike variations in aquifer-system compaction; summer water-level drawdowns are associated with larger rates of compaction, and winter water-level recoveries are associated with smaller rates of compaction. The absence of aquifer-system expansion during recovery is consistent with the delayed drainage and resultant delayed, or residual, compaction of thick aquitards. A numerical one-dimensional MODFLOW model of aquitard drainage was used to refine estimates of aquifer-system hydraulic parameters that control compaction and to predict potential future compaction at the Holly site. The analyses and simulations of aquifer-system compaction are based on established theories of aquitard drainage. Historical ground-water-level and land-subsidence data collected near the Holly site were used to constrain simulations of aquifer-system compaction and land subsidence at the site for the period 1908?90, and ground-water-level and aquifer- system compaction measurements collected at the Holly site were used to constrain the model for the period 1990?97. Model results indicate that two thick

  8. Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Adam Szybinski

    2006-01-01

    The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley – Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1

  9. Geothermal hydrology of Warner Valley, Oregon: a reconnaissance study

    SciTech Connect

    Sammel, E.A.; Craig, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Warner Valley and its southern extension, Coleman Valley, are two of several high-desert valleys in the Basin and Range province of south-central Oregon that contain thermal waters. At least 20 thermal springs, defined as having temperatures of 20/sup 0/C or more, issue from Tertiary basaltic flows and tuffs in and near the valleys. Many shallow wells also produce thermal waters. The highest measured temperature is 127/sup 0/C, reported from a well known as Crump geyser, at a depth of 200 meters. The hottest spring, located near Crump geyser, has a surface temperature of 78/sup 0/C. The occurrence of these thermal waters is closely related to faults and fault intersections in the graben and horst structure of the valleys. Chemical analyses show that the thermal waters are of two types: sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate waters. The warmer waters are likely to have higher concentrations of sodium and chloride, as well as sulfate, silica, and dissolved solids, than the cooler waters. Chemical indicators show that the geothermal system is a hot-water rather than a vapor-dominated system. Conductive heat flow in areas of the valley unaffected by hydrothermal convection is probably about 75 milliwatts per square meter. The normal thermal gradient in valley-fill deposits in these areas may be about 40/sup 0/C per kilometer. Extensive areas underlain by thermal ground water occur near Crump geyser and Fisher Hot Spring.

  10. Geothermal hydrology of Warner Valley, Oregon: a reconnaissance study

    SciTech Connect

    Sammel, E.A.; Craig, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Warner Valley and its southern extension, Coleman Valley, are two of several high-desert valleys in the Basin and Range province of south-central Oregon that contain thermal waters. At least 20 thermal springs, defined as having temperatures of 20/sup 0/C or more, issue from Tertiary basaltic flows and tuffs in and near the valleys. Many shallow wells also produce thermal waters. The highest measured temperature is 127/sup 0/C, reported from a well known as Crump geyser, at a depth of 200 meters. The hottest spring, located near Crump geyser, has a surface temperature of 78/sup 0/C. The occurrence of these thermal waters is closely related to faults and fault intersections in the graben and horst structure of the valleys. Chemical analyses show that the thermal waters are of two types: sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate waters. Chemical indicators show that the geothermal system is a hot-water rather than a vapor-dominated system. Conductive heat flow in areas of the valley unaffected by hydrothermal convection is probably about 75 milliwatts per square meter. The normal thermal gradient in valley-fill dpeosits in these areas may be about 40/sup 0/C per kilometer. Geothermometers and mixing models indicate that temperatures of equilibration are at least 170/sup 0/C for the thermal components of the hotter waters. The size and location of geothermal reservoirs are unknown.

  11. Optical manipulation of valley pseudospin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ziliang; Sun, Dezheng; Heinz, Tony F.

    2017-01-01

    The coherent manipulation of spin and pseudospin underlies existing and emerging quantum technologies, including quantum communication and quantum computation. Valley polarization, associated with the occupancy of degenerate, but quantum mechanically distinct valleys in momentum space, closely resembles spin polarization and has been proposed as a pseudospin carrier for the future quantum electronics. Valley exciton polarization has been created in the transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers using excitation by circularly polarized light and has been detected both optically and electrically. In addition, the existence of coherence in the valley pseudospin has been identified experimentally. The manipulation of such valley coherence has, however, remained out of reach. Here we demonstrate all-optical control of the valley coherence by means of the pseudomagnetic field associated with the optical Stark effect. Using below-bandgap circularly polarized light, we rotate the valley exciton pseudospin in monolayer WSe2 on the femtosecond timescale. Both the direction and speed of the rotation can be manipulated optically by tuning the dynamic phase of excitons in opposite valleys. This study unveils the possibility of generation, manipulation, and detection of the valley pseudospin by coupling to photons.

  12. Infection of gill and kidney of Fraser River sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), by Parvicapsula minibicornis and its effect on host physiology.

    PubMed

    Bradford, M J; Lovy, J; Patterson, D A

    2010-09-01

    Adult sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), migrating upstream in the Fraser River, British Columbia, are exposed to the myxozoan parasite Parvicapsula minibicornis when they enter the river from the ocean. Infections are initially localized in the kidney but have recently been associated with branchitis in one population. Adult fish from five locations in the watershed were sampled to determine whether branchitis was widespread. P. minibicornis infections in kidney glomeruli were prevalent in all samples except for a sample of fish that had just entered the Fraser River from the ocean. For fish captured in spawning streams, parasites were observed in the renal tubules and gill, and branchitis was observed in 70% of fish. Plasma osmolality was negatively correlated with the number of parasites in the kidney tubules, which we hypothesize to be caused by the breach of glomerular membranes as the parasite leaves the fish. Plasma lactate values increased with increasing levels of pathology in gills. These findings support the hypothesis that P. minibicornis impacts the physiology of migrating fish, which may in turn affect the likelihood that adults will be able to migrate and spawn successfully.

  13. Environmental audit: West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Audit of West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) located in West Valley, New York. The WVDP Environmental Audit was conducted from July 29 through August 16, 1991, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). This Audit evaluated environmental programs and activities at WVDP as well as the overall environmental management system. The scope of the Environmental Audit was comprehensive, addressing environmental media and Federal, state, and local regulations, with the exception of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Also addressed were DOE Orders, WVDP 1989 ES&H Assessment Action Plan, formalized facility or program operating procedures, and BMPS. The technical disciplines addressed by the Audit were: Air; Surface Water; Soils, Sediment and Biota; Groundwater; Waste Management; Toxic and Chemical Materials; Radiation; Quality Assurance; and Inactive Waste Sites. In addition, the Audit included a review of environmental management programs within the West Valley Project Office (WVPO). West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS), and Subcontractor organizations. The effectiveness of environmental monitoring programs was a major component of the review conducted within each technical discipline.

  14. Environmental audit: West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Audit of West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) located in West Valley, New York. The WVDP Environmental Audit was conducted from July 29 through August 16, 1991, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). This Audit evaluated environmental programs and activities at WVDP as well as the overall environmental management system. The scope of the Environmental Audit was comprehensive, addressing environmental media and Federal, state, and local regulations, with the exception of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Also addressed were DOE Orders, WVDP 1989 ES H Assessment Action Plan, formalized facility or program operating procedures, and BMPS. The technical disciplines addressed by the Audit were: Air; Surface Water; Soils, Sediment and Biota; Groundwater; Waste Management; Toxic and Chemical Materials; Radiation; Quality Assurance; and Inactive Waste Sites. In addition, the Audit included a review of environmental management programs within the West Valley Project Office (WVPO). West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS), and Subcontractor organizations. The effectiveness of environmental monitoring programs was a major component of the review conducted within each technical discipline.

  15. Ground-water conditions in southern Utah Valley and Goshen Valley, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cordova, R.M.

    1970-01-01

    The investigation of ground-water conditions in southern Utah Valley and Goshen Valley, Utah, was made by the U. S. Geological Survey as part of a cooperative program with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, to investigate the water resources of the State. The purposes of the investigation were to (1) determine the occurrence, recharge, discharge, movement, storage, chemical quality, and availability of ground water; (2) appraise the effects of increased withdrawal of water from wells; and (3) evaluate the effect of the Central Utah Project on the ground-water reservoir and the water supply of Utah Lake.This report presents a description of the aquifer system in the two valleys, a detailed description of the ground-water resources, and conclusions about potential development and its effect on the hydrologic conditions in the valleys. Two supplementary reports are products of the investigation. A basic-data release (Cordova, 1969) contains most of the basic data collected for the investigation, including well characteristics, drillers' logs, water levels, pumpage from wells, chemical analyses of ground and surface waters, and discharge of selected springs, drains, and streams. An interpretive report (Cordova and Mower, 1967) contains the results of a large-scale aquifer test in southern Utah Valley.

  16. 7. Photocopy of map of the Agua Fria Valley and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of map of the Agua Fria Valley and lands to be irrigated by the Agua Fria Water and Land Company. Photographer Mark Durben, 1987 Source: 'Map of the Agua Fria Valley and the Western Portion of the Salt River Valley Showing the System of Reservoirs and Canals of the Agua Fria Water and Land Company and the Land to be Irrigated Thereby 160,000 Acres of New Land to be Reclaimed in the Maricopa County, Arizona Territory,' (Brochure) Union Photo Engraving Company, c. 1895, Salt River Project Research Archives, Tempe, Arizona. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. Revised geologic cross sections of parts of the Colorado, White River, and Death Valley regional groundwater flow systems, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, William R.; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Langenheim, V.E.; Berger, Mary A.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents revisions to parts of seven of the ten cross sections originally published in U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2006-1040. The revisions were necessary to correct errors in some of the original cross sections, and to show new parts of several sections that were extended and (or) appended to the original section profiles. Revisions were made to cross sections C-C', D-D', E-E', F-F', G-G', I-I', and J-J', and the parts of the sections revised or extended are highlighted below the sections on plate 1 by red brackets and the word "revised," or "extended." Sections not listed above, as well as the interpretive text and figures, are generally unchanged from the original report. Cross section C-C' includes revisions in the east Mormon Mountains in the east part of the section; D-D' includes revisions in the Mormon Mesa area in the east part of the section; E-E' includes revisions in the Muddy Mountains in the east part of the section; F-F' includes revisions from the Muddy Mountains to the south Virgin Mountains in the east part of the section; and J-J' includes some revisions from the east Mormon Mountains to the Virgin Mountains. The east end of G-G' was extended about 16 km from the Black Mountains to the southern Virgin Mountains, and the northern end of I-I' was extended about 45 km from the Muddy Mountains to the Mormon Mountains, and revisions were made in the Muddy Mountains part of the original section. This report contains 10 interpretive cross sections and an integrated text describing the geology of parts of the Colorado, White River, and Death Valley regional groundwater flow systems in Nevada, Utah, and Arizona. The primary purpose of the report is to provide geologic framework data for input into a numerical groundwater model. Therefore, the stratigraphic and structural summaries are written in a hydrogeologic context. The oldest rocks (basement) are Early Proterozoic metamorphic and intrusive crystalline rocks that are considered

  18. The California Valley grassland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.; Schoenherr, Allan A.

    1990-01-01

    Grasslands are distributed throughout California from Oregon to Baja California Norte and from the coast to the desert (Brown 1982) (Figure 1). This review will focus on the dominant formation in cismontane California, a community referred to as Valley Grassland (Munz 1959). Today, Valley Grassland is dominated by non-native annual grasses in genera such as Avena (wild oat), Bromus (brome grass), and Hordeum (barley), and is often referred to as the California annual grassland. On localized sites, native perennial bunchgrasses such as Stipa pultra (purple needle grass) may dominate and such sites are interpreted to be remnants of the pristine valley grassland. In northwestern California a floristically distinct formation of the Valley Grassland, known as Coast Prairie (Munz 1959) or Northern Coastal Grassland (Holland and Keil 1989) is recognized. The dominant grasses include many native perennial bunchgrasses in genera such as Agrostis, Calamagrostis, Danthonia, Deschampsia, Festuca, Koeleria and Poa (Heady et al. 1977). Non-native annuals do not dominate, but on some sites non-native perennials like Anthoxanthum odoratum may colonize the native grassland (Foin and Hektner 1986). Elevationally, California's grasslands extend from sea level to at leas 1500 m. The upper boundary is vague because montane grassland formations are commonly referred to as meadows; a community which Munz (1959) does not recognize. Holland and Keil (1989) describe the montane meadow as an azonal community; that is, a community restricted not so much to a particular climatic zone but rather controlled by substrate characteristics. They consider poor soil-drainage an over-riding factor in the development of montane meadows and, in contrast to grasslands, meadows often remain green through the summer drought. Floristically, meadows are composed of graminoids; Cyperaceae, Juncaceae, and rhizomatous grasses such as Agropyron (wheat grass). Some bunchgrasses, such as Muhlenbergia rigens, are

  19. Quality of Shallow Groundwater and Drinking Water in the Mississippi Embayment-Texas Coastal Uplands Aquifer System and the Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer, South-Central United States, 1994-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Heather L.; Kingsbury, James A.; Tollett, Roland W.; Seanor, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    The Mississippi embayment-Texas coastal uplands aquifer system is an important source of drinking water, providing about 724 million gallons per day to about 8.9 million people in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, and Alabama. The Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer ranks third in the Nation for total withdrawals of which more than 98 percent is used for irrigation. From 1994 through 2004, water-quality samples were collected from 169 domestic, monitoring, irrigation, and public-supply wells in the Mississippi embayment-Texas coastal uplands aquifer system and the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in various land-use settings and of varying well capacities as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Groundwater samples were analyzed for physical properties and about 200 water-quality constituents, including total dissolved solids, major inorganic ions, trace elements, radon, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, pesticides, pesticide degradates, and volatile organic compounds. The occurrence of nutrients and pesticides differed among four groups of the 114 shallow wells (less than or equal to 200 feet deep) in the study area. Tritium concentrations in samples from the Holocene alluvium, Pleistocene valley trains, and shallow Tertiary wells indicated a smaller component of recent groundwater than samples from the Pleistocene terrace deposits. Although the amount of agricultural land overlying the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer was considerably greater than areas overlying parts of the shallow Tertiary and Pleistocene terrace deposits wells, nitrate was rarely detected and the number of pesticides detected was lower than other shallow wells. Nearly all samples from the Holocene alluvium and Pleistocene valley trains were anoxic, and the reducing conditions in these aquifers likely result in denitrification of nitrate. In contrast, most samples from the

  20. Synthetic River Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2011-12-01

    The description of fluvial form has evolved from anecdotal descriptions to artistic renderings to 2D plots of cross section or longitudinal profiles and more recently 3D digital models. Synthetic river valleys, artificial 3D topographic models of river topography, have a plethora of potential applications in fluvial geomorphology, and the earth sciences in general, as well as in computer science and ecology. Synthetic river channels have existed implicitly since approximately the 1970s and can be simulated from a variety of approaches spanning the artistic and numerical. An objective method of synthesizing 3D stream topography based on reach scale attributes would be valuable for sizing 3D flumes in the physical and numerical realms, as initial input topography for morphodynamic models, stream restoration design, historical reconstruction, and mechanistic testing of interactions of channel geometric elements. Quite simply - simulation of synthetic channel geometry of prescribed conditions can allow systematic evaluation of the dominant relationships between river flow and geometry. A new model, the control curve method, is presented that uses hierarchically scaled parametric curves in over-lapping 2D planes to create synthetic river valleys. The approach is able to simulate 3D stream geometry from paired 2D descriptions and can allow experimental insight into form-process relationships in addition to visualizing past measurements of channel form that are limited to two dimension descriptions. Results are presented that illustrate the models ability to simulate fluvial topography representative of real world rivers as well as how channel geometric elements can be adjusted. The testing of synthetic river valleys would open up a wealth of knowledge as to why some 3D attributes of river channels are more prevalent than others as well as bridging the gap between the 2D descriptions that have dominated fluvial geomorphology the past century and modern, more complete, 3D