Science.gov

Sample records for frequency analyzers

  1. Frequency spectrum analyzer with phase-lock

    DOEpatents

    Boland, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    A frequency-spectrum analyzer with phase-lock for analyzing the frequency and amplitude of an input signal is comprised of a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) which is driven by a ramp generator, and a phase error detector circuit. The phase error detector circuit measures the difference in phase between the VCO and the input signal, and drives the VCO locking it in phase momentarily with the input signal. The input signal and the output of the VCO are fed into a correlator which transfers the input signal to a frequency domain, while providing an accurate absolute amplitude measurement of each frequency component of the input signal.

  2. Techniques for analyzing frequency selective surfaces - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, Raj; Chan, Chi H.; Cwik, Tom

    1988-01-01

    A number of representative techniques for analyzing frequency-selective surfaces (FSSs), which comprise periodic arrays of patches or apertures in a conducting screen and find important applications as filters in microwaves and optics, are discussed. The basic properties of the FSSs are reviewed and several different approaches to predicting their frequency-response characteristics are described. Some recent developments in the treatment of truncated, curved, and doubly periodic screens are mentioned and representative experimental results are included.

  3. Primary Multi-frequency Data Analyze in Electrical Impedance Scanning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruigang; Dong, Xiuzhen; Fu, Feng; Shi, Xuetao; You, Fusheng; Ji, Zhenyu

    2005-01-01

    This paper deduced the Cole-Cole arc equation in form of admittance by the traditional Cole-Cole equation in form of impedance. Comparing to the latter, the former is more adaptive to the electrical impedance scanning which using lower frequency region. When using our own electrical impedance scanning device at 50-5000Hz, the measurement data separated on the arc of the former, while collected near the direct current resistor on the arc of the latter. The four parameters of the former can be evaluated by the least square method. The frequency of the imaginary part of admittance reaching maximum can be calculated by the Cole-Cole parameters. In conclusion, the Cole-Cole arc in form of admittance is more effective to multi-frequency data analyze at lower frequency region, like EIS.

  4. Probing a Spray Using Frequency-Analyzed Light Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael H.; Rhys, Noah O.

    2008-01-01

    Frequency-analyzed laser-light scattering (FALLS) is a relatively simple technique that can be used to measure principal characteristics of a sheet of sprayed liquid as it breaks up into ligaments and then the ligaments break up into droplets. In particular, through frequency analysis of laser light scattered from a spray, it is possible to determine whether the laser-illuminated portion of the spray is in the intact-sheet region, the ligament region, or the droplet region. By logical extension, it is possible to determine the intact length from the location of the laser beam at the transition between the intact-sheet and ligament regions and to determine a breakup frequency from the results of the frequency analysis. Hence, FALLS could likely be useful both as a means of performing research on sprays in general and as a means of diagnostic sensing in diverse applications in which liquid fuels are sprayed. Sprays are also used for drying and to deposit paints and other coating materials.

  5. Rectennas at optical frequencies: How to analyze the response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Saumil; Moddel, Garret

    2015-08-01

    Optical rectennas, antenna-coupled diode rectifiers that receive optical-frequency electromagnetic radiation and convert it to DC output, have been proposed for use in harvesting electromagnetic radiation from a blackbody source. The operation of these devices is qualitatively different from that of lower-frequency rectennas, and their design requires a new approach. To that end, we present a method to determine the rectenna response to high frequency illumination. It combines classical circuit analysis with classical and quantum-based photon-assisted tunneling response of a high-speed diode. We demonstrate the method by calculating the rectenna response for low and high frequency monochromatic illumination, and for radiation from a blackbody source. Such a blackbody source can be a hot body generating waste heat, or radiation from the sun.

  6. A general purpose wideband optical spatial frequency spectrum analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, G. S.; Mellor, F. A.

    1972-01-01

    The light scattered at various angles by a transparent media is studied. An example of these applications is the optical Fourier spectrum measurement resulting from various spatial frequencies which were recorded on a photographic emulsion. A method for obtaining these measurements consists of illuminating the test object with parallel monochromatic light. A stationary lens, placed in the resulting wavefield at a distance of one focal length from the object, will focus parallel waves emanating from the test object at a point lying in the focal plane of the lens. A light detector with a small filtering aperture is then used to measure the intensity variation of the light in the focal or transform plane of the lens. Such measurements require the use of a lens which is highly corrected for all of the common aberrations except chromatic aberration.

  7. Analyzing Radio-Frequency Coverage for the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolen, Steven M.; Sham, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    The Interactive Coverage Analysis Tool (iCAT) is an interactive desktop computer program serving to (1) support planning of coverage, and management of usage of frequencies, of current and proposed radio communication systems on and near the International Space Station (ISS) and (2) enable definition of requirements for development of future such systems. The iCAT can also be used in design trade studies for other (both outer-space and terrestrial) communication systems. A user can enter the parameters of a communication-system link budget in a table in a worksheet. The nominal (onaxis) link values for the bit-to-noise-energy ratio, received isotropic power (RIP), carrier-to-noise ratio (C/N), power flux density (PFD), and link margin of the system are calculated and displayed in the table. Plots of field gradients for the RIP, C/N, PFD, and link margin are constructed in an ISS coordinate system, at a specified link range, for both the forward and return link parameters, and are displayed in worksheets. The forward and reverse link antenna gain patterns are also constructed and displayed. Line-of-sight (LOS) obstructions can be both incorporated into the gradient plots and displayed on separate plots.

  8. High-frequency field-deployable isotope analyzer for hydrological applications

    Treesearch

    Elena S.F. Berman; Manish Gupta; Chris Gabrielli; Tina Garland; Jeffrey J. McDonnell

    2009-01-01

    A high-frequency, field-deployable liquid water isotope analyzer was developed. The instrument was deployed for 4 contiguous weeks in the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest Long-term Ecological Research site in western Oregon, where it was used for real-time measurement of the isotope ratios of precipitation and stream water during three large storm events. We were able...

  9. Retarding field analyzer for ion energy distribution measurements at a radio-frequency biased electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Gahan, D.; Hopkins, M. B.; Dolinaj, B.

    2008-03-15

    A retarding field energy analyzer designed to measure ion energy distributions impacting a radio-frequency biased electrode in a plasma discharge is examined. The analyzer is compact so that the need for differential pumping is avoided. The analyzer is designed to sit on the electrode surface, in place of the substrate, and the signal cables are fed out through the reactor side port. This prevents the need for modifications to the rf electrode--as is normally the case for analyzers built into such electrodes. The capabilities of the analyzer are demonstrated through experiments with various electrode bias conditions in an inductively coupledmore » plasma reactor. The electrode is initially grounded and the measured distributions are validated with the Langmuir probe measurements of the plasma potential. Ion energy distributions are then given for various rf bias voltage levels, discharge pressures, rf bias frequencies - 500 kHz to 30 MHz, and rf bias waveforms - sinusoidal, square, and dual frequency.« less

  10. Data mining of tree-based models to analyze freeway accident frequency.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Yen; Chen, Wen-Chieh

    2005-01-01

    Statistical models, such as Poisson or negative binomial regression models, have been employed to analyze vehicle accident frequency for many years. However, these models have their own model assumptions and pre-defined underlying relationship between dependent and independent variables. If these assumptions are violated, the model could lead to erroneous estimation of accident likelihood. Classification and Regression Tree (CART), one of the most widely applied data mining techniques, has been commonly employed in business administration, industry, and engineering. CART does not require any pre-defined underlying relationship between target (dependent) variable and predictors (independent variables) and has been shown to be a powerful tool, particularly for dealing with prediction and classification problems. This study collected the 2001-2002 accident data of National Freeway 1 in Taiwan. A CART model and a negative binomial regression model were developed to establish the empirical relationship between traffic accidents and highway geometric variables, traffic characteristics, and environmental factors. The CART findings indicated that the average daily traffic volume and precipitation variables were the key determinants for freeway accident frequencies. By comparing the prediction performance between the CART and the negative binomial regression models, this study demonstrates that CART is a good alternative method for analyzing freeway accident frequencies. By comparing the prediction performance between the CART and the negative binomial regression models, this study demonstrates that CART is a good alternative method for analyzing freeway accident frequencies.

  11. ProteinAC: a frequency domain technique for analyzing protein dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt Varolgunes, Yasemin; Demir, Alper

    2018-03-01

    It is widely believed that the interactions of proteins with ligands and other proteins are determined by their dynamic characteristics as opposed to only static, time-invariant processes. We propose a novel computational technique, called ProteinAC (PAC), that can be used to analyze small scale functional protein motions as well as interactions with ligands directly in the frequency domain. PAC was inspired by a frequency domain analysis technique that is widely used in electronic circuit design, and can be applied to both coarse-grained and all-atom models. It can be considered as a generalization of previously proposed static perturbation-response methods, where the frequency of the perturbation becomes the key. We discuss the precise relationship of PAC to static perturbation-response schemes. We show that the frequency of the perturbation may be an important factor in protein dynamics. Perturbations at different frequencies may result in completely different response behavior while magnitude and direction are kept constant. Furthermore, we introduce several novel frequency dependent metrics that can be computed via PAC in order to characterize response behavior. We present results for the ferric binding protein that demonstrate the potential utility of the proposed techniques.

  12. Wideband optical vector network analyzer based on optical single-sideband modulation and optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Xue, Min; Pan, Shilong; He, Chao; Guo, Ronghui; Zhao, Yongjiu

    2013-11-15

    A novel approach to increase the measurement range of the optical vector network analyzer (OVNA) based on optical single-sideband (OSSB) modulation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed system, each comb line in an optical frequency comb (OFC) is selected by an optical filter and used as the optical carrier for the OSSB-based OVNA. The frequency responses of an optical device-under-test (ODUT) are thus measured channel by channel. Because the comb lines in the OFC have fixed frequency spacing, by fitting the responses measured in all channels together, the magnitude and phase responses of the ODUT can be accurately achieved in a large range. A proof-of-concept experiment is performed. A measurement range of 105 GHz and a resolution of 1 MHz is achieved when a five-comb-line OFC with a frequency spacing of 20 GHz is applied to measure the magnitude and phase responses of a fiber Bragg grating.

  13. High Frequency Analyzer (HFA) of Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) onboard the Arase spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumamoto, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Kasahara, Yoshiya; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Yagitani, Satoshi; Ishisaka, Keigo; Imachi, Tomohiko; Ozaki, Mitsunori; Matsuda, Shoya; Shoji, Masafumi; Matsuoka, Aayako; Katoh, Yuto; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Obara, Takahiro

    2018-05-01

    The High Frequency Analyzer (HFA) is a subsystem of the Plasma Wave Experiment onboard the Arase (ERG) spacecraft. The main purposes of the HFA include (1) determining the electron number density around the spacecraft from observations of upper hybrid resonance (UHR) waves, (2) measuring the electromagnetic field component of whistler-mode chorus in a frequency range above 20 kHz, and (3) observing radio and plasma waves excited in the storm-time magnetosphere. Two components of AC electric fields detected by Wire Probe Antenna and one component of AC magnetic fields detected by Magnetic Search Coils are fed to the HFA. By applying analog and digital signal processing in the HFA, the spectrograms of two electric fields (EE mode) or one electric field and one magnetic field (EB mode) in a frequency range from 10 kHz to 10 MHz are obtained at an interval of 8 s. For the observation of plasmapause, the HFA can also be operated in PP (plasmapause) mode, in which spectrograms of one electric field component below 1 MHz are obtained at an interval of 1 s. In the initial HFA operations from January to July, 2017, the following results are obtained: (1) UHR waves, auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), whistler-mode chorus, electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves, and nonthermal terrestrial continuum radiation were observed by the HFA in geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions. (2) In the test operations of the polarization observations on June 10, 2017, the fundamental R-X and L-O mode AKR and the second-harmonic R-X mode AKR from different sources in the northern polar region were observed. (3) The semiautomatic UHR frequency identification by the computer and a human operator was applied to the HFA spectrograms. In the identification by the computer, we used an algorithm for narrowing down the candidates of UHR frequency by checking intensity and bandwidth. Then, the identified UHR frequency by the computer was checked and corrected if needed by the human

  14. High-frequency acoustic spectrum analyzer based on polymer integrated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacoubian, Araz

    This dissertation presents an acoustic spectrum analyzer based on nonlinear polymer-integrated optics. The device is used in a scanning heterodyne geometry by zero biasing a Michelson interferometer. It is capable of detecting vibrations from DC to the GHz range. Initial low frequency experiments show that the device is an effective tool for analyzing an acoustic spectrum even in noisy environments. Three generations of integrated sensors are presented, starting with a very lossy (86 dB total insertion loss) initial device that detects vibrations as low as λ/10, and second and third generation improvements with a final device of 44 dB total insertion loss. The sensor was further tested for detecting a pulsed laser-excited vibration and resonances due to the structure of the sample. The data are compared to the acoustic spectrum measured using a low loss passive fiber interferometer detection scheme which utilizes a high speed detector. The peaks present in the passive detection scheme are clearly visible with our sensor data, which have a lower noise floor. Hybrid integration of GHz electronics is also investigated in this dissertation. A voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) is integrated on a polymer device using a new approach. The VCO is shown to operate as specified by the manufacturer, and the RF signal is efficiently launched onto the micro-strip line used for EO modulation. In the future this technology can be used in conjunction with the presented sensor to produce a fully integrated device containing high frequency drive electronics controlled by low DC voltage. Issues related to device fabrication, loss analysis, RF power delivery to drive circuitry, efficient poling of large area samples, and optimizing poling conditions are also discussed throughout the text.

  15. Ground penetrating radar data analyzed in frequency and time domain for engineering issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzoli, Luigi; Giampaolo, Valeria; Votta, Mario; Rizzo, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) allows to analyze reinforced concrete and masonry structures, in order to identify gaps, defects, delaminations, and fracture. In the field of engineering, non-invasive diagnostic is used to test the processes of construction and maintenance of buildings and artifacts of the individual components, to reduce analysis time and costs of intervention (Proto et al., 2010). Ground penetrating radar (GPR) allows to evaluate with a good effectiveness the state of conservation of engineering construction (Mellet 1995)). But there are some uncertainties in GPR data due to the complexity of artificial objects. In this work we try to evaluate the capability of GPR for the characterization of building structures in the laboratory and in-situ. In particular the focus of this research consists in integrate spectral analysis to time domain data to enhance information obtained in a classical GPR processing approach. For this reason we have applied spectral analysis to localize and characterize the presence of extraneous bodies located in a test site rebuilt in laboratory to simulate a part of a typical concrete road. The test site is a segment of a road superimposed on two different layers of sand and gravel of varying thickness inside which were introduced steel rebar, PVC and aluminium pipes. This structure has also been cracked in a predetermined area and hidden internal fractures were investigated. The GPR has allowed to characterize the panel in a non-invasive mode and radargrams were acquired using two-dimensional and three-dimensional models from data obtained with the use of 400, 900, 1500 and 2000 Mhz antennas. We have also studied with 2 GHz antenna a beam of 'to years precast bridge characterized by a high state of decay. The last case study consisted in the characterization of a radiant floor analyzed with an integrated use of GPR and infrared thermography. In the frequency domain analysis has been possible to determine variations in the

  16. High-frequency asymptotic methods for analyzing the EM scattering by open-ended waveguide cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, R. J.; Pathak, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    Four high-frequency methods are described for analyzing the electromagnetic (EM) scattering by electrically large open-ended cavities. They are: (1) a hybrid combination of waveguide modal analysis and high-frequency asymptotics, (2) geometrical optics (GO) ray shooting, (3) Gaussian beam (GB) shooting, and (4) the generalized ray expansion (GRE) method. The hybrid modal method gives very accurate results but is limited to cavities which are made up of sections of uniform waveguides for which the modal fields are known. The GO ray shooting method can be applied to much more arbitrary cavity geometries and can handle absorber treated interior walls, but it generally only predicts the major trends of the RCS pattern and not the details. Also, a very large number of rays need to be tracked for each new incidence angle. Like the GO ray shooting method, the GB shooting method can handle more arbitrary cavities, but it is much more efficient and generally more accurate than the GO method because it includes the fields diffracted by the rim at the open end which enter the cavity. However, due to beam divergence effects the GB method is limited to cavities which are not very long compared to their width. The GRE method overcomes the length-to-width limitation of the GB method by replacing the GB's with GO ray tubes which are launched in the same manner as the GB's to include the interior rim diffracted field. This method gives good accuracy and is generally more efficient than the GO method, but a large number of ray tubes needs to be tracked.

  17. Analyzing crash frequency in freeway tunnels: A correlated random parameters approach.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qinzhong; Tarko, Andrew P; Meng, Xianghai

    2018-02-01

    The majority of past road safety studies focused on open road segments while only a few focused on tunnels. Moreover, the past tunnel studies produced some inconsistent results about the safety effects of the traffic patterns, the tunnel design, and the pavement conditions. The effects of these conditions therefore remain unknown, especially for freeway tunnels in China. The study presented in this paper investigated the safety effects of these various factors utilizing a four-year period (2009-2012) of data as well as three models: 1) a random effects negative binomial model (RENB), 2) an uncorrelated random parameters negative binomial model (URPNB), and 3) a correlated random parameters negative binomial model (CRPNB). Of these three, the results showed that the CRPNB model provided better goodness-of-fit and offered more insights into the factors that contribute to tunnel safety. The CRPNB was not only able to allocate the part of the otherwise unobserved heterogeneity to the individual model parameters but also was able to estimate the cross-correlations between these parameters. Furthermore, the study results showed that traffic volume, tunnel length, proportion of heavy trucks, curvature, and pavement rutting were associated with higher frequencies of traffic crashes, while the distance to the tunnel wall, distance to the adjacent tunnel, distress ratio, International Roughness Index (IRI), and friction coefficient were associated with lower crash frequencies. In addition, the effects of the heterogeneity of the proportion of heavy trucks, the curvature, the rutting depth, and the friction coefficient were identified and their inter-correlations were analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-Seismology Seismology: Using QuakeCatchers to Analyze the Frequency of Bridge Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtier, A. M.; Constantin, C.; Wilson, C. F.

    2013-12-01

    We conducted an experiment to test the feasibility of measuring seismic waves generated by traffic near James Madison University. We used QuakeCatcher seismometers (originally designed for passive seismic measurement) to measure vibrations associated with traffic on a wooden bridge as well as a nearby concrete bridge. This experiment was a signal processing exercise for a student research project and did not draw any conclusions regarding bridge safety or security. The experiment consisted of two temporary measurement stations comprised of a laptop computer and a QuakeCatcher - a small seismometer that plugs directly into the laptop via a USB cable. The QuakeCatcher was taped to the ground at the edge of the bridge to achieve good coupling, and vibrational events were triggered repeatedly with a control vehicle to accumulate a consistent dataset of the bridge response. For the wooden bridge, the resulting 'seismograms' were converted to Seismic Analysis Code (SAC) format and analyzed in MATLAB. The concrete bridge did not generate vibrations significant enough to trigger the recording mechanism on the QuakeCatchers. We will present an overview of the experimental design and frequency content of the traffic patterns, as well as a discussion of the instructional benefits of using the QuakeCatcher sensors in this non-traditional setting.

  19. Analyzing Effect of System Inertia on Grid Frequency Forecasting Usnig Two Stage Neuro-Fuzzy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourey, Divyansh R.; Gupta, Himanshu; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Jitesh; Kumar, Anand; Mishra, Anup

    2018-04-01

    Frequency forecasting is an important aspect of power system operation. The system frequency varies with load-generation imbalance. Frequency variation depends upon various parameters including system inertia. System inertia determines the rate of fall of frequency after the disturbance in the grid. Though, inertia of the system is not considered while forecasting the frequency of power system during planning and operation. This leads to significant errors in forecasting. In this paper, the effect of inertia on frequency forecasting is analysed for a particular grid system. In this paper, a parameter equivalent to system inertia is introduced. This parameter is used to forecast the frequency of a typical power grid for any instant of time. The system gives appreciable result with reduced error.

  20. Analyzing mobile WiMAX base station deployment under different frequency planning strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, M. K.; Ahmad, R. B.; Ali, Ziad G.; Aldhaibani, Jaafar A.; Fayadh, Rashid A.

    2015-05-01

    The frequency spectrum is a precious resource and scarce in the communication markets. Therefore, different techniques are adopted to utilize the available spectrum in deploying WiMAX base stations (BS) in cellular networks. In this paper several types of frequency planning techniques are illustrated, and a comprehensive comparative study between conventional frequency reuse of 1 (FR of 1) and fractional frequency reuse (FFR) is presented. These techniques are widely used in network deployment, because they employ universal frequency (using all the available bandwidth) in their base station installation/configuration within network system. This paper presents a network model of 19 base stations in order to be employed in the comparison of the aforesaid frequency planning techniques. Users are randomly distributed within base stations, users' resource mapping and their burst profile selection are based on the measured signal to interference plus-noise ratio (SINR). Simulation results reveal that the FFR has advantages over the conventional FR of 1 in various metrics. 98 % of downlink resources (slots) are exploited when FFR is applied, whilst it is 81 % at FR of 1. Data rate of FFR has been increased to 10.6 Mbps, while it is 7.98 Mbps at FR of 1. The spectral efficiency is better enhanced (1.072 bps/Hz) at FR of 1 than FFR (0.808 bps/Hz), since FR of 1 exploits all the Bandwidth. The subcarrier efficiency shows how many data bits that can be carried by subcarriers under different frequency planning techniques, the system can carry more data bits under FFR (2.40 bit/subcarrier) than FR of 1 (1.998 bit/subcarrier). This study confirms that FFR can perform better than conventional frequency planning (FR of 1) which made it a strong candidate for WiMAX BS deployment in cellular networks.

  1. Analyzing Idioms and Their Frequency in Three Advanced ILI Textbooks: A Corpus-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alavi, Sepideh; Rajabpoor, Aboozar

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at identifying and quantifying the idioms used in three ILI "Advanced" level textbooks based on three different English corpora; MICASE, BNC and the Brown Corpus, and comparing the frequencies of the idioms across the three corpora. The first step of the study involved searching the books to find multi-word…

  2. Unique capabilities of AC frequency scanning and its implementation on a Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Dalton T; Kaplan, Desmond A; Danell, Ryan M; van Amerom, Friso H W; Pinnick, Veronica T; Brinckerhoff, William B; Mahaffy, Paul R; Cooks, R Graham

    2017-06-21

    A limitation of conventional quadrupole ion trap scan modes which use rf amplitude control for mass scanning is that, in order to detect a subset of an ion population, the rest of the ion population must also be interrogated. That is, ions cannot be detected out of order; they must be detected in order of either increasing or decreasing mass-to-charge (m/z). However, an ion trap operated in the ac frequency scan mode, where the rf amplitude is kept constant and instead the ac frequency is used for mass-selective operations, has no such limitation because any variation in the ac frequency affects only the subset of ions whose secular frequencies match the perturbation frequency. Hence, an ion trap operated in the ac frequency scan mode can perform any arbitrary mass scan, as well as a sequence of scans, using a single ion injection; we demonstrate both capabilities here. Combining these two capabilities, we demonstrate the acquisition of a full mass spectrum, a product ion spectrum, and a second generation product ion spectrum using a single ion injection event. We further demonstrate a "segmented scan" in which different mass ranges are interrogated at different rf amplitudes in order to improve resolution over a portion of the mass range, and a "periodic scan" in which ions are continuously introduced into the ion trap to achieve a nearly 100% duty cycle. These unique scan modes, along with other characteristics of ac frequency scanning, are particularly appropriate for miniature ion trap mass spectrometers. Hence, implementation of ac frequency scanning on a prototype of the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer mass spectrometer is also described.

  3. Investigations on the sensitivity of a stepped-frequency radar utilizing a vector network analyzer for Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, Daniel; Schubert, Karsten; Schoebel, Joerg

    2014-12-01

    Employing a continuous-wave radar system, with the stepped-frequency radar being one type of this class, all reflections from the environment are present continuously and simultaneously at the receiver. Utilizing such a radar system for Ground Penetrating Radar purposes, antenna cross-talk and ground bounce reflection form an overall dominant signal contribution while reflections from objects buried in the ground are of quite weak amplitude due to attenuation in the ground. This requires a large dynamic range of the receiver which in turn requires high sensitivity of the radar system. In this paper we analyze the sensitivity of our vector network analyzer utilized as stepped-frequency radar system for GPR pipe detection. We furthermore investigate the performance of increasing the sensitivity of the radar by means of appropriate averaging and low-noise pre-amplification of the received signal. It turns out that the improvement in sensitivity actually achievable may differ significantly from theoretical expectations. In addition, we give a descriptive explanation why our appropriate experiments demonstrate that the sensitivity of the receiver is independent of the distance between the target object and the source of dominant signal contribution. Finally, our investigations presented in this paper lead to a preferred setting of operation for our vector network analyzer in order to achieve best detection capability for weak reflection amplitudes, hence making the radar system applicable for Ground Penetrating Radar purposes.

  4. Onboard software of Plasma Wave Experiment aboard Arase: instrument management and signal processing of Waveform Capture/Onboard Frequency Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Shoya; Kasahara, Yoshiya; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Yagitani, Satoshi; Ozaki, Mitsunori; Imachi, Tomohiko; Ishisaka, Keigo; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Ota, Mamoru; Kurita, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Hikishima, Mitsuru; Matsuoka, Ayako; Shinohara, Iku

    2018-05-01

    We developed the onboard processing software for the Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) onboard the Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace, Arase satellite. The PWE instrument has three receivers: Electric Field Detector, Waveform Capture/Onboard Frequency Analyzer (WFC/OFA), and the High-Frequency Analyzer. We designed a pseudo-parallel processing scheme with a time-sharing system and achieved simultaneous signal processing for each receiver. Since electric and magnetic field signals are processed by the different CPUs, we developed a synchronized observation system by using shared packets on the mission network. The OFA continuously measures the power spectra, spectral matrices, and complex spectra. The OFA obtains not only the entire ELF/VLF plasma waves' activity but also the detailed properties (e.g., propagation direction and polarization) of the observed plasma waves. We performed simultaneous observation of electric and magnetic field data and successfully obtained clear wave properties of whistler-mode chorus waves using these data. In order to measure raw waveforms, we developed two modes for the WFC, `chorus burst mode' (65,536 samples/s) and `EMIC burst mode' (1024 samples/s), for the purpose of the measurement of the whistler-mode chorus waves (typically in a frequency range from several hundred Hz to several kHz) and the EMIC waves (typically in a frequency range from a few Hz to several hundred Hz), respectively. We successfully obtained the waveforms of electric and magnetic fields of whistler-mode chorus waves and ion cyclotron mode waves along the Arase's orbit. We also designed the software-type wave-particle interaction analyzer mode. In this mode, we measure electric and magnetic field waveforms continuously and transfer them to the mission data recorder onboard the Arase satellite. We also installed an onboard signal calibration function (onboard SoftWare CALibration; SWCAL). We performed onboard electric circuit diagnostics and

  5. Onboard Processing on PWE OFA/WFC (Onboard Frequency Analyzer/Waveform Capture) aboard the ERG (ARASE) Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, S.; Kasahara, Y.; Kojima, H.; Kasaba, Y.; Yagitani, S.; Ozaki, M.; Imachi, T.; Ishisaka, K.; Kurita, S.; Ota, M.; Kumamoto, A.; Tsuchiya, F.; Yoshizumi, M.; Matsuoka, A.; Teramoto, M.; Shinohara, I.

    2017-12-01

    Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) is a mission for understanding particle acceleration, loss mechanisms, and the dynamic evolution of space storms in the context of cross-energy and cross-regional coupling [Miyoshi et al., 2012]. The ERG (ARASE) satellite was launched on December 20, 2016, and successfully inserted into an orbit. The Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) is one of the science instruments on board the ERG satellite to measure electric field and magnetic field in the inner magnetosphere. PWE consists of three sub-components, EFD (Electric Field Detector), OFA/WFC (Onboard Frequency Analyzer and Waveform Capture), and HFA (High Frequency Analyzer). Especially, OFA/WFC measures electric and magnetic field spectrum and waveform from a few Hz to 20 kHz. OFA/WFC processes signals detected by a couple of dipole wire-probe antenna (WPT) and tri-axis magnetic search coils (MSC) installed onboard the satellite. The PWE-OFA subsystem calculates and produces three kind of data; OFA-SPEC (power spectrum), OFA-MATRIX (spectrum matrix), and OFA-COMPLEX (complex spectrum). They are continuously processed 24 hours per day and all data are sent to the ground. OFA-MATRIX and OFA-COMPLEX are used for polarization analyses and direction finding of the plasma waves. The PWE-WFC subsystem measures raw (64 kHz sampled) and down-sampled (1 kHz sampled) burst waveform detected by the WPT and the MSC sensors. It activates by a command, automatic triggering, and scheduling. The initial check-out process of the PWE successfully completed, and initial data has been obtained. In this presentation, we introduce onboard processing technique on PWE OFA/WFC and its initial results.

  6. The Kuroshio Extension low-frequency variability analyzed with altimeter data through an ad hoc composite index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, Stefano; Gentile, Vittorio; de Ruggiero, Paola; Pietranera, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The Kuroshio Extension (KE) low-frequency variability (LFV) is analyzed with the satellite altimeter data distributed by AVISO from January 1993 to November 2015 through a new ad hoc composite index [1] that links the mean latitudinal position L of the KE jet and an integrated wavelet amplitude A measuring the high-frequency variability (HFV) of the KE path. This approach allows one to follow the KE evolution as an orbit in the (L,A) plane, as typically done in dynamical systems theory. Three intervals, I1 (1993-1998), I2 (1998-2006) and I3 (2006-November 2015) are separately analyzed also with sea surface height (SSH) maps. In I1 and I3, L and A are mostly anti-correlated and a recharging phase (characterized by a weak convoluted jet experiencing a rapid increase of the HFV) begins when negative SSH anomalies, remotely generated by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, reach the KE region. On the other hand, in I2 the KE evolution is described by a hysteresis loop: this starts with a weak jet state followed by a recharging phase leading, in turn, to a persistent two-meander state, to its progressive and rapid erosion and, eventually, to the reestablishment of a weak jet state. This loop is found to correspond quite closely to the highly nonlinear intrinsic relaxation oscillation obtained in numerical process studies [1,2]. This supports the hypothesis that the KE LFV may have been controlled, during I2, by an intrinsic oceanic mode of variability. [1] Pierini S., 2015. J. Climate, 28, 5873-5881. [2] Pierini S., 2006. J. Phys. Oceanogr., 36, 1605-1625.

  7. A Spatial-frequency Method for Analyzing Antenna-to-Probe Interactions in Near-field Antenna Measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Billy C.

    The measurement of the radiation characteristics of an antenna on a near-field range requires that the antenna under test be located very close to the near-field probe. Although the direct coupling is utilized for characterizing the near field, this close proximity also presents the opportunity for significant undesired interactions (for example, reflections) to occur between the antenna and the near-field probe. When uncompensated, these additional interactions will introduce error into the measurement, increasing the uncertainty in the final gain pattern obtained through the near-field-to-far-field transformation. Quantifying this gain-uncertainty contribution requires quantifying the various additional interactions. A method incorporating spatial-frequency analysismore » is described which allows the dominant interaction contributions to be easily identified and quantified. In addition to identifying the additional antenna-to-probe interactions, the method also allows identification and quantification of interactions with other nearby objects within the measurement room. Because the method is a spatial-frequency method, wide-bandwidth data is not required, and it can be applied even when data is available at only a single temporal frequency. This feature ensures that the method can be applied to narrow-band antennas, where a similar time-domain analysis would not be possible. - 3 - - 4 -« less

  8. Time and frequency pump-probe multiplexing to enhance the signal response of Brillouin optical time-domain analyzers.

    PubMed

    Soto, Marcelo A; Ricchiuti, Amelia Lavinia; Zhang, Liang; Barrera, David; Sales, Salvador; Thévenaz, Luc

    2014-11-17

    A technique to enhance the response and performance of Brillouin distributed fiber sensors is proposed and experimentally validated. The method consists in creating a multi-frequency pump pulse interacting with a matching multi-frequency continuous-wave probe. To avoid nonlinear cross-interaction between spectral lines, the method requires that the distinct pump pulse components and temporal traces reaching the photo-detector are subject to wavelength-selective delaying. This way the total pump and probe powers launched into the fiber can be incrementally boosted beyond the thresholds imposed by nonlinear effects. As a consequence of the multiplied pump-probe Brillouin interactions occurring along the fiber, the sensor response can be enhanced in exact proportion to the number of spectral components. The method is experimentally validated in a 50 km-long distributed optical fiber sensor augmented to 3 pump-probe spectral pairs, demonstrating a signal-to-noise ratio enhancement of 4.8 dB.

  9. Initial report of the High Frequency Analyzer (HFA) onboard the ARASE (ERG) Satellite: Observations of the plasmasphere evolution and auroral kilometric radiation from the both hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumamoto, A.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kasahara, Y.; Kasaba, Y.; Kojima, H.; Yagitani, S.; Ishisaka, K.; Imachi, T.; Ozaki, M.; Matsuda, S.; Shoji, M.; Matsuoka, A.; Katoh, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Shinohara, I.; Obara, T.

    2017-12-01

    High Frequency Analyzer (HFA) is a subsystem of the Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) onboard the ARASE (ERG, Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace) spacecraft for observation of radio and plasma waves in a frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz. In ARASE mission, HFA is expected to perform the following observations: (1) Upper hybrid resonance (UHR) waves in order to determine the electron number density around the spacecraft. (2) Magnetic field component of the chorus waves in a frequency range from 20 kHz to 100 kHz. (3) Radio and plasma waves excited via wave particle interactions and mode conversion processes in storm-time magnetosphere.HFA is operated in the following three observation modes: EE-mode, EB-mode, and PP-mode. In far-Earth region, HFA is operated in EE-mode. Spectrogram of two orthogonal or right and left-handed components of electric field in perpendicular directions to the spin axis of the spacecraft are obtained. In the near-Earth region, HFA is operated in EB-mode. Spectrogram of one components of electric field in perpendicular direction to the spin plane, and one component of the magnetic field in parallel direction to the spin axis are obtained. In EE and EB-modes, the frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz are covered with 480 frequency steps. The time resolution is 8 sec. We also prepared PP mode to measure the locations and structures of the plasmapause at higher resolution. In PP-mode, spectrogram of one electric field component in a frequency range from 0.01-0.4 MHz (PP1) or 0.1-1 MHz (PP2) can be obtained at time resolution of 1 sec.After the successful deployment of the wire antenna and search coils mast and initial checks, we could start routine observations and detect various radio and plasma wave phenomena such as upper hybrid resonance (UHR) waves, electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ESCH) waves, auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), kilometric continuum (KC) and Type-III solar radio bursts. In the presentation, we

  10. Analyzing the properties of acceptor mode in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals based on a modified finite-difference frequency-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng, E-mail: hanlor@163.com; Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132; Ding, Guo-Wen

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, the properties of acceptor mode in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (2D PPCs) composed of the homogeneous and isotropic dielectric cylinders inserted into nonmagnetized plasma background with square lattices under transverse-magnetic wave are theoretically investigated by a modified finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method with supercell technique, whose symmetry of every supercell is broken by removing a central rod. A new FDFD method is developed to calculate the band structures of such PPCs. The novel FDFD method adopts a general function to describe the distribution of dielectric in the present PPCs, which can easily transform the complicated nonlinear eigenvalue equationmore » to the simple linear equation. The details of convergence and effectiveness of proposed FDFD method are analyzed using a numerical example. The simulated results demonstrate that the enough accuracy of the proposed FDFD method can be observed compared to the plane wave expansion method, and the good convergence can also be obtained if the number of meshed grids is large enough. As a comparison, two different configurations of photonic crystals (PCs) but with similar defect are theoretically investigated. Compared to the conventional dielectric-air PCs, not only the acceptor mode has a higher frequency but also an additional photonic bandgap (PBG) can be found in the low frequency region. The calculated results also show that PBGs of proposed PPCs can be enlarged as the point defect is introduced. The influences of the parameters for present PPCs on the properties of acceptor mode are also discussed in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the acceptor mode in the present PPCs can be easily tuned by changing those parameters. Those results can hold promise for designing the tunable applications in the signal process or time delay devices based on the present PPCs.« less

  11. Speech analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokerson, D. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A speech signal is analyzed by applying the signal to formant filters which derive first, second and third signals respectively representing the frequency of the speech waveform in the first, second and third formants. A first pulse train having approximately a pulse rate representing the average frequency of the first formant is derived; second and third pulse trains having pulse rates respectively representing zero crossings of the second and third formants are derived. The first formant pulse train is derived by establishing N signal level bands, where N is an integer at least equal to two. Adjacent ones of the signal bands have common boundaries, each of which is a predetermined percentage of the peak level of a complete cycle of the speech waveform.

  12. Development and Deployment of a Portable Water Isotope Analyzer for Accurate, Continuous and High-Frequency Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Measurements in Water Vapor and Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Feng; Baer, Douglas

    2010-05-01

    Stable isotopes of water in liquid and vapor samples are powerful tracers to investigate the hydrological cycle and ecological processes. Therefore, continuous, in-situ and accurate measurements of del_18O and del_2H are critical to advance the understanding of water cycle dynamics around the globe. Furthermore, the combination of meteorological techniques and high-frequency isotopic water measurements can provide detailed time-resolved information on the eco-physiological performance of plants and enable improved understanding of water fluxes at ecosystem scales. In this work, we present recent laboratory development and field deployment of a novel Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer (WVIA), based on cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy, capable of simultaneous in-situ measurements of del_18O and del_2H and water mixing ratio with high precision and high frequency (up to 10 Hz measurement rate). In addition, to ensure the accuracy of the water vapor isotope measurements, a novel Water Vapor Isotope Standard Source (WVISS), based on the instantaneous evaporation of micro-droplets of liquid water (with known isotope composition), has been developed to provide the reference water vapor with widely adjustable mixing ratio (500-30,000 ppmv) for real-time calibration of the WVIA. The comprehensive system that includes the WVIA and WVISS has been validated in extensive laboratory and field studies to be insensitive to ambient temperature changes (5-40 C) and to changes in water mixing ratio over a wide range of mixing ratios. In addition, by operating in the dual inlet mode, measurement drift has essentially been eliminated. The system (WVIA+WVISS) has also been deployed for long-term unattended continuous measurements in the field. In addition to water vapor isotope measurements, the new Water Vapor Isotopic Standard Source (WVISS) may be combined with the WVIA to provide continuous isotopic measurements of liquid water samples at rapid data rate. The availability of

  13. DIFFERENTIAL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, E.G.; Gordon, C.M.

    1959-02-10

    Improvements in analog eomputing machines of the class capable of evaluating differential equations, commonly termed differential analyzers, are described. In general form, the analyzer embodies a plurality of basic computer mechanisms for performing integration, multiplication, and addition, and means for directing the result of any one operation to another computer mechanism performing a further operation. In the device, numerical quantities are represented by the rotation of shafts, or the electrical equivalent of shafts.

  14. Vibration analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention relates to monitoring circuitry for the real time detection of vibrations of a predetermined frequency and which are greater than a predetermined magnitude. The circuitry produces an instability signal in response to such detection. The circuitry is particularly adapted for detecting instabilities in rocket thrusters, but may find application with other machines such as expensive rotating machinery, or turbines. The monitoring circuitry identifies when vibration signals are present having a predetermined frequency of a multi-frequency vibration signal which has an RMS energy level greater than a predetermined magnitude. It generates an instability signal only if such a vibration signal is identified. The circuitry includes a delay circuit which responds with an alarm signal only if the instability signal continues for a predetermined time period. When used with a rocket thruster, the alarm signal may be used to cut off the thruster if such thruster is being used in flight. If the circuitry is monitoring tests of the thruster, it generates signals to change the thruster operation, for example, from pulse mode to continuous firing to determine if the instability of the thruster is sustained once it is detected.

  15. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The M200 originated in the 1970's under an Ames Research Center/Stanford University contract to develop a small, lightweight gas analyzer for Viking Landers. Although the unit was not used on the spacecraft, it was further developed by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Three researchers from the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. (MTI) to commercialize the analyzer. The original version (Micromonitor 500) was introduced in 1982, and the M200 in 1988. The M200, a more advanced version, features dual gas chromatograph which separate a gaseous mixture into components and measure concentrations of each gas. It is useful for monitoring gas leaks, chemical spills, etc. Many analyses are completed in less than 30 seconds, and a wide range of mixtures can be analyzed.

  16. Process Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The ChemScan UV-6100 is a spectrometry system originally developed by Biotronics Technologies, Inc. under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. It is marketed to the water and wastewater treatment industries, replacing "grab sampling" with on-line data collection. It analyzes the light absorbance characteristics of a water sample, simultaneously detects hundreds of individual wavelengths absorbed by chemical substances in a process solution, and quantifies the information. Spectral data is then processed by ChemScan analyzer and compared with calibration files in the system's memory in order to calculate concentrations of chemical substances that cause UV light absorbance in specific patterns. Monitored substances can be analyzed for quality and quantity. Applications include detection of a variety of substances, and the information provided enables an operator to control a process more efficiently.

  17. Process Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Axiomatics Corporation developed a shunting Dielectric Sensor to determine the nutrient level and analyze plant nutrient solutions in the CELSS, NASA's space life support program. (CELSS is an experimental facility investigating closed-cycle plant growth and food processing for long duration manned missions.) The DiComp system incorporates a shunt electrode and is especially sensitive to changes in dielectric property changes in materials at measurements much lower than conventional sensors. The analyzer has exceptional capabilities for predicting composition of liquid streams or reactions. It measures concentrations and solids content up to 100 percent in applications like agricultural products, petrochemicals, food and beverages. The sensor is easily installed; maintenance is low, and it can be calibrated on line. The software automates data collection and analysis.

  18. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  19. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  20. MULTICHANNEL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, G.G.

    1959-11-10

    A multichannel pulse analyzer having several window amplifiers, each amplifier serving one group of channels, with a single fast pulse-lengthener and a single novel interrogation circuit serving all channels is described. A pulse followed too closely timewise by another pulse is disregarded by the interrogation circuit to prevent errors due to pulse pileup. The window amplifiers are connected to the pulse lengthener output, rather than the linear amplifier output, so need not have the fast response characteristic formerly required.

  1. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  2. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatograph, a system which separates a gaseous mixture into its components and measures the concentration of the individual gases, was designed for the Viking Lander. The technology was further developed under National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and funded by Ames Research Center/Stanford as a toxic gas leak detection device. Three researchers on the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. to commercialize the product. It is a battery-powered system consisting of a sensing wand connected to a computerized analyzer. Marketed as the Michromonitor 500, it has a wide range of applications.

  3. Contamination Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of the total organic carbon content in water is important in assessing contamination levels in high purity water for power generation, pharmaceutical production and electronics manufacture. Even trace levels of organic compounds can cause defects in manufactured products. The Sievers Model 800 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Analyzer, based on technology developed for the Space Station, uses a strong chemical oxidizing agent and ultraviolet light to convert organic compounds in water to carbon dioxide. After ionizing the carbon dioxide, the amount of ions is determined by measuring the conductivity of the deionized water. The new technique is highly sensitive, does not require compressed gas, and maintenance is minimal.

  4. CCFP Analyzer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-06

    ISS047e106715 (05/06/2016) --- ESA (European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake unpacks a cerebral and cochlear fluid pressure (CCFP) analyzer. The device is being tested to measure the pressure of the fluid in the skull, also known as intracranial pressure, which may increase due to fluid shifts in the body while in microgravity. It is hypothesized that the headward fluid shift that occurs during space flight leads to increased pressure in the brain, which may push on the back of the eye, causing it to change shape.

  5. Stress Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    SPATE 900 Dynamic Stress Analyzer is an acronym for Stress Pattern Analysis by Thermal Emission. It detects stress-induced temperature changes in a structure and indicates the degree of stress. Ometron, Inc.'s SPATE 9000 consists of a scan unit and a data display. The scan unit contains an infrared channel focused on the test structure to collect thermal radiation, and a visual channel used to set up the scan area and interrogate the stress display. Stress data is produced by detecting minute temperature changes, down to one-thousandth of a degree Centigrade, resulting from the application to the structure of dynamic loading. The electronic data processing system correlates the temperature changes with a reference signal to determine stress level.

  6. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, A.D.

    1987-09-28

    An optical analyzer wherein a sample of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter is placed in a combustion tube, and light from a light source is passed through the sample. The temperature of the sample is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample is detected as the temperature is raised. A data processor, differentiator and a two pen recorder provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample. These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample. Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates or heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters. 7 figs.

  7. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-02-07

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  8. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-01-01

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  9. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  10. Motion detector and analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Unruh, W.P.

    1987-03-23

    Method and apparatus are provided for deriving positive and negative Doppler spectrum to enable analysis of objects in motion, and particularly, objects having rotary motion. First and second returned radar signals are mixed with internal signals to obtain an in-phase process signal and a quadrature process signal. A broad-band phase shifter shifts the quadrature signal through 90/degree/ relative to the in-phase signal over a predetermined frequency range. A pair of signals is output from the broad-band phase shifter which are then combined to provide a first side band signal which is functionally related to a negative Doppler shift spectrum. The distinct positive and negative Doppler spectra may then be analyzed for the motion characteristics of the object being examined.

  11. MULTICHANNEL PULSE-HEIGHT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.T.; Lefevre, H.W.

    1958-01-21

    This patent deals with electronic computing circuits and more particularly to pulse-height analyzers used for classifying variable amplitude pulses into groups of different amplitudes. The device accomplishes this pulse allocation by by converting the pulses into frequencies corresponding to the amplitudes of the pulses, which frequencies are filtered in channels individually pretuned to a particular frequency and then detected and recorded in the responsive channel. This circuit substantially overcomes the disadvantages of prior annlyzers incorporating discriminators pre-set to respond to certain voltage levels, since small variation in component values is not as critical to satisfactory circuit operation.

  12. Analyzing Aeroelasticity in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.

    2003-01-01

    ASTROP2-LE is a computer program that predicts flutter and forced responses of blades, vanes, and other components of such turbomachines as fans, compressors, and turbines. ASTROP2-LE is based on the ASTROP2 program, developed previously for analysis of stability of turbomachinery components. In developing ASTROP2- LE, ASTROP2 was modified to include a capability for modeling forced responses. The program was also modified to add a capability for analysis of aeroelasticity with mistuning and unsteady aerodynamic solutions from another program, LINFLX2D, that solves the linearized Euler equations of unsteady two-dimensional flow. Using LINFLX2D to calculate unsteady aerodynamic loads, it is possible to analyze effects of transonic flow on flutter and forced response. ASTROP2-LE can be used to analyze subsonic, transonic, and supersonic aerodynamics and structural mistuning for rotors with blades of differing structural properties. It calculates the aerodynamic damping of a blade system operating in airflow so that stability can be assessed. The code also predicts the magnitudes and frequencies of the unsteady aerodynamic forces on the airfoils of a blade row from incoming wakes. This information can be used in high-cycle fatigue analysis to predict the fatigue lives of the blades.

  13. The Mid-Canada Radar Line and First Nations' people of the James Bay region, Canada: an evaluation using log-linear contingency modelling to analyze organochlorine frequency data.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Leonard J S; Wainman, Bruce C; Martin, Ian D; Weber, Jean-Philippe; Sutherland, Celine; Elliott, J Richard; Nieboer, Evert

    2005-09-01

    Abandoned radar line stations in the North American arctic and sub-arctic regions are point sources of contamination, especially for PCBs. Few data exist with respect to human body burden of organochlorines (OCs) in residents of communities located in close proximity to these radar line sites. We compared plasma OC concentration (unadjusted for total lipids) frequency distribution data using log-linear contingency modelling for Fort Albany First Nation, the site of an abandoned Mid-Canada Radar Line station, and two comparison populations (the neighbouring community of Kashechewan First Nation without such a radar installation, and Hamilton, a city in southern Ontario, Canada). This type of analysis is important as it allows for an initial investigation of contaminant data without imputing any values. The two-state log-linear model (employing both non-detectable and detectable concentration frequencies and applicable to PCB congeners 28 and 105 and cis-nonachlor) and the four-state log-linear model (using quartile concentration frequencies for Aroclor 1260, PCB congeners [99,118,138,153,156,170,180,183,187], beta-HCH, p,p'-DDT +p,p'-DDE, HCB, mirex, oxychlordane, and trans-nonachlor) revealed that the effects of subject gender were inconsequential. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between the groups examined were attributable to the effect of location on the frequency of detection of OCs or on their differential distribution among the concentration quartiles. In general, people from Hamilton had higher frequencies of non-detections and of concentrations in the first quartile (p < 0.05) for most OCs compared to people from Fort Albany and Kashechewan (who consume a traditional diet of wild meats that does not include marine mammals). An unexpected finding was that, for Kashechewan males, the frequency of many OCs was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the 4th concentration quartile than that predicted by the four-state log-linear model, but significantly lower

  14. The Statistical Loop Analyzer (SLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    The statistical loop analyzer (SLA) is designed to automatically measure the acquisition, tracking and frequency stability performance characteristics of symbol synchronizers, code synchronizers, carrier tracking loops, and coherent transponders. Automated phase lock and system level tests can also be made using the SLA. Standard baseband, carrier and spread spectrum modulation techniques can be accomodated. Through the SLA's phase error jitter and cycle slip measurements the acquisition and tracking thresholds of the unit under test are determined; any false phase and frequency lock events are statistically analyzed and reported in the SLA output in probabilistic terms. Automated signal drop out tests can be performed in order to trouble shoot algorithms and evaluate the reacquisition statistics of the unit under test. Cycle slip rates and cycle slip probabilities can be measured using the SLA. These measurements, combined with bit error probability measurements, are all that are needed to fully characterize the acquisition and tracking performance of a digital communication system.

  15. Concordance study and population frequencies for 16 autosomal STRs analyzed with PowerPlex® ESI 17 and AmpFℓSTR® NGM SElect™ in Somalis, Danes and Greenlanders.

    PubMed

    Tomas, C; Mogensen, H S; Friis, S L; Hallenberg, C; Stene, M C; Morling, N

    2014-07-01

    A concordance study of the results of PowerPlex(®) ESI 17 and AmpFℓSTR(®) NGM SElect™ kits obtained from 591 individuals from Somalia (N=198), Denmark (N=199) and Greenland (N=194) was performed. Among 9456 STR types, seven discordant results were found with the two kits: one observed in the D19S433 system in an individual from Denmark and six in the SE33 system in six individuals from Somalia. Sequencing of SE33 in the six samples with discordant results showed G>A transition 15bp downstream of the repeat unit in three of the individuals, and G>A transition 68bp downstream of the repeat unit in the other three individuals. Population data for 16 autosomal STR systems analyzed in 989 individuals from Somalia, Denmark and Greenland are also presented. The highest mean heterozygosity was observed in Danes (82.5%). With the exception of D8S1179 in Danes, no significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg expectations were observed. Only one pair of systems (D12S391 and D18S51) showed significant allelic association in Greenlanders (after Holm-Šidák correction). A MDS plot drawn from pairwise FST values calculated between 21 populations showed a clear displacement of the Greenlandic population versus the other ones included in the analyses. The highest combined chance of exclusion and power of discrimination was observed for Danes reaching values of 99.9999987% and 1 in 1.8×10(21), respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A wideband, high-resolution spectrum analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, M. P.; Wilck, H. C.; Garyantes, M. F.; Grimm, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    A two-million-channel, 40 MHz bandwidth, digital spectrum analyzer under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is described. The analyzer system will serve as a prototype processor for the sky survey portion of NASA's Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence program and for other applications in the Deep Space Network. The analyzer digitizes an analog input, performs a 2 (sup 21) point Discrete Fourier Transform, accumulates the output power, normalizes the output to remove frequency-dependent gain, and automates simple signal detection algorithms. Due to its built-in frequency-domain processing functions and configuration flexibility, the analyzer is a very powerful tool for real-time signal analysis.

  17. Analyzing Peace Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haavelsrud, Magnus; Stenberg, Oddbjorn

    2012-01-01

    Eleven articles on peace education published in the first volume of the Journal of Peace Education are analyzed. This selection comprises peace education programs that have been planned or carried out in different contexts. In analyzing peace pedagogies as proposed in the 11 contributions, we have chosen network analysis as our method--enabling…

  18. Portable automatic blood analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Analyzer employs chemical-sensing electrodes for determination of blood, gas, and ion concentrations. It is rugged, easily serviced, and comparatively simple to operate. System can analyze up to eight parameters and can be modified to measure other blood constituents including nonionic species, such as urea, glucose, and oxygen.

  19. Gearbox vibration diagnostic analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Gearbox Vibration Diagnostic Analyzer installed in the NASA Lewis Research Center's 500 HP Helicopter Transmission Test Stand to monitor gearbox testing. The vibration of the gearbox is analyzed using diagnostic algorithms to calculate a parameter indicating damaged components.

  20. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  1. 40 CFR 89.311 - Analyzer calibration frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test... rejection ratio and the CO2 rejection ratio as specified in § 89.318. (e) Verify that the dynamometer test...

  2. Automatic amino acid analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, B. J.; Carle, G. C.; Oyama, V. I.

    1971-01-01

    Analyzer operates unattended or up to 15 hours. It has an automatic sample injection system and can be programmed. All fluid-flow valve switching is accomplished pneumatically from miniature three-way solenoid pilot valves.

  3. Soil Rock Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A redesigned version of a soil/rock analyzer developed by Martin Marietta under a Langley Research Center contract is being marketed by Aurora Tech, Inc. Known as the Aurora ATX-100, it has self-contained power, an oscilloscope, a liquid crystal readout, and a multichannel spectrum analyzer. It measures energy emissions to determine what elements in what percentages a sample contains. It is lightweight and may be used for mineral exploration, pollution monitoring, etc.

  4. Universal MOSFET parameter analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klekachev, A. V.; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Pikulev, V. B.; Gurtov, V. A.

    2006-05-01

    MOSFET analyzer is developed to extract most important parameters of transistors. Instead of routine DC transfer and output characteristics, analyzer provides an evaluation of interface states density by applying charge pumping technique. There are two features that outperform the analyzer among similar products of other vendors. It is compact (100 × 80 × 50 mm 3 in dimensions) and lightweight (< 200 gram) instrument with ultra low power supply (< 2.5 W). The analyzer operates under control of IBM PC by means of USB interface that simultaneously provides power supply. Owing to the USB-compatible microcontroller as the basic element, designed analyzer offers cost-effective solution for diverse applications. The enclosed software runs under Windows 98/2000/XP operating systems, it has convenient graphical interface simplifying measurements for untrained user. Operational characteristics of analyzer are as follows: gate and drain output voltage within limits of +/-10V measuring current range of 1pA ÷ 10 mA; lowest limit of interface states density characterization of ~10 9 cm -2 • eV -1. The instrument was designed on the base of component parts from CYPRESS and ANALOG DEVICES (USA).

  5. Charge Analyzer Responsive Local Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, Linda Habash; Thornton, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The first transatlantic radio transmission, demonstrated by Marconi in December of 1901, revealed the essential role of the ionosphere for radio communications. This ionized layer of the upper atmosphere controls the amount of radio power transmitted through, reflected off of, and absorbed by the atmospheric medium. Low-frequency radio signals can propagate long distances around the globe via repeated reflections off of the ionosphere and the Earth's surface. Higher frequency radio signals can punch through the ionosphere to be received at orbiting satellites. However, any turbulence in the ionosphere can distort these signals, compromising the performance or even availability of space-based communication and navigations systems. The physics associated with this distortion effect is analogous to the situation when underwater images are distorted by convecting air bubbles. In fact, these ionospheric features are often called 'plasma bubbles' since they exhibit some of the similar behavior as underwater air bubbles. These events, instigated by solar and geomagnetic storms, can cause communication and navigation outages that last for hours. To help understand and predict these outages, a world-wide community of space scientists and technologists are devoted to researching this topic. One aspect of this research is to develop instruments capable of measuring the ionospheric plasma bubbles. Figure 1 shows a photo of the Charge Analyzer Responsive to Local Oscillations (CARLO), a new instrument under development at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It is a frequency-domain ion spectrum analyzer designed to measure the distributions of ionospheric turbulence from 1 Hz to 10 kHz (i.e., spatial scales from a few kilometers down to a few centimeters). This frequency range is important since it focuses on turbulence scales that affect VHF/UHF satellite communications, GPS systems, and over-the-horizon radar systems. CARLO is based on the flight-proven Plasma Local

  6. Microwave transient analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Gallegos, Cenobio H.; Ogle, James W.; Stokes, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for capturing and recording indications of frequency content of electromagnetic signals and radiation is disclosed including a laser light source (12) and a Bragg cell (14) for deflecting a light beam (22) at a plurality of deflection angles (36) dependent upon frequency content of the signal. A streak camera (26) and a microchannel plate intensifier (28) are used to project Bragg cell (14) output onto either a photographic film (32) or a charge coupled device (CCD) imager (366). Timing markers are provided by a comb generator (50) and a one shot generator (52), the outputs of which are also routed through the streak camera (26) onto the film (32) or the CCD imager (366). Using the inventive method, the full range of the output of the Bragg cell (14) can be recorded as a function of time.

  7. Microwave transient analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Gallegos, C.H.; Ogle, J.W.; Stokes, J.L.

    1992-11-24

    A method and apparatus for capturing and recording indications of frequency content of electromagnetic signals and radiation is disclosed including a laser light source and a Bragg cell for deflecting a light beam at a plurality of deflection angles dependent upon frequency content of the signal. A streak camera and a microchannel plate intensifier are used to project Bragg cell output onto either a photographic film or a charge coupled device (CCD) imager. Timing markers are provided by a comb generator and a one shot generator, the outputs of which are also routed through the streak camera onto the film or the CCD imager. Using the inventive method, the full range of the output of the Bragg cell can be recorded as a function of time. 5 figs.

  8. Total organic carbon analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godec, Richard G.; Kosenka, Paul P.; Smith, Brian D.; Hutte, Richard S.; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The development and testing of a breadboard version of a highly sensitive total-organic-carbon (TOC) analyzer are reported. Attention is given to the system components including the CO2 sensor, oxidation reactor, acidification module, and the sample-inlet system. Research is reported for an experimental reagentless oxidation reactor, and good results are reported for linearity, sensitivity, and selectivity in the CO2 sensor. The TOC analyzer is developed with gravity-independent components and is designed for minimal additions of chemical reagents. The reagentless oxidation reactor is based on electrolysis and UV photolysis and is shown to be potentially useful. The stability of the breadboard instrument is shown to be good on a day-to-day basis, and the analyzer is capable of 5 sample analyses per day for a period of about 80 days. The instrument can provide accurate TOC and TIC measurements over a concentration range of 20 ppb to 50 ppm C.

  9. Analyzing Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Interactive controls analysis (INCA) program developed to provide user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control. Designed for use with both small- and large-order systems. Using interactive-graphics capability, INCA user quickly plots root locus, frequency response, or time response of either continuous-time system or sampled-data system. Configuration and parameters easily changed, allowing user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analyses in very convenient manner. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  10. Analyzing Political Television Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burson, George

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan to help students understand that political advertisements often mislead, lie, or appeal to emotion. Suggests that the lesson will enable students to examine political advertisements analytically. Includes a worksheet to be used by students to analyze individual political advertisements. (DK)

  11. Electronic sleep analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Electronic instrument automatically monitors the stages of sleep of a human subject. The analyzer provides a series of discrete voltage steps with each step corresponding to a clinical assessment of level of consciousness. It is based on the operation of an EEG and requires very little telemetry bandwidth or time.

  12. Proton Electrostatic Analyzer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    Detector Assembly ......................................... 11 2.2 Analyzer (Energy Selector) Assembly............................ 12 2.3 Collimator...Spectrometer assembly ........................................ 13 2.2 Base plate .................................................. 14 - ~ 2.3 Detector ... sensitive vehicle systems. Space objects undergo differential charging due to variations in physical properties among their surface regions. The rate and

  13. List mode multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Daniel E [Livermore, CA; Luke, S John [Pleasanton, CA; Mauger, G Joseph [Livermore, CA; Riot, Vincent J [Berkeley, CA; Knapp, David A [Livermore, CA

    2007-08-07

    A digital list mode multichannel analyzer (MCA) built around a programmable FPGA device for onboard data analysis and on-the-fly modification of system detection/operating parameters, and capable of collecting and processing data in very small time bins (<1 millisecond) when used in histogramming mode, or in list mode as a list mode MCA.

  14. Analyzing Workforce Education. Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Community & Technical Coll. Workforce Education Consortium.

    This monograph examines the issue of task analysis as used in workplace literacy programs, debating the need for it and how to perform it in a rapidly changing environment. Based on experiences of community colleges in Texas, the report analyzes ways that task analysis can be done and how to implement work force education programs more quickly.…

  15. The ACS statistical analyzer

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-03-01

    This document provides guidance for using the ACS Statistical Analyzer. It is an Excel-based template for users of estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) to assess the precision of individual estimates and to compare pairs of estimates fo...

  16. ANALYZING COHORT MORTALITY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several methods for analyzing data from mortality studies of occupationally or environmentally exposed cohorts are shown to be special cases of a single procedure. The procedure assumes a proportional hazards model for exposure effects and represents the log-likelihood kernel for...

  17. Soft Decision Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansdowne, Chatwin; Steele, Glen; Zucha, Joan; Schlesinger, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We describe the benefit of using closed-loop measurements for a radio receiver paired with a counterpart transmitter. We show that real-time analysis of the soft decision output of a receiver can provide rich and relevant insight far beyond the traditional hard-decision bit error rate (BER) test statistic. We describe a Soft Decision Analyzer (SDA) implementation for closed-loop measurements on single- or dual- (orthogonal) channel serial data communication links. The analyzer has been used to identify, quantify, and prioritize contributors to implementation loss in live-time during the development of software defined radios. This test technique gains importance as modern receivers are providing soft decision symbol synchronization as radio links are challenged to push more data and more protocol overhead through noisier channels, and software-defined radios (SDRs) use error-correction codes that approach Shannon's theoretical limit of performance.

  18. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Greenblatt, M.H.

    1958-03-25

    This patent pertains to pulse amplitude analyzers for sorting and counting a serles of pulses, and specifically discloses an analyzer which ls simple in construction and presents the puise height distribution visually on an oscilloscope screen. According to the invention, the pulses are applied to the vertical deflection plates of an oscilloscope and trigger the horizontal sweep. Each pulse starts at the same point on the screen and has a maximum amplitude substantially along the same vertical line. A mask is placed over the screen except for a slot running along the line where the maximum amplitudes of the pulses appear. After the slot has been scanned by a photocell in combination with a slotted rotating disk, the photocell signal is displayed on an auxiliary oscilloscope as vertical deflection along a horizontal time base to portray the pulse amplitude distribution.

  19. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Gray, G.W.; Jensen, A.S.

    1957-10-22

    A pulse-height analyzer system of improved design for sorting and counting a series of pulses, such as provided by a scintillation detector in nuclear radiation measurements, is described. The analyzer comprises a main transmission line, a cathode-ray tube for each section of the line with its deflection plates acting as the line capacitance; means to bias the respective cathode ray tubes so that the beam strikes a target only when a prearranged pulse amplitude is applied, with each tube progressively biased to respond to smaller amplitudes; pulse generating and counting means associated with each tube to respond when the beam is deflected; a control transmission line having the same time constant as the first line per section with pulse generating means for each tube for initiating a pulse on the second transmission line when a pulse triggers the tube of corresponding amplitude response, the former pulse acting to prevent successive tubes from responding to the pulse under test. This arrangement permits greater deflection sensitivity in the cathode ray tube and overcomes many of the disadvantages of prior art pulse-height analyzer circuits.

  20. Method for network analyzation and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bracht, Roger B.; Pasquale, Regina V.

    2001-01-01

    A portable network analyzer and method having multiple channel transmit and receive capability for real-time monitoring of processes which maintains phase integrity, requires low power, is adapted to provide full vector analysis, provides output frequencies of up to 62.5 MHz and provides fine sensitivity frequency resolution. The present invention includes a multi-channel means for transmitting and a multi-channel means for receiving, both in electrical communication with a software means for controlling. The means for controlling is programmed to provide a signal to a system under investigation which steps consecutively over a range of predetermined frequencies. The resulting received signal from the system provides complete time domain response information by executing a frequency transform of the magnitude and phase information acquired at each frequency step.

  1. Inductive dielectric analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agranovich, Daniel; Polygalov, Eugene; Popov, Ivan; Ben Ishai, Paul; Feldman, Yuri

    2017-03-01

    One of the approaches to bypass the problem of electrode polarization in dielectric measurements is the free electrode method. The advantage of this technique is that, the probing electric field in the material is not supplied by contact electrodes, but rather by electromagnetic induction. We have designed an inductive dielectric analyzer based on a sensor comprising two concentric toroidal coils. In this work, we present an analytic derivation of the relationship between the impedance measured by the sensor and the complex dielectric permittivity of the sample. The obtained relationship was successfully employed to measure the dielectric permittivity and conductivity of various alcohols and aqueous salt solutions.

  2. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    DOEpatents

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  3. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  4. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  5. Mineral/Water Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An x-ray fluorescence spectrometer developed for the Viking Landers by Martin Marietta was modified for geological exploration, water quality monitoring, and aircraft engine maintenance. The aerospace system was highly miniaturized and used very little power. It irradiates the sample causing it to emit x-rays at various energies, then measures the energy levels for sample composition analysis. It was used in oceanographic applications and modified to identify element concentrations in ore samples, on site. The instrument can also analyze the chemical content of water, and detect the sudden development of excessive engine wear.

  6. Ring Image Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    Ring Image Analyzer software analyzes images to recognize elliptical patterns. It determines the ellipse parameters (axes ratio, centroid coordinate, tilt angle). The program attempts to recognize elliptical fringes (e.g., Newton Rings) on a photograph and determine their centroid position, the short-to-long-axis ratio, and the angle of rotation of the long axis relative to the horizontal direction on the photograph. These capabilities are important in interferometric imaging and control of surfaces. In particular, this program has been developed and applied for determining the rim shape of precision-machined optical whispering gallery mode resonators. The program relies on a unique image recognition algorithm aimed at recognizing elliptical shapes, but can be easily adapted to other geometric shapes. It is robust against non-elliptical details of the image and against noise. Interferometric analysis of precision-machined surfaces remains an important technological instrument in hardware development and quality analysis. This software automates and increases the accuracy of this technique. The software has been developed for the needs of an R&TD-funded project and has become an important asset for the future research proposal to NASA as well as other agencies.

  7. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1995-08-08

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

  8. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibres to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands.

  9. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  10. ICAN: Integrated composites analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    The ICAN computer program performs all the essential aspects of mechanics/analysis/design of multilayered fiber composites. Modular, open-ended and user friendly, the program can handle a variety of composite systems having one type of fiber and one matrix as constituents as well as intraply and interply hybrid composite systems. It can also simulate isotropic layers by considering a primary composite system with negligible fiber volume content. This feature is specifically useful in modeling thin interply matrix layers. Hygrothermal conditions and various combinations of in-plane and bending loads can also be considered. Usage of this code is illustrated with a sample input and the generated output. Some key features of output are stress concentration factors around a circular hole, locations of probable delamination, a summary of the laminate failure stress analysis, free edge stresses, microstresses and ply stress/strain influence coefficients. These features make ICAN a powerful, cost-effective tool to analyze/design fiber composite structures and components.

  11. Analyzing Visibility Configurations.

    PubMed

    Dachsbacher, C

    2011-04-01

    Many algorithms, such as level of detail rendering and occlusion culling methods, make decisions based on the degree of visibility of an object, but do not analyze the distribution, or structure, of the visible and occluded regions across surfaces. We present an efficient method to classify different visibility configurations and show how this can be used on top of existing methods based on visibility determination. We adapt co-occurrence matrices for visibility analysis and generalize them to operate on clusters of triangular surfaces instead of pixels. We employ machine learning techniques to reliably classify the thus extracted feature vectors. Our method allows perceptually motivated level of detail methods for real-time rendering applications by detecting configurations with expected visual masking. We exemplify the versatility of our method with an analysis of area light visibility configurations in ray tracing and an area-to-area visibility analysis suitable for hierarchical radiosity refinement. Initial results demonstrate the robustness, simplicity, and performance of our method in synthetic scenes, as well as real applications.

  12. Lorentz force particle analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Thess, André; Moreau, René; Tan, Yanqing; Dai, Shangjun; Tao, Zhen; Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    A new contactless technique is presented for the detection of micron-sized insulating particles in the flow of an electrically conducting fluid. A transverse magnetic field brakes this flow and tends to become entrained in the flow direction by a Lorentz force, whose reaction force on the magnetic-field-generating system can be measured. The presence of insulating particles suspended in the fluid produce changes in this Lorentz force, generating pulses in it; these pulses enable the particles to be counted and sized. A two-dimensional numerical model that employs a moving mesh method demonstrates the measurement principle when such a particle is present. Two prototypes and a three-dimensional numerical model are used to demonstrate the feasibility of a Lorentz force particle analyzer (LFPA). The findings of this study conclude that such an LFPA, which offers contactless and on-line quantitative measurements, can be applied to an extensive range of applications. These applications include measurements of the cleanliness of high-temperature and aggressive molten metal, such as aluminum and steel alloys, and the clean manufacturing of semiconductors.

  13. PULSE HEIGHT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-01-21

    An anticoincidence device is described for a pair of adjacent channels of a multi-channel pulse height analyzer for preventing the lower channel from generating a count pulse in response to an input pulse when the input pulse has sufficient magnitude to reach the upper level channel. The anticoincidence circuit comprises a window amplifier, upper and lower level discriminators, and a biased-off amplifier. The output of the window amplifier is coupled to the inputs of the discriminators, the output of the upper level discriminator is connected to the resistance end of a series R-C network, the output of the lower level discriminator is coupled to the capacitance end of the R-C network, and the grid of the biased-off amplifier is coupled to the junction of the R-C network. In operation each discriminator produces a negative pulse output when the input pulse traverses its voltage setting. As a result of the connections to the R-C network, a trigger pulse will be sent to the biased-off amplifier when the incoming pulse level is sufficient to trigger only the lower level discriminator.

  14. Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; Pan, Lei; Zhai, Chengxing; Tang, Benyang; Kubar, Terry; Zhang, Zia; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The comprehensive and innovative evaluation of climate models with newly available global observations is critically needed for the improvement of climate model current-state representation and future-state predictability. A climate model diagnostic evaluation process requires physics-based multi-variable analyses that typically involve large-volume and heterogeneous datasets, making them both computation- and data-intensive. With an exploratory nature of climate data analyses and an explosive growth of datasets and service tools, scientists are struggling to keep track of their datasets, tools, and execution/study history, let alone sharing them with others. In response, we have developed a cloud-enabled, provenance-supported, web-service system called Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer (CMDA). CMDA enables the physics-based, multivariable model performance evaluations and diagnoses through the comprehensive and synergistic use of multiple observational data, reanalysis data, and model outputs. At the same time, CMDA provides a crowd-sourcing space where scientists can organize their work efficiently and share their work with others. CMDA is empowered by many current state-of-the-art software packages in web service, provenance, and semantic search.

  15. TEAMS Model Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tijidjian, Raffi P.

    2010-01-01

    The TEAMS model analyzer is a supporting tool developed to work with models created with TEAMS (Testability, Engineering, and Maintenance System), which was developed by QSI. In an effort to reduce the time spent in the manual process that each TEAMS modeler must perform in the preparation of reporting for model reviews, a new tool has been developed as an aid to models developed in TEAMS. The software allows for the viewing, reporting, and checking of TEAMS models that are checked into the TEAMS model database. The software allows the user to selectively model in a hierarchical tree outline view that displays the components, failure modes, and ports. The reporting features allow the user to quickly gather statistics about the model, and generate an input/output report pertaining to all of the components. Rules can be automatically validated against the model, with a report generated containing resulting inconsistencies. In addition to reducing manual effort, this software also provides an automated process framework for the Verification and Validation (V&V) effort that will follow development of these models. The aid of such an automated tool would have a significant impact on the V&V process.

  16. Analyzing Spacecraft Telecommunication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordon, Mark; Hanks, David; Gladden, Roy; Wood, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Multi-Mission Telecom Analysis Tool (MMTAT) is a C-language computer program for analyzing proposed spacecraft telecommunication systems. MMTAT utilizes parameterized input and computational models that can be run on standard desktop computers to perform fast and accurate analyses of telecommunication links. MMTAT is easy to use and can easily be integrated with other software applications and run as part of almost any computational simulation. It is distributed as either a stand-alone application program with a graphical user interface or a linkable library with a well-defined set of application programming interface (API) calls. As a stand-alone program, MMTAT provides both textual and graphical output. The graphs make it possible to understand, quickly and easily, how telecommunication performance varies with variations in input parameters. A delimited text file that can be read by any spreadsheet program is generated at the end of each run. The API in the linkable-library form of MMTAT enables the user to control simulation software and to change parameters during a simulation run. Results can be retrieved either at the end of a run or by use of a function call at any time step.

  17. Analyzing the Acoustic Beat with Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency ?f. The…

  18. Real time speech formant analyzer and display

    DOEpatents

    Holland, George E.; Struve, Walter S.; Homer, John F.

    1987-01-01

    A speech analyzer for interpretation of sound includes a sound input which converts the sound into a signal representing the sound. The signal is passed through a plurality of frequency pass filters to derive a plurality of frequency formants. These formants are converted to voltage signals by frequency-to-voltage converters and then are prepared for visual display in continuous real time. Parameters from the inputted sound are also derived and displayed. The display may then be interpreted by the user. The preferred embodiment includes a microprocessor which is interfaced with a television set for displaying of the sound formants. The microprocessor software enables the sound analyzer to present a variety of display modes for interpretive and therapeutic used by the user.

  19. Real time speech formant analyzer and display

    DOEpatents

    Holland, G.E.; Struve, W.S.; Homer, J.F.

    1987-02-03

    A speech analyzer for interpretation of sound includes a sound input which converts the sound into a signal representing the sound. The signal is passed through a plurality of frequency pass filters to derive a plurality of frequency formants. These formants are converted to voltage signals by frequency-to-voltage converters and then are prepared for visual display in continuous real time. Parameters from the inputted sound are also derived and displayed. The display may then be interpreted by the user. The preferred embodiment includes a microprocessor which is interfaced with a television set for displaying of the sound formants. The microprocessor software enables the sound analyzer to present a variety of display modes for interpretive and therapeutic used by the user. 19 figs.

  20. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  1. Crew Activity Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James; Kirillov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The crew activity analyzer (CAA) is a system of electronic hardware and software for automatically identifying patterns of group activity among crew members working together in an office, cockpit, workshop, laboratory, or other enclosed space. The CAA synchronously records multiple streams of data from digital video cameras, wireless microphones, and position sensors, then plays back and processes the data to identify activity patterns specified by human analysts. The processing greatly reduces the amount of time that the analysts must spend in examining large amounts of data, enabling the analysts to concentrate on subsets of data that represent activities of interest. The CAA has potential for use in a variety of governmental and commercial applications, including planning for crews for future long space flights, designing facilities wherein humans must work in proximity for long times, improving crew training and measuring crew performance in military settings, human-factors and safety assessment, development of team procedures, and behavioral and ethnographic research. The data-acquisition hardware of the CAA (see figure) includes two video cameras: an overhead one aimed upward at a paraboloidal mirror on the ceiling and one mounted on a wall aimed in a downward slant toward the crew area. As many as four wireless microphones can be worn by crew members. The audio signals received from the microphones are digitized, then compressed in preparation for storage. Approximate locations of as many as four crew members are measured by use of a Cricket indoor location system. [The Cricket indoor location system includes ultrasonic/radio beacon and listener units. A Cricket beacon (in this case, worn by a crew member) simultaneously transmits a pulse of ultrasound and a radio signal that contains identifying information. Each Cricket listener unit measures the difference between the times of reception of the ultrasound and radio signals from an identified beacon

  2. Whole blood coagulation analyzers.

    PubMed

    1997-08-01

    Whole blood Coagulation analyzers (WBCAs) are widely used point-of-care (POC) testing devices found primarily in cardiothoracic surgical suites and cardia catheterization laboratories. Most of these devices can perform a number of coagulation tests that provide information about a patient's blood clotting status. Clinicians use the results of the WBCA tests, which are available minutes after applying a blood sample, primarily to monitor the effectiveness of heparin therapy--an anticoagulation therapy used during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery, angioplasty, hemodialysis, and other clinical procedures. In this study we evaluated five WBCAs from four suppliers. Our testing focused on the applications for which WBCAs are primarily used: Monitoring moderate to high heparin levels, as would be required, for example, during CPB are angioplasty. For this function, WCBAs are typically used to perform an activated clotting time (ACT) test or, as one supplier refers to its test, a heparin management test (HMT). All models included in this study offered an ACT test or an HMT. Monitoring low heparin levels, as would be required, for example,during hemodialysis. For this function, WBCAs would normally be used to perform either a low-range ACT (LACT) test or a whole blood activated partial thromboplastin time (WBAPTT) test. Most of the evaluated units could perform at least one of these tests; one unit did not offer either test and was therefore not rated for this application. We rated and ranked each evaluated model separately for each of these two applications. In addition, we provided a combined rating and ranking that considers the units' appropriateness for performing both application. We based our conclusions on a unit's performance and humans factor design, as determined by our testing, and on its five-year life-cycle cost, as determined by our net present value (NPV) analysis. While we rated all evaluated units acceptable for each appropriate category, we did

  3. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Hedgecock, Jud; Nienaber, Terry; Cooper, Bonnie; Allen, Carlton; Ming, Doug

    2000-01-01

    The Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA) is a high-temperature furnace and mass spectrometer instrument for determining the mineralogical composition and reactivity of soil samples. REGA provides key mineralogical and reactivity data that is needed to understand the soil chemistry of an asteroid, which then aids in determining in-situ which materials should be selected for return to earth. REGA is capable of conducting a number of direct soil measurements that are unique to this instrument. These experimental measurements include: (1) Mass spectrum analysis of evolved gases from soil samples as they are heated from ambient temperature to 900 C; and (2) Identification of liberated chemicals, e.g., water, oxygen, sulfur, chlorine, and fluorine. REGA would be placed on the surface of a near earth asteroid. It is an autonomous instrument that is controlled from earth but does the analysis of regolith materials automatically. The REGA instrument consists of four primary components: (1) a flight-proven mass spectrometer, (2) a high-temperature furnace, (3) a soil handling system, and (4) a microcontroller. An external arm containing a scoop or drill gathers regolith samples. A sample is placed in the inlet orifice where the finest-grained particles are sifted into a metering volume and subsequently moved into a crucible. A movable arm then places the crucible in the furnace. The furnace is closed, thereby sealing the inner volume to collect the evolved gases for analysis. Owing to the very low g forces on an asteroid compared to Mars or the moon, the sample must be moved from inlet to crucible by mechanical means rather than by gravity. As the soil sample is heated through a programmed pattern, the gases evolved at each temperature are passed through a transfer tube to the mass spectrometer for analysis and identification. Return data from the instrument will lead to new insights and discoveries including: (1) Identification of the molecular masses of all of the gases

  4. Soft Decision Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Glen; Lansdowne, Chatwin; Zucha, Joan; Schlensinger, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The Soft Decision Analyzer (SDA) is an instrument that combines hardware, firmware, and software to perform realtime closed-loop end-to-end statistical analysis of single- or dual- channel serial digital RF communications systems operating in very low signal-to-noise conditions. As an innovation, the unique SDA capabilities allow it to perform analysis of situations where the receiving communication system slips bits due to low signal-to-noise conditions or experiences constellation rotations resulting in channel polarity in versions or channel assignment swaps. SDA s closed-loop detection allows it to instrument a live system and correlate observations with frame, codeword, and packet losses, as well as Quality of Service (QoS) and Quality of Experience (QoE) events. The SDA s abilities are not confined to performing analysis in low signal-to-noise conditions. Its analysis provides in-depth insight of a communication system s receiver performance in a variety of operating conditions. The SDA incorporates two techniques for identifying slips. The first is an examination of content of the received data stream s relation to the transmitted data content and the second is a direct examination of the receiver s recovered clock signals relative to a reference. Both techniques provide benefits in different ways and allow the communication engineer evaluating test results increased confidence and understanding of receiver performance. Direct examination of data contents is performed by two different data techniques, power correlation or a modified Massey correlation, and can be applied to soft decision data widths 1 to 12 bits wide over a correlation depth ranging from 16 to 512 samples. The SDA detects receiver bit slips within a 4 bits window and can handle systems with up to four quadrants (QPSK, SQPSK, and BPSK systems). The SDA continuously monitors correlation results to characterize slips and quadrant change and is capable of performing analysis even when the

  5. Frequency spirals.

    PubMed

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call "frequency spirals." These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seen in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.

  6. Frequency spirals

    SciTech Connect

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H., E-mail: strogatz@cornell.edu

    2016-09-15

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call “frequency spirals.” These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seenmore » in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.« less

  7. Analyzing the acoustic beat with mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-04-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency Δf. The resulting auditory sensation is a tone with a volume that varies periodically. Acoustic beats can be perceived repeatedly in day-to-day life and have some interesting applications. For example, string instruments are still tuned with the help of an acoustic beat, even with modern technology. If a reference tone (e.g., 440 Hz) and, for example, a slightly out-of-tune violin string produce a tone simultaneously, a beat can be perceived. The more similar the frequencies, the longer the duration of the beat. In the extreme case, when the frequencies are identical, a beat no longer arises. The string is therefore correctly tuned. Using the Oscilloscope app,4 it is possible to capture and save acoustic signals of this kind and determine the beat frequency fS of the signal, which represents the difference in frequency Δf of the two overlapping tones (for Android smartphones, the app OsciPrime Oscilloscope can be used).

  8. Droplet actuator analyzer with cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturmer, Ryan A. (Inventor); Paik, Philip Y. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Vijay (Inventor); Brafford, Keith R. (Inventor); West, Richard M. (Inventor); Smith, Gregory F. (Inventor); Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Pamula, Vamsee K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator with cartridge is provided. According to one embodiment, a sample analyzer is provided and includes an analyzer unit comprising electronic or optical receiving means, a cartridge comprising self-contained droplet handling capabilities, and a wherein the cartridge is coupled to the analyzer unit by a means which aligns electronic and/or optical outputs from the cartridge with electronic or optical receiving means on the analyzer unit. According to another embodiment, a sample analyzer is provided and includes a sample analyzer comprising a cartridge coupled thereto and a means of electrical interface and/or optical interface between the cartridge and the analyzer, whereby electrical signals and/or optical signals may be transmitted from the cartridge to the analyzer.

  9. Soft Decision Analyzer and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zucha, Joan P. (Inventor); Schlesinger, Adam M. (Inventor); Lansdowne, Chatwin (Inventor); Steele, Glen F. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A soft decision analyzer system is operable to interconnect soft decision communication equipment and analyze the operation thereof to detect symbol wise alignment between a test data stream and a reference data stream in a variety of operating conditions.

  10. Soft Decision Analyzer and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zucha, Joan P. (Inventor); Schlesinger, Adam M. (Inventor); Lansdowne, Chatwin (Inventor); Steele, Glen F. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A soft decision analyzer system is operable to interconnect soft decision communication equipment and analyze the operation thereof to detect symbol wise alignment between a test data stream and a reference data stream in a variety of operating conditions.

  11. Pseudotachometer for mobile metabolic analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Metabolic analyzer determines a patient's walking or ambulation speed and simultaneously measures his metabolic parameters. Analyzer is designed to move at some preselected human ambulation speed. During test, patient is connected to system and follows analyzer closely while his metabolic data is being monitored.

  12. The Deep Space Network stability analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Greenhall, Charles A.; Hamell, Robert L.; Kuhnle, Paul F.

    1995-01-01

    A stability analyzer for testing NASA Deep Space Network installations during flight radio science experiments is described. The stability analyzer provides realtime measurements of signal properties of general experimental interest: power, phase, and amplitude spectra; Allan deviation; and time series of amplitude, phase shift, and differential phase shift. Input ports are provided for up to four 100 MHz frequency standards and eight baseband analog (greater than 100 kHz bandwidth) signals. Test results indicate the following upper bounds to noise floors when operating on 100 MHz signals: -145 dBc/Hz for phase noise spectrum further than 200 Hz from carrier, 2.5 x 10(exp -15) (tau =1 second) and 1.5 x 10(exp -17) (tau =1000 seconds) for Allan deviation, and 1 x 10(exp -4) degrees for 1-second averages of phase deviation. Four copies of the stability analyzer have been produced, plus one transportable unit for use at non-NASA observatories.

  13. Josephson Junction spectrum analyzer for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, S. Y.; Anischenko, S. E.; Khabayev, P. V.

    1995-01-01

    A prototype of the Josephson-effect spectrum analyzer developed for the millimeter wave band is described. The measurement results for spectra obtained in the frequency band from 50 to 250 GHz are presented.

  14. Josephson junction spectrum analyzer for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, S.Y.; Anischenko, S.E.; Khabayev, P.V.

    1994-12-31

    A prototype of the Josephson-effect spectrum analyzer developed for the millimeter-wave band is described. The measurement results for spectra obtained in the frequency band from 50 to 250 GHz are presented.

  15. A wide-band high-resolution spectrum analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Maureen P.; Garyantes, Michael F.; Wilck, Helmut C.; Grimm, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A two-million-channel, 40 MHz bandwidth, digital spectrum analyzer under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is described. The analyzer system will serve as a prototype processor for the sky survey portion of NASA's Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence program and for other applications in the Deep Space Network. The analyzer digitizes an analog input, performs a 2 (sup 21) point Discrete Fourier Transform, accumulates the output power, normalizes the output to remove frequency-dependent gain, and automates simple detection algorithms. Due to its built-in frequency-domain processing functions and configuration flexibility, the analyzer is a very powerful tool for real-time signal analysis.

  16. Comparison of fiber length analyzers

    Treesearch

    Don Guay; Nancy Ross Sutherland; Walter Rantanen; Nicole Malandri; Aimee Stephens; Kathleen Mattingly; Matt Schneider

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, several fiber new fiber length analyzers have been developed and brought to market. The new instruments provide faster measurements and the capability of both laboratory and on-line analysis. Do the various fiber analyzers provide the same length, coarseness, width, and fines measurements for a given fiber sample? This paper provides a comparison of...

  17. Nonlinear single-spin spectrum analyzer.

    PubMed

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2013-03-15

    Qubits have been used as linear spectrum analyzers of their environments. Here we solve the problem of nonlinear spectral analysis, required for discrete noise induced by a strongly coupled environment. Our nonperturbative analytical model shows a nonlinear signal dependence on noise power, resulting in a spectral resolution beyond the Fourier limit as well as frequency mixing. We develop a noise characterization scheme adapted to this nonlinearity. We then apply it using a single trapped ion as a sensitive probe of strong, non-Gaussian, discrete magnetic field noise. Finally, we experimentally compared the performance of equidistant vs Uhrig modulation schemes for spectral analysis.

  18. Calibration of optical particle-size analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Pechin, William H.; Thacker, Louis H.; Turner, Lloyd J.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a system for the calibration of an optical particle-size analyzer of the light-intercepting type for spherical particles, wherein a rotary wheel or disc is provided with radially-extending wires of differing diameters, each wire corresponding to a particular equivalent spherical particle diameter. These wires are passed at an appropriate frequency between the light source and the light detector of the analyzer. The reduction of light as received at the detector is a measure of the size of the wire, and the electronic signal may then be adjusted to provide the desired signal for corresponding spherical particles. This calibrator may be operated at any time without interrupting other processing.

  19. [Automated analyzer of enzyme immunoassay].

    PubMed

    Osawa, S

    1995-09-01

    Automated analyzers for enzyme immunoassay can be classified by several points of view: the kind of labeled antibodies or enzymes, detection methods, the number of tests per unit time, analytical time and speed per run. In practice, it is important for us consider the several points such as detection limits, the number of tests per unit time, analytical range, and precision. Most of the automated analyzers on the market can randomly access and measure samples. I will describe the recent advance of automated analyzers reviewing their labeling antibodies and enzymes, the detection methods, the number of test per unit time and analytical time and speed per test.

  20. Nuclear fuel microsphere gamma analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Kenneth H.; Long, Jr., Ernest L.; Willey, Melvin G.

    1977-01-01

    A gamma analyzer system is provided for the analysis of nuclear fuel microspheres and other radioactive particles. The system consists of an analysis turntable with means for loading, in sequence, a plurality of stations within the turntable; a gamma ray detector for determining the spectrum of a sample in one section; means for analyzing the spectrum; and a receiver turntable to collect the analyzed material in stations according to the spectrum analysis. Accordingly, particles may be sorted according to their quality; e.g., fuel particles with fractured coatings may be separated from those that are not fractured, or according to other properties.

  1. 21 CFR 882.1420 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum....1420 Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer is a device used to display the frequency content or power spectral...

  2. 21 CFR 882.1420 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum....1420 Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer is a device used to display the frequency content or power spectral...

  3. 21 CFR 882.1420 - Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum....1420 Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer. (a) Identification. An electroencephalogram (EEG) signal spectrum analyzer is a device used to display the frequency content or power spectral...

  4. Molecular wake shield gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for measuring and characterizing the ultrahigh vacuum in the wake of an orbiting spacecraft are studied. A high sensitivity mass spectrometer that contains a double mass analyzer consisting of an open source miniature magnetic sector field neutral gas analyzer and an identical ion analyzer is proposed. These are configured to detect and identify gas and ion species of hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide and any other gas or ion species in the 1 to 46 amu mass range. This range covers the normal atmospheric constituents. The sensitivity of the instrument is sufficient to measure ambient gases and ion with a particle density of the order of one per cc. A chemical pump, or getter, is mounted near the entrance aperture of the neutral gas analyzer which integrates the absorption of ambient gases for a selectable period of time for subsequent release and analysis. The sensitivity is realizable for all but rare gases using this technique.

  5. Market study: Whole blood analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market survey was conducted to develop findings relative to the commercialization potential and key market factors of the whole blood analyzer which is being developed in conjunction with NASA's Space Shuttle Medical System.

  6. CSTT Update: Fuel Quality Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, Eric L.; Lujan, Roger W.; Mukundan, Rangachary

    These are slides from a presentation. The following topics are covered: project background (scope and approach), developing the prototype (timeline), update on intellectual property, analyzer comparisons (improving humidification, stabilizing the baseline, applying clean-up strategy, impact of ionomer content and improving clean-up), proposed operating mode, considerations for testing in real-world conditions (Gen 1 analyzer electronics development, testing partner identified, field trial planning), summary, and future work.

  7. A Categorization of Dynamic Analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lujan, Michelle R.

    1997-01-01

    Program analysis techniques and tools are essential to the development process because of the support they provide in detecting errors and deficiencies at different phases of development. The types of information rendered through analysis includes the following: statistical measurements of code, type checks, dataflow analysis, consistency checks, test data,verification of code, and debugging information. Analyzers can be broken into two major categories: dynamic and static. Static analyzers examine programs with respect to syntax errors and structural properties., This includes gathering statistical information on program content, such as the number of lines of executable code, source lines. and cyclomatic complexity. In addition, static analyzers provide the ability to check for the consistency of programs with respect to variables. Dynamic analyzers in contrast are dependent on input and the execution of a program providing the ability to find errors that cannot be detected through the use of static analysis alone. Dynamic analysis provides information on the behavior of a program rather than on the syntax. Both types of analysis detect errors in a program, but dynamic analyzers accomplish this through run-time behavior. This paper focuses on the following broad classification of dynamic analyzers: 1) Metrics; 2) Models; and 3) Monitors. Metrics are those analyzers that provide measurement. The next category, models, captures those analyzers that present the state of the program to the user at specified points in time. The last category, monitors, checks specified code based on some criteria. The paper discusses each classification and the techniques that are included under them. In addition, the role of each technique in the software life cycle is discussed. Familiarization with the tools that measure, model and monitor programs provides a framework for understanding the program's dynamic behavior from different, perspectives through analysis of the input

  8. Frequency of orthodontic extraction

    PubMed Central

    Dardengo, Camila de S.; Fernandes, Luciana Q. P.; Capelli, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The option of dental extraction for orthodontic purposes has been debated for more than 100 years, including periods when it was widely used in treatment, including the present, during which other methods are used to avoid dental extractions. The objective was to analyze the frequency of tooth extraction treatment performed between 1980 and 2011 at the Orthodontic Clinic of Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ). Material and Methods: The clinical records of 1484 patients undergoing orthodontic treatment were evaluated. The frequency of extractions was evaluated with regard to sex, Angle's classification, the different combinations of extractions and the period when orthodontic treatment began. Chi-square test was used to determine correlations between variables, while the chi-square test for trends was used to assess the frequency of extractions over the years. Results: There was a reduction of approximately 20% in the frequency of cases treated with tooth extraction over the last 32 years. The most frequently extracted teeth were first premolars. Patients with Class I malocclusion showed fewer extractions, while Class II patients underwent a higher number of extraction treatment. There were no statistically significant differences with regard to sex. Conclusion: New features introduced into the orthodontic clinic and new esthetic concepts contributed to reducing the number of cases treated with dental extractions. However, dental extractions for orthodontic purposes are still well indicated in certain cases. PMID:27007762

  9. Numerical methods for analyzing electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Lo, Y. T.; Chuang, S. L.; Lee, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical methods to analyze electromagnetic scattering are presented. The dispersions and attenuations of the normal modes in a circular waveguide coated with lossy material were completely analyzed. The radar cross section (RCS) from a circular waveguide coated with lossy material was calculated. The following is observed: (1) the interior irradiation contributes to the RCS much more than does the rim diffraction; (2) at low frequency, the RCS from the circular waveguide terminated by a perfect electric conductor (PEC) can be reduced more than 13 dB down with a coating thickness less than 1% of the radius using the best lossy material available in a 6 radius-long cylinder; (3) at high frequency, a modal separation between the highly attenuated and the lowly attenuated modes is evident if the coating material is too lossy, however, a large RCS reduction can be achieved for a small incident angle with a thin layer of coating. It is found that the waveguide coated with a lossy magnetic material can be used as a substitute for a corrugated waveguide to produce a circularly polarized radiation yield.

  10. Digital frequency control of satellite frequency standards. [Defense Navigation Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    In the Frequency and Time Standard Development Program of the TIMATION System, a new miniaturized rubidium vapor frequency standard has been tested and analyzed for possible use on the TIMATION 3A launch, as part of the Defense Navigation Satellite Development Program. The design and construction of a digital frequency control was required to remotely control this rubidium vapor frequency standard as well as the quartz oscillator in current use. This control must be capable of accepting commands from a satellite telemetry system, verify that the correct commands have been sent and control the frequency to the requirements of the system. Several modifications must be performed to the rubidium vapor frequency standard to allow it to be compatible with the digital frequency control. These include the addition of a varactor to voltage tune the coarse range of the flywheel oscillator, and a modification to supply the C field current externally. The digital frequency control for the rubidium vapor frequency standard has been successfully tested in prototype form.

  11. Digital signal processing in the radio science stability analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    The Telecommunications Division has built a stability analyzer for testing Deep Space Network installations during flight radio science experiments. The low-frequency part of the analyzer operates by digitizing wave signals with bandwidths between 80 Hz and 45 kHz. Processed outputs include spectra of signal, phase, amplitude, and differential phase; time series of the same quantities; and Allan deviation of phase and differential phase. This article documents the digital signal-processing methods programmed into the analyzer.

  12. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Norman E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90.degree. and 180.degree. excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A UV-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  13. On-Demand Urine Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Inscore, Frank; Shende, Chetan

    2010-01-01

    A lab-on-a-chip was developed that is capable of extracting biochemical indicators from urine samples and generating their surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) so that the indicators can be quantified and identified. The development was motivated by the need to monitor and assess the effects of extended weightlessness, which include space motion sickness and loss of bone and muscle mass. The results may lead to developments of effective exercise programs and drug regimes that would maintain astronaut health. The analyzer containing the lab-on-a- chip includes materials to extract 3- methylhistidine (a muscle-loss indicator) and Risedronate (a bone-loss indicator) from the urine sample and detect them at the required concentrations using a Raman analyzer. The lab-on- a-chip has both an extractive material and a SERS-active material. The analyzer could be used to monitor the onset of diseases, such as osteoporosis.

  14. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, N.E.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A uv-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  15. Personal Computer (PC) Thermal Analyzer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    demonstrate the power of the PC Thermal Analyzer, it was compared with an existing thermal analysis method. Specifically, the PC Thermal Analyzer was...34Intelligence" I T Kowledge 1 User I Inference e Base I Interface 1i FMechanisms H 1 asI I II - I L m m m m m m - m m i m m - m m - m I- m i m Expert...Temperature in degrees centi- grade? (2) What is the total Heat Output ( power dissipation) in watts?). 25 BOARD ASSEMBLY ~UI U2 aooo 0i0000t00 U15

  16. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Stanley A.; Reedy, Gerald T.; Kumar, Romesh

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  17. Identification of site frequencies from building records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    2003-01-01

    A simple procedure to identify site frequencies using earthquake response records from roofs and basements of buildings is presented. For this purpose, data from five different buildings are analyzed using only spectral analyses techniques. Additional data such as free-field records in close proximity to the buildings and site characterization data are also used to estimate site frequencies and thereby to provide convincing evidence and confirmation of the site frequencies inferred from the building records. Furthermore, simple code-formula is used to calculate site frequencies and compare them with the identified site frequencies from records. Results show that the simple procedure is effective in identification of site frequencies and provides relatively reliable estimates of site frequencies when compared with other methods. Therefore the simple procedure for estimating site frequencies using earthquake records can be useful in adding to the database of site frequencies. Such databases can be used to better estimate site frequencies of those sites with similar geological structures.

  18. Improvement of a respiratory ozone analyzer.

    PubMed

    Ultman, J S; Ben-Jebria, A; Mac Dougall, C S; Rigas, M L

    1997-10-01

    The breath-to-breath measurement of total respiratory ozone (O3) uptake requires monitoring O3 concentration at the airway opening with an instrument that responds rapidly relative to the breathing frequency. Our original chemiluminescent analyzer, using 2-methyl-2-butene as the reactant gas, had a 10% to 90% step-response time of 110 msec and a minimal detectable concentration of 0.018 parts per million (ppm) O3 (Ben-Jebria et al. 1990). This instrument was suitable for respiratory O3 monitoring during quiet breathing and light exercise. For this study, we constructed a more self-contained analyzer with a faster response time using ethylene as the reactant gas. When the analyzer was operated at a reaction chamber pressure of 350 torr, an ethylene-to-sample flow ratio of 4:1, and a sampling flow of 0.6 liters per minute (Lpm), it had a 10% to 90% step-response time of 70 msec and a minimal detectable concentration of 0.006 ppm. These specifications make respiratory O3 monitoring possible during moderate-to-heavy exercise. In addition, the nonlinear calibration and the carbon dioxide (CO2) interference exhibited by the original analyzer were eliminated. In breath-to-breath measurements in two healthy men, the fractional uptake of O3 during one minute of quiet breathing was comparable to the results obtained by using a slowly responding commercial analyzer with a quasi-steady material balance method (Wiester et al. 1996). In fact, fractional uptake was about 0.8 regardless of O3 exposure concentration (0.11 to 0.43 ppm) or ventilation rate (4 to 41 Lpm/m2).

  19. Signal Identification and Isolation Utilizing Radio Frequency Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-01

    analyzers can measure the frequency of signals and filters can be used to separate the signals apart from one another. This report will review...different techniques for spectrum analysis and isolation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS radio frequency, photonics, spectrum analyzer, filters 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...Analyzers .......................................................................................... 3 3.2 Frequency Identification using Filters

  20. Strategies for Analyzing Tone Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coupe, Alexander R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines a method of auditory and acoustic analysis for determining the tonemes of a language starting from scratch, drawing on the author's experience of recording and analyzing tone languages of north-east India. The methodology is applied to a preliminary analysis of tone in the Thang dialect of Khiamniungan, a virtually undocumented…

  1. Therapy Talk: Analyzing Therapeutic Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Margaret M.

    2004-01-01

    Therapeutic discourse is the talk-in-interaction that represents the social practice between clinician and client. This article invites speech-language pathologists to apply their knowledge of language to analyzing therapy talk and to learn how talking practices shape clinical roles and identities. A range of qualitative research approaches,…

  2. Helping Students Analyze Business Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devet, Bonnie

    2001-01-01

    Notes that student writers gain greater insight into the importance of audience by analyzing business documents. Discusses how business writing teachers can help students understand the rhetorical refinements of writing to an audience. Presents an assignment designed to lead writers systematically through an analysis of two advertisements. (SG)

  3. Pollution Analyzing and Monitoring Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    Compiled in this book is basic, technical information useful in a systems approach to pollution control. Descriptions and specifications are given of what is available in ready made, on-the-line commercial equipment for sampling, monitoring, measuring and continuously analyzing the multitudinous types of pollutants found in the air, water, soil,…

  4. Methods of analyzing crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Jjunju, Fred Paul Mark; Li, Anyin

    The invention generally relates to methods of analyzing crude oil. In certain embodiments, methods of the invention involve obtaining a crude oil sample, and subjecting the crude oil sample to mass spectrometry analysis. In certain embodiments, the method is performed without any sample pre-purification steps.

  5. Multi-frequency communication system and method

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-06-01

    A multi-frequency RFID remote communication system is provided that includes a plurality of RFID tags configured to receive a first signal and to return a second signal, the second signal having a first frequency component and a second frequency component, the second frequency component including data unique to each remote RFID tag. The system further includes a reader configured to transmit an interrogation signal and to receive remote signals from the tags. A first signal processor, preferably a mixer, removes an intermediate frequency component from the received signal, and a second processor, preferably a second mixer, analyzes the IF frequency component to output data that is unique to each remote tag.

  6. DEEP WATER ISOTOPIC CURRENT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, W.H.

    1964-04-21

    A deepwater isotopic current analyzer, which employs radioactive isotopes for measurement of ocean currents at various levels beneath the sea, is described. The apparatus, which can determine the direction and velocity of liquid currents, comprises a shaft having a plurality of radiation detectors extending equidistant radially therefrom, means for releasing radioactive isotopes from the shaft, and means for determining the time required for the isotope to reach a particular detector. (AEC)

  7. Analyzing Big Data in Psychology: A Split/Analyze/Meta-Analyze Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Mike W.-L.; Jak, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Big data is a field that has traditionally been dominated by disciplines such as computer science and business, where mainly data-driven analyses have been performed. Psychology, a discipline in which a strong emphasis is placed on behavioral theories and empirical research, has the potential to contribute greatly to the big data movement. However, one challenge to psychologists—and probably the most crucial one—is that most researchers may not have the necessary programming and computational skills to analyze big data. In this study we argue that psychologists can also conduct big data research and that, rather than trying to acquire new programming and computational skills, they should focus on their strengths, such as performing psychometric analyses and testing theories using multivariate analyses to explain phenomena. We propose a split/analyze/meta-analyze approach that allows psychologists to easily analyze big data. Two real datasets are used to demonstrate the proposed procedures in R. A new research agenda related to the analysis of big data in psychology is outlined at the end of the study. PMID:27242639

  8. Analyzing Big Data in Psychology: A Split/Analyze/Meta-Analyze Approach.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Mike W-L; Jak, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Big data is a field that has traditionally been dominated by disciplines such as computer science and business, where mainly data-driven analyses have been performed. Psychology, a discipline in which a strong emphasis is placed on behavioral theories and empirical research, has the potential to contribute greatly to the big data movement. However, one challenge to psychologists-and probably the most crucial one-is that most researchers may not have the necessary programming and computational skills to analyze big data. In this study we argue that psychologists can also conduct big data research and that, rather than trying to acquire new programming and computational skills, they should focus on their strengths, such as performing psychometric analyses and testing theories using multivariate analyses to explain phenomena. We propose a split/analyze/meta-analyze approach that allows psychologists to easily analyze big data. Two real datasets are used to demonstrate the proposed procedures in R. A new research agenda related to the analysis of big data in psychology is outlined at the end of the study.

  9. Rotating field mass and velocity analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven Joel (Inventor); Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A rotating field mass and velocity analyzer having a cell with four walls, time dependent RF potentials that are applied to each wall, and a detector. The time dependent RF potentials create an RF field in the cell which effectively rotates within the cell. An ion beam is accelerated into the cell and the rotating RF field disperses the incident ion beam according to the mass-to-charge (m/e) ratio and velocity distribution present in the ion beam. The ions of the beam either collide with the ion detector or deflect away from the ion detector, depending on the m/e, RF amplitude, and RF frequency. The detector counts the incident ions to determine the m/e and velocity distribution in the ion beam.

  10. Frequency steerable acoustic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, Matteo

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an active research area devoted to the assessment of the structural integrity of critical components of aerospace, civil and mechanical systems. Guided wave methods have been proposed for SHM of plate-like structures using permanently attached piezoelectric transducers, which generate and sense waves to evaluate the presence of damage. Effective interrogation of structural health is often facilitated by sensors and actuators with the ability to perform electronic, i.e. phased array, scanning. The objective of this research is to design an innovative directional piezoelectric transducer to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health. The proposed Frequency Steerable Acoustic Transducers (FSATs) are characterized by a spatial arrangement of active material which leads to directional characteristics varying with frequency. Thus FSATs can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the FSATs is obtained through a theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. The FSAT configurations analyzed in this work are a quadrilateral array and a geometry which corresponds to a spiral in the wavenumber domain. The quadrilateral array is experimentally validated, confirming the concept of frequency-dependent directionality. Its limited directivity is improved by the Wavenumber Spiral FSAT (WS-FSAT), which, instead, is characterized by a continuous frequency dependent directionality. Preliminary validations of the WS-FSAT, using a laser doppler vibrometer, are followed by the implementation of the WS-FSAT as a properly shaped piezo transducer. The prototype is first used for localization of acoustic broadband sources. Signal processing

  11. The Aqueduct Global Flood Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iceland, Charles

    2015-04-01

    As population growth and economic growth take place, and as climate change accelerates, many regions across the globe are finding themselves increasingly vulnerable to flooding. A recent OECD study of the exposure of the world's large port cities to coastal flooding found that 40 million people were exposed to a 1 in 100 year coastal flood event in 2005, and the total value of exposed assets was about US 3,000 billion, or 5% of global GDP. By the 2070s, those numbers were estimated to increase to 150 million people and US 35,000 billion, or roughly 9% of projected global GDP. Impoverished people in developing countries are particularly at risk because they often live in flood-prone areas and lack the resources to respond. WRI and its Dutch partners - Deltares, IVM-VU University Amsterdam, Utrecht University, and PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency - are in the initial stages of developing a robust set of river flood and coastal storm surge risk measures that show the extent of flooding under a variety of scenarios (both current and future), together with the projected human and economic impacts of these flood scenarios. These flood risk data and information will be accessible via an online, easy-to-use Aqueduct Global Flood Analyzer. We will also investigate the viability, benefits, and costs of a wide array of flood risk reduction measures that could be implemented in a variety of geographic and socio-economic settings. Together, the activities we propose have the potential for saving hundreds of thousands of lives and strengthening the resiliency and security of many millions more, especially those who are most vulnerable. Mr. Iceland will present Version 1.0 of the Aqueduct Global Flood Analyzer and provide a preview of additional elements of the Analyzer to be released in the coming years.

  12. Method for analyzing microbial communities

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Jizhong [Oak Ridge, TN; Wu, Liyou [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-20

    The present invention provides a method for quantitatively analyzing microbial genes, species, or strains in a sample that contains at least two species or strains of microorganisms. The method involves using an isothermal DNA polymerase to randomly and representatively amplify genomic DNA of the microorganisms in the sample, hybridizing the resultant polynucleotide amplification product to a polynucleotide microarray that can differentiate different genes, species, or strains of microorganisms of interest, and measuring hybridization signals on the microarray to quantify the genes, species, or strains of interest.

  13. Metabolic analyzer. [for Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus is described for the measurement of metabolic rate and breathing dynamics in which inhaled and exhaled breath are sensed by sealed, piston-displacement type spirometers. These spirometers electrically measure the volume of inhaled and exhaled breath. A mass spectrometer analyzes simultaneously for oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water vapor. Circuits responsive to the outputs of the spirometers, mass spectrometer, temperature, pressure, and timing signals compute oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute volume, and respiratory exchange ratio. A selective indicator provides for readout of these data at predetermined cyclic intervals.

  14. Trace Gas Analyzer (TGA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and test of a breadboard trace gas analyzer (TGA) is documented. The TGA is a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system. The gas chromatograph subsystem employs a recirculating hydrogen carrier gas. The recirculation feature minimizes the requirement for transport and storage of large volumes of carrier gas during a mission. The silver-palladium hydrogen separator which permits the removal of the carrier gas and its reuse also decreases vacuum requirements for the mass spectrometer since the mass spectrometer vacuum system need handle only the very low sample pressure, not sample plus carrier. System performance was evaluated with a representative group of compounds.

  15. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Allman, S.L.; Chunghsuan Chen; Chen, F.C.

    1993-02-02

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  16. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Allman, Steve L.; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Chen, Fang C.

    1993-01-01

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  17. Managing healthcare information: analyzing trust.

    PubMed

    Söderström, Eva; Eriksson, Nomie; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie

    2016-08-08

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to analyze two case studies with a trust matrix tool, to identify trust issues related to electronic health records. Design/methodology/approach - A qualitative research approach is applied using two case studies. The data analysis of these studies generated a problem list, which was mapped to a trust matrix. Findings - Results demonstrate flaws in current practices and point to achieving balance between organizational, person and technology trust perspectives. The analysis revealed three challenge areas, to: achieve higher trust in patient-focussed healthcare; improve communication between patients and healthcare professionals; and establish clear terminology. By taking trust into account, a more holistic perspective on healthcare can be achieved, where trust can be obtained and optimized. Research limitations/implications - A trust matrix is tested and shown to identify trust problems on different levels and relating to trusting beliefs. Future research should elaborate and more fully address issues within three identified challenge areas. Practical implications - The trust matrix's usefulness as a tool for organizations to analyze trust problems and issues is demonstrated. Originality/value - Healthcare trust issues are captured to a greater extent and from previously unchartered perspectives.

  18. The instantaneous frequency rate spectrogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    An accelerogram of the instantaneous phase of signal components referred to as an instantaneous frequency rate spectrogram (IFRS) is presented as a joint time-frequency distribution. The distribution is directly obtained by processing the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) locally. A novel approach to amplitude demodulation based upon the reassignment method is introduced as a useful by-product. Additionally, an estimator of energy density versus the instantaneous frequency rate (IFR) is proposed and referred to as the IFR profile. The energy density is estimated based upon both the classical energy spectrogram and the IFRS smoothened by the median filter. Moreover, the impact of an analyzing window width, additive white Gaussian noise and observation time is tested. Finally, the introduced method is used for the analysis of the acoustic emission of an automotive engine. The recording of the engine of a Lamborghini Gallardo is analyzed as an example.

  19. A wide-band high-resolution spectrum analyzer.

    PubMed

    Quirk, M P; Garyantes, M F; Wilck, H C; Grimm, M J

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes a two-million-channel 40-MHz-bandwidth, digital spectrum analyzer under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analyzer system will serve as a prototype processor for the sky survey portion of NASA's Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence program and for other applications in the Deep Space Network. The analyzer digitizes an analog input, performs a 2(21)-point, Discrete Fourier Transform, accumulates the output power, normalizes the output to remove frequency-dependent gain, and automates simple signal detection algorithms. Due to its built-in frequency-domain processing functions and configuration flexibility, the analyzer is a very powerful tool for real-time signal analysis and detection.

  20. Coaxial charged particle energy analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael A. (Inventor); Bryson, III, Charles E. (Inventor); Wu, Warren (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A non-dispersive electrostatic energy analyzer for electrons and other charged particles having a generally coaxial structure of a sequentially arranged sections of an electrostatic lens to focus the beam through an iris and preferably including an ellipsoidally shaped input grid for collimating a wide acceptance beam from a charged-particle source, an electrostatic high-pass filter including a planar exit grid, and an electrostatic low-pass filter. The low-pass filter is configured to reflect low-energy particles back towards a charged particle detector located within the low-pass filter. Each section comprises multiple tubular or conical electrodes arranged about the central axis. The voltages on the lens are scanned to place a selected energy band of the accepted beam at a selected energy at the iris. Voltages on the high-pass and low-pass filters remain substantially fixed during the scan.

  1. Compact Microwave Fourier Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    A compact photonic microwave Fourier spectrum analyzer [a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, (FTMWS)] with no moving parts has been proposed for use in remote sensing of weak, natural microwave emissions from the surfaces and atmospheres of planets to enable remote analysis and determination of chemical composition and abundances of critical molecular constituents in space. The instrument is based on a Bessel beam (light modes with non-zero angular momenta) fiber-optic elements. It features low power consumption, low mass, and high resolution, without a need for any cryogenics, beyond what is achievable by the current state-of-the-art in space instruments. The instrument can also be used in a wide-band scatterometer mode in active radar systems.

  2. Real-Time, Polyphase-FFT, 640-MHz Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, George A.; Garyantes, Michael F.; Grimm, Michael J.; Charny, Bentsian; Brown, Randy D.; Wilck, Helmut C.

    1994-01-01

    Real-time polyphase-fast-Fourier-transform, polyphase-FFT, spectrum analyzer designed to aid in detection of multigigahertz radio signals in two 320-MHz-wide polarization channels. Spectrum analyzer divides total spectrum of 640 MHz into 33,554,432 frequency channels of about 20 Hz each. Size and cost of polyphase-coefficient memory substantially reduced and much of processing loss of windowed FFTs eliminated.

  3. A wide-band, high-resolution spectrum analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilck, H. C.; Quirk, M. P.; Grimm, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    A million-channel, 20 MHz-bandwidth, digital spectrum analyzer under evelopment for use in the SETI Sky Survey and other applications in the Deep Space Network is described. The analyzer digitizes an analog input, performs a 2(20)-point Radix-2, Fast Fourier Transform, accumulates the output power, and normalizes the output to remove frequency-dependent gain. The effective speed of the real-time hardware is 2.2 GigaFLOPS.

  4. Frequency-Rank Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Bertram C.; Griffiths, Jose M.

    1978-01-01

    Frequency, rank, and frequency rank distributions are defined. Extensive discussion on several aspects of frequency rank distributions includes the Poisson process as a means of exploring the stability of ranks; the correlation of frequency rank distributions; and the transfer coefficient, a new measure in frequency rank distribution. (MBR)

  5. Preparing and Analyzing Iced Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Cotton, Barbara J.; Choo, Yung K.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Pennline, James A.; Hackenberg, Anthony W.; Schilling, Herbert W.; Slater, John W.; hide

    2004-01-01

    SmaggIce version 1.2 is a computer program for preparing and analyzing iced airfoils. It includes interactive tools for (1) measuring ice-shape characteristics, (2) controlled smoothing of ice shapes, (3) curve discretization, (4) generation of artificial ice shapes, and (5) detection and correction of input errors. Measurements of ice shapes are essential for establishing relationships between characteristics of ice and effects of ice on airfoil performance. The shape-smoothing tool helps prepare ice shapes for use with already available grid-generation and computational-fluid-dynamics software for studying the aerodynamic effects of smoothed ice on airfoils. The artificial ice-shape generation tool supports parametric studies since ice-shape parameters can easily be controlled with the artificial ice. In such studies, artificial shapes generated by this program can supplement simulated ice obtained from icing research tunnels and real ice obtained from flight test under icing weather condition. SmaggIce also automatically detects geometry errors such as tangles or duplicate points in the boundary which may be introduced by digitization and provides tools to correct these. By use of interactive tools included in SmaggIce version 1.2, one can easily characterize ice shapes and prepare iced airfoils for grid generation and flow simulations.

  6. Substructure coupling in the frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Frequency domain analysis was found to be a suitable method for determining the transient response of systems subjected to a wide variety of loads. However, since a large number of calculations are performed within the discrete frequency loop, the method loses it computational efficiency if the loads must be represented by a large number of discrete frequencies. It was also discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain work particularly well for analyzing structural system with a small number of interface and loaded degrees of freedom. It was discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain can lead to an efficient method of obtaining natural frequencies of undamped structures. It was also found that the damped natural frequencies of a system may be determined using frequency domain techniques.

  7. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  8. Beat frequency interference pattern characteristics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, J. H.; Rice, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency spectra and corresponding beat frequencies created by the relative motions between multiple Solar Power Satellites due to solar wind, lunar gravity, etc. were analyzed. The results were derived mathematically and verified through computer simulation. Frequency spectra plots were computer generated. Detailed computations were made for the seven following locations in the continental US: Houston, Tx.; Seattle, Wa.; Miami, Fl.; Chicago, Il.; New York, NY; Los Angeles, Ca.; and Barberton, Oh.

  9. Multiple Frequency Parametric Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    300003 1 MULTIPLE FREQUENCY PARAMETRIC SONAR STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and...a method for increasing the bandwidth of a parametric sonar system by using multiple primary frequencies rather than only two primary frequencies...2) Description of Prior Art [0004] Parametric sonar generates narrow beams at low frequencies by projecting sound at two distinct primary

  10. Synchrosqueezing an effective method for analyzing Doppler radar physiological signals.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Ehsan; Rahman, Ashikur; Jia Xu; Mandic, Danilo P; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2016-08-01

    Doppler radar can monitor vital sign wirelessly. Respiratory and heart rate have time-varying behavior. Capturing the rate variability provides crucial physiological information. However, the common time-frequency methods fail to detect key information. We investigate Synchrosqueezing method to extract oscillatory components of the signal with time varying spectrum. Simulation and experimental result shows the potential of the proposed method for analyzing signals with complex time-frequency behavior like physiological signals. Respiration and heart signals and their components are extracted with higher resolution and without any pre-filtering and signal conditioning.

  11. A frequency standard via spectrum analysis and direct digital synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dawei; Shi, Daiting; Hu, Ermeng; Wang, Yigen; Tian, Lu; Zhao, Jianye; Wang, Zhong

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrated a frequency standard based on a detuned coherent population beating phenomenon. In this phenomenon, the beat frequency of the radio frequency for laser modulation and the hyperfine splitting can be obtained by digital signal processing technology. After analyzing the spectrum of the beat frequency, the fluctuation information is obtained and applied to compensate for the frequency shift to generate the standard frequency by the digital synthesis method. Frequency instability of 2.6 × 1012 at 1000 s is observed in our preliminary experiment. By eliminating the phase-locking loop, the method will enable us to achieve a full-digital frequency standard with remarkable stability.

  12. Frequency Diverse Array Receiver Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-29

    completely associated with FDA, the Hybrid MIMO phased array (HMPAR) concept presented in [18] developed the basic beam patern synthesis theory for an...20], that analyzed beam paterns of chirp waveforms with slightly 6 different starting frequencies. In [21] and [11] they investigated using FDA for...forward-looking radar GMTI benefits. This research showed the ability of the range-dependent energy distribution characteristics of the FDA beam patern

  13. Pavement profile viewer and analyzer : product brief.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-06-01

    Pavement Profile Viewer and Analyzer, or ProVAL, is a software package that imports, displays, and analyzes the characteristics of pavement profiles from many different sources. ProVAL can analyze pavement profiles using several methods, including In...

  14. AUTOMATIC FREQUENCY CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, C.F.; Salisbury, J.D.

    1961-01-10

    A control is described for automatically matching the frequency of a resonant cavity to that of a driving oscillator. The driving oscillator is disconnected from the cavity and a secondary oscillator is actuated in which the cavity is the frequency determining element. A low frequency is mixed with the output of the driving oscillator and the resultant lower and upper sidebands are separately derived. The frequencies of the sidebands are compared with the secondary oscillator frequency. deriving a servo control signal to adjust a tuning element in the cavity and matching the cavity frequency to that of the driving oscillator. The driving oscillator may then be connected to the cavity.

  15. Frequency domain FIR and IIR adaptive filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of the LMS adaptive filter relating to its convergence characteristics and the problems associated with disparate eigenvalues is presented. This is used to introduce the concept of proportional convergence. An approach is used to analyze the convergence characteristics of block frequency-domain adaptive filters. This leads to a development showing how the frequency-domain FIR adaptive filter is easily modified to provide proportional convergence. These ideas are extended to a block frequency-domain IIR adaptive filter and the idea of proportional convergence is applied. Experimental results illustrating proportional convergence in both FIR and IIR frequency-domain block adaptive filters is presented.

  16. Multi-Pass Quadrupole Mass Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the composition of planetary atmospheres is one of the most important and fundamental measurements in planetary robotic exploration. Quadrupole mass analyzers (QMAs) are the primary tool used to execute these investigations, but reductions in size of these instruments has sacrificed mass resolving power so that the best present-day QMA devices are still large, expensive, and do not deliver performance of laboratory instruments. An ultra-high-resolution QMA was developed to resolve N2 +/CO+ by trapping ions in a linear trap quadrupole filter. Because N2 and CO are resolved, gas chromatography columns used to separate species before analysis are eliminated, greatly simplifying gas analysis instrumentation. For highest performance, the ion trap mode is used. High-resolution (or narrow-band) mass selection is carried out in the central region, but near the DC electrodes at each end, RF/DC field settings are adjusted to allow broadband ion passage. This is to prevent ion loss during ion reflection at each end. Ions are created inside the trap so that low-energy particles are selected by low-voltage settings on the end electrodes. This is beneficial to good mass resolution since low-energy particles traverse many cycles of the RF filtering fields. Through Monte Carlo simulations, it is shown that ions are reflected at each end many tens of times, each time being sent back through the central section of the quadrupole where ultrahigh mass filtering is carried out. An analyzer was produced with electrical length orders of magnitude longer than its physical length. Since the selector fields are sized as in conventional devices, the loss of sensitivity inherent in miniaturizing quadrupole instruments is avoided. The no-loss, multi-pass QMA architecture will improve mass resolution of planetary QMA instruments while reducing demands on the RF electronics for high-voltage/high-frequency production since ion transit time is no longer limited to a single pass. The

  17. Analyzing wildfire exposure on Sardinia, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salis, Michele; Ager, Alan A.; Arca, Bachisio; Finney, Mark A.; Alcasena, Fermin; Bacciu, Valentina; Duce, Pierpaolo; Munoz Lozano, Olga; Spano, Donatella

    2014-05-01

    We used simulation modeling based on the minimum travel time algorithm (MTT) to analyze wildfire exposure of key ecological, social and economic features on Sardinia, Italy. Sardinia is the second largest island of the Mediterranean Basin, and in the last fifty years experienced large and dramatic wildfires, which caused losses and threatened urban interfaces, forests and natural areas, and agricultural productions. Historical fires and environmental data for the period 1995-2009 were used as input to estimate fine scale burn probability, conditional flame length, and potential fire size in the study area. With this purpose, we simulated 100,000 wildfire events within the study area, randomly drawing from the observed frequency distribution of burn periods and wind directions for each fire. Estimates of burn probability, excluding non-burnable fuels, ranged from 0 to 1.92x10-3, with a mean value of 6.48x10-5. Overall, the outputs provided a quantitative assessment of wildfire exposure at the landscape scale and captured landscape properties of wildfire exposure. We then examined how the exposure profiles varied among and within selected features and assets located on the island. Spatial variation in modeled outputs resulted in a strong effect of fuel models, coupled with slope and weather. In particular, the combined effect of Mediterranean maquis, woodland areas and complex topography on flame length was relevant, mainly in north-east Sardinia, whereas areas with herbaceous fuels and flat areas were in general characterized by lower fire intensity but higher burn probability. The simulation modeling proposed in this work provides a quantitative approach to inform wildfire risk management activities, and represents one of the first applications of burn probability modeling to capture fire risk and exposure profiles in the Mediterranean basin.

  18. Effect of laser frequency noise on fiber-optic frequency reference distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, R. T., Jr.; Lutes, G. F.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the linewidth of a single longitude-mode laser on the frequency stability of a frequency reference transmitted over a single-mode optical fiber is analyzed. The interaction of the random laser frequency deviations with the dispersion of the optical fiber is considered to determine theoretically the effect on the Allan deviation (square root of the Allan variance) of the transmitted frequency reference. It is shown that the magnitude of this effect may determine the limit of the ultimate stability possible for frequency reference transmission on optical fiber, but is not a serious limitation to present system performance.

  19. RF environment survey of Space Shuttle related EEE frequency bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J.; Prigel, B.; Postelle, J.

    1977-01-01

    Radio frequency assignments within the continental United States in frequency bands between 121 MHz abd 65 GHz were surveyed and analyzed in order to determine current utilization of anticipated frequency bands for the shuttle borne electromagnetic environment experiment. Data from both government and nongovernment files were used. Results are presented in both narrative form and in histograms which show the total number of unclassified assignments versus frequency and total assigned power versus frequency.

  20. Cover/Frequency (CF)

    Treesearch

    John F. Caratti

    2006-01-01

    The FIREMON Cover/Frequency (CF) method is used to assess changes in plant species cover and frequency for a macroplot. This method uses multiple quadrats to sample within-plot variation and quantify statistically valid changes in plant species cover, height, and frequency over time. Because it is difficult to estimate cover in quadrats for larger plants, this method...

  1. DDC Descriptor Frequencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingbiel, Paul H.; Jacobs, Charles R.

    This report summarizes the frequency of use of the 7144 descriptors used for indexing technical reports in the Defense Documentation Center (DDC) collection. The descriptors are arranged alphabetically in the first section and by frequency in the second section. The frequency data cover about 427,000 AD documents spanning the interval from March…

  2. Expert system for analyzing eddy current measurements

    DOEpatents

    Levy, Arthur J.; Oppenlander, Jane E.; Brudnoy, David M.; Englund, James M.; Loomis, Kent C.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus (called DODGER) analyzes eddy current data for heat exchanger tubes or any other metallic object. DODGER uses an expert system to analyze eddy current data by reasoning with uncertainty and pattern recognition. The expert system permits DODGER to analyze eddy current data intelligently, and obviate operator uncertainty by analyzing the data in a uniform and consistent manner.

  3. 40 CFR 86.319-79 - Analyzer checks and calibrations; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENGINES Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust... testing, check the NOX converter efficiency, as described in § 86.332. (c) At least once every 30 days...

  4. 40 CFR 86.319-79 - Analyzer checks and calibrations; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENGINES Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust... testing, check the NOX converter efficiency, as described in § 86.332. (c) At least once every 30 days...

  5. 40 CFR 86.319-79 - Analyzer checks and calibrations; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENGINES Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust... testing, check the NOX converter efficiency, as described in § 86.332. (c) At least once every 30 days...

  6. 40 CFR 86.319-79 - Analyzer checks and calibrations; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... during testing, perform the following: (1) Leak check the pressure side of the system (see § 86.328). If the option described in § 86.328(b)(2) is used, a pressure leak check is not required. (2) Calibrate... need be checked only every 90 days. (d) At least once every 90 days during testing check the water...

  7. Using Size-Frequency Distributions to Analyze Fire Regimes in Florida

    Treesearch

    Thomas P. Holmes; Jeffrey P. Prestemon; John M. Pye; David T. Butry; D. Evan Mercer; Karen L. Abt

    2004-01-01

    Wildfire regimes in natural forest ecosystems have been characterized with power­law distributions. In this paper, we evaluated whether wildfire regimes in a human-dominated landscape were also consistent with power­law distributions. Our case study focused on wildfires in Florida, a state with rapid population growth and consequent rapid alteration of forest...

  8. Data Acquisition Unit for SATCOM Signal Analyzer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    APSIM simulator program APDEBUG debugging program APTEST diagnostic and test program MATH Library IOP-16 16 bit I/O port 223 APPENDIX C Table...3. SYNTEST Corporation, Frequency Synthesizer Module, Data Sheet, The Syntest SM-101 Frequency Synthesizer Module, not dated . 4. DATEL Systems Inc

  9. Frequency set on systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, W. A.; Brett, A. R. H.

    Frequency set on techniques used in ECM applications include repeater jammers, frequency memory loops (RF and optical), coherent digital RF memories, and closed loop VCO set on systems. Closed loop frequency set on systems using analog phase and frequency locking are considered to have a number of cost and performance advantages. Their performance is discussed in terms of frequency accuracy, bandwidth, locking time, stability, and simultaneous signals. Some experimental results are presented which show typical locking performance. Future ECM systems might require a response to very short pulses. Acoustooptic and fiber-optic pulse stretching techniques can be used to meet such requirements.

  10. Harmonic Frequency Lowering

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm for frequency lowering in music was developed and experimentally tested in hearing-impaired listeners. Harmonic frequency lowering (HFL) combines frequency transposition and frequency compression to preserve the harmonic content of music stimuli. Listeners were asked to make judgments regarding detail and sound quality in music stimuli. Stimuli were presented under different signal processing conditions: original, low-pass filtered, HFL, and nonlinear frequency compressed. Results showed that participants reported perceiving the most detail in the HFL condition. In addition, there was no difference in sound quality across conditions. PMID:26834122

  11. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2014-11-25

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  12. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2013-05-28

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  13. Radio frequency spectrum management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujdak, E. J., Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This thesis is a study of radio frequency spectrum management as practiced by agencies and departments of the Federal Government. After a brief introduction to the international agency involved in radio frequency spectrum management, the author concentrates on Federal agencies engaged in frequency management. These agencies include the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee (IRAC), and the Department of Defense (DoD). Based on an analysis of Department of Defense frequency assignment procedures, recommendations are given concerning decentralizing military frequency assignment by delegating broader authority to unified commanders. This proposal includes a recommendation to colocate the individual Service frequency management offices at the Washington level. This would result in reduced travel costs, lower manpower requirements, and a common tri-Service frequency management data base.

  14. Frequency discriminator/phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Circuit provides dual function of frequency discriminator/phase detector which reduces frequency acquisition time without adding to circuit complexity. Both frequency discriminators, in evaluated frequency discriminator/phase detector circuits, are effective two decades above and below center frequency.

  15. A Portable Analyzer for Pouch-Actuated, Immunoassay Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael G.; Hart, Robert W.; Chen, Dafeng; Qiu, Jing; Kientz, Terry; Fiene, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    2011-01-01

    A portable, small footprint, light, general purpose analyzer (processor) to control the flow in immunoassay cassettes and to facilitate the detection of test results is described. The durable analyzer accepts disposable cassettes that contain pouches and reaction chambers for various unit operations such as hydration of dry reagents, stirring, and incubation. The analyzer includes individually controlled, linear actuators to compress the pouches in the cassette, which facilitates the pumping and mixing of sample and reagents, and to close diaphragm-based valves for flow control. The same types of actuators are used to compress pouches and actuate valves. The analyzer also houses a compact OEM scanner/reader to excite fluorescence and detect emission from labels. The analyzer is hydraulically isolated from the cassette, reducing the possibility of cross-contamination. The analyzer facilitates programmable, automated execution of a sequence of operations such as pumping and valving in a timely fashion, reducing the level of expertise required from the operator and the possibility for errors. The analyzer’s design is modular and expandable to accommodate cassettes of various complexities and additional functionalities. In this paper, the utility of the analyzer has been demonstrated with the execution of a simple, consecutive, lateral flow assay of a model biological system and the test results were detected with up converting phosphor labels that are excited at infrared frequencies and emit in the visible spectrum. PMID:22125359

  16. 40 CFR 86.1422 - Analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Trucks; Certification Short Test Procedures § 86.1422 Analyzer calibration. (a) Determine that the... check. Prior to its introduction into service and at specified periods thereafter, the analyzer must...

  17. A network of automatic atmospherics analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, J.; Volland, H.; Ingmann, P.; Eriksson, A. J.; Heydt, G.

    1980-01-01

    The design and function of an atmospheric analyzer which uses a computer are discussed. Mathematical models which show the method of measurement are presented. The data analysis and recording procedures of the analyzer are discussed.

  18. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    DOEpatents

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  19. Optomechanical frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miri, Mohammad-Ali; D’Aguanno, Giuseppe; Alù, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    We study the formation of frequency combs in a single-mode optomechanical cavity. The comb is composed of equidistant spectral lines centered at the pump laser frequency and located at different harmonics of the mechanical resonator. We investigate the classical nonlinear dynamics of such system and find analytically the onset of parametric instability resulting in the breakdown of a stationary continuous wave intracavity field into a periodic train of pulses, which in the Fourier domain gives rise to a broadband frequency comb. Different dynamical regimes, including a stationary state, frequency comb generation and chaos, and their dependence on the system parameters, are studied both analytically and numerically. Interestingly, the comb generation is found to be more robust in the poor cavity limit, where optical loss is equal or larger than the mechanical resonance frequency. Our results show that optomechanical resonators open exciting opportunities for microwave photonics as compact and robust sources of frequency combs with megahertz line spacing.

  20. Waveform frequency notching

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Andrews, John

    The various technologies presented herein relate to incorporating one or more notches into a radar spectrum, whereby the notches relate to one or more frequencies for which no radar transmission is to occur. An instantaneous frequency is monitored and if the frequency is determined to be of a restricted frequency, then a radar signal can be modified. Modification can include replacing the signal with a signal having a different instantaneous amplitude, a different instantaneous phase, etc. The modification can occur in a WFS prior to a DAC, as well as prior to a sin ROM component and/or a cos ROMmore » component. Further, the notch can be dithered to enable formation of a deep notch. The notch can also undergo signal transitioning to enable formation of a deep notch. The restricted frequencies can be stored in a LUT against which an instantaneous frequency can be compared.« less

  1. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system comprises first and second gain sources providing first and second frequency radiation outputs where the second gain source receives as input the output of the first gain source and, further, the second gain source comprises a Raman or Brillouin gain fiber for wave shifting a portion of the radiation of the first frequency output into second frequency radiation output to provided a combined output of first and second frequencies. Powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  2. Development of an Infrared Fluorescent Gas Analyzer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClatchie, E. A.

    A prototype model low level carbon monoxide analyzer was developed using fluorescent cell and negative chopping techniques to achieve a device superior to state of art NDIR (Nondispersive infrared) analyzers in stability and cross-sensitivity to other gaseous species. It is clear that this type of analyzer has that capacity. The prototype…

  3. 46 CFR 154.1360 - Oxygen analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oxygen analyzer. 154.1360 Section 154.1360 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Instrumentation § 154.1360 Oxygen analyzer. The vessel must have a portable analyzer that measures oxygen levels...

  4. 46 CFR 154.1360 - Oxygen analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oxygen analyzer. 154.1360 Section 154.1360 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Instrumentation § 154.1360 Oxygen analyzer. The vessel must have a portable analyzer that measures oxygen levels...

  5. 46 CFR 154.1360 - Oxygen analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oxygen analyzer. 154.1360 Section 154.1360 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Instrumentation § 154.1360 Oxygen analyzer. The vessel must have a portable analyzer that measures oxygen levels...

  6. 46 CFR 154.1360 - Oxygen analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oxygen analyzer. 154.1360 Section 154.1360 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Instrumentation § 154.1360 Oxygen analyzer. The vessel must have a portable analyzer that measures oxygen levels...

  7. 46 CFR 154.1360 - Oxygen analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oxygen analyzer. 154.1360 Section 154.1360 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Instrumentation § 154.1360 Oxygen analyzer. The vessel must have a portable analyzer that measures oxygen levels...

  8. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as RAZs. RAZs are displayed as go, no-go signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  9. VISAR Analysis in the Frequency Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, D. H.; Specht, P.

    2017-05-18

    VISAR measurements are typically analyzed in the time domain, where velocity is approximately proportional to fringe shift. Moving to the frequency domain clarifies the limitations of this approximation and suggests several improvements. For example, optical dispersion preserves high-frequency information, so a zero-dispersion (air delay) interferometer does not provide optimal time resolution. Combined VISAR measurements can also improve time resolution. With adequate bandwidth and reasonable noise levels, it is quite possible to achieve better resolution than the VISAR approximation allows.

  10. Low-frequency oscillations in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Li-Qiu; Han, Liang; Yu, Da-Ren; Guo, Ning

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we summarize the research development of low-frequency oscillations in the last few decades. The findings of physical mechanism, characteristics and stabilizing methods of low-frequency oscillations are discussed. It shows that it is unreasonable and incomplete to model an ionization region separately to analyze the physical mechanism of low-frequency oscillations. Electro-dynamics as well as the formation conditions of ionization distribution play an important role in characteristics and stabilizing of low-frequency oscillations. Understanding the physical mechanism and characteristics of low- frequency oscillations thoroughly and developing a feasible method stabilizing this instability are still important research subjects. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51477035), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. HIT.NSRIF 2015064), and the Open Research Fund Program of State Key Laboratory of Cryogenic Vacuum Technology and Physics, China (Grant No. ZDK201304).

  11. Burst-by-burst laser frequency monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esproles, Carlos (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a system for real-time frequency monitoring and display of an RF burst where the burst frequency is analyzed and displayed on a burst-by-burst basis in order to allow for frequency control. Although the invention was made for monitoring the laser frequency of a LIDAR system, it has other applications where realtime monitoring is required. The novelty of the invention resides in the use of a counter that is reset at the beginning of each unit time of monitoring and then gated for a unit of time. The invention also has an LED bar graph for displaying the measure of frequency at the end of each unit time in either a bar length mode or a moving dot mode. In the latter mode, the operator makes necessary adjustments to maintain the dot at the center of the bar graph.

  12. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  13. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  14. Ultrastable automatic frequency control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabourin, D. J.; Furiga, A.

    1981-01-01

    Center frequency of wideband AFC circuit drifts only hundredths of percent per day. Since circuit responds only to slow frequency drifts and modulation signal has high-pass characteristics, AFC does not interfere with normal FM operation. Stable oscillator, reset circuit, and pulse generator constitute time-averaging discriminator; digital counter in pulse generator replaces usual monostable multivibrator.

  15. Low frequency noise study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-04-01

    This report documents a study to investigate human response to the low-frequency : content of aviation noise, or low-frequency noise (LFN). The study comprised field : measurements and laboratory studies. The major findings were: : 1. Start-of-takeof...

  16. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  17. Web-based multi-channel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russ E.

    2003-12-23

    The present invention provides an improved multi-channel analyzer designed to conveniently gather, process, and distribute spectrographic pulse data. The multi-channel analyzer may operate on a computer system having memory, a processor, and the capability to connect to a network and to receive digitized spectrographic pulses. The multi-channel analyzer may have a software module integrated with a general-purpose operating system that may receive digitized spectrographic pulses for at least 10,000 pulses per second. The multi-channel analyzer may further have a user-level software module that may receive user-specified controls dictating the operation of the multi-channel analyzer, making the multi-channel analyzer customizable by the end-user. The user-level software may further categorize and conveniently distribute spectrographic pulse data employing non-proprietary, standard communication protocols and formats.

  18. Single-shot distributed Brillouin optical time domain analyzer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jian; Xu, Pengbai; Dong, Yongkang; Shieh, William

    2017-06-26

    We demonstrate a novel single-shot distributed Brillouin optical time domain analyzer (SS-BOTDA). In our method, dual-polarization probe with orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) modulation is used to acquire the distributed Brillouin gain spectra, and coherent detection is used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) drastically. Distributed temperature sensing is demonstrated over a 1.08 km standard single-mode fiber (SSMF) with 20.48 m spatial resolution and 0.59 °C temperature accuracy. Neither frequency scanning, nor polarization scrambling, nor averaging is required in our scheme. All the data are obtained through only one-shot measurement, indicating that the sensing speed is only limited by the length of fiber.

  19. Altitude characteristics of selected air quality analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. H.; Strong, R.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of altitude (pressure) on the operation and sensitivity of various air quality analyzers frequently flown on aircraft were analyzed. Two ozone analyzers were studied at altitudes from 600 to 7500 m and a nitrogen oxides chemiluminescence detector and a sulfur dioxide flame photometric detector were studied at altitudes from 600 to 3000 m. Calibration curves for altitude corrections to the sensitivity of the instruments are presented along with discussion of observed instrument behavior.

  20. Analysis of Fresnel Zone Plates Focusing Dependence on Operating Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, José Miguel; Candelas, Pilar; Castiñeira-Ibáñez, Sergio; Pérez-López, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The focusing properties of Fresnel Zone Plates (FZPs) against frequency are analyzed in this work. It is shown that the FZP focal length depends almost linearly on the operating frequency. Focal depth and focal distortion are also considered, establishing a limit on the frequency span at which the operating frequency can be shifted. An underwater FZP ultrasound focusing system is demonstrated, and experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis and simulations. PMID:29206137

  1. Frequency comb swept lasers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2009-11-09

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a approximately -1.2dB sensitivity roll off over approximately 3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have -10dB and -5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0-3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed.

  2. Frequency comb swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a ~−1.2dB sensitivity roll off over ~3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have −10dB and −5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0–3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed. PMID:19997365

  3. Time and frequency applications.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, H

    1993-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities of atomic clocks and quartz crystal oscillators in terms of available precision of time and frequency signals. The generation, comparison, and dissemination of time and frequency is then discussed. The principal focus is to survey uses of time and frequency in navigation, communication, and science. The examples given include the Global Positioning System, a satellite-based global navigation system, and general and dedicated communication networks, as well as experiments in general relativity and radioastronomy. The number of atomic clocks and crystal oscillators that are in actual use worldwide is estimated.

  4. New sample cell configuration for wide-frequency dielectric spectroscopy: DC to radio frequencies.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Masahiro; Sasaki, Yasutaka; Nozaki, Ryusuke

    2010-12-01

    A new configuration for the sample cell to be used in broadband dielectric spectroscopy is presented. A coaxial structure with a parallel plate capacitor (outward parallel plate cell: OPPC) has made it possible to extend the frequency range significantly in comparison with the frequency range of the conventional configuration. In the proposed configuration, stray inductance is significantly decreased; consequently, the upper bound of the frequency range is improved by two orders of magnitude from the upper limit of conventional parallel plate capacitor (1 MHz). Furthermore, the value of capacitance is kept high by using a parallel plate configuration. Therefore, the precision of the capacitance measurement in the lower frequency range remains sufficiently high. Finally, OPPC can cover a wide frequency range (100 Hz-1 GHz) with an appropriate admittance measuring apparatus such as an impedance or network analyzer. The OPPC and the conventional dielectric cell are compared by examining the frequency dependence of the complex permittivity for several polar liquids and polymeric films.

  5. 21 CFR 882.1020 - Rigidity analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigidity analyzer. 882.1020 Section 882.1020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1020 Rigidity analyzer. (a...

  6. 21 CFR 882.1020 - Rigidity analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigidity analyzer. 882.1020 Section 882.1020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1020 Rigidity analyzer. (a...

  7. Kundt's Tube: An Acoustic Gas Analyzer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aristov, Natasha; Habekost, Gehsa; Habekost, Achim

    2011-01-01

    A Kundt tube is normally used to measure the speed of sound in gases. Therefore, from known speeds of sound, a Kundt tube can be used to identify gases and their fractions in mixtures. In these experiments, the speed of sound is determined by measuring the frequency of a standing sound wave at a fixed tube length, temperature, and pressure. This…

  8. Technique for analyzing human respiratory process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, F. F.

    1970-01-01

    Electronic system /MIRACLE 2/ places frequency and gas flow rate of the respiratory process within a common frame of reference to render them comparable and compatible with ''real clock time.'' Numerous measurements are accomplished accurately on a strict one-minute half-minute, breath-by-breath, or other period basis.

  9. Histograms and Frequency Density.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micromath, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Introduces exercises on histograms and frequency density. Guides pupils to Discovering Important Statistical Concepts Using Spreadsheets (DISCUSS), created at the University of Coventry. Includes curriculum points, teaching tips, activities, and internet address (http://www.coventry.ac.uk/discuss/). (KHR)

  10. Frequency domain measurement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eischer, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    Stable frequency sources and signal processing blocks were characterized by their noise spectra, both discrete and random, in the frequency domain. Conventional measures are outlined, and systems for performing the measurements are described. Broad coverage of system configurations which were found useful is given. Their functioning and areas of application are discussed briefly. Particular attention is given to some of the potential error sources in the measurement procedures, system configurations, double-balanced-mixer-phase-detectors, and application of measuring instruments.

  11. Electromechanical Frequency Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wersing, W.; Lubitz, K.

    Frequency filters select signals with a frequency inside a definite frequency range or band from signals outside this band, traditionally afforded by a combination of L-C-resonators. The fundamental principle of all modern frequency filters is the constructive interference of travelling waves. If a filter is set up of coupled resonators, this interference occurs as a result of the successive wave reflection at the resonators' ends. In this case, the center frequency f c of a filter, e.g., set up of symmetrical λ/2-resonators of length 1, is given by f_c = f_r = v_{ph}/λ = v_{ph}/2l , where v ph is the phase velocity of the wave. This clearly shows the big advantage of acoustic waves for filter applications in comparison to electro-magnetic waves. Because v ph of acoustic waves in solids is about 104-105 smaller than that of electro-magnetic waves, much smaller filters can be realised. Today, piezoelectric materials and processing technologies exist that electromechanical resonators and filters can be produced in the frequency range from 1 kHz up to 10 GHz. Further requirements for frequency filters such as low losses (high resonator Q) and low temperature coefficients of frequency constants can also be fulfilled with these filters. Important examples are quartz-crystal resonators and filters (1 kHz-200 MHz) as discussed in Chap. 2, electromechanical channel filters (50 kHz and 130 kHz) for long-haul communication systems as discussed in this section, surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters (20 MHz-5 GHz), as discussed in Chap. 14, and thin film bulk acoustic resonators (FBAR) and filters (500 MHz-10 GHz), as discussed in Chap. 15.

  12. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  13. Methods, computer readable media, and graphical user interfaces for analysis of frequency selective surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K [Shelley, ID; Rohrbaugh, David T [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-09-07

    A frequency selective surface (FSS) and associated methods for modeling, analyzing and designing the FSS are disclosed. The FSS includes a pattern of conductive material formed on a substrate to form an array of resonance elements. At least one aspect of the frequency selective surface is determined by defining a frequency range including multiple frequency values, determining a frequency dependent permittivity across the frequency range for the substrate, determining a frequency dependent conductivity across the frequency range for the conductive material, and analyzing the frequency selective surface using a method of moments analysis at each of the multiple frequency values for an incident electromagnetic energy impinging on the frequency selective surface. The frequency dependent permittivity and the frequency dependent conductivity are included in the method of moments analysis.

  14. ALMA High Frequency Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J. D.; Mason, B.; Impellizzeri, V.; Kameno, S.; Fomalont, E.; Chibueze, J.; Takahashi, S.; Remijan, A.; Wilson, C.; ALMA Science Team

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the ALMA High Frequency Campaign is to improve the quality and efficiency of science observing in Bands 8, 9, and 10 (385-950 GHz), the highest frequencies available to the ALMA project. To this end, we outline observing modes which we have demonstrated to improve high frequency calibration for the 12m array and the ACA, and we present the calibration of the total power antennas at these frequencies. Band-to-band (B2B) transfer and bandwidth switching (BWSW), techniques which improve the speed and accuracy of calibration at the highest frequencies, are most necessary in Bands 8, 9, and 10 due to the rarity of strong calibrators. These techniques successfully enable increased signal-to-noise on the calibrator sources (and better calibration solutions) by measuring the calibrators at lower frequencies (B2B) or in wider bandwidths (BWSW) compared to the science target. We have also demonstrated the stability of the bandpass shape to better than 2.4% for 1 hour, hidden behind random noise, in Band 9. Finally, total power observing using the dual sideband receivers in Bands 9 and 10 requires the separation of the two sidebands; this procedure has been demonstrated in Band 9 and is undergoing further testing in Band 10.

  15. Analyzing machine noise for real time maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamato, Yoji; Fukumoto, Yoshifumi; Kumazaki, Hiroki

    2017-02-01

    Recently, IoT technologies have been progressed and applications of maintenance area are expected. However, IoT maintenance applications are not spread in Japan yet because of one-off solution of sensing and analyzing for each case, high cost to collect sensing data and insufficient maintenance automation. This paper proposes a maintenance platform which analyzes sound data in edges, analyzes only anomaly data in cloud and orders maintenance automatically to resolve existing technology problems. We also implement a sample application and compare related work.

  16. Systems Analyze Water Quality in Real Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A water analyzer developed under Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Kennedy Space Center now monitors treatment processes at water and wastewater facilities around the world. Originally designed to provide real-time detection of nutrient levels in hydroponic solutions for growing plants in space, the ChemScan analyzer, produced by ASA Analytics Inc., of Waukesha, Wisconsin, utilizes spectrometry and chemometric algorithms to automatically analyze multiple parameters in the water treatment process with little need for maintenance, calibration, or operator intervention. The company has experienced a compound annual growth rate of 40 percent over its 15-year history as a direct result of the technology's success.

  17. Graph Frequency Analysis of Brain Signals

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiyu; Goldsberry, Leah; Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T.; Bassett, Danielle S.; Ribeiro, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents methods to analyze functional brain networks and signals from graph spectral perspectives. The notion of frequency and filters traditionally defined for signals supported on regular domains such as discrete time and image grids has been recently generalized to irregular graph domains, and defines brain graph frequencies associated with different levels of spatial smoothness across the brain regions. Brain network frequency also enables the decomposition of brain signals into pieces corresponding to smooth or rapid variations. We relate graph frequency with principal component analysis when the networks of interest denote functional connectivity. The methods are utilized to analyze brain networks and signals as subjects master a simple motor skill. We observe that brain signals corresponding to different graph frequencies exhibit different levels of adaptability throughout learning. Further, we notice a strong association between graph spectral properties of brain networks and the level of exposure to tasks performed, and recognize the most contributing and important frequency signatures at different levels of task familiarity. PMID:28439325

  18. System for analyzing coal liquefaction products

    DOEpatents

    Dinsmore, Stanley R.; Mrochek, John E.

    1984-01-01

    A system for analyzing constituents of coal-derived materials comprises three adsorption columns and a flow-control arrangement which permits separation of both aromatic and polar hydrocarbons by use of two eluent streams.

  19. Guide to analyzing investment options using TWIGS.

    Treesearch

    Charles R Blinn; Dietmar W. Rose; Monique L. Belli

    1988-01-01

    Describes methods for analyzing economic return of simulated stand management alternatives in TWIGS. Defines and discusses net present value, equivalent annual income, soil expectation value, and real vs. nominal analyses. Discusses risk and sensitivity analysis when comparing alternatives.

  20. Analyzing the economic impacts of transportation projects.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-09-01

    The main goal of the study is to explore methods, approaches and : analytical software tools for analyzing economic activity that results from largescale : transportation investments in Connecticut. The primary conclusion is that the : transportation...

  1. Audio Frequency Analysis in Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía

    2016-01-01

    A new experiment using mobile phones is proposed in which its audio frequency response is analyzed using the audio port for inputting external signal and getting a measurable output. This experiment shows how the limited audio bandwidth used in mobile telephony is the main cause of the poor speech quality in this service. A brief discussion is…

  2. Monolithic THz Frequency Multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, N. R.; Narayanan, G.; Grosslein, R. M.; Martin, S.; Mehdi, I.; Smith, P.; Coulomb, M.; DeMartinez, G.

    2001-01-01

    Frequency multipliers are required as local oscillator sources for frequencies up to 2.7 THz for FIRST and airborne applications. Multipliers at these frequencies have not previously been demonstrated, and the object of this work was to show whether such circuits are really practical. A practical circuit is one which not only performs as well as is required, but also can be replicated in a time that is feasible. As the frequency of circuits is increased, the difficulties in fabrication and assembly increase rapidly. Building all of the circuit on GaAs as a monolithic circuit is highly desirable to minimize the complexity of assembly, but at the highest frequencies, even a complete monolithic circuit is extremely small, and presents serious handling difficulty. This is compounded by the requirement for a very thin substrate. Assembly can become very difficult because of handling problems and critical placement. It is very desirable to make the chip big enough to that it can be seen without magnification, and strong enough that it may be picked up with tweezers. Machined blocks to house the chips present an additional challenge. Blocks with complex features are very expensive, and these also imply very critical assembly of the parts. It would be much better if the features in the block were as simple as possible and non-critical to the function of the chip. In particular, grounding and other electrical interfaces should be done in a manner that is highly reproducible.

  3. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  4. Method and apparatus for frequency spectrum analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Steven W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for frequency spectrum analysis of an unknown signal in real-time is discussed. The method is based upon integration of 1-bit samples of signal voltage amplitude corresponding to sine or cosine phases of a controlled center frequency clock which is changed after each integration interval to sweep the frequency range of interest in steps. Integration of samples during each interval is carried out over a number of cycles of the center frequency clock spanning a number of cycles of an input signal to be analyzed. The invention may be used to detect the frequency of at least two signals simultaneously. By using a reference signal of known frequency and voltage amplitude (added to the two signals for parallel processing in the same way, but in a different channel with a sampling at the known frequency and phases of the reference signal), the absolute voltage amplitude of the other two signals may be determined by squaring the sine and cosine integrals of each channel and summing the squares to obtain relative power measurements in all three channels and, from the known voltage amplitude of the reference signal, obtaining an absolute voltage measurement for the other two signals by multiplying the known voltage of the reference signal with the ratio of the relative power of each of the other two signals to the relative power of the reference signal.

  5. Single frequency multitransmitter telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carreno, Victor A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to a single frequency multitransmitter telemetry system that will deliver a substantial amount of data at low cost. The invention consists essentially of a plurality of sensor transmitter units at different locations, with individual signal conditioning and logic, which send sampled data signals to a single receiver. The transmitters operate independently on the same frequency in a frequency shift keying modulation system and are not synchronized to the receiver. The problem of reception of data from more than one transmitter simultaneously is solved by discarding the data - when there is overlap of data from two or more transmitters, the data is discarded and when there is no overlap the data is retained. The invention utilizes a unique overlap detection technique to determine if data should be retained or discarded. When data is received from a transmitter, it goes into a shift register.

  6. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  7. Hg(+) Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we review the development of Hg(+) microwave frequency standards for use in high reliability and continuous operation applications. In recent work we have demonstrated short-term frequency stability of 3 x 10(exp -14)/nu(sub tau) when a cryogenic oscillator of stability 2-3 x 10(exp 15) was used a the local oscillator. The trapped ion frequency standard employs a Hg-202 discharge lamp to optically pump the trapped Hg(+)-199 clock ions and a helium buffer gas to cool the ions to near room temperature. We describe a small Hg(+) ion trap based frequency standard with an extended linear ion trap (LITE) architecture which separates the optical state selection region from the clock resonance region. This separation allows the use of novel trap configurations in the resonance region since no optical pumping is carried out there. A method for measuring the size of an ion cloud inside a linear trap with a 12-rod trap is currently being investigated. At approx. 10(exp -12), the 2nd order Doppler shift for trapped mercury ion frequency standards is one of the largest frequency offsets and its measurement to the 1% level would represent an advance in insuring the very long-term stability of these standards to the 10(exp -14) or better level. Finally, we describe atomic clock comparison experiments that can probe for a time variation of the fine structure constant, alpha = e(exp 2)/2(pi)hc, at the level of 10(exp -20)/year as predicted in some Grand Unified String Theories.

  8. Frequency division multiplex technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brey, H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system for monitoring a plurality of condition responsive devices is described. It consists of a master control station and a remote station. The master control station is capable of transmitting command signals which includes a parity signal to a remote station which transmits the signals back to the command station so that such can be compared with the original signals in order to determine if there are any transmission errors. The system utilizes frequency sources which are 1.21 multiples of each other so that no linear combination of any harmonics will interfere with another frequency.

  9. Frequency Tunable Wire Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides frequency tunable solid-state radiation-generating devices, such as lasers and amplifiers, whose active medium has a size in at least one transverse dimension (e.g., its width) that is much smaller than the wavelength of radiation generated and/or amplified within the active medium. In such devices, a fraction of radiation travels as an evanescent propagating mode outside the active medium. It has been discovered that in such devices the radiation frequency can be tuned by the interaction of a tuning mechanism with the propagating evanescent mode.

  10. In-situ continuous water analyzing module

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1998-01-01

    An in-situ continuous liquid analyzing system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

  11. The Cosmic Dust Analyzer for Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G.; Gruen, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf

    1996-01-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) is designed to characterize the dust environment in interplanetary space, in the Jovian and in the Saturnian systems. The instrument consists of two major components, the Dust Analyzer (DA) and the High Rate Detector (HRD). The DA has a large aperture to provide a large cross section for detection in low flux environments. The DA has the capability of determining dust particle mass, velocity, flight direction, charge, and chemical composition. The chemical composition is determined by the Chemical Analyzer system based on a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The DA is capable of making full measurements up to one impact/second. The HRD contains two smaller PVDF detectors and electronics designed to characterize dust particle masses at impact rates up to 10(exp 4) impacts/second. These high impact rates are expected during Saturn ring, plane crossings.

  12. OASIS: Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, S. A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Martin, M.; Zheng, Y.; Balvin, M.; Southard, A. E.; Ferrance, J.; Malespin, C.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a well established laboratory technique for detecting and analyzing organic molecules. This approach has been especially fruitful in the analysis of nucleobases, amino acids, and establishing chirol ratios [1 -3]. We are developing OASIS, Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces, for future in situ landed missions to astrochemically important icy bodies, such as asteroids, comets, and icy moons. The OASIS design employs a microfabricated, on-chip analytical column to chromatographically separate liquid ana1ytes using known LC stationary phase chemistries. The elution products are then interfaced through electrospray ionization (ESI) and analyzed by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). A particular advantage of this design is its suitability for microgravity environments, such as for a primitive small body.

  13. Analyzed DTS Data, Guelph, ON Canada

    DOE Data Explorer

    Coleman, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Analyzed DTS datasets from active heat injection experiments in Guelph, ON Canada is included. A .pdf file of images including borehole temperature distributions, temperature difference distributions, temperature profiles, and flow interpretations is included as the primary analyzed dataset. Analyzed data used to create the .pdf images are included as a matlab data file that contains the following 5 types of data: 1) Borehole Temperature (matrix of temperature data collected in the borehole), 2) Borehole Temperature Difference (matrix of temperature difference above ambient for each test), 3) Borehole Time (time in both min and sec since the start of a DTS test), 4) Borehole Depth (channel depth locations for the DTS measurements), 5) Temperature Profiles (ambient, active, active off early time, active off late time, and injection).

  14. High responsivity secondary ion energy analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, A. S.; Chermoshentsev, D. A.; Gavrilov, S. A.; Frolov, O. T.; Netchaeva, L. P.; Nikulin, E. S.; Zubets, V. N.

    2018-05-01

    The degree of space charge compensation of a 70 mA, 400 keV pulsed hydrogen ion beam has been measured with the use of an electrostatic energy analyzer of secondary ions. The large azimuthal angle of the analyzer enables a high responsivity, defined as the ratio of the slow secondary ion current emerging from the partially-compensated ion beam to the fast ion beam current. We measured 84% space charge compensation of the ion beam. The current from the slow ions and the rise time from the degree of space charge compensation were measured and compared with expected values.

  15. PARALYZER FOR PULSE HEIGHT DISTRIBUTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Fairstein, E.

    1960-01-19

    A paralyzer circuit is described for use with a pulseheight distribution analyzer to prevent the analyzer from counting overlapping pulses where they would serve to provide a false indication. The paralyzer circuit comprises a pair of cathode-coupled amplifiers for amplifying pulses of opposite polarity. Diodes are provided having their anodes coupled to the separate outputs of the amplifiers to produce only positive signals, and a trigger circuit is coupled to the diodes ior operation by input pulses of either polarity from the amplifiers. A delay network couples the output of the trigger circuit for delaying the pulses.

  16. Empirical mode decomposition for analyzing acoustical signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention discloses a computer implemented signal analysis method through the Hilbert-Huang Transformation (HHT) for analyzing acoustical signals, which are assumed to be nonlinear and nonstationary. The Empirical Decomposition Method (EMD) and the Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) are used to obtain the HHT. Essentially, the acoustical signal will be decomposed into the Intrinsic Mode Function Components (IMFs). Once the invention decomposes the acoustic signal into its constituting components, all operations such as analyzing, identifying, and removing unwanted signals can be performed on these components. Upon transforming the IMFs into Hilbert spectrum, the acoustical signal may be compared with other acoustical signals.

  17. Analyzed Boise Data for Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography

    DOE Data Explorer

    Lim, David

    2015-07-01

    Data here has been "pre-processed" and "analyzed" from the raw data submitted to the GDR previously (raw data files found at http://gdr.openei.org/submissions/479. doi:10.15121/1176944 after 30 September 2017). First, we submit .mat files which are the "pre-processed" data (must have MATLAB software to use). Secondly, the csv files contain submitted data in its final analyzed form before being used for inversion. Specifically, we have fourier coefficients obtained from Fast Fourier Transform Algorithms.

  18. Time/frequency systems.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1971-06-01

    The report summarizes the work performed at DOT/TSC on the Time/Frequency ATC System study project. Principal emphasis in this report is given to the evaluation and analysis of the technological risk areas. A survey and description of proposed T/F sy...

  19. The Frequency Spectrum Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This journal issue focuses on the frequency spectrum used in radio communication and on the World Administrative Radio Conference, sponsored by the International Telecommunication Union, held in Geneva, Switzerland, in the fall of 1979. Articles describe the World Administrative Radio Conference as the most important radio communication conference…

  20. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  1. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  2. Analyzing volatile compounds in dairy products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatile compounds give the first indication of the flavor in a dairy product. Volatiles are isolated from the sample matrix and then analyzed by chromatography, sensory methods, or an electronic nose. Isolation may be performed by solvent extraction or headspace analysis, and gas chromatography i...

  3. Analyzing the Teaching of Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Based on their case studies of preparation for professional practice in the clergy, teaching, and clinical psychology, Grossman and colleagues (2009) identified three key concepts for analyzing and comparing practice in professional education--representations, decomposition, and approximations--to support professional educators…

  4. Imaging thermal plasma mass and velocity analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, Andrew W.; Howarth, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    We present the design and principle of operation of the imaging ion mass and velocity analyzer on the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP), which measures low-energy (1-90 eV/e) ion mass composition (1-40 AMU/e) and velocity distributions using a hemispherical electrostatic analyzer (HEA), a time-of-flight (TOF) gate, and a pair of toroidal electrostatic deflectors (TED). The HEA and TOF gate measure the energy-per-charge and azimuth of each detected ion and the ion transit time inside the analyzer, respectively, providing the 2-D velocity distribution of each major ionospheric ion species and resolving the minor ion species under favorable conditions. The TED are in front of the TOF gate and optionally sample ions at different elevation angles up to ±60°, for measurement of 3-D velocity distribution. We present examples of observation data to illustrate the measurement capability of the analyzer, and show the occurrence of enhanced densities of heavy "minor" O++, N+, and molecular ions and intermittent, high-velocity (a few km/s) upward and downward flowing H+ ions in localized regions of the quiet time topside high-latitude ionosphere.

  5. Analyzing the Generality of Conflict Adaptation Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funes, Maria Jesus; Lupianez, Juan; Humphreys, Glyn

    2010-01-01

    Conflict adaptation effects refer to the reduction of interference when the incongruent stimulus occurs immediately after an incongruent trial, compared with when it occurs after a congruent trial. The present study analyzes the key conditions that lead to adaptation effects that are specific to the type of conflict involved versus those that are…

  6. A Teaching Procedure for the Diatype Analyzer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pringle, Girard F.; O'Brien, Michael James

    1973-01-01

    The Diatype Analyzer is a motor-driven typewriting device which attaches to the carriage of the typewriter and is used to diagnose students' typewriting difficulties (rhythm, difficult strokes, concentration, carriage return, operation of the shift key or space bar) more exactly than by teacher examination. (AG)

  7. Analyzing the Curriculum Alignment of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turan-Özpolat, Esen; Bay, Erdal

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to analyze the curriculum alignment of teachers in secondary education 5th grade Science course. Alignment levels of teachers in dimensions of acquisition, content, teaching methods and techniques, activity, material and measurement - assessment, and the reasons for their alignment/non-alignment to the curriculum…

  8. Studying Reliability Using Identical Handheld Lactate Analyzers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Mark T.; Stavrianeas, Stasinos

    2008-01-01

    Accusport analyzers were used to generate lactate performance curves in an investigative laboratory activity emphasizing the importance of reliable instrumentation. Both the calibration and testing phases of the exercise provided students with a hands-on opportunity to use laboratory-grade instrumentation while allowing for meaningful connections…

  9. Multichannel analyzers at high rates of input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, S. J.; Strauss, M. G.

    1969-01-01

    Multichannel analyzer, used with a gating system incorporating pole-zero compensation, pile-up rejection, and baseline-restoration, achieves good resolution at high rates of input. It improves resolution, reduces tailing and rate-contributed continuum, and eliminates spectral shift.

  10. Fluidization quality analyzer for fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Daw, C. Stuart; Hawk, James A.

    1995-01-01

    A control loop and fluidization quality analyzer for a fluidized bed utilizes time varying pressure drop measurements. A fast-response pressure transducer measures the overall bed pressure drop, or over some segment of the bed, and the pressure drop signal is processed to produce an output voltage which changes with the degree of fluidization turbulence.

  11. Fluidization quality analyzer for fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Daw, C.S.; Hawk, J.A.

    1995-07-25

    A control loop and fluidization quality analyzer for a fluidized bed utilizes time varying pressure drop measurements. A fast-response pressure transducer measures the overall bed pressure drop, or over some segment of the bed, and the pressure drop signal is processed to produce an output voltage which changes with the degree of fluidization turbulence. 9 figs.

  12. SINDA, Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, L. C.; Pan, H. M. Y.; Ishimoto, T.

    1972-01-01

    Computer program has been written to analyze group of 100-node areas and then provide for summation of any number of 100-node areas to obtain temperature profile. SINDA program options offer user variety of methods for solution of thermal analog modes presented in network format.

  13. Reference guide for the soil compactor analyzer.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-07-01

    The Soil Compactor Analyzer (SCA) attaches to the automatic tamper used for Test Methods Tex-113-E and 114-E and uses rapid sampling of the hammer displacement to measure impact velocity. With the known mass of the hammer and the determined velocity,...

  14. How to Analyze Company Using Social Network?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palus, Sebastian; Bródka, Piotr; Kazienko, Przemysław

    Every single company or institution wants to utilize its resources in the most efficient way. In order to do so they have to be have good structure. The new way to analyze company structure by utilizing existing within company natural social network and example of its usage on Enron company are presented in this paper.

  15. Analyzing Faculty Salaries When Statistics Fail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, William A.

    The role played by nonstatistical procedures, in contrast to multivariant statistical approaches, in analyzing faculty salaries is discussed. Multivariant statistical methods are usually used to establish or defend against prima facia cases of gender and ethnic discrimination with respect to faculty salaries. These techniques are not applicable,…

  16. Strengthening 4-H by Analyzing Enrollment Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Stephen F.; Northern, Angela; Neff, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The study reported here used data from the ACCESS 4-H Enrollment System to gain insight into strengthening New York State's 4-H programming. Member enrollment lists from 2009 to 2012 were analyzed using Microsoft Excel to determine trends and dropout rates. The descriptive data indicate declining 4-H enrollment in recent years and peak enrollment…

  17. Photoelectron imaging using an ellipsoidal display analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dütemeyer, T.; Quitmann, C.; Kitz, M.; Dörnemann, K.; Johansson, L. S. O.; Reihl, B.

    2001-06-01

    We have built an ellipsoidal display analyzer (EDA) for angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and related techniques. The instrument is an improved version of a design by Eastman et al. [Nucl. Instrum. Methods 172, 327 (1980)] and measures the angle-resolved intensity distribution of photoelectrons at fixed energy I(θ,φ)|E=const.. Such two-dimensional cuts through the Brillouin zone are recorded using a position-sensitive detector. The large acceptance angle (Δθ=43° in the polar direction and Δφ=360° in the azimuthal direction) leads to a collection efficiency which exceeds that of conventional hemispherical analyzers by a factor of about 3000. Using ray-tracing calculations we analyze the electron optical properties of the various analyzer components and optimize their arrangement. This minimizes distortions and aberrations in the recorded images and greatly improves the performance compared to previous realizations of this analyzer. We present examples demonstrating the performance of the analyzer and its versatility. Using a commercial He-discharge lamp we are able to measure complete angular distribution patterns in less than 5 s. The energy and angular resolution are ΔEEDA=85 meV and Δθ=1.2°, respectively. Complete stacks of such cuts through the Brillouin zone at different kinetic energies E can be acquired automatically using custom software. The raw data are processed leading to a three-dimensional set (I(EB,k∥) of photoelectron intensity versus binding energy E and wave vector k∥. From this all relevant information, like the dispersion relations EB(k∥) along arbitrary directions of the Brillouin zone or Fermi-surface maps, can then be computed. An additional electron gun enables low-energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Switching between electrons and photons as the excitation source is possible without any movement of the sample or analyzer. Because of the high acquisition

  18. When does word frequency influence written production?

    PubMed

    Baus, Cristina; Strijkers, Kristof; Costa, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the central (e.g., lexical processing) and peripheral processes (motor preparation and execution) underlying word production during typewriting. To do so, we tested non-professional typers in a picture typing task while continuously recording EEG. Participants were instructed to write (by means of a standard keyboard) the corresponding name for a given picture. The lexical frequency of the words was manipulated: half of the picture names were of high-frequency while the remaining were of low-frequency. Different measures were obtained: (1) first keystroke latency and (2) keystroke latency of the subsequent letters and duration of the word. Moreover, ERPs locked to the onset of the picture presentation were analyzed to explore the temporal course of word frequency in typewriting. The results showed an effect of word frequency for the first keystroke latency but not for the duration of the word or the speed to which letter were typed (interstroke intervals). The electrophysiological results showed the expected ERP frequency effect at posterior sites: amplitudes for low-frequency words were more positive than those for high-frequency words. However, relative to previous evidence in the spoken modality, the frequency effect appeared in a later time-window. These results demonstrate two marked differences in the processing dynamics underpinning typing compared to speaking: First, central processing dynamics between speaking and typing differ already in the manner that words are accessed; second, central processing differences in typing, unlike speaking, do not cascade to peripheral processes involved in response execution.

  19. When does word frequency influence written production?

    PubMed Central

    Baus, Cristina; Strijkers, Kristof; Costa, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the central (e.g., lexical processing) and peripheral processes (motor preparation and execution) underlying word production during typewriting. To do so, we tested non-professional typers in a picture typing task while continuously recording EEG. Participants were instructed to write (by means of a standard keyboard) the corresponding name for a given picture. The lexical frequency of the words was manipulated: half of the picture names were of high-frequency while the remaining were of low-frequency. Different measures were obtained: (1) first keystroke latency and (2) keystroke latency of the subsequent letters and duration of the word. Moreover, ERPs locked to the onset of the picture presentation were analyzed to explore the temporal course of word frequency in typewriting. The results showed an effect of word frequency for the first keystroke latency but not for the duration of the word or the speed to which letter were typed (interstroke intervals). The electrophysiological results showed the expected ERP frequency effect at posterior sites: amplitudes for low-frequency words were more positive than those for high-frequency words. However, relative to previous evidence in the spoken modality, the frequency effect appeared in a later time-window. These results demonstrate two marked differences in the processing dynamics underpinning typing compared to speaking: First, central processing dynamics between speaking and typing differ already in the manner that words are accessed; second, central processing differences in typing, unlike speaking, do not cascade to peripheral processes involved in response execution. PMID:24399980

  20. 40 CFR 1065.308 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... which you sample and record gas-analyzer concentrations. (b) Measurement principles. This test verifies... appropriate frequency to prevent loss of information. This test also verifies that the measurement system... instructions. Adjust the measurement system as needed to optimize performance. Run this verification with the...

  1. Frequency band adjustment match filtering based on variable frequency GPR antennas pairing scheme for shallow subsurface investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Shahid Ali; Tian, Gang; Shi, Zhanjie; Zhao, Wenke; Junejo, S. A.

    2018-02-01

    Ground penetrating Radar (GPR) is an efficient tool for subsurface geophysical investigations, particularly at shallow depths. The non-destructiveness, cost efficiency, and data reliability are the important factors that make it an ideal tool for the shallow subsurface investigations. Present study encompasses; variations in central frequency of transmitting and receiving GPR antennas (Tx-Rx) have been analyzed and frequency band adjustment match filters are fabricated and tested accordingly. Normally, the frequency of both the antennas remains similar to each other whereas in this study we have experimentally changed the frequencies of Tx-Rx and deduce the response. Instead of normally adopted three pairs, a total of nine Tx-Rx pairs were made from 50 MHz, 100 MHz, and 200 MHz antennas. The experimental data was acquired at the designated near surface geophysics test site of the Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China. After the impulse response analysis of acquired data through conventional as well as varied Tx-Rx pairs, different swap effects were observed. The frequency band and exploration depth are influenced by transmitting frequencies rather than the receiving frequencies. The impact of receiving frequencies was noticed on the resolution; the more noises were observed using the combination of high frequency transmitting with respect to low frequency receiving. On the basis of above said variable results we have fabricated two frequency band adjustment match filters, the constant frequency transmitting (CFT) and the variable frequency transmitting (VFT) frequency band adjustment match filters. By the principle, the lower and higher frequency components were matched and then incorporated with intermediate one. Therefore, this study reveals that a Tx-Rx combination of low frequency transmitting with high frequency receiving is a better choice. Moreover, both the filters provide better radargram than raw one, the result of VFT frequency band adjustment filter is

  2. Microwave Frequency Multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazco, J. E.

    2017-02-01

    High-power microwave radiation is used in the Deep Space Network (DSN) and Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) for uplink communications with spacecraft and for monitoring asteroids and space debris, respectively. Intense X-band (7.1 to 8.6 GHz) microwave signals are produced for these applications via klystron and traveling-wave microwave vacuum tubes. In order to achieve higher data rate communications with spacecraft, the DSN is planning to gradually furnish several of its deep space stations with uplink systems that employ Ka-band (34-GHz) radiation. Also, the next generation of planetary radar, such as Ka-Band Objects Observation and Monitoring (KaBOOM), is considering frequencies in the Ka-band range (34 to 36 GHz) in order to achieve higher target resolution. Current commercial Ka-band sources are limited to power levels that range from hundreds of watts up to a kilowatt and, at the high-power end, tend to suffer from poor reliability. In either case, there is a clear need for stable Ka-band sources that can produce kilowatts of power with high reliability. In this article, we present a new concept for high-power, high-frequency generation (including Ka-band) that we refer to as the microwave frequency multiplier (MFM). The MFM is a two-cavity vacuum tube concept where low-frequency (2 to 8 GHz) power is fed into the input cavity to modulate and accelerate an electron beam. In the second cavity, the modulated electron beam excites and amplifies high-power microwaves at a frequency that is a multiple integer of the input cavity's frequency. Frequency multiplication factors in the 4 to 10 range are being considered for the current application, although higher multiplication factors are feasible. This novel beam-wave interaction allows the MFM to produce high-power, high-frequency radiation with high efficiency. A key feature of the MFM is that it uses significantly larger cavities than its klystron counterparts, thus greatly reducing power density and arcing

  3. Adiabatic description of long range frequency sweeping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breizman, Boris; Nyqvist, Robert; Lilley, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to describe long range frequency sweeping events in the 1D electrostatic bump-on-tail model with fast particle sources and collisions. The model includes three collision operators (Krook, drag (dynamical friction) and velocity space diffusion), and allows for a general shape of the fast particle distribution function. The behavior of phase space holes and clumps is analyzed, and the effect of particle trapping due to separatrix expansion is discussed. With a fast particle distribution function whose slope decays above the resonant phase velocity, hooked frequency sweeping is found for holes in the presence of drag collisions alone.

  4. Analyzing public health policy: three approaches.

    PubMed

    Coveney, John

    2010-07-01

    Policy is an important feature of public and private organizations. Within the field of health as a policy arena, public health has emerged in which policy is vital to decision making and the deployment of resources. Public health practitioners and students need to be able to analyze public health policy, yet many feel daunted by the subject's complexity. This article discusses three approaches that simplify policy analysis: Bacchi's "What's the problem?" approach examines the way that policy represents problems. Colebatch's governmentality approach provides a way of analyzing the implementation of policy. Bridgman and Davis's policy cycle allows for an appraisal of public policy development. Each approach provides an analytical framework from which to rigorously study policy. Practitioners and students of public health gain much in engaging with the politicized nature of policy, and a simple approach to policy analysis can greatly assist one's understanding and involvement in policy work.

  5. CRIE: An automated analyzer for Chinese texts.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yao-Ting; Chang, Tao-Hsing; Lin, Wei-Chun; Hsieh, Kuan-Sheng; Chang, Kuo-En

    2016-12-01

    Textual analysis has been applied to various fields, such as discourse analysis, corpus studies, text leveling, and automated essay evaluation. Several tools have been developed for analyzing texts written in alphabetic languages such as English and Spanish. However, currently there is no tool available for analyzing Chinese-language texts. This article introduces a tool for the automated analysis of simplified and traditional Chinese texts, called the Chinese Readability Index Explorer (CRIE). Composed of four subsystems and incorporating 82 multilevel linguistic features, CRIE is able to conduct the major tasks of segmentation, syntactic parsing, and feature extraction. Furthermore, the integration of linguistic features with machine learning models enables CRIE to provide leveling and diagnostic information for texts in language arts, texts for learning Chinese as a foreign language, and texts with domain knowledge. The usage and validation of the functions provided by CRIE are also introduced.

  6. Real-time airborne particle analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2012-10-16

    An aerosol particle analyzer includes a laser ablation chamber, a gas-filled conduit, and a mass spectrometer. The laser ablation chamber can be operated at a low pressure, which can be from 0.1 mTorr to 30 mTorr. The ablated ions are transferred into a gas-filled conduit. The gas-filled conduit reduces the electrical charge and the speed of ablated ions as they collide and mix with buffer gases in the gas-filled conduit. Preferably, the gas filled-conduit includes an electromagnetic multipole structure that collimates the nascent ions into a beam, which is guided into the mass spectrometer. Because the gas-filled conduit allows storage of vast quantities of the ions from the ablated particles, the ions from a single ablated particle can be analyzed multiple times and by a variety of techniques to supply statistically meaningful analysis of composition and isotope ratios.

  7. Compact fast analyzer of rotary cuvette type

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1976-01-01

    A compact fast analyzer of the rotary cuvette type is provided for simultaneously determining concentrations in a multiplicity of discrete samples using either absorbance or fluorescence measurement techniques. A rigid, generally rectangular frame defines optical passageways for the absorbance and fluorescence measurement systems. The frame also serves as a mounting structure for various optical components as well as for the cuvette rotor mount and drive system. A single light source and photodetector are used in making both absorbance and fluorescence measurements. Rotor removal and insertion are facilitated by a swing-out drive motor and rotor mount. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention relates generally to concentration measuring instruments and more specifically to a compact fast analyzer of the rotary cuvette type which is suitable for making either absorbance or fluorescence measurements. It was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  8. Electric wind in a Differential Mobility Analyzer

    DOE PAGES

    Palo, Marus; Meelis Eller; Uin, Janek; ...

    2015-10-25

    Electric wind -- the movement of gas, induced by ions moving in an electric field -- can be a distorting factor in size distribution measurements using Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMAs). The aim of this study was to determine the conditions under which electric wind occurs in the locally-built VLDMA (Very Long Differential Mobility Analyzer) and TSI Long-DMA (3081) and to describe the associated distortion of the measured spectra. Electric wind proved to be promoted by the increase of electric field strength, aerosol layer thickness, particle number concentration and particle size. The measured size spectra revealed three types of distortion: wideningmore » of the size distribution, shift of the mode of the distribution to smaller diameters and smoothing out the peaks of the multiply charged particles. Electric wind may therefore be a source of severe distortion of the spectrum when measuring large particles at high concentrations.« less

  9. Coordinating, Scheduling, Processing and Analyzing IYA09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gipson, John; Behrend, Dirk; Gordon, David; Himwich, Ed; MacMillan, Dan; Titus, Mike; Corey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The IVS scheduled a special astrometric VLBI session for the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA09) commemorating 400 years of optical astronomy and 40 years of VLBI. The IYA09 session is the most ambitious geodetic session to date in terms of network size, number of sources, and number of observations. We describe the process of designing, coordinating, scheduling, pre-session station checkout, correlating, and analyzing this session.

  10. Analyzing Noise for the Muon Silicon Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Marchan, Miguelangel; Utes, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The development of a silicon muon tomography detector is a joint project between Fermilab and National Security Technologies, LLC. The goal of this detector is to detect nuclear materials better than technology in the past. Using silicon strip detectors and readout chips used by experiments at CERN we have been developing the detector. This summer we have been testing components of the detector and have been analyzing noise characteristics.

  11. A Raman-Based Portable Fuel Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart

    2010-08-01

    Fuel is the single most import supply during war. Consider that the US Military is employing over 25,000 vehicles in Iraq and Afghanistan. Most fuel is obtained locally, and must be characterized to ensure proper operation of these vehicles. Fuel properties are currently determined using a deployed chemical laboratory. Unfortunately, each sample requires in excess of 6 hours to characterize. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a portable fuel analyzer capable of determine 7 fuel properties that allow determining fuel usage. The analyzer uses Raman spectroscopy to measure the fuel samples without preparation in 2 minutes. The challenge, however, is that as distilled fractions of crude oil, all fuels are composed of hundreds of hydrocarbon components that boil at similar temperatures, and performance properties can not be simply correlated to a single component, and certainly not to specific Raman peaks. To meet this challenge, we measured over 800 diesel and jet fuels from around the world and used chemometrics to correlate the Raman spectra to fuel properties. Critical to the success of this approach is laser excitation at 1064 nm to avoid fluorescence interference (many fuels fluoresce) and a rugged interferometer that provides 0.1 cm-1 wavenumber (x-axis) accuracy to guarantee accurate correlations. Here we describe the portable fuel analyzer, the chemometric models, and the successful determination of these 7 fuel properties for over 100 unknown samples provided by the US Marine Corps, US Navy, and US Army.

  12. Harry Mergler with His Modified Differential Analyzer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1951-06-21

    Harry Mergler stands at the control board of a differential analyzer in the new Instrument Research Laboratory at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory. The differential analyzer was a multi-variable analog computation machine devised in 1931 by Massachusetts Institute of Technology researcher and future NACA Committee member Vannevar Bush. The mechanical device could solve computations up to the sixth order, but had to be rewired before each new computation. Mergler modified Bush’s differential analyzer in the late 1940s to calculate droplet trajectories for Lewis’ icing research program. In four days Mergler’s machine could calculate what previously required weeks. NACA Lewis built the Instrument Research Laboratory in 1950 and 1951 to house the large analog computer equipment. The two-story structure also provided offices for the Mechanical Computational Analysis, and Flow Physics sections of the Physics Division. The division had previously operated from the lab’s hangar because of its icing research and flight operations activities. Mergler joined the Instrument Research Section of the Physics Division in 1948 after earning an undergraduate degree in Physics from the Case Institute of Technology. Mergler’s focus was on the synthesis of analog computers with the machine tools used to create compressor and turbine blades for jet engines.

  13. Thermo Scientific Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Springston, S. R.

    The Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures sulfur dioxide based on absorbance of UV light at one wavelength by SO2 molecules which then decay to a lower energy state by emitting UV light at a longer wavelength. Specifically, SO2 + hυ1 →SO2 *→SO2 + hυ2 The emitted light is proportional to the concentration of SO2 in the optical cell. External communication with the analyzer is available through an Ethernet port configured through the instrument network of the AOS systems. The Model 43i-TLE is part of the i-series of Thermo Scientific instruments. The i-series instruments are designed to interface with external computers throughmore » the proprietary Thermo Scientific iPort Software. However, this software is somewhat cumbersome and inflexible. BNL has written an interface program in National Instruments LabView that both controls the Model 43i-TLE Analyzer AND queries the unit for all measurement and housekeeping data. The LabView vi (the software program written by BNL) ingests all raw data from the instrument and outputs raw data files in a uniform data format similar to other instruments in the AOS and described more fully in Section 6.0 below.« less

  14. Semantic analyzability in children's understanding of idioms.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, R W

    1991-06-01

    This study investigated the role of semantic analyzability in children's understanding of idioms. Kindergartners and first, third, and fourth graders listened to idiomatic expressions either alone or at the end of short story contexts. Their task was to explain verbally the intended meanings of these phrases and then to choose their correct idiomatic interpretations. The idioms presented to the children differed in their degree of analyzability. Some idioms were highly analyzable or decomposable, with the meanings of their parts contributing independently to their overall figurative meanings. Other idioms were nondecomposable because it was difficult to see any relation between a phrase's individual components and the idiom's figurative meaning. The results showed that younger children (kindergartners and first graders) understood decomposable idioms better than they did nondecomposable phrases. Older children (third and fourth graders) understood both kinds of idioms equally well in supporting contexts, but were better at interpreting decomposable idioms than they were at understanding nondecomposable idioms without contextual information. These findings demonstrate that young children better understand idiomatic phrases whose individual parts independently contribute to their overall figurative meanings.

  15. Handheld Fluorescence Microscopy based Flow Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Manish; Jayakumar, Nitin; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has the intrinsic advantages of favourable contrast characteristics and high degree of specificity. Consequently, it has been a mainstay in modern biological inquiry and clinical diagnostics. Despite its reliable nature, fluorescence based clinical microscopy and diagnostics is a manual, labour intensive and time consuming procedure. The article outlines a cost-effective, high throughput alternative to conventional fluorescence imaging techniques. With system level integration of custom-designed microfluidics and optics, we demonstrate fluorescence microscopy based imaging flow analyzer. Using this system we have imaged more than 2900 FITC labeled fluorescent beads per minute. This demonstrates high-throughput characteristics of our flow analyzer in comparison to conventional fluorescence microscopy. The issue of motion blur at high flow rates limits the achievable throughput in image based flow analyzers. Here we address the issue by computationally deblurring the images and show that this restores the morphological features otherwise affected by motion blur. By further optimizing concentration of the sample solution and flow speeds, along with imaging multiple channels simultaneously, the system is capable of providing throughput of about 480 beads per second.

  16. Integrated Millimeter-Wave Frequency Multiplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenthal, Gerhard S.; Deaver, B. S.; Crowe, T. W.; Bishop, W. L.; Saini, K.; Bradley, R. F.

    2001-11-01

    Many of the molecules of interest to radio astronomers and atmospheric chemists resonate at frequencies in the millimeter and submillimeter wavelength bands. To measure the spectra of these molecules scientists rely on heterodyne receivers that convert the high frequency signal to the GHz band where it is readily amplified and analyzed. One of the challenges of developing suitable receiver systems is the development of compact, reliable and affordable sources of local oscillator power at frequencies in excess of 100 GHz. One useful solution is to use GaAs Schottky diodes, in their varactor mode, to generate high frequency harmonics of lower frequency sources such as Gunn oscillators. As a part of a multi-national radio astronomy project, the Atacama Millimeter Large Array (ALMA), we have designed and fabricated a broadband frequency tripler with an output centered at 240 GHz. It is integrated on a quartz substrate to greatly reduce the parasitic capacitance and thereby improve electrical performance. The integrated circuit was designed to require no oxides or ohmic contacts, thereby easing fabrication. This talk will discuss the novel millimeter-wave integrated circuit fabrication process and the initial results.

  17. Micro ion frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Serkland, Darwin K.; Boye, Robert; Fang, Lu; Casias, Adrian; Manginell, Ronald P.; Moorman, Matthew; Prestage, John; Yu, Nan

    2011-06-01

    We are developing a highly miniaturized trapped ion clock to probe the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition in the 171Yb+ ion. The clock development is being funded by the Integrated Micro Primary Atomic Clock Technology (IMPACT) program from DARPA where the stated goals are to develop a clock that consumes 50 mW of power, has a size of 5 cm3, and has a long-term frequency stability of 10-14 at one month. One of the significant challenges will be to develop miniature single-frequency lasers at 369 nm and 935 nm and the optical systems to deliver light to the ions and to collect ion fluorescence on a detector.

  18. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  19. Vortices at Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Enrico; Pompeo, Nicola; Dobrovolskiy, Oleksandr V.

    2017-11-01

    The behavior of vortices at microwave frequencies is an extremely useful source of information on the microscopic parameters that enter the description of the vortex dynamics. This feature has acquired particular relevance since the discovery of unusual superconductors, such as cuprates. Microwave investigation then extended its field of application to many families of superconductors, including the artificially nanostructured materials. It is then important to understand the basics of the physics of vortices moving at high frequency, as well as to understand what information the experiments can yield (and what they can not). The aim of this brief review is to introduce the readers to some basic aspects of the physics of vortices under a microwave electromagnetic field, and to guide them to an understanding of the experiment, also by means of the illustration of some relevant results.

  20. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  1. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers.

  2. Extended frequency turbofan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. R.; Park, J. W.; Jaekel, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    The fan model was developed using two dimensional modeling techniques to add dynamic radial coupling between the core stream and the bypass stream of the fan. When incorporated into a complete TF-30 engine simulation, the fan model greatly improved compression system frequency response to planar inlet pressure disturbances up to 100 Hz. The improved simulation also matched engine stability limits at 15 Hz, whereas the one dimensional fan model required twice the inlet pressure amplitude to stall the simulation. With verification of the two dimensional fan model, this program formulated a high frequency F-100(3) engine simulation using row by row compression system characteristics. In addition to the F-100(3) remote splitter fan, the program modified the model fan characteristics to simulate a proximate splitter version of the F-100(3) engine.

  3. Simple and flexible SAS and SPSS programs for analyzing lag-sequential categorical data.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, B P

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes simple and flexible programs for analyzing lag-sequential categorical data, using SAS and SPSS. The programs read a stream of codes and produce a variety of lag-sequential statistics, including transitional frequencies, expected transitional frequencies, transitional probabilities, adjusted residuals, z values, Yule's Q values, likelihood ratio tests of stationarity across time and homogeneity across groups or segments, transformed kappas for unidirectional dependence, bidirectional dependence, parallel and nonparallel dominance, and significance levels based on both parametric and randomization tests.

  4. Frequency Selection for Multi-frequency Acoustic Measurement of Suspended Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; HO, H.; Fu, X.

    2017-12-01

    Multi-frequency acoustic measurement of suspended sediment has found successful applications in marine and fluvial environments. Difficult challenges remain in regard to improving its effectiveness and efficiency when applied to high concentrations and wide size distributions in rivers. We performed a multi-frequency acoustic scattering experiment in a cylindrical tank with a suspension of natural sands. The sands range from 50 to 600 μm in diameter with a lognormal size distribution. The bulk concentration of suspended sediment varied from 1.0 to 12.0 g/L. We found that the commonly used linear relationship between the intensity of acoustic backscatter and suspended sediment concentration holds only at sufficiently low concentrations, for instance below 3.0 g/L. It fails at a critical value of concentration that depends on measurement frequency and the distance between the transducer and the target point. Instead, an exponential relationship was found to work satisfactorily throughout the entire range of concentration. The coefficient and exponent of the exponential function changed, however, with the measuring frequency and distance. Considering the increased complexity of inverting the concentration values when an exponential relationship prevails, we further analyzed the relationship between measurement error and measuring frequency. It was also found that the inversion error may be effectively controlled within 5% if the frequency is properly set. Compared with concentration, grain size was found to heavily affect the selection of optimum frequency. A regression relationship for optimum frequency versus grain size was developed based on the experimental results.

  5. Frequency-noise measurements of optical frequency combs by multiple fringe-side discriminator

    PubMed Central

    Coluccelli, Nicola; Cassinerio, Marco; Gambetta, Alessio; Laporta, Paolo; Galzerano, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The frequency noise of an optical frequency comb is routinely measured through the hetherodyne beat of one comb tooth against a stable continuous-wave laser. After frequency-to-voltage conversion, the beatnote is sent to a spectrum analyzer to retrive the power spectral density of the frequency noise. Because narrow-linewidth continuous-wave lasers are available only at certain wavelengths, heterodyning the comb tooth can be challenging. We present a new technique for direct characterization of the frequency noise of an optical frequency comb, requiring no supplementary reference lasers and easily applicable in all spectral regions from the terahertz to the ultraviolet. The technique is based on the combination of a low finesse Fabry-Perot resonator and the so-called “fringe-side locking” method, usually adopted to characterize the spectral purity of single-frequency lasers, here generalized to optical frequency combs. The effectiveness of this technique is demonstrated with an Er-fiber comb source across the wavelength range from 1 to 2 μm. PMID:26548900

  6. Research of frequency converters energy characteristics of drilling rigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, B. Y.; Kalashnikov, O. V.; Oleynikova, A. M.; Ivanovsky, A. I.; Grudinin, N. N.

    2017-10-01

    The investigation deals with multi-motor electric drives with frequency converters of various structures: with a common converter, with an individual converter, with a multi-inverter frequency converter. Their shortcomings and advantages were analyzed and there were drawn conclusions about the expediency of using each structure. Expediency of using multi-inverter frequency converters with an active frond end was shown to ensure the highest power characteristics of multi-motor electric drives of drilling rigs’ main mechanisms.

  7. Multiwire thermocouples: Frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements are made with a novel two wire thermocouple. Signals from two wires of unequal diameters are recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the two wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 2 omega(sub 1) where omega is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. A compensation factor is recommended for larger frequencies omega greater than 2 omega(sub 1). Theory and experimental measurements are compared with a novel three wire thermocouple. Signals from three wires of unequal diameters are recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the three wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 5 omega(sub 1) where omega (sub 1) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. The latter result represents a significant improvement compared to previous work with two wire thermocouples. A correction factor has also been derived to account for wires of arbitrary diameter. Measurements are recorded for multiwire thermocouples consisting of either two or three wires of unequal diameters. Signals from the multiwire probe are recorded for a reversing gas flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the multiwire thermocouple requires no compensation provided omega/omega(sub 1) is less than 2.3 for two wires or omega/omega(sub 1) is less than 3.6 for three wires where omega(sub 1) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire based on the maximum gas velocity. The latter results were possible provided Fourier transformed data were used and knowledge of the gas velocity is available.

  8. Rubidium Frequency Standard Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    small size, rapid warmup, and low power consumption along with frequency stability, repeatability, 1-2 . . *1 %0 now- L~tt~ ~nine~j ?odel ISu and low...the resonance and/or filter * cells at reduced temperatures with thermoelectric coolers on the basis that too much power was required and magnetic...range is dictated by thermal and steady-stp’te power considera- -_tions imposed by the performance requirements. The filter cell serves two pri- *mary

  9. Vector network analyzer ferromagnetic resonance spectrometer with field differential detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaru, S.; Tsunegi, S.; Kubota, H.; Yuasa, S.

    2018-05-01

    This work presents a vector network analyzer ferromagnetic resonance (VNA-FMR) spectrometer with field differential detection. This technique differentiates the S-parameter by applying a small binary modulation field in addition to the DC bias field to the sample. By setting the modulation frequency sufficiently high, slow sensitivity fluctuations of the VNA, i.e., low-frequency components of the trace noise, which limit the signal-to-noise ratio of the conventional VNA-FMR spectrometer, can be effectively removed, resulting in a very clean FMR signal. This paper presents the details of the hardware implementation and measurement sequence as well as the data processing and analysis algorithms tailored for the FMR spectrum obtained with this technique. Because the VNA measures a complex S-parameter, it is possible to estimate the Gilbert damping parameter from the slope of the phase variation of the S-parameter with respect to the bias field. We show that this algorithm is more robust against noise than the conventional algorithm based on the linewidth.

  10. A computer program for analyzing channel geometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Regan, R.S.; Schaffranek, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Channel Geometry Analysis Program (CGAP) provides the capability to process, analyze, and format cross-sectional data for input to flow/transport simulation models or other computational programs. CGAP allows for a variety of cross-sectional data input formats through use of variable format specification. The program accepts data from various computer media and provides for modification of machine-stored parameter values. CGAP has been devised to provide a rapid and efficient means of computing and analyzing the physical properties of an open-channel reach defined by a sequence of cross sections. CGAP 's 16 options provide a wide range of methods by which to analyze and depict a channel reach and its individual cross-sectional properties. The primary function of the program is to compute the area, width, wetted perimeter, and hydraulic radius of cross sections at successive increments of water surface elevation (stage) from data that consist of coordinate pairs of cross-channel distances and land surface or channel bottom elevations. Longitudinal rates-of-change of cross-sectional properties are also computed, as are the mean properties of a channel reach. Output products include tabular lists of cross-sectional area, channel width, wetted perimeter, hydraulic radius, average depth, and cross-sectional symmetry computed as functions of stage; plots of cross sections; plots of cross-sectional area and (or) channel width as functions of stage; tabular lists of cross-sectional area and channel width computed as functions of stage for subdivisions of a cross section; plots of cross sections in isometric projection; and plots of cross-sectional area at a fixed stage as a function of longitudinal distance along an open-channel reach. A Command Procedure Language program and Job Control Language procedure exist to facilitate program execution on the U.S. Geological Survey Prime and Amdahl computer systems respectively. (Lantz-PTT)

  11. IRISpy: Analyzing IRIS Data in Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Christe, Steven; Mumford, Stuart; Baruah, Ankit; Timothy, Shelbe; Pereira, Tiago; De Pontieu, Bart

    2017-08-01

    IRISpy is a new community-developed open-source software library for analysing IRIS level 2 data. It is written in Python, a free, cross-platform, general-purpose, high-level programming language. A wide array of scientific computing software packages have already been developed in Python, from numerical computation (NumPy, SciPy, etc.), to visualization and plotting (matplotlib), to solar-physics-specific data analysis (SunPy). IRISpy is currently under development as a SunPy-affiliated package which means it depends on the SunPy library, follows similar standards and conventions, and is developed with the support of of the SunPy development team. IRISpy’s has two primary data objects, one for analyzing slit-jaw imager data and another for analyzing spectrograph data. Both objects contain basic slicing, indexing, plotting, and animating functionality to allow users to easily inspect, reduce and analyze the data. As part of this functionality the objects can output SunPy Maps, TimeSeries, Spectra, etc. of relevant data slices for easier inspection and analysis. Work is also ongoing to provide additional data analysis functionality including derivation of systematic measurement errors (e.g. readout noise), exposure time correction, residual wavelength calibration, radiometric calibration, and fine scale pointing corrections. IRISpy’s code base is publicly available through github.com and can be contributed to by anyone. In this poster we demonstrate IRISpy’s functionality and future goals of the project. We also encourage interested users to become involved in further developing IRISpy.

  12. Air sampling unit for breath analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabra, Dariusz; Prokopiuk, Artur; Mikołajczyk, Janusz; Ligor, Tomasz; Buszewski, Bogusław; Bielecki, Zbigniew

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents a portable breath sampling unit (BSU) for human breath analyzers. The developed unit can be used to probe air from the upper airway and alveolar for clinical and science studies. The BSU is able to operate as a patient interface device for most types of breath analyzers. Its main task is to separate and to collect the selected phases of the exhaled air. To monitor the so-called I, II, or III phase and to identify the airflow from the upper and lower parts of the human respiratory system, the unit performs measurements of the exhaled CO2 (ECO2) in the concentration range of 0%-20% (0-150 mm Hg). It can work in both on-line and off-line modes according to American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society standards. A Tedlar bag with a volume of 5 dm3 is mounted as a BSU sample container. This volume allows us to collect ca. 1-25 selected breath phases. At the user panel, each step of the unit operation is visualized by LED indicators. This helps us to regulate the natural breathing cycle of the patient. There is also an operator's panel to ensure monitoring and configuration setup of the unit parameters. The operation of the breath sampling unit was preliminarily verified using the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) laboratory setup. At this setup, volatile organic compounds were extracted by solid phase microextraction. The tests were performed by the comparison of GC/MS signals from both exhaled nitric oxide and isoprene analyses for three breath phases. The functionality of the unit was proven because there was an observed increase in the signal level in the case of the III phase (approximately 40%). The described work made it possible to construct a prototype of a very efficient breath sampling unit dedicated to breath sample analyzers.

  13. Multiscale field-aligned current analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunescu, C.; Marghitu, O.; Constantinescu, D.; Narita, Y.; Vogt, J.; Blǎgǎu, A.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is achieved, essentially, by a superposition of quasi-stationary and time-dependent field-aligned currents (FACs), over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. The planarity of the FAC structures observed by satellite data and the orientation of the planar FAC sheets can be investigated by the well-established minimum variance analysis (MVA) of the magnetic perturbation. However, such investigations are often constrained to a predefined time window, i.e., to a specific scale of the FAC. The multiscale field-aligned current analyzer, introduced here, relies on performing MVA continuously and over a range of scales by varying the width of the analyzing window, appropriate for the complexity of the magnetic field signatures above the auroral oval. The proposed technique provides multiscale information on the planarity and orientation of the observed FACs. A new approach, based on the derivative of the largest eigenvalue of the magnetic variance matrix with respect to the length of the analysis window, makes possible the inference of the current structures' location (center) and scale (thickness). The capabilities of the FAC analyzer are explored analytically for the magnetic field profile of the Harris sheet and tested on synthetic FAC structures with uniform current density and infinite or finite geometry in the cross-section plane of the FAC. The method is illustrated with data observed by the Cluster spacecraft on crossing the nightside auroral region, and the results are cross checked with the optical observations from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms ground network.

  14. Volatile Analyzer for Lunar Polar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibons, Everett K.; Pillinger, Colin T.; McKay, David S.; Waugh, Lester J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major questions remaining for the future exploration of the Moon by humans concerns the presence of volatiles on our nearest neighbor in space. Observational studies, and investigations involving returned lunar samples and using robotic spacecraft infer the existence of volatile compounds particularly water [1]. It seems very likely that a volatile component will be concentrated at the poles in circumstances where low-temperatures exist to provide cryogenic traps. However, the full inventory of species, their concentration and their origin and sources are unknown. Of particular importance is whether abundances are sufficient to act as a resource of consumables for future lunar expeditions especially if a long-term base involving humans is to be established. To address some of these issues requires a lander designed specifically for operation at a high-lunar latitude. A vital part of the payload needs to be a volatile analyzer such as the Gas Analysis Package specifically designed for identification quantification of volatile substances and collecting information which will allow the origin of these volatiles to be identified [1]. The equipment included, particularly the gas analyzer, must be capable of operation in the extreme environmental conditions to be encountered. No accurate information yet exists regarding volatile concentration even for sites closer to the lunar equator (because of contamination). In this respect it will be important to understand (and thus limit) contamination of the lunar surface by extraneous material contributed from a variety of sources. The only data for the concentrations of volatiles at the poles comes from orbiting spacecraft and whilst the levels at high latitudes may be greater than at the equator, the volatile analyzer package under consideration will be designed to operate at the highest specifications possible and in a way that does not compromise the data.

  15. Mass spectrometer calibration of Cosmic Dust Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Gupta, Satish C.; Jyoti, G.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2003-02-01

    The time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer (MS) of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) instrument aboard the Cassini spacecraft is expected to be placed in orbit about Saturn to sample submicrometer-diameter ring particles and impact ejecta from Saturn's satellites. The CDA measures a mass spectrum of each particle that impacts the chemical analyzer sector of the instrument. Particles impact a Rh target plate at velocities of 1-100 km/s and produce some 10-8 to 10-5 times the particle mass of positive valence, single-charged ions. These are analyzed via a TOF MS. Initial tests employed a pulsed N2 laser acting on samples of kamacite, pyrrhotite, serpentine, olivine, and Murchison meteorite induced bursts of ions which were detected with a microchannel plate and a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA). Pulses from the N2 laser (1011 W/cm2) are assumed to simulate particle impact. Using aluminum alloy as a test sample, each pulse produces a charge of ~4.6 pC (mostly Al+1), whereas irradiation of a stainless steel target produces a ~2.8 pC (Fe+1) charge. Thus the present system yields ~10-5% of the laser energy in resulting ions. A CSA signal indicates that at the position of the microchannel plate, the ion detector geometry is such that some 5% of the laser-induced ions are collected in the CDA geometry. Employing a multichannel plate detector in this MS yields for Al-Mg-Cu alloy and kamacite targets well-defined peaks at 24 (Mg+1), 27(Al+1), and 64 (Cu+1) and 56 (Fe+1), 58 (Ni+1), and 60 (Ni+1) dalton, respectively.

  16. Real-Time Occupancy Change Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-30

    The Real-Time Occupancy Change Analyzer (ROCA) produces an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scans the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converts the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. Changes in the occupancy grid can be reported in real time to support a number of tracking capabilities. The benefit of ROCA is that rather than only providing a vector to the detected change, it provides the actual x,y position of the change.

  17. The GSFC NASTRAN thermal analyzer new capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. P.; Harder, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of four analysis capabilities, which developed and integrated into the NASTRAN Thermal Analyzer, is given. To broaden the scope of applications, these additions provide the NTA users with the following capabilities: (1) simulating a thermal louver as a means of the passive thermal control, (2) simulating a fluid loop for transporting energy as a means of the active thermal control, (3) condensing a large sized finite element model for an efficient transient thermal analysis, and (4) entering multiple boundary condition sets in a single submission for execution in steady state thermal analyses.

  18. Miniature integrated-optical wavelength analyzer chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, R. E.; Dübendorfer, J.

    1995-11-01

    A novel integrated-optical chip suitable for realizing compact miniature wavelength analyzers with high linear dispersion is presented. The chip performs the complete task of converting the spectrum of an input beam into a corresponding spatial irradiance distribution without the need for an imaging function. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach experimentally by monitoring the changes in the mode spectrum of a laser diode on varying its case temperature. Comparing the results with simultaneous measurements by a commercial spectrometer yielded a rms wavelength deviation of 0.01 nm.

  19. Using SCR methods to analyze requirements documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John; Morrison, Jeffery

    1995-01-01

    Software Cost Reduction (SCR) methods are being utilized to analyze and verify selected parts of NASA's EOS-DIS Core System (ECS) requirements documentation. SCR is being used as a spot-inspection tool. Through this formal and systematic approach of the SCR requirements methods, insights as to whether the requirements are internally inconsistent or incomplete as the scenarios of intended usage evolve in the OC (Operations Concept) documentation. Thus, by modelling the scenarios and requirements as mode charts using the SCR methods, we have been able to identify problems within and between the documents.

  20. MULTI-CHANNEL PULSE HEIGHT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-11-25

    An improved multi-channel pulse height analyzer of the type where the device translates the amplitude of each pulse into a time duration electrical quantity which is utilized to control the length of a train of pulses forwarded to a scaler is described. The final state of the scaler for any one train of pulses selects the appropriate channel in a magnetic memory in which an additional count of one is placed. The improvement consists of a storage feature for storing a signal pulse so that in many instances when two signal pulses occur in rapid succession, the second pulse is preserved and processed at a later time.

  1. Thermo Scientific Ozone Analyzer Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Springston, S. R.

    The primary measurement output from the Thermo Scientific Ozone Analyzer is the concentration of the analyte (O3) reported at 1-s resolution in units of ppbv in ambient air. Note that because of internal pneumatic switching limitations the instrument only makes an independent measurement every 4 seconds. Thus, the same concentration number is repeated roughly 4 times at the uniform, monotonic 1-s time base used in the AOS systems. Accompanying instrument outputs include sample temperatures, flows, chamber pressure, lamp intensities and a multiplicity of housekeeping information. There is also a field for operator comments made at any time while data ismore » being collected.« less

  2. The SPAR thermal analyzer: Present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlowe, M. B.; Whetstone, W. D.; Robinson, J. C.

    The SPAR thermal analyzer, a system of finite-element processors for performing steady-state and transient thermal analyses, is described. The processors communicate with each other through the SPAR random access data base. As each processor is executed, all pertinent source data is extracted from the data base and results are stored in the data base. Steady state temperature distributions are determined by a direct solution method for linear problems and a modified Newton-Raphson method for nonlinear problems. An explicit and several implicit methods are available for the solution of transient heat transfer problems. Finite element plotting capability is available for model checkout and verification.

  3. The SPAR thermal analyzer: Present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, M. B.; Whetstone, W. D.; Robinson, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The SPAR thermal analyzer, a system of finite-element processors for performing steady-state and transient thermal analyses, is described. The processors communicate with each other through the SPAR random access data base. As each processor is executed, all pertinent source data is extracted from the data base and results are stored in the data base. Steady state temperature distributions are determined by a direct solution method for linear problems and a modified Newton-Raphson method for nonlinear problems. An explicit and several implicit methods are available for the solution of transient heat transfer problems. Finite element plotting capability is available for model checkout and verification.

  4. Light-weight analyzer for odor recognition

    DOEpatents

    Vass, Arpad A; Wise, Marcus B

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides a light weight analyzer, e.g., detector, capable of locating clandestine graves. The detector utilizes the very specific and unique chemicals identified in the database of human decompositional odor. This detector, based on specific chemical compounds found relevant to human decomposition, is the next step forward in clandestine grave detection and will take the guess-work out of current methods using canines and ground-penetrating radar, which have historically been unreliable. The detector is self contained, portable and built for field use. Both visual and auditory cues are provided to the operator.

  5. CRISP90 - SOFTWARE DESIGN ANALYZER SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The CRISP90 Software Design Analyzer System, an update of CRISP-80, is a set of programs forming a software design and documentation tool which supports top-down, hierarchic, modular, structured design and programming methodologies. The quality of a computer program can often be significantly influenced by the design medium in which the program is developed. The medium must foster the expression of the programmer's ideas easily and quickly, and it must permit flexible and facile alterations, additions, and deletions to these ideas as the design evolves. The CRISP90 software design analyzer system was developed to provide the PDL (Programmer Design Language) programmer with such a design medium. A program design using CRISP90 consists of short, English-like textual descriptions of data, interfaces, and procedures that are imbedded in a simple, structured, modular syntax. The display is formatted into two-dimensional, flowchart-like segments for a graphic presentation of the design. Together with a good interactive full-screen editor or word processor, the CRISP90 design analyzer becomes a powerful tool for the programmer. In addition to being a text formatter, the CRISP90 system prepares material that would be tedious and error prone to extract manually, such as a table of contents, module directory, structure (tier) chart, cross-references, and a statistics report on the characteristics of the design. Referenced modules are marked by schematic logic symbols to show conditional, iterative, and/or concurrent invocation in the program. A keyword usage profile can be generated automatically and glossary definitions inserted into the output documentation. Another feature is the capability to detect changes that were made between versions. Thus, "change-bars" can be placed in the output document along with a list of changed pages and a version history report. Also, items may be marked as "to be determined" and each will appear on a special table until the item is

  6. Spectrum Analyzers Incorporating Tunable WGM Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute

    2009-01-01

    A photonic instrument is proposed to boost the resolution for ultraviolet/ optical/infrared spectral analysis and spectral imaging allowing the detection of narrow (0.00007-to-0.07-picometer wavelength resolution range) optical spectral signatures of chemical elements in space and planetary atmospheres. The idea underlying the proposal is to exploit the advantageous spectral characteristics of whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators to obtain spectral resolutions at least three orders of magnitude greater than those of optical spectrum analyzers now in use. Such high resolutions would enable measurement of spectral features that could not be resolved by prior instruments.

  7. ASDA - Advanced Suit Design Analyzer computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Conger, Bruce C.; Iovine, John V.; Chang, Chi-Min

    1992-01-01

    An ASDA model developed to evaluate the heat and mass transfer characteristics of advanced pressurized suit design concepts for low pressure or vacuum planetary applications is presented. The model is based on a generalized 3-layer suit that uses the Systems Integrated Numerical Differencing Analyzer '85 in conjunction with a 41-node FORTRAN routine. The latter simulates the transient heat transfer and respiratory processes of a human body in a suited environment. The user options for the suit encompass a liquid cooled garment, a removable jacket, a CO2/H2O permeable layer, and a phase change layer.

  8. Vector Beam Polarization State Spectrum Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ignacio; Davis, Jeffrey A; Badham, Katherine; Sánchez-López, María M; Holland, Joseph E; Cottrell, Don M

    2017-05-22

    We present a proof of concept for a vector beam polarization state spectrum analyzer based on the combination of a polarization diffraction grating (PDG) and an encoded harmonic q-plate grating (QPG). As a result, a two-dimensional polarization diffraction grating is formed that generates six different q-plate channels with topological charges from -3 to +3 in the horizontal direction, and each is split in the vertical direction into the six polarization channels at the cardinal points of the corresponding higher-order Poincaré sphere. Consequently, 36 different channels are generated in parallel. This special polarization diffractive element is experimentally demonstrated using a single phase-only spatial light modulator in a reflective optical architecture. Finally, we show that this system can be used as a vector beam polarization state spectrum analyzer, where both the topological charge and the state of polarization of an input vector beam can be simultaneously determined in a single experiment. We expect that these results would be useful for applications in optical communications.

  9. Modular thermal analyzer routine, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oren, J. A.; Phillips, M. A.; Williams, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Modular Thermal Analyzer Routine (MOTAR) is a general thermal analysis routine with strong capabilities for performing thermal analysis of systems containing flowing fluids, fluid system controls (valves, heat exchangers, etc.), life support systems, and thermal radiation situations. Its modular organization permits the analysis of a very wide range of thermal problems for simple problems containing a few conduction nodes to those containing complicated flow and radiation analysis with each problem type being analyzed with peak computational efficiency and maximum ease of use. The organization and programming methods applied to MOTAR achieved a high degree of computer utilization efficiency in terms of computer execution time and storage space required for a given problem. The computer time required to perform a given problem on MOTAR is approximately 40 to 50 percent that required for the currently existing widely used routines. The computer storage requirement for MOTAR is approximately 25 percent more than the most commonly used routines for the most simple problems but the data storage techniques for the more complicated options should save a considerable amount of space.

  10. Improving respiration measurements with gas exchange analyzers.

    PubMed

    Montero, R; Ribas-Carbó, M; Del Saz, N F; El Aou-Ouad, H; Berry, J A; Flexas, J; Bota, J

    2016-12-01

    Dark respiration measurements with open-flow gas exchange analyzers are often questioned for their low accuracy as their low values often reach the precision limit of the instrument. Respiration was measured in five species, two hypostomatous (Vitis Vinifera L. and Acanthus mollis) and three amphistomatous, one with similar amount of stomata in both sides (Eucalyptus citriodora) and two with different stomata density (Brassica oleracea and Vicia faba). CO 2 differential (ΔCO 2 ) increased two-fold with no change in apparent R d , when the two leaves with higher stomatal density faced outside. These results showed a clear effect of the position of stomata on ΔCO 2 . Therefore, it can be concluded that leaf position is important to guarantee the improvement of respiration measurements increasing ΔCO 2 without affecting the respiration results by leaf or mass units. This method will help to increase the accuracy of leaf respiration measurements using gas exchange analyzers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Developments on the Toroid Ion Trap Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, S.A.; Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1999-06-13

    Investigations into several areas of research have been undertaken to address the performance limitations of the toroid analyzer. The Simion 3D6 (2) ion optics simulation program was used to determine whether the potential well minimum of the toroid trapping field is in the physical center of the trap electrode structure. The results (Figures 1) indicate that the minimum of the potential well is shifted towards the inner ring electrode by an amount approximately equal to 10% of the r0 dimension. A simulation of the standard 3D ion trap under similar conditions was performed as a control. In this case, themore » ions settle to the minimum of the potential well at a point that is coincident with the physical center (both radial and axial) of the trapping electrodes. It is proposed that by using simulation programs, a set of new analyzer electrodes can be fashioned that will correct for the non- linear fields introduced by curving the substantially quadrupolar field about the toroid axis in order to provide a trapping field similar to the 3D ion trap cross- section. A new toroid electrode geometry has been devised to allow the use of channel- tron style detectors in place of the more expensive multichannel plate detector. Two different versions have been designed and constructed - one using the current ion trap cross- section (Figure 2) and another using the linear quedrupole cross- section design first reported by Bier and Syka (3).« less

  12. Solar Probe ANalyzer for Ions - Laboratory Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livi, R.; Larson, D. E.; Kasper, J. C.; Korreck, K. E.; Whittlesey, P. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Parker Solar Probe (PSP) mission is a heliospheric satellite that will orbit the Sun closer than any prior mission to date with a perihelion of 35 solar radii (RS) and an aphelion of 10 RS. PSP includes the Solar Wind Electrons Alphas and Protons (SWEAP) instrument suite, which in turn consists of four instruments: the Solar Probe Cup (SPC) and three Solar Probe ANalyzers (SPAN) for ions and electrons. Together, this suite will take local measurements of particles and electromagnetic fields within the Sun's corona. SPAN-Ai has completed flight calibration and spacecraft integration and is set to be launched in July of 2018. The main mode of operation consists of an electrostatic analyzer (ESA) at its aperture followed by a Time-of-Flight section to measure the energy and mass per charge (m/q) of the ambient ions. SPAN-Ai's main objective is to measure solar wind ions within an energy range of 5 eV - 20 keV, a mass/q between 1-60 [amu/q] and a field of view of 2400x1200. Here we will show flight calibration results and performance.

  13. Analyzing endocrine system conservation and evolution.

    PubMed

    Bonett, Ronald M

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing variation in rates of evolution can provide important insights into the factors that constrain trait evolution, as well as those that promote diversification. Metazoan endocrine systems exhibit apparent variation in evolutionary rates of their constituent components at multiple levels, yet relatively few studies have quantified these patterns and analyzed them in a phylogenetic context. This may be in part due to historical and current data limitations for many endocrine components and taxonomic groups. However, recent technological advancements such as high-throughput sequencing provide the opportunity to collect large-scale comparative data sets for even non-model species. Such ventures will produce a fertile data landscape for evolutionary analyses of nucleic acid and amino acid based endocrine components. Here I summarize evolutionary rate analyses that can be applied to categorical and continuous endocrine traits, and also those for nucleic acid and protein-based components. I emphasize analyses that could be used to test whether other variables (e.g., ecology, ontogenetic timing of expression, etc.) are related to patterns of rate variation and endocrine component diversification. The application of phylogenetic-based rate analyses to comparative endocrine data will greatly enhance our understanding of the factors that have shaped endocrine system evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Analyzing linear spatial features in ecology.

    PubMed

    Buettel, Jessie C; Cole, Andrew; Dickey, John M; Brook, Barry W

    2018-06-01

    The spatial analysis of dimensionless points (e.g., tree locations on a plot map) is common in ecology, for instance using point-process statistics to detect and compare patterns. However, the treatment of one-dimensional linear features (fiber processes) is rarely attempted. Here we appropriate the methods of vector sums and dot products, used regularly in fields like astrophysics, to analyze a data set of mapped linear features (logs) measured in 12 × 1-ha forest plots. For this demonstrative case study, we ask two deceptively simple questions: do trees tend to fall downhill, and if so, does slope gradient matter? Despite noisy data and many potential confounders, we show clearly that topography (slope direction and steepness) of forest plots does matter to treefall. More generally, these results underscore the value of mathematical methods of physics to problems in the spatial analysis of linear features, and the opportunities that interdisciplinary collaboration provides. This work provides scope for a variety of future ecological analyzes of fiber processes in space. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. The Solar Wind Ion Analyzer for MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Taylor, E. R.; Dalton, G.; Johnson, G.; Curtis, D. W.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar Wind Ion Analyzer (SWIA) on the MAVEN mission will measure the solar wind ion flows around Mars, both in the upstream solar wind and in the magneto-sheath and tail regions inside the bow shock. The solar wind flux provides one of the key energy inputs that can drive atmospheric escape from the Martian system, as well as in part controlling the structure of the magnetosphere through which non-thermal ion escape must take place. SWIA measurements contribute to the top level MAVEN goals of characterizing the upper atmosphere and the processes that operate there, and parameterizing the escape of atmospheric gases to extrapolate the total loss to space throughout Mars' history. To accomplish these goals, SWIA utilizes a toroidal energy analyzer with electrostatic deflectors to provide a broad 360∘×90∘ field of view on a 3-axis spacecraft, with a mechanical attenuator to enable a very high dynamic range. SWIA provides high cadence measurements of ion velocity distributions with high energy resolution (14.5 %) and angular resolution (3.75∘×4.5∘ in the sunward direction, 22.5∘×22.5∘ elsewhere), and a broad energy range of 5 eV to 25 keV. Onboard computation of bulk moments and energy spectra enable measurements of the basic properties of the solar wind at 0.25 Hz.

  16. The MAVEN Solar Wind Electron Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Thocaven, J.-J.; Rouzaud, J.; Fedorov, A.; Rouger, P.; Toublanc, D.; Taylor, E.; Gordon, D.; Robinson, M.; Heavner, S.; Turin, P.; Diaz-Aguado, M.; Curtis, D. W.; Lin, R. P.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-04-01

    The MAVEN Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) is a symmetric hemispheric electrostatic analyzer with deflectors that is designed to measure the energy and angular distributions of 3-4600-eV electrons in the Mars environment. This energy range is important for impact ionization of planetary atmospheric species, and encompasses the solar wind core and halo populations, shock-energized electrons, auroral electrons, and ionospheric primary photoelectrons. The instrument is mounted at the end of a 1.5-meter boom to provide a clear field of view that spans nearly 80 % of the sky with ˜20° resolution. With an energy resolution of 17 % (Δ E/E), SWEA readily distinguishes electrons of solar wind and ionospheric origin. Combined with a 2-second measurement cadence and on-board real-time pitch angle mapping, SWEA determines magnetic topology with high (˜8-km) spatial resolution, so that local measurements of the plasma and magnetic field can be placed into global context.

  17. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  18. Analyzing Virtual Physics Simulations with Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claessens, Tom

    2017-12-01

    In the physics teaching community, Tracker is well known as a user-friendly open source video analysis software, authored by Douglas Brown. With this tool, the user can trace markers indicated on a video or on stroboscopic photos and perform kinematic analyses. Tracker also includes a data modeling tool that allows one to fit some theoretical equations of motion onto experimentally obtained data. In the field of particle mechanics, Tracker has been effectively used for learning and teaching about projectile motion, "toss up" and free-fall vertical motion, and to explain the principle of mechanical energy conservation. Also, Tracker has been successfully used in rigid body mechanics to interpret the results of experiments with rolling/slipping cylinders and moving rods. In this work, I propose an original method in which Tracker is used to analyze virtual computer simulations created with a physics-based motion solver, instead of analyzing video recording or stroboscopic photos. This could be an interesting approach to study kinematics and dynamics problems in physics education, in particular when there is no or limited access to physical labs. I demonstrate the working method with a typical (but quite challenging) problem in classical mechanics: a slipping/rolling cylinder on a rough surface.

  19. Mid-frequency MTF compensation of optical sparse aperture system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenghao; Wang, Zhile

    2018-03-19

    Optical sparse aperture (OSA) can greatly improve the spatial resolution of optical system. However, because of its aperture dispersion and sparse, its mid-frequency modulation transfer function (MTF) are significantly lower than that of a single aperture system. The main focus of this paper is on the mid-frequency MTF compensation of the optical sparse aperture system. Firstly, the principle of the mid-frequency MTF decreasing and missing of optical sparse aperture are analyzed. This paper takes the filling factor as a clue. The method of processing the mid-frequency MTF decreasing with large filling factor and method of compensation mid-frequency MTF with small filling factor are given respectively. For the MTF mid-frequency decreasing, the image spatial-variant restoration method is proposed to restore the mid-frequency information in the image; for the mid-frequency MTF missing, two images obtained by two system respectively are fused to compensate the mid-frequency information in optical sparse aperture image. The feasibility of the two method are analyzed in this paper. The numerical simulation of the system and algorithm of the two cases are presented using Zemax and Matlab. The results demonstrate that by these two methods the mid-frequency MTF of OSA system can be compensated effectively.

  20. Framework for analyzing hyper-viscoelastic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Akash; Siviour, Clive

    2017-06-01

    Hyper-viscoelastic polymers have multiple areas of application including aerospace, biomedicine, and automotive. Their mechanical responses are therefore extremely important to understand, particularly because they exhibit strong rate and temperature dependence, including a low temperature brittle transition. Relationships between the response at various strain rates and temperatures are investigated and a framework developed to predict response at rates where experiments are unfeasible. A master curve of the storage modulus's rate dependence at a reference temperature is constructed using a DMA test of the polymer. A frequency sweep spanning two decades and a temperature range from pre-glass transition to pre-melt is used. A fractional derivative model is fitted to the experimental data, and this model's parameters are used to derive stress-strain relationships at a desired strain rate. Finite element simulations with this constitutive model are used for verification with experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Air Force Materiel Command, USAF under Award No. FA9550-15-1-0448.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - FIELD PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYZER - SCITEC, MAP SPECTRUM ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In April 1995, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored a demonstration of field portable X-ray fluorescence (FPXRF) analyzers. The primary objectives of this demonstration were (1) to determine how well FPXRF analyzers perform in comparison to standard reference...

  2. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  3. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  4. High frequency pulsed electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, David Wayne

    Electromigration life tests were performed on copper-alloyed aluminum test structures that were representative of modern CMOS metallization schemes, complete with Ti/TiN cladding layers and a tungsten-plug contact at the cathode. A total of 18 electrical stress treatments were applied. One was a DC current of 15 mA. The other 17 were pulsed currents, varied according to duty cycle and frequency. The pulse amplitude was 15 mA (˜2.7 × 10sp6 A/cmsp2) for all treatments. Duty cycles ranged from 33.3% to 80%, and frequencies fell into three rough ranges-100 KHz, 1 MHz, and 100 MHz. The ambient test temperature was 200sp°C in all experiments. Six to 9 samples were subjected to each treatment. Experimental data were gathered in the form of test stripe resistance versus time, R(t). For purposes of lifetime analysis, "failure" was defined by the criterion R(t)/R(0) = 1.10, and the median time to failure, tsb{50}, was used as the primary basis of comparison between test groups. It was found that the dependence of tsb{50} on pulse duty cycle conformed rather well to the so-called "average current density model" for duty cycles of 50% and higher. Lifetimes were less enhanced for a duty cycle of 33.3%, but they were still considerably longer than an "on-time" model would predict. No specific dependence of tsb{50} on pulse frequency was revealed by the data, that is, reasonably good predictions of tsb{50} could be made by recognizing the dominant influence of duty cycle. These findings confirm that IC miniaturization can be more aggressively pursued than an on-time prediction would allow. It is significant that this was found to be true for frequencies on the order of 100 MHz, where many present day digital applications operate. Post-test optical micrographs were obtained for each test subject in order to determine the location of electromigration damage. The pulse duty cycle was found to influence the location. Most damage occurred at the cathode contact, regardless of

  5. Frequency Hopping Transceiver Multiplexer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    l~o ngth ( method 211) Ile If 19 nose (m Wace em. t amem 0 311c fte s Saa Spray (meto 101. cond. U) nom t 7 o m011 V $h dIVN5k~ WaftIS OCIV16111 ATC...the resonators together to reduce adverse loading is also critical. Figure 5-12 shows two methods of obtaining the desired selectivity. Part A of...this large frequency range required. E.7 CONCLUSIONS It appears that the Helical Resonator with the capacitance bus is the best method available to

  6. Frequency Domain Identification Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Chung-Wen

    1996-01-01

    This report documents software written in MATLAB programming language for performing identification of systems from frequency response functions. MATLAB is a commercial software environment which allows easy manipulation of data matrices and provides other intrinsic matrix functions capabilities. Algorithms programmed in this collection of subroutines have been documented elsewhere but all references are provided in this document. A main feature of this software is the use of matrix fraction descriptions and system realization theory to identify state space models directly from test data. All subroutines have templates for the user to use as guidelines.

  7. Automated Root Tracking with "Root System Analyzer"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Jin, Meina; Ockert, Charlotte; Bol, Roland; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Crucial factors for plant development are water and nutrient availability in soils. Thus, root architecture is a main aspect of plant productivity and needs to be accurately considered when describing root processes. Images of root architecture contain a huge amount of information, and image analysis helps to recover parameters describing certain root architectural and morphological traits. The majority of imaging systems for root systems are designed for two-dimensional images, such as RootReader2, GiA Roots, SmartRoot, EZ-Rhizo, and Growscreen, but most of them are semi-automated and involve mouse-clicks in each root by the user. "Root System Analyzer" is a new, fully automated approach for recovering root architectural parameters from two-dimensional images of root systems. Individual roots can still be corrected manually in a user interface if required. The algorithm starts with a sequence of segmented two-dimensional images showing the dynamic development of a root system. For each image, morphological operators are used for skeletonization. Based on this, a graph representation of the root system is created. A dynamic root architecture model helps to determine which edges of the graph belong to an individual root. The algorithm elongates each root at the root tip and simulates growth confined within the already existing graph representation. The increment of root elongation is calculated assuming constant growth. For each root, the algorithm finds all possible paths and elongates the root in the direction of the optimal path. In this way, each edge of the graph is assigned to one or more coherent roots. Image sequences of root systems are handled in such a way that the previous image is used as a starting point for the current image. The algorithm is implemented in a set of Matlab m-files. Output of Root System Analyzer is a data structure that includes for each root an identification number, the branching order, the time of emergence, the parent

  8. Frequency compounding in multifrequency vibroacoustography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Matthew W.; Alizad, Azra; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2009-02-01

    Vibro-acoustography is a speckle-free ultrasound based imaging modality that can visualize normal and abnormal soft tissue through mapping stimulated acoustic emission. The acoustic emission is generated by focusing two ultrasound beams of slightly different frequencies (Δf = f1-f2) to the same spatial location and vibrating the tissue as a result of ultrasound radiation force. Reverberation of the acoustic emission can create dark and bright areas in the image that affect overall image contrast and detectability of abnormal tissue. Using finite length tonebursts yields acoustic emission at Δf and at sidebands centered about Δf that originate from the temporal toneburst gating. Separate images are formed by bandpass filtering the acoustic emission at Δf and the associated sidebands. The data at these multiple frequencies are compounded through coherent or incoherent processes to reduce the artifacts associated with reverberation of the acoustic emission. Experimental results from a urethane breast phantom and in vivo human breast scans are shown. The reduction in reverberation artifacts are analyzed using a smoothness metric which uses the variances of the gray levels of the original images and those formed through coherent and incoherent compounding of image data. This smoothness metric is minimized when the overall image background is smooth while image features are still preserved. The smoothness metric indicates that the images improved by factors from 1.23-4.33 and 1.09-2.68 in phantom and in vivo studies, respectively. The coherent and incoherent compounding of multifrequency data demonstrate, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the efficacy of this method for reduction of reverberation artifacts.

  9. Analyzing communication errors in an air medical transport service.

    PubMed

    Dalto, Joseph D; Weir, Charlene; Thomas, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Poor communication can result in adverse events. Presently, no standards exist for classifying and analyzing air medical communication errors. This study sought to determine the frequency and types of communication errors reported within an air medical quality and safety assurance reporting system. Of 825 quality assurance reports submitted in 2009, 278 were randomly selected and analyzed for communication errors. Each communication error was classified and mapped to Clark's communication level hierarchy (ie, levels 1-4). Descriptive statistics were performed, and comparisons were evaluated using chi-square analysis. Sixty-four communication errors were identified in 58 reports (21% of 278). Of the 64 identified communication errors, only 18 (28%) were classified by the staff to be communication errors. Communication errors occurred most often at level 1 (n = 42/64, 66%) followed by level 4 (21/64, 33%). Level 2 and 3 communication failures were rare (, 1%). Communication errors were found in a fifth of quality and safety assurance reports. The reporting staff identified less than a third of these errors. Nearly all communication errors (99%) occurred at either the lowest level of communication (level 1, 66%) or the highest level (level 4, 33%). An air medical communication ontology is necessary to improve the recognition and analysis of communication errors. Copyright © 2013 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A software tool for analyzing multichannel cochlear implant signals.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wai Kong; Bögli, Hans; Dillier, Norbert

    2003-10-01

    A useful and convenient means to analyze the radio frequency (RF) signals being sent by a speech processor to a cochlear implant would be to actually capture and display them with appropriate software. This is particularly useful for development or diagnostic purposes. sCILab (Swiss Cochlear Implant Laboratory) is such a PC-based software tool intended for the Nucleus family of Multichannel Cochlear Implants. Its graphical user interface provides a convenient and intuitive means for visualizing and analyzing the signals encoding speech information. Both numerical and graphic displays are available for detailed examination of the captured CI signals, as well as an acoustic simulation of these CI signals. sCILab has been used in the design and verification of new speech coding strategies, and has also been applied as an analytical tool in studies of how different parameter settings of existing speech coding strategies affect speech perception. As a diagnostic tool, it is also useful for troubleshooting problems with the external equipment of the cochlear implant systems.

  11. Temperature effects on wavelength calibration of the optical spectrum analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongkonsatit, Kittiphong; Ranusawud, Monludee; Srikham, Sitthichai; Bhatranand, Apichai; Jiraraksopakun, Yuttapong

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the investigation of the temperature effects on wavelength calibration of an optical spectrum analyzer or OSA. The characteristics of wavelength dependence on temperatures are described and demonstrated under the guidance of the IEC 62129-1:2006, the international standard for the Calibration of wavelength/optical frequency measurement instruments - Part 1: Optical spectrum analyzer. Three distributed-feedback lasers emit lights with wavelengths of 1310 nm, 1550 nm, and 1600 nm were used as light sources in this work. Each light was split by a 1 x 2 fiber splitter whereas one end was connected to a standard wavelength meter and the other to an under-test OSA. Two Experiment setups were arranged for the analysis of the wavelength reading deviations between a standard wavelength meter and an OSA under a variety of circumstances of different temperatures and humidity conditions. The experimental results showed that, for wavelengths of 1550 nm and 1600 nm, the wavelength deviations were proportional to the value of temperature with the minimum and maximum of -0.015 and 0.030 nm, respectively. While the deviations of 1310 nm wavelength did not change much with the temperature as they were in the range of -0.003 nm to 0.010 nm. The measurement uncertainty was also evaluated according to the IEC 62129-1:2006. The main contribution of measurement uncertainty was caused by the wavelength deviation. The uncertainty of measurement in this study is 0.023 nm with coverage factor, k = 2.

  12. High-Frequency Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Michelle D.

    1997-01-01

    For the past five years, Andover, Kansas middle-schoolers in an amateur radio club and class have sent and received Morse code messages, assembled and soldered circuit boards, designed and built antenna systems, and used computer programs to analyze radio communications problems. A successful bond issue financed a ham shack enabling students to…

  13. Gaseous trace impurity analyzer and method

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Jr., David; Schneider, William

    1980-01-01

    Simple apparatus for analyzing trace impurities in a gas, such as helium or hydrogen, comprises means for drawing a measured volume of the gas as sample into a heated zone. A segregable portion of the zone is then chilled to condense trace impurities in the gas in the chilled portion. The gas sample is evacuated from the heated zone including the chilled portion. Finally, the chilled portion is warmed to vaporize the condensed impurities in the order of their boiling points. As the temperature of the chilled portion rises, pressure will develop in the evacuated, heated zone by the vaporization of an impurity. The temperature at which the pressure increase occurs identifies that impurity and the pressure increase attained until the vaporization of the next impurity causes a further pressure increase is a measure of the quantity of the preceding impurity.

  14. Ultrasonic interface level analyzer shop test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    STAEHR, T.W.

    1999-05-24

    The Royce Instrument Corporation Model 2511 Interface Level Analyzer (URSILLA) system uses an ultrasonic ranging technique (SONAR) to measure sludge depths in holding tanks. Three URSILLA instrument assemblies provided by the W-151 project are planned to be used during mixer pump testing to provide data for determining sludge mobilization effectiveness of the mixer pumps and sludge settling rates. The purpose of this test is to provide a documented means of verifying that the functional components of the three URSILLA instruments operate properly. Successful completion of this Shop Test Procedure (STP) is a prerequisite for installation in the AZ-101 tank. Themore » objective of the test is to verify the operation of the URSILLA instruments and to verify data collection using a stand alone software program.« less

  15. Analyzing the generality of conflict adaptation effects.

    PubMed

    Funes, Maria Jesús; Lupiáñez, Juan; Humphreys, Glyn

    2010-02-01

    Conflict adaptation effects refer to the reduction of interference when the incongruent stimulus occurs immediately after an incongruent trial, compared with when it occurs after a congruent trial. The present study analyzes the key conditions that lead to adaptation effects that are specific to the type of conflict involved versus those that are conflict general. In the first 2 experiments, we combined 2 types of conflict for which compatibility arises from clearly different sources in terms of dimensional overlap while keeping the task context constant across conflict types. We found a clear pattern of specificity on conflict adaptation across conflict types. In subsequent experiments, we tested whether this pattern could be accounted in terms of feature integration processes contributing differently to repetition versus alternation of conflict types. The results clearly indicated that feature integration was not key to generating conflict type specificity on conflict adaptation. The data are consistent with there being separate modes of control for different types of cognitive conflict.

  16. Analyzing Strategic Business Rules through Simulation Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orta, Elena; Ruiz, Mercedes; Toro, Miguel

    Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) holds promise for business agility since it allows business process to change to meet new customer demands or market needs without causing a cascade effect of changes in the underlying IT systems. Business rules are the instrument chosen to help business and IT to collaborate. In this paper, we propose the utilization of simulation models to model and simulate strategic business rules that are then disaggregated at different levels of an SOA architecture. Our proposal is aimed to help find a good configuration for strategic business objectives and IT parameters. The paper includes a case study where a simulation model is built to help business decision-making in a context where finding a good configuration for different business parameters and performance is too complex to analyze by trial and error.

  17. METCAN: The metal matrix composite analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Dale A.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1988-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) are the subject of intensive study and are receiving serious consideration for critical structural applications in advanced aerospace systems. MMC structural analysis and design methodologies are studied. Predicting the mechanical and thermal behavior and the structural response of components fabricated from MMC requires the use of a variety of mathematical models. These models relate stresses to applied forces, stress intensities at the tips of cracks to nominal stresses, buckling resistance to applied force, or vibration response to excitation forces. The extensive research in computational mechanics methods for predicting the nonlinear behavior of MMC are described. This research has culminated in the development of the METCAN (METal Matrix Composite ANalyzer) computer code.

  18. The Improvement Cycle: Analyzing Our Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pajerski, Rose; Waligora, Sharon

    1996-01-01

    NASA's Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL), one of the earliest pioneers in the areas of software process improvement and measurement, has had a significant impact on the software business at NASA Goddard. At the heart of the SEL's improvement program is a belief that software products can be improved by optimizing the software engineering process used to develop them and a long-term improvement strategy that facilitates small incremental improvements that accumulate into significant gains. As a result of its efforts, the SEL has incrementally reduced development costs by 60%, decreased error rates by 85%, and reduced cycle time by 25%. In this paper, we analyze the SEL's experiences on three major improvement initiatives to better understand the cyclic nature of the improvement process and to understand why some improvements take much longer than others.

  19. Composite blade structural analyzer (COBSTRAN) user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The installation and use of a computer code, COBSTRAN (COmposite Blade STRuctrual ANalyzer), developed for the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades and also for composite wind turbine blades was described. This code combines composite mechanics and laminate theory with an internal data base of fiber and matrix properties. Inputs to the code are constituent fiber and matrix material properties, factors reflecting the fabrication process, composite geometry and blade geometry. COBSTRAN performs the micromechanics, macromechanics and laminate analyses of these fiber composites. COBSTRAN generates a NASTRAN model with equivalent anisotropic homogeneous material properties. Stress output from NASTRAN is used to calculate individual ply stresses, strains, interply stresses, thru-the-thickness stresses and failure margins. Curved panel structures may be modeled providing the curvature of a cross-section is defined by a single value function. COBSTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77.

  20. Digital avionics design and reliability analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The description and specifications for a digital avionics design and reliability analyzer are given. Its basic function is to provide for the simulation and emulation of the various fault-tolerant digital avionic computer designs that are developed. It has been established that hardware emulation at the gate-level will be utilized. The primary benefit of emulation to reliability analysis is the fact that it provides the capability to model a system at a very detailed level. Emulation allows the direct insertion of faults into the system, rather than waiting for actual hardware failures to occur. This allows for controlled and accelerated testing of system reaction to hardware failures. There is a trade study which leads to the decision to specify a two-machine system, including an emulation computer connected to a general-purpose computer. There is also an evaluation of potential computers to serve as the emulation computer.

  1. Methods for automatically analyzing humpback song units.

    PubMed

    Rickwood, Peter; Taylor, Andrew

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents mathematical techniques for automatically extracting and analyzing bioacoustic signals. Automatic techniques are described for isolation of target signals from background noise, extraction of features from target signals and unsupervised classification (clustering) of the target signals based on these features. The only user-provided inputs, other than raw sound, is an initial set of signal processing and control parameters. Of particular note is that the number of signal categories is determined automatically. The techniques, applied to hydrophone recordings of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), produce promising initial results, suggesting that they may be of use in automated analysis of not only humpbacks, but possibly also in other bioacoustic settings where automated analysis is desirable.

  2. Buccal microbiology analyzed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abreu, Geraldo Magno Alves; da Silva, Gislene Rodrigues; Khouri, Sônia; Favero, Priscila Pereira; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-01-01

    Rapid microbiological identification and characterization are very important in dentistry and medicine. In addition to dental diseases, pathogens are directly linked to cases of endocarditis, premature delivery, low birth weight, and loss of organ transplants. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze oral pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-JP2, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans which was clinically isolated from the human blood-CI. Significant spectra differences were found among each organism allowing the identification and characterization of each bacterial species. Vibrational modes in the regions of 3500-2800 cm-1, the 1484-1420 cm-1, and 1000-750 cm-1 were used in this differentiation. The identification and classification of each strain were performed by cluster analysis achieving 100% separation of strains. This study demonstrated that FTIR can be used to decrease the identification time, compared to the traditional methods, of fastidious buccal microorganisms associated with the etiology of the manifestation of periodontitis.

  3. Stackable differential mobility analyzer for aerosol measurement

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn [Oak Ridge, TN; Chen, Da-Ren [Creve Coeur, MO

    2007-05-08

    A multi-stage differential mobility analyzer (MDMA) for aerosol measurements includes a first electrode or grid including at least one inlet or injection slit for receiving an aerosol including charged particles for analysis. A second electrode or grid is spaced apart from the first electrode. The second electrode has at least one sampling outlet disposed at a plurality different distances along its length. A volume between the first and the second electrode or grid between the inlet or injection slit and a distal one of the plurality of sampling outlets forms a classifying region, the first and second electrodes for charging to suitable potentials to create an electric field within the classifying region. At least one inlet or injection slit in the second electrode receives a sheath gas flow into an upstream end of the classifying region, wherein each sampling outlet functions as an independent DMA stage and classifies different size ranges of charged particles based on electric mobility simultaneously.

  4. Structural factoring approach for analyzing stochastic networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Shier, Douglas R.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of finding the distribution of the shortest path length through a stochastic network is investigated. A general algorithm for determining the exact distribution of the shortest path length is developed based on the concept of conditional factoring, in which a directed, stochastic network is decomposed into an equivalent set of smaller, generally less complex subnetworks. Several network constructs are identified and exploited to reduce significantly the computational effort required to solve a network problem relative to complete enumeration. This algorithm can be applied to two important classes of stochastic path problems: determining the critical path distribution for acyclic networks and the exact two-terminal reliability for probabilistic networks. Computational experience with the algorithm was encouraging and allowed the exact solution of networks that have been previously analyzed only by approximation techniques.

  5. Drug stability analyzer for long duration spaceflights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shende, Chetan; Smith, Wayne; Brouillette, Carl; Farquharson, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    Crewmembers of current and future long duration spaceflights require drugs to overcome the deleterious effects of weightlessness, sickness and injuries. Unfortunately, recent studies have shown that some of the drugs currently used may degrade more rapidly in space, losing their potency well before their expiration dates. To complicate matters, the degradation products of some drugs can be toxic. Consequently there is a need for an analyzer that can determine if a drug is safe at the time of use, as well as to monitor and understand space-induced degradation, so that drug types, formulations, and packaging can be improved. Towards this goal we have been investigating the ability of Raman spectroscopy to monitor and quantify drug degradation. Here we present preliminary data by measuring acetaminophen, and its degradation product, p-aminophenol, as pure samples, and during forced degradation reactions.

  6. Diffractive interference optical analyzer (DiOPTER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Harish; Prasad, Vishnu; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    This report demonstrates a method for high-resolution refractometric measurements using, what we have termed as, a Diffractive Interference Optical Analyzer (DiOpter). The setup consists of a laser, polarizer, a transparent diffraction grating and Si-photodetectors. The sensor is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk refractive index changes. In these setups, the differential read-out of the diffracted orders suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6x10-7 RIU was achieved in glass. This work focuses on devices with integrated sample well, made on low-cost PDMS. As the detection methodology is experimentally straightforward, it can be used across a wide array of applications, ranging from detecting changes in surface adsorbates via binding reactions to estimating refractive index (and hence concentration) variations in bulk samples. An exciting prospect of this technique is the potential integration of this device to smartphones using a simple interface based on transmission mode configuration. In a transmission configuration, we were able to achieve an LoD of 4x10-4 RIU which is sufficient to explore several applications in food quality testing and related fields. We are envisioning the future of this platform as a personal handheld optical analyzer for applications ranging from environmental sensing to healthcare and quality testing of food products.

  7. Laser frequency multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-11-01

    A high quality mode locked pulse train was obtained at 9.55 microns, the CO2 wavelength chosen for frequency doubling into the atmospheric window at 4.8 microns. The pulse train consists of a 3 micro sec burst of 1.5 nsec pulses separated by 40 nsec, in a TEM (sub 00) mode and with a total energy of 100 mJ. The pulse intensity without focussing is about 3 MW/sq.cm., already quite close to the target intensity of 10 MW/sq.cm. for frequency doubling in a AgGaSe2 crystal. The mode-locked train is obtained by intracavity modulation at 12.5 MHz using a germanium crystal driven with a power of about 30 Watts. Line selection is achieved firstly by the use of a 0.92 mm thick CaF2 plate at the Brewster angle within the cavity, which completely suppresses 10.6 micron band radiation. Secondly, a particular rotational line, the P20 at 9.55 micron, is selected by the injection of a continuous beam is mode-matched to the pulsed laser cavity using a long focal length lens, and for best line-locking it is necessary to fine tune the length of the pulsed laser resonator. Injection causes substantial depression of the gain switched spike.

  8. Design and Calibration of an Airborne Multichannel Swept-Tuned Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamory, Philip J.; Diamond, John K.; Bertelrud, Arild

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the design and calibration of a four-channel, airborne, swept-tuned spectrum analyzer used in two hypersonic flight experiments for characterizing dynamic data up to 25 kHz. Built mainly from commercially available analog function modules, the analyzer proved useful for an application with limited telemetry bandwidth, physical weight and volume, and electrical power. The authors discuss considerations that affect the frequency and amplitude calibrations, limitations of the design, and example flight data.

  9. [Research on electricity frequency property of blood].

    PubMed

    Hu, Maoqing; Huang, Hua; Yuan, Zirun; Chen, Huaiqing; Den, Lihua

    2006-02-01

    On the basis of our previous work, the electric frequency property of human blood in different components, in physiological state and in pathological state (diabetes) are tested and analyzed in the range of 1Hz-20MHz progressively. Among the different components of blood; the lowest electrical impedance is serum; the plasma and the whole blood gradually become larger, the blood corpuscle is the largest one. Otherwise, the negative phase of serum is the largest, the plasma and the whole blood are lower, and the blood corpuscle is the lowest. Here, the question is why the effect of the electric capacity of serum and plasma is the biggest in the condition of no cell and cell membrane; diabetes mellitus is an endocrine disorder in which blood changes obviously, the electric frequency property of the blood of diabetic patients changes markedly; the electrical impedance of blood decreases (more obviously with low frequency), the negative phase increases (more obviously with high frequency). These indicate that the increase of electric conductivity in diabetic patients' blood is due to electric capacitance conductivity that is related to the changes of cell membrane, deformation abilities and aggregation of RBC. Related experiments demonstrate again that with the progressing of research in the electric frequency property of blood, we may use the theory and method of electricity to examine some important characters of blood in a different way, and so to corroborate other tests and analyses.

  10. Frequency dispersions of human skin dielectrics.

    PubMed Central

    Poon, C S; Choy, T T

    1981-01-01

    The electrical properties of many biological materials are known to exhibit frequency dispersions. In the human skin, the impedance measured at various frequencies closely describes a circular locus of the Cole-Cole type in the complex impedance plane. In this report, the formative mechanisms responsible for the anomalous circular-arc behavior of skin impedance were investigated, using data from impedance measurements taken after successive strippings of the skin. The data were analyzed with respect to changes in the parameters of the equivalent Cole-Cole model after each stripping. For an exponential resistivity profile (Tregear, 1966, Physical Functions of Skin; Yamamoto and Yamamoto, 1976, Med. Biol. Eng., 14:151--158), the profile of the dielectric constant was shown to be uniform across the epidermis. Based on these results, a structural model has been formulated in terms of the relaxation theory of Maxwell and Wagner for inhomogeneous dielectric materials. The impedance locus obtained from the model approximates a circular are with phase constant alpha = 0.82, which compares favorably with experimental data. At higher frequencies a constant-phase, frequency-dependent component having the same phase constant alpha is also demonstrated. It is suggested that an approximately rectangular distribution of the relaxation time over the epidermal dielectric sheath is adequate to account for the anomalous frequency characteristics of human skin impedance. PMID:7213928

  11. Frequency Arrangement For 700 MHz Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancans, G.; Bobrovs, V.; Ivanovs, G.

    2015-02-01

    The 694-790 MHz (700 MHz) band was allocated by the 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12) in ITU Region 1 (Europe included), to the mobile service on a co-primary basis with other services to which this band was allocated on the primary basis and identified for the International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT). At the same time, the countries of Region 1 will be able also to continue using these frequencies for their broadcasting services if necessary. This allocation will be effective immediately after 2015 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15). In order to make the best possible use of this frequency band for mobile service, a worldwide harmonized frequency arrangement is to be prepared to allow for large economies of scale and international roaming as well as utilizing the available spectrum in the best possible way, minimizing possible interference between services, facilitating deployment and cross-border coordination. The authors analyze different possible frequency arrangements and conclude on the frequency arrangement most suitable for Europe.

  12. An R package for analyzing and modeling ranking data.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul H; Yu, Philip L H

    2013-05-14

    In medical informatics, psychology, market research and many other fields, researchers often need to analyze and model ranking data. However, there is no statistical software that provides tools for the comprehensive analysis of ranking data. Here, we present pmr, an R package for analyzing and modeling ranking data with a bundle of tools. The pmr package enables descriptive statistics (mean rank, pairwise frequencies, and marginal matrix), Analytic Hierarchy Process models (with Saaty's and Koczkodaj's inconsistencies), probability models (Luce model, distance-based model, and rank-ordered logit model), and the visualization of ranking data with multidimensional preference analysis. Examples of the use of package pmr are given using a real ranking dataset from medical informatics, in which 566 Hong Kong physicians ranked the top five incentives (1: competitive pressures; 2: increased savings; 3: government regulation; 4: improved efficiency; 5: improved quality care; 6: patient demand; 7: financial incentives) to the computerization of clinical practice. The mean rank showed that item 4 is the most preferred item and item 3 is the least preferred item, and significance difference was found between physicians' preferences with respect to their monthly income. A multidimensional preference analysis identified two dimensions that explain 42% of the total variance. The first can be interpreted as the overall preference of the seven items (labeled as "internal/external"), and the second dimension can be interpreted as their overall variance of (labeled as "push/pull factors"). Various statistical models were fitted, and the best were found to be weighted distance-based models with Spearman's footrule distance. In this paper, we presented the R package pmr, the first package for analyzing and modeling ranking data. The package provides insight to users through descriptive statistics of ranking data. Users can also visualize ranking data by applying a thought

  13. Low frequency electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1989-01-01

    Following preliminary investigations of the low frequency electric and magnetic fields that may exists in the Earth-ionospheric cavity, measurements were taken with state-of-the art spectrum analyzers. As a follow up to this activity, an investigation was initiated to determine sources and values for possible low frequency signal that would appear in the cavity. The lowest cavity resonance is estimated at about 8 Hz, but lower frequencies may be an important component of our electromagnetic environment. The potential field frequencies produced by the electron were investigated by a classical model that included possible cross coupling of the electric and gravitation fields. During this work, an interesting relationship was found that related the high frequency charge field with the extremely low frequency of the gravitation field. The results of numerical calculations were surprisingly accurate and this area of investigation is continuing. The work toward continued development of a standardized monitoring facility is continuing with the potential of installing the prototype at West Virginia State College early in 1990. This installation would be capable of real time monitoring of ELF signals in the Earth-ionoshpere cavity and would provide some directional information. A high gain, low noise, 1/f frequency corrected preamplifier was designed and tested for the ferrite core magnetic sensor. The potential application of a super conducting sensor for the ELF magnetic field detection is under investigation. It is hoped that a fully operational monitoring network could pinpoint the location of ELF signal sources and provide new information on where these signals originate and what causes them, assuming that they are natural in origin.

  14. Ballistic missile precession frequency extraction by spectrogram's texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Longlong; Xu, Shiyou; Li, Gang; Chen, Zengping

    2013-10-01

    In order to extract precession frequency, an crucial parameter in ballistic target recognition, which reflected the kinematical characteristics as well as structural and mass distribution features, we developed a dynamic RCS signal model for a conical ballistic missile warhead, with a log-norm multiplicative noise, substituting the familiar additive noise, derived formulas of micro-Doppler induced by precession motion, and analyzed time-varying micro-Doppler features utilizing time-frequency transforms, extracted precession frequency by measuring the spectrogram's texture, verified them by computer simulation studies. Simulation demonstrates the excellent performance of the method proposed in extracting the precession frequency, especially in the case of low SNR.

  15. 40 CFR 86.1416 - Calibration; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Vehicles and New Gasoline-Fueled Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks; Certification Short Test Procedures § 86.1416 Calibration; frequency and... calibration of the analyzer must be checked. The analyzer must be adjusted or repaired as necessary. (c) Water...

  16. 40 CFR 86.1416 - Calibration; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Vehicles and New Gasoline-Fueled Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks; Certification Short Test Procedures § 86.1416 Calibration; frequency and... calibration of the analyzer must be checked. The analyzer must be adjusted or repaired as necessary. (c) Water...

  17. 40 CFR 86.1416 - Calibration; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Vehicles and New Gasoline-Fueled Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks; Certification Short Test Procedures § 86.1416 Calibration; frequency and... calibration of the analyzer must be checked. The analyzer must be adjusted or repaired as necessary. (c) Water...

  18. 40 CFR 86.1416 - Calibration; frequency and overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Vehicles and New Gasoline-Fueled Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks; Certification Short Test Procedures § 86.1416 Calibration; frequency and... calibration of the analyzer must be checked. The analyzer must be adjusted or repaired as necessary. (c) Water...

  19. Basis-neutral Hilbert-space analyzers

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lane; Mardani, Davood; Kondakci, H. Esat; Larson, Walker D.; Shabahang, Soroush; Jahromi, Ali K.; Malhotra, Tanya; Vamivakas, A. Nick; Atia, George K.; Abouraddy, Ayman F.

    2017-01-01

    Interferometry is one of the central organizing principles of optics. Key to interferometry is the concept of optical delay, which facilitates spectral analysis in terms of time-harmonics. In contrast, when analyzing a beam in a Hilbert space spanned by spatial modes – a critical task for spatial-mode multiplexing and quantum communication – basis-specific principles are invoked that are altogether distinct from that of ‘delay’. Here, we extend the traditional concept of temporal delay to the spatial domain, thereby enabling the analysis of a beam in an arbitrary spatial-mode basis – exemplified using Hermite-Gaussian and radial Laguerre-Gaussian modes. Such generalized delays correspond to optical implementations of fractional transforms; for example, the fractional Hankel transform is the generalized delay associated with the space of Laguerre-Gaussian modes, and an interferometer incorporating such a ‘delay’ obtains modal weights in the associated Hilbert space. By implementing an inherently stable, reconfigurable spatial-light-modulator-based polarization-interferometer, we have constructed a ‘Hilbert-space analyzer’ capable of projecting optical beams onto any modal basis. PMID:28344331

  20. Analyzing neural responses with vector fields.

    PubMed

    Buneo, Christopher A

    2011-04-15

    Analyzing changes in the shape and scale of single cell response fields is a key component of many neurophysiological studies. Typical analyses of shape change involve correlating firing rates between experimental conditions or "cross-correlating" single cell tuning curves by shifting them with respect to one another and correlating the overlapping data. Such shifting results in a loss of data, making interpretation of the resulting correlation coefficients problematic. The problem is particularly acute for two dimensional response fields, which require shifting along two axes. Here, an alternative method for quantifying response field shape and scale based on correlation of vector field representations is introduced. The merits and limitations of the methods are illustrated using both simulated and experimental data. It is shown that vector correlation provides more information on response field changes than scalar correlation without requiring field shifting and concomitant data loss. An extension of this vector field approach is also demonstrated which can be used to identify the manner in which experimental variables are encoded in studies of neural reference frames. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Walking-age analyzer for healthcare applications.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bo; Thu, Tran Hoai; Baek, Eunhye; Sakong, SungHwan; Xiao, Jin; Mondal, Tapas; Deen, M Jamal

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes a walking-age pattern analysis and identification system using a 3-D accelerometer and a gyroscope. First, a walking pattern database from 79 volunteers of ages ranging from 10 to 83 years is constructed. Second, using feature extraction and clustering, three distinct walking-age groups, children of ages 10 and below, adults in 20-60s, and elders in 70s and 80s, were identified. For this study, low-pass filtering, empirical mode decomposition, and K-means were used to process and analyze the experimental results. Analysis shows that volunteers' walking-ages can be categorized into distinct groups based on simple walking pattern signals. This grouping can then be used to detect persons with walking patterns outside their age groups. If the walking pattern puts an individual in a higher "walking age" grouping, then this could be an indicator of potential health/walking problems, such as weak joints, poor musculoskeletal support system or a tendency to fall.

  2. Analyzing costs of space debris mitigation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, C.; Krag, H.; Bendisch, J.; Sdunnus, H.

    2004-01-01

    The steadily increasing number of space objects poses a considerable hazard to all kinds of spacecraft. To reduce the risks to future space missions different debris mitigation measures and spacecraft protection techniques have been investigated during the last years. However, the economic efficiency has not been considered yet in this context. Current studies have the objective to evaluate the mission costs due to space debris in a business as usual (no mitigation) scenario compared to the missions costs considering debris mitigation. The aim is an estimation of the time until the investment in debris mitigation will lead to an effective reduction of mission costs. This paper presents the results of investigations on the key issues of cost estimation for spacecraft and the influence of debris mitigation and shielding on cost. Mitigation strategies like the reduction of orbital lifetime and de- or re-orbit of non-operational satellites are methods to control the space debris environment. These methods result in an increase of costs. In a first step the overall costs of different types of unmanned satellites are analyzed. A selected cost model is simplified and generalized for an application on all operational satellites. In a next step the influence of space debris on cost is treated, if the implementation of mitigation strategies is considered.

  3. MERCURY MEASUREMENTS USING DIRECT-ANALYZER ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under EPA's Water Quality Research Program, exposure studies are needed to determine how well control strategies and guidance are working. Consequently, reliable and convenient techniques that minimize waste production are of special interest. While traditional methods for determining mercury in solid samples involve the use of aggressive chemicals to dissolve the matrix and the use of other chemicals to properly reduce the mercury to the volatile elemental form, pyrolysis-based analyzers can be used by directly weighing the solid in a sampling boat and initiating the instrumental analysis for total mercury. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subtask 1: To integrate state-of-the-art technologies (polar organic chemical integrative samplers, advanced solid-phase extraction methodologies with liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry) and apply them to studying the sources and fate of a select list of PPCPs. Application and improvement of analytical methodologies that can detect non-volatile, polar, water-soluble pharmaceuticals in source waters at levels that could be environmentally significant (at con

  4. A Methodology to Analyze Photovoltaic Tracker Uptime

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Matthew T; Ruth, Dan

    A metric is developed to analyze the daily performance of single-axis photovoltaic (PV) trackers. The metric relies on comparing correlations between the daily time series of the PV power output and an array of simulated plane-of-array irradiances for the given day. Mathematical thresholds and a logic sequence are presented, so the daily tracking metric can be applied in an automated fashion on large-scale PV systems. The results of applying the metric are visually examined against the time series of the power output data for a large number of days and for various systems. The visual inspection results suggest that overall,more » the algorithm is accurate in identifying stuck or functioning trackers on clear-sky days. Visual inspection also shows that there are days that are not classified by the metric where the power output data may be sufficient to identify a stuck tracker. Based on the daily tracking metric, uptime results are calculated for 83 different inverters at 34 PV sites. The mean tracker uptime is calculated at 99% based on 2 different calculation methods. The daily tracking metric clearly has limitations, but as there is no existing metrics in the literature, it provides a valuable tool for flagging stuck trackers.« less

  5. Complete denture analyzed by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Todea, Carmen; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2008-02-01

    The complete dentures are currently made using different technologies. In order to avoid deficiencies of the prostheses made using the classical technique, several alternative systems and procedures were imagined, directly related to the material used and also to the manufacturing technology. Thus, at the present time, there are several injecting systems and technologies on the market, that use chemoplastic materials, which are heat cured (90-100°C), in dry or wet environment, or cold cured (below 60°C). There are also technologies that plasticize a hard cured material by thermoplastic processing (without any chemical changes) and then inject it into a mold. The purpose of this study was to analyze the existence of possible defects in several dental prostheses using a non invasive method, before their insertion in the mouth. Different dental prostheses, fabricated from various materials were investigated using en-face optical coherence tomography. In order to discover the defects, the scanning was made in three planes, obtaining images at different depths, from 0,01 μm to 2 mm. In several of the investigated prostheses we found defects which may cause their fracture. These defects are totally included in the prostheses material and can not be vizualised with other imagistic methods. In conclusion, en-face OCT is an important investigative tool for the dental practice.

  6. Stackable differential mobility analyzer for aerosol measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn; Chen, Da-Ren

    2007-05-08

    A multi-stage differential mobility analyzer (MDMA) for aerosol measurements includes a first electrode or grid including at least one inlet or injection slit for receiving an aerosol including charged particles for analysis. A second electrode or grid is spaced apart from the first electrode. The second electrode has at least one sampling outlet disposed at a plurality different distances along its length. A volume between the first and the second electrode or grid between the inlet or injection slit and a distal one of the plurality of sampling outlets forms a classifying region, the first and second electrodes for chargingmore » to suitable potentials to create an electric field within the classifying region. At least one inlet or injection slit in the second electrode receives a sheath gas flow into an upstream end of the classifying region, wherein each sampling outlet functions as an independent DMA stage and classifies different size ranges of charged particles based on electric mobility simultaneously.« less

  7. Update on Integrated Optical Design Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James D., Jr.; Troy, Ed

    2003-01-01

    Updated information on the Integrated Optical Design Analyzer (IODA) computer program has become available. IODA was described in Software for Multidisciplinary Concurrent Optical Design (MFS-31452), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 8a. To recapitulate: IODA facilitates multidisciplinary concurrent engineering of highly precise optical instruments. The architecture of IODA was developed by reviewing design processes and software in an effort to automate design procedures. IODA significantly reduces design iteration cycle time and eliminates many potential sources of error. IODA integrates the modeling efforts of a team of experts in different disciplines (e.g., optics, structural analysis, and heat transfer) working at different locations and provides seamless fusion of data among thermal, structural, and optical models used to design an instrument. IODA is compatible with data files generated by the NASTRAN structural-analysis program and the Code V (Registered Trademark) optical-analysis program, and can be used to couple analyses performed by these two programs. IODA supports multiple-load-case analysis for quickly accomplishing trade studies. IODA can also model the transient response of an instrument under the influence of dynamic loads and disturbances.

  8. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2014-11-15

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, “Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry,” J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, “Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes,” Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5–11 (1971)]more » for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.« less

  9. Numerical methods for analyzing electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Lo, Y. T.; Chuang, S. L.; Lee, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Attenuation properties of the normal modes in an overmoded waveguide coated with a lossy material were analyzed. It is found that the low-order modes, can be significantly attenuated even with a thin layer of coating if the coating material is not too lossy. A thinner layer of coating is required for large attenuation of the low-order modes if the coating material is magnetic rather than dielectric. The Radar Cross Section (RCS) from an uncoated circular guide terminated by a perfect electric conductor was calculated and compared with available experimental data. It is confirmed that the interior irradiation contributes to the RCS. The equivalent-current method based on the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) was chosen for the calculation of the contribution from the rim diffraction. The RCS reduction from a coated circular guide terminated by a PEC are planned schemes for the experiments are included. The waveguide coated with a lossy magnetic material is suggested as a substitute for the corrugated waveguide.

  10. Analyzing the extrusion mould for aluminum profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Wang; Xu, Zhenying; Dai, Yachun; Dong, Peilong; Yuan, Guoding; Lan, Cai

    2007-12-01

    The die or mould used for extruding aluminum wallboard profile is in serious work conditions, so it is easy to appear drawbacks in the mould such as non-uniform stress and strain distributions, crack initiation and propagation, elastic warp, and even plastic distortion. As we know, the extrusion die or mould is subject to complex loads including the extrusion pressure, friction and thermal load, which make the mould complicated and hard to be designed and analyzed by using conventional analytical method. In this paper, we applied Deform-3D, FEA (Finite Element Analysis) software used frequently in all engineering fields, to simulate three-dimensional extruding process of aluminum profile. The simulation results show that the deformation increases gradually from inside to outside. Exterior deformation contour distribution is relative uniform since the influence of inner holes on deformation is small, and the contour form is regular and similar with the shape of the mould. However, the interior deformation contour is irregular as the influence of holes with basically symmetric equivalent curves. At the middle of the mould, the deformation reaches the largest, it reaches 0.633mm. The deformation of the mould can be reduced by increasing the distance between two holes or increasing thickness of the mould. Experiment result accords with simulation. The simulation process and results ensure the feasibility of finite element method, providing the support for mould design and structural optimization.

  11. Development of the electric vehicle analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Michael R.; Klucz, Raymond S.; Ennix, Kimberly A.; Matuszak, Leo M.

    1990-06-01

    The increasing technological maturity of high power (greater than 20 kW) electric propulsion devices has led to renewed interest in their use as a means of efficiently transferring payloads between earth orbits. Several systems and architecture studies have identified the potential cost benefits of high performance Electric Orbital Transfer Vehicles (EOTVs). These studies led to the initiation of the Electric Insertion Transfer Experiment (ELITE) in 1988. Managed by the Astronautics Laboratory, ELITE is a flight experiment designed to sufficiently demonstrate key technologies and options to pave the way for the full-scale development of an operational EOTV. An important consideration in the development of the ELITE program is the capability of available analytical tools to simulate the orbital mechanics of a low thrust, electric propulsion transfer vehicle. These tools are necessary not only for ELITE mission planning exercises but also for continued, efficient, accurate evaluation of DoD space transportation architectures which include EOTVs. This paper presents such a tool: the Electric Vehicle Analyzer (EVA).

  12. Citizen scientists analyzing tropical cyclone intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    2012-10-01

    A new crowd sourcing project called CycloneCenter enables the public to analyze historical global tropical cyclone (TC) intensities. The primary goal of CycloneCenter, which launched in mid-September, is to resolve discrepancies in the recent global TC record arising principally from inconsistent development of tropical cyclone intensity data. The historical TC record is composed of data sets called "best tracks," which contain a forecast agency's best assessment of TC tracks and intensities. Best track data have improved in quality since the beginning of the geostationary satellite era in the 1960s (because TCs could no longer disappear from sight). However, a global compilation of best track data (International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS)) has brought to light large interagency differences between some TC best track intensities, even in the recent past [Knapp et al., 2010Knapp et al., 2010]. For example, maximum wind speed estimates for Tropical Cyclone Gay (1989) differed by as much as 70 knots as it was tracked by three different agencies.

  13. Signal processing and analyzing works of art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Don H.; Johnson, C. Richard, Jr.; Hendriks, Ella

    2010-08-01

    In examining paintings, art historians use a wide variety of physico-chemical methods to determine, for example, the paints, the ground (canvas primer) and any underdrawing the artist used. However, the art world has been little touched by signal processing algorithms. Our work develops algorithms to examine x-ray images of paintings, not to analyze the artist's brushstrokes but to characterize the weave of the canvas that supports the painting. The physics of radiography indicates that linear processing of the x-rays is most appropriate. Our spectral analysis algorithms have an accuracy superior to human spot-measurements and have the advantage that, through "short-space" Fourier analysis, they can be readily applied to entire x-rays. We have found that variations in the manufacturing process create a unique pattern of horizontal and vertical thread density variations in the bolts of canvas produced. In addition, we measure the thread angles, providing a way to determine the presence of cusping and to infer the location of the tacks used to stretch the canvas on a frame during the priming process. We have developed weave matching software that employs a new correlation measure to find paintings that share canvas weave characteristics. Using a corpus of over 290 paintings attributed to Vincent van Gogh, we have found several weave match cliques that we believe will refine the art historical record and provide more insight into the artist's creative processes.

  14. Analyzing the development of Indonesia shrimp industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wati, L. A.

    2018-04-01

    This research aimed to analyze the development of shrimp industry in Indonesia. Porter’s Diamond Theory was used for analysis. The Porter’s Diamond theory is one of framework for industry analysis and business strategy development. The Porter’s Diamond theory has five forces that determine the competitive intensity in an industry, namely (1) the threat of substitute products, (2) the threat of competition, (3) the threat of new entrants, (4) bargaining power of suppliers, and (5) bargaining power of consumers. The development of Indonesian shrimp industry pretty good, explained by Porter Diamond Theory analysis. Analysis of Porter Diamond Theory through four main components namely factor conditions; demand condition; related and supporting industries; and firm strategy, structure and rivalry coupled with a two-component supporting (regulatory the government and the factor of chance). Based on the result of this research show that two-component supporting (regulatory the government and the factor of chance) have positive. Related and supporting industries have negative, firm and structure strategy have negative, rivalry has positive, factor condition have positive (except science and technology resources).

  15. A Method for Analyzing Volunteered Geographic Information ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI) can be used to identify public valuation of ecosystem services in a defined geographic area using photos as a representation of lived experiences. This method can help researchers better survey and report on the values and preferences of stakeholders involved in rehabilitation and revitalization projects. Current research utilizes VGI in the form of geotagged social media photos from three platforms: Flickr, Instagram, and Panaramio. Social media photos have been obtained for the neighborhoods next to the St. Louis River in Duluth, Minnesota, and are being analyzed along several dimensions. These dimensions include the spatial distribution of each platform, the characteristics of the physical environment portrayed in the photos, and finally, the ecosystem service depicted. In this poster, we focus on the photos from the Irving and Fairmount neighborhoods of Duluth, MN to demonstrate the method at the neighborhood scale. This study demonstrates a method for translating the values expressed in social media photos into ecosystem services and spatially-explicit data to be used in multiple settings, including the City of Duluth’s Comprehensive Planning and community revitalization efforts, habitat restoration in a Great Lakes Area of Concern, and the USEPA’s Office of Research and Development. This poster will demonstrate a method for translating values expressed in social media photos into ecosystem services and spatially

  16. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1996-01-01

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  17. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  18. A framework to analyze emissions implications of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Future year emissions depend highly on the evolution of the economy, technology and current and future regulatory drivers. A scenario framework was adopted to analyze various technology development pathways and societal change while considering existing regulations and future uncertainty in regulations and evaluate resulting emissions growth patterns. The framework integrates EPA’s energy systems model with an economic Input-Output (I/O) Life Cycle Assessment model. The EPAUS9r MARKAL database is assembled from a set of technologies to represent the U.S. energy system within MARKAL bottom-up technology rich energy modeling framework. The general state of the economy and consequent demands for goods and services from these sectors are taken exogenously in MARKAL. It is important to characterize exogenous inputs about the economy to appropriately represent the industrial sector outlook for each of the scenarios and case studies evaluated. An economic input-output (I/O) model of the US economy is constructed to link up with MARKAL. The I/O model enables user to change input requirements (e.g. energy intensity) for different sectors or the share of consumer income expended on a given good. This gives end-users a mechanism for modeling change in the two dimensions of technological progress and consumer preferences that define the future scenarios. The framework will then be extended to include environmental I/O framework to track life cycle emissions associated

  19. Analyzing human errors in flight mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, Kristin J.; Welz, Linda L.; Barnes, G. Michael; Sherif, Josef

    1993-01-01

    A long-term program is in progress at JPL to reduce cost and risk of flight mission operations through a defect prevention/error management program. The main thrust of this program is to create an environment in which the performance of the total system, both the human operator and the computer system, is optimized. To this end, 1580 Incident Surprise Anomaly reports (ISA's) from 1977-1991 were analyzed from the Voyager and Magellan projects. A Pareto analysis revealed that 38 percent of the errors were classified as human errors. A preliminary cluster analysis based on the Magellan human errors (204 ISA's) is presented here. The resulting clusters described the underlying relationships among the ISA's. Initial models of human error in flight mission operations are presented. Next, the Voyager ISA's will be scored and included in the analysis. Eventually, these relationships will be used to derive a theoretically motivated and empirically validated model of human error in flight mission operations. Ultimately, this analysis will be used to make continuous process improvements continuous process improvements to end-user applications and training requirements. This Total Quality Management approach will enable the management and prevention of errors in the future.

  20. An informatics approach to analyzing the incidentalome.

    PubMed

    Berg, Jonathan S; Adams, Michael; Nassar, Nassib; Bizon, Chris; Lee, Kristy; Schmitt, Charles P; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C; Evans, James P

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has transformed genetic research and is poised to revolutionize clinical diagnosis. However, the vast amount of data and inevitable discovery of incidental findings require novel analytic approaches. We therefore implemented for the first time a strategy that utilizes an a priori structured framework and a conservative threshold for selecting clinically relevant incidental findings. We categorized 2,016 genes linked with Mendelian diseases into "bins" based on clinical utility and validity, and used a computational algorithm to analyze 80 whole-genome sequences in order to explore the use of such an approach in a simulated real-world setting. The algorithm effectively reduced the number of variants requiring human review and identified incidental variants with likely clinical relevance. Incorporation of the Human Gene Mutation Database improved the yield for missense mutations but also revealed that a substantial proportion of purported disease-causing mutations were misleading. This approach is adaptable to any clinically relevant bin structure, scalable to the demands of a clinical laboratory workflow, and flexible with respect to advances in genomics. We anticipate that application of this strategy will facilitate pretest informed consent, laboratory analysis, and posttest return of results in a clinical context.

  1. Software Analyzes Complex Systems in Real Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Expert system software programs, also known as knowledge-based systems, are computer programs that emulate the knowledge and analytical skills of one or more human experts, related to a specific subject. SHINE (Spacecraft Health Inference Engine) is one such program, a software inference engine (expert system) designed by NASA for the purpose of monitoring, analyzing, and diagnosing both real-time and non-real-time systems. It was developed to meet many of the Agency s demanding and rigorous artificial intelligence goals for current and future needs. NASA developed the sophisticated and reusable software based on the experience and requirements of its Jet Propulsion Laboratory s (JPL) Artificial Intelligence Research Group in developing expert systems for space flight operations specifically, the diagnosis of spacecraft health. It was designed to be efficient enough to operate in demanding real time and in limited hardware environments, and to be utilized by non-expert systems applications written in conventional programming languages. The technology is currently used in several ongoing NASA applications, including the Mars Exploration Rovers and the Spacecraft Health Automatic Reasoning Pilot (SHARP) program for the diagnosis of telecommunication anomalies during the Neptune Voyager Encounter. It is also finding applications outside of the Space Agency.

  2. Analyzing risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Michael S; Zhang, Xun; Platt, Robert W

    2014-02-01

    Approaches for analyzing the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes have been the source of much debate and many publications. Much of the problem, in our view, is the conflation of time at risk with gestational age at birth (or birth weight, a proxy for gestational age). We consider the causal questions underlying such analyses with the help of a generic directed acyclic graph. We discuss competing risks and populations at risk in the context of appropriate numerators and denominators, respectively. We summarize 3 different approaches to quantifying risks with respect to gestational age, each of which addresses a distinct etiological or prognostic question (i.e., cumulative risk, prospective risk, or instantaneous risk (hazard)) and suggest the appropriate denominators for each. We show how the gestational age-specific risk of perinatal death (PND) can be decomposed as the product of the gestational age-specific risk of birth and the risk of PND conditional on birth at a given gestational age. Finally, we demonstrate how failure to consider the first of these 2 risks leads to selection bias. This selection bias creates the well-known crossover paradox, thus obviating the need to posit common causes of early birth and PND other than the study exposure.

  3. Analyzing handwriting biometrics in metadata context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidat, Tobias; Wolf, Franziska; Vielhauer, Claus

    2006-02-01

    In this article, methods for user recognition by online handwriting are experimentally analyzed using a combination of demographic data of users in relation to their handwriting habits. Online handwriting as a biometric method is characterized by having high variations of characteristics that influences the reliance and security of this method. These variations have not been researched in detail so far. Especially in cross-cultural application it is urgent to reveal the impact of personal background to security aspects in biometrics. Metadata represent the background of writers, by introducing cultural, biological and conditional (changing) aspects like fist language, country of origin, gender, handedness, experiences the influence handwriting and language skills. The goal is the revelation of intercultural impacts on handwriting in order to achieve higher security in biometrical systems. In our experiments, in order to achieve a relatively high coverage, 48 different handwriting tasks have been accomplished by 47 users from three countries (Germany, India and Italy) have been investigated with respect to the relations of metadata and biometric recognition performance. For this purpose, hypotheses have been formulated and have been evaluated using the measurement of well-known recognition error rates from biometrics. The evaluation addressed both: system reliance and security threads by skilled forgeries. For the later purpose, a novel forgery type is introduced, which applies the personal metadata to security aspects and includes new methods of security tests. Finally in our paper, we formulate recommendations for specific user groups and handwriting samples.

  4. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing [Houston, TX; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, TX

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  5. Frequency doubling crystals

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Francis; Velsko, Stephan P.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a "harmonic generating unit" which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L-arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyl hydroxyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  6. Instantaneous Frequency Attribute Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlin, M. J.; Margrave, G. F.; Ben Horin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The instantaneous seismic data attribute provides a different means of seismic interpretation, for all types of seismic data. It first came to the fore in exploration seismology in the classic paper of Taner et al (1979), entitled " Complex seismic trace analysis". Subsequently a vast literature has been accumulated on the subject, which has been given an excellent review by Barnes (1992). In this research we will compare two different methods of computation of the instantaneous frequency. The first method is based on the original idea of Taner et al (1979) and utilizes the derivative of the instantaneous phase of the analytic signal. The second method is based on the computation of the power centroid of the time-frequency spectrum, obtained using either the Gabor Transform as computed by Margrave et al (2011) or the Stockwell Transform as described by Stockwell et al (1996). We will apply both methods to exploration seismic data and the DPRK events recorded in 2006 and 2013. In applying the classical analytic signal technique, which is known to be unstable, due to the division of the square of the envelope, we will incorporate the stabilization and smoothing method proposed in the two paper of Fomel (2007). This method employs linear inverse theory regularization coupled with the application of an appropriate data smoother. The centroid method application is straightforward and is based on the very complete theoretical analysis provided in elegant fashion by Cohen (1995). While the results of the two methods are very similar, noticeable differences are seen at the data edges. This is most likely due to the edge effects of the smoothing operator in the Fomel method, which is more computationally intensive, when an optimal search of the regularization parameter is done. An advantage of the centroid method is the intrinsic smoothing of the data, which is inherent in the sliding window application used in all Short-Time Fourier Transform methods. The Fomel technique

  7. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1989-01-17

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feed-through provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflections from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  8. Flying radio frequency undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Vikharev, A. A.; Savilov, A. V.

    2014-07-21

    A concept for the room-temperature rf undulator, designed to produce coherent X-ray radiation by means of a relatively low-energy electron beam and pulsed mm-wavelength radiation, is proposed. The “flying” undulator is a high-power short rf pulse co-propagating together with a relativistic electron bunch in a helically corrugated waveguide. The electrons wiggle in the rf field of the −1st spatial harmonic with the phase velocity directed in the opposite direction in respect to the bunch velocity, so that particles can irradiate high-frequency Compton's photons. A high group velocity (close to the speed of light) ensures long cooperative motion of the particlesmore » and the co-propagating rf pulse.« less

  9. Bounce frequency fishbone analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Roscoe; Fredrickson, Eric; Chen, Liu

    2002-11-01

    Large amplitude bursting modes are observed on NSTX, which are identified as bounce frequency fishbone modes(PDX Group, Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, Phys Rev. Lett) 50, 891 (1983)^,(L. Chen, R. B. White, and M. N. Rosenbluth Phys Rev. Lett) 52, 1122 (1984). The identification is carried out using numerical equilibria obtained from TRANSP( R. V. Budny, M. G. Bell A. C. Janos et al), Nucl Fusion 35, 1497 (1995) and the numerical guiding center code ORBIT( R.B. White, Phys. Fluids B 2)(4), 845 (1990). These modes are important for high energy particle distributions which have large average bounce angle, such as the nearly tangentially injected beam ions in NSTX and isotropic alpha particle distributions. They are particularly important in high q low shear advanced plasma scenarios. Different ignited plasma scenarios are investigated with these modes in view.

  10. Frequency mixing crystal

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, Christopher A.; Davis, Laura E.; Webb, Mark

    1992-01-01

    In a laser system for converting infrared laser light waves to visible light comprising a source of infrared laser light waves and means of harmoic generation associated therewith for production of light waves at integral multiples of the frequency of the original wave, the improvement of said means of harmonic generation comprising a crystal having the chemical formula X.sub.2 Y(NO.sub.3).sub.5 .multidot.2 nZ.sub.2 o wherein X is selected from the group consisting of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Tl; Y is selected from the group consisting of Sc, Y, La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Al, Ga, and In; Z is selected from the group consisting of H and D; and n ranges from 0 to 4.

  11. FREQUENCY STABILIZING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.; Anderson, O.A.

    1960-05-01

    An electronic control circuit is described in which a first signal frequency is held in synchronization with a second varying reference signal. The circuit receives the first and second signals as inputs and produces an output signal having an amplitude dependent upon rate of phase change between the two signals and a polarity dependent on direction of the phase change. The output may thus serve as a correction signal for maintaining the desired synchronization. The response of the system is not dependent on relative phase angle between the two compared signals. By having practically no capacitance in the circuit, there is minimum delay between occurrence of a phase shift and a response in the output signal and therefore very fast synchronization is effected.

  12. Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, T.; Chen, X.; Mohan, P.; Lao, B. Q.

    2017-09-01

    The observational facilities of radio astronomy keep constant upgrades and developments to achieve better capabilities including increasing the time of the data recording and frequency resolutions, and increasing the receiving and recording bandwidth. However in contrast, only a limited spectrum resource has been allocated to radio astronomy by the International Telecommunication Union, resulting in that the radio observational instrumentations are inevitably exposed to undesirable radio frequency interference (RFI) signals which originate mainly from the terrestrial human activity and are becoming stronger with time. RFIs degrade the quality of data and even lead to invalid data. The impact of RFIs on scientific outcome becomes more and more serious. In this article, the requirement for RFI mitigation is motivated, and the RFI characteristics, mitigation techniques, and strategies are reviewed. The mitigation strategies adopted at some representative observatories, telescopes, and arrays are also introduced. The advantages and shortcomings of the four classes of RFI mitigation strategies are discussed and presented, applicable at the connected causal stages: preventive, pre-detection, pre-correlation, and post-correlation. The proper identification and flagging of RFI is the key to the reduction of data loss and improvement in data quality, and is also the ultimate goal of developing RFI mitigation technique. This can be achieved through a strategy involving a combination of the discussed techniques in stages. The recent advances in the high speed digital signal processing and high performance computing allow for performing RFI excision of the large data volumes generated from large telescopes or arrays in both real time and offline modes, aiding the proposed strategy.

  13. Frequency mixer having ferromagnetic film

    DOEpatents

    Khitun, Alexander; Roshchin, Igor V.; Galatsis, Kosmas; Bao, Mingqiang; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-03-29

    A frequency conversion device, which may include a radiofrequency (RF) mixer device, includes a substrate and a ferromagnetic film disposed over a surface of the substrate. An insulator is disposed over the ferromagnetic film and at least one microstrip antenna is disposed over the insulator. The ferromagnetic film provides a non-linear response to the frequency conversion device. The frequency conversion device may be used for signal mixing and amplification. The frequency conversion device may also be used in data encryption applications.

  14. Digital frequency-offset detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, R. W.; Juengst, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Simple, low-cost device with designer-selectable tolerances provides accurate frequency comparison with minimal circuitry and ease of adjustment. Warning alerts if frequencies being compared fall outside selected tolerance. Device can be applied to any electronic system where accurate timing or frequency control is important.

  15. Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer Web Service System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Pan, L.; Zhai, C.; Tang, B.; Kubar, T. L.; Li, J.; Zhang, J.; Wang, W.

    2015-12-01

    Both the National Research Council Decadal Survey and the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Report stressed the need for the comprehensive and innovative evaluation of climate models with the synergistic use of global satellite observations in order to improve our weather and climate simulation and prediction capabilities. The abundance of satellite observations for fundamental climate parameters and the availability of coordinated model outputs from CMIP5 for the same parameters offer a great opportunity to understand and diagnose model biases in climate models. In addition, the Obs4MIPs efforts have created several key global observational datasets that are readily usable for model evaluations. However, a model diagnostic evaluation process requires physics-based multi-variable comparisons that typically involve large-volume and heterogeneous datasets, making them both computationally- and data-intensive. In response, we have developed a novel methodology to diagnose model biases in contemporary climate models and implementing the methodology as a web-service based, cloud-enabled, provenance-supported climate-model evaluation system. The evaluation system is named Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer (CMDA), which is the product of the research and technology development investments of several current and past NASA ROSES programs. The current technologies and infrastructure of CMDA are designed and selected to address several technical challenges that the Earth science modeling and model analysis community faces in evaluating and diagnosing climate models. In particular, we have three key technology components: (1) diagnostic analysis methodology; (2) web-service based, cloud-enabled technology; (3) provenance-supported technology. The diagnostic analysis methodology includes random forest feature importance ranking, conditional probability distribution function, conditional sampling, and time-lagged correlation map. We have implemented the

  16. Analyzing petabytes of data with Hadoop

    ScienceCinema

    Hammerbacher, Jeff

    2018-05-14

    The open source Apache Hadoop project provides a powerful suite of tools for storing and analyzing petabytes of data using commodity hardware. After several years of production use inside of web companies like Yahoo! and Facebook and nearly a year of commercial support and development by Cloudera, the technology is spreading rapidly through other disciplines, from financial services and government to life sciences and high energy physics. The talk will motivate the design of Hadoop and discuss some key implementation details in depth. It will also cover the major subprojects in the Hadoop ecosystem, go over some example applications, highlight best practices for deploying Hadoop in your environment, discuss plans for the future of the technology, and provide pointers to the many resources available for learning more. In addition to providing more information about the Hadoop platform, a major goal of this talk is to begin a dialogue with the ATLAS research team on how the tools commonly used in their environment compare to Hadoop, and how Hadoop could improve better to serve the high energy physics community. Short Biography: Jeff Hammerbacher is Vice President of Products and Chief Scientist at Cloudera. Jeff was an Entrepreneur in Residence at Accel Partners immediately prior to founding Cloudera. Before Accel, he conceived, built, and led the Data team at Facebook. The Data team was responsible for driving many of the applications of statistics and machine learning at Facebook, as well as building out the infrastructure to support these tasks for massive data sets. The team produced two open source projects: Hive, a system for offline analysis built above Hadoop, and Cassandra, a structured storage system on a P2P network. Before joining Facebook, Jeff was a quantitative analyst on Wall Street. Jeff earned his Bachelor's Degree in Mathematics from Harvard University and recently served as contributing editor to the book "Beautiful Data", published by O'Reilly in

  17. Analyzing petabytes of data with Hadoop

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerbacher, Jeff

    The open source Apache Hadoop project provides a powerful suite of tools for storing and analyzing petabytes of data using commodity hardware. After several years of production use inside of web companies like Yahoo! and Facebook and nearly a year of commercial support and development by Cloudera, the technology is spreading rapidly through other disciplines, from financial services and government to life sciences and high energy physics. The talk will motivate the design of Hadoop and discuss some key implementation details in depth. It will also cover the major subprojects in the Hadoop ecosystem, go over some example applications, highlightmore » best practices for deploying Hadoop in your environment, discuss plans for the future of the technology, and provide pointers to the many resources available for learning more. In addition to providing more information about the Hadoop platform, a major goal of this talk is to begin a dialogue with the ATLAS research team on how the tools commonly used in their environment compare to Hadoop, and how Hadoop could improve better to serve the high energy physics community. Short Biography: Jeff Hammerbacher is Vice President of Products and Chief Scientist at Cloudera. Jeff was an Entrepreneur in Residence at Accel Partners immediately prior to founding Cloudera. Before Accel, he conceived, built, and led the Data team at Facebook. The Data team was responsible for driving many of the applications of statistics and machine learning at Facebook, as well as building out the infrastructure to support these tasks for massive data sets. The team produced two open source projects: Hive, a system for offline analysis built above Hadoop, and Cassandra, a structured storage system on a P2P network. Before joining Facebook, Jeff was a quantitative analyst on Wall Street. Jeff earned his Bachelor's Degree in Mathematics from Harvard University and recently served as contributing editor to the book "Beautiful Data", published by O

  18. Analyzing costs of space debris mitigation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, C.; Krag, H.; Bendisch, J.; Sdunnus, H.

    The steadily increasing number of space objects poses a considerable hazard to all kinds of spacecraft. To reduce the risks to future space missions different debris mitigation measures and spacecraft protection techniques have been investigated during the last years. However, the economic efficiency has not been considered yet in this context. This economical background is not always clear to satellite operators and the space industry. Current studies have the objective to evaluate the mission costs due to space debris in a business as usual (no mitigation) scenario compared to the missions costs considering debris mitigation. The aim i an estimation of thes time until the investment in debris mitigation will lead to an effective reduction of mission costs. This paper presents the results of investigations on the key problems of cost estimation for spacecraft and the influence of debris mitigation and shielding on cost. The shielding of a satellite can be an effective method to protect the spacecraft against debris impact. Mitigation strategies like the reduction of orbital lifetime and de- or re-orbit of non-operational satellites are methods to control the space debris environment. These methods result in an increase of costs. In a first step the overall costs of different types of unmanned satellites are analyzed. The key problem is, that it is not possible to provide a simple cost model that can be applied to all types of satellites. Unmanned spacecraft differ very much in mission, complexity of design, payload and operational lifetime. It is important to classify relevant cost parameters and investigate their influence on the respective mission. The theory of empirical cost estimation and existing cost models are discussed. A selected cost model is simplified and generalized for an application on all operational satellites. In a next step the influence of space debris on cost is treated, if the implementation of mitigation strategies is considered.

  19. Analyzing Personalized Policies for Online Biometric Verification

    PubMed Central

    Sadhwani, Apaar; Yang, Yan; Wein, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by India’s nationwide biometric program for social inclusion, we analyze verification (i.e., one-to-one matching) in the case where we possess similarity scores for 10 fingerprints and two irises between a resident’s biometric images at enrollment and his biometric images during his first verification. At subsequent verifications, we allow individualized strategies based on these 12 scores: we acquire a subset of the 12 images, get new scores for this subset that quantify the similarity to the corresponding enrollment images, and use the likelihood ratio (i.e., the likelihood of observing these scores if the resident is genuine divided by the corresponding likelihood if the resident is an imposter) to decide whether a resident is genuine or an imposter. We also consider two-stage policies, where additional images are acquired in a second stage if the first-stage results are inconclusive. Using performance data from India’s program, we develop a new probabilistic model for the joint distribution of the 12 similarity scores and find near-optimal individualized strategies that minimize the false reject rate (FRR) subject to constraints on the false accept rate (FAR) and mean verification delay for each resident. Our individualized policies achieve the same FRR as a policy that acquires (and optimally fuses) 12 biometrics for each resident, which represents a five (four, respectively) log reduction in FRR relative to fingerprint (iris, respectively) policies previously proposed for India’s biometric program. The mean delay is sec for our proposed policy, compared to 30 sec for a policy that acquires one fingerprint and 107 sec for a policy that acquires all 12 biometrics. This policy acquires iris scans from 32–41% of residents (depending on the FAR) and acquires an average of 1.3 fingerprints per resident. PMID:24787752

  20. Analyzing personalized policies for online biometric verification.

    PubMed

    Sadhwani, Apaar; Yang, Yan; Wein, Lawrence M

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by India's nationwide biometric program for social inclusion, we analyze verification (i.e., one-to-one matching) in the case where we possess similarity scores for 10 fingerprints and two irises between a resident's biometric images at enrollment and his biometric images during his first verification. At subsequent verifications, we allow individualized strategies based on these 12 scores: we acquire a subset of the 12 images, get new scores for this subset that quantify the similarity to the corresponding enrollment images, and use the likelihood ratio (i.e., the likelihood of observing these scores if the resident is genuine divided by the corresponding likelihood if the resident is an imposter) to decide whether a resident is genuine or an imposter. We also consider two-stage policies, where additional images are acquired in a second stage if the first-stage results are inconclusive. Using performance data from India's program, we develop a new probabilistic model for the joint distribution of the 12 similarity scores and find near-optimal individualized strategies that minimize the false reject rate (FRR) subject to constraints on the false accept rate (FAR) and mean verification delay for each resident. Our individualized policies achieve the same FRR as a policy that acquires (and optimally fuses) 12 biometrics for each resident, which represents a five (four, respectively) log reduction in FRR relative to fingerprint (iris, respectively) policies previously proposed for India's biometric program. The mean delay is [Formula: see text] sec for our proposed policy, compared to 30 sec for a policy that acquires one fingerprint and 107 sec for a policy that acquires all 12 biometrics. This policy acquires iris scans from 32-41% of residents (depending on the FAR) and acquires an average of 1.3 fingerprints per resident.

  1. Mimvec: a deep learning approach for analyzing the human phenome.

    PubMed

    Gan, Mingxin; Li, Wenran; Zeng, Wanwen; Wang, Xiaojian; Jiang, Rui

    2017-09-21

    The human phenome has been widely used with a variety of genomic data sources in the inference of disease genes. However, most existing methods thus far derive phenotype similarity based on the analysis of biomedical databases by using the traditional term frequency-inverse document frequency (TF-IDF) formulation. This framework, though intuitive, not only ignores semantic relationships between words but also tends to produce high-dimensional vectors, and hence lacks the ability to precisely capture intrinsic semantic characteristics of biomedical documents. To overcome these limitations, we propose a framework called mimvec to analyze the human phenome by making use of the state-of-the-art deep learning technique in natural language processing. We converted 24,061 records in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database to low-dimensional vectors using our method. We demonstrated that the vector presentation not only effectively enabled classification of phenotype records against gene ones, but also succeeded in discriminating diseases of different inheritance styles and different mechanisms. We further derived pairwise phenotype similarities between 7988 human inherited diseases using their vector presentations. With a joint analysis of this phenome with multiple genomic data, we showed that phenotype overlap indeed implied genotype overlap. We finally used the derived phenotype similarities with genomic data to prioritize candidate genes and demonstrated advantages of this method over existing ones. Our method is capable of not only capturing semantic relationships between words in biomedical records but also alleviating the dimensional disaster accompanying the traditional TF-IDF framework. With the approaching of precision medicine, there will be abundant electronic records of medicine and health awaiting for deep analysis, and we expect to see a wide spectrum of applications borrowing the idea of our method in the near future.

  2. Thromboelastography platelet mapping in healthy dogs using 1 analyzer versus 2 analyzers.

    PubMed

    Blois, Shauna L; Banerjee, Amrita; Wood, R Darren; Park, Fiona M

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the results of thromboelastography platelet mapping (TEG-PM) carried out using 2 techniques in 20 healthy dogs. Maximum amplitudes (MA) generated by thrombin (MAthrombin), fibrin (MAfibrin), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor activity (MAADP), and thromboxane A2 (TxA2) receptor activity (stimulated by arachidonic acid, MAAA) were recorded. Thromboelastography platelet mapping was carried out according to the manufacturer's guidelines (2-analyzer technique) and using a variation of this method employing only 1 analyzer (1-analyzer technique) on 2 separate blood samples obtained from each dog. Mean [± standard deviation (SD)] MA values for the 1-analyzer/2-analyzer techniques were: MAthrombin = 51.9 mm (± 7.1)/52.5 mm (± 8.0); MAfibrin = 20.7 mm (± 21.8)/23.0 mm (± 26.1); MAADP = 44.5 mm (± 15.6)/45.6 mm (± 17.0); and MAAA = 45.7 mm (± 11.6)/45.0 mm (± 15.4). Mean (± SD) percentage aggregation due to ADP receptor activity was 70.4% (± 32.8)/67.6% (± 33.7). Mean percentage aggregation due to TxA2 receptor activity was 77.3% (± 31.6)/78.1% (± 50.2). Results of TEG-PM were not significantly different for the 1-analyzer and 2-analyzer methods. High correlation was found between the 2 methods for MAfibrin [concordance correlation coefficient (r) = 0.930]; moderate correlation was found for MAthrombin (r = 0.70) and MAADP (r = 0.57); correlation between the 2 methods for MAAA was lower (r = 0.32). Thromboelastography platelet mapping (TEG-PM) should be further investigated to determine if it is a suitable method for measuring platelet dysfunction in dogs with thrombopathy.

  3. Thromboelastography platelet mapping in healthy dogs using 1 analyzer versus 2 analyzers

    PubMed Central

    Blois, Shauna L.; Banerjee, Amrita; Wood, R. Darren; Park, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the results of thromboelastography platelet mapping (TEG-PM) carried out using 2 techniques in 20 healthy dogs. Maximum amplitudes (MA) generated by thrombin (MAthrombin), fibrin (MAfibrin), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor activity (MAADP), and thromboxane A2 (TxA2) receptor activity (stimulated by arachidonic acid, MAAA) were recorded. Thromboelastography platelet mapping was carried out according to the manufacturer’s guidelines (2-analyzer technique) and using a variation of this method employing only 1 analyzer (1-analyzer technique) on 2 separate blood samples obtained from each dog. Mean [± standard deviation (SD)] MA values for the 1-analyzer/2-analyzer techniques were: MAthrombin = 51.9 mm (± 7.1)/52.5 mm (± 8.0); MAfibrin = 20.7 mm (± 21.8)/23.0 mm (± 26.1); MAADP = 44.5 mm (± 15.6)/45.6 mm (± 17.0); and MAAA = 45.7 mm (± 11.6)/45.0 mm (± 15.4). Mean (± SD) percentage aggregation due to ADP receptor activity was 70.4% (± 32.8)/67.6% (± 33.7). Mean percentage aggregation due to TxA2 receptor activity was 77.3% (± 31.6)/78.1% (± 50.2). Results of TEG-PM were not significantly different for the 1-analyzer and 2-analyzer methods. High correlation was found between the 2 methods for MAfibrin [concordance correlation coefficient (r) = 0.930]; moderate correlation was found for MAthrombin (r = 0.70) and MAADP (r = 0.57); correlation between the 2 methods for MAAA was lower (r = 0.32). Thromboelastography platelet mapping (TEG-PM) should be further investigated to determine if it is a suitable method for measuring platelet dysfunction in dogs with thrombopathy. PMID:24101802

  4. [Low-Frequency Flow Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.

    1997-01-01

    . During the third regime, the separation regime, the flow was segmented from the airfoil leading edge and did not reattach to the airfoil surface. The reverse flow was seen to grow in vertical extent up from the model surface as the phase increased. Next reattachment began again at the leading edge signaling the start of the reattachment regime, and so the cycle continued. From Broeren's work, the details of the unsteady flowfield over the airfoil were seen for the first time. From this research a great deal has been learned about the low-frequency flow oscillation which naturally occurs on the LRN-1007 airfoil near stall. The oscillation was seen to persist at higher Reynolds number, the dependence of the Strouhal number on angle of attack and Reynolds number were discovered, the critical role played by the laminar bubble was shown and the entire upper surface flowfield during a flow oscillation cycle was measured and analyzed. What still eludes understanding is the scaling of the flow oscillation and why certain airfoils, such as the LRN, have a very strong low-frequency mode and other airfoils exhibit no organized low-frequency oscillation at all.

  5. Analyzing the attributes of Indiana's STEM schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltz, Jeremy

    "Primary and secondary schools do not seem able to produce enough students with the interest, motivation, knowledge, and skills they will need to compete and prosper in the emerging world" (National Academy of Sciences [NAS], 2007a, p. 94). This quote indicated that there are changing expectations for today's students which have ultimately led to new models of education, such as charters, online and blended programs, career and technical centers, and for the purposes of this research, STEM schools. STEM education as defined in this study is a non-traditional model of teaching and learning intended to "equip them [students] with critical thinking, problem solving, creative and collaborative skills, and ultimately establishes connections between the school, work place, community and the global economy" (Science Foundation Arizona, 2014, p. 1). Focusing on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education is believed by many educational stakeholders to be the solution for the deficits many students hold as they move on to college and careers. The National Governors Association (NGA; 2011) believes that building STEM skills in the nation's students will lead to the ability to compete globally with a new workforce that has the capacity to innovate and will in turn spur economic growth. In order to accomplish the STEM model of education, a group of educators and business leaders from Indiana developed a comprehensive plan for STEM education as an option for schools to use in order to close this gap. This plan has been promoted by the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE, 2014a) with the goal of increasing STEM schools throughout Indiana. To determine what Indiana's elementary STEM schools are doing, this study analyzed two of the elementary schools that were certified STEM by the IDOE. This qualitative case study described the findings and themes from two elementary STEM schools. Specifically, the research looked at the vital components to accomplish STEM

  6. Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer Web Service System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Pan, L.; Zhai, C.; Tang, B.; Jiang, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report stressed the need for the comprehensive and innovative evaluation of climate models with newly available global observations. The traditional approach to climate model evaluation, which compares a single parameter at a time, identifies symptomatic model biases and errors but fails to diagnose the model problems. The model diagnosis process requires physics-based multi-variable comparisons that typically involve large-volume and heterogeneous datasets, making them both computationally- and data-intensive. To address these challenges, we are developing a parallel, distributed web-service system that enables the physics-based multi-variable model performance evaluations and diagnoses through the comprehensive and synergistic use of multiple observational data, reanalysis data, and model outputs. We have developed a methodology to transform an existing science application code into a web service using a Python wrapper interface and Python web service frameworks (i.e., Flask, Gunicorn, and Tornado). The web-service system, called Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer (CMDA), currently supports (1) all the datasets from Obs4MIPs and a few ocean datasets from NOAA and Argo, which can serve as observation-based reference data for model evaluation and (2) many of CMIP5 model outputs covering a broad range of atmosphere, ocean, and land variables from the CMIP5 specific historical runs and AMIP runs. Analysis capabilities currently supported by CMDA are (1) the calculation of annual and seasonal means of physical variables, (2) the calculation of time evolution of the means in any specified geographical region, (3) the calculation of correlation between two variables, and (4) the calculation of difference between two variables. A web user interface is chosen for CMDA because it not only lowers the learning curve and removes the adoption barrier of the tool but also enables instantaneous use

  7. Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer Web Service System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Pan, L.; Zhai, C.; Tang, B.; Jiang, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a cloud-enabled web-service system that empowers physics-based, multi-variable model performance evaluations and diagnoses through the comprehensive and synergistic use of multiple observational data, reanalysis data, and model outputs. We have developed a methodology to transform an existing science application code into a web service using a Python wrapper interface and Python web service frameworks. The web-service system, called Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer (CMDA), currently supports (1) all the observational datasets from Obs4MIPs and a few ocean datasets from NOAA and Argo, which can serve as observation-based reference data for model evaluation, (2) many of CMIP5 model outputs covering a broad range of atmosphere, ocean, and land variables from the CMIP5 specific historical runs and AMIP runs, and (3) ECMWF reanalysis outputs for several environmental variables in order to supplement observational datasets. Analysis capabilities currently supported by CMDA are (1) the calculation of annual and seasonal means of physical variables, (2) the calculation of time evolution of the means in any specified geographical region, (3) the calculation of correlation between two variables, (4) the calculation of difference between two variables, and (5) the conditional sampling of one physical variable with respect to another variable. A web user interface is chosen for CMDA because it not only lowers the learning curve and removes the adoption barrier of the tool but also enables instantaneous use, avoiding the hassle of local software installation and environment incompatibility. CMDA will be used as an educational tool for the summer school organized by JPL's Center for Climate Science in 2014. In order to support 30+ simultaneous users during the school, we have deployed CMDA to the Amazon cloud environment. The cloud-enabled CMDA will provide each student with a virtual machine while the user interaction with the system will remain the same

  8. The Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory Data Quality Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringler, A. T.; Hagerty, M.; Holland, J.; Gee, L. S.; Wilson, D.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) has several efforts underway to improve data quality at its stations. The Data Quality Analyzer (DQA) is one such development. The DQA is designed to characterize station data quality in a quantitative and automated manner. Station quality is based on the evaluation of various metrics, such as timing quality, noise levels, sensor coherence, and so on. These metrics are aggregated into a measurable grade for each station. The DQA consists of a website, a metric calculator (Seedscan), and a PostgreSQL database. The website allows the user to make requests for various time periods, review specific networks and stations, adjust weighting of the station's grade, and plot metrics as a function of time. The website dynamically loads all station data from a PostgreSQL database. The database is central to the application; it acts as a hub where metric values and limited station descriptions are stored. Data is stored at the level of one sensor's channel per day. The database is populated by Seedscan. Seedscan reads and processes miniSEED data, to generate metric values. Seedscan, written in Java, compares hashes of metadata and data to detect changes and perform subsequent recalculations. This ensures that the metric values are up to date and accurate. Seedscan can be run in a scheduled task or on demand by way of a config file. It will compute metrics specified in its configuration file. While many metrics are currently in development, some are completed and being actively used. These include: availability, timing quality, gap count, deviation from the New Low Noise Model, deviation from a station's noise baseline, inter-sensor coherence, and data-synthetic fits. In all, 20 metrics are planned, but any number could be added. ASL is actively using the DQA on a daily basis for station diagnostics and evaluation. As Seedscan is scheduled to run every night, data quality analysts are able to then use the

  9. METCAN-PC - METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE ANALYZER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature metal matrix composites offer great potential for use in advanced aerospace structural applications. The realization of this potential however, requires concurrent developments in (1) a technology base for fabricating high temperature metal matrix composite structural components, (2) experimental techniques for measuring their thermal and mechanical characteristics, and (3) computational methods to predict their behavior. METCAN (METal matrix Composite ANalyzer) is a computer program developed to predict this behavior. METCAN can be used to computationally simulate the non-linear behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC), thus allowing the potential payoff for the specific application to be assessed. It provides a comprehensive analysis of composite thermal and mechanical performance. METCAN treats material nonlinearity at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level, where the behavior of each constituent is modeled accounting for time-temperature-stress dependence. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by making use of composite micromechanics and macromechanics. Factors which affect the behavior of the composite properties include the fabrication process variables, the fiber and matrix properties, the bonding between the fiber and matrix and/or the properties of the interphase between the fiber and matrix. The METCAN simulation is performed as point-wise analysis and produces composite properties which are readily incorporated into a finite element code to perform a global structural analysis. After the global structural analysis is performed, METCAN decomposes the composite properties back into the localized response at the various levels of the simulation. At this point the constituent properties are updated and the next iteration in the analysis is initiated. This cyclic procedure is referred to as the integrated approach to metal matrix composite analysis. METCAN

  10. The harmonic frequencies of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, Nicholas C.; Maslen, Paul E.; Amos, Roger D.; Andrews, Jamie S.; Murray, Christopher W.; Laming, Gregory J.

    1992-09-01

    We report calculations for the harmonic frequencies of C 6H 6 and C 6D 6. Our most sophisticated quantum chemistry values are obtained with the MP2 method and a TZ2P+f basis set (288 basis functions), which are the largest such calculations reported on benzene to date. Using the SCF density, we also calculate the frequencies using the exchange and correlation expressions of density functional theory. We compare our calculated harmonic frequencies with those deduced from experiment by Goodman, Ozkabak and Thakur. The density functional frequencies appear to be more reliable predictions than the MP2 frequencies and they are obtained at significantly less cost.

  11. Influence of modulation frequency in rubidium cell frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, C.; Viennet, J.; Cyr, N.; Vanier, J.

    1983-01-01

    The error signal which is used to control the frequency of the quartz crystal oscillator of a passive rubidium cell frequency standard is considered. The value of the slope of this signal, for an interrogation frequency close to the atomic transition frequency is calculated and measured for various phase (or frequency) modulation waveforms, and for several values of the modulation frequency. A theoretical analysis is made using a model which applies to a system in which the optical pumping rate, the relaxation rates and the RF field are homogeneous. Results are given for sine-wave phase modulation, square-wave frequency modulation and square-wave phase modulation. The influence of the modulation frequency on the slope of the error signal is specified. It is shown that the modulation frequency can be chosen as large as twice the non-saturated full-width at half-maximum without a drastic loss of the sensitivity to an offset of the interrogation frequency from center line, provided that the power saturation factor and the amplitude of modulation are properly adjusted.

  12. A practical implementation of multi-frequency widefield frequency-domain FLIM

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime, especially in kinetic studies in biomedical researches. However, the small range of modulation frequencies available in commercial instruments makes this technique limited in its applications. Here we describe a practical implementation of multi-frequency widefield FD-FLIM using a pulsed supercontinuum laser and a direct digital synthesizer. In this instrument we use a pulse to modulate the image intensifier rather than the more conventional sine wave modulation. This allows parallel multi-frequency FLIM measurement using the Fast Fourier Transform and the cross-correlation technique, which permits precise and simultaneous isolation of individual frequencies. In addition, the pulse modulation at the cathode of image intensifier restored the loss of optical resolution caused by the defocusing effect when the voltage at the cathode is sinusoidally modulated. Furthermore, in our implementation of this technique, data can be graphically analyzed by the phasor method while data are acquired, which allows easy fit-free lifetime analysis of FLIM images. Here our measurements of standard fluorescent samples and a Föster resonance energy transfer pair demonstrate that the widefield multi-frequency FLIM system is a valuable and simple tool in fluorescence imaging studies. PMID:23296945

  13. A Biochemical Magic Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1993-01-01

    Life is composed principally of four classes of biomolecules - protein, nucleic acid, polysaccharide and lipid. Using 1) estimates of the reducing equivalents (electron pairs) needed to synthesize these biomolecules from carbon dioxide, and 2) measurements of the molecular composition of different organisms, we calculated the average number of electron pairs required for the reduction of carbon dioxide to biological carbon (electron pairs/carbon atom). These calculations showed that the carbon of the Earths biosphere is at the reduction level of formaldehyde that requires 2 electron pairs/carbon atom to be synthesized from carbon dioxide. This was also the reduction level of carbon of individual organisms, except for those that stored large amounts of fuel as lipid. Since this chemical property of life is easily discovered and probably universal, it's most likely known by other intelligent life in the universe. It could be the one thing we know about other carbon-based life in the universe, and the one thing that other intelligent life knows about us. We believe this common knowledge that formaldehyde represents the reduction level of life's carbon could lead to the selection of the 72.83814 GHz line of the 0,0,0,1,0,1 ground-state rotational transition of formaldehyde as a frequency for interstellar communication.

  14. Analyzers Measure Greenhouse Gases, Airborne Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    In complete darkness, a NASA observatory waits. When an eruption of boiling water billows from a nearby crack in the ground, the observatory s sensors seek particles in the fluid, measure shifts in carbon isotopes, and analyze samples for biological signatures. NASA has landed the observatory in this remote location, far removed from air and sunlight, to find life unlike any that scientists have ever seen. It might sound like a scene from a distant planet, but this NASA mission is actually exploring an ocean floor right here on Earth. NASA established a formal exobiology program in 1960, which expanded into the present-day Astrobiology Program. The program, which celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2010, not only explores the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe, but also examines how life begins and evolves, and what the future may hold for life on Earth and other planets. Answers to these questions may be found not only by launching rockets skyward, but by sending probes in the opposite direction. Research here on Earth can revise prevailing concepts of life and biochemistry and point to the possibilities for life on other planets, as was demonstrated in December 2010, when NASA researchers discovered microbes in Mono Lake in California that subsist and reproduce using arsenic, a toxic chemical. The Mono Lake discovery may be the first of many that could reveal possible models for extraterrestrial life. One primary area of interest for NASA astrobiologists lies with the hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor. These vents expel jets of water heated and enriched with chemicals from off-gassing magma below the Earth s crust. Also potentially within the vents: microbes that, like the Mono Lake microorganisms, defy the common characteristics of life on Earth. Basically all organisms on our planet generate energy through the Krebs Cycle, explains Mike Flynn, research scientist at NASA s Ames Research Center. This metabolic process breaks down sugars for energy

  15. Using Simulation to Analyze Acoustic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main projects that was worked on this semester was creating an acoustic model for the Advanced Space Suit in Comsol Multiphysics. The geometry tools built into the software were used to create an accurate model of the helmet and upper torso of the suit. After running the simulation, plots of the sound pressure level within the suit were produced, as seen below in Figure 1. These plots show significant nulls which should be avoided when placing microphones inside the suit. In the future, this model can be easily adapted to changes in the suit design to determine optimal microphone placements and other acoustic properties. Another major project was creating an acoustic diverter that will potentially be used to route audio into the Space Station's Node 1. The concept of the project was to create geometry to divert sound from a neighboring module, the US Lab, into Node 1. By doing this, no new audio equipment would need to be installed in Node 1. After creating an initial design for the diverter, analysis was performed in Comsol in order to determine how changes in geometry would affect acoustic performance, as shown in Figure 2. These results were used to produce a physical prototype diverter on a 3D printer. With the physical prototype, testing was conducted in an anechoic chamber to determine the true effectiveness of the design, as seen in Figure 3. The results from this testing have been compared to the Comsol simulation results to analyze how closely the Comsol results are to real-world performance. While the Comsol results do not seem to closely resemble the real world performance, this testing has provided valuable insight into how much trust can be placed in the results of Comsol simulations. A final project that was worked on during this tour was the Audio Interface Unit (AIU) design for the Orion program. The AIU is a small device that will be used for as an audio communication device both during launch and on-orbit. The unit will have functions

  16. Stable radio frequency dissemination by simple hybrid frequency modulation scheme.

    PubMed

    Yu, Longqiang; Wang, Rong; Lu, Lin; Zhu, Yong; Wu, Chuanxin; Zhang, Baofu; Wang, Peizhang

    2014-09-15

    In this Letter, we propose a fiber-based stable radio frequency transfer system by a hybrid frequency modulation scheme. Creatively, two radio frequency signals are combined and simultaneously transferred by only one laser diode. One frequency component is used to detect the phase fluctuation, and the other one is the derivative compensated signal providing a stable frequency for the remote end. A proper ratio of the frequencies of the components is well maintained by parameter m to avoid interference between them. Experimentally, a stable 200 MHz signal is transferred over 100 km optical fiber with the help of a 1 GHz detecting signal, and fractional instability of 2×10(-17) at 10(5) s is achieved.

  17. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  18. Improvement of Frequency Locking Algorithm for Atomic Frequency Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Ho; Kang, Hoonsoo; Heyong Lee, Soo; Eon Park, Sang; Lee, Jong Koo; Lee, Ho Seong; Kwon, Taeg Yong

    2010-09-01

    The authors describe a novel method of frequency locking algorithm for atomic frequency standards. The new algorithm for locking the microwave frequency to the Ramsey resonance is compared with the old one that had been employed in the cesium atomic beam frequency standards such as NIST-7 and KRISS-1. Numerical simulations for testing the performance of the algorithm show that the new method has a noise filtering performance superior to the old one by a factor of 1.2 for the flicker signal noise and 1.4 for random-walk signal noise. The new algorithm can readily be used to enhance the frequency stability for a digital servo employing the slow square wave frequency modulation.

  19. Grid Frequency Extreme Event Analysis and Modeling: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Florita, Anthony R; Clark, Kara; Gevorgian, Vahan

    Sudden losses of generation or load can lead to instantaneous changes in electric grid frequency and voltage. Extreme frequency events pose a major threat to grid stability. As renewable energy sources supply power to grids in increasing proportions, it becomes increasingly important to examine when and why extreme events occur to prevent destabilization of the grid. To better understand frequency events, including extrema, historic data were analyzed to fit probability distribution functions to various frequency metrics. Results showed that a standard Cauchy distribution fit the difference between the frequency nadir and prefault frequency (f_(C-A)) metric well, a standard Cauchy distributionmore » fit the settling frequency (f_B) metric well, and a standard normal distribution fit the difference between the settling frequency and frequency nadir (f_(B-C)) metric very well. Results were inconclusive for the frequency nadir (f_C) metric, meaning it likely has a more complex distribution than those tested. This probabilistic modeling should facilitate more realistic modeling of grid faults.« less

  20. Local spatial frequency analysis for computer vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krumm, John; Shafer, Steven A.

    1990-01-01

    A sense of vision is a prerequisite for a robot to function in an unstructured environment. However, real-world scenes contain many interacting phenomena that lead to complex images which are difficult to interpret automatically. Typical computer vision research proceeds by analyzing various effects in isolation (e.g., shading, texture, stereo, defocus), usually on images devoid of realistic complicating factors. This leads to specialized algorithms which fail on real-world images. Part of this failure is due to the dichotomy of useful representations for these phenomena. Some effects are best described in the spatial domain, while others are more naturally expressed in frequency. In order to resolve this dichotomy, we present the combined space/frequency representation which, for each point in an image, shows the spatial frequencies at that point. Within this common representation, we develop a set of simple, natural theories describing phenomena such as texture, shape, aliasing and lens parameters. We show these theories lead to algorithms for shape from texture and for dealiasing image data. The space/frequency representation should be a key aid in untangling the complex interaction of phenomena in images, allowing automatic understanding of real-world scenes.

  1. Radio Frequency Mass Gauging of Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Vaden, Karl R.; Herlacher, Michael D.; Buchanan, David A.; VanDresar, Neil T.

    2007-01-01

    A combined experimental and computer simulation effort was conducted to measure radio frequency (RF) tank resonance modes in a dewar partially filled with liquid oxygen, and compare the measurements with numerical simulations. The goal of the effort was to demonstrate that computer simulations of a tank's electromagnetic eigenmodes can be used to accurately predict ground-based measurements, thereby providing a computational tool for predicting tank modes in a low-gravity environment. Matching the measured resonant frequencies of several tank modes with computer simulations can be used to gauge the amount of liquid in a tank, thus providing a possible method to gauge cryogenic propellant tanks in low-gravity. Using a handheld RF spectrum analyzer and a small antenna in a 46 liter capacity dewar for experimental measurements, we have verified that the four lowest transverse magnetic eigenmodes can be accurately predicted as a function of liquid oxygen fill level using computer simulations. The input to the computer simulations consisted of tank dimensions, and the dielectric constant of the fluid. Without using any adjustable parameters, the calculated and measured frequencies agree such that the liquid oxygen fill level was gauged to within 2 percent full scale uncertainty. These results demonstrate the utility of using electromagnetic simulations to form the basis of an RF mass gauging technology with the power to simulate tank resonance frequencies from arbitrary fluid configurations.

  2. Time-frequency analysis of electric motors

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Mattingly, J.K.

    1995-12-31

    Physical signals such as the current of an electric motor become nonstationary as a consequence of degraded operation and broken parts. In this instance, their power spectral densities become time dependent, and time-frequency analysis techniques become the appropriate tools for signal analysis. The first among these techniques, generally called the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) method, is the Gabor transform 2 (GT) of a signal S(t), which decomposes the signal into time-local frequency modes: where the window function, {Phi}(t-{tau}), is a normalized Gaussian. Alternatively, one can decompose the signal into its multi-resolution representation at different levels of magnification. This representation ismore » achieved by the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) where the function g(t) is a kernel of zero average belonging to a family of scaled and shifted wavelet kernels. The CWT can be interpreted as the action of a microscope that locates the signal by the shift parameter b and adjusts its magnification by changing the scale parameter a. The Fourier-transformed CWT, W,{sub g}(a, {omega}), acts as a filter that places the high-frequency content of a signal into the lower end of the scale spectrum and vice versa for the low frequencies. Signals from a motor in three different states were analyzed.« less

  3. Frequency synchronization of a frequency-hopped MFSK communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.; Polydoros, A.; Simon, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the performance of fine-frequency synchronization. The performance degradation due to imperfect frequency synchronization is found in terms of the effect on bit error probability as a function of full-band or partial-band noise jamming levels and of the number of frequency hops used in the estimator. The effect of imperfect fine-time synchronization is also included in the calculation of fine-frequency synchronization performance to obtain the overall performance degradation due to synchronization errors.

  4. Operational frequency stability of rubidium and cesium frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The frequency stabilities under operational conditions of several commercially available rubidium and cesium frequency standards were determined from experimental data for frequency averaging times from 10 to the 7th power s and are presented in table and graph form. For frequency averaging times between 10 to the 5th power and 10 to the 7th power s, the rubidium standards tested have a stability of between 10 to the minus 12th power and 5 x 10 to the minus 12th power, while the cesium standards have a stability of between 2 x 10 to the minus 13th power and 5 x 10 to the minus 13th power.

  5. Engine Hydraulic Stability. [injector model for analyzing combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesselring, R. C.; Sprouse, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical injector model was developed specifically to analyze combustion instability coupling between the injector hydraulics and the combustion process. This digital computer dynamic injector model will, for any imposed chamber of inlet pressure profile with a frequency ranging from 100 to 3000 Hz (minimum) accurately predict/calculate the instantaneous injector flowrates. The injector system is described in terms of which flow segments enter and leave each pressure node. For each flow segment, a resistance, line lengths, and areas are required as inputs (the line lengths and areas are used in determining inertance). For each pressure node, volume and acoustic velocity are required as inputs (volume and acoustic velocity determine capacitance). The geometric criteria for determining inertances of flow segments and capacitance of pressure nodes was set. Also, a technique was developed for analytically determining time averaged steady-state pressure drops and flowrates for every flow segment in an injector when such data is not known. These pressure drops and flowrates are then used in determining the linearized flow resistance for each line segment of flow.

  6. Analyzing transmission dynamics of cholera with public health interventions.

    PubMed

    Posny, Drew; Wang, Jin; Mukandavire, Zindoga; Modnak, Chairat

    2015-06-01

    Cholera continues to be a serious public health concern in developing countries and the global increase in the number of reported outbreaks suggests that activities to control the diseases and surveillance programs to identify or predict the occurrence of the next outbreaks are not adequate. These outbreaks have increased in frequency, severity, duration and endemicity in recent years. Mathematical models for infectious diseases play a critical role in predicting and understanding disease mechanisms, and have long provided basic insights in the possible ways to control infectious diseases. In this paper, we present a new deterministic cholera epidemiological model with three types of control measures incorporated into a cholera epidemic setting: treatment, vaccination and sanitation. Essential dynamical properties of the model with constant intervention controls which include local and global stabilities for the equilibria are carefully analyzed. Further, using optimal control techniques, we perform a study to investigate cost-effective solutions for time-dependent public health interventions in order to curb disease transmission in epidemic settings. Our results show that the basic reproductive number (R0) remains the model's epidemic threshold despite the inclusion of a package of cholera interventions. For time-dependent controls, the results suggest that these interventions closely interplay with each other, and the costs of controls directly affect the length and strength of each control in an optimal strategy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A framework for analyzing contagion in assortative banking networks

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Thomas R.; Gleeson, James P.; Melnik, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a probabilistic framework that represents stylized banking networks with the aim of predicting the size of contagion events. Most previous work on random financial networks assumes independent connections between banks, whereas our framework explicitly allows for (dis)assortative edge probabilities (i.e., a tendency for small banks to link to large banks). We analyze default cascades triggered by shocking the network and find that the cascade can be understood as an explicit iterated mapping on a set of edge probabilities that converges to a fixed point. We derive a cascade condition, analogous to the basic reproduction number R0 in epidemic modelling, that characterizes whether or not a single initially defaulted bank can trigger a cascade that extends to a finite fraction of the infinite network. This cascade condition is an easily computed measure of the systemic risk inherent in a given banking network topology. We use percolation theory for random networks to derive a formula for the frequency of global cascades. These analytical results are shown to provide limited quantitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulation studies of finite-sized networks. We show that edge-assortativity, the propensity of nodes to connect to similar nodes, can have a strong effect on the level of systemic risk as measured by the cascade condition. However, the effect of assortativity on systemic risk is subtle, and we propose a simple graph theoretic quantity, which we call the graph-assortativity coefficient, that can be used to assess systemic risk. PMID:28231324

  8. Pollen embryogenesis to induce, detect, and analyze mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, M.J.

    The development of fully differentiated plants from individual pollen grains through a series of developmental phases that resemble embryogenesis beginning with the zygote was demonstrated during the mid-1960's. This technology opened the door to the use of haploid plants (sporophytes with the gametic number of chromosomes) for plant breeding and genetic studies, biochemical and metabolic studies, and the selection of mutations. Although pollen embryogenesis has been demonstrated successfully in numerous plant genera, the procedure cannot as yet be used routinely to generate large populations of plants for experiments. Practical results from use of the technology in genetic toxicology research tomore » detect mutations have failed to fully realize the theoretical potential; further developments of the technology could overcome the limitations. Pollen embryogenesis could be used to develop plants from mutant pollen grains to verify that genetic changes are involved. Through either spontaneous or induced chromosome doubling, these plants can be made homozygous and used to analyze genetically the mutants involved. The success of this approach will depend on the mutant frequency relative to the fraction of pollen grains that undergo embryogenesis; these two factors will dictate population size needed for success. Research effort is needed to further develop pollen embryogenesis for use in the detection of genotoxins under both laboratory and in situ conditions.« less

  9. A framework for analyzing contagion in assortative banking networks.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Thomas R; Gleeson, James P; Melnik, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a probabilistic framework that represents stylized banking networks with the aim of predicting the size of contagion events. Most previous work on random financial networks assumes independent connections between banks, whereas our framework explicitly allows for (dis)assortative edge probabilities (i.e., a tendency for small banks to link to large banks). We analyze default cascades triggered by shocking the network and find that the cascade can be understood as an explicit iterated mapping on a set of edge probabilities that converges to a fixed point. We derive a cascade condition, analogous to the basic reproduction number R0 in epidemic modelling, that characterizes whether or not a single initially defaulted bank can trigger a cascade that extends to a finite fraction of the infinite network. This cascade condition is an easily computed measure of the systemic risk inherent in a given banking network topology. We use percolation theory for random networks to derive a formula for the frequency of global cascades. These analytical results are shown to provide limited quantitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulation studies of finite-sized networks. We show that edge-assortativity, the propensity of nodes to connect to similar nodes, can have a strong effect on the level of systemic risk as measured by the cascade condition. However, the effect of assortativity on systemic risk is subtle, and we propose a simple graph theoretic quantity, which we call the graph-assortativity coefficient, that can be used to assess systemic risk.

  10. Femtosecond irradiation of chicken corneas analyzed by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fimia, A.; Gomariz, M.; Murciano, A.; Acebal, P.; Madrigal, R.; Carretero, L.; Alió, J. L.; Rodriguez, A.; Fernández, E.

    2012-06-01

    Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) is a potentially non-invasive new technology which can be applied in many areas from applied imaging science to biomedical optics. DHM is an interferometric technique that gives us a number of important advantages such as the possibility to acquire holograms at high speed, to obtain complete information about amplitude and phase and to use image processing techniques. In this sense, DHM offers rapid 3D imaging with a theoretically higher resolution than OCT (Optical Coherent Tomography). By this technique optical path measurements with sensitivities in the nanometer range of reflective and transparent objects can be obtained. In this work, we use DHM to study the effect of ablation using 4.5 nJ pulses on chicken corneas. For this, a titanium sapphire laser at 800 nm and 76 MHz frequency (Vitesse, Coherent Inc. USA) was focused to its diffraction-limited spot size by a 10x objective of 0.3 numerical aperture. The width of the pulse (170 fs) at the sample was measured by spectral techniques. The average beam power at the sample was 340 mW and all the system was mechanically driven by a XY synchronization unit that controls the speed of the sample movement. The speed of the sample was varied between 1-50 μm/s. The studied chicken corneal tissue was previously processed by Trypan dye in order to visualize the irradiated area. The photodisrupted zone was analyzed by a HDM technique by illuminating it using a laser diode source (λ=683 nm) linearly polarized in a modified Mach-Zehnder with an off-axis geometry configuration. The reflected object wave by the tissue surface (specimen) interferes with the reference wave and a CCD camera records the hologram. As a result, the influence of the speed of photodisruption in the depth of the ablated corneas was analyzed. Therefore, it is possible to analyze thermal and photoirradiated effects on corneal tissues which allow us the possibility to optimize the interaction of intratissue and the

  11. An R package for analyzing and modeling ranking data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In medical informatics, psychology, market research and many other fields, researchers often need to analyze and model ranking data. However, there is no statistical software that provides tools for the comprehensive analysis of ranking data. Here, we present pmr, an R package for analyzing and modeling ranking data with a bundle of tools. The pmr package enables descriptive statistics (mean rank, pairwise frequencies, and marginal matrix), Analytic Hierarchy Process models (with Saaty’s and Koczkodaj’s inconsistencies), probability models (Luce model, distance-based model, and rank-ordered logit model), and the visualization of ranking data with multidimensional preference analysis. Results Examples of the use of package pmr are given using a real ranking dataset from medical informatics, in which 566 Hong Kong physicians ranked the top five incentives (1: competitive pressures; 2: increased savings; 3: government regulation; 4: improved efficiency; 5: improved quality care; 6: patient demand; 7: financial incentives) to the computerization of clinical practice. The mean rank showed that item 4 is the most preferred item and item 3 is the least preferred item, and significance difference was found between physicians’ preferences with respect to their monthly income. A multidimensional preference analysis identified two dimensions that explain 42% of the total variance. The first can be interpreted as the overall preference of the seven items (labeled as “internal/external”), and the second dimension can be interpreted as their overall variance of (labeled as “push/pull factors”). Various statistical models were fitted, and the best were found to be weighted distance-based models with Spearman’s footrule distance. Conclusions In this paper, we presented the R package pmr, the first package for analyzing and modeling ranking data. The package provides insight to users through descriptive statistics of ranking data. Users can also visualize

  12. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, G.J.; Kaskey, J.A.

    1992-11-24

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics. 2 figs.

  13. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, Gordon J.; Kaskey, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics.

  14. Microresonator Frequency Comb Optical Clock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-22

    lithic construction with small size and power consumption. Microcomb development has included frequency control of their spectra [8–11...frequency f eo and amplified to a maximum of 140 mW. The first-order sideband powers are approximately 3 dB lower than the pump, and the piece of highly...resonator offers sufficient peak power for our experiments and is stable and repeatable even for different settings of pump frequency and power

  15. Frequency-Shift Hearing Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed hearing aid maps spectrum of speech into band of lower frequencies at which ear remains sensitive. By redirecting normal speech frequencies into frequency band from 100 to 1,500 Hz, hearing aid allows people to understand normal conversation, including telephone calls. Principle operation of hearing aid adapted to other uses such as, clearing up noisy telephone or radio communication. In addition, loud-speakers more easily understood in presence of high background noise.

  16. Effective switching frequency multiplier inverter

    DOEpatents

    Su, Gui-Jia [Oak Ridge, TN; Peng, Fang Z [Okemos, MI

    2007-08-07

    A switching frequency multiplier inverter for low inductance machines that uses parallel connection of switches and each switch is independently controlled according to a pulse width modulation scheme. The effective switching frequency is multiplied by the number of switches connected in parallel while each individual switch operates within its limit of switching frequency. This technique can also be used for other power converters such as DC/DC, AC/DC converters.

  17. Chip-Scale Architectures for Precise Optical Frequency Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinghui

    Scientists and engineers have investigated various types of stable and accurate optical synthesizers, where mode-locked laser based optical frequency comb synthesizers have been widely investigated. These frequency combs bridge the frequencies from optical domain to microwave domain with orders of magnitude difference, providing a metrological tool for various platforms. The demand for highly robust, scalable, compact and cost-effective femtosecond-laser synthesizers, however, are of great importance for applications in air- or space-borne platforms, where low cost and rugged packaging are particularly required. This has been afforded in the past several years due to breakthroughs in chip-scale nanofabrication, bringing advances in optical frequency combs down to semiconductor chips. These platforms, with significantly enhanced light-matter interaction, provide a fertile sandbox for research rich in nonlinear dynamics, and offer a reliable route towards low-phase noise photonic oscillators, broadband optical frequency synthesizers, miniaturized optical clockwork, and coherent terabit communications. The dissertation explores various types of optical frequency comb synthesizers based on nonlinear microresonators. Firstly, the fundamental mechanism of mode-locking in a high-quality factor microresonator is examined, supported by ultrafast optical characterizations, analytical closed-form solutions and numerical modeling. In the evolution of these frequency microcombs, the key nonlinear dynamical effect governing the comb state coherence is rigorously analyzed. Secondly, a prototype of chip-scale optical frequency synthesizer is demonstrated, with the laser frequency comb stabilized down to instrument-limited 50-mHz RF frequency inaccuracies and 10-16 fractional frequency inaccuracies, near the fundamental limits. Thirdly, a globally stable Turing pattern is achieved and characterized in these nonlinear resonators with high-efficiency conversion, subsequently

  18. Noise and analyzer-crystal angular position analysis for analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Keivan; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-04-01

    The analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging (ABI) method is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. Like many of the modern imaging techniques, ABI is a computed imaging method (meaning that images are calculated from raw data). ABI can simultaneously generate a number of planar parametric images containing information about absorption, refraction, and scattering properties of an object. These images are estimated from raw data acquired by measuring (sampling) the angular intensity profile of the x-ray beam passed through the object at different angular positions of the analyzer crystal. The noise in the estimated ABI parametric images depends upon imaging conditions like the source intensity (flux), measurements angular positions, object properties, and the estimation method. In this paper, we use the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) to quantify the noise properties in parametric images and to investigate the effect of source intensity, different analyzer-crystal angular positions and object properties on this bound, assuming a fixed radiation dose delivered to an object. The CRLB is the minimum bound for the variance of an unbiased estimator and defines the best noise performance that one can obtain regardless of which estimation method is used to estimate ABI parametric images. The main result of this paper is that the variance (hence the noise) in parametric images is directly proportional to the source intensity and only a limited number of analyzer-crystal angular measurements (eleven for uniform and three for optimal non-uniform) are required to get the best parametric images. The following angular measurements only spread the total dose to the measurements without improving or worsening CRLB, but the added measurements may improve parametric images by reducing estimation bias. Next, using CRLB we evaluate the multiple-image radiography, diffraction enhanced imaging and scatter diffraction enhanced imaging estimation techniques

  19. Noise and Analyzer-Crystal Angular Position Analysis for Analyzer-Based Phase-Contrast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Majidi, Keivan; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-01-01

    The analyzer-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging (ABI) method is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. Like many of the modern imaging techniques, ABI is a computed imaging method (meaning that images are calculated from raw data). ABI can simultaneously generate a number of planar parametric images containing information about absorption, refraction, and scattering properties of an object. These images are estimated from raw data acquired by measuring (sampling) the angular intensity profile (AIP) of the X-ray beam passed through the object at different angular positions of the analyzer crystal. The noise in the estimated ABI parametric images depends upon imaging conditions like the source intensity (flux), measurements angular positions, object properties, and the estimation method. In this paper, we use the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) to quantify the noise properties in parametric images and to investigate the effect of source intensity, different analyzer-crystal angular positions and object properties on this bound, assuming a fixed radiation dose delivered to an object. The CRLB is the minimum bound for the variance of an unbiased estimator and defines the best noise performance that one can obtain regardless of which estimation method is used to estimate ABI parametric images. The main result of this manuscript is that the variance (hence the noise) in parametric images is directly proportional to the source intensity and only a limited number of analyzer-crystal angular measurements (eleven for uniform and three for optimal non-uniform) are required to get the best parametric images. The following angular measurements only spread the total dose to the measurements without improving or worsening CRLB, but the added measurements may improve parametric images by reducing estimation bias. Next, using CRLB we evaluate the Multiple-Image Radiography (MIR), Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) and Scatter Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (S

  20. Comparative evaluation of Plateletworks, Multiplate analyzer and Platelet function analyzer-200 in cardiology patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeeyong; Cho, Chi Hyun; Jung, Bo Kyeung; Nam, Jeonghun; Seo, Hong Seog; Shin, Sehyun; Lim, Chae Seung

    2018-04-14

    The objective of this study was to comparatively evaluate three commercial whole-blood platelet function analyzer systems: Platelet Function Analyzer-200 (PFA; Siemens Canada, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada), Multiplate analyzer (MP; Roche Diagnostics International Ltd., Rotkreuz, Switzerland), and Plateletworks Combo-25 kit (PLW; Helena Laboratories, Beaumont, TX, USA). Venipuncture was performed on 160 patients who visited a department of cardiology. Pairwise agreement among the three platelet function assays was assessed using Cohen's kappa coefficient and percent agreement within the reference limit. Kappa values with the same agonists were poor between PFA-collagen (COL; agonist)/adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and MP-ADP (-0.147), PFA-COL/ADP and PLW-ADP (0.089), MP-ADP and PLW-ADP (0.039), PFA-COL/ADP and MP-COL (-0.039), and between PFA-COL/ADP and PLW-COL (-0.067). Nonetheless, kappa values for the same assay principle with a different agonist were slightly higher between PFA-COL/ADP and PFA-COL/EPI (0.352), MP-ADP and MP-COL (0.235), and between PLW-ADP and PLW-COL (0.247). The range of percent agreement values was 38.7% to 73.8%. Therefore, various measurements of platelet function by more than one method were needed to obtain a reliable interpretation of platelet function considering low kappa coefficient and modest percent agreement rates among 3 different platelet function tests.

  1. Automatic oscillator frequency control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A frequency control system makes an initial correction of the frequency of its own timing circuit after comparison against a frequency of known accuracy and then sequentially checks and corrects the frequencies of several voltage controlled local oscillator circuits. The timing circuit initiates the machine cycles of a central processing unit which applies a frequency index to an input register in a modulo-sum frequency divider stage and enables a multiplexer to clock an accumulator register in the divider stage with a cyclical signal derived from the oscillator circuit being checked. Upon expiration of the interval, the processing unit compares the remainder held as the contents of the accumulator against a stored zero error constant and applies an appropriate correction word to a correction stage to shift the frequency of the oscillator being checked. A signal from the accumulator register may be used to drive a phase plane ROM and, with periodic shifts in the applied frequency index, to provide frequency shift keying of the resultant output signal. Interposition of a phase adder between the accumulator register and phase plane ROM permits phase shift keying of the output signal by periodic variation in the value of a phase index applied to one input of the phase adder.

  2. Binaural beats at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    McFadden, D; Pasanen, E G

    1975-10-24

    Binaural beats have long been believed to be audible only at low frequencies, but an interaction reminiscent of a binaural beat can sometimes be heard when different two-tone complexes of high frequency are presented to the two ears. The primary requirement is that the frequency separation in the complex at one ear be slightly different from that in the other--that is, that there be a small interaural difference in the envelope periodicities. This finding is in accord with other recent demonstrations that the auditory system is not deaf to interaural time differences at high frequencies.

  3. A graphene based frequency quadrupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuantong; Huang, Beiju; Mao, Xurui; Zhang, Zanyun; Zhang, Zan; Geng, Zhaoxin; Xue, Ping; Chen, Hongda

    2017-04-01

    Benefit from exceptional electrical transport properties, graphene receives worldwide attentions, especially in the domain of high frequency electronics. Due to absence of effective bandgap causing off-state the device, graphene material is extraordinarily suitable for analog circuits rather than digital applications. With this unique ambipolar behavior, graphene can be exploited and utilized to achieve high performance for frequency multipliers. Here, dual-gated graphene field-effect transistors have been firstly used to achieve frequency quadrupling. Two Dirac points in the transfer curves of the designed GFETs can be observed by tuning top-gate voltages, which is essential to generate the fourth harmonic. By applying 200 kHz sinusoid input, arround 50% of the output signal radio frequency power is concentrated at the desired frequency of 800 kHz. Additionally, in suitable operation areas, our devices can work as high performance frequency doublers and frequency triplers. Considered both simple device structure and potential superhigh carrier mobility of graphene material, graphene-based frequency quadruplers may have lots of superiorities in regards to ultrahigh frequency electronic applications in near future. Moreover, versatility of carbon material system is far-reaching for realization of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible electrically active devices.

  4. A graphene based frequency quadrupler

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chuantong; Huang, Beiju; Mao, Xurui; Zhang, Zanyun; Zhang, Zan; Geng, Zhaoxin; Xue, Ping; Chen, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    Benefit from exceptional electrical transport properties, graphene receives worldwide attentions, especially in the domain of high frequency electronics. Due to absence of effective bandgap causing off-state the device, graphene material is extraordinarily suitable for analog circuits rather than digital applications. With this unique ambipolar behavior, graphene can be exploited and utilized to achieve high performance for frequency multipliers. Here, dual-gated graphene field-effect transistors have been firstly used to achieve frequency quadrupling. Two Dirac points in the transfer curves of the designed GFETs can be observed by tuning top-gate voltages, which is essential to generate the fourth harmonic. By applying 200 kHz sinusoid input, arround 50% of the output signal radio frequency power is concentrated at the desired frequency of 800 kHz. Additionally, in suitable operation areas, our devices can work as high performance frequency doublers and frequency triplers. Considered both simple device structure and potential superhigh carrier mobility of graphene material, graphene-based frequency quadruplers may have lots of superiorities in regards to ultrahigh frequency electronic applications in near future. Moreover, versatility of carbon material system is far-reaching for realization of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible electrically active devices. PMID:28418013

  5. An Investigation into the Use of Word Frequency Lists in Computing Vocabulary Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniam, David

    1999-01-01

    Investigates word frequency as an indicator of language proficiency in the written English of Grade 13 learners of English in Hong Kong. The study develops Laufer and Nation's (1995) work on Lexical Frequency Profile in which student writing was analyzed for the frequency of word families, with vocabulary profiles produced from the scripts on the…

  6. Modal testing with Asher's method using a Fourier analyzer and curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, R. R.; Hallauer, W. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An unusual application of the method proposed by Asher (1958) for structural dynamic and modal testing is discussed. Asher's method has the capability, using the admittance matrix and multiple-shaker sinusoidal excitation, of separating structural modes having indefinitely close natural frequencies. The present application uses Asher's method in conjunction with a modern Fourier analyzer system but eliminates the necessity of exciting the test structure simultaneously with several shakers. Evaluation of this approach with numerically simulated data demonstrated its effectiveness; the parameters of two modes having almost identical natural frequencies were accurately identified. Laboratory evaluation of this approach was inconclusive because of poor experimental input data.

  7. Analyzing the Implications of Climate Data on the Rainfall Frequency Spectrum: Case Study of Knoxville, Tennessee and Surrounding Region

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, Linda M.; Omitaomu, Olufemi A.; Parish, Esther S.

    2016-09-01

    Modeled daily precipitation values are used to determine changes in percentile rainfall event depths, for planning and mitigation of stormwater runoff, over past (1980-2005) and future (2025-2050) periods for Knoxville, Tennessee and the surrounding area.

  8. 21 CFR 884.2050 - Obstetric data analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Obstetric data analyzer. 884.2050 Section 884.2050... § 884.2050 Obstetric data analyzer. (a) Identification. An obstetric data analyzer (fetal status data analyzer) is a device used during labor to analyze electronic signal data obtained from fetal and maternal...

  9. 21 CFR 884.2050 - Obstetric data analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obstetric data analyzer. 884.2050 Section 884.2050... § 884.2050 Obstetric data analyzer. (a) Identification. An obstetric data analyzer (fetal status data analyzer) is a device used during labor to analyze electronic signal data obtained from fetal and maternal...

  10. 21 CFR 884.2050 - Obstetric data analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric data analyzer. 884.2050 Section 884.2050... § 884.2050 Obstetric data analyzer. (a) Identification. An obstetric data analyzer (fetal status data analyzer) is a device used during labor to analyze electronic signal data obtained from fetal and maternal...

  11. 21 CFR 884.2050 - Obstetric data analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Obstetric data analyzer. 884.2050 Section 884.2050... § 884.2050 Obstetric data analyzer. (a) Identification. An obstetric data analyzer (fetal status data analyzer) is a device used during labor to analyze electronic signal data obtained from fetal and maternal...

  12. Characterization of an Outdoor Ambient Radio Frequency Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-16

    radio frequency noise ”) prior to testing of a specific system under test (SUT). With this characterization, locations can be selected to avoid RF...spectrum analyzer, ambient RF noise floor, RF interference 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18...environment (sometimes referred to as “radio frequency noise ”) prior to testing of a specific system under test (SUT). With this characterization

  13. Interpretations of Frequency Domain Analyses of Neural Entrainment: Periodicity, Fundamental Frequency, and Harmonics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Melloni, Lucia; Poeppel, David; Ding, Nai

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity can follow the rhythms of dynamic sensory stimuli, such as speech and music, a phenomenon called neural entrainment. It has been hypothesized that low-frequency neural entrainment in the neural delta and theta bands provides a potential mechanism to represent and integrate temporal information. Low-frequency neural entrainment is often studied using periodically changing stimuli and is analyzed in the frequency domain using the Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis decomposes a periodic signal into harmonically related sinusoids. However, it is not intuitive how these harmonically related components are related to the response waveform. Here, we explain the interpretation of response harmonics, with a special focus on very low-frequency neural entrainment near 1 Hz. It is illustrated why neural responses repeating at f Hz do not necessarily generate any neural response at f Hz in the Fourier spectrum. A strong neural response at f Hz indicates that the time scales of the neural response waveform within each cycle match the time scales of the stimulus rhythm. Therefore, neural entrainment at very low frequency implies not only that the neural response repeats at f Hz but also that each period of the neural response is a slow wave matching the time scale of a f Hz sinusoid.

  14. Monitoring method and apparatus using high-frequency carrier

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring an electrical-motor-driven device by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto the power line current. The method is accomplished by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto an AC power line current. The AC power line current supplies the electrical-motor-driven device with electrical energy. As a result, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the electrical-motor-driven device modulate the high frequency carrier signal and the AC power line current. The high frequency carrier signal is then monitored, conditioned and demodulated. Finally, the modulated high frequency carrier signal is analyzed to ascertain the operating condition of the electrical-motor-driven device.

  15. Modal vector estimation for closely spaced frequency modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.; Chung, Y. T.; Blair, M.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques for obtaining improved modal vector estimates for systems with closely spaced frequency modes are discussed. In describing the dynamical behavior of a complex structure modal parameters are often analyzed: undamped natural frequency, mode shape, modal mass, modal stiffness and modal damping. From both an analytical standpoint and an experimental standpoint, identification of modal parameters is more difficult if the system has repeated frequencies or even closely spaced frequencies. The more complex the structure, the more likely it is to have closely spaced frequencies. This makes it difficult to determine valid mode shapes using single shaker test methods. By employing band selectable analysis (zoom) techniques and by employing Kennedy-Pancu circle fitting or some multiple degree of freedom (MDOF) curve fit procedure, the usefulness of the single shaker approach can be extended.

  16. Monitoring method and apparatus using high-frequency carrier

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, H.D.

    1996-04-30

    A method and apparatus for monitoring an electrical-motor-driven device by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto the power line current. The method is accomplished by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto an AC power line current. The AC power line current supplies the electrical-motor-driven device with electrical energy. As a result, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the electrical-motor-driven device modulate the high frequency carrier signal and the AC power line current. The high frequency carrier signal is then monitored, conditioned and demodulated. Finally, the modulated high frequency carrier signal is analyzed to ascertain the operating condition of the electrical-motor-driven device. 6 figs.

  17. 40 CFR 91.317 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... service and annually thereafter, check the NDIR carbon monoxide analyzer for response to water vapor and... N2 through water at room temperature and record analyzer response. (4) An analyzer response of more...

  18. 40 CFR 91.317 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... service and annually thereafter, check the NDIR carbon monoxide analyzer for response to water vapor and... N2 through water at room temperature and record analyzer response. (4) An analyzer response of more...

  19. 40 CFR 91.317 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... service and annually thereafter, check the NDIR carbon monoxide analyzer for response to water vapor and... N2 through water at room temperature and record analyzer response. (4) An analyzer response of more...

  20. 40 CFR 91.317 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... service and annually thereafter, check the NDIR carbon monoxide analyzer for response to water vapor and... N2 through water at room temperature and record analyzer response. (4) An analyzer response of more...

  1. Gaming Frequency and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Barry; Jacobs, Gabriel; Watkins, Alan

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous claims that playing computer and video games may be educationally beneficial, but there has been little formal investigation into whether or not the frequency of exposure to such games actually affects academic performance. This paper explores the issue by analysing the relationships between gaming frequency--measured as the…

  2. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  3. Frequency Discrimination in Young Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsho, Lynne Werner; And Others

    Frequency difference thresholds were determined for fourteen 4- to 9-month-old infants (mean age, 6 months 10 days) using a discrimination learning paradigm, following a one-up, two-down staircase procedure. The subject heard 500 msec tone bursts repeated at a rate of one per sec, with a fixed standard frequency. At various points in this pulse…

  4. Frequency conversion of structured light.

    PubMed

    Steinlechner, Fabian; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Pruneri, Valerio; Torres, Juan P

    2016-02-15

    Coherent frequency conversion of structured light, i.e. the ability to manipulate the carrier frequency of a wave front without distorting its spatial phase and intensity profile, provides the opportunity for numerous novel applications in photonic technology and fundamental science. In particular, frequency conversion of spatial modes carrying orbital angular momentum can be exploited in sub-wavelength resolution nano-optics and coherent imaging at a wavelength different from that used to illuminate an object. Moreover, coherent frequency conversion will be crucial for interfacing information stored in the high-dimensional spatial structure of single and entangled photons with various constituents of quantum networks. In this work, we demonstrate frequency conversion of structured light from the near infrared (803 nm) to the visible (527 nm). The conversion scheme is based on sum-frequency generation in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal pumped with a 1540-nm Gaussian beam. We observe frequency-converted fields that exhibit a high degree of similarity with the input field and verify the coherence of the frequency-conversion process via mode projection measurements with a phase mask and a single-mode fiber. Our results demonstrate the suitability of exploiting the technique for applications in quantum information processing and coherent imaging.

  5. Optical frequency standards for gravitational wave detection using satellite velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutha, Amar

    2015-04-01

    Satellite Doppler velocimetry, building on the work of Kaufmann and Estabrook and Wahlquist, is a complementary technique to interferometric methods of gravitational wave detection. This method is based on the fact that the gravitational wave amplitude appears in the apparent Doppler shift of photons propagating from an emitter to a receiver. This apparent Doppler shift can be resolved provided that a frequency standard, capable of quickly averaging down to a high stability, is available. We present a design for a space-capable optical atomic frequency standard, and analyze the sensitivity of satellite Doppler velocimetry for gravitational wave astronomy in the milli-hertz frequency band.

  6. Entanglement and asymmetric steering over two octaves of frequency difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    The development of quantum technologies which use quantum states of the light field interacting with other systems creates a demand for entangled states spanning wide frequency ranges. In this work we analyze a parametric scheme of cascaded harmonic generation which promises to deliver bipartite entangled states in which the two modes are separated by two octaves in frequency. This scheme is potentially very useful for applications in quantum communication and computation networks as well as providing for quantum interfaces between a wider range of light and atomic ensembles than is presently practicable. It doubles the frequency range over which entanglement is presently available.

  7. Communication: Probing anomalous diffusion in frequency space

    SciTech Connect

    Stachura, Sławomir; Synchrotron Soleil, L’Orme de Merisiers, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette; Kneller, Gerald R., E-mail: gerald.kneller@cnrs-orleans.fr

    Anomalous diffusion processes are usually detected by analyzing the time-dependent mean square displacement of the diffusing particles. The latter evolves asymptotically as W(t) ∼ 2D{sub α}t{sup α}, where D{sub α} is the fractional diffusion constant and 0 < α < 2. In this article we show that both D{sub α} and α can also be extracted from the low-frequency Fourier spectrum of the corresponding velocity autocorrelation function. This offers a simple method for the interpretation of quasielastic neutron scattering spectra from complex (bio)molecular systems, in which subdiffusive transport is frequently encountered. The approach is illustrated and validated by analyzing molecularmore » dynamics simulations of molecular diffusion in a lipid POPC bilayer.« less

  8. Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer system: Implementation of the analyzer algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, JáNos; Ferencz, Csaba; Hamar, Daniel; Steinbach, Peter; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Collier, Andrew B.

    2010-12-01

    The full potential of whistlers for monitoring plasmaspheric electron density variations has not yet been realized. The primary reason is the vast human effort required for the analysis of whistler traces. Recently, the first part of a complete whistler analysis procedure was successfully automated, i.e., the automatic detection of whistler traces from the raw broadband VLF signal was achieved. This study describes a new algorithm developed to determine plasmaspheric electron density measurements from whistler traces, based on a Virtual (Whistler) Trace Transformation, using a 2-D fast Fourier transform transformation. This algorithm can be automated and can thus form the final step to complete an Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer (AWDA) system. In this second AWDA paper, the practical implementation of the Automatic Whistler Analyzer (AWA) algorithm is discussed and a feasible solution is presented. The practical implementation of the algorithm is able to track the variations of plasmasphere in quasi real time on a PC cluster with 100 CPU cores. The electron densities obtained by the AWA method can be used in investigations such as plasmasphere dynamics, ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling, or in space weather models.

  9. Single-frequency tunable laser for pumping cesium frequency standards

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, O V; Ivanov, Andrei V; Leonovich, A I

    2006-08-31

    A single-frequency tunable laser for pumping the cesium frequency standard is studied. It is shown experimentally that the laser emits at a single frequency despite the fact that a few longitudinal modes of the external cavity fall within the reflection band of a fibre Bragg grating (FBG) written in the optical fibre. The laser wavelength can be tuned by varying the pump current of the laser, its temperature, and the FBG temperature. The laser linewidth does not exceed 2 MHz for 10 mW of output power. (lasers)

  10. On analyzing free-response data on location level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandos, Andriy I.; Obuchowski, Nancy A.

    2017-03-01

    Free-response ROC (FROC) data are typically collected when primary question of interest is focused on the proportions of the correct detection-localization of known targets and frequencies of false positive responses, which can be multiple per subject (image). These studies are particularly relevant for CAD and related applications. The fundamental tool of the location-level FROC analysis is the FROC curve. Although there are many methods of FROC analysis, as we describe in this work, some of the standard and popular approaches, while important, are not suitable for analyzing specifically the location-level FROC performance as summarized by the FROC curve. Analysis of the FROC curve, on the other hand, might not be straightforward. Recently we developed an approach for the location-level analysis of the FROC data using the well-known tools for clustered ROC analysis. In the current work, based on previously developed concepts, and using specific examples, we demonstrate the key reasons why specifically location-level FROC performance cannot be fully addressed by the common approaches as well as illustrate the proposed solution. Specifically, we consider the two most salient FROC approaches, namely JAFROC and the area under the exponentially transformed FROC curve (AFE) and show that clearly superior FROC curves can have lower values for these indices. We describe the specific features that make these approaches inconsistent with FROC curves. This work illustrates some caveats for using the common approaches for location-level FROC analysis and provides guidelines for the appropriate assessment or comparison of FROC systems.

  11. Ranking Highlights in Personal Videos by Analyzing Edited Videos.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Farhadi, Ali; Chen, Tseng-Hung; Seitz, Steve

    2016-11-01

    We present a fully automatic system for ranking domain-specific highlights in unconstrained personal videos by analyzing online edited videos. A novel latent linear ranking model is proposed to handle noisy training data harvested online. Specifically, given a targeted domain such as "surfing," our system mines the YouTube database to find pairs of raw and their corresponding edited videos. Leveraging the assumption that an edited video is more likely to contain highlights than the trimmed parts of the raw video, we obtain pair-wise ranking constraints to train our model. The learning task is challenging due to the amount of noise and variation in the mined data. Hence, a latent loss function is incorporated to mitigate the issues caused by the noise. We efficiently learn the latent model on a large number of videos (about 870 min in total) using a novel EM-like procedure. Our latent ranking model outperforms its classification counterpart and is fairly competitive compared with a fully supervised ranking system that requires labels from Amazon Mechanical Turk. We further show that a state-of-the-art audio feature mel-frequency cepstral coefficients is inferior to a state-of-the-art visual feature. By combining both audio-visual features, we obtain the best performance in dog activity, surfing, skating, and viral video domains. Finally, we show that impressive highlights can be detected without additional human supervision for seven domains (i.e., skating, surfing, skiing, gymnastics, parkour, dog activity, and viral video) in unconstrained personal videos.

  12. Modal, ray, and beam techniques for analyzing the EM scattering by open-ended waveguide cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pathak, Prabhakar H.; Burkholder, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of high-frequency electromagnetic (EM) scattering by open-ended waveguide cavities with an interior termination is analyzed via three different approaches. When cavities can be adequately modeled by joining together piecewise separable waveguide sections, a hybrid combination of asymptotic high-frequency and modal techniques is employed. In the case of more arbitrarily shaped waveguide cavities for which modes cannot even be defined in the conventional sense, the geometrical optics ray approach proves to be highly useful. However, at sufficiently high frequencies, both of these approaches tend to become inefficient. Hence, a paraxial Gaussian batch technique, which retains much of the simplicity of the ray approximation but is potentially more efficient, is investigated. Typical numerical results based on the different approaches are discussed.

  13. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  14. Laser frequency stabilization for LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Guido; McNamara, Paul; Thorpe, Ira; Camp, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    The requirement on laser frequency noise in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) depends on the velocity and our knowledge of the position of each spacecraft of the interferometer. Currently it is assumed that the lasers must have a pre-stabilized frequency stability of 30Hz/square root of Hz over LISA'S most sensitive frequency band (3 mHz - 30 mHz). The intrinsic frequency stability of even the most stable com- mercial lasers is several orders of magnitude above this level. Therefore it is necessary to stabilize the laser frequency to an ultra-stable frequency reference which meets the LISA requirements. The baseline frequency reference for the LISA lasers are high finesse optical cavities based on ULE spacers. We measured the stability of two ULE spacer cavities with respect to each other. Our current best results show a noise floor at, or below, 30 Hz/square root of Hz above 3 mHz. In this report we describe the experimental layout of the entire experiment and discuss the limiting noise sources.

  15. Low frequency events on Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, K.; Neuberg, J.

    2003-04-01

    Earthquake swarms observed on volcanoes consist generally of low frequency events. The low frequency content of these events indicates the presence of interface waves at the boundary of the magma filled conduit and the surrounding country rock. The observed seismic signal at the surface shows therefore a complicated interference pattern of waves originating at various parts of the magma filled conduit, interacting with the free surface and interfaces in the volcanic edifice. This research investigates the applicability of conventional seismic tools on these low frequency events, focusing on hypocenter location analysis using arrival times and particle motion analysis for the Soufrière Hills Volcano on Montserrat. Both single low frequency events and swarms are observed on this volcano. Synthetic low frequency events are used for comparison. Results show that reliable hypocenter locations and particle motions can only be obtained if the low frequency events are single events with an identifiable P wave onset, for example the single events preceding swarms on Montserrat or the first low frequency event of a swarm. Consecutive events of the same swarm are dominated by interface waves which are converted at the top of the conduit into weak secondary P waves and surface waves. Conventional seismic tools fail to correctly analyse these events.

  16. Discrimination of nonlinear frequency glides.

    PubMed

    Thyer, Nick; Mahar, Doug

    2006-05-01

    Discrimination thresholds for short duration nonlinear tone glides that differed in glide rate were measured in order to determine whether cues related to rate of frequency change alone were sufficient for discrimination. Thresholds for rising and falling nonlinear glides of 50-ms and 400-ms duration, spanning three frequency excursions (0.5, 1, and 2 ERBs) at three center frequencies (0.5, 2.0, and 6.0 kHz) were measured. Results showed that glide discrimination was possible when duration and initial and final frequencies were identical. Thresholds were of a different order to those found in previous studies using linear frequency glides where endpoint frequency or duration information is available as added cues. The pattern of results was suggestive of a mechanism sensitive to spectral changes in time. Thresholds increased as the rate of transition span increased, particularly above spans of 1 ERB. The Weber fraction associated with these changes was 0.6-0.7. Overall, the results were consistent with an excitation pattern model of nonlinear glide detection that has difficulty in tracking signals with rapid frequency changes that exceed the width of an auditory filter and are of short duration.

  17. High frequency x-ray generator basics.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Wlad T

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present basic functional principles of high frequency x-ray generators. The emphasis is put on physical concepts that determine the engineering solutions to the problem of efficient generation and control of high voltage power required to drive the x-ray tube. The physics of magnetically coupled circuits is discussed first, as a background for the discussion of engineering issues related to high-frequency power transformer design. Attention is paid to physical processes that influence such factors as size, efficiency, and reliability of a high voltage power transformer. The basic electrical circuit of a high frequency generator is analyzed next, with focus on functional principles. This section investigates the role and function of basic components, such as power supply, inverter, and voltage doubler. Essential electronic circuits of generator control are then examined, including regulation of voltage, current and timing of electrical power delivery to the x-ray tube. Finally, issues related to efficient feedback control, including basic design of the AEC circuitry are reviewed.

  18. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  19. Frequency characterization of a swept- and fixed-wavelength external-cavity quantum cascade laser by use of a frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Knabe, Kevin; Williams, Paul A; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R; Armacost, Chris M; Crivello, Sam; Radunsky, Michael B; Newbury, Nathan R

    2012-05-21

    The instantaneous optical frequency of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser (QCL) is characterized by comparison to a near-infrared frequency comb. Fluctuations in the instantaneous optical frequency are analyzed to determine the frequency-noise power spectral density for the external-cavity QCL both during fixed-wavelength and swept-wavelength operation. The noise performance of a near-infrared external-cavity diode laser is measured for comparison. In addition to providing basic frequency metrology of external-cavity QCLs, this comb-calibrated swept QCL system can be applied to rapid, precise broadband spectroscopy in the mid-infrared spectral region.

  20. Frequency Correction for MIRO Chirp Transformation Spectroscopy Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    This software processes the flyby spectra of the Chirp Transform Spectrometer (CTS) of the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO). The tool corrects the effect of Doppler shift and local-oscillator (LO) frequency shift during the flyby mode of MIRO operations. The frequency correction for CTS flyby spectra is performed and is integrated with multiple spectra into a high signal-to-noise averaged spectrum at the rest-frame RF frequency. This innovation also generates the 8 molecular line spectra by dividing continuous 4,096-channel CTS spectra. The 8 line spectra can then be readily used for scientific investigations. A spectral line that is at its rest frequency in the frame of the Earth or an asteroid will be observed with a time-varying Doppler shift as seen by MIRO. The frequency shift is toward the higher RF frequencies on approach, and toward lower RF frequencies on departure. The magnitude of the shift depends on the flyby velocity. The result of time-varying Doppler shift is that of an observed spectral line will be seen to move from channel to channel in the CTS spectrometer. The direction (higher or lower frequency) in the spectrometer depends on the spectral line frequency under consideration. In order to analyze the flyby spectra, two steps are required. First, individual spectra must be corrected for the Doppler shift so that individual spectra can be superimposed at the same rest frequency for integration purposes. Second, a correction needs to be applied to the CTS spectra to account for the LO frequency shifts that are applied to asteroid mode.