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Sample records for frequency domain method

  1. Frequency-Domain Methods for Characterization of Pulsed Power Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    White, A D; Anderson, R A; Ferriera, T J; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    This paper discusses methods of frequency-domain characterization of pulsed power sensors using vector network analyzer and spectrum analyzer techniques that offer significant simplification over time-domain methods, while mitigating or minimizing the effect of the difficulties present in time domain characterization. These methods are applicable to characterization of a wide variety of sensors.

  2. Robust time and frequency domain estimation methods in adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamaire, Richard Orville

    1987-01-01

    A robust identification method was developed for use in an adaptive control system. The type of estimator is called the robust estimator, since it is robust to the effects of both unmodeled dynamics and an unmeasurable disturbance. The development of the robust estimator was motivated by a need to provide guarantees in the identification part of an adaptive controller. To enable the design of a robust control system, a nominal model as well as a frequency-domain bounding function on the modeling uncertainty associated with this nominal model must be provided. Two estimation methods are presented for finding parameter estimates, and, hence, a nominal model. One of these methods is based on the well developed field of time-domain parameter estimation. In a second method of finding parameter estimates, a type of weighted least-squares fitting to a frequency-domain estimated model is used. The frequency-domain estimator is shown to perform better, in general, than the time-domain parameter estimator. In addition, a methodology for finding a frequency-domain bounding function on the disturbance is used to compute a frequency-domain bounding function on the additive modeling error due to the effects of the disturbance and the use of finite-length data. The performance of the robust estimator in both open-loop and closed-loop situations is examined through the use of simulations.

  3. A simple method for converting frequency domain aerodynamics to the time domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1980-01-01

    A simple, direct procedure was developed for converting frequency domain aerodynamics into indicial aerodynamics. The data required for aerodynamic forces in the frequency domain may be obtained from any available (linear) theory. The method retains flexibility for the analyst and is based upon the particular character of the frequency domain results. An evaluation of the method was made for incompressible, subsonic, and transonic two dimensional flows.

  4. Frequency-domain multiscale quantum mechanics/electromagnetics simulation method

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Lingyi; Yin, Zhenyu; Yam, ChiYung E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk; Koo, SiuKong; Chen, GuanHua E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk; Chen, Quan; Wong, Ngai

    2013-12-28

    A frequency-domain quantum mechanics and electromagnetics (QM/EM) method is developed. Compared with the time-domain QM/EM method [Meng et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 1190–1199 (2012)], the newly developed frequency-domain QM/EM method could effectively capture the dynamic properties of electronic devices over a broader range of operating frequencies. The system is divided into QM and EM regions and solved in a self-consistent manner via updating the boundary conditions at the QM and EM interface. The calculated potential distributions and current densities at the interface are taken as the boundary conditions for the QM and EM calculations, respectively, which facilitate the information exchange between the QM and EM calculations and ensure that the potential, charge, and current distributions are continuous across the QM/EM interface. Via Fourier transformation, the dynamic admittance calculated from the time-domain and frequency-domain QM/EM methods is compared for a carbon nanotube based molecular device.

  5. Advancements in frequency-domain methods for rotorcraft system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.

    1989-01-01

    A new method for frequency-domain identification of rotorcraft dynamics is presented. Nonparametric frequency-response identification and parametric transfer-function modeling methods are extended to allow the extraction of state-space (stability and control derivative) representations. An interactive computer program DERIVID is described for the iterative solution of the multi-input/multi-output frequency-response matching approach used in the identification. Theoretical accuracy methods are used to determine the appropriate model structure and degree-of-confidence in the identified parameters. The method is applied to XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft data in hover. Bare-airframe stability and control derivatives for the lateral/directional dynamics are shown to compare favorably with models previously obtained using time-domain identification methods and the XV-15 simulation program.

  6. Advancements in frequency-domain methods for rotorcraft system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.

    1988-01-01

    A new method for frequency-domain identification of rotorcraft dynamics is presented. Nonparametric frequency-response identification and parametric tranfer-function modeling methods are extended to allow the extraction of state-space (stability and control derivative) representations. An interactive computer program DERIVID is described for the iterative solution of the multi-input/multi-output frequency-response matching approach used in the identification. Theoretical accuracy methods are used to determine the appropriate model structure and degree-of-confidence in the identified parameters. The method is applied to XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft data in hover. Bare-airframe stability and control derivatives for the lateral/directional dynamics are shown to compare favorably with models previously obtained using time-domain identification methods and the XV-15 simulation program.

  7. Frequency domain optical tomography using a Monte Carlo perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Sakamoto, Hiroki

    2016-04-01

    A frequency domain Monte Carlo method is applied to near-infrared optical tomography, where an intensity-modulated light source with a given modulation frequency is used to reconstruct optical properties. The frequency domain reconstruction technique allows for better separation between the scattering and absorption properties of inclusions, even for ill-posed inverse problems, due to cross-talk between the scattering and absorption reconstructions. The frequency domain Monte Carlo calculation for light transport in an absorbing and scattering medium has thus far been analyzed mostly for the reconstruction of optical properties in simple layered tissues. This study applies a Monte Carlo calculation algorithm, which can handle complex-valued particle weights for solving a frequency domain transport equation, to optical tomography in two-dimensional heterogeneous tissues. The Jacobian matrix that is needed to reconstruct the optical properties is obtained by a first-order "differential operator" technique, which involves less variance than the conventional "correlated sampling" technique. The numerical examples in this paper indicate that the newly proposed Monte Carlo method provides reconstructed results for the scattering and absorption coefficients that compare favorably with the results obtained from conventional deterministic or Monte Carlo methods.

  8. Application of frequency-domain-method to rotorcraft aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manish

    A formulation is developed to compute the flow around a helicopter rotor in the frequency domain combined with computational fluid dynamics software. The solution in frequency domain is obtained using a harmonic balance method. This approach is found to be very suitable for problems involving periodic flow like oscillating airfoils and wings. Helicopter rotor in forward flight encounters periodic flow variation around the azimuth and therefore lends itself very well to frequency-domain-based solution methods. In the frequency-domain approach, the periodicity is enforced in the solution methodology as opposed to traditional time-domain approaches, where periodicity evolves after transients are damped out during the solution procedure. This leads to a huge leap in efficiency for the frequency-domain approach as compared to the time-domain approach. The solution can also be obtained using a single blade with phase-shifted periodic boundary conditions. This reduction in domain leads to an increase in efficiency by a factor equal to the number of blades in the rotor. In the current work, the feasibility as well as potential advantages of obtaining helicopter flow solution in multiblade coordinates is also explored. The process of transformation of flow equations from a conventional rotor coordinate system to a multiblade coordinate system leads to the cancellation of harmonics other than those at the blade passage frequencies. Therefore, a reduced number of time locations per revolution are required to capture the retained harmonics. This further reduces the processing time and storage memory requirements. Another advantage of multiblade coordinate system is the simplicity of coupled aeroelastic formulation due to a direct relation between rotor aerodynamic forces and rotor motion parameters. The developed software implements the formulation based on Euler equations and incorporates a structured grid generation method. A distributed programming technique is implemented

  9. Damping identification in frequency domain using integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiwei; Sheng, Meiping; Ma, Jiangang; Zhang, Wulin

    2015-03-01

    A new method for damping identification of linear system in frequency domain is presented, by using frequency response function (FRF) with integral method. The FRF curve is firstly transformed to other type of frequency-related curve by changing the representations of horizontal and vertical axes. For the newly constructed frequency-related curve, integral is conducted and the area forming from the new curve is used to determine the damping. Three different methods based on integral are proposed in this paper, which are called FDI-1, FDI-2 and FDI-3 method, respectively. For a single degree of freedom (Sdof) system, the formulated relation of each method between integrated area and loss factor is derived theoretically. The numeral simulation and experiment results show that, the proposed integral methods have high precision, strong noise resistance and are very stable in repeated measurements. Among the three integral methods, FDI-3 method is the most recommended because of its higher accuracy and simpler algorithm. The new methods are limited to linear system in which modes are well separated, and for closely spaced mode system, mode decomposition process should be conducted firstly.

  10. A mixed finite element domain decomposition method for nearly elastic wave equations in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiaobing

    1996-12-31

    A non-overlapping domain decomposition iterative method is proposed and analyzed for mixed finite element methods for a sequence of noncoercive elliptic systems with radiation boundary conditions. These differential systems describe the motion of a nearly elastic solid in the frequency domain. The convergence of the iterative procedure is demonstrated and the rate of convergence is derived for the case when the domain is decomposed into subdomains in which each subdomain consists of an individual element associated with the mixed finite elements. The hybridization of mixed finite element methods plays a important role in the construction of the discrete procedure.

  11. Acoustic viscoelastic modeling by frequency-domain boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xizhu; Fu, Li-Yun; Sun, Weijia

    2017-04-01

    Earth medium is not completely elastic, with its viscosity resulting in attenuation and dispersion of seismic waves. Most viscoelastic numerical simulations are based on the finite-difference and finite-element methods. Targeted at viscoelastic numerical modeling for multilayered media, the constant- Q acoustic wave equation is transformed into the corresponding wave integral representation with its Green's function accounting for viscoelastic coefficients. An efficient alternative for full-waveform solution to the integral equation is proposed in this article by extending conventional frequency-domain boundary element methods to viscoelastic media. The viscoelastic boundary element method enjoys a distinct characteristic of the explicit use of boundary continuity conditions of displacement and traction, leading to a semi-analytical solution with sufficient accuracy for simulating the viscoelastic effect across irregular interfaces. Numerical experiments to study the viscoelastic absorption of different Q values demonstrate the accuracy and applicability of the method.

  12. Numerical methods for time-domain and frequency-domain analysis: applications in engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamas, R. D.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical methods are widely used for modeling different physical phenomena in engineering, especially when an analytic approach is not possible. Time-domain or frequency- domain type variations are generally investigated, depending on the nature of the process under consideration. Some methods originate from mechanics, although most of their applications belong to other fields, such as electromagnetism. Conversely, other methods were firstly developed for electromagnetism, but their field of application was extended to other fields. This paper presents some results that we have obtained by using a general purpose method for solving linear equations, i.e., the method of moments (MoM), and a time-domain method derived for electromagnetism, i.e., the Transmission Line Matrix method (TLM).

  13. Comparison of frequency-domain and time-domain rotorcraft vibration control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Active control of rotor-induced vibration in rotorcraft has received significant attention recently. Two classes of techniques have been proposed. The more developed approach works with harmonic analysis of measured time histories and is called the frequency-domain approach. The more recent approach computes the control input directly using the measured time history data and is called the time-domain approach. The report summarizes the results of a theoretical investigation to compare the two approaches. Five specific areas were addressed: (1) techniques to derive models needed for control design (system identification methods), (2) robustness with respect to errors, (3) transient response, (4) susceptibility to noise, and (5) implementation difficulties. The system identification methods are more difficult for the time-domain models. The time-domain approach is more robust (e.g., has higher gain and phase margins) than the frequency-domain approach. It might thus be possible to avoid doing real-time system identification in the time-domain approach by storing models at a number of flight conditions. The most significant error source is the variation in open-loop vibrations caused by pilot inputs, maneuvers or gusts. The implementation requirements are similar except that the time-domain approach can be much simpler to implement if real-time system identification were not necessary.

  14. Frequency-domain method based on the singular value decomposition for frequency-selective NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stoica, Petre; Sandgren, Niclas; Selén, Yngve; Vanhamme, Leentje; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2003-11-01

    In several applications of NMR spectroscopy the user is interested only in the components lying in a small frequency band of the spectrum. A frequency selective analysis deals precisely with this kind of NMR spectroscopy: parameter estimation of only those spectroscopic components that lie in a preselected frequency band of the NMR data spectrum, with as little interference as possible from the out-of-band components and in a computationally efficient way. In this paper we introduce a frequency-domain singular value decomposition (SVD)-based method for frequency selective spectroscopy that is computationally simple, statistically accurate, and which has a firm theoretical basis. To illustrate the good performance of the proposed method we present a number of numerical examples for both simulated and in vitro NMR data.

  15. Propagation Characteristics of Rectangular Waveguides at Terahertz Frequencies with Finite-Difference Frequency-Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Binke; Zhao, Chongfeng

    2014-01-01

    The 2-D finite-difference frequency-domain method (FDFD) combined with the surface impedance boundary condition (SIBC) was employed to analyze the propagation characteristics of hollow rectangular waveguides at Terahertz (THz) frequencies. The electromagnetic field components, in the interior of the waveguide, were discretized using central finite-difference schemes. Considering the hollow rectangular waveguide surrounded by a medium of finite conductivity, the electric and magnetic tangential field components on the metal surface were related by the SIBC. The surface impedance was calculated by the Drude dispersion model at THz frequencies, which was used to characterize the conductivity of the metal. By solving the Eigen equations, the propagation constants, including the attenuation constant and the phase constant, were obtained for a given frequency. The proposed method shows good applicability for full-wave analysis of THz waveguides with complex boundaries.

  16. Modeling of thermoacoustic systems using the nonlinear frequency domain method.

    PubMed

    de Jong, J A; Wijnant, Y H; Wilcox, D; de Boer, A

    2015-09-01

    When modeling thermoacoustic (TA) devices at high amplitude, nonlinear effects such as time-average mass flows, and the generation of higher harmonics can no longer be neglected. Thus far, modeling these effects in TA devices required a generally computationally costly time integration of the nonlinear governing equations. In this paper, a fast one-dimensional nonlinear model for TA devices is presented, which omits this costly time integration by directly solving the periodic steady state. The model is defined in the frequency domain, which eases the implementation of phase delays due to viscous resistance and thermoacoustic heat exchange. As a demonstration, the model is used to solve an experimental standing wave thermoacoustic engine. The obtained results agree with experimental results, as well as with results from a nonlinear time domain model from the literature. The low computational cost of this model opens the possibility to do optimization studies using a nonlinear TA model.

  17. On the Analysis Methods for the Time Domain and Frequency Domain Response of a Buried Objects*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poljak, Dragan; Šesnić, Silvestar; Cvetković, Mario

    2014-05-01

    There has been a continuous interest in the analysis of ground-penetrating radar systems and related applications in civil engineering [1]. Consequently, a deeper insight of scattering phenomena occurring in a lossy half-space, as well as the development of sophisticated numerical methods based on Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, Finite Element Method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Method of Moments (MoM) and various hybrid methods, is required, e.g. [2], [3]. The present paper deals with certain techniques for time and frequency domain analysis, respectively, of buried conducting and dielectric objects. Time domain analysis is related to the assessment of a transient response of a horizontal straight thin wire buried in a lossy half-space using a rigorous antenna theory (AT) approach. The AT approach is based on the space-time integral equation of the Pocklington type (time domain electric field integral equation for thin wires). The influence of the earth-air interface is taken into account via the simplified reflection coefficient arising from the Modified Image Theory (MIT). The obtained results for the transient current induced along the electrode due to the transmitted plane wave excitation are compared to the numerical results calculated via an approximate transmission line (TL) approach and the AT approach based on the space-frequency variant of the Pocklington integro-differential approach, respectively. It is worth noting that the space-frequency Pocklington equation is numerically solved via the Galerkin-Bubnov variant of the Indirect Boundary Element Method (GB-IBEM) and the corresponding transient response is obtained by the aid of inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT). The results calculated by means of different approaches agree satisfactorily. Frequency domain analysis is related to the assessment of frequency domain response of dielectric sphere using the full wave model based on the set of coupled electric field integral

  18. Frequency-domain method for discrete frequency noise prediction of rotors in arbitrary steady motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaretti, M.; Testa, C.; Bernardini, G.

    2012-12-01

    A novel frequency-domain formulation for the prediction of the tonal noise emitted by rotors in arbitrary steady motion is presented. It is derived from Farassat's 'Formulation 1A', that is a time-domain boundary integral representation for the solution of the Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings equation, and represents noise as harmonic response to body kinematics and aerodynamic loads via frequency-response-function matrices. The proposed frequency-domain solver is applicable to rotor configurations for which sound pressure levels of discrete tones are much higher than those of broadband noise. The numerical investigation concerns the analysis of noise produced by an advancing helicopter rotor in blade-vortex interaction conditions, as well as the examination of pressure disturbances radiated by the interaction of a marine propeller with a non-uniform inflow.

  19. Overview of multi-input frequency domain modal testing methods with an emphasis on sine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rost, Robert W.; Brown, David L.

    1988-01-01

    An overview of the current state of the art multiple-input, multiple-output modal testing technology is discussed. A very brief review of the current time domain methods is given. A detailed review of frequency and spatial domain methods is presented with an emphasis on sine testing.

  20. Spectral element method for elastic and acoustic waves in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Linlin; Zhou, Yuanguo; Wang, Jia-Min; Zhuang, Mingwei; Liu, Na; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-01

    Numerical techniques in time domain are widespread in seismic and acoustic modeling. In some applications, however, frequency-domain techniques can be advantageous over the time-domain approach when narrow band results are desired, especially if multiple sources can be handled more conveniently in the frequency domain. Moreover, the medium attenuation effects can be more accurately and conveniently modeled in the frequency domain. In this paper, we present a spectral-element method (SEM) in frequency domain to simulate elastic and acoustic waves in anisotropic, heterogeneous, and lossy media. The SEM is based upon the finite-element framework and has exponential convergence because of the use of GLL basis functions. The anisotropic perfectly matched layer is employed to truncate the boundary for unbounded problems. Compared with the conventional finite-element method, the number of unknowns in the SEM is significantly reduced, and higher order accuracy is obtained due to its spectral accuracy. To account for the acoustic-solid interaction, the domain decomposition method (DDM) based upon the discontinuous Galerkin spectral-element method is proposed. Numerical experiments show the proposed method can be an efficient alternative for accurate calculation of elastic and acoustic waves in frequency domain.

  1. Spectral element method for elastic and acoustic waves in frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Linlin; Zhou, Yuanguo; Wang, Jia-Min; Zhuang, Mingwei; Liu, Na; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-15

    Numerical techniques in time domain are widespread in seismic and acoustic modeling. In some applications, however, frequency-domain techniques can be advantageous over the time-domain approach when narrow band results are desired, especially if multiple sources can be handled more conveniently in the frequency domain. Moreover, the medium attenuation effects can be more accurately and conveniently modeled in the frequency domain. In this paper, we present a spectral-element method (SEM) in frequency domain to simulate elastic and acoustic waves in anisotropic, heterogeneous, and lossy media. The SEM is based upon the finite-element framework and has exponential convergence because of the use of GLL basis functions. The anisotropic perfectly matched layer is employed to truncate the boundary for unbounded problems. Compared with the conventional finite-element method, the number of unknowns in the SEM is significantly reduced, and higher order accuracy is obtained due to its spectral accuracy. To account for the acoustic-solid interaction, the domain decomposition method (DDM) based upon the discontinuous Galerkin spectral-element method is proposed. Numerical experiments show the proposed method can be an efficient alternative for accurate calculation of elastic and acoustic waves in frequency domain.

  2. Comparison of back projection methods of determining earthquake rupture process in time and frequency domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Wen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Back projection is a method to back project the seismic energy recorded in a seismic array back to the earthquake source region and determine the rupture process of a large earthquake. The method takes advantage of the coherence of seismic energy in a seismic array and is quick in determining some important properties of earthquake source. The method can be performed in both time and frequency domains. In time domain, the most conventional procedure is beam forming with some measures of suppressing the noise, such as the Nth root stacking, etc. In the frequency domain, the multiple signal classification method (MUSIC) estimates the direction of arrivals of multiple waves propagating through an array using the subspace method. The advantage of this method is the ability to study rupture properties at various frequencies and to resolve simultaneous arrivals making it suitable for detecting biliteral rupture of an earthquake source. We present a comparison of back projection results on some large earthquakes between the methods in time domain and frequency domain. The time-domain procedure produces an image that is smeared and exhibits some artifacts, although some enhancing stacking methods can at some extent alleviate the problem. On the other hand, the MUSIC method resolves clear multiple arrivals and provides higher resolution of rupture imaging.

  3. Determining XV-15 aeroelastic modes from flight data with frequency-domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1993-01-01

    The XV-15 tilt-rotor wing has six major aeroelastic modes that are close in frequency. To precisely excite individual modes during flight test, dual flaperon exciters with automatic frequency-sweep controls were installed. The resulting structural data were analyzed in the frequency domain (Fourier transformed). All spectral data were computed using chirp z-transforms. Modal frequencies and damping were determined by fitting curves to frequency-response magnitude and phase data. The results given in this report are for the XV-15 with its original metal rotor blades. Also, frequency and damping values are compared with theoretical predictions made using two different programs, CAMRAD and ASAP. The frequency-domain data-analysis method proved to be very reliable and adequate for tracking aeroelastic modes during flight-envelope expansion. This approach required less flight-test time and yielded mode estimations that were more repeatable, compared with the exponential-decay method previously used.

  4. Comparison of Frequency-Domain Array Methods for Studying Earthquake Rupture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y.; Yin, J.; Yao, H.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic array methods, in both time- and frequency- domains, have been widely used to study the rupture process and energy radiation of earthquakes. With better spatial resolution, the high-resolution frequency-domain methods, such as Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) (Schimdt, 1986; Meng et al., 2011) and the recently developed Compressive Sensing (CS) technique (Yao et al., 2011, 2013), are revealing new features of earthquake rupture processes. We have performed various tests on the methods of MUSIC, CS, minimum-variance distortionless response (MVDR) Beamforming and conventional Beamforming in order to better understand the advantages and features of these methods for studying earthquake rupture processes. We use the ricker wavelet to synthesize seismograms and use these frequency-domain techniques to relocate the synthetic sources we set, for instance, two sources separated in space but, their waveforms completely overlapping in the time domain. We also test the effects of the sliding window scheme on the recovery of a series of input sources, in particular, some artifacts that are caused by the sliding window scheme. Based on our tests, we find that CS, which is developed from the theory of sparsity inversion, has relatively high spatial resolution than the other frequency-domain methods and has better performance at lower frequencies. In high-frequency bands, MUSIC, as well as MVDR Beamforming, is more stable, especially in the multi-source situation. Meanwhile, CS tends to produce more artifacts when data have poor signal-to-noise ratio. Although these techniques can distinctly improve the spatial resolution, they still produce some artifacts along with the sliding of the time window. Furthermore, we propose a new method, which combines both the time-domain and frequency-domain techniques, to suppress these artifacts and obtain more reliable earthquake rupture images. Finally, we apply this new technique to study the 2013 Okhotsk deep mega earthquake

  5. Frequency- and Time-Domain Methods in Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bolisetti, Chandrakanth; Whittaker, Andrew S.; Coleman, Justin L.

    2015-06-01

    Soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis in the nuclear industry is currently performed using linear codes that function in the frequency domain. There is a consensus that these frequency-domain codes give reasonably accurate results for low-intensity ground motions that result in almost linear response. For higher intensity ground motions, which may result in nonlinear response in the soil, structure or at the vicinity of the foundation, the adequacy of frequency-domain codes is unproven. Nonlinear analysis, which is only possible in the time domain, is theoretically more appropriate in such cases. These methods are available but are rarely used due to the large computational requirements and a lack of experience with analysts and regulators. This paper presents an assessment of the linear frequency-domain code, SASSI, which is widely used in the nuclear industry, and the time-domain commercial finite-element code, LS-DYNA, for SSI analysis. The assessment involves benchmarking the SSI analysis procedure in LS-DYNA against SASSI for linearly elastic models. After affirming that SASSI and LS-DYNA result in almost identical responses for these models, they are used to perform nonlinear SSI analyses of two structures founded on soft soil. An examination of the results shows that, in spite of using identical material properties, the predictions of frequency- and time-domain codes are significantly different in the presence of nonlinear behavior such as gapping and sliding of the foundation.

  6. New optical frequency domain differential mode delay measurement method for a multimode optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Ahn, T; Moon, S; Youk, Y; Jung, Y; Oh, K; Kim, D

    2005-05-30

    A novel mode analysis method and differential mode delay (DMD) measurement technique for a multimode optical fiber based on optical frequency domain reflectometry has been proposed for the first time. We have used a conventional OFDR with a tunable external cavity laser and a Michelson interferometer. A few-mode optical multimode fiber was prepared to test our proposed measurement technique. We have also compared the OFDR measurement results with those obtained using a traditional time-domain measurement method.

  7. Identification of XV-15 aeroelastic modes using frequency-domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, Cecil W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1989-01-01

    The XV-15 Tilt-Rotor wing has six major aeroelastic modes that are close in frequency. To precisely excite individual modes during flight test, dual flaperon exciters with automatic frequency-sweep controls were installed. The resulting structural data were analyzed in the frequency domain (Fourier transformed) with cross spectral and transfer function methods. Modal frequencies and damping were determined by performing curve fits to transfer function magnitude and phase data and to cross spectral magnitude data. Results are given for the XV-15 with its original metal rotor blades. Frequency and damping values are also compared with earlier predictions.

  8. Using frequency-domain methods to identify XV-15 aeroelastic modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    The XV-15 Tilt-Rotor wing has six major aeroelastic modes that are close in frequency. To precisely excite individual modes during flight test, dual flaperon exciters with automatic frequency-sweep controls were installed. The resulting structural data were analyzed in the frequency domain (Fourier transformed) with cross spectral and transfer function methods. Modal frequencies and damping were determined by performing curve fits to transfer function magnitude and phase data and to cross spectral magnitude data. Results are given for the XV-15 with its original metal rotor blades. Frequency and damping values are also compared with earlier predictions.

  9. Maximum likelihood method for estimating airplane stability and control parameters from flight data in frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.

    1980-01-01

    A frequency domain maximum likelihood method is developed for the estimation of airplane stability and control parameters from measured data. The model of an airplane is represented by a discrete-type steady state Kalman filter with time variables replaced by their Fourier series expansions. The likelihood function of innovations is formulated, and by its maximization with respect to unknown parameters the estimation algorithm is obtained. This algorithm is then simplified to the output error estimation method with the data in the form of transformed time histories, frequency response curves, or spectral and cross-spectral densities. The development is followed by a discussion on the equivalence of the cost function in the time and frequency domains, and on advantages and disadvantages of the frequency domain approach. The algorithm developed is applied in four examples to the estimation of longitudinal parameters of a general aviation airplane using computer generated and measured data in turbulent and still air. The cost functions in the time and frequency domains are shown to be equivalent; therefore, both approaches are complementary and not contradictory. Despite some computational advantages of parameter estimation in the frequency domain, this approach is limited to linear equations of motion with constant coefficients.

  10. Phase-modulation method for AWG phase-error measurement in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kazumasa; Hirose, Tomohiro

    2009-12-15

    We report a phase-modulation method for measuring arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) phase error in the frequency domain. By combining the method with a digital sampling technique that we have already reported, we can measure the phase error within an accuracy of +/-0.055 rad for the center 90% waveguides in the array even when no carrier frequencies are generated in the beat signal from the interferometer.

  11. Short term frequency stability measurement for narrow linewidth laser by time domain self-heterodyne method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lidong; Sun, Xiaoyan; Bu, Xiande; Li, Binglin

    2016-11-01

    Based on the time delay self-heterodyne method to measure the laser linewidth, the short-term linewidth variation of a narrow linewidth laser is experimentally studied and analyzed, and then a time domain self-heterodyne method is proposed to measure the short-term frequency stability of narrow linewidth laser. The Rayleigh backscattering frequency of a pulsed light propagating in an optical fiber with length of 100km is used as the local oscillation frequency with relatively long time duration to measure the frequency variation of the narrow linewidth laser. By heterodyne between the laser frequency and the local oscillation frequency, the variation of the laser frequency is presented in the heterodyne radio frequency (IF). Then the time domain data of the heterodyne IF are extracted by an oscilloscope and through short time Fourier transform the frequency from the laser in different time segments is obtained. Experimental results demonstrate that for narrow linewidth laser its frequency in short-term is randomly fluctuating with a range less than triple of the laser linewidth. The measurement and evaluation of laser short-term frequency stability benefits the application of narrow linewidth lasers in distributed optical fiber sensing area.

  12. Accuracy of time-domain and frequency-domain methods used to characterize catchment transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godsey, S. E.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    The mean residence time - the average time that it takes rainfall to reach the stream - is a basic parameter used to characterize catchment processes. Heterogeneities in these processes lead to a distribution of travel times around the mean residence time. By examining this travel time distribution, we can better predict catchment response to contamination events. A catchment system with shorter residence times or narrower distributions will respond quickly to contamination events, whereas systems with longer residence times or longer-tailed distributions will respond more slowly to those same contamination events. The travel time distribution of a catchment is typically inferred from time series of passive tracers (e.g., water isotopes or chloride) in precipitation and streamflow. Variations in the tracer concentration in streamflow are usually damped compared to those in precipitation, because precipitation inputs from different storms (with different tracer signatures) are mixed within the catchment. Mathematically, this mixing process is represented by the convolution of the travel time distribution and the precipitation tracer inputs to generate the stream tracer outputs. Because convolution in the time domain is equivalent to multiplication in the frequency domain, it is relatively straightforward to estimate the parameters of the travel time distribution in either domain. In the time domain, the parameters describing the travel time distribution are typically estimated by maximizing the goodness of fit between the modeled and measured tracer outputs. In the frequency domain, the travel time distribution parameters can be estimated by fitting a power-law curve to the ratio of precipitation spectral power to stream spectral power. Differences between the methods of parameter estimation in the time and frequency domain mean that these two methods may respond differently to variations in data quality, record length and sampling frequency. Here we evaluate how

  13. Novel frequency domain techniques and advances in Finite Difference Time domain (FDTD) method for efficient solution of multiscale electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayappan, Kadappan

    With the advent of sub-micron technologies and increasing awareness of Electromagnetic Interference and Compatibility (EMI/EMC) issues, designers are often interested in full- wave solutions of complete systems, taking to account a variety of environments in which the system operates. However, attempts to do this substantially increase the complexities involved in computing full-wave solutions, especially when the problems involve multi- scale geometries with very fine features. For such problems, even the well-established numerical methods, such as the time domain technique FDTD and the frequency domain methods FEM and MoM, are often challenged to the limits of their capabilities. In an attempt to address such challenges, three novel techniques have been introduced in this work, namely Dipole Moment (DM) Approach, Recursive Update in Frequency Domain (RUFD) and New Finite Difference Time Domain ( vFDTD). Furthermore, the efficacy of the above techniques has been illustrated, via several examples, and the results obtained by proposed techniques have been compared with other existing numerical methods for the purpose of validation. The DM method is a new physics-based approach for formulating MoM problems, which is based on the use of dipole moments (DMs), as opposed to the conventional Green's functions. The absence of the Green's functions, as well as those of the vector and scalar potentials, helps to eliminate two of the key sources of difficulties in the conventional MoM formulation, namely the singularity and low-frequency problems. Specifically, we show that there are no singularities that we need to be concerned with in the DM formulation; hence, this obviates the need for special techniques for integrating these singularities. Yet another salutary feature of the DM approach is its ability to handle thin and lossy structures, or whether they are metallic, dielectric-type, or even combinations thereof. We have found that the DM formulation can handle these

  14. A frequency-spatial domain decomposition (FSDD) method for operational modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingmi; Wang, Tong; Tamura, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    Following a brief review of the development of operational modal identification techniques, we describe a new method named frequency-spatial domain decomposition (FSDD), with theoretical background, formulation and algorithm. Three typical applications to civil engineering structures are presented to demonstrate the procedure and features of the method: a large-span stadium roof for finite-element model verification, a highway bridge for damage detection and a long-span cable-stayed bridge for structural health monitoring.

  15. 2.5-D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modelling using finite-element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-guo; Huang, Xing-xing; Liu, Wei-fang; Zhao, Wei-jun; Song, Jian-yong; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Shang-xu

    2017-10-01

    2-D seismic modelling has notable dynamic information discrepancies with field data because of the implicit line-source assumption, whereas 3-D modelling suffers from a huge computational burden. The 2.5-D approach is able to overcome both of the aforementioned limitations. In general, the earth model is treated as an elastic material, but the real media is viscous. In this study, we develop an accurate and efficient frequency-domain finite-element method (FEM) for modelling 2.5-D viscoelastic wave propagation. To perform the 2.5-D approach, we assume that the 2-D viscoelastic media are based on the Kelvin-Voigt rheological model and a 3-D point source. The viscoelastic wave equation is temporally and spatially Fourier transformed into the frequency-wavenumber domain. Then, we systematically derive the weak form and its spatial discretization of 2.5-D viscoelastic wave equations in the frequency-wavenumber domain through the Galerkin weighted residual method for FEM. Fixing a frequency, the 2-D problem for each wavenumber is solved by FEM. Subsequently, a composite Simpson formula is adopted to estimate the inverse Fourier integration to obtain the 3-D wavefield. We implement the stiffness reduction method (SRM) to suppress artificial boundary reflections. The results show that this absorbing boundary condition is valid and efficient in the frequency-wavenumber domain. Finally, three numerical models, an unbounded homogeneous medium, a half-space layered medium and an undulating topography medium, are established. Numerical results validate the accuracy and stability of 2.5-D solutions and present the adaptability of finite-element method to complicated geographic conditions. The proposed 2.5-D modelling strategy has the potential to address modelling studies on wave propagation in real earth media in an accurate and efficient way.

  16. Testing for Granger Causality in the Frequency Domain: A Phase Resampling Method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siwei; Molenaar, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces phase resampling, an existing but rarely used surrogate data method for making statistical inferences of Granger causality in frequency domain time series analysis. Granger causality testing is essential for establishing causal relations among variables in multivariate dynamic processes. However, testing for Granger causality in the frequency domain is challenging due to the nonlinear relation between frequency domain measures (e.g., partial directed coherence, generalized partial directed coherence) and time domain data. Through a simulation study, we demonstrate that phase resampling is a general and robust method for making statistical inferences even with short time series. With Gaussian data, phase resampling yields satisfactory type I and type II error rates in all but one condition we examine: when a small effect size is combined with an insufficient number of data points. Violations of normality lead to slightly higher error rates but are mostly within acceptable ranges. We illustrate the utility of phase resampling with two empirical examples involving multivariate electroencephalography (EEG) and skin conductance data.

  17. Fast time- and frequency-domain finite-element methods for electromagnetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woochan

    Fast electromagnetic analysis in time and frequency domain is of critical importance to the design of integrated circuits (IC) and other advanced engineering products and systems. Many IC structures constitute a very large scale problem in modeling and simulation, the size of which also continuously grows with the advancement of the processing technology. This results in numerical problems beyond the reach of existing most powerful computational resources. Different from many other engineering problems, the structure of most ICs is special in the sense that its geometry is of Manhattan type and its dielectrics are layered. Hence, it is important to develop structure-aware algorithms that take advantage of the structure specialties to speed up the computation. In addition, among existing time-domain methods, explicit methods can avoid solving a matrix equation. However, their time step is traditionally restricted by the space step for ensuring the stability of a time-domain simulation. Therefore, making explicit time-domain methods unconditionally stable is important to accelerate the computation. In addition to time-domain methods, frequency-domain methods have suffered from an indefinite system that makes an iterative solution difficult to converge fast. The first contribution of this work is a fast time-domain finite-element algorithm for the analysis and design of very large-scale on-chip circuits. The structure specialty of on-chip circuits such as Manhattan geometry and layered permittivity is preserved in the proposed algorithm. As a result, the large-scale matrix solution encountered in the 3-D circuit analysis is turned into a simple scaling of the solution of a small 1-D matrix, which can be obtained in linear (optimal) complexity with negligible cost. Furthermore, the time step size is not sacrificed, and the total number of time steps to be simulated is also significantly reduced, thus achieving a total cost reduction in CPU time. The second contribution

  18. Frequency-Domain Chromatic Dispersion Equalization Using Overlap-Add Methods in Coherent Optical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T.; Jacobsen, G.; Popov, S.; Forzati, M.; Mårtensson, J.; Mussolin, M.; Li, J.; Wang, K.; Zhang, Y.; Friberg, A. T.

    2011-06-01

    The frequency domain equalizers (FDEs) employing two types of overlap-add zero-padding (OLA-ZP) methods are applied to compensate the chromatic dispersion in a 112-Gbit/s non-return-to-zero polarization division multiplexed quadrature phase shift keying (NRZ-PDM-QPSK) coherent optical transmission system. Simulation results demonstrate that the OLA-ZP methods can achieve the same acceptable performance as the overlapsave method. The required minimum overlap (or zero-padding) in the FDE is derived, and the optimum fast Fourier transform length to minimize the computational complexity is also analyzed.

  19. Single channel speech separation in modulation frequency domain based on a novel pitch range estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodzadeh, Azar; Abutalebi, Hamid Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Sheikhzadeh, Hamid

    2012-12-01

    Computational Auditory Scene Analysis (CASA) has been the focus in recent literature for speech separation from monaural mixtures. The performance of current CASA systems on voiced speech separation strictly depends on the robustness of the algorithm used for pitch frequency estimation. We propose a new system that estimates pitch (frequency) range of a target utterance and separates voiced portions of target speech. The algorithm, first, estimates the pitch range of target speech in each frame of data in the modulation frequency domain, and then, uses the estimated pitch range for segregating the target speech. The method of pitch range estimation is based on an onset and offset algorithm. Speech separation is performed by filtering the mixture signal with a mask extracted from the modulation spectrogram. A systematic evaluation shows that the proposed system extracts the majority of target speech signal with minimal interference and outperforms previous systems in both pitch extraction and voiced speech separation.

  20. Parallel full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain by the Gauss-Newton method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zhuang, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain. We first test the inversion ability of three numerical optimization methods, i.e., the steepest-descent method, the Newton-CG method and the Gauss- Newton method, for a simple model. The results show that the Gauss-Newton method performs well and efficiently. Then numerical computations for a benchmark model named Marmousi model by the Gauss-Newton method are implemented. Parallel algorithm based on message passing interface (MPI) is applied as the inversion is a typical large-scale computational problem. Numerical computations show that the Gauss-Newton method has good ability to reconstruct the complex model.

  1. Frequency domain measurement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eischer, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    Stable frequency sources and signal processing blocks were characterized by their noise spectra, both discrete and random, in the frequency domain. Conventional measures are outlined, and systems for performing the measurements are described. Broad coverage of system configurations which were found useful is given. Their functioning and areas of application are discussed briefly. Particular attention is given to some of the potential error sources in the measurement procedures, system configurations, double-balanced-mixer-phase-detectors, and application of measuring instruments.

  2. 3D micro profile measurement with the method of spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongxiang

    2015-10-01

    3D micro profiles are often needed for measurement in many fields, e.g., binary optics, electronic industry, mechanical manufacturing, aeronautic and space industry, etc. In the case where height difference between two neighboring points of a test profile is equal to or greater than λ / 4, microscopic interferometry based on laser source will no longer be applicable because of the uncertainty in phase unwrapping. As white light possesses the characteristic of interference length approximate to zero, applying it for micro profilometry can avoid the trouble and can yield accurate results. Using self-developed Mirau-type scanning interference microscope, a step-like sample was tested twice, with 128 scanning interferograms recorded for each test. To process each set of the interferograms, the method of spatial frequency domain analysis was adopted. That is, for each point, by use of Furrier transform, white-light interference intensities were decomposed in spatial frequency domain, thus obtaining phase values corresponding to different wavenumbers; by using least square fitting on phases and wave numbers, a group-velocity OPD was gained for the very point; and finally in terms of the relation between relative height and the group-velocity OPD, the profile of the test sample was obtained. Two tests yielded same profile result for the sample, and step heights obtained were 50.88 nm and 50.94 nm, respectively. Meantime, the sample was also measured with a Zygo Newview 7200 topography instrument, with same profile result obtained and step height differing by 0.9 nm. In addition, data processing results indicate that chromatic dispersion equal to and higher than 2nd order is negligible when applying spatial frequency domain analysis method.

  3. Tuning fractional PID controllers for a Steward platform based on frequency domain and artificial intelligence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copot, Cosmin; Zhong, Yu; Ionescu, Clara; Keyser, Robin

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, two methods to tune a fractional-order PI λ D μ controller for a mechatronic system are presented. The first method is based on a genetic algorithm to obtain the parameter values for the fractionalorder PI λ D μ controller by global optimization. The second method used to design the fractional-order PI λ D μ controller relies on an auto-tuning approach by meeting some specifications in the frequency domain. The real-time experiments are conducted using a Steward platform which consists of a table tilted by six servo-motors with a ball on the top of the table. The considered system is a 6 degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) motion platform. The feedback on the position of the ball is obtained from images acquired by a visual sensor mounted above the platform. The fractional-order controllers were implemented and the performances of the steward platform are analyzed.

  4. Evaluation of a wave-vector-frequency-domain method for nonlinear wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yun; Tao, Molei; Clement, Greg T

    2011-01-01

    A wave-vector-frequency-domain method is presented to describe one-directional forward or backward acoustic wave propagation in a nonlinear homogeneous medium. Starting from a frequency-domain representation of the second-order nonlinear acoustic wave equation, an implicit solution for the nonlinear term is proposed by employing the Green's function. Its approximation, which is more suitable for numerical implementation, is used. An error study is carried out to test the efficiency of the model by comparing the results with the Fubini solution. It is shown that the error grows as the propagation distance and step-size increase. However, for the specific case tested, even at a step size as large as one wavelength, sufficient accuracy for plane-wave propagation is observed. A two-dimensional steered transducer problem is explored to verify the nonlinear acoustic field directional independence of the model. A three-dimensional single-element transducer problem is solved to verify the forward model by comparing it with an existing nonlinear wave propagation code. Finally, backward-projection behavior is examined. The sound field over a plane in an absorptive medium is backward projected to the source and compared with the initial field, where good agreement is observed.

  5. Evaluation of a wave-vector-frequency-domain method for nonlinear wave propagation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yun; Tao, Molei; Clement, Greg T.

    2011-01-01

    A wave-vector-frequency-domain method is presented to describe one-directional forward or backward acoustic wave propagation in a nonlinear homogeneous medium. Starting from a frequency-domain representation of the second-order nonlinear acoustic wave equation, an implicit solution for the nonlinear term is proposed by employing the Green’s function. Its approximation, which is more suitable for numerical implementation, is used. An error study is carried out to test the efficiency of the model by comparing the results with the Fubini solution. It is shown that the error grows as the propagation distance and step-size increase. However, for the specific case tested, even at a step size as large as one wavelength, sufficient accuracy for plane-wave propagation is observed. A two-dimensional steered transducer problem is explored to verify the nonlinear acoustic field directional independence of the model. A three-dimensional single-element transducer problem is solved to verify the forward model by comparing it with an existing nonlinear wave propagation code. Finally, backward-projection behavior is examined. The sound field over a plane in an absorptive medium is backward projected to the source and compared with the initial field, where good agreement is observed. PMID:21302985

  6. Adaptive eigenspace method for inverse scattering problems in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grote, Marcus J.; Kray, Marie; Nahum, Uri

    2017-02-01

    A nonlinear optimization method is proposed for the solution of inverse scattering problems in the frequency domain, when the scattered field is governed by the Helmholtz equation. The time-harmonic inverse medium problem is formulated as a PDE-constrained optimization problem and solved by an inexact truncated Newton-type iteration. Instead of a grid-based discrete representation, the unknown wave speed is projected to a particular finite-dimensional basis of eigenfunctions, which is iteratively adapted during the optimization. Truncating the adaptive eigenspace (AE) basis at a (small and slowly increasing) finite number of eigenfunctions effectively introduces regularization into the inversion and thus avoids the need for standard Tikhonov-type regularization. Both analytical and numerical evidence underpins the accuracy of the AE representation. Numerical experiments demonstrate the efficiency and robustness to missing or noisy data of the resulting adaptive eigenspace inversion method.

  7. Electromagnetic coupling in frequency-domain induced polarization data: a method for removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, Partha S.; Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    2001-04-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) coupling is generally considered to be noise in induced polarization (IP) data and interpretation is difficult when its contribution is large compared to the IP signal. The effect is exacerbated by conductive environments and large-array survey geometries designed to explore deeper targets. In this paper we present a methodology to remove EM coupling from frequency-domain IP data. We first investigate the effect of EM coupling on the IP data and derive the necessary equations to represent the IP effect for both amplitude and phase responses of the signal. The separation of the inductive response from the total response in the low-frequency regime is derived using the electric field due to a horizontal electric dipole and it is assumed that at low frequencies the interaction of EM effects and IP effects is negligible. The total electric field is then expressed as a product of a scalar function, which is due to IP effects, and an electric field, which depends on the EM coupling response. It is this representation that enables us to obtain the IP response from EM-coupling-contaminated data. To compute the EM coupling response we recognize that conductivity information is necessary. We illustrate this with a synthetic example. The removal method developed in this work for the phase and the per cent frequency effect (PFE) data are applicable to 1-D, 2-D and 3-D structures. The practical utility of the method is illustrated on a 2-D field example that is typical of mineral exploration problems.

  8. An improved wave-vector frequency-domain method for nonlinear wave modeling.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yun; Tao, Molei; Cannata, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a recently developed wave-vector frequency-domain method for nonlinear wave modeling is improved and verified by numerical simulations and underwater experiments. Higher order numeric schemes are proposed that significantly increase the modeling accuracy, thereby allowing for a larger step size and shorter computation time. The improved algorithms replace the left-point Riemann sum in the original algorithm by the trapezoidal or Simpson's integration. Plane waves and a phased array were first studied to numerically validate the model. It is shown that the left-point Riemann sum, trapezoidal, and Simpson's integration have first-, second-, and third-order global accuracy, respectively. A highly focused therapeutic transducer was then used for experimental verifications. Short high-intensity pulses were generated. 2-D scans were conducted at a prefocal plane, which were later used as the input to the numerical model to predict the acoustic field at other planes. Good agreement is observed between simulations and experiments.

  9. Ultrasonic guided wave based damage imaging by time-reversal method in frequency-wavenumber domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. G.; Xu, B. Q.; Luo, Y.; Xu, G. D.; Lu, L. Z.

    2017-05-01

    More attention has been drawn to ultrasonic guided waves (UGW) based damage detection method for its advantages of wide range inspection of large scale structures. However, complex propagation characteristics of guided waves as well as traditional contact ultrasonic transducers limit its application for the practical damage detection. By combining Scanning Laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) technology, Time-Reversal method in frequency-wavenumber domain (f-k RTM) can compensate for the dispersive nature of Lamb waves, localize multiple damage sites and identify their sizes without time consuming numerical calculation. In this work, we adopt f-k RTM for damage detection in plate-like structure. Instead of SLDV in experiment, 3D finite element numerical method is adopted to obtain scattered ultrasonic guided wavefield data with high spatial resolution. The direct path waves were extracted to obtain the incident wavefield while the scattered signals were used to calculate the scattering wave field. Damage imaging can also be achieved by introducing crosscorrelation imaging condition. Imaging results show that the method is very effective for crack localization and boundary shape-recognition. Numerical simulation results and imaging algorithm laid the foundation for the method applied in experiment and practice.

  10. Ruby crystal for demonstrating time- and frequency-domain methods of fluorescence lifetime measurements.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Danielle E; Majumdar, Zigurts K; Heiss, Gregor J; Clegg, Robert M

    2006-11-01

    We present experiments that are convenient and educational for measuring fluorescence lifetimes with both time- and frequency-domain methods. The sample is ruby crystal, which has a lifetime of about 3.5 milliseconds, and is easy to use as a class-room demonstration. The experiments and methods of data analysis are used in the lab section of a class on optical spectroscopy, where we go through the theory and applications of fluorescence. Because the fluorescence decay time of ruby is in the millisecond region, the instrumentation for this experiment can be constructed easily and inexpensively compared to the nanosecond-resolved instrumentation required for most fluorescent compounds, which have nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. The methods are applicable to other luminescent compounds with decay constants from microseconds and longer, such as transition metal and lanthanide complexes and phosphorescent samples. The experiments, which clearly demonstrate the theory and methods of measuring temporally resolved fluorescence, are instructive and demonstrate what the students have learned in the lectures without the distraction of highly sophisticated instrumentation.

  11. A frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes method including acoustic damping by eddy viscosity using RANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Andreas; Kierkegaard, Axel; Weng, Chenyang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a method for including damping of acoustic energy in regions of strong turbulence is derived for a linearized Navier-Stokes method in the frequency domain. The proposed method is validated and analyzed in 2D only, although the formulation is fully presented in 3D. The result is applied in a study of the linear interaction between the acoustic and the hydrodynamic field in a 2D T-junction, subject to grazing flow at Mach 0.1. Part of the acoustic energy at the upstream edge of the junction is shed as harmonically oscillating disturbances, which are conveyed across the shear layer over the junction, where they interact with the acoustic field. As the acoustic waves travel in regions of strong shear, there is a need to include the interaction between the background turbulence and the acoustic field. For this purpose, the oscillation of the background turbulence Reynold's stress, due to the acoustic field, is modeled using an eddy Newtonian model assumption. The time averaged flow is first solved for using RANS along with a k-ε turbulence model. The spatially varying turbulent eddy viscosity is then added to the spatially invariant kinematic viscosity in the acoustic set of equations. The response of the 2D T-junction to an incident acoustic field is analyzed via a plane wave scattering matrix model, and the result is compared to experimental data for a T-junction of rectangular ducts. A strong improvement in the agreement between calculation and experimental data is found when the modification proposed in this paper is implemented. Discrepancies remaining are likely due to inaccuracies in the selected turbulence model, which is known to produce large errors e.g. for flows with significant rotation, which the grazing flow across the T-junction certainly is. A natural next step is therefore to test the proposed methodology together with more sophisticated turbulence models.

  12. Equations for the angles of arrival and departure for multivariable root loci using frequency-domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagle, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    Frequency domain methods are used to study the angles of arrival and departure for multivariable root loci. Explicit equations are obtained. For a special class of poles and zeros, some simpler equations that are generalizations of the single input/single output equations are presented.

  13. Substructure coupling in the frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Frequency domain analysis was found to be a suitable method for determining the transient response of systems subjected to a wide variety of loads. However, since a large number of calculations are performed within the discrete frequency loop, the method loses it computational efficiency if the loads must be represented by a large number of discrete frequencies. It was also discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain work particularly well for analyzing structural system with a small number of interface and loaded degrees of freedom. It was discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain can lead to an efficient method of obtaining natural frequencies of undamped structures. It was also found that the damped natural frequencies of a system may be determined using frequency domain techniques.

  14. Method for measuring the phase error distribution of a wideband arrayed waveguide grating in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kazumasa; Satoh, Shin-ichi

    2006-02-01

    We describe a method for measuring the phase error distribution of an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) in the frequency domain when the free spectral range (FSR) of the AWG is so wide that it cannot be covered by one tunable laser source. Our method is to sweep the light frequency in the neighborhoods of two successive peaks in the AWG transmission spectrum by using two laser sources with different tuning ranges. The method was confirmed experimentally by applying it to a 160 GHz spaced AWG with a FSR of 11 THz. The variations in the derived phase error data were very small at +/-0.02 rad around the central arrayed waveguides.

  15. Efficient frequency-domain channel equalization methods for dual-polarization orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing/offset quadrature amplitude modulation-passive optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bangjiang; Fang, Xi; Tang, Xuan; Lin, Chun; Li, Yiwei; Zhang, Shihao; Wu, Yi; Li, Hui

    2016-10-01

    We present dual-polarization orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing/offset quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM/OQAM) transmission for passive optical network (PON) with intensity modulation and direct detection, which has high spectral efficiency and high robustness against chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization mode dispersion (PMD). The frequency-domain optical fiber channel transmission model for dual-polarization OFDM/OQAM-PON with the CD- and PMD-induced intrinsic imaginary interference (IMI) effect is systemically deduced. The intrasymbol frequency-domain averaging (ISFA) and minimum mean-squared error (MMSE) with the full loaded (FL) and half loaded (HL) preamble structures are used to mitigate the IMI effect. Compared with the conventional interference approximation method, the ISFA and MMSE offer improved receiver sensitivity. For channel estimation, the FL method is more effective than the HL method in mitigating the IMI effect and optical noise.

  16. Frequency Domain Speech Coding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    perceptible affect on the sound of the reconstructed noiselike speech . It is possible that the frequency bands need not be mel scaled. Equally spaced frequency...levels seemed to affect the quality of the reproduced speech more than did the number of amplitude quantization levels. Informal listening test...the original. Eliminating spectral components has an adverse affect on the quality of reproduced speech . The whole process of selecting frequency and

  17. Frequency domain dipole localization: extensions of the method and applications to auditory and visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Raz, J; Biggins, C A; Turetsky, B; Fein, G

    1993-09-01

    We describe a statistical frequency domain approach to localizing equivalent dipole generators of human brain evoked potentials. The frequency domain representation allows considerable data reduction, constrains the magnitude function of the dipoles to be smooth, and accounts for the statistical properties of the background EEG. A previous paper described a restrictive model in which the dipole orientations were assumed to be fixed over time, and only one dipole was allowed. In this paper, we consider the more general model in which the orientation can vary over time, and which includes multiple dipole generators. The varying orientation model has the practical advantage of being more nearly linear and more flexible than the fixed orientation model, which facilitates convergence of the iterative fitting algorithm. We suggest a measure of goodness-of-fit that compares the likelihood of the dipole model with the likelihoods of saturated and null models. We report the results of fitting the model to recorded auditory and visual evoked potentials. A single dipole with fixed orientation seems to be an adequate model of the auditory midlatency response, while two dipoles with varying orientation are needed to fit the later P200 component. Analysis of the visual P100 response to unilateral stimulation localized a generator in the contralateral occipital cortex, as expected from anatomical considerations. A two-dipole model fit the visual P100 response of bilateral stimulations, and the locations of the two dipoles were similar to the locations obtained by single-dipole fits to the responses to left and right unilateral stimuli.

  18. Frequency-Domain Optical Mammogram

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    have performed the proposed analysis of frequency-domain optical mammograms for a clinical population of about 150 patients. This analysis has led to...model the propagation of light in tissue14-20 have led to new approaches to optical mammography. As The authors are with the Department of Electrical...Modulation Methods, and Signal Detection /406 7.2.1 Lasers and arc lamps / 407’ 7.2.2 Pulsed sources / 407 7.2.3 Laser diodes and light-emitting diodes ( LEDs

  19. Equations for the angles of arrival and departure for multivariable root loci using frequency-domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagle, A. E.; Levy, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    Frequency domain methods are developed to obtain explicit equations for the angles of arrival and departure for multivariable root loci. The techniques involve an evaluation of polynomials formulated within the transfer function matrix. The equations defined require simpler computations than the state-space results of Shaked (1976). A class of higher order poles and zeros is formulated in terms of simpler equations than Shaked's, and the equations are shown to be generalizations of the single-input-single-output root locus equations.

  20. Method and apparatus for determining shaliness and oil saturations in earth formations using induced polarization in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1982-11-16

    An apparatus is disclosed for borehole measurements of the induced polarization of earth formations. The apparatus consists of an induced polarization logger capable of measuring both in-phase and quadrature conductivities in the frequency domain. A method is described which uses these measurements to determine cation exchange capacity per unit pore volume, Qv, brine conductivity, Cw, and oil and water saturations, So and Sw, in shaly sands.

  1. Method for vector characterization of polar liquids using frequency-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Shimul C.; Grant, James P.; Ma, Yong; Khalid, A.; Hong, Feng; Cumming, David R. S.

    2011-09-01

    A device for performing vector transmission spectroscopy on aqueous and polar solvent specimens at terahertz frequencies is presented. The device enables the direct measurement of the complex dielectric function across the terahertz band using a Fourier transform IR spectrometer for lossy solutions. Using microfluidic sampling, specimen handling is straightforward and direct measurements on polar specimens are made possible. The method is scalable to longer or shorter wavelengths.

  2. Calculation of the magnetic gradient tensor from total magnetic anomaly field based on regularized method in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Gang; Zhang, Yingtang; Mi, Songlin; Fan, Hongbo; Li, Zhining

    2016-11-01

    To obtain accurate magnetic gradient tensor data, a fast and robust calculation method based on regularized method in frequency domain was proposed. Using the potential field theory, the transform formula in frequency domain was deduced in order to calculate the magnetic gradient tensor from the pre-existing total magnetic anomaly data. By analyzing the filter characteristics of the Vertical vector transform operator (VVTO) and Gradient tensor transform operator (GTTO), we proved that the conventional transform process was unstable which would zoom in the high-frequency part of the data in which measuring noise locate. Due to the existing unstable problem that led to a low signal-to-noise (SNR) for the calculated result, we introduced regularized method in this paper. By selecting the optimum regularization parameters of different transform phases using the C-norm approach, the high frequency noise was restrained and the SNR was improved effectively. Numerical analysis demonstrates that most value and characteristics of the calculated data by the proposed method compare favorably with reference magnetic gradient tensor data. In addition, calculated magnetic gradient tensor components form real aeromagnetic survey provided better resolution of the magnetic sources and original profile.

  3. Frequency Domain Identification Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Chung-Wen

    1996-01-01

    This report documents software written in MATLAB programming language for performing identification of systems from frequency response functions. MATLAB is a commercial software environment which allows easy manipulation of data matrices and provides other intrinsic matrix functions capabilities. Algorithms programmed in this collection of subroutines have been documented elsewhere but all references are provided in this document. A main feature of this software is the use of matrix fraction descriptions and system realization theory to identify state space models directly from test data. All subroutines have templates for the user to use as guidelines.

  4. Frequency Domain Analysis of Beat-Less Control Method for Converter-Inverter Driving Systems Applied to AC Electric Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Akira

    In inverter-converter driving systems for AC electric cars, the DC input voltage of an inverter contains a ripple component with a frequency that is twice as high as the line voltage frequency, because of a single-phase converter. The ripple component of the inverter input voltage causes pulsations on torques and currents of driving motors. To decrease the pulsations, a beat-less control method, which modifies a slip frequency depending on the ripple component, is applied to the inverter control. In the present paper, the beat-less control method was analyzed in the frequency domain. In the first step of the analysis, transfer functions, which revealed the relationship among the ripple component of the inverter input voltage, the slip frequency, the motor torque pulsation and the current pulsation, were derived with a synchronous rotating model of induction motors. An analysis model of the beat-less control method was then constructed using the transfer functions. The optimal setting of the control method was obtained according to the analysis model. The transfer functions and the analysis model were verified through simulations.

  5. An objective frequency domain method for quantifying confined aquifer compressible storage using Earth and atmospheric tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acworth, R. Ian; Halloran, Landon J. S.; Rau, Gabriel C.; Cuthbert, Mark O.; Bernardi, Tony L.

    2016-11-01

    The groundwater hydraulic head response to the worldwide and ubiquitous atmospheric tide at 2 cycles per day (cpd) is a direct function of confined aquifer compressible storage. The ratio of the responses of hydraulic head to the atmospheric pressure change is a measure of aquifer barometric efficiency, from which formation compressibility and aquifer specific storage can be determined in situ rather than resorting to laboratory or aquifer pumping tests. The Earth tide also impacts the hydraulic head response at the same frequency, and a method is developed here to quantify and remove this interference. As a result, the barometric efficiency can be routinely calculated from 6-hourly hydraulic head, atmospheric pressure, and modeled Earth tide records where available for a minimum of 15 days duration. This new approach will be of critical importance in assessing worldwide problems of land subsidence or groundwater resource evaluation that both occur due to groundwater abstraction.

  6. Extension of the frequency-domain pFFT method for wave structure interaction in finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Bin; Song, Zhi-jie

    2017-06-01

    To analyze wave interaction with a large scale body in the frequency domain, a precorrected Fast Fourier Transform (pFFT) method has been proposed for infinite depth problems with the deep water Green function, as it can form a matrix with Toeplitz and Hankel properties. In this paper, a method is proposed to decompose the finite depth Green function into two terms, which can form matrices with the Toeplitz and a Hankel properties respectively. Then, a pFFT method for finite depth problems is developed. Based on the pFFT method, a numerical code pFFT-HOBEM is developed with the discretization of high order elements. The model is validated, and examinations on the computing efficiency and memory requirement of the new method have also been carried out. It shows that the new method has the same advantages as that for infinite depth.

  7. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-01-01

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. PMID:27322266

  8. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-06-16

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment.

  9. Frequency domain fluorometry: theory and application.

    PubMed

    Vetromile, Carissa M; Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    Frequency domain fluorometry is a widely utilized tool in the physical, chemical, and biological sciences. This chapter focuses on the theory of the method and the practical aspects required to carry out intensity decay, i.e., lifetime measurements on a modern frequency domain fluorometer. Several chemical/biological systems are utilized to illustrate data acquisition protocols. Data analysis procedures and methodologies are also discussed.

  10. A sensitivity function-based conjugate gradient method for optical tomography with the frequency-domain equation of radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Keol; Charette, André

    2007-03-01

    The Sensitivity Function-based Conjugate Gradient Method (SFCGM) is described. This method is used to solve the inverse problems of function estimation, such as the local maps of absorption and scattering coefficients, as applied to optical tomography for biomedical imaging. A highly scattering, absorbing, non-reflecting, non-emitting medium is considered here and simultaneous reconstructions of absorption and scattering coefficients inside the test medium are achieved with the proposed optimization technique, by using the exit intensity measured at boundary surfaces. The forward problem is solved with a discrete-ordinates finite-difference method on the framework of the frequency-domain full equation of radiative transfer. The modulation frequency is set to 600 MHz and the frequency data, obtained with the source modulation, is used as the input data. The inversion results demonstrate that the SFCGM can retrieve simultaneously the spatial distributions of optical properties inside the medium within a reasonable accuracy, by significantly reducing a cross-talk between inter-parameters. It is also observed that the closer-to-detector objects are better retrieved.

  11. The frequency-domain method of calculation for the pulsed electromagnetic field in a conductive ferromagnetic plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosov, G. V.; Kuleshova, E. O.; Lefebvre, S.; Plyusnin, A. A.; Tokmashev, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    The technique for parameters determination of magnetic skin effect on ferromagnetic plate at a specified pulse of magnetic field intensity on the plate surface is proposed. It is based on a frequency-domain method and could be applied for a pulsing transformer, a dynamoelectric pulse generator and a commutating inductor that contains an imbricated core. Due to this technique, such plate parameters as specific heat loss energy, the average power of this energy and the plate temperature raise, the magnetic flux attenuation factor and the plate q-factor could be calculated. These parameters depend on the steel type, the amplitude, the rms value, the duration and the form of the magnetic field intensity impulse on the plate surface. The plate thickness is defined by the value of the flux attenuation factor and the plate q-factor that should be maximal. The reliability of the proposed technique is built on a common frequency-domain usage applicable for pulse transient study under zero boundary conditions of the electric circuit and the conformity of obtained results with the sinusoidal steady-state mode.

  12. Dynamic optical frequency domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Arbel, Dror; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-04-21

    We describe a dynamic Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) system which enables real time, long range, acoustic sensing at high sampling rate. The system is based on a fast scanning laser and coherent detection scheme. Distributed sensing is obtained by probing the Rayleigh backscattered light. The system was tested by interrogation of a 10 km communication type single mode fiber and successfully detected localized impulse and sinusoidal excitations.

  13. An adaptive subspace trust-region method for frequency-domain seismic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; Li, Xiaofan; Song, Hanjie; Liu, Shaolin

    2015-05-01

    Full waveform inversion is currently considered as a promising seismic imaging method to obtain high-resolution and quantitative images of the subsurface. It is a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem, the main difficulty of which that prevents the full waveform inversion from widespread applying to real data is the sensitivity to incorrect initial models and noisy data. Local optimization theories including Newton's method and gradient method always lead the convergence to local minima, while global optimization algorithms such as simulated annealing are computationally costly. To confront this issue, in this paper we investigate the possibility of applying the trust-region method to the full waveform inversion problem. Different from line search methods, trust-region methods force the new trial step within a certain neighborhood of the current iterate point. Theoretically, the trust-region methods are reliable and robust, and they have very strong convergence properties. The capability of this inversion technique is tested with the synthetic Marmousi velocity model and the SEG/EAGE Salt model. Numerical examples demonstrate that the adaptive subspace trust-region method can provide solutions closer to the global minima compared to the conventional Approximate Hessian approach and the L-BFGS method with a higher convergence rate. In addition, the match between the inverted model and the true model is still excellent even when the initial model deviates far from the true model. Inversion results with noisy data also exhibit the remarkable capability of the adaptive subspace trust-region method for low signal-to-noise data inversions. Promising numerical results suggest this adaptive subspace trust-region method is suitable for full waveform inversion, as it has stronger convergence and higher convergence rate.

  14. A novel method for sensing metastatic cells in the CSF of pediatric population with medulloblastoma by frequency domain FLIM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahav, Gilad; Fixler, Dror; Gershanov, Sivan; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza

    2016-03-01

    Brain tumors are the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, after leukemia. Patients with cancer in the central nervous system have a very low recovery rate. Today known imaging and cytology techniques are not always sensitive enough for an early detection of both tumor and its metastatic spread, moreover the detection is generally limited, reviewer dependent and takes a relatively long time. Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. The aim of our talk is to present the frequency domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system as a possible method for an early detection of MB and its metastatic spread in the cerebrospinal fluids within the pediatric population.

  15. H2 consensus control of time-delayed multi-agent systems: A frequency-domain method.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Zhang, Weidong; Ou, Linlin

    2017-01-01

    An analytical H2 controller design approach of homogeneous multi-agent systems with time delays is presented to improve consensus performance. Firstly, a closed-loop multi-input multi-output framework in frequency domain is introduced, and a consensus tracking condition is given. Secondly, the decomposition method is utilized to simplify the analysis of internal stability and H2 performance index of the whole system to a set of independent optimization problems. Finally, the H2 optimal controller can be computed from all the stabilizing controllers. The contributions of the new approach are that the design procedure is conducted analytically for arbitrary delayed multi-agent systems, and a simple quantitative tuning way is developed to trade off the nominal performance and robustness. The simulation examples show the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  16. a Frequency Domain Based NUMERIC-ANALYTICAL Method for Non-Linear Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, S.; Sekar, P.

    1998-04-01

    In this paper a multiharmonic balancing technique is used to develop certain algorithms to determine periodic orbits of non-liner dynamical systems with external, parametric and self excitations. Essentially, in this method the non-linear differential equations are transformed into a set of non-linear algebraic equations in terms of the Fourier coefficients of the periodic solutions which are solved by using the Newton-Raphson technique. The method is developed such that both fast Fourier transform and discrete Fourier transform algorithms can be used. It is capable of treating all types of non-linearities and higher dimensional systems. The stability of periodic orbits is investigated by obtaining the monodromy matrix. A path following algorithm based on the predictor-corrector method is also presented to enable the bifurcation analysis. The prediction is done with a cubic extrapolation technique with an arc length incrementation while the correction is done with the use of the least square minimisation technique. The under determined system of equations is solved by singular value decomposition. The suitability of the method is demonstrated by obtaining the bifurcational behaviour of rolling contact vibrations modelled by Hertz contact law.

  17. Bio-Photonic Detection and Quantitative Evaluation Method for the Progression of Dental Caries Using Optical Frequency-Domain Imaging Method

    PubMed Central

    Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Cho, Nam Hyun; Park, Kibeom; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2016-01-01

    The initial detection of dental caries is an essential biomedical requirement to barricade the progression of caries and tooth demineralization. The objective of this study is to introduce an optical frequency-domain imaging technique based quantitative evaluation method to calculate the volume and thickness of enamel residual, and a quantification method was developed to evaluate the total intensity fluctuation in depth direction owing to carious lesions, which can be favorable to identify the progression of dental caries in advance. The cross-sectional images of the ex vivo tooth samples were acquired using 1.3 μm spectral domain optical coherence tomography system (SD-OCT). Moreover, the advantages of the proposed method over the conventional dental inspection methods were compared to highlight the potential capability of OCT. As a consequence, the threshold parameters obtained through the developed method can be used as an efficient investigating technique for the initial detection of demineralization. PMID:27929440

  18. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength. PMID:24805968

  19. Accurate Interpolation at Receiver Positions: A Novel Method for Frequency-Domain Marine CSEM Finite-Difference Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Li, Yuguo; Han, Bo

    2017-05-01

    We present an accurate interpolating method for calculating electric and magnetic fields at the seafloor with a resistivity contrast. This method is applied to the three-dimensional (3D) frequency-domain marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) modeling with the towed transmitters and receivers located at the seafloor. We simulate the 3D marine CSEM responses by the staggered finite-difference method with a direct solver. The secondary-field approach is used for avoiding the source singularities and the primary fields excited by the electric dipole source could be calculated quasi-analytically for the one-dimensional layered background. Therefore, in this study, we focus on interpolating of electric and magnetic fields to the receiver locations at the seafloor interface between the conductive seawater and resistive seafloor formation. Considering the discontinuity of the normal electric fields, we use the normal current electric density for interpolation. The secondary electric and magnetic fields are also used for interpolation instead of the total fields for high numerical accuracy. The proposed interpolation only utilizes the nodes below/above the seafloor interface and is approved to be much more accurate than other tested interpolating methods, i.e., the conventional linear interpolation and the rigorous interpolation.

  20. Modulated imaging: A spatial frequency domain imaging method for wide-field spectroscopy and tomography of turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuccia, David John

    Modulated Imaging (MI) is a fast, scan-free method that enables one to image and quantify the optical properties of turbid media. The technology can simultaneously map surface and sub-surface tissue structure, function and composition. Based on frequency-domain measurement principles, MI uses spatially-periodic or "structured" illumination and camera-based detection to separate and quantify the absorption, scattering, and fluorescence optical properties over a wide field-of-view (many cm) without the need for sample contact. Resolution is depth-dependent and thus scalable (sub-millimeter to millimeter), with depth sensitivity up to a few cm. This method has particularly strong potential for in-vivo clinical and pre-clinical imaging, where optical properties at several wavelengths provide quantitative information on endogeneous chromophore concentrations (i.e. oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, fat, and water). These parameters reflect quantitative, localized tissue status such as blood volume, tissue oxygenation, and edema. Using multispectral MI instrumentation, demonstrations of two in-vivo applications are investigated: (1) pre-clinical functional imaging of brain injury in a rodent model and (2) clinical imaging spectroscopy of human skin. Also, preliminary 3D fluorescence tomography data suggest that MI may provide a convenient, low-cost platform for localizing and quantifying exogenous molecular probes in-vivo.

  1. Frequency-Domain Identification Of Aeroelastic Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Tischler, Mark B.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes flight measurements and frequency-domain analyses of aeroelastic vibrational modes of wings of XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft. Begins with description of flight-test methods. Followed by brief discussion of methods of analysis, which include Fourier-transform computations using chirp z transformers, use of coherence and other spectral functions, and methods and computer programs to obtain frequencies and damping coefficients from measurements. Includes brief description of results of flight tests and comparisions among various experimental and theoretical results. Ends with section on conclusions and recommended improvements in techniques.

  2. REVIEW ARTICLE: Frequency domain complex permittivity measurements at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupka, Jerzy

    2006-06-01

    Overview of frequency domain measurement techniques of the complex permittivity at microwave frequencies is presented. The methods are divided into two categories: resonant and non-resonant ones. In the first category several methods are discussed such as cavity resonator techniques, dielectric resonator techniques, open resonator techniques and resonators for non-destructive testing. The general theory of measurements of different materials in resonant structures is presented showing mathematical background, sources of uncertainties and theoretical and experimental limits. Methods of measurement of anisotropic materials are presented. In the second category, transmission-reflection techniques are overviewed including transmission line cells as well as free-space techniques.

  3. Photo sorting and compression in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yang; Wong, Tien-Tsin; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2004-10-01

    With the increasing popularity of digital camera, organizing and managing the large collection of digital photos effectively are therefore required. In this paper, we study the photo album sorting, clustering and compression techniques in DCT frequency domain without having to decompress JPEG photos into spatial domain firstly. We utilize the first several non-zero DCT coefficients to build our feature set and calculate the energy histograms in frequency domain directly. We then calculate the similarity distance of every two photos, and perform photo album sorting and adaptive clustering algorithms to group the most similar photos together. We further compress those clustered photos by a MPEG-like algorithm with variable IBP frames and adaptive search windows. Our methods provide a compact and reasonable format for people to store and transmit their large number of digital photos. Experiments prove that our algorithm is efficient and effective for digital photo processing.

  4. Frequency-domain method for measuring spectral properties in multiple-scattering media: methemoglobin absorption spectrum in a tissuelike phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkin, Joshua B.; So, Peter T. C.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    1995-03-01

    We have measured the optical absorption and scattering coefficient spectra of a multiple-scattering medium (i.e., a biological tissue-simulating phantom comprising a lipid colloid) containing methemoglobin by using frequency-domain techniques. The methemoglobin absorption spectrum determined in the multiple-scattering medium is in excellent agreement with a corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum obtained from a steady-state spectrophotometer measurement of the optical density of a minimally scattering medium. The determination of the corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum takes into account the scattering from impurities in the methemoglobin solution containing no lipid colloid. Frequency-domain techniques allow for the separation of the absorbing from the scattering properties of multiple-scattering media, and these techniques thus provide an absolute

  5. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  6. Frequency domain convolution for SCANSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantraine, Guy; Dendal, Didier

    1994-12-01

    Starting from basic signals expressions, the rigorous formulation of frequency domain convolution is demonstrated, in general and impulse terms, including antenna patterns and squint angle. The major differences with conventional algorithms are discussed and theoretical concepts clarified. In a second part, the philosophy of advanced SAR algorithms is compared with that of a SCANSAR observation (several subswaths). It is proved that a general impulse response can always be written as the product of three factors, i.e., a phasor, an antenna coefficient, and a migration expression, and that the details of antenna effects can be ignored in the usual SAR system, but not the range migration (the situation is reversed in a SCANSAR reconstruction scheme). In a next step, some possible inverse filter kernels (the matched filter, the true inverse filter, ...) for general SAR or SCANSAR mode reconstructions, are compared. By adopting a noise corrupted model of data, we get the corresponding Wiener filter, the major interest of which is to avoid all divergence risk. Afterwards, the vocable `a class of filter' is introduced and summarized by a parametric formulation. Lastly, the homogeneity of the reconstruction, with a noncyclic fast Fourier transform deconvolution is studied by comparing peak responses according to the burst location. The more homogeneous sensitivity of the Wiener filter, with a stepper fall when the target begins to go outside the antenna pattern, is confirmed. A linear optimal merging of adjacent looks (in azimuth) minimizing the rms noise is also presented, as well as consideration about squint ambiguity.

  7. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Simon, F.; Murányi, F.

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  8. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Murányi, F.; Simon, F.

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  9. Frequency domain FIR and IIR adaptive filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of the LMS adaptive filter relating to its convergence characteristics and the problems associated with disparate eigenvalues is presented. This is used to introduce the concept of proportional convergence. An approach is used to analyze the convergence characteristics of block frequency-domain adaptive filters. This leads to a development showing how the frequency-domain FIR adaptive filter is easily modified to provide proportional convergence. These ideas are extended to a block frequency-domain IIR adaptive filter and the idea of proportional convergence is applied. Experimental results illustrating proportional convergence in both FIR and IIR frequency-domain block adaptive filters is presented.

  10. Apparatus and method for qualitative and quantitative measurements of optical properties of turbid media using frequency-domain photon migration

    DOEpatents

    Tromberg, Bruce J.; Tsay, Tsong T.; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lara O.; Haskell, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Optical measurements of turbid media, that is media characterized by multiple light scattering, is provided through an apparatus and method for exposing a sample to a modulated laser beam. The light beam is modulated at a fundamental frequency and at a plurality of integer harmonics thereof. Modulated light is returned from the sample and preferentially detected at cross frequencies at frequencies slightly higher than the fundamental frequency and at integer harmonics of the same. The received radiance at the beat or cross frequencies is compared against a reference signal to provide a measure of the phase lag of the radiance and modulation ratio relative to a reference beam. The phase and modulation amplitude are then provided as a frequency spectrum by an array processor to which a computer applies a complete curve fit in the case of highly scattering samples or a linear curve fit below a predetermined frequency in the case of highly absorptive samples. The curve fit in any case is determined by the absorption and scattering coefficients together with a concentration of the active substance in the sample. Therefore, the curve fitting to the frequency spectrum can be used both for qualitative and quantitative analysis of substances in the sample even though the sample is highly turbid.

  11. Apparatus and method for qualitative and quantitative measurements of optical properties of turbid media using frequency-domain photon migration

    DOEpatents

    Tromberg, B.J.; Tsay, T.T.; Berns, M.W.; Svaasand, L.O.; Haskell, R.C.

    1995-06-13

    Optical measurements of turbid media, that is media characterized by multiple light scattering, is provided through an apparatus and method for exposing a sample to a modulated laser beam. The light beam is modulated at a fundamental frequency and at a plurality of integer harmonics thereof. Modulated light is returned from the sample and preferentially detected at cross frequencies at frequencies slightly higher than the fundamental frequency and at integer harmonics of the same. The received radiance at the beat or cross frequencies is compared against a reference signal to provide a measure of the phase lag of the radiance and modulation ratio relative to a reference beam. The phase and modulation amplitude are then provided as a frequency spectrum by an array processor to which a computer applies a complete curve fit in the case of highly scattering samples or a linear curve fit below a predetermined frequency in the case of highly absorptive samples. The curve fit in any case is determined by the absorption and scattering coefficients together with a concentration of the active substance in the sample. Therefore, the curve fitting to the frequency spectrum can be used both for qualitative and quantitative analysis of substances in the sample even though the sample is highly turbid. 14 figs.

  12. Frequency domain state-space system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chung-Wen; Juang, Jer-Nan; Lee, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for identifying state-space models from frequency response data of linear systems is presented. A matrix-fraction description of the transfer function is employed to curve-fit the frequency response data, using the least-squares method. The parameters of the matrix-fraction representation are then used to construct the Markov parameters of the system. Finally, state-space models are obtained through the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm using Markov parameters. The main advantage of this approach is that the curve-fitting and the Markov parameter construction are linear problems which avoid the difficulties of nonlinear optimization of other approaches. Another advantage is that it avoids windowing distortions associated with other frequency domain methods.

  13. Wavelet-based method for time-domain noise analysis and reduction in a frequency-scan ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chou, Szu-Wei; Shiu, Guo-Rung; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2012-11-01

    We adopt an orthogonal wavelet packet decomposition (OWPD) filtering approach to cancel harmonic interference noises arising from an AC power source in time domain and remove the resulting rf voltage interference noise from the mass spectra acquired by using a charge detection frequency-scan quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. With the use of a phase lock resampling technique, the transform coefficients of the rf interference in signals become a constant, exhibiting a shift of the baseline in different rf phases. The rf interference is therefore removable by shifting the baselines back to zero in OWPD coefficients. The approach successfully reduces the time-domain background noise from 1367 electrons (rms) to 408 electrons (rms) (an improvement of 70 %) and removes the high frequency noise components in the charge detection ion trap mass spectrometry. Unlike other smoothing or averaging methods commonly used in the mass-to-charge (m/Ze) domain, our approach does not cause any distortion of original signals.

  14. Time-Domain Frequency Correction Method for Averaging Low-Field NMR Signals Acquired in Urban Laboratory Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Long-Qing; Liu, Chao; Dong, Hui; Xu, Lu; Zhang, Yi; Hans-Joachim, Krause; Xie, Xiao-Ming; Andreas, Offenhäusser

    2012-10-01

    Using a second-order helium-cooled superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer as the detector, ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF-NMR) signals of protons are recorded in an urban environment without magnetic shielding. The homogeneity and stability of the measurement field are investigated. NMR signals of protons are studied at night and during working hours. The Larmor frequency variation caused by the fluctuation of the external magnetic field during daytime reaches around 5 Hz when performing multiple measurements for about 10 min, which seriously affects the results of averaging. In order to improve the performance of the averaged data, we suggest the use of a data processor, i.e. the so-called time-domain frequency correction (TFC). For a 50-times averaged signal spectrum, the signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced from 30 to 120 when applying TFC while preserving the NMR spectrum linewidth. The TFC is also applied successfully to the measurement data of the hetero-nuclear J-coupling in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol.

  15. Frequency domain optoacoustic tomography using amplitude and phase

    PubMed Central

    Mohajerani, Pouyan; Kellnberger, Stephan; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    We introduce optoacoustic tomographic imaging using intensity modulated light sources and collecting amplitude and phase information in the frequency domain. Imaging is performed at multiple modulation frequencies. The forward modeling uses the Green's function solution to the pressure wave equation in frequency domain and the resulting inverse problem is solved using regularized least squares minimization. We study the effect of the number of frequencies and of the bandwidth employed on the image quality achieved. The possibility of employing an all-frequency domain optoacoustic imaging for experimental measurements is studied as a function of noise. We conclude that frequency domain optoacoustic tomography may evolve to a practical experimental method using light intensity modulated sources, with advantages over time-domain optoacoustics. PMID:25431755

  16. Frequency Domain Calculations Of Acoustic Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Two complex geometry problems are solved using the linearized Euler equations. The impedance mismatch method1 is used to impose the solid surfaces without the need to use a body-fitted grid. The problem is solved in the frequency domain to avoid long run times. Although the harmonic assumption eliminates all time dependence, a pseudo-time term is added to allow conventional iterative methods to be employed. A Jameson type, Runge-Kutta scheme is used to advance the solution in pseudo time. The spatial operator is based on a seven-point, sixth-order finite difference. Constant coefficient, sixth-derivative artificial dissipation is used throughout the domain. A buffer zone technique employing a complex frequency to damp all waves near the boundaries is used to minimize reflections. The results show that the method is capable of capturing the salient features of the scattering, but an excessive number of grid points are required to resolve the phenomena in the vicinity of the solid bodies because the wavelength of the acoustics is relatively short compared with the size of the bodies. Smoothly transitioning into the immersed boundary condition alleviates the difficulties, but a fine mesh is still required.

  17. Spatial frequency domain error budget

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschildt, H; Krulewich, D

    1998-08-27

    The aim of this paper is to describe a methodology for designing and characterizing machines used to manufacture or inspect parts with spatial-frequency-based specifications. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, one of our responsibilities is to design or select the appropriate machine tools to produce advanced optical and weapons systems. Recently, many of the component tolerances for these systems have been specified in terms of the spatial frequency content of residual errors on the surface. We typically use an error budget as a sensitivity analysis tool to ensure that the parts manufactured by a machine will meet the specified component tolerances. Error budgets provide the formalism whereby we account for all sources of uncertainty in a process, and sum them to arrive at a net prediction of how "precisely" a manufactured component can meet a target specification. Using the error budget, we are able to minimize risk during initial stages by ensuring that the machine will produce components that meet specifications before the machine is actually built or purchased. However, the current error budgeting procedure provides no formal mechanism for designing machines that can produce parts with spatial-frequency-based specifications. The output from the current error budgeting procedure is a single number estimating the net worst case or RMS error on the work piece. This procedure has limited ability to differentiate between low spatial frequency form errors versus high frequency surface finish errors. Therefore the current error budgeting procedure can lead us to reject a machine that is adequate or accept a machine that is inadequate. This paper will describe a new error budgeting methodology to aid in the design and characterization of machines used to manufacture or inspect parts with spatial-frequency-based specifications. The output from this new procedure is the continuous spatial frequency content of errors that result on a machined part. If the machine

  18. Investigations on polarimetric terahertz frequency domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yandong; Zhang, Banghong; Notake, Takashi; Minamide, Hiroaki; Olivo, Malini; Sugii, Shigeki

    2014-04-01

    A polarimetric Terahertz frequency-domain spectroscopy system is presented which has an additional polarization measurement function at the Terahertz band. The achromatic Terahertz waveplate, which acts as the key device in the system, is also presented.

  19. VISAR Analysis in the Frequency Domain

    DOE PAGES

    Dolan, D. H.; Specht, P.

    2017-05-18

    VISAR measurements are typically analyzed in the time domain, where velocity is approximately proportional to fringe shift. Moving to the frequency domain clarifies the limitations of this approximation and suggests several improvements. For example, optical dispersion preserves high-frequency information, so a zero-dispersion (air delay) interferometer does not provide optimal time resolution. Combined VISAR measurements can also improve time resolution. With adequate bandwidth and reasonable noise levels, it is quite possible to achieve better resolution than the VISAR approximation allows.

  20. A new principle technic for the transformation from frequency domain to time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ben-Qing

    2017-03-01

    A principle technic for the transformation from frequency domain to time domain is presented. Firstly, a special type of frequency domain transcendental equation is obtained for an expected frequency domain parameter which is a rational or irrational fraction expression. Secondly, the inverse Laplace transformation is performed. When the two time-domain factors corresponding to the two frequency domain factors at two sides of frequency domain transcendental equation are known quantities, a time domain transcendental equation is reached. At last, the expected time domain parameter corresponding to the expected frequency domain parameter can be solved by the inverse convolution process. Proceeding from rational or irrational fraction expression, all solving process is provided. In the meantime, the property of time domain sequence is analyzed and the strategy for choosing the parameter values is described. Numerical examples are presented to verify the proposed theory and technic. Except for rational or irrational fraction expressions, examples of complex relative permittivity of water and plasma are used as verification method. The principle method proposed in the paper can easily solve problems which are difficult to be solved by Laplace transformation.

  1. Optical frequency-domain chromatic dispersion measurement method for higher-order modes in an optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tae-Jung; Jung, Yongmin; Oh, Kyunghwan; Kim, Dug Young

    2005-12-12

    We propose a new chromatic dispersion measurement method for the higher-order modes of an optical fiber using optical frequency modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) interferometry. An optical fiber which supports few excited modes was prepared for our experiments. Three different guiding modes of the fiber were identified by using far-field spatial beam profile measurements and confirmed with numerical mode analysis. By using the principle of a conventional FMWC interferometry with a tunable external cavity laser, we have demonstrated that the chromatic dispersion of a few-mode optical fiber can be obtained directly and quantitatively as well as qualitatively. We have also compared our measurement results with those of conventional modulation phase-shift method.

  2. Frequency Domain Electroretinography in Retinitis Pigmentosa versus Normal Eyes.

    PubMed

    Hassan-Karimi, Homa; Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Blouri, Bahram; Hashemi, Hassan; Sadeghi, Arash Zare; Mirzajani, Ali

    2012-01-01

    To compare electroretinogram (ERG) characteristics in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and normal subjects using frequency domain analysis. Five basic ERG recordings were performed in normal subjects and patients with a clinical diagnosis of RP according to the ISCEV (International Society of Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision) protocol. Frequency domain analysis was performed by MATLAB software. Different frequency domain parameters were compared between the study groups. Peak frequency (Fmod) of flicker and oscillatory responses in RP patients showed significant (P<0.0001) high pass response as compared to normal controls. Peak frequency (Fmod) of the other responses was not significantly different between the two groups. In addition to conventional ERG using time domain methods, frequency domain analysis may be useful for diagnosis of RP. Oscillatory and flicker responses may be analyzed in frequency domain. Fast Fourier transform may reveal two distinct high pass responses (shift to higher frequencies) in Fmod. Time and frequency domain analyses may be performed simultaneously with many modern ERG machines and may therefore be recommended in RP patients.

  3. Asymptotic Waveform Evaluation (AWE) Technique for Frequency Domain Electromagnetic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1996-01-01

    The Asymptotic Waveform Evaluation (AWE) technique is applied to a generalized frequency domain electromagnetic problem. Most of the frequency domain techniques in computational electromagnetics result in a matrix equation, which is solved at a single frequency. In the AWE technique, the Taylor series expansion around that frequency is applied to the matrix equation. The coefficients of the Taylor's series are obtained in terms of the frequency derivatives of the matrices evaluated at the expansion frequency. The coefficients hence obtained will be used to predict the frequency response of the system over a frequency range. The detailed derivation of the coefficients (called 'moments') is given along with an illustration for electric field integral equation (or Method of Moments) technique. The radar cross section (RCS) frequency response of a square plate is presented using the AWE technique and is compared with the exact solution at various frequencies.

  4. Adaptive corrector operating in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radikaynen, Y. M.

    1984-11-01

    An interference-immune corrector for a signal converter with automatic regulation of adaptation speed is described which operates in the frequency domain with fast convergence and high signal-to-noise ratio. It contains an analog-to-digital converter, a demodulator, and a filter array with equidistant spacing of center frequencies, three multipliers and two summators, as well as a reference signal generator, a frequency divider, a counter, and a noise meter. Filtering is done by a n-point Fourier transformation or bunching with a memory at the filter input followed by inverse Fourier transformation or debunching, respectively. The algorithm of corrector operation in the frequency domain can be constructed heuristically by an analog to the complex algorithm of minimizing the mean-square error in the time domain. Each weight factor can be processed independently and only once per Fourier transformation cycle, which ensures fast convergence without preliminary phase correction even with large distortions in the communication channel.

  5. Autonomous Frequency-Domain Indentification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Yam, Yeung; Bayard, David S.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Test and data-processing system determines plant models and uncertainties. Integrated system of methods, digital signal-processing, and algorithms identifies parametric model of large, flexible structures. Experiments in development of system conducted on laboratory model intended to represent large space antenna or flexible spacecraft. Also applicable to many terrestrial systems, robust control of dynamic plants and processes, robust control of systems about which knowledge uncertain or incomplete, decentralized control, and knowledge-based control systems.

  6. Time-Domain vs. Frequency-Domain CSEM: Implications for Marine Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, D. M.; Key, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    The frequency-domain marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method is now routinely applied to map resistive hydrocarbons buried beneath the seabed in deepwater. Alternatively, it has been suggested that time-domain CSEM methods may offer improved resolution of difficult targets such as deeply buried reservoirs. Furthermore, time-domain methods may overcome a sensitivity limitation imposed by the airwave saturation that is experienced for shallow-water frequency-domain CSEM. In order to examine and test these claims, we have developed a modeling code for computing time-domain responses for layered 1D models with arbitrarily located and oriented transmitters and receivers. Our code extends the open-source frequency domain code Dipole1D by efficiently computing the time-domain step-on and impulse responses by Fourier transformation of the frequency-domain kernels. By applying a realistic noise model to synthetic data generated from this code, we systematically examine the sensitivity and resolution of time-domain and frequency-domain CSEM to representative targets of interest for offshore hydrocarbon exploration and exploration surveys of seafloor volcanic and hydrothermal systems. These studies have practical implications for marine EM survey systems that use either towed or stationary transmitters and receivers.

  7. Numerical solution of Maxwell equations by a finite-difference time-domain method in a medium with frequency and spatial dispersion.

    PubMed

    Potravkin, N N; Perezhogin, I A; Makarov, V A

    2012-11-01

    We propose an alternative method of integration of Maxwell equations. This method is the generalization of a finite-difference time-domain method with an auxiliary differential equation for the case of a linear optical medium with a frequency dispersion and an arbitrary source of spatial dispersion. We apply this method to the problem of the propagation of short plane-wave linearly polarized light pulses in such a medium. It is shown that some features of their propagation are completely different from those that are generally recognized for the linear optical activity phenomenon. For example, in some cases an initially linearly polarized light pulse becomes elliptically polarized during the propagation. This effect is more prominent in the front part of the pulse.

  8. Frequency domain optical tomography in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuqi; Wang, Yao; Pei, Yaling; Zhu, Wenwu; Hu, Jenhun; Barbour, Randall L.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, a reconstruction algorithm for frequency-domain optical tomography in human tissue is presented. A fast and efficient multigrid finite difference (MGFD) method is adopted as a forward solver to obtain the simulated detector responses and the required imaging operator. The solutions obtained form MGFD method for 3D problems with weakly discontinuous cocoefficients are compared with analyzed solutions to determine the accuracy of the numerical method. Simultaneous reconstruction of both absorption and scattering coefficients for tissue-like media is accomplished by solving a perturbation equation using the Born approximation. This solution is obtained by a conjugate gradient descent method with Tikhonov regularization. Two examples are given to show the quality of the reconstruction results. Both involve the examination of anatomically accurate optical models of tissue derived from segmented 3D magnetic resonance images to which have been assigned optical coefficients to the designated tissue types. One is a map of a female breast containing two small 'added pathologies', such as tumors. The other is a map of the brain containing a 'local bleeding' area, representing a hemorrhage. The reconstruction results show that the algorithm is computationally practical and can yield qualitatively correct geometry of the objects embedded in the simulated human tissue. Acceptable results are obtaiend even when 10% noise is present in the data.

  9. Prediction of low-frequency structure-borne sound in concrete structures using the finite-difference time-domain method.

    PubMed

    Asakura, T; Ishizuka, T; Miyajima, T; Toyoda, M; Sakamoto, S

    2014-09-01

    Due to limitations of computers, prediction of structure-borne sound remains difficult for large-scale problems. Herein a prediction method for low-frequency structure-borne sound transmissions on concrete structures using the finite-difference time-domain scheme is proposed. The target structure is modeled as a composition of multiple plate elements to reduce the dimensions of the simulated vibration field from three-dimensional discretization by solid elements to two-dimensional discretization. This scheme reduces both the calculation time and the amount of required memory. To validate the proposed method, the vibration characteristics using the numerical results of the proposed scheme are compared to those measured for a two-level concrete structure. Comparison of the measured and simulated results suggests that the proposed method can be used to simulate real-scale structures.

  10. Method and Apparatus of Multiplexing and Acquiring Data from Multiple Optical Fibers Using a Single Data Channel of an Optical Frequency-Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jr., Allen R (Inventor); Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Piazza, Anthony (Nino) (Inventor); Richards, William Lance (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method and system for multiplexing a network of parallel fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor-fibers to a single acquisition channel of a closed Michelson interferometer system via a fiber splitter by distinguishing each branch of fiber sensors in the spatial domain. On each branch of the splitter, the fibers have a specific pre-determined length, effectively separating each branch of fiber sensors spatially. In the spatial domain the fiber branches are seen as part of one acquisition channel on the interrogation system. However, the FBG-reference arm beat frequency information for each fiber is retained. Since the beat frequency is generated between the reference arm, the effective fiber length of each successive branch includes the entire length of the preceding branch. The multiple branches are seen as one fiber having three segments where the segments can be resolved. This greatly simplifies optical, electronic and computational complexity, and is especially suited for use in multiplexed or branched OFS networks for SHM of large and/or distributed structures which need a lot of measurement points.

  11. Analyzing the properties of acceptor mode in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals based on a modified finite-difference frequency-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Ding, Guo-Wen; Lin, Yi-Bing; Chen, Yu-Qing

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, the properties of acceptor mode in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (2D PPCs) composed of the homogeneous and isotropic dielectric cylinders inserted into nonmagnetized plasma background with square lattices under transverse-magnetic wave are theoretically investigated by a modified finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method with supercell technique, whose symmetry of every supercell is broken by removing a central rod. A new FDFD method is developed to calculate the band structures of such PPCs. The novel FDFD method adopts a general function to describe the distribution of dielectric in the present PPCs, which can easily transform the complicated nonlinear eigenvalue equation to the simple linear equation. The details of convergence and effectiveness of proposed FDFD method are analyzed using a numerical example. The simulated results demonstrate that the enough accuracy of the proposed FDFD method can be observed compared to the plane wave expansion method, and the good convergence can also be obtained if the number of meshed grids is large enough. As a comparison, two different configurations of photonic crystals (PCs) but with similar defect are theoretically investigated. Compared to the conventional dielectric-air PCs, not only the acceptor mode has a higher frequency but also an additional photonic bandgap (PBG) can be found in the low frequency region. The calculated results also show that PBGs of proposed PPCs can be enlarged as the point defect is introduced. The influences of the parameters for present PPCs on the properties of acceptor mode are also discussed in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the acceptor mode in the present PPCs can be easily tuned by changing those parameters. Those results can hold promise for designing the tunable applications in the signal process or time delay devices based on the present PPCs.

  12. Phase based method for location of the centers of side bands in spatial frequency domain in off-axis digital holographic microcopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Wang, Zhao; Li, Jiansu; Gao, Jianmin; Huang, Junhui

    2016-11-01

    The digital holography (DH) off-axis geometry in microscope configuration introduces the tilt phase aberration in construction, resulting in the reconstructed image distortion. The two typical methods of the tilt aberration compensation, digital reference wavefront method and spectrum centering method, all require the hologram spectrum's centering judgment of side band as a precondition. However, it is difficult to judge the center location of side band by the spectral amplitude maximum due to the presence of the quadratic phase aberration, thus producing the residual tilt phase aberration. Therefore, the method for location of the center of side band based on the unwrapped phase in spatial frequency domain is proposed in the pre-magnification configuration. The Fourier spectrum of the hologram is a complex function and its unwrapped phase distribution always appears the extremum corresponding to the carrier frequency. The correct hologram spectrum's center location of side band can be obtained by judging its unwrapped phase maximum, which makes assure of the tilt aberration compensation in the pre-magnification configuration. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by applying it to the phase imaging of the micro-hole array, phase grating and phase steps.

  13. Dynamic triggering potential of large earthquakes recorded by the EarthScope U.S. Transportable Array using a frequency domain detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linville, L. M.; Pankow, K. L.; Kilb, D. L.; Velasco, A. A.; Hayward, C.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the abundance of data from the Earthscope U.S. Transportable Array (TA), data paucity and station sampling bias in the US are no longer significant obstacles to understanding some of the physical parameters driving dynamic triggering. Initial efforts to determine locations of dynamic triggering in the US following large earthquakes (M ≥ 8.0) during TA relied on a time domain detection algorithm which used an optimized short-term average to long-term average (STA/LTA) filter and resulted in an unmanageably large number of false positive detections. Specific site sensitivities and characteristic noise when coupled with changes in detection rates often resulted in misleading output. To navigate this problem, we develop a frequency domain detection algorithm that first pre-whitens each seismogram and then computes a broadband frequency stack of the data using a three hour time window beginning at the origin time of the mainshock. This method is successful because of the broadband nature of earthquake signals compared with the more band-limited high frequency picks that clutter results from time domain picking algorithms. Preferential band filtering of the frequency stack for individual events can further increase the accuracy and drive the detection threshold to below magnitude one, but at general cost to detection levels across large scale data sets. Of the 15 mainshocks studied, 12 show evidence of discrete spatial clusters of local earthquake activity occurring within the array during the mainshock coda. Most of this activity is in the Western US with notable sequences in Northwest Wyoming, Western Texas, Southern New Mexico and Western Montana. Repeat stations (associated with 2 or more mainshocks) are generally rare, but when occur do so exclusively in California and Nevada. Notably, two of the most prolific regions of seismicity following a single mainshock occur following the 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa (Sep 29, 2009, 17:48:10) event, in areas with few

  14. Frequency versus time domain immunity testing of Smart Grid components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronwald, F.

    2014-11-01

    Smart Grid components often are subject to considerable conducted current disturbances in the frequency range 2-150 kHz and, as a consequence, it is necessary to provide reliable immunity test methods. The relevant basic standard IEC 61000-4-19 that is currently under discussion focusses on frequency domain test methods. It is remarked in this contribution that in the context of frequency domain testing the chosen frequency spacing is related to the resonance response of the system under test which, in turn, is characterized in terms of resonance frequencies and quality factors. These notions apply well to physical system but it is pointed out by the example of an actual smart meter immunity test that smart grid components may exhibit susceptibilities that do not necessarily follow a resonance pattern and, additionally, can be narrowband. As a consequence it is suggested to supplement the present frequency domain test methods by time domain tests which utilize damped sinusoidal excitations with corresponding spectra that properly cover the frequency range 2-150 kHz, as exemplified by the military standard MIL-STD-461.

  15. High frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy

    2013-12-01

    A new method for the high frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is developed based on the characteristic matrix method. This method is useful for studying planar samples or stack of planar samples. The terahertz radiation was generated by optical rectification in a ZnTe crystal and detected by another ZnTe crystal via electro-optic sampling method. In this new characteristic matrix based method, the spectra of the sample and reference waveforms will be modeled by using characteristic matrices. We applied this new method to measure the optical constants of air. The terahertz transmission through the layered systems air-Teflon-air-Quartz-air and Nitrogen gas-Teflon-Nitrogen gas-Quartz-Nitrogen gas was modeled by the characteristic matrix method. A transmission coefficient is derived from these models which was optimized to fit the experimental transmission coefficient to extract the optical constants of air. The optimization of an error function involving the experimental complex transmission coefficient and the theoretical transmission coefficient was performed using patternsearch algorithm of MATLAB. Since this method takes account of the echo waveforms due to reflections in the layered samples, this method allows analysis of longer time-domain waveforms giving rise to very high frequency resolution in the frequency-domain. We have presented the high frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of air and compared the results with the literature values. We have also fitted the complex susceptibility of air to the Lorentzian and Gaussian functions to extract the linewidths.

  16. Time Domain Stability Margin Assessment Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Keith

    2017-01-01

    The baseline stability margins for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle were generated via the classical approach of linearizing the system equations of motion and determining the gain and phase margins from the resulting frequency domain model. To improve the fidelity of the classical methods, the linear frequency domain approach can be extended by replacing static, memoryless nonlinearities with describing functions. This technique, however, does not address the time varying nature of the dynamics of a launch vehicle in flight. An alternative technique for the evaluation of the stability of the nonlinear launch vehicle dynamics along its trajectory is to incrementally adjust the gain and/or time delay in the time domain simulation until the system exhibits unstable behavior. This technique has the added benefit of providing a direct comparison between the time domain and frequency domain tools in support of simulation validation.

  17. Recovery of lifetime distributions from frequency-domain fluorometry data by means of the quantified maximum entropy method.

    PubMed

    Brochon, J C; Pouget, J; Valeur, B

    1995-06-01

    The new quantified version of the maximum entropy method allows one to recover lifetime distributions with a precise statement of the accuracy of position, surface, and broadness of peaks in the distribution. Applications to real data (2,6-ANS in aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles of Β-cyclodextrin) are presented.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Kinefuchi, K.; Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T.

    2012-10-15

    Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinefuchi, K.; Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T.

    2012-10-01

    Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

  20. Subtraction of background fluorescence in multiharmonic frequency-domain fluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, N; Verkman, A S

    1992-02-14

    Background fluorescence is a major concern in time-resolved microfluorimetry studies of biological samples. A general method for subtraction of an arbitrary background signal in measurements of lifetime and anisotropy decay by multiharmonic Fourier transform spectroscopy is presented. Multifrequency phase and modulation values are measured in parallel by transformation of digitized time-domain waveforms into the frequency domain. For subtraction of background, time-domain waveforms are acquired for emission and reference photomultipliers for sample (e.g., cell containing fluorophore) and blank (e.g., unlabeled cell). Time-domain waveforms obtained in a series of measurements (e.g., sample and blank for parallel and perpendicular orientations of an emission polarizer) are time-justified by least-squares fitting of reference channel waveforms or by phase comparison of the first Fourier harmonics of the reference channel. Background is then subtracted directly in the time domain, and the subtracted waveform is Fourier transformed to the frequency domain for analysis of lifetime or anisotropy decay. This approach yielded excellent background correction over a wide range of background intensities and decay profiles. The method was tested in cuvette fluorimetry with fluorescein and acridine orange and in fluorescence microscopy with living MDCK cells loaded with the pH indicator BCECF. Sample lifetimes and rotational parameters could be recovered accurately with greater than 50% of the signal arising from background. These results establish a direct and practical approach to subtraction of background in complex biological and chemical samples studied by frequency-domain fluorimetry.

  1. Robust time-domain frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Daniel; Longbotham, Harold G.

    1992-04-01

    One domain in which the ordering filters have not appeared is frequency analysis. Simultaneously one must note that the impulse rejection properties of the ordering filters could be very beneficial due to the lack of robustness of the DFT/FFT. Another problem with the DFT/FFT is the ambiguity of the estimate of frequency at a point (frequency localization). This paper introduces a transform (WMMR/MED/COUNT) that simultaneously solves both of the problems in some cases. The Gabor transform and various wavelet techniques have recently been reviewed as a substitute to FFT frequency analysis for spatial localization. While the Gabor transform optimally infers frequency content and spatial localization simultaneously, it suffers from the fact that it requires a full period within the window. This paper presents a transform based on the WMMR filters that will yield frequency analysis and spatial localization with a window width of 1/4 period or less. Experimentally, it has been shown that this technique can be used with impulsive noise of up to 40% and with random baseline shifts. The short-time Fourier, Gabor transform and the WMMR/MED/COUNT transforms (WMCT) are compared for their localization properties in noisy and noiseless situations.

  2. Design PID controllers for desired time-domain or frequency-domain response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Xi, Yugeng; Yang, Genke; Xu, Xiaoming

    2002-10-01

    Practical requirements on the design of control systems, especially process control systems, are usually specified in terms of time-domain response, such as overshoot and rise time, or frequency-domain response, such as resonance peak and stability margin. Although numerous methods have been developed for the design of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, little work has been done in relation to the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses. In this paper, we study the following problem: Given a nominal stable process with time delay, we design a suboptimal PID controller to achieve the required time-domain response or frequency-domain response for the nominal system or the uncertain system. An H(infinity) PID controller is developed based on optimal control theory and the parameters are derived analytically. Its properties are investigated and compared with that of two developed suboptimal controllers: an H2 PID controller and a Maclaurin PID controller. It is shown that all three controllers can provide the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses.

  3. Materials characterization using frequency domain photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, Oluwaseyi Oladeinde

    A frequency domain photoacoustic microscopy system is developed for the characterization of micro- and nanoscale materials. An amplified, intensity modulated continuous wave (CW) laser source is used to generate narrow-bandwidth acoustic waves through the thermoelastic effect. The displacement resulting from acoustic wave interaction with material boundaries is measured using a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer. The signal from the interferometer is coupled to a RF lock-in amplifier or vector network analyzer, allowing for the bandwidth of the detection system to be matched to that of the acoustic signals. Measurements are made over an extremely narrow bandwidth by modulating the excitation laser source on the sample surface over a long time interval and selecting a corresponding integration time for the detection system. An analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of this system indicates that it offers substantial improvements over existing systems that incorporate pulsed laser sources to generate broad bandwidth acoustic waves. Using a bandwidth of 1.0 Hz, for instance, experimental results show a minimum detectable displacement of 3.1 fm. Extracting quantitative material parameters from the complex acoustic spectrum can be difficult when multiple acoustic modes are excited, or in the presence of reflections from sample boundaries. Two techniques are used to process the measured signals. In the first technique, the modulation frequency of the excitation laser is scanned over the bandwidth of interest, and a transient sample response is constructed from the frequency domain data. Acoustic arrivals that are separated in the time domain are time gated for further analysis. In the second approach, the modulation frequency of the excitation laser is fixed, but the source to receiver distance is varied. The spatial frequencies of the acoustic modes are found by analyzing the spatial variation of the phase, allowing for the velocity of each mode generated at

  4. Examining thermal transport through a frequency-domain representation of time-domain thermoreflectance data.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kimberlee C; Maznev, Alexei A; Cuffe, John; Nelson, Keith A; Chen, Gang

    2014-12-01

    Laser-based time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) and frequency-domain thermoreflectance (FDTR) techniques are widely used for investigating thermal transport at micro- and nano-scales. We demonstrate that data obtained in TDTR measurements can be represented in a frequency-domain form equivalent to FDTR, i.e., in the form of a surface temperature amplitude and phase response to time-harmonic heating. Such a representation is made possible by using a large TDTR delay time window covering the entire pulse repetition interval. We demonstrate the extraction of frequency-domain data up to 1 GHz from TDTR measurements on a sapphire sample coated with a thin layer of aluminum, and show that the frequency dependencies of both the amplitude and phase responses agree well with theory. The proposed method not only allows a direct comparison of TDTR and FDTR data, but also enables measurements at high frequencies currently not accessible to FDTR. The frequency-domain representation helps uncover aspects of the measurement physics which remain obscured in a traditional TDTR measurement, such as the importance of modeling the details of the heat transport in the metal transducer film for analyzing high frequency responses.

  5. Frequency Domain Modeling of SAW Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    New SAW sensors for integrated vehicle health monitoring of aerospace vehicles are being investigated. SAW technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, and extremely low power. However, the lack of design tools for MEMS devices in general, and for Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices specifically, has led to the development of tools that will enable integrated design, modeling, simulation, analysis and automatic layout generation of SAW devices. A frequency domain model has been created. The model is mainly first order, but it includes second order effects from triple transit echoes. This paper presents the model and results from the model for a SAW delay line device.

  6. Terahertz grayscale imaging using spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhihui; Sun, Lin; Zhang, Dongwen; Yuan, Jianmin

    2011-11-01

    We reported a technology of gray-scale imaging using broadband terahertz pulse. Utilizing the spatial distribution of different frequency content, image information can be acquired from the terahertz frequency domain analysis. Unlike CCDs(charge-coupled devices) or spot scanning technology are used in conversional method, a single-pixels detector with single measurement can meet the demand of our scheme. And high SNR terahertz imaging with fast velocity is believed.

  7. Terahertz grayscale imaging using spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhihui; Sun, Lin; Zhang, Dongwen; Yuan, Jianmin

    2012-03-01

    We reported a technology of gray-scale imaging using broadband terahertz pulse. Utilizing the spatial distribution of different frequency content, image information can be acquired from the terahertz frequency domain analysis. Unlike CCDs(charge-coupled devices) or spot scanning technology are used in conversional method, a single-pixels detector with single measurement can meet the demand of our scheme. And high SNR terahertz imaging with fast velocity is believed.

  8. Frequency domain laser velocimeter signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Murphy, R. Jay

    1991-01-01

    A new scheme for processing signals from laser velocimeter systems is described. The technique utilizes the capabilities of advanced digital electronics to yield a signal processor capable of operating in the frequency domain maximizing the information obtainable from each signal burst. This allows a sophisticated approach to signal detection and processing, with a more accurate measurement of the chirp frequency resulting in an eight-fold increase in measurable signals over the present high-speed burst counter technology. Further, the required signal-to-noise ratio is reduced by a factor of 32, allowing measurements within boundary layers of wind tunnel models. Measurement accuracy is also increased up to a factor of five.

  9. AU-FREDI - AUTONOMOUS FREQUENCY DOMAIN IDENTIFICATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification program, AU-FREDI, is a system of methods, algorithms and software that was developed for the identification of structural dynamic parameters and system transfer function characterization for control of large space platforms and flexible spacecraft. It was validated in the CALTECH/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory. Due to the unique characteristics of this laboratory environment, and the environment-specific nature of many of the software's routines, AU-FREDI should be considered to be a collection of routines which can be modified and reassembled to suit system identification and control experiments on large flexible structures. The AU-FREDI software was originally designed to command plant excitation and handle subsequent input/output data transfer, and to conduct system identification based on the I/O data. Key features of the AU-FREDI methodology are as follows: 1. AU-FREDI has on-line digital filter design to support on-orbit optimal input design and data composition. 2. Data composition of experimental data in overlapping frequency bands overcomes finite actuator power constraints. 3. Recursive least squares sine-dwell estimation accurately handles digitized sinusoids and low frequency modes. 4. The system also includes automated estimation of model order using a product moment matrix. 5. A sample-data transfer function parametrization supports digital control design. 6. Minimum variance estimation is assured with a curve fitting algorithm with iterative reweighting. 7. Robust root solvers accurately factorize high order polynomials to determine frequency and damping estimates. 8. Output error characterization of model additive uncertainty supports robustness analysis. The research objectives associated with AU-FREDI were particularly useful in focusing the identification methodology for realistic on-orbit testing conditions. Rather than estimating the entire structure, as is

  10. AU-FREDI - AUTONOMOUS FREQUENCY DOMAIN IDENTIFICATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification program, AU-FREDI, is a system of methods, algorithms and software that was developed for the identification of structural dynamic parameters and system transfer function characterization for control of large space platforms and flexible spacecraft. It was validated in the CALTECH/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory. Due to the unique characteristics of this laboratory environment, and the environment-specific nature of many of the software's routines, AU-FREDI should be considered to be a collection of routines which can be modified and reassembled to suit system identification and control experiments on large flexible structures. The AU-FREDI software was originally designed to command plant excitation and handle subsequent input/output data transfer, and to conduct system identification based on the I/O data. Key features of the AU-FREDI methodology are as follows: 1. AU-FREDI has on-line digital filter design to support on-orbit optimal input design and data composition. 2. Data composition of experimental data in overlapping frequency bands overcomes finite actuator power constraints. 3. Recursive least squares sine-dwell estimation accurately handles digitized sinusoids and low frequency modes. 4. The system also includes automated estimation of model order using a product moment matrix. 5. A sample-data transfer function parametrization supports digital control design. 6. Minimum variance estimation is assured with a curve fitting algorithm with iterative reweighting. 7. Robust root solvers accurately factorize high order polynomials to determine frequency and damping estimates. 8. Output error characterization of model additive uncertainty supports robustness analysis. The research objectives associated with AU-FREDI were particularly useful in focusing the identification methodology for realistic on-orbit testing conditions. Rather than estimating the entire structure, as is

  11. 2-GHz frequency-domain fluorometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Laczko, Gabor; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    1986-10-01

    We developed a frequency-domain fluorometer which operates from 4 to 2000 MHz. The modulated excitation is provided by the harmonic content of a laser pulse train (3.76 MHz, 5 ps) from a synchronously pumped and cavity dumped dye laser. The phase angle and modulation of the emission are measured with a microchannel-plate photomultiplier (PMT). Cross-correlation detection is performed outside the PMT. The high-frequency signals for cross correlation were obtained by multiplication of the output from a 500-MHz frequency synthesizer. The performance was verified in several ways, including measurement of known time delays and examination of standard fluorophores. The detector displayed no detectable color effect, with the 300-600-nm difference being less than 5 ps. The precision of the measurements is adequate to detect differences of 20 ps for decay times of 500 ps. A correlation time of 53 ps was found for indole in water at 20 °C. The shortest correlation time we measured was 15 ps for indole in methanol/water (75/25) at 40 °C. Also, the 2-GHz data reveal the time-dependent ((t)1/2) terms found in the presence of collisional quenching. The degree of random error is about 0.3° of phase and 0.005 in modulation throughout the frequency range.

  12. Assessment of the frequency-domain multi-distance method to evaluate the brain optical properties: Monte Carlo simulations from neonate to adult

    PubMed Central

    Dehaes, Mathieu; Grant, P. Ellen; Sliva, Danielle D.; Roche-Labarbe, Nadège; Pienaar, Rudolph; Boas, David A.; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Selb, Juliette

    2011-01-01

    The near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) frequency-domain multi-distance (FD-MD) method allows for the estimation of optical properties in biological tissue using the phase and intensity of radiofrequency modulated light at different source-detector separations. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of this method to retrieve the absorption coefficient of the brain at different ages. Synthetic measurements were generated with Monte Carlo simulations in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based heterogeneous head models for four ages: newborn, 6 and 12 month old infants, and adult. For each age, we determined the optimal set of source-detector separations and estimated the corresponding errors. Errors arise from different origins: methodological (FD-MD) and anatomical (curvature, head size and contamination by extra-cerebral tissues). We found that the brain optical absorption could be retrieved with an error between 8–24% in neonates and infants, while the error increased to 19–44% in adults over all source-detector distances. The dominant contribution to the error was found to be the head curvature in neonates and infants, and the extra-cerebral tissues in adults. PMID:21412461

  13. A frequency domain Ritz-method-based spectral finite element methodology for the computation of band structure of the pentamode metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sushovan; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2016-04-01

    The class of fabricated materials known as metamaterials, with its promises for unconventional material properties or characteristics, has opened up a whole new paradigm of possibilities and challenges. The primary enablers have been capabilities at the very low length scale and novel design configurations. Pentamode metamaterials, having fluid like properties, is one such idea to have been realized in recent past. This type of fabricated materials show high bulk modulus but low shear modulus. The fundamental constituent element is a rod like structure tapered down on both ends. Four of such elements meet at any joint, two of which in a plane orthogonal to that of the other two. The dynamics and wave propagation characteristics of such structures have been studied with an aim to obtain band structures formed because of their periodic nature. Here, a methodology has been developed to compute the wave propagation characteristics of such pentamode structures using spectrally formulated finite elements based on frequency domain Ritz method. Bloch theory has also been used to represent the dynamics of an infinite structure through that of a unit cell. The proposed method is computationally more efficient compared to one using conventional finite element. A few variants of pentamodes are also analyzed to arrive at configurations with superior wave propagation characteristics.

  14. Finite-number-of-periods holographic gratings with finite-width incident beams: analysis using the finite-difference frequency-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shun-Der; Glytsis, Elias N.

    2002-10-01

    The effects of finite number of periods (FNP) and finite incident beams on the diffraction efficiencies of holographic gratings are investigated by the finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method. Gratings comprising 20, 15, 10, 5, and 3 periods illuminated by TE and TM incident light with various beam sizes are analyzed with the FDFD method and compared with the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Both unslanted and slanted gratings are treated in transmission as well as in reflection configurations. In general, the effect of the FNP is a decrease in the diffraction efficiency with a decrease in the number of periods of the grating. Similarly, a decrease in incident-beam width causes a decrease in the diffraction efficiency. Exceptions appear in off-Bragg incidence in which a smaller beam width could result in higher diffraction efficiency. For beam widths greater than 10 grating periods and for gratings with more than 20 periods in width, the diffraction efficiencies slowly converge to the values predicted by the RCWA (infinite incident beam and infinite-number-of-periods grating) for both TE and TM polarizations. Furthermore, the effects of FNP holographic gratings on their diffraction performance are found to be comparable to their counterparts of FNP surface-relief gratings. 2002 Optical Society of America

  15. Identification of characteristic components in frequency domain from signal singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2010-03-01

    In rotating machinery condition monitoring, identification of characteristic components is fundamental in many engineering applications so as to obtain fault sensitive features for fault detection and diagnosis. This paper proposed a novel method for the identification of characteristic components in frequency domain based on singularity analysis. In this process, Lipschitz exponent function is constructed from the signal through wavelet-based singularity analysis. In order to highlight the periodic phenomena, autocorrelation transform is employed to extract the periodic exponents and Fourier transform is used to map the time-domain information into frequency domain. Case study with rolling element bearing vibration data shows that the proposed has very excellent capability for the identification of characteristic components compared with traditional methods.

  16. Identification of characteristic components in frequency domain from signal singularities.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2010-03-01

    In rotating machinery condition monitoring, identification of characteristic components is fundamental in many engineering applications so as to obtain fault sensitive features for fault detection and diagnosis. This paper proposed a novel method for the identification of characteristic components in frequency domain based on singularity analysis. In this process, Lipschitz exponent function is constructed from the signal through wavelet-based singularity analysis. In order to highlight the periodic phenomena, autocorrelation transform is employed to extract the periodic exponents and Fourier transform is used to map the time-domain information into frequency domain. Case study with rolling element bearing vibration data shows that the proposed has very excellent capability for the identification of characteristic components compared with traditional methods.

  17. Application of frequency domain line edge roughness characterization methodology in lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Wang, Wenhui; Beique, Genevieve; Wood, Obert; Kim, Ryoung-Han

    2015-03-01

    A frequency domain 3 sigma LER characterization methodology combining the standard deviation and power spectral density (PSD) methods is proposed. In the new method, the standard deviation is calculated in the frequency domain instead of the spatial domain as in the conventional method. The power spectrum of the LER is divided into three regions: low frequency (LF), middle frequency (MF) and high frequency (HF) regions. The frequency region definition is based on process visual comparisons. Three standard deviation numbers are used to characterize the LER in the three frequency regions. Pattern wiggling can be detected quantitatively with a wiggling factor which is also proposed in this paper.

  18. Thermal property microscopy with frequency domain thermoreflectance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia; Maragliano, Carlo; Schmidt, Aaron J

    2013-10-01

    A thermal property microscopy technique based on frequency domain thermoreflectance (FDTR) is presented. In FDTR, a periodically modulated laser locally heats a sample while a second probe beam monitors the surface reflectivity, which is related to the thermal properties of the sample with an analytical model. Here, we extend FDTR into an imaging technique capable of producing micrometer-scale maps of several thermophysical properties simultaneously. Thermal phase images are recorded at multiple frequencies chosen for maximum sensitivity to thermal properties of interest according to a thermal model of the sample. The phase versus frequency curves are then fit point-by-point to obtain quantitative thermal property images of various combinations of thermal properties in multilayer samples, including the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities, heat capacity, thermal interface conductance, and film thickness. An FDTR microscope based on two continuous-wave lasers is described, and a sensitivity analysis of the technique to different thermal properties is carried out. As a demonstration, we image ~3 nm of patterned titanium under 100 nm of gold on a silicon substrate, and simultaneously create maps of the thermal interface conductance and substrate thermal conductivity. Results confirm the potential of our technique for imaging and quantifying thermal properties of buried layers, indicating its utility for mapping thermal properties in integrated circuits.

  19. Frequency-domain imaging of thick tissues using a CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Todd E.; Gratton, Enrico; Maier, John S.

    1992-04-01

    Imaging of thick tissue has been an area of active research during the past several years. Among the methods proposed to deal with the high scattering of biological tissues, the time resolution of a short light probe traversing a tissue seems to be the most promising. Time resolution can be achieved in the time domain using correlated single photon counting techniques or in the frequency domain using phase resolved methods. We have developed a CCD camera system which provides ultra high time resolution on the entire field of view. The phase of the photon diffusion wave traveling in the highly turbid medium can be measured with an accuracy of about one degree at each pixel. The camera has been successfully modulated at frequencies on the order of 100 MHz. At this frequency, one degree of phase shift corresponds to about 30 ps maximum time resolution. Powerful image processing software displays in real time the phase resolved image on the computer screen.

  20. Evaluation of the accuracy of brain optical properties estimation at different ages using the frequency-domain multi-distance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehaes, Mathieu; Grant, P. Ellen; Sliva, Danielle D.; Roche-Labarbe, Nadège; Pienaar, Rudolph; Boas, David A.; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Selb, Juliette

    2011-03-01

    NIRS is safe, non-invasive and offers the possibility to record local hemodynamic parameters at the bedside, avoiding the transportation of neonates and critically ill patients. In this work, we evaluate the accuracy of the frequency-domain multi-distance (FD-MD) method to retrieve brain optical properties from neonate to adult. Realistic measurements are simulated using a 3D Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation. Height different ages were investigated: a term newborn of 38 weeks gestational age, two infants of 6 and 12 months of age, a toddler of 2 year (yr.) old, two children of 5 and 10 years of age, a teenager of 14 yr. old, and an adult. Measurements are generated at multiple distances on the right parietal area of head models and fitted to a homogeneous FD-MD model to estimate the brain optical properties. In the newborn, infants, toddler and 5 yr. old child models, the error was dominated by the head curvature, while the superficial layer in the 10 yr. old child, teenager and adult heads. The influence of the CSF is also evaluated. In this case, absorption coefficients suffer from an additional error. In all cases, measurements at 5 mm provided worse estimation because of the diffusion approximation.

  1. Higher order statistical frequency domain decomposition for operational modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, G. M.; Mahgoub, M. A.; Sharyatpanahi, S. G.; Cretu, N. C.; El-Fouly, T. M.

    2017-02-01

    Experimental methods based on modal analysis under ambient vibrational excitation are often employed to detect structural damages of mechanical systems. Many of such frequency domain methods, such as Basic Frequency Domain (BFD), Frequency Domain Decomposition (FFD), or Enhanced Frequency Domain Decomposition (EFFD), use as first step a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) estimate of the power spectral density (PSD) associated with the response of the system. In this study it is shown that higher order statistical estimators such as Spectral Kurtosis (SK) and Sample to Model Ratio (SMR) may be successfully employed not only to more reliably discriminate the response of the system against the ambient noise fluctuations, but also to better identify and separate contributions from closely spaced individual modes. It is shown that a SMR-based Maximum Likelihood curve fitting algorithm may improve the accuracy of the spectral shape and location of the individual modes and, when combined with the SK analysis, it provides efficient means to categorize such individual spectral components according to their temporal dynamics as coherent or incoherent system responses to unknown ambient excitations.

  2. Discussion summary: Fictitious domain methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glowinski, Rowland; Rodrigue, Garry

    1991-01-01

    Fictitious Domain methods are constructed in the following manner: Suppose a partial differential equation is to be solved on an open bounded set, Omega, in 2-D or 3-D. Let R be a rectangle domain containing the closure of Omega. The partial differential equation is first solved on R. Using the solution on R, the solution of the equation on Omega is then recovered by some procedure. The advantage of the fictitious domain method is that in many cases the solution of a partial differential equation on a rectangular region is easier to compute than on a nonrectangular region. Fictitious domain methods for solving elliptic PDEs on general regions are also very efficient when used on a parallel computer. The reason is that one can use the many domain decomposition methods that are available for solving the PDE on the fictitious rectangular region. The discussion on fictitious domain methods began with a talk by R. Glowinski in which he gave some examples of a variational approach to ficititious domain methods for solving the Helmholtz and Navier-Stokes equations.

  3. [Frequency-domain quantification based on the singular value decomposition and frequency-selection for magnetic resonance spectra].

    PubMed

    Men, Kuo; Quan, Hong; Yang, Peipei; Cao, Ting; Li, Weihao

    2010-04-01

    The frequency-domain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is achieved by the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the time-domain signals. Usually we are only interested in the portion lying in a frequency band of the whole spectrum. A method based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) and frequency-selection is presented in this article. The method quantifies the spectrum lying in the interested frequency band and reduces the interference of the parts lying out of the band in a computationally efficient way. Comparative experiments with the standard time-domain SVD method indicate that the method introduced in this article is accurate and timesaving in practical situations.

  4. Autonomous Frequency-Domain System-Identification Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Mettler, Edward; Bayard, David S.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification (AU-FREDI) computer program implements system of methods, algorithms, and software developed for identification of parameters of mathematical models of dynamics of flexible structures and characterization, by use of system transfer functions, of such models, dynamics, and structures regarded as systems. Software considered collection of routines modified and reassembled to suit system-identification and control experiments on large flexible structures.

  5. Autonomous Frequency-Domain System-Identification Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Mettler, Edward; Bayard, David S.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification (AU-FREDI) computer program implements system of methods, algorithms, and software developed for identification of parameters of mathematical models of dynamics of flexible structures and characterization, by use of system transfer functions, of such models, dynamics, and structures regarded as systems. Software considered collection of routines modified and reassembled to suit system-identification and control experiments on large flexible structures.

  6. A time domain frequency-selective multivariate Granger causality approach.

    PubMed

    Leistritz, Lutz; Witte, Herbert

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of effective connectivity is one of the major topics in computational neuroscience to understand the interaction between spatially distributed neuronal units of the brain. Thus, a wide variety of methods has been developed during the last decades to investigate functional and effective connectivity in multivariate systems. Their spectrum ranges from model-based to model-free approaches with a clear separation into time and frequency range methods. We present in this simulation study a novel time domain approach based on Granger's principle of predictability, which allows frequency-selective considerations of directed interactions. It is based on a comparison of prediction errors of multivariate autoregressive models fitted to systematically modified time series. These modifications are based on signal decompositions, which enable a targeted cancellation of specific signal components with specific spectral properties. Depending on the embedded signal decomposition method, a frequency-selective or data-driven signal-adaptive Granger Causality Index may be derived.

  7. Experimental analysis of hydraulic discharge line in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klarecki, K.; Rabsztyn, D.; Hetmanczyk, M. P.

    2017-08-01

    The article presents the results of the experimental test of the pressure pulsation propagation across hydraulic line. The tests have been conducted in the form of a complete two-level experiment, having selected the following parameter variables: flexible hose type (1 or 2-wire hose), pressure value in the pressure line, rotational speed of the pump shaft, pressure line length. The series of pressure runs were analysed in frequency domain using FFT method. The results confirmed the prediction that the discharge line should be treated as a hydraulic transmission line (similar to the long transmission line) with distributed parameters, which variously attenuates pressure pulses of different frequencies.

  8. Remote sensing image fusion based on frequency domain segmenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deren; Li, Linyi; Yu, Xin

    2006-10-01

    Remote sensing image fusion has become one of hotspots in the researches and applications of Geoinformatics in recent years. It has been widely used to integrate low-resolution multispectral images with high-resolution panchromatic images. In order to obtain good fusion effects, high frequency components of panchromatic images and low frequency components of multispectral images should be identified and combined in a reasonable way. However, it is very difficult due to complex processes of remote sensing image formation. In order to solve this problem, a new remote sensing image fusion method based on frequency domain segmenting is proposed in this paper. Discrete wavelet packet transform is used as the mathematical tool to segment the frequency domain of remote sensing images after analyzing the frequency relationship between high-resolution panchromatic images and low-resolution multispectral images. And several wavelet packet coefficient features are extracted and combined as the fusion decision criteria. Besides visual perception and some statistical parameters, classification accuracy parameters are also used to evaluate the fusion effects in the experiment. And the results show that fused images by the proposed method are not only suitable for human perception but also suitable for some computer applications such as remote sensing image classification.

  9. Real-time spatial frequency domain imaging by single snapshot multiple frequency demodulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zili; Lin, Weihao; Chen, Xinlin; Zeng, Bixin; Xu, Min

    2017-02-01

    We have presented a novel Single Snapshot Multiple Frequency Demodulation (SSMD) method enabling single snapshot wide field imaging of optical properties of turbid media in the Spatial Frequency Domain. SSMD makes use of the orthogonality of harmonic functions and extracts the modulation transfer function (MTF) at multiple modulation frequencies and of arbitrary orientations and amplitudes simultaneously from a single structured-illuminated image at once. SSMD not only increases significantly the data acquisition speed and reduces motion artifacts but also exhibits excellent noise suppression in imaging as well. The performance of SSMD-SFDI is demonstrated with experiments on both tissue mimicking phantoms and in vivo for recovering optical properties. SSMD is ideal in the implementation of a real-time spatial frequency domain imaging platform, which will open up SFDI for vast applications in, for example, mapping the optical properties of a dynamic turbid medium or monitoring fast temporal evolutions.

  10. Multivariable frequency domain identification via 2-norm minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    1992-01-01

    The author develops a computational approach to multivariable frequency domain identification, based on 2-norm minimization. In particular, a Gauss-Newton (GN) iteration is developed to minimize the 2-norm of the error between frequency domain data and a matrix fraction transfer function estimate. To improve the global performance of the optimization algorithm, the GN iteration is initialized using the solution to a particular sequentially reweighted least squares problem, denoted as the SK iteration. The least squares problems which arise from both the SK and GN iterations are shown to involve sparse matrices with identical block structure. A sparse matrix QR factorization method is developed to exploit the special block structure, and to efficiently compute the least squares solution. A numerical example involving the identification of a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) plant having 286 unknown parameters is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  11. The Peltier driven frequency domain approach in thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Andrea; Giaretto, Valter

    2014-10-01

    The merits of Frequency Domain analysis as a tool for thermal system characterization are discussed, and the complex thermal impedance approach is illustrated. Pure AC thermal flux generation with negligible DC component is possible with a Peltier device, differently from other existing methods in which a significant DC component is intrinsically attached to the generated AC flux. Such technique is named here Peltier Driven Frequency Domain (PDFD). As a necessary prerequisite, a novel one-dimensional analytical model for an asymmetrically loaded Peltier device is developed, which is general enough to be useful in most practical situations as a design tool for measurement systems and as a key for the interpretation of experimental results. Impedance analysis is possible with Peltier devices by the inbuilt Seebeck effect differential thermometer, and is used in the paper for an experimental validation of the analytical model. Suggestions are then given for possible applications of PDFD, including the determination of thermal properties of materials.

  12. The Peltier driven frequency domain approach in thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, Andrea De; Giaretto, Valter

    2014-10-01

    The merits of Frequency Domain analysis as a tool for thermal system characterization are discussed, and the complex thermal impedance approach is illustrated. Pure AC thermal flux generation with negligible DC component is possible with a Peltier device, differently from other existing methods in which a significant DC component is intrinsically attached to the generated AC flux. Such technique is named here Peltier Driven Frequency Domain (PDFD). As a necessary prerequisite, a novel one-dimensional analytical model for an asymmetrically loaded Peltier device is developed, which is general enough to be useful in most practical situations as a design tool for measurement systems and as a key for the interpretation of experimental results. Impedance analysis is possible with Peltier devices by the inbuilt Seebeck effect differential thermometer, and is used in the paper for an experimental validation of the analytical model. Suggestions are then given for possible applications of PDFD, including the determination of thermal properties of materials.

  13. Frequency domain quantum optimal control under multiple constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Ho, Tak-San; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-03-01

    Optimal control of quantum systems with complex constrained external fields is one of the longstanding theoretical and numerical challenges at the frontier of quantum control research. Here, we present a theoretical method that can be utilized to optimize the control fields subject to multiple constraints while guaranteeing monotonic convergence towards desired physical objectives. This optimization method is formulated in the frequency domain in line with the current ultrafast pulse shaping technique, providing the possibility for performing quantum optimal control simulations and experiments in a unified fashion. For illustrations, this method is successfully employed to perform multiple constraint spectral-phase-only optimization for maximizing resonant multiphoton transitions with desired pulses.

  14. Optical wire guided lumpectomy: frequency domain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, A. L.; Keränen, V. T.; Prahl, S. A.

    2009-02-01

    In practice, complete removal of the tumor during a lumpectomy is difficult; the published rates of positive margins range from 10% to 50%. A spherical lumpectomy specimen with tumor directly in the middle may improve the success rate. A light source placed within the tumor may accomplish this goal by creating a sphere surrounding the tumor that can serve as a guide for resection. In an optical phantom and a prophylactic mastectomy specimen, sinusoidally modulated light within the medium was collected by optical fiber(s) at fixed distance(s) from the source and used to measure the optical properties. These optical properties were then used to calculate the distance the light had traveled through the medium. The fiber was coupled to an 830nm diode laser that was modulated at 100, 200 and 300 MHz. A handheld optical probe collected the modulated light and a network analyzer measured the phase lag. This data was used to calculate the distance the light traveled from the emitting fiber tip to the probe. The optical properties were μa = 0.004mm-1 and μ1s = 0.38mm-1 in the phantom. The optical properties for the tissue were μa = 0.005mm-1 and μ1s = 0.20mm-1. The prediction of distance from the source was within 4mm of the actual distance at 30mm in the phantom and within 3mm of the actual distance at 25mm in the tissue. The feasibility of a frequency domain system that makes measurements of local optical properties and then extrapolates those optical properties to make measurements of distance with a separate probe was demonstrated.

  15. Time domain and frequency domain design techniques for model reference adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1971-01-01

    Some problems associated with the design of model-reference adaptive control systems are considered and solutions to these problems are advanced. The stability of the adapted system is a primary consideration in the development of both the time-domain and the frequency-domain design techniques. Consequentially, the use of Liapunov's direct method forms an integral part of the derivation of the design procedures. The application of sensitivity coefficients to the design of model-reference adaptive control systems is considered. An application of the design techniques is also presented.

  16. Digital parallel frequency-domain spectroscopy for tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnesano, Cosimo; Santoro, Ylenia; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-09-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) (650 to 1000 nm) optical properties of turbid media can be quantified accurately and noninvasively using methods based on diffuse reflectance or transmittance, such as frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM). Conventional FDPM techniques based on white-light steady-state (SS) spectral measurements in conjunction with the acquisition of frequency-domain (FD) data at selected wavelengths using laser diodes are used to measure broadband NIR scattering-corrected absorption spectra of turbid media. These techniques are limited by the number of wavelength points used to obtain FD data and by the sweeping technique used to collect FD data over a relatively large range. We have developed a method that introduces several improvements in the acquisition of optical parameters, based on the digital parallel acquisition of a comb of frequencies and on the use of a white laser as a single light source for both FD and SS measurements. The source, due to the high brightness, allows a higher penetration depth with an extremely low power on the sample. The parallel acquisition decreases the time required by standard serial systems that scan through a range of modulation frequencies. Furthermore, all-digital acquisition removes analog noise, avoids the analog mixer, and does not create radiofrequency interference or emission.

  17. Frequency Domain Beamforming for a Deep Space Network Downlink Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a frequency domain beamformer to array up to 8 antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network currently in development. The objective of this array is to replace and enhance the capability of the DSN 70m antennas with multiple 34m antennas for telemetry, navigation and radio science use. The array will coherently combine the entire 500 MHz of usable bandwidth available to DSN receivers. A frequency domain beamforming architecture was chosen over a time domain based architecture to handle the large signal bandwidth and efficiently perform delay and phase calibration. The antennas of the DSN are spaced far enough apart that random atmospheric and phase variations between antennas need to be calibrated out on an ongoing basis in real-time. The calibration is done using measurements obtained from a correlator. This DSN Downlink Array expands upon a proof of concept breadboard array built previously to develop the technology and will become an operational asset of the Deep Space Network. Design parameters for frequency channelization, array calibration and delay corrections will be presented as well a method to efficiently calibrate the array for both wide and narrow bandwidth telemetry.

  18. Analysis of frequency domain frame detection and synchronization in OQAM-OFDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thein, Christoph; Schellmann, Malte; Peissig, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    For future communication systems, filter bank multicarrier schemes offer the flexibility to increase spectrum utilization in heterogeneous wireless environments by good separation of signals in the frequency domain. To fully exploit this property for frame detection and synchronization, the advantage of the filter bank should be taken at the receiver side. In this work, the concept of frequency domain processing for frame detection and synchronization is analyzed and a suitable preamble design as well as corresponding estimation algorithms is discussed. The theoretical performance of the detection and estimation schemes is derived and compared with simulation-based assessments. The results show that, even though the frequency domain algorithms are sensitive to carrier frequency offsets, satisfactory frame detection and synchronization can be achieved in the frequency domain. In comparison to time domain synchronization methods, the computational complexity increases; however, enhanced robustness in shared spectrum access scenarios is gained in case the described frequency domain approach is utilized.

  19. Visual saliency: a biologically plausible contourlet-like frequency domain approach.

    PubMed

    Bian, Peng; Zhang, Liming

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we propose a fast frequency domain saliency detection method that is also biologically plausible, referred to as frequency domain divisive normalization (FDN). We show that the initial feature extraction stage, common to all spatial domain approaches, can be simplified to a Fourier transform with a contourlet-like grouping of coefficients, and saliency detection can be achieved in frequency domain. Specifically, we show that divisive normalization, a model of cortical surround inhibition, can be conducted in frequency domain. Since Fourier coefficients are global in space, we extend to this model by conducting piecewise FDN (PFDN) using overlapping local patches to provide better biological plausibility. Not only do FDN and PFDN outperform current state-of-the-art methods in eye fixation prediction, they are also faster. Speed and simplicity are advantages of our frequency domain approach, and its biological plausibility is the main contribution of our paper.

  20. A statistical package for computing time and frequency domain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlow, J.

    1978-01-01

    The spectrum analysis (SPA) program is a general purpose digital computer program designed to aid in data analysis. The program does time and frequency domain statistical analyses as well as some preanalysis data preparation. The capabilities of the SPA program include linear trend removal and/or digital filtering of data, plotting and/or listing of both filtered and unfiltered data, time domain statistical characterization of data, and frequency domain statistical characterization of data.

  1. Frequency and Time Domain Modeling of Acoustic Liner Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research program directed at the acoustics of advanced subsonic propulsion systems undertaken at NASA Langley, Duke University was funded to develop a boundary condition model for bulk-reacting nacelle liners. The overall objective of the Langley program was to understand and predict noise from advanced subsonic transport engines and to develop related noise control technology. The overall technical areas included: fan and propeller source noise, acoustics of ducts and duct liners, interior noise, subjective acoustics, and systems noise prediction. The Duke effort was directed toward duct liner acoustics for the development of analytical methods to characterize liner behavior in both frequency domain and time domain. A review of duct acoustics and liner technology can be found in Reference [1]. At that time, NASA Langley was investigating the propulsion concept of an advanced ducted fan, with a large diameter housed inside a relatively short duct. Fan diameters in excess of ten feet were proposed. The lengths of both the inlet and exhaust portions of the duct were to be short, probably less than half the fan diameter. The nacelle itself would be relatively thin-walled for reasons of aerodynamic efficiency. The blade-passage frequency was expected to be less than I kHz, and very likely in the 200 to 300 Hz range. Because of the design constraints of a short duct, a thin nacelle, and long acoustic wavelengths, the application of effective liner technology would be especially challenging. One of the needs of the NASA Langley program was the capability to accurately and efficiently predict the behavior of the acoustic liner. The traditional point impedance method was not an adequate model for proposed liner designs. The method was too restrictive to represent bulk reacting liners and to allow for the characterization of many possible innovative liner concepts. In the research effort at Duke, an alternative method, initially developed to handle bulk

  2. Frequency-domain analysis for pulsating combustion of gaseous fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, I. A.; Porshnev, S. V.; Oshchepkova, V. Y.; Medvedev, A. N.

    2017-06-01

    Pulsating combustion is among combustion control methods used to suppress formation of NOx. Past experiments showed that the dependency of NOx content from pulsation rate has a minimum. A measuring unit was set up to study torch behavior in infrared band. To study pulsating combustion of gaseous fuel a thermographic camera was used. Thermographic sequences were recorded using the instrument FLIR 7700M with the resolution of 320×240 pixels at the frame rate of 412 Hz. The experiments resulted in obtaining thermographic sequences radiation intensity fields in the longitudinal section of the torch at different pulsation rates. The obtained raw data was preprocessed to obtain distributions of quantities of pixels corresponding to temperatures in each frame, as well as time-domain series for changes of the torch core longitudinal section area. Frequency-domain analysis was run for each time-domain series using Fast Fourier transform (FFT). The results demonstrate that the first maximum of spectral density coincides with the control action rate. The spectrum also contains pronounced second and third harmonics. For each spectrum of the time-domain series signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated. Comparison of different SNR shows that maximum impact of pulsation control on torch radiation intensity takes place at the on/off valve opening rate of 4 Hz. This method of torch diagnostics can be helpful for future studies and development of pulsating combustion control systems.

  3. Blind separation of multiple vehicle signatures in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi-Sadjadi, M. R.; Srinivasan, S.

    2005-05-01

    This paper considers the problem of classifying ground vehicles using their acoustic signatures recorded by unattended passive acoustic sensors. Using these sensors, acoustic signatures of a wide variety of sources such as trucks, tanks, personnel, and airborne targets can be recorded. Additionally, interference sources such as wind noise and ambient noise are typically present. The proposed approach in this paper relies on the blind source separation of the recorded signatures of various sources. Two different frequency domain source separation methods have been employed to separate the vehicle signatures that overlap both spectrally and temporally. These methods rely on the frequency domain extension of the independent component analysis (ICA) method and a joint diagonalization of the time varying spectra. Spectral and temporal-dependent features are then extracted from the separated sources using a new feature extraction method and subsequently used for target classification using a three-layer neural network. The performance of the developed algorithms are demonstrated on a subset of a real acoustic signature database acquired from the US Army TACOM-ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  4. Pole-zero form fractional model identification in frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mansouri, R.; Djamah, T.; Djennoune, S.; Bettayeb, M.

    2009-03-05

    This paper deals with system identification in the frequency domain using non integer order models given in the pole-zero form. The usual identification techniques cannot be used in this case because of the non integer orders of differentiation which makes the problem strongly nonlinear. A general identification method based on Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is developed and allows to estimate the (2n+2m+1) parameters of the model. Its application to identify the ''skin effect'' of a squirrel cage induction machine modeling is then presented.

  5. Frequency domain, waveform inversion of laboratory crosswell radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Mazzella, Aldo T.; Horton, Robert J.; McKenna, Jason R.

    2010-01-01

    A new waveform inversion for crosswell radar is formulated in the frequency-domain for a 2.5D model. The inversion simulates radar waves using the vector Helmholtz equation for electromagnetic waves. The objective function is minimized using a backpropagation method suitable for a 2.5D model. The inversion is tested by processing crosswell radar data collected in a laboratory tank. The estimated model is consistent with the known electromagnetic properties of the tank. The formulation for the 2.5D model can be extended to inversions of acoustic and elastic data.

  6. Pole-zero form fractional model identification in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, R.; Djamah, T.; Bettayeb, M.; Djennoune, S.

    2009-03-01

    This paper deals with system identification in the frequency domain using non integer order models given in the pole-zero form. The usual identification techniques cannot be used in this case because of the non integer orders of differentiation which makes the problem strongly nonlinear. A general identification method based on Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is developed and allows to estimate the (2n+2m+1) parameters of the model. Its application to identify the "skin effect" of a squirrel cage induction machine modeling is then presented.

  7. A frequency domain approach to handling qualities design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolovich, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    A method for designing linear multivariable feedback control systems based on desired closed loop transfer matrix information is introduced. The technique which was employed to achieve the final design was based on a theoretical result, known as the structure theorem. The structure theorem was a frequency domain relationship which simplified the expression for the transfer matrix (matrix of transfer functions) of a linear time-invariant multivariable system. The effect of linear state variable feedback on the closed loop transfer matrix of the system was also clarified.

  8. Frequency domain analysis of triggered lightning return stroke luminosity velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, F. L.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Moore, R. C.

    2017-02-01

    Fourier analysis is applied to time domain return stroke luminosity signals to calculate the phase and group velocities and the amplitude of the luminosity signals as a function of frequency measured between 4 m and 115 m during 12 triggered lightning strokes. We show that pairs of time domain luminosity signals measured at different heights can be interpreted as the input and the output of a system whose frequency domain transfer function can be determined from the measured time domain signals. From the frequency domain transfer function phase we find the phase and group velocities, and luminosity amplitude as a function of triggered lightning channel height and signal frequency ranging from 50 kHz to 300 kHz. We show that higher-frequency luminosity components propagate faster than the lower frequency components and that higher-frequency luminosity components attenuate more rapidly than lower frequency components. Finally, we calculate time domain return stroke velocities as a function of channel height using two time delay techniques: (1) measurement at the 20% amplitude level and (2) cross correlation.

  9. Frequency Domain Detection of Biomolecules using Silicon Nanowire Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gengfeng; Gao, Xuan P. A.; Lieber, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a new protein detection methodology based upon frequency domain electrical measurement using silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) biosensors. The power spectral density of voltage from a current-biased SiNW FET shows 1/f-dependence in frequency domain for measurements of antibody functionalized SiNW devices in buffer solution or in the presence of protein not specific to the antibody receptor. In the presence of protein (antigen) recognized specifically by the antibody-functionalized SiNW FET, the frequency spectrum exhibits a Lorentzian shape with a characteristic frequency of several kHz. Frequency and conventional time domain measurements carried out with the same device as a function of antigen concentration show more than 10-fold increase in detection sensitivity in the frequency domain data. These concentration dependent results together with studies of antibody receptor density effect further address possible origins of the Lorentzian frequency spectrum. Our results show that frequency domain measurements can be used as a complementary approach to conventional time domain measurements for ultra-sensitive electrical detection of proteins and other biomolecules using nanoscale FETs. PMID:20698634

  10. Combined frequency domain photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging for intravascular applications

    PubMed Central

    Castelino, Robin F.; Hynes, Michael; Munding, Chelsea E.; Telenkov, Sergey; Foster, F. Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging has the potential to characterize lipid-rich structures based on the optical absorption contrast of tissues. In this study, we explore frequency domain photoacoustics (FDPA) for intravascular applications. The system employed an intensity-modulated continuous wave (CW) laser diode, delivering 1W over an intensity modulated chirp frequency of 4-12MHz. We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach on an agar vessel phantom with graphite and lipid targets, imaged using a planar acoustic transducer co-aligned with an optical fibre, allowing for the co-registration of IVUS and FDPA images. A frequency domain correlation method was used for signal processing and image reconstruction. The graphite and lipid targets show an increase in FDPA signal as compared to the background of 21dB and 16dB, respectively. Use of compact CW laser diodes may provide a valuable alternative for the development of photoacoustic intravascular devices instead of pulsed laser systems. PMID:27895986

  11. Spatial frequency domain imaging for monitoring palpable breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Constance M.; Antaki, James F.; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.

    2017-02-01

    We describe a novel approach for monitoring breast lesions, utilizing spatial frequency domain imaging, a diffuse optical imaging method to detect hemoglobin contrast, in combination with mechanical compression of the tissue. The project is motivated by the growing rate of unnecessary breast biopsies, caused by uncertainty in X-ray mammographic diagnoses. We believe there is a need for an alternate means of tracking the progression palpable lesions exhibiting probably benign features, that can be performed non-invasively and hence frequently: at home or in the clinic. The proposed approach capitalizes on two distinguishing properties of cancerous lesions, namely the relative stiffness with respect to surrounding tissue and the optical absorption due to the greater vascularization, hence hemoglobin concentration. The current research project is a pilot study to evaluate the principle on soft, breast tissue-mimicking phantoms containing stiffer, more highly absorbing inclusions. Spatial frequency domain imaging was performed by projecting onto the phantom a series of wide-field patterns at multiple spatial frequencies. Image analysis then was performed to map absorption and scattering properties. The results of the study demonstrate that compression significantly increases the optical contrast observed for inclusions located 10 and 15 mm beneath the surface. In the latter case, the inclusion was not detectable without compression.

  12. Frequency domain fluorometry with pulsed light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Herman, Petr; Vecer, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    We present a simple way to extend the time resolution of a standard frequency domain (FD) fluorometer by use of pulsed light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as an excitation source. High temporal resolution of the multifrequency FD method requires the excitation light to be modulated up to the highest possible frequencies with high modulation depth. We used harmonic content of subnanosecond-pulsed LEDs for generation of modulated excitation light. By a replacement of the light source, the upper frequency limit increased to 500-600 MHz, which is almost triple the frequency limit of the standard FD fluorometer equipped with an ordinary photomultiplier tube and an electro-optical modulator. Besides the increased time resolution, this approach allowed for elimination of a light modulator with an associated synthesizer and radio frequency power amplifier that are normally required for FD measurements with continuous wave light sources. Performance of the instrument with pulsed LED excitation is demonstrated on several examples of ultraviolet-excited fluorescence decays. We show that pulsed LEDs can serve as an inexpensive alternative to pulsed laser sources for FD fluorescence spectroscopy.

  13. Iterative procedures for wave propagation in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seongjai; Symes, W.W.

    1996-12-31

    A parallelizable two-grid iterative algorithm incorporating a domain decomposition (DD) method is considered for solving the Helmholtz problem. Since a numerical method requires choosing at least 6 to 8 grid points per wavelength, the coarse-grid problem itself is not an easy task for high frequency applications. We solve the coarse-grid problem using a nonoverlapping DD method. To accelerate the convergence of the iteration, an artificial damping technique and relaxation parameters are introduced. Automatic strategies for finding efficient parameters are discussed. Numerical results are presented to show the effectiveness of the method. It is numerically verified that the rate of convergence of the algorithm depends on the wave number sub-linearly and does not deteriorate as the mesh size decreases.

  14. Remote Strain Sensing of CFRP Using Microwave Frequency Domain Reflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composites Project is investigating technologies that increase automated remote inspection of aircraft composite structures. Therefore, microwave Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) is being investigated as a method of enabling rapid remote measurement of strain occurring at the first ply of a composite fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) structure using Radio Frequency (RF) Electro-Magnetic (EM) radiation. While microwave reflectometry has been used to detect disbonds in CFRP structures, its use in detecting strain has been limited. This work will present data demonstrating the measurement of the reactance changes due to loading conditions that are indicative of strain in a CFRP structure. In addition, the basic EM signature will be presented along with an analysis of temperature and humidity effects.

  15. Nonintrusive noncontacting frequency-domain photothermal radiometry of caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.; Abd-Elwahab, Bassam

    2010-04-01

    Among diffusion methods, photothermal radiometry (PTR) has the ability to penetrate and yield information about an opaque medium well beyond the range of conventional optical imaging. Owing to this ability, pulsed-laser PTR has been extensively used in turbid media such as biological tissues to study the sub-surface deposition of laser radiation, a task that may be difficult or impossible for many optical methods due to excessive scattering and absorption. In this paper considers the achievements of Pulsed Photothermal Radiometry using IR camera in the investigation of physical properties of biological materials and the diagnostics of the interaction of laser radiation with biological materials. A three-dimensional heat conduction formulation with the use of three-dimensional optical diffusion is developed to derive a turbid frequency-domain PTR model. The present photo-thermal model for frequency-domain PTR may prove useful for non-contact; non-invasive, in situ evaluate the depth profilometric imaging capabilities of FDPTR in monitoring carious and artificial subsurface lesions in human teeth.

  16. Optical frequency-domain reflectometry for microbend sensor demodulation.

    PubMed

    Pierce, S G; MacLean, A; Culshaw, B

    2000-09-01

    The operation of an incoherent optical frequency-domain reflectometer for monitoring the continuous Rayleigh backscatter in a multimode optical fiber is presented. A simple but effective model to predict the value of beat frequencies arising in the system when excited by a linearly frequency-swept amplitude modulation has been developed. We have verified the model's predictions by experimental measurement of beat frequencies and modulation depth indices of different lengths of standard graded-index multimode optical fiber. Demonstration of the system sensitivity to the detection of microbending loss is then discussed. In particular the detection of loss in a hydrogel-based water-sensing cable allows an alternative interrogation to conventional optical time-domain reflectometry techniques to be implemented. We demonstrate that the incoherent optical frequency-domain reflectometer is capable of detecting and locating sections of increased loss in a multimode optical fiber, and we discuss the fundamental limits on spatial resolution and dynamic range.

  17. Rule-based frequency domain speech coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Vance M.

    1990-12-01

    A speech processing system is designed to simulate the transmission of speech signals using a speech coding scheme. The transmitter portion of the simulation extracts a minimized set of frequencies in Fourier space which represents the essence of each of the speech timeslices. These parameters are then adaptively quantized and transmitted to a receiver portion of the coding scheme. The receiver then generates an estimate of the original timeslice from the transmitted parameters using a sinusoidal speech model. After initial design, how each of the design parameters affect the human perceived quality of speech is studied. This is done with listening tests. The listening tests consist of having volunteers listen to a series of speech reconstructions. Each reconstruction is the result of the coding scheme acting on the same speech input file with the design parameters varied. The design parameters which are varied are: number of frequencies used in the sinusoidal speech model for reconstruction, number of bits to encode amplitude information, and number of bits used to code phase information. The final design parameters for the coding scheme were selected based on the results of the listening tests. Post design listening tests showed that the system was capable of 4800 bps speech transmission with a quality rating of five on a scale from zero (not understandable) to ten (sounds just like original speech).

  18. Phasor plotting with frequency-domain flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Peria, William; Sands, Bryan; Naivar, Mark; Brent, Roger; Houston, Jessica P.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in time resolved flow cytometry is growing. In this paper, we collect time-resolved flow cytometry data and use it to create polar plots showing distributions that are a function of measured fluorescence decay rates from individual fluorescently-labeled cells and fluorescent microspheres. Phasor, or polar, graphics are commonly used in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In FLIM measurements, the plotted points on a phasor graph represent the phase-shift and demodulation of the frequency-domain fluorescence signal collected by the imaging system for each image pixel. Here, we take a flow cytometry cell counting system, introduce into it frequency-domain optoelectronics, and process the data so that each point on a phasor plot represents the phase shift and demodulation of an individual cell or particle. In order to demonstrate the value of this technique, we show that phasor graphs can be used to discriminate among populations of (i) fluorescent microspheres, which are labeled with one fluorophore type; (ii) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells labeled with one and two different fluorophore types; and (iii) Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that express combinations of fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes. The resulting phasor plots reveal differences in the fluorescence lifetimes within each sample and provide a distribution from which we can infer the number of cells expressing unique single or dual fluorescence lifetimes. These methods should facilitate analysis time resolved flow cytometry data to reveal complex fluorescence decay kinetics. PMID:27410612

  19. Phasor plotting with frequency-domain flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Peria, William; Sands, Bryan; Naivar, Mark; Brent, Roger; Houston, Jessica P

    2016-06-27

    Interest in time resolved flow cytometry is growing. In this paper, we collect time-resolved flow cytometry data and use it to create polar plots showing distributions that are a function of measured fluorescence decay rates from individual fluorescently-labeled cells and fluorescent microspheres. Phasor, or polar, graphics are commonly used in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In FLIM measurements, the plotted points on a phasor graph represent the phase-shift and demodulation of the frequency-domain fluorescence signal collected by the imaging system for each image pixel. Here, we take a flow cytometry cell counting system, introduce into it frequency-domain optoelectronics, and process the data so that each point on a phasor plot represents the phase shift and demodulation of an individual cell or particle. In order to demonstrate the value of this technique, we show that phasor graphs can be used to discriminate among populations of (i) fluorescent microspheres, which are labeled with one fluorophore type; (ii) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells labeled with one and two different fluorophore types; and (iii) Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that express combinations of fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes. The resulting phasor plots reveal differences in the fluorescence lifetimes within each sample and provide a distribution from which we can infer the number of cells expressing unique single or dual fluorescence lifetimes. These methods should facilitate analysis time resolved flow cytometry data to reveal complex fluorescence decay kinetics.

  20. Quantification of prostate MRSI data by model-based time domain fitting and frequency domain analysis.

    PubMed

    Pels, Pieter; Ozturk-Isik, Esin; Swanson, Mark G; Vanhamme, Leentje; Kurhanewicz, John; Nelson, Sarah J; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2006-04-01

    This paper compares two spectral processing methods for obtaining quantitative measures from in vivo prostate spectra, evaluates their effectiveness, and discusses the necessary modifications for accurate results. A frequency domain analysis (FDA) method based on peak integration was compared with a time domain fitting (TDF) method, a model-based nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm. The accuracy of both methods at estimating the choline + creatine + polyamines to citrate ratio (CCP:C) was tested using Monte Carlo simulations, empirical phantom MRSI data and in vivo MRSI data. The paper discusses the different approaches employed to achieve the quantification of the overlapping choline, creatine and polyamine resonances. Monte Carlo simulations showed induced biases on the estimated CCP:C ratios. Both methods were successful in identifying tumor tissue, provided that the CCP:C ratio was greater than a given (normal) threshold. Both methods predicted the same voxel condition in 94% of the in vivo voxels (68 out of 72). Both TDF and FDA methods had the ability to identify malignant voxels in an artifact-free case study using the estimated CCP:C ratio. Comparing the ratios estimated by the TDF and the FDA, the methods predicted the same spectrum type in 17 out of 18 voxels of the in vivo case study (94.4%).

  1. Broadband ultrasonic sensor array via optical frequency domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabai, Haniel; Steinberg, Idan; Eyal, Avishay

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a new approach for multiplexing fiber-based ultrasound sensors using Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR). In the present demonstration of the method, each sensor was a short section of Polyimide-coated single-mode fiber. One end of the sensing fiber was pigtailed to a mirror and the other end was connected, via a fiber optic delay line, to a 1X4 fiber coupler. The multiplexing was enabled by using a different delay to each sensor. Ultrasonic excitation was performed by a 1MHz transducer which transmitted 4μs tone-bursts above the sensor array. The ultrasound waves generated optical phase variations in the fibers which were detected using the OFDR method. The ultrasound field at the sensors was successfully reconstructed without any noticeable cross-talk.

  2. Real-Time Parameter Estimation in the Frequency Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for real-time estimation of parameters in a linear dynamic state-space model was developed and studied. The application is aircraft dynamic model parameter estimation from measured data in flight. Equation error in the frequency domain was used with a recursive Fourier transform for the real-time data analysis. Linear and nonlinear simulation examples and flight test data from the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle were used to demonstrate that the technique produces accurate model parameter estimates with appropriate error bounds. Parameter estimates converged in less than one cycle of the dominant dynamic mode, using no a priori information, with control surface inputs measured in flight during ordinary piloted maneuvers. The real-time parameter estimation method has low computational requirements and could be implemented

  3. Ion mobility spectrometer using frequency-domain separation

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Butler, Michael A.; Frye, Gregory C.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method is provided for separating and analyzing chemical species in an ion mobility spectrometer using a frequency-domain technique wherein the ions generated from the chemical species are selectively transported through an ion flow channel having a moving electrical potential therein. The moving electrical potential allows the ions to be selected according to ion mobility, with certain of the ions being transported to an ion detector and other of the ions being effectively discriminated against. The apparatus and method have applications for sensitive chemical detection and analysis for monitoring of exhaust gases, hazardous waste sites, industrial processes, aerospace systems, non-proliferation, and treaty verification. The apparatus can be formed as a microelectromechanical device (i.e. a micromachine).

  4. Accurate reconstruction of digital holography using frequency domain zero padding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jun Geun; Kim, Ju Wan; Lee, Jae Hwi; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2017-04-01

    We propose an image reconstruction method of digital holography for getting more accurate reconstruction. Digital holography provides both the light amplitude and the phase of a specimen through recording the interferogram. Since the Fresenl diffraction can be efficiently implemented by the Fourier transform, zero padding technique can be applied to obtain more accurate information. In this work, we report the method of frequency domain zero padding (FDZP). Both in computer-simulation and in experiment made with a USAF 1951 resolution chart and target, the FDZD gave the more accurate rconstruction images. Even though, the FDZD asks more processing time, with the help of graphics processing unit (GPU), it can find good applications in digital holography for 3-D profile imaging.

  5. Ion mobility spectrometer using frequency-domain separation

    DOEpatents

    Martin, S.J.; Butler, M.A.; Frye, G.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1998-08-04

    An apparatus and method are provided for separating and analyzing chemical species in an ion mobility spectrometer using a frequency-domain technique wherein the ions generated from the chemical species are selectively transported through an ion flow channel having a moving electrical potential therein. The moving electrical potential allows the ions to be selected according to ion mobility, with certain of the ions being transported to an ion detector and other of the ions being effectively discriminated against. The apparatus and method have applications for sensitive chemical detection and analysis for monitoring of exhaust gases, hazardous waste sites, industrial processes, aerospace systems, non-proliferation, and treaty verification. The apparatus can be formed as a microelectromechanical device (i.e. a micromachine). 6 figs.

  6. Features of the Frequency- and Time-Domain Photoacoustic Modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, B.; Mandelis, A.

    2013-09-01

    This article presents an instrumentation and modality-based study of the salient differences between pulsed and frequency-domain photoacoustic (PA) signals with respect to signal processing and imaging properties. The parameters of both modalities were adjusted to achieve the maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Experiments were performed by employing a dual-mode PA system and under the condition of maximum permissible exposure for both modalities. In addition, proper filtering has been applied post-processing to enhance the image quality for both methods. Theoretical estimates versus practical issues are discussed. In conclusion, it has been shown that parameters of these two methods can be adjusted to provide a competitive SNR and resolution.

  7. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    DOE PAGES

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; ...

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible bymore » simply extending the data acquisition time.« less

  8. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Stephen M; Liu, Shih Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-09-01

    Pump-probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (∼100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ∼1 ps. Improved precision is possible by simply extending the data acquisition time.

  9. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    PubMed Central

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-01-01

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (∼100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ∼1 ps. Improved precision is possible by simply extending the data acquisition time. PMID:26289282

  10. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih -Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-08-06

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (~100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ~1 ps. Improved precision is possible by simply extending the data acquisition time.

  11. Frequency calibration of terahertz time-domain spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Naftaly, M.; Dudley, R. A.; Bernard, F.; Thomson, C.; Tian, Z.; Fletcher, J. R.

    2009-07-15

    We present three techniques of calibrating frequency and spectral profile measurements of terahertz time-domain spectrometers. The first utilizes the etalon effect generated by multiple reflections in thin nonabsorbing samples. The second employs a CO gas cell to provide multiple narrow absorption lines at known frequencies. The third aims to use a grating monochromator to produce an independently measured comparable spectrum.

  12. Phase shifting in the spatial frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Roghayeh; Petsch, Sebastian; Fallah, Hamidreza; Hajimahmoodzadeh, Morteza; Zappe, Hans

    2016-03-01

    We present a simple mathematical method for phase shifting that overcomes some phase shift errors and limitations of commonly used methods. The method is used to generate a sequence of phase-shifted interferograms from a single interferogram. The generated interferograms are employed to reconstruct the wavefront aberrations, as an application. The approach yields results with only very small deviations compared to both simulated wavefront aberrations, including the first 25 Zernike polynomials (0.05%) and those measured with a Shack-Hartmann sensor (0.5%).

  13. A frequency domain based rigid motion artifact reduction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hai; Huang, Xiaojie; Pan, Wenyu; Zhou, Heqin; Feng, Huanqing

    2009-10-01

    During a CT scan, patients' conscious or unconscious motions would result in motion artifacts which undermine the image quality and hamper doctors' accurate diagnosis and therapy. It is desirable to develop a precise motion estimation and artifact reduction method in order to produce high-resolution images. Rigid motion can be decomposed into two components: translational motion and rotational motion. Since considering the rotation and translation simultaneously is very difficult, most former studies on motion artifact reduction ignore rotation. The extended HLCC based method considering the rotation and translation simultaneously relies on a searching algorithm which leads to expensive computing cost. Therefore, a novel method which does not rely on searching is desirable. In this paper, we focus on parallel-beam CT. We first propose a frequency domain based method to estimate rotational motion, which is not affected by translational motion. It realizes the separation of rotation estimation and translation estimation. Then we combine this method with the HLCC based method to construct a new method for general rigid motion called separative estimation and collective correction method. Furthermore, we present numerical simulation results to show the accuracy and robustness of our approach.

  14. A nonlinear causality measure in the frequency domain: nonlinear partial directed coherence with applications to EEG.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Billings, Stephen A; Wei, Hua-Liang; Sarrigiannis, Ptolemaios G

    2014-03-30

    Frequency domain Granger causality measures have been proposed and widely applied in analyzing rhythmic neurophysiological and biomedical signals. Almost all these measures are based on linear time domain regression models, and therefore can only detect linear causal effects in the frequency domain. A frequency domain causality measure, the partial directed coherence, is explicitly linked with the frequency response function concept of linear systems. By modeling the nonlinear relationships between time series using nonlinear models and employing corresponding frequency-domain analysis techniques (i.e., generalized frequency response functions), a new nonlinear partial directed coherence method is derived. The advantages of the new method are illustrated via a numerical example of a nonlinear physical system and an application to electroencephalogram signals from a patient with childhood absence epilepsy. The new method detects both linear and nonlinear casual effects between bivariate signals in the frequency domain, while the existing measures can only detect linear effects. The proposed new method has important advantages over the classical linear measures, because detecting nonlinear dependencies has become more and more important in characterizing functional couplings in neuronal and biological systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multielevation calibration of frequency-domain electromagnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minsley, Burke J.; Kass, M. Andy; Hodges, Greg; Smith, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic calibration errors must be taken into account because they can substantially impact the accuracy of inverted subsurface resistivity models derived from frequency-domain electromagnetic data, resulting in potentially misleading interpretations. We have developed an approach that uses data acquired at multiple elevations over the same location to assess calibration errors. A significant advantage is that this method does not require prior knowledge of subsurface properties from borehole or ground geophysical data (though these can be readily incorporated if available), and is, therefore, well suited to remote areas. The multielevation data were used to solve for calibration parameters and a single subsurface resistivity model that are self consistent over all elevations. The deterministic and Bayesian formulations of the multielevation approach illustrate parameter sensitivity and uncertainty using synthetic- and field-data examples. Multiplicative calibration errors (gain and phase) were found to be better resolved at high frequencies and when data were acquired over a relatively conductive area, whereas additive errors (bias) were reasonably resolved over conductive and resistive areas at all frequencies. The Bayesian approach outperformed the deterministic approach when estimating calibration parameters using multielevation data at a single location; however, joint analysis of multielevation data at multiple locations using the deterministic algorithm yielded the most accurate estimates of calibration parameters. Inversion results using calibration-corrected data revealed marked improvement in misfit, lending added confidence to the interpretation of these models.

  16. Calibration and filtering strategies for frequency domain electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsley, Burke J.; Smith, Bruce D.; Hammack, Richard; Sams, James I.; Veloski, Garret

    2012-05-01

    Repeat frequency-domain electromagnetic (FDEM) surveys have been acquired over agricultural fields in the Powder River Basin (PRB), Wyoming, where subsurface drip irrigation is being utilized for the beneficial dispersal of coalbed methane produced water. The purpose of the FDEM surveys is to monitor changes in subsurface electrical properties due to the injection of the produced water. In order to quantitatively interpret the data, however, both systematic and random errors must be accounted for. A calibration procedure, adapted from airborne geophysical data processing, corrects for systematic errors by making the FDEM data consistent with the results of a direct current resistivity survey that is coincident with a portion of the FDEM data. Calibration is shown to improve the inter-frequency relationships within the data, resulting in reduced misfit when the data are inverted and therefore added confidence in the inversion results. A filtering approach that is based on principal component analysis is used to attenuate random errors in the data. This type of filter is advantageous because it has a physical-basis in the fact that FDEM data are highly correlated across frequencies, and does not require an arbitrarily-defined spatial filter window length. The calibration and filtering methods are successfully applied to approximately 15 line-km of data in the PRB. It is apparent, however, that calibration parameters may drift in time and should be re-assessed at regular intervals throughout a survey.

  17. Color-signal filtering in the Fourier-frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Romero, Javier; Valero, Eva; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Nieves, Juan L

    2003-09-01

    We have analyzed the Fourier-frequency content of spectral power distributions deriving from three types of illuminants (daylight, incandescent, and fluorescent) and the color signals from both biochrome and nonbiochrome surfaces lit by these illuminants. As far as daylight and the incandescent illuminant are concerned, after filtering the signals through parabolic (low-pass) filters in the Fourier-frequency domain and then reconstructing them, we found that most of the spectral information was contained below 0.016 c/nm. When fluorescent illuminants were involved, we were unable to recover either the original illuminants or color signals to any satisfactory degree. We also used the spectral modulation sensitivity function, which is related to the human visual system's color discrimination thresholds, as a Fourier-frequency filter and obtained consistently less reliable results than with low-pass filtering. We provide comparative results for daylight signals recovered by three different methods. We found reconstructions based on linear models to be the most effective.

  18. Frequency domain fluorescence diffuse tomography of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Anna G.; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Plehanov, Vladimir I.; Balalaeva, Irina V.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Kleshnin, Michail S.

    2007-05-01

    Fluorescent compounds for selective cancer cell marking are used for development of novel medical diagnostic methods, investigation of the influence of external factors on tumor growth, regress and metastasis. Only special tools for turbid media imaging, such as optical diffusion tomography permit noninvasive monitoring of fluorescent-labeled tumor alterations deep in animal tissue. In this work, the results of preliminary experiments utilizing frequency-domain fluorescent diffusion tomography (FD FDT) experimental setup in small animal are presented. Low-frequency modulated light (1 kHz) from Nd:YAG laser with second harmonic generation at the wavelength of 532 nm was used in the setup. The transilluminative planar configuration was used in the setup. A series of model experiments has been conducted and show good agreement between theoretical and experimental fluorescence intensity. Models of deep tumors were created by two methods: (1) glass capsules containing fluorophore solution were inserted into esophagus of small animals to simulate marked tumors; (2) a suspension of transfected HEΚ293-Turbo-RFP cells was subcutaneously injected to small animal. The conducted experiments have shown that FD FDT allows one to detect the presence of labeled tumor cells in small animals, to determine the volume of an experimental tumor, to perform 3D tumor reconstruction, as well as to conduct monitoring investigations. The obtained results demonstrate the potential capability of the FD FDT method for noninvasive whole-body imaging in cancer studies, diagnostics and therapy.

  19. High-order wide-band frequency domain identification using composite curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for curve fitting nonparametric frequency domain data so as to identify a parametric model composed of two models in parallel, where each model has dynamics in a specified portion of the frequency band. This decomposition overcomes the problem of numerical sensitivity since lower order polynomials can be used compared to existing methods which estimate the model as a single entity. Consequently, composite curve fitting is useful for frequency domain identification of high-order systems and/or systems whose dynamics are spread over a large bandwidth. The approach can be extended to identify an arbitrary number of parallel subsystems in specified frequency regimes.

  20. High-order wide-band frequency domain identification using composite curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for curve fitting nonparametric frequency domain data so as to identify a parametric model composed of two models in parallel, where each model has dynamics in a specified portion of the frequency band. This decomposition overcomes the problem of numerical sensitivity since lower order polynomials can be used compared to existing methods which estimate the model as a single entity. Consequently, composite curve fitting is useful for frequency domain identification of high-order systems and/or systems whose dynamics are spread over a large bandwidth. The approach can be extended to identify an arbitrary number of parallel subsystems in specified frequency regimes.

  1. In vivo validation of quantitative frequency domain fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; Ghijsen, Michael; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a hybrid frequency domain fluorescence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging system (MRI) for small animal imaging. The main purpose of this system is to obtain quantitatively accurate fluorescence concentration and lifetime images using a multi-modality approach. In vivo experiments are undertaken to evaluate the system. We compare the recovered fluorescence parameters with and without MRI structural a priori information. In addition, we compare two optical background heterogeneity correction methods: Born normalization and utilizing diffuse optical tomography (DOT) functional a priori information. The results show that the concentration and lifetime of a 4.2-mm diameter indocyanine green inclusion located 15 mm deep inside a rat can be recovered with less than a 5% error when functional a priori information from DOT and structural a priori information from MRI are utilized.

  2. Multimodal optical molecular image reconstruction with frequency domain measurements.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M; Chen, W; Bardhan, R; Ke, S; Halas, N J; Wareing, T; McGhee, J; Joshi, A

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality molecular imaging is becoming more and more important to understand both the structural and the functional characteristics of tissue, organs and tumors. So far, invasive nuclear methods utilizing ionizing radiation have been the "gold standard" of molecular imaging. We investigate non-contact, non-invasive, patient-tolerant and inexpensive near infrared (NIR) frequency domain optical tomography (FDOT) as a functional complement to structural X-ray computed tomography (CT) data. We show a novel multifrequency NIR FDOT approach both in transmission and reflectance mode and employ radiative transport equation (RTE) for 3D reconstruction of a target with novel fluorescent gold nanoshell indocyanine green (NS ICG) in an ex vivo nude mouse. The results demonstrate that gold NS ICG with multifrequency NIR FDOT is a promising fluorophore for multimodal optical molecular image reconstruction.

  3. Calibration and filtering strategies for frequency domain electromagnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minsley, Burke J.; Smith, Bruce D.; Hammack, Richard; Sams, James I.; Veloski, Garret

    2010-01-01

    echniques for processing frequency-domain electromagnetic (FDEM) data that address systematic instrument errors and random noise are presented, improving the ability to invert these data for meaningful earth models that can be quantitatively interpreted. A least-squares calibration method, originally developed for airborne electromagnetic datasets, is implemented for a ground-based survey in order to address systematic instrument errors, and new insights are provided into the importance of calibration for preserving spectral relationships within the data that lead to more reliable inversions. An alternative filtering strategy based on principal component analysis, which takes advantage of the strong correlation observed in FDEM data, is introduced to help address random noise in the data without imposing somewhat arbitrary spatial smoothing.Read More: http://library.seg.org/doi/abs/10.4133/1.3445431

  4. Modeling of photon density waves in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, V. L.; Zubkov, L. A.; Papazoglou, E.

    2012-08-01

    We have described the transfer of modulated radiation in a random medium in terms of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Based on the obtained expression for the scattering intensity, we have developed an original technique of modeling the photon density waves in terms of the Monte Carlo method. Expressions for measurable parameters in the frequency domain have been derived, and, based on them, the amplitude and phase of the photon density waves have been calculated. We have studied how the parameters of the photon density waves depend on the scattering anisotropy for model states with the Henyey-Greenstein phase function. The range of applicability of the diffusion approximation for the interpretation of signals of photon density waves has been investigated.

  5. Uncertainty Modeling Via Frequency Domain Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1999-01-01

    Abstract The majority of literature on robust control assumes that a design model is available and that the uncertainty model bounds the actual variations about the nominal model. However, methods for generating accurate design models have not received as much attention in the literature. The influence of the level of accuracy of the uncertainty model on closed loop performance has received even less attention. The research reported herein is an initial step in applying and extending the concept of model validation to the problem of obtaining practical uncertainty models for robust control analysis and design applications. An extension of model validation called 'sequential validation' is presented and applied to a simple spring-mass-damper system to establish the feasibility of the approach and demonstrate the benefits of the new developments.

  6. Autonomous frequency domain identification: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.; Scheid, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis, design, and on-orbit tuning of robust controllers require more information about the plant than simply a nominal estimate of the plant transfer function. Information is also required concerning the uncertainty in the nominal estimate, or more generally, the identification of a model set within which the true plant is known to lie. The identification methodology that was developed and experimentally demonstrated makes use of a simple but useful characterization of the model uncertainty based on the output error. This is a characterization of the additive uncertainty in the plant model, which has found considerable use in many robust control analysis and synthesis techniques. The identification process is initiated by a stochastic input u which is applied to the plant p giving rise to the output. Spectral estimation (h = P sub uy/P sub uu) is used as an estimate of p and the model order is estimated using the produce moment matrix (PMM) method. A parametric model unit direction vector p is then determined by curve fitting the spectral estimate to a rational transfer function. The additive uncertainty delta sub m = p - unit direction vector p is then estimated by the cross spectral estimate delta = P sub ue/P sub uu where e = y - unit direction vectory y is the output error, and unit direction vector y = unit direction vector pu is the computed output of the parametric model subjected to the actual input u. The experimental results demonstrate the curve fitting algorithm produces the reduced-order plant model which minimizes the additive uncertainty. The nominal transfer function estimate unit direction vector p and the estimate delta of the additive uncertainty delta sub m are subsequently available to be used for optimization of robust controller performance and stability.

  7. Frequency-domain full waveform inversion with an angle-domain wavenumber filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jingrui; Xie, Xiao-Bi

    2017-06-01

    To mitigate the local minima problem in full waveform inversion, the iteration process can be carried out in a multi-scale way, with the inversion starting from large-scale perturbations and gradually changing to small-scale structures. However, this technique is often limited due to the lack of low-frequency information in the observed data. In a scattering process, the scale length of the velocity perturbation is not only related to the frequency, but also associated with the scattering angles. We introduce a scattering angle filter in frequency-domain full waveform inversion. Choosing proper scattering angles in the iteration process can control the wavenumber components entering into the velocity updating, and accomplish multi-scale waveform inversion. Using the slant-stacking method, we decompose the source- and receiver-side waves into local plane waves, from which the scattering angles between the incident and scattering directions are calculated and used as the constraint to determine the wavenumber components to be retrieved. Small scattering angles are related to large-scale model perturbations. Therefore, by filtering out large scattering angles, we can invert the large-scale background perturbations first. Then, by gradually increasing the band pass of scattering angles, we can retrieve fine-scale structures. Numerical examples demonstrate that when the initial model has large velocity errors and the low-frequency information is unavailable in the data, the multi-scale strategy based on the angle-domain wavenumber filter can largely improve the convergence in the initial iteration stage and make the searching towards the global minimum.

  8. An analog filter approach to frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Trainham, Clifford P.; O'Neill, Mary D.; McKenna, Ian J.

    2015-10-01

    The rate equations found in frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy are the same as those found in electronics under analog filter theory. Laplace transform methods are a natural way to solve the equations, and the methods can provide solutions for arbitrary excitation functions. The fluorescence terms can be modeled as circuit components and cascaded with drive and detection electronics to produce a global transfer function. Electronics design tools such as Spicea can be used to model fluorescence problems. In applications, such as remote sensing, where detection electronics are operated at high gain and limited bandwidth, a global modeling of the entiremore » system is important, since the filter terms of the drive and detection electronics affect the measured response of the fluorescence signals. Furthermore, the techniques described here can be used to separate signals from fast and slow fluorophores emitting into the same spectral band, and data collection can be greatly accelerated by means of a frequency comb driver waveform and appropriate signal processing of the response.« less

  9. An analog filter approach to frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, Clifford P.; O'Neill, Mary D.; McKenna, Ian J.

    2015-10-01

    The rate equations found in frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy are the same as those found in electronics under analog filter theory. Laplace transform methods are a natural way to solve the equations, and the methods can provide solutions for arbitrary excitation functions. The fluorescence terms can be modeled as circuit components and cascaded with drive and detection electronics to produce a global transfer function. Electronics design tools such as Spicea can be used to model fluorescence problems. In applications, such as remote sensing, where detection electronics are operated at high gain and limited bandwidth, a global modeling of the entire system is important, since the filter terms of the drive and detection electronics affect the measured response of the fluorescence signals. Furthermore, the techniques described here can be used to separate signals from fast and slow fluorophores emitting into the same spectral band, and data collection can be greatly accelerated by means of a frequency comb driver waveform and appropriate signal processing of the response.

  10. Electronic noise suppression in the wavelet, frequency, and time domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvelo, Juan

    2005-04-01

    Automatic machine gun recordings were severely contaminated with electronic noise. A detailed examination of the character of the electronic noise revealed that it consists of periodic pulses at an interval of about 4.2 ms and that its frequency content is rich in narrow-band lines with a colored broadband background. Given the impulsive nature of the electronic noise in the time domain, wavelet decomposition was applied in an attempt to harness the noise and to null it out. An alternative approach was also implemented where a bank of stop band Butterworth filters were applied in the frequency domain to suppress the narrow-band components of the electronic noise. Other approaches include the use of adaptive cancellation in the time and frequency domains. We will demonstrate and compare the performance of these approaches emphasizing the need to minimize their influence in distorting the signal of interest.

  11. Velocity measurement using frequency domain interferometer and chirped pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Mori, Y.; Hanayama, R.; Kitagawa, Y.; Sekine, T.; Sato, N.; Kurita, T.; Kawashima, T.; Sunahara, A.; Sentoku, Y.; Miura, E.; Iwamoto, A.; Sakagami, H.

    2017-02-01

    An ultra-intense short pulse laser induces a shock wave in material. The pressure of shock compression is stronger than a few tens GPa. To characterize shock waves, time-resolved velocity measurement in nano- or pico-second time scale is needed. Frequency domain interferometer and chirped pulse laser provide single-shot time-resolved measurement. We have developed a laser-driven shock compression system and frequency domain interferometer with CPA laser. In this paper, we show the principle of velocity measurement using a frequency domain interferometer and a chirped pulse laser. Next, we numerically calculated spectral interferograms and show the time-resolved velocity measurement can be done from the phase analysis of spectral interferograms. Moreover we conduct the laser driven shock generation and shock velocity measurement. From the spectral fringes, we analyze the velocities of the sample and shockwaves.

  12. Frequency Domain Tomography Of Evolving Laser-Plasma Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Peng; Reed, Stephen; Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady; Downer, Mike

    2009-01-22

    Frequency Domain Holography (FDH), a technique for visualizing quasistatic objects propagating near the speed of light, has produced 'snapshots' of laser wakefields, but they are averaged over structural variations that occur during propagation through the plasma medium. Here we explore via simulations a generalization of FDH--that we call Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT)--that can potentially record a time sequence of quasistatic snapshots, like the frames of a movie, of the wake structure as it propagates through the plasma. FDT utilizes a several probe-reference pulse pairs that propagate obliquely to the drive pulse and wakefield, along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans.

  13. Frequency domain simultaneous algebraic reconstruction techniques: algorithm and convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiong; Zheng, Yibin

    2005-03-01

    We propose a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) in the frequency domain for linear imaging problems. This algorithm has the advantage of efficiently incorporating pixel correlations in an a priori image model. First it is shown that the generalized SART algorithm converges to the weighted minimum norm solution of a weighted least square problem. Then an implementation in the frequency domain is described. The performance of the new algorithm is demonstrated with fan beam computed tomography (CT) examples. Compared to the traditional SART and its major alternative ART, the new algorithm offers superior image quality and potential application to other modalities.

  14. Algorithm for solving the equation of radiative transfer in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kui; Abdoulaev, Gassan S; Bal, Guillaume; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2004-03-15

    We present an algorithm that provides a frequency-domain solution of the equation of radiative transfer (ERT) for heterogeneous media of arbitrary shape. Although an ERT is more accurate than a diffusion equation, no ERT code for the widely employed frequency-domain case has been developed to date. In this work the ERT is discretized by a combination of discrete-ordinate and finite-volume methods. Two numerical simulations are presented.

  15. Amplified, frequency swept lasers for frequency domain reflectometry and OCT imaging: design and scaling principles.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Wojtkowski, M; Taira, K; Fujimoto, J; Hsu, K

    2005-05-02

    We demonstrate a high-speed, frequency swept, 1300 nm laser source for frequency domain reflectometry and OCT with Fourier domain/swept-source detection. The laser uses a fiber coupled, semiconductor amplifier and a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter. We present scaling principles which predict the maximum frequency sweep speed and trade offs in output power, noise and instantaneous linewidth performance. The use of an amplification stage for increasing output power and for spectral shaping is discussed in detail. The laser generates ~45 mW instantaneous peak power at 20 kHz sweep rates with a tuning range of ~120 nm full width. In frequency domain reflectometry and OCT applications the frequency swept laser achieves 108 dB sensitivity and ~10 mum axial resolution in tissue. We also present a fast algorithm for real time calibration of the fringe signal to equally spaced sampling in frequency for high speed OCT image preview.

  16. A frequency domain blind deconvolution algorithm in acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramann, Mark R.; Erling, Josh G.; Roan, Michael J.

    2003-10-01

    It is common in acoustics to measure a signal that has been corrupted by an unknown filtering function during propagation from an unknown source. Blind deconvolution is a technique for learning and applying the inverse of the unknown channel impulse response in order to recover the original source signal. One approach to accomplishing this task is based on an adaptive nonlinear algorithm using mutual information as a cost function [A. J. Bell and T. J. Sejnowski, Neural Comput. 7, 1129-1159 (1995)]. A new frequency domain implementation of this algorithm is presented which greatly reduces computational cost. The frequency domain approach allows adaptive learning rates to be applied individually to each frequency bin of the inverse filter. This technique can lead to improved convergence times for filters with a large spread of frequency response magnitudes. Preliminary results suggest that a factor of two reduction in convergence time and a factor of ten reduction in computational cost can be attained. Experimental results for several simple acoustical systems are presented comparing the performance of the pre-existing time domain algorithm and the new frequency domain implementation. [Work supported by Dr. David Drumheller, ONR Code 333, Contract No. N00014-00-G-0058.

  17. Solution to the indexing problem of frequency domain simulation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, Mousumi; Park, Stephen K.

    1991-01-01

    A frequency domain simulation experiment is one in which selected system parameters are oscillated sinusoidally to induce oscillations in one or more system statistics of interest. A spectral (Fourier) analysis of these induced oscillations is then performed. To perform this spectral analysis, all oscillation frequencies must be referenced to a common, independent variable - an oscillation index. In a discrete-event simulation, the global simulation clock is the most natural choice for the oscillation index. However, past efforts to reference all frequencies to the simulation clock generally yielded unsatisfactory results. The reason for these unsatisfactory results is explained in this paper and a new methodology which uses the simulation clock as the oscillation index is presented. Techniques for implementing this new methodology are demonstrated by performing a frequency domain simulation experiment for a network of queues.

  18. Model-based compressed sensing of fiber Bragg grating arrays in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werzinger, Stefan; Gottinger, Michael; Gussner, Sandra; Bergdolt, Sven; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Schmauss, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    We propose a model-based compressed sensing (MBCS) of FBG arrays (FBGA), interrogated with wavelength scanning incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry. This method measures the frequency response of a FBGA with an electrical vector network analyzer combined with a tunable laser. Instead of the usual inverse discrete Fourier transform (IDFT), we apply a direct estimation of the grating reflectivities with a simple frequency domain model. A reconstruction of 10 gratings spaced by 20 cm is demonstrated. MBCS allows to reduce the number of measurement frequencies from 120 to 8, compared to an IDFT, while using a bandwidth of just 500 MHz.

  19. Adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filter for noise removal in wrapped phase patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guixiong; Chen, Dongxue; Peng, Yanhua; Zeng, Qilin

    2016-08-01

    In order to avoid the detrimental effects of excessive noise in the phase fringe patterns of a laser digital interferometer over the accuracy of phase unwrapping and the successful detection of mechanical fatigue defects, an effective method of adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filtering is introduced based on the characteristics of the energy spectrum of localized wrapped phase patterns. Not only can this method automatically set the cutoff frequency, but it can also effectively filter out noise while preserving the image edge information. Compared with the sine and cosine transform filtering and the multidirectional frequency domain filtering, the experimental results demonstrate that the image filtered by our method has the fewest number of residues and is the closest to the noise-free image, compared to the two aforementioned methods, demonstrating the effectiveness of this adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filter.

  20. Frequency domain identification of grinding stiffness and damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonesio, Marco; Parenti, Paolo; Bianchi, Giacomo

    2017-09-01

    As equivalent stiffness and damping of the grinding process dominate cutting stability, their identification is essential to predict and avoid detrimental chatter occurrence. The identification of these process constants is not easy in large cylindrical grinding machines, e.g. roll grinders, since there are no practical ways to measure cutting force normal component. This paper presents a novel frequency domain approach for identifying these process parameters, exploiting in-process system response, measured via impact testing. This method adopts a sub-structuring approach to couple the wheel-workpiece relative dynamic compliance with a two-dimensional grinding force model that entails both normal and tangential directions. The grinding specific energy and normal force ratio, that determine grinding stiffness and damping, are identified by fitting the closed loop FRF (Frequency Response Function) measured during specific plunge-grinding tests. The fitting quality supports the predictive capability of the model. Eventually, the soundness of the proposed identification procedure is further assessed by comparing the grinding specific energy identified through standard cutting power measurements.

  1. Frequency domain analysis of noise in autoregulated gene circuits

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Michael L.; Cox, Chris D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a frequency domain technique for the analysis of intrinsic noise within negatively autoregulated gene circuits. This approach is based on the transfer function around the feedback loop (loop transmission) and the equivalent noise bandwidth of the system. The loop transmission, T, is shown to be a determining factor of the dynamics and the noise behavior of autoregulated gene circuits, and this T-based technique provides a simple and flexible method for the analysis of noise arising from any source within the gene circuit. We show that negative feedback not only reduces the variance of the noise in the protein concentration, but also shifts this noise to higher frequencies where it may have a negligible effect on the noise behavior of following gene circuits within a cascade. This predicted effect is demonstrated through the exact stochastic simulation of a two-gene cascade. The analysis elucidates important aspects of gene circuit structure that control functionality, and may provide some insights into selective pressures leading to this structure. The resulting analytical relationships have a simple form, making them especially useful as synthetic gene circuit design equations. With the exception of the linearization of Hill kinetics, this technique is general and may be applied to the analysis or design of networks of higher complexity. This utility is demonstrated through the exact stochastic simulation of an autoregulated two-gene cascade operating near instability. PMID:12671069

  2. A development of a generalized frequency - domain transient program - FTP

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, N.; Ametani, A. )

    1988-10-01

    A generalized frequency-domain transient program (FTP) is developed in the paper. The FTP is based on a frequency-time transform method adopting nodal analysis, admittance parameter and modal theories. Discontinuous and nonlinear elements are solved as initial condition problems using a piece-wise linear approximation of the nonlinear characteristics. The FTP is used to solve the transient and steady states of a network composed of an arbitrary interconnection of basic circuit elements. The FTP is structured to be compatible with the EMTP so that the same input data and output formats are those of the EMTP can be used. The present version of the FTP can deal with a network with over a hundred of nodes and branches. Comparisons of calculated results by the FTP with field test results and calculated results by the EMTP confirm a high accuracy and a satisfactory efficiency of the FTP. The FTP is of great advantage to offer the most accurate or theoretically exact solutions of transients on distributed-parameter lines.

  3. Finding the Secret of Image Saliency in the Frequency Domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Duan, Ling-Yu; Chen, Xiaowu; Huang, Tiejun; Tian, Yonghong

    2015-12-01

    There are two sides to every story of visual saliency modeling in the frequency domain. On the one hand, image saliency can be effectively estimated by applying simple operations to the frequency spectrum. On the other hand, it is still unclear which part of the frequency spectrum contributes the most to popping-out targets and suppressing distractors. Toward this end, this paper tentatively explores the secret of image saliency in the frequency domain. From the results obtained in several qualitative and quantitative experiments, we find that the secret of visual saliency may mainly hide in the phases of intermediate frequencies. To explain this finding, we reinterpret the concept of discrete Fourier transform from the perspective of template-based contrast computation and thus develop several principles for designing the saliency detector in the frequency domain. Following these principles, we propose a novel approach to design the saliency detector under the assistance of prior knowledge obtained through both unsupervised and supervised learning processes. Experimental results on a public image benchmark show that the learned saliency detector outperforms 18 state-of-the-art approaches in predicting human fixations.

  4. Low Frequency Geoacoustic Inversion Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Distribution approved for public release, distribution is unlimited Low Frequency Geoacoustic Inversion Method A. Tolstoy ... Tolstoy , ’10), particularly the investigation of a new broadband method (the minimization method; see Tolstoy , ’12); � to apply the LF G.I. method...ADDRESS(ES) A. Tolstoy ,1538 Hampton Hill Circle,McLean,VA,22101 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND

  5. Frequency-domain synthetic aperture focusing for helical ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, H.; Chen, J.; Wu, E.; Yang, K.

    2017-04-01

    The synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) is widely used to provide significant improvement in the lateral resolution of ultrasonic images. Frequency-domain SAFT has shown higher accuracy and greater efficiency than time-domain SAFT. However, frequency-domain SAFT should be helix-based for ultrasonic scanning of cylindrical structures such as pipes and axletrees. In this study, a frequency-domain SAFT is proposed for 3D helical ultrasonic imaging applications. This technique adjusts the phase spectra of the images to complete the synthetic aperture focusing process. The focused image is precise because the proposed algorithm is established on the basis of the wave equation in a helical coordinate system. In addition, the algorithm can efficiently separate out point scatterers and present volume scatterers. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm yields lower side lobes and enhances the angular resolution of the ultrasonic image to approximately 1°- 1.5°, which is much better than the performance of time-domain SAFT. The maximum deviations are only 0.6 mm, 0.5°, and 0.4 mm along the r-axes, θ-axes, and z-axes, respectively, which are appropriate for normal ultrasonic nondestructive testing.

  6. Bubble Pulse Cancelation in the Time-Frequency Domain Using Warping Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hai-Qiang; Zhang, Ren-He; Li, Zheng-Lin; Guo, Yong-Gang; He, Li

    2013-08-01

    The received shock waves produced by explosive charges are often polluted by bubble pulses in underwater acoustic experiments. A method based on warping operators is proposed to cancel the bubble pulses in the time-frequency domain. This is applied to the explosive data collected during the Yellow Sea experiment in November 2000. The original received signal is first transformed into a warped signal by warping operators. Then, the warped signal is analyzed in the time-frequency domain. Due to the different features between the shock waves and the bubble pulses in the time-frequency domain for the warped signal, the bubble pulses can be easily filtered out. Furthermore, the shock waves in the original time domain can be retrieved by the inverse warping transformation. The autocorrelation functions and the time-frequency representation show that the bubble pulses can be canceled effectively.

  7. Time domain measurement of frequency stability: A tutorial introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanier, J.; Tetu, M.

    1978-01-01

    The theoretical basis behind the definition of frequency stability in the time domain is outlined. Various types of variances were examined. Their differences and interrelation are pointed out. Systems that are generally used in the measurement of these variances are described.

  8. Depth sensitivity of frequency domain optical measurements in diffusive media

    PubMed Central

    Sassaroli, Angelo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Farina, Andrea; Durduran, Turgut; Cavalieri, Stefano; Pifferi, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The depth sensitivity functions for AC amplitude, phase (PH) and DC intensity signals have been obtained in the frequency domain (where the source amplitude is modulated at radio-frequencies) by making use of analytical solutions of the photon diffusion equation in an infinite slab geometry. Furthermore, solutions for the relative contrast of AC, PH and DC signals when a totally absorbing plane is placed at a fixed depth of the slab have also been obtained. The solutions have been validated by comparisons with gold standard Monte Carlo simulations. The obtained results show that the AC signal, for modulation frequencies < 200 MHz, has a depth sensitivity with similar characteristics to that of the continuous-wave (CW) domain (source modulation frequency of zero). Thus, the depth probed by such a signal can be estimated by using the formula of penetration depth for the CW domain (Sci. Rep. 6, 27057 (2016)27256988). However, the PH signal has a different behavior compared to the CW domain, showing a larger depth sensitivity at shallow depths and a less steep relative contrast as a function of depth. These results mark a clear difference in term of depth sensitivity between AC and PH signals, and highlight the complexity of the estimation of the actual depth probed in tissue spectroscopy. PMID:28663921

  9. Depth sensitivity of frequency domain optical measurements in diffusive media.

    PubMed

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Sassaroli, Angelo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Farina, Andrea; Durduran, Turgut; Cavalieri, Stefano; Pifferi, Antonio; Martelli, Fabrizio

    2017-06-01

    The depth sensitivity functions for AC amplitude, phase (PH) and DC intensity signals have been obtained in the frequency domain (where the source amplitude is modulated at radio-frequencies) by making use of analytical solutions of the photon diffusion equation in an infinite slab geometry. Furthermore, solutions for the relative contrast of AC, PH and DC signals when a totally absorbing plane is placed at a fixed depth of the slab have also been obtained. The solutions have been validated by comparisons with gold standard Monte Carlo simulations. The obtained results show that the AC signal, for modulation frequencies < 200 MHz, has a depth sensitivity with similar characteristics to that of the continuous-wave (CW) domain (source modulation frequency of zero). Thus, the depth probed by such a signal can be estimated by using the formula of penetration depth for the CW domain (Sci. Rep.6, 27057 (2016)). However, the PH signal has a different behavior compared to the CW domain, showing a larger depth sensitivity at shallow depths and a less steep relative contrast as a function of depth. These results mark a clear difference in term of depth sensitivity between AC and PH signals, and highlight the complexity of the estimation of the actual depth probed in tissue spectroscopy.

  10. Coherent-control of linear signals: Frequency-domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-10-01

    The dependence of various types of linear signals on the phase profile of broadband optical pulses is examined using fundamental time translation invariance symmetry of multipoint correlation functions. The frequency-domain wave-mixing analysis presented here unifies several arguments made earlier with respect to the conditions whereby coherent control schemes may be used.

  11. SPA- STATISTICAL PACKAGE FOR TIME AND FREQUENCY DOMAIN ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlow, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The need for statistical analysis often arises when data is in the form of a time series. This type of data is usually a collection of numerical observations made at specified time intervals. Two kinds of analysis may be performed on the data. First, the time series may be treated as a set of independent observations using a time domain analysis to derive the usual statistical properties including the mean, variance, and distribution form. Secondly, the order and time intervals of the observations may be used in a frequency domain analysis to examine the time series for periodicities. In almost all practical applications, the collected data is actually a mixture of the desired signal and a noise signal which is collected over a finite time period with a finite precision. Therefore, any statistical calculations and analyses are actually estimates. The Spectrum Analysis (SPA) program was developed to perform a wide range of statistical estimation functions. SPA can provide the data analyst with a rigorous tool for performing time and frequency domain studies. In a time domain statistical analysis the SPA program will compute the mean variance, standard deviation, mean square, and root mean square. It also lists the data maximum, data minimum, and the number of observations included in the sample. In addition, a histogram of the time domain data is generated, a normal curve is fit to the histogram, and a goodness-of-fit test is performed. These time domain calculations may be performed on both raw and filtered data. For a frequency domain statistical analysis the SPA program computes the power spectrum, cross spectrum, coherence, phase angle, amplitude ratio, and transfer function. The estimates of the frequency domain parameters may be smoothed with the use of Hann-Tukey, Hamming, Barlett, or moving average windows. Various digital filters are available to isolate data frequency components. Frequency components with periods longer than the data collection interval

  12. SPA- STATISTICAL PACKAGE FOR TIME AND FREQUENCY DOMAIN ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlow, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The need for statistical analysis often arises when data is in the form of a time series. This type of data is usually a collection of numerical observations made at specified time intervals. Two kinds of analysis may be performed on the data. First, the time series may be treated as a set of independent observations using a time domain analysis to derive the usual statistical properties including the mean, variance, and distribution form. Secondly, the order and time intervals of the observations may be used in a frequency domain analysis to examine the time series for periodicities. In almost all practical applications, the collected data is actually a mixture of the desired signal and a noise signal which is collected over a finite time period with a finite precision. Therefore, any statistical calculations and analyses are actually estimates. The Spectrum Analysis (SPA) program was developed to perform a wide range of statistical estimation functions. SPA can provide the data analyst with a rigorous tool for performing time and frequency domain studies. In a time domain statistical analysis the SPA program will compute the mean variance, standard deviation, mean square, and root mean square. It also lists the data maximum, data minimum, and the number of observations included in the sample. In addition, a histogram of the time domain data is generated, a normal curve is fit to the histogram, and a goodness-of-fit test is performed. These time domain calculations may be performed on both raw and filtered data. For a frequency domain statistical analysis the SPA program computes the power spectrum, cross spectrum, coherence, phase angle, amplitude ratio, and transfer function. The estimates of the frequency domain parameters may be smoothed with the use of Hann-Tukey, Hamming, Barlett, or moving average windows. Various digital filters are available to isolate data frequency components. Frequency components with periods longer than the data collection interval

  13. In vivo spatial frequency domain spectroscopy of two layer media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nguyen, John Quan M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of tissue blood volume and local oxygen saturation can inform the assessment of tissue health, healing, and dysfunction. These quantities can be estimated from the contribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to the absorption spectrum of the dermis. However, estimation of blood related absorption in skin can be confounded by the strong absorption of melanin in the epidermis and epidermal thickness and pigmentation varies with anatomic location, race, gender, and degree of disease progression. Therefore, a method is desired that decouples the effect of melanin absorption in the epidermis from blood absorption in the dermis for a large range of skin types and thicknesses. A previously developed inverse method based on a neural network forward model was applied to simulated spatial frequency domain reflectance of skin for multiple wavelengths in the near infrared. It is demonstrated that the optical thickness of the epidermis and absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the dermis can be determined independently and with minimal coupling. Then, the same inverse method was applied to reflectance measurements from a tissue simulating phantom and in vivo human skin. Oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin concentrations were estimated from the volar forearms of weakly and strongly pigmented subjects using a standard homogeneous model and the present two layer model.

  14. Microcirculation monitoring with real time spatial frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinlin; Cao, Zili; Lin, Weihao; Zhu, Danfeng; Zhu, Xiuwei; Zeng, Bixin; Xu, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) study of local hemodynamics in the forearm of healthy volunteers performing paced breathing. Real time Single Snapshot Multiple Frequency Demodulation - Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SSMD-SFDI) was used to map the optical properties of the subsurface of the forearm continuously. The oscillations of the concentrations of deoxy- and oxyhemoglobin at the subsurface of the forearm induced by paced breathing are found to be close to out-of-phase, attributed to the dominance of the blood flow modulation by paced breathing. The properties of local microcirculation including the blood transit times through capillaries and venules are extracted by fitting to Simplified Hemodynamics Model. Our preliminary results suggest that the real time SSMD-SFDI platform may serve as one effective imaging modality for microcirculation monitoring.

  15. Domain decomposition methods in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Saltz, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Compressible Euler equations are solved for two-dimensional problems by a preconditioned conjugate gradient-like technique. An approximate Riemann solver is used to compute the numerical fluxes to second order accuracy in space. Two ways to achieve parallelism are tested, one which makes use of parallelism inherent in triangular solves and the other which employs domain decomposition techniques. The vectorization/parallelism in triangular solves is realized by the use of a recording technique called wavefront ordering. This process involves the interpretation of the triangular matrix as a directed graph and the analysis of the data dependencies. It is noted that the factorization can also be done in parallel with the wave front ordering. The performances of two ways of partitioning the domain, strips and slabs, are compared. Results on Cray YMP are reported for an inviscid transonic test case. The performances of linear algebra kernels are also reported.

  16. Signal-to-noise analysis of biomedical photoacoustic measurements in time and frequency domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telenkov, Sergey; Mandelis, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    Sensitivity analysis of photoacoustic measurements is conducted using estimates of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved under two different modes of optical excitation. The standard pulsed time-domain photoacoustic imaging is compared to the frequency-domain counterpart with a modulated optical source. The feasibility of high-SNR continuous wave depth-resolved photoacoustics with frequency-swept (chirp) modulation pattern has been demonstrated. Utilization of chirped modulation waveforms achieves dramatic SNR increase of the periodic signals and preserves axial resolution comparable to the time-domain method. Estimates of the signal-to-noise ratio were obtained using typical parameters of piezoelectric transducers and optical properties of tissue.

  17. Combined failure acoustical diagnosis based on improved frequency domain blind deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Nan; Wu, Xing; Chi, YiLin; Liu, Xiaoqin; Liu, Chang

    2012-05-01

    According to gear box combined failure extraction in complex sound field, an acoustic fault detection method based on improved frequency domain blind deconvolution was proposed. Follow the frequency-domain blind deconvolution flow, the morphological filtering was firstly used to extract modulation features embedded in the observed signals, then the CFPA algorithm was employed to do complex-domain blind separation, finally the J-Divergence of spectrum was employed as distance measure to resolve the permutation. Experiments using real machine sound signals was carried out. The result demonstrate this algorithm can be efficiently applied to gear box combined failure detection in practice.

  18. RA diagnostics applying optical tomography in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Alexander D.; Prapavat, Viravuth; Minet, Olaf; Beuthan, Juergen; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1998-01-01

    Our aim is to reconstruct the optical parameters in a slice of a finger joint phantom for further investigations about rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, we have developed a flexible NIR scanning system in order to collect amplitude and phase delay of photon density waves in frequency-domain. A cylindrical finger joint phantom was embedded in a container of Intralipid solution due to the application of an inverse method for infinite geometry. The joint phantom was investigated by a laser beam obtaining several projections. The average optical parameters of each projection was calculated. Using different reconstruction techniques, e.g. ART and SIRT with a special projection operator, we reconstructed the optical parameters in a slice. The projection operator can be heuristically described by a photon path density function of a homogeneous media with infinite geometry. Applied to an object with an unknown distribution of optical parameters it calculates the expectation value of the investigated object. The potentials and limits of these fast reconstruction methods will be presented.

  19. 3D frequency-domain ultrasound waveform tomography breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Gursharan Yash; West, Erik; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; Duric, Neb

    2017-03-01

    Frequency-domain ultrasound waveform tomography is a promising method for the visualization and characterization of breast disease. It has previously been shown to accurately reconstruct the sound speed distributions of breasts of varying densities. The reconstructed images show detailed morphological and quantitative information that can help differentiate different types of breast disease including benign and malignant lesions. The attenuation properties of an ex vivo phantom have also been assessed. However, the reconstruction algorithms assumed a 2D geometry while the actual data acquisition process was not. Although clinically useful sound speed images can be reconstructed assuming this mismatched geometry, artifacts from the reconstruction process exist within the reconstructed images. This is especially true for registration across different modalities and when the 2D assumption is violated. For example, this happens when a patient's breast is rapidly sloping. It is also true for attenuation imaging where energy lost or gained out of the plane gets transformed into artifacts within the image space. In this paper, we will briefly review ultrasound waveform tomography techniques, give motivation for pursuing the 3D method, discuss the 3D reconstruction algorithm, present the results of 3D forward modeling, show the mismatch that is induced by the violation of 3D modeling via numerical simulations, and present a 3D inversion of a numerical phantom.

  20. Optical Frequency Domain Visualization of Electron Beam Driven Plasma Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, Michael C.; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl; Fedurin, Michhail; Babzien, Marcus

    2010-11-04

    Bunch driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA), such as the 'plasma afterburner', are a promising emerging method for significantly increasing the energy output of conventional particle accelerators. The study and optimization of this method would benefit from an experimental correlation of the drive bunch parameters and the accelerated particle parameters with the corresponding plasma wave structure. However, the plasma wave structure has not been observed directly so far. We will report ongoing development of a noninvasive optical Frequency Domain Interferometric (FDI) and Holographic (FDH) diagnostics of bunch driven plasma wakes. Both FDI and FDH have been previously demonstrated in the case of laser driven wakes. These techniques employ two laser pulses co-propagating with the drive particle bunch and the trailing plasma wave. One pulse propagates ahead of the drive bunch and serves as a reference, while the second is overlapped with the plasma wave and probes its structure. The multi-shot FDI and single-shot FDH diagnostics permit direct noninvasive observation of longitudinal and transverse structure of the plasma wakes. The experiment is being developed at the 70 MeV Linac in the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to visualize wakes generated by two and multi-bunch drive beams.

  1. Optical Frequency Domain Visualization of Electron Beam Driven Plasma Wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, Michael C.; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Kusche, Karl; Fedurin, Michhail; Babzien, Marcus

    2010-11-01

    Bunch driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA), such as the "plasma afterburner," are a promising emerging method for significantly increasing the energy output of conventional particle accelerators [1]. The study and optimization of this method would benefit from an experimental correlation of the drive bunch parameters and the accelerated particle parameters with the corresponding plasma wave structure. However, the plasma wave structure has not been observed directly so far. We will report ongoing development of a noninvasive optical Frequency Domain Interferometric (FDI) [2] and Holographic (FDH) [3] diagnostics of bunch driven plasma wakes. Both FDI and FDH have been previously demonstrated in the case of laser driven wakes. These techniques employ two laser pulses co-propagating with the drive particle bunch and the trailing plasma wave. One pulse propagates ahead of the drive bunch and serves as a reference, while the second is overlapped with the plasma wave and probes its structure. The multi-shot FDI and single-shot FDH diagnostics permit direct noninvasive observation of longitudinal and transverse structure of the plasma wakes. The experiment is being developed at the 70 MeV Linac in the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory to visualize wakes generated by two [4] and multi-bunch [5] drive beams.

  2. Domain adaptive boosting method and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jie; Miao, Zhenjiang

    2015-03-01

    Differences of data distributions widely exist among datasets, i.e., domains. For many pattern recognition, nature language processing, and content-based analysis systems, a decrease in performance caused by the domain differences between the training and testing datasets is still a notable problem. We propose a domain adaptation method called domain adaptive boosting (DAB). It is based on the AdaBoost approach with extensions to cover the domain differences between the source and target domains. Two main stages are contained in this approach: source-domain clustering and source-domain sample selection. By iteratively adding the selected training samples from the source domain, the discrimination model is able to achieve better domain adaptation performance based on a small validation set. The DAB algorithm is suitable for the domains with large scale samples and easy to extend for multisource adaptation. We implement this method on three computer vision systems: the skin detection model in single images, the video concept detection model, and the object classification model. In the experiments, we compare the performances of several commonly used methods and the proposed DAB. Under most situations, the DAB is superior.

  3. Removing the depth-degeneracy in optical frequency domain imaging with frequency shifting

    PubMed Central

    Yun, S. H.; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.; Bouma, B. E.

    2009-01-01

    A novel technique using an acousto-optic frequency shifter in optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) is presented. The frequency shift eliminates the ambiguity between positive and negative differential delays, effectively doubling the interferometric ranging depth while avoiding image cross-talk. A signal processing algorithm is demonstrated to accommodate nonlinearity in the tuning slope of the wavelength-swept OFDI laser source. PMID:19484034

  4. High-resolution frequency domain second harmonic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jianping; Tomov, I. V.; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Zhongping

    2007-02-01

    We used continuum generated in an 8.5 cm long fiber by a femtosecond Yb fiber laser to improve threefold the axial resolution of frequency domain SH-OCT to 12μm. The acquisition time was shortened by more than two orders of magnitude compared to time domain SH-OCT. The system was applied to image biological tissue of fish scales, pig leg tendon and rabbit eye sclera. Highly organized collagen fibrils can be visualized in the recorded images. Polarization dependence on second harmonic has been used to obtain polarization resolved images.

  5. Characterization of microstrip discontinuities in the time and frequency domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Mittra, R.

    1985-01-01

    A number of impedance transitions and interconnections to a microstrip were designed and investigated. The double-step discontinuity on a microstrip was studied in detail, and a procedure was developed to design these structures. Their response was determined by making measurements in both the frequency and time domains in a consistent and repeatable manner. The time-domain presentation of the data was the most useful feature of the measuring system. All undesirable signal components were filtered out through the use of gating functions. Theoretically computed results were verified experimentally.

  6. Compact optical processor for Hough and frequency domain features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Peter

    1996-11-01

    Shape recognition is necessary in a broad band of applications such as traffic sign or work piece recognition. It requires not only neighborhood processing of the input image pixels but global interconnection of them. The Hough transform (HT) performs such a global operation and it is well suited in the preprocessing stage of a shape recognition system. Translation invariant features can be easily calculated form the Hough domain. We have implemented on the computer a neural network shape recognition system which contains a HT, a feature extraction, and a classification layer. The advantage of this approach is that the total system can be optimized with well-known learning techniques and that it can explore the parallelism of the algorithms. However, the HT is a time consuming operation. Parallel, optical processing is therefore advantageous. Several systems have been proposed, based on space multiplexing with arrays of holograms and CGH's or time multiplexing with acousto-optic processors or by image rotation with incoherent and coherent astigmatic optical processors. We took up the last mentioned approach because 2D array detectors are read out line by line, so a 2D detector can achieve the same speed and is easier to implement. Coherent processing can allow the implementation of tilers in the frequency domain. Features based on wedge/ring, Gabor, or wavelet filters have been proven to show good discrimination capabilities for texture and shape recognition. The astigmatic lens system which is derived form the mathematical formulation of the HT is long and contains a non-standard, astigmatic element. By methods of lens transformation s for coherent applications we map the original design to a shorter lens with a smaller number of well separated standard elements and with the same coherent system response. The final lens design still contains the frequency plane for filtering and ray-tracing shows diffraction limited performance. Image rotation can be done

  7. Frequency-Domain Streak Camera and Tomography for Ultrafast Imaging of Evolving and Channeled Plasma Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Reed, Stephen; Dong, Peng; Downer, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate a prototype Frequency Domain Streak Camera (FDSC) that can capture the picosecond time evolution of the plasma accelerator structure in a single shot. In our prototype Frequency-Domain Streak Camera, a probe pulse propagates obliquely to a sub-picosecond pump pulse that creates an evolving nonlinear index "bubble" in fused silica glass, supplementing a conventional Frequency Domain Holographic (FDH) probe-reference pair that co-propagates with the "bubble". Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT) generalizes Frequency-Domain Streak Camera by probing the "bubble" from multiple angles and reconstructing its morphology and evolution using algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans. Multiplexing methods (Temporal Multiplexing and Angular Multiplexing) improve data storage and processing capability, demonstrating a compact Frequency Domain Tomography system with a single spectrometer.

  8. Frequency-Domain Streak Camera and Tomography for Ultrafast Imaging of Evolving and Channeled Plasma Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang Xiaoming; Reed, Stephen; Dong Peng; Downer, Michael C.

    2010-11-04

    We demonstrate a prototype Frequency Domain Streak Camera (FDSC) that can capture the picosecond time evolution of the plasma accelerator structure in a single shot. In our prototype Frequency-Domain Streak Camera, a probe pulse propagates obliquely to a sub-picosecond pump pulse that creates an evolving nonlinear index 'bubble' in fused silica glass, supplementing a conventional Frequency Domain Holographic (FDH) probe-reference pair that co-propagates with the 'bubble'. Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT) generalizes Frequency-Domain Streak Camera by probing the 'bubble' from multiple angles and reconstructing its morphology and evolution using algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans. Multiplexing methods (Temporal Multiplexing and Angular Multiplexing) improve data storage and processing capability, demonstrating a compact Frequency Domain Tomography system with a single spectrometer.

  9. Simulation of DLA grating structures in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egenolf, T.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Niedermayer, U.

    2017-07-01

    Dielectric laser accelerators (DLA) driven by ultrashort laser pulses can reach orders of magnitude larger gradients than contemporary RF electron accelerators. A new implemented field solver based on the finite element method in the frequency domain allows the efficient calculation of the structure constant, i.e. the ratio of energy gain to laser peak amplitude. We present the maximization of this ratio as a parameter study looking at a single grating period only. Based on this optimized shape the entire design of a beta-matched grating is completed in an iterative process. The period length of a beta-matched grating increases due to the increasing velocity of the electron when a subrelativistic beam is accelerated. The determination of the optimal length of each grating period thus requires the knowledge of the energy gain within all so far crossed periods. Furthermore, we outline to reverse the excitation in the presented solver for beam coupling impedance calculations and an estimation of the beam loading intensity limit.

  10. High-speed frequency-domain terahertz coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yahng, Ji Sang; Park, Choon-Su; Lee, Hwi Don; Kim, Chang-Seok; Yee, Dae-Su

    2016-01-25

    High-speed frequency-domain terahertz (THz) coherence tomography is demonstrated using frequency sweeping of continuous-wave THz radiation and beam steering. For axial scanning, THz frequency sweeping with a kHz sweep rate and a THz sweep range is executed using THz photomixing with an optical beat source consisting of a wavelength-swept laser and a distributed feedback laser diode. During the frequency sweep, frequency-domain THz interferograms are measured using coherent homodyne detection employing signal averaging for noise reduction and used as axial-scan data via fast Fourier transform. Axial-scan data are acquired while scanning a transverse range of 100 × 100 mm(2) by use of a THz beam scanner with moving neither sample nor THz transmitter/receiver unit. It takes 100 s to acquire axial-scan data for 100 × 100 points with 5 averaged traces at a sweep rate of 1 kHz. THz tomographic images of a glass fiber reinforced polymer sample with artificial internal defects are presented, acquired using the tomography system.

  11. Single SQUID frequency-domain multiplexer for large bolometer arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J.M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M.J.; Skidmore, J.T.; Richards, P.L.; Spieler, H.G.

    2001-08-20

    We describe the development of a frequency-domain superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer which monitors a row of low-temperature sensors simultaneously with a single SQUID. Each sensor is ac biased with a unique frequency and all the sensor currents are added in a superconducting summing loop. A single SQUID measures the current in the summing loop, and the individual signals are lock-in detected after the room temperature SQUID electronics. The current in the summing loop is nulled by feedback to eliminate direct crosstalk. We have built an eight-channel prototype and demonstrated channel separation and signal recovery.

  12. Multifunction tests of a frequency domain based flutter suppression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David M.; Adams, William M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The process is described of analysis, design, digital implementation, and subsonic testing of an active control flutter suppression system for a full span, free-to-roll wind tunnel model of an advanced fighter concept. The design technique uses a frequency domain representation of the plant and used optimization techniques to generate a robust multi input/multi output controller. During testing in a fixed-in-roll configuration, simultaneous suppression of both symmetric and antisymmetric flutter was successfully shown. For a free-to-roll configuration, symmetric flutter was suppressed to the limit of the tunnel test envelope. During aggressive rolling maneuvers above the open-loop flutter boundary, simultaneous flutter suppression and maneuver load control were demonstrated. Finally, the flutter damping controller was reoptimized overnight during the test using combined experimental and analytical frequency domain data, resulting in improved stability robustness.

  13. An implementation of synthetic aperture focusing technique in frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2007-07-01

    A new implementation of a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) based on concepts used in synthetic aperture radar and sonar is presented in the paper. The algorithm, based on the convolution model of the imaging system developed in frequency domain, accounts for the beam pattern of the finite-sized transducer used in the synthetic aperture. The 2D fast Fourier transform (FFT) is used for the calculation of a 2D spectrum of the ultrasonic data. The spectrum is then interpolated to convert the polar coordinate system used for the acquisition of ultrasonic signals to the rectangular coordinates used for the presentation of imaging results. After compensating the transducer lobe amplitude profile using a Wiener filter, the transformed spectrum is subjected to the 2D inverse Fourier transform to get the time-domain image again. The algorithm is computationally attractive due to the use of 2D FFT. The performance of the proposed frequency-domain algorithm and the classical time-domain SAFT are compared in the paper using simulated and real ultrasonic data.

  14. Spatial frequency domain spectroscopy of two layer media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2011-10-01

    Monitoring of tissue blood volume and oxygen saturation using biomedical optics techniques has the potential to inform the assessment of tissue health, healing, and dysfunction. These quantities are typically estimated from the contribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to the absorption spectrum of the dermis. However, estimation of blood related absorption in superficial tissue such as the skin can be confounded by the strong absorption of melanin in the epidermis. Furthermore, epidermal thickness and pigmentation varies with anatomic location, race, gender, and degree of disease progression. This study describes a technique for decoupling the effect of melanin absorption in the epidermis from blood absorption in the dermis for a large range of skin types and thicknesses. An artificial neural network was used to map input optical properties to spatial frequency domain diffuse reflectance of two layer media. Then, iterative fitting was used to determine the optical properties from simulated spatial frequency domain diffuse reflectance. Additionally, an artificial neural network was trained to directly map spatial frequency domain reflectance to sets of optical properties of a two layer medium, thus bypassing the need for iteration. In both cases, the optical thickness of the epidermis and absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the dermis were determined independently. The accuracy and efficiency of the iterative fitting approach was compared with the direct neural network inversion.

  15. Extending the effective imaging depth in spectral domain optical coherence tomography by dual spatial frequency encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Qingqing; Liu, Youwen; Wang, Jiming

    2016-03-01

    We present a spatial frequency domain multiplexing method for extending the imaging depth range of a SDOCT system without any expensive device. This method uses two reference arms with different round-trip optical delay to probe different depth regions within the sample. Two galvo scanners with different pivot-offset distances in the reference arms are used for spatial frequency modulation and multiplexing. While simultaneously driving the galvo scanners in the reference arms and the sample arm, the spatial spectrum of the acquired two-dimensional OCT spectral interferogram corresponding to the shallow and deep depth of the sample will be shifted to the different frequency bands in the spatial frequency domain. After data filtering, image reconstruction and fusion the spatial frequency multiplexing SDOCT system can provide an approximately 1.9 fold increase in the effective ranging depth compared with that of a conventional single-reference-arm full-range SDOCT system.

  16. Low Frequency Geoacoustic Inversion Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Distribution approved for public release, distribution is unlimited Low Frequency Geoacoustic Inversion Method A. Tolstoy ...recently featuring the minimization processor ( Tolstoy , ’10 and ’12); demonstration that horizontal arrays can be successfully used for G.I. with the...over twenty years, particularly for the suppression of sidelobes ( Tolstoy , ’93). For each the MFP values at sidelobes (non-true parameter values

  17. Low Frequency Geoacoustic Inversion Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Inversion Method A. Tolstoy 1538 Hampton Hill Circle, McLean VA 22101 phone: (703) 760-0881 email: atolstoy@ieee.org Award Number: N00014-10-C...inversion method ( Tolstoy , ’10) with extension to slightly higher frequencies (up to 100Hz) and longer ranges (up 5km); � to apply the new LF...correlation value (see Tolstoy , ’93). A new feature for this effort includes software to check if the sampling has been fine enough to catch the “true

  18. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  19. Frequency domain stress intensity calibration of damped cracked panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses two schemes for doing finite element K calibration in the frequency domain. The baseline scheme uses the definition of K as a limit toward the crack tip. The limiting process requires using a very fine mesh around the crack tip making the scheme computationally very expensive. It is shown that the behavior of K as a function of frequency is very similar to a modal response. Taking advantage of this, a more efficient scheme involves a modal analysis of the cracked sheet and scaling the response to that of the static stress intensity. In this way, only a static K calibration need be performed. All the examples shown are for a frequency range spanning multiple resonances and with two levels of damping.

  20. Electromagnetic coupling in frequency domain induced polarisation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, Partha Sarathi

    2000-11-01

    Frequency domain induced polarization (IP) surveys are commonly carried out to provide information about the chargeability structure of the earth. The goals might be as diverse as trying to delineate a mineralized and/or alteration zone for mineral exploration, or to find a region of contaminants for an environmental problem. Unfortunately, the measured responses can have contributions from inductive and galvanic effects of the ground. The inductive components are called EM coupling effects. They are considered to be ``noise'' and much of this thesis is devoted towards either removing these effects, or reformulating the inverse problem so that inductive effects are part of the ``signal''. If the forward modeling is based on galvanic responses only, then the inductive responses must first be removed from the data. The motivation for attacking the problem in this manner is that it is easier to solve D.C. resistivity equation than the full Maxwell's equation. The separation of the inductive response from the total response is derived by expressing the total electric field as a product of an IP response function, and an electric field which depends on EM coupling response. This enables me to generate formulae to obtain IP amplitude (PFE) and phase response from the raw data. The data can then be inverted, using a galvanic forward modeling. I illustrate this with 1D and 3D synthetic examples. To handle field data sets, I have developed an approximate method for estimating the EM coupling effects based upon the assumption that the earth is locally 1D. The 1D conductivity is obtained from a 2D inversion of the low frequency DC resistivity data. Application of this method to a field data set has shown encouraging results. I also examine the EM coupling problem in terms of complex conductivity. I show that if the forward modeling is carried out with full Maxwell's equation, then there is no need to remove EM coupling. I illustrate this with 1D synthetic example. In summary

  1. A Modified Normalization Technique for Frequency-Domain Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Jeong, G.; Min, D. J.; KIM, S.; Heo, J. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a technique to estimate subsurface material properties minimizing the misfit function built with residuals between field and modeled data. To achieve computational efficiency, FWI has been performed in the frequency domain by carrying out modeling in the frequency domain, whereas observed data (time-series data) are Fourier-transformed.One of the main drawbacks of seismic FWI is that it easily gets stuck in local minima because of lacking of low-frequency data. To compensate for this limitation, damped wavefields are used, as in the Laplace-domain waveform inversion. Using damped wavefield in FWI plays a role in generating low-frequency components and help recover long-wavelength structures. With these newly generated low-frequency components, we propose a modified frequency-normalization technique, which has an effect of boosting contribution of low-frequency components to model parameter update.In this study, we introduce the modified frequency-normalization technique which effectively amplifies low-frequency components of damped wavefields. Our method is demonstrated for synthetic data for the SEG/EAGE salt model. AcknowledgementsThis work was supported by the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning(KETEP) and the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy(MOTIE) of the Republic of Korea (No. 20168510030830) and by the Dual Use Technology Program, granted financial resource from the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy, Republic of Korea.

  2. Frequency-domain sensitivity analysis for small imaging domains using the equation of radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xuejun; Ren, Kui; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2007-04-01

    Optical tomography of small imaging domains holds great promise as the signal-to-noise ratio is usually high, and the achievable spatial resolution is much better than in large imaging domains. Emerging applications range from the imaging of joint diseases in human fingers to monitoring tumor growth or brain activity in small animals. In these cases, the diameter of the tissue under investigation is typically smaller than 3 cm, and the optical path length is only a few scattering mean-free paths. It is well known that under these conditions the widely applied diffusion approximation to the equation of radiative transfer (ERT) is of limited applicability. To accurately model light propagation in these small domains, the ERT has to be solved directly. We use the frequency-domain ERT to perform a sensitivity study for small imaging domains. We found optimal source-modulation frequencies for which variations in optical properties, size, and location of a tissue inhomogeneity lead to maximal changes in the amplitude and phase of the measured signal. These results will be useful in the design of experiments and optical tomographic imaging systems that probe small tissue volumes.

  3. Frequency Domain Magnetic Measurements from Kilohertz to Gigahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, John F.

    "......we applied much prolonged labor on investigating the magnetical forces; so wonderful indeed are they, compared with the forces in all other minerals, surpassing even the virtues of all bodies around us. Nor have we found this labor idle or unfruitful; since daily in our experimenting new unexpected properties came to light."William Gilbert, De Magnete, 1600Abstract. This review deals with practical aspects of making frequency-domain measurements of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic losses from 200 kHz up to 10 GHz. It sets out the types of measurement concerned, distinguishing resonant from nonresonant phenomena. The techniques available are categorized according to suitability for the different frequency regimes and types of investigation. Practical recipes are provided for undertaking such experiments across the entire frequency range. Marginal oscillator spectrometry is discussed which is applicable across the whole frequency range. Different instruments are presented, and particular emphasis is placed on designs which function on the Robinson principle. Analysis of oscillation condition and signal-to-noise performance is dealt with, also sample considerations such as filling factor. Practical circuits are presented and their merits and demerits evaluated. Layout and radio-frequency design considerations are dealt with. Ultrahigh/microwave frequency marginal oscillator spectrometry is given special treatment and several practical designs are given. The essentials of good microwave design are emphasized. A general discussion of resonant structures is included which treats multiple layer coil design, slow wave line structures, stripline and cavities. Unusual cavity designs such as the rhumbatron are treated. Use of striplines with microwave marginal spectrometry is described and compared with conventional network-analysis techniques. The use of parameter matrices for high-frequency analysis is alluded to. Some details of good construction practice are

  4. Psychiatric rehabilitation practitioner perceptions of frequency and importance of performance domain scales.

    PubMed

    Blau, Gary; Surges Tatum, Donna; Goldberg, Casey Ward; Viswanathan, Krupa; Karnik, Satyajit; Aaronson, William

    2014-03-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to test if reliable performance domain scales can be developed for psychiatric rehabilitation practitioners (PRPs). An online survey was filled out by 1,639 PRPs who provided demographic and frequency-based and importance-based performance domain data. There were 70 items each for the frequency and importance performance domains. Complete data for testing the research questions was available for 965 PRPs using frequency and 985 PRPs using importance ratings. Descriptive and correlation analyses tested the research question. The descriptive and correlation results supported the research question. Nine reliable performance domain scales were created for both frequency and importance ratings: interpersonal competencies, professional role, community integration, assessment/planning, facilitating recovery, systems competencies, diversity, supporting health and wellness, and transition-age youth services. The nine performance domain scales should be useful for future PRP job analyses. In addition, individual performance domain scales can be applied to other PRP research issues. Study limitations are acknowledged. Future research validating this 70-item measure is encouraged using other sources (e.g., supervisor) as well as other data collection methods (e.g., interview), from various psychiatric rehabilitative agency settings.

  5. Quantitative analysis of a frequency-domain nonlinearity indicator.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Brent O; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Miller, Kyle G

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, quantitative understanding of a frequency-domain nonlinearity indicator is developed. The indicator is derived from an ensemble-averaged, frequency-domain version of the generalized Burgers equation, which can be rearranged in order to directly compare the effects of nonlinearity, absorption, and geometric spreading on the pressure spectrum level with frequency and distance. The nonlinear effect is calculated using pressure-squared-pressure quadspectrum. Further theoretical development has given an expression for the role of the normalized quadspectrum, referred to as Q/S by Morfey and Howell [AIAA J. 19, 986-992 (1981)], in the spatial rate of change of the pressure spectrum level. To explore this finding, an investigation of the change in level for initial sinusoids propagating as plane waves through inviscid and thermoviscous media has been conducted. The decibel change with distance, calculated through Q/S, captures the growth and decay of the harmonics and indicates that the most significant changes in level occur prior to sawtooth formation. At large distances, the inviscid case results in a spatial rate of change that is uniform across all harmonics. For thermoviscous media, large positive nonlinear gains are observed but offset by absorption, which leads to a greater overall negative spatial rate of change for higher harmonics.

  6. Quantifying online visuomotor feedback utilization in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    de Grosbois, John; Tremblay, Luc

    2016-12-01

    The utilization of sensory information during activities of daily living is ubiquitous both prior to and during movements (i.e., related to planning and online control, respectively). Because of the overlapping nature of online corrective processes, the quantification of feedback utilization has proven difficult. In the present study, we primarily sought to evaluate the utility of a novel analysis in the frequency domain for identifying visuomotor feedback utilization (i.e., online control). A second goal was to compare the sensitivity of the frequency analysis to that of currently utilized measures of online control. Participants completed reaching movements to targets located 27, 30, and 33 cm from a start position. During these reaches, vision of the environment was either provided or withheld. Performance was assessed across contemporary measures of online control. For the novel frequency analysis presented in this study, the acceleration profiles of reaching movements were detrended with a 5th-order polynomial fit, and the proportional power spectra were computed from the residuals of these fits. The results indicated that the use of visual feedback during reaching movements increased the contribution of the 4.68-Hz frequency to the residuals of the acceleration profiles. Comparisons across all measures of online control showed that the most sensitive measure was the squared Fisher transform of the correlation between the positions at 75 % and 100 % of the movement time. However, because such correlational measures can be contaminated by offline control processes, the frequency-domain analysis proposed herein represents a viable and promising alternative to detect changes in online feedback utilization.

  7. Frequency domain probe design for high frequency sensing of soil moisture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate moisture sensing is an important need for many research programs as well as in control of industrial processes. This paper covers the development of a frequency domain sensing probe for use in obtaining measurements of material properties suitable for work ranging from 0 to 6GHz. The probe ...

  8. A Frequency-Domain Substructure System Identification Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blades, Eric L.; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A new frequency-domain system identification algorithm is presented for system identification of substructures, such as payloads to be flown aboard the Space Shuttle. In the vibration test, all interface degrees of freedom where the substructure is connected to the carrier structure are either subjected to active excitation or are supported by a test stand with the reaction forces measured. The measured frequency-response data is used to obtain a linear, viscous-damped model with all interface-degree of freedom entries included. This model can then be used to validate analytical substructure models. This procedure makes it possible to obtain not only the fixed-interface modal data associated with a Craig-Bampton substructure model, but also the data associated with constraint modes. With this proposed algorithm, multiple-boundary-condition tests are not required, and test-stand dynamics is accounted for without requiring a separate modal test or finite element modeling of the test stand. Numerical simulations are used in examining the algorithm's ability to estimate valid reduced-order structural models. The algorithm's performance when frequency-response data covering narrow and broad frequency bandwidths is used as input is explored. Its performance when noise is added to the frequency-response data and the use of different least squares solution techniques are also examined. The identified reduced-order models are also compared for accuracy with other test-analysis models and a formulation for a Craig-Bampton test-analysis model is also presented.

  9. Frequency Domain Modelling of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Layered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Felix; Wagner, Norman; Lünenschloß, Peter; Toepfer, Hannes; Dietrich, Peter; Kaliorias, Andreas; Bumberger, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The amount of water in porous media such as soils and rocks is a key parameter when water resources are under investigation. Especially the quantitative spatial distribution and temporal evolution of water contents in soil formations are needed. In high frequency electromagnetic applications soil water content is quantitatively derived from the propagation behavior of electromagnetic waves along waveguides embedded in soil formations. The spatial distribution of the dielectric material properties along the waveguide can be estimated by numerical solving of the inverse problem based on the full wave forward model in time or frequency domain. However, current approaches mostly neglect or approximate the frequency dependence of the electromagnetic material properties of transfer function of the waveguide. As a first prove of concept a full two port broadband frequency domain forward model for propagation of transverse electromagnetic (TEM) waves in coaxial waveguide has been implemented. It is based on the propagation matrix approach for layered transmission line sections Depending on the complexity of the material different models for the frequency dependent complex permittivity were applied. For the validation of the model a broadband frequency domain measurement with network analyzer technique was used. The measurement is based on a 20 cm long 50 Ohm 20/46 coaxial transmission line cell considering inhomogeneous material distributions. This approach allows (i) an increase of the waveguide calibration accuracy in comparison to conventional TDR based technique and (ii) the consideration of the broadband permittivity spectrum of the porous material. In order to systematic analyze the model, theoretical results were compared with measurements as well as 3D broadband finite element modeling of homogeneous and layered media in the coaxial transmission line cell. Defined standards (Teflon, dry glass beads, de-ionized water) were placed inside the line as the dielectric

  10. Frequency Domain Modelling of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Layered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Felix; Lünenschloss, Peter; Mai, Juliane; Wagner, Norman; Töpfer, Hannes; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The amount of water in porous media such as soils and rocks is a key parameter when water resources are under investigation. Especially the quantitative spatial distribution and temporal evolution of water contents in soil formations are needed. In high frequency electromagnetic applications soil water content is quantitatively derived from the propagation behavior of electromagnetic waves along waveguides embedded in soil formations. The spatial distribution of the dielectric material properties along the waveguide can be estimated by numerical solving of the inverse problem based on the full wave forward model in time or frequency domain. However, current approaches mostly neglect or approximate the frequency dependence of the electromagnetic material properties of transfer function of the waveguide. As a first prove of concept a full two port broadband frequency domain forward model for propagation of transverse electromagnetic (TEM) waves in coaxial waveguide has been implemented. It is based on the propagation matrix approach for layered transmission line sections. Depending on the complexity of the material different models for the frequency dependent complex permittivity were applied. For the validation of the model a broadband frequency domain measurement with network analyzer technique was used. The measurement is based on a 20 cm long 50 Ohm 20/46 coaxial transmission line cell considering inhomogeneous material distributions. This approach allows (i) an increase of the waveguide calibration accuracy in comparison to conventional TDR based technique and (ii) the consideration of the broadband permittivity spectrum of the porous material. In order to systematic analyze the model, theoretical results were compared with measurements as well as 3D broadband finite element modeling of homogeneous and layered media in the coaxial transmission line cell. Defined standards (Teflon, dry glass beads, de-ionized water) were placed inside the line as the dielectric

  11. Analysis of wave packet motion in frequency and time domain: oxazine 1.

    PubMed

    Braun, Markus; Sobotta, Constanze; Dürr, Regina; Pulvermacher, Horst; Malkmus, Stephan

    2006-08-17

    Wave packet motion in the laser dye oxazine 1 in methanol is investigated by spectrally resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The spectral range of 600-690 nm was accessible by amplified broadband probe pulses covering the overlap region of ground-state bleach and stimulated emission signal. The influence of vibrational wave packets on the optical signal is analyzed in the frequency domain and the time domain. For the analysis in the frequency domain an algorithm is presented that accounts for interference effects of neighbored vibrational modes. By this method amplitude, phase and decay time of vibrational modes are retrieved as a function of probe wavelength and distortions due to neighbored modes are reduced. The analysis of the data in the time domain yields complementary information on the intensity, central wavelength, and spectral width of the optical bleach spectrum due to wave packet motion.

  12. Consensus for Linear Multiagent Systems With Time-Varying Delays: A Frequency Domain Perspective.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanye; Shi, Yang

    2016-07-27

    This paper investigates the consensus problem for multiagent systems with time-varying delays. The bounded delays can be arbitrarily fast time-varying. The communication topology is assumed to be undirected and fixed. With general linear dynamics under average state feedback protocols, the consensus problem is then transformed into the robust control problem. Further, sufficient frequency domain criteria are established in terms of small gain theorem by analyzing the delay dependent gains for both continuous-time and discrete-time systems. The controller synthesis problems can be solved by applying the frequency domain design methods. Numerical examples are demonstrated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  13. Demultiplexing based on frequency-domain joint decision MMA for MDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caili, Gong; Li, Li; Guijun, Hu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a demultiplexing method based on frequency-domain joint decision multi-modulus algorithm (FD-JDMMA) for mode division multiplexing (MDM) system. The performance of FD-JDMMA is compared with frequency-domain multi-modulus algorithm (FD-MMA) and frequency-domain least mean square (FD-LMS) algorithm. The simulation results show that FD-JDMMA outperforms FD-MMA in terms of BER and convergence speed in the cases of mQAM (m=4, 16 and 64) formats. And it is also demonstrated that FD-JDMMA achieves better BER performance and converges faster than FD-LMS in the cases of 16QAM and 64QAM. Furthermore, FD-JDMMA maintains similar computational complexity as the both equalization algorithms.

  14. Frequency domain multiplexing for large-scale bolometer arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, Helmuth

    2002-05-31

    The development of planar fabrication techniques for superconducting transition-edge sensors has brought large-scale arrays of 1000 pixels or more to the realm of practicality. This raises the problem of reading out a large number of sensors with a tractable number of connections. A possible solution is frequency-domain multiplexing. I summarize basic principles, present various circuit topologies, and discuss design trade-offs, noise performance, cross-talk and dynamic range. The design of a practical device and its readout system is described with a discussion of fabrication issues, practical limits and future prospects.

  15. Baseband feedback for SAFARI-SPICA using Frequency Domain Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounab, A.; de Korte, P.; Cros, A.; van der Kuur, J.; van Leeuwen, B. J.; Monna, B.; Mossel, R.; Nieuwenhuizen, A.; Ravera, L.

    We report on the performance of the digital baseband feedback circuit developed to readout and process signals from arrays of transition edge sensors for SPICA-SAFARI in frequency domain multiplexing (FDM). The standard procedure to readout the SQUID current amplifiers is to use a feedback loop (flux-locked loop: FLL). However the achievable FFL bandwidth is limited by the cable transport delay t_d, which makes standard feedback inconvenient. A much better approach is to use baseband feedback. We have developed a model of the electronic readout chain for SPICA-SAFARI instrument by using an Anlog-digital co-simulation based on Simulink-System Generator environment.

  16. Frequency-domain single-shot optical frequency comb tomography using VIPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaoka, Takumi; Shioda, Tatsutoshi

    2016-03-01

    Novel two-dimensional single-shot imaging optical system based on Frequency-domain interferometry using a virtually imaged phased array is proposed. The VIPA simultaneously outputs incoherent optical frequency combs (OFCs) whose teeth interval are scanned as a function of its output angle. Teeth intervals of the OFCs only in a reference are spatially swept by using of a VIPA whose advantage compared to an optical resonator. Thus, the single-shot imaging system can be realized with the FSR scanned frequency-domain OFC interference monitored by CCD. This system enable high speed 2-dimensional tomographic image without mechanical moving part. And the axial measurement range is not limited by using multi-order interference that is generated by OFCs interferometry. We will present the operation principle with its confirmed results in terms of both simulation and experiment.

  17. High-Performance Computational Electromagnetics in Frequency-Domain and Time-Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-04

    for sound-hard acoustic scattering problems were put forth in [15]; use of these equations gives rise to very significant improvements in iterations...Bruno, O., Elling, T. and Turc, C., Regularized integral equations and fast high-order solvers for sound-hard acoustic scattering problems...solutions for some of the most challenging scattering problems in science and engineering. Electromagnetic scattering . Frequency domain solvers. Integral

  18. Frequency domain identification for robust large space structure control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Bayard, D. S.; Scheid, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is demonstrated for frequency domain identification of large space structures which systematically transforms experimental raw data into a form required for synthesizing H(infinity) controllers using modern robust control design software (e.g., Matlab Toolboxes). A unique feature of this approach is that the additive uncertainty is characterized to a specified statistic confidence rather than with hard bounds. In this study, the difference in robust performance is minimal between the two levels of confidence. In general cases, the present methodology provides a tool for performance/confidence level tradeoff studies. For simplicity, the additive uncertainty on a frequency grid is considered and the interpolation error in between grid points is neglected.

  19. Frequency domain identification for robust large space structure control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Bayard, D. S.; Scheid, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is demonstrated for frequency domain identification of large space structures which systematically transforms experimental raw data into a form required for synthesizing H(infinity) controllers using modern robust control design software (e.g., Matlab Toolboxes). A unique feature of this approach is that the additive uncertainty is characterized to a specified statistic confidence rather than with hard bounds. In this study, the difference in robust performance is minimal between the two levels of confidence. In general cases, the present methodology provides a tool for performance/confidence level tradeoff studies. For simplicity, the additive uncertainty on a frequency grid is considered and the interpolation error in between grid points is neglected.

  20. The anti-counterfeiting hologram of encryption processing in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Nai K.; Chen, Zhongyu Y.

    2004-09-01

    This paper proposed a new encryption method using Computer Generated Fourier Hologram in frequency domain. When the main frequency spectrum, i.e. brand and an encrypted information frequency spectrum are mixed, it will not recognized and copied. We will use the methods of Dot Matrix (Digital) Hologram Modulation and the filter to get real signal. One new multi-modulated dot matrix hologram is introduced. It is encoded using several gratings. These gratings have different angles of inclination and different periods in same dot, to enable us in obtaining more information.

  1. Adaptive Channel Estimation for Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Frequency Domain Equalization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    FDE) in a single carrier (SC) multiple - input multiple - output ( MIMO ) system. Two types of channel estimation methods are proposed, assuming...Adaptive Channel Estimation for Multiple - Input Multiple - Output Frequency Domain Equalization Xu Zhu*, Fareq Malek*, Yi Gong+ and Yi Huang...perfect channel state information (CSI), and has a fast convergence speed and reasonably low complexity. Keywords- Multiple - Input Multiple - Output

  2. Frequency-Domain Green's Functions for Radar Waves in Heterogeneous 2.5D Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green’s functions for radar waves propagating in heterogeneous media may be calculated in the frequency domain using a hybrid of two numerical methods. The model is defined in the Cartesian coordinate system, and its electromagnetic properties may vary in the x and z directions, ...

  3. Frequency-Domain Green's Functions for Radar Waves in Heterogeneous 2.5D Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green’s functions for radar waves propagating in heterogeneous media may be calculated in the frequency domain using a hybrid of two numerical methods. The model is defined in the Cartesian coordinate system, and its electromagnetic properties may vary in the x and z directions, ...

  4. Ultrasound breast imaging using frequency domain reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, O.; Zuberi, M. A. H.; Pratt, R. G.; Duric, N.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ultrasonography reconstruction techniques, such as B-mode, are based on a simple wave propagation model derived from a high frequency approximation. Therefore, to minimize model mismatch, the central frequency of the input pulse is typically chosen between 3 and 15 megahertz. Despite the increase in theoretical resolution, operating at higher frequencies comes at the cost of lower signal-to-noise ratio. This ultimately degrades the image contrast and overall quality at higher imaging depths. To address this issue, we investigate a reflection imaging technique, known as reverse time migration, which uses a more accurate propagation model for reconstruction. We present preliminary simulation results as well as physical phantom image reconstructions obtained using data acquired with a breast imaging ultrasound tomography prototype. The original reconstructions are filtered to remove low-wavenumber artifacts that arise due to the inclusion of the direct arrivals. We demonstrate the advantage of using an accurate sound speed model in the reverse time migration process. We also explain how the increase in computational complexity can be mitigated using a frequency domain approach and a parallel computing platform.

  5. Dynamics of spintronic materials: Exploration in the time and frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Zabel, Hartmut

    2014-12-14

    X-ray and neutron reflectivity are mature experimental techniques for the exploration of film thicknesses and interface roughnesses on the nanoscale. Combining with photon and neutron polarization, these methods can be carried forward to the analysis of magnetic thin films and magnetic domain structures. New opportunities open up when these methods are used either in the time or in the frequency domain. Then dynamical processes can be studied such as domain oscillations, domain propagation, precession of spins, and damping effects. Two methods are discussed which have been developed recently: polarized neutron reflectivity from magnetic films in an alternating magnetic field and time resolved resonant magnetic x-ray reflectivity of the free precessional dynamics in films and multilayers.

  6. Allan deviation computations of a linear frequency synthesizer system using frequency domain techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Andy

    1995-01-01

    Allan Deviation computations of linear frequency synthesizer systems have been reported previously using real-time simulations. Even though it takes less time compared with the actual measurement, it is still very time consuming to compute the Allan Deviation for long sample times with the desired confidence level. Also noises, such as flicker phase noise and flicker frequency noise, can not be simulated precisely. The use of frequency domain techniques can overcome these drawbacks. In this paper the system error model of a fictitious linear frequency synthesizer is developed and its performance using a Cesium (Cs) atomic frequency standard (AFS) as a reference is evaluated using frequency domain techniques. For a linear timing system, the power spectral density at the system output can be computed with known system transfer functions and known power spectral densities from the input noise sources. The resulting power spectral density can then be used to compute the Allan Variance at the system output. Sensitivities of the Allan Variance at the system output to each of its independent input noises are obtained, and they are valuable for design trade-off and trouble-shooting.

  7. Frequency-domain optical mammography: edge effect corrections.

    PubMed

    Fantini, S; Franceschini, M A; Gaida, G; Gratton, E; Jess, H; Mantulin, W W; Moesta, K T; Schlag, P M; Kaschke, M

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the problem of edge effects in laser-beam transillumination scanning of the human breast. Edge effects arise from tissue thickness variability along the scanned area, and from lateral photon losses through the sides of the breast. Edge effects can be effectively corrected in frequency-domain measurements by employing a two-step procedure: (1) use of the phase information to calculate an effective tissue thickness for each pixel location; (2) application of the knowledge of tissue thickness to calculate an edge-corrected optical image from the ac signal image. The measurements were conducted with a light mammography apparatus (LIMA) designed for feasibility tests in the clinical environment. Operating in the frequency-domain (110 MHz), this instrument performs a transillumination optical scan at two wavelengths (685 and 825 nm). We applied the proposed two-step procedure to data from breast phantoms and from human breasts. The processed images provide higher contrast and detectability in optical mammography with respect to raw data breast images.

  8. Parametric study of the frequency-domain thermoreflectance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, C.; Jensen, C.; Hua, Z.; Ban, H.; Hurley, D. H.; Khafizov, M.; Kennedy, J. R.

    2012-11-01

    Without requiring regression for parameter determination, one-dimensional (1D) analytical models are used by many research groups to extract the thermal properties in frequency-domain thermoreflectance measurements. Experimentally, this approach involves heating the sample with a pump laser and probing the temperature response with spatially coincident probe laser. Micron order lateral resolution can be obtained by tightly focusing the pump and probe lasers. However, small laser beam spot sizes necessarily bring into question the assumptions associated with 1D analytical models. In this study, we analyzed the applicability of 1D analytical models by comparing to 2D analytical and fully numerical models. Specifically, we considered a generic n-layer two-dimensional (2D), axisymmetric analytical model including effects of volumetric heat absorption, contact resistance, and anisotropic properties. In addition, a finite element numerical model was employed to consider nonlinear effects caused by temperature dependent thermal conductivity. Nonlinearity is of germane importance to frequency domain approaches because the experimental geometry is such that the probe is always sensing the maximum temperature fluctuation. To quantify the applicability of the 1D model, parametric studies were performed considering the effects of: film thickness, heating laser size, probe laser size, substrate-to-film effusivity ratio, interfacial thermal resistance between layers, volumetric heating, substrate thermal conductivity, nonlinear boundary conditions, and anisotropic and temperature dependent thermal conductivity.

  9. Parametric Study of the Frequency-Domain Thermoreflectance Technique

    SciTech Connect

    C. Xing; C. Jensen; Z. Hua; H. Ban; D. H. Hurley; M. Khafizov; J. Rory Kennedy

    2012-11-01

    Without requiring regression for parameter determination, one-dimensional (1D) analytical models are used by many research groups to extract the thermal properties in frequency-domain thermoreflectance measurements. Experimentally, this approach involves heating the sample with a pump laser and probing the temperature response with spatially coincident probe laser. Micron order lateral resolution can be obtained by tightly focusing the pump and probe lasers. However, small laser beam spot sizes necessarily bring into question the assumptions associated with 1D analytical models. In this study, we analyzed the applicability of 1D analytical models by comparing to 2D analytical and fully numerical models. Specifically, we considered a generic nlayer two-dimensional (2D), axisymmetric analytical model including effects of volumetric heat absorption, contact resistance, and anisotropic properties. In addition, a finite element numerical model was employed to consider nonlinear effects caused by temperature dependent thermal conductivity. Nonlinearity is of germane importance to frequency domain approaches because the experimental geometry is such that the probe is always sensing the maximum temperature fluctuation. To quantify the applicability of the 1D model, parametric studies were performed considering the effects of: film thickness, heating laser size, probe laser size, substrate-to-film effusivity ratio, interfacial thermal resistance between layers, volumetric heating, substrate thermal conductivity, nonlinear boundary conditions, and anisotropic and temperature dependent thermal conductivity.

  10. [Feature extraction of motor imagery electroencephalography based on time-frequency-space domains].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueru; Li, Xin; Li, Honghong; Shao, Chengcheng; Ying, Lijuan; Wu, Shuicai

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of using brain-computer interface (BCI) is to build a bridge between brain and computer for the disable persons, in order to help them to communicate with the outside world. Electroencephalography (EEG) has low signal to noise ratio (SNR), and there exist some problems in the traditional methods for the feature extraction of EEG, such as low classification accuracy, lack of spatial information and huge amounts of features. To solve these problems, we proposed a new method based on time domain, frequency domain and space domain. In this study, independent component analysis (ICA) and wavelet transform were used to extract the temporal, spectral and spatial features from the original EEG signals, and then the extracted features were classified with the method combined support vector machine (SVM) with genetic algorithm (GA). The proposed method displayed a better classification performance, and made the mean accuracy of the Graz datasets in the BCI Competitions of 2003 reach 96%. The classification results showed that the proposed method with the three domains could effectively overcome the drawbacks of the traditional methods based solely on time-frequency domain when the EEG signals were used to describe the characteristics of the brain electrical signals.

  11. Rolling element bearing faults diagnosis based on kurtogram and frequency domain correlated kurtosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaohui; Yang, Shaopu; Liu, Yongqiang; Hao, Rujiang

    2016-12-01

    Envelope analysis is one of the most useful methods in localized fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings. However, there is a challenge in selecting the optimal resonance band. In this paper, a novel method based on kurtogram and frequency domain correlated kurtosis is proposed. To obtain the correct relationship between the node and frequency band in wavelet packet transform, a vital process named frequency ordering is conducted to solve the frequency folding problem due to down sampling. Correlated kurtosis of envelope spectrum instead of correlated kurtosis of envelope signal or kurtosis of envelope spectrum is utilized to generate the kurtogram, in which the maximum value can indicate the optimal band for envelope analysis. Several cases of experimental bearing fault signals are used to evaluate the immunity of the proposed method to strong noise interference. The improved performance has also been compared with two previous developed methods. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the method in fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings.

  12. Orthogonal Multi-Carrier DS-CDMA with Frequency-Domain Equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ken; Tomeba, Hiromichi; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    Orthogonal multi-carrier direct sequence code division multiple access (orthogonal MC DS-CDMA) is a combination of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and time-domain spreading, while multi-carrier code division multiple access (MC-CDMA) is a combination of OFDM and frequency-domain spreading. In MC-CDMA, a good bit error rate (BER) performance can be achieved by using frequency-domain equalization (FDE), since the frequency diversity gain is obtained. On the other hand, the conventional orthogonal MC DS-CDMA fails to achieve any frequency diversity gain. In this paper, we propose a new orthogonal MC DS-CDMA that can obtain the frequency diversity gain by applying FDE. The conditional BER analysis is presented. The theoretical average BER performance in a frequency-selective Rayleigh fading channel is evaluated by the Monte-Carlo numerical computation method using the derived conditional BER and is confirmed by computer simulation of the orthogonal MC DS-CDMA signal transmission.

  13. In-vitro comparison of time-domain, frequency-domain and wavelet ultrasound parameters in diagnostics of cartilage degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kaleva, E; Saarakkala, S; Töyräs, J; Nieminen, H J; Jurvelin, J S

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUI) is a promising preclinical method for detecting early osteoarthrotic (OA) changes in articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to compare time-domain, frequency-domain and wavelet transform (WT) QUI parameters in terms of their performance in revealing degenerative changes in cartilage in vitro. Mankin score and Cartilage Quality Index (CQI) were used as a reference for quantifying cartilage degeneration. Intact (n = 11, Mankin score = 0) and spontaneously degenerated (n = 21, Mankin score = 1-10, mean = 4) osteochondral samples (diameter 19 mm) from bovine patellae, prepared and scanned with an ultrasound instrument in our earlier study, were further analyzed. Ultrasound reflection coefficient (R), integrated reflection coefficient (IRC) and ultrasound roughness index (URI) for cartilage surfaces were obtained from our earlier study. In the present study, maximum magnitude (MM) and echo duration (ED) for the cartilage surface were determined from the WT analysis. All ultrasound (US) parameters were capable of distinguishing intact and degenerated cartilage groups (p < 0.01, Mann-Whitney U test). Significant correlations were established between all QUI parameters and CQI or Mankin score (p < 0.01, Spearman's correlation test). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that the simple time-domain parameters (R and URI) were diagnostically as sensitive and specific as the more complex frequency-domain (IRC) or WT (MM, ED) parameters. Although QUI shows significant potential for OA diagnostics, complex signal processing techniques may provide only limited additional benefits for diagnostic performance compared with simple time-domain methods. However, certain technical challenges must be met before any of these methods can be used clinically.

  14. Patellofemoral pain syndrome: electromyography in a frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelli, D. S.; Kuriki, H. U.; Polito, L. F.; Azevedo, F. M.; Negrão Filho, R. F.; Alves, N.

    2011-09-01

    The Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS), has a multifactorial etiology and affects approximately 7 to 15% of the population, mostly women, youth, adults and active persons. PFPS causes anterior or retropatelar pain that is exacerbated during functional motor gestures, such as up and down stairs or spending long periods of time sitting, squatting or kneeling. As the diagnostic evaluation of this syndrome is still indirect, different mechanisms and methodologies try to make a classification that distinguishes patients with PFPS in relation to asymptomatic. Thereby, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of the electromyographic (EMG) signal in the frequency domain of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) in patients with PFPS, during the ascent of stairs. 33 young women (22 control group and 11 PFPS group), were evaluated by EMG during ascent of stairs. The VMO mean power frequency (MPF) and the VL frequency 95% (F95) were lower in symptomatic individuals. This may be related to the difference in muscle recruitment strategy exerted by each muscle in the PFPS group compared to the control group.

  15. Modal identification using the frequency-scale domain decomposition technique of ambient vibration responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thien-Phu; Argoul, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposes a new modal identification method of ambient vibration responses. The application of the singular value decomposition to continuous wavelet transform of power spectral density matrix gives singular values and singular vectors in frequency-scale domain. Analytical development shows a direct relation between local maxima in frequency-scale representation of singular values and modal parameters. This relation is then carried on for the identification of modal parameters via a complete practical procedure. The main novelties of this work involve the new formulation in frequency-scale domain and the capacity for the identification of modal parameters without the step of ridges extraction in comparison with previous wavelet-based modal identification methods.

  16. Stereo Sound Field Controller Design Using Partial Model Matching on the Frequency Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, Makoto; Miike, Katsuhiro; Eguchi, Kazuki; Mizumoto, Ikuro; Iwai, Zenta

    The objective of sound field control is to make the acoustic characteristics of a listening room close to those of the desired system. Conventional methods apply feedforward controllers, such as digital filters, to achieve this objective. However, feedback controllers are also necessary in order to attenuate noise or to compensate the uncertainty of the acoustic characteristics of the listening room. Since acoustic characteristics are well modeled on the frequency domain, it is efficient to design controllers with respect to frequency responses, but it is difficult to design a multi input multi output (MIMO) control system on a wide frequency domain. In the present study, a partial model matching method on the frequency domain was adopted because this method requires only sampled data, rather than complex mathematical models of the plant, in order to design controllers for MIMO systems. The partial model matching method was applied to design two-degree-of-freedom controllers for acoustic equalization and noise reduction. Experiments demonstrated effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Cerebral autoregulation in the preterm newborn using near-infrared spectroscopy: a comparison of time-domain and frequency-domain analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Vibeke R.; Hahn, Gitte H.; Greisen, Gorm

    2015-03-01

    The aim was to compare two conventional methods used to describe cerebral autoregulation (CA): frequency-domain analysis and time-domain analysis. We measured cerebral oxygenation (as a surrogate for cerebral blood flow) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) in 60 preterm infants. In the frequency domain, outcome variables were coherence and gain, whereas the cerebral oximetry index (COx) and the regression coefficient were the outcome variables in the time domain. Correlation between coherence and COx was poor. The disagreement between the two methods was due to the MAP and cerebral oxygenation signals being in counterphase in three cases. High gain and high coherence may arise spuriously when cerebral oxygenation decreases as MAP increases; hence, time-domain analysis appears to be a more robust-and simpler-method to describe CA.

  18. Joint AVO inversion in the time and frequency domain with Bayesian interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhao-Yun; Yin, Xing-Yao; Li, Kun

    2016-12-01

    Amplitude variations with offset or incident angle (AVO/AVA) inversion are typically combined with statistical methods, such as Bayesian inference or deterministic inversion. We propose a joint elastic inversion method in the time and frequency domain based on Bayesian inversion theory to improve the resolution of the estimated P- and S-wave velocities and density. We initially construct the objective function using Bayesian inference by combining seismic data in the time and frequency domain. We use Cauchy and Gaussian probability distribution density functions to obtain the prior information for the model parameters and the likelihood function, respectively. We estimate the elastic parameters by solving the initial objective function with added model constraints to improve the inversion robustness. The results of the synthetic data suggest that the frequency spectra of the estimated parameters are wider than those obtained with conventional elastic inversion in the time domain. In addition, the proposed inversion approach offers stronger antinoising compared to the inversion approach in the frequency domain. Furthermore, results from synthetic examples with added Gaussian noise demonstrate the robustness of the proposed approach. From the real data, we infer that more model parameter details can be reproduced with the proposed joint elastic inversion.

  19. Time domain Rankine-Green panel method for offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhifu; Ren, Huilong; Liu, Riming; Li, Hui

    2017-02-01

    To solve the numerical divergence problem of the direct time domain Green function method for the motion simulation of floating bodies with large flare, a time domain hybrid Rankine-Green boundary element method is proposed. In this numerical method, the fluid domain is decomposed by an imaginary control surface, at which the continuous condition should be satisfied. Then the Rankine Green function is adopted in the inner domain. The transient free surface Green function is applied in the outer domain, which is used to find the relationship between the velocity potential and its normal derivative for the inner domain. Besides, the velocity potential at the mean free surface between body surface and control surface is directly solved by the integration scheme. The wave exciting force is computed through the convolution integration with wave elevation, by introducing the impulse response function. Additionally, the nonlinear Froude-Krylov force and hydrostatic force, which is computed under the instantaneous incident wave free surface, are taken into account by the direct pressure integration scheme. The corresponding numerical computer code is developed and first used to compute the hydrodynamic coefficients of the hemisphere, as well as the time history of a ship with large flare; good agreement is obtained with the analytical solutions as well as the available numerical results. Then the hydrodynamic properties of a FPSO are studied. The hydrodynamic coefficients agree well with the results computed by the frequency method; the influence of the time interval and the truncated time is investigated in detail.

  20. Simultaneous storage of medical images in the spatial and frequency domain: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Jagadish; Bhat, P Subbanna; Acharya U, Rajendra; UC, Niranjan

    2004-01-01

    Background Digital watermarking is a technique of hiding specific identification data for copyright authentication. This technique is adapted here for interleaving patient information with medical images, to reduce storage and transmission overheads. Methods The patient information is encrypted before interleaving with images to ensure greater security. The bio-signals are compressed and subsequently interleaved with the image. This interleaving is carried out in the spatial domain and Frequency domain. The performance of interleaving in the spatial, Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) coefficients is studied. Differential pulse code modulation (DPCM) is employed for data compression as well as encryption and results are tabulated for a specific example. Results It can be seen from results, the process does not affect the picture quality. This is attributed to the fact that the change in LSB of a pixel changes its brightness by 1 part in 256. Spatial and DFT domain interleaving gave very less %NRMSE as compared to DCT and DWT domain. Conclusion The Results show that spatial domain the interleaving, the %NRMSE was less than 0.25% for 8-bit encoded pixel intensity. Among the frequency domain interleaving methods, DFT was found to be very efficient. PMID:15180899

  1. Frequency domain studies of CoZr continuous thin films and FeNi wires using coplanar transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerekes, M.; Viegas, A. D. C.; Stanescu, D.; Ebels, U.; Xavier, P.; Suran, G.

    2004-06-01

    A ferromagnetic resonance measurement technique based on coplanar waveguides is presented. This technique is adapted to measure the high frequency response of metallic magnetic materials in the frequency domain up to 20 GHz and is complementary to the inductive time-domain method. Upon scanning the frequency at constant field, for varying field angle, the frequency-field dispersion as well as the frequency linewidth can be obtained. The absorption spectra for a Co90Zr10 continuous film and for Fe20Ni80 wires of different thickness are presented. For the latter an increase in the linewidth and damping parameter is observed with increasing wire thickness.

  2. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  3. Motion estimation in the frequency domain using fuzzy c-planes clustering.

    PubMed

    Erdem, C E; Karabulut, G Z; Yanmaz, E; Anarim, E

    2001-01-01

    A recent work explicitly models the discontinuous motion estimation problem in the frequency domain where the motion parameters are estimated using a harmonic retrieval approach. The vertical and horizontal components of the motion are independently estimated from the locations of the peaks of respective periodogram analyses and they are paired to obtain the motion vectors using a procedure proposed. In this paper, we present a more efficient method that replaces the motion component pairing task and hence eliminates the problems of the pairing method described. The method described in this paper uses the fuzzy c-planes (FCP) clustering approach to fit planes to three-dimensional (3-D) frequency domain data obtained from the peaks of the periodograms. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Single carrier frequency domain equalization based on SSB modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junwen; Fang, Wuliang; Shao, Yufeng; Huang, Bo; Chi, Nan

    2009-11-01

    Single-carrier frequency domain equalization (SC-FDE), as a mature technique in wireless commutation, is widely researched for signal equalization and compensation utilizing high speed electronic devices such as DSP. In this paper, for the first time, we propose and demonstrate a SC-FDE technique in optical communication system. By adopting SCFDE technique, after 50km, 80km, 100km transmission for a 10Gb/s ASK single sideband (SSB) signal on a single mode fiber (SMF), the dispersion of optical signa1 is effectively compensated. The SSB signal is generated by a dual-arm Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) cascading a phase modulator (PM) based on Hilbert Finite impulse response (FIR) digital filter. The results demonstrate, in our proposed SC-FDE model, the eye opening and the clock recovery is improved, and the effect of compensation is enhanced as the transmission distance increases.

  5. Monitoring electrical and thermal burns with Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica

    2011-10-01

    Thermal and electrical injuries are devastating and hard-to-treat clinical lesions. The pathophysiology of these injuries is not fully understood to this day. Further elucidating the natural history of this form of tissue injury could be helpful in offering stage-appropriate therapy. Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) is a novel non-invasive technique that can be used to determine optical properties of biological media. We have developed an experimental apparatus based on SFDI aimed at monitoring parameters of clinical interest such as tissue oxygen saturation, methemoglobin volume fraction, and hemoglobin volume fraction. Co- registered Laser Doppler images of the lesions are also acquired to assess tissue perfusion. Results of experiments conducted on a rat model and discussions on the systemic changes in tissue optical properties before and after injury will be presented.

  6. Frequency-domain ultrasound waveform tomography breast attenuation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Gursharan Yash Singh; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; West, Erik; Montgomery, Katelyn; Boone, Michael; Duric, Neb

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound waveform tomography techniques have shown promising results for the visualization and characterization of breast disease. By using frequency-domain waveform tomography techniques and a gradient descent algorithm, we have previously reconstructed the sound speed distributions of breasts of varying densities with different types of breast disease including benign and malignant lesions. By allowing the sound speed to have an imaginary component, we can model the intrinsic attenuation of a medium. We can similarly recover the imaginary component of the velocity and thus the attenuation. In this paper, we will briefly review ultrasound waveform tomography techniques, discuss attenuation and its relations to the imaginary component of the sound speed, and provide both numerical and ex vivo examples of waveform tomography attenuation reconstructions.

  7. Face identification with frequency domain matched filtering in mobile environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Su; Woo, Yong-Hyun; Yeom, Seokwon; Kim, Shin-Hwan

    2012-06-01

    Face identification at a distance is very challenging since captured images are often degraded by blur and noise. Furthermore, the computational resources and memory are often limited in the mobile environments. Thus, it is very challenging to develop a real-time face identification system on the mobile device. This paper discusses face identification based on frequency domain matched filtering in the mobile environments. Face identification is performed by the linear or phase-only matched filter and sequential verification stages. The candidate window regions are decided by the major peaks of the linear or phase-only matched filtering outputs. The sequential stages comprise a skin-color test and an edge mask filtering test, which verify color and shape information of the candidate regions in order to remove false alarms. All algorithms are built on the mobile device using Android platform. The preliminary results show that face identification of East Asian people can be performed successfully in the mobile environments.

  8. Frequency-domain optical tomographic imaging of arthritic finger joints.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Andreas H; Kim, Hyun Keol; Montejo, Ludguier D; Blaschke, Sabine; Netz, Uwe J; Zwaka, Paul A; Illing, Gerd; Muller, Gerhard A; Beuthan, Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    We are presenting data from the largest clinical trial on optical tomographic imaging of finger joints to date. Overall we evaluated 99 fingers of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 120 fingers from healthy volunteers. Using frequency-domain imaging techniques we show that sensitivities and specificities of 0.85 and higher can be achieved in detecting RA. This is accomplished by deriving multiple optical parameters from the optical tomographic images and combining them for the statistical analysis. Parameters derived from the scattering coefficient perform slightly better than absorption derived parameters. Furthermore we found that data obtained at 600 MHz leads to better classification results than data obtained at 0 or 300 MHz.

  9. Frequency domain identification experiment on a large flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Yam, Y.; Scheid, R. E.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experiences in the field of flexible structure control in space have indicated a need for on-orbit system identification to support robust control redesign to avoid in-flight instabilities and maintain high spacecraft performance. The authors highlight an automated frequency domain system identification methodology recently developed to fill this need. The methodology supports (1) the estimation of system quantities useful for robust control analysis and design, (2) experiment design tailored to performing system identification in a typically constrained on-orbit environment, and (3) the automation of operations to reduce human-in-the-loop requirements. A basic overview of the methodology is presented first, followed by an experimental verification of the approach performed on the JPL/AFAL testbed facility.

  10. Optical Frequency Domain Visualization of Electron Beam Driven Plasma Wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, M. C.; Muggli, Patric; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Babzien, Marcus; Kusche, Karl; Fedurin, Mikhail

    2010-11-01

    Beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA), such as the ``plasma afterburner,'' are a promising approach for significantly increasing the particle energies of conventional accelerators. The study and optimization of PWFA would benefit from an experimental correlation between the parameters of the drive bunch, the accelerated bunch and the corresponding, accelerating plasma wave structure. However, the plasma wave structure has not yet been observed directly in PWFA. We will report our current work on noninvasive optical Frequency Domain Interferometric (FDI) and Holographic (FDH) visualization of beam-driven plasma waves. Both techniques employ two laser pulses (probe and reference) co-propagating with the particle drive-beam and its plasma wake. The reference pulse precedes the drive bunch, while the probe overlaps the plasma wave and maps its longitudinal and transverse structure. The experiment is being developed at the BNL/ATF Linac to visualize wakes generated by two and multi-bunch drive beams.

  11. Noise characteristics of heterodyne/homodyne frequency-domain measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We theoretically develop and experimentally validate the noise characteristics of heterodyne and/or homodyne measurements that are widely used in frequency-domain diffusive imaging. The mean and covariance of the modulated heterodyne output are derived by adapting the random amplification of a temporal point process. A multinomial selection rule is applied to the result of the temporal noise analysis to additionally model the spatial distribution of intensified photons measured by a charge-coupled device (CCD), which shows that the photon detection efficiency of CCD pixels plays an important role in the noise property of detected photons. The approach of using a multinomial probability law is validated from experimental results. Also, experimentally measured characteristics of means and variances of homodyne outputs are in agreement with the developed theory. The developed noise model can be applied to all photon amplification processes. PMID:22352646

  12. Novel Burst Suppression Segmentation in the Joint Time-Frequency Domain for EEG in Treatment of Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaeyun; Song, Woo-Jin; Lee, Hyang Woon

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method to distinguish bursts and suppressions for EEG burst suppression from the treatments of status epilepticus, employing the joint time-frequency domain. We obtained the feature used in the proposed method from the joint use of the time and frequency domains, and we estimated the decision as to whether the measured EEG was a burst segment or suppression segment by the maximum likelihood estimation. We evaluated the performance of the proposed method in terms of its accordance with the visual scores and estimation of the burst suppression ratio. The accuracy was higher than the sole use of the time or frequency domains, as well as conventional methods conducted in the time domain. In addition, probabilistic modeling provided a more simplified optimization than conventional methods. Burst suppression quantification necessitated precise burst suppression segmentation with an easy optimization; therefore, the excellent discrimination and the easy optimization of burst suppression by the proposed method appear to be beneficial. PMID:27872655

  13. Frequency-dependent FDTD methods using Z transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Dennis M.

    1992-01-01

    While the frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain, or (FD)2TD, method can correctly calculate EM propagation through media whose dielectric properties are frequency-dependent, more elaborate applications lead to greater (FD)2TD complexity. Z-transform theory is presently used to develop the mathematical bases of the (FD)2TD method, simultaneously obtaining a clearer formulation and allowing researchers to draw on the existing literature of systems analysis and signal-processing.

  14. A new image cipher in time and frequency domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu; Amin, Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Recently, various encryption techniques based on chaos have been proposed. However, most existing chaotic encryption schemes still suffer from fundamental problems such as small key space, weak security function and slow performance speed. This paper introduces an efficient encryption scheme for still visual data that overcome these disadvantages. The proposed scheme is based on hybrid Linear Feedback Shift Register (LFSR) and chaotic systems in hybrid domains. The core idea is to scramble the pixel positions based on 2D chaotic systems in frequency domain. Then, the diffusion is done on the scrambled image based on cryptographic primitive operations and the incorporation of LFSR and chaotic systems as round keys. The hybrid compound of LFSR, chaotic system and cryptographic primitive operations strengthen the encryption performance and enlarge the key space required to resist the brute force attacks. Results of statistical and differential analysis show that the proposed algorithm has high security for secure digital images. Furthermore, it has key sensitivity together with a large key space and is very fast compared to other competitive algorithms.

  15. Coherent optical time domain reflectometry by logarithmic detection and timed random frequency hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lidong; Sun, Xiaoyan; Bu, Xiande; Li, Binglin

    2017-02-01

    A scheme using timed random frequency hopping and signal logarithmic mean method is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in a coherent optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) system to reduce the fading noise of the OTDR trace and simplify the signal processing procedure. The timed random frequency hopping is realized by randomly changing the driving current of the laser at certain time points. By this method, the fading noise of OTDR trace can be reduced to be 1/5 of that without using it. Also, a radio frequency power detector (RFPD), whose output voltage has linear relationship with the input logarithmic RF power, is used to extract the power of the RF signals from the balanced photodetector. Then, a data acquisition card directly captures and adds the digital voltage signals from the RFPD to reduce the fading noise and improve the measurement dynamic range. Compared with synchronous and asynchronous frequency hopping scheme, the proposed method is of high efficiency.

  16. Attenuation estimation using the peak frequency method with high-resolution time-frequency transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tary, J. B.; Van der Baan, M.; Herrera, R. H.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic waves attenuate during their propagation due to Earth anelasticity. Attenuation is usually estimated by frequency domain methods such as the spectral ratio and frequency shift methods. These methods compare large frequency bandwidths of the spectra of two waveforms to compute attenuation. Time-frequency distribution resulting from high-resolution time-frequency transforms are highly localized which prevent their use to compute attenuation with these methods.The peak frequency method only requires the estimation of peak frequencies for a pair of waveforms to estimate attenuation, which is then compatible with high-resolution transforms. We here employ three transforms, namely basis pursuit, synchrosqueezing transform, and complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD). We evaluate their performance regarding attenuation estimation using synthetic examples with different signal-to-noise ratios, and compare their results to those of the spectral ratio and frequency shift methods. In most cases basis pursuit and the synchrosqueezing transform provide accurate results, while CEEMD show a higher sensitivity to the presence of noise.We then apply the three high-resolution transforms and the peak frequency method to two case studies, a seismic reflection profile and a vertical seismic profile (VSP). We employ centroid frequencies instead of peak frequencies because they provide stabler frequency estimates which are then transferred to stabler attenuation estimates. In the case of the seismic reflection profile, the three time-frequency transforms show small increases in centroid frequencies superimposed on a general decreasing trend. This likely corresponds to local tuning effects due to the layering superimposed on the effect of intrinsic attenuation. For the VSP, the three time-frequency transforms show consistent patterns in centroid frequencies and quality factors. These results show the worth of high-resolution transforms for attenuation estimation.

  17. Time domain analysis of nonlinear frequency mixing in a slender beam for localizing a breathing crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, Mira

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear interaction of a dual frequency flexural wave with a breathing crack generates a peculiar frequency mixing phenomena, which is manifested in form of the side bands or peaks at combinations frequencies in frequency spectrum of the response. Although these peaks have been proven useful in ascertaining the presence of crack, they barely carry any information about the crack location. In this regards, the present article analyzes the time domain representation of the response obtained by employing a wavelet spectral finite element method. The study reveals that the combination tones generated at the crack location travel with dissimilar speeds along the waveguide, owing to its dispersive nature. The separation between the lobes corresponding to these combination tones therefore, depends on the distance that they have travelled. This observation is then used to formulate a method to predict the crack location with respect to the sensor. A brief parametric study shows marginal errors in predicting the crack location, which ascertains the validity of the method. This article also studies the frequency spectrum of the response. The peaks at combination tones are quantified in terms of a modulate parameter which depends on the severity of the crack. The inferences drawn from the time and the frequency domain study can be instrumental in designing a robust strategy for detecting location and severity of the crack.

  18. Frequency domain-based models of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Baratta, R V; Solomonow, M; Zhou, B H

    1998-04-01

    Models of skeletal muscle based on its response to sinusoidal stimulation have been in use since the late 1960s. In these methods, cyclic excitation at varying frequencies is used to determine force or muscle length amplitude and phase as functions of excitation frequency. These functions can then be approximated by models consisting of combinations of poles and zeros and pure time delays without the need to combine force-length or force-velocity relationships. The major findings of a series of frequency response studies undertaken in our laboratory revealed that: The frequency response models for isometric force including orderly recruitment of motor units were relatively invariant of the particular strategy or oscillation level employed. A critically damped second order model with corner frequency near 2 Hz and a pure time delay best described the relationship between input stimulation and output isometric force. The frequency response models for load-moving muscles consisted of an overall gain which is a function of mass, dependent mostly on the width of the length-force relation at a given load (force), and a frequency-dependent gain component independent of load mass. The phase lag between input and output was also independent of load. Muscle function and architecture are the primary determinants of its isometric force frequency response. Tendon viscoelasticity (excluding the aponeurosis) has no significant effect on isometric force dynamic response, but does have a minor effect on load-moving dynamic response. The effect of tendon in reducing or augmenting the load-moving muscle response bandwidth is muscle-dependent. The joint produces decreased high frequency gain and uniformly increased phase lags between input excitation and output force in isometric conditions. The joint acts as a lag network in load-moving conditions, increasing the phase lag without significant effect on the gain. Despite its inherent non-linear properties, the joint does not

  19. Linear and nonlinear frequency- and time-domain spectroscopy with multiple frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kochise; Rouxel, Jeremy R.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2017-09-01

    Two techniques that employ equally spaced trains of optical pulses to map an optical high frequency into a low frequency modulation of the signal that can be detected in real time are compared. The development of phase-stable optical frequency combs has opened up new avenues to metrology and spectroscopy. The ability to generate a series of frequency spikes with precisely controlled separation permits a fast, highly accurate sampling of the material response. Recently, pairs of frequency combs with slightly different repetition rates have been utilized to down-convert material susceptibilities from the optical to microwave regime where they can be recorded in real time. We show how this one-dimensional dual comb technique can be extended to multiple dimensions by using several combs. We demonstrate how nonlinear susceptibilities can be quickly acquired using this technique. In a second class of techniques, sequences of ultrafast mode locked laser pulses are used to recover pathways of interactions contributing to nonlinear susceptibilities by using a photo-acoustic modulation varying along the sequences. We show that these techniques can be viewed as a time-domain analog of the multiple frequency comb scheme.

  20. Linear and nonlinear frequency- and time-domain spectroscopy with multiple frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kochise; Rouxel, Jeremy R; Mukamel, Shaul

    2017-09-07

    Two techniques that employ equally spaced trains of optical pulses to map an optical high frequency into a low frequency modulation of the signal that can be detected in real time are compared. The development of phase-stable optical frequency combs has opened up new avenues to metrology and spectroscopy. The ability to generate a series of frequency spikes with precisely controlled separation permits a fast, highly accurate sampling of the material response. Recently, pairs of frequency combs with slightly different repetition rates have been utilized to down-convert material susceptibilities from the optical to microwave regime where they can be recorded in real time. We show how this one-dimensional dual comb technique can be extended to multiple dimensions by using several combs. We demonstrate how nonlinear susceptibilities can be quickly acquired using this technique. In a second class of techniques, sequences of ultrafast mode locked laser pulses are used to recover pathways of interactions contributing to nonlinear susceptibilities by using a photo-acoustic modulation varying along the sequences. We show that these techniques can be viewed as a time-domain analog of the multiple frequency comb scheme.

  1. Iterative Frequency Domain Decision Feedback Equalization and Decoding for Underwater Acoustic Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Ge, Jian-Hua

    2012-12-01

    Single-carrier (SC) transmission with frequency-domain equalization (FDE) is today recognized as an attractive alternative to orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) for communication application with the inter-symbol interference (ISI) caused by multi-path propagation, especially in shallow water channel. In this paper, we investigate an iterative receiver based on minimum mean square error (MMSE) decision feedback equalizer (DFE) with symbol rate and fractional rate samplings in the frequency domain (FD) and serially concatenated trellis coded modulation (SCTCM) decoder. Based on sound speed profiles (SSP) measured in the lake and finite-element ray tracking (Bellhop) method, the shallow water channel is constructed to evaluate the performance of the proposed iterative receiver. Performance results show that the proposed iterative receiver can significantly improve the performance and obtain better data transmission than FD linear and adaptive decision feedback equalizers, especially in adopting fractional rate sampling.

  2. Long-range vibration sensor based on correlation analysis of optical frequency-domain reflectometry signals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhenyang; Yao, X Steve; Liu, Tiegen; Du, Yang; Liu, Kun; Han, Qun; Meng, Zhuo; Chen, Hongxin

    2012-12-17

    We present a novel method to achieve a space-resolved long- range vibration detection system based on the correlation analysis of the optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR) signals. By performing two separate measurements of the vibrated and non-vibrated states on a test fiber, the vibration frequency and position of a vibration event can be obtained by analyzing the cross-correlation between beat signals of the vibrated and non-vibrated states in a spatial domain, where the beat signals are generated from interferences between local Rayleigh backscattering signals of the test fiber and local light oscillator. Using the proposed technique, we constructed a standard single-mode fiber based vibration sensor that can have a dynamic range of 12 km and a measurable vibration frequency up to 2 kHz with a spatial resolution of 5 m. Moreover, preliminarily investigation results of two vibration events located at different positions along the test fiber are also reported.

  3. Frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error for step response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang-Long; Xu, Ke-Jun

    2012-11-01

    To obtain accurate results in dynamic measurements it is required that the sensors should have good dynamic performance. In practice, sensors have non-ideal dynamic characteristics due to their small damp ratios and low natural frequencies. In this case some dynamic error correction methods can be adopted for dealing with the sensor responses to eliminate the effect of their dynamic characteristics. The frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error is a common method. Using the existing calculation method, however, the correct frequency-domain correction function (FCF) cannot be obtained according to the step response calibration experimental data. This is because of the leakage error and invalid FCF value caused by the cycle extension of the finite length step input-output intercepting data. In order to solve these problems the data splicing preprocessing and FCF interpolation are put forward, and the FCF calculation steps as well as sensor dynamic error correction procedure by the calculated FCF are presented in this paper. The proposed solution is applied to the dynamic error correction of the bar-shaped wind tunnel strain gauge balance so as to verify its effectiveness. The dynamic error correction results show that the adjust time of the balance step response is shortened to 10 ms (shorter than 1/30 before correction) after frequency-domain correction, and the overshoot is fallen within 5% (less than 1/10 before correction) as well. The dynamic measurement accuracy of the balance is improved significantly.

  4. Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for Aircraft Acoustic Nacelle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Kreider, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in aircraft engine nacelles. To reduce storage requirements for large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing equation in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential equation, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  5. Frequency-Domain Visco-Acoustic Full Waveform Inversion of Laboratory Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Nihei, K. T.; Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L. R.

    2001-12-01

    The quest to extract rock properties from seismic images has resulted in a growing interest in full-waveform inversion. This study investigates the performance of a frequency-domain full waveform visco-acoustic inversion for imaging velocity and attenuation using synthetic and laboratory data. Although the frequency domain method is mathematically equivalent to the time-domain method, an efficient implementation can be achieved by performing a series of single-frequency inversions sweeping from a low to a high frequency. In the visco-acoustic inversion, the intrinsic attenuation is incorporated using a complex velocity. The velocity and quality factor (Q) can be imaged either simultaneously or consecutively. Our approach is a cascaded inversion in which the velocity is imaged using phase information first, then the Q-value is imaged using amplitude information. This method is applied to laboratory data obtained in a water tank with suspended acrylic rods. Broadband 200 kHz data is obtained for a crosshole configuration with a two-axes computer-controlled scanning system and a piezofilm source and detector. The image produced by full waveform inversion has a higher resolution and more precisely defines the location of the acrylic bars compared to the result of the traveltime tomography. Current efforts to image Q are underway and will be reported at the conference.

  6. Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for the Convective Wave Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Kreider, K. L.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in ducts. To reduce storage requirements for large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing equation in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential equation, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  7. Time-domain representation of frequency-dependent foundation impedance functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    2006-01-01

    Foundation impedance functions provide a simple means to account for soil-structure interaction (SSI) when studying seismic response of structures. Impedance functions represent the dynamic stiffness of the soil media surrounding the foundation. The fact that impedance functions are frequency dependent makes it difficult to incorporate SSI in standard time-history analysis software. This paper introduces a simple method to convert frequency-dependent impedance functions into time-domain filters. The method is based on the least-squares approximation of impedance functions by ratios of two complex polynomials. Such ratios are equivalent, in the time-domain, to discrete-time recursive filters, which are simple finite-difference equations giving the relationship between foundation forces and displacements. These filters can easily be incorporated into standard time-history analysis programs. Three examples are presented to show the applications of the method.

  8. Frequency domain stability analysis of nonlinear active disturbance rejection control system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Qi, Xiaohui; Xia, Yuanqing; Pu, Fan; Chang, Kai

    2015-05-01

    This paper applies three methods (i.e., root locus analysis, describing function method and extended circle criterion) to approach the frequency domain stability analysis of the fast tool servo system using nonlinear active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) algorithm. Root locus qualitative analysis shows that limit cycle is generated because the gain of the nonlinear function used in ADRC varies with its input. The parameters in the nonlinear function are adjustable to suppress limit cycle. In the process of root locus analysis, the nonlinear function is transformed based on the concept of equivalent gain. Then, frequency domain description of the nonlinear function via describing function is presented and limit cycle quantitative analysis including estimating prediction error is presented, which virtually and theoretically demonstrates that the describing function method cannot guarantee enough precision in this case. Furthermore, absolute stability analysis based on extended circle criterion is investigated as a complement.

  9. 3D frequency-domain finite-difference modeling of acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present a 3D frequency-domain finite-difference method for acoustic wave propagation modeling. This method is developed as a tool to perform 3D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-angle seismic data. For wide-angle data, frequency-domain full-waveform inversion can be applied only to few discrete frequencies to develop reliable velocity model. Frequency-domain finite-difference (FD) modeling of wave propagation requires resolution of a huge sparse system of linear equations. If this system can be solved with a direct method, solutions for multiple sources can be computed efficiently once the underlying matrix has been factorized. The drawback of the direct method is the memory requirement resulting from the fill-in of the matrix during factorization. We assess in this study whether representative problems can be addressed in 3D geometry with such approach. We start from the velocity-stress formulation of the 3D acoustic wave equation. The spatial derivatives are discretized with second-order accurate staggered-grid stencil on different coordinate systems such that the axis span over as many directions as possible. Once the discrete equations were developed on each coordinate system, the particle velocity fields are eliminated from the first-order hyperbolic system (following the so-called parsimonious staggered-grid method) leading to second-order elliptic wave equations in pressure. The second-order wave equations discretized on each coordinate system are combined linearly to mitigate the numerical anisotropy. Secondly, grid dispersion is minimized by replacing the mass term at the collocation point by its weighted averaging over all the grid points of the stencil. Use of second-order accurate staggered- grid stencil allows to reduce the bandwidth of the matrix to be factorized. The final stencil incorporates 27 points. Absorbing conditions are PML. The system is solved using the parallel direct solver MUMPS developed for distributed

  10. Antialiasing filter design for subpixel downsampling via frequency-domain analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lu; Au, Oscar C; Tang, Ketan; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with image downsampling using subpixel techniques to achieve superior sharpness for small liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Such a problem exists when a high-resolution image or video is to be displayed on low-resolution display terminals. Limited by the low-resolution display, we have to shrink the image. Signal-processing theory tells us that optimal decimation requires low-pass filtering with a suitable cutoff frequency, followed by downsampling. In doing so, we need to remove many useful image details causing blurring. Subpixel-based downsampling, taking advantage of the fact that each pixel on a color LCD is actually composed of individual red, green, and blue subpixel stripes, can provide apparent higher resolution. In this paper, we use frequency-domain analysis to explain what happens in subpixel-based downsampling and why it is possible to achieve a higher apparent resolution. According to our frequency-domain analysis and observation, the cutoff frequency of the low-pass filter for subpixel-based decimation can be effectively extended beyond the Nyquist frequency using a novel antialiasing filter. Applying the proposed filters to two existing subpixel downsampling schemes called direct subpixel-based downsampling (DSD) and diagonal DSD (DDSD), we obtain two improved schemes, i.e., DSD based on frequency-domain analysis (DSD-FA) and DDSD based on frequency-domain analysis (DDSD-FA). Experimental results verify that the proposed DSD-FA and DDSD-FA can provide superior results, compared with existing subpixel or pixel-based downsampling methods.

  11. Prediction of Cancer Proteins by Integrating Protein Interaction, Domain Frequency, and Domain Interaction Data Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are known to be associated with cancer diseases. It is quite often that their precise functional role in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. A strategy to gain a better understanding of the function of these proteins is to make use of a combination of different aspects of proteomics data types. In this study, we extended Aragues's method by employing the protein-protein interaction (PPI) data, domain-domain interaction (DDI) data, weighted domain frequency score (DFS), and cancer linker degree (CLD) data to predict cancer proteins. Performances were benchmarked based on three kinds of experiments as follows: (I) using individual algorithm, (II) combining algorithms, and (III) combining the same classification types of algorithms. When compared with Aragues's method, our proposed methods, that is, machine learning algorithm and voting with the majority, are significantly superior in all seven performance measures. We demonstrated the accuracy of the proposed method on two independent datasets. The best algorithm can achieve a hit ratio of 89.4% and 72.8% for lung cancer dataset and lung cancer microarray study, respectively. It is anticipated that the current research could help understand disease mechanisms and diagnosis. PMID:25866773

  12. Nonlinear (time domain) and linearized (time and frequency domain) solutions to the compressible Euler equations in conservation law form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreenivas, Kidambi; Whitfield, David L.

    1995-01-01

    Two linearized solvers (time and frequency domain) based on a high resolution numerical scheme are presented. The basic approach is to linearize the flux vector by expressing it as a sum of a mean and a perturbation. This allows the governing equations to be maintained in conservation law form. A key difference between the time and frequency domain computations is that the frequency domain computations require only one grid block irrespective of the interblade phase angle for which the flow is being computed. As a result of this and due to the fact that the governing equations for this case are steady, frequency domain computations are substantially faster than the corresponding time domain computations. The linearized equations are used to compute flows in turbomachinery blade rows (cascades) arising due to blade vibrations. Numerical solutions are compared to linear theory (where available) and to numerical solutions of the nonlinear Euler equations.

  13. Frequency domain optical resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy using a modulated laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Gregor; Langer, Andreas; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    In this paper a multimodal optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscope in frequency domain is presented. Photoacoustic waves and modulated fluorescence are generated in chromophores by using a modulated diode laser. The photoacoustic waves, recorded with a hydrophone, and the fluorescence signals, acquired with an avalanche photodiode, are simultaneously measured using a lock-in technique. Two possibilities to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio are discussed. The first method is based on the optimization of the excitation waveform and it is argued why square-wave excitation is best. The second way to enhance the SNR is to optimize the modulation frequency. For modulation periods that are much shorter than the relaxation times of the excited chromophores, the photoacoustic signal scales linearly with the modulation frequency. We come to the conclusion that frequency-domain photoacoustic microscopy performed with modulation frequencies in the range of 100 MHz can compete with time-domain photoacoustic microscopy regarding the signal-to-noise ratio. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by experimental results. Additionally, images of stained and unstained biological samples are presented in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the multimodal imaging system.

  14. Aero-acoustics source separation with sparsity inducing priors in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwander, Olivier; Picheral, José; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Blacodon, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of acoustic sources is of great interest in many industrial applications, in particular for the aeronautic or automotive industry for the development of new products. While localization of sources using observations from a wind tunnel is a well-known subject, the characterization and separation of the sources still needs to be explored. We present here a Bayesian approach for sources separation. Two prior modeling of the sources are considered: a sparsity inducing prior in the frequency domain and an autoregressive model in the time domain. The proposed methods are evaluated on synthetic data simulating noise sources emitting from an airfoil inside a wind tunnel.

  15. Interpretations of Frequency Domain Analyses of Neural Entrainment: Periodicity, Fundamental Frequency, and Harmonics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Melloni, Lucia; Poeppel, David; Ding, Nai

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity can follow the rhythms of dynamic sensory stimuli, such as speech and music, a phenomenon called neural entrainment. It has been hypothesized that low-frequency neural entrainment in the neural delta and theta bands provides a potential mechanism to represent and integrate temporal information. Low-frequency neural entrainment is often studied using periodically changing stimuli and is analyzed in the frequency domain using the Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis decomposes a periodic signal into harmonically related sinusoids. However, it is not intuitive how these harmonically related components are related to the response waveform. Here, we explain the interpretation of response harmonics, with a special focus on very low-frequency neural entrainment near 1 Hz. It is illustrated why neural responses repeating at f Hz do not necessarily generate any neural response at f Hz in the Fourier spectrum. A strong neural response at f Hz indicates that the time scales of the neural response waveform within each cycle match the time scales of the stimulus rhythm. Therefore, neural entrainment at very low frequency implies not only that the neural response repeats at f Hz but also that each period of the neural response is a slow wave matching the time scale of a f Hz sinusoid.

  16. Interpretations of Frequency Domain Analyses of Neural Entrainment: Periodicity, Fundamental Frequency, and Harmonics

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Melloni, Lucia; Poeppel, David; Ding, Nai

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity can follow the rhythms of dynamic sensory stimuli, such as speech and music, a phenomenon called neural entrainment. It has been hypothesized that low-frequency neural entrainment in the neural delta and theta bands provides a potential mechanism to represent and integrate temporal information. Low-frequency neural entrainment is often studied using periodically changing stimuli and is analyzed in the frequency domain using the Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis decomposes a periodic signal into harmonically related sinusoids. However, it is not intuitive how these harmonically related components are related to the response waveform. Here, we explain the interpretation of response harmonics, with a special focus on very low-frequency neural entrainment near 1 Hz. It is illustrated why neural responses repeating at f Hz do not necessarily generate any neural response at f Hz in the Fourier spectrum. A strong neural response at f Hz indicates that the time scales of the neural response waveform within each cycle match the time scales of the stimulus rhythm. Therefore, neural entrainment at very low frequency implies not only that the neural response repeats at f Hz but also that each period of the neural response is a slow wave matching the time scale of a f Hz sinusoid. PMID:27375465

  17. Three-dimensional migration velocity analysis in the space-frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, T. R.

    1981-02-01

    Through the use of general techniques of image formation, two algorithms that yield both optimum velocity for migration, and strike and dip parameters is presented. The formation and evaluation of acoustic images is of prime importance to the methods employed. The particular images of interest are the source image for field gathers and the common reflection 'point' for common midpoint gathers. Through the use of two forms of the Rayleigh Sommerfield diffraction formula, acoustic images for these types of recordings are formed for a range of parameters (velocity, dip, and strike), the image of highest intensity corresponding to the 'best fit' set of trial parameters. Both algorithms operate in the temporal frequency domain and present new methods for frequency domain velocity and dip analysis and direct extraction or strike information.

  18. Frequency domain volume rendering by the wavelet X-ray transform.

    PubMed

    Westenberg, M A; Roerdink, J M

    2000-01-01

    We describe a wavelet based X-ray rendering method in the frequency domain with a smaller time complexity than wavelet splatting. Standard Fourier volume rendering is summarized and interpolation and accuracy issues are briefly discussed. We review the implementation of the fast wavelet transform in the frequency domain. The wavelet X-ray transform is derived, and the corresponding Fourier-wavelet volume rendering algorithm (FWVR) is introduced, FWVR uses Haar or B-spline wavelets and linear or cubic spline interpolation. Various combinations are tested and compared with wavelet splatting (WS). We use medical MR and CT scan data, as well as a 3-D analytical phantom to assess the accuracy, time complexity, and memory cost of both FWVR and WS. The differences between both methods are enumerated.

  19. Feature clustering for robust frequency-domain classification of EEG activity.

    PubMed

    Myrden, Andrew; Chau, Tom

    2016-03-15

    The analysis of electroencephalograms is often performed in the frequency-domain. These analyses typically involve the computation of spectral power either over pre-defined frequency bands (e.g. theta, delta, alpha, and beta bands) or over a large number of narrow frequency ranges. However, the former technique ignores variability in these frequency bands over time and between participants while the latter ignores the significant redundancy between these powers. This paper details an unsupervised feature extraction method for EEG data that uses a clustering of features to agglomerate narrow-band spectral powers based on their similarities. This method computes a set of analogues to the traditional frequency bands that are data-driven and participant-specific. A fast correlation-based filter was used to identify which of these agglomerated features were most useful for each investigated classification problem. The new feature clustering algorithm was used to detect changes in three mental states and to detect the performance of three mental tasks. Balanced classification accuracies approaching or exceeding 70% were attained for all classification problems. Classification accuracies attained by this algorithm were compared to those attained by two frequency-domain algorithms that did not employ clustering--a wide-band algorithm based on the spectral power within the theta, delta, alpha, and beta bands and a narrow-band algorithm based on the spectral power within 1-Hz ranges. Overall, the feature clustering algorithm was statistically superior to both alternative algorithms. The new feature clustering algorithm provides a promising alternative to conventional frequency-domain EEG analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamic analysis of offshore structures with non-zero initial conditions in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fushun; Lu, Hongchao; Li, Huajun

    2016-03-01

    The state of non-zero conditions is typically treated as fact when considering the dynamic analysis of offshore structures. This article extends a newly proposed method [1] to manage the non-zero initial conditions of offshore structures in the frequency domain, including new studies on original environmental loads reconstruction, response comparisons with the commercial software ANSYS, and a demonstration using an experimental cantilever beam. The original environmental loads, such as waves, currents, and winds, that act on a structure are decomposed into multiple complex exponential components are represented by a series of poles and corresponding residues. Counter to the traditional frequency-domain method, the non-zero initial conditions of offshore structures could be solved in the frequency domain. Compared with reference [1], an improvement reported in this article is that practical issues, including the choice of model order and central-processing-unit (CPU) time consumption, are further studied when applying this new method to offshore structures. To investigate the feasibility of the representation of initial environmental loads by their poles and corresponding residues, a measured random wave force collected from a column experiment at the Lab of Ocean University of China is used, decomposed, reconstructed and then compared with the original wave force; then, a numerical offshore platform is used to study the performance of the proposed method in detail. The numerical results of this study indicate that (1) a short duration of environmental loads are required to obtain their constitutive poles and residues, which implies good computational efficiency; and (2) the proposed method has a similar computational efficiency to traditional methods due to the use of the inverse Fourier transform technique. To better understand the performance, of time consumption and accuracy of the proposed method, the commercial software ANSYS is used to determine responses

  1. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, John L. (Inventor); Morrison, William H. (Inventor); Christophersen, Jon P. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Real-time battery impedance spectrum is acquired using a one-time record. Fast Summation Transformation (FST) is a parallel method of acquiring a real-time battery impedance spectrum using a one-time record that enables battery diagnostics. An excitation current to a battery is a sum of equal amplitude sine waves of frequencies that are octave harmonics spread over a range of interest. A sample frequency is also octave and harmonically related to all frequencies in the sum. The time profile of this signal has a duration that is a few periods of the lowest frequency. The voltage response of the battery, average deleted, is the impedance of the battery in the time domain. Since the excitation frequencies are known and octave and harmonically related, a simple algorithm, FST, processes the time record by rectifying relative to the sine and cosine of each frequency. Another algorithm yields real and imaginary components for each frequency.

  2. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, John L [Butte, MT; Morrison, William H [Manchester, CT; Christophersen, Jon P [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-04-03

    Real-time battery impedance spectrum is acquired using a one-time record. Fast Summation Transformation (FST) is a parallel method of acquiring a real-time battery impedance spectrum using a one-time record that enables battery diagnostics. An excitation current to a battery is a sum of equal amplitude sine waves of frequencies that are octave harmonics spread over a range of interest. A sample frequency is also octave and harmonically related to all frequencies in the sum. The time profile of this signal has a duration that is a few periods of the lowest frequency. The voltage response of the battery, average deleted, is the impedance of the battery in the time domain. Since the excitation frequencies are known and octave and harmonically related, a simple algorithm, FST, processes the time record by rectifying relative to the sine and cosine of each frequency. Another algorithm yields real and imaginary components for each frequency.

  3. Imaging weak zones in the foundation using frequency domain attenuation tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, V. R.; Jha, P. C.; Chandrasekhar, E.; Babu, B. Butchi; Sivaram, Y. V.; Sandeep, N.

    2013-10-01

    Cross-hole imaging method using Time Domain (TD) and Frequency Domain (FD) parts of cross-hole radar tomography data acquired using Step Frequency Ground Penetrating Radar (SFGPR) was implemented. This method was adopted for imaging foundation of a dam to check if the foundation was free of geological weak zones. The dam site is characterised by massive and jointed-phyllites associated with major and minor shears. The cross-hole radar tomography data was acquired in the frequency bandwidth of 250 MHz, from the deepest level gallery up to a depth of 40 m in the foundation. In TD, first arrival time and amplitudes of radio waves were inverted using Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT) resulting in velocity and attenuation tomograms. The tomograms showed nearly uniform velocity or attenuation structure in the respective tomographic plane. Subsequently, cross-hole radar tomography data was analysed in FD for a variation of spectrum-amplitude at different frequencies. Amplitudes picked at each single frequency were then inverted using SIRT for obtaining frequency domain attenuation tomogram (FDAT). The FDAT clearly showed presence of anomalous high attenuation zones in the depth range of 23-33 m of the tomographic plane. The anomalous zones in the attenuation tomogram are weak zones in the foundation. To validate the above observations, cross-hole seismic tomography was also done in the same boreholes. Cross-hole seismic tomography results showed low velocity (p-wave) zones around the same location corresponding to the high attenuation zone in FDAT, bringing the dormant weak zone to light. This enabled fine-tuning of the reinforcement design and strengthening the weak zone. This paper discusses the cross-hole radar tomography imaging method, the results of its application in imaging weak zones in the foundation and the comparison of cross-hole radar tomography results (in TD and FD) with the cross-hole seismic tomography results.

  4. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  5. Visible spatial frequency domain imaging with a digital light microprojector

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Alexander J.; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Konecky, Soren D.; Cui, Haotian; Rice, Tyler B.; Choi, Bernard; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. There is a need for cost effective, quantitative tissue spectroscopy and imaging systems in clinical diagnostics and pre-clinical biomedical research. A platform that utilizes a commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) based projector, cameras, and scaled Monte Carlo model for calculating tissue optical properties is presented. These components are put together to perform spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI), a model-based reflectance technique that measures and maps absorption coefficients (μa) and reduced scattering coefficients (μs′) in thick tissue such as skin or brain. We validate the performance of the flexible LED and modulation element (FLaME) system at 460, 530, and 632 nm across a range of physiologically relevant μa values (0.07 to 1.5  mm−1) in tissue-simulating intralipid phantoms, showing an overall accuracy within 11% of spectrophotometer values for μa and 3% for μs′. Comparison of oxy- and total hemoglobin fits between the FLaME system and a spectrophotometer (450 to 1000 nm) is differed by 3%. Finally, we acquire optical property maps of a mouse brain in vivo with and without an overlying saline well. These results demonstrate the potential of FLaME to perform tissue optical property mapping in visible spectral regions and highlight how the optical clearing effect of saline is correlated to a decrease in μs′ of the skull. PMID:24005154

  6. POLARIZED SPATIAL FREQUENCY DOMAIN IMAGING OF HEART VALVE FIBER STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues’ elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants. PMID:28775394

  7. Optimal Frequency-Domain System Realization with Weighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Maghami, Peiman G.

    1999-01-01

    Several approaches are presented to identify an experimental system model directly from frequency response data. The formulation uses a matrix-fraction description as the model structure. Frequency weighting such as exponential weighting is introduced to solve a weighted least-squares problem to obtain the coefficient matrices for the matrix-fraction description. A multi-variable state-space model can then be formed using the coefficient matrices of the matrix-fraction description. Three different approaches are introduced to fine-tune the model using nonlinear programming methods to minimize the desired cost function. The first method uses an eigenvalue assignment technique to reassign a subset of system poles to improve the identified model. The second method deals with the model in the real Schur or modal form, reassigns a subset of system poles, and adjusts the columns (rows) of the input (output) influence matrix using a nonlinear optimizer. The third method also optimizes a subset of poles, but the input and output influence matrices are refined at every optimization step through least-squares procedures.

  8. New parallel SOR method by domain partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, D.; Adams, L.

    1999-07-01

    In this paper the authors propose and analyze a new parallel SOR method, the PSOR method, formulated by using domain partitioning and interprocessor data communication techniques. They prove that the PSOR method has the same asymptotic rate of convergence as the Red/Black (R/B) SOR method for the five-point stencil on both strip and block partitions, and as the four-color (R/B/G/O) SOR method for the nine-point stencil on strip partitions. They also demonstrate the parallel performance of the PSOR method on four different MIMD multiprocessors (a KSR1, an Intel Delta, a Paragon, and an IBM SP2). Finally, they compare the parallel performance of PSOR, R/B SOR, and R/B/G/O SOR. Numerical results on the Paragon indicate that PSOR is more efficient than R/B SOR and R/B/G/O SOR in both computation and interprocessor data communication.

  9. Frequency domain response of a parametrically excited riser under random wave forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Song; Zhang, Wen-Shou; Lin, Jia-Hao; Yue, Qian-Jin; Kennedy, D.; Williams, F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Floating Production, Drilling, Storage and Offloading units represent a new technology with a promising future in the offshore oil industry. An important role is played by risers, which are installed between the subsea wellhead and the Tension Leg Deck located in the middle of the moon-pool in the hull. The inevitable heave motion of the floating hull causes a time-varying axial tension in the riser. This time dependent tension may have an undesirable influence on the lateral deflection response of the riser, with random wave forces in the frequency domain. To investigate this effect, a riser is modeled as a Bernoulli-Euler beam. The axial tension is expressed as a static part, along with a harmonic dynamic part. By linearizing the wave drag force, the riser's lateral deflection is obtained through a partial differential equation containing a time-dependent coefficient. Applying the Galerkin method, the equation is reduced to an ordinary differential equation that can be solved using the pseudo-excitation method in the frequency domain. Moreover, the Floquet-Liapunov theorem is used to estimate the stability of the vibration system in the space of parametric excitation. Finally, stability charts are obtained for some numerical examples, the correctness of the proposed method is verified by comparing with Monte-Carlo simulation and the influence of the parametric excitation on the frequency domain responses of the riser is discussed.

  10. A Frequency-Domain Adaptive Matched Filter for Active Sonar Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhishan; Zhao, Anbang; Hui, Juan; Hou, Baochun; Sotudeh, Reza; Niu, Fang

    2017-07-04

    The most classical detector of active sonar and radar is the matched filter (MF), which is the optimal processor under ideal conditions. Aiming at the problem of active sonar detection, we propose a frequency-domain adaptive matched filter (FDAMF) with the use of a frequency-domain adaptive line enhancer (ALE). The FDAMF is an improved MF. In the simulations in this paper, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) gain of the FDAMF is about 18.6 dB higher than that of the classical MF when the input SNR is -10 dB. In order to improve the performance of the FDAMF with a low input SNR, we propose a pre-processing method, which is called frequency-domain time reversal convolution and interference suppression (TRC-IS). Compared with the classical MF, the FDAMF combined with the TRC-IS method obtains higher SNR gain, a lower detection threshold, and a better receiver operating characteristic (ROC) in the simulations in this paper. The simulation results show that the FDAMF has higher processing gain and better detection performance than the classical MF under ideal conditions. The experimental results indicate that the FDAMF does improve the performance of the MF, and can adapt to actual interference in a way. In addition, the TRC-IS preprocessing method works well in an actual noisy ocean environment.

  11. A Frequency-Domain Adaptive Matched Filter for Active Sonar Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhishan; Zhao, Anbang; Hui, Juan; Hou, Baochun; Sotudeh, Reza; Niu, Fang

    2017-01-01

    The most classical detector of active sonar and radar is the matched filter (MF), which is the optimal processor under ideal conditions. Aiming at the problem of active sonar detection, we propose a frequency-domain adaptive matched filter (FDAMF) with the use of a frequency-domain adaptive line enhancer (ALE). The FDAMF is an improved MF. In the simulations in this paper, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) gain of the FDAMF is about 18.6 dB higher than that of the classical MF when the input SNR is −10 dB. In order to improve the performance of the FDAMF with a low input SNR, we propose a pre-processing method, which is called frequency-domain time reversal convolution and interference suppression (TRC-IS). Compared with the classical MF, the FDAMF combined with the TRC-IS method obtains higher SNR gain, a lower detection threshold, and a better receiver operating characteristic (ROC) in the simulations in this paper. The simulation results show that the FDAMF has higher processing gain and better detection performance than the classical MF under ideal conditions. The experimental results indicate that the FDAMF does improve the performance of the MF, and can adapt to actual interference in a way. In addition, the TRC-IS preprocessing method works well in an actual noisy ocean environment. PMID:28677622

  12. Estimation of tire-road friction coefficient based on frequency domain data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Luo, Yugong; Bian, Mingyuan; Qin, Zhaobo; Luo, Jian; Li, Keqiang

    2017-02-01

    Due to the noise of sensing equipment, the tire states, such as the sideslip angle and the slip ratio, cannot be accurately observed under the conditions with small acceleration, which results in the inapplicability of the time domain data based tire-road friction coefficient (TRFC) estimation method. In order to overcome this shortcoming, frequency domain data fusion is proposed to estimate the TRFC based on the natural frequencies of the steering system and the in-wheel motor driving system. Firstly, a relationship between TRFC and the steering system natural frequency is deduced by investigating its frequency response function (FRF). Then the lateral TRFC is determined by the steering natural frequency which is only identified using the information of the assist motor current and the steering speed of the column. With spectral comparison between the steering and driving systems, the data fusion is carried out to get a comprehensive TRFC result, using the different frequency information of the longitudinal and lateral value. Finally, simulations and experiments on different road surfaces validated the correctness of the steering system FRF and the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  13. Enhancement of frequency domain indices of heart rate variability by cholinergic stimulation with pyridostigmine bromide.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Ali Asghar; Foroutan, Seyyed Abbas; Foroutan, Seyyed Mohsen; Erfanian Omidvar, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Pyridostigmine bromide (PB) is a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of orally administration of single dose sustained-released tablet of pyridostigmine bromide (PBSR) on the frequency domain indices of heart rate variability (HRV). Thirty-two healthy young men were participated in this study. They were divided into 2 groups; the pyridostigmine group (n = 22) and the placebo group (n = 10). Electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded at 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 300 and 420 min after PBSR administration. At each time, simultaneously, a blood sample was prepared and PB plasma concentration was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Statistical analysis showed that in different indices of HRV, there is a significant increase in low frequency (LF) band at 300 min, but no difference in high frequency band (HF). It also showed significant decreases in normalized high frequency band (Hfnu), normalized low frequency band (Lfnu) and LF/HF ratio at 120, 240 and 300 min after PBSR administration. Maximum plasma concentration of PB was 150 min after the administration. In conclusion, administration of a single dose PBSR can enhance the frequency domains indices of HRV and improvesympathovagal balance.

  14. Enhancement of Frequency Domain Indices of Heart Rate Variability by Cholinergic Stimulation with Pyridostigmine Bromide

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Ali Asghar; Foroutan, Seyyed Abbas; Foroutan, Seyyed Mohsen; Erfanian Omidvar, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Pyridostigmine bromide (PB) is a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of orally administration of single dose sustained-released tablet of pyridostigmine bromide (PBSR) on the frequency domain indices of heart rate variability (HRV). Thirty-two healthy young men were participated in this study. They were divided into 2 groups; the pyridostigmine group (n = 22) and the placebo group (n = 10). Electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded at 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 300 and 420 min after PBSR administration. At each time, simultaneously, a blood sample was prepared and PB plasma concentration was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Statistical analysis showed that in different indices of HRV, there is a significant increase in low frequency (LF) band at 300 min, but no difference in high frequency band (HF). It also showed significant decreases in normalized high frequency band (Hfnu), normalized low frequency band (Lfnu) and LF/HF ratio at 120, 240 and 300 min after PBSR administration. Maximum plasma concentration of PB was 150 min after the administration. In conclusion, administration of a single dose PBSR can enhance the frequency domains indices of HRV and improvesympathovagal balance. PMID:24250427

  15. Statistical significance of task related deep brain EEG dynamic changes in the time-frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Chládek, J; Brázdil, M; Halámek, J; Plešinger, F; Jurák, P

    2013-01-01

    We present an off-line analysis procedure for exploring brain activity recorded from intra-cerebral electroencephalographic data (SEEG). The objective is to determine the statistical differences between different types of stimulations in the time-frequency domain. The procedure is based on computing relative signal power change and subsequent statistical analysis. An example of characteristic statistically significant event-related de/synchronization (ERD/ERS) detected across different frequency bands following different oddball stimuli is presented. The method is used for off-line functional classification of different brain areas.

  16. Modal analysis of 2-D sedimentary basin from frequency domain decomposition of ambient vibration array recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggi, Valerio; Ermert, Laura; Michel, Clotaire; Fäh, Donat

    2014-05-01

    The frequency domain decomposition is a well-established spectral technique used in civil engineering to analyze and monitor the modal response of buildings and structures. The method is based on singular value decomposition of the cross-power spectral density matrix from simultaneous array recordings of ambient vibration. This method is advantageous to retrieve not only the resonance frequencies of the investigated structure, but also the corresponding modal shapes without using an absolute reference. This is an important piece of information, which can be used to identify areas of minimum and maximum ground motion on the structure. We apply this approach to evaluate the SH and P-SV resonance characteristics of 2D Alpine sedimentary valleys through decomposition of ambient vibration recordings from linear seismic arrays deployed perpendicularly to the valley axis. Results are presented for a set of synthetic models, initially used to validate the method, and for a real acquisition survey performed in the Rhone valley (Switzerland). For the real case, up to six separate resonant frequencies, together with their corresponding modal shapes, were retrieved for the SH case using the frequency domain decomposition method. We then compare these mode shapes with results from classical site-to-reference spectral ratios and solutions from analytical and numerical modal analysis.

  17. Studies on an Iterative Frequency Domain Channel Estimation Technique for MIMO-UWB Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takanashi, Masaki; Ogawa, Yasutaka; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Ohgane, Takeo

    MIMO (Multiple-Input Multiple-Output) technologies have attracted much interest for high-rate and high-capacity wireless communications. MIMO technologies under frequency-selective fading environments (wideband MIMO technologies) have also been studied. A wideband MIMO system is affected by ISI (Inter Symbol Interference) and CCI (Co-Channel Interference). Hence, we need a MIMO signal detection technique that simultaneously suppresses ISI and CCI. The OFDM system and SC-FDE (Single Carrier-Frequency Domain Equalization) techniques are often used for suppressing ISI. By employing these techniques with the ZF (Zero Forcing) or the MMSE (Minimum Mean Square Error) spatial filtering technique, we can cancel both ISI and CCI. To use ZF or MMSE, we need channel state information for calculating the receive weights. Although an LS (Least Square) channel estimation technique has been proposed for MIMO-OFDM systems, it needs a large estimation matrix at the receiver side to obtain sufficient estimation performance in heavy multipath environments. However, the use of a large matrix increases computational complexity and the circuit size. We use frequency domain channel estimation to solve these problems and propose an iterative method for achieving better estimation performance. In this paper, we assume the use of a MIMO-UWB system that employs a UWB-IR (Ultra-Wideband Impulse Radio) scheme with the FDE technique as the wideband wireless transmission scheme for heavy multipath environments, and we evaluate the iterative frequency domain channel estimation through computer simulations and computational complexity calculations.

  18. Determination of medium electrical properties through full-wave modelling of frequency domain reflectrometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Frédéric; Lambot, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Accurate knowledge of the shallow soil properties is of prime importance in agricultural, hydrological and environmental engineering. During the last decade, numerous geophysical techniques, either invasive or resorting to proximal or remote sensing, have been developed and applied for quantitative characterization of soil properties. Amongst them, time domain reflectrometry (TDR) and frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) are recognized as standard techniques for the determination of soil dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity, based on the reflected electromagnetic waves from a probe inserted into the soil. TDR data were first commonly analyzed in the time domain using methods considering only a part of the waveform information. Later, advancements have led to the possibility of analyzing the TDR signal through full-wave inverse modeling either in the time or the frequency domains. A major advantage of FDR compared to TDR is the possibility to increase the bandwidth, thereby increasing the information content of the data and providing more detailed characterization of the medium. Amongst the recent works in this field, Minet et al. (2010) developed a modeling procedure for processing FDR data based on an exact solution of Maxwell's equations for wave propagation in one-dimensional multilayered media. In this approach, the probe head is decoupled from the medium and is fully described by characteristic transfer functions. The authors successfully validated the method for homogeneous sand subject to a range of water contents. In the present study, we further validated the modelling approach using reference liquids with well-characterized frequency-dependent electrical properties. In addition, the FDR model was coupled with a dielectric mixing model to investigate the ability of retrieving water content, pore water electrical conductivity and sand porosity from inversion of FDR data acquired in sand subject to different water content levels. Finally, the

  19. Quantitative broadband absorption and scattering spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and steady state methodologies

    DOEpatents

    Tromberg, Bruce J.; Berger, Andrew J.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Bevilacqua, Frederic; Jakubowski, Dorota

    2008-09-23

    A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media that uses a combination of frequency-domain and steady-state reflectance methods. Most of the wavelength coverage is provided by a white-light steady-state measurement, whereas the frequency-domain data are acquired at a few selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption and reduced scattering derived from the frequency-domain data are used to calibrate the intensity of the steady-state measurements and to determine the reduced scattering coefficient at all wavelengths in the spectral window of interest. The absorption coefficient spectrum is determined by comparing the steady-state reflectance values with the predictions of diffusion theory, wavelength by wavelength. Absorption spectra of a turbid phantom and of human breast tissue in vivo, derived with the combined frequency-domain and steady-state technique, agree well with expected reference values.

  20. Frequency domain transfer function identification using the computer program SYSFIT

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    Because the primary application of SYSFIT for BPA involves studying power system dynamics, this investigation was geared toward simulating the effects that might be encountered in studying electromechanical oscillations in power systems. Although the intended focus of this work is power system oscillations, the studies are sufficiently genetic that the results can be applied to many types of oscillatory systems with closely-spaced modes. In general, there are two possible ways of solving the optimization problem. One is to use a least-squares optimization function and to write the system in such a form that the problem becomes one of linear least-squares. The solution can then be obtained using a standard least-squares technique. The other method involves using a search method to obtain the optimal model. This method allows considerably more freedom in forming the optimization function and model, but it requires an initial guess of the system parameters. SYSFIT employs this second approach. Detailed investigations were conducted into three main areas: (1) fitting to exact frequency response data of a linear system; (2) fitting to the discrete Fourier transformation of noisy data; and (3) fitting to multi-path systems. The first area consisted of investigating the effects of alternative optimization cost function options; using different optimization search methods; incorrect model order, missing response data; closely-spaced poles; and closely-spaced pole-zero pairs. Within the second area, different noise colorations and levels were studied. In the third area, methods were investigated for improving fitting results by incorporating more than one system path. The following is a list of guidelines and properties developed from the study for fitting a transfer function to the frequency response of a system using optimization search methods.

  1. Cerebral and muscle oxygen saturation measurement by a frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Marco; De Blasi, Roberto A.; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria-Angela; Barbieri, Beniamino B.; Quaresima, Valentina; Gratton, Enrico

    1995-05-01

    Absorption and reduced scattering coefficients at 715 and 825 nm as well as hemoglobin saturation and content of the forehead and the forearm were measured by a 110 MHz frequency-domain multisource instrument. The absolute data obtained by the frequency- domain spectrometer were compared with oxygenation changes measured by a continuous wave instrument during quadriceps ischemia and postural changes. These preliminary results indicate that portable frequency-domain instruments could be very helpful to investigate brain and muscle pathophysiology.

  2. Radio frequency power load and associated method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A radio frequency power load and associated method. A radio frequency power load apparatus includes a container and a fluid having an ion source therein, the fluid being contained in the container. Two conductors are immersed in the fluid. A radio frequency transmission system includes a radio frequency transmitter, a radio frequency amplifier connected to the transmitter and a radio frequency power load apparatus connected to the amplifier. The apparatus includes a fluid having an ion source therein, and two conductors immersed in the fluid. A method of dissipating power generated by a radio frequency transmission system includes the steps of: immersing two conductors of a radio frequency power load apparatus in a fluid having an ion source therein; and connecting the apparatus to an amplifier of the transmission system.

  3. Structure, frequency dependent dielectric properties and domain configuration of PMN-PFN-PT single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nengneng; Li, Qiang; Yan, Qingfeng; Zhang, Yiling; Xia, Zhiguo; Chu, Xiangcheng

    2014-09-01

    Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-Pb(Fe1/2Nb1/2)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PFN-PT) single crystal was grown successfully from high temperature solution by slow cooling method. Structure, frequency dependent dielectric properties and domain configuration of [0 0 1]-oriented single crystal have been investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the as-grown single crystal had a pure perovskite structure with tetragonal symmetry at room temperature. The temperature dependent dielectric permittivity showed only one dielectric anomaly, indicating the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition. According to the modified Curie-Weiss relationship, as-grown PMN-PFN-PT single crystal was in an intermediate state between normal and relaxor ferroelectrics. Dielectric permittivity and loss of [0 0 1]-oriented PMN-PFN-PT single crystal at room temperature decreased sharply with increasing frequency, which were different from those of PMN-PT65/35 single crystal. Domain configuration of [0 0 1]-oriented PMN-PFN-PT single crystal was observed for the first time by using a polarized light microscopy (PLM). The extinction of 90° domains at P/A:0° revealed a tetragonal structure. Domains along (0 0 1) face exhibited a straight stripe-like morphology with domain size on the scale of 10 μm in average, combining with some much smaller domains about 3-5 μm in width at the intersection of domain blocks which helps to minimize its total energy.

  4. A note on the existence and uniqueness of solutions of frequency domain elastic wave problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramble, James H.; Pasciak, Joseph E.

    2008-09-01

    In this note, we provide existence and uniqueness results for frequency domain elastic wave problems. These problems are posed on the complement of a bounded domain (the scatterer). The boundary condition at infinity is given by the Kupradze-Sommerfeld radiation condition and involves different Sommerfeld conditions on different components of the field. Our results are obtained by setting up the problem as a variational problem in the Sobolev space H1 on a bounded domain. We use a nonlocal boundary condition which is related to the Dirichlet to Neumann conditions used for acoustic and electromagnetic scattering problems. We obtain stability results for the source problem, a necessary ingredient for the analysis of numerical methods for this problem based on finite elements or finite differences.

  5. Single trial time-frequency domain analysis of error processing in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Clemans, Zachary A; El-Baz, Ayman S; Hollifield, Michael; Sokhadze, Estate M

    2012-09-13

    Error processing studies in psychology and psychiatry are relatively common. Event-related potentials (ERPs) are often used as measures of error processing, two such response-locked ERPs being the error-related negativity (ERN) and the error-related positivity (Pe). The ERN and Pe occur following committed error in reaction time tasks as low frequency (4-8 Hz) electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations registered at the midline fronto-central sites. We created an alternative method for analyzing error processing using time-frequency analysis in the form of a wavelet transform. A study was conducted in which subjects with PTSD and healthy control completed a forced-choice task. Single trial EEG data from errors in the task were processed using a continuous wavelet transform. Coefficients from the transform that corresponded to the theta range were averaged to isolate a theta waveform in the time-frequency domain. Measures called the time-frequency ERN and Pe were obtained from these waveforms for five different channels and then averaged to obtain a single time-frequency ERN and Pe for each error trial. A comparison of the amplitude and latency for the time-frequency ERN and Pe between the PTSD and control group was performed. A significant group effect was found on the amplitude of both measures. These results indicate that the developed single trial time-frequency error analysis method is suitable for examining error processing in PTSD and possibly other psychiatric disorders.

  6. Frequency domain analysis of the random loading of cracked panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    The primary effort concerned the development of analytical methods for the accurate prediction of the effect of random loading on a panel with a crack. Of particular concern was the influence of frequency on the stress intensity factor behavior. Many modern structures, such as those found in advanced aircraft, are lightweight and susceptible to critical vibrations, and consequently dynamic response plays a very important role in their analysis. The presence of flaws and cracks can have catastrophic consequences. The stress intensity factor, K, emerges as a very significant parameter that characterizes the crack behavior. In analyzing the dynamic response of panels that contain cracks, the finite element method is used, but because this type of problem is inherently computationally intensive, a number of ways of calculating K more efficiently are explored.

  7. 2D Seismic Imaging of Elastic Parameters by Frequency Domain Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.; Operto, S.

    2008-12-01

    Thanks to recent advances in parallel computing, full waveform inversion is today a tractable seismic imaging method to reconstruct physical parameters of the earth interior at different scales ranging from the near- surface to the deep crust. We present a massively parallel 2D frequency-domain full-waveform algorithm for imaging visco-elastic media from multi-component seismic data. The forward problem (i.e. the resolution of the frequency-domain 2D PSV elastodynamics equations) is based on low-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method (P0 and/or P1 interpolations). Thanks to triangular unstructured meshes, the DG method allows accurate modeling of both body waves and surface waves in case of complex topography for a discretization of 10 to 15 cells per shear wavelength. The frequency-domain DG system is solved efficiently for multiple sources with the parallel direct solver MUMPS. The local inversion procedure (i.e. minimization of residuals between observed and computed data) is based on the adjoint-state method which allows to efficiently compute the gradient of the objective function. Applying the inversion hierarchically from the low frequencies to the higher ones defines a multiresolution imaging strategy which helps convergence towards the global minimum. In place of expensive Newton algorithm, the combined use of the diagonal terms of the approximate Hessian matrix and optimization algorithms based on quasi-Newton methods (Conjugate Gradient, LBFGS, ...) allows to improve the convergence of the iterative inversion. The distribution of forward problem solutions over processors driven by a mesh partitioning performed by METIS allows to apply most of the inversion in parallel. We shall present the main features of the parallel modeling/inversion algorithm, assess its scalability and illustrate its performances with realistic synthetic case studies.

  8. Enhanced magnetic domain relaxation frequency and low power losses in Zn2+ substituted manganese ferrites potential for high frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveena, K.; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Sadhana, K.; Murthy, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays electronic industries prerequisites magnetic materials, i.e., iron rich materials and their magnetic alloys. However, with the advent of high frequency applications, the standard techniques of reducing eddy current losses, using iron cores, were no longer efficient or cost effective. Current market trends of the switched mode power supplies industries required even low energy losses in power conversion with maintenance of adequate initial permeability. From the above point of view, in the present study we aimed at the production of Manganese-Zinc ferrites prepared via solution combustion method using mixture of fuels and achieved low loss, high saturation magnetization, high permeability, and high magnetic domain relaxation frequency. The as-synthesized Zn2+ substituted MnFe2O4 were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fractions of Mn2+, Zn2+ and Fe2+ cations occupying tetrahedral sites along with Fe occupying octahedral sites within the unit cell of all ferrite samples were estimated by Raman scattering spectroscopy. The magnetic domain relaxation was investigated by inductance spectroscopy (IS) and the observed magnetic domain relaxation frequency (fr) was increased with the increase in grain size. The real and imaginary part of permeability (μ‧ and μ″) increased with frequency and showed a maximum above 100 MHz. This can be explained on the basis of spin rotation and domain wall motion. The saturation magnetization (Ms), remnant magnetization (Mr) and magneton number (μB) decreased gradually with increasing Zn2+ concentration. The decrease in the saturation magnetization was discussed with Yafet-Kittel (Y-K) model. The Zn2+ concentration increases the relative number of ferric ions on the A sites, reduces the A-B interactions. The frequency dependent total power losses decreased as the zinc concentration increased. At 1 MHz, the total power loss (Pt) changed from 358 mW/cm3 for x=0-165 mW/cm3

  9. Frequency-domain photothermoacoustic imaging contrast enhancement with a CW laser and non-linear frequency modulation chirps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, B.; Mandelis, A.

    2010-03-01

    The application of photoacoustic (PA) phenomena to medical imaging has been investigated for more than a decade. To implement this modality, one may choose between two types of laser sources, pulsed or continuous wave (CW). This selection will affect all features of the imaging technique. Nowadays pulsed lasers are the state-of-the-art technique in the PTA research. In this work we report frequency-domain photothermoacoustic imaging using linear and non-linear frequency chirps with a CW laser. The images produced using turbid tissue phantoms with subsurface inclusions were compared according to their contrast and depth resolution of absorbing lesions. In the CW method, in addition to the image produced by the amplitude of the cross-correlation between input and output signals, another image which is generated by the phase of the correlation signal is also available. The application of nonlinear frequency modulation instead of the standard linear frequency chirps introduced in our laboratory is demonstrated. These features are additional degrees of freedom uniquely available to the CW (but not to the pulsed laser) method.

  10. Microwave signal processing in two-frequency domain for ROF systems implementation: training course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Morozov, Gennady A.

    2014-04-01

    This article is presented materials from two tutorials: "Optical two-frequency domain reflectometry1, 2" and "Microwave technologies in industry, living systems and telecommunications3". These materials were prepared for master training courses and listed in the "SPIE Optical Education Directory" for 2013/2014. The main its theme is microwave photonics. Microwave photonics has been defined as the study of photonic devices operating at microwave frequencies and their application to microwave and optical systems. Its initial rationale was to use the advantages of photonic technologies to provide functions in microwave systems that are very complex or even impossible to carry out directly in the radiofrequency domain. But microwave photonics is also succeeding in incorporating a variety of techniques used in microwave engineering to improve the performance of photonic communication networks and systems. Three parts of this chapter are devoted to applications and construction principles of systems forming microwave photonic filters, measuring instantaneous frequency of microwave heterodyne signals and characterizing stimulated Mandelstam- Brillouin scattering spectrum in ROF systems. The main emphasis is on the use of the two-frequency symmetric radiation, generated by the Il'in-Morozov's method4, in given systems. It is forming radiation for the synthesis of optical filters coefficients, it's application and processing determine the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio during heterodyne frequencies monitoring and characterization of nonlinear effects spectrum.

  11. To Err is Normable: The Computation of Frequency-Domain Error Bounds from Time-Domain Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Veillette, Robert J.; DeAbreuGarcia, J. Alexis; Chicatelli, Amy; Hartmann, Richard

    1998-01-01

    This paper exploits the relationships among the time-domain and frequency-domain system norms to derive information useful for modeling and control design, given only the system step response data. A discussion of system and signal norms is included. The proposed procedures involve only simple numerical operations, such as the discrete approximation of derivatives and integrals, and the calculation of matrix singular values. The resulting frequency-domain and Hankel-operator norm approximations may be used to evaluate the accuracy of a given model, and to determine model corrections to decrease the modeling errors.

  12. A Method to Examine Content Domain Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Jerome; Karpinski, Aryn; Welsh, Megan

    2011-01-01

    After a test is developed, most content validation analyses shift from ascertaining domain definition to studying domain representation and relevance because the domain is assumed to be set once a test exists. We present an approach that allows for the examination of alternative domain structures based on extant test items. In our example based on…

  13. Radio Frequency Power Load and Associated Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, V. Karthik (Inventor); Freestone, Todd M. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency power load and associated method. A radio frequency power load apparatus may include a container with an ionized fluid therein. The apparatus may include one conductor immersed in a fluid and another conductor electrically connected to the container. A radio frequency transmission system may include a radio frequency transmitter, a radio frequency amplifier connected to the transmitter and a radio frequency power load apparatus connected to the amplifier. The apparatus may include a fluid having an ion source therein, one conductor immersed in a fluid, and another conductor electrically connected to the container. A method of dissipating power generated by a radio frequency transmission system may include constructing a waveguide with ionized fluid in a container and connecting the waveguide to an amplifier of the transmission system.

  14. Multiple frequency method for operating electrochemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Louis P [San Ramon, CA

    2012-05-15

    A multiple frequency method for the operation of a sensor to measure a parameter of interest using calibration information including the steps of exciting the sensor at a first frequency providing a first sensor response, exciting the sensor at a second frequency providing a second sensor response, using the second sensor response at the second frequency and the calibration information to produce a calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, using the first sensor response at the first frequency, the calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, and the calibration information to measure the parameter of interest.

  15. Time and Frequency Domain Synthesis in the Optimal Design of Shock and Vibration Isolation for Large Structural Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    DOMAIN SYNTHESIS COMPUTER CODE The computer language used for the frequency domain synthesis and all other computer coding in this thesis is MATLAB V.4.2c... method is really not restrictive in its application, but rather in what information it can provide. D. STATIC DISPLACEMENT SYNTHESIS COMPUTER CODE The...synthesis, and perform a comparative analysis of the synthesis versus classical Guyan reduction methods . The programs presented in Appendix B can be

  16. Visualization of evolving laser-generated structures by frequency domain tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yenyu; Li, Zhengyan; Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, Michael

    2011-10-01

    We introduce frequency domain tomography (FDT) for single-shot visualization of time-evolving refractive index structures (e.g. laser wakefields, nonlinear index structures) moving at light-speed. Previous researchers demonstrated single-shot frequency domain holography (FDH), in which a probe-reference pulse pair co- propagates with the laser-generated structure, to obtain snapshot-like images. However, in FDH, information about the structure's evolution is averaged. To visualize an evolving structure, we use several frequency domain streak cameras (FDSCs), in each of which a probe-reference pulse pair propagates at an angle to the propagation direction of the laser-generated structure. The combination of several FDSCs constitutes the FDT system. We will present experimental results for a 4-probe FDT system that has imaged the whole-beam self-focusing of a pump pulse propagating through glass in a single laser shot. Combining temporal and angle multiplexing methods, we successfully processed data from four probe pulses in one spectrometer in a single-shot. The output of data processing is a multi-frame movie of the self- focusing pulse. Our results promise the possibility of visualizing evolving laser wakefield structures that underlie laser-plasma accelerators used for multi-GeV electron acceleration.

  17. Frequency domain approach for time-resolved pump-probe microscopy using intensity modulated laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, J.; Kawasumi, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    2014-09-01

    We present a scheme for time-resolved pump-probe microscopy using intensity modulated laser diodes. The modulation frequencies of the pump and probe beams are varied up to 500 MHz with fixed frequency detuning typically set at 15 kHz. The frequency response of the pump-probe signal is detected using a lock-in amplifier referenced at the beat frequency. This frequency domain method is capable of characterizing the nanosecond to picosecond relaxation dynamics of sample species without the use of a high speed detector or a high frequency lock-in amplifier. Furthermore, as the pump-probe signal is based on the nonlinear interaction between the two laser beams and the sample, our scheme provides better spatial resolution than the conventional diffraction-limited optical microscopes. Time-resolved pump-probe imaging of fluorescence beads and aggregates of quantum dots demonstrates that this method is useful for the microscopic analysis of optoelectronic devices. The system is implemented using compact and low-cost laser diodes, and thus has a broad range of applications in the fields of photochemistry, optical physics, and biological imaging.

  18. Fiber sensor identification based on incoherent Rayleigh backscatter measurements in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeppel, Max; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Werzinger, Stefan; Schmauss, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a fiber identification method based on incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry (IOFDR) measurements is introduced. The proposed method uses the characteristic interference pattern of IOFDR Rayleigh backscatter measurements with a broadband light source to unambiguously recognize different initially scanned fiber segments. The recognition is achieved by cross-correlating the spatially resolved Rayleigh backscatter profile of the fiber segment under test with a initially measured and stored backscatter profile. This profile was found to be relatively insensitive to temperature changes. It is shown that identification is possible even if the fiber segment in question is installed subsequent to 300m of lead fiber.

  19. New parallel SOR method by domain partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Dexuan

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we propose and analyze a new parallel SOR method, the PSOR method, formulated by using domain partitioning together with an interprocessor data-communication technique. For the 5-point approximation to the Poisson equation on a square, we show that the ordering of the PSOR based on the strip partition leads to a consistently ordered matrix, and hence the PSOR and the SOR using the row-wise ordering have the same convergence rate. However, in general, the ordering used in PSOR may not be {open_quote}consistently ordered{close_quotes}. So, there is a need to analyze the convergence of PSOR directly. In this paper, we present a PSOR theory, and show that the PSOR method can have the same asymptotic rate of convergence as the corresponding sequential SOR method for a wide class of linear systems in which the matrix is {open_quotes}consistently ordered{close_quotes}. Finally, we demonstrate the parallel performance of the PSOR method on four different message passing multiprocessors (a KSR1, the Intel Delta, an Intel Paragon and an IBM SP2), along with a comparison with the point Red-Black and four-color SOR methods.

  20. Gearbox fault diagnosis based on time-frequency domain synchronous averaging and feature extraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengli; Tang, Jiong

    2016-04-01

    Gearbox is one of the most vulnerable subsystems in wind turbines. Its healthy status significantly affects the efficiency and function of the entire system. Vibration based fault diagnosis methods are prevalently applied nowadays. However, vibration signals are always contaminated by noise that comes from data acquisition errors, structure geometric errors, operation errors, etc. As a result, it is difficult to identify potential gear failures directly from vibration signals, especially for the early stage faults. This paper utilizes synchronous averaging technique in time-frequency domain to remove the non-synchronous noise and enhance the fault related time-frequency features. The enhanced time-frequency information is further employed in gear fault classification and identification through feature extraction algorithms including Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA), Multilinear Principal Component Analysis (MPCA), and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE). Results show that the LLE approach is the most effective to classify and identify different gear faults.

  1. Localized Mode DFT-S-OFDMA Implementation Using Frequency and Time Domain Interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viholainen, Ari; Ihalainen, Tero; Rinne, Mika; Renfors, Markku

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method to generate a localized mode single-carrier frequency division multiple access (SC-FDMA) waveform. Instead of using DFT-spread OFDMA (DFT-S-OFDMA) processing, the new structure called SCiFI-FDMA relies on frequency and time domain interpolation followed by a user-specific frequency shift. SCiFI-FDMA can provide signal waveforms that are compatible to DFT-S-OFDMA. In addition, it provides any resolution of user bandwidth allocation for the uplink multiple access with comparable computational complexity, because the DFT is avoided. Therefore, SCiFI-FDMA allows a flexible choice of parameters appreciated in broadband mobile communications in the future.

  2. Frequency-domain Model Matching PID Controller Design for Aero-engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Huang, Jinquan; Lu, Feng

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear model of aero-engine was linearized at multiple operation points by using frequency response method. The validation results indicate high accuracy of static and dynamic characteristics of the linear models. The improved PID tuning method of frequency-domain model matching was proposed with the system stability condition considered. The proposed method was applied to the design of PID controller of the high pressure rotor speed control in the flight envelope, and the control effects were evaluated by the nonlinear model. Simulation results show that the system had quick dynamic response with zero overshoot and zero steadystate error. Furthermore, a PID-fuzzy switching control scheme for aero-engine was designed, and the fuzzy switching system stability was proved. Simulations were studied to validate the applicability of the multiple PIDs fuzzy switching controller for aero-engine with wide range dynamics.

  3. High-frequency programmable acoustic wave device realized through ferroelectric domain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivry, Yachin; Wang, Nan; Durkan, Colm

    2014-03-01

    Surface acoustic wave devices are extensively used in contemporary wireless communication devices. We used atomic force microscopy to form periodic macroscopic ferroelectric domains in sol-gel deposited lead zirconate titanate, where each ferroelectric domain is composed of many crystallites, each of which contains many microscopic ferroelastic domains. We examined the electro-acoustic characteristics of the apparatus and found a resonator behavior similar to that of an equivalent surface or bulk acoustic wave device. We show that the operational frequency of the device can be tailored by altering the periodicity of the engineered domains and demonstrate high-frequency filter behavior (>8 GHz), allowing low-cost programmable high-frequency resonators.

  4. Symmetry based frequency domain processing to remove harmonic noise from surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Annette; Larsen, Jakob Juul; Parsekian, Andrew D.

    2017-02-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a unique geophysical method due to its direct sensitivity to water. A key limitation to overcome is the difficulty of making surface NMR measurements in environments with anthropogenic electromagnetic noise, particularly constant frequency sources such as powerlines. Here we present a method of removing harmonic noise by utilizing frequency domain symmetry of surface NMR signals to reconstruct portions of the spectrum corrupted by frequency-domain noise peaks. This method supplements the existing NMR processing workflow and is applicable after despiking, coherent noise cancellation, and stacking. The symmetry based correction is simple, grounded in mathematical theory describing NMR signals, does not introduce errors into the data set, and requires no prior knowledge about the harmonics. Modelling and field examples show that symmetry based noise removal reduces the effects of harmonics. In one modelling example, symmetry based noise removal improved signal-to-noise ratio in the data by 10 per cent. This improvement had noticeable effects on inversion parameters including water content and the decay constant T2*. Within water content profiles, aquifer boundaries and water content are more accurate after harmonics are removed. Fewer spurious water content spikes appear within aquifers, which is especially useful for resolving multilayered structures. Within T2* profiles, estimates are more accurate after harmonics are removed, especially in the lower half of profiles.

  5. Symmetry based frequency domain processing to remove harmonic noise from surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Annette; Larsen, Jakob Juul; Parsekian, Andrew D.

    2016-11-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a unique geophysical method due to its direct sensitivity to water. A key limitation to overcome is the difficulty of making surface NMR measurements in environments with anthropogenic electromagnetic noise, particularly constant frequency sources such as powerlines. Here we present a method of removing harmonic noise by utilizing frequency domain symmetry of surface NMR signals to reconstruct portions of the spectrum corrupted by frequency-domain noise peaks. This method supplements the existing NMR processing workflow and is applicable after despiking, coherent noise cancellation, and stacking. The symmetry based correction is simple, grounded in mathematical theory describing NMR signals, does not introduce errors into the dataset, and requires no prior knowledge about the harmonics. Modeling and field examples show that symmetry based noise removal reduces the effects of harmonics. In one modeling example, symmetry based noise removal improved signal to noise ratio in the data by 10%. This improvement had noticeable effects on inversion parameters including water content and the decay constant T2*. Within water content profiles, aquifer boundaries and water content are more accurate after harmonics are removed. Fewer spurious water content spikes appear within aquifers, which is especially useful for resolving multi-layered structures. Within T2* profiles, estimates are more accurate after harmonics are removed, especially in the lower half of profiles.

  6. Three-dimensional phantoms for curvature correction in spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu T. A.; Le, Hanh N. D.; Vo, Minh; Wang, Zhaoyang; Luu, Long; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity to surface profile of non-contact optical imaging, such as spatial frequency domain imaging, may lead to incorrect measurements of optical properties and consequently erroneous extrapolation of physiological parameters of interest. Previous correction methods have focused on calibration-based, model-based, and computation-based approached. We propose an experimental method to correct the effect of surface profile on spectral images. Three-dimensional (3D) phantoms were built with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic using an accurate 3D imaging and an emergent 3D printing technique. In this study, our method was utilized for the correction of optical properties (absorption coefficient μa and reduced scattering coefficient μs′) of objects obtained with a spatial frequency domain imaging system. The correction method was verified on three objects with simple to complex shapes. Incorrect optical properties due to surface with minimum 4 mm variation in height and 80 degree in slope were detected and improved, particularly for the absorption coefficients. The 3D phantom-based correction method is applicable for a wide range of purposes. The advantages and drawbacks of the 3D phantom-based correction methods are discussed in details. PMID:22741068

  7. Resolution enhancement of robust Bayesian pre-stack inversion in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xingyao; Li, Kun; Zong, Zhaoyun

    2016-10-01

    AVO/AVA (amplitude variation with an offset or angle) inversion is one of the most practical and useful approaches to estimating model parameters. So far, publications on AVO inversion in the Fourier domain have been quite limited in view of its poor stability and sensitivity to noise compared with time-domain inversion. For the resolution and stability of AVO inversion in the Fourier domain, a novel robust Bayesian pre-stack AVO inversion based on the mixed domain formulation of stationary convolution is proposed which could solve the instability and achieve superior resolution. The Fourier operator will be integrated into the objective equation and it avoids the Fourier inverse transform in our inversion process. Furthermore, the background constraints of model parameters are taken into consideration to improve the stability and reliability of inversion which could compensate for the low-frequency components of seismic signals. Besides, the different frequency components of seismic signals can realize decoupling automatically. This will help us to solve the inverse problem by means of multi-component successive iterations and the convergence precision of the inverse problem could be improved. So, superior resolution compared with the conventional time-domain pre-stack inversion could be achieved easily. Synthetic tests illustrate that the proposed method could achieve high-resolution results with a high degree of agreement with the theoretical model and verify the quality of anti-noise. Finally, applications on a field data case demonstrate that the proposed method could obtain stable inversion results of elastic parameters from pre-stack seismic data in conformity with the real logging data.

  8. Method of Detecting System Function by Measuring Frequency Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, John L. (Inventor); Morrison, William H. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Real time battery impedance spectrum is acquired using one time record, Compensated Synchronous Detection (CSD). This parallel method enables battery diagnostics. The excitation current to a test battery is a sum of equal amplitude sin waves of a few frequencies spread over range of interest. The time profile of this signal has duration that is a few periods of the lowest frequency. The voltage response of the battery, average deleted, is the impedance of the battery in the time domain. Since the excitation frequencies are known, synchronous detection processes the time record and each component, both magnitude and phase, is obtained. For compensation, the components, except the one of interest, are reassembled in the time domain. The resulting signal is subtracted from the original signal and the component of interest is synchronously detected. This process is repeated for each component.

  9. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, John L.; Morrison, William H.

    2008-07-01

    Real time battery impedance spectrum is acquired using one time record, Compensated Synchronous Detection (CSD). This parallel method enables battery diagnostics. The excitation current to a test battery is a sum of equal amplitude sin waves of a few frequencies spread over range of interest. The time profile of this signal has duration that is a few periods of the lowest frequency. The voltage response of the battery, average deleted, is the impedance of the battery in the time domain. Since the excitation frequencies are known, synchronous detection processes the time record and each component, both magnitude and phase, is obtained. For compensation, the components, except the one of interest, are reassembled in the time domain. The resulting signal is subtracted from the original signal and the component of interest is synchronously detected. This process is repeated for each component.

  10. Characterization of an intraluminal differential frequency-domain photoacoustics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, Bahman; Son, Jungik; Liang, Simon; Castelino, Robin; Foster, F. Stuart; Courtney, Brian; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular related diseases are ranked as the second highest cause of death in Canada. Among the most important cardiovascular diseases is atherosclerosis. Current methods of diagnosis of atherosclerosis consist of angiography, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). None of these methods possesses adequate sensitivity, as the ideal technique should be capable of both depth profiling, as well as functional imaging. An alternative technique is photoacoustics (PA) which can perform deep imaging and spectroscopy. The presented study explores the application of wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar (WM-DPAR) for characterizing arterial vessels. The wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic technique was shown to be able to substantially increase the dynamic range and sensitivity of hemoglobin oxygenation level detection. In this work the differential PA technique was used with a very high frequency modulation range. To perform spectroscopic PA imaging, at least two wavelengths are required. The selected wavelengths for this work are 1210 nm and 980 nm. 1210 nm corresponds to the maximum optical absorption coefficient of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters which are the main constituents of plaques. Since water, elastin and collagen also have high absorption coefficients at 1210 nm, this wavelength alone cannot provide very high sensitivity and specificity. The additional wavelength, 980 nm corresponds to high absorption coefficient of those constituents of healthy artery tissue. The simultaneous application of the abovementioned wavelengths can provide higher sensitivity and improved specificity in detecting lipids in the arterial vessels.

  11. Spectral signal space projection algorithm for frequency domain MEG and EEG denoising, whitening, and source imaging.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Rey R; Kopell, Brian H; Butson, Christopher R; Hiner, Bradley C; Baillet, Sylvain

    2011-05-01

    MEG and EEG data contain additive correlated noise generated by environmental and physiological sources. To suppress this type of spatially coloured noise, source estimation is often performed with spatial whitening based on a measured or estimated noise covariance matrix. However, artifacts that span relatively small noise subspaces, such as cardiac, ocular, and muscle artifacts, are often explicitly removed by a variety of denoising methods (e.g., signal space projection) before source imaging. Here, we introduce a new approach, the spectral signal space projection (S(3)P) algorithm, in which time-frequency (TF)-specific spatial projectors are designed and applied to the noisy TF-transformed data, and whitened source estimation is performed in the TF domain. The approach can be used to derive spectral variants of all linear time domain whitened source estimation algorithms. The denoised sensor and source time series are obtained by the corresponding inverse TF-transform. The method is evaluated and compared with existing subspace projection and signal separation techniques using experimental data. Altogether, S(3)P provides an expanded framework for MEG/EEG data denoising and whitened source imaging in both the time and frequency/scale domains. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Global tomography using finite-frequency kernels in the wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, H.; Loris, I.; Fornasier, M.; Vetter, P.; Judd, S.; Nolet, G.; Daubechies, I.

    2007-12-01

    Finite-frequency tomographic methods find their origin in the recognition that seismic waves are sensitive to the earth's structure not only on but also in a neighborhood of the ray connecting source and receiver. The sensitivity kernels are therefore nonzero within some positive distance from this ray. Real-life tomographic applications often need to employ a coarse model parameterization to reduce the number of model parameters and make the inversion practical from a computational point of view. This coarse parameterization, however, substantially reduces the benefit in resolution of finite-frequency tomography when compared to classical tomographic methods; standard coarse parameterization effectively turns the finite-frequency sensitivity kernels into 'fat' rays. To overcome this we are developing global-scale finite-frequency tomography in the wavelet domain, where the sparseness of both the sensitivity kernel and the model can be exploited in carrying out the inversion. We work on the cubed sphere to allow us to use wavelet transforms in Cartesian coordinates. This cubed sphere is built through a one-to-one mapping of Cartesian coordinates on each face of the cube to the corresponding "faces of the sphere". At the edges of each of the faces of the cube, the mapping is singular; this induces artifical singularities in the model and kernel, which in the wavelet domain would show up as large coefficients. We avoid these artificially large wavelet coefficients by using domain-adapted wavelets based on the construction of wavelets on the interval. The inversion is based on an l1-norm minimization procedure. We will present some preliminary examples.

  13. Quantification of magnetic nanoparticles with broadband measurements of magnetic susceptibility in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto; An, Zhisheng; Chang, Hong; Qiang, Xiaoke

    2015-04-01

    Measurement of low-field magnetic susceptibility over a wide band of frequencies spanning four orders of magnitude is a useful method for the assessment of the grain size distribution of ultrafine magnetic particles smaller than the SP/SSD boundary. This method has been applied to a loess/paleosol sequence at Luochuan in the Chinese Loess Plateau. The studied succession consists of sequences from the latest paleosol unit to the upper part of the loess unit, spanning the last glacial-interglacial cycle. Reconstructed grain size distributions (GSDs) consist of volume fractions on the order of 10-24 m3, and the mean GSDs are modal but with distinctive skewness among the loess, the weakly developed paleosol (weak paleosol), and the mature paleosol. This indicates that the mean volume of SP particles in this sequence tends to increase during the transition from the loess to the paleosol. An index, defined as the difference between χ130 at the lowest (130 Hz) and χ500k at the highest (500 kHz) frequencies normalized to χ130, is judged to be a more suitable index than previous frequency dependence parameters for the concentration of SP particles. This index has a strong correlation with χ130, showing a continuous 'growth curve' with the rate of increase being highest for the loess, moderate for the weak paleosol, and saturated for the paleosol. The characteristic curve suggests that smaller SP particles are preferentially formed in the earlier stage of pedogenesis rather than the later phase when even larger particles are formed in the mature paleosol. These results demonstrate that the broad-band-frequency susceptibility measurement will be useful for the quantitative assessment of magnetic nanoparticles in soils and sediments. Additionally, we point out that the measurement in the frequency domain generally requires time and may not be most suitable to routine measurements. We thus propose an alternative manner, the measurement in the time domain that can be

  14. Computational Complexity Reduction of Synthetic-aperture Focus in Ultrasound Imaging Using Frequency-domain Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moghimirad, Elahe; Mahloojifar, Ali; Mohammadzadeh Asl, Babak

    2016-05-01

    A new frequency-domain implementation of a synthetic aperture focusing technique is presented in the paper. The concept is based on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and sonar that is a developed version of the convolution model in the frequency domain. Compared with conventional line-by-line imaging, synthetic aperture imaging has a better resolution and contrast at the cost of more computational load. To overcome this problem, point-by-point reconstruction methods have been replaced by block-processing algorithms in radar and sonar; however, these techniques are relatively unknown in medical imaging. In this paper, we extended one of these methods called wavenumber to medical ultrasound imaging using a simple model of synthetic aperture focus. The model, derived here for monostatic mode, can be generalized to multistatic as well. The method consists of 4 steps: a 2D fast Fourier transform of the data, frequency shift of the data to baseband, interpolation to convert polar coordinates to rectangular ones, and returning the data to the spatial-domain using a 2D inverse Fourier transform. We have also used chirp pulse excitation followed by matched filtering and spotlighting algorithm to compensate the effect of differences in parameters between radar and medical imaging. Computational complexities of the two methods, wavenumber and delay-and-sum (DAS), have been calculated. Field II simulated point data have been used to evaluate the results in terms of resolution and contrast. Evaluations with simulated data show that for typical phantoms, reconstruction by the wavenumber algorithm is almost 20 times faster than classical DAS while retaining the resolution. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Scatterer size estimation using the center frequency assessed from ultrasound time domain data.

    PubMed

    Erlöv, Tobias; Jansson, Tomas; Persson, Hans W; Cinthio, Magnus

    2016-10-01

    Scatterer size estimation is useful when characterizing tissue using ultrasound. In all previous studies on scatterer size, the estimations are performed in the frequency domain and are thus subjected to a trade off in time-frequency resolution. This study focused on the feasibility of estimating scatterer size in the time domain using only the ultrasound center frequency, assuming a Gaussian-shaped pulse. A model for frequency normalization was derived and the frequency-dependent attenuation was compensated. Five phantoms with well-defined sizes of spherical glass beads were made and scanned with two different linear array transducers with variable center frequencies. A strong correlation (r = 0.99, p < 10(-19)) between the backscattered center frequency and the product between the wave number and scatterer radius was demonstrated. On average the scatterer diameter was underestimated by 6% ± 24%. These results suggest that estimation of scatterer size is possible using only the center frequency assessed in the time domain.

  16. Modeling of earthquake ground motion in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrainsson, Hjortur

    In recent years, the utilization of time histories of earthquake ground motion has grown considerably in the design and analysis of civil structures. It is very unlikely, however, that recordings of earthquake ground motion will be available for all sites and conditions of interest. Hence, there is a need for efficient methods for the simulation and spatial interpolation of earthquake ground motion. In addition to providing estimates of the ground motion at a site using data from adjacent recording stations, spatially interpolated ground motions can also be used in design and analysis of long-span structures, such as bridges and pipelines, where differential movement is important. The objective of this research is to develop a methodology for rapid generation of horizontal earthquake ground motion at any site for a given region, based on readily available source, path and site characteristics, or (sparse) recordings. The research includes two main topics: (i) the simulation of earthquake ground motion at a given site, and (ii) the spatial interpolation of earthquake ground motion. In topic (i), models are developed to simulate acceleration time histories using the inverse discrete Fourier transform. The Fourier phase differences, defined as the difference in phase angle between adjacent frequency components, are simulated conditional on the Fourier amplitude. Uniformly processed recordings from recent California earthquakes are used to validate the simulation models, as well as to develop prediction formulas for the model parameters. The models developed in this research provide rapid simulation of earthquake ground motion over a wide range of magnitudes and distances, but they are not intended to replace more robust geophysical models. In topic (ii), a model is developed in which Fourier amplitudes and Fourier phase angles are interpolated separately. A simple dispersion relationship is included in the phase angle interpolation. The accuracy of the interpolation

  17. Frequency-domain trade-offs for dielectric elastomer generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, Plinio; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Homer, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric Elastomer Generators (DEGs) are an emerging energy harvesting technology based on a the cyclic stretching of a rubber-like membrane. However, most design processes do not take into account different excitation frequencies; thus limits the applicability studies since in real-world situations forcing frequency is not often constant. Through the use of a practical design scenario we use modeling and simulation to determine the material frequency response and, hence, carefully investigate the excitation frequencies that maximize the performance (power output, efficiency) of DEGs and the factors that influence it.

  18. Domain decomposition methods in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gropp, William D.; Keyes, David E.

    1991-01-01

    The divide-and-conquer paradigm of iterative domain decomposition, or substructuring, has become a practical tool in computational fluid dynamic applications because of its flexibility in accommodating adaptive refinement through locally uniform (or quasi-uniform) grids, its ability to exploit multiple discretizations of the operator equations, and the modular pathway it provides towards parallelism. These features are illustrated on the classic model problem of flow over a backstep using Newton's method as the nonlinear iteration. Multiple discretizations (second-order in the operator and first-order in the preconditioner) and locally uniform mesh refinement pay dividends separately, and they can be combined synergistically. Sample performance results are included from an Intel iPSC/860 hypercube implementation.

  19. Domain decomposition methods in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gropp, William D.; Keyes, David E.

    1992-01-01

    The divide-and-conquer paradigm of iterative domain decomposition, or substructuring, has become a practical tool in computational fluid dynamic applications because of its flexibility in accommodating adaptive refinement through locally uniform (or quasi-uniform) grids, its ability to exploit multiple discretizations of the operator equations, and the modular pathway it provides towards parallelism. These features are illustrated on the classic model problem of flow over a backstep using Newton's method as the nonlinear iteration. Multiple discretizations (second-order in the operator and first-order in the preconditioner) and locally uniform mesh refinement pay dividends separately, and they can be combined synergistically. Sample performance results are included from an Intel iPSC/860 hypercube implementation.

  20. Frequency domain ultrasound waveform tomography: breast imaging using a ring transducer.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, G Y; Li, C; Roy, O; Schmidt, S; Duric, N

    2015-07-21

    Application of the frequency domain acoustic wave equation on data acquired from ultrasound tomography scans is shown to yield high resolution sound speed images on the order of the wavelength of the highest reconstructed frequency. Using a signal bandwidth of 0.4-1 MHz and an average sound speed of 1500 m s(-1), the resolution is approximately 1.5 mm. The quantitative sound speed values and morphology provided by these images have the potential to inform diagnosis and classification of breast disease. In this study, we present the formalism, practical application, and in vivo results of waveform tomography applied to breast data gathered by two different ultrasound tomography scanners that utilize ring transducers. The formalism includes a review of frequency domain modeling of the wave equation using finite difference operators as well as a review of the gradient descent method for the iterative reconstruction scheme. It is shown that the practical application of waveform tomography requires an accurate starting model, careful data processing, and a method to gradually incorporate higher frequency information into the sound speed reconstruction. Following these steps resulted in high resolution quantitative sound speed images of the breast. These images show marked improvement relative to commonly used ray tomography reconstruction methods. The robustness of the method is demonstrated by obtaining similar results from two different ultrasound tomography devices. We also compare our method to MRI to demonstrate concordant findings. The clinical data used in this work was obtained from a HIPAA compliant clinical study (IRB 040912M1F).

  1. Frequency Domain Ultrasound Waveform Tomography: Breast Imaging Using a Ring Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, G Y; Li, C; Roy, O; Schmidt, S; Duric, N

    2016-01-01

    Application of the frequency domain acoustic wave equation on data acquired from ultrasound tomography scans is shown to yield high resolution sound speed images on the order of the wavelength of the highest reconstructed frequency. Using a signal bandwidth of 0.4–1 MHz and an average sound speed of 1500 m/s, the resolution is approximately 1.5 mm. The quantitative sound speed values and morphology provided by these images have the potential to inform diagnosis and classification of breast disease. In this study, we present the formalism, practical application, and in vivo results of waveform tomography applied to breast data gathered by two different ultrasound tomography scanners that utilize ring transducers. The formalism includes a review of frequency domain modeling of the wave equation using finite difference operators as well as a review of the gradient descent method for the iterative reconstruction scheme. It is shown that the practical application of waveform tomography requires an accurate starting model, careful data processing, and a method to gradually incorporate higher frequency information into the sound speed reconstruction. Following these steps resulted in high resolution quantitative sound speed images of the breast. These images show marked improvement relative to commonly used ray tomography reconstruction methods. The robustness of the method is demonstrated by obtaining similar results from two different ultrasound tomography devices. We also compare our method to MRI to demonstrate concordant findings. The clinical data used in this work was obtained from a HIPAA compliant clinical study (IRB 040912M1F). PMID:26110909

  2. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    DOEpatents

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  3. Frequency domain analysis of errors in cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Zigone, Dimitri

    2016-12-01

    We analyse random errors (variances) in cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise in the frequency domain, which differ from previous time domain methods. Extending previous theoretical results on ensemble averaged cross-spectrum, we estimate confidence interval of stacked cross-spectrum of finite amount of data at each frequency using non-overlapping windows with fixed length. The extended theory also connects amplitude and phase variances with the variance of each complex spectrum value. Analysis of synthetic stationary ambient noise is used to estimate the confidence interval of stacked cross-spectrum obtained with different length of noise data corresponding to different number of evenly spaced windows of the same duration. This method allows estimating Signal/Noise Ratio (SNR) of noise cross-correlation in the frequency domain, without specifying filter bandwidth or signal/noise windows that are needed for time domain SNR estimations. Based on synthetic ambient noise data, we also compare the probability distributions, causal part amplitude and SNR of stacked cross-spectrum function using one-bit normalization or pre-whitening with those obtained without these pre-processing steps. Natural continuous noise records contain both ambient noise and small earthquakes that are inseparable from the noise with the existing pre-processing steps. Using probability distributions of random cross-spectrum values based on the theoretical results provides an effective way to exclude such small earthquakes, and additional data segments (outliers) contaminated by signals of different statistics (e.g. rain, cultural noise), from continuous noise waveforms. This technique is applied to constrain values and uncertainties of amplitude and phase velocity of stacked noise cross-spectrum at different frequencies, using data from southern California at both regional scale (˜35 km) and dense linear array (˜20 m) across the plate-boundary faults. A block bootstrap resampling method

  4. A vector handheld frequency-domain sensor for UXO identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Juan Pablo; Barrowes, Benjamin; O'Neill, Kevin; Shamatava, Irma; Shubitidze, Fridon

    2009-05-01

    The GEM-3D+ sensor developed by Geophex, Ltd. is a new incarnation of their widely known GEM-3. The sensor provides the analyst with all three vector components of the secondary magnetic field over a wide range of frequencies. The GEM-3D+ features an innovative "beacon-based" positioning system that provides a full description of its location and orientation at every point without requiring any on-sensor hardware beyond an electronic compass. This enhances the usefulness of the instrument for dynamic surveying, This paper presents some methods and results related to UXO identification using the GEM-3D+. Our analyses exploit data provided by the sensor in both grid-based and dynamic measurements to characterize different objects, including metal spheres and actual UXO. For the data analysis we alternate between the dipole model and the more rigorous standardized excitation approach. We review some ill-conditioning issues encountered with the latter model and the different approaches that we use to overcome them. In applications, the availability of horizontal field components in the data allow us to identify UXO vs. non-UXO items while minimizing the nonnegligible effects of ground response.

  5. On the effective measurement frequency of time domain reflectometry in dispersive and nonconductive dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, D. A.; Schaap, M. G.; Or, D.; Jones, S. B.

    2005-02-01

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is one of the most commonly used techniques for water content determination in the subsurface. The measurement results in a single bulk permittivity value that corresponds to a particular, but unknown, "effective" frequency (feff). Estimating feff using TDR is important, as it allows comparisons with other techniques, such as impedance or capacitance probes, or microwave remote sensing devices. Soils, especially those with high clay and organic matter content, show appreciable dielectric dispersion, i.e., the real permittivity changes as a function of frequency. Consequently, comparison of results obtained with different sensor types must account for measurement frequency in assessing sensor accuracy and performance. In this article we use a transmission line model to examine the impact of dielectric dispersion on the TDR signal, considering lossless materials (negligible electrical conductivity). Permittivity is inferred from the standard tangent line fitting procedure (KaTAN) and by a method of using the apex of the derivative of the TDR waveform (KaDER). The permittivity determined using the tangent line method is considered to correspond to a velocity associated with a maximum passable frequency; whereas we consider the permittivity determined from the derivative method to correspond with the frequency associated with the signal group velocity. The effective frequency was determined from the 10-90% risetime of the reflected signal. On the basis of this definition, feff was found to correspond with the permittivity determined from KaDER and not from KaTAN in dispersive dielectrics. The modeling is corroborated by measurements in bentonite, ethanol and 1-propanol/water mixtures, which demonstrate the same result. Interestingly, for most nonconductive TDR measurements, frequencies are expected to lie in a range from 0.7 to 1 GHz, while in dispersive media, feff is expected to fall below 0.6 GHz.

  6. On the effective measurement frequency of time domain reflectometry in dispersive and nonconductive dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, D. A.; Schaap, M. G.; Or, D.; Jones, S. B.

    2005-02-01

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is one of the most commonly used techniques for water content determination in the subsurface. The measurement results in a single bulk permittivity value that corresponds to a particular, but unknown, ``effective'' frequency (feff). Estimating feff using TDR is important, as it allows comparisons with other techniques, such as impedance or capacitance probes, or microwave remote sensing devices. Soils, especially those with high clay and organic matter content, show appreciable dielectric dispersion, i.e., the real permittivity changes as a function of frequency. Consequently, comparison of results obtained with different sensor types must account for measurement frequency in assessing sensor accuracy and performance. In this article we use a transmission line model to examine the impact of dielectric dispersion on the TDR signal, considering lossless materials (negligible electrical conductivity). Permittivity is inferred from the standard tangent line fitting procedure (KaTAN) and by a method of using the apex of the derivative of the TDR waveform (KaDER). The permittivity determined using the tangent line method is considered to correspond to a velocity associated with a maximum passable frequency; whereas we consider the permittivity determined from the derivative method to correspond with the frequency associated with the signal group velocity. The effective frequency was determined from the 10-90% risetime of the reflected signal. On the basis of this definition, feff was found to correspond with the permittivity determined from KaDER and not from KaTAN in dispersive dielectrics. The modeling is corroborated by measurements in bentonite, ethanol and 1-propanol/water mixtures, which demonstrate the same result. Interestingly, for most nonconductive TDR measurements, frequencies are expected to lie in a range from 0.7 to 1 GHz, while in dispersive media, feff is expected to fall below 0.6 GHz.

  7. Spatially constrained Bayesian inversion of frequency- and time-domain electromagnetic data from the Tellus projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyan, Duygu; Rath, Volker; Delhaye, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The frequency- and time-domain airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data collected under the Tellus projects of the Geological Survey of Ireland (GSI) which represent a wealth of information on the multi-dimensional electrical structure of Ireland's near-surface. Our project, which was funded by GSI under the framework of their Short Call Research Programme, aims to develop and implement inverse techniques based on various Bayesian methods for these densely sampled data. We have developed a highly flexible toolbox using Python language for the one-dimensional inversion of AEM data along the flight lines. The computational core is based on an adapted frequency- and time-domain forward modelling core derived from the well-tested open-source code AirBeo, which was developed by the CSIRO (Australia) and the AMIRA consortium. Three different inversion methods have been implemented: (i) Tikhonov-type inversion including optimal regularisation methods (Aster el al., 2012; Zhdanov, 2015), (ii) Bayesian MAP inversion in parameter and data space (e.g. Tarantola, 2005), and (iii) Full Bayesian inversion with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (Sambridge and Mosegaard, 2002; Mosegaard and Sambridge, 2002), all including different forms of spatial constraints. The methods have been tested on synthetic and field data. This contribution will introduce the toolbox and present case studies on the AEM data from the Tellus projects.

  8. Design of frequency domain multiplexing of TES signals by multi-input SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Masui, Kensuke; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Morooka, Toshimitsu; Nakayama, Satoshi; Takei, Yoh

    2006-04-01

    In frequency-domain Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) multiplexing for Transition Edge Sensor (TES) readout, a magnetic field summation method utilizing multi-input SQUIDs has a fundamental merit of small degradation of signal-to-noise ratio. Independent wiring without common impedance avoids the cross talk current, and the current induced by magnetic coupling between the input coils is suppressed by the direct feedback at the summing point. A multi-input SQUID which has 8 input coils has been fabricated and requirements for Flux Locked Loop (FLL) circuits are summarized.

  9. Vibrational frequencies of anti-diabetic drug studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, S. Q.; Li, H.; Xie, L.; Chen, L.; Peng, Y.; Zhu, Y. M.; Li, H.; Dong, P.; Wang, J. T.

    2012-04-01

    By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the absorption spectra of seven anti-diabetic pills have been investigated. For gliquidone, glipizide, gliclazide, and glimepiride, an obvious resonance peak is found at 1.37 THz. Furthermore, to overcome the limit of density functional theory that can analyze the normal mode frequencies of the ground state of organic material, we also present a method that relies on pharmacophore recognition, from which we can obtain the resonance peak at 1.37 THz can be attributed to the vibration of sulfonylurea group. The results indicate that the veracity of density functional theory can be increased by combining pharmacophore recognition.

  10. Stability and stabilisation of linear multidimensional discrete systems in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lizhen; Xu, Li; Lin, Zhiping

    2013-11-01

    This paper gives a reasonably detailed review of advances in stability and stabilisation of linear multidimensional (N-D) discrete systems in the frequency domain. The emphasis is on the recent progress, especially in the past decade. The discussion will focus on two topics: (i) stability test. Determination of whether a given N-D (N ≥ 2) system is stable; (ii) stabilisation. Parameterisation of all stabilising compensators for a stabilisable N-D system. After reviewing the progress and several state of the art methods in these two topics with illustrative examples, some related issues are also briefly mentioned at the end.

  11. Generalized frequency-domain synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic imaging of irregularly layered objects.

    PubMed

    Qin, Kaihuai; Yang, Chun; Sun, Feng

    2014-01-01

    In ultrasonic nondestructive testing (NDT), the phase shift migration (PSM) technique, as a frequency-domain implementation of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), can be adopted for imaging of regularly layered objects that are inhomogeneous only in depth but isotropic and homogeneous in the lateral direction. To deal with irregularly layered objects that are anisotropic and inhomogeneous in both the depth and lateral directions, a generalized frequency- domain SAFT, called generalized phase shift migration (GPSM), is proposed in this paper. Compared with PSM, the most significant innovation of GPSM is that the phase shift factor is generalized to handle anisotropic media with lateral velocity variations. The generalization is accomplished by computer programming techniques without modifying the PSM model. In addition, SRFFT (split-radix fast Fourier transform) input/output pruning algorithms are developed and employed in the GPSM algorithm to speed up the image reconstructions. The experiments show that the proposed imaging techniques are capable of reconstructing accurate shapes and interfaces of irregularly layered objects. The computing time of the GPSM algorithm is much less than the time-domain SAFT combined with the ray-tracing technique, which is, at present, the common method used in ultrasonic NDT industry for imaging layered objects. Furthermore, imaging regularly layered objects can be regarded as a special case of the presented technique.

  12. Frequency and Time Domain Analysis of Foetal Heart Rate Variability with Traditional Indexes: A Critical Survey

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Maria; Iuppariello, Luigi; Ponsiglione, Alfonso Maria; Improta, Giovanni; Bifulco, Paolo; Cesarelli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of foetal heart rate and its variability (FHRV) covers an important role in assessing health of foetus. Many analysis methods have been used to get quantitative measures of FHRV. FHRV has been studied in time and in frequency domain and interesting clinical results have been obtained. Nevertheless, a standardized definition of FHRV and a precise methodology to be used for its evaluation are lacking. We carried out a literature overview about both frequency domain analysis (FDA) and time domain analysis (TDA). Then, by using simulated FHR signals, we defined the methodology for FDA. Further, employing more than 400 real FHR signals, we analysed some of the most common indexes, Short Term Variability for TDA and power content of the spectrum bands and sympathovagal balance for FDA, and evaluated their ranges of values, which in many cases are a novelty. Finally, we verified the relationship between these indexes and two important parameters: week of gestation, indicator of foetal growth, and foetal state, classified as active or at rest. Our results indicate that, according to literature, it is necessary to standardize the procedure for FHRV evaluation and to consider week of gestation and foetal state before FHR analysis. PMID:27195018

  13. Multiple-Antenna Receiving and Frequency Domain Equalization in Transmitted-Reference UWB Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xuewen; Zhu, Shihua; Zeng, Erlin

    A multiple-antenna receiving and combining scheme is proposed for high-data-rate transmitted-reference (TR) Ultra-Wideband (UWB) systems. The nonlinearity of the inter-symbol interference (IST) model is alleviated via simple antenna combining. Under the simplified ISI model, frequency domain equalization (FDE) is adopted and greatly reduces the complexity of the equalizer. A simple estimation algorithm for the simplified ISI model is presented. Simulation results demonstrate that compared to the single receive antenna scheme, the proposed method can obtain a significant diversity gain and eliminate the BER floor effect. Moreover, compared to the complex second-order time domain equalizer, FDE showed better performance robustness in the case of imperfect model estimation.

  14. Shape-Measure Method for Introducing the Nearly Optimal Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    elements. The problem is to find the optimal domain approximately for a given functional that is involved with the solution of a linear or nonlinear...elliptic equation with a boundary condition over a domain. The Shape-Measure method, in Cartesian coordinates will be used to find the nearly optimal...domain by using the embedding method. Then the Shape-Measure method will be applied to find the best domain approximately. An example will be given.

  15. Quantification of (1) H-MRS signals based on sparse metabolite profiles in the time-frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Parto Dezfouli, Mohammad Ali; Parto Dezfouli, Mohsen; Ahmadian, Alireza; Frangi, Alejandro F; Esmaeili Rad, Melika; Saligheh Rad, Hamidreza

    2017-02-01

    MRS is an analytical approach used for both quantitative and qualitative analysis of human body metabolites. The accurate and robust quantification capability of proton MRS ((1) H-MRS) enables the accurate estimation of living tissue metabolite concentrations. However, such methods can be efficiently employed for quantification of metabolite concentrations only if the overlapping nature of metabolites, existing static field inhomogeneity and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are taken into consideration. Representation of (1) H-MRS signals in the time-frequency domain enables us to handle the baseline and noise better. This is possible because the MRS signal of each metabolite is sparsely represented, with only a few peaks, in the frequency domain, but still along with specific time-domain features such as distinct decay constant associated with T2 relaxation rate. The baseline, however, has a smooth behavior in the frequency domain. In this study, we proposed a quantification method using continuous wavelet transformation of (1) H-MRS signals in combination with sparse representation of features in the time-frequency domain. Estimation of the sparse representations of MR spectra is performed according to the dictionaries constructed from metabolite profiles. Results on simulated and phantom data show that the proposed method is able to quantify the concentration of metabolites in (1) H-MRS signals with high accuracy and robustness. This is achieved for both low SNR (5 dB) and low signal-to-baseline ratio (-5 dB) regimes.

  16. Signals features extraction in liquid-gas flow measurements using gamma densitometry. Part 2: frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanus, Robert; Zych, Marcin; Petryka, Leszek; Jaszczur, Marek; Hanus, Paweł

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of the structure of a flow is really significant for the proper conduct a number of industrial processes. In this case a description of a two-phase flow regimes is possible by use of the time-series analysis e.g. in frequency domain. In this article the classical spectral analysis based on Fourier Transform (FT) and Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) were applied for analysis of signals obtained for water-air flow using gamma ray absorption. The presented method was illustrated by use data collected in experiments carried out on the laboratory hydraulic installation with a horizontal pipe of 4.5 m length and inner diameter of 30 mm equipped with two 241Am radioactive sources and scintillation probes with NaI(Tl) crystals. Stochastic signals obtained from detectors for plug, bubble, and transitional plug - bubble flows were considered in this work. The recorded raw signals were analyzed and several features in the frequency domain were extracted using autospectral density function (ADF), cross-spectral density function (CSDF), and the STFT spectrogram. In result of a detail analysis it was found that the most promising to recognize of the flow structure are: maximum value of the CSDF magnitude, sum of the CSDF magnitudes in the selected frequency range, and the maximum value of the sum of selected amplitudes of STFT spectrogram.

  17. Effect of duty cycle in different frequency domains on SSVEP based BCI: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gan; Yao, Lin; Zhang, Dingguo; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2012-01-01

    Compared with the well learned amplitude-frequency characteristic of Steady State Visual Evoked Potential (SSVEP), the effect of duty cycle is still unclear. In this work, the influence of duty cycle on SSVEP response is investigated in differnt frequency domains. The amplitude surface with the change of both frequencies and duty cycles is plotted. To get a stable response, the experiment arranged in 3 days, and each result is an average of 12 repetitions. It is interesting that the results from power spectral density (PSD) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method are not consistent. In addition, the relation between the fundamental component and its second harmonic component with the change of duty cycle is quite different at frequency of 7 Hz, 10 Hz and 13 Hz. Based on the amplitude surface, we try to configure the subject-specific SSVEP based BCI. The frequencies and duty cycles of the stimulus are selected corresponding to the higher SSVEP response in the amplitude surface. Cross validation results show a significant improvement in the performance for the adjustment of duty cycle.

  18. Frequency domain mediolateral balance assessment using a center of pressure tracking task.

    PubMed

    Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Reeves, N Peter; Verschueren, Sabine M P; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-11-15

    Since impaired mediolateral balance can increase fall risk, especially in the elderly, its quantification and training might be a powerful preventive tool. We propose a visual tracking task (VTT) with increasing frequencies (.3-2.0Hz) and with center of pressure as visual feedback as an assessment method. This mediolateral balance assessment (MELBA) consists of two tasks, tracking a predictable target signal to determine physical capacity and tracking an unpredictable target signal to determine sensorimotor integration limitations. Within and between sessions learning effects and reliability in balance performance descriptors in both tasks were studied in 20 young adults. Balance performance was expressed as the phase-shift (PS) and gain (G) between the target and CoP in the frequency domain and cut-off frequencies at which the performance dropped. Results showed significant differences between the MELBA tasks in PS and G indicating a lower delay and higher accuracy in tracking the predictable target. Significant within and between sessions learning effects for the same measures were found only for the unpredictable task. Reliability of the cut-off frequencies at which PS and G performance declined and the average values within cut-off frequencies was fair to good (ICC .46-.66) for the unpredictable task and fair to excellent for the predictable task (ICC .68-.87). In conclusion, MELBA can reliably quantify balance performance using a predictable VTT. Additionally, the unpredictable tasks can give insight into the visuomotor integration mechanisms controlling balance and highlights MELBA's potential as a training tool.

  19. Laser frequency translation: a new method.

    PubMed

    Poelker, M; Kumar, P; Ho, S T

    1991-12-01

    We demonstrate how the frequency of a single-mode cw dye laser can be translated by 1.772 GHz using stimulated Raman scattering in sodium vapor. The output of a sodium Raman laser, the frequency-translated beam, is shown to be highly correlated in frequency with the dye-laser pump beam. The bandwidth of the 1.772-GHz heterodyne beat signal between the two beams is found to be as narrow as 440 Hz, much narrower than the root-mean-square frequency jitter (~1 MHz) of the dye-laser pump beam. The Raman laser method can be used with materials other than sodium, such as cesium or magnesium, to obtain frequency translations of a magnitude that may not be easily attainable with acousto-optic or electro-optic techniques.

  20. A Frequency Domain Analysis of the Linear Discrete Kalman Filter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    15 to Fourier Series ------------------------------- 15 2o Basic Concept -------------------------------- 17 3# Discrete Data and the Sampling...m-dinensional measurement vector. The filter maw operate in a J-dimensional coordinate svstem where J:1.m, Jhn. The basic assumption is that each...understanding of digital signal theorw in the freauencv domain. The Fourier transform is a basic tool. A full r= exposition of the underlwina theorw is

  1. Application of Frequency Domain Substructure Synthesis Technique for Plates Loaded with Complex Attachments

    SciTech Connect

    RL Campbell; SA Hambric

    2004-02-05

    Frequency domain substructure synthesis is a modeling technique that enables the prediction of a combined response of individual structures using experimentally measured or numerically predicted frequency response functions (FRFs). The traditional synthesis algorithm [1,2] operates on component impedances and thus generally requires several matrix inversions. An improved algorithm, developed by Jetmundsen et al. [3], requires a single matrix inversion with a completely arbitrary interface definition that can easily incorporate connection impedances. The main limitations of the method are the large data requirements and sensitivity to data truncation. The utility of this technique is demonstrated through a comparison of synthesized and measured admittances of an edge-stiffened plate with attached equipment. The plate mobilities are obtained from a numerical analysis because of the ability to accurately model this structure using a finite element representation. The attachments are characterized experimentally because of their complexity. The sections describe the synthesis technique and show numerical and experimental results for the plate and equipment.

  2. Joint Tomlinson-Harashima Precoding and Frequency-Domain Equalization for Broadband Single-Carrier Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuki; Tomeba, Hiromichi; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    The performance of single-carrier (SC) transmission in a frequency-selective fading channel degrades due to a severe inter-symbol interference (ISI). Using frequency-domain equalization (FDE) based on the minimum mean square error (MMSE) criterion can improve the bit error rate (BER) performance of SC transmission. However, the residual ISI after FDE limits the performance improvement. In this paper, we propose a joint use of Tomlinson-Harashima precoding (THP) and FDE to remove the residual ISI. An approximate conditional BER analysis is presented for the given channel condition. The achievable average BER performance is evaluated by Monte-Carlo numerical computation method using the derived conditional BER. The BER analysis is confirmed by computer simulation of the signal transmission.

  3. Method and apparatus for frequency spectrum analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Steven W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for frequency spectrum analysis of an unknown signal in real-time is discussed. The method is based upon integration of 1-bit samples of signal voltage amplitude corresponding to sine or cosine phases of a controlled center frequency clock which is changed after each integration interval to sweep the frequency range of interest in steps. Integration of samples during each interval is carried out over a number of cycles of the center frequency clock spanning a number of cycles of an input signal to be analyzed. The invention may be used to detect the frequency of at least two signals simultaneously. By using a reference signal of known frequency and voltage amplitude (added to the two signals for parallel processing in the same way, but in a different channel with a sampling at the known frequency and phases of the reference signal), the absolute voltage amplitude of the other two signals may be determined by squaring the sine and cosine integrals of each channel and summing the squares to obtain relative power measurements in all three channels and, from the known voltage amplitude of the reference signal, obtaining an absolute voltage measurement for the other two signals by multiplying the known voltage of the reference signal with the ratio of the relative power of each of the other two signals to the relative power of the reference signal.

  4. Evaluating highly resolved paleoclimate records in the frequency domain for multidecadal-scale climate variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, K.L.; Quinn, T.M.; Mitchum, G.T.; Poore, R.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Do the chronological methods used in the construction of paleoclimate records influence the results of the frequency analysis applied to them? We explore this phenomenon using the Dongge Cave speleothem record (U-series chronology with variable time steps, ??t) and the El Malpais tree-ring index (cross-dating of ring-width series). Interpolation of the Dongge Cave record to a constant ??t resulted in the suppression of periodicities (<20 years) altering the red noise model used for significance testing. Frequency analysis of temporal subsets of the El Malpais tree-ring index revealed that concentrations of variance varied with the number of ring-width series. Frequency analyses of these records identified significant periodicities, some common to both (???25 and ???69 years). Cross-wavelet analysis, which examines periodicities in the time domain, revealed that coherency between these records occurs intermittently. We found the chronology methods can influence the ability of frequency analysis to detect periodicities and tests for coherency. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Interaction between two adjacent grounded sources in frequency domain semi-airborne electromagnetic survey.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haigen; Lin, Jun; Liu, Changsheng; Kang, Lili; Li, Gang; Zeng, Xinsen

    2016-03-01

    Multi-source and multi-frequency emission method can make full use of the valuable and short flight time in frequency domain semi-airborne electromagnetic (FSAEM) exploration, which has potential to investigate the deep earth structure in complex terrain region. Because several sources are adjacent in multi-source emission method, the interaction of different sources should be considered carefully. An equivalent circuit model of dual-source is established in this paper to assess the interaction between two individual sources, where the parameters are given with the typical values based on the practical instrument system and its application. By simulating the output current of two sources in different cases, the influence from the adjacent source is observed clearly. The current waveforms show that the mutual resistance causes the fluctuation and drift in another source and that the mutual inductance causes transient peaks. A field test with dual-source was conducted to certify the existence of interaction between adjacent sources. The simulation of output current also shows that current errors at low frequency are mainly caused by the mutual resistance while those at high frequency are mainly due to the mutual inductance. Increasing the distance between neighboring sources is a proposed measure to reduce the emission signal errors with designed ones. The feasible distance is discussed in the end. This study gives a useful guidance to lay multi sources to meet the requirement of measurement accuracy in FSAEM survey.

  6. Experimental Study of High-Range-Resolution Medical Acoustic Imaging for Multiple Target Detection by Frequency Domain Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Takuya; Sato, Toru

    2009-07-01

    We employed frequency domain interferometry (FDI) for use as a medical acoustic imager to detect multiple targets with high range resolution. The phase of each frequency component of an echo varies with the frequency, and target intervals can be estimated from the phase variance. This processing technique is generally used in radar imaging. When the interference within a range gate is coherent, the cross correlation between the desired signal and the coherent interference signal is nonzero. The Capon method works under the guiding principle that output power minimization cancels the desired signal with a coherent interference signal. Therefore, we utilize frequency averaging to suppress the correlation of the coherent interference. The results of computational simulations using a pseudoecho signal show that the Capon method with adaptive frequency averaging (AFA) provides a higher range resolution than a conventional method. These techniques were experimentally investigated and we confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method of processing by FDI.

  7. Frequency-domain elastic full waveform inversion using encoded simultaneous sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, W.; Son, W.; Pyun, S.; Min, D.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, numerous studies have endeavored to develop robust full waveform inversion and migration algorithms. These processes require enormous computational costs, because of the number of sources in the survey. To avoid this problem, the phase encoding technique for prestack migration was proposed by Romero (2000) and Krebs et al. (2009) proposed the encoded simultaneous-source inversion technique in the time domain. On the other hand, Ben-Hadj-Ali et al. (2011) demonstrated the robustness of the frequency-domain full waveform inversion with simultaneous sources for noisy data changing the source assembling. Although several studies on simultaneous-source inversion tried to estimate P- wave velocity based on the acoustic wave equation, seismic migration and waveform inversion based on the elastic wave equations are required to obtain more reliable subsurface information. In this study, we propose a 2-D frequency-domain elastic full waveform inversion technique using phase encoding methods. In our algorithm, the random phase encoding method is employed to calculate the gradients of the elastic parameters, source signature estimation and the diagonal entries of approximate Hessian matrix. The crosstalk for the estimated source signature and the diagonal entries of approximate Hessian matrix are suppressed with iteration as for the gradients. Our 2-D frequency-domain elastic waveform inversion algorithm is composed using the back-propagation technique and the conjugate-gradient method. Source signature is estimated using the full Newton method. We compare the simultaneous-source inversion with the conventional waveform inversion for synthetic data sets of the Marmousi-2 model. The inverted results obtained by simultaneous sources are comparable to those obtained by individual sources, and source signature is successfully estimated in simultaneous source technique. Comparing the inverted results using the pseudo Hessian matrix with previous inversion results

  8. A mixed space-time and wavenumber-frequency domain procedure for modelling ground vibration from surface railway tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroma, S. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Hussein, M. F. M.; Ntotsios, E.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology for studying ground vibration in which the railway track is modelled in the space-time domain using the finite element method (FEM) and, for faster computation, discretisation of the ground using either FEM or the boundary element method (BEM) is avoided by modelling it in the wavenumber-frequency domain. The railway track is coupled to the ground through a series of rectangular strips located at the surface of the ground; their vertical interaction is described by a frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness matrix whose elements are represented by discrete lumped parameter models. The effectiveness of this approach is assessed firstly through frequency domain analysis using as excitation a stationary harmonic load applied on the rail. The interaction forces at the ballast/ground interface are calculated using the FE track model in the space-time domain, transformed to the wavenumber domain, and used as input to the ground model for calculating vibration in the free field. Additionally, time domain simulations are also performed with the inclusion of nonlinear track parameters. Results are presented for the coupled track/ground model in terms of time histories and frequency spectra for the track vibration, interaction forces and free-field ground vibration. For the linear track model, the results from the mixed formulation are in excellent agreement with those from a semi-analytical model formulated in the wavenumber-frequency domain, particularly in the vicinity of the loading point. The accuracy of the mixed formulation away from the excitation point depends strongly on the inclusion of through-ground coupling in the lumped parameter model, which has been found to be necessary for both track dynamics and ground vibration predictions.

  9. Concurrent DSMC Method Using Dynamic Domain Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.-S.; Tseng, K.-C.

    2003-05-01

    In the current study, a parallel two-dimensional direct simulation Monte Carlo method is reported, which incorporates a multi-level graph-partitioning technique to dynamically decompose the computational domain. The current DSMC method is implemented on an unstructured mesh using particle ray-tracing technique, which takes the advantages of the cell connectivity information. Standard Message Passage Interface (MPI) is used to communicate data between processors. In addition, different strategies applying the Stop at Rise (SAR) [7] scheme is utilized to determine when to adapt the workload distribution among processors. Corresponding analysis of parallel performance is reported using the results of a high-speed driven cavity flow on IBM-SP2 parallel machines (memory-distributed, CPU 160 MHz, RAM 256 MB each) up to 64 processors. Small, medium and large problems, based on the number of particles and cells, are simulated. Results, applying SAR scheme every two time steps, show that parallel efficiency is 57%, 90% and 107% for small, medium and large problems, respectively, at 64 processors. In general, benefits of applying SAR scheme at larger periods decrease gradually with increasing problem size. Detailed time analysis shows that degree of imbalance levels off very rapidly at a relatively low value (30%˜40%) with increasing number of processors applying dynamic load balancing, while it, at a value of 5˜6 times larger, increases with increasing number of processors without dynamic load balancing. At the end, the completed code is applied to compute a near-continuum gas flow to demonstrate its superior computational capability.

  10. Feasibility of direct digital sampling for diffuse optical frequency domain spectroscopy in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roblyer, Darren; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Warren, Robert V.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-04-01

    Frequency domain optical spectroscopy in the diffusive regime is currently being investigated for biomedical applications including tumor detection, therapy monitoring, exercise metabolism and others. Analog homodyne or heterodyne detection of sinusoidally modulated signals has been the predominant method for measuring phase and amplitude of photon density waves that have traversed through tissue. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing direct digital sampling of modulated signals using a 3.6 gigasample/second 12 bit analog to digital converter. Digitally synthesized modulated signals between 50 MHz and 400 MHz were measured on tissue-simulating phantoms at six near-infrared wavelengths. An amplitude and phase precision of 1% and 0.6° were achieved during drift tests. Amplitude, phase, scattering and absorption values were compared with a well-characterized network analyzer-based diffuse optical device. Optical properties measured with both systems were within 3.6% for absorption and 2.8% for scattering over a range of biologically relevant values. Direct digital sampling represents a viable method for frequency domain diffuse optical spectroscopy and has the potential to reduce system complexity, size and cost.

  11. Feasibility of Direct Digital Sampling for Diffuse Optical Frequency Domain Spectroscopy in Tissue.

    PubMed

    Roblyer, Darren; O'Sullivan, Thomas D; Warren, Robert V; Tromberg, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Frequency domain optical spectroscopy in the diffusive regime is currently being investigated for biomedical applications including tumor detection, therapy monitoring, exercise metabolism, and others. Analog homodyne or heterodyne detection of sinusoidally modulated signals have been the predominant method for measuring phase and amplitude of photon density waves that have traversed through tissue. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing direct digital sampling of modulated signals using a 3.6 Gigasample/second 12 bit Analog to Digital Converter. Digitally synthesized modulated signals between 50MHz and 400MHz were measured on tissue simulating phantoms at six near-infrared wavelengths. An amplitude and phase precision of 1% and 0.6 degrees were achieved during drift tests. Amplitude, phase, scattering and absorption values were compared with a well-characterized network analyzer based diffuse optical device. Measured optical properties measured with both systems were within 3.6% for absorption and 2.8% for scattering over a range of biologically relevant values. Direct digital sampling represents a viable method for frequency domain diffuse optical spectroscopy and has the potential to reduce system complexity, size, and cost.

  12. Phase-locked 10 MHz reference signal for frequency domain time-resolved fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Trevor A.; Bird, Damian K.; Nuske, John W.

    2007-05-01

    A complete electronic system that is suitable for use in megahertz frequency domain time-resolved fluorescence instruments based on mode-locked lasers is described. The circuit produces a 10MHz signal, phase locked to the mode-locked laser pulse frequency, which is required by many commercial frequency synthesizers as the external reference signal. This device is particularly useful in conjunction with ultrafast gated intensified charge coupled device cameras capable of being frequency modulated for time-resolved fluorescence imaging.

  13. Lithospheric imaging from teleseismic data by frequency-domain elastic full-waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pageot, D.; Operto, S.; Vallée, M.; Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.; Seiscope

    2010-12-01

    Teleseismic data recorded by dense multicomponent surveys are potentially amenable to multichannel processing such as full waveform inversion to develop high-resolution lithospheric models. In this study, 2D frequency-domain full waveform tomography (FWT) is tailored to suit teleseismic geometries. Frequency-domain FWT seeks to estimate the elastic properties of the Earth by minimizing a misfit function between recorded and modeled full wavefields. FWT is designed to invert few discrete frequencies by proceeding hierarchically from the low frequencies to the higher ones, following a multiscale approach useful to mitigate the inversion nonlinearity. In teleseismic framework, seismic sources are planar incident wavefields impinging the base of the lithosphere with arbitrary incidence and obliquity angles. The full wavefield is computed using a scattered-field formulation in the frequency domain. First, an analytical wavefield is computed in a homogeneous background model with free surface on the topside for an incident compressional plane wave. Then, a scattering source is formed by the product of the analytical planewave with the difference of the forward problem operators associated with the homogeneous background and lithospheric models. The scattered wavefield is then computed by performing a simulation in the lithospheric model using the scattering source, and, finally, the full wavefield is built by summation of the analytical wavefield and of the scattered wavefield. The 2D P-SV wave modeling is performed with a finite element discontinuous Galerkin method allowing for unstructured triangular meshes. Teleseismic experiments are characterized by a narrow illumination of aperture angles because of the limited number of planewave sources related to the teleseismic earthquake distribution. This narrow aperture bandwith requires the use of finely-sampled frequencies to prevent spatial aliasing in the reconstructed FWT models. Moreover, planewave propagation from

  14. Impact of Domain Analysis on Reuse Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-06

    reusable. The resultant model is called a system archetype . The archetype is then adapted to build a new system according to the needs of each...Domain modelhig, archetypes , DARTS software generation system. o GTE Laboratories - Domain analysis process, component classification, tools for...called an archetype . Altematively, if a working system already exists in this problem class, then this system can be modified to be an archetype . Once

  15. Frequency domain analysis and synthesis of lumped parameter systems using nonlinear least squares techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    Lumped parametric system models are simplified and computationally advantageous in the frequency domain of linear systems. Nonlinear least squares computer program finds the least square best estimate for any number of parameters in an arbitrarily complicated model.

  16. Frequency domain approach for activity classification using accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wan-Young; Purwar, Amit; Sharma, Annapurna

    2008-01-01

    Activity classification was performed using MEMS accelerometer and wireless sensor node for wireless sensor network environment. Three axes MEMS accelerometer measures body's acceleration and transmits measured data with the help of sensor node to base station attached to PC. On the PC, real time accelerometer data is processed for movement classifications. In this paper, Rest, walking and running are the classified activities of the person. Both time and frequency analysis was performed to classify running and walking. The classification of rest and movement is done using Signal magnitude area (SMA). The classification accuracy for rest and movement is 100%. For the classification of walk and Run two parameters i.e. SMA and Median frequency were used. The classification accuracy for walk and running was detected as 81.25% in the experiments performed by the test persons.

  17. Angle correction for small animal tumor imaging with spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanyu; Tabassum, Syeda; Piracha, Shaheer; Nandhu, Mohan Sobhana; Viapiano, Mariano; Roblyer, Darren

    2016-01-01

    Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) is a widefield imaging technique that allows for the quantitative extraction of tissue optical properties. SFDI is currently being explored for small animal tumor imaging, but severe imaging artifacts occur for highly curved surfaces (e.g. the tumor edge). We propose a modified Lambertian angle correction, adapted from the Minnaert correction method for satellite imagery, to account for tissue surface angles up to 75°. The method was tested in a hemisphere phantom study as well as a small animal tumor model. The proposed method reduced µa and µs` extraction errors by an average of 64% and 16% respectively compared to performing no angle correction, and provided more physiologically agreeable optical property and chromophore values on tumors. PMID:27375952

  18. Determination of delayed neutrons source in the frequency domain based on in-pile oscillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yedvab, Y.; Reiss, I.; Bettan, M.; Harari, R.; Grober, A.; Ettedgui, H.; Caspi, E. N.

    2006-07-01

    A method for determining delayed neutrons source in the frequency domain based on measuring power oscillations in a non-critical reactor is presented. This method is unique in the sense that the delayed neutrons source is derived from the dynamic behavior of the reactor, which serves as the measurement system. An algorithm for analyzing power oscillation measurements was formulated, which avoids the need for a multi-parameter non-linear fit process used by other methods. Using this algorithm results of two sets of measurements performed in IRR-I and IRR-II (Israeli Research Reactors I and II) are presented. The agreement between measured values from both reactors and calculated values based on Keepin (and JENDL-3.3) group parameters is very good. (authors)

  19. Stage-based frequency-modulated full-range complex Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Haiyi; Gao, Wanrong

    2015-10-01

    We propose a simple method to modulate spatial interferogram to achieve full-range complex imaging in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, in which a sample stage is employed which can be adjusted to introduce a constant carrier frequency into the interference signal during the B-scan by adjusting the stage angle with respect to the normal to the object under test. An additional phase, which is linearly related to the lateral position, is then induced in the A-scan. The in vivo images of human skin were generated which demonstrate that the method proposed can generate the cross-sectional image with the same quality with that obtained with other methods and with the advantage of the simplicity in implementation.

  20. A look at motion in the frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, A. B.; Ahumada, A. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A moving image can be specified by a contrast distribution, c(x,y,t), over the dimensions of space x,y, and time t. Alternatively, it can be specified by the distribution C(u,v,w) over spatial frequency u,v and temporal frequency w. The frequency representation of a moving image is shown to have a characteristic form. This permits two useful observations. The first is that the apparent smoothness of time-sampled moving images (apparent motion) can be explained by the filtering action of the human visual system. This leads to the following formula for the required update rate for time-sampled displays. W(c)=W(l)+ru(l) where w(c) is the required update rate in Hz, W(l) is the limit of human temporal resolution in Hz, r is the velocity of the moving image in degrees/sec, and u(l) is the limit of human spatial resolution in cycles/deg. The second observation is that it is possible to construct a linear sensor that responds to images moving in a particular direction. The sensor is derived and its properties are discussed.

  1. Controller design for flexible, distributed parameter mechanical arms via combined state space and frequency domain techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, W. J.; Majett, M.

    1982-01-01

    The potential benefits of the ability to control more flexible mechanical arms are discussed. A justification is made in terms of speed of movement. A new controller design procedure is then developed to provide this capability. It uses both a frequency domain representation and a state variable representation of the arm model. The frequency domain model is used to update the modal state variable model to insure decoupled states. The technique is applied to a simple example with encouraging results.

  2. Frequency-domain sparse Bayesian learning inversion of AVA data for elastic parameters reflectivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yongzhen; Yuan, Sanyi; Wang, Shangxu; Deng, Li

    2016-10-01

    The prestack amplitude variation with angle (AVA) inversion method utilising angle information to obtain the elastic parameters estimation of subsurface rock is vital to reservoir characterisation. Under the assumption of blocky layered media, an AVA inversion algorithm combining prestack spectral reflectivity inversion with sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) is presented. Prior information of the model parameters is involved in the inversion through the hierarchical Gaussian distribution where each parameter has a unique variance instead of sharing a common one. The frequency-domain prestack SBL inversion method retrieves sparse P- and S-wave impedance reflectivities by sequentially adding, deleting or re-estimating hyper-parameters without pre-setting the number of non-zero P- and S-wave reflectivity spikes. The selection of frequency components can help get rid of noise outside the selected frequency band. The precondition of the parameters helps to balance the weight of different parameters and incorporate the relationship between those parameters into the inversion process, thus improves the inversion result. Synthetic and real data examples illustrate the effectiveness of the method.

  3. Modal analysis of 2-D sedimentary basin from frequency domain decomposition of ambient vibration array recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggi, Valerio; Ermert, Laura; Burjanek, Jan; Michel, Clotaire; Fäh, Donat

    2015-01-01

    Frequency domain decomposition (FDD) is a well-established spectral technique used in civil engineering to analyse and monitor the modal response of buildings and structures. The method is based on singular value decomposition of the cross-power spectral density matrix from simultaneous array recordings of ambient vibrations. This method is advantageous to retrieve not only the resonance frequencies of the investigated structure, but also the corresponding modal shapes without the need for an absolute reference. This is an important piece of information, which can be used to validate the consistency of numerical models and analytical solutions. We apply this approach using advanced signal processing to evaluate the resonance characteristics of 2-D Alpine sedimentary valleys. In this study, we present the results obtained at Martigny, in the Rhône valley (Switzerland). For the analysis, we use 2 hr of ambient vibration recordings from a linear seismic array deployed perpendicularly to the valley axis. Only the horizontal-axial direction (SH) of the ground motion is considered. Using the FDD method, six separate resonant frequencies are retrieved together with their corresponding modal shapes. We compare the mode shapes with results from classical standard spectral ratios and numerical simulations of ambient vibration recordings.

  4. Grandchild of the frequency: Decomposition multigrid method

    SciTech Connect

    Dendy, J.E. Jr.; Tazartes, C.C.

    1994-12-31

    Previously the authors considered the frequency decomposition multigrid method and rejected it because it was not robust for problems with discontinuous coefficients. In this paper they show how to modify the method so as to obtain such robustness while retaining robustness for problems with anisotropic coefficients. They also discuss application of this method to a problem arising in global ocean modeling on the CM-5.

  5. Automated removal of quasiperiodic noise using frequency domain statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Frédéric; Grédiac, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Digital images may be impaired by periodic or quasiperiodic noise, which manifests itself by spurious long-range repetitive patterns. Most of the time, quasiperiodic noise is well localized in the Fourier domain; thus it can be attenuated by smoothing out the image spectrum with a well-designed notch filter. While existing algorithms require hand-tuned filter design or parameter setting, this paper presents an automated approach based on the expected power spectrum of a natural image. The resulting algorithm enables not only the elimination of simple periodic noise whose influence on the image spectrum is limited to a few Fourier coefficients, but also of quasiperiodic structured noise with a much more complex contribution to the spectrum. Various examples illustrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm. A comparison with morphological component analysis, a blind source separation algorithm, is also provided. A MATLAB implementation is available.

  6. Frequency-domain model of tonal blade thickness and loading noise.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yijun; Xu, Chen; Qi, Datong

    2014-01-01

    A tonal thickness noise and loading noise model of rotating blades has been developed as an extension of the exact frequency-domain solutions for rotating monopole and dipole point sources. The present model has two advantages over the previous methods and models for noise prediction. The first is the unified expression for sources in subsonic and supersonic rotation even at rest. The second is that the present model has no limit on the location of the observer and no interpolation error. Two test cases are carried out to validate the present model and emphasize its advantage at the noise prediction for sources in supersonic rotation. Moreover, as a specified application of the present model for the rotating blades whose tip radius is acoustically compact, acoustic energy distribution at different frequencies and in different directions is analyzed. Result shows that the acoustic energy of acoustically compact rotating blades is mainly concentrated at the source frequency while propagating along the axial direction, leaving the rest propagating along the radial direction at the other frequencies.

  7. Domain Decomposition By the Advancing-Partition Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2008-01-01

    A new method of domain decomposition has been developed for generating unstructured grids in subdomains either sequentially or using multiple computers in parallel. Domain decomposition is a crucial and challenging step for parallel grid generation. Prior methods are generally based on auxiliary, complex, and computationally intensive operations for defining partition interfaces and usually produce grids of lower quality than those generated in single domains. The new technique, referred to as "Advancing Partition," is based on the Advancing-Front method, which partitions a domain as part of the volume mesh generation in a consistent and "natural" way. The benefits of this approach are: 1) the process of domain decomposition is highly automated, 2) partitioning of domain does not compromise the quality of the generated grids, and 3) the computational overhead for domain decomposition is minimal. The new method has been implemented in NASA's unstructured grid generation code VGRID.

  8. Comparison of signal to noise ratios from spatial and frequency domain formulations of nonprewhitening model observers in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Sisini, Francesco; Zanca, Federica; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Taibi, Angelo; Cardarelli, Paolo; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Image quality indices based upon model observers are promising alternatives to laborious human readings of contrast-detail images. This is especially appealing in digital mammography as limiting values for contrast thresholds determine, according to some international protocols, the acceptability of these systems in the radiological practice. The objective of the present study was to compare the signal to noise ratios (SNR) obtained with two nonprewhitening matched filter model observer approaches, one in the spatial domain and the other in the frequency domain, and with both of them worked out for disks as present in the CDMAM phantom. Methods: The analysis was performed using images acquired with the Siemens Novation and Inspiration digital mammography systems. The spatial domain formulation uses a series of high dose CDMAM images as the signal and a routine exposure of two flood images to calculate the covariance matrix. The frequency domain approach uses the mathematical description of a disk and modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS) calculated from images. Results: For both systems most of the SNR values calculated in the frequency domain were in very good agreement with the SNR values calculated in the spatial domain. Both the formulations in the frequency domain and in the spatial domain show a linear relationship between SNR and the diameter of the CDMAM discs. Conclusions: The results suggest that both formulations of the model observer lead to very similar figures of merit. This is a step forward in the adoption of figures of merit based on NPS and MTF for the acceptance testing of mammography systems.

  9. Extension of a spectral time-stepping domain decomposition method for dispersive and dissipative wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Botts, Jonathan; Savioja, Lauri

    2015-04-01

    For time-domain modeling based on the acoustic wave equation, spectral methods have recently demonstrated promise. This letter presents an extension of a spectral domain decomposition approach, previously used to solve the lossless linear wave equation, which accommodates frequency-dependent atmospheric attenuation and assignment of arbitrary dispersion relations. Frequency-dependence is straightforward to assign when time-stepping is done in the spectral domain, so combined losses from molecular relaxation, thermal conductivity, and viscosity can be approximated with little extra computation or storage. A mode update free from numerical dispersion is derived, and the model is confirmed with a numerical experiment.

  10. Mode separation in frequency-wavenumber domain through compressed sensing of far-field Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Luo, Zhi

    2017-07-01

    This method based on Lamb waves shows great potential for long-range damage detection. Mode superposition resulting from multi-modal and dispersive characteristics makes signal interpretation and damage feature extraction difficult. Mode separation in the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) domain using a 1D sparse sensing array is a promising solution. However, due to the lack of prior knowledge about damage location, this method based on 1D linear measurement, for the mode extraction of arbitrary reflections caused by defects that are not in line with the sensor array, is restricted. In this paper, an improved compressed sensing method under the far-field assumption is established, which is beneficial to the reconstruction of reflections in the f-k domain. Hence, multiple components consisting of structure and damage features could be recovered via a limited number of measurements. Subsequently, a mode sweeping process based on theoretical dispersion curves has been designed for mode characterization and direction of arrival estimation. Moreover, 2D f-k filtering and inverse transforms are applied to the reconstructed f-k distribution in order to extract the purified mode of interest. As a result, overlapping waveforms can be separated and the direction of defects can be estimated. A uniform linear sensor array consisting of 16 laser excitations is finally employed for experimental investigations and the results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  11. A Unified Frequency Domain Model to Study the Effect of Demyelination on Axonal Conduction.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Saurabh; Goodwin, Shikha J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease caused by demyelination of nerve fibers. In order to determine the loss of signal with the percentage of demyelination, we need to develop models that can simulate this effect. Existing time-based models does not provide a method to determine the influences of demyelination based on simulation results. Our goal is to develop a system identification approach to generate a transfer function in the frequency domain. The idea is to create a unified modeling approach for neural action potential propagation along the length of an axon containing number of Nodes of Ranvier (N). A system identification approach has been used to identify a transfer function of the classical Hodgkin-Huxley equations for membrane voltage potential. Using this approach, we model cable properties and signal propagation along the length of the axon with N node myelination. MATLAB/Simulink platform is used to analyze an N node-myelinated neuronal axon. The ability to transfer function in the frequency domain will help reduce effort and will give a much more realistic feel when compared to the classical time-based approach. Once a transfer function is identified, the conduction as a cascade of each linear time invariant system-based transfer function can be modeled. Using this approach, future studies can model the loss of myelin in various parts of nervous system.

  12. A Unified Frequency Domain Model to Study the Effect of Demyelination on Axonal Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Chaubey, Saurabh; Goodwin, Shikha J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease caused by demyelination of nerve fibers. In order to determine the loss of signal with the percentage of demyelination, we need to develop models that can simulate this effect. Existing time-based models does not provide a method to determine the influences of demyelination based on simulation results. Our goal is to develop a system identification approach to generate a transfer function in the frequency domain. The idea is to create a unified modeling approach for neural action potential propagation along the length of an axon containing number of Nodes of Ranvier (N). A system identification approach has been used to identify a transfer function of the classical Hodgkin–Huxley equations for membrane voltage potential. Using this approach, we model cable properties and signal propagation along the length of the axon with N node myelination. MATLAB/Simulink platform is used to analyze an N node-myelinated neuronal axon. The ability to transfer function in the frequency domain will help reduce effort and will give a much more realistic feel when compared to the classical time-based approach. Once a transfer function is identified, the conduction as a cascade of each linear time invariant system-based transfer function can be modeled. Using this approach, future studies can model the loss of myelin in various parts of nervous system. PMID:27103847

  13. Fuzzy-possibilistic neural network to vector quantizer in frequency domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jzau-Sheng

    2002-04-01

    The fuzzy possibilistic c-means (FPCM) is embedded into a 2-D Hopfield neural network termed the fuzzy possibilistic Hopfield network (FPHN) to generate an optimal solution for vector quantization (VQ) in the discrete cosine transform (DCT) and the Hadamard transform (HT) domains. The information transformed by DCT or HT is separated into dc and ac coefficients. Then, the ac coefficients are trained using the proposed methods to generate a better codebook based on VQ. The energy function of the FPHN is defined as the fuzzy membership grades and possibilistic typicality degrees between training samples and codevectors. A near global-minimum codebook in the frequency domains can be obtained when the energy function converges to a stable state. Instead of one state in a neuron for the conventional Hopfield nets, each neuron occupies two states called the membership state and the typicality state in the proposed FPHN. The simulated results show that a valid and promising codebook can be generated in the DCT or HT domains using the FPHN.

  14. Template-based CTA X-ray angio rigid registration of coronary arteries in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Timur; Demirci, Stefanie; Degertekin, Muzaffer; Navab, Nassir; Unal, Gozde

    2013-03-01

    This study performs 3D to 2D rigid registration of segmented pre-operative CTA coronary arteries with a single segmented intra-operative X-ray Angio frame in both frequency and spatial domains for real-time Angiography interventions by C-arm fluoroscopy. Most of the work on rigid registration in literature required a close initial- ization of poses and/or positions because of the abundance of local minima and high complexity that searching algorithms face. This study avoids such setbacks by transforming the projections into translation-invariant Fourier domain for estimating the 3D pose. First, template DRRs as candidate poses of 3D vessels of segmented CTA are produced by rotating the camera (image intensifier) around the DICOM angle values with a wide range as in C-arm setup. We have compared the 3D poses of template DRRs with the real X-ray after equalizing the scales (due to disparities in focal length distances) in 3 domains, namely Fourier magnitude, Fourier phase and Fourier polar. The best pose candidate was chosen by one of the highest similarity measures returned by the methods in these domains. It has been noted in literature that these methods are robust against noise and occlusion which was also validated by our results. Translation of the volume was then recovered by distance-map based BFGS optimization well suited to convex structure of our objective function without local minima due to distance maps. Final results were evaluated in 2D projection space rather than with actual values in 3D due to lack of ground truth, ill-posedness of the problem which we intend to address in future.

  15. Building the analytical response in frequency domain of AC biased bolometers. Application to Planck/HFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvé, Alexandre; Montier, Ludovic

    2016-12-01

    Context: Bolometers are high sensitivity detector commonly used in Infrared astronomy. The HFI instrument of the Planck satellite makes extensive use of them, but after the satellite launch two electronic related problems revealed critical. First an unexpected excess response of detectors at low optical excitation frequency for ν < 1 Hz, and secondly the Analog To digital Converter (ADC) component had been insufficiently characterized on-ground. These two problems require an exquisite knowledge of detector response. However bolometers have highly nonlinear characteristics, coming from their electrical and thermal coupling making them very difficult to model. Goal: We present a method to build the analytical transfer function in frequency domain which describe the voltage response of an Alternative Current (AC) biased bolometer to optical excitation, based on the standard bolometer model. This model is built using the setup of the Planck/HFI instrument and offers the major improvement of being based on a physical model rather than the currently in use had-hoc model based on Direct Current (DC) bolometer theory. Method: The analytical transfer function expression will be presented in matrix form. For this purpose, we build linearized versions of the bolometer electro thermal equilibrium. A custom description of signals in frequency is used to solve the problem with linear algebra. The model performances is validated using time domain simulations. Results: The provided expression is suitable for calibration and data processing. It can also be used to provide constraints for fitting optical transfer function using real data from steady state electronic response and optical response. The accurate description of electronic response can also be used to improve the ADC nonlinearity correction for quickly varying optical signals.

  16. A practical implementation of multifrequency widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongtao; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-03-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime, especially in kinetic studies in biomedical researches. However, the small range of modulation frequencies available in commercial instruments makes this technique limited in its applications. Herein, we describe a practical implementation of multifrequency widefield FD-FLIM using a pulsed supercontinuum laser and a direct digital synthesizer. In this instrument we use a pulse to modulate the image intensifier rather than the more conventional sine-wave modulation. This allows parallel multifrequency FLIM measurement using the Fast Fourier Transform and the cross-correlation technique, which permits precise and simultaneous isolation of individual frequencies. In addition, the pulse modulation at the cathode of image intensifier restores the loss of optical resolution caused by the defocusing effect when the cathode is sinusoidally modulated. Furthermore, in our implementation of this technique, data can be graphically analyzed by the phasor method while data are acquired, which allows easy fit-free lifetime analysis of FLIM images. Here, our measurements of standard fluorescent samples and a Föster resonance energy transfer pair demonstrate that the widefield multifrequency FLIM system is a valuable and simple tool in fluorescence imaging studies. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Uncertainty quantification of dynamic responses in the frequency domain in the context of virtual testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehm, Maik; Deraemaeker, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    For the development of innovative materials, construction types or maintenance strategies, experimental investigations are inevitable to validate theoretical approaches in praxis. Numerical simulations, embedded in a general virtual testing approach, are alternatives to expensive experimental investigations. The statistical properties of the dynamic response in the frequency domain obtained from continuously measured data are often the basis for many developments, such as the optimization of damage indicators for structural health monitoring systems or the investigation of data-based frequency response function estimates. Two straightforward numerical simulation approaches exist to derive the statistics of a response due to random excitation and measurement errors. One approach is the sample-based technique, wherein for each excitation sample a time integration solution is needed. This can be computationally very demanding if a high accuracy of the statistical properties is of interest. The other approach consists in using the relationship between the excitation and the response directly in the frequency domain, wherein a weakly stationary process is assumed. This approach is inherently related to an infinite time response, which can hardly be derived from measured data. In this paper, a novel approach is proposed that overcomes the limitation of both aforementioned methods, by providing a fast analytical probabilistic framework for uncertainty quantification to determine accurately the statistics of short time dynamic responses. It is assumed that the structural system is known and can be described by deterministic parameters. The influences of signal processing techniques, such as linear combinations, windowing, and segmentation used in Welch's method, are considered as well. The performance of the new algorithm is investigated in comparison to both previous approaches on a three degrees of freedom system. The benchmark shows that the novel approach outperforms

  18. Broadband absorption spectroscopy by combining frequency-domain and steady-state techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Andrew J.; Bevilacqua, Frederic; Jakubowski, Dorota B.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Butler, John A.; Hsiang, D.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2001-06-01

    A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media is presented using a combination of frequency-domain (FD) and steady-state (SS) reflectance methods. Most of the wavelength coverage is provided by a white-light SS measurement, while the FD data are acquired at a few selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption ((mu) a) and reduced scattering ((mu) s') derived from the FD data are used to intensity-calibrate the SS measurements and to estimate (mu) s' at all wavelengths in the spectral window of interest. After these steps are performed, (mu) a can be determined by comparing the SS reflectance values to the predictions of diffusion theory, wavelength by wavelength. We present an application of this method to breast tumor characterization. A case study of a fibroadenoma is shown, where different absorption spectra were found between the normal and the tumor sides.

  19. Subspace-based identification of a nonlinear spacecraft in the time and frequency domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, J. P.; Marchesiello, S.; Kerschen, G.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the present paper is to address the identification of a strongly nonlinear satellite structure. To this end, two nonlinear subspace identification methods formulated in the time and frequency domains are exploited, referred to as the TNSI and FNSI methods, respectively. The modal parameters of the underlying linear structure and the coefficients of the nonlinearities will be estimated by these two approaches based on periodic random measurements. Their respective merits will also be discussed in terms of both accuracy and computational efficiency and the use of stabilisation diagrams in nonlinear system identification will be introduced. The application of interest is the SmallSat spacecraft developed by EADS-Astrium, which possesses an impact-type nonlinear device consisting of eight mechanical stops limiting the motion of an inertia wheel mounted on an elastomeric interface. This application is challenging for several reasons including the non-smooth nature of the nonlinearities, high modal density and high non-proportional damping.

  20. Real-time locating and speed measurement of fibre fuse using optical frequency-domain reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shoulin; Ma, Lin; Fan, Xinyu; Wang, Bin; He, Zuyuan

    2016-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate real-time locating and speed measurement of fibre fuse by analysing the Doppler shift of reflected light using optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR). Our method can detect the start of a fibre fuse within 200 ms which is equivalent to a propagation distance of about 10 cm in standard single-mode fibre. We successfully measured instantaneous speed of propagating fibre fuses and observed their subtle fluctuation owing to the laser power instability. The resolution achieved for speed measurement in our demonstration is 1 × 10−3 m/s. We studied the fibre fuse propagation speed dependence on the launched power in different fibres. Our method is promising for both real time fibre fuse monitoring and future studies on its propagation and termination. PMID:27146550

  1. Fault detection of gearbox using time-frequency method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widodo, A.; Satrijo, Dj.; Prahasto, T.; Haryanto, I.

    2017-04-01

    This research deals with fault detection and diagnosis of gearbox by using vibration signature. In this work, fault detection and diagnosis are approached by employing time-frequency method, and then the results are compared with cepstrum analysis. Experimental work has been conducted for data acquisition of vibration signal thru self-designed gearbox test rig. This test-rig is able to demonstrate normal and faulty gearbox i.e., wears and tooth breakage. Three accelerometers were used for vibration signal acquisition from gearbox, and optical tachometer was used for shaft rotation speed measurement. The results show that frequency domain analysis using fast-fourier transform was less sensitive to wears and tooth breakage condition. However, the method of short-time fourier transform was able to monitor the faults in gearbox. Wavelet Transform (WT) method also showed good performance in gearbox fault detection using vibration signal after employing time synchronous averaging (TSA).

  2. Time-domain simulation of a guitar: model and method.

    PubMed

    Derveaux, Grégoire; Chaigne, Antoine; Joly, Patrick; Bécache, Eliane

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional time-domain numerical model of the vibration and acoustic radiation from a guitar. The model involves the transverse displacement of the string excited by a force pulse, the flexural motion of the soundboard, and the sound radiation. A specific spectral method is used for solving the Kirchhoff-Love's dynamic top plate model for a damped, heterogeneous orthotropic material. The air-plate interaction is solved with a fictitious domain method, and a conservative scheme is used for the time discretization. Frequency analysis is performed on the simulated sound pressure and plate velocity waveforms in order to evaluate quantitatively the transfer of energy through the various components of the coupled system: from the string to the soundboard and from the soundboard to the air. The effects of some structural changes in soundboard thickness and cavity volume on the produced sounds are presented and discussed. Simulations of the same guitar in three different cases are also performed: "in vacuo," in air with a perfectly rigid top plate, and in air with an elastic top plate. This allows comparisons between structural, acoustic, and structural-acoustic modes of the instrument. Finally, attention is paid to the evolution with time of the spatial pressure field. This shows, in particular, the complex evolution of the directivity pattern in the near field of the instrument, especially during the attack.

  3. Time-domain simulation of a guitar: Model and method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derveaux, Grégoire; Chaigne, Antoine; Joly, Patrick; Bécache, Eliane

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional time-domain numerical model of the vibration and acoustic radiation from a guitar. The model involves the transverse displacement of the string excited by a force pulse, the flexural motion of the soundboard, and the sound radiation. A specific spectral method is used for solving the Kirchhoff-Love's dynamic top plate model for a damped, heterogeneous orthotropic material. The air-plate interaction is solved with a fictitious domain method, and a conservative scheme is used for the time discretization. Frequency analysis is performed on the simulated sound pressure and plate velocity waveforms in order to evaluate quantitatively the transfer of energy through the various components of the coupled system: from the string to the soundboard and from the soundboard to the air. The effects of some structural changes in soundboard thickness and cavity volume on the produced sounds are presented and discussed. Simulations of the same guitar in three different cases are also performed: ``in vacuo,'' in air with a perfectly rigid top plate, and in air with an elastic top plate. This allows comparisons between structural, acoustic, and structural-acoustic modes of the instrument. Finally, attention is paid to the evolution with time of the spatial pressure field. This shows, in particular, the complex evolution of the directivity pattern in the near field of the instrument, especially during the attack.

  4. Statistics and frequency-domain moveout for multiple-taper receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Levin, V.

    2016-10-01

    The multiple-taper correlation (MTC) algorithm for the estimation of teleseismic receiver functions (RFs) has desirable statistical properties. This paper presents several adaptations to the MTC algorithm that exploit its frequency-domain uncertainty estimates to generate stable RFs that include moveout corrections for deeper interfaces. Narrow-band frequency averaging implicit in spectral cross-correlation restricts the MTC-based RF estimates to resolve Ps converted phases only at short delay times, appropriate to the upper 100 km of Earth's lithosphere. The Ps conversions from deeper interfaces can be reconstructed by the MTC algorithm in two ways. Event cross-correlation computes a cross-correlation of single-taper spectrum estimates for a cluster of events rather than for a set of eigenspectrum estimates of a single P coda. To extend the reach of the algorithm, pre-stack moveout corrections in the frequency domain preserves the formal uncertainties of the RF estimates, which are used to weight RF stacks. Moving-window migration retains the multiple-taper approach, but cross-correlates the P-polarized motion with time-delayed SH and SV motion to focus on a Ps phase of interest. The frequency-domain uncertainties of bin-averaged RFs do not translate directly into the time domain. A jackknife over data records in each bin stack offers uncertainty estimates in the time domain while preserving uncertainty weighting in the frequency-domain RF stack.

  5. High-frequency programmable acoustic wave device realized through ferroelectric domain engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Ivry, Yachin E-mail: cd229@eng.cam.ac.uk; Wang, Nan; Durkan, Colm E-mail: cd229@eng.cam.ac.uk

    2014-03-31

    Surface acoustic wave devices are extensively used in contemporary wireless communication devices. We used atomic force microscopy to form periodic macroscopic ferroelectric domains in sol-gel deposited lead zirconate titanate, where each ferroelectric domain is composed of many crystallites, each of which contains many microscopic ferroelastic domains. We examined the electro-acoustic characteristics of the apparatus and found a resonator behavior similar to that of an equivalent surface or bulk acoustic wave device. We show that the operational frequency of the device can be tailored by altering the periodicity of the engineered domains and demonstrate high-frequency filter behavior (>8 GHz), allowing low-cost programmable high-frequency resonators.

  6. Frequency-domain algorithm for the Lorenz-gauge gravitational self-force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp; Warburton, Niels; Barack, Leor

    2013-11-01

    State-of-the-art computations of the gravitational self-force (GSF) on massive particles in black hole spacetimes involve numerical evolution of the metric perturbation equations in the time domain, which is computationally very costly. We present here a new strategy based on a frequency-domain treatment of the perturbation equations, which offers considerable computational saving. The essential ingredients of our method are (i) a Fourier-harmonic decomposition of the Lorenz-gauge metric perturbation equations and a numerical solution of the resulting coupled set of ordinary equations with suitable boundary conditions; (ii) a generalized version of the method of extended homogeneous solutions [L. Barack, A. Ori, and N. Sago, Phys. Rev. D 78, 084021 (2008)] used to circumvent the Gibbs phenomenon that would otherwise hamper the convergence of the Fourier mode sum at the particle’s location; (iii) standard mode-sum regularization, which finally yields the physical GSF as a sum over regularized modal contributions. We present a working code that implements this strategy to calculate the Lorenz-gauge GSF along eccentric geodesic orbits around a Schwarzschild black hole. The code is far more efficient than existing time-domain methods; the gain in computation speed (at a given precision) is about an order of magnitude at an eccentricity of 0.2, and up to 3 orders of magnitude for circular or nearly circular orbits. This increased efficiency was crucial in enabling the recently reported calculation of the long-term orbital evolution of an extreme mass ratio inspiral [N. Warburton, S. Akcay, L. Barack, J. R. Gair, and N. Sago, Phys. Rev. D 85, 061501(R) (2012)]. Here we provide full technical details of our method to complement the above report.

  7. Computational helioseismology in the frequency domain: acoustic waves in axisymmetric solar models with flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizon, Laurent; Barucq, Hélène; Duruflé, Marc; Hanson, Chris S.; Leguèbe, Michael; Birch, Aaron C.; Chabassier, Juliette; Fournier, Damien; Hohage, Thorsten; Papini, Emanuele

    2017-04-01

    Context. Local helioseismology has so far relied on semi-analytical methods to compute the spatial sensitivity of wave travel times to perturbations in the solar interior. These methods are cumbersome and lack flexibility. Aims: Here we propose a convenient framework for numerically solving the forward problem of time-distance helioseismology in the frequency domain. The fundamental quantity to be computed is the cross-covariance of the seismic wavefield. Methods: We choose sources of wave excitation that enable us to relate the cross-covariance of the oscillations to the Green's function in a straightforward manner. We illustrate the method by considering the 3D acoustic wave equation in an axisymmetric reference solar model, ignoring the effects of gravity on the waves. The symmetry of the background model around the rotation axis implies that the Green's function can be written as a sum of longitudinal Fourier modes, leading to a set of independent 2D problems. We use a high-order finite-element method to solve the 2D wave equation in frequency space. The computation is embarrassingly parallel, with each frequency and each azimuthal order solved independently on a computer cluster. Results: We compute travel-time sensitivity kernels in spherical geometry for flows, sound speed, and density perturbations under the first Born approximation. Convergence tests show that travel times can be computed with a numerical precision better than one millisecond, as required by the most precise travel-time measurements. Conclusions: The method presented here is computationally efficient and will be used to interpret travel-time measurements in order to infer, e.g., the large-scale meridional flow in the solar convection zone. It allows the implementation of (full-waveform) iterative inversions, whereby the axisymmetric background model is updated at each iteration.

  8. De-striping hyperspectral imagery using wavelet transform and adaptive frequency domain filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande-Chhetri, Roshan; Abd-Elrahman, Amr

    2011-09-01

    Hyperspectral imagers are built line-by-line similar to images acquired by pushbroom sensors. They can experience striping artifacts due to variations in detector response to incident imagery. In this research, a method for hyperspectral image de-striping based on wavelet analysis and adaptive Fourier zero-frequency amplitude normalization has been developed. The algorithm was tested against three other de-striping algorithms. Hyperspectral image bands of different scenes with significant striping and random noise, as well as an image with simulated noise, were used in the testing. The results were assessed visually and quantitatively using frequency domain Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) and/or Peak Signal-to-Ratio (PSNR). The results demonstrated the superiority of our proposed algorithm in de-striping hyperspectral images without introducing unwanted artifacts, yet preserving image details. In the noise-induced image results, the proposed method reduced RMSE error and improved PSNR by 3.5 dB which is better than other tested methods. A Combined method, integrating the proposed algorithm with a generic wavelet-based de-noising algorithm, showed significant random noise suppression in addition to stripe reduction with a PSNR value of 4.3 dB. These findings make the algorithm a candidate for practical implementation on remote sensing images including high resolution hyperspectral images contaminated with stripe and random noise.

  9. Domain wall dynamics and relaxation through the frequency dependence of hysteresis loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, M.; Merceron, T.; Cagan, V.

    1985-04-01

    The frequency dependence of hysteresis loops of high purity yttrium iron garnet (YIG) polycrystals has been measured over the range of temperature and frequency where the permeability spectrum has evidenced significant dispersion. Very close to Tc, the effect of domain wall damping results in elliptical loops when the wall relaxation frequency is approached. The observed increase in losses with frequency implies values of the wall damping parameter β which agree with previous determinations from permeability data. In the 150 K range, migrating electrons due to the voluntary slight iron deficiency of the studied sample cannot follow fast wall motions and relax, which in turn produce more rectangular loops for frequencies above the diffusion relaxation frequency. The corresponding increase in hysteresis losses is due to an increase in the wall energy γ and possible dynamical changes of the domain wall configuration in the sample.

  10. Feasibility study of spatial frequency domain imaging using a handheld miniaturized projector and rigid endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Sreyankar; Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Zhou, Feifei; Zhu, Quing

    2017-02-01

    Initial feasibility of a spatial frequency domain imaging system was studied consisting of a hand held miniaturized projector and a rigid endoscope. Three wavelengths and two spatial frequencies were used for imaging. The system was calibrated using tissue mimicking phantoms. In vivo imaging was performed on five live mouse tumor models, and the absorption, scattering, hemoglobin oxygen saturation was measured. The initial promising results indicate that the spatial frequency domain imaging can a very useful tool for quantitative wide field tissue evaluation during minimally invasive image guided surgery.

  11. Digital Frequency Domain Multiplexer for mm-Wavelength Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, Helmuth G; Dobbs, Matt; Bissonnette, Eric; Spieler, Helmuth G.

    2007-07-23

    An FPGA based digital signal processing (DSP) system for biasing and reading out multiplexed bolometric detectors for mm-wavelength telescopes is presented. This readout system is being deployed for balloon-borne and ground based cosmology experiments with the primary goal of measuring the signature of inflation with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. The system consists of analog superconducting electronics running at 250 mK and 4 K, coupled to digital room temperature backend electronics described here. The digital electronics perform the real time functionality with DSP algorithms implemented in firmware. A soft embedded processor provides all of the slow housekeeping control and communications. Each board in the system synthesizes multi-frequency combs of 8 to 32 carriers in the MHz band to bias the detectors. After the carriers have been modulated with the sky-signal by the detectors, the same boards digitize the comb directly. The carriers are mixed down to base-band and low pass filtered. The signal bandwidth of 0.050Hz-100 Hz places extreme requirements on stability and requires powerful filtering techniques to recover the sky-signal from the MHz carriers.

  12. Analysis of the Peak Resistance Frequency Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Boshuo; Weiland, James D

    2016-10-01

    This study analyzes the peak resistance frequency (PRF) method described by Mercanzini et al., a method that can easily extract the tissue resistance from impedance spectroscopy for many neural engineering applications but has no analytical description thus far. Mathematical analyses and computer simulations were used to explore underlying principles, accuracy, and limitations of the PRF method. The mathematical analyses demonstrated that the PRF method has an inherent but correctable deviation dependent on the idealness of the electrode-tissue interface, which is validated by simulations. Further simulations show that both frequency sampling and noise affect the accuracy of the PRF method, and in general, it performs less accurately than least squares methods. However, the PRF method achieves simplicity and reduced measurement and computation time at the expense of accuracy. From the qualitative results, the PRF method can work with reasonable precision and simplicity, although its limitation and the idealness of the electrode-tissue interface involved should be taken into consideration. This paper provides a mathematical foundation for the PRF method and its practical implementation.

  13. 100-Gb/s coherent optical fiber communication with frequency domain equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Juhao; Yang, Chuanchuan; Chen, Zhangyuan; Zhao, Chunxu; Zhang, Su

    2010-12-01

    Multi- and single-carrier (SC) coherent optical fiber communication with frequency domain equalization (FDE) is discussed with emphasis on 100-Gb/s operation. 120-Gb/s coherent optical (CO-SCFDE) system over 317-km standard single-mode fiber is demonstrated. Coherent optical orthogonal frequency-division-multiplexing (CO-OFDM) and single-carrier frequency-division-multiplexing scheme (CO-SCFDM) are theoretically and experimentally compared.

  14. Biochemical Applications Of Frequency-Domain Fluorometry; Determination Of Time-Resolved Anisotropies And Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Gryczynski, Ignazy; Cherek, Henryh; Laczko, Gabor; Joshi, Nanda

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of time-resolved fluorescence are often used for studies of biological macromolecules. Such measurements are usually performed in the time-domain, by measurement of the time-dependent emission following pulsed excitation. It has recently become possible to measure the frequency-response of the emission to intensity modulated light, over a wide range of modulation frequencies. We used frequency-domain fluorometers which operates from 1 to 220 MHz, and more recently to 2000 MHz. The frequency-domain data provide excellent resolution of time-dependent spectral parameters. It is now possible to resolve closely spaced fluorescence lifetimes, to determine multi-exponential decays of anisotropy and to determine time-resolved emission spectra of samples which display time-dependent spectral shifts. In this article we show representative results on tryptophan fluorescence from proteins and for protein-bound fluorophores.

  15. Frequency-domain endoscopic diffuse optical tomography reconstruction algorithm based on dual-modulation-frequency and dual-points source diffuse equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhuanping; Hou, Qiang; Zhao, Huijuan; Yang, Yanshuang; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Gao, Feng

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, frequency-domain endoscopic diffuse optical tomography image reconstruction algorithm based on dual-modulation-frequency and dual-points source diffuse equation is investigated for the reconstruction of the optical parameters including the absorption and reducing scattering coefficients. The forward problem is solved by the finite element method based on the frequency domain diffuse equation (FD-DE) for dual-points source approximation and multi-modulation-frequency. In the image reconstruction, a multi-modulation-frequency Newton-Raphson algorithm is applied to obtain the solution. To further improve the image accuracy and quality, a method based on the region of interest (ROI) is applied on the above procedures. The simulation is performed in the tubular model to verify the validity of the algorithm. Results show that the FD-DE with dual-points source approximate is more accuracy at shorter source-detector separation. The reconstruction with dual-modulation-frequency improves the image accuracy and quality compared to the results with single-modulation-frequency and triple-modulation-frequency method. The peak optical coefficients in ROI (ROI_max) are almost equivalent to the true optical coefficients with the relative error less than 6.67%. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) achieves 82% of the true radius. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image coefficient(IC) is 5.678 and 26.962, respectively. Additionally, the results with the method based on ROI show that the ROI_max is equivalent to the true value. The FWHM can improve by 88% of the true radius. The CNR and IC is improved over 7.782 and 45.335, respectively.

  16. Identification of domains and domain interface residues in multidomain proteins from graph spectral method.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Ramesh K; K V, Brinda; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2005-05-15

    We present a novel method for the identification of structural domains and domain interface residues in proteins by graph spectral method. This method converts the three-dimensional structure of the protein into a graph by using atomic coordinates from the PDB file. Domain definitions are obtained by constructing either a protein backbone graph or a protein side-chain graph. The graph is constructed based on the interactions between amino acid residues in the three-dimensional structure of the proteins. The spectral parameters of such a graph contain information regarding the domains and subdomains in the protein structure. This is based on the fact that the interactions among amino acids are higher within a domain than across domains. This is evident in the spectra of the protein backbone and the side-chain graphs, thus differentiating the structural domains from one another. Further, residues that occur at the interface of two domains can also be easily identified from the spectra. This method is simple, elegant, and robust. Moreover, a single numeric computation yields both the domain definitions and the interface residues. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Handheld Frequency Domain Vector EMI Sensing for UXO Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    the unseen instance. We have used two methods to regularize (4.1.26): 1) We first perform Tikhonov regularization [11, 24] using the L-curve method [31...parametrize these equations in terms of a total dipole strength and the sine of the tilt angels in place of mx,y,z A non-linear iterative inversion...matrix can be polished further (i.e., made “more orthogonal”) by iterating [25] Rn+1 = Rn +(RTn) −1 2 , (4.1.15) Benjamin Barrowes, Kevin O’Neill -37- MM

  18. Automated frequency domain system identification of a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the development and experimental results of an automated on-orbit system identification method for large flexible spacecraft that yields estimated quantities to support on-line design and tuning of robust high performance control systems. The procedure consists of applying an input to the plant, obtaining an output, and then conducting nonparametric identification to yield the spectral estimate of the system transfer function. A parametric model is determined by curve fitting the spectral estimate to a rational transfer function. The identification method has been demonstrated experimentally on the Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory in JPL.

  19. Calculation of HVDC-converter harmonics in frequency domain with regard to asymmetries and comparison with time domain simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rittiger, J.; Kulicke, B.

    1995-10-01

    In order to study the effects of large HVDC converters to the feeding ac networks, it is of importance to explain and to calculate harmonic phenomena which are a result of converter operation. During commissioning of real HVDC converters it could be seen, that harmonics resulting from unsymmetries in the system voltages or from unsymmetries in converter operation led to significant difficulties concerning the system design. For this reason, not only the effects of characteristic but also the effects of noncharacteristic converter harmonics must be taken into account. The aim is to describe the steady state harmonic behavior of the converter. The harmonic spectra are not determined by time domain analysis but instead the solution is found by frequency domain calculations. This can result in reduced calculation time in comparison to conventional fourier analysis of the time functions. The converter is interpreted as an amplitude modulator with voltage and current converter functions which describe the coupling of the dc circuit and the ac network through the converter. To verify the theory, comparison of frequency domain with time domain calculations were carried out.

  20. Frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime measurements via frequency segmentation and recombination as applied to pyrene with dissolved humic materials.

    PubMed

    Marwani, Hadi M; Lowry, Mark; Xing, Baoshan; Warner, Isiah M; Cook, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the association behavior of pyrene with different dissolved humic materials (DHM) was investigated utilizing the recently developed segmented frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime method. The humic materials involved in this study consisted of three commercially available International Humic Substances Society standards (Suwannee River fulvic acid reference, SRFAR, Leonardite humic acid standard, LHAS, and Florida peat humic acid standard, FPHAS), the peat derived Amherst humic acid (AHA), and a chemically bleached Amherst humic acid (BAHA). It was found that the three commercial humic materials displayed three lifetime components, while both Amherst samples displayed only two lifetime components. In addition, it was found that the chemical bleaching procedure preferentially removed red wavelength emitting fluorophores from AHA. In regards to pyrene association with the DHM, different behavior was found for all commercially available humics, while AHA and BAHA, which displayed strikingly similar behavior in terms of fluorescence lifetimes. It was also found that there was an enhancement of pyrene's measured lifetime (combined with a decrease in pyrene emission) in the presence of FPHAS. The implications of this long lifetime are discussed in terms of (1) quenching mechanism and (2) use of the fluorescence quenching method used to determine the binding of compounds to DHM.

  1. Multipactor radiation analysis within a waveguide region based on a frequency-domain representation of the dynamics of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, B; Sorolla, E; Anza, S; Vicente, C; Gil, J; Pérez, A M; Boria, V E; Pérez-Soler, F J; Quesada, F; Alvarez, A; Raboso, D

    2009-04-01

    A technique for the accurate computation of the electromagnetic fields radiated by a charged particle moving within a parallel-plate waveguide is presented. Based on a transformation of the time-varying current density of the particle into a time-harmonic current density, this technique allows the evaluation of the radiated electromagnetic fields both in the frequency and time domains, as well as in the near- and far-field regions. For this purpose, several accelerated versions of the parallel-plate Green's function in the frequency domain have been considered. The theory has been successfully applied to the multipactor discharge occurring within a two metal-plates region. The proposed formulation has been tested with a particle-in-cell code based on the finite-difference time-domain method, obtaining good agreement.

  2. Tailored sinc pulses for uniform excitation and artifact-free radio frequency time-domain EPR imaging.

    PubMed

    Devasahayam, N; Murugesan, R; Matsumoto, K; Mitchell, J B; Cook, J A; Subramanian, S; Krishna, M C

    2004-05-01

    A method to generate shaped radiofrequency pulses for uniform excitation of electron spins in time-domain radio frequency (RF) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging is presented. A commercial waveform generator was integrated with the transmit arm of the existing time-domain RF-EPR spectrometer to generate tailored excitation pulses with sub-nano second resolution for excitation with a 90 degrees flip-angle. A truncated sinc [sin(x)/x] pulse, tailored to compensate for the Q-profile (RF frequency response) of the resonator, was shown to yield images from phantom objects as well as in vivo images, with minimal distortion. These studies point to the advantages in using shaped sinc pulses to achieve improved uniform excitation over a relatively wide bandwidth region in time-domain RF-EPR imaging (RF-FT-EPRI).

  3. Multipactor radiation analysis within a waveguide region based on a frequency-domain representation of the dynamics of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, B.; Sorolla, E.; Anza, S.; Vicente, C.; Gil, J.; Pérez, A. M.; Boria, V. E.; Pérez-Soler, F. J.; Quesada, F.; Álvarez, A.; Raboso, D.

    2009-04-01

    A technique for the accurate computation of the electromagnetic fields radiated by a charged particle moving within a parallel-plate waveguide is presented. Based on a transformation of the time-varying current density of the particle into a time-harmonic current density, this technique allows the evaluation of the radiated electromagnetic fields both in the frequency and time domains, as well as in the near- and far-field regions. For this purpose, several accelerated versions of the parallel-plate Green’s function in the frequency domain have been considered. The theory has been successfully applied to the multipactor discharge occurring within a two metal-plates region. The proposed formulation has been tested with a particle-in-cell code based on the finite-difference time-domain method, obtaining good agreement.

  4. Frequency-Domain Eigenbeam-SDM and Equalization for Single-Carrier Transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Kazuyuki; Nakajima, Akinori; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    In mobile communications, the channel consists of many resolvable paths with different time delays, resulting in a severely frequency-selective fading channel. The frequency-domain equalization (FDE) can take advantage of the channel selectivity and improve the bit error rate (BER) performance of the single-carrier (SC) transmission. Recently, multi-input multi-output (MIMO) multiplexing is gaining much attention for achieving very high speed data transmissions with the limited bandwidth. Eigenbeam space division multiplexing (E-SDM) is known as one of MIMO multiplexing techniques. In this paper, we propose frequency-domain SC E-SDM for SC transmission. In frequency-domain SC E-SDM, the orthogonal transmission channels to transmit different data in parallel are constructed at each orthogonal frequency. At a receiver, FDE is used to suppress the inter-symbol interference (ISI). In this paper, the transmit power allocation and adaptive modulation based on the equivalent channel gains after performing FDE are applied. The BER performance of the frequency-domain SC E-SDM in a severe frequency-selective Rayleigh fading channel is evaluated by computer simulation.

  5. A novel feature link quality analysis method applied in satellite adaptive frequency hopping communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Wang, Bing; Han, Zhixue; Xiao, Changchun

    2009-12-01

    A novel feature link quality analysis method (FLQAM) applied in satellite adaptive frequency hopping communication is presented in this paper. The method uses a frequency domain feature to tell whether the tested frequency area is jammed or not, which is much simple and efficient compared with traditional methods. Simulations are performed in Matlab environment and show that the success detecting rates is above 95% when INR is over -1dB.

  6. Frequency domain interferometry observations of tropo/stratospheric scattering layers using the MU radar: Description and first results

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.D.; Fukao, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Tsuda, T.; Kato, S. ); Woodman, R.F. ); Larsen, M.F. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper describes the first results of the implementation of frequency domain interferometry (FDI) using the Middle and Upper (MU) atmosphere radar. A new method of using this FDI data is introduced, which is shown to be useful in studying the dynamics of scattering layers in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Using this method, the effective altitude resolution of the MU radar has been improved.

  7. Application of frequency-domain helicopter-borne electromagnetics for groundwater exploration in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemon, Bernhard; Steuer, Annika; Ullmann, Angelika; Vasterling, Margarete; Voß, Wolfgang

    Airborne geophysical methods have been used successfully in groundwater exploration over the last decades. Particularly airborne electromagnetics is appropriate for large-scale and efficient groundwater surveying. Due to the dependency of the electrical conductivity on both the clay content of the host material and the mineralisation of the water, airborne electromagnetics is suitable for providing information on groundwater resources, water quality, aquifer conditions and protection levels. Frequency-domain helicopter-borne electromagnetic systems are used to investigate near-surface groundwater occurrences in detail even in rough terrain and populated areas. In order to reveal the subsurface conductivity distribution, the quantities measured, the secondary magnetic fields, are generally inverted into resistivity-depth models. Due to the skin-effect the penetration depths of the electromagnetic fields depend on the system characteristics used: high-frequency data describe the shallower parts of the conducting subsurface and the low-frequency data the deeper parts. Typical maximum investigation depths range from some ten metres (highly conductive saltwater saturated sediments) to several hundred metres (resistive hard rocks). In urban areas there are a number of man-made sources affecting the electromagnetic measurements. These effects on the secondary field values are discussed on the basis of synthetic data as well as uncorrected and corrected field data. The case histories of different hydrogeological setups in Indonesia, The Netherlands and Germany demonstrate that airborne electromagnetics can be applied to groundwater exploration purposes even in urban areas.

  8. Frequency domain averaging based experimental evaluation of gear fault without tachometer for fluctuating speed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vikas; Parey, Anand

    2017-02-01

    In the purview of fluctuating speeds, gear fault diagnosis is challenging due to dynamic behavior of forces. Various industrial applications employing gearbox which operate under fluctuating speed conditions. For diagnostics of a gearbox, various vibrations based signal processing techniques viz FFT, time synchronous averaging and time-frequency based wavelet transform, etc. are majorly employed. Most of the time, theories about data or computational complexity limits the use of these methods. In order to perform fault diagnosis of a gearbox for fluctuating speeds, frequency domain averaging (FDA) of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) after their dynamic time warping (DTW) has been done in this paper. This will not only attenuate the effect of fluctuating speeds but will also extract the weak fault feature those masked in vibration signal. Experimentally signals were acquired from Drivetrain Diagnostic Simulator for different gear health conditions i.e., healthy pinion, pinion with tooth crack, chipped tooth and missing tooth and were analyzed for the different fluctuating profiles of speed. Kurtosis was calculated for warped IMFs before DTW and after DTW of the acquired vibration signals. Later on, the application of FDA highlights the fault frequencies present in the FFT of faulty gears. The result suggests that proposed approach is more effective towards the fault diagnosing with fluctuating speed.

  9. Frequency Domain Fluorimetry Using a Mercury Vapor Lamp

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-07

    U3O8 and is actually a mixture of UO2 and UO3 oxides . The same three measurements were made the samples of vaseline glass and yellow cake; namely, a...United States) and higher harmonics. The fluorescent lifetimes for 3 different materials (willemite, uranium doped glass and U3O8 ) are measured with...problem that is impossible to detect using this method. Uranium quickly oxidizes to form uranyl compounds, UO22+, (the +6 oxidation state of uranium

  10. Enhanced UXO Discrimination Using Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Induction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    3. “MTADS Unexploded Ordnance Operations at the Badlands Bombing Range, Pine Ridge Reservation, Cuny Table, SD ,” J. R. McDonald, H. H. Nelson, J...that showed any classification ability [4]. More recently, we have used the methods at JPG-V and on a live range, the Impact Area of the Badlands ...Bombing Range, SD . In all these demonstrations, our classification ability has been limited by the information available from the sensor. The EM61

  11. Time-domain finite-difference/finite-element hybrid simulations of radio frequency coils in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shumin; Duyn, Jeff H

    2008-05-21

    A hybrid method that combines the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and the finite-element time-domain (FETD) method is presented for simulating radio-frequency (RF) coils in magnetic resonance imaging. This method applies a high-fidelity FETD method to RF coils, while the human body is modeled with a low-cost FDTD method. Since the FDTD and the FETD methods are applied simultaneously, the dynamic interaction between RF coils and the human body is fully accounted for. In order to simplify the treatment of the highly irregular FDTD/FETD interface, composite elements are proposed. Two examples are provided to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the hybrid method in high-field receive-and-transmit coil design. This approach is also applicable to general bio-electromagnetic simulations.

  12. A comparison of infinite Timoshenko and Euler Bernoulli beam models on Winkler foundation in the frequency- and time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruge, P.; Birk, C.

    2007-07-01

    This paper deals with the dynamic analysis of infinite beam models. The translational and the rotational dynamic stiffness of both Timoshenko and Euler-Bernoulli beams on Winkler foundation are derived and compared in the frequency-domain. The situation of vanishing elastic foundation is included as a special case. Here, special emphasis is placed on the asymptotic behaviour of the derived stiffness expressions for high frequencies, since this is of importance in case of transient excitations. It is shown that the dynamic stiffness of the infinite Timoshenko beam follows a linear function of iω, whereas rational powers of iω are involved in case of Euler-Bernoulli's model. The stiffness formulations can be transformed into the time-domain using the mixed-variables technique. This is based on a rational approximation of the low-frequency force-displacement relationship and a subsequent algebraic splitting process. At the same time, the high-frequency asymptotic dynamic stiffness is transformed into the time-domain in closed-form. It is shown that the Timoshenko beam is equivalent to a simple dashpot in the high-frequency limit, whereas Euler-Bernoulli's beam model leads to fractional derivatives of the unknown state variables in an equivalent time-domain description. This finding confirms the superiority of Timoshenko's model especially for high frequencies and transient excitations. Numerical examples illustrate the differences with respect to the two beam models and demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method for the time-domain transformation of force-displacement relationships.

  13. Structural Damage Detection Using Frequency Domain Error Localization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    113 rn ~l-,I T X ~oy Ul C 114 APPENDIX D. FE MODEL / COMPUTER CODES The following is a brief description of MATLAB routines employed in this thesis...R.R., Structural Dynamics, An Introduction to Computer Methods , pp. 383-387, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1981. 8. Guyan , R.J., "Reduction of Stiffness...official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. 12a. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE

  14. Enhanced UXO Discrimination Using Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Induction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-27

    the methods at JPG-V and on a live range, the Impact Area of the Badlands Bombing Range, SD . In all these demonstrations, our classification ability...and one file for the IMU output. The sensor and GPS files are ASCII format and the IMU file mirrors the packed binary output of the IMU. All these...Nelson, R. Jeffries, and R. Robertson, NRL/PU/6110-- 99-375, January 1999. 3. “MTADS Unexploded Ordnance Operations at the Badlands Bombing Range

  15. Enhanced UXO Discrimination Using Frequency Domain Electromagnetic Induction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    classification ability [3]. More recently, we have used the methods at JPG-V and on a live range, the Impact Area of the Badlands Bombing Range, SD ...Marine Electronics Association (NMEA) NMEA-0183 message format (PTNL,GGK or GGK). The MB1 receiver also operates as a “moving base,” transmitting...angle [pitch], and range) between the two antennae is reported at 10 Hz using a vendor-specific NMEA-0183 message format (PTNL,AVR or AVR). MB2 also

  16. Efficient calculation of full waveform time domain inversion for electromagnetic problem using fictitious wave domain method and cascade decimation decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, N.; Schultz, A.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, a full waveform time domain inverse solution has been developed for the magnetotelluric (MT) and controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) methods. The ultimate goal of this approach is to obtain a computationally tractable direct waveform joint inversion to solve simultaneously for source fields and earth conductivity structure in three and four dimensions. This is desirable on several grounds, including the improved spatial resolving power expected from use of a multitude of source illuminations, the ability to operate in areas of high levels of source signal spatial complexity, and non-stationarity. This goal would not be obtainable if one were to adopt the pure time domain solution for the inverse problem. This is particularly true for the case of MT surveys, since an enormous number of degrees of freedom are required to represent the observed MT waveforms across a large frequency bandwidth. This means that for the forward simulation, the smallest time steps should be finer than that required to represent the highest frequency, while the number of time steps should also cover the lowest frequency. This leads to a sensitivity matrix that is computationally burdensome to solve a model update. We have implemented a code that addresses this situation through the use of cascade decimation decomposition to reduce the size of the sensitivity matrix substantially, through quasi-equivalent time domain decomposition. We also use a fictitious wave domain method to speed up computation time of the forward simulation in the time domain. By combining these refinements, we have developed a full waveform joint source field/earth conductivity inverse modeling method. We found that cascade decimation speeds computations of the sensitivity matrices dramatically, keeping the solution close to that of the undecimated case. For example, for a model discretized into 2.6x105 cells, we obtain model updates in less than 1 hour on a 4U rack-mounted workgroup Linux server, which

  17. SPECTRON, a neutron noise measurement system in frequency domain.

    PubMed

    de Izarra, G; Jammes, C; Geslot, B; Di Salvo, J; Destouches, C

    2015-11-01

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation and validation of SPECTRON, a novel neutron noise measurement system developed at CEA Cadarache. The device is designed for the measurement of the β(eff) parameter (effective fraction of delayed neutrons) of experimental nuclear reactors using the Cohn-α method. An integrated electronic system is used to record the current from fission chambers. Spectra computed from measurement data are processed by a dedicated software in order to estimate the reactor transfer function and then the effective fraction of delayed neutrons as well as the prompt neutron generation time. After a review of the pile noise measurement method in current mode, the SPECTRON architecture is presented. Then, the validation procedure is described and experimental results are shown, supporting the proper functioning of this new measurement system. It is shown that every technical requirement needed for correct measurement of neutron noise is fulfilled. Measurements performed at MINERVE and EOLE, two experimental nuclear reactors at CEA Cadarache, in real conditions allowed us to validate SPECTRON.

  18. SPECTRON, a neutron noise measurement system in frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Izarra, G. de; Jammes, C. Destouches, C.; Geslot, B.; Di Salvo, J.

    2015-11-15

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation and validation of SPECTRON, a novel neutron noise measurement system developed at CEA Cadarache. The device is designed for the measurement of the β{sub eff} parameter (effective fraction of delayed neutrons) of experimental nuclear reactors using the Cohn-α method. An integrated electronic system is used to record the current from fission chambers. Spectra computed from measurement data are processed by a dedicated software in order to estimate the reactor transfer function and then the effective fraction of delayed neutrons as well as the prompt neutron generation time. After a review of the pile noise measurement method in current mode, the SPECTRON architecture is presented. Then, the validation procedure is described and experimental results are shown, supporting the proper functioning of this new measurement system. It is shown that every technical requirement needed for correct measurement of neutron noise is fulfilled. Measurements performed at MINERVE and EOLE, two experimental nuclear reactors at CEA Cadarache, in real conditions allowed us to validate SPECTRON.

  19. Optical-fiber frequency domain interferometer with nanometer resolution and centimeter measuring range.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jidong; Tao, Tianjiong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2013-11-01

    A new optical-fiber frequency domain interferometer (OFDI) device for accurate measurement of the absolute distance between two stationary objects, with centimeter measuring range and nanometer resolution, has been developed. Its working principle and on-line data processing method were elaborated. The new OFDI instrument was constructed all with currently available commercial communication products. It adopted the wide-spectrum amplified spontaneous emission light as the light source and optical-fiber tip as the test probe. Since this device consists of only fibers or fiber coupled components, it is very compact, convenient to operate, and easy to carry. By measuring the single-step length of a translation stage and the thickness of standard gauge blocks, its ability in implementing nanometer resolution and centimeter measuring range on-line measurements was validated.

  20. Time and frequency domain analysis of sampled data controllers via mixed operation equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1981-01-01

    Specification of the mathematical equations required to define the dynamic response of a linear continuous plant, subject to sampled data control, is complicated by the fact that the digital components of the control system cannot be modeled via linear ordinary differential equations. This complication can be overcome by introducing two new mathematical operations; namely, the operation of zero order hold and digial delay. It is shown that by direct utilization of these operations, a set of linear mixed operation equations can be written and used to define the dynamic response characteristics of the controlled system. It also is shown how these linear mixed operation equations lead, in an automatable manner, directly to a set of finite difference equations which are in a format compatible with follow on time and frequency domain analysis methods.